WorldWideScience

Sample records for assessing lung carcinogenic

  1. Exposure Assessment Suggests Exposure to Lung Cancer Carcinogens in a Painter Working in an Automobile Bumper Shop

    OpenAIRE

    KIM, Boowook; Yoon, Jin-Ha; Choi, Byung-Soon; Shin, Yong Chul

    2013-01-01

    A 46-year-old man who had worked as a bumper spray painter in an automobile body shop for 15 years developed lung cancer. The patient was a nonsmoker with no family history of lung cancer. To determine whether the cancer was related to his work environment, we assessed the level of exposure to carcinogens during spray painting, sanding, and heat treatment. The results showed that spray painting with yellow paint increased the concentration of hexavalent chromium in the air to as much as 118.3...

  2. Carcinogen risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes the methods by which risk factors for carcinogenic hazards are determined and the limitations inherent in the process. From statistical and epidemiological studies, the major identifiable factors related to cancer in the United States were determined to be cigarette smoking, diet, reproductive and sexual behavior, infections, ultraviolet and ionizing radiation, and alcohol consumption. The incidence of lung cancer due to air pollutants was estimated to be less than 2%. Research needs were discussed

  3. Exposure assessment suggests exposure to lung cancer carcinogens in a painter working in an automobile bumper shop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Boowook; Yoon, Jin-Ha; Choi, Byung-Soon; Shin, Yong Chul

    2013-12-01

    A 46-year-old man who had worked as a bumper spray painter in an automobile body shop for 15 years developed lung cancer. The patient was a nonsmoker with no family history of lung cancer. To determine whether the cancer was related to his work environment, we assessed the level of exposure to carcinogens during spray painting, sanding, and heat treatment. The results showed that spray painting with yellow paint increased the concentration of hexavalent chromium in the air to as much as 118.33 μg/m(3). Analysis of the paint bulk materials showed that hexavalent chromium was mostly found in the form of lead chromate. Interestingly, strontium chromate was also detected, and the concentration of strontium chromate increased in line with the brightness of the yellow color. Some paints contained about 1% crystalline silica in the form of quartz. PMID:24422178

  4. Tobacco Carcinogen NNK Transporter MRP2 Regulates CFTR Function in Lung Epithelia: Implications for Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Chunying; Schuetz, John D.; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. About 85% of all lung cancers are linked to tobacco smoke, in which more than 50 lung carcinogens have been identified and one of the most abundant is 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)- 1-butanone (NNK). The human lung epithelium constitutes the first line of defense against tobacco specific carcinogens, in which apically-localized receptors, transporters, and ion channels in the airway may play a critical role in this n...

  5. Environmental carcinogenic agents and cancer prevention. Risk assessment and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many agents in our environment have been established as being carcinogenic, and in most cases, the carcinogenic properties of these agents were identified because of high-dose occupational or accidental exposure. Risk characterization, taking into account the dose-response relationship, and exposure assessment are essential for risk assessment and subsequent cancer prevention. Based on scientific risk assessment, risk management should be conducted practically by considering the economic, social, political, and other technical issues and by balancing the risks and benefits. Asbestos and environmental tobacco smoke are typical examples of established carcinogenic agents in the general environment, contributing to low-dose exposure. Further epidemiological studies are required to investigate the carcinogenicity of low-dose exposure to known carcinogenic agents such as arsenic and cadmium through dietary intake, radiation via medical and natural exposure, and air pollution due to diesel exhaust. In contrast, occupational chemical exposure to 1,2-dichloropropane and/or dichloromethane, whose carcinogenicity had not been established, was suggested to cause cholangiocarcinoma among workers involved in offset color proof-printing only after a rare situation of high-dose exposure was unveiled. Continuous monitoring of unusual cancer occurrences in target populations such as workers in occupational and regional settings as well as exposure reduction to suspected carcinogenic agents to levels as low as reasonably achievable is essential for reducing the risk of cancer due to environmental carcinogens. (author)

  6. Chemoprevention with Acetylsalicylic Acid, Vitamin D and Calcium Reduces Risk of Carcinogen-induced Lung Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, J; Raskov, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim: Research has shown that chemoprevention may be effective against the development of lung cancer. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of oral chemoprevention in a mouse model of tobacco carcinogen-induced lung tumor.......Background/Aim: Research has shown that chemoprevention may be effective against the development of lung cancer. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of oral chemoprevention in a mouse model of tobacco carcinogen-induced lung tumor....

  7. Biologic markers in risk assessment for environmental carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, F.; Mayer, J.; Santella, R.M.; Brenner, D.; Jeffrey, A.; Latriano, L.; Smith, S.; Warburton, D.; Young, T.L.; Tsai, W.Y.; Brandt-Rauf, P. (Columbia Univ. School of Public Health, New York, NY (United States)); Hemminki, K. (Finnish School of Occupational Health, Helsinki (Finland))

    1991-01-01

    The potential of biologic markers to provide more timely and precise risk assessments for environmental carcinogens is viewed against the current state-of-the-art in biological monitoring/molecular epidemiology. Biologic markers such as carcinogen-DNA adducts and oncogene activation are currently considered valid qualitative indicators of potential risk, but for most chemical exposures research is needed to establish their validity as quantitative predictors of cancer risk. Biologic markers have, however, already provided valuable insights into the magnitude of interindividual variation in response to carcinogenic exposures, with major implications for risk assessment.

  8. Biologic markers in risk assessment for environmental carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of biologic markers to provide more timely and precise risk assessments for environmental carcinogens is viewed against the current state-of-the-art in biological monitoring/molecular epidemiology. Biologic markers such as carcinogen-DNA adducts and oncogene activation are currently considered valid qualitative indicators of potential risk, but for most chemical exposures research is needed to establish their validity as quantitative predictors of cancer risk. Biologic markers have, however, already provided valuable insights into the magnitude of interindividual variation in response to carcinogenic exposures, with major implications for risk assessment

  9. Biologic markers in risk assessment for environmental carcinogens

    OpenAIRE

    Perera, F.; Mayer, J.; Santella, R. M.; Brenner, D; Jeffrey, A.; Latriano, L; Smith, S.; Warburton, D; Young, T. L.; Tsai, W. Y.; Hemminki, K; Brandt-Rauf, P

    1991-01-01

    The potential of biologic markers to provide more timely and precise risk assessments for environmental carcinogens is viewed against the current state-of-the-art in biological monitoring/molecular epidemiology. Biologic markers such as carcinogen-DNA adducts and oncogene activation are currently considered valid qualitative indicators of potential risk, but for most chemical exposures research is needed to establish their validity as quantitative predictors of cancer risk. Biologic markers h...

  10. The role of the Akt/mTOR pathway in tobacco-carcinogen induced lung tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Memmott, Regan M.; Dennis, Phillip A.

    2009-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States, and 85–90% of lung cancer cases are associated with tobacco use. Tobacco components promote lung tumorigenesis through genotoxic effects, as well as through biochemical modulation of signaling pathways such as the Akt/mTOR pathway that regulate cell proliferation and survival. This review will describe cell surface receptors and other upstream components required for tobacco-carcinogen induced activation of Akt and...

  11. CARCINOGEN ASSESSMENT OF COKE OVEN EMISSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coke oven workers in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania and at 10 non-Allegheny County coke plants in the United States and Canada were found to be at an excess risk of mortality from cancer of all sites and from cancer of the lungs, bronchus, trachea, kidney, and prostate. An import...

  12. Leisure time activities related to carcinogen exposure and lung cancer risk in never smokers. A case-control study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruano-Ravina, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.ruano@usc.es [Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública CIBERESP, Barcelona (Spain); García-Lavandeira, José Antonio [Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Department of Preventive Medicine, A Coruña University Hospital Complex, Coruña (Spain); Torres-Durán, María [Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Service of Neumology, University Hospital Complex of Vigo, Vigo (Spain); Prini-Guadalupe, Luciana [Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Parente-Lamelas, Isaura [Service of Neumology, Ourense Hospital Complex, Ourense (Spain); Leiro-Fernández, Virginia [Service of Neumology, University Hospital Complex of Vigo, Vigo (Spain); Montero-Martínez, Carmen [Service of Neumology, University Hospital Complex of A Coruña, Coruña (Spain); González-Barcala, Francisco Javier; Golpe-Gómez, Antonio [Service of Neumology, Santiago de Compostela University Clinic Hospital, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Martínez, Cristina [National Institute of Silicosis, University Hospital of Asturias, Oviedo, Asturias (Spain); Castro-Añón, Olalla [Service of Neumology, Hospital Lucus Augusti, Lugo (Spain); Mejuto-Martí, María José [Service of Neumology, Hospital Arquitecto Marcide, Ferrol (Spain); and others

    2014-07-15

    We aim to assess the relationship between leisure time activities related to exposure to carcinogenic substances and lung cancer risk in a hospital-based case-control study performed in never smokers. We included never smoking cases with anatomopathologically confirmed lung cancer and never smoking controls undergoing trivial surgery, at 8 Spanish hospitals. The study was conducted between January 2011 and June 2013. Participants were older than 30 and had no previous neoplasms. All were personally interviewed focusing on lifestyle, environmental tobacco smoke exposure, occupational history and leisure time activities (including duration of such activities). Results were analyzed through logistic regression and adjusted also by residential radon and education level. We included 513 never smokers, 191 cases and 322 controls. The OR for those performing the studied leisure time activities was 1.43 (95%CI 0.78–2.61). When we restricted the analysis to those performing do-it-yourself activities for more than 10 years the OR was 2.21 (95%CI 0.93–5.27). Environmental tobacco smoke exposure did not modify this association. The effect for the different lung cancer histological types was very close to significance for adenocarcinoma but only when these activities were performed for more than 10 years. We encourage health professionals to recommend protective measures for those individuals while performing these hobbies to reduce the risk of lung cancer. - Highlights: • Some leisure time activities are associated with the exposure to carcinogenic substances. • These activities are model-making, painting (artistic or not), furniture refinishing or wood working. • Few studies have assessed lung cancer risk due to these hobbies and none in never-smokers. • Leisure activities related to exposure to carcinogenic substances present higher lung cancer risk. • The risk is higher when these activities are performed for more than 10 years.

  13. Leisure time activities related to carcinogen exposure and lung cancer risk in never smokers. A case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We aim to assess the relationship between leisure time activities related to exposure to carcinogenic substances and lung cancer risk in a hospital-based case-control study performed in never smokers. We included never smoking cases with anatomopathologically confirmed lung cancer and never smoking controls undergoing trivial surgery, at 8 Spanish hospitals. The study was conducted between January 2011 and June 2013. Participants were older than 30 and had no previous neoplasms. All were personally interviewed focusing on lifestyle, environmental tobacco smoke exposure, occupational history and leisure time activities (including duration of such activities). Results were analyzed through logistic regression and adjusted also by residential radon and education level. We included 513 never smokers, 191 cases and 322 controls. The OR for those performing the studied leisure time activities was 1.43 (95%CI 0.78–2.61). When we restricted the analysis to those performing do-it-yourself activities for more than 10 years the OR was 2.21 (95%CI 0.93–5.27). Environmental tobacco smoke exposure did not modify this association. The effect for the different lung cancer histological types was very close to significance for adenocarcinoma but only when these activities were performed for more than 10 years. We encourage health professionals to recommend protective measures for those individuals while performing these hobbies to reduce the risk of lung cancer. - Highlights: • Some leisure time activities are associated with the exposure to carcinogenic substances. • These activities are model-making, painting (artistic or not), furniture refinishing or wood working. • Few studies have assessed lung cancer risk due to these hobbies and none in never-smokers. • Leisure activities related to exposure to carcinogenic substances present higher lung cancer risk. • The risk is higher when these activities are performed for more than 10 years

  14. Environmental Carcinogen Releases and Lung Cancer Mortality in Rural-Urban Areas of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Juhua; Hendryx, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Environmental hazards are unevenly distributed across communities and populations; however, little is known about the distribution of environmental carcinogenic pollutants and lung cancer risk across populations defined by race, sex, and rural-urban setting. Methods: We used the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) database to conduct an…

  15. Non—Genotoxic Carcinogens.Approaches to Their Rish Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.A.CASTRO; M.I.DiazGomez; 等

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiological studies support the idea that most human cancers are related to chemicals present in the human environment.In turn,chemicals are believed to cause cancer via either genotoxic or non-genotoxic mechanisms.There were described in literature several simple rapid and inexpensive short term ests to reasonably predict the genotoxic nature of chemicals but in contrast,there is no reliable test or battery of tests available to predict the carcinogenicity of non-genotoxic compounds and this poses a major problem to their rish assessment.In addition,there are conflictive opinions about rish assessment needs for both classes of carcinogens.Some workers elieve that for non-genotoxic carcinogens,thresholds for exposure can be drawn while others do not.In this review,the reasons behind both of these opinions and the present hypotheses about the mechanism of action of non-genotoxic carcinogens are described and analyzed in relation to future needs.

  16. Risk assessment of DNA-reactive carcinogens in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk assessment of DNA-reactive carcinogens in food requires knowledge of the extent of DNA damage in the target organ which results from the competition between DNA adduct formation and repair. Estimates of DNA adduct levels can be made by direct measurement or indirectly as a consequence of their presence, for example, by tumor formation in animal models or exposed populations epidemiologically. Food-borne DNA-reactive carcinogens are present from a variety of sources. They are generally not intrinsically DNA-reactive but require bioactivation to DNA-reactive metabolites a process which may be modulated by the compound itself or the presence of other xenobiotics. A single DNA reactant may form several distinct DNA adducts each undergoing different rates of repair. Some DNA reactants may be photochemically activated or produce reactive oxygen species and thus indirect oxidative DNA damage. The levels of DNA adducts arising from exposures influenced by variations in the doses, the frequency with which an individual is exposed, and rates of DNA repair for specific adducts. Each adduct has a characteristic efficiency with which it induces mutations. Based on experience with the well-studied DNA-reactive food carcinogen aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a limit of 20 ppb or ∼30 μg/day has been set and is considered a tolerable daily intake (TDI). Since AFB1 is considered a potent carcinogen, doses of 32P-postlabeling or the use of surrogates such as hemoglobin adducts, together with approaches to evaluate the results. A discussion of approaches to estimating possible threshold effects for DNA-reactive carcinogens is made

  17. Indoor air-assessment: Indoor concentrations of environmental carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the report, indoor concentration data are presented for the following general categories of air pollutants: radon-222, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), asbestos, gas phase organic compounds, formaldehyde, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), pesticides, and inorganic compounds. These pollutants are either known or suspect carcinogens (i.e., radon-222, asbestos) or more complex mixtures or classes of compounds which contain known or suspect carcinogens. Concentration data for individual carcinogenic compounds in complex mixtures are usually far from complete. The data presented for complex mixtures often include compounds which are not carcinogenic or for which data are insufficient to evaluate carcinogenicity. Their inclusion is justified, however, by the possibility that further work may show them to be carcinogens, cocarcinogens, initiators or promotors, or that they may be employed as markers (e.g., nicotine, acrolein) for the estimation of exposure to complex mixtures

  18. Lung cancer incidence decreases with elevation: evidence for oxygen as an inhaled carcinogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamen P. Simeonov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The level of atmospheric oxygen, a driver of free radical damage and tumorigenesis, decreases sharply with rising elevation. To understand whether ambient oxygen plays a role in human carcinogenesis, we characterized age-adjusted cancer incidence (compiled by the National Cancer Institute from 2005 to 2009 across counties of the elevation-varying Western United States and compared trends displayed by respiratory cancer (lung and non-respiratory cancers (breast, colorectal, and prostate. To adjust for important demographic and cancer-risk factors, 8–12 covariates were considered for each cancer. We produced regression models that captured known risks. Models demonstrated that elevation is strongly, negatively associated with lung cancer incidence (p < 10−16, but not with the incidence of non-respiratory cancers. For every 1,000 m rise in elevation, lung cancer incidence decreased by 7.23 99% CI [5.18–9.29] cases per 100,000 individuals, equivalent to 12.7% of the mean incidence, 56.8. As a predictor of lung cancer incidence, elevation was second only to smoking prevalence in terms of significance and effect size. Furthermore, no evidence of ecological fallacy or of confounding arising from evaluated factors was detected: the lung cancer association was robust to varying regression models, county stratification, and population subgrouping; additionally seven environmental correlates of elevation, such as exposure to sunlight and fine particulate matter, could not capture the association. Overall, our findings suggest the presence of an inhaled carcinogen inherently and inversely tied to elevation, offering epidemiological support for oxygen-driven tumorigenesis. Finally, highlighting the need to consider elevation in studies of lung cancer, we demonstrated that previously reported inverse lung cancer associations with radon and UVB became insignificant after accounting for elevation.

  19. AKT1E17K Is Oncogenic in Mouse Lung and Cooperates with Chemical Carcinogens in Inducing Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanga, Donatella; Belmonte, Stefania; Colelli, Fabiana; Scarfò, Marzia; De Marco, Carmela; Oliveira, Duarte Mendes; Mirante, Teresa; Camastra, Caterina; Gagliardi, Monica; Rizzuto, Antonia; Mignogna, Chiara; Paciello, Orlando; Papparella, Serenella; Fagman, Henrik; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The hotspot AKT1E17K mutation in the pleckstrin homology domain of AKT1 occurs in approximately 0.6–2% of human lung cancers. Recently, we have demonstrated that AKT1E17K transforms immortalized human bronchial cells. Here by use of a transgenic Cre-inducible murine strain in the wild type Rosa26 (R26) locus (R26-AKT1E17K mice) we demonstrate that AKT1E17K is a bona-fide oncogene and plays a role in the development of lung cancer in vivo. In fact, we report that mutant AKT1E17K induces bronchial and/or bronchiolar hyperplastic lesions in murine lung epithelium, which progress to frank carcinoma at very low frequency, and accelerates tumor formation induced by chemical carcinogens. In conclusion, AKT1E17K induces hyperplasia of mouse lung epithelium in vivo and cooperates with urethane to induce the fully malignant phenotype. PMID:26859676

  20. Cell kinetics in mouse lung following administration of carcinogens and butylated hydroxytoluene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of experiments is described which was designed to test the hypothesis that, in mouse lung, enhancement of tumor development could occur independently of overall alveolar cell hyperplasia. Male A/J mice were given 1000 mg/kg of urethane or 10 mg/kg of 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA). Alveolar cells were labeled through continuous infusion of [3H]thymidine for 6 weeks after administration of the carcinogen. Urethane produced a significant hyperplasia of the type II alveolar cell population, whereas MCA had no such effect. Five repeated injections of 300 mg/kg of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), a procedure known to enhance lung tumor development, produced cell hyperplasia only during the first 2 weeks; later the mice became resistant to the action of BHT. In animals treated with piperonyl butoxide prior to BHT, cell proliferation was abolished. BHT still had a small but significant enhancing effect on tumor development. However, this effect was dwarfed by the observation that piperonyl butoxide alone greatly inhibited tumor development. The data do not allow exclusion of alveolar cell hyperplasia as a mechanism in BHT-mediated enhancement of mouse lung tumor development. 19 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  1. Chronic occupational exposure to arsenic induces carcinogenic gene signaling networks and neoplastic transformation in human lung epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic arsenic exposure remains a human health risk; however a clear mode of action to understand gene signaling-driven arsenic carcinogenesis is currently lacking. This study chronically exposed human lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells to low-dose arsenic trioxide to elucidate cancer promoting gene signaling networks associated with arsenic-transformed (B-As) cells. Following a 6 month exposure, exposed cells were assessed for enhanced cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion ability and in vivo tumor formation compared to control cell lines. Collected mRNA was subjected to whole genome expression microarray profiling followed by in silico Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to identify lung carcinogenesis modes of action. B-As cells displayed significant increases in proliferation, colony formation and invasion ability compared to BEAS-2B cells. B-As injections into nude mice resulted in development of primary and secondary metastatic tumors. Arsenic exposure resulted in widespread up-regulation of genes associated with mitochondrial metabolism and increased reactive oxygen species protection suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. Carcinogenic initiation via reactive oxygen species and epigenetic mechanisms was further supported by altered DNA repair, histone, and ROS-sensitive signaling. NF-κB, MAPK and NCOR1 signaling disrupted PPARα/δ-mediated lipid homeostasis. A ‘pro-cancer’ gene signaling network identified increased survival, proliferation, inflammation, metabolism, anti-apoptosis and mobility signaling. IPA-ranked signaling networks identified altered p21, EF1α, Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB signaling networks promoting genetic disorder, altered cell cycle, cancer and changes in nucleic acid and energy metabolism. In conclusion, transformed B-As cells with their whole genome expression profile provide an in vitro arsenic model for future lung cancer signaling research and data for chronic arsenic exposure risk assessment. Highlights: ► Chronic As2O3

  2. Chronic occupational exposure to arsenic induces carcinogenic gene signaling networks and neoplastic transformation in human lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stueckle, Todd A., E-mail: tstueckle@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Lu, Yongju, E-mail: yongju6@hotmail.com [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Davis, Mary E., E-mail: mdavis@wvu.edu [Department of Physiology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Wang, Liying, E-mail: lmw6@cdc.gov [Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Jiang, Bing-Hua, E-mail: bhjiang@jefferson.edu [Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Holaskova, Ida, E-mail: iholaskova@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Schafer, Rosana, E-mail: rschafer@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Barnett, John B., E-mail: jbarnett@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Rojanasakul, Yon, E-mail: yrojan@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure remains a human health risk; however a clear mode of action to understand gene signaling-driven arsenic carcinogenesis is currently lacking. This study chronically exposed human lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells to low-dose arsenic trioxide to elucidate cancer promoting gene signaling networks associated with arsenic-transformed (B-As) cells. Following a 6 month exposure, exposed cells were assessed for enhanced cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion ability and in vivo tumor formation compared to control cell lines. Collected mRNA was subjected to whole genome expression microarray profiling followed by in silico Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to identify lung carcinogenesis modes of action. B-As cells displayed significant increases in proliferation, colony formation and invasion ability compared to BEAS-2B cells. B-As injections into nude mice resulted in development of primary and secondary metastatic tumors. Arsenic exposure resulted in widespread up-regulation of genes associated with mitochondrial metabolism and increased reactive oxygen species protection suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. Carcinogenic initiation via reactive oxygen species and epigenetic mechanisms was further supported by altered DNA repair, histone, and ROS-sensitive signaling. NF-κB, MAPK and NCOR1 signaling disrupted PPARα/δ-mediated lipid homeostasis. A ‘pro-cancer’ gene signaling network identified increased survival, proliferation, inflammation, metabolism, anti-apoptosis and mobility signaling. IPA-ranked signaling networks identified altered p21, EF1α, Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB signaling networks promoting genetic disorder, altered cell cycle, cancer and changes in nucleic acid and energy metabolism. In conclusion, transformed B-As cells with their whole genome expression profile provide an in vitro arsenic model for future lung cancer signaling research and data for chronic arsenic exposure risk assessment. Highlights: ► Chronic As{sub 2}O

  3. The in vivo rodent test systems for assessment of carcinogenic potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Laan, Jan-Willem; Spindler, Per

    2002-01-01

    mouse models, the RasH2 and Tg.AC transgenic mouse models, and the neonatal mouse model. The "ICH Guideline S1B on Testing for Carcinogenicity of Pharmaceuticals" advocates that carcinogenicity testing of pharmaceuticals, when needed, might be carried out choosing one 2-year rodent carcinogenicity study...... (rat) plus one other study that supplements the 2-year study and providing additional information that is not readily available from the 2-year study: either (1) a short- or medium-term in vivo rodent test system or (2) a 2-year carcinogenicity study in a second rodent species (mouse). Another topic of...... end of 2001. The use of the short- and medium-term rodent test systems were not considered appropriate for the assessment of carcinogenic potential of biotechnology-derived medicinal products....

  4. In vivo transgenic bioassays and assessment of the carcinogenic potential of pharmaceuticals.

    OpenAIRE

    Contrera, J F; DeGeorge, J J

    1998-01-01

    There is general agreement in the scientific community on the need to improve carcinogenicity testing and the assessment of human carcinogenic risk and to incorporate more information on mechanisms and modes of action into the risk assessment process. Advances in molecular biology have identified a growing number of genes such as protooncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that are highly conserved across species and are associated with a wide variety of human and animal cancers. In vivo transg...

  5. Carcinogenicity assessments of biotechnology-derived pharmaceuticals: a review of approved molecules and best practice recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahle, John L; Finch, Gregory L; Heidel, Shawn M; Hovland, David N; Ivens, Inge; Parker, Suezanne; Ponce, Rafael A; Sachs, Clifford; Steigerwalt, Ronald; Short, Brian; Todd, Marque D

    2010-06-01

    An important safety consideration for developing new therapeutics is assessing the potential that the therapy will increase the risk of cancer. For biotherapeutics, traditional two-year rodent bioassays are often not scientifically applicable or feasible. This paper is a collaborative effort of industry toxicologists to review past and current practice regarding carcinogenicity assessments of biotherapeutics and to provide recommendations. Publicly available information on eighty marketed protein biotherapeutics was reviewed. In this review, no assessments related to carcinogenicity or tumor growth promotion were identified for fifty-one of the eighty molecules. For the twenty-nine biotherapeutics in which assessments related to carcinogenicity were identified, various experimental approaches were employed. This review also discusses several key principles to aid in the assessment of carcinogenic potential, including (1) careful consideration of mechanism of action to identify theoretical risks, (2) careful investigation of existing data for indications of proliferative or immunosuppressive potential, and (3) characterization of any proliferative or immunosuppressive signals detected. Traditional two-year carcinogenicity assays should not be considered as the default method for assessing the carcinogenicity potential of biotherapeutics. If experimentation is considered warranted, it should be hypothesis driven and may include a variety of experimental models. Ultimately, it is important that preclinical data provide useful guidance in product labeling. PMID:20472697

  6. Recent developments in the multistage modeling of cohort data for carcinogenic risk assessment.

    OpenAIRE

    Mazumdar, S; Redmond, C K; Costantino, J P; Patwardhan, R N; Zhou, S. Y.

    1991-01-01

    The modeling of cohort data based on the Armitage-Doll multistage model of the carcinogenic process has gained popular acceptance as a methodology for quantitative risk assessment for estimating the dose-related relationships between different occupational and environmental carcinogenic exposures and cancer mortality. The multistage model can be used for extrapolation to low doses relevant for setting environmental standards and also provides information regarding whether more than one stage ...

  7. Chemopreventive Effects of the p53-Modulating Agents CP-31398 and Prima-1 in Tobacco Carcinogen-Induced Lung Tumorigenesis in A/J Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinthalapally V. Rao

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Expression of the p53 tumor suppressor protein is frequently altered in tobacco-associated lung cancers. We studied chemopreventive effects of p53-modulating agents, namely, CP-31398 and Prima-1, on 4-(methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK-induced lung adenoma and adenocarcinoma formation in female A/J mice. Seven-week-old mice were treated with a single dose of NNK (10 µmol/mouse by intraperitoneal injection and, 3 weeks later, were randomized to mice fed a control diet or experimental diets containing 50 or 100 ppm CP-31398 or 150 or 300 ppm Prima-1 for either 17 weeks (10 mice/group or 34 weeks (15 mice/group to assess the efficacy against lung adenoma and adenocarcinoma. Dietary feeding of 50 or 100 ppm CP-31398 significantly suppressed (P < .0001 lung adenocarcinoma by 64% and 73%, respectively, after 17 weeks and by 47% and 56%, respectively, after 34 weeks. Similarly, 150 or 300 ppm Prima-1 significantly suppressed (P < .0001 lung adenocarcinoma formation by 56% and 62%, respectively, after 17 weeks and 39% and 56%, respectively, after 34 weeks. Importantly, these results suggest that both p53 modulators cause a delay in the progression of adenoma to adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical analysis of lung tumors from mice exposed to p53-modulating agents showed a significantly reduced tumor cell proliferation and increased accumulation of wild-type p53 in the nucleus. An increase in p21- and apoptotic-positive cells was also observed in lung tumors of mice exposed to p53-modulating agents. These results support a chemopreventive role of p53-modulating agents in tobacco carcinogen-induced lung adenocarcinoma formation.

  8. CARCINOGEN ASSESSMENT OF COKE OVEN EMISSIONS (REVISED DRAFT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coke oven workers in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania and at 10 non-Allegheny County coke plants in the United States and Canada were found to be at an excess risk of mortality from cancer of all sites and from cancer of the lungs, bronchus, and trachea, kidney, and prostate. An im...

  9. Lung cancer: assessing resectability

    OpenAIRE

    Quint, Leslie E

    2003-01-01

    Staging classification in patients with non-small cell lung cancer does not always correlate perfectly with surgical resectability. Therefore, it is important to evaluate individual features of a patient’s tumor in order to determine if surgical resection is the optimal method of treatment, regardless of tumor stage. Such features include characteristics of the primary tumor, regional lymph nodes and distant sites.

  10. Opportunities for an alternative integrating testing strategy for carcinogen hazard assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doktorova, Tatyana Y; Pauwels, Marleen; Vinken, Mathieu; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera

    2012-02-01

    The 2-year rodent carcinogenicity bioassay evolved more than 40 years ago, and although it is complex, long lasting, expensive, and animal consuming, it is still the only generally accepted test for assessing the carcinogenicity of chemicals. Over time, different alternative approaches have been developed with the final goal to replace the bioassay. Unfortunately, at present, none of these strategies alone provides sufficient assurance of accurate prediction. In this review paper, we discuss the major advantages and pitfalls of the existing alternative methodologies to the carcinogenicity bioassay. Finally, based on the available scientific data in the public domain, we propose what we would like to call a "feasible integrated testing strategy" which incorporates some promising alternatives, providing at the same time information on the mechanism of action and the toxic nature of the compounds tested. It is, however, clear that the adoption of whatever "new" testing scheme should be considered with caution and its effectiveness should be experimentally demonstrated in advance by addressing a reasonable number of chemical carcinogens and non-carcinogens from a variety of structural and functional classes. PMID:22141324

  11. Butylated Hydroxyanisole Blocks the Occurrence of Tumor Associated Macrophages in Tobacco Smoke Carcinogen-Induced Lung Tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) promote tumorigenesis because of their proangiogenic and immune-suppressive functions. Here, we report that butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) blocks occurrence of tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) in tobacco smoke carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis. Continuous administration of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), a ROS inhibitor, before or after NNK treatment significantly blocked tumor development, although less effectively when BHA is administered after NNK treatment. Strikingly, BHA abolished the occurrence of F4/80+ macrophages with similar efficiency no matter whether it was administered before or after NNK treatment. Detection of cells from bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) confirmed that BHA markedly inhibited the accumulation of macrophages while slightly reducing the number of lymphocytes that were induced by NNK. Immunohistological staining showed that BHA specifically abolished the occurrence of CD206+ TAMs when it was administered before or after NNK treatment. Western blot analysis of TAMs markers, arginase I and Ym-1, showed that BHA blocked NNK-induced TAMs accumulation. Our study clearly demonstrated that inhibiting the occurrence of TAMs by BHA contributes to the inhibition of tobacco smoke carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis, suggesting ROS inhibitors may serve as a therapeutic target for treating smoke-induced lung cancer

  12. Butylated Hydroxyanisole Blocks the Occurrence of Tumor Associated Macrophages in Tobacco Smoke Carcinogen-Induced Lung Tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yan; Choksi, Swati; Liu, Zheng-Gang, E-mail: zgliu@helix.nih.gov [Cell and Cancer Biology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2013-12-04

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) promote tumorigenesis because of their proangiogenic and immune-suppressive functions. Here, we report that butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) blocks occurrence of tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) in tobacco smoke carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis. Continuous administration of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), a ROS inhibitor, before or after NNK treatment significantly blocked tumor development, although less effectively when BHA is administered after NNK treatment. Strikingly, BHA abolished the occurrence of F4/80{sup +} macrophages with similar efficiency no matter whether it was administered before or after NNK treatment. Detection of cells from bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) confirmed that BHA markedly inhibited the accumulation of macrophages while slightly reducing the number of lymphocytes that were induced by NNK. Immunohistological staining showed that BHA specifically abolished the occurrence of CD206{sup +} TAMs when it was administered before or after NNK treatment. Western blot analysis of TAMs markers, arginase I and Ym-1, showed that BHA blocked NNK-induced TAMs accumulation. Our study clearly demonstrated that inhibiting the occurrence of TAMs by BHA contributes to the inhibition of tobacco smoke carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis, suggesting ROS inhibitors may serve as a therapeutic target for treating smoke-induced lung cancer.

  13. Butylated Hydroxyanisole Blocks the Occurrence of Tumor Associated Macrophages in Tobacco Smoke Carcinogen-Induced Lung Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs promote tumorigenesis because of their proangiogenic and immune-suppressive functions. Here, we report that butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA blocks occurrence of tumor associated macrophages (TAMs in tobacco smoke carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis. Continuous administration of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA, a ROS inhibitor, before or after NNK treatment significantly blocked tumor development, although less effectively when BHA is administered after NNK treatment. Strikingly, BHA abolished the occurrence of F4/80+ macrophages with similar efficiency no matter whether it was administered before or after NNK treatment. Detection of cells from bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BALF confirmed that BHA markedly inhibited the accumulation of macrophages while slightly reducing the number of lymphocytes that were induced by NNK. Immunohistological staining showed that BHA specifically abolished the occurrence of CD206+ TAMs when it was administered before or after NNK treatment. Western blot analysis of TAMs markers, arginase I and Ym-1, showed that BHA blocked NNK-induced TAMs accumulation. Our study clearly demonstrated that inhibiting the occurrence of TAMs by BHA contributes to the inhibition of tobacco smoke carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis, suggesting ROS inhibitors may serve as a therapeutic target for treating smoke-induced lung cancer.

  14. Contribution of Radon Exposure to the Risk of Lung Cancer Assessed by Applying a Multifactor Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: It is well known that many different carcinogenic risk factors contribute to the development of lung cancer. Smoking, occupational exposure to carcinogens, chronic lung diseases and industrial air pollution are the most significant of them. Indoor radon exposure is considered a weak carcinogenic risk factor in the Urals, Russia. A drawback of traditionally applied monofactor methods of epidemiologic analysis is that different carcinogenic risk factors are analysed separately and their complex effect on public health is not taken into account. With such an approach it is impossible to adequately assess each factor's contribution in the total carcinogenic risk. For this reason it is expedient to apply methods of multifactor analysis in epidemiologic studies. We applied mathematical methods of pattern recognition when analysing the effect of indoor radon exposure on the development of lung cancer in the population of two Ural cities. We assessed the association between radon/thoron exposures and lung cancer using both BEIR VI model and the above-mentioned methods. The results were significantly different. According to BEIR VI model the contribution of radon/thoron in the risk of lung cancer varied from 7.2% to 33%, whereas this contribution assessed in the multifactor analysis was only 0.5%. We think that the contribution assessed in BEIR VI model is overestimated. Our considerable experience in conducting epidemiologic studies using mathematical methods of pattern recognition, gives us grounds to state that the assessment of radon/thoron exposure on lung cancer risk obtained in the multifactor analysis is more adequate and precise. (author)

  15. Quantitative assessment of exposure and risk for three carcinogenics in long-standing pollution sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project attempts a quantitative assessment of risks for three carcinogenics that are common in sites of long-standing pollution. Benzo(a)pyrene stands for the group of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, cadmium for heavy metals, and benzene for volatile aromatic compounds. The report discusses the general fundamentals of exposure and risk assessment. The exposure model is described in detail and applied to the three test substances. (orig./MG)

  16. Carcinogenic alterations in murine liver, lung, and uterine tumors induced by in utero exposure to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumniczky, K; Antal, S; Unger, E; Wunderlich, L; Hidvégi, E J; Sáfrány, G

    1998-02-01

    The atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the nuclear accident at Chernobyl raised the question of prenatal sensitivity to ionizing radiation-induced cancer. In this study, mice were exposed to single doses of gamma-radiation (0.2-2.0 Gy) at different embryonic stages. The tumor incidence increased with dose from 15% in control mice to 35% in mice irradiated with 2.0 Gy on 18 d of prenatal life. Various oncogenic events were investigated in lymphoid, liver, lung, and uterine tumors. We observed threefold to fivefold increases in myc expression in 25% of the lymphomas, and the expression of Ha-ras and p53 genes decreased in 40% and 60% of the lung tumors by twofold to fivefold. Point mutations were tissue specific: Ha-ras codon 61 mutations were found in about 40% of the liver adenocarcinomas, Ki-ras codon 12 mutations in about 17% of lung tumors, and p53 mutations in about 15% of the lymphomas. Amplification and rearrangement of the p53, myc, and Ha-, Ki- and N-ras genes were not detected. Loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 4 at the multiple tumor suppressor 1 and 2 genes was observed in all types of malignancies. Allelic losses on chromosome 11 at the p53 locus were found in lymphoid, liver, and lung tumors, but they were absent from uterine tumors. Multiple oncogenic changes were often detected. The frequency of carcinogenic alterations was similar in spontaneous and radiation-induced lymphoid, liver, and uterine tumors. In radiation-induced lung adenocarcinomas, however, the incidences of many oncogenic changes were different from those found in their spontaneous counterparts. This suggests that different oncogenic pathways are activated during spontaneous and in utero gamma-radiation-induced murine lung carcinogenesis. PMID:9496910

  17. Carcinogenic and Non-Carcinogenic Assessment of Phthalates Exposure Through Consumption of Bottled Water During the Storage Time

    OpenAIRE

    M Zare Jeddi; Rastkari, N.; R Ahmadkhaniha; M Alimohammadi; M. Yunesian

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Bottles for packaging drinking water represent one of the most popular uses of plastic and polymer additives. Recently, public concerns related to possibility of exposure to chemicals through the consumption of polyethylene terephthalate bottled water has caused great concern to consumers. Phthalate esters, as a class of these compounds, are often classified as endocrine disruptors and one of them is a possible carcinogen for human. The aim of this study was to dete...

  18. GST-π EXPRESSION IN TRANSFORMED CELLS BY TRANSFECTING OF DNA ISOLATED FROM HUMAN FETAL LUNG TISSUES TREATED WITH CARCINOGENS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Denggao; Hu Guogang; Luo Xianmao; Zhu Ming

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between the GSTs, GST-π expression and initiation of lung carcinogenesis. Methods: The Rat-1 cells were transformed by carcinogens (DEN, MNU and CSC) treated fetal lung DNA for 24 h. Results: The GSTs activities toward 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitro-benzene (CDNB) in transformed cells were significantly higher than in the solvent control cells (P<0.05). GST-π content and GST-π mRNA expression level of transformed cells were also higher than those of control cells which were performed by ELISA and Northern blotting method respectively. The results indicated that the higher GSTS activities of transformed cells were due to the increase of GST-π content and the GST-π mRNA overexpressing may be responsible for the increase of GST-π protein level of the transformed cells. Conclusion: The changes of GSTs and GST-π may be considered as the one of the biomarkers of the initiation of human lung carcinogenesis.

  19. The genotoxic effect of carcinogenic PAHs, their artificial and environmental mixtures (EOM) on human diploid lung fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the genotoxic effect of single carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (c-PAHs), as well as their binary and artificial mixtures containing c-PAHs in the same relative proportions as real complex mixtures, and to investigate the genotoxic effect of environmental mixtures such as EOM (extractable organic matter adsorbed to respirable air particles). We used normal human diploid lung fibroblasts (HEL) in a confluent ('quiescent') state as being closer to in vivo conditions. We determined DNA adducts by 32P-postlabelling and the expression of p53 and p21WAF1 proteins by Western blotting. Our results showed that the DNA binding potencies of c-PAHs in quiescent HEL cells were as follows: DB[al]P>>B[a]P>>B[b]F∼CHRY∼B[k]F∼B[a]A∼DB[ah]A∼I[cd]P>B[ghi]P. Both DB[al]P and B[a]P were chosen to assess the genotoxic effect of other c-PAHs when present in binary mixtures. In all cases, co-treatment resulted in significantly lower DNA adduct levels as compared with adduct levels resulting from single compounds. The highest inhibitory effect was found in the presence of DB[ah]A followed by B[k]F. In both artificial and EOM mixtures a strong inhibitory effect of other compounds was observed. BPDE-adduct levels were up to five-fold lower in an artificial c-PAH mixture and up to 10-fold lower in an EOM sample than expected from applying B[a]P alone at the same concentration. These results suggest a competition for the metabolic activation enzymes, their saturation and/or inactivation by PAH metabolites. We did not observe the decrease of DNA adducts and induced levels of both p53 and p21WAF1 proteins during the post-treatment period up to 6 days following exposure. We suggest that parent c-PAHs accumulate inside cells and that they are further activated by newly synthesised enzymes during the post-treatment period. Therefore, unaltered c-PAHs may act as a reservoir inside the cells for the long-term production of active

  20. Evaluation of toxicogenomics approaches for assessing the risk of nongenotoxic carcinogenicity in rat liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Eichner

    Full Text Available The current gold-standard method for cancer safety assessment of drugs is a rodent two-year bioassay, which is associated with significant costs and requires testing a high number of animals over lifetime. Due to the absence of a comprehensive set of short-term assays predicting carcinogenicity, new approaches are currently being evaluated. One promising approach is toxicogenomics, which by virtue of genome-wide molecular profiling after compound treatment can lead to an increased mechanistic understanding, and potentially allow for the prediction of a carcinogenic potential via mathematical modeling. The latter typically involves the extraction of informative genes from omics datasets, which can be used to construct generalizable models allowing for the early classification of compounds with unknown carcinogenic potential. Here we formally describe and compare two novel methodologies for the reproducible extraction of characteristic mRNA signatures, which were employed to capture specific gene expression changes observed for nongenotoxic carcinogens. While the first method integrates multiple gene rankings, generated by diverse algorithms applied to data from different subsamplings of the training compounds, the second approach employs a statistical ratio for the identification of informative genes. Both methods were evaluated on a dataset obtained from the toxicogenomics database TG-GATEs to predict the outcome of a two-year bioassay based on profiles from 14-day treatments. Additionally, we applied our methods to datasets from previous studies and showed that the derived prediction models are on average more accurate than those built from the original signatures. The selected genes were mostly related to p53 signaling and to specific changes in anabolic processes or energy metabolism, which are typically observed in tumor cells. Among the genes most frequently incorporated into prediction models were Phlda3, Cdkn1a, Akr7a3, Ccng1 and Abcb4.

  1. Noninvasive assessment of peroxidative lung damage by HIPDM lung scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miniati, M.; Borrelli, E.; Monti, S.; Cocci, F.; Solfanelli, S.; Giani, L.; Pistolesi, M. (Univ. of Pisa (Italy) Univ. of Siena, (Italy))

    1991-03-15

    The basic compound iodobenzyl-propanediamine (HIPDM), when given intravenously, is extracted by the lungs whence it is effluxed at a slow exponential rate. In humans (normal non smokers), the mean residence time ({bar t}) of 123I-HIPDM, assessed by external detection, averages 7.2 {plus minus} 1.1 hrs. Persistence of HIPDM in lungs is significantly increased in asymptomatic smokers and, to a greater extent, in patients with ARDS. Since production of free oxygen radicals reportedly occurs as a consequence of smoke exposure and in the course of acute lung injury, the authors hypothesized that the prolonged persistence of HIPDM in the lungs of smokers and of patients with ARDS might reflect a peroxidative damage of lung tissue. They tested this hypothesis in rabbits since their baseline HIPDM lung clearance is similar to that of nonsmoking humans. In rabbits, acute lung injury was induced by phorbol myristate acetate. Three hrs after PMA administration, the animals received an i.v. bolus of {sup 131}I-HIPDM. Radioactivity over the chest was recorded for 2 hrs by gamma camera and HIPDM mean residence time in the lungs was computed. Thereafter, the animals were sacrificed and their lungs were removed to measure wet/dry weight ratio as index of lung edema and malondialdehyde (MDA) content as index of lipid peroxidation. HIPDM mean residence time was positively correlated with MDA level in lung tissue, but not with wet/dry weight ratio. Noninvasive assessment of HIPDM lung kinetics may then serve as specific in vivo marker of peroxidative lung injury.

  2. Assessing resectability of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to assess the value of computed tomography (CT) of the mediastinum, upper abdomen and head in the assessment of resectability of lung cancer, the CT findings of 262 patients, of whom 198 underwent thoracotomy, were anlyzed retrospectively and the stagings obtained at CT and thoracotomy were compared. Mediastinal CT reliably predicted resectability when there was no evidence of mediastinal involvement. However, it was often impossible to determine whether tumour with apparent mediastinal infiltration on CT was resectable or not. The sole finding of lymph node enlargement did not permit differentiation of benign from malignant lymphadenopathy when the lymph node diameter as < 25 mm and the lymphadenopathy was confined to one lymph node station. Upper abdominal metastases were found in 6.1% and brain metastases in 4.6% of patients and neither the histological type nor other features of the tumour were found to be useful predictors of their presence. The large number of non-specific findings decreased the utility of abdominal CT. The appropriate strategy for the pre-operative evaluation of patients with lung cancer is discussed. (author). 29 refs.; 1 fig.; 10 tabs

  3. Lung cancer incidence decreases with elevation: evidence for oxygen as an inhaled carcinogen

    OpenAIRE

    Kamen P. Simeonov; HIMMELSTEIN, DANIEL S.

    2015-01-01

    The level of atmospheric oxygen, a driver of free radical damage and tumorigenesis, decreases sharply with rising elevation. To understand whether ambient oxygen plays a role in human carcinogenesis, we characterized age-adjusted cancer incidence (compiled by the National Cancer Institute from 2005 to 2009) across counties of the elevation-varying Western United States and compared trends displayed by respiratory cancer (lung) and non-respiratory cancers (breast, colorectal, and prostate). To...

  4. Assessment of Peripheral Lung Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Bates, Jason H. T.; Suki, Béla

    2008-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the lung periphery are major determinants of overall lung function, and can change dramatically in disease. In this review we examine the various experimental techniques that have provided data pertaining to the mechanical properties of the lung periphery, together with the mathematical models that have been used to interpret these data. These models seek to make a clear distinction between the central and peripheral compartments of the lung by encapsulating funct...

  5. Tobacco carcinogen induces both lung cancer and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and hepatocellular carcinomas in ferrets which can be attenuated by lycopene supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Koichi; Liu, Chun; Tang, Sanyuan; Veeramachaneni, Sudipta; Hu, Kang-Quan; Smith, Donald E; Wang, Xiang-Dong

    2016-09-01

    Early epidemiologic studies have reported that tobacco smoking, which is causally associated with liver cancer, is an independent risk factor for non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD). Lycopene from tomatoes has been shown to be a potential preventive agent against NAFLD and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In the present study, we investigated whether the tobacco carcinogen 4-(N-methyl-N-nitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) induces lesions in both lungs and livers of ferrets with or without lycopene intervention. Male ferrets (6 groups, n = 8-10) were treated either with NNK (50 mg/kg BW, i.p., once a month for four consecutive months) or saline with or without dietary lycopene supplementation (2.2 and 6.6 mg/kg BW/day, respectively) for 26 weeks. Results demonstrate that NNK exposure results in higher incidences of lung tumors, HCC and steatohepatitis (which is characterized by severe inflammatory cell infiltration with concurrent fat accumulation in liver, hepatocellular ballooning degeneration and increased NF-κB expression), as well as elevations in bilirubin and AST levels in ferrets. Lycopene supplementation at two doses prevented NNK-induced expressions of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the lung and NF-κB and CYP2E1 in the liver and attenuated the NNK-induced mortality and pathological lesions in both the lungs and livers of ferrets. The present study provided strong experimental evidence that the tobacco carcinogen NNK can induce both HCC and steatohepatitis in the ferrets and can be a useful model for studying tobacco carcinogen-associated NAFLD and liver cancer. Furthermore, lycopene could provide potential benefits against smoke carcinogen-induced pulmonary and hepatic injury. PMID:27116542

  6. Carcinogenic and Non-Carcinogenic Assessment of Phthalates Exposure Through Consumption of Bottled Water During the Storage Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Zare Jeddi

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: The research showed that the concentration of phthalates in PET-bottled water was extremely low. Consequently, based on the risk assessment results, bottled waters regarding existence of safe for consumers and they phthalates are not considered as public health issue for consumers as phthalates does not have any risk exposure for the consumers.

  7. Acrylamide carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaunig, James E

    2008-08-13

    The induction of cancer by chemicals is a multiple-stage process. Acrylamide is carcinogenic to experimental mice and rats, causing tumors at multiple organ sites in both species when given in drinking water or by other means. In mice, acrylamide increased the incidence and multiplicity of lung tumors and skin tumors. In two bioassays in rats, acrylamide administered in drinking water consistently induced mesotheliomas of the testes, thyroid tumors, and mammary gland tumors. In addition, brain tumors appeared to be increased. In one of the rat bioassays, pituitary tumors, pheochromocytomas, uterine tumors, and pituitary tumors were noted. The conversion of acrylamide metabolically to the reactive, mutagenic, and genotoxic product, glycidamide, can occur in both rodent and humans. Glycidamide and frequently acrylamide have been positive for mutagenicity and DNA reactivity in a number of in vitro and in vivo assays. The effects of chronic exposure of glycidamide to rodents have not been reported. Epidemiologic studies of workers for possible health effects from exposures to acrylamide have not shown a consistent increase in cancer risk. Although an increase in the risk for pancreatic cancer (almost double) was seen in highly exposed workers, no exposure response relationship could be determined. The mode of action remains unclear for acrylamide-induced rodent carcinogenicity, but support for a genotoxic mechanism based on in vitro and in vivo DNA reactivity assays cannot be ruled out. In addition, the pattern of tumor formation in the rat following chronic exposure supports a genotoxic mode of action but also suggests a potential role of endocrine modification. PMID:18624430

  8. Lung Carcinogenic Bioassay of CuO and TiO2 Nanoparticles with Intratracheal Instillation Using F344 Male Rats

    OpenAIRE

    YOKOHIRA, MASANAO; Hashimoto, Nozomi; YAMAKAWA, KEIKO; Suzuki, Satoshi; Saoo, Kousuke; KUNO, TOSHIYA; Imaida, Katsumi

    2009-01-01

    Toxicity assessment of nanoparticles, now widespread in our environment, is an important issue. We have focused attention on the carcinogenic potential of copper oxide (CuO) and titanium dioxide (TiO2). In experiment 1, a sequential pilot study, the effectiveness of a carcinogenic bioassay featuring intraperitoneal injection (i.p.) of 20 mg 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) or 0.1% N-bis(2-hydroxypropyl)nitrosamine (DHPN) in drinking water for 2 weeks was examined. Based on...

  9. Biomarkers for assessing potential carcinogenic effects of chronic arsenic exposure in Inner Mongolia, CHINA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic is ubiquitous in the environment. Chronic arsenic exposure via drinking water has been associated. with carcinogenic, cardiovascular, neurological and diabetic effects in humans and has been of great public health concern worldwide. In 2001, U.S. Environmental Protection ...

  10. [Notion of threshold in mutagenesis: implications for mutagenic and carcinogenic risk assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzin, D

    2007-11-01

    account. A very important point to consider is to demonstrate that the mechanism with threshold was really thee only one involved in the mutagenic effect. The demonstration of such thresholds is of particular interest for human risk assessment in the case of mutagens and of genotoxic carcinogens. PMID:18079673

  11. Carcinogenic risk assessment and management of ionising radiation, asbestos and nickel: a comparative approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    assessment of individual exposures and their measurements are difficult to achieve. In this context, the ALARA approach refers mainly to the adoption of good practices. In this study, a quantitative comparison of risks in the various sectors is less important than a qualitative comparison of the risk-assessment and management approaches. It is felt that identifying similarities and differences is an objective in its own right in that it provides a basis on which to challenge, where necessary, some commonly-held beliefs regarding the advances that some sectors are assumed to have over others. The collected data reveal some significant similarities in the principles on which the assessment and management of risks of low-level exposure are based. At the same time, the procedures which are actually used in practice, despite being based on relatively distinct 'instruments', ultimately produce results that are not dissimilar and that in general reflect the shared concern to devise reasonable' solutions with regard to the prevention of carcinogenic risks. (author)

  12. The Impact of Clean Indoor Air Exemptions and Preemption Policies on the Prevalence of a Tobacco-Specific Lung Carcinogen Among Nonsmoking Bar and Restaurant Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Michael J.; Rohde, Kristen; Maher, Julie E.; Pizacani, Barbara A.; Dent, Clyde W.; Bard, Ronda; Carmella, Steven G.; Benoit, Adam R.; Thomson, Nicole M.; Hecht, Stephen S.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. We studied the impact of clean indoor air law exemptions and preemption policies on the prevalence of a tobacco-specific lung carcinogen—4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK)—among nonsmoking bar and restaurant workers. Methods.secondhand smoke were compared with results from participants who were exposed to it. Results. Participants exposed to workplace secondhand smoke were more likely to have any detectable level of NNAL (P=.005) and higher mean levels of NNAL (P < .001) compared with nonexposed participants. Increased levels of NNAL were also associated with hours of a single workplace exposure (P=.005). Conclusions. Nonsmoking employees left unprotected from workplace secondhand smoke exposure had elevated levels of a tobacco-specific carcinogen in their bodies. All workers—including bar and restaurant workers—should be protected from indoor workplace exposure to cancer-causing secondhand smoke. PMID:17600262

  13. On use of the multistage dose-response model for assessing laboratory animal carcinogenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Nitcheva, Daniella; Piegorsch, Walter W.; West, R. Webster

    2007-01-01

    We explore how well a statistical multistage model describes dose-response patterns in laboratory animal carcinogenicity experiments from a large database of quantal response data. The data are collected from the U.S. EPA’s publicly available IRIS data warehouse and examined statistically to determine how often higher-order values in the multistage predictor yield significant improvements in explanatory power over lower-order values. Our results suggest that the addition of a second-order par...

  14. Carcinogenic risk of non-uniform alpha particle irradiation in the lungs: radon progeny effects at bronchial bifurcations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combined effect of enhanced deposition and reduced clearance at bronchial bifurcations leads to increased radon progeny doses within branching sites compared with uniformly distributed activity within a given airway generation. A multi-stage carcinogenesis model was used to predict the probability of lung cancer induction at different sites of the bronchial region. For relatively low radon progeny exposures, lung cancer risk is significantly higher in bifurcation zones, particularly at carinal ridges, than along tubular segments. At sufficiently high exposures, however, lung cancer risk is highest in the tubular portions of a generation. This suggests that the common assumption of a uniform dose distribution provides realistic risk estimates for high uranium miner exposures, but may underestimate lung cancer risk at low, environmental exposures. If concomitant exposure to cigarette smoke is factored into our risk analysis in a multiplicative fashion, then the effect related to risk inhomogeneity becomes even more pronounced. (author)

  15. RADON AND CARCINOGENIC RISK IN MOSCOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Golovanev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: comparative evaluation of carcinogenic risk inMoscowfrom radon in indoor and atmospheric pollutants.Materials and methods: the lung cancer incidence in Moscow; radiation-hygienic passport of the territory; .U.S. EPA estimated average age at all and radon induced deaths, years of life lost; Report of UNSCEAR 2006 and WHO handbook on indoor radon, 2009. Trend analysis of incidence; evaluation of the excess relative risk; assessment of ratio radon-induced population risk and published values оf total population carcinogenic risk from chemical carcinogens.Results: it is shown that the 304 cases of lung cancer per year (1. 85 10-3 on average from 2006 to 2011 (21280diseases for 70 years in addition to background level induced by radon; the differences in average trends of all lungcancer incidence in the districts can exceed 25%.Conclusion. The potential of risk reduction by measures of mitigation radon concentration exceeds 5 times the cost efficiency to reduce emissions from vehicles and can reduce cancer incidence, on average 236 cases per year; population risk 16520 cases over 70 years or save not less than 2832 person-years of life per year. The annual effect of reducing losses from not-survival of 12 years as a result of radon-induced lung cancer deaths exceeds 14160000 dollars. The evaluating of the carcinogenic risk from radon in accordance with the definition of population risk increases the predictive evaluation of the effectiveness of preventive measures more than twice.

  16. Ultrasonography for the assessment of lung recruitment maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tusman, Gerardo; Acosta, Cecilia M; Costantini, Mauro

    2016-12-01

    Lung collapse is a known complication that affects most of the patients undergoing positive pressure mechanical ventilation. Such atelectasis and airways closure lead to gas exchange and lung mechanics impairment and has the potential to develop an inflammatory response in the lungs. These negative effects of lung collapse can be reverted by a lung recruitment maneuver (RM) i.e. a ventilatory strategy that resolves lung collapse by a brief and controlled increment in airway pressures. However, an unsolved question is how to assess such RM at the bedside. The aim of this paper is to describe the usefulness of lung sonography (LUS) to conduct and personalize RM in a real-time way at the bedside. LUS has favorable features to assess lung recruitment due to its high specificity and sensitivity to detect lung collapse together with its non-invasiveness, availability and simple use. PMID:27496127

  17. COMPARISON OF THE LUNG ADENOMA RESPONSE IN STRAIN A/J MICE AFTER INTRAPERITONEAL AND ORAL ADMINISTRATION OF CARCINOGENS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was undertaken to compare the ability of a series of compounds from different chemical classes to induce lung tumors in strain A/J mice after either ip or po administration. 3-Methylcholanthrene, benzo(a)pyrene, urethan, diethylnitrosamine, ethylnitrosourea, and dimeth...

  18. Assessing non-resectability of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate whether the assessment of resectability of lung cancer can be reliably made on the basis of computed tomography (CT), the thoracic CT scans of 96 lung cancer patients who were operated on, and in whom the tumour was classified to be of stage III at preoperative CT or at thoracotomy, were analysed. Of the patients, 58 underwent complete resection of the tumour, whereas thoracotomy resulted in non-complete resection or exploration only in 38 cases. Overlapping of the CT findings in the groups of complete and non-successful resection was observed. The majority of tumours with apparent growth to the carina, trachea, oesophagus or great vessels at CT were completely resected. Tumours that only bordered on the pleura could not be distinguished from those with pleural invasion. Mediastinal lymph node enlargement did not always mean metastatic spread. We conclude that there is no definite sign that identifies non-resectability of lung tumours, and a certain proportion of non-curative thoracotomies must be accepted. (orig.)

  19. RADON AND CARCINOGENIC RISK IN MOSCOW

    OpenAIRE

    S. M. Golovanev

    2015-01-01

    Objective: comparative evaluation of carcinogenic risk inMoscowfrom radon in indoor and atmospheric pollutants.Materials and methods: the lung cancer incidence in Moscow; radiation-hygienic passport of the territory; .U.S. EPA estimated average age at all and radon induced deaths, years of life lost; Report of UNSCEAR 2006 and WHO handbook on indoor radon, 2009. Trend analysis of incidence; evaluation of the excess relative risk; assessment of ratio radon-induced population risk and published...

  20. Risk Assessment of Non-Carcinogenic Heavy Metals (Barium, Cadmium, and Lead in Hair Color in Markets of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Khalili

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Chemical hair color are one of the most widely used cosmetics. The presence of heavy metals in these products can affect the health of consumers. Unlike other cosmetics, no study has been conducted on the heavy metal levels in the synthetic chemical hair colors. This study determined the concentration of heavy metals in these products and the risk assessment of non-carcinogenic effects by these elements were calculated. Material and Method: 32 samples of chemical hair color from eight brands (3 local and 5 imported ones and four most used colors were collected from the markets in Tehran. The concentration of cadmium, lead, and barium was determined using ICP-MS. The information required to assess exposure risk was gathered through  a questionnaire distributed among citizens of Tehran. The assessment of exposure was conducted using Mont Carlo method and  non-carcinogenic risk was determined using the index of Hazard Quotient. . Results: Barium concentration measured was 0.86 mg/kg and concentrations of Cadmium and Lead were 0.45 and 185.34 µg/kg respectively. Among the elements, Pb with Hazard Quotient equals to 7.46×10-4 had the most risk and cadmium with Hazard Quotient equals to 3.57×10-5 had the lowest risk. Moreover, the Iranian brand and blond had the highest risk among the samples. Conclusion: Based on the index of Hazard Quotient, heavy metals in the studied samples had no risk for consumers of these products.

  1. Squamous cell carcinoma in association with dental implants: an assessment of previously hypothesized carcinogenic mechanisms and a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatavadekar, Neel B

    2012-12-01

    Although dental implants have seen tremendous clinical success over the past few decades, there are some worrying reports in literature describing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in close association with dental implants. This article also provides a critical assessment of the published literature relating to the presence of carcinoma in association with dental implants, analyzing the previously published and hypothesized carcinogenic responses to an implant, to try and come to a conclusion regarding the plausibility and clinical risk for cancer formation in association with dental implants. An unusual case of an SCC noted in close proximity to a dental implant is also presented. A systematic search was conducted using Medline (PubMed), Cochrane Database, and Google Scholar with the search terms "cancer," "squamous cell carcinoma," "dental implant," "SCC," "peri-implantitis," "oral cancer," and "implantology" and using multiple combinations using Boolean operators "or" and "and." The search was not limited to dental literature; orthopedic and biomedical literature was also included. The results were then hand screened to pick out the relevant articles. In total, 14 previous published reports were found, where 24 dental implants were reported to be associated with SCC. Not all the reported patients had a history of cancer, but contributory factors such as smoking were found. An analysis of the biological plausibility of previously proposed carcinogenic mechanisms, such as corrosion, metallic ion release, and particulate debris, did not support the etiologic role for dental implants in cancer development, and the standardized incidence ratio was found to be extremely low (0.00017). Peri-implantitis should be assessed cautiously in patients receiving implants who have a previous history of cancer. Dental implants are a safe treatment modality based on the published data, and any change in surgical protocol is not mandated. PMID:21574824

  2. Assessment of the carcinogenic N-nitrosodiethanolamine in tobacco products and tobacco smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple, reproducible gas chromatography-thermal energy analyzer (g.c.-TEA) method has been developed for the analysis of N-nitrosodiethanolamine (NDELA) in tobacco and tobacco smoke. The extract of tobacco or the trapped particulates of tobacco smoke are chromatographed on silica gel. The NDELA containing fractions are concentrated, silylated and analyzed with a modified g.c.-TEA system. [/sup 14/C]NDELA serves as internal standard for the quantitative analysis. Experimental cigarettes made from tobaccos which were treated with the sucker growth inhibitor maleic hydrazidediethanolamine (MH-DELA) contained 115--420 p.p.b. of NDELA and their smoke contained 20--290 ng/cigarette, whereas hand-suckered tobacco and its smoke were free of NDELA. The tobacco of US smoking products contained 115--420 p.p.b. of NDELA and the mainstream smoke from such products yielded 10--68 ng/cigar or cigarette. NDELA levels in chewing tobacco ranged from 220--280 p.p.b. and in two commercial snuff products were 3,200 and 6,800 p.p.b. Although the five analyzed MH-DELA preparations contained between 0.6--1.9 p.p.m. NDELA it is evident that the major portion of NDELA in tobacco is formed from the DELA residue during the tobacco processing. Based on bioassay data from various laboratories which have shown that NDELA is a relatively strong carcinogen and based on the results of this study the use of MH-DELA for the cultivation of tobacco is questioned

  3. EVALUATION OF THE POTENTIAL CARCINOGENICITY OF CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyclophosphamide is a probable human carcinogen, classified as weight-of-evidence Group B1 under the EPA Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment (U.S. EPA, 1986a).Evidence on potential carcinogenicity from animal studies is "Sufficient," and the evidence from human studies is "...

  4. Cea-Expo: A facility exposure matrix to assess passed exposure to chemical carcinogens and radionuclides of nuclear workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 'Facility-Exposure Matrix' (FEM) is proposed to assess exposure to chemical carcinogens and radionuclides in a cohort of nuclear workers. Exposures are to be attributed in the following way: a worker reports to an administrative unit and/or is monitored for exposure to ionising radiation in a specific workplace. These units are connected with a list of facilities for which exposure is assessed through a group of experts. The entire process of the FEM applied in one of the nuclear centres included in the study shows that the FEM is feasible: exposure durations as well as groups of correlated exposures are presented but have to be considered as possible rather than positive exposures. Considering the number of facilities to assess (330), ways to simplify the method are proposed: (i) the list of exposures will be restricted to 18 chemical products retained from an extensive bibliography study; (ii) for each of the following classes of facilities: nuclear reactors, fuel fabrication, high-activity laboratories and radiation chemistry, accelerators and irradiators, waste treatment, biology, reprocessing, fusion, occupational exposure will be deduced from the information already gathered by the initial method. Besides taking into account confusion factors in the low doses epidemiological study of nuclear workers, the matrix should help in the assessment of internal contamination and chemical exposures in the nuclear industry. (author)

  5. Lung cancer risk in relation to traffic-related nano/ultrafine particle-bound PAHs exposure: a preliminary probabilistic assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chung-Min; Chio, Chia-Pin; Chen, Wei-Yu; Ju, Yun-Ru; Li, Wen-Hsuan; Cheng, Yi-Hsien; Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan; Chen, Szu-Chieh; Ling, Min-Pei

    2011-06-15

    Exposures to carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been linked to human lung cancer. The purpose of this study was to assess lung cancer risk caused by inhalation exposure to nano/ultrafine particle-bound PAHs at the population level in Taiwan appraised with recent published data. A human respiratory tract model was linked with a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to estimate deposition fraction and internal organic-specific PAHs doses. A probabilistic risk assessment framework was developed to estimate potential lung cancer risk. We reanalyzed particle size distribution, total-PAHs, particle-bound benzo(a)pyrene (B[a]P) and PM concentrations. A dose-response profile describing the relationships between external B[a]P concentration and lung cancer risk response was constructed based on population attributable fraction (PAF). We found that 90% probability lung cancer risks ranged from 10(-5) to 10(-4) for traffic-related nano and ultrafine particle-bound PAHs, indicating a potential lung cancer risk. The particle size-specific PAF-based excess annual lung cancer incidence rate due to PAHs exposure was estimated to be less than 1 per 100,000 population, indicating a mild risk factor for lung cancer. We concluded that probabilistic risk assessment linked PAF for limiting cumulative PAHs emissions to reduce lung cancer risk plays a prominent role in future government risk assessment program. PMID:21458918

  6. Case study on the utility of hepatic global gene expression profiling in the risk assessment of the carcinogen furan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Anna Francina, E-mail: Francina.Jackson@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa K1A 0K9 (Canada); Department of Biology, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa K1S 5B6 (Canada); Williams, Andrew, E-mail: Andrew.Williams@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa K1A 0K9 (Canada); Recio, Leslie, E-mail: lrecio@ils-inc.com [ILS, Inc., P.O. Box 13501, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Waters, Michael D., E-mail: mwaters@ils-inc.com [ILS, Inc., P.O. Box 13501, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Lambert, Iain B., E-mail: Iain.Lambert@carleton.ca [Department of Biology, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa K1S 5B6 (Canada); Yauk, Carole L., E-mail: Carole.Yauk@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa K1A 0K9 (Canada)

    2014-01-01

    Furan is a chemical hepatocarcinogen in mice and rats. Its previously postulated cancer mode of action (MOA) is chronic cytotoxicity followed by sustained regenerative proliferation; however, its molecular basis is unknown. To this end, we conducted toxicogenomic analysis of B3C6F1 mouse livers following three week exposures to non-carcinogenic (0, 1, 2 mg/kg bw) or carcinogenic (4 and 8 mg/kg bw) doses of furan. We saw enrichment for pathways responsible for cytotoxicity: stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) and death receptor (DR5 and TNF-alpha) signaling, and proliferation: extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and TNF-alpha. We also noted the involvement of NF-kappaB and c-Jun in response to furan, which are genes that are known to be required for liver regeneration. Furan metabolism by CYP2E1 produces cis-2-butene-1,4-dial (BDA), which is required for ensuing cytotoxicity and oxidative stress. NRF2 is a master regulator of gene expression during oxidative stress and we suggest that chronic NFR2 activity and chronic inflammation may represent critical transition events between the adaptive (regeneration) and adverse (cancer) outcomes. Another objective of this study was to demonstrate the applicability of toxicogenomics data in quantitative risk assessment. We modeled benchmark doses for our transcriptional data and previously published cancer data, and observed consistency between the two. Margin of exposure values for both transcriptional and cancer endpoints were also similar. In conclusion, using furan as a case study we have demonstrated the value of toxicogenomics data in elucidating dose-dependent MOA transitions and in quantitative risk assessment. - Highlights: • Global gene expression changes in furan-exposed mouse livers were analyzed. • A molecular mode of action for furan-induced hepatocarcinogenesis is proposed. • Key pathways include NRF2, SAPK, ERK and death receptor signaling. • Important roles for TNF-alpha, c-Jun, and NF

  7. The relevance of the rat lung response to particle overload for human risk assessment: a workshop consensus report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    On 23-24 March 1998, the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) Risk Science Institute convened a workshop entitled "Relevance of the Rat Lung Response to Particle Overload for Human Risk Assessment." The workshop addressed the numerous study reports of lung tumors in rats resulting from chronic inhalation exposures to poorly soluble, nonfibrous particles of low acute toxicity and not directly genotoxic. These poorly soluble particles, indicated by the acronym PSPs (e.g., carbon black, coal dust, diesel soot, nonasbestiform talc, and titanium dioxide), elicit tumors in rats when deposition overwhelms the clearance mechanisms of the lung resulting in a condition referred to as "overload." These PSPs have been shown not to induce tumors in mice and hamsters, and the available data in humans are consistently negative. The objectives were twofold: (1) to provide guidance for risk assessment on the interpretation of neoplastic and nonneoplastic responses of the rat lung to PSPs; and (2) to identify important data gaps in our understanding of the lung responses of rats and other species to PSPs. Utilizing the five critical reviews of relevant literature that follow herein and the combined expertise and experience of the 30 workshop participants, a number of questions were addressed. The consensus views of the workshop participants are presented in this report. Because it is still not known with certainty whether high lung burdens of PSPs can lead to lung cancer in humans via mechanisms similar to those of the rat, in the absence of mechanistic data to the contrary it must be assumed that the rat model can identify potential carcinogenic hazards to humans. Since the apparent responsiveness of the rat model at overload is dependent on coexistent chronic active inflammation and cell proliferation, at lower lung doses where chronic active inflammation and cell proliferation are not present, no lung cancer hazard is anticipated. PMID:10715616

  8. Relationship between dose and risk, and assessment of carcinogenic risks associated with low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report raises doubts on the validity of using LNT (linear no-threshold) relationship for evaluating the carcinogenic risk of low doses (< 100 mSv) and even more for very low doses (< 10 mSv). The LNT concept can be a useful pragmatic tool for assessing rules in radioprotection for doses above 10 mSv; however since it is not based on biological concepts of our current knowledge, it should not be used without precaution for assessing by extrapolation the risks associated with low and even more so, with very low doses (< 10 mSv), especially for benefit-risk assessments imposed on radiologists by the European directive 97-43. The biological mechanisms are different for doses lower than a few dozen mSv and for higher doses. The eventual risks in the dose range of radiological examinations (0.1 to 5 mSv, up to 20 mSv for some examinations) must be estimated taking into account radiobiological and experimental data. An empirical relationship which has been just validated for doses higher than 200 mSv may lead to an overestimation of risks (associated with doses one hundred fold lower), and this overestimation could discourage patients from undergoing useful examinations and introduce a bias in radioprotection measures against very low doses (< 10 mSv). Decision makers confronted with problems of radioactive waste or risk of contamination, should re-examine the methodology used for the evaluation of risks associated with very low doses and with doses delivered at a very low dose rate. This report confirms the inappropriateness of the collective dose concept to evaluate population irradiation risks

  9. Potential co-carcinogens in the uranium mine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of increased incidence of lung cancer in uranium miners have focussed on the relationship between lung cancer and miners' exposure to radon daughters and smoking. However, epidemiologic analyses of uranium miner populations also include the effects of exposure to external gamma rays, long-lived alpha emitters and other non-radioactive workplace contaminants. The diversity and variability of miner exposures to potentially carcinogenic substances and combinations of substances, and the natural difficulties involved in the study of lung cancer in human populations, make the assessment of the relative effects of causative agents difficult if not impossible. Moreover, concentrations of most of the substances have rarely been measured in mine environments, and data on human response to these substances is sparse. Nonetheless, research on the potential effects of such substances is required to understand the potential hazards in the mining environment. This paper examines the potential carcinogenic and co-carcinogenic effects of agents other than ionizing radiation, which may currently be present in uranium mine atmospheres

  10. Molecular bio-dosimetry for carcinogenic risk assessment in survivors of Bhopal gas tragedy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradyumna Kumar Mishra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available December 2014 marked the 30th year anniversary of Bhopal gas tragedy. This sudden and accidental leakage of deadly poisonous methyl isocyanate (MIC gas instigated research efforts to understand the nature, severity of health damage and sufferings of 570 000 ailing survivors of this tragedy. In a decade-long period, our systematic laboratory investigations coupled with long-term molecular surveillance studies have comprehensively demonstrated that the risk of developing an environmental associated aberrant disease phenotype, including cancer, involves complex interplay of genomic and epigenetic reprogramming. These findings poised us to translate this knowledge into an investigative framework of “molecular biodosimetry” in a strictly selected cohort of MIC exposed individuals. A pragmatic cancer risk-assessment strategy pursued in concert with a large-scale epidemiological study might unfold molecular underpinnings of host-susceptibility and exposureresponse relationship. The challenges are enormous, but we postulate that the study will be necessary to establish a direct initiation-promotion paradigm of environmental carcinogenesis. Given that mitochondrial retrograde signaling-induced epigenetic reprogramming is apparently linked to neoplasticity, a cutting-edge tailored approach by an expert pool of biomedical researchers will be fundamental to drive these strategies from planning to execution. Validating the epigenomic signatures will hopefully result in the development of biomarkers to better protect human lives in an overburdened ecosystem, such as India, which is continuously challenged to meet population demands. Besides, delineating the mechanistic links between MIC exposure and cancer morbidity, our investigative strategy might help to formulate suitable regulatory policies and measures to reduce the overall burden of occupational and environmental carcinogenesis.

  11. An assessment of the carcinogenic potential of ezetimibe using nonclinical data in a weight-of-evidence approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezetimibe blocks intestinal absorption of sterols via interaction with the Neimann-Pick C1-Like 1 (NPC1L1) transporter and is approved for use in the treatment of primary hyperlipidemia (heterozygous familial and non-familial), homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, and homozygous sitosterolemia. A recently completed randomized clinical trial [simvastatin and ezetimibe in aortic stenosis (SEAS)] testing the effectiveness of VytorinTM (a combination of simvastatin and ezetimibe) in patients with aortic stenosis reported an unexpected safety finding: an increase in overall cancer incidence and cancer-associated mortality (all types) in the treated groups relative to the placebo control. A subsequent meta-analysis utilizing a much larger database from two ongoing clinical trials indicated that the observed findings in the SEAS trial were likely due to chance and not a true drug-induced effect. Nonetheless, it has been suggested by various commentators on the SEAS trial that ezetimibe may be carcinogenic. The extensive nonclinical database for ezetimibe was used to test the hypothesis that ezetimibe may be a direct or indirect carcinogen. Using two different in silico approaches, ezetimibe showed no structural alerts for genetic toxicity or carcinogenicity. Ezetimibe was not genotoxic in two reverse mutation assays, one in vitro clastogenicity assay, and two mouse micronucleus assays. No evidence of proliferative lesions was observed in three species in studies of 1-12 months in duration. Ezetimibe was not carcinogenic in standard 2-year bioassays in mice and rats. Additionally, in these 2-year bioassays, no drug-related non-neoplastic lesions were noted. The absence of drug-induced non-neoplastic or proliferative lesions in these studies indicates that ezetimibe treatment was not associated with findings characteristic of carcinogens (i.e., DNA reactivity or cell proliferation) Administration of pharmacologic doses of ezetimibe to mice did not alter hepatic

  12. Whole-lung densitometry versus visual assessment of emphysema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compared whole-lung densitometry with visual evaluation of pulmonary emphysema. Thirty patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease underwent multi-detector CT (150 mAs and 0.75 collimation) with double reconstruction: thick (5-mm) slices with smooth filter for whole-lung densitometry and thin (1 mm) slices with sharp filter for visual assessment (one of every ten slices). Densitometry and visual assessment were performed by three operators each, and the time required for assessment, the inter-observer agreement and the correlation with the results of the diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide (DLCO) in the same patients were computed. The average time for densitometry (8.49 ± 0.13 min) was significantly longer (p CO with relative area at -960 and -970 Hounsfield units (HU) (both r = -0.66) and of the first percentile point of lung density (r = 0.66) were slightly stronger than that of the visual score (r = -0.62). Densitometry should be preferred to visual assessment because it enables a more reproducible evaluation of the extent of pulmonary emphysema, which can be carried out on the entire lung in a reasonable amount of time. (orig.)

  13. In vivo assessment of a lung amine endothelial receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung endothelial N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine (IMP) receptors were assessed applying principles of competitive binding assay adapted for in vivo measurements obtained by digital imaging. Data were acquired following a previously published method. I-123=IMP, the test cellular tracer, and Tc-99m-Dexiran, the reference vascular tracer were imaged during their first pass through the SVC, right heart, lungs and left heart in West African dwarf goats. The lung fractional extraction of IMP diminished progressively from 0.96 to 0.20 as the amount of IMP in the test tracer boli was gradually increased from 0.6 to 150 mg. This demonstrated that lung extraction of IMP is via a saturable carrier mediated transport mechanism, receptors. The dissociation constant of IMP-lung binding sites reaction was calculated by Scatchard plot and found to be 11.7 mg. The amount of IMP bound to the receptors at saturation (R), was found to be 30 mg. Assuming that a single molecule of IMP bound a single receptor, the total number of free receptors was computed as the Avogadro's number times R, divided by the IMP molecular weight, and found to be 6.06 x 10E+19. Using a computer model, it was determined that the 12 mg. per bolus isotherm was the most sensitive for measuring the number of total free receptors. It is the first time that noninvasive in vivo assessment of receptors has been accomplished. Basically, the method used can be applied in humans and also to assess receptors in organs other than the lungs

  14. Environmental carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil from Himalayas, India: Implications for spatial distribution, sources apportionment and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Ningombam Linthoingambi; Yadav, Ishwar Chandra; Shihua, Qi; Dan, Yang; Zhang, Gan; Raha, Priyankar

    2016-02-01

    The Indian Himalayan Region (IHR) is one of the important mountain ecosystems among the global mountain system which support wide variety of flora, fauna, human communities and cultural diversities. Surface soil samples (n = 69) collected from IHR were analysed for 16 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) listed by USEPA. The ∑16PAH concentration in surface soil ranged from 15.3 to 4762 ngg(-1) (mean 458 ngg(-1)). The sum total of low molecular weight PAH (∑LMW-PAHs) (mean 74.0 ngg(-1)) were relatively lower than the high molecular weight PAH (∑HMW-PAHs) (mean 384 ngg(-1)). The concentration of eight carcinogenic PAHs (BaA, CHR, BbF, BkF, BaP, DahA, IcdP, BghiP) were detected high in mountain soil from IHR and ranged from 0.73 to 2729 ngg(-1) (mean 272 ngg(-1)). Based on spatial distribution map, high concentration of HMW- and LMW-PAHs were detected at GS1 site in Guwahati (615 and 4071 ngg(-1)), and lowest concentration of HMW-PAHs were found at IS6 in Itanagar (5.80 ngg(-1)) and LMW-PAHs at DS2 (17.3 ngg(-1)) in Dibrugarh. Total organic carbon (TOC) in mountain soil was poorly connected with ∑PAHs (r(2) = 0.072) and Car-PAHs (r(2) = 0.048), suggesting the little role of TOC in adsorption of PAHs. Isomeric ratio of PAHs showed the source of PAH contamination in IHR is mixed of petrogenic and pyrogenic origin and was affirmed by PAHs composition profile. These source apportionment results were further confirmed by principal component analysis (PCA). Eco-toxicological analysis showed the calculated TEQ for most carcinogenic PAH were 2-4 times more than the Dutch allowed limit, while TEQ of BaP was 25 times high, suggesting increasing trend of carcinogenicity of surface soil. PMID:26386774

  15. Carcinogenicity of the insulation wools: reassessment of the IARC evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R C; Davis, J M; Douglas, D; Gruber, U F; Hoskins, J A; Ilgren, E B; Johnson, N F; Rossiter, C E; Wagner, J C

    1991-08-01

    In assessing the health evidence concerning man-made mineral fibers, the chemical composition, surface activity, durability, and size of fibers have to be taken into account. Special-purpose fine glass fibers need to be separated from the insulation wools (glass, rock, and slag wool). The epidemiological evidence is sufficient to conclude that there has been no mesothelioma risk to workers producing or using glass wool, rock wool, or slag wool. The epidemiological studies have been large and powerful, and they show no evidence of a cause-effect relationship between lung cancer and exposure to glass wool, rock wool, or slag wool fibers. There is some evidence of a small cancer hazard attached to the manufacturing process in slag wool plants 20 to 50 years ago, when asbestos was used in some products and other carcinogenic substances were present. However, this hazard is not associated with any index of exposure to slag wool itself. Animal inhalation studies of ordinary insulation wools also show that there is no evidence of hazard associated with exposure to these relatively coarse, soluble fibers. The evidence of carcinogenicity is limited to experiments with special-purpose fine durable glass fibers or experimental fibers, and only when these fibers are injected directly into the pleural or peritoneal cavity. Multiple chronic inhalation studies of these same special-purpose fine glass fibers have not produced evidence of carcinogenicity. It is suggested that the present IARC evaluation of the carcinogenic risk of insulation wools should be revised to Category 3: not classifiable as to carcinogenicity to humans. PMID:1947241

  16. EVALUATION OF THE POTENTIAL CARCINOGENICITY OF COKE OVEN EMISSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coke oven emissions are known human carcinogens, classified as weight-of-evidence Group A under the EPA Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment (U.S. EPA, 1986a). vidence on potential carcinogenicity from animal studies is "Sufficient,". and the evidence rom human studies is "S...

  17. EVALUATION OF THE POTENTIAL CARCINOGENICITY OF TRYPAN BLUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trypan blue is a probable human carcinogen, classified as weight-of-evidence Group B2 under the EPA Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment (U.S. EPA, 1986a). vidence on potential carcinogenicity from animal studies is "Sufficient," and the evidence from human studies is "No Da...

  18. Rodent Carcinogenicity Dataset

    OpenAIRE

    Fjodorova, Natalja; Novič, Marjana

    2013-01-01

    The rodent carcinogenicity dataset was compiled from the Carcinogenic Potency Database (CPDBAS) and was applied for the classification of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for the prediction of carcinogenicity based on the counter-propagation artificial neural network (CP ANN) algorithm. The models were developed within EU-funded project CAESAR for regulatory use. The dataset contains the following information: common information about chemicals (ID, chemical name, an...

  19. Assessing the carcinogenic potential of low-dose exposures to chemical mixtures in the environment: the challenge ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, William H.; Lowe, Leroy; Carpenter, David O.; Gilbertson, Michael; Manaf Ali, Abdul; Lopez de Cerain Salsamendi, Adela; Lasfar, Ahmed; Carnero, Amancio; Azqueta, Amaya; Amedei, Amedeo; Charles, Amelia K.; Collins, Andrew R.; Ward, Andrew; Salzberg, Anna C.; Colacci, Anna Maria; Olsen, Ann-Karin; Berg, Arthur; Barclay, Barry J.; Zhou, Binhua P.; Blanco-Aparicio, Carmen; Baglole, Carolyn J.; Dong, Chenfang; Mondello, Chiara; Hsu, Chia-Wen; Naus, Christian C.; Yedjou, Clement; Curran, Colleen S.; Laird, Dale W.; Koch, Daniel C.; Carlin, Danielle J.; Felsher, Dean W.; Roy, Debasish; Brown, Dustin G.; Ratovitski, Edward; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Corsini, Emanuela; Rojas, Emilio; Moon, Eun-Yi; Laconi, Ezio; Marongiu, Fabio; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Chiaradonna, Ferdinando; Darroudi, Firouz; Martin, Francis L.; Van Schooten, Frederik J.; Goldberg, Gary S.; Wagemaker, Gerard; Nangami, Gladys N.; Calaf, Gloria M.; Williams, Graeme P.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Koppen, Gudrun; Brunborg, Gunnar; Lyerly, H. Kim; Krishnan, Harini; Ab Hamid, Hasiah; Yasaei, Hemad; Sone, Hideko; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Salem, Hosni K.; Hsu, Hsue-Yin; Park, Hyun Ho; Koturbash, Igor; Miousse, Isabelle R.; Scovassi, A.Ivana; Klaunig, James E.; Vondráček, Jan; Raju, Jayadev; Roman, Jesse; Wise, John Pierce; Whitfield, Jonathan R.; Woodrick, Jordan; Christopher, Joseph A.; Ochieng, Josiah; Martinez-Leal, Juan Fernando; Weisz, Judith; Kravchenko, Julia; Sun, Jun; Prudhomme, Kalan R.; Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Cohen-Solal, Karine A.; Moorwood, Kim; Gonzalez, Laetitia; Soucek, Laura; Jian, Le; D’Abronzo, Leandro S.; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Li, Lin; Gulliver, Linda; McCawley, Lisa J.; Memeo, Lorenzo; Vermeulen, Louis; Leyns, Luc; Zhang, Luoping; Valverde, Mahara; Khatami, Mahin; Romano, Maria Fiammetta; Chapellier, Marion; Williams, Marc A.; Wade, Mark; Manjili, Masoud H.; Lleonart, Matilde E.; Xia, Menghang; Gonzalez Guzman, Michael J.; Karamouzis, Michalis V.; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Vaccari, Monica; Kuemmerle, Nancy B.; Singh, Neetu; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; van Larebeke, Nik; Ahmed, Nuzhat; Ogunkua, Olugbemiga; Krishnakumar, P.K.; Vadgama, Pankaj; Marignani, Paola A.; Ghosh, Paramita M.; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Thompson, Patricia A.; Dent, Paul; Heneberg, Petr; Darbre, Philippa; Leung, Po Sing; Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Cheng, Qiang (Shawn); Robey, R.Brooks; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Roy, Rabindra; Andrade-Vieira, Rafaela; Sinha, Ranjeet K.; Mehta, Rekha; Vento, Renza; Di Fiore, Riccardo; Ponce-Cusi, Richard; Dornetshuber-Fleiss, Rita; Nahta, Rita; Castellino, Robert C.; Palorini, Roberta; Hamid, Roslida A.; Langie, Sabine A.S.; Eltom, Sakina E.; Brooks, Samira A.; Ryeom, Sandra; Wise, Sandra S.; Bay, Sarah N.; Harris, Shelley A.; Papagerakis, Silvana; Romano, Simona; Pavanello, Sofia; Eriksson, Staffan; Forte, Stefano; Casey, Stephanie C.; Luanpitpong, Sudjit; Lee, Tae-Jin; Otsuki, Takemi; Chen, Tao; Massfelder, Thierry; Sanderson, Thomas; Guarnieri, Tiziana; Hultman, Tove; Dormoy, Valérian; Odero-Marah, Valerie; Sabbisetti, Venkata; Maguer-Satta, Veronique; Rathmell, W.Kimryn; Engström, Wilhelm; Decker, William K.; Bisson, William H.; Rojanasakul, Yon; Luqmani, Yunus; Chen, Zhenbang; Hu, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Lifestyle factors are responsible for a considerable portion of cancer incidence worldwide, but credible estimates from the World Health Organization and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) suggest that the fraction of cancers attributable to toxic environmental exposures is between 7% and 19%. To explore the hypothesis that low-dose exposures to mixtures of chemicals in the environment may be combining to contribute to environmental carcinogenesis, we reviewed 11 hallmark phenotypes of cancer, multiple priority target sites for disruption in each area and prototypical chemical disruptors for all targets, this included dose-response characterizations, evidence of low-dose effects and cross-hallmark effects for all targets and chemicals. In total, 85 examples of chemicals were reviewed for actions on key pathways/mechanisms related to carcinogenesis. Only 15% (13/85) were found to have evidence of a dose-response threshold, whereas 59% (50/85) exerted low-dose effects. No dose-response information was found for the remaining 26% (22/85). Our analysis suggests that the cumulative effects of individual (non-carcinogenic) chemicals acting on different pathways, and a variety of related systems, organs, tissues and cells could plausibly conspire to produce carcinogenic synergies. Additional basic research on carcinogenesis and research focused on low-dose effects of chemical mixtures needs to be rigorously pursued before the merits of this hypothesis can be further advanced. However, the structure of the World Health Organization International Programme on Chemical Safety ‘Mode of Action’ framework should be revisited as it has inherent weaknesses that are not fully aligned with our current understanding of cancer biology. PMID:26106142

  20. Assessment of possible carcinogenicity of oxyfluorfen to humans using mode of action analysis of rodent liver effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, Nicola J; LeBaron, Matthew J; Eisenbrandt, David L; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Klaunig, James E

    2012-08-01

    Oxyfluorfen is a herbicide that is not genotoxic and produces liver toxicity in rodents, following repeated administration at high dose levels. Lifetime rodent feeding studies reported in 1977 with low-purity oxyfluorfen (85%) showed no increase in any tumor type in rats (800 ppm, high dose) and only a marginally increased incidence of hepatocellular tumors in male CD-1 mice at the highest dose (200 ppm). To evaluate the potential carcinogenicity of the currently registered oxyfluorfen (> 98% purity), we conducted a series of short-term liver mode of action (MOA) toxicology studies in male CD-1 mice administered dietary doses of 0, 40, 200, 800, and 1600 ppm for durations of 3, 7, 10, or 28 days. MOA endpoints examined included liver weight, histopathology, cell proliferation, nuclear receptor-mediated gene expression, and other peroxisome proliferator-specific endpoints and their reversibility. Minimal liver effects were observed in mice administered doses at or below 200 ppm for up to 28 days. Increased liver weight, single-cell necrosis, cell proliferation, and peroxisomal acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO) were observed at 800 ppm after 28 days, but there was no increase in peroxisomes. Expression of Cyp2b10 and Cyp4a10 transcripts, markers of constitutive androstane receptor and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α nuclear receptor activation, respectively, were increased at 800 and 1600 ppm after 3 or 10 days. Collectively, these data along with the negative genotoxicity demonstrate that oxyfluorfen (> 98% purity) has the potential to induce mouse liver tumors through a nongenotoxic, mitogenic MOA with a clear threshold and is not predicted to be carcinogenic in humans at relevant exposure levels. PMID:22539621

  1. MODES OF ACTION FOR THE CARCINOGENICITY AND TOXICITY OF ARSENIC - MOVING TOWARDS A MORE QUANTITATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic exposures can lead to human tumors in skin, lung, urinary bladder, kidney and liver. Three likely initial stages of arsenical¬macromolecular interaction are (1) binding of trivalent arsenicals to sulfhydryl groups of peptides and proteins, (2) arsenical-induced generation...

  2. Role of lung scanning in assessing the resectability of bronchial carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, D A; Hawkins, T.; Gibson, G. J.; Nariman, S

    1983-01-01

    Ventilation and perfusion lung scans were performed in 58 patients before operation for bronchial carcinoma to determine in which patients the lung scan was most useful for assessing mediastinal spread and resectability of the tumour. Perfusion of the affected lung was less with larger and more centrally situated tumours. Perfusion was also less for left-sided than for right-sided tumours but this is explained by the normal differential perfusion of the right and left lungs. The lung scan was...

  3. Risk assessment of bioaccessible trace elements in smoke haze aerosols versus urban aerosols using simulated lung fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xian; Betha, Raghu; Tan, Li Yun; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2016-01-01

    Smoke-haze episodes, caused by uncontrolled peat and forest fires, occur almost every year in the South-East Asian region with increased concentrations of PM2.5 (airborne particulate matter (PM) with diameter ≤ 2.5 μm). Particulate-bound trace elements (TrElems), especially carcinogenic and toxic elements, were measured during smoke haze as well as non-haze periods in 2014 as they are considered to be indicators of potential health effects. The bioaccessibilities of 13 TrElems were investigated using two types of simulated lung fluids (SLFs), Gamble's solution and artificial lysosomal fluid (ALF), instead of the commonly used leaching agent (water). The dissolution kinetics was also examined for these TrElems. Many TrElems showed higher solubility in SLFs, and were more soluble in ALF compared to the Gamble's solution. Cu, Mn and Cd were observed to be the most soluble trace elements in ALF, while in Gamble's solution the most soluble trace elements were Cu, Mn and Zn. The dissolution rates were highly variable among the elements. Health risk assessment was conducted based on the measured concentrations of TrElems and their corresponding toxicities for three possible scenarios involving interactions between carcinogenic and toxic TrElems and SLFs, using the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) human health risk assessment model. The cumulative cancer risks exceeded the acceptable level (1 in a million i.e. 1 × 10-6). However, the estimation of health quotient (HQ) indicated no significant chronic toxic health effects. The risk assessment results revealed that the assessment of bioaccessibility of particulate-bound TrElems using water as the leaching agent may underestimate the health risk.

  4. Is nitrous oxide a genotoxic carcinogen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donovan, Michael R; Hammond, Timothy G

    2015-07-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) has been widely used as a dental and surgical anaesthetic for over 150 years. However, results from a recent study suggested that increased DNA damage was seen in lymphocytes from surgical patients and this led to its continued clinical use to be questioned. The data can be challenged on technical grounds and must be considered with other studies in order to assess any possible risk. There are other studies indicating that N2O has weak genotoxicity in man, but these are confused by exposure of the populations to other anaesthetic gases including isoflurane and sevoflurane, both of which have also been reported to increase DNA damage. It should be noted that the suggested genotoxic mechanisms are all indirect, including folate deficiency, oxidative stress and homocysteine toxicity. Further, results from in vitro studies indicate that N2O has no direct DNA reactivity as negative results were obtained in a bacterial mutation (Ames) test and an assay for mutation at the hprt locus in Chinese hamster lung cells. Although not performed to definitive study designs, no evidence of carcinogenicity was seen in two long-term tests in mice and another in rats. Although there is some evidence that N2O is weakly genotoxic in humans, this appears to be similar to that reported for isoflurane and sevoflurane and all the postulated mechanisms have clear thresholds with no evidence of direct DNA reactivity. Because any potential genotoxic mechanism would have a threshold, it seems reasonable to conclude that neither occasional high exposure to patients as an anaesthetic nor low-level exposure to staff within published recommended exposure limits presents any significant carcinogenic risk. PMID:25852088

  5. Coronary artery disease in lung transplant candidates: role of routine invasive assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Wild, Johannes; Arrigo, Mattia; Isenring, Bruno Dieter; Buergi, Urs; Kurowski, Thomas; Schuurmans, Macé M.; Huber, Lars C; Benden, Christian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An atherosclerotic disease burden sufficient to put lung transplant candidates at risk for end-organ disease after transplantation is considered to be a relative contraindication for lung transplantation. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess our current practice of cardiac workup by coronary angiography in lung transplant candidates ≥50 years of age. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 50 consecutive lung transplant candidates ≥50 years of age in which coronary a...

  6. Lung cancer trends: smoking, obesity, and sex assessed in the Staten Island University’s lung cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Shilpi; Hassan, Samer; Bhatt, Vijaya R.; Abdul Sater, Houssein; Dilawari, Asma

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of lung cancer in the United States decreased by 1.8% from 1991 to 2005 while it increased by 0.5% in females. We assessed whether nonsmokers afflicted with lung cancer at Staten Island University Hospital are disproportionately female in comparison to national averages. We also evaluated different factors including race, histology, and body mass index (BMI) in correlation with smoking history. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted from 2005 to 2011 on ...

  7. Carcinogens in the Workplace: A Scientific, Political and Social Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Atherley, Gordon; Whiting, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Investigation, assessment, and management of carcinogenic risks are not only scientific but also political responsibilities. In Canada, this becomes cumbersome, since local, provincial and federal policies are involved. The process also involves workers and management. This article outlines Canadian legislative experience, the principles involved, the methods of risk assessment, and the classification of carcinogens in the workplace.

  8. Assessment of Benzo(apyrene-equivalent Carcinogenicity and Mutagenicity of Residential Indoor versus Outdoor Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Exposing Young Children in New York City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel L. Miller

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The application of benzo(apyrene (BaP-toxic equivalent factor to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH concentrations can provide a more accurate risk assessment from environmental exposure to PAH. We hypothesized that BaP-equivalent toxicity determined following residential air monitoring among young urban children may vary by season. Residential indoor and outdoor air levels of PAH measured over two-weeks in a cohort of 5–6 year old children (n = 260 in New York City were normalized to the cancer and mutagen potency equivalent factor of BaP (BaP = 1. Data are presented as carcinogenic equivalents (BaP-TEQ and mutagenic equivalents (BaP-MEQ for the sum of 8 PAH (∑8PAH; MW ³ 228 and individual PAH and compared across heating versus nonheating seasons. Results show that heating compared to nonheating season was associated significantly with higher (BaP-TEQ∑8PAH and (BaP-MEQ∑8PAH both indoors and outdoors (p < 0.001. Outdoor (BaP-TEQ∑8PAH and (BaP-MEQ∑8PAH were significantly higher than the corresponding indoor measures during the heating season (p < 0.01. These findings suggest that at levels encountered in New York City air, especially during the heating season, residential exposure to PAH may pose an increased risk of cancer and mutation.

  9. Epidemiology and diagnostic assessment of interstitial lung diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Thomeer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The interstitial lung diseases affect the parenchyma of the lung including the pulmonary alveolar epithelium, the capillary endothelium and the spaces between these structures, together with the tissues within the septa including the perivascular and perilymphatic tissues. Although the different interstitial lung diseases have rather similar clinical presentations with increasing shortness of breath, a restrictive lung function and a widespread shadowing on the chest radiograph, they comprise...

  10. Impact of fine particles in ambient air on lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gerard Hoek; Ole Raaschou-Nielsen

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has classified outdoor air pol ution and the particulate matter component of outdoor air pollution as class I carcinogen. Air pollution is consistently associated with lung cancer in epidemiologic and experimental studies. The IARC assessment is specifical y designed as hazard identification, and it does not quantify the magnitude of the cancer risk. This article addresses the magnitude of the lung cancer risk in the population due to ambient air pol ution exposure.

  11. MR assessment of fetal lung development using lung volumes and signal intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the monitoring and diagnostic potential of MRI in fetal lung development and disease using lung volume and signal intensity changes through gestation. Thirty-five healthy fetuses (22-42 weeks) were examined on a 1.5- T MR system using sagittal T2w single-shot fast spin-echo imaging (TR indefinite, TE 90 ms, slice thickness/gap 3-5/0 mm, FOV 26-40 cm, NEX 0.5). Fetal body and lung were segmented manually and volumes calculated. Signal intensities (SI) of fetal lung and three reference values were measured on the section best displaying the lung. Regions of interests were defined by including the maximal organ area possible. The following SI ratios were generated: lung/liver, lung/amniotic fluid, lung/muscle, liver/fluid and liver/muscle. Volumes and ratios were correlated with gestational age. Data from seven fetuses with pulmonary pathology were compared with these normative values. Absolute lung volume varied from 12.3 to 143.5 cm3 in correlation with gestational age (P<0.001); lung volume relative to total body volume ranged from 1.6 to 5.0%, decreasing with gestational age (P=0.001). (orig.)

  12. Beryllium: genotoxicity and carcinogenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beryllium (Be) has physical-chemical properties, including low density and high tensile strength, which make it useful in the manufacture of products ranging from space shuttles to golf clubs. Despite its utility, a number of standard setting agencies have determined that beryllium is a carcinogen. Only a limited number of studies, however, have addressed the underlying mechanisms of the carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of beryllium. Importantly, mutation and chromosomal aberration assays have yielded somewhat contradictory results for beryllium compounds and whereas bacterial tests were largely negative, mammalian test systems showed evidence of beryllium-induced mutations, chromosomal aberrations, and cell transformation. Although inter-laboratory differences may play a role in the variability observed in genotoxicity assays, it is more likely that the different chemical forms of beryllium have a significant effect on mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. Because workers are predominantly exposed to airborne particles which are generated during the machining of beryllium metal, ceramics, or alloys, testing of the mechanisms of the mutagenic and carcinogenic activity of beryllium should be performed with relevant chemical forms of beryllium

  13. Carcinogenic risks of radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionising radiations are known since the end of the 19th century. Early, after being discovered, they were applied in Medicine and the association with an increased number of different malignant tumors was proved. This paper presents a literature review concerning epidemiological proof of radiation induced cancer, molecular mechanisms and factors that increase or decrease the carcinogenic action of ionizing radiations

  14. Carcinogenic risk of hot-particle exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been suggested that spatially non-uniform radiation exposures, such as those from small radioactive particles ('hot particles'), may be very much more carcinogenic than when the same amount of energy is deposited uniformly throughout a tissue volume. This review provides a brief summary of in vivo and in vitro experimental findings, and human epidemiology data, which can be used to evaluate the veracity of this suggestion. Overall, this supports the contrary view and indicates that average dose, as advocated by the ICRP, is likely to provide a reasonable estimate of carcinogenic risk (within a factor of ∼ ±3). There are few human data with which to address this issue. The limited data on lung cancer mortality following occupational inhalation of plutonium aerosols, and the incidence of liver cancer and leukaemia due to thorotrast administration for clinical diagnosis, do not appear to support a significant enhancement factor. Very few animal studies, including mainly lung and skin exposures, provide any indication of a hot-particle enhancement for carcinogenicity. Some recent in vitro malignant transformation experiments provide evidence for an enhanced cell transformation for hot-particle exposures but, properly interpreted, the effect is modest. Few studies extend below absorbed doses of ∼ 0.1 Gy. (review)

  15. Assessment of tumors of the lung apex by imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the value of MR in the preoperative staging of tumors of the lung apex and detection of local invasion of adjacent structures to determine its influence on the therapeutic approach. We obtained plain X-ray images in two planes, as well as CT and Mr images, in 12 patients with Pan coast tumor in whom there was surgical (n=8) or clinical (n=4) evidence of invasion. The objective was to assess local infiltration of brain stem and chest wall soft tissue, enveloping of the subclavian artery, substantial involvement of the brachial plexus and destruction of the vertebral body. In our series, MR was superior to the other imaging techniques in predicting the involvement of the structures surrounding the tumor. In conclusion, MR should be performed in a patient diagnosed by plain radiography as having an apical tumors to assess local tumor extension, while CT should be done to detect mediastinal lymph node involvement and distant metastases. 19 refs

  16. Workshop on problem areas associated with developing carcinogen guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-06-01

    A workshop was conducted to discuss problem areas associated with developing carcinogen guidelines. Session topics included (1) definition of a carcinogen for regulatory purposes; (2) potency; (3) risk assessment; (4) uncertainties; (5) de minimis quantity; and (6) legal and regulatory issues. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers. (ACR)

  17. Chemistry of carcinogenic metals.

    OpenAIRE

    Martell, A E

    1981-01-01

    The periodic distribution of known and suspected carcinogenic metal ions is described, and the chemical behavior of various types of metal ions is explained in terms of the general theory of hard and soft acids and bases. The chelate effect is elucidated, and the relatively high stability of metal chelates in very dilute solutions is discussed. The concepts employed for the chelate effect are extended to explain the high stabilities of macrocyclic and cryptate complexes. Procedures for the us...

  18. The carcinogenicity of chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Norseth, Tor

    1981-01-01

    The carcinogenicity of chromium compounds is reviewed with specific attention to the gaps in knowledge for risk estimation and research needs. The most important problems at present are whether trivalent chromium compounds cause cancer, and whether there is a difference in cancer causing effects between the soluble and the slightly soluble hexavalent compounds in the practical exposure situation. Dose estimates for risk estimation based on epidemiological investigations are also lacking. Pres...

  19. Chemically-induced mouse lung tumors: applications to human health assessments [Poster 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    A state-of-the-science workshop on chemically-induced mouse lung tumors was conducted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to discuss issues related to the use of mouse lung tumor data in human health assessments. Naphthalene, styrene, and ethylbenzene were chosen for the anal...

  20. Chemically-induced Mouse Lung Tumors: Applications to Human Health Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    A state-of-the-science workshop on chemically-induced mouse lung tumors was conducted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to better understand the mouse lung tumor data’s role in human health assessments. Three environmental chemicals - naphthalene, styrene, and ethylbe...

  1. Proton magnetic resonance imaging for assessment of lung function and respiratory dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichinger, Monika [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Department of Radiology (E010), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: m.eichinger@dkfz.de; Tetzlaff, Ralf; Puderbach, Michael [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Department of Radiology (E010), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Woodhouse, Neil [Unit of Academic Radiology, University of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Kauczor, H.-U. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Department of Radiology (E010), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Since many pulmonary diseases present with a variable regional involvement, modalities for assessment of regional lung function gained increasing attention over the last years. Together with lung perfusion and gas exchange, ventilation, as a result of the interaction of the respiratory pump and the lungs, is an indispensable component of lung function. So far, this complex mechanism is still mainly assessed indirectly and globally. A differentiation between the individual determining factors of ventilation would be crucial for precise diagnostics and adequate treatment. By dynamic imaging of the respiratory pump, the mechanical components of ventilation can be assessed regionally. Amongst imaging modalities applicable to this topic, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as a tool not relying on ionising radiation, is the most attractive. Recent advances in MRI technology have made it possible to assess diaphragmatic and chest wall motion, static and dynamic lung volumes, as well as regional lung function. Even though existing studies show large heterogeneity in design and applied methods, it becomes evident that MRI is capable to visualise pulmonary function as well as diaphragmatic and thoracic wall movement, providing new insights into lung physiology. Partly contradictory results and conclusions are most likely caused by technical limitations, limited number of studies and small sample size. Existing studies mainly evaluate possible imaging techniques and concentrate on normal physiology. The few studies in patients with lung cancer and emphysema already give a promising outlook for these techniques from which an increasing impact on improved and quantitative disease characterization as well as better patient management can be expected.

  2. Proton magnetic resonance imaging for assessment of lung function and respiratory dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since many pulmonary diseases present with a variable regional involvement, modalities for assessment of regional lung function gained increasing attention over the last years. Together with lung perfusion and gas exchange, ventilation, as a result of the interaction of the respiratory pump and the lungs, is an indispensable component of lung function. So far, this complex mechanism is still mainly assessed indirectly and globally. A differentiation between the individual determining factors of ventilation would be crucial for precise diagnostics and adequate treatment. By dynamic imaging of the respiratory pump, the mechanical components of ventilation can be assessed regionally. Amongst imaging modalities applicable to this topic, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as a tool not relying on ionising radiation, is the most attractive. Recent advances in MRI technology have made it possible to assess diaphragmatic and chest wall motion, static and dynamic lung volumes, as well as regional lung function. Even though existing studies show large heterogeneity in design and applied methods, it becomes evident that MRI is capable to visualise pulmonary function as well as diaphragmatic and thoracic wall movement, providing new insights into lung physiology. Partly contradictory results and conclusions are most likely caused by technical limitations, limited number of studies and small sample size. Existing studies mainly evaluate possible imaging techniques and concentrate on normal physiology. The few studies in patients with lung cancer and emphysema already give a promising outlook for these techniques from which an increasing impact on improved and quantitative disease characterization as well as better patient management can be expected

  3. The ISS Carcinogens Data Bank (BDC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Data Bank on Carcinogens (Banca Dati Cancerogeni, BDC) is a factual data bank, available on the Istituto Superiore di Sanita web site, aimed at supporting the risk management decision making of central and local administrators. It can also represent a valuable tool for industry. The available information on carcinogenicity evaluations/classifications produced by European Union and by other institutions (IARC, USEPA, NTP, CCTN) is presented in a concise form accompanied by bibliographic references enabling the users to consult the original sources and, in some cases, to be directly connected to the relevant web site. The classifications carried out by each organization in accordance with its own criteria assign the examined agents to specific qualitative categories and do not include quantitative assessment. BDC intends to provide an easy tool for experts, researchers and risk managers dealing with carcinogenic agents

  4. Reliability of the Brazilian version of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy‐Lung (FACT‐L) and the FACT‐Lung Symptom Index (FLSI)

    OpenAIRE

    Franceschini Juliana; José R Jardim; Ana Luisa Godoy Fernandes; Sérgio Jamnik; Ilka Lopes Santoro

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of the Brazilian version of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung (FACT-L) with the FACT-Lung Symptom Index (FLSI) questionnaire. INTRODUCTION: The assessment of quality of life in patients with lung cancer has become an important evaluative endpoint in current clinical trials. For lung cancer patients, one of the most common quality of life tools available is the FACT-L. Despite the amount of data available regard...

  5. Utility of SPECT Lung Perfusion Scans in Assessing the Early Changes in Pulmonary Function after Radiotherapy for Patients with Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenjie Zhang; Rong Zheng; Luiun Zhao; Luhua Wang; Shengzu Chen

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Radiation-induced lung injury commonly follows radiotherapy (RT) fortumors within and near the thorax. Lung function is usually measured by pulmonary function tests (PFTs). But RT-induced regional changes of pulmonary function cannot be accurately evaluated by PFTs. Lung perfusion scintigraphy compared with other radiographic methods can assess well regional pulmonary physiological function, and a 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning system can quantitatively calculate irradiation dosage. The purpose of this study is to assess, by lung perfusion scintigraphy, early changes in the pulmonary function of patients with lung cancer when receiving thoracic 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT).METHODS Nineteen patients receiving thoracic 3D-CRT for lung cancer were studied. A single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)lung perfusion scan, X-ray or CT scan before RT and after 40~50Gy radiation were performed. Pre-RT SPECT lung perfusion images were classified by comparing lung perfusion defects with radiological abnormalities before RT. Grade 0: There was no lung perfusion defect in the area of radiological abnormality. Grade 1: The size of the radiological abnormality was similar to the area of the lung perfusion defect. Grade 2: The area of the lung perfusion defect was bigger than the size of the radiological abnormality and extended to one lobe of the lung. Grade 3: The area of lung perfusion defect exceeded one lobe of the lung. The radiation field with more than 20 Gy was drawn as a region of interest (ROI). The proportion of radioactive dose within this ROI relative to total lung dose in one slice was calculated.RESULTS All patients had lung perfusion defects, nine patients with grade 1,five patients with grade 2 and five patients with grade 3 damage,respectively. All tumors in the 19 patients were reduced in CT or X-ray images to various degrees after 40~50 Gy radiation. The mean proportion of ROI in 19 patients was 53.7±29

  6. Assessing uncertainty in published risk estimates using hexavalent chromium and lung cancer mortality as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: The National Research Council recommended quantitative evaluation of uncertainty in effect estimates for risk assessment. This analysis considers uncertainty across model forms and model parameterizations with hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] and lung cancer mortality a...

  7. Assessing model uncertainty using hexavalent chromium and lung cancer mortality as an example [Abstract 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: The National Research Council recommended quantitative evaluation of uncertainty in effect estimates for risk assessment. This analysis considers uncertainty across model forms and model parameterizations with hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] and lung cancer mortality a...

  8. Accuracy of postmortem radiography of excised air-inflated human lungs in assessment of pulmonary emphysema.

    OpenAIRE

    Sutinen, S; Lohela, P.; Pääkkö, P.; Lahti, R.

    1982-01-01

    The accuracy of radiography of excised air-inflated lungs in assessing pulmonary emphysema at necropsy was evaluated in a series of 107 adults who had died in hospital by reading the radiographs and examining the pathological specimens independently. The radiographic and pathological assessments of the severity of emphysema correlated significantly (r = 0.87, p less than 0.0001). Mild emphysema was recognised radiographically in 88.7% and moderate in 94.9% of the lungs. One of 16 normal lungs...

  9. Effect of lung resection on regional lung function assessed by 133Xe radiospirometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regional lung function of 39 patients, 19 with lung cancer and 20 with a non-malignant condition, was studied radiospirometrically before partial lung resection and 2.6 and 12 months postoperatively. Dynamic spirometry was also performed at each stage. Initially, the postoperative reduction of total FEV1 was 19% and of VC 18%. There was 26% reduction of unilateral ventilation. 34% of perfusion and 30% of VC at two months post-operatively. At six months there was significant improvement in all parameters, whereas at twelve months there was no further notable change with the exception of total VC. At twelve months the reduction of FEV1 was 14% and of VC 8%. The unilateral perfusion was reduced 30%, ventilation 19%, and VC 17%. The V/Q ratio was 1.00 preoperatively and 1.11 12 months post-operatively. The results show that the final reduction of both unilateral and total function caused by partial lung resection is smaller than would be expected considering the anatomical extent of the operation. However, the V/Q mismatch ensuing from the operation may increase the functional impairment. Lung function appears to become stabilized at its permanent postoperative level during the first six months after operation. (orig.)

  10. The value of nitrogen washout/washin method in assessing alveolar recruitment volume in acute lung injury patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李洋

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the precision and feasibility of nitrogen washout/washin method in assessing lung recruitment of acute lung injury(ALI)patients.Methods Fifteen ALI patients underwent mechanical ventilation

  11. Food derived carcinogenic amnoimidazoazaarenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik

    Carcinogenic aminoimidazoazaarenes are formed during cooking of meat and fish. Important factors for the formation of these compounds are meat type, cooking temperature and time. The compounds are genotoxic in bacterial and mammalian cells. In animal feeding studies the compounds tested so far were...... adducts with DNA. Adducts with 2-deoxyguanosine have been characterized for a number of aminoimidazoazaarenes. Adducts with DNA have also been found in animals after exposure to these compounds. In \\:iw major metabolic detoxification pathways are ring hydroxylation followed by conjugation and conjugation...... of the exocyclic amino group. Estimations of human cancer risk have indicated that ingestion of food containing aminoimidazoazaarenes are of importance....

  12. Assessment of Carcinogenicity of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate in a short-term assay using Xpa(-/-) and Xpa(-/-)/p53(+/-) mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Alicja; Bertram, Margareta; Aarup, V.; Sørensen, Ilona Kryspin

    2002-01-01

    between the models. The only liver tumors in all models were adenomas in males with no statistically significantly increased incidence. For p-cresidine, the survival was decreased (p <0.05) only in transgenic models. Statistically significantly increased incidences of nonneoplastic lesions were recorded...... in the liver, urinary bladder, and nasal cavity in all models, and in kidneys in transgenic models. The only tumors with statistically significantly increased incidence were liver adenomas in transgenic models (XPA:1 vs 7; `XPA/p53': 0 vs 12; WT: 0 vs 5, p = 0.053) and urinary bladder carcinomas in...... XPA/p53 model (0 vs 7). The negative carcinogenic response to DEHP and the positive response to p-cresidine support the expected sensitivity to genotoxic carcinogens in these transgenic models....

  13. Magnetic resonance lung function – a breakthrough for lung imaging and functional assessment? A phantom study and clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rauh Manfred

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic lung diseases are a major issue in public health. A serial pulmonary assessment using imaging techniques free of ionizing radiation and which provides early information on local function impairment would therefore be a considerably important development. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a powerful tool for the static and dynamic imaging of many organs. Its application in lung imaging however, has been limited due to the low water content of the lung and the artefacts evident at air-tissue interfaces. Many attempts have been made to visualize local ventilation using the inhalation of hyperpolarized gases or gadolinium aerosol responding to MRI. None of these methods are applicable for broad clinical use as they require specific equipment. Methods We have shown previously that low-field MRI can be used for static imaging of the lung. Here we show that mathematical processing of data derived from serial MRI scans during the respiratory cycle produces good quality images of local ventilation without any contrast agent. A phantom study and investigations in 85 patients were performed. Results The phantom study proved our theoretical considerations. In 99 patient investigations good correlation (r = 0.8; p ≤ 0.001 was seen for pulmonary function tests and MR ventilation measurements. Small ventilation defects were visualized. Conclusion With this method, ventilation defects can be diagnosed long before any imaging or pulmonary function test will indicate disease. This surprisingly simple approach could easily be incorporated in clinical routine and may be a breakthrough for lung imaging and functional assessment.

  14. Mechanisms, assessment and therapeutic implications of lung hyperinflation in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Andrea; Aisanov, Zaurbek; Avdeev, Sergey; Di Maria, Giuseppe; Donner, Claudio F; Izquierdo, José Luis; Roche, Nicolas; Similowski, Thomas; Watz, Henrik; Worth, Heinrich; Miravitlles, Marc

    2015-07-01

    The main complaint of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is shortness of breath with exercise, that is usually progressive. The principal mechanism that explains this symptom is the development of lung hyperinflation (LH) which is defined by an increase of functional residual capacity (FRC) above predicted values. Patients with COPD may develop static LH (sLH) because of destruction of pulmonary parenchyma and loss of elastic recoil. In addition, dynamic LH (dLH) develops when patients with COPD breathe in before achieving a full exhalation and, as a consequence, air is trapped within the lungs with each further breath. Dynamic LH may also occur at rest but it becomes clinically relevant during exercise and exacerbation. Lung hyperinflation may have an impact beyond the lungs and the effects of LH on cardiovascular function have been extensively analysed. The importance of LH makes its identification and measurement crucial. The demonstration of LH in COPD leads to the adoption of strategies to minimise its impact on the daily activities of patients. Several strategies reduce the impact of LH; the use of long-acting bronchodilators has been shown to reduce LH and improve exercise capacity. Non pharmacologic interventions have also been demonstrated to be useful. This article describes the pathophysiology of LH, its impact on the lungs and beyond and reviews the strategies that improve LH in COPD. PMID:25892293

  15. Regional assessment of treatment in lung cancer using lung perfusion and ventilation images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 30 patients with lung cancer undergoing non-surgical treatment, we performed perfusion lung imaging using 99mTc-MAA and inhalation lung studies using Technegas before and after treatment and evaluated regional perfusion and ventilation status in the lung regions where bronchogenic carcinoma was located. Regional ventilation status was preserved rather than perfusion counterpart (V>P) in 18 patients (18/30=60.0%) before treatment, while the former was better than the latter in 27 patients (27/30=90.0%) after treatment, indicating that regional ventilation status improved more significantly than regional perfusion counterpart after treatment (P=0.005). We also classified the therapeutic effect for regional perfusion and ventilation status as improved, unchanged, or worsened, respectively; improvement in regional perfusion status was observed in 17 patients (56.7%) and that in regional ventilation status in 24 patients (80.0%). There was a statistically significant correlation between improved regional perfusion and ventilation status (P=0.0018) when therapeutic effect was recognized. The patients who showed improvement in regional perfusion status after treatment always showed improved regional ventilation status, but 7 patients showed either unchanged or worsened regional perfusion status after treatment, although regional ventilation status was improved. In conclusion the pulmonary vascular beds seem more vulnerable to bronchogenic carcinoma and improvement in regional perfusion status was revealed to be more difficult than that in regional ventilation status after treatment. (author)

  16. Risk assessment of lung cancer for Brazilian uranium mining workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fatality risks of lung cancer is estimated for several categories of miners working in the Brazilian uranium mine Osamu Utsumi in Pocos de Caldas, during the period of 03/76 to 07/78. A total of 198 miners were classified conforming the type of work performed and it was considered the lung dose equivalent received due only to the inhalation of the short lived airborne Radon-222 daughters. The average lung dose equivalent values were evaluated from the individual accumulated alpha exposure. These were expressed in unit of WLM derived from the periods of occupancy and working level data obtained by daily air monitoring using the Harley method. (M.A.C.)

  17. Association of Arsenic Exposure with Lung Cancer Incidence Rates in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Putila, Joseph J.; Guo, Nancy Lan

    2011-01-01

    Background Although strong exposure to arsenic has been shown to be carcinogenic, its contribution to lung cancer incidence in the United States is not well characterized. We sought to determine if the low-level exposures to arsenic seen in the U.S. are associated with lung cancer incidence after controlling for possible confounders, and to assess the interaction with smoking behavior. Methodology Measurements of arsenic stream sediment and soil concentration obtained from the USGS National G...

  18. Arsenic Is A Genotoxic Carcinogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic is a recognized human carcinogen; however, there is controversy over whether or not it should be considered a genotoxic carcinogen. Many possible modes of action have been proposed on how arsenic induces cancer, including inhibiting DNA repair, altering methylation patter...

  19. Towards understanding patients' and caregivers' assessments of symptoms and quality of life in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Broberger, Eva

    2007-01-01

    Lung cancer is associated with a wide range of symptoms arising from both disease progression and treatment side effects. Nurses caring for patients with lung cancer are thus challenged to help patients cope with a variety of problems. Individual perspectives, influences and experiences are of great importance to consider when interpreting patients and caregivers assessments of symptoms and quality of life. The overall aim of this thesis is to gain better understanding of...

  20. Assessment of bronchodilator response through changes in lung volumes in chronic airflow obstruction

    OpenAIRE

    J.B. Figueroa-Casas; A.R. Diez; M. P. Rondelli; M. p. Figueroa-Casas; J. C. Figueroa-Casas

    2003-01-01

    Although FEV1 improvement is routinely used to define bronchodilator (BD) response, it correlates poorly with clinical effects. Changes in lung volumes (LV) have shown better correlation with exercise tolerance and might be more sensitive to detect BD effects. We assessed the additional contribution of measuring LV before and after BD to detect acute improvement in lung function not demonstrated by FEV1, and the influence of the response criteria selected on this contribution. We analyzed 98 ...

  1. Spiritual Assessment in a Patient With Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borneman, Tami

    2014-01-01

    CASE STUDY  Mr. G., an 82-year-old retired European man, was diagnosed with stage 4 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and recently enrolled on a phase II clinical trial. He is married and has two adult children, who are very supportive. He and his wife described themselves as nonpracticing Catholics. He had never smoked, and there was no personal or family history of cancer. Fatigue was the main side effect from the clinical trial drugs, necessitating frequent periods of rest throughout the day and ultimately requiring dose reduction. His left leg was edematous and painful, and he was diagnosed with and treated for deep-vein thrombosis. Over time, these symptoms resolved, and Mr. G. enjoyed a fairly normal quality of life (QOL). He continued to do well for almost a year, but then his cancer progressed and his performance status began to decline. When offered treatment options, he elected to discontinue the clinical trial, take a break, and then initiate single-agent chemotherapy. Mr. G. was enrolled in a palliative care research study that provided patient-tailored education by an advanced practitioner (AP). The education addressed each QOL domain: physical, psychological, social, and spiritual. When the AP connected with Mr. G. during one of his clinic appointments, he appeared very concerned. He shared that he previously had lived in a communist country and now that he was in the United States, he was afraid of losing his insurance and having to stop treatment. The conversation was interrupted as he was called in for his appointment, yet he consented to talk about the matter further by telephone. The AP contacted Mr. G. the next day. He shared a glimpse of his childhood and experience in his homeland to try to explain his current fears. After reassuring him that his insurance would not be withdrawn, the AP asked whether he would be willing to talk about his life before coming to the United States more than 50 years ago. She wanted to assess where he was

  2. Assessment of the mode of action for hexavalent chromium-induced lung cancer following inhalation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • No published or well recognized MOA for Cr(VI)-induced lung tumors exists. • MOA analysis for Cr(VI)-induced lung cancer was conducted to inform risk assessment. • Cr(VI) epidemiologic, toxicokinetic, toxicological, mechanistic data were evaluated. • Weight of evidence does not support a mutagenic MOA for Cr(VI)-induced lung cancer. • Non-linear approaches should be considered for evaluating Cr(VI) lung cancer risk. - Abstract: Inhalation of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is associated with increased lung cancer risk among workers in several industries, most notably chromate production workers exposed to high concentrations of Cr(VI) (≥100 μg/m3), for which clear exposure–response relationships and respiratory irritation and tissue damage have been reported. Data from this industry are used to assess lung cancer risk associated with environmental and current occupational exposures, occurring at concentrations that are significantly lower. There is considerable uncertainty in the low dose extrapolation of historical occupational epidemiology data to assess risk at current exposures because no published or well recognized mode of action (MOA) for Cr(VI)-induced lung tumors exists. We conducted a MOA analysis for Cr(VI)-induced lung cancer evaluating toxicokinetic and toxicological data in humans and rodents and mechanistic data to assess plausibility, dose–response, and temporal concordance for potential MOAs. Toxicokinetic data support that extracellular reduction of Cr(VI), which limits intracellular absorption of Cr(VI) and Cr(VI)-induced toxicity, can be overwhelmed at high exposure levels. In vivo genotoxicity and mutagenicity data are mostly negative and do not support a mutagenic MOA. Further, both chronic bioassays and the epidemiologic literature support that lung cancer occurs at exposures that cause tissue damage. Based on this MOA analysis, the overall weight of evidence supports a MOA involving deposition and accumulation of

  3. Quantitative assessment of emphysema from whole lung CT scans: comparison with visual grading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Apanosovich, Tatiyana V.; Wang, Jianwei; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.

    2009-02-01

    Emphysema is a disease of the lungs that destroys the alveolar air sacs and induces long-term respiratory dysfunction. CT scans allow for imaging of the anatomical basis of emphysema and for visual assessment by radiologists of the extent present in the lungs. Several measures have been introduced for the quantification of the extent of disease directly from CT data in order to add to the qualitative assessments made by radiologists. In this paper we compare emphysema index, mean lung density, histogram percentiles, and the fractal dimension to visual grade in order to evaluate the predictability of radiologist visual scoring of emphysema from low-dose CT scans through quantitative scores, in order to determine which measures can be useful as surrogates for visual assessment. All measures were computed over nine divisions of the lung field (whole lung, individual lungs, and upper/middle/lower thirds of each lung) for each of 148 low-dose, whole lung scans. In addition, a visual grade of each section was also given by an expert radiologist. One-way ANOVA and multinomial logistic regression were used to determine the ability of the measures to predict visual grade from quantitative score. We found that all measures were able to distinguish between normal and severe grades (p<0.01), and between mild/moderate and all other grades (p<0.05). However, no measure was able to distinguish between mild and moderate cases. Approximately 65% prediction accuracy was achieved from using quantitative score to predict visual grade, with 73% if mild and moderate cases are considered as a single class.

  4. An estimation of the carcinogenic risk associated with the intake of multiple relevant carcinogens found in meat and charcuterie products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Ángel Rodríguez; Boada, Luis D; Almeida-González, Maira; Mendoza, Zenaida; Ruiz-Suárez, Norberto; Valeron, Pilar F; Camacho, María; Zumbado, Manuel; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis A; Luzardo, Octavio P

    2015-05-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have demonstrated a link between excessive meat consumption and the incidence of various cancers, especially colorectal cancer, and it has been suggested that environmental carcinogens present in meat might be related to the increased risk of cancer associated with this food. However, there are no studies evaluating the carcinogenic potential of meat in relation to its content of carcinogens. Our purpose was to emphasize the relevance of environmental carcinogens existing in meat as a determinant of the association between cancer and meat consumption. Because within Europe, Spain shows high consumption of meat and charcuterie, we performed this study focusing on Spanish population. Based on the preferences of consumers we acquired 100 samples of meat and charcuterie that reflect the variety available in the European market. We quantified in these samples the concentration of 33 chemicals with calculated carcinogenic potential (PAHs, organochlorine pesticides, and dioxin-like PCBs). The carcinogenic risk of these contaminants was assessed for each food using a risk ratio based on the current consumption of meat and charcuterie and the maximum tolerable intake of these foods depending on the level of contamination by the carcinogens they contain. Our results indicate that the current consumption of beef, pork, lamb, chicken, and "chorizo", represents a relevant carcinogenic risk for consumers (carcinogenic risk quotient between 1.33 and 13.98). In order to reduce carcinogenic risk, the study population should halve the monthly consumption of these foods, and also not to surpass the number of 5 servings of beef/pork/chicken (considered together). PMID:25659303

  5. Assessment of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae-induced Pneumonia using Different Lung Lesion Scoring Systems: a Comparative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Morante, B; Segalés, J; Fraile, L; Pérez de Rozas, A; Maiti, H; Coll, T; Sibila, M

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the primary aetiological agent of swine enzootic pneumonia (EP) and one of the major contributors to the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). Gross lung lesions in pigs affected by EP consist of cranioventral pulmonary consolidation (CVPC), usually distributed bilaterally in the apical, intermediate, accessory and cranial parts of the diaphragmatic lobes. Several lung scoring methods are currently in place for the evaluation of CVPC. The aims of this study were (1) to review the lung lesion scoring systems used to assess pneumonia associated with M. hyopneumoniae infection, and (2) to evaluate eight of these scoring systems by applying them to the lungs of 76 pigs with experimentally-induced M. hyopneumoniae pneumonia. A significant correlation between all lung lesion scoring systems was observed and the coefficients of determination in a regression analysis were very high between each pair-wise comparison, except for a unique scoring system based on image analysis. A formula of equivalence between lung scoring methods was developed in order to compare the results obtained with these methods. The present review provides a basis for comparison (even retrospectively) of lesions evaluated using different lung scoring systems. PMID:26774274

  6. Model-based risk assessment for motion effects in 3D radiotherapy of lung tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, René; Ehrhardt, Jan; Schmidt-Richberg, Alexander; Handels, Heinz

    2012-02-01

    Although 4D CT imaging becomes available in an increasing number of radiotherapy facilities, 3D imaging and planning is still standard in current clinical practice. In particular for lung tumors, respiratory motion is a known source of uncertainty and should be accounted for during radiotherapy planning - which is difficult by using only a 3D planning CT. In this contribution, we propose applying a statistical lung motion model to predict patients' motion patterns and to estimate dosimetric motion effects in lung tumor radiotherapy if only 3D images are available. Being generated based on 4D CT images of patients with unimpaired lung motion, the model tends to overestimate lung tumor motion. It therefore promises conservative risk assessment regarding tumor dose coverage. This is exemplarily evaluated using treatment plans of lung tumor patients with different tumor motion patterns and for two treatment modalities (conventional 3D conformal radiotherapy and step-&- shoot intensity modulated radiotherapy). For the test cases, 4D CT images are available. Thus, also a standard registration-based 4D dose calculation is performed, which serves as reference to judge plausibility of the modelbased 4D dose calculation. It will be shown that, if combined with an additional simple patient-specific breathing surrogate measurement (here: spirometry), the model-based dose calculation provides reasonable risk assessment of respiratory motion effects.

  7. Lung scintigraphy in the assessment of recurrent bronchitis and pneumonia in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recurrent bronchitis and pneumonia in childhood are a significant factor in predisposing adults to chronic respiratory disease. Lung scintigraphy in children with recurrent respiratory problems very frequently shows regional abnormalities, even in the absence of radiological sings. Structural changes, also at the histological level, are accompanied bu functional disturbances that cause lung scan abnormalities to become stable with time and are very likely responsible for persisting disease in adulthood. Moreover, any chronic respiratory condition that has been diagnosed,like cystic-fibrosis, bronchiectasis, bronchopulmonary malformations, lung fibrosis, should be assessed and followed-up by means of lung scintigraphy. Suspected radio transparent foreign-body inhalation, radiographical hypernucleus (compensatory or pathological emphysema?), functional assessment before lung surgery, suspected mucociliary function impairment, suspected interstitial pneumonia, all of the above conditions represent important indications to lung scintigraphy in children. Finally, it is wise pointing out that, in order to avoid false positive results towards the diagnosis of structural disease, any easily reversible functional impairment should be removed before the scan, by proper patient preparation: in children this is done by at least aerosol therapy with beta-agonists, local steroids and mucolytics for 1 week - 10 days

  8. EMT and stem cell-like properties associated with miR-205 and miR-200 epigenetic silencing are early manifestations during carcinogen-induced transformation of human lung epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tellez, Carmen S.; Juri, Daniel E.; Do, Kieu; Bernauer, Amanda M.; Thomas, Cindy L.; Damiani, Leah A.; Tessema, Mathewos; Leng, Shuguang; Belinsky, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) is strongly associated with cancer progression, but its potential role during premalignant development has not been studied. Here we show that a four-week exposure of immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) to tobacco carcinogens can induce a persistent, irreversible, and multifaceted dedifferentiation program marked by EMT and the emergence of stem cell-like properties. EMT induction was epigenetically driven, initially by chromatin remod...

  9. Oxidative Stress in the Carcinogenicity of Chemical Carcinogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Wanibuchi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights several in vivo studies utilizing non-genotoxic and genotoxic chemical carcinogens, and the mechanisms of their high and low dose carcinogenicities with respect to formation of oxidative stress. Here, we survey the examples and discuss possible mechanisms of hormetic effects with cytochrome P450 inducers, such as phenobarbital, a-benzene hexachloride and 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl-2,2,2-trichloroethane. Epigenetic processes differentially can be affected by agents that impinge on oxidative DNA damage, repair, apoptosis, cell proliferation, intracellular communication and cell signaling. Non-genotoxic carcinogens may target nuclear receptors and induce post-translational modifications at the protein level, thereby impacting on the stability or activity of key regulatory proteins, including oncoproteins and tumor suppressor proteins. We further discuss role of oxidative stress focusing on the low dose carcinogenicities of several genotoxic carcinogens such as a hepatocarcinogen contained in seared fish and meat, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, arsenic and its metabolites, and the kidney carcinogen potassium bromate.

  10. Oxidative Stress in the Carcinogenicity of Chemical Carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakehashi, Anna; Wei, Min [Department of Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-Ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan); Fukushima, Shoji [Japan Bioassay Research Center, Japan Industrial Safety and Health Association, 2445 Hirasawa, Hadano, Kanagawa 257-0015 (Japan); Wanibuchi, Hideki, E-mail: wani@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-Ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan)

    2013-10-28

    This review highlights several in vivo studies utilizing non-genotoxic and genotoxic chemical carcinogens, and the mechanisms of their high and low dose carcinogenicities with respect to formation of oxidative stress. Here, we survey the examples and discuss possible mechanisms of hormetic effects with cytochrome P{sub 450} inducers, such as phenobarbital, α-benzene hexachloride and 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane. Epigenetic processes differentially can be affected by agents that impinge on oxidative DNA damage, repair, apoptosis, cell proliferation, intracellular communication and cell signaling. Non-genotoxic carcinogens may target nuclear receptors and induce post-translational modifications at the protein level, thereby impacting on the stability or activity of key regulatory proteins, including oncoproteins and tumor suppressor proteins. We further discuss role of oxidative stress focusing on the low dose carcinogenicities of several genotoxic carcinogens such as a hepatocarcinogen contained in seared fish and meat, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, arsenic and its metabolites, and the kidney carcinogen potassium bromate.

  11. Oxidative Stress in the Carcinogenicity of Chemical Carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review highlights several in vivo studies utilizing non-genotoxic and genotoxic chemical carcinogens, and the mechanisms of their high and low dose carcinogenicities with respect to formation of oxidative stress. Here, we survey the examples and discuss possible mechanisms of hormetic effects with cytochrome P450 inducers, such as phenobarbital, α-benzene hexachloride and 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane. Epigenetic processes differentially can be affected by agents that impinge on oxidative DNA damage, repair, apoptosis, cell proliferation, intracellular communication and cell signaling. Non-genotoxic carcinogens may target nuclear receptors and induce post-translational modifications at the protein level, thereby impacting on the stability or activity of key regulatory proteins, including oncoproteins and tumor suppressor proteins. We further discuss role of oxidative stress focusing on the low dose carcinogenicities of several genotoxic carcinogens such as a hepatocarcinogen contained in seared fish and meat, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, arsenic and its metabolites, and the kidney carcinogen potassium bromate

  12. Understanding arsenic carcinogenicity by the use of animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although numerous epidemiological studies have indicated that human arsenic exposure is associated with increased incidences of bladder, liver, skin, and lung cancers, limited attempts have been made to understand mechanisms of carcinogenicity using animal models. Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), an organic arsenic compound, is a major metabolite of ingested inorganic arsenics in mammals. Recent in vitro studies have proven DMA to be a potent clastogenic agent, capable of inducing DNA damage including double strand breaks and cross-link formation. In our attempts to clarify DMA carcinogenicity, we have recently shown carcinogenic effects of DMA and its related metabolites using various experimental protocols in rats and mice: (1) a multi-organ promotion bioassay in rats; (2) a two-stage promotion bioassay by DMA of rat urinary bladder and liver carcinogenesis; (3) a 2-year carcinogenicity test of DMA in rats; (4) studies on the effects of DMA on lung carcinogenesis in rats; (5) promotion of skin carcinogenesis by DMA in keratin (K6)/ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) transgenic mice; (6) carcinogenicity of DMA in p53(+/-) knockout and Mmh/8-OXOG-DNA glycolase (OGG1) mutant mice; (7) promoting effects of DMA and related organic arsenicals in rat liver; (8) promoting effects of DMA and related organic arsenicals in a rat multi-organ carcinogenesis test; and (9) 2-year carcinogenicity tests of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO) in rats. The results revealed that the adverse effects of arsenic occurred either by promoting and initiating carcinogenesis. These data, as covered in the present review, suggest that several mechanisms may be involved in arsenic carcinogenesis

  13. Lung cancer trends: smoking, obesity, and sex assessed in the Staten Island University’s lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta S

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Shilpi Gupta,1 Samer Hassan,1 Vijaya R Bhatt,2 Houssein Abdul Sater,1 Asma Dilawari31Hematology-Oncology, Staten Island University Hospital, Staten Island, NY, USA; 2Hematology-Oncology, Nebraska Medical Ctr, Omaha, NE, USA; 3Hematology-Oncology, MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Olney, Maryland, USAIntroduction: The incidence of lung cancer in the United States decreased by 1.8% from 1991 to 2005 while it increased by 0.5% in females. We assessed whether nonsmokers afflicted with lung cancer at Staten Island University Hospital are disproportionately female in comparison to national averages. We also evaluated different factors including race, histology, and body mass index (BMI in correlation with smoking history.Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted from 2005 to 2011 on 857 patients. Patients were divided into two groups according to their smoking status: current or ever-smokers, and former or never-smokers. A chi-square test for categorical data and multivariate logistic regression analyses was used to study the relation between BMI and the other clinical and demographic data.Results: Forty-nine percent of patients were men and 51% were women with a mean age at diagnosis of 67.8 years. Current smokers were most common (50.2% followed by ever-smokers (18.2%, former smokers (15.8% and never-smokers (15.6%. Forty eight percent had stage IV lung cancer upon presentation. Never-smokers with lung cancer were 24 times more likely to be females. However, the proportion of female former smokers (31.6% was lower than the proportion of male former smokers (68.4% (P=0.001. There was no significant association between American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC stage, sex, race, and histological type in the two smoking groups. Current/ever-smokers tended to be younger at age of diagnosis (P=0.0003. BMI was lower in the current/ever-smokers (26.8 kg/m2 versus former/never-smokers (28.8 in males (P=0.0005. BMI was significantly higher in

  14. Lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present no simple statement can be made relative to the role of radionuclidic lung studies in the pediatric population. It is safe to assume that they will be used with increasing frequency for research and clinical applications because of their sensitivity and ready applicability to the pediatric patient. Methods comparable to those used in adults can be used in children older than 4 years. In younger children, however, a single injection of 133Xe in solution provides an index of both regional perfusion and ventilation which is easier to accomplish. This method is particularly valuable in infants and neonates because it is rapid, requires no patient cooperation, results in a very low radiation dose, and can be repeated in serial studies. Radionuclidic studies of ventilation and perfusion can be performed in almost all children if the pediatrician and the nuclear medicine specialist have motivation and ingenuity. S

  15. Comparison of carcinogen, carbon monoxide, and ultrafine particle emissions from narghile waterpipe and cigarette smoking: Sidestream smoke measurements and assessment of second-hand smoke emission factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Nancy; Saleh, Rawad; Jaroudi, Ezzat; Sheheitli, Hiba; Badr, Thérèse; Sepetdjian, Elizabeth; Al Rashidi, Mariam; Saliba, Najat; Shihadeh, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The lack of scientific evidence on the constituents, properties, and health effects of second-hand waterpipe smoke has fueled controversy over whether public smoking bans should include the waterpipe. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare emissions of ultrafine particles (UFP, hookah) waterpipes. These smoke constituents are associated with a variety of cancers, and heart and pulmonary diseases, and span the volatility range found in tobacco smoke. Sidestream cigarette and waterpipe smoke was captured and aged in a 1 m 3 Teflon-coated chamber operating at 1.5 air changes per hour (ACH). The chamber was characterized for particle mass and number surface deposition rates. UFP and CO concentrations were measured online using a fast particle spectrometer (TSI 3090 Engine Exhaust Particle Sizer), and an indoor air quality monitor. Particulate PAH and gaseous volatile aldehydes were captured on glass fiber filters and DNPH-coated SPE cartridges, respectively, and analyzed off-line using GC-MS and HPLC-MS. PAH compounds quantified were the 5- and 6-ring compounds of the EPA priority list. Measured aldehydes consisted of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, methacrolein, and propionaldehyde. We found that a single waterpipe use session emits in the sidestream smoke approximately four times the carcinogenic PAH, four times the volatile aldehydes, and 30 times the CO of a single cigarette. Accounting for exhaled mainstream smoke, and given a habitual smoker smoking rate of 2 cigarettes per hour, during a typical one-hour waterpipe use session a waterpipe smoker likely generates ambient carcinogens and toxicants equivalent to 2-10 cigarette smokers, depending on the compound in question. There is therefore good reason to include waterpipe tobacco smoking in public smoking bans.

  16. Comparison of carcinogen, carbon monoxide, and ultrafine particle emissions from narghile waterpipe and cigarette smoking: Sidestream smoke measurements and assessment of second-hand smoke emission factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Nancy; Saleh, Rawad; Jaroudi, Ezzat; Sheheitli, Hiba; Badr, Thérèse; Sepetdjian, Elizabeth; Al Rashidi, Mariam; Saliba, Najat; Shihadeh, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The lack of scientific evidence on the constituents, properties, and health effects of second-hand waterpipe smoke has fueled controversy over whether public smoking bans should include the waterpipe. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare emissions of ultrafine particles (UFP, range found in tobacco smoke. Sidestream cigarette and waterpipe smoke was captured and aged in a 1 m 3 Teflon-coated chamber operating at 1.5 air changes per hour (ACH). The chamber was characterized for particle mass and number surface deposition rates. UFP and CO concentrations were measured online using a fast particle spectrometer (TSI 3090 Engine Exhaust Particle Sizer), and an indoor air quality monitor. Particulate PAH and gaseous volatile aldehydes were captured on glass fiber filters and DNPH-coated SPE cartridges, respectively, and analyzed off-line using GC-MS and HPLC-MS. PAH compounds quantified were the 5- and 6-ring compounds of the EPA priority list. Measured aldehydes consisted of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, methacrolein, and propionaldehyde. We found that a single waterpipe use session emits in the sidestream smoke approximately four times the carcinogenic PAH, four times the volatile aldehydes, and 30 times the CO of a single cigarette. Accounting for exhaled mainstream smoke, and given a habitual smoker smoking rate of 2 cigarettes per hour, during a typical one-hour waterpipe use session a waterpipe smoker likely generates ambient carcinogens and toxicants equivalent to 2-10 cigarette smokers, depending on the compound in question. There is therefore good reason to include waterpipe tobacco smoking in public smoking bans.

  17. Hypothesis-based weight-of-evidence evaluation and risk assessment for naphthalene carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey, Lisa A; Nascarella, Marc A.; Kerper, Laura E.; Rhomberg, Lorenz R.

    2015-01-01

    Inhalation of naphthalene causes olfactory epithelial nasal tumors in rats (but not in mice) and benign lung adenomas in mice (but not in rats). The limited available human data have not identified an association between naphthalene exposure and increased respiratory cancer risk. Assessing naphthalene's carcinogenicity in humans, therefore, depends entirely on experimental evidence from rodents. We evaluated the respiratory carcinogenicity of naphthalene in rodents, and its potential relevanc...

  18. Lung ventilation-perfusion imbalance in pulmonary emphysema. Assessment with automated V/Q quotient SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tc-99m-Technegas-macro-aggregated albumin (MAA) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-derived ventilation (V)/perfusion (Q) quotient SPECT was used to assess lung V-Q imbalance in patients with pulmonary emphysema. V/Q quotient SPECT and V/Q profile were automatically built in 38 patients with pulmonary emphysema and 12 controls, and V/Q distribution and V/Q profile parameters were compared. V/Q distribution on V/Q quotient SPECT was correlated with low attenuation areas (LAA) on density-mask computed tomography (CT). Parameters of V/Q profile such as the median, standard deviation (SD), kurtosis and skewness were proposed to objectively evaluate the severity of lung V-Q imbalance. In contrast to uniform V/Q distribution on V/Q quotient SPECT and a sharp peak with symmetrical V/Q distribution on V/Q profile in controls, lung areas showing heterogeneously high or low V/Q and flattened peaks with broadened V/Q distribution were frequently seen in patients with emphysema, including lung areas with only slight LAA. V/Q distribution was also often asymmetric regardless of symmetric LAA. All the proposed parameters of V/Q profile in entire lungs of patients with emphysema showed large variations compared with controls; SD and kurtosis were significantly different from controls (P<0.0001 and P<0.001, respectively), and a significant correlation was found between SD and A-aDO2 (P<0.0001). V/Q quotient SPECT appears to be more sensitive to detect emphysematous lungs compared with morphologic CT in patients with emphysema. SD and kurtosis of V/Q profile can be adequate parameters to assess the severity of lung V-Q imbalance causing gas-exchange impairment in patients with emphysema. (author)

  19. Critical analysis of carcinogenicity study outcomes. Relationship with pharmacological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, Jan Willem; Kasper, Peter; Silva Lima, Beatriz; Jones, David R; Pasanen, Markku

    2016-08-01

    Predicting the outcome of life-time carcinogenicity studies in rats based on chronic (6-month) toxicity studies in this species is possible in some instances. This should reduce the number of such studies and hence have a significant impact on the total number of animals used in safety assessment of new medicines. From a regulatory perspective, this should be sufficient to grant a waiver for a carcinogenicity study in those cases where there is confidence in the outcome of the prediction. Pharmacological properties are a frequent key factor for the carcinogenic mode of action of some pharmaceuticals, but data-analysis on a large dataset has never been formally conducted. We have conducted an analysis of a dataset based on the perspective of the pharmacology of 255 compounds from industrial and regulatory sources. It is proposed that a pharmacological, class-specific, model may consist of an overall causal relationship between the pharmacological class and the histopathology findings in rats after 6 months treatment, leading to carcinogenicity outcome after 2 years. Knowledge of the intended drug target and pathway pharmacology should enhance the prediction of either positive or negative outcomes of rat carcinogenicity studies. The goal of this analysis is to review the pharmacological properties of compounds together with the histopathology findings from the chronic toxicity study in rodents in order to introduce an integrated approach to estimate the risk of human carcinogenicity of pharmaceuticals. This approach would allow scientists to define conditions under which 2-year rat carcinogenicity studies will or will not add value to such an assessment. We have demonstrated the possibility of a regulatory waiver for a carcinogenicity study in rats, as currently discussed in the International Council for Harmonization (ICH) - formerly known as the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH), by applying the proposed prediction approach in a number of case studies

  20. A functional assessment of patients two years after lung transplantation in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Jastrzębski, Dariusz T.; Gumola, Anna; Wojarski, Jacek; Żegleń, Sławomir; Ochman, Marek; Czyżewski, Damian; Ziora, Dariusz; Zembala, Marian; Kozielski, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study The aim of the study was to assess the long-term results of lung transplantation (LT) in Poland two years after the procedure. Material and methods The study included patients who underwent LT between December 2004 and December 2009 in the Silesian Center for Heart Diseases in Zabrze. Various lung functions (forced vital capacity – FVC; forced expiratory volume in 1 second – FEV1), the quality of life (SF-36 questionnaire), the level of perceived dyspnea (Medical Research...

  1. Utilization of the Organ Care System Lung for the assessment of lungs from a donor after cardiac death (DCD) before bilateral transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohite, P N; Sabashnikov, A; García Sáez, D; Pates, B; Zeriouh, M; De Robertis, F; Simon, A R

    2015-07-01

    In this manuscript, we present the first experience of evaluating donation after circulatory death (DCD) lungs, using the normothermic preservation Organ Care System (OCS) and subsequent successful transplantation. The OCS could be a useful tool for the evaluation of marginal lungs from DCD donors as it allows a proper recruitment and bronchoscopy in such donations in addition to continuous ex-vivo perfusion and assessment and treatment during transport. The OCS could potentially be a standard of care in the evaluation of marginal lungs from DCD. PMID:25332197

  2. Assessment of Carcinogenicity of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate in a short-term assay using Xpa(-/-) and Xpa(-/-)/p53(+/-) mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Alicja; Bertram, Margareta; Aarup, V.;

    2002-01-01

    The potential of Xpa(-/-) and Xpa(-/-)/p53(+/-) mice for short-term carcinogenicity assays was evaluated with di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP). Groups of 15 male and female Xpa(-/-) mice, received diets containing 0, 1,500, 3, 000, or 6,000 ppm DEHP, and wild-type (WT) and Xpa(-/-)/p53(+/-) mice 0...... or 6,000 ppm DEHP for 39 weeks. Xpa(-/-), Xpa(-/-)/p53(+/-), and WT males, fed 2,500 ppm p-cresidine, served as a positive control. In all models, the survival was not altered by DEHP. Increased incidences of nonneoplastic lesions were recorded in testes and kidneys with no apparent difference...... in the liver, urinary bladder, and nasal cavity in all models, and in kidneys in transgenic models. The only tumors with statistically significantly increased incidence were liver adenomas in transgenic models (XPA:1 vs 7; `XPA/p53': 0 vs 12; WT: 0 vs 5, p = 0.053) and urinary bladder carcinomas in...

  3. Two azole fungicides (carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil) exhibit different hepatic cytochrome P450 activities in medaka fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Hung [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chou, Pei-Hsin [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chen, Pei-Jen, E-mail: chenpj@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-30

    Highlights: • We assess ecotoxicological impact of azole fungicides in the aquatic environment. • Carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic azoles show different CYP activities in medaka. • We compare azole-induced CYP expression and carcinogenesis between fish and rodents. • Liver CYP-enzyme induction is a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. • We suggest toxicity evaluation methods for azole fungicides using medaka fish. - Abstract: Conazoles are a class of imidazole- or triazole-containing drugs commonly used as fungicides in agriculture and medicine. The broad application of azole drugs has led to the contamination of surface aquifers receiving the effluent of municipal or hospital wastewater or agricultural runoff. Several triazoles are rodent carcinogens; azole pollution is a concern to environmental safety and human health. However, the carcinogenic mechanisms associated with cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) of conazoles remain unclear. We exposed adult medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) to continuous aqueous solutions of carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil for 7 to 20 days at sub-lethal or environmentally relevant concentrations and assessed hepatic CYP activity and gene expression associated with CYP-mediated toxicity. Both triadimefon and myclobutanil induced hepatic CYP3A activity, but only triadimefon enhanced CYP1A activity. The gene expression of cyp3a38, cyp3a40, pregnane x receptor (pxr), cyp26b, retinoid acid receptor γ1 (rarγ1) and p53 was higher with triadimefon than myclobutanil. As well, yeast-based reporter gene assay revealed that 4 tested conazoles were weak agonists of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We reveal differential CYP gene expression with carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic conazoles in a lower vertebrate, medaka fish. Liver CYP-enzyme induction may be a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. This information is essential to evaluate the potential threat of conazoles to human health and fish

  4. Two azole fungicides (carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil) exhibit different hepatic cytochrome P450 activities in medaka fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We assess ecotoxicological impact of azole fungicides in the aquatic environment. • Carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic azoles show different CYP activities in medaka. • We compare azole-induced CYP expression and carcinogenesis between fish and rodents. • Liver CYP-enzyme induction is a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. • We suggest toxicity evaluation methods for azole fungicides using medaka fish. - Abstract: Conazoles are a class of imidazole- or triazole-containing drugs commonly used as fungicides in agriculture and medicine. The broad application of azole drugs has led to the contamination of surface aquifers receiving the effluent of municipal or hospital wastewater or agricultural runoff. Several triazoles are rodent carcinogens; azole pollution is a concern to environmental safety and human health. However, the carcinogenic mechanisms associated with cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) of conazoles remain unclear. We exposed adult medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) to continuous aqueous solutions of carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil for 7 to 20 days at sub-lethal or environmentally relevant concentrations and assessed hepatic CYP activity and gene expression associated with CYP-mediated toxicity. Both triadimefon and myclobutanil induced hepatic CYP3A activity, but only triadimefon enhanced CYP1A activity. The gene expression of cyp3a38, cyp3a40, pregnane x receptor (pxr), cyp26b, retinoid acid receptor γ1 (rarγ1) and p53 was higher with triadimefon than myclobutanil. As well, yeast-based reporter gene assay revealed that 4 tested conazoles were weak agonists of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We reveal differential CYP gene expression with carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic conazoles in a lower vertebrate, medaka fish. Liver CYP-enzyme induction may be a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. This information is essential to evaluate the potential threat of conazoles to human health and fish

  5. Assessment of CF lung disease using motion corrected PROPELLER MRI: a comparison with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciet, Pierluigi [General Hospital Ca' Foncello, Radiology Department, Treviso (Italy); Sophia Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Pulmonology Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Serra, Goffredo; Catalano, Carlo [University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' , Radiology, Rome (Italy); Bertolo, Silvia; Morana, Giovanni [General Hospital Ca' Foncello, Radiology Department, Treviso (Italy); Spronk, Sandra [Erasmus MC, Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Epidemiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Ros, Mirco [Ca' Foncello Hospital, Pediatrics, Treviso (Italy); Fraioli, Francesco [University College London (UCL), Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Quattrucci, Serena [University of Rome Sapienza, Pediatrics, Rome (Italy); Assael, M.B. [Azienda Ospedaliera di Verona, Verona CF Center, Verona (Italy); Pomerri, Fabio [University of Padova, Department of Medicine-DIMED, Padova (Italy); Tiddens, Harm A.W.M. [Sophia Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Pulmonology Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-03-15

    To date, PROPELLER MRI, a breathing-motion-insensitive technique, has not been assessed for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. We compared this technique to CT for assessing CF lung disease in children and adults. Thirty-eight stable CF patients (median 21 years, range 6-51 years, 22 female) underwent MRI and CT on the same day. Study protocol included respiratory-triggered PROPELLER MRI and volumetric CT end-inspiratory and -expiratory acquisitions. Two observers scored the images using the CF-MRI and CF-CT systems. Scores were compared with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI versus CT were calculated. MRI sensitivity for detecting severe CF bronchiectasis was 0.33 (CI 0.09-0.57), while specificity was 100 % (CI 0.88-1). ICCs for bronchiectasis and trapped air were as follows: MRI-bronchiectasis (0.79); CT-bronchiectasis (0.85); MRI-trapped air (0.51); CT-trapped air (0.87). Bland-Altman plots showed an MRI tendency to overestimate the severity of bronchiectasis in mild CF disease and underestimate bronchiectasis in severe disease. Motion correction in PROPELLER MRI does not improve assessment of CF lung disease compared to CT. However, the good inter- and intra-observer agreement and the high specificity suggest that MRI might play a role in the short-term follow-up of CF lung disease (i.e. pulmonary exacerbations). (orig.)

  6. Assessment of CF lung disease using motion corrected PROPELLER MRI: a comparison with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To date, PROPELLER MRI, a breathing-motion-insensitive technique, has not been assessed for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. We compared this technique to CT for assessing CF lung disease in children and adults. Thirty-eight stable CF patients (median 21 years, range 6-51 years, 22 female) underwent MRI and CT on the same day. Study protocol included respiratory-triggered PROPELLER MRI and volumetric CT end-inspiratory and -expiratory acquisitions. Two observers scored the images using the CF-MRI and CF-CT systems. Scores were compared with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI versus CT were calculated. MRI sensitivity for detecting severe CF bronchiectasis was 0.33 (CI 0.09-0.57), while specificity was 100 % (CI 0.88-1). ICCs for bronchiectasis and trapped air were as follows: MRI-bronchiectasis (0.79); CT-bronchiectasis (0.85); MRI-trapped air (0.51); CT-trapped air (0.87). Bland-Altman plots showed an MRI tendency to overestimate the severity of bronchiectasis in mild CF disease and underestimate bronchiectasis in severe disease. Motion correction in PROPELLER MRI does not improve assessment of CF lung disease compared to CT. However, the good inter- and intra-observer agreement and the high specificity suggest that MRI might play a role in the short-term follow-up of CF lung disease (i.e. pulmonary exacerbations). (orig.)

  7. Improved dosimetry and risk assessment for plutonium-induced lung disease using a microdosimetric approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risk of developing radiation-induced lung cancer is currently estimated using models based on epidemiological data from populations exposed either to relatively uniform, low-LET radiation, or from uranium miners exposed to radon and its progeny. Because inhaled alpha-emitting radionuclides (e.g., Pu, Am) produce nonuniform, chronic irradiation of the parenchymal region of the lung, a better scientific basis is needed for assessing the risk of developing radiation-induced disease from these radionuclides. Scientists at FIB-1 and LRRI are using a unique resource at the FIB-1, i.e., a set of about 600 lung specimens fixed in 10% formalin, and obtained from a population of workers at the Mayak Production Association, many of whom inhaled significant quantities of Pu and other alpha-emitting radionuclides during their careers. The objectives of this research are to measure the microscopic distribution of Pu by quantitative autoradiography, to determine the spatial distribution of Pu in human lung tissue with respect to specific lung structures and to determine the effect of chronic tobacco-smoke exposure on the distribution of local Pu radiation dose. The approach to analyzing these lung samples is to utilize contemporary stereological sampling and analysis techniques together with quantitative alpha-particle autoradiography. Our initial results have validated the usefulness of these lung specimens for determining Pu particle distribution with respect to anatomic location, as well as identifying normal and diseased compartments in the lung. In brief, particles were most often found associated with parenchymal and nonparenchymal scars, with other particles in organized lymphoid tissue or the interstitium of the pulmonary parenchyma (respiratory bronchioles and alveolar region). Based on comparison of one lung from a smoker and one from a nonsmoker, there was an increased fraction of Pu particles associated with tissue scars in the smoker vs the nonsmoker, and this

  8. Quantitative Risk Assessment for Lung Cancer from Exposure to Metal Ore Dust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FUHUA; JINGXIPENG; 等

    1992-01-01

    To quantitatively assess risk for lung cancer of metal miners,a historical cohort study was conducted.The cohort consisted of 1113 miners who were employed to underground work for at least 12 months between January 1,1960and December,12,1974,According to the records or dust concentration,a cumulative dust dose of each miner in the cohort was estimated.There wer 162 deaths in total and 45 deaths from lung cancer with a SMR of 2184,The SMR for lung cancer increased from 1019 for those with cumulative dust of less than 500mg-year to 2469 for those with the dose of greater than 4500mg-year.Furthermore,the risk in the highest category of combined cumulative dust dose and cigarette smoking was 46-fold greater than the lowest category of dust dose and smoking.This study showed that there was an exposure-response relationship between metal ore dust and lung cancer,and an interaction of lung cancer between smoking and metal ore dust exposure.

  9. Collateral Ventilation to Congenital Hyperlucent Lung Lesions Assessed on Xenon-Enhanced Dynamic Dual-Energy CT: an Initial Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Yang, Dong Hyun; Kim, Namkug; Park, Seung Il; Kim, Dong Kwan; Kim, Ellen Ai-Rhan

    2011-01-01

    Objective We wanted to evaluate the resistance to collateral ventilation in congenital hyperlucent lung lesions and to correlate that with the anatomic findings on xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT. Materials and Methods Xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT was successfully and safely performed in eight children (median age: 5.5 years, 4 boys and 4 girls) with congenital hyperlucent lung lesions. Functional assessment of the lung lesions on the xenon map was done, including performing a ...

  10. The Weight of Evidence Does Not Support the Listing of Styrene as "Reasonably Anticipated to be a Human Carcinogen" in NTP's Twelfth Report on Carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhomberg, Lorenz R; Goodman, Julie E; Prueitt, Robyn L

    2013-01-01

    Styrene was listed as "reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen" in the twelfth edition of the National Toxicology Program's Report on Carcinogens based on what we contend are erroneous findings of limited evidence of carcinogenicity in humans, sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals, and supporting mechanistic data. The epidemiology studies show no consistent increased incidence of, or mortality from, any type of cancer. In animal studies, increased incidence rates of mostly benign tumors have been observed only in certain strains of one species (mice) and at one tissue site (lung). The lack of concordance of tumor incidence and tumor type among animals (even within the same species) and humans indicates that there has been no particular cancer consistently observed among all available studies. The only plausible mechanism for styrene-induced carcinogenesis-a non-genotoxic mode of action that is specific to the mouse lung-is not relevant to humans. As a whole, the evidence does not support the characterization of styrene as "reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen," and styrene should not be listed in the Report on Carcinogens. PMID:23335843

  11. The Assessment of Health-Related Quality of Life in Scleroderma-Interstitial Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad M Lari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pulmonary involvement is the most common cause of mortality and disability in patients with systemic sclerosis and it significantly affects the quality of life in these patients. Therefore, early diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary involvement seems necessary in patients with SSc. In this study, we aimed to assess the health-related quality of life (HRQoL in patients with Scleroderma-Interstitial Lung Disease (SSc-ILD and its relationship with pulmonary function parameters. Materials and Methods: Considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 25 patients with SSc-ILD were enrolled in this cross-sectional study from April 2012 to June 2013. Full tests of lung function, including body plethysmography and diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DLCO, 6-minute walk distance (6MWD, and pulse oximetry were performed. The HRQoL was assessed using St. George’s and CAT questionnaires; also, dyspnea was evaluated for all the patients, using modified medical research council (MMRC scale. Afterwards, the relationship between the total scores of HRQoL questionnaires and the severity of lung disease was analyzed, based on the recorded variables. Results: The mean age of the patients was 40.36±9.50 years and the mean duration of the disease was 7.16±4.50 years. A statistically significant inverse correlation was observed between 6MWD (r=-0.50, P=0.01, DLCO (r=-0.67, P

  12. Two azole fungicides (carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil) exhibit different hepatic cytochrome P450 activities in medaka fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Hung; Chou, Pei-Hsin; Chen, Pei-Jen

    2014-07-30

    Conazoles are a class of imidazole- or triazole-containing drugs commonly used as fungicides in agriculture and medicine. The broad application of azole drugs has led to the contamination of surface aquifers receiving the effluent of municipal or hospital wastewater or agricultural runoff. Several triazoles are rodent carcinogens; azole pollution is a concern to environmental safety and human health. However, the carcinogenic mechanisms associated with cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) of conazoles remain unclear. We exposed adult medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) to continuous aqueous solutions of carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil for 7 to 20 days at sub-lethal or environmentally relevant concentrations and assessed hepatic CYP activity and gene expression associated with CYP-mediated toxicity. Both triadimefon and myclobutanil induced hepatic CYP3A activity, but only triadimefon enhanced CYP1A activity. The gene expression of cyp3a38, cyp3a40, pregnane x receptor (pxr), cyp26b, retinoid acid receptor γ1 (rarγ1) and p53 was higher with triadimefon than myclobutanil. As well, yeast-based reporter gene assay revealed that 4 tested conazoles were weak agonists of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We reveal differential CYP gene expression with carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic conazoles in a lower vertebrate, medaka fish. Liver CYP-enzyme induction may be a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. This information is essential to evaluate the potential threat of conazoles to human health and fish populations in the aquatic environment. PMID:24962053

  13. The utility of SPECT lung perfusion cans in assessing the changes in pulmonary function after radiotherapy for patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the pulmonary function by lung perfusion scintigraphy in lung cancer patients treated with thoracic conform.al radiotherapy. Materials: Between June and December 2003, 21 lung cancer patients treated with thoracic radiotherapy (RT) performed Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) lung perfusion scans before RT and after 40 Gy-50 Gy radiation. Seventeen of these patients receiving thoracic 3-dimension conformal radiotherapy were included in this study. Severn patients had small cell lung carcinoma, 8 squamous cell carcinoma, and 2 no classification. There are 15 male and 2 female. The median age was 56 years, with a range of 46-78 years. SPECT lung perfusion scans were obtained following the intravenous administration of 185 MBq (5 mCi) of technetium-99m-labeled macroaggregated albumin (MAA). Images of static (ANT, POST, RAO, RPO, LAO, LPO, RLAT, LLAT) and tomography (transverse, sagittal, coronal) were acquired after injection using a dual-head SPECT (GE MillenniumTM VGV, Hawkeye) with low energy high resolution collimator, All patients were in supine with their arms above their head. Every attempt was made to have all of the scans and the radiation treatment delivered with the patient in a similar position. At the same time X-ray or CT scan were performed. The pre-RT CT or X-ray of the thorax and SPECT images were visually reviewed to assess the presence of hypoperfusion. Each of post-RT SPECT scan was also visually compared with the pre-RT SPECT image to detect whether or not reperfusion of previously under perfused areas. Furthermore, each pre-RT and post-RT SPECT image set was visually registered with the pre-RT planning CT images; the 3-D dose distribution was thus registered with the lung perfusion scan. The radiotherapy field (>20 Gy) was drawn as a region of interest (ROI) in the SPECT transversal images. The proportion of radioactive count within this ROI relative to total lung count in one slice was determined. Student's t

  14. Assessment of regional lung ventilation by electrical impedance tomography in a patient with unilateral bronchial stenosis and a history of tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Liégina Silveira Marinho; Nathalia Parente de Sousa; Carlos Augusto Barbosa da Silveira Barros; Marcelo Silveira Matias; Luana Torres Monteiro; Marcelo do Amaral Beraldo; Eduardo Leite Vieira Costa; Marcelo Britto Passos Amato; Marcelo Alcantara Holanda

    2013-01-01

    Bronchial stenosis can impair regional lung ventilation by causing abnormal, asymmetric airflow limitation. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is an imaging technique that allows the assessment of regional lung ventilation and therefore complements the functional assessment of the lungs. We report the case of a patient with left unilateral bronchial stenosis and a history of tuberculosis, in whom regional lung ventilation was assessed by EIT. The EIT results were compared with those obtain...

  15. Assessment of regional lung ventilation by electrical impedance tomography in a patient with unilateral bronchial stenosis and a history of tuberculosis*

    OpenAIRE

    de Sousa, Nathalia Parente; Marinho, Liégina Silveira; Barros, Carlos Augusto Barbosa da Silveira; Matias, Marcelo Silveira; Monteiro, Luana Torres; Beraldo, Marcelo do Amaral; Costa, Eduardo Leite Vieira; Amato, Marcelo Britto Passos; Holanda, Marcelo Alcantara

    2013-01-01

    Bronchial stenosis can impair regional lung ventilation by causing abnormal, asymmetric airflow limitation. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is an imaging technique that allows the assessment of regional lung ventilation and therefore complements the functional assessment of the lungs. We report the case of a patient with left unilateral bronchial stenosis and a history of tuberculosis, in whom regional lung ventilation was assessed by EIT. The EIT results were compared with those obtain...

  16. Non-contrast-enhanced preoperative assessment of lung perfusion in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer using Fourier decomposition magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, Gregor, E-mail: gregor.sommer@usb.ch [Department of Radiology (E010), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC-H), Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Basel Hospital, Petersgraben 4, 4031 Basel (Switzerland); Bauman, Grzegorz, E-mail: gbauman@wisc.edu [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC-H), Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Medical Physics in Radiology (E020), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, 53705 WI (United States); Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel, E-mail: marcelk46@yahoo.com.br [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC-H), Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, University Hospital of the School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto – University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine, Thoraxklinik Heidelberg gGmbH, Amalienstr. 5, 69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Draenkow, Christopher, E-mail: c.draenkow@thoraxklinik-heidelberg.de [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC-H), Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Surgery, Thoraxklinik Heidelberg gGmbH, Amalienstr. 5, 69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Heussel, Claus Peter, E-mail: heussel@uni-heidelberg.de [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC-H), Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine, Thoraxklinik Heidelberg gGmbH, Amalienstr. 5, 69126 Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2013-12-01

    Objective: To investigate non-contrast-enhanced Fourier decomposition MRI (FD MRI) for assessment of regional lung perfusion in patients with Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) in comparison to dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE MRI). Methods: Time-resolved non-contrast-enhanced images of the lungs were acquired prospectively in 15 patients using a 2D balanced steady-state free precession (b-SSFP) sequence. After non-rigid registration of the native image data, perfusion-weighted images were calculated by separating periodic changes of lung proton density at the cardiac frequency using FD. DCE MRI subtraction datasets were acquired as standard of reference. Both datasets were analyzed visually for perfusion defects. Then segmentation analyses were performed to describe perfusion of pulmonary lobes semi-quantitatively as percentages of total lung perfusion. Overall FD MRI perfusion signal was compared to velocity-encoded flow measurements in the pulmonary trunk as an additional fully quantitative reference. Results: Image quality ratings of FD MRI were significantly inferior to those of DCE MRI (P < 0.0001). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of FD MRI for visual detection of perfusion defects were 84%, 92%, and 91%. Semi-quantitative evaluation of lobar perfusion provided high agreement between FD MRI and DCE MRI for both entire lungs and upper lobes, but less agreement in the lower parts of both lungs. FD perfusion signal showed high linear correlation with pulmonary arterial blood flow. Conclusion: FD MRI is a promising technique that allows for assessing regional lung perfusion in NSCLC patients without contrast media or ionizing radiation. However, for being applied in clinical routine, image quality and robustness of the technique need to be further improved.

  17. Non-contrast-enhanced preoperative assessment of lung perfusion in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer using Fourier decomposition magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate non-contrast-enhanced Fourier decomposition MRI (FD MRI) for assessment of regional lung perfusion in patients with Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) in comparison to dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE MRI). Methods: Time-resolved non-contrast-enhanced images of the lungs were acquired prospectively in 15 patients using a 2D balanced steady-state free precession (b-SSFP) sequence. After non-rigid registration of the native image data, perfusion-weighted images were calculated by separating periodic changes of lung proton density at the cardiac frequency using FD. DCE MRI subtraction datasets were acquired as standard of reference. Both datasets were analyzed visually for perfusion defects. Then segmentation analyses were performed to describe perfusion of pulmonary lobes semi-quantitatively as percentages of total lung perfusion. Overall FD MRI perfusion signal was compared to velocity-encoded flow measurements in the pulmonary trunk as an additional fully quantitative reference. Results: Image quality ratings of FD MRI were significantly inferior to those of DCE MRI (P < 0.0001). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of FD MRI for visual detection of perfusion defects were 84%, 92%, and 91%. Semi-quantitative evaluation of lobar perfusion provided high agreement between FD MRI and DCE MRI for both entire lungs and upper lobes, but less agreement in the lower parts of both lungs. FD perfusion signal showed high linear correlation with pulmonary arterial blood flow. Conclusion: FD MRI is a promising technique that allows for assessing regional lung perfusion in NSCLC patients without contrast media or ionizing radiation. However, for being applied in clinical routine, image quality and robustness of the technique need to be further improved

  18. New clues on carcinogenicity-related substructures derived from mining two large datasets of chemical compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbamaki, Azadi; Benfenati, Emilio; Golbamaki, Nazanin; Manganaro, Alberto; Merdivan, Erinc; Roncaglioni, Alessandra; Gini, Giuseppina

    2016-04-01

    In this study, new molecular fragments associated with genotoxic and nongenotoxic carcinogens are introduced to estimate the carcinogenic potential of compounds. Two rule-based carcinogenesis models were developed with the aid of SARpy: model R (from rodents' experimental data) and model E (from human carcinogenicity data). Structural alert extraction method of SARpy uses a completely automated and unbiased manner with statistical significance. The carcinogenicity models developed in this study are collections of carcinogenic potential fragments that were extracted from two carcinogenicity databases: the ANTARES carcinogenicity dataset with information from bioassay on rats and the combination of ISSCAN and CGX datasets, which take into accounts human-based assessment. The performance of these two models was evaluated in terms of cross-validation and external validation using a 258 compound case study dataset. Combining R and H predictions and scoring a positive or negative result when both models are concordant on a prediction, increased accuracy to 72% and specificity to 79% on the external test set. The carcinogenic fragments present in the two models were compared and analyzed from the point of view of chemical class. The results of this study show that the developed rule sets will be a useful tool to identify some new structural alerts of carcinogenicity and provide effective information on the molecular structures of carcinogenic chemicals. PMID:26986491

  19. Unilateral empyema impacts the assessment of regional lung ventilation by electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several studies have shown the ability of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) to assess regional ventilation distribution in human lungs. Fluid accumulation in the pleural space as in empyema, typically occurring on one chest side, may influence the distribution of ventilation and the corresponding EIT findings. The aim of our study was to examine this effect on the assessment of regional ventilation by EIT. Six patients suffering from unilateral empyema and intubated with a double-lumen endotracheal tube were studied. EIT data were acquired during volume-controlled ventilation with bilateral (tidal volume (VT): 800 ml) and unilateral ventilation (VT: 400 ml) of the right and left lungs. Mean tidal amplitudes of the EIT signal were calculated in all image pixels. The sums of these values, expressed as relative impedance change (rel. ΔZ), were then determined in whole images and functionally defined regions-of-interest (ROI). The sums of rel. ΔZ calculated during the two cases of one-lung ventilation either on the affected or unaffected side were significantly smaller than during bilateral ventilation. However, in contrast to previous findings in patients with no pleural pathology, very low values of rel. ΔZ were found when the lung on the affected side was ventilated. ROI-based analysis rendered higher values than the whole-image analysis in this case, nonetheless, the values were significantly smaller than when the unaffected side was ventilated in spite of identical VT. In conclusion, our results indicate that the presence of empyema may affect the quantitative evaluation of regional lung ventilation by EIT. (paper)

  20. Ultrasound lung comets for serial assessment of pulmonary congestion in heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Gargani, Luna; Frassi, Francesca; Prado, Aldo; Tesorio, Tullio; Soldati, Gino; Viola, Umberto; Porcari, Alberto; Mottola, Gaetano; Picano, Eugenio

    2007-01-01

    Background: Serial chest radiographs are too insensitive and therefore NOT recommended for monitoring pulmonary congestion in heart failure patients (AHA/ACC guidelines 2006). Ultrasound lung comets (ULCs) are a simple, quantitative chest sonography sign of pulmonary congestion, originating from water-thickened interlobular septa, and might represent a convenient alternative to chest x-ray in this clinical setting. Aim: To assess whether dynamic changes in ULCs could mirror variations in clin...

  1. Lobar analysis of collapsibility indices to assess functional lung volumes in COPD patients

    OpenAIRE

    Iwano, Shingo

    2014-01-01

    Mariko Kitano,1 Shingo Iwano,1 Naozumi Hashimoto,2 Keiji Matsuo,3 Yoshinori Hasegawa,2 Shinji Naganawa1 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan; 3Department of Radiology, Ichinomiya Municipal Hospital, Ichinomiya, Aichi, Japan Background: We investigated correlations between lung volume collapsibility indices and pulmonary function test (PFT) results and assessed lobar differences in chronic obstructi...

  2. Assessment of murine lung mechanics outcome measures: alignment with those made in asthmatics

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Julia K. L.; Kraft, Monica; Fisher, John T

    2013-01-01

    Although asthma is characterized as an inflammatory disease, recent reports highlight the importance of pulmonary physiology outcome measures to the clinical assessment of asthma control and risk of asthma exacerbation. Murine models of allergic inflammatory airway disease have been widely used to gain mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis of asthma; however, several aspects of murine models could benefit from improvement. This review focuses on aligning lung mechanics measures made in mi...

  3. A call to expand regulation to all carcinogenic fibrous minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, F.; Steele, I.; Ambrosi, J.; Carbone, M.

    2013-05-01

    The regulatory term "asbestos" groups only the six fibrous minerals that were commercially used among approximately 400. The carcinogenicity of these six regulated minerals has been largely demonstrated and is related to fiber structure, fiber length/diameter ratio, and bio-persistence. From a public perception, the generic term "asbestos" refers to the fibrous minerals that cause asbestosis, mesothelioma and other cancers. However, other non-regulated fibrous minerals are potentially as dangerous as the regulatory asbestos because they share similar physical and chemical properties, epidemiological studies have demonstrated their relationship with asbestos-related diseases, and both in vitro and in vivo experiments have established the toxicity of these minerals. For example, the non-regulated asbestiform winchite and richterite minerals that contaminated the vermiculite mined from Libby, Montana, (USA) were associated with mesothelioma, lung cancer and asbestosis observed among the area's residents and miners. Many other examples of non-regulated carcinogenic fibrous minerals include, but are not limited to, antigorite, arfvedsonite, balangeroite, carlosturanite, erionite, fluoro-edenite, hornblende, mordenite, palygorskite, and sepiolite. To propose a regulatory definition that would provide protection from all carcinogenic fibers, we have conducted an interdisciplinary literature review to compare the characteristics of "asbestos" and of non-regulated mineral fibers that relate to carcinogenicity. We specifically studied two non-regulated fibrous minerals that are associated with asbestos-related diseases: the serpentine antigorite and the zeolite erionite. Both examples underscore the problem of regulation based on commercial, rather than scientific principles: 1) the occurrence of fibrous antigorite in materials used to pave roads has been correlated with high mesothelioma rates in New Caledonia. Antigorite was also the cause of asbestosis in Poland, and in

  4. Comparison of expert and job-exposure matrix-based retrospective exposure assessment of occupational carcinogens in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offermans, Nadine S. M.; Vermeulen, Roel; Burdorf, Alex; Peters, Susan; Goldbohm, R. Alexandra; van Tongeren, Martie; Kauppinen, T.; Kant, Ijmert; Kromhout, Hans; van den Brandt, Piet A.; Koeman, T.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Reliable retrospective exposure assessment continues to be a challenge in most population-based studies. Several methodologies exist for estimating exposures retrospectively, of which case-by-case expert assessment and job-exposure matrices (JEMs) are commonly used. This study evaluated t

  5. Lung pathology and exposure to radon daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The data presented suggest that the primary carcinogen of lung cancer in uranium miners is cigarette smoking because the incidence of lung cancer in noncigarette smokers is insignificant. In cigarette-smoking uranium miners, however, the incidence of cancer in those exposed to significant amounts of radon daughters is higher than in the smoking, nonmining population. This suggests that radon is an additive carcinogen if the lung has been injured by the cigarette-smoking carcinogen. Preliminary studies measuring DNA, T cells, and rosette inhibition immunological studies indicate closer monitoring of uranium miners' health during this occupation may be justified

  6. A Proposed In Vitro Method to Assess Effects of Inhaled Particles on Lung Surfactant Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørli, Jorid B; Da Silva, Emilie; Bäckman, Per; Levin, Marcus; Thomsen, Birthe L; Koponen, Ismo K; Larsen, Søren T

    2016-03-01

    The lung surfactant (LS) lining is a thin liquid film covering the air-liquid interface of the respiratory tract. LS reduces surface tension, enabling lung surface expansion and contraction with minimal work during respiration. Disruption of surface tension is believed to play a key role in severe lung conditions. Inhalation of aerosols that interfere with the LS may induce a toxic response and, as a part of the safety assessment of chemicals and inhaled medicines, it may be relevant to study their impact on LS function. Here, we present a novel in vitro method, based on the constrained drop surfactometer, to study LS functionality after aerosol exposure. The applicability of the method was investigated using three inhaled asthma medicines, micronized lactose, a pharmaceutical excipient used in inhaled medication, and micronized albumin, a known inhibitor of surfactant function. The surfactometer was modified to allow particles mixed in air to flow through the chamber holding the surfactant drop. The deposited dose was measured with a custom-built quartz crystal microbalance. The alterations allowed the study of continuously increasing quantified doses of particles, allowing determination of the dose of particles that affects the LS function. The tested pharmaceuticals did not inhibit the function of a model LS even at extreme doses--neither did lactose. Micronized albumin, however, impaired surfactant function. The method can discriminate between safe inhaled aerosols--as exemplified by the approved inhaled medicines and the pharmaceutical excipient lactose--and albumin known to impair lung functionality by inhibiting LS function. PMID:26524226

  7. Impact of environmental exposures on the mutagenicity/carcinogenicity of heterocyclic amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcinogenic heterocyclic amines are produced from overcooked foods and are highly mutagenic in most short-term test systems. One of the most abundant of these amines, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), induces breast, colon and prostate tumors in rats. Human dietary epidemiology studies suggest a strong correlation between either meat consumption or well-done muscle meat consumption and cancers of the colon, breast, stomach, lung and esophagus. For over 20 years our laboratory has helped define the human exposure to these dietary carcinogens. In this report we describe how various environmental exposures may modulate the risk from exposure to heterocyclic amines, especially PhIP. To assess the impact of foods on PhIP metabolism in humans, we developed an LC/MS/MS method to analyze the four major PhIP urinary metabolites following the consumption of a single portion of grilled chicken. Adding broccoli to the volunteers' diet altered the kinetics of PhIP metabolism. At the cellular level we have found that PhIP itself stimulates a significant estrogenic response in MCF-7 cells, but even more interestingly, co-incubation of the cells with herbal teas appear to enhance the response. Numerous environmental chemicals found in food or the atmosphere can impact the exposure, metabolism, and cell proliferation response of heterocyclic amines

  8. Impact of Environmental Exposures on the Mutagenicity/Carcinogenicity of Heterocyclic Amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felton, J S; Knize, M G; Bennett, L M; Malfatti, M A; Colvin, M E; Kulp, K S

    2003-12-19

    Carcinogenic heterocyclic amines are produced from overcooked foods and are highly mutagenic in most short-term test systems. One of the most abundant of these amines, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), induces breast, colon and prostate tumors in rats. Human dietary epidemiology studies suggest a strong correlation between either meat consumption or well-done muscle meat consumption and cancers of the colon, breast, stomach, lung and esophagus. For over 20 years our laboratory has helped define the human exposure to these dietary carcinogens. In this report we describe how various environmental exposures may modulate the risk from exposure to heterocyclic amines, especially PhIP. To assess the impact of foods on PhIP metabolism in humans, we developed an LC/MS/MS method to analyze the four major PhIP urinary metabolites following the consumption of a single portion of grilled chicken. Adding broccoli to the volunteers' diet altered the kinetics of PhIP metabolism. At the cellular level we have found that PhIP itself stimulates a significant estrogenic response in MCF-7 cells, but even more interestingly, co-incubation of the cells with herbal teas appear to enhance the response. Numerous environmental chemicals found in food or the atmosphere can impact the exposure, metabolism, and cell proliferation response of heterocyclic amines.

  9. Assessing uncertainty in published risk estimates using hexavalent chromium and lung cancer mortality as an example [Presentation 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: The National Research Council recommended quantitative evaluation of uncertainty in effect estimates for risk assessment. This analysis considers uncertainty across model forms and model parameterizations with hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] and lung cancer mortality a...

  10. Direct assessment of lung function in COPD using CT densitometric measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate whether lung function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can be directly predicted using CT densitometric measures and assess the underlying prediction errors as compared with the traditional spirometry-based measures. A total of 600 CT examinations were collected from a COPD study. In addition to the entire lung volume, the extent of emphysema depicted in each CT examination was quantified using density mask analysis (densitometry). The partial least square regression was used for constructing the prediction model, where a repeated random split-sample validation was employed. For each split, we randomly selected 400 CT exams for training (regression) purpose and the remaining 200 exams for assessing performance in prediction of lung function (e.g., FEV1 and FEV1/FVC) and disease severity. The absolute and percentage errors as well as their standard deviations were computed. The averaged percentage errors in prediction of FEV1, FEV1/FVC%, TLC, RV/TLC% and DLco% predicted were 33%, 17%, 9%, 18% and 23%, respectively. When classifying the exams in terms of disease severity grades using the CT measures, 37% of the subjects were correctly classified with no error and 83% of the exams were either correctly classified or classified into immediate neighboring categories. The linear weighted kappa and quadratic weighted kappa were 0.54 (moderate agreement) and 0.72 (substantial agreement), respectively. Despite the existence of certain prediction errors in quantitative assessment of lung function, the CT densitometric measures could be used to relatively reliably classify disease severity grade of COPD patients in terms of GOLD. (paper)

  11. Longitudinal micro-CT provides biomarkers of lung disease that can be used to assess the effect of therapy in preclinical mouse models, and reveal compensatory changes in lung volume

    OpenAIRE

    Vande Velde, Greetje; Poelmans, Jennifer; De Langhe, Ellen; Hillen, Amy; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen; Himmelreich, Uwe; Lories, Rik J

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In vivo lung micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is being increasingly embraced in pulmonary research because it provides longitudinal information on dynamic disease processes in a field in which ex vivo assessment of experimental disease models is still the gold standard. To optimize the quantitative monitoring of progression and therapy of lung diseases, we evaluated longitudinal changes in four different micro-CT-derived biomarkers [aerated lung volume, lung tissue (including les...

  12. Poster — Thur Eve — 70: Automatic lung bronchial and vessel bifurcations detection algorithm for deformable image registration assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate an automatic bronchial and vessel bifurcations detection algorithm for deformable image registration (DIR) assessment to improve lung cancer radiation treatment. Methods: 4DCT datasets were acquired and exported to Varian treatment planning system (TPS) EclipseTM for contouring. The lungs TPS contour was used as the prior shape for a segmentation algorithm based on hierarchical surface deformation that identifies the deformed lungs volumes of the 10 breathing phases. Hounsfield unit (HU) threshold filter was applied within the segmented lung volumes to identify blood vessels and airways. Segmented blood vessels and airways were skeletonised using a hierarchical curve-skeleton algorithm based on a generalized potential field approach. A graph representation of the computed skeleton was generated to assign one of three labels to each node: the termination node, the continuation node or the branching node. Results: 320 ± 51 bifurcations were detected in the right lung of a patient for the 10 breathing phases. The bifurcations were visually analyzed. 92 ± 10 bifurcations were found in the upper half of the lung and 228 ± 45 bifurcations were found in the lower half of the lung. Discrepancies between ten vessel trees were mainly ascribed to large deformation and in regions where the HU varies. Conclusions: We established an automatic method for DIR assessment using the morphological information of the patient anatomy. This approach allows a description of the lung's internal structure movement, which is needed to validate the DIR deformation fields for accurate 4D cancer treatment planning

  13. Assessment of lung microstructure with magnetic resonance imaging of hyperpolarized Helium-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Wolfgang G.; Morbach, Andreas E; Stavngaard, Trine;

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of hyperpolarized Helium-3 is a new technique for probing pulmonary microstructure in vivo. The aim of this study was the assessment of potential sources of systematic errors of the ADC measurement. The influence of macroscopic...... motion was determined by measurements at two different delays after initiating the breath-hold, and before and after cardiac arrest. An intercentre comparison was performed in two age- and lung function-matched groups of lung-healthy volunteers at two research sites. Moreover, measurements of diffusion...... anisotropy were performed. We found no dependency of the ADC as a function of the delay after stop of inspiration. The influence of cardiac motion was less than 10%. In the intercentre comparison study, an excellent agreement between the two sites was found. First measurements of the diffusion tensor of...

  14. A review of mechanisms of acrylamide carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besaratinia, Ahmad; Pfeifer, Gerd P

    2007-03-01

    The fact that acrylamide, a proven rodent carcinogen, is present in significant quantities (up to several mg/kg of foodstuff) in a wide range of commonly consumed human foods is alarming. Attempts to determine a possible involvement of dietary acrylamide in human cancers have not been conclusive, however. To resolve the carcinogenicity of acrylamide to humans, the as yet unknown mechanism of action of acrylamide needs to be unraveled. The present review is a synopsis of research on the known and hypothetical modes of action of acrylamide of relevance for carcinogenesis. Both genotoxic and non-genotoxic modes of action of acrylamide are discussed with special emphasis on DNA adduct-targeted mutagenesis. Mechanistic data are presented from various experimental systems including in vitro experiments and in vivo rodent and human studies with special focus on mouse models. Human exposure data, including estimates of daily intake of dietary acrylamide in different populations and the corresponding cancer risk assessments are provided. The significant gaps in knowledge, which currently preclude a more definitive evaluation of human cancer risk due to exposure to dietary acrylamide, are highlighted. Future directions for research on acrylamide and cancer are outlined, and potential challenges are underscored. PMID:17234719

  15. Collateral Ventilation to Congenital Hyperlucent Lung Lesions Assessed on Xenon-Enhanced Dynamic Dual-Energy CT: an Initial Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We wanted to evaluate the resistance to collateral ventilation in congenital hyperlucent lung lesions and to correlate that with the anatomic findings on xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT. Xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT was successfully and safely performed in eight children (median age: 5.5 years, 4 boys and 4 girls) with congenital hyperlucent lung lesions. Functional assessment of the lung lesions on the xenon map was done, including performing a time-xenon value curve analysis and assessing the amplitude of xenon enhancement (A) value, the rate of xenon enhancement (K) value and the time of arrival value. Based on the A value, the lung lesions were categorized into high or low (A value > 10 Hounsfi eld unit [HU]) resistance to collateral ventilation. In addition, the morphologic CT findings of the lung lesions, including cyst, mucocele and an accessory or incomplete fissure, were assessed on the weighted-average CT images. The xenon-enhanced CT radiation dose was estimated. Five of the eight lung lesions were categorized into the high resistance group and three lesions were categorized into the low resistance group. The A and K values in the normal lung were higher than those in the low resistance group. The time of arrival values were delayed in the low resistance group. Cysts were identified in five lesions, mucocele in four, accessory fissure in three and incomplete fissure in two. Either cyst or an accessory fissure was seen in four of the five lesions showing high resistance to collateral ventilation. The xenon-enhanced CT radiation dose was 2.3 ± 0.6 mSv. Xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT can help visualize and quantitate various degrees of collateral ventilation to congenital hyperlucent lung lesions in addition to assessing the anatomic details of the lung

  16. Collateral Ventilation to Congenital Hyperlucent Lung Lesions Assessed on Xenon-Enhanced Dynamic Dual-Energy CT: an Initial Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Yang, Dong Hyun; Kim, Nam Kug; Park, Seung Il; Kim, Dong Kwan; Kim, Ellen Ai Rhan [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    We wanted to evaluate the resistance to collateral ventilation in congenital hyperlucent lung lesions and to correlate that with the anatomic findings on xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT. Xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT was successfully and safely performed in eight children (median age: 5.5 years, 4 boys and 4 girls) with congenital hyperlucent lung lesions. Functional assessment of the lung lesions on the xenon map was done, including performing a time-xenon value curve analysis and assessing the amplitude of xenon enhancement (A) value, the rate of xenon enhancement (K) value and the time of arrival value. Based on the A value, the lung lesions were categorized into high or low (A value > 10 Hounsfi eld unit [HU]) resistance to collateral ventilation. In addition, the morphologic CT findings of the lung lesions, including cyst, mucocele and an accessory or incomplete fissure, were assessed on the weighted-average CT images. The xenon-enhanced CT radiation dose was estimated. Five of the eight lung lesions were categorized into the high resistance group and three lesions were categorized into the low resistance group. The A and K values in the normal lung were higher than those in the low resistance group. The time of arrival values were delayed in the low resistance group. Cysts were identified in five lesions, mucocele in four, accessory fissure in three and incomplete fissure in two. Either cyst or an accessory fissure was seen in four of the five lesions showing high resistance to collateral ventilation. The xenon-enhanced CT radiation dose was 2.3 {+-} 0.6 mSv. Xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT can help visualize and quantitate various degrees of collateral ventilation to congenital hyperlucent lung lesions in addition to assessing the anatomic details of the lung

  17. Chemoprevention of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Keith, Robert L

    2009-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, and the majority of diagnoses are made in former smokers. While avoidance of tobacco abuse and smoking cessation clearly will have the greatest impact on lung cancer development, effective chemoprevention could prove to be more effective than treatment of established disease. Chemoprevention is the use of dietary or pharmaceutical agents to reverse or inhibit the carcinogenic process and has been successfully applied to co...

  18. Lung Cancer Chemoprevention

    OpenAIRE

    Keith, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, and the majority of diagnoses are made in former smokers. Although avoidance of tobacco abuse and smoking cessation clearly will have the greatest impact on lung cancer development, effective chemoprevention could prove to be more effective than treatment of established, advanced-stage disease. Chemoprevention is the use of dietary or pharmaceutical agents to reverse or block the carcinogenic process and has been successfu...

  19. Ventilation/Perfusion Positron Emission Tomography—Based Assessment of Radiation Injury to Lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate 68Ga-ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) as a novel imaging modality for assessment of perfusion, ventilation, and lung density changes in the context of radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: In a prospective clinical trial, 20 patients underwent 4-dimensional (4D)-V/Q PET/CT before, midway through, and 3 months after definitive lung RT. Eligible patients were prescribed 60 Gy in 30 fractions with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Functional images were registered to the RT planning 4D-CT, and isodose volumes were averaged into 10-Gy bins. Within each dose bin, relative loss in standardized uptake value (SUV) was recorded for ventilation and perfusion, and loss in air-filled fraction was recorded to assess RT-induced lung fibrosis. A dose-effect relationship was described using both linear and 2-parameter logistic fit models, and goodness of fit was assessed with Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Results: A total of 179 imaging datasets were available for analysis (1 scan was unrecoverable). An almost perfectly linear negative dose-response relationship was observed for perfusion and air-filled fraction (r2=0.99, P<.01), with ventilation strongly negatively linear (r2=0.95, P<.01). Logistic models did not provide a better fit as evaluated by AIC. Perfusion, ventilation, and the air-filled fraction decreased 0.75 ± 0.03%, 0.71 ± 0.06%, and 0.49 ± 0.02%/Gy, respectively. Within high-dose regions, higher baseline perfusion SUV was associated with greater rate of loss. At 50 Gy and 60 Gy, the rate of loss was 1.35% (P=.07) and 1.73% (P=.05) per SUV, respectively. Of 8/20 patients with peritumoral reperfusion/reventilation during treatment, 7/8 did not sustain this effect after treatment. Conclusions: Radiation-induced regional lung functional deficits occur in a dose-dependent manner and can be estimated by simple linear models with 4D-V/Q PET/CT imaging. These

  20. Ventilation/Perfusion Positron Emission Tomography—Based Assessment of Radiation Injury to Lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siva, Shankar, E-mail: shankar.siva@petermac.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Parkville (Australia); Hardcastle, Nicholas [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong (Australia); Kron, Tomas [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Bressel, Mathias [Department of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Callahan, Jason [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); MacManus, Michael P.; Shaw, Mark; Plumridge, Nikki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville (Australia); Steinfort, Daniel [Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville (Australia); Department of Cancer Medicine, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Ball, David L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Hofman, Michael S. [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville (Australia)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate {sup 68}Ga-ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) as a novel imaging modality for assessment of perfusion, ventilation, and lung density changes in the context of radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: In a prospective clinical trial, 20 patients underwent 4-dimensional (4D)-V/Q PET/CT before, midway through, and 3 months after definitive lung RT. Eligible patients were prescribed 60 Gy in 30 fractions with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Functional images were registered to the RT planning 4D-CT, and isodose volumes were averaged into 10-Gy bins. Within each dose bin, relative loss in standardized uptake value (SUV) was recorded for ventilation and perfusion, and loss in air-filled fraction was recorded to assess RT-induced lung fibrosis. A dose-effect relationship was described using both linear and 2-parameter logistic fit models, and goodness of fit was assessed with Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Results: A total of 179 imaging datasets were available for analysis (1 scan was unrecoverable). An almost perfectly linear negative dose-response relationship was observed for perfusion and air-filled fraction (r{sup 2}=0.99, P<.01), with ventilation strongly negatively linear (r{sup 2}=0.95, P<.01). Logistic models did not provide a better fit as evaluated by AIC. Perfusion, ventilation, and the air-filled fraction decreased 0.75 ± 0.03%, 0.71 ± 0.06%, and 0.49 ± 0.02%/Gy, respectively. Within high-dose regions, higher baseline perfusion SUV was associated with greater rate of loss. At 50 Gy and 60 Gy, the rate of loss was 1.35% (P=.07) and 1.73% (P=.05) per SUV, respectively. Of 8/20 patients with peritumoral reperfusion/reventilation during treatment, 7/8 did not sustain this effect after treatment. Conclusions: Radiation-induced regional lung functional deficits occur in a dose-dependent manner and can be estimated by simple linear models with 4D-V/Q PET

  1. Molecular biology of the lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Lung cancer is one of the most common malignant diseases and leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The advances in molecular biology and genetics, including the modern microarray technology and rapid sequencing techniques, have enabled a remarkable progress into elucidating the lung cancer ethiopathogenesis. Numerous studies suggest that more than 20 different genetic and epigenetic alterations are accumulating during the pathogenesis of clinically evident pulmonary cancers as a clonal, multistep process. Thus far, the most investigated alterations are the inactivational mutations and losses of tumour suppressor genes and the overexpression of growth-promoting oncogenes. More recently, the acquired epigenetic inactivation of tumour suppressor genes by promoter hypermethylation has been recognized. The early clonal genetic abnormalities that occur in preneoplastic bronchial epithelium damaged by smoking or other carcinogenes are being identified. The molecular distinctions between small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as between tumors with different clinical outcomes have been described. These investigations lead to the hallmarks of lung cancer. Conclusions. It is realistic to expect that the molecular and cell culture-based investigations will lead to discoveries of new clinical applications with the potential to provide new avenues for early diagnosis, risk assessment, prevention, and most important, new more effective treatment approaches for the lung cancer patients. (author)

  2. Cystic fibrosis lung disease: genetic influences, microbial interactions, and radiological assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskowitz, Samuel M.; Gibson, Ronald L. [University of Washington, Department of Pediatrics, Seattle, WA (United States); Effmann, Eric L. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Children' s Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multiorgan disease caused by mutation of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Obstructive lung disease is the predominant cause of morbidity and mortality; thus, most efforts to improve outcomes are directed toward slowing or halting lung-disease progression. Current therapies, such as mucolytics, airway clearance techniques, bronchodilators, and antibiotics, aim to suppress airway inflammation and the processes that stimulate it, namely, retention and infection of mucus plaques at the airway surface. New approaches to therapy that aim to ameliorate specific CFTR mutations or mutational classes by restoring normal expression or function are being investigated. Because of its sensitivity in detecting changes associated with early airway obstruction and regional lung disease, high-resolution CT (HRCT) complements pulmonary function testing in defining disease natural history and measuring response to both conventional and experimental therapies. In this review, perspectives on the genetics and microbiology of CF provide a context for understanding the increasing importance of HRCT and other imaging techniques in assessing CF therapies. (orig.)

  3. Cystic fibrosis lung disease: genetic influences, microbial interactions, and radiological assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multiorgan disease caused by mutation of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Obstructive lung disease is the predominant cause of morbidity and mortality; thus, most efforts to improve outcomes are directed toward slowing or halting lung-disease progression. Current therapies, such as mucolytics, airway clearance techniques, bronchodilators, and antibiotics, aim to suppress airway inflammation and the processes that stimulate it, namely, retention and infection of mucus plaques at the airway surface. New approaches to therapy that aim to ameliorate specific CFTR mutations or mutational classes by restoring normal expression or function are being investigated. Because of its sensitivity in detecting changes associated with early airway obstruction and regional lung disease, high-resolution CT (HRCT) complements pulmonary function testing in defining disease natural history and measuring response to both conventional and experimental therapies. In this review, perspectives on the genetics and microbiology of CF provide a context for understanding the increasing importance of HRCT and other imaging techniques in assessing CF therapies. (orig.)

  4. Utility of thin-section/high-pitch helical CT for the assessment of small lung nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the utility of thin-section/high-pitch CT for the assessment of small lung nodules, a lung phantom was scanned on 1 mm width collimation at variable pitches of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0. Images obtained at pitch 3.0 were degraded visually. Secondly a bead phantom was scanned on 1 mm width collimation at pitches of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 3.0. Focus size was determined with a variable setting of small and large. We obtained maximum and full width at half maximum (FWHM) scans and performed a clinical study of small lung nodules on 1 mm width at pitch 2.0 on small focus. Thirdly, we estimated the image quality of 1 mm/2 mm helical scans in comparison with 1 mm/1 mm helical scans. Comparison was made using axial, MPR and 3D-CT (MIP) images. The axial and MIP images were almost equal qualitatively, whereas MPR images were degraded, especially in the near region of the heart and great vessels, due to motion artifacts. We emphasize the utility of 1 mm/2 mm helical CT in scanning a much larger volume with the same breath holding. (author)

  5. Biomarkers of carcinogen exposure and cancer risk in a coke plant.

    OpenAIRE

    Assennato, G; Ferri, G M; Tockman, M S; Poirier, M C; Schoket, B; Porro, A.; Corrado, V.; Strickland, P T

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the association between an indicator of carcinogen exposure (peripheral blood leukocyte DNA adducts of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) and an early indicator of neoplastic transformation (sputum epithelial cell membrane antigens binding by monoclonal antibodies against small cell lung cancer and against nonsmall cell lung cancer), a survey of 350 coke-oven workers and 100 unexposed workers was planned. This paper reports a pilot investigation on a subgroup of 23 coke-oven worker...

  6. Association between Six Environmental Chemicals and Lung Cancer Incidence in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Juhua Luo; Michael Hendryx; Alan Ducatman

    2011-01-01

    Background. An increased risk of lung cancer has been observed at exposure to certain industrial chemicals in occupational settings; however, less is known about their carcinogenic potential to the general population when those agents are released into the environment. Methods. We used the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) database and Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data to conduct an ecological study at the county level. We used multiple linear regression to assess the assoc...

  7. In vitro assessment of Macleaya cordata crude extract bioactivity and anticancer properties in normal and cancerous human lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Lin, Yu-ling; Chen, Xuan-Ren; Liao, Chi-Cheng; Poo, Wak-Kim

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the bioactivity and anticancer properties of Macleaya cordata crude extract in vitro using normal fetal lung fibroblast MRC5 and adenocarcinomic epithelial cell A549 as model systems,. Treatment of extract induced cell detachment, rounding, and irregularity in shape, in both normal and adenocarcinomic human lung cells, in accompanied of significant reduction in cell proliferation. The data indicated that necrosis appeared to be involved in compromising cell growth in both types of lung cells since membrane permeability and cell granularity were elevated. Although apoptosis was evident, the responses were differential in normal and diseased lung cells. Viability of treated MRC5 cells was reduced in a dose-dependent manner, demonstrating that the normal lung cells are sensitive to the extract. Surprisingly, A549 viability was slightly elevated in response to extract exposure at low concentration, implying that cells survived were metabolically active; the viability was reduced accordingly to treatment at higher concentrations. The present findings demonstrate that the crude extract of M. cordata contains agents affecting the functioning of normal and diseased lung cells in vitro. The observed cytotoxic effects against adenocarcinomic lung cells validate the potential of using M. cordata as herbal intervention in combined with conventional chemotherapy for lung cancer treatment. PMID:23238228

  8. EPA's approach to assessment of radon risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Protection Agency has assessed the potential lung cancer risk to the general population due to radon based on the Agency's general principles of risk assessment. This is the same approach that has been used to assess the impact on public health of other carcinogenic environmental pollutants. This paper describes the application of this approach to radon. This paper includes a description of the method used by the Agency to estimate that 20,000 lung cancer deaths per year may be related to radon exposure. Also presented are the weight-of-evidence for classifying radon as a known human carcinogen and the uncertainties associated with estimating risks from radon exposure. These reflect the extent of the underlying support and context for these estimates

  9. Bulky carcinogen-DNA adducts and exposure to environmental and occupational sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Influence of susceptibility genotypes on adduct level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabro Nielsen, P.

    1996-12-31

    PAH exposure, whether it is of occupational or environmental origin, is thought to result in an elevated risk of cancer especially in the lungs. DNA damage is considered an important step in the carcinogenic effect of PAH. Hence, methods that elucidate the steps in the carcinogenic process are important to understand the action of PAH. It may prove useful in the exposure assessment and in combination with classical epidemiological methods give better basis for risk estimation. The objective in this thesis was to evaluate the feasibility of the {sup 32}P-postlabeling method to detect carcinogen-DNA adducts for assessing exposure to DNA damaging compounds in different occupationally and environmentally exposed groups. The studies included groups, that have an elevated cancer risk due to occupational exposure to PAH. Exposure levels were supposed to be relatively low according to reports on occupational and environmental air quality programs. Another aim was to evaluate the influence of polymorphisms in metabolizing enzyme genes on DNA adduct levels. A third objective was to establish some kind of baseline DNA adduct level for individuals with supposed low exposure, and compare it to the more exposed groups. A fourth aim in these studies was to examine if biomarkers of genotoxic exposure could be useful in epidemiological studies to identify groups at risk and thereby contribute with better exposure estimates in the study of PAH related cancer risk. (EG).

  10. Bulky carcinogen-DNA adducts and exposure to environmental and occupational sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Influence of susceptibility genotypes on adduct level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PAH exposure, whether it is of occupational or environmental origin, is thought to result in an elevated risk of cancer especially in the lungs. DNA damage is considered an important step in the carcinogenic effect of PAH. Hence, methods that elucidate the steps in the carcinogenic process are important to understand the action of PAH. It may prove useful in the exposure assessment and in combination with classical epidemiological methods give better basis for risk estimation. The objective in this thesis was to evaluate the feasibility of the 32P-postlabeling method to detect carcinogen-DNA adducts for assessing exposure to DNA damaging compounds in different occupationally and environmentally exposed groups. The studies included groups, that have an elevated cancer risk due to occupational exposure to PAH. Exposure levels were supposed to be relatively low according to reports on occupational and environmental air quality programs. Another aim was to evaluate the influence of polymorphisms in metabolizing enzyme genes on DNA adduct levels. A third objective was to establish some kind of baseline DNA adduct level for individuals with supposed low exposure, and compare it to the more exposed groups. A fourth aim in these studies was to examine if biomarkers of genotoxic exposure could be useful in epidemiological studies to identify groups at risk and thereby contribute with better exposure estimates in the study of PAH related cancer risk. (EG)

  11. State-of-the-art radiological techniques improve the assessment of postoperative lung function in patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu, E-mail: yoshiharuohno@aol.com [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Koyama, Hisanobu [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Nogami, Munenobu [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Division of Image-Based Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, 2-2 Minatojima Minami-machi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo, 650-0047 (Japan); Takenaka, Daisuke; Onishi, Yumiko; Matsumoto, Keiko; Matsumoto, Sumiaki [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Maniwa, Yoshimasa [Division of Cardiovascular, Thoracic and Pediatric Surgery, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo, 650-0017 (Japan); Yoshimura, Masahiro [Division of Cardiovascular, Thoracic and Pediatric Surgery, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo, 650-0017 (Japan); Division of Thoracic Surgery, Hyogo Cancer Center, 13-7 Kitaohji-cho, Akashi, Hyogo, 673-8558 (Japan); Nishimura, Yoshihiro [Division of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo, 650-0017 (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare predictive capabilities for postoperative lung function in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients of the state-of-the-art radiological methods including perfusion MRI, quantitative CT and SPECT/CT with that of anatomical method (i.e. qualitative CT) and traditional nuclear medicine methods such as planar imaging and SPECT. Materials and methods: Perfusion MRI, CT, nuclear medicine study and measurements of %FEV{sub 1} before and after lung resection were performed for 229 NSCLC patients (125 men and 104 women). For perfusion MRI, postoperative %FEV{sub 1} (po%FEV{sub 1}) was predicted from semi-quantitatively assessed blood volumes within total and resected lungs, for quantitative CT, it was predicted from the functional lung volumes within total and resected lungs, for qualitative CT, from the number of segments of total and resected lungs, and for nuclear medicine studies, from uptakes within total and resected lungs. All SPECTs were automatically co-registered with CTs for preparation of SPECT/CTs. Predicted po%FEV{sub 1}s were then correlated with actual po%FEV{sub 1}s, which were measured %FEV{sub 1}s after operation. The limits of agreement were also evaluated. Results: All predicted po%FEV{sub 1}s showed good correlation with actual po%FEV{sub 1}s (0.83 {<=} r {<=} 0.88, p < 0.0001). Perfusion MRI, quantitative CT and SPECT/CT demonstrated better correlation than other methods. The limits of agreement of perfusion MRI (4.4 {+-} 14.2%), quantitative CT (4.7 {+-} 14.2%) and SPECT/CT (5.1 {+-} 14.7%) were less than those of qualitative CT (6.0 {+-} 17.4%), planar imaging (5.8 {+-} 18.2%), and SPECT (5.5 {+-} 16.8%). Conclusions: State-of-the-art radiological methods can predict postoperative lung function in NSCLC patients more accurately than traditional methods.

  12. State-of-the-art radiological techniques improve the assessment of postoperative lung function in patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare predictive capabilities for postoperative lung function in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients of the state-of-the-art radiological methods including perfusion MRI, quantitative CT and SPECT/CT with that of anatomical method (i.e. qualitative CT) and traditional nuclear medicine methods such as planar imaging and SPECT. Materials and methods: Perfusion MRI, CT, nuclear medicine study and measurements of %FEV1 before and after lung resection were performed for 229 NSCLC patients (125 men and 104 women). For perfusion MRI, postoperative %FEV1 (po%FEV1) was predicted from semi-quantitatively assessed blood volumes within total and resected lungs, for quantitative CT, it was predicted from the functional lung volumes within total and resected lungs, for qualitative CT, from the number of segments of total and resected lungs, and for nuclear medicine studies, from uptakes within total and resected lungs. All SPECTs were automatically co-registered with CTs for preparation of SPECT/CTs. Predicted po%FEV1s were then correlated with actual po%FEV1s, which were measured %FEV1s after operation. The limits of agreement were also evaluated. Results: All predicted po%FEV1s showed good correlation with actual po%FEV1s (0.83 ≤ r ≤ 0.88, p < 0.0001). Perfusion MRI, quantitative CT and SPECT/CT demonstrated better correlation than other methods. The limits of agreement of perfusion MRI (4.4 ± 14.2%), quantitative CT (4.7 ± 14.2%) and SPECT/CT (5.1 ± 14.7%) were less than those of qualitative CT (6.0 ± 17.4%), planar imaging (5.8 ± 18.2%), and SPECT (5.5 ± 16.8%). Conclusions: State-of-the-art radiological methods can predict postoperative lung function in NSCLC patients more accurately than traditional methods.

  13. sup 111 Indium-labeled neutrophil migration into the lungs of bleomycin-treated rabbits assessed noninvasively by external scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haslett, C.; Shen, A.S.; Feldsien, D.C.; Allen, D.; Henson, P.M.; Cherniack, R.M. (National Jewish Center for Immunology and Respiratory Medicine, Denver, CO (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Factors controlling neutrophil migration into the lung are poorly understood, but their identification is important for our understanding of the pathogenesis of inflammatory lung diseases. Pulmonary inflammation is difficult to quantify, and neutrophils in tissues and BAL may not accurately represent cell migration. In this study, intravenously delivered pulses of rabbit neutrophils labeled with Indium-111 (111In-neutrophils) were used to monitor neutrophil migration into the lungs. Radioactivity quantified in the lung region of interest (ROI) of external gamma camera scintigrams recorded 24 h after intravenous 111In-neutrophil injection accurately reflected the actual neutrophil-associated lung tissue radioactivity. ROI radioactivity at 24 h also correlated closely with the percent of 111In-neutrophils that had migrated into lavageable air spaces, and this parameter therefore provided an index of total lung 111In-neutrophil migration. Using 24-h ROI radioactivity and percent of injected 111In-neutrophils recovered in BAL at 24 h as indices of neutrophil migration into the lung, it was found that intratracheal saline caused only a transient neutrophil migration, whereas 10 U/kg intratracheal bleomycin induced migration that persisted for as long as 3 wk. 111In-neutrophil migration into the lung, assessed by external scintigraphy, correlated with total neutrophils quantified in histologic sections (r = 0.71, p = 0.006). The data suggest that this approach will be valuable in investigating mechanisms controlling neutrophil migration in lung inflammation, and that 111In-neutrophil scintigraphy may provide a noninvasive index of total lung neutrophil load that might be useful in staging inflammation in patchy diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  14. 111Indium-labeled neutrophil migration into the lungs of bleomycin-treated rabbits assessed noninvasively by external scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Factors controlling neutrophil migration into the lung are poorly understood, but their identification is important for our understanding of the pathogenesis of inflammatory lung diseases. Pulmonary inflammation is difficult to quantify, and neutrophils in tissues and BAL may not accurately represent cell migration. In this study, intravenously delivered pulses of rabbit neutrophils labeled with Indium-111 (111In-neutrophils) were used to monitor neutrophil migration into the lungs. Radioactivity quantified in the lung region of interest (ROI) of external gamma camera scintigrams recorded 24 h after intravenous 111In-neutrophil injection accurately reflected the actual neutrophil-associated lung tissue radioactivity. ROI radioactivity at 24 h also correlated closely with the percent of 111In-neutrophils that had migrated into lavageable air spaces, and this parameter therefore provided an index of total lung 111In-neutrophil migration. Using 24-h ROI radioactivity and percent of injected 111In-neutrophils recovered in BAL at 24 h as indices of neutrophil migration into the lung, it was found that intratracheal saline caused only a transient neutrophil migration, whereas 10 U/kg intratracheal bleomycin induced migration that persisted for as long as 3 wk. 111In-neutrophil migration into the lung, assessed by external scintigraphy, correlated with total neutrophils quantified in histologic sections (r = 0.71, p = 0.006). The data suggest that this approach will be valuable in investigating mechanisms controlling neutrophil migration in lung inflammation, and that 111In-neutrophil scintigraphy may provide a noninvasive index of total lung neutrophil load that might be useful in staging inflammation in patchy diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in lung tissue of patients with pulmonary cancer from Romania. Influence according as demographic status and ABO phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioroiu, Bogdan Ionel; Tarcau, Doina; Cucu-Man, Simona; Chisalita, Irina; Cioroiu, Mona

    2013-07-01

    The lung is a target organ for the toxic effects of several chemical agents, including natural products, industrial chemicals, environmental agents, and occasionally, drugs. The assessment of PAHs in the lungs of patients with pulmonary cancer is important because these pollutants have mutagenic, carcinogenic and endocrine-disrupting properties. This study included 31 histological confirmed lung cancer cases diagnosed consecutively at the Clinical Hospital of Pneumology (Iasi, Romania) from 2008 to 2009. Analyses were carried out using an accelerated solvent extraction technique and HPLC with a fluorescence detector. Fifteen PAHs were detected in all analyzed samples with non-carcinogenic compounds significantly elevated (45.57 ng g(-1) wet tissue) against carcinogenic compounds (6.12 ng g(-1) wet tissue). The mean ± SD lung tissue level of benzo(a)anthracene (3.57 ± 4.64 ng g(-1) wet tissue), a carcinogenic PAH, was found to be significantly higher (psamples collected from subjects with A and O blood types. PMID:23541146

  16. Comparison between US and MRI in the prenatal assessment of lung malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contribution of MRI in the prenatal evaluation of congenital lung abnormalities (CLA) has not been extensively investigated. (1) To compare diagnostic accuracy and assessment of prognostic factors between US and MRI in CLA and (2) to assess the diagnosis agreement between prenatal imaging and postnatal diagnosis. We included 23 consecutive fetuses who underwent concomitant US and MRI during gestation as well as postnatal CT and surgery (n = 22). US-MRI sets were performed at median gestational age of 26 (n = 16) and 34 (n = 22) weeks. Postnatal diagnoses were 11 congenital pulmonary airway malformations (CPAM), 4 bronchopulmonary sequestrations (BPS), 6 hybrid lesions and 2 cysts. US and MRI agreement was significantly better during the second trimester than during the third one (P = 0.02). Disagreements were related to missed cysts (n = 5), mediastinal shift (n = 6) and vessels (n = 5). US and MRI diagnosis agreement was present in 20 cases, including 5 cases of misdiagnosis. US and MRI were concordant with postnatal diagnosis in 17 and 16 cases, respectively. In our series, no clear superiority of MRI over US in the prenatal evaluation of CLA was demonstrated, but US better demonstrated systemic feeding vessels and MRI cysts and normal lung adjacent to the lesion. (orig.)

  17. Comparison between US and MRI in the prenatal assessment of lung malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beydon, Nicole [Hopital Armand-Trousseau, Assistance Publique Hopital de Paris (APHP), Unite Fonctionnelle de Physiologie-Explorations Fonctionnelles Respiratoires (EFR), Paris Cedex 12 (France); Larroquet, Michele [Hopital Armand-Trousseau, APHP Service de Chirurgie Viscerale, Paris (France); Coulomb, Aurore [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Hopital Armand-Trousseau, APHP Service d' Anatomo-Pathologie, Paris (France); Jouannic, Jean-Marie [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Hopital Armand-Trousseau, APHP Service de Gyneco-Obstetrique, Paris (France); Ducou le Pointe, Hubert [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Hopital Armand-Trousseau, APHP Service de Radiologie, Paris (France); Clement, Annick [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Hopital Armand-Trousseau, APHP Unite Fonctionnelle de Pneumologie Pediatrique, Paris (France); Garel, Catherine [Hopital Armand-Trousseau, APHP Service de Radiologie, Paris (France)

    2013-06-15

    The contribution of MRI in the prenatal evaluation of congenital lung abnormalities (CLA) has not been extensively investigated. (1) To compare diagnostic accuracy and assessment of prognostic factors between US and MRI in CLA and (2) to assess the diagnosis agreement between prenatal imaging and postnatal diagnosis. We included 23 consecutive fetuses who underwent concomitant US and MRI during gestation as well as postnatal CT and surgery (n = 22). US-MRI sets were performed at median gestational age of 26 (n = 16) and 34 (n = 22) weeks. Postnatal diagnoses were 11 congenital pulmonary airway malformations (CPAM), 4 bronchopulmonary sequestrations (BPS), 6 hybrid lesions and 2 cysts. US and MRI agreement was significantly better during the second trimester than during the third one (P = 0.02). Disagreements were related to missed cysts (n = 5), mediastinal shift (n = 6) and vessels (n = 5). US and MRI diagnosis agreement was present in 20 cases, including 5 cases of misdiagnosis. US and MRI were concordant with postnatal diagnosis in 17 and 16 cases, respectively. In our series, no clear superiority of MRI over US in the prenatal evaluation of CLA was demonstrated, but US better demonstrated systemic feeding vessels and MRI cysts and normal lung adjacent to the lesion. (orig.)

  18. Dual energy CT for the assessment of lung perfusion-Correlation to scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thieme, Sven F.; Becker, Christoph R. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich (Germany); Hacker, Marcus [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich (Germany); Nikolaou, Konstantin; Reiser, Maximilian F. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich (Germany); Johnson, Thorsten R.C. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich (Germany)], E-mail: thorsten.johnson@med.uni-muenchen.de

    2008-12-15

    Purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of dual energy CT in the assessment of pulmonary perfusion with reference to pulmonary perfusion scintigraphy. Thirteen patients received both dual energy CT (DECT) angiography (Somatom Definition, Siemens) and ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy. Median time between scans was 3 days (range, 0-90). DECT perfusion maps were generated based on the spectral properties of iodine. Two blinded observes assessed DECT angiograms, perfusion maps and scintigrams for presence and location of perfusion defects. The results were compared by patient and by segment, and diagnostic accuracy of DECT perfusion imaging was calculated regarding scintigraphy as standard of reference. Diagnostic accuracy per patient showed 75% sensitivity, 80% specificity and a negative predictive value of 66%. Sensitivity per segment amounted to 83% with 99% specificity, with 93% negative predictive value. Peripheral parts of the lungs were not completely covered by the 80 kVp detector in 85% of patients. CTA identified corresponding emboli in 66% of patients with concordant perfusion defects in DECT and scintigraphy. Dual energy CT perfusion imaging is able to display pulmonary perfusion defects with good agreement to scintigraphic findings. DECT can provide a pulmonary CT angiogram, high-resolution morphology of the lung parenchyma and perfusion information in one single exam.

  19. Computed tomography densitometry of the lung: a method to assess perfusion defects in acute pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groell, Reinhard E-mail: reinhard.groell@kfunigraz.ac.at; Peichel, Karl H.; Uggowitzer, Martin M.; Schmid, Ferdinand; Hartwagner, Karin

    1999-12-01

    Objective: To evaluate the potential of spiral computed tomography (CT) densitometry of the lung to assess segmental perfusion defects in patients with acute pulmonary embolism. Materials and Methods: Ten patients with known segmental or lobar perfusion defects on ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy and with normal findings in the contralateral lung segment underwent spiral CT of the thorax before and after the administration of contrast material. Regions of interest were defined in 14 segments with normal perfusion and in 14 segments with reduced perfusion. Three consecutive densitometry measurements were performed in each segment. Results: Those segments with reduced perfusion showed a significantly lower mean CT value on the enhanced scans (-813.4{+-}57.1 Hounsfield units (HU) vs -794.0{+-}44.8 HU, P=0.01) and a significantly decreased contrast enhancement (12.3{+-}18.2 HU vs 29.8{+-}16.6 HU, P<0.01) when compared to segments with normal perfusion. Measurements from the unenhanced CT scans were not statistically different between segments with reduced and normal perfusion. Conclusions: Spiral CT densitometry allows the assessment of at least segmental perfusion defects in patients with acute pulmonary embolism.

  20. Urban air carcinogens and their effects on health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechner, J.F.

    1994-11-01

    Airborne carcinogens may be relevant especially in metropolitan regions with extreme smog as a primary cause of lung cancer. Lung cancer is most common in urban environs and the incidence directly correlates with the size of the city. In addition, several, but not all formal epidemiological studies also suggest a positive correlation between lung cancer incidence and the intensity of air pollution exposure. There is further support for a role of air pollution; as of 1993, 4.4% of all of the bronchogenic adenocarcinoma cancer cases among Mexicans living in industrialized cities are under 40 years of age. It is plausible that chronic inhalation of automobile combustion products, factory emissions, and/or radon is at least partially responsible for the higher incidence of lung cancer exemplified by the never-smoking urban residents. The exceptionally high incidence of lung cancer cases among never-smokers living in highly industrialized Mexican cities offers a unique opportunity to use molecular epidemiology to test whether chronic inhalation of atmospheric pollutants increases the risk for this disease. Overall, the analysis of the genetic alterations in two cancer genes, and possibly the hprt locus should give new insight as to whether the urban never-smokers developed their cancers because of exposure to environmental pollutants.

  1. Relative preservation of peripheral lung function in smoking-related pulmonary emphysema: assessment with 99mTc-MAA perfusion and dynamic 133Xe SPET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study the cross-sectional functional differences between the central and peripheral lung in smokers with pulmonary emphysema were evaluated by lung perfusion and dynamic xenon-133 single-photon emission tomography (SPET). The subjects were 81 patients with a long-term smoking history and relatively advanced emphysema, 17 non-smoker patients with non-obstructive lung diseases and six healthy non-smokers. Regional lung functional difference between the peripheral and central lung was assessed in the upper, middle and lower lung zones by technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin SPET and dynamic 133Xe SPET. The distribution of emphysematous changes was assessed by density-mask computed tomography (CT) images which depicted abnormally low attenuation areas (LAAs) of less than -960 Hounsfield units. Two hundred and eighty-eight (59.2%) lung zones of 63 (77.7%) patients with pulmonary emphysema showed relative preservation of lung function in the peripheral lung, with a curvilinear band of normal perfusion (a stripe sign) and a significantly faster 133Xe half-clearance time (T1/2) than in central lung (P1/2 in the peripheral lung area (P1/2 values and LAA distributions between the central and peripheral lung. Relative preservation of peripheral lung function seems to be a characteristic feature in smoking-related pulmonary emphysema, and may indicate a lower susceptibility of peripheral parenchyma to the development of this disease. (orig.)

  2. The validity of risk assessments for lung cancer induced by radon daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Available input data for the risk assessment from low level radon daughter (Rn-d) exposure are mostly either of low quality, partially contradicting or simply ''guesstimates''. Therefore at present only the upper limit of this risk can be estimated. Results of epidemiological studies amongst miners are associated with large uncertainties with regard to the assessment of past radiation exposure, lung cancer diagnostic and/or classification and synergistic effects due to smoking and dust exposure. An alternative approach uses dosimetric modelling for Rn-d inhalation to obtain Rn-d exposure-dose conversion factors. Large uncertainty is caused by individual variability due the influence of life style, physical and biological parameters. It is concluded that for ''normal'' indoor Rn-d exposure the resulting risk is neglegible compared to other risks ''accepted'' by society

  3. Assessment of lung development in isolated congenital diaphragmatic hernia using signal intensity ratios on fetal MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate developmental changes in the apparently unaffected contralateral lung by using signal intensity ratios (SIR) and lung volumes (LV), and to search for correlation with clinical outcome. Twenty-five fetuses (22-37 weeks' gestation) were examined. Lung/liver signal intensity ratios (LLSIR) were assessed on T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences for both lungs, then together with LV compared with age-matched controls of 91 fetuses by using the U test. Differences in LLSIRs and lung volumes were correlated with neonatal outcomes. LLSIRs in fetuses with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) were significantly higher in both lungs on T1-weighted images and significantly lower on T2-weighted images, compared with normals (p < 0.05), increasing on T2-weighted imaging and decreasing on T1-weighted imaging during gestation. Total LV were significantly smaller in the CDH group than in controls (p < 0.05). No significant differences in LLSIR of the two lungs were found. Outcomes correlated significantly with total LV, but not with LLSIR. Changes in LLSIR seem to reflect developmental impairment in CDH; however, they provide no additional information in predicting outcome. LV remains the best indicator on fetal MR imaging of neonatal survival in isolated, left-sided CDH. (orig.)

  4. Assessment of lung development in isolated congenital diaphragmatic hernia using signal intensity ratios on fetal MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balassy, Csilla; Kasprian, Gregor; Weber, Michael; Herold, Christian; Prayer, Daniela [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Brugger, Peter C. [Medical University of Vienna, Centre of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Vienna (Austria); Csapo, Bence [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Obstetrics and Gyneocology, Vienna (Austria)

    2010-04-15

    To investigate developmental changes in the apparently unaffected contralateral lung by using signal intensity ratios (SIR) and lung volumes (LV), and to search for correlation with clinical outcome. Twenty-five fetuses (22-37 weeks' gestation) were examined. Lung/liver signal intensity ratios (LLSIR) were assessed on T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences for both lungs, then together with LV compared with age-matched controls of 91 fetuses by using the U test. Differences in LLSIRs and lung volumes were correlated with neonatal outcomes. LLSIRs in fetuses with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) were significantly higher in both lungs on T1-weighted images and significantly lower on T2-weighted images, compared with normals (p < 0.05), increasing on T2-weighted imaging and decreasing on T1-weighted imaging during gestation. Total LV were significantly smaller in the CDH group than in controls (p < 0.05). No significant differences in LLSIR of the two lungs were found. Outcomes correlated significantly with total LV, but not with LLSIR. Changes in LLSIR seem to reflect developmental impairment in CDH; however, they provide no additional information in predicting outcome. LV remains the best indicator on fetal MR imaging of neonatal survival in isolated, left-sided CDH. (orig.)

  5. Long-term monitoring of thorium inhaled by workers and assessment of thorium lung burden in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term monitoring of thorium inhaled by workers and assessment of their thorium lung burden has been carried out in China since 1960. Various monitoring methods have been adopted, such as chemical analysis of thorium concentration in urine samples; assessing thorium lung burden by measurement of 212Pb etc. using a whole-body counter; measurement of exhaled thoron using a ZnS detector; or exhaled thoron decay products using an electrostatic collection system. Our experience over more than 20 years has shown that the last named measurement system is the best method for monitoring and assessing the lung burden of thorium (ThO2) inhaled by miners and workers. (author)

  6. An evaluation of the feasibility of assessment of volume perfusion for the whole lung by 128-slice spiral CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Haitao [Imaging Center of Taian Central Hospital, Taian, Shandong (China); Gao, Fei; Li, Ning; Liu, Cheng [Shandong Univ., Shandong Medical Imaging Research Inst., CT Room, Shandong (China)], e-mail: liucheng491025@sina.com

    2013-10-15

    Background: Lung perfusion based on dynamic scanning cannot provide a quantitative assessment of the whole lung because of the limited coverage of the current computed tomography (CT) detector designs. Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of dynamic volume perfusion CT (VPCT) of the whole lung using a 128-slice CT for the quantitative assessment and visualization of pulmonary perfusion. Material and Methods: Imaging was performed in a control group of 17 subjects who had no signs of disturbance of pulmonary function or diffuse lung disease, and 15 patients (five patients with acute pulmonary embolism and 10 with emphysema) who constituted the abnormal lung group. Dynamic VPCT was performed in all subjects, and pulmonary blood flow (PBF), pulmonary blood volume (PBV), and mean transit time (MTT) were calculated from dynamic contrast images with a coverage of 20.7 cm. Regional and volumetric PBF, PBV, and MTT were statistically evaluated and comparisons were made between the normal and abnormal lung groups. Results: Regional PBF (94.2{+-}36.5, 161.8 {+-}29.6, 185.7 {+-}38.1 and 125.5 {+-}46.1, 161.9 {+-}31.4, 169.3 {+-}51.7), PBV (6.7 {+-}2.8, 10.9 {+-}3.0, 12.9 {+-}4.5 and 9.9 {+-}4.6, 10.3 {+-}2.9, 11.9 {+-}4.5), and MTT (5.8 {+-}2.4, 4.5 {+-}1.3, 4.7 {+-}2.1 and 5.6 {+-}2.3, 4.3 {+-}1.5, 4.9 {+-}1.5) demonstrated significant differences in the gravitational and isogravitational directions in the normal lung group (P < 0.05). The PBF (154.2 {+-}30.6 vs. 94.9 {+-}15.9) and PBV (11.1 {+-}4.0 vs. 6.6 {+-}1.7) by dynamic VPCT showed significant differences between normal and abnormal lungs (P < 0.05), notwithstanding the four large lungs that had coverage > 20.7 cm. Conclusion: Dynamic VPCT of the whole lung is feasible for the quantitative assessment of pulmonary perfusion by 128-slice CT, and may in future permit the evaluation of both morphological and functional features of the whole lung in a single examination.

  7. Functional and histological assessment of the radiobiology of normal rat lung in BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the radiobiology and sensitivity of the normal rat lung to Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) radiation. Rat thorax irradiations were carried out with x-rays or with neutrons in the presence or absence of p-boronophenylalanine (BPA). Lung damage were assessed functionally with breathing rate measurement up to 180 days after irradiation and then histologically. Breathing rates 20% (∼3 σ) above the control group (sham-irradiated rats) mean were considered as positive responses to lung radiation damage. Though most responding animals demonstrated radiation induced pneumonitis (≤110 days) as well as pulmonary fibrosis (>110 days), some animals receiving neutrons plus BPA showed only the latter. The breathing rate dose response data were fit using probit analysis. The ED50 values measured for x-rays, neutron beam only, and neutrons plus BPA were 11.5±0.4 Gy, 9.2±0.5 Gy, and 6.7±0.4 Gy, respectively. The biological weighting factors for the neutron beam (n+γ), the thermal neutron dose component, and the 10B dose component were determined to be 1.2±0.1, 2.2±0.4, and 2.3±0.3, respectively. The histological dose response curves were linear. Consistent with the functional assay, the weighting factors measured histologically were 1.2±0.1 for the thermal neutron beam and 1.9±0.2 for the 10B dose component. (author)

  8. The Adaptation, Face, and Content Validation of a Needs Assessment Tool: Progressive Disease for People with Interstitial Lung Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Boland, Jason W.; Reigada, Carla; Yorke, Janelle; Hart, Simon P.; Bajwah, Sabrina; Ross, Joy; Wells, Athol; Papadopoulos, Athanasios; Currow, David C; Grande, Gunn; Macleod, Una; Johnson, Miriam J

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Irrreversible interstitial lung disease (ILD) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Palliative care needs of patients and caregivers are not routinely assessed; there is no tool to identify needs and triage support in clinical practice. Objective: The study objective was to adapt and face/content validate a palliative needs assessment tool for people with ILD. Methods: The Needs Assessment Tool: Progressive Disease-Cancer (NAT:PD-C) was adapted to reflect the p...

  9. The adaptation, face, and content validation of a Needs Assessment Tool for people with interstitial lung disease

    OpenAIRE

    Boland J, Reigada C, Yorke J, et al.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Irrreversible interstitial lung disease (ILD) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Palliative care needs of patients and caregivers are not routinely assessed; there is no tool to identify needs and triage support in clinical practice. Objective: The study objective was to adapt and face/content validate a palliative needs assessment tool for people with ILD. Methods: The Needs Assessment Tool: Progressive Disease-Cancer (NAT:PD-C) was adapted to reflect...

  10. Assessment of Circulating microRNAs in Plasma of Lung Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orazio Fortunato

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide and numerous ongoing research efforts are directed to identify new strategies for its early detection. The development of non-invasive blood-based biomarkers for cancer detection in its preclinical phases is crucial to improve the outcome of this deadly disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a new promising class of circulating biomarkers for cancer detection and prognosis definition, but lack of consensus on data normalization methods for circulating miRNAs and the critical issue of haemolysis, has affected the identification of circulating miRNAs with diagnostic potential. We describe here an interesting approach for profiling circulating miRNAs in plasma samples based on the evaluation of reciprocal miRNA levels measured by quantitative Real-Time PCR. By monitoring changes of plasma miRNA-ratios, it is possible to assess the deregulation of tumor-related miRNAs and identify signatures with diagnostic and prognostic value. In addition, to avoid bias due to the release of miRNAs from blood cells, a miRNA-ratios signature distinguishing haemolyzed samples was identified. The method described was validated in plasma samples of lung cancer patients, but given its reproducibility and reliability, could be potentially applied for the identification of diagnostic circulating miRNAs in other diseases.

  11. Application of the adductome approach to assess intertissue DNA damage variations in human lung and esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods for determining the differential susceptibility of human organs to DNA damage have not yet been explored to any large extent due to technical constraints. The development of comprehensive analytical approaches by which to detect intertissue variations in DNA damage susceptibility may advance our understanding of the roles of DNA adducts in cancer etiology and as exposure biomarkers at least. A strategy designed for the detection and comparison of multiple DNA adducts from different tissue samples was applied to assess esophageal and peripherally- and centrally-located lung tissue DNA obtained from the same person. This adductome approach utilized LC/ESI-MS/MS analysis methods designed to detect the neutral loss of 2'-deoxyribose from positively ionized 2'-deoxynucleoside adducts transmitting the [M+H]+ > [M+H-116]+ transition over 374 transitions. In the final analyses, adductome maps were produced which facilitated the visualization of putative DNA adducts and their relative levels of occurrence and allowed for comprehensive comparisons between samples, including a calf thymus DNA negative control. The largest putative adducts were distributed similarly across the samples, however, differences in the relative amounts of putative adducts in lung and esophagus tissue were also revealed. The largest-occurring lung tissue DNA putative adducts were 90% similar (n = 50), while putative adducts in esophagus tissue DNA were shown to be 80 and 84% similar to central and peripheral lung tissue DNA respectively. Seven DNA adducts, N2-ethyl-2'-deoxyguanosine (N2-ethyl-dG), 1,N6-etheno-2'-deoxyadenosine (εdA), α-S- and α-R-methyl-γ-hydroxy-1,N2-propano-2'-deoxyguanosine (1,N2-PdG1, 1,N2-PdG2), 3-(2'-deoxyribosyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-8-hydroxy-pyrimido[1,2-a] purine-(3H)-one (8-OH-PdG) and the two stereoisomers of 3-(2'-deoxyribosyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-6-hydroxypyrimido[1,2-a] purine-(3H)-one (6-OH-PdG) were unambiguously detected in all tissue DNA samples by

  12. Distinct mechanisms of oxidative DNA damage induced by carcinogenic nickel subsulfide and nickel oxides.

    OpenAIRE

    Kawanishi, Shosuke; Oikawa, Shinji; Inoue, Sumiko; Nishino, Kohsuke

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. National Toxicology Program has shown clear evidence of carcinogenicity of nickel subsulfide (Ni(3)S(2)) and some evidence of carcinogenicity of NiO (green) in rats. In the present study, DNA damage in cultured cells and in lungs of rats induced by nickel compounds was investigated to clarify the mechanism of nickel carcinogenesis. In cultured HeLa cells, Ni(3)S(2) induced a significant increase in 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) formation, whereas NiO (black), NiO (green), and NiS...

  13. In vivo Comet assay on isolated kidney cells to distinguish genotoxic carcinogens from epigenetic carcinogens or cytotoxic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesslany, Fabrice; Zennouche, Nadia; Simar-Meintières, Sophie; Talahari, Ismaïl; Nkili-Mboui, Esther-Nadège; Marzin, Daniel

    2007-06-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the ability of the alkaline in vivo Comet assay (pH>13) to distinguish genotoxic carcinogens from epigenetic carcinogens when performed on freshly isolated kidney cells and to determine the possible interference of cytotoxicity by assessing DNA damage induced by renal genotoxic, epigenetic or toxic compounds after enzymatic isolation of kidney cells from OFA Sprague-Dawley male rats. The ability of the Comet assay to distinguish (1) genotoxicity versus cytotoxicity and (2) genotoxic versus non-genotoxic (epigenetic) carcinogens, was thus investigated by studying five known genotoxic renal carcinogens acting through diverse mechanisms of action, i.e. streptozotocin, aristolochic acids, 2-nitroanisole, potassium bromate and cisplatin, two rodent renal epigenetic carcinogens: d-limonene and ciclosporine and two nephrotoxic compounds: streptomycin and indomethacin. Animals were treated once with the test compound by the appropriate route of administration and genotoxic effects were measured at the two sampling times of 3-6 and 22-26h after treatment. Regarding the tissue processing, the limited background level of DNA migration observed in the negative control groups throughout all experiments demonstrated that the enzymatic isolation method implemented in the current study is appropriate. On the other hand, streptozotocin, 20mg/kg, used as positive reference control concurrently to each assay, caused a clear increase in the mean Olive Tail Moment median value, which allows validating the current methodology. Under these experimental conditions, the in vivo rodent Comet assay demonstrated good sensitivity and good specificity: all the five renal genotoxic carcinogens were clearly detected in at least one expression period either directly or indirectly, as in the case of cisplatin: for this cross-linking agent, the significant decrease in DNA migration observed under standard electrophoresis conditions was clearly amplified

  14. [Update on benzene: from industrial toxicant to environmental carcinogen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manno, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Benzene, an industrial chemical myelotoxic at high doses in workers, is now an almost ubiquitous pollutant. It is also a no-threshold genotoxic carcinogen causing acute leukemia and other lymphoaematological tumours. Although its mechanism of action has not been fully clarified, benzene toxicity and carcinogenicity depend on metabolic activation. Polymorphism of activating and detoxifying enzymes (CYP, GST, NQO1) may be critical, therefore, in modulating individual susceptibility to benzene. Further uncertainty factors in assessing low level benzene exposure are the limited sensitivity and specificity of most exposure biomarkers, the frequent coexposure to other volatile organic chemicals (VOC), and the presence of non occupational sources of exposure, such as cigarette smoke and veicular traffic. The aim of this presentation is to introduce the main current critical issues in the risk assessment and the biological monitoring of occupational exposure to benzene at low doses. PMID:24303704

  15. Potential Role of Lung Ventilation Scintigraphy in the Assessment of COPD

    OpenAIRE

    Cukic, Vesna; Begic, Amela

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To highlight the importance of the lung ventilation scintigraphy (LVS) to study the regional distribution of lung ventilation and to describe most frequent abnormal patterns of lung ventilation distribution obtained by this technique in COPD and to compare the information obtained by LVS with the that obtained by traditional lung function tests. Material and methods: The research was done in 20 patients with previously diagnosed COPD who were treated in Intensive care unit of Clini...

  16. Proton MRI as a noninvasive tool to assess elastase-induced lung damage in spontaneously breathing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Harry Karmouty; Cannet, Catherine; Zurbruegg, Stefan; Blé, François-Xavier; Fozard, John R; Page, Clive P; Beckmann, Nicolau

    2006-12-01

    Elastase-induced changes in lung morphology and function were detected in spontaneously breathing rats using conventional proton MRI at 4.7 T. A single dose of porcine pancreatic elastase (75 U/100 g body weight) or vehicle (saline) was administered intratracheally (i.t.) to male Brown Norway (BN) rats. MRI fluid signals were detected in the lungs 24 hr after administration of elastase and resolved within 2 weeks. These results correlated with perivascular edema and cellular infiltration observed histologically. Reductions in MRI signal intensity of the lung parenchyma, and increases in lung volume were detected as early as 2 weeks following elastase administration and remained uniform throughout the study, which lasted 8 weeks. Observations were consistent with air trapping resulting from emphysema detected histologically. In a separate experiment, animals were treated daily intraperitoneally (i.p.) with all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA; 500 microg/kg body weight) or its vehicle (triglyceride oil) starting on day 21 after elastase administration and continuing for 12 days. Under these conditions, ATRA did not elicit a reversal of elastase-induced lung damage as measured by MRI and histology. The present approach complements other validated applications of proton MRI in experimental lung research as a method for assessing drugs in rat models of respiratory diseases. PMID:17029230

  17. 4D cone beam CT-based dose assessment for SBRT lung cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weixing; Dhou, Salam; Cifter, Fulya; Myronakis, Marios; Hurwitz, Martina H.; Williams, Christopher L.; Berbeco, Ross I.; Seco, Joao; Lewis, John H.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a 4DCBCT-based dose assessment method for calculating actual delivered dose for patients with significant respiratory motion or anatomical changes during the course of SBRT. To address the limitation of 4DCT-based dose assessment, we propose to calculate the delivered dose using time-varying (‘fluoroscopic’) 3D patient images generated from a 4DCBCT-based motion model. The method includes four steps: (1) before each treatment, 4DCBCT data is acquired with the patient in treatment position, based on which a patient-specific motion model is created using a principal components analysis algorithm. (2) During treatment, 2D time-varying kV projection images are continuously acquired, from which time-varying ‘fluoroscopic’ 3D images of the patient are reconstructed using the motion model. (3) Lateral truncation artifacts are corrected using planning 4DCT images. (4) The 3D dose distribution is computed for each timepoint in the set of 3D fluoroscopic images, from which the total effective 3D delivered dose is calculated by accumulating deformed dose distributions. This approach is validated using six modified XCAT phantoms with lung tumors and different respiratory motions derived from patient data. The estimated doses are compared to that calculated using ground-truth XCAT phantoms. For each XCAT phantom, the calculated delivered tumor dose values generally follow the same trend as that of the ground truth and at most timepoints the difference is less than 5%. For the overall delivered dose, the normalized error of calculated 3D dose distribution is generally less than 3% and the tumor D95 error is less than 1.5%. XCAT phantom studies indicate the potential of the proposed method to accurately estimate 3D tumor dose distributions for SBRT lung treatment based on 4DCBCT imaging and motion modeling. Further research is necessary to investigate its performance for clinical patient data.

  18. Classification of weakly carcinogenic human papillomavirus types: addressing the limits of epidemiology at the borderline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buonaguro Franco M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Virtually all cases of cervical cancer are caused by persistent infections with a restricted set of human papillomaviruses (HPV. Some HPV types, like HPV16 and HPV18, are clear and powerful carcinogens. However, the categorization of the most weakly carcinogenic HPV types is extremely challenging. The decisions are important for screening test and vaccine development. This article describes for open discussion an approach recently taken by a World Health Organization International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC Monographs Working Group to re-assess the carcinogenicity of different HPV types.

  19. Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor by carcinogenic aromatic amines and modulatory effects of their N-acetylated metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juricek, Ludmila; Bui, Linh-Chi; Busi, Florent; Pierre, Stéphane; Guyot, Erwan; Lamouri, Aazdine; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Barouki, Robert; Coumoul, Xavier; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2015-12-01

    Aromatic amines (AAs) are an important class of chemicals which account for 12 % of known carcinogens. The biological effects of AAs depend mainly on their biotransformation into reactive metabolites or into N-acetylated metabolites which are generally considered as less toxic. Although the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway by certain carcinogenic AAs has been reported, the effects of their N-acetylated metabolites on the AhR have not been addressed. Here, we investigated whether carcinogenic AAs and their N-acetylated metabolites may activate/modulate the AhR pathway in the absence and/or the presence of a bona fide AhR ligand (benzo[a]pyrene/B(a)P]. In agreement with previous studies, we found that certain AAs activated the AhR in human liver and lung cells as assessed by an increase in cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) expression and activity. Altogether, we report for the first time that these properties can be modulated by the N-acetylation status of the AA. Whereas 2-naphthylamine significantly activated the AhR and induced CYP1A1 expression, its N-acetylated metabolite was less efficient. In contrast, the N-acetylated metabolite of 2-aminofluorene was able to significantly activate AhR, whereas the parent AA, 2-aminofluorene, did not. In the presence of B(a)P, activation of AhR or antagonist effects were observed depending on the AA or its N-acetylated metabolite. Activation and/or modulation of the AhR pathway by AAs and their N-acetylated metabolites may represent a novel mechanism contributing to the toxicological effects of AAs. More broadly, our data suggest biological interactions between AAs and other classes of xenobiotics through the AhR pathway. PMID:25224404

  20. TH-E-BRF-07: Raman Spectroscopy for Radiation Treatment Response Assessment in a Lung Metastases Mouse Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Raman spectroscopy is an optical spectroscopic method used to probe chemical information about a target tissue. Our goal was to investigate whether Raman spectroscopy is able to distinguish lung tumors from normal lung tissue and whether this technique can identify the molecular changes induced by radiation. Methods: 4T1 mouse breast cancer cells were implanted subcutaneously into the flanks of 6 Balb/C female mice. Four additional mice were used as “normal lung” controls. After 14 days, 3 mice bearing tumors received 6Gy to the left lung with 6MV photons and the other three were treated as “unirradiated tumor” controls. At a 24-hour time point, lungs were excised and the specimens were sectioned using a cryostat; alternating sections were either stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) for evaluation by a pathologist or unstained for Raman measurements. 240 total Raman spectra were collected; 84 from normal lung controls; 63 from unirradiated tumors and 64 from tumors irradiated with 6Gy in a single fraction. Raman spectra were also collected from normal lung tissues of mice with unirradiated tumors. Principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant function analysis (DFA) were performed to analyze the data. Results: Raman bands assignable to DNA/RNA showed prominent contributions in tumor tissues while Raman bands associated with hemoglobin showed strong contributions in normal lung tissue. PCA/DFA analysis identified normal lung tissue and tumor with 100% and 98.4% accuracy, respectively, relative to pathologic scoring. Additionally, normal lung tissues from unirradiated mice bearing tumors were classified as normal with 100% accuracy. In a model consisting of unirradiated and irradiated tumors identification accuracy was 79.4% and 93.8% respectively, relative to pathologic assessment. Conclusion: Initial results demonstrate the promise for Raman spectroscopy in the diagnosis normal vs. lung metastases as well as the assessment of

  1. TH-E-BRF-07: Raman Spectroscopy for Radiation Treatment Response Assessment in a Lung Metastases Mouse Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devpura, S; Barton, K; Brown, S; Siddiqui, F; Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Sethi, S [Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, MI (United States); Klein, M [Children' s Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Raman spectroscopy is an optical spectroscopic method used to probe chemical information about a target tissue. Our goal was to investigate whether Raman spectroscopy is able to distinguish lung tumors from normal lung tissue and whether this technique can identify the molecular changes induced by radiation. Methods: 4T1 mouse breast cancer cells were implanted subcutaneously into the flanks of 6 Balb/C female mice. Four additional mice were used as “normal lung” controls. After 14 days, 3 mice bearing tumors received 6Gy to the left lung with 6MV photons and the other three were treated as “unirradiated tumor” controls. At a 24-hour time point, lungs were excised and the specimens were sectioned using a cryostat; alternating sections were either stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) for evaluation by a pathologist or unstained for Raman measurements. 240 total Raman spectra were collected; 84 from normal lung controls; 63 from unirradiated tumors and 64 from tumors irradiated with 6Gy in a single fraction. Raman spectra were also collected from normal lung tissues of mice with unirradiated tumors. Principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant function analysis (DFA) were performed to analyze the data. Results: Raman bands assignable to DNA/RNA showed prominent contributions in tumor tissues while Raman bands associated with hemoglobin showed strong contributions in normal lung tissue. PCA/DFA analysis identified normal lung tissue and tumor with 100% and 98.4% accuracy, respectively, relative to pathologic scoring. Additionally, normal lung tissues from unirradiated mice bearing tumors were classified as normal with 100% accuracy. In a model consisting of unirradiated and irradiated tumors identification accuracy was 79.4% and 93.8% respectively, relative to pathologic assessment. Conclusion: Initial results demonstrate the promise for Raman spectroscopy in the diagnosis normal vs. lung metastases as well as the assessment of

  2. Spirometric assessment of lung transplant patients: one year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo M. Pêgo-Fernandes

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare spirometry data between patients who underwent single-lung or double-lung transplantation the first year after transplantation. INTRODUCTION: Lung transplantation, which was initially described as an experimental method in 1963, has become a therapeutic option for patients with advanced pulmonary diseases due to improvements in organ conservation, surgical technique, immunosuppressive therapy and treatment of post-operative infections. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the records of the 39 patients who received lung transplantation in our institution between August 2003 and August 2006. Twenty-nine patients survived one year post-transplantation, and all of them were followed. RESULTS: The increase in lung function in the double-lung transplant group was more substantial than that of the single-lung transplant group, exhibiting a statistical difference from the 1st month in both the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 and the forced vital capacity (FVC in comparison to the pre-transplant values (p <0.05. Comparison between double-lung transplant and single lung-transplant groups of emphysema patients demonstrated a significant difference in lung function beginning in the 3rd month after transplantation. DISCUSSION: The analyses of the whole group of transplant recipients and the sub-group of emphysema patients suggest the superiority of bilateral transplant over the unilateral alternative. Although the pre-transplant values of lung function were worse in the double-lung group, this difference was no longer significant in the subsequent months after surgery. CONCLUSION: Although both groups demonstrated functional improvement after transplantation, there was a clear tendency to greater improvement in FVC and FEV1 in the bilateral transplant group. Among our subjects, double-lung transplantation improved lung function.

  3. Chronic Exposure to Particulate Nickel Induces Neoplastic Transformation in Human Lung Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, Amie L.; Therry The; Kelsey Thompson; Michael Mason; Sanjeev Kandpal; Tongzhang Zheng; John Pierce Wise

    2013-01-01

    Nickel is a well-known human lung carcinogen with the particulate form being the most potent; however, the carcinogenic mechanism remains largely unknown. Few studies have investigated the genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of nickel in its target cell, human bronchial epithelial cells. Thus, the goal of this study was to investigate the effects of particulate nickel in human lung epithelial cells. We found that nickel subsulfide induced concentration- and time-dependent increases in both cytot...

  4. Combining QSAR Modeling and Text-Mining Techniques to Link Chemical Structures and Carcinogenic Modes of Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamokos, George; Silins, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing need for new reliable non-animal based methods to predict and test toxicity of chemicals. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), a computer-based method linking chemical structures with biological activities, is used in predictive toxicology. In this study, we tested the approach to combine QSAR data with literature profiles of carcinogenic modes of action automatically generated by a text-mining tool. The aim was to generate data patterns to identify associations between chemical structures and biological mechanisms related to carcinogenesis. Using these two methods, individually and combined, we evaluated 96 rat carcinogens of the hematopoietic system, liver, lung, and skin. We found that skin and lung rat carcinogens were mainly mutagenic, while the group of carcinogens affecting the hematopoietic system and the liver also included a large proportion of non-mutagens. The automatic literature analysis showed that mutagenicity was a frequently reported endpoint in the literature of these carcinogens, however, less common endpoints such as immunosuppression and hormonal receptor-mediated effects were also found in connection with some of the carcinogens, results of potential importance for certain target organs. The combined approach, using QSAR and text-mining techniques, could be useful for identifying more detailed information on biological mechanisms and the relation with chemical structures. The method can be particularly useful in increasing the understanding of structure and activity relationships for non-mutagens.

  5. The Inflammatory-Nutritional Index: assessing nutritional status and prognosis in gastrointestinal and lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Alberici Pastore

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the prognostic capacity of the Inflammatory-Nutritional Index (INI in gastrointestinal and lung cancer patients. Methods: Longitudinal study, including patients from a chemotherapy service in Brazil, between July 2008 and May 2010. INI (Albumin/CRP and nutritional status (by Subjective Global Assessment - SGA were evaluated. Risk INI was defined as lower than 0.35. The mean follow-up of survival was 1.6 year. Statistical analyses were performed using Stata 11.1™. Results: 74 patients participated in the study, mean age 63.4, most of them male (58% and presenting gastrointestinal cancer (71%. Malnutrition was identified in 87% of the patients (22% severely malnourished. The mean INI was 2.67 and 54% of the patients had INI levels considered as risk. During the follow-up there were 49 deaths (66%. The median survival time for INI risk patients was significantly shorter than for normal INI ones (p = 0,002. It took 0.78 year for the INI risk subsample to decline 50%, while it took 2.78 year for the normal INI subsample. INI risk and severe malnutrition were independent predictors for poor survival. Conclusion: The INI showed prognostic capacity in this sample and may be a useful tool, based on routinely available blood tests, to assess cancer patients.

  6. Cellular-signaling pathways unveil the carcinogenic potential of chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Giel; van de Water, Bob; Schoonen, Willem; Vrieling, Harry

    2013-06-01

    Most of the current in vitro carcinogenicity assays assess the potential carcinogenic properties of chemicals through the detection of inflicted DNA damage or subsequent chromosome damage and gene mutations. Unfortunately, these assays generally do not provide mechanistic insight into the reactive properties of a chemical. Upon chemical-induced damage of biomolecules, molecular sensors will activate general and damage-specific cellular response pathways that provide protection against the (geno)toxic and potential carcinogenic properties of chemicals. These cellular defense mechanisms include activation of cell-cycle checkpoints, DNA repair systems and induction of apoptosis or necrosis. Visualization of activated cellular-signaling pathways forms a powerful means to readily detect the genotoxic potential of chemical compounds and simultaneously gain insight into their reactive properties. Over the past years, various in vitro reporter assays have been developed that monitor activation of general and more specific cellular-signaling pathways, including the GreenScreen HC and ToxTracker assays. In this review we provide a perspective on how we can exploit activation of cellular signaling pathways to shed light on the mode of action of the chemical exposure and to develop sophisticated mechanism-based in vitro assays for cancer risk assessment. PMID:23339022

  7. Implementation and evaluation of a new workflow for registration and segmentation of pulmonary MRI data for regional lung perfusion assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently it has been shown that regional lung perfusion can be assessed using time-resolved contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Quantification of the perfusion images has been attempted, based on definition of small regions of interest (ROIs). Use of complete lung segmentations instead of ROIs could possibly increase quantification accuracy. Due to the low signal-to-noise ratio, automatic segmentation algorithms cannot be applied. On the other hand, manual segmentation of the lung tissue is very time consuming and can become inaccurate, as the borders of the lung to adjacent tissues are not always clearly visible. We propose a new workflow for semi-automatic segmentation of the lung from additionally acquired morphological HASTE MR images. First the lung is delineated semi-automatically in the HASTE image. Next the HASTE image is automatically registered with the perfusion images. Finally, the transformation resulting from the registration is used to align the lung segmentation from the morphological dataset with the perfusion images. We evaluated rigid, affine and locally elastic transformations, suitable optimizers and different implementations of mutual information (MI) metrics to determine the best possible registration algorithm. We located the shortcomings of the registration procedure and under which conditions automatic registration will succeed or fail. Segmentation results were evaluated using overlap and distance measures. Integration of the new workflow reduces the time needed for post-processing of the data, simplifies the perfusion quantification and reduces interobserver variability in the segmentation process. In addition, the matched morphological data set can be used to identify morphologic changes as the source for the perfusion abnormalities

  8. The effect of airway deposition on the assessment of lung injury by 99mTc-DTPA clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 99mTc-DTPA aerosol inhalation method permits detection of pulmonary epithelial damage. We investigated one of several problems, airway deposition of inhaled aerosol, on the assessment of pulmonary epithelial permeability in healthy nonsmokers and patients with interstitial lung diseases. We used the rate constant of pulmonary 99mTc-DTPA clearance curve, k, as a parameter of the epithelial permeability. The alveolar-peripheral airway deposition of aerosol was estimated by the duplicated inhalation method, which we newly developed. The mean k in patients with interstitial lung disease (2.52±0.72%/min, n=8; pc) was higher in patients with interstitial lung disease (4.08±1.63%/min; pc in both groups (pc obtained among the subjects (r=0.951; p99mTc-DTPA aerosol inhalation method although the correction was significant in the individual subjects. (author)

  9. Assessment of excess lung cancer risk due to the indoor radon exposure in some cities of Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indoor radon concentration levels were measured in the cities of Amman, Zarka, and Sault using Cr-39 etch track detectors. The average values of indoor concentration levels in these cities were found to be 41.3 Bq m/sup -3/, 30.7 Bq m/sup -3/ and 51.2 Bq m/sup -3/ respectively. Based on these data, excess lung cancer risk was assessed using the risk factors recommended by UNSCEAR. The life time excess lung cancer risk due to the life time exposure has been determined and is found to vary from 33 per MPY to 55 MPY at the age of 70 when lower value of the risk factors is used. On the other hand, if upper value of the risk factors is used then the estimated excess lung cancer risk at the age of 70 varies from 74 per MPY to 125 per MPY. (author)

  10. Biomonitoring of exposure to chemical carcinogens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šrám, Radim

    Poland : Institute of Nuclear Physics, 2002. s. -. [NATO advanced research workshop (Human monitoring for genetic effects). 23.06.2002-27.06.2002, Krakow - Poland] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : carcinogens Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  11. Dynamic MRI of Grid-Tagged Hyperpolarized Helium-3 for the Assessment of Lung Motion During Breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tagging technique using hyperpolarized helium-3 (HP He-3) to track lung motion. Methods and Materials: An accelerated non-Cartesian k-space trajectory was used to gain acquisition speed, at the cost of introducing image artifacts, providing a viable strategy for obtaining whole-lung coverage with adequate temporal resolution. Multiple-slice two-dimensional dynamic images of the lung were obtained in three healthy subjects after inhaling He-3 gas polarized to 35%-40%. Displacement, strain, and ventilation maps were computed from the observed motion of the grid peaks. Results: Both temporal and spatial variations of pulmonary mechanics were observed in normal subjects, including shear motion between different lobes of the same lung. Conclusion: These initial results suggest that dynamic imaging of grid-tagged hyperpolarized magnetization may potentially be a powerful tool for observing and quantifying pulmonary biomechanics on a regional basis and for assessing, validating, and improving lung deformable image registration algorithms.

  12. Assessment of indoor radon exposure and risk of lung cancer in the population of the Sverdlovsk region, Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adverse radioecological situation in the Sverdlovsk Region of Russia forms elevated radiation load on the population. To adequately assess the influence of exposure to radon on the development of lung cancer, a cohort study employing a multivariate analysis was conducted in the city of Pervouralsk, Russia. According to the chosen method, 200 lung cancer cases were randomly matched with 237 controls. Each of the 437 cohort members was characterized by a complex of 26 parameters reflecting known risk factors of lung cancer. Analytical tasks were solved based on methods of discriminant analysis. None of the three parameters directly characterizing the indoor level of radiation pollution by radon and thoron was found to be one of the most informative cancer risk factors. Thus, as compared to other analyzed risk factors of lung cancer, the contribution of radon and thoron exposure of population inhabiting multi story residential buildings in the city of Pervouralsk could not be considered as the most important cause of lung cancer. (authors)

  13. Mutagenic and carcinogenic properties of drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter results of oxidation treatments with chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide, and ultraviolet (UV), with respect to their effects on activity (Ames test) in drinking water supplies are reviewed. In addition, the authors present the preliminary results of a pilot plant study on the effects of chlorine and chlorine dioxide on mutagenicity. Furthermore, results of several carcinogenicity studies performed with organic drinking water concentrates are discussed in relation to the results of a Dutch carcinogenicity study with mutagenic drinking water concentrates

  14. Regional perfusion and ventilation of the lungs assessed by means of perfusion scintigraphy with Tc-99m microspheres and inhalation scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional lung function which is usually estimated prior to the surgical removal of a lung tumor to provide information about the remaining lung after surgery is generally assessed by means of perfusion scintigraphy. We tried to find out whether regional lung function computed from perfusion scans versus inhalation scintigraphy using 127Xe of sup(99m)Tc showed intraindividual differences in excess of 20%. For this purpose 18 patients with lung cancer (15 males and 3 females aged between 53 and 73 years) underwent spirometry, perfusion scintigraphy and inhalation scintigraphy using 127Xe or sup(99m)Tc aerosols. Regional lung function was assessed from FEV1 and the counts measured in regions of interest (ROIs) during pulmonary scintigraphy in the posterior view. In 12 patients regional lung function differed by at least 20% when measured by perfusion versus 127Xe inhalation scintigraphy. In 6 patients divergent data were also obtained when using perfusion versus sup(99m)Tc inhalation scintigraphy; and in 3 cases 127Xe inhalation data disagreed with those obtained with the sup(99m)Tc aerosol. For a more precise estimate of regional lung function following lung surgery in patients with severely reduced global lung function regional perfusion data should be supplemented by regional ventilation data using 127Xe (or 133Xe) inhalation scans. (Author)

  15. Application of the two-stage clonal expansion model in characterizing the joint effect of exposure to two carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we describe application of the two-stage clonal expansion model to characterize the joint effect of exposure to two carcinogens. This biologically based model of carcinogenesis provides a useful framework for the quantitative description of carcinogenic risks and for defining agents that act as initiators, promoters, and completers. Depending on the mechanism of action, the agent-specific relative risk following exposure to two carcinogens can be additive, multiplicative, or supramultiplicative, with supra-additive relative risk indicating a synergistic effect between the two agents. Maximum-likelihood methods for fitting the two-stage clonal expansion model with intermittent exposure to two carcinogens are described and illustrated, using data on lung-cancer mortality among Colorado uranium miners exposed to both radon and tobacco smoke

  16. Particulate matter air pollution components and risk for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaschou-Nielsen, O; Beelen, R; Wang, M.;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Particulate matter (PM) air pollution is a human lung carcinogen; however, the components responsible have not been identified. We assessed the associations between PM components and lung cancer incidence. METHODS: We used data from 14 cohort studies in eight European countries. We...... meta-analysis. RESULTS: The 245,782 cohort members contributed 3,229,220person-years at risk. During follow-up (mean, 13.1years), 1878 incident cases of lung cancer were diagnosed. In the meta-analyses, elevated hazard ratios (HRs) for lung cancer were associated with all elements except V; none was.......59; 1.12-2.26 per 2ng/m(3)) and PM10 K (1.17; 1.02-1.33 per 100ng/m(3)). In two-pollutant models, associations between PM10 and PM2.5 and lung cancer were largely explained by PM2.5 S. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that the association between PM in air pollution and lung cancer can be attributed to...

  17. Carcinogen specific dosimetry model for passive smokers of various ages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies indicate that being exposed to second hand smoke increases the chance of developing lung cancer. Understanding the deposition of carcinogenic particles present in second hand smoke is necessary to understand the development of specific histologic type cancers. In this study, a deposition model is presented for subjects of various ages exposed to sidestream smoke. The model included particle dynamics of coagulation, hygroscopic growth, charge and cloud behavior. Concentrations were varied from the maximum measured indoor concentrations (106 particles/cm3) to what would be expected from wisps of smoke (108 particles/cm3). Model results agreed well with experimental data taken from human subject deposition measurements (four studies). The model results were used to determine the dose intensity (dose per unit airway surface area) of Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in the respiratory tract for subjects of various ages. Model predictions for BaP surface concentration on the airway walls paralleled incident rates of tumors by location in the upper tracheobronchial region. Mass deposition efficiency was found to be larger for younger subjects, consistent with diffusion being the predominant mechanism for this particle size range. However, the actual dose intensity of BaP was found to be smaller for children than adults. This occurred due to the predominant effect of the smaller initial inhaled mass for children resulting from smaller tidal volumes. The resulting model is a useful tool to predict carcinogen specific particle deposition

  18. Carcinogenicity prediction of noncongeneric chemicals by augmented top priority fragment classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalegno, Mosè; Sello, Guido

    2016-04-01

    Carcinogenicity prediction is an important process that can be performed to cut down experimental costs and save animal lives. The current reliability of the results is however disputed. Here, a blind exercise in carcinogenicity category assessment is performed using augmented top priority fragment classification. The procedure analyses the applicability domain of the dataset, allocates in clusters the compounds using a leading molecular fragment, and a similarity measure. The exercise is applied to three compound datasets derived from the Lois Gold Carcinogenic Database. The results, showing good agreement with experimental data, are compared with published ones. A final discussion on our viewpoint on the possibilities that the carcinogenicity modelling of chemical compounds offers is presented. PMID:26878128

  19. Serological assessment of neutrophil elastase activity on elastin during lung ECM remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jacob Hull; Karsdal, Morten A.; Sand, Jannie M. B.;

    2015-01-01

    Background: During the pathological destruction of lung tissue, neutrophil elastase (NE) degrades elastin, one of the major constituents of lung parenchyma. However there are no non-invasive methods to quantify NE degradation of elastin. We selected specific elastin fragments generated by NE for ...

  20. Advances in physiologic lung assessment via electron beam computed tomography (EBCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Eric A.

    1999-09-01

    Lung function has been evaluated in both health and disease states by techniques, such as pulmonary function tests, which generally study aggregate function. These decades old modalities have yielded a valuable understanding of global physiologic and pathophysiologic structure-to-function relationships. However, such approaches have reached their limits. They cannot meet the current and anticipated needs of new surgical and pharmaceutical treatments. 4-D CT can provide insights into regional lung function (ventilation and blood flow) and thus can provide information at an early stage of disease when intervention will have the greatest impact. Lung CT over the last decade has helped with further defining anatomic features in disease, but has lagged behind advances on the cellular and molecular front largely because of the failure to account for functional correlates to structural pathology. Commercially available CT scanners are now capable of volumetric data acquisition in a breath-hold and capable of multi-level slice acquisitions of the heart and lungs with a per slice scan aperture of 50 - 300 msec, allowing for regional blood flow measurements. Static, volumetric imaging of the lung is inadequate in that much of lung pathology is a dynamic phenomenon and, thus, is only detectable if the lung is imaged as air and blood are flowing. This paper review the methodologies and early physiologic findings associated with our measures of lung tissue properties coupled with regional ventilation and perfusion.

  1. Quantitative assessment of elemental carbon in the lungs of never smokers, cigarette smokers and coal miners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhalation exposure to particulates such as cigarette smoke and coal dust is known to contribute to the development of chronic lung disease. The purpose of this study was to estimate the amount of elemental carbon (EC) deposits from autopsied lung samples from cigarette smokers, ...

  2. Assessment of metal contaminants in non-small cell lung cancer by EDX microanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Scimeca

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Human cardio-respiratory diseases are strongly correlated to concentrations of atmospheric elements. Bioaccumulation of heavy metals is strictly monitored, because of its possible toxic effects. In this work, we utilized the EDX microanalysis in order to identify the potential heavy metal accumulation in the lung tissue.  To this aim, we enrolled 45 human lung biopsies: 15 non-small cell lung cancers, 15 lung benign lesions and 15 control biopsies. Lung samples were both paraffin embedded for light microscopy study and eponepoxid embedded for transmission electron microscopy. EDX microanalysis was performed on 100 nm thick unstained ultrathin-sections placed on specific copper grids. Our results demonstrated that the EDX technology was particularly efficient in the study of elemental composition of lung tissues, where we found heavy metals, such as Cobalt (Co, Chromium (Cr, Manganese (Mn and Lead (Pb. Furthermore, in malignant lesions we demonstrated the presence of multiple bio-accumulated elements. In fact, a high rate of lung cancers was associated with the presence of 3 or more bio-accumulated elements compared to benign lesions and control tissue (91.7%, 0%, 8.3%, respectively. The environmental impact on pulmonary carcinogenesis could be better clarified by demonstrating the presence of polluting agents in lung tissues. The application of EDX microanalysis on biological tissuescould shed new light in the study of the possible bioaccumulation of polluting agents in different human organs and systems.

  3. Toxicity of Lunar Dust in Lungs Assessed by Examining Biomarkers in Exposed Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, C.-W.; James, J. T.; Zeidler-Erdely, P. C.; Castranova, V.; Young, S. H.; Quan, C. L.; Khan-Mayberry, N.; Taylor, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is contemplating to build an outpost on the Moon for prolonged human habitation and research. The lunar surface is covered by a layer of soil, of which the finest portion is highly reactive dust. Dust samples of respirable sizes were aerodynamically isolated from two lunar soil samples of different maturities (cosmic exposure ages) collected during the Apollo 16 mission. The lunar dust samples, TiO2, or quartz, suspended in normal saline were given to groups of 5 C57 male mice by intrapharyngeal aspiration at 0. 1, 0.3, or 1.0 mg/mouse. Because lunar dust aggregates rapidly in aqueous media, some tests were conducted with dusts suspended in Survanta/saline (1:1). The mice were euthanized 7 or 30 days later, and their lungs were lavaged to assess the presence of toxicity biomarkers in bronchioalveolar lavage fluids. The overall results showed that the two lunar dust samples were similar in toxicity, they were more toxic than T102 , but less toxic than quartz. This preliminary study is a part of the large study to obtain data for setting exposure limits for astronauts living on the Moon

  4. NOTCH1, HIF1A and other cancer-related proteins in lung tissue from uranium miners : variation by occupational exposure and subtype of lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Pesch, Beate; Casjens, Swaantje; Stricker, Ingo; Westerwick, Daniela; Taeger, Dirk; Rabstein, Sylvia; Wiethege, Thorsten; Tannapfel, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas; Johnen, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Background Radon and arsenic are established pulmonary carcinogens. We investigated the association of cumulative exposure to these carcinogens with NOTCH1, HIF1A and other cancer-specific proteins in lung tissue from uranium miners. Methodology/Principal Findings Paraffin-embedded tissue of 147 miners was randomly selected from an autopsy repository by type of lung tissue, comprising adenocarcinoma (AdCa), squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC), small cell lung cancer (SCLC), and cancer-free tissue....

  5. Artificial sweeteners--do they bear a carcinogenic risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihrauch, M R; Diehl, V

    2004-10-01

    Artificial sweeteners are added to a wide variety of food, drinks, drugs and hygiene products. Since their introduction, the mass media have reported about potential cancer risks, which has contributed to undermine the public's sense of security. It can be assumed that every citizen of Western countries uses artificial sweeteners, knowingly or not. A cancer-inducing activity of one of these substances would mean a health risk to an entire population. We performed several PubMed searches of the National Library of Medicine for articles in English about artificial sweeteners. These articles included 'first generation' sweeteners such as saccharin, cyclamate and aspartame, as well as 'new generation' sweeteners such as acesulfame-K, sucralose, alitame and neotame. Epidemiological studies in humans did not find the bladder cancer-inducing effects of saccharin and cyclamate that had been reported from animal studies in rats. Despite some rather unscientific assumptions, there is no evidence that aspartame is carcinogenic. Case-control studies showed an elevated relative risk of 1.3 for heavy artificial sweetener use (no specific substances specified) of >1.7 g/day. For new generation sweeteners, it is too early to establish any epidemiological evidence about possible carcinogenic risks. As many artificial sweeteners are combined in today's products, the carcinogenic risk of a single substance is difficult to assess. However, according to the current literature, the possible risk of artificial sweeteners to induce cancer seems to be negligible. PMID:15367404

  6. Relative preservation of peripheral lung function in smoking-related pulmonary emphysema: assessment with {sup 99m}Tc-MAA perfusion and dynamic {sup 133}Xe SPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suga, Kazuyoshi; Kume, Norihiko; Matsunaga, Naofumi; Ogasawara, Nobuhiko; Motoyama, Kazumi; Hara, Akiko; Matsumoto, Tsuneo [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University School of Medicine, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    In this study the cross-sectional functional differences between the central and peripheral lung in smokers with pulmonary emphysema were evaluated by lung perfusion and dynamic xenon-133 single-photon emission tomography (SPET). The subjects were 81 patients with a long-term smoking history and relatively advanced emphysema, 17 non-smoker patients with non-obstructive lung diseases and six healthy non-smokers. Regional lung functional difference between the peripheral and central lung was assessed in the upper, middle and lower lung zones by technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin SPET and dynamic {sup 133}Xe SPET. The distribution of emphysematous changes was assessed by density-mask computed tomography (CT) images which depicted abnormally low attenuation areas (LAAs) of less than -960 Hounsfield units. Two hundred and eighty-eight (59.2%) lung zones of 63 (77.7%) patients with pulmonary emphysema showed relative preservation of lung function in the peripheral lung, with a curvilinear band of normal perfusion (a stripe sign) and a significantly faster {sup 133}Xe half-clearance time (T{sub 1/2}) than in central lung (P<0.0001). Of these lung zones, 256 (88.8%) showed central-dominant LAA distributions on density-mask CT images, but the remaining 32 zones did not show any regional preference in LAA distribution. Conversely, 117 (24.0%) lung zones of 19 (23.4%) patients showed periphery-dominant perfusion defects and LAA distributions, with significantly prolonged T{sub 1/2} in the peripheral lung area (P<0.0001). The remaining 81 lung zones of the patients with pulmonary emphysema and all the lung zones of the healthy subjects and patients with non-obstructive lung diseases did not show a stripe sign, and no differences were observed in T{sub 1/2} values and LAA distributions between the central and peripheral lung. Relative preservation of peripheral lung function seems to be a characteristic feature in smoking-related pulmonary emphysema, and may indicate a

  7. Chronic Exposure to Zinc Chromate Induces Centrosome Amplification and Spindle Assembly Checkpoint Bypass in Human Lung Fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, Amie L.; Wise, Sandra S.; Pelsue, Stephen C.; Aboueissa, AbouEl-Makarim; Lingle, Wilma; Salisbury, Jeffery; Gallagher, Jamie; Wise, John Pierce

    2010-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) compounds are known human lung carcinogens. Solubility plays an important role in its carcinogenicity with the particulate or insoluble form being the most potent. Of the particulate Cr(VI) compounds, zinc chromate appears to be the most potent carcinogen, however, very few studies have investigated its carcinogenic mechanism. In this study, we investigated the ability of chronic exposure to zinc chromate to induce numerical chromosome instability. We found no inc...

  8. Assessment of bronchodilator response through changes in lung volumes in chronic airflow obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. Figueroa-Casas

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Although FEV1 improvement is routinely used to define bronchodilator (BD response, it correlates poorly with clinical effects. Changes in lung volumes (LV have shown better correlation with exercise tolerance and might be more sensitive to detect BD effects. We assessed the additional contribution of measuring LV before and after BD to detect acute improvement in lung function not demonstrated by FEV1, and the influence of the response criteria selected on this contribution. We analyzed 98 spirometries and plethismographies performed pre and post BD in patients with airflow obstruction (FEV1/FVC 10% of baseline (D>5 anD>15% were also analyzed. FEV1 identified as responders 32% of patients. Greater proportions were uncovered by slow vital capacity (51%, p5 anD>15%. Mean change and proportions of responders for each LV varied significantly (pSi bien el aumento del VEF1 es habitualmente utilizado para definir respuesta a broncodilatadores (BD, su correlación con efectos clínicos es pobre. Los cambios en volúmenes pulmonares (VP han demostrado mejor correlación con tolerancia al ejercicio y podrían ser más sensibles para detectar efectos de los BD. Nosotros evaluamos la contribución adicional de medir VP antes y después de BD para detectar mejoría funcional aguda no demostrada por cambios del VEF1, y la influencia del criterio de respuesta seleccionado en esta contribución. Se analizaron 98 espirometrías y pletismografías realizadas pre y post BD en pacientes con obstrucción al flujo aéreo (VEF1/CVF 10% del basal (D>5 y 15% fueron también analizados. El VEF1 identificó como respondedores a 32% de los pacientes. Proporciones mayores fueron identificadas por capacidad vital lenta (51%, p5 y 15%. El cambio promedio y las proporciones de respondedores para cada VP variaron significativamente (p<0.05 según que el cambio fuese expresado como porcentaje del basal o del valor predicho. Una proporción considerable de pacientes con obstrucci

  9. Studies on the biological effects of internal exposure of alpha emitters. Carcinogenicity test of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Outlines of carcinogenicity tests in animals given with injected or inhaled plutonium (Pu) were described. Insoluble 239PuO2 particles were nasally inhaled in rats maintained for life. The dose response relationship between incidence of their lung tumor and absorbed radiation dose in the lung revealed that>1 Gy dose increased the incidence of malignant lung tumors, which differed from findings in the U.S. probably due to the difference between particle sizes. Further, a carcinogenic mechanism specific for alpha-ray was suggested based on tumor-related gene analysis. After soluble 239Pu (citrate salt) was injected in mice, significant reduction of lifetime and early tumor- or non-tumor-death were observed when the bone dose exceeded 3 Gy. Tumors were mostly osteosarcoma, lymphoma and other soft tissue solid cancers and were different from those induced by gamma-ray, X-ray and neutron irradiation. Studies on the strain difference, on the carcinogenic mechanism and alpha-ray induced mutation and transformation are in progress, which may lead to elucidation of the biological effects of internal exposure of alpha-emitters. (K.H.)

  10. Effectiveness of rosiglitazone on bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis: Assessed by micro-computed tomography and pathologic scores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) agonists exhibit potent anti-fibrotic effects in the lung and other tissues. Recently, micro-computed tomography (CT) has been a useful tool for the investigation of lung diseases in small animals and is now increasingly applied to visualize and quantify the pulmonary structures. However, there is little information on the assessment for therapeutic effects of PPARγ agonists on the pulmonary fibrosis in mice using micro-CT. This study was aimed to determine the capability of micro-CT in examining the effects of rosiglitazone on pulmonary fibrosis. We used a murine model of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis to evaluate the feasibility of micro-CT in evaluating the therapeutic potential of rosiglitazone on pulmonary fibrosis, comparing with pathologic scores. On micro-CT findings, ground glass opacity (80%) and consolidation (20%) were observed predominantly at 3 weeks after the instillation of bleomycin, and the radiologic features became more complex at 6 weeks. In bleomycin-instilled mice treated with rosiglitazone, the majority (80%) showed normal lung features on micro-CT. Radiological-pathologic correlation analyses revealed that ground glass opacity and consolidation were correlated closely with acute inflammation, while reticular opacity was well correlated with histological honeycomb appearance. These results demonstrate that rosiglitazone displays a protective effect on pulmonary fibrosis in mice and that the visualization of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis using micro-CT is satisfactory to assess the effects of rosiglitazone. It implies that micro-CT can be applied to evaluate therapeutic efficacies of a variety of candidate drugs for lung diseases.

  11. Validation of a new transpulmonary thermodilution system to assess global end-diastolic volume and extravascular lung water

    OpenAIRE

    Bendjelid, Karim; Giraud, Raphaël; Siegenthaler, Nils; Michard, Frederic

    2010-01-01

    Introduction A new system has been developed to assess global end-diastolic volume (GEDV), a volumetric marker of cardiac preload, and extravascular lung water (EVLW) from a transpulmonary thermodilution curve. Our goal was to compare this new system with the system currently in clinical use. Methods Eleven anesthetized and mechanically ventilated pigs were instrumented with a central venous catheter and a right (PulsioCath; Pulsion, Munich, Germany) and a left (VolumeView™; Edwards Lifescien...

  12. Are the most distressing concerns of men and women with inoperable lung cancer adequately assessed? A mixed-methods analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Tishelman C, Lövgren M, Broberger E, Hamberg, K and Sprangers MAG.

    2010-01-01

    PurposeStandardized questionnaires for patient-reported outcomes are generally composed of specifiedpredetermined items, although other areas may also cause patients distress. We therefore studiedreports of what was most distressing for 343 patients with inoperable lung cancer (LC) at six timepoints during the first year postdiagnosis and how these concerns were assessed by threequality-of-life and symptom questionnaires.Patients and MethodsQualitative analysis of patients’ responses to the q...

  13. Investigation of a Patient Reported Outcome tool to assess radiotherapy-related toxicity prospectively in patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: There is a paucity of data regarding the feasibility and relevance of Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) tools to assess radiotherapy-related toxicity in lung cancer. Material and methods: From January to June 2013, lung cancer patients undergoing thoracic radiotherapy/chemo-radiotherapy completed nine patient-adapted Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life (QoL) questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) at baseline, the end of radiotherapy and at follow-up. Clinicians completed the same CTCAE items and agreement between patients’ and clinicians’ reporting was assessed using weighted kappa coefficients. QoL and HADS scores were correlated with the patients’ and clinicians’ reported toxicity. Results: 70/116 patients completed the questionnaires for at least one time point excluding baseline. Agreement between patients’ and clinicians’ reported toxicity ranged from slight to substantial. Most discrepancies were within one grade and patients reported greater severity than clinicians for most symptoms. QoL and HADS scores were more strongly correlated with the patients’ compared to clinicians’ matching toxicity reports. The PRO tool was found to be statistically reliable. Conclusions: The use of a PRO tool in lung cancer radiotherapy is feasible, reliable and acceptable to patients. PROs should be integrated in future clinical trials evaluating new radiotherapy approaches to assess toxicity

  14. The multitude and diversity of environmental carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have recently proposed that lifestyle-related factors, screening and aging cannot fully account for the present overall growing incidence of cancer. In order to propose the concept that in addition to lifestyle related factors, exogenous environmental factors may play a more important role in carcinogenesis than it is expected, and may therefore account for the growing incidence of cancer, we overview herein environmental factors, rated as certainly or potentially carcinogenic by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). We thus analyze the carcinogenic effect of microorganisms (including viruses), radiations (including radioactivity, UV and pulsed electromagnetic fields) and xenochemicals. Chemicals related to environmental pollution appear to be of critical importance, since they can induce occupational cancers as well as other cancers. Of major concerns are: outdoor air pollution by carbon particles associated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; indoor air pollution by environmental tobacco smoke, formaldehyde and volatile organic compounds such as benzene and 1,3 butadiene, which may particularly affect children, and food pollution by food additives and by carcinogenic contaminants such as nitrates, pesticides, dioxins and other organochlorines. In addition, carcinogenic metals and metalloids, pharmaceutical medicines and cosmetics may be involved. Although the risk fraction attributable to environmental factors is still unknown, this long list of carcinogenic and especially mutagenic factors supports our working hypothesis according to which numerous cancers may in fact be caused by the recent modification of our environment

  15. Evaluation of carcinogenic potential of the herbicide glyphosate, drawing on tumor incidence data from fourteen chronic/carcinogenicity rodent studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greim, Helmut; Saltmiras, David; Mostert, Volker; Strupp, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Abstract Glyphosate, an herbicidal derivative of the amino acid glycine, was introduced to agriculture in the 1970s. Glyphosate targets and blocks a plant metabolic pathway not found in animals, the shikimate pathway, required for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in plants. After almost forty years of commercial use, and multiple regulatory approvals including toxicology evaluations, literature reviews, and numerous human health risk assessments, the clear and consistent conclusions are that glyphosate is of low toxicological concern, and no concerns exist with respect to glyphosate use and cancer in humans. This manuscript discusses the basis for these conclusions. Most toxicological studies informing regulatory evaluations are of commercial interest and are proprietary in nature. Given the widespread attention to this molecule, the authors gained access to carcinogenicity data submitted to regulatory agencies and present overviews of each study, followed by a weight of evidence evaluation of tumor incidence data. Fourteen carcinogenicity studies (nine rat and five mouse) are evaluated for their individual reliability, and select neoplasms are identified for further evaluation across the data base. The original tumor incidence data from study reports are presented in the online data supplement. There was no evidence of a carcinogenic effect related to glyphosate treatment. The lack of a plausible mechanism, along with published epidemiology studies, which fail to demonstrate clear, statistically significant, unbiased and non-confounded associations between glyphosate and cancer of any single etiology, and a compelling weight of evidence, support the conclusion that glyphosate does not present concern with respect to carcinogenic potential in humans. PMID:25716480

  16. Assessment of Regional Lung Function with Multivolume 1H MR Imaging in Health and Obstructive Lung Disease: Comparison with 3He MR Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Pennati, Francesca; Quirk, James D.; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.; Castro, Mario; Aliverti, Andrea; Woods, Jason C.

    2014-01-01

    Results demonstrate that proton MR signal changes among different lung volumes are in good agreement with 3He MR ventilation imaging findings and can be successfully applied in both healthy volunteers and patients with obstructive lung disease.

  17. Lung cancer in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrera-Rodriguez R

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Raúl Barrera-Rodriguez,1 Jorge Morales-Fuentes2 1Biochemistry and Environmental Medicine Laboratory, National Institute of Respiratory Disease, 2Lung Cancer Medical Service, National Institute of Respiratory Disease, Tlalpan, Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico Both authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Recent biological advances in tumor research provide clear evidence that lung cancer in females is different from that in males. These differences appear to have a direct impact on the clinical presentation, histology, and outcomes of lung cancer. Women are more likely to present with lung adenocarcinoma, tend to receive a diagnosis at an earlier age, and are more likely to be diagnosed with localized disease. Women may also be more predisposed to molecular aberrations resulting from the carcinogenic effects of tobacco, but do not appear to be more susceptible than men to developing lung cancer. The gender differences found in female lung cancer make it mandatory that gender stratification is used in clinical trials in order to improve the survival rates of patients with lung cancer.Keywords: lung cancer, adenocarcinoma, women, genetic susceptibility, genetic differences, tobacco

  18. Development and assessment of countermeasure formulations for treatment of lung injury induced by chlorine inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, Gary W; Chen, Jing; Schlueter, Connie F; Mo, Yiqun; Humphrey, David M; Rawson, Greg; Niño, Joe A; Carson, Kenneth H

    2016-05-01

    Chlorine is a commonly used, reactive compound to which humans can be exposed via accidental or intentional release resulting in acute lung injury. Formulations of rolipram (a phosphodiesterase inhibitor), triptolide (a natural plant product with anti-inflammatory properties), and budesonide (a corticosteroid), either neat or in conjunction with poly(lactic:glycolic acid) (PLGA), were developed for treatment of chlorine-induced acute lung injury by intramuscular injection. Formulations were produced by spray-drying, which generated generally spherical microparticles that were suitable for intramuscular injection. Multiple parameters were varied to produce formulations with a wide range of in vitro release kinetics. Testing of selected formulations in chlorine-exposed mice demonstrated efficacy against key aspects of acute lung injury. The results show the feasibility of developing microencapsulated formulations that could be used to treat chlorine-induced acute lung injury by intramuscular injection, which represents a preferred route of administration in a mass casualty situation. PMID:26952014

  19. Chronic allograft rejection in lung transplant recipients: assessment with paired inspiratory and expiratory CT

    OpenAIRE

    Bankier, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    This work discusses the role of CT in the etection and quantification of chronic allograft rejection in patients after lung transplantation and provides solutions to the technical challenges involved with this approach.

  20. An evidence-based assessment for the association between long-term exposure to outdoor air pollution and the risk of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wan-Shui; Zhao, Hao; Wang, Xin; Deng, Qin; Fan, Wen-Yan; Wang, Ling

    2016-05-01

    Although outdoor air pollution has been identified as carcinogenic to humans, the magnitude of the relative risk (RR) and the 95% confidence interval (CI) for lung cancer in relation to outdoor air pollution remain uncertain. On a global scale, we quantified the risk of lung cancer associated with long-term exposure to outdoor air pollution using a meta-analytic approach. Relevant cohort studies from two databases (PubMed and Web of Science) through 31 May 2014 were searched, and a total of 21 cohort studies were identified in the analysis. The risk of lung cancer mortality or morbidity increased 7.23 (95% CI: 1.48-13.31)%/10 μg/m increase in fine particles (PM2.5), 13.17 (95% CI: 5.57-21.30)%/10 parts per billion (ppb) increase in nitrogen dioxide (NO2), 0.81 (95% CI: 0.14-1.49)%/10 ppb increase in nitrogen oxides (NOx), and 14.76 (95% CI: 1.04-30.34)%/10 ppb increase in sulfur dioxide (SO2). These positive associations remained when analysis was restricted to never-smokers or studies with high methodological quality, and showed no difference by sex. In addition, the association of fine particles with lung cancer was suggestively stronger among never-smokers (RR per each 10 μg/m=1.18, 95% CI: 1.06-1.32). There was a null association for carbon monoxide and ozone. Our study indicated that long-term exposure to PM2.5, NO2, NOx, and SO2 may be associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. Although the magnitude of the RR is relatively small, our finding, if validated, may be of public health importance because a large proportion of the population is exposed to air pollution globally. PMID:25757194

  1. Carcinogenic potential of various energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of the health impacts of different sources of energy should include a comparison of the potential carcinogenic effects of the radioactive and chemical substances produced by various sources. In general, these potential health effects are too small to be measured directly and are therefore estimated by extrapolation, on the basis of a linear dose-response model, from measurable effects at high dose levels. Estimates of the carcinogenic potential of various energy sources available in North America are given in this paper. For most if not all of the energy sources for which data are currently available, it would appear that the known biological benefits in terms of life expectancy greatly outweigh all the potential harm due to carcinogenic (and genetic) effects on human beings, when expressed in the same terms, i.e. life expectancy. (author)

  2. Quantitative assessment of global lung inflammation following radiation therapy using FDG PET/CT: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulla, Sarah; Salavati, Ali; Saboury, Babak; Torigian, Drew A. [University of Pennsylvania, and Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Basu, Sandip [Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Tata Memorial Center Annexe, Radiation Medicine Center, Bombay (India); Alavi, Abass [University of Pennsylvania, and Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Radiation pneumonitis is the most severe dose-limiting complication in patients receiving thoracic radiation therapy. The aim of this study was to quantify global lung inflammation following radiation therapy using FDG PET/CT. We studied 20 subjects with stage III non-small-cell lung carcinoma who had undergone FDG PET/CT imaging before and after radiation therapy. On all PET/CT studies, the sectional lung volume (sLV) of each lung was calculated from each slice by multiplying the lung area by slice thickness. The sectional lung glycolysis (sLG) was calculated by multiplying the sLV and the lung sectional mean standardized uptake value (sSUVmean) on each slice passing through the lung. The lung volume (LV) was calculated by adding all sLVs from the lung, and the global lung glycolysis (GLG) was calculated by adding all sLGs from the lung. Finally, the lung SUVmean was calculated by dividing the GLG by the LV. The amount of inflammation in the lung parenchyma directly receiving radiation therapy was calculated by subtracting tumor measurements from GLG. In the lung directly receiving radiation therapy, the lung parenchyma SUVmean and global lung parenchymal glycolysis were significantly increased following therapy. In the contralateral lung (internal control), no significant changes were observed in lung SUVmean or GLG following radiation therapy. Global lung parenchymal glycolysis and lung parenchymal SUVmean may serve as potentially useful biomarkers to quantify lung inflammation on FDG PET/CT following thoracic radiation therapy. (orig.)

  3. Computer analysis of ventilation-perfusion scans for detection and assessment of lung disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Burton, G H; Seed, W A; Vernon, P.

    1985-01-01

    A previously reported computer analysis has been used to provide numerical ventilation-perfusion lung scan data, for comparison with tests of airways function and results of arterial blood gas analysis in 11 patients with pulmonary embolism, 18 with asthma, and 37 with chronic obstructive lung disease. In pulmonary embolism an index of underperfusion showed high sensitivity, and an index of ventilation-perfusion mismatching correlated well with severity (hypoxaemia). In asthma an index of und...

  4. Economic Issues in the Use of Office Spirometry for Lung Health Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Murray Krahn; Chapman, Kenneth R.

    2003-01-01

    The National Lung Health Education Program (United States) has recently recommended using office spirometry to screen for subclinical lung disease in adult smokers. No published studies evaluate the economic consequences of this recommendation. This review article outlines the issues that must be considered when evaluating the costs and health benefits of office spirometry. Much of the available data on the effectiveness of screening is from studies that included smoking cessation interventio...

  5. Standards for Quantitative Assessment of Lung Structure: The Dawn of Stereopneumology

    OpenAIRE

    Stathopoulos, Georgios T

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY. The lungs are complex 3D structuresstudied in the clinic and the laboratory using histologic or imaging sections. Although such 2D analyses of lung structure are considered “gold standards”, the information conveyed is often insufficient and does not represent the whole organ. Stereology, the mathematical approach to the analysis of 3D structures via 2D sampling and morphometry, the practical application of stereology, provide solutions to this problem, but had until recently not bee...

  6. Assessment of regional lung ventilation by electrical impedance tomography in a patient with unilateral bronchial stenosis and a history of tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liégina Silveira Marinho

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bronchial stenosis can impair regional lung ventilation by causing abnormal, asymmetric airflow limitation. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT is an imaging technique that allows the assessment of regional lung ventilation and therefore complements the functional assessment of the lungs. We report the case of a patient with left unilateral bronchial stenosis and a history of tuberculosis, in whom regional lung ventilation was assessed by EIT. The EIT results were compared with those obtained by ventilation/perfusion radionuclide imaging. The patient was using nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Therefore, we studied the effects of postural changes and of the use of nasal CPAP. The EIT revealed heterogeneous distribution of regional lung ventilation, the ventilation being higher in the right lung, and this distribution was influenced by postural changes and CPAP use. The EIT assessment of regional lung ventilation produced results similar to those obtained with the radionuclide imaging technique and had the advantage of providing a dynamic evaluation without radiation exposure.

  7. Mouse lung infection model to assess Rhodococcus equi virulence and vaccine protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Iglesias, Patricia; Scortti, Mariela; MacArthur, Iain; Hapeshi, Alexia; Rodriguez, Héctor; Prescott, John F; Vazquez-Boland, José A

    2014-08-01

    The pathogenic actinomycete Rhodococcus equi causes severe purulent lung infections in foals and immunocompromised people. Although relatively unsusceptible to R. equi, mice are widely used for in vivo studies with this pathogen. The most commonly employed mouse model is based on systemic (intravenous) infection and determination of R. equi burdens in spleen and liver. Here, we investigated the murine lung for experimental infection studies with R. equi. Using a 10(7)CFU intranasal challenge in BALB/c mice, virulent R. equi consistently survived in quantifiable numbers up to 10 days in the lungs whereas virulence-deficient R. equi bacteria were rapidly cleared. An internally controlled virulence assay was developed in which the test R. equi strains are co-inoculated and monitored in the same mouse. Isogenic R. equi bacteria lacking either the plasmid vapA gene or the entire virulence plasmid were compared using this competitive assay. Both strains showed no significant differences in in vivo fitness in the lung, indicating that the single loss of the virulence factor VapA was sufficient to account for the full attenuation seen in the absence of the virulence plasmid. To test the adequacy of the lung infection model for monitoring R. equi vaccine efficacy, BALB/c mice were immunized with live R. equi and challenged intranasally. Vaccination conferred protection against acute pulmonary challenge with virulent R. equi. Our data indicate that the murine lung infection model provides a useful tool for both R. equi virulence and vaccine studies. PMID:24852140

  8. Improved Retrospective Exposure Assessment of Dust and Selected Dust Constituents in the Norwegian Silicon Carbide Industry from 1913 to 2005

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Aims The main purpose of the study was to assess and characterize the exposure to dust and selected dust constituents in the Norwegian silicon carbide industry from 1913 to 2005 and construct a retrospective job-exposure matrix for use in epidemiological studies. The dust constituents were selected based on their known or suspected lung carcinogenicity and presence in the SiC industry. Materials and methods An exposure assessment based on repeated random personal sampling within a p...

  9. Prognosticators and Risk Grouping in Patients with Lung Metastasis from Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A more accurate and appropriate assessment of prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung metastases arising from nasopharyngeal carcinomas (NPC) have a relatively favourable prognosis. The purpose of this study was to identify the prognostic factors and to establish a risk grouping in patients with lung metastases from NPC. A total of 198 patients who developed lung metastases from NPC after primary therapy were retrospectively recruited from January 1982 to December 2000. Univariate and multivariate analyses of clinical variables were performed using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Actuarial survival rates were plotted against time using the Kaplan-Meier method, and log-rank testing was used to compare the differences between the curves. The median overall survival (OS) period and the lung metastasis survival (LMS) period were 51.5 and 20.9 months, respectively. After univariate and multivariate analyses of the clinical variables, age, T classification, N classification, site of metastases, secondary metastases and disease-free interval (DFI) correlated with OS, whereas age, VCA-IgA titre, number of metastases and secondary metastases were related to LMS. The prognoses of the low- (score 0-1), intermediate- (score 2-3) and high-risk (score 4-8) subsets based on these factors were significantly different. The 3-, 5- and 10-year survival rates of the low-, intermediate- and high-risk subsets, respectively (P < 0.001) were as follows: 77.3%, 60% and 59%; 52.3%, 30% and 27.8%; and 20.5%, 7% and 0%. In this study, clinical variables provided prognostic indicators of survival in NPC patients with lung metastases. Risk subsets would help in a more accurate assessment of a patient's prognosis in the clinical setting and could facilitate the establishment of patient-tailored medical strategies and supports

  10. Computed tomography to assess pulmonary injury associated with concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To characterize serial computed tomography (CT) findings of pulmonary injury after a uniform regimen of concurrent chemo-radiotherapy in inoperable non-small cell lung cancer, and to compare the radiation-induced lung toxicity with other concurrent chemo-radiation regimens. Twenty-four patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer received 2 induction cycles of cisplatin and vinblastine, followed by 2 further cycles of cisplatin and vinblastine, concurrent with 60 Gy radiation at 2 Gy per fraction. Radiation-induced lung injury in the acute and chronic phases was assessed by serial CT scans and compared with preradiation baseline scans. Acute radiation pneumonitis was evaluated using the Common Toxicity Criteria, and chronic radiation fibrosis was graded according to the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer - Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Scale. Seventeen (81%) patients had characteristic CT findings of radiation induced pulmonary damage, which were confined to the radiation ports. Although patchy nonhomogeneous and air-space opacities characterized acute radiation pneumonitis, and homogeneous opacities with loss of volume were typical for chronic fibrosis, ground-glass opacities were found frequently in both phases. Acute radiation pneumonitis grade 1 was seen in 29% and grade 2 in 9.5%. Chronic radiation fibrosis grades 1, 2 and 3 were found in 14%, 33% and 19% of the patients respectively. Median survival time was 13 months. CT enables detailed evaluation of radiation-induced pulmonary injury after concurrent chemo-radiation for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer. Although survival time with the present regimen is comparable to other concurrent chemo-radiation regimens, a high incidence of radiation injury was found, though the severity was not life threatening. (author)

  11. An assessment of ecological and case-control methods for estimating lung cancer risk due to indoor radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of underground miners indicate that indoor radon is an important cause of lung cancer. This finding has raised concern that exposure to radon also causes lung cancer in the general population. Epidemiological studies, including both case-control and ecological approaches, have directly addressed the risks of indoor residential radon; many more case-control studies are in progress. Ecological studies that associate lung-cancer rates with typical indoor radon levels in various geographic areas have not consistently shown positive associations. The results of purportedly negative ecological studies have been used as a basis for questioning the hazards of indoor radon exposure. Because of potentially serious methodologic flaws for testing hypotheses, we examined the ecological method as a tool for assessing lung-cancer risk from indoor radon exposure. We developed a simulation approach that utilizes the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radon survey data to assign exposures to individuals within counties. Using the computer-generated data, we compared risk estimates obtained by ecological regression methods with those obtained from other regression methods and with the open-quotes trueclose quotes risks used to generate the data. For many of these simulations, the ecological models, while fitting the summary data well, gave risk estimates that differed considerably from the true risks. For some models, the risk estimates were negatively correlated with exposure, although the assumed relationship was positive. Attempts to improve the ecological models by adding smoking variables, including interaction terms, did not always improve the estimates of risk, which are easily affected by model misspecification. Because exposure situations used in the simulations are realistic, our results show that ecological methods may not accurately estimate the lung-cancer risk associated with indoor radon exposure

  12. Indoor radon levels in some regions of Jordan and assessment of the associated excess lung cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CR-39 based cup type dosimeters were used for indoor radon level measurements in randomly selected dwellings in the cities of Jerash, Irbid and Ajloun in Jordan. The average values of radon concentration levels in the above mentioned cities were found to be 53-2 +-7.3 Bq m /sup -3/ and 55.2+- 9.2 Bq m/sup -3/, respectively. The indoor radon level in Irbid was found to be normal but was double of the global average in Jerash and Ajloun. The excess lung cancer risk was assessed using the above measured values of indoor radon concentration levels for the general population. For this assessment, UNSCEAR and EPA models were used. The life time lung cancer risk due to the life time exposure was found to vary from 17 to 34 per MPY at the age of 70 when value of the risk factors of EPA model was used. In the case, when higher value of risk factors proposed by UNSCEAR was used, then the estimated excess lung cancer risk at the age of 70 varied from 66 to 135 per MPY. (author)

  13. Assessing exposure risk for dust storm events-associated lung function decrement in asthmatics and implications for control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Nan-Hung; Liao, Chung-Min

    2013-04-01

    Asian dust storms (ADS) events are seasonally-based meteorological phenomena that exacerbate chronic respiratory diseases. The purpose of this study was to assess human health risk from airborne dust exposure during ADS events in Taiwan. A probabilistic risk assessment framework was developed based on exposure and experimental data to quantify ADS events induced lung function decrement. The study reanalyzed experimental data from aerosol challenge in asthmatic individuals to construct the dose-response relationship between inhaled dust aerosol dose and decreasing percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (%FEV1). An empirical lung deposition model was used to predict deposition fraction for size specific dust aerosols in pulmonary regions. The toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic models were used to simulate dust aerosols binding kinetics in lung airway in that %FEV1 change was also predicted. The mask respirators were applied to control the inhaled dose under dust aerosols exposure. Our results found that only 2% probability the mild ADS events were likely to cause %FEV1 decrement higher than 5%. There were 50% probability of decreasing %FEV1 exceeding 16.9, 18.9, and 7.1% in north, center, and south Taiwan under severe ADS events, respectively. Our result implicates that the use of activated carbon of mask respirators has the best efficacy for reducing inhaled dust aerosol dose, by which the %FEV1 decrement can be reduced up to less than 1%.

  14. Lobar analysis of collapsibility indices to assess functional lung volumes in COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitano M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mariko Kitano,1 Shingo Iwano,1 Naozumi Hashimoto,2 Keiji Matsuo,3 Yoshinori Hasegawa,2 Shinji Naganawa1 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan; 3Department of Radiology, Ichinomiya Municipal Hospital, Ichinomiya, Aichi, Japan Background: We investigated correlations between lung volume collapsibility indices and pulmonary function test (PFT results and assessed lobar differences in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients, using paired inspiratory and expiratory three dimensional (3D computed tomography (CT images. Methods: We retrospectively assessed 28 COPD patients who underwent paired inspiratory and expiratory CT and PFT exams on the same day. A computer-aided diagnostic system calculated total lobar volume and emphysematous lobar volume (ELV. Normal lobar volume (NLV was determined by subtracting ELV from total lobar volume, both for inspiratory phase (NLVI and for expiratory phase (NLVE. We also determined lobar collapsibility indices: NLV collapsibility ratio (NLVCR (% = (1 - NLVE/NLVI × 100%. Associations between lobar volumes and PFT results, and collapsibility indices and PFT results were determined by Pearson correlation analysis. Results: NLVCR values were significantly correlated with PFT results. Forced expiratory volume in 1 second, measured as percent of predicted results (FEV1%P was significantly correlated with NLVCR values for the lower lobes (P<0.01, whereas this correlation was not significant for the upper lobes (P=0.05. FEV1%P results were also moderately correlated with inspiratory, expiratory ELV (ELVI,E for the lower lobes (P<0.05. In contrast, the ratio of the diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide to alveolar gas volume, measured as percent of predicted (DLCO/VA%P results were strongly correlated with ELVI for the upper lobes (P<0.001, whereas this correlation with NLVCR values was weaker for upper lobes (P<0

  15. Temporal aspects of tumorigenic response to individual and mixed carcinogens. Progress report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research proposed here is designed to obtain a better understanding of the temporal kinetics of tumor induction when one or more carcinogens are present simultaneously or sequentially for prolonged periods of time. Studies done to date under this contract have shown that carcinogenesis in mouse skin by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon carcinogens is consistent with the induction of dependent and autonomous cell transformations by the carcinogen followed by the conversion of autonomous tumor cells into malignancies at a rate which is determined by the level of carcinogen exposure. Dependent cell transformations remain latent in the skin unless expressed by a promoting agent. Dependent neoplasia appears to follow one-hit kinetics while malignancy is a multihit endpoint. Dose-related and time-related aspects of tumor induction are separable in the initiation-promotion system of mouse skin which along with rat skin and hamster lung is being used as a model for testing hypotheses. Results to date provide the basis for a new interpretation of the linear non-threshold extrapolation model. The broad aim of the study is to provide a basis or rationale for estimating risks associated with prolonged exposures to carcinogens found in the environment and to predict how different tissues and species respond to the carcinogens, promoters, and cocarcinogens

  16. Evaluation of Arsenic Trioxide Potential for Lung Cancer Treatment: Assessment of Apoptotic Mechanisms and Oxidative Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Alice M; Stevens, Jacqueline J; Ndebele, Kenneth; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is one of the most lethal and common cancers in the world, causing up to 3 million deaths annually. The chemotherapeutic drugs that have been used in treating lung cancer include cisplatin-pemetrexed, cisplastin-gencitabinoe, carboplatin-paclitaxel and crizotinib. Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been used in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. However, its effects on lung cancer are not known. We hypothesize that ATO may also have a bioactivity against lung cancer, and its mechanisms of action may involve apoptosis, DNA damage and changes in stress-related proteins in lung cancer cells. Methods To test the above stated hypothesis, lung carcinoma (A549) cells were used as the test model. The effects of ATO were examined by performing 6-diamidine-2 phenylindole (DAPI) nuclear staining for morphological characterization of apoptosis, flow cytometry analysis for early apoptosis, and western blot analysis for stress-related proteins (Hsp70 and cfos) and apoptotic protein expressions. Also, the single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay was used to evaluate the genotoxic effect. Results ATO-induced apoptosis was evidenced by chromatin condensation and formation of apoptotic bodies as revealed by DAPI nuclear staining. Cell shrinkage and membrane blebbing were observed at 4 and 6 µg/ml of ATO. Data from the western blot analysis revealed a significant dose-dependent increase (p < 0.05) in the Hsp 70, caspase 3 and p53 protein expression, and a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the cfos, and bcl-2 protein expression at 4 and 6 µg/ml of ATO. There was a slight decrease in cytochrome c protein expression at 4 and 6 µg/ ml of ATO. Comet assay data revealed significant dose-dependent increases in the percentages of DNA damage, Comet tail lengths, and Comet tail moment. Conclusion Taken together our results indicate that ATO is cytotoxic to lung cancer cells and its bioactivity is associated with oxidative damage, changes in cellular

  17. Quantitative ventilation-perfusion lung scans in infants and children: utility of a submicronic radiolabeled aerosol to assess ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantitative assessment of regional pulmonary ventilation and perfusion provides useful information regarding lung function. Its use in infants and young children, however, has been minimal because of practical and technical limitations when the distribution of ventilation is assessed by radioactive gases. In 16 infants and children we used an inexpensive commercially available nebulizer to produce a submicronic aerosol labeled with 99mtechnetium-diethylenetriamine pentacetic acid to assess ventilation quantitatively, and intravenous injections of 99mtechnetium-labeled macroaggregates of albumin to assess pulmonary perfusion quantitatively. Studies were safely completed in both ambulatory and critically ill patients, including two premature infants who had endotracheal tubes in place for ventilatory support. No sedation or patient cooperation is required. This technique enables any department of nuclear medicine to measure regional pulmonary ventilation and perfusion in infants and children

  18. Mechanisms of cellular transformation by carcinogenic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains 14 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: DNA Modification by Chemical Carcinogens; Role of DNA Lesions and Repair in the Transformation of Human Cells; The Induction and Regulation of Radiogenic Transformation In Vitro: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms; Cellular Transformation by Adenoviruses; and The fos Gene

  19. Biomonitoring human exposure to environmental carcinogenic chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farmer, P.B.; Sepai, O.; Lawrence, R.;

    1996-01-01

    detecting carcinogen-induced damage to DNA and proteins, and subsequent biological effects. These methods were validated with the occupational exposures, which showed evidence of DNA and/or protein and/or chromosome damage in workers in a coke oven plant, garage workers exposed to diesel exhaust and workers...

  20. Mechanisms of cellular transformation by carcinogenic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunberger, D.; Goff, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 14 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: DNA Modification by Chemical Carcinogens; Role of DNA Lesions and Repair in the Transformation of Human Cells; The Induction and Regulation of Radiogenic Transformation In Vitro: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms; Cellular Transformation by Adenoviruses; and The fos Gene.

  1. Carcinogenic effects of radiation-introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The weight of experimental evidence reviewed indicates that UV damage to DNA, probably pyrimidine dimers, is the best molecular candidate for the initiating damage that leads to skin cancer. It is postulated that the carcinogenic action spectrum should be similar to the DNA action spectrum filtered through the upper layer of skin

  2. Lung cancer and environmental radon exposure: a case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer accounts for approximately 100,000 deaths annually and nearly 30% of these are due to factors other than smoking. The prognosis for lung cancer is very poor and control of this disease depends on the identification and manipulation of etiologic agents. Radon is a demonstrated pulmonary carcinogen among uranium miners and is a ubiquitous environmental agent. This study addresses two principal issues: (a) the assessment of the potential health effects due to radon exposure from radioactive waste disposal in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, and (b) the broader scientific question of the existence of an association between lung cancer and environmental radon exposure. Indoor radon concentrations were taken in the homes of 50 lung cancer cases and 48 ASHD controls as an index of cumulative exposure. The distribution of concentrations was similar among case and control homes. The range of exposures was within background expectations as were lung cancer rates in the area. There was, furthermore, no geographic clustering of cases near the tailings site. Although an association between lung cancer and environmental radon exposure cannot be ruled out, the evidence suggests that radon exposure due to the disposal of tailings did not have a significant impact on the health of the residents living in the area and that indoor radon is not an important lung cancer risk factor at concentrations less than about 4pCi/I

  3. Carcinogens formed when Meat is Cooked

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felton, J S; Salmon, C P; Knize, M G

    2003-05-30

    Diet has been associated with varying cancer rates in human populations for many years, yet the causes of the observed variation in cancer patterns have not been adequately explained (Wynder et al. 1977). Along with the effect of diet on human cancer incidence is the strong evidence that mutations are the initiating events in the cancer process (Vogelstein et al. 1992). Foods, when heated, are a good source of genotoxic carcinogens that very likely are a cause for some of these events(Doll et al. 1981). These carcinogens fall into two chemical classes: heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). There is ample evidence that many of these compounds are complete carcinogens in rodents(El-Bayoumy et al. 1995; Ohgaki et al. 1991). Heterocyclic aromatic amines are among the most potent mutagenic substances ever tested in the Ames/Salmonella mutagenicity test (Wakabayashi et al. 1992). Both classes of carcinogen cause tumors in rodents at multiple sites, (El-Bayoumy et al. 1995; Ohgaki et al. 1991) many of which are common tumor sites in people on a Western diet. An HAA, PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine), and a PAH, B[a]P (benzo[a]pyrene), of comparable carcinogenic potency caused mammary gland tumors in a feeding study in female rats (El-Bayoumy et al. 1995). In addition, PhIP has recently been shown to cause carcinomas in the prostate of the male rat (Shirai et al. 1997). Complementing the rodent cancer studies are numerous human case-control and prospective studies suggesting a relationship between overheated beef, chicken, and lamb, and cancer of the colon, breast, prostate, and stomach (Sinha et al. 1999; Ward et al. 1997; Zheng et al. 1998).

  4. A new approach to assess COPD by identifying lung function break-points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Göran; Jarenbäck, Linnea; Peterson, Stefan; Ankerst, Jaro; Bjermer, Leif; Tufvesson, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose COPD is a progressive disease, which can take different routes, leading to great heterogeneity. The aim of the post-hoc analysis reported here was to perform continuous analyses of advanced lung function measurements, using linear and nonlinear regressions. Patients and methods Fifty-one COPD patients with mild to very severe disease (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] Stages I–IV) and 41 healthy smokers were investigated post-bronchodilation by flow-volume spirometry, body plethysmography, diffusion capacity testing, and impulse oscillometry. The relationship between COPD severity, based on forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and different lung function parameters was analyzed by flexible nonparametric method, linear regression, and segmented linear regression with break-points. Results Most lung function parameters were nonlinear in relation to spirometric severity. Parameters related to volume (residual volume, functional residual capacity, total lung capacity, diffusion capacity [diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide], diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide/alveolar volume) and reactance (reactance area and reactance at 5Hz) were segmented with break-points at 60%–70% of FEV1. FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) and resonance frequency had break-points around 80% of FEV1, while many resistance parameters had break-points below 40%. The slopes in percent predicted differed; resistance at 5 Hz minus resistance at 20 Hz had a linear slope change of −5.3 per unit FEV1, while residual volume had no slope change above and −3.3 change per unit FEV1 below its break-point of 61%. Conclusion Continuous analyses of different lung function parameters over the spirometric COPD severity range gave valuable information additional to categorical analyses. Parameters related to volume, diffusion capacity, and reactance showed break-points around 65% of FEV1, indicating that air trapping starts to dominate

  5. A new approach to assess COPD by identifying lung function break-points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriksson G

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Göran Eriksson,1,* Linnea Jarenbäck,1,* Stefan Peterson,2 Jaro Ankerst,1 Leif Bjermer,1 Ellen Tufvesson11Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, 2Regional Cancer Center South, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden*These authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: COPD is a progressive disease, which can take different routes, leading to great heterogeneity. The aim of the post-hoc analysis reported here was to perform continuous analyses of advanced lung function measurements, using linear and nonlinear regressions.Patients and methods: Fifty-one COPD patients with mild to very severe disease (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] Stages I–IV and 41 healthy smokers were investigated post-bronchodilation by flow-volume spirometry, body plethysmography, diffusion capacity testing, and impulse oscillometry. The relationship between COPD severity, based on forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, and different lung function parameters was analyzed by flexible nonparametric method, linear regression, and segmented linear regression with break-points.Results: Most lung function parameters were nonlinear in relation to spirometric severity. Parameters related to volume (residual volume, functional residual capacity, total lung capacity, diffusion capacity [diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide], diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide/alveolar volume and reactance (reactance area and reactance at 5Hz were segmented with break-points at 60%–70% of FEV1. FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC and resonance frequency had break-points around 80% of FEV1, while many resistance parameters had break-points below 40%. The slopes in percent predicted differed; resistance at 5 Hz minus resistance at 20 Hz had a linear slope change of -5.3 per unit FEV1, while residual volume had no slope change above and -3.3 change per unit FEV1 below its break-point of 61

  6. Assessing nodule detection on lung cancer screening CT: the effects of tube current modulation and model observer selection on detectability maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, J. M.; Noo, F.; McMillan, K.; Young, S.; McNitt-Gray, M.

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer screening using low dose CT has been shown to reduce lung cancer related mortality and been approved for widespread use in the US. These scans keep radiation doses low while maximizing the detection of suspicious lung lesions. Tube current modulation (TCM) is one technique used to optimize dose, however limited work has been done to assess TCM's effect on detection tasks. In this work the effect of TCM on detection is investigated throughout the lung utilizing several different model observers (MO). 131 lung nodules were simulated at 1mm intervals in each lung of the XCAT phantom. A Sensation 64 TCM profile was generated for the XCAT phantom and 2500 noise realizations were created using both TCM and a fixed TC. All nodules and noise realizations were reconstructed for a total of 262 (left and right lungs) nodule reconstructions and 10 000 XCAT lung reconstructions. Single-slice Hotelling (HO) and channelized Hotelling (CHO) observers, as well as a multislice CHO were used to assess area-under-the-curve (AUC) as a function of nodule location in both the fixed TC and TCM cases. As expected with fixed TC, nodule detectability was lowest through the shoulders and leveled off below mid-lung; with TCM, detectability was unexpectedly highest through the shoulders, dropping sharply near the mid-lung and then increasing into the abdomen. Trends were the same for all model observers. These results suggest that TCM could be further optimized for detection and that detectability maps present exciting new opportunities for TCM optimization on a patient-specific level.

  7. Predictions for the outcome of rodent carcinogenicity bioassays: identification of trans-species carcinogens and noncarcinogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Tennant, R W; Spalding, J.

    1996-01-01

    Thirty chemicals or substances currently undergoing long-term carcinogenicity bioassays in rodents have been used in a project to further evaluate methods and information that may have the capability of predicting potential carcinogens. In our predictions the principal information used includes structural alerts and in vitro test results for Salmonella mutagenicity, relative subchronic toxicity, and the sites and types of pathology found in subchronic (90-day) studies. This group of chemicals...

  8. Lung function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The term lung function is often restricted to the assessment of volume time curves measured at the mouth. Spirometry includes the assessment of lung volumes which can be mobilised with the corresponding flow-volume curves. In addition, lung volumes that can not be mobilised, such as the residual volume, or only partially as FRC and TLC can be measured by body plethysmography combined with the determination of the airway resistance. Body plethysmography allows the correct positioning of forced breathing manoeuvres on the volume-axis, e.g. before and after pharmacotherapy. Adding the CO single breath transfer factor (TLCO), which includes the measurement of the ventilated lung volume using He, enables a clear diagnosis of different obstructive, restrictive or mixed ventilatory defects with and without trapped air. Tests of reversibility and provocation, as well as the assessment of inspiratory mouth pressures (PImax, P0.1) help to classify the underlying disorder and to clarify treatment strategies. For further information and to complete the diagnostic of disturbances of the ventilation, diffusion and/or perfusion (capillar-)arterial bloodgases at rest and under physical strain sometimes amended by ergospirometry are recommended. Ideally, lung function measurements are amended by radiological and nuclear medicine techniques. (orig.)

  9. Multicomponent criteria for predicting carcinogenicity: dataset of 30 NTP chemicals.

    OpenAIRE

    Huff, J; Weisburger, E; Fung, V A

    1996-01-01

    This article is in response to the challenge issued to the scientific community by the National Toxicology Program to predict the carcinogenicity potential of 30 chemicals previously selected for long-term carcinogenicity testing. Utilizing the available toxicologic, genetic, and structural information on 30 chemicals previously selected for long-term carcinogenicity testing, we predict that 16 chemicals (53%) would induce some indication of carcinogenic activity in rodents; we further predic...

  10. Toxicology study assessing efficacy and safety of repeated administration of lipid/DNA complexes to mouse lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alton, E W F W; Boyd, A C; Cheng, S H; Davies, J C; Davies, L A; Dayan, A; Gill, D R; Griesenbach, U; Higgins, T; Hyde, S C; Innes, J A; McLachlan, G; Porteous, D; Pringle, I; Scheule, R K; Sumner-Jones, S

    2014-01-01

    For gene therapy to improve lung function in cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects, repeated administration of the gene transfer agent over the lifetime of patients is likely to be necessary. This requirement limits the utility of adenoviral and adeno-associated viral vectors (both previously evaluated in CF gene therapy trials) because of induced adaptive immune responses that render repeated dosing ineffective. For CF gene therapy trials, non-viral vectors are currently the only viable option. We previously showed that the cationic lipid formulation GL67A is the most efficient of several non-viral vectors analysed for airway gene transfer. Here, we assessed the efficacy and safety of administering 12 inhaled doses of GL67A complexed with pGM169, a CpG-free plasmid encoding human CFTR complementary DNA, into mice. We show that repeated administration of pGM169/GL67A to murine lungs is feasible, safe and achieves reproducible, dose-related and persistent gene expression (>140 days after each dose) using an aerosol generated by a clinically relevant nebuliser. This study supports progression into the first non-viral multidose lung trial in CF patients. PMID:24196086

  11. Assessment of the relationship between lung parenchymal destruction and impaired pulmonary perfusion on a lobar level in patients with emphysema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the relationship between lung parenchymal destruction and impaired pulmonary perfusion on a lobar level using CT and MRI in patients with emphysema. Material and methods: Forty-five patients with severe emphysema (GOLD III and IV) underwent inspiratory 3D-HRCT and contrast-enhanced MR-perfusion (1.5T; 3.5 mm x 1.9 mm x 4 mm). 3D-HRCT data was analyzed using a software for detection and visualization of emphysema. Emphysema was categorized in four clusters with different volumes and presented as overlay on the CT. CT and lung perfusion were visually analyzed for three lobes on each side using a four-point-score to grade the abnormalities on CT (1: predominantly small emphysema-clusters to 4: >75% large emphysema-clusters) and MRI (1: normal perfusion to 4: no perfusion). Results: A total of 270 lobes were evaluated. At CT, the score was 1 for 9 lobes, 2 for 43, 3 for 77, and 4 for 141 lobes. At MRI, the score was 1 for 13 lobes, 2 for 45, 3 for 92, and 4 for 120 lobes. Matching of lung parenchymal destruction and reduced perfusion was found in 213 lobes (weighted kappa = 0.8). The score was higher on CT in 44, and higher on MRI in 13 lobes. Conclusion: 3D-HRCT and 3D MR-perfusion show a high lobar agreement between parenchymal destruction and reduction of perfusion in patients with severe emphysema

  12. Lung Cancer and Interstitial Lung Diseases: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostas Archontogeorgis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs represent a heterogeneous group of more than two hundred diseases of either known or unknown etiology with different pathogenesis and prognosis. Lung cancer, which is the major cause of cancer death in the developed countries, is mainly attributed to cigarette smoking and exposure to inhaled carcinogens. Different studies suggest a link between ILDs and lung cancer, through different pathogenetic mechanisms, such as inflammation, coagulation, dysregulated apoptosis, focal hypoxia, activation, and accumulation of myofibroblasts as well as extracellular matrix accumulation. This paper reviews current evidence on the association between lung cancer and interstitial lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, sarcoidosis, systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis/polymyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and pneumoconiosis.

  13. Quantitative assessment of irradiated lung volume and lung mass in breast cancer patients treated with tangential fields in combination with deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapp, Karin Sigrid [Univ. Clinic of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Medical Univ. of Graz (Austria); Zurl, Brigitte; Stranzl, Heidi; Winkler, Peter

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Comparison of the amount of irradiated lung tissue volume and mass in patients with breast cancer treated with an optimized tangential-field technique with and without a deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique and its impact on the normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP). Material and Methods: Computed tomography datasets of 60 patients in normal breathing (NB) and subsequently in DIBH were compared. With a Real-Time Position Management Respiratory Gating System (RPM), anteroposterior movement of the chest wall was monitored and a lower and upper threshold were defined. Ipsilateral lung and a restricted tangential region of the lung were delineated and the mean and maximum doses calculated. Irradiated lung tissue mass was computed based on density values. NTCP for lung was calculated using a modified Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model. Results: Mean dose to the ipsilateral lung in DIBH versus NB was significantly reduced by 15%. Mean lung mass calculation in the restricted area receiving {<=} 20 Gy (M{sub 20}) was reduced by 17% in DIBH but associated with an increase in volume. NTCP showed an improvement in DIBH of 20%. The correlation of individual breathing amplitude with NTCP proved to be independent. Conclusion: The delineation of a restricted area provides the lung mass calculation in patients treated with tangential fields. DIBH reduces ipsilateral lung dose by inflation so that less tissue remains in the irradiated region and its efficiency is supported by a decrease of NTCP. (orig.)

  14. Chronic inorganic arsenic exposure in vitro induces a cancer cell phenotype in human peripheral lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Person, Rachel J.; Olive Ngalame, Ntube N.; Makia, Ngome L.; Bell, Matthew W.; Waalkes, Michael P.; Tokar, Erik J., E-mail: tokare@niehs.nih.gov

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a human lung carcinogen. We studied the ability of chronic inorganic arsenic (2 μM; as sodium arsenite) exposure to induce a cancer phenotype in the immortalized, non-tumorigenic human lung peripheral epithelial cell line, HPL-1D. After 38 weeks of continuous arsenic exposure, secreted matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) activity increased to over 200% of control, levels linked to arsenic-induced cancer phenotypes in other cell lines. The invasive capacity of these chronic arsenic-treated lung epithelial (CATLE) cells increased to 320% of control and colony formation increased to 280% of control. CATLE cells showed enhanced proliferation in serum-free media indicative of autonomous growth. Compared to control cells, CATLE cells showed reduced protein expression of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (decreased to 26% of control) and the putative tumor suppressor gene SLC38A3 (14% of control). Morphological evidence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurred in CATLE cells together with appropriate changes in expression of the EMT markers vimentin (VIM; increased to 300% of control) and e-cadherin (CDH1; decreased to 16% of control). EMT is common in carcinogenic transformation of epithelial cells. CATLE cells showed increased KRAS (291%), ERK1/2 (274%), phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK; 152%), and phosphorylated AKT1 (p-AKT1; 170%) protein expression. Increased transcript expression of metallothioneins, MT1A and MT2A and the stress response genes HMOX1 (690%) and HIF1A (247%) occurred in CATLE cells possibly in adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure. Thus, arsenic induced multiple cancer cell characteristics in human peripheral lung epithelial cells. This model may be useful to assess mechanisms of arsenic-induced lung cancer. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure transforms a human peripheral lung epithelia cell line. • Cells acquire characteristics in common with human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • These transformed cells provide a

  15. Chronic inorganic arsenic exposure in vitro induces a cancer cell phenotype in human peripheral lung epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inorganic arsenic is a human lung carcinogen. We studied the ability of chronic inorganic arsenic (2 μM; as sodium arsenite) exposure to induce a cancer phenotype in the immortalized, non-tumorigenic human lung peripheral epithelial cell line, HPL-1D. After 38 weeks of continuous arsenic exposure, secreted matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) activity increased to over 200% of control, levels linked to arsenic-induced cancer phenotypes in other cell lines. The invasive capacity of these chronic arsenic-treated lung epithelial (CATLE) cells increased to 320% of control and colony formation increased to 280% of control. CATLE cells showed enhanced proliferation in serum-free media indicative of autonomous growth. Compared to control cells, CATLE cells showed reduced protein expression of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (decreased to 26% of control) and the putative tumor suppressor gene SLC38A3 (14% of control). Morphological evidence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurred in CATLE cells together with appropriate changes in expression of the EMT markers vimentin (VIM; increased to 300% of control) and e-cadherin (CDH1; decreased to 16% of control). EMT is common in carcinogenic transformation of epithelial cells. CATLE cells showed increased KRAS (291%), ERK1/2 (274%), phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK; 152%), and phosphorylated AKT1 (p-AKT1; 170%) protein expression. Increased transcript expression of metallothioneins, MT1A and MT2A and the stress response genes HMOX1 (690%) and HIF1A (247%) occurred in CATLE cells possibly in adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure. Thus, arsenic induced multiple cancer cell characteristics in human peripheral lung epithelial cells. This model may be useful to assess mechanisms of arsenic-induced lung cancer. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure transforms a human peripheral lung epithelia cell line. • Cells acquire characteristics in common with human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • These transformed cells provide a

  16. Lung carcinoma signaling pathways activated by smoking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wen; Jian-Hua Fu; Wei Zhang; Ming Guo

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and women worldwide, with over a million deaths annually. Tobacco smoke is the major etiologic risk factor for lung cancer in current or previous smokers and has been strongly related to certain types of lung cancer, such as small cell lung carcinoma and squamous cell lung carcinoma. In recent years, there has been an increased incidence of lung adenocarcinoma. This change is strongly associated with changes in smoking behavior and cigarette design. Carcinogens present in tobacco products and their intermediate metabolites can activate multiple signaling pathways that contribute to lung cancer carcinogenesis. In this review, we summarize the smoking-activated signaling pathways involved in lung cancer.

  17. Ochratoxin A carcinogenicity involves a complex network of epigenetic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Kuan, Maricel; Cavin, Christophe; Delatour, Thierry; Schilter, Benoît

    2008-08-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin occurring in a wide range of food products. Because of the limitation of human epidemiological data, the safety significance of OTA in food has to rely on animal data, with renal toxicity and carcinogenicity being considered the pivotal effects. The elucidation of the mechanism of action would improve the use of experimental animal data for risk assessment. Direct genotoxicity versus epigenetic mechanisms appears to be a key question. In the present review, the increasingly documented epigenetic cellular effects of OTA and their potential toxicological relevance are discussed. The information available suggests that OTA is unlikely to act through a single, well-defined mechanism of action. Instead, it is proposed that a network of interacting epigenetic mechanisms, including protein synthesis inhibition, oxidative stress and the activation of specific cell signalling pathways, is responsible for OTA carcinogenicity. From a risk assessment perspective, it has to be noted that the mechanisms proposed above depend mainly upon gene expression and enzyme activation, and are, therefore, likely to be thresholded. PMID:18649906

  18. Assessment of SPECT ventilation-perfusion imaging in patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventilation and perfusion SPECT images during tidal breathing were studied in 15 cases of lung cancer using 81mKr gas and 99mTc-microspheres. Furthermore, functional images of V/Q ratio and Q/V ratio were prepared, and their clinical significance is discussed with reference to general lung function. There was a decrease in %VC and %FEVi.0 in 7 of 15 cases, and an increase of AaDo2 in the blood gas analysis in 12 of 15 cases. Both planar and SPECT images showed ventilation and perfusion abnormalities in all 15 cases. Of these, 12 patients showed matched ventilation and perfusion defects, 2 patients a dead-space effect and 1 patient a shunt effect. In comparing planar and SPECT images, depiction of ventilation and perfusion impairments were equally clear in 11 cases, but in 3, showing a lobar or segmental defect with a shunt effect, the SPECT images were superior. In a patient with markedly impaired function of the affected lung, the remaining function could not be depicted by SPECT. From the above, it seems that better information can be obtained for understanding the ventilation and perfusion states of lung cancer by adding the SPECT images to the planar image. (orig.)

  19. Correct measurement of height is important when assessing lung function values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Renstrøm, Sidsel Bendixen Holm; Andersen, Christian Skjoldvang; Pedersen, Camilla Helene Borup; Madsen, Flemming F

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Measurement of stature is a prerequisite for determination of the normal lung function since reference equations are based on stature (standing height). We investigated the optimal method for measuring stature and for testing the current practice. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We measured t...

  20. Quantitative texture-based assessment of one-year changes in fibrotic reticular patterns on HRCT in scleroderma lung disease treated with oral cyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Scleroderma Lung Study showed the efficacy of cyclophosphamide in modestly improving the forced vital capacity (FVC) compared with placebo over 1 year. Using changes in texture-based scores that quantify lung fibrosis as the percentage involvement of reticulation patterns, the effectiveness of cyclophosphamide was re-assessed by examining its impact on quantitative lung fibrosis (QLF). Axial HRCT images were acquired (1-mm slice thickness, 10-mm increments) in the prone position at inspiration. A validated model for quantifying interstitial disease patterns was applied to images from 83 subjects at baseline and 12 months. Scores were calculated for six zones (upper, mid, lower of the right/left lung) and the whole lung. Average changes were compared. Correlations were performed between QLF and physiological and clinical scores. From the most severe zones identified at baseline, QLF scores decreased by 2.6% in the cyclophosphamide group, whereas they increased by 9.1% in the placebo group, leading to ∝12% difference (p = 0.0027). Between-treatment difference in whole lung QLF was ∝5% (p = 0.0190). Significant associations were observed between changes in QLF and FVC (r = -0.33), dyspnea score (r = -0.29), and consensus visual score (p = 0.0001). QLF scores provide an objective quantitative tool for assessing treatment efficacy in scleroderma-related interstitial lung disease. (orig.)

  1. Quantitative texture-based assessment of one-year changes in fibrotic reticular patterns on HRCT in scleroderma lung disease treated with oral cyclophosphamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun J.; Brown, Matthew S. [David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Center for Computer Vision and Imaging Biomarker, Department of Radiological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Elashoff, Robert [David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Department of Biostatistics and Biomathematics, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Li, Gang [School of Public Health, UCLA, Department of Biostatistics, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Gjertson, David W. [School of Public Health and David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Department of Biostatistics and Pathology, Los Angeles (United States); Lynch, David A. [National Jewish Health, Radiology Department, Denver, CO (United States); Strollo, Diane C. [UPMC Presbyterian, Radiology Department, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kleerup, Eric; Tashkin, Donald P. [David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Department of Med-Pul and Critical Care, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Chong, Daniel; Shah, Sumit K.; Ahmad, Shama; Abtin, Fereidoun; Goldin, Jonathan G. [David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Department of Radiological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2011-12-15

    The Scleroderma Lung Study showed the efficacy of cyclophosphamide in modestly improving the forced vital capacity (FVC) compared with placebo over 1 year. Using changes in texture-based scores that quantify lung fibrosis as the percentage involvement of reticulation patterns, the effectiveness of cyclophosphamide was re-assessed by examining its impact on quantitative lung fibrosis (QLF). Axial HRCT images were acquired (1-mm slice thickness, 10-mm increments) in the prone position at inspiration. A validated model for quantifying interstitial disease patterns was applied to images from 83 subjects at baseline and 12 months. Scores were calculated for six zones (upper, mid, lower of the right/left lung) and the whole lung. Average changes were compared. Correlations were performed between QLF and physiological and clinical scores. From the most severe zones identified at baseline, QLF scores decreased by 2.6% in the cyclophosphamide group, whereas they increased by 9.1% in the placebo group, leading to {proportional_to}12% difference (p = 0.0027). Between-treatment difference in whole lung QLF was {proportional_to}5% (p = 0.0190). Significant associations were observed between changes in QLF and FVC (r = -0.33), dyspnea score (r = -0.29), and consensus visual score (p = 0.0001). QLF scores provide an objective quantitative tool for assessing treatment efficacy in scleroderma-related interstitial lung disease. (orig.)

  2. Lung transplantation: Postoperative imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung transplantation has recently become feasible primarily due to improvements in surgical techniques and use of cyclosporin for immunosuppression. Because it allows the donor heart and, for single lung transplant, the second lung to be used in other recipients, this technique is gaining widespread use. Imaging procedures play an integral role in the diagnosis of posttransplant complications and in the assessment of the functional status of the transplanted lung. Unique complications seen in these patients include those associated with cyclosporin-induced immunosuppression, rejection, and bronchostrenosis and dehiscence of the bronchial anastomosis. The authors report the imaging findings in 13 single-lung and three double-lung transplant recipients

  3. Pulmonary hilar lymph nodes in lung cancer: assessment with 3D-dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We performed 3D-dynamic MRI on patients with primary lung cancer to identify its usefulness for detecting hilar adenopathy shown at surgery. Methods and materials: 30 consecutive patients with peripheral lung cancer underwent preoperative 3D-dynamic Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI. Two thoracic radiologists blinded to histopathologic findings reviewed those studies independently for hilar adenopathy visualization. The results were correlated with surgical and histopathologic findings. Interreader agreement for the detection of hilar adenopathy was assessed by means of the κ statistic. Results: Dynamic MRI demonstrated hilar adenopathy, with or without metastasis revealed at surgery, in all of 15 patients. Adenopathy without metastasis was shown in four patients. Dynamic MRI also revealed metastatic adenopathy in 11 of 12 patients with pathologically proven metastasis. There was only one case with lymph node metastasis that did not have adenopathy either on MRI or even at surgery. The diagnostic accuracy of dynamic MRI for adenopathy with or without metastases revealed at surgery were as follows; sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 100%; positive predictive value, 100%; and negative predictive value, 100%, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy of dynamic MRI for hilar lymph nodes metastasis were as follows; sensitivity, 92%; specificity, 78%; positive predictive value, 73%; and negative predictive value, 93%. Interreader agreement was substantial (κ=0.73) for detection of hilar adenopathy. Conclusion: Hilar adenopathy on 3D-dynamic MRI correlated well with that of surgical finding on patients with primary lung cancer. It may have the potential to make an accurate preoperative evaluation of hilar lymph node metastasis from lung cancer

  4. [ULTRASONIC ASSESSMENT OF DIAPHRAGM CONDITION OF THE PATIENTS, WHO PASSED THE SELECTION FOR LUNG VOLUME REDUCTION SURGERY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunkov, S D; Varlamov, V V; Gichkin, A Yu; Perley, V E; Chernyi, S M; Romanikhin, A I; Syrovnev, V A; Agishev, A S; Akopov, A L

    2015-01-01

    The article showed the results of ultrasonic assessment of topographic and functional diaphragm indices in patients with severe diffuse emphysema. They passed the selection for lung volume reduction surgery. The comparison of diaphragm indices was presented in patients with diffuse emphysema and control group of healthy volunteers. Dynamics of diaphragm condition was studied after surgical treatment. There wasn't noted any statistical difference of diaphragm topographic indices as compared with the control group. There wasn't shown a correlation between respiratory function indices and functional diaphragm indices, but it was noted a positive tendency in characteristics during quiet breathing. PMID:26983252

  5. Assessing lung cancer incidence disparities between Puerto Ricans and other racial/ethnic groups in the United States, 1992–2010

    OpenAIRE

    Calo, William A.; Suárez, Erick; Soto-Salgado, Marievelisse; Quintana, Rafael A.; Ana P. Ortiz

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the incidence of lung cancer among Puerto Ricans (PRs) with that of Whites, Blacks, and Hispanics in the United States. We computed age-standardized rates of lung cancer during 1992–2010 and percentages of change over time. Standardized rate ratios (SRR) were estimated to assess racial/ethnic and gender differences. All men groups showed a significant decline in lung cancer over time but PRs observed the smallest change (−1.2%). For both men and women, PRs had lower incide...

  6. Exploring new quantitative CT image features to improve assessment of lung cancer prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emaminejad, Nastaran; Qian, Wei; Kang, Yan; Guan, Yubao; Lure, Fleming; Zheng, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Due to the promotion of lung cancer screening, more Stage I non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLC) are currently detected, which usually have favorable prognosis. However, a high percentage of the patients have cancer recurrence after surgery, which reduces overall survival rate. To achieve optimal efficacy of treating and managing Stage I NSCLC patients, it is important to develop more accurate and reliable biomarkers or tools to predict cancer prognosis. The purpose of this study is to investigate a new quantitative image analysis method to predict the risk of lung cancer recurrence of Stage I NSCLC patients after the lung cancer surgery using the conventional chest computed tomography (CT) images and compare the prediction result with a popular genetic biomarker namely, protein expression of the excision repair cross-complementing 1 (ERCC1) genes. In this study, we developed and tested a new computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme to segment lung tumors and initially compute 35 tumor-related morphologic and texture features from CT images. By applying a machine learning based feature selection method, we identified a set of 8 effective and non-redundant image features. Using these features we trained a naïve Bayesian network based classifier to predict the risk of cancer recurrence. When applying to a test dataset with 79 Stage I NSCLC cases, the computed areas under ROC curves were 0.77±0.06 and 0.63±0.07 when using the quantitative image based classifier and ERCC1, respectively. The study results demonstrated the feasibility of improving accuracy of predicting cancer prognosis or recurrence risk using a CAD-based quantitative image analysis method.

  7. Canadian population risk of radon induced lung cancer: a re-assessment based on the recent cross-Canada radon survey

    OpenAIRE

    J. Chen; Moir, D.; Whyte, J.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to indoor radon has been determined to be the second leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco smoking. Canadian population risk of radon induced lung cancer was assessed in 2005 with the radon distribution characteristics determined from a radon survey carried out in the late 1970s in 19 cities. In that survey, a grab sampling method was used to measure radon levels. The observed radon concentration in 14 000 Canadian homes surveyed followed a log–normal distribution with a geometr...

  8. Detection of genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens in Xpc−/−p53+/− mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An accurate assessment of the carcinogenic potential of chemicals and pharmaceutical drugs is essential to protect humans and the environment. Therefore, substances are extensively tested before they are marketed to the public. Currently, the rodent two-year bioassay is still routinely used to assess the carcinogenic potential of substances. However, over time it has become clear that this assay yields false positive results and also has several economic and ethical drawbacks including the use of large numbers of animals, the long duration, and the high cost. The need for a suitable alternative assay is therefore high. Previously, we have proposed the Xpa*p53 mouse model as a very suitable alternative to the two-year bioassay. We now show that the Xpc*p53 mouse model preserves all the beneficial traits of the Xpa*p53 model for sub-chronic carcinogen identification and can identify both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Moreover, Xpc*p53 mice appear to be more responsive than Xpa*p53 mice towards several genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Furthermore, Xpc*p53 mice are far less sensitive than Xpa*p53 mice for the toxic activity of DNA damaging agents and as such clearly respond in a similar way as wild type mice do. These advantageous traits of the Xpc*p53 model make it a better alternative for in vivo carcinogen testing than Xpa*p53. This pilot study suggests that Xpc*p53 mice are suited for routine sub-chronic testing of both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens and as such represent a suitable alternative to possibly replace the murine life time cancer bioassay. Highlights: ► The Xpc*p53 mouse model is able to identify genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. ► Time, animals and cost can be significantly reduced compared to the 2-year bioassay. ► Xpc*p53 mice are more advantageous for carcinogen identification than Xpa*p53 mice. ► Xpc*p53 mice exhibit a wild type response upon exposure to genotoxicants.

  9. Effects of combined exposure of F344 rats to inhaled 239PuO2 and a chemical carcinogen (NNK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Workers in nuclear weapons facilitates have a significant potential for exposure to chemical carcinogens and to radiation from external sources or from internally deposited radionuclides such as 239Pu. Although the carcinogenic effects of inhaled 239Pu and many chemicals have been studied individually, very little information is available on their combined effects. One chemical carcinogen that workers could be exposed to, via tobacco smoke, is the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(N-Methyl-N-nitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), a product of the curing of tobacco and pyrolysis of nicotine in tobacco. NNK causes lung tumors in rats, regardless of the route of administration and to a lesser extent tumors in the liver, nasal passages, and pancreas. The purpose of this study is to characterize the effects of combined exposure of rats to NNK and internally deposited plutonium, as well as to these agents alone

  10. Current and emerging challenges in toxicopathology: Carcinogenic threshold of phenobarbital and proof of arsenic carcinogenicity using rat medium-term bioassays for carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the last 25 years, Prof. Nobuyuki Ito and his laboratory have focused on the development of liver medium-term bioassay system for detection of carcinogens in F344 rats utilizing glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P)-positive foci as an end point marker. In this presentation, the outline and samples of medium-term bioassay systems were described. Furthermore, our data demonstrated the presence of a threshold for the non-genotoxic carcinogen, phenobarbital (PB), and the lack of linearity in the low-dose area of the dose-response curve, providing evidence for hormesis. In addition, the establishment and applications of multiorgan carcinogenicity bioassay (DMBDD model), used for the examination of the carcinogenicity of genotoxic and non-genotoxic chemicals, are discussed. Dimethylarsinic acid, one of organic arsenics, was found to be carcinogenic in rat bladder using DMBDD model and carcinogenicity test

  11. Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ePublications > Our ePublications > Lung disease fact sheet ePublications Lung disease fact sheet This information in Spanish (en ... disease? More information on lung disease What is lung disease? Lung disease refers to disorders that affect ...

  12. A randomized trial to assess the utility of preintubation adult fiberoptic bronchoscope assessment in patients for thoracic surgery requiring one-lung ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Nayana; Tarwade, Pritee; Shetmahajan, Madhavi; Pramesh, C. S.; Jiwnani, Sabita; Mahajan, Abhishek; Purandare, Nilendu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Confirmation of placement of Double lumen endobronchial tubes (DLETT) and bronchial blockers (BBs) with the pediatric fiberoptic bronchoscope (FOB) is the most preferred practice worldwide. Most centers possess standard adult FOBs, some, particularly in developing countries might not have access to the pediatric-sized devices. We have evaluated the role of preintubation airway assessment using the former, measuring the distance from the incisors to the carina and from carina to the left and right upper lobe bronchus in deciding the depth of insertion of the lung isolation device. Methods: The study was a randomized, controlled, double-blind trial consisting of 84 patients (all >18 years) undergoing thoracic surgery over a 12-month period. In the study group (n = 38), measurements obtained during FOB with the adult bronchoscope decided the depth of insertion of the lung isolation device. In the control group (n = 46), DLETTs and BBs were placed blindly followed by clinical confirmation by auscultation. Selection of the type and size of the lung isolation device was at the discretion of the anesthesiologist conducting the case. In all cases, pediatric FOB was used to confirm accurate placement of devices. Results: Of 84 patients (DLETT used in 76 patients; BB used in 8 patients), preintubation airway measurements significantly improved the success rate of optimal placement of lung isolation device from 25% (11/44) to 50% (18/36) (P = 0.04). Our incidence of failed device placement at initial insertion was 4.7% (4/84). Incidence of malposition was 10% (8/80) with 4 cases in each group. The incidence of suboptimal placement was lower in the study group at 38.9% (14/36) versus 65.9% (29/44). Conclusions: Preintubation airway measurements with the adult FOB reduces airway manipulations and improves the success rate of optimal placement of DLETT and BB. PMID:27052065

  13. The multitude and diversity of environmental carcinogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Belpomme, Dominique; Irigaray, Philippe; Hardell, Lennart; Clapp, Richard; Montagnier, Luc; Epstein, Slava; Sasco, Annie

    2007-01-01

    We have recently proposed that lifestyle-related factors, screening and aging cannot fully account for the present overall growing incidence of cancer. In order to propose the concept that in addition to lifestyle related factors, exogenous environmental factors may play a more important role in carcinogenesis than it is expected, and may therefore account for the growing incidence of cancer, we overview herein environmental factors, rated as certainly or potentially carcinogenic by the Inter...

  14. Quantitative structure carcinogenicity relationship for detecting structural alerts in nitroso-compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevention of environmentally induced cancers is a major health problem of which solutions depend on the rapid and accurate screening of potential chemical hazards. Lately, theoretical approaches such as the one proposed here - Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) - are increasingly used for assessing the risks of environmental chemicals, since they can markedly reduce costs, avoid animal testing, and speed up policy decisions. This paper reports a QSAR study based on the Topological Substructural Molecular Design (TOPS-MODE) approach, aiming at predicting the rodent carcinogenicity of a set of nitroso-compounds selected from the Carcinogenic Potency Data Base (CPDB). The set comprises nitrosoureas (14 chemicals), N-nitrosamines (18 chemicals) C-nitroso-compounds (1 chemical), nitrosourethane (1 chemical) and nitrosoguanidine (1 chemical), which have been bioassayed in male rat using gavage as the route of administration. Here we are especially concerned in gathering the role of both parameters on the carcinogenic activity of this family of compounds. First, the regression model was derived, upon removal of one identified nitrosamine outlier, and was able to account for more than 84% of the variance in the experimental activity. Second, the TOPS-MODE approach afforded the bond contributions - expressed as fragment contributions to the carcinogenic activity - that can be interpreted and provide tools for better understanding the mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Finally, and most importantly, we demonstrate the potentialities of this approach towards the recognition of structural alerts for carcinogenicity predictions

  15. Lung cancer incidence and risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of developing lung cancer (lc) as a consequence of inhaling hot particles from the Chernobyl accident is discussed. The risk from various factors is reviewed in order to assess the rate of contribution for any of them to carcinogenic process. The conclusions are based on data reported by National Centre of Oncology, Sofia (BG). A total of 2873 new cases have been recorded in 1990. The data for the period 1970-1990 show a crude increase for males and tend to stabilization for females. The similar pattern is obtained in other countries and geographic areas with steady rise of lc cases with about 0.5% per year. The contribution of particular risk factor and its interaction with other factors is assessed on the basis of large number of epidemiologic and experimental studies. The risk of cigarette smoking, as the principal cause for lc, is discussed in various aspects - age, duration, possible dropping the habit. The assessment of another risk factor - exposure to relatively high doses of natural radon daughter products - is more complicated. As an occupational hazard in uranium mines radon and its progeny reveals an increase in excess lc incidence. Regarding radon and its daughters as an environmental risk factor in dwellings, no clear positive relationship between exposure and lc incidence has been observed. In this case the assessment for population living in areas with higher concentration of radon products have to rely on data from uranium mines. Non radiation factors as asbestos, ethers, chromates, metallic iron, nickel, beryllium and arsenic, are also considered. The combined effect of all these factors, as well as of pathological cell processes, viruses, malfunctions of immune system, is mentioned as well. The possibility of interpreting the findings from epidemiological studies within the framework of theoretical multistage models of carcinogenic process is pointed out. (author)

  16. Metabolism, genotoxicity, and carcinogenicity of comfrey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Nan; Guo, Lei; Fu, Peter P; Fuscoe, James C; Luan, Yang; Chen, Tao

    2010-10-01

    Comfrey has been consumed by humans as a vegetable and a tea and used as an herbal medicine for more than 2000 years. Comfrey, however, produces hepatotoxicity in livestock and humans and carcinogenicity in experimental animals. Comfrey contains as many as 14 pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PA), including 7-acetylintermedine, 7-acetyllycopsamine, echimidine, intermedine, lasiocarpine, lycopsamine, myoscorpine, symlandine, symphytine, and symviridine. The mechanisms underlying comfrey-induced genotoxicity and carcinogenicity are still not fully understood. The available evidence suggests that the active metabolites of PA in comfrey interact with DNA in liver endothelial cells and hepatocytes, resulting in DNA damage, mutation induction, and cancer development. Genotoxicities attributed to comfrey and riddelliine (a representative genotoxic PA and a proven rodent mutagen and carcinogen) are discussed in this review. Both of these compounds induced similar profiles of 6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5H-pyrrolizine (DHP)-derived DNA adducts and similar mutation spectra. Further, the two agents share common mechanisms of drug metabolism and carcinogenesis. Overall, comfrey is mutagenic in liver, and PA contained in comfrey appear to be responsible for comfrey-induced toxicity and tumor induction. PMID:21170807

  17. Impact and compliance: OSHA Carcinogen Policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, A.F. Jr.; Crowder, C.; Wisniewski, S.; Russell, T.; Senn, K.

    1980-06-26

    This document provides an examination of various aspects of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)Carcinogen Policy. To satisfy the dimensions of the Policy's broad, general nature, a two-fold approach was taken. Throughout, the focus is on the possible effects of the Policy's implementation, but this is first approached as it generally will effect research and compliance activities across broad industry sectors, while specific impacts on DOE are addressed separately. To overview and integrate these approaches, and to provide a quick reference for further information, an outline of information is presented. General or industry-wide applications are addressed both in the Summary and Overview of the Policy (Chapters I and II) and in the discussion of the Model Standard (Chapter V). Also included is a copy of the Policy itself in the General Industry Standards and interpretations Change 10. Sections specifically addressed to the major concerns of DOE and its contractors are a discussion of implications for action regarding the synthetic fuels program, a comparison of the OSHA Model Regulations and the FE OSH Manual Standards for Carcinogens, and finally, a list of known carcinogens in coal gasification/liquefaction. Together, these elements illustrate the broad scope of the policy's impact, which economic and other constraining consequences begin to become visible. Measures to minimize these consequences are a common underlying theme to each of the sections.

  18. Lung cinescintigraphy in the dynamic assessment of ventilation and mucociliary clearance of asbestos cement workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Di Lorenzo, L; Mele, M; Pegorari, M M; Fratello, A; Zocchetti, C; Capozzi, D.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To verify in vivo whether lung cinescintigraphy confirms the effect of asbestos on the patency of the smallest airways and on the efficiency of mucociliary clearance in asbestos cement workers. METHODS: 39 male subjects were examined: 30 asbestos cement workers and nine workers never exposed to occupational respiratory irritants. All subjects had a chest radiograph (International Labour Organisation (ILO) 1980); standard questionnaire on chronic bronchitis; spirometry; arterial bl...

  19. Assessment of Lung Recruitment by Electrical Impedance Tomography and Oxygenation in ARDS Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Long; He, Huai-Wu; Möller, Knut; Frerichs, Inéz; Liu, Dawei; Zhao, Zhanqi

    2016-05-01

    We hypothesized that not all patients with appreciably recruited lung tissue during a recruitment maneuver (RM) show significant improvement of oxygenation. In the present study, we combined electrical impedance tomography (EIT) with oxygenation measurements to examine the discrepancies of lung ventilation and perfusion versus oxygenation after RM.A 2-minute RM (20 cm H2O positive end-expiratory pressure [PEEP] + 20 cm H2O pressure control) was prospectively conducted in 20 acute respiratory distress syndrome patients from January 2014 to December 2014. A decremental PEEP trial was performed to select the PEEP level after RM. A positive response to RM was identified as PaO2 + PaCO2 ≥400 mm Hg. Relative differences in the distribution of ventilation and perfusion in the most dependent region of interest (ROI4) were monitored with EIT and denoted as the ventilation-perfusion index.Ten patients were found to be responders and 10 patients to be nonresponders. No significant difference in baseline PaO2/FiO2 was observed between nonresponders and responders. A significantly higher PaO2/FiO2 ratio during RM and higher PEEP set after PEEP titration were recorded in responders. In both responders and nonresponders, the proportion of ventilation distributed in ROI4 compared with the global value was lower than the cardiac-related activity before RM, but this situation was reversed after RM (P ventilation in ROI4. A significant difference in the relative ventilation-perfusion index was found between the patients with remarkable and insufficient lung tissue reopening in the nonresponder group (P < 0.01).A discrepancy between lung tissue reopening and oxygenation improvement after RM was observed. EIT has the potential to evaluate the efficacy of RM by combining oxygenation measurements. PMID:27258527

  20. Hemocompatibility Assessment of Carbonic Anhydrase Modified Hollow Fiber Membranes for Artificial Lungs

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Heung-Il; Ye, Sang-Ho; Johnson, Carl A.; Woolley, Joshua R.; Federspiel, William J.; Wagner, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Hollow fiber membrane (HFM)-based artificial lungs can require a large blood-contacting membrane surface area to provide adequate gas exchange. However, such a large surface area presents significant challenges to hemocompatibility. One method to improve carbon dioxide (CO2) transfer efficiency might be to immobilize carbonic anhydrase (CA) onto the surface of conventional HFMs. By catalyzing the dehydration of bicarbonate in blood, CA has been shown to facilitate diffusion of CO2 toward the ...

  1. Serial micro-CT assessment of the therapeutic effects of rosiglitazone in a bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eun Jung; Jin, Gong Yong; Bok, Se Mi; Han, Young Min; Lee, Young Sun; Jung, Myung Ja; Kwon, Keun Sang [Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University, Biomedical Research Institute of Chonbuk National University Hospital, Institute for Medical Sciences, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the therapeutic effects of rosiglitazone with serial micro-CT findings before and after rosiglitazone administration in a lung fibrosis mouse model induced with bleomycin. We instilled the bleomycin solution directly into the trachea in twenty mice (female, C57BL/6 mice). After the instillation with bleomycin, mice were closely observed for 3 weeks and then all mice were scanned using micro-CT without sacrifice. At 3 weeks, the mice were treated with rosiglitazone on days 21 to 27 if they had abnormal CT findings (n = 9, 45%). For the mice treated with rosiglitazone, we performed micro-CT with mouse sacrifice 2 weeks after the rosiglitazone treatment completion. We assessed the abnormal CT findings (ground glass attenuation, consolidation, bronchiectasis, reticular opacity, and honeycombing) using a five-point scale at 3 and 6 weeks using Wilcoxon-signed ranked test. The micro-CT findings were correlated with the histopathologic results. One out of nine (11.1%) mice improved completely. In terms of consolidation, all mice (100%) showed marked decrease from 3.1 ± 1.4 at 3 weeks to 0.9 ± 0.9 at 6 weeks (p = 0.006). At 6 weeks, mild bronchiectasis (n = 6, 66.7%), mild reticular opacity (n 7, 77.8%) and mild honeycomb patterns (n = 3, 33.3%) appeared. A serial micro-CT enables the evaluation of drug effects in a lung fibrosis mouse model.

  2. Thorax, Trachea, and Lung Ultrasonography in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine: Assessment of an Objective Structured Training Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul Breitkreutz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Study objective. Focused lung ultrasound (LUS examinations are important tools in critical care medicine. There is evidence that LUS can be used for the detection of acute thoracic lesions. However, no validated training method is available. The goal of this study was to develop and assess an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE curriculum for focused thorax, trachea, and lung ultrasound in emergency and critical care medicine (THOLUUSE. Methods. 39 trainees underwent a one-day training course in a prospective educational study, including lectures in sonoanatomy and -pathology of the thorax, case presentations, and hands-on training. Trainees’ pre- and posttest performances were assessed by multiple choice questionnaires, visual perception tests by interpretation video clips, practical performance of LUS, and identification of specific ultrasound findings. Results. Trainees postcourse scores of correct MCQ answers increased from 56±4% to 82±2% (mean± SD; P<0.001; visual perception skills increased from 54±5% to 78±3% (P<0.001; practical ultrasound skills improved, and correct LUS was performed in 94%. Subgroup analysis revealed that learning success was independent from the trainees’ previous ultrasound experience. Conclusions. THOLUUSE significantly improves theoretical and practical skills for the diagnosis of acute thoracic lesions. We propose to implement THOLUUSE in emergency medicine training.

  3. Model-based assessment of lung structures: Inferencing and control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general methodology has been developed for computer interpretation of medical images, based on an explicit anatomical model. A test system for analyzing posterior-anterior (PA) chest X-rays has been implemented. The inferencing and control system identifies the major lung structures in the image, and then flags any suspected abnormalities. Image and model data are transformed into a feature space where they are represented in terms of edge descriptions. The inference engine compares the image and model in feature space to label the edges anatomically, and check for normality. The control system schedules events within the inference engine and coordinates interaction with the model and image processing routines. The control architecture is blackboard-based, with a separate data frame for each structure to be identified. The anatomical model uses fuzzy sets to provide ranges of feature values which are considered normal or indicative of a particular abnormality. This allows the inference engine to give a confidence score and linguistic description to each decision. Mediastinum, cardiac border, domes of the diaphragm, ribs and lung outline have been modeled. Their automatic identification allows diagnostic checks such as the cardiothoracic ratio, comparison of right and left lungs to identify lobular collapse and inspection of interfaces in terms of shape and clarity. The inference engine provides simple comments on its findings, making it suitable for pre- or double-checking of images

  4. Predicting carcinogenicity of organic compounds based on CPDB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiuchao; Zhang, Qingzhu; Wang, Hui; Hu, Jingtian

    2015-11-01

    Cancer is a major killer of human health and predictions for the carcinogenicity of chemicals are of great importance. In this article, predictive models for the carcinogenicity of organic compounds using QSAR methods for rats and mice were developed based on the data from CPDB. The models was developed based on the data of specific target site liver and classified according to sex of rats and mice. Meanwhile, models were also classified according to whether there is a ring in the molecular structure in order to reduce the diversity of molecular structure. Therefore, eight local models were developed in the final. Taking into account the complexity of carcinogenesis and in order to obtain as much information, DRAGON descriptors were selected as the variables used to develop models. Fitting ability, robustness and predictive power of the models were assessed according to the OECD principles. The external predictive coefficients for validation sets of each model were in the range of 0.711-0.906, and for the whole data in each model were all greater than 0.8, which represents that all models have good predictivity. In order to study the mechanism of carcinogenesis, standardized regression coefficients were calculated for all predictor variables. In addition, the effect of animal sex on carcinogenesis was compared and a trend that female showed stronger tolerance for cancerogen than male in both species was appeared. PMID:26070146

  5. Systems biology perspectives on the carcinogenic potential of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review focuses on recent experimental and modeling studies that attempt to define the physiological context in which high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation increases epithelial cancer risk and the efficiency with which it does so. Radiation carcinogenesis is a two-compartment problem: ionizing radiation can alter genomic sequence as a result of damage due to targeted effects (TE) from the interaction of energy and DNA; it can also alter phenotype and multicellular interactions that contribute to cancer by poorly understood non-targeted effects (NTE). Rather than being secondary to DNA damage and mutations that can initiate cancer, radiation NTE create the critical context in which to promote cancer. Systems biology modeling using comprehensive experimental data that integrates different levels of biological organization and time-scales is a means of identifying the key processes underlying the carcinogenic potential of high-LET radiation. We hypothesize that inflammation is a key process, and thus cancer susceptibility will depend on specific genetic predisposition to the type and duration of this response. Systems genetics using novel mouse models can be used to identify such determinants of susceptibility to cancer in radiation sensitive tissues following high-LET radiation. Improved understanding of radiation carcinogenesis achieved by defining the relative contribution of NTE carcinogenic effects and identifying the genetic determinants of the high-LET cancer susceptibility will help reduce uncertainties in radiation risk assessment

  6. Neoplastic transformation of human diploid fibroblast cells by chemical carcinogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakunaga, Takeo

    1978-01-01

    Cultured fibroblast cells derived from a skin biopsy sample taken from normal human adult were exposed to a potent carcinogen, 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide. Alterations of cell growth pattern such as higher density and piling up of cells were noticed in some fractions of cultures that were successively subcultured after nitroquinoline oxide treatment. Morphologically altered cells retained this growth pattern and became established lines of transformed cells without showing the limited life-span characteristic of normal cells in culture. The transformed cells showed a higher saturation density and the ability to grow in soft agar, properties that are usually correlated with neoplastic transformation of cells in culture. Selection of preexisting transformed human cells as a mechanism of this observed transformation seemed unlikely because clones of these normal cells could also be used to assess the transforming effect of nitroquinoline oxide. Preliminary results suggest that numerous cell divisions were required for the development of the transformation after nitroquinoline oxide treatment of these human cells. When the transformed cell lines were injected subcutaneously into nude (athymic) mice, solid tumors were produced at the site of inoculation. Treatment with N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine also induced cell transformation, in a manner similar to treatment with nitroquinoline oxide. However, transformation was not induced with (i) 4-aminoquinoline 1-oxide (a noncarcinogenic derivative of 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide), (ii) 3-methylcholanthrene (a carcinogen that cannot be metabolically activated by the target cells employed), or (iii) the solvent dimethyl sulfoxide. Images PMID:418410

  7. Carcinogenic potential of hydrotreated petroleum aromatic extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doak, S M; Hend, R W; van der Wiel, A; Hunt, P F

    1985-06-01

    Five experimental petroleum extracts were produced from luboil distillates derived from Middle East paraffinic crude by solvent extraction and severe hydrotreatment. The polycyclic aromatic content (PCA) of the extracts was determined by dimethyl sulphoxide extraction and ranged from 3.7-9.2% w/w. The five extracts were evaluated for their potential to induce cutaneous and systemic neoplasia in female mice derived from Carworth Farm No 1 strain (CF1). The test substances were applied undiluted (0.2 ml per application) to the shorn dorsal skin twice weekly for up to 78 weeks, with 48 mice in each treatment group and 96 in the untreated control group; two further groups, each of 48 mice, were similarly treated either with a non-hydrotreated commercial aromatic extract (PCA content, 19.7% w/v) or with a low dose of benzo(a)pyrene (12.5 micrograms/ml acetone). The mice were housed individually in polypropylene cages in specified pathogen free conditions. The incidence of cutaneous and systemic tumours was determined from histological analysis of haematoxylin and eosin stained tissue sections. The results were correlated with the PCA content of the extracts and compared with those from female mice exposed to a non-hydrotreated commercial aromatic extract. Four of the hydrotreated extracts were carcinogenic for murine skin; the two products with the lower PCA contents were less carcinogenic than the products with the higher PCA contents and all were less carcinogenic than the commercial extract. One extract with the lowest PCA content was non-carcinogenic. Thus refining by severe hydrotreatment was an effective method of reducing the carcinogenic potential of petroleum aromatic extracts. Although other physicochemical properties may influence the biological activity of oil products, the PCA content determined by dimethyl sulphoxide extraction may be a useful indicator of the potential of oil products to induce cutaneous tumours in experimental animals. There was no

  8. Lung, liver and lymph node metastases in follow-up MSCT. Comprehensive volumetric assessment of lesion size changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate measurement accuracy in terms of precision and inter-rater variability in the simultaneous volumetric assessment of lung, liver and lymph node metastasis size change over time in comparison to RECIST 1.1. Materials and Methods: Three independent readers evaluated multislice CT data from clinical follow-up studies (chest/abdomen) in 50 patients with metastases. A total of 117 lung, 77 liver and 97 lymph node metastases were assessed manually (RECIST 1.1) and by volumetry with semi-automated software. The quality of segmentation and need for manual adjustments were recorded. Volumes were converted to effective diameters to allow comparison to RECIST. For statistical assessment of precision and interobserver agreement, the Wilcoxon-signed rank test and Bland-Altman plots were utilized. Results: The quality of segmentation after manual correction was acceptable to excellent in 95 % of lesions and manual corrections were applied in 21 - 36 % of all lesions, most predominantly in lymph nodes. Mean precision was 2.6 - 6.3 % (manual) with 0.2 - 1.5 % (effective) relative measurement deviation (p <.001). Inter-reader median variation coefficients ranged from 9.4 - 12.8 % (manual) and 2.9 - 8.2 % (volumetric) for different lesion types (p <.001). The limits of agreement were ± 9.8 to ± 11.2 % for volumetric assessment. Conclusion: Superior precision and inter-rater variability of volumetric over manual measurement of lesion change over time was demonstrated in a whole body setting. (orig.)

  9. Carcinogenicity of consumption of red and processed meat: What about environmental contaminants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, José L; Nadal, Martí

    2016-02-01

    In October 26, 2015, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) issued a press release informing of the recent evaluation of the carcinogenicity of red and processed meat consumption. The consumption of red meat and processed meat was classified as "probably carcinogenic to humans", and as "carcinogenic to humans", respectively. The substances responsible of this potential carcinogenicity would be generated during meat processing, such as curing and smoking, or when meat is heated at high temperatures (N-nitroso-compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic aromatic amines). However, in its assessments, the IARC did not make any reference to the role that may pose some carcinogenic environmental pollutants, which are already present in raw or unprocessed meat. The potential role of a number of environmental chemical contaminants (toxic trace elements, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans, polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, polychlorinated diphenyl ethers, polychlorinated naphthalenes and perfluoroalkyl substances) on the carcinogenicity of consumption of meat and meat products is discussed in this paper. A case-study, Catalonia (Spain), is specifically assessed, while the influence of cooking on the concentrations of environmental pollutants is also reviewed. It is concluded that although certain cooking processes could modify the levels of chemical contaminants in food, the influence of cooking on the pollutant concentrations depends not only on the particular cooking process, but even more on their original contents in each specific food item. As most of these environmental pollutants are organic, cooking procedures that release or remove fat from the meat should tend to reduce the total concentrations of these contaminants in the cooked meat. PMID:26656511

  10. Evaluation of human health risks posed by carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic multiple contaminants associated with consumption of fish from Taihu Lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yingxin; Wang, Xinxin; Yang, Dan; Lei, Bingli; Zhang, Xiaolan; Zhang, Xinyu

    2014-07-01

    The present study estimated the human daily intake and uptake of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and toxic trace elements [mercury (Hg), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), and arsenic (As)] due to consumption of fish from Taihu Lake, China, and the associated potential health risks posed by these contaminants. The health risks posed by the contaminants were assessed using a risk quotient of the fish consumption rate to the maximum allowable fish consumption rate considering the contaminants for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effect endpoints. The results showed that fish consumption would not pose non-cancer risks. However, some species would cause a cancer risk. Relative risks of the contaminants were calculated to investigate the contaminant which posed the highest risk to humans. As a result, in view of the contaminants for carcinogenic effects, As was the contaminant which posed the highest risk to humans. However, when non-carcinogenic effects of the contaminants were considered, Hg posed the highest risk. The risk caused by PBDEs was negligible. The results demonstrated that traditional contaminants, such as As, Hg, DDTs (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites), and PCBs, require more attention in Taihu Lake than the other target contaminants. PMID:24727049

  11. Incidence and etiology of lung cancer in the Pacific Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirohata, T; Fukuda, K

    1979-11-01

    Incidence of lung cancer in the Pacific Basin was either compiled from published reports or computed by the authors. The results showed a great variation in age-standardized annual incidence rates of lung cancer among 10 countries and 17 areas in the Pacific Basin where tumor registry statistics are available. For males the incidence rates ranged from 10 to over 70 and for females from less than 5 to over 30/100,000 population. The reason(s) for the great variation is unclear. Ionizing radiation, carcinogenic chemical substances (e.g., chromium, arsenic compounds, asbestos, etc.), or air pollution are unlikely to be responsible. Because cigarette smoking is known to be a major cause of lung cancer, the authors have suggested that surveys on cigarette smoking be conducted among various populations in the Pacific Basin so that etiologic significance of cigarette smoking for the noted variation can be assessed. In Hawaii such a survey is underway, and a preliminary analysis was made to examine the association between lung cancer and cigarette smoking among five races. PMID:537621

  12. Effects of combined exposure of F344 rats to inhaled Plutonium-239 dioxide and a chemical carcinogen (NNK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundgren, D.L.; Carlton, W.W. [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States); Griffith, W.C. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Workers in nuclear weapons facilities have a significant potential for exposure to chemical carcinogens and to radiation from external sources or from internally deposited radionuclides such as {sup 239}Pu. Although the carcinogenic effects of inhaled {sup 239}Pu and many chemicals have been studied individually, very little information is available on their combined effects. One chemical carcinogen that workers could be exposed to via tobacco smoke is the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(N-methyl-n-nitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), a product of tobacco curing and the pyrolysis of nicotine in tobacco. NNK causes lung tumors in rats, regardless of the route of administration and to a lesser extent liver, nasal, and pancreatic tumors. From the results presented, it can be concluded that exposure to a chemical carcinogen (NNK) in combination with {alpha}-particle radiation from inhaled {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} acts in, at best, an additive manner in inducing lung cancer in rats.

  13. Clinical utility of co-registered respiratory-gated {sup 99m}Tc-Technegas/MAA SPECT-CT images in the assessment of regional lung functional impairment in patients with lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suga, Kazuyoshi; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Zaki, Mohammed; Yamashita, Tomio; Shimizu, Kensaku; Matsunaga, Naofumi [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, 755-8505, Yamaguchi (Japan)

    2004-09-01

    The aim of the study was to provide preliminary validation of the utility of co-registered respiratory-gated ventilation/perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) images in the assessment of regional lung functional impairment in patients with lung cancer. Twenty untreated and three radiotherapy-treated patients with lung cancer underwent gated {sup 99m}Tc-Technegas/macroaggregated albumin (MAA) SPECT, using a triple-headed SPECT unit and a respiratory synchroniser. Gated SPECT images were obtained from 1/8 data centered at peak inspiration for each regular respiratory cycle and co-registered with tidal inspiration CT images using an automated three-dimensional registration tool. Gated SPECT images detected 10.2% more ventilation defects (205 vs 186) and 9% more perfusion defects (218 vs 200) compared with ungated images, with a significantly higher lesion-to-normal lung contrast (P<0.0001). Co-registered gated SPECT-CT images accurately visualised the anatomy of ventilation and/or perfusion defects associated with bronchial and/or vascular involvement by tumours, resulting in changes in surgical planning in two patients with lung cancer. In the three patients who had received radiotherapy, perfusion defects along the radiation field were identified even in the lung areas without abnormal opacities on CT images. In the operated patients, the co-registered gated SPECT-CT images allowed accurate placement of regions of interest over the lung lobes to be resected, yielding a significantly better prediction of postoperative forced expired volume in 1 s (FEV{sub 1}) compared with that predicted without use of these images (R=0.993 vs R=0.890; P<0.05), with an excellent inter-observer reproducibility. Detailed functional-morphological correlation on co-registered gated SPECT-CT images contributes to accurate assessment of regional functional impairment, and may be useful for surgical planning, prediction of postoperative function

  14. Tomography assessment of lung hyper inflation areas within cats in a pressure controlled ventilation staggered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical ventilation is essential for oxygen supply during anesthesia. Some strategies are related to lung injury associated with mechanical ventilation. 10 cats, 4±1 kg, 1-6 years old, induced and maintained with propofol (6mg/kg, 0,5mg/kg/min) placed in supine position, subjected to pressure controlled ventilation (PCV) in oxygen at 40% with 5cmH2O peak pressure in 'ZEEP' for 20 minutes, rising in 2cmH2O installments peak pressure every five minutes until it reached 15cmH2O. Moments P5, P7, P9, P11, P13, P15. Respiratory rate and inspiratory time were held on 15 movements per minute and 1 second regardless their EtCO2. Muscle relaxation achieved by rocuronium bollus (1mg/kg/IV). Immediately, at each increase on pressure was performed a 4 seconds' inspiratory pause to allow the five millimeters CT slice of diaphragmatic region followed by hemogasometric and cardiorespiratory variables collected. P5 had the smallest hyperinflated area (3,24±4,02) Compared to other moments. P5 blood gases showed acidaemia (7,257±0,08) for mild respiratory acidosis (45±9.2) with good oxygenation (178±40.8mmHg) compared to other times which obtained reduction of CO2 and an increased pH. As the increase in peak pressure was observed increased distension of the lung parenchyma, a fact related to possible risk of lung injury in prolonged periods. 5cmH2O pressure was demonstrated to be less harmful due to its lower hyper inflated areas that other moments, even with a low pH and high CO2, being corrected by increasing respiratory rate.

  15. Four-dimensional computed tomography based assessment and analysis of lung tumor motion during free-breathing respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To quantify the amplitudes of lung tumor motion during free-breathing using four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT), and seek the characteristics of tumors with large motion. Methods: Respiratory-induced tumor motion was analyzed for 44 tumors from 43 patients. All patients un-derwent 4DCT during free-breathing before treatment. Gross tumor volumes (GTV) on ten respiratory phases were contoured by the same doctor. The centroids of GTVs were autoplaced with treatment software (ADAC Pinnacle 7.4f), then the amplitudes of tumor motion were assessed. The various clinical and anatomic factors associated with GTV motion were analyzed. The characteristics of tumors with motion greater than 5 mm in any direction were explored. Results: The tumor motion was found to be associated with T stage, GTV size, the superior-inferior (SI) tumor location in the lung, and the attachment to rigid structures such as the chest wall, vertebrae or mediastinum. The motion over 5 mm was observed in ten tumors, which were all located in the lower or posterior half of the lung, with the greatest motion of 14.4 mm. For 95% of the tumors, the magnitude of motion was less than I 1.8 mm, 4.6 mm and 2.7 mm along the SI, anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral directions, respectively. Conclusions: Tumor motion due to breathing is associated with tumor location, volume, and T stage. The greatest motion was in the SI direction for unfixed tumor in lower-lobe, followed by tumor in upper-lobe posterior-segment. (authors)

  16. Detection of environmental carcinogens-DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been estimated that majority of human cancer is due to environmental factors including pollutants in air, soil, water and food, work places exposure and personal habits such as smoking. After penetration in organism, xenobiotics could be directly excreted or are bio transformed by oxidation or reduction in more hydrophilic compounds which could be conjugate and then eliminated in urine. But in some case, the biotransformation leads to electrophilic compounds which interact with macromolecules such as DNA, forming addition products named adduct. The 32P post-labelling method, inspired by recent developments in the methodology for sequencing nucleic acids, is an extremely sensitive method for assessing and quantifying DNA adducts and is applicable to structurally diverse classes of chemicals. In the first study, we have analysed hepatic DNA from fish living in the River Rhone downstream and upstream from a polychlorinated biphenyl incineration plant. Our results suggest that fish are exposed to genotoxic chemicals. In another study, leave DNA from healthy and declining hop were analysed. The total adduct level is 3 time higher in declining hop. A comparison between DNA adducts from several vegetal cells cultured in presence of heptachlor and DNA adduct in declining hop, confirmed the implication of heptachlor. In these examples, our data indicate the usefulness of the 32 P-post labelling method to assess the contamination of the environment by genotoxic pollutants. Epidemiological data suggested that increasing exposure to airborne PAH contributes to increase risk cancer in this population. Exposure-dependent adducts were detected in while blood cells in coke oven workers. The adduct levels is function of the level of pollutant. In the last example we have analysed lung tissue from patient with cancer. We observed many adducts in peritumoral tissue, while few adducts could be detected in tumoral tissues. (author)

  17. Assessment of the right ventricle by magnetic resonance imaging in chronic obstructive lung disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Turnbull, L W; Ridgway, J P; Biernacki, W; McRitchie, H; Muir, A L; Best, J J; MacNee, W

    1990-01-01

    Right ventricular wall and chamber volume were measured by magnetic resonance imaging in 16 patients with stable chronic obstructive lung disease who subsequently underwent measurement of pulmonary haemodynamics by right heart catheterisation. The patients had a forced expiratory volume in one second of 0.7 (SD 0.3) litres, a forced vital capacity of 2.4 (1.0) l, an arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) of 6.5 (1.3) kPa, an arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2) of 6.5 (1.0) kPa, and a mean pulmona...

  18. Occupational lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 592 cases of occupational lung cancer were recorded in the Czech Republic during the 1992 to 1999 period. Ionizing radiation was the causal etiological factor in 92% cases. Uranium miners constituted the group which was affected most. Primary and secondary prevention measures are highlighted and the procedure for assessing occupational lung cancer from radioactive substances is outlined. The basic principles of a rational interdisciplinary collaboration in investigating the occupational nature of lung cancer and the mandatory assessment criteria are discussed

  19. Rapid Akt activation by nicotine and a tobacco carcinogen modulates the phenotype of normal human airway epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    West, Kip A.; Brognard, John; Clark, Amy S.; Linnoila, Ilona R.; Yang, Xiaowei; Swain, Sandra M.; Harris, Curtis; Belinsky, Steven; Dennis, Phillip A.

    2003-01-01

    Tobacco-related diseases such as lung cancer cause over 4.2 million deaths annually, with approximately 400,000 deaths per year occurring in the US. Genotoxic effects of tobacco components have been described, but effects on signaling pathways in normal cells have not been described. Here, we show activation of the serine/threonine kinase Akt in nonimmortalized human airway epithelial cells in vitro by two components of cigarette smoke, nicotine and the tobacco-specific carcinogen 4-(methylni...

  20. Assessment of central lung cancer spreading based on roentgenological, radiological and endoscopic evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made of 105 patients with central lung cancer of whom 74 had been operated on. The potentialities of the X-ray, endoscopic and radionuclide methods in the evaluation of the extent of tumor infiltration in the bronchi and the state of the intrathoracic lymph nodes for defining a disease stage had been studied. Combined X-ray and endoscopic investigations made it possible to establish the extent of tumor infiltration in the bronchi in 91% of the cases. Intrathoratic lymph node involvement could be detected with the help of a combined study using radionuclide methods and in some cases CT. The absence of foci of elevated 67Ga-citrate accumulation in the thoracic cavity with the involvement of the segmental and lobar bronchi testified against metastases in the mediastinal lymph nodes. Incseased RP fixation in a tumor and in the mediastinal zone was a convincing proof of the presence of metastates in the mediastinal lymph nodes. A study of the blood flow using 99mTc-MAA at Stages T1-2NO and T3N2 provided additional information to define indications for surgical treatment of central lung cancer

  1. Assessment of uranium tetrafluoride dissolution in the lung by in vivo and in vitro methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The data acquired over the past twenty years concerning the solubility of uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) are contradictory. To check the validity of this compound's W classification by the ICRP, we investigated its in vivo dissolution in rats and baboons and compared it to the in vitro dissolution obtained either with alveolar macrophages in culture or with a serum simulant fluid. We studied daily urinary excretion of uranium in rats and baboons and U tissue distribution in rats after inhalation of raw UF4 powder or intratracheal instillation of a UF4 particle suspension. Alveolar macrophages from 4 rats and 2 baboons were tested for their ability to dissolve UF4. Since UF4 dissolution in the lung may be influenced by oxidation to the very soluble form UO2F2, we performed in vitro dissolution with a serum simulant fluid bubbled with either pure oxygen or argon. There was good agreement between the in vivo and in vitro results for both rats and baboons. Our results support the view that dissolution of UF4 in the lung is fast, and that this compound is more soluble than expected. (author)

  2. Assessment of lung ventilation by MR imaging: current status and future perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Hanke, Alexander [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Langenbeckstrasse 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Beek, Edwin J.R. van [Unit of Academic Radiology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Glossop Road, Sheffield S10 2JF (United Kingdom)

    2002-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the present status of novel MRI techniques as a new important instrument for functional ventilation imaging. The current status and future perspectives in research and clinical applications are summarized. Morphological lung imaging is based on chest radiography and computed tomography, whereas scintigraphy is used for ventilation imaging. During recent years, MRI has emerged as a new means for functional imaging of ventilation. Aerosolized contrast agents and oxygen are used in proton imaging, whereas non-proton imaging relies on fluorine compounds, such as sulfur hexafluoride and perfluorcarbons, or on hyperpolarized noble gases, such as helium-3 or xenon-129. All the gases are administered as inhaled ''contrast agents'' for imaging of the airways and airspaces. In general, straightforward images demonstrate the homogeneity of ventilation in a breath-hold and allow for determination of ventilated lung. The different properties of the different compounds enable the measurement of additional functional parameters. They comprise airspace size, regional oxygen partial pressure, and analysis of ventilation distribution, ventilation/perfusion ratios, and gas exchange, including oxygen uptake. Novel MRI techniques provide the potential for functional imaging of ventilation. The next steps include definition of the value and the potential of the different contrast mechanisms as well as determination of the significance of the functional information with regard to physiological research and patient management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and others. (orig.)

  3. 4-D segmentation and normalization of 3He MR images for intrasubject assessment of ventilated lung volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contrella, Benjamin; Tustison, Nicholas J.; Altes, Talissa A.; Avants, Brian B.; Mugler, John P., III; de Lange, Eduard E.

    2012-03-01

    Although 3He MRI permits compelling visualization of the pulmonary air spaces, quantitation of absolute ventilation is difficult due to confounds such as field inhomogeneity and relative intensity differences between image acquisition; the latter complicating longitudinal investigations of ventilation variation with respiratory alterations. To address these potential difficulties, we present a 4-D segmentation and normalization approach for intra-subject quantitative analysis of lung hyperpolarized 3He MRI. After normalization, which combines bias correction and relative intensity scaling between longitudinal data, partitioning of the lung volume time series is performed by iterating between modeling of the combined intensity histogram as a Gaussian mixture model and modulating the spatial heterogeneity tissue class assignments through Markov random field modeling. Evaluation of the algorithm was retrospectively applied to a cohort of 10 asthmatics between 19-25 years old in which spirometry and 3He MR ventilation images were acquired both before and after respiratory exacerbation by a bronchoconstricting agent (methacholine). Acquisition was repeated under the same conditions from 7 to 467 days (mean +/- standard deviation: 185 +/- 37.2) later. Several techniques were evaluated for matching intensities between the pre and post-methacholine images with the 95th percentile value histogram matching demonstrating superior correlations with spirometry measures. Subsequent analysis evaluated segmentation parameters for assessing ventilation change in this cohort. Current findings also support previous research that areas of poor ventilation in response to bronchoconstriction are relatively consistent over time.

  4. Tumour heterogeneity in non-small cell lung carcinoma assessed by CT texture analysis: a potential marker of survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganeshan, Balaji; Miles, Ken [Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Clinical Imaging Sciences Centre, Division of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, Brighton, East Sussex (United Kingdom); Panayiotou, Elleny; Burnand, Kate [Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, Brighton (United Kingdom); Dizdarevic, Sabina [Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Sussex County Hospital, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2012-04-15

    To establish the potential for tumour heterogeneity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as assessed by CT texture analysis (CTTA) to provide an independent marker of survival for patients with NSCLC. Tumour heterogeneity was assessed by CTTA of unenhanced images of primary pulmonary lesions from 54 patients undergoing {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET-CT for staging of NSCLC. CTTA comprised image filtration to extract fine, medium and coarse features with quantification of the distribution of pixel values (uniformity) within the filtered images. Receiver operating characteristics identified thresholds for PET and CTTA parameters that were related to patient survival using Kaplan-Meier analysis. The median (range) survival was 29.5 (1-38) months. 24, 10, 14 and 6 patients had tumour stages I, II, III and IV respectively. PET stage and tumour heterogeneity assessed by CTTA were significant independent predictors of survival (PET stage: Odds ratio 3.85, 95% confidence limits 0.9-8.09, P = 0.002; CTTA: Odds ratio 56.4, 95% confidence limits 4.79-666, p = 0.001). SUV was not a significantly associated with survival. Assessment of tumour heterogeneity by CTTA of non-contrast enhanced images has the potential for to provide a novel, independent predictor of survival for patients with NSCLC. (orig.)

  5. Carcinogen-induced damage to DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human cells respond to carcinogen-induced damage in their DNA in at least two ways. The first response, excision repair, proceeds by at least three variations, depending on the nature of the damage. Nucleotide excision results in relatively large repair patches but few free DNA breaks, since the endonuclease step is limiting. Apurinic repair is characterized by the appearance of numerous breaks in the DNA and by short repair patches. The pathways behave as though they function independently. Lymphoic cells derived from a xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C patient are deficient in their ability to perform nucleotide excision and also to excise 6 methoxyguanine adducts, but they are apurinic repair competent. Organisms may bypass damage in their DNA. Lymphoblastoid cells, including those derived from xeroderma pigmentosum treated with 3H-anti-BPDE, can replicate their DNA at low doses of carcinogen. Unexcised 3H is found in the light or parental strand of the resulting hybrid DNA when replication occurs in medium with BrdUrd. This observation indicates a bypass reaction occurring by a mechanism involving branch migration at DNA growing points. Branch migration in DNA preparations have been observed, but the evidence is that most occurs in BrdUrd-containing DNA during cell lysis. The measurement of the bifilarly substituted DNA resulting from branch migration is a convenient method of estimating the proportion of new synthesis remaining in the vicinity of the DNA growing point. Treatment with carcinogens or caffeine results in accumulation of DNA growing points accompanied by the synthesis of shortened pieces of daughter DNA

  6. Development of ferret as a human lung cancer model by injecting4-(N-methyl-N-nitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development of new animal lung cancer models that are relevant to human lung carcinogenesis is important for lung cancer research. Previously we have shown the induction of lung tumor in ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) exposed to both tobacco smoke and a tobacco carcinogen (4-(N-methyl-N-nitrosamino...

  7. Uncertainty induced by chest wall thickness assessment methods on lung activity estimation for plutonium and americium: a large population-based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo lung counting aims at assessing the retained activity in the lungs. The calibration factor relating the measured counts to the worker’s specific retained lung activity can be obtained by several means and strongly depends on the chest wall thickness. Here we compare, for 374 male nuclear workers, the activity assessed with a reference protocol, where the material equivalent chest wall thickness is known from ultrasound measurements, with two other protocols. The counting system is an array of four germanium detectors. It is found that non site-specific equations for the assessment of the chest wall thickness induce large biases in the assessment of activity. For plutonium isotopes or 241Am the proportion of workers for whom the retained activity is within ± 10% of the reference one is smaller than 10%. The use of site-specific equations raises this proportion to 20% and 58% for plutonium and 241Am, respectively. Finally, for the studied population, when site-specific equations are used for the chest wall thickness, the standard uncertainties for the lung activity are 42% and 12.5%, for plutonium and 241Am, respectively. Due to the relatively large size of the studied population, these values are a relatively robust estimate of the uncertainties due to the assessment of the chest wall thickness for the current practice at this site. (paper)

  8. Promotion of lung tumor growth by interleukin-17

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Beibei; Guenther, James F.; Pociask, Derek A.; Wang, Yu; Kolls, Jay K.; You, Zongbing; Chandrasekar, Bysani; Shan, Bin; Sullivan, Deborah E.; Morris, Gilbert F.

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings demonstrate that inhaled cigarette smoke, the predominant lung carcinogen, elicits a T helper 17 (Th17) inflammatory phenotype. Interleukin-17A (IL-17), the hallmark cytokine of Th17 inflammation, displays pro- and antitumorigenic properties in a manner that varies according to tumor type and assay system. To investigate the role of IL-17 in lung tumor growth, we used an autochthonous tumor model (K-RasLA1 mice) with lung delivery of a recombinant adenovirus that expresses IL-...

  9. Screening tests for determination of cytotoxic agent, mutagens and carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiegelberg, T.; Koerdel, W.; Goertz, T.; Thriemer, A.

    1983-01-01

    It is supposed that chemical substances are the primary factors responsible for the development of tumors and genetic damages. From this results the urgend demand to examine at least the frequently applied and suspicious substances on possibly health-affecting effects. The performance of these examinations with experimental animals requires a lot of time and financial support and has increasingly been criticised in public with regard to protection of animals. Experience gained in the U.S.A. revealed that the carcinogenicity test of one single substance performed with animal experiments takes approximately 3 years and costs about 300,000 Dollars. Therefore the application of cell cultures for such examinations and tests has been postulated and discussed for several years. Cell cultures require only little space and generally the observed effects develop after only a short time. Objectification and statistical assessment (due to high cell amounts per test) can be performed without any problems.

  10. Association of arsenic exposure with lung cancer incidence rates in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J Putila

    Full Text Available Although strong exposure to arsenic has been shown to be carcinogenic, its contribution to lung cancer incidence in the United States is not well characterized. We sought to determine if the low-level exposures to arsenic seen in the U.S. are associated with lung cancer incidence after controlling for possible confounders, and to assess the interaction with smoking behavior.Measurements of arsenic stream sediment and soil concentration obtained from the USGS National Geochemical Survey were combined, respectively, with 2008 BRFSS estimates on smoking prevalence and 2000 U.S. Census county level income to determine the effects of these factors on lung cancer incidence, as estimated from respective state-wide cancer registries and the SEER database. Poisson regression was used to determine the association between each variable and age-adjusted county-level lung cancer incidence. ANOVA was used to assess interaction effects between covariates.Sediment levels of arsenic were significantly associated with an increase in incident cases of lung cancer (P<0.0001. These effects persisted after controlling for smoking and income (P<0.0001. Across the U.S., exposure to arsenic may contribute to up to 5,297 lung cancer cases per year. There was also a significant interaction between arsenic exposure levels and smoking prevalence (P<0.05.Arsenic was significantly associated with lung cancer incidence rates in the U.S. after controlling for smoking and income, indicating that low-level exposure to arsenic is responsible for excess cancer cases in many parts of the U.S. Elevated county smoking prevalence strengthened the association between arsenic exposure and lung cancer incidence rate, an effect previously unseen on a population level.

  11. Longitudinal assessment of TUBB3 expression in non-small cell lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jan Nyrop; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2014-01-01

    NSCLC patients stage T1-4N0-1 was treated with surgery alone without preceding chemotherapy (OP-group). Paired repeated samples were compared in order to evaluate for changes in TUBB3 expression. RESULTS: No statistically significant change in TUBB3 expression was observed between initial diagnostic......INTRODUCTION: Class-III-beta-tubulin (TUBB3) expression may be a potential predictive factor for treatment with microtubule interfering cytotoxic drugs in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Potential changes in TUBB3 expression during chemotherapy may be of interest if future choice of...... chemotherapy is to be based on TUBB3 expression. If the biomarker expression changes during chemotherapy, biopsies before initiation of chemotherapy beyond first line may be needed if treatment decision is to be based on TUBB3 expression. Thus, the aim was to explore TUBB3 expression heterogeneity and changes...

  12. Trace elements and carcinogenicity: a subject in review

    OpenAIRE

    Mulware, Stephen Juma

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is known to be a multi-step process, which involves different stages including initiation, promotion, progression and metastasis. Chemical carcinogens including most trace elements can change any of these processes to induce their carcinogenic effects. Various studies confirm that cancer arises from the accumulation of irreversible DNA damage, which results from multiple mutations in critical genes in the body organ. Chemical carcinogens most often directly or after xenobiotic metaboli...

  13. Lung Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergencies Cardiac Emergencies Eye Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Lung Emergencies People with Marfan syndrome can be at ... should be considered an emergency. Symptoms of sudden lung collapse (pneumothorax) Symptoms of a sudden lung collapse ...

  14. Lung metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metastases to the lung; Metastatic cancer to the lung ... Metastatic tumors in the lungs are cancers that developed at other places in the body (or other parts of the lungs) and spread through the ...

  15. Influence of radiation therapy on the lung-tissue in breast cancer patients: CT-assessed density changes and associated symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relative electron density of lung tissue was measured from computer tomography (CT) slices in 33 breast cancer patients treated by various techniques of adjuvant radiotherapy. The measurements were made before radiotherapy, 3 months and 9 months after completion of radiation therapy. The changes in lung densities at 3 months and 9 months were compared to radiation induced radiological (CT) findings. In addition, subjective symptoms such as cough and dyspnoea were assessed before and after radiotherapy. It was observed that the mean of the relative electron density of lung tissue varied from 0.25 when the whole lung was considered to 0.17 when only the anterior lateral quarter of the lung was taken into account. In patients with positive radiological (CT) findings the mean lung density of the anterior lateral quarter increased 2.1 times 3 months after radiotherapy and was still increased 1.6 times 6 months later. For those patients without findings, in the CT pictures the corresponding values were 1.2 and 1.1, respectively. The standard deviation of the pixel values within the anterior lateral quarter of the lung increased 3.8 times and 3.2 times at 3 months and 9 months, respectively, in the former group, as opposed to 1.2 and 1.1 in the latter group. Thirteen patients had an increase in either cough or dyspnoea as observed 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. In eleven patients these symptoms persisted 6 months later. No significant correlation was found between radiological findings and subjective symptoms. However, when three different treatment techniques were compared among 29 patients the highest rate of radiological findings was observed in patients in which the largest lung volumes received the target dose. A tendency towards an increased rate of subjective symptoms was also found in this group

  16. Estimation of carcinogenicity using molecular fragments tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Lu, Jing; Wang, Fei; Shen, Qiancheng; Zheng, Mingyue; Luo, Xiaomin; Zhu, Weiliang; Jiang, Hualiang; Chen, Kaixian

    2012-08-27

    Carcinogenicity is an important toxicological endpoint that poses high concern to drug discovery. In this study, we developed a method to extract structural alerts (SAs) and modulating factors of carcinogens on the basis of statistical analyses. First, the Gaston algorithm, a frequent subgraph mining method, was used to detect substructures that occurred at least six times. Then, a molecular fragments tree was built and pruned to select high-quality SAs. The p-value of the parent node in the tree and that of its children nodes were compared, and the nodes that had a higher statistical significance in binomial tests were retained. Finally, modulating factors that suppressed the toxic effects of SAs were extracted by three self-defining rules. The accuracy of the 77 SAs plus four SA/modulating factor pairs model for the training set, and the test set was 0.70 and 0.65, respectively. Our model has higher predictive ability than Benigni's model, especially in the test set. The results highlight that this method is preferable in terms of prediction accuracy, and the selected SAs are useful for prediction as well as interpretation. Moreover, our method is convenient to users in that it can extract SAs from a database using an automated and unbiased manner that does not rely on a priori knowledge of mechanism of action. PMID:22834690

  17. Carcinogenicity/tumour promotion by NDL PCB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrenk, D. [Kaiserslautern Univ. (Germany). Food Chemistry and Environmental Toxicology

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) belong to the group of persistent environmental pollutants exhibiting neurotoxic, teratogenic and tumour-promoting effects in experimental animal models. PCB congeners can be divided into 'dioxinlike' and 'non-dioxinlike' congeners on the basis of their ability to act as aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. Like the most toxic dioxin congener 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) 'dioxinlike' PCBs bind to the AhR and show characteristic effects on the expression of AhR-regulated genes including the induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1. On the other hand, 'non-dioxinlike' PCB congeners have a lower or no binding affinity to the AhR, but exhibit a 'phenobarbital-type' induction of CYP 2B1/2 activity. A carcinogenic potential of PCBs has been demonstrated with technical mixtures such as Aroclors or Clophens. In these studies the liver and the thyroid gland were found to be the principal target organs of PCB-mediated carcinogenesis in rodents. No studies have been published, however, on the carcinogenicity of individual congeners. In two-stage initiation-promotion protocols in rats, both technical mixtures and individual 'dioxinlike' and 'non-dioxinlike' congeners were reported to act as liver tumour promoters.

  18. Hepatic metabolism of carcinogenic β-asarone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartus, Alexander T; Stegmüller, Simone; Simson, Nadine; Wahl, Andrea; Neef, Sylvia; Kelm, Harald; Schrenk, Dieter

    2015-09-21

    β-Asarone (1) belongs to the group of naturally occurring phenylpropenes like eugenol or anethole. Compound 1 is found in several plants, e.g., Acorus calamus or Asarum europaeum. Compound 1-containing plant materials and essential oils thereof are used to flavor foods and alcoholic beverages and as ingredients of many drugs in traditional phytomedicines. Although 1 has been claimed to have several positive pharmacological effects, it was found to be genotoxic and carcinogenic in rodents (liver and small intestine). The mechanism of action of carcinogenic allylic phenylpropenes consists of the metabolic activation via cytochrome P450 enzymes and sulfotransferases. In vivo experiments suggested that this pathway does not play a major role in the carcinogenicity of the propenylic compound 1 as is the case for other propenylic compounds, e.g., anethole. Since the metabolic pathways of 1 have not been investigated and its carcinogenic mode of action is unknown, we investigated the metabolism of 1 in liver microsomes of rats, bovines, porcines, and humans using (1)H NMR, HPLC-DAD, and LC-ESI-MS/MS techniques. We synthesized the majority of identified metabolites which were used as reference compounds for the quantification and final verification of metabolites. Microsomal epoxidation of the side chain of 1 presumably yielded (Z)-asarone-1',2'-epoxide (8a) which instantly was hydrolyzed to the corresponding erythro- and threo-configurated diols (9b, 9a) and the ketone 2,4,5-trimethoxyphenylacetone (13). This was the main metabolic pathway in the metabolism of 1 in all investigated liver microsomes. Hydroxylation of the side chain of 1 led to the formation of three alcohols at total yields of less than 30%: 1'-hydroxyasarone (2), (E)- and (Z)-3'-hydroxyasarone (4 and 6), with 6 being the mainly formed alcohol and 2 being detectable only in liver microsomes of Aroclor 1254-pretreated rats. Small amounts of 4 and 6 were further oxidized to the corresponding carbonyl

  19. ASSESSMENT OF ACUTE LUNG INJURY INDUCED BY PM 2.5 SAMPLES FROM TWO CITIES IN GERMANY WITH DIFFERING INCIDENCE OF ALLERGIES AND ASTHMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ASSESSMENT OF ACUTE LUNG INJURY INDUCED BY PM 2.5 SAMPLES FROM TWO CITIES IN GERMANY WITH DIFFERING INCIDENCE OF ALLERGIES AND ASTHMA.LR Bishop, J Heinrich*, MK Selgrade & MI Gilmour. Experimental Toxicology Division, ORD/ NHEERL, U.S. EPA, RTP, NC. *GSF, Neuherberg,...

  20. Locoregional control of non-small cell lung cancer in relation to automated early assessment of tumor regression on cone beam computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Carsten; Bernchou, Uffe; Bertelsen, Anders;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Large interindividual variations in volume regression of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are observable on standard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) during fractionated radiation therapy. Here, a method for automated assessment of tumor volume regression is presented and its poten...

  1. Exposure and Metabolic Activation Biomarkers of Carcinogenic Tobacco-Specific Nitrosamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Stephen S; Stepanov, Irina; Carmella, Steven G

    2016-01-19

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the world, and cigarette smoking is its main cause. Oral cavity cancer is another debilitating and often fatal cancer closely linked to tobacco product use. While great strides have been made in decreasing tobacco use in the United States and some other countries, there are still an estimated 1 billion men and 250 million women in the world who are cigarette smokers and there are hundreds of millions of smokeless tobacco users, all at risk for cancer. Worldwide, lung cancer kills about three people per minute. This Account focuses on metabolites and biomarkers of two powerful tobacco-specific nitrosamine carcinogens, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN), considered to be among the main causes of lung cancer and oral cavity cancer in people who use tobacco products. Three properties of NNK and NNN are critical for successful biomarker studies: they are present in all tobacco products, they are tobacco-specific and are not found in any other product, and they are strong carcinogens. NNK and NNN are converted in humans to urinary metabolites that can be quantified by mass spectrometry as biomarkers of exposure to these carcinogens. They are also metabolized to diazonium ions and related electrophiles that react with DNA to form addition products that can be detected and quantified by mass spectrometry. These urinary metabolites and DNA addition products can serve as biomarkers of exposure and metabolic activation, respectively. The biomarkers of exposure, in particular the urinary NNK metabolites 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) and its glucuronides, have been extensively applied to document tobacco-specific lung carcinogen uptake in smokers and nonsmokers exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke. Highly sensitive mass spectrometric methods have been developed for quantitative analysis of these NNK metabolites as well as metabolites of NNN in human urine

  2. Studies on carcinogenicity or anticarcinogenicity of isonicotinic acid hydrazide and caffeine by nine-week assay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to many surveys, cancer is one of the major causes of death in most developed countries and the incidence of cancer appears to be on the increase. Therefore, many studies on detection of carcinogenic or anticarcinogenic agents need urgently. The purpose of this investigation is evaluation the carcinogenic or anticarcinogenic effect of INH and caffeine, which were interpreted as showing either the presence or the absence of a carcinogenic or anticarcinogenic effect, using nine-week assay system. The non-inbred NIH(GP) newborn mice were injected subcutaneously with NIH(400,425, 450 or 480 μg/ head) or caffeine (75 or 100 μg/head) for evaluation of carcinogenicity. Caffeine (1 or 2 mg/ml of drinking water) was administered orally to the mice, which were injected subcutaneously with BP(500μg/head) at new-born, during 6 weeks after weaning for evaluation of anticarcinogenicity. Each group was killed at 9 weeks after the start of exanination. All major organs were examined grossly and histopathologically. Decreased lung adenoma incidence was observed statistically significant in mice fed with caffeine 1 mg(18.8%) or 2 mg(5.1%) per ml of drinking water compared to BP control group (41.3%). However, there was no statistical difference in the incidence of lung and other site tumor between the INH group and the normal control group or between caffeine injection group and normal control group. This result will be contribute to the prevention of cancer from the viewpoint of identifying carcinogenic or anticarcinogenic agents from the environment. (Author)

  3. Prediction of rodent carcinogenic potential of naturally occurring chemicals in the human diet using high-throughput QSAR predictive modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consistent with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Critical Path Initiative, predictive toxicology software programs employing quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models are currently under evaluation for regulatory risk assessment and scientific decision support for highly sensitive endpoints such as carcinogenicity, mutagenicity and reproductive toxicity. At the FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition's Office of Food Additive Safety and the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research's Informatics and Computational Safety Analysis Staff (ICSAS), the use of computational SAR tools for both qualitative and quantitative risk assessment applications are being developed and evaluated. One tool of current interest is MDL-QSAR predictive discriminant analysis modeling of rodent carcinogenicity, which has been previously evaluated for pharmaceutical applications by the FDA ICSAS. The study described in this paper aims to evaluate the utility of this software to estimate the carcinogenic potential of small, organic, naturally occurring chemicals found in the human diet. In addition, a group of 19 known synthetic dietary constituents that were positive in rodent carcinogenicity studies served as a control group. In the test group of naturally occurring chemicals, 101 were found to be suitable for predictive modeling using this software's discriminant analysis modeling approach. Predictions performed on these compounds were compared to published experimental evidence of each compound's carcinogenic potential. Experimental evidence included relevant toxicological studies such as rodent cancer bioassays, rodent anti-carcinogenicity studies, genotoxic studies, and the presence of chemical structural alerts. Statistical indices of predictive performance were calculated to assess the utility of the predictive modeling method. Results revealed good predictive performance using this software's rodent carcinogenicity module of over 1200 chemicals

  4. Molecular basis of carcinogenicity of tungsten alloy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tungsten alloy of 91% tungsten, 6% nickel and 3% cobalt (WNC 91–6–3) induces rhabdomyosarcoma when implanted into a rat thigh muscle. To investigate whether this effect is species-specific human HSkMc primary muscle cells were exposed to WNC 91–6–3 particles and responses were compared with those from a rat skeletal muscle cell line (L6-C11). Toxicity was assessed by the adenylate kinase assay and microscopy, DNA damage by the Comet assay. Caspase 3 enzyme activity was measured and oligonucleotide microarrays were used for transcriptional profiling. WNC 91–6–3 particles caused toxicity in cells adjacent to the particles and also increased DNA strand breaks. Inhibition of caspase 3 by WNC 91–6–3 occurred in rat but not in human cells. In both rat and human cells, the transcriptional response to WNC 91–6–3 showed repression of transcripts encoding muscle-specific proteins with induction of glycolysis, hypoxia, stress responses and transcripts associated with DNA damage and cell death. In human cells, genes encoding metallothioneins were also induced, together with genes related to angiogenesis, dysregulation of apoptosis and proliferation consistent with pre-neoplastic changes. An alloy containing iron, WNF 97–2–1, which is non-carcinogenic in vivo in rats, did not show these transcriptional changes in vitro in either species while the corresponding cobalt-containing alloy, WNC 97–2–1 elicited similar responses to WNC 91–6–3. Tungsten alloys containing both nickel and cobalt therefore have the potential to be carcinogenic in man and in vitro assays coupled with transcriptomics can be used to identify alloys, which may lead to tumour formation, by dysregulation of biochemical processes. - Highlights: • Use of transcriptomics to identify likely carcinogenic tungsten alloys in vitro • Cobalt containing alloys cause oxidative stress, DNA-damage and perturb apoptosis. • Presence of cobalt causes changes in gene expression

  5. Molecular basis of carcinogenicity of tungsten alloy particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Robert M.; Williams, Tim D.; Waring, Rosemary H.; Hodges, Nikolas J., E-mail: n.hodges@bham.ac.uk

    2015-03-15

    The tungsten alloy of 91% tungsten, 6% nickel and 3% cobalt (WNC 91–6–3) induces rhabdomyosarcoma when implanted into a rat thigh muscle. To investigate whether this effect is species-specific human HSkMc primary muscle cells were exposed to WNC 91–6–3 particles and responses were compared with those from a rat skeletal muscle cell line (L6-C11). Toxicity was assessed by the adenylate kinase assay and microscopy, DNA damage by the Comet assay. Caspase 3 enzyme activity was measured and oligonucleotide microarrays were used for transcriptional profiling. WNC 91–6–3 particles caused toxicity in cells adjacent to the particles and also increased DNA strand breaks. Inhibition of caspase 3 by WNC 91–6–3 occurred in rat but not in human cells. In both rat and human cells, the transcriptional response to WNC 91–6–3 showed repression of transcripts encoding muscle-specific proteins with induction of glycolysis, hypoxia, stress responses and transcripts associated with DNA damage and cell death. In human cells, genes encoding metallothioneins were also induced, together with genes related to angiogenesis, dysregulation of apoptosis and proliferation consistent with pre-neoplastic changes. An alloy containing iron, WNF 97–2–1, which is non-carcinogenic in vivo in rats, did not show these transcriptional changes in vitro in either species while the corresponding cobalt-containing alloy, WNC 97–2–1 elicited similar responses to WNC 91–6–3. Tungsten alloys containing both nickel and cobalt therefore have the potential to be carcinogenic in man and in vitro assays coupled with transcriptomics can be used to identify alloys, which may lead to tumour formation, by dysregulation of biochemical processes. - Highlights: • Use of transcriptomics to identify likely carcinogenic tungsten alloys in vitro • Cobalt containing alloys cause oxidative stress, DNA-damage and perturb apoptosis. • Presence of cobalt causes changes in gene expression

  6. Assessment of inhaled acute ammonia-induced lung injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Michael W; Wong, Benjamin; Tressler, Justin; Coggins, Andrew; Rodriguez, Ashley; Devorak, Jennifer; Sciuto, Alfred M

    2016-02-01

    This study examined acute toxicity and lung injury following inhalation exposure to ammonia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (300-350 g) were exposed to 9000, 20 000, 23 000, 26 000, 30 000 or 35 000 ppm of ammonia for 20 min in a custom head-out exposure system. The exposure atmosphere, which attained steady state within 3 min for all ammonia concentrations, was monitored and verified using a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) gas analyzer. Animals exposed to ammonia resulted in dose-dependent increases in observed signs of intoxication, including increased chewing and licking, ocular irritation, salivation, lacrimation, oronasal secretion and labored breathing. The LCt50 of ammonia within this head-out inhalation exposure model was determined by probit analysis to be 23 672 ppm (16 489 mg/m(3)) for the 20 min exposure in male rats. Exposure to 20 000 or 23 000 ppm of ammonia resulted in significant body weight loss 24-h post-exposure. Lung edema increased in all ammonia-exposed animal groups and was significant following exposure to 9000 ppm. Bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF) protein concentrations significantly increased following exposure to 20 000 or 23 000 ppm of ammonia in comparison to controls. BAL cell (BALC) death and total cell counts increased in animals exposed to 20 000 or 23 000 ppm of ammonia in comparison to controls. Differential cell counts of white blood cells, neutrophils and platelets from blood and BALF were significantly increased following exposure to 23 000 ppm of ammonia. The following studies describe the validation of a head-out inhalation exposure model for the determination of acute ammonia-induced toxicity; this model will be used for the development and evaluation of potential therapies that provide protection against respiratory and systemic toxicological effects. PMID:26821737

  7. Functional capacity, physical activity and muscle strength assessment of individuals with non-small cell lung cancer: a systematic review of instruments and their measurement properties

    OpenAIRE

    Granger, Catherine L.; McDonald, Christine F; Parry, Selina M.; Oliveira, Cristino C; Denehy, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Background The measurement properties of instruments used to assess functional capacity, physical activity and muscle strength in participants with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have not been systematically reviewed. Method Objectives: To identify outcome measures used to assess these outcomes in participants with NSCLC; and to evaluate, synthesise and compare the measurement properties of the outcome measures identified. Data Sources: A systematic review of articles using electronic dat...

  8. Non-invasive whole-body plethysmograph for assessment and prediction of radiation-induced lung injury using simultaneously acquired nitric oxide and lung volume measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a prevalent side effect in patients who undergo thoracic irradiation as part of their cancer treatment. Preclinical studies play a major role in understanding disease onset under controlled experimental conditions. The aim of this work is to develop a single-chambered optimized, non-invasive, whole-body plethysmograph prototype for unrestrained small animal lung volume measurements for preclinical RILI studies. The system is also designed to simultaneously obtain nitric oxide (NO) measurements of the expired breath. The device prototype was tested using computer simulations, phantom studies and in vivo measurements in experimental animal models of RILI. The system was found to improve resemblance to true breathing signal characteristics as measured by improved skewness (21.83%) and kurtosis (51.94%) in addition to increased overall signal sensitivity (3.61%) of the acquired breath signal, when compared to matching control data. NO concentration data was combined with breath measurements in order to predict early RILI onset. The system was evaluated using serial weekly measurements in hemi-thorax irradiated rats (n = 8) yielding a classification performance of 50.0%, 62.5%, 87.5% using lung volume only, NO only, and combined measurements of both, respectively. Our results indicate that improved performance could be achieved when measurements of lung volume are combined with those of NO. This would provide the overall plethysmography system with the ability to provide useful diagnostic and prognostic information for preclinical and, potentially, clinical thoracic dose escalation studies. (paper)

  9. Ventilation/perfusion SPECT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: an evaluation by reference to symptoms, spirometric lung function and emphysema, as assessed with HRCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joegi, Jonas; Bajc, Marika [Lund University, Skaane University Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Lund (Sweden); Ekberg, Marie [Lund University, Skaane University Hospital, Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Lund (Sweden); Jonson, Bjoern [Lund University, Department of Clinical Physiology, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Lund (Sweden); Bozovic, Gracijela [Lund University, Skaane University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Lund (Sweden)

    2011-07-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by airflow limitation which is not fully reversible. Despite the heterogeneity of COPD, its diagnosis and staging is currently based solely on forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV{sub 1}). FEV{sub 1} does not explain the underlying pathophysiology of airflow limitation. The relationship between FEV{sub 1}, symptoms and emphysema extent is weak. Better diagnostic tools are needed to define COPD. Tomographic lung scintigraphy [ventilation/perfusion single photon emission tomography (V/P SPECT)] visualizes regional V and P. In COPD, relations between V/P SPECT, spirometry, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and symptoms have been insufficiently studied. The aim of this study was to investigate how lung function imaging and obstructive disease grading undertaken using V/P SPECT correlate with symptoms, spirometric lung function and degree of emphysema assessed with HRCT in patients with COPD. Thirty patients with stable COPD were evaluated with the Medical Research Council dyspnoea questionnaire (MRC) and the clinical COPD questionnaire (CCQ). Spirometry was performed. The extent of emphysema was assessed using HRCT. V/P SPECT was used to assess V/P patterns, total reduction in lung function and degree of obstructive disease. The total reduction in lung function and degree of obstructive disease, assessed with V/P SPECT, significantly correlated with emphysema extent (r = 0.66-0.69, p < 0.0001) and spirometric lung function (r = 0.62-0.74, p < 0.0005). The correlation between emphysema extent and spirometric lung function was weaker. No correlation between MRC, CCQ and objective measurements was found. V/P SPECT is sensitive to early changes in COPD. V/P SPECT also has the possibility to identify comorbid disease. V/P SPECT findings show a significant correlation with emphysema extent and spirometric lung function. We therefore recommend that scintigraphic signs of COPD, whenever found, should be

  10. Ventilation/perfusion SPECT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: an evaluation by reference to symptoms, spirometric lung function and emphysema, as assessed with HRCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by airflow limitation which is not fully reversible. Despite the heterogeneity of COPD, its diagnosis and staging is currently based solely on forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). FEV1 does not explain the underlying pathophysiology of airflow limitation. The relationship between FEV1, symptoms and emphysema extent is weak. Better diagnostic tools are needed to define COPD. Tomographic lung scintigraphy [ventilation/perfusion single photon emission tomography (V/P SPECT)] visualizes regional V and P. In COPD, relations between V/P SPECT, spirometry, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and symptoms have been insufficiently studied. The aim of this study was to investigate how lung function imaging and obstructive disease grading undertaken using V/P SPECT correlate with symptoms, spirometric lung function and degree of emphysema assessed with HRCT in patients with COPD. Thirty patients with stable COPD were evaluated with the Medical Research Council dyspnoea questionnaire (MRC) and the clinical COPD questionnaire (CCQ). Spirometry was performed. The extent of emphysema was assessed using HRCT. V/P SPECT was used to assess V/P patterns, total reduction in lung function and degree of obstructive disease. The total reduction in lung function and degree of obstructive disease, assessed with V/P SPECT, significantly correlated with emphysema extent (r = 0.66-0.69, p < 0.0001) and spirometric lung function (r = 0.62-0.74, p < 0.0005). The correlation between emphysema extent and spirometric lung function was weaker. No correlation between MRC, CCQ and objective measurements was found. V/P SPECT is sensitive to early changes in COPD. V/P SPECT also has the possibility to identify comorbid disease. V/P SPECT findings show a significant correlation with emphysema extent and spirometric lung function. We therefore recommend that scintigraphic signs of COPD, whenever found, should be reported. V/P SPECT

  11. Assessment of radiofrequency ablation for lung cancer on the basis of clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for malignant lung tumors become increasingly widespread. We therefore conducted a multi-center phase I/II clinical study to evaluate its safety and efficacy. Eligibility criteria included a lesion of longer axis 1-2.5 cm with abnormal accumulation on fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and of which was also considered to be difficult to curatively resect. Lesion of the diameters of which was difficult to measure, and close to the mediastinum, pleura or major blood vessels or bronchi larger than 5 mm is excluded. Percutaneous puncture was performed under image guidance using local anesthesia. Output power is gradually elevated from a low power. Overlapping ablation is carried out if necessary to cover the entire lesion. Safety was evaluated before and after the procedure by patient observation, CT, MRI, blood biochemical tests, respiratory function test and so on. The efficacy was evaluated by visual analysis of abnormal accumulation of FDG-PET before the procedure, 3 months later and 6 months later. Of the 30 cases (primary 6, metastasis 24) reported until now, the mean diameter was 1.53 cm. Pneumothorax was observed in 46.7% and a chest tube needed to be inserted in one case of them. There were no severe complications. The rate of efficacy evaluated by FDG-PET was 91.7%. Data should be analyzed in more detail in the future. (author)

  12. Temporal aspects of tumorigenic response to individual and mixed carcinogens. Comprehensive progress report, June 1, 1975--May 31, 1978. [Mouse skin, rats, hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, R.E.; Burns, F.J.; Altshuler, B.

    1978-02-01

    The research proposed here is designed to obtain a better understanding of the temporal kinetics of tumor induction when one or more carcinogens are present simultaneously or sequentially for prolonged periods of time. Studies done to date under this contract have shown that carcinogenesis in mouse skin by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon carcinogens is consistent with the induction of dependent and autonomous cell transformations by the carcinogen followed by the conversion of autonomous tumor cells into malignancies at a rate which is determined by the level of carcinogen exposure. Dependent cell transformations remain latent in the skin unless expressed by a promoting agent. Dependent neoplasia appears to follow one-hit kinetics while malignancy is a multihit endpoint. Dose-related and time-related aspects of tumor induction are separable in the initiation-promotion system of mouse skin which along with rat skin and hamster lung is being used as a model for testing hypotheses. Results to date provide the basis for a new interpretation of the linear non-threshold extrapolation model. The broad aim of the study is to provide a basis or rationale for estimating risks associated with prolonged exposures to carcinogens found in the environment and to predict how different tissues and species respond to the same carcinogens.

  13. Cancer of the lung in uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer of the lung in uranium miners is due to cigarette smoking and high radon daughter product exposure in uranium mines. The incidence of oat cell cancer was very high (75 to 80%) when the miners were exposed to high levels of radiation (WLM). Exposure to these two carcinogens causes squamous cell metaplasia which is also due to upper respiratory inflammatory disease. The squamous metaplasia is not distinguishable as to cause, but when due to carcinogen, these cells persist over a longer period of time and become progressively more and more atypical until invasive neoplasia develops. This is the latent period and lasts about 10 to 15 years

  14. The Impact of Homogeneous Versus Heterogeneous Emphysema on Dynamic Hyperinflation in Patients With Severe COPD Assessed for Lung Volume Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutou, Afroditi K; Zoumot, Zaid; Nair, Arjun; Davey, Claire; Hansell, David M; Jamurtas, Athanasios; Polkey, Michael I; Hopkinson, Nicholas S

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic hyperinflation (DH) is a pathophysiologic hallmark of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of emphysema distribution on DH during a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) in patients with severe COPD. This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data among severe COPD patients who underwent thoracic high-resolution computed tomography, full lung function measurements and maximal CPET with inspiratory manouvers as assessment for a lung volume reduction procedure. ΔIC was calculated by subtracting the end-exercise inspiratory capacity (eIC) from resting IC (rIC) and expressed as a percentage of rIC (ΔIC%). Emphysema quantification was conducted at 3 predefined levels using the syngo PULMO-CT (Siemens AG); a difference >25% between best and worse slice was defined as heterogeneous emphysema. Fifty patients with heterogeneous (62.7% male; 60.9 ± 7.5 years old; FEV1% = 32.4 ± 11.4) and 14 with homogeneous emphysema (61.5% male; 62.5 ± 5.9 years old; FEV1% = 28.1 ± 10.3) fulfilled the enrolment criteria. The groups were matched for all baseline variables. ΔIC% was significantly higher in homogeneous emphysema (39.8% ± 9.8% vs.31.2% ± 13%, p = 0.031), while no other CPET parameter differed between the groups. Upper lobe predominance of emphysema correlated positively with peak oxygen pulse, peak oxygen uptake and peak respiratory rate, and negatively with ΔIC%. Homogeneous emphysema is associated with more DH during maximum exercise in COPD patients. PMID:26398112

  15. Biological response and morphological assessment of individually dispersed multi-wall carbon nanotubes in the lung after intratracheal instillation in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological responses of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were assessed after a single intratracheal instillation in rats. The diameter and median length of the MWCNTs used in this study were approximately 60 nm and 1.5 μm, respectively. Groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally instilled with 0.04, 0.2, or 1 mg/kg of the individually dispersed MWCNT suspension. After instillation, the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was assessed for inflammatory cells and markers, and the lung, liver, kidney, spleen, and cerebrum were histopathologically evaluated at 3-day, 1-week, 1-month, 3-month, and 6-month post-exposure. Transient pulmonary inflammatory responses were observed only in the lungs of the group of rats exposed to 1 mg/kg of MWCNTs. Morphology of the instilled MWCNTs in the lungs of rats was assessed using light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Light microscopy examination revealed that MWCNTs deposited in the lungs of the rats were typically phagocytosed by the alveolar macrophages and these macrophages were consequently accumulated in the alveoli until 6-month post-exposure. The 400 TEM images obtained showed that all MWCNTs were located in the alveolar macrophages or macrophages in the interstitial tissues, and MWCNTs were not located in the cells of the interstitial tissues. There was no evidence of chronic inflammation, such as angiogenesis or fibrosis, induced by MWCNT instillation. These results suggest that MWCNTs were being processed and cleared by alveolar macrophages.

  16. The Adaptation, Face, and Content Validation of a Needs Assessment Tool: Progressive Disease for People with Interstitial Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigada, Carla; Yorke, Janelle; Hart, Simon P.; Bajwah, Sabrina; Ross, Joy; Wells, Athol; Papadopoulos, Athanasios; Currow, David C.; Grande, Gunn; Macleod, Una; Johnson, Miriam J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Irrreversible interstitial lung disease (ILD) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Palliative care needs of patients and caregivers are not routinely assessed; there is no tool to identify needs and triage support in clinical practice. Objective: The study objective was to adapt and face/content validate a palliative needs assessment tool for people with ILD. Methods: The Needs Assessment Tool: Progressive Disease-Cancer (NAT:PD-C) was adapted to reflect the palliative care needs identified from the ILD literature and patient/caregiver interviews. Face and content validity of the NAT:PD-ILD was tested using patient/caregiver focus groups and an expert consensus group. Participants in the study were two English tertiary health care trusts' outpatients clinics. There were four focus groups: two patient (n = 7; n = 4); one caregiver (n = 3); and one clinician (n = 8). There was a single caregiver interview, and an expert consensus group—academics (n = 3), clinicians (n = 9), patients (n = 4), and caregivers (n = 2). Each item in the tool was revised as agreed by the groups. Expert consensus was reached. Results: Overall, the tool reflected participants' experience of ILD. Each domain was considered relevant. Adaptations were needed to represent the burden of ILD: respiratory symptoms (especially cough) and concerns about sexual activity were highlighted. All emphasized assessment of caregiver need as critical, and the role of caregivers in clinical consultations. Conclusions: The NAT:PD-ILD appears to have face and content validity. The inclusion of the family caregiver in the consultation as someone with their own needs as well as a source of information was welcomed. Reliability testing and construct validation of the tool are ongoing. PMID:26840603

  17. Brasfield and Wisconsin scoring systems have equal value as outcome assessment tools of cystic fibrosis lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleveland, Robert H.; Stamoulis, Catherine; Sawicki, Gregory; Kelliher, Emma; Wood, Christopher; Zurakowski, David; Lee, Edward [Boston Children' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Zucker, Evan J. [Tufts Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Several imaging-based scoring systems have been used as outcome measures in assessing the severity of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. It has been shown that chest radiography performs equally to computed tomography (CT). There is the opinion that of the two most commonly used chest radiograph (CXR) systems, the Brasfield system is less sensitive and reliable than the Wisconsin system. This report assesses the reproducibility and reliability of the two systems. Thirty patients with CXRs during a 5-year period were randomly selected. One hundred eighty-two studies had data for all CXRs and pulmonary function tests (PFTs), Forced Expiratory Volume in One Second (FEV-1) and Forced Vital Capacity (FVC). PFT values closest to the date of each CXR were recorded. Four radiologists scored each image twice by both the Brasfield and Wisconsin systems. Intra- and inter-rater reliability, correlation with PFTs and direct correlation of the two systems were calculated. Intra-rater agreement: r = 0.86-0.99 Brasfield, r = 0.78-0.96 Wisconsin. Inter-rater agreement: 0.76-0.90 Brasfield, r = 0.74-0.97 Wisconsin. Brasfield vs. FEV-1: r = 0.55, vs. FVC r = 0.61. Wisconsin vs. FEV-1: r = 0.57, vs. FVC r = 0.66. Correlation of the two systems: r = 0.86 (all P < 0.001). The Brasfield and Wisconsin systems performed very similarly providing equally reproducible, robust and reliable measures. (orig.)

  18. Brasfield and Wisconsin scoring systems have equal value as outcome assessment tools of cystic fibrosis lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several imaging-based scoring systems have been used as outcome measures in assessing the severity of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. It has been shown that chest radiography performs equally to computed tomography (CT). There is the opinion that of the two most commonly used chest radiograph (CXR) systems, the Brasfield system is less sensitive and reliable than the Wisconsin system. This report assesses the reproducibility and reliability of the two systems. Thirty patients with CXRs during a 5-year period were randomly selected. One hundred eighty-two studies had data for all CXRs and pulmonary function tests (PFTs), Forced Expiratory Volume in One Second (FEV-1) and Forced Vital Capacity (FVC). PFT values closest to the date of each CXR were recorded. Four radiologists scored each image twice by both the Brasfield and Wisconsin systems. Intra- and inter-rater reliability, correlation with PFTs and direct correlation of the two systems were calculated. Intra-rater agreement: r = 0.86-0.99 Brasfield, r = 0.78-0.96 Wisconsin. Inter-rater agreement: 0.76-0.90 Brasfield, r = 0.74-0.97 Wisconsin. Brasfield vs. FEV-1: r = 0.55, vs. FVC r = 0.61. Wisconsin vs. FEV-1: r = 0.57, vs. FVC r = 0.66. Correlation of the two systems: r = 0.86 (all P < 0.001). The Brasfield and Wisconsin systems performed very similarly providing equally reproducible, robust and reliable measures. (orig.)

  19. Chemical mechanisms of the interaction between radiation and chemical carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is evidence to suggest that ionizing radiation and chemical carcinogens can act synergistically to produce deleterious biological effects. In addition, many carcinogens undergo metabolic activation in vivo. This activation, initiated by biochemical redox reactions, can be simulated chemically, electrochemically, photochemically and radiation chemically. The principal reactive species formed by the action of ionizing radiation on aqueous solutions of macromolecules and mammalian cells, are hydroxyl radicals and superoxide anions. Pulse and steady-state radiolysis studies of model chemical systems have established that these species can 'activate' chemical carcinogens by a radical oxidation process, and that the resulting activated carcinogens can subsequently react with nucleophilic sites on DNA and other potential target macromolecules. Rate constants for some of the fast reactions involved in the radiation activation of carcinogens and in the subsequent carcinogen-DNA interactions have been determined, together with the yields of radiation-induced covalent DNA-carcinogen binding. A redox models for radiation-induced chemical carcinogenesis is proposed which describes a possible mechanism of action involving free radical species generated in the aqueous cellular milieu, which diffuse to and react with carcinogens located within the micro-environment of the cell. Preliminary experiments suggest that protection against radiation and chemical carcinogenesis can be achieved by radical scavenging or by competitive free radical inhibition

  20. Researchers exploring faster alternatives to 2-year test for carcinogenicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Charlie

    2006-01-01

    KEYWORDS - CLASSIFICATION: Animals;Animals,Laboratory;biomarkers of exposure & effect: validation;Carcinogenicity Tests;Carcinogens;Female;metabolism;methods;Male;Mice;Pharmaceutical Preparations;Predictive Value of Tests;Prognosis;Rats;standards;Species Specificity;trends;Time Factors;Tumor Markers,Biological;United States;United States Environmental Protection Agency;United States Food and Drug Administration.

  1. 29 CFR 1926.1103 - 13 carcinogens (4-Nitrobiphenyl, etc.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 13 carcinogens (4-Nitrobiphenyl, etc.). 1926.1103 Section 1926.1103 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... § 1926.1103 13 carcinogens (4-Nitrobiphenyl, etc.). Note: The requirements applicable to...

  2. 29 CFR 1915.1003 - 13 carcinogens (4-Nitrobiphenyl, etc.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 13 carcinogens (4-Nitrobiphenyl, etc.). 1915.1003 Section 1915.1003 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Hazardous Substances § 1915.1003 13 carcinogens (4-Nitrobiphenyl, etc.). Note: The requirements...

  3. 29 CFR 1910.1003 - 13 Carcinogens (4-Nitrobiphenyl, etc.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... employees, designated representatives, and the Assistant Secretary in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020 (a... 29 Labor 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 13 Carcinogens (4-Nitrobiphenyl, etc.). 1910.1003 Section... Substances § 1910.1003 13 Carcinogens (4-Nitrobiphenyl, etc.). (a) Scope and application. (1) This...

  4. Assessment of volume and leak measurements during CPAP using a neonatal lung model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although several commercial devices are available which allow tidal volume and air leak monitoring during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in neonates, little is known about their measurement accuracy and about the influence of air leaks on volume measurement. The aim of this in vitro study was the validation of volume and leak measurement under CPAP using a commercial ventilatory device, taking into consideration the clinical conditions in neonatology. The measurement accuracy of the Leoni ventilator (Heinen and Löwenstein, Germany) was investigated both in a leak-free system and with leaks simulated using calibration syringes (2–10 ml, 20–100 ml) and a mechanical lung model. Open tubes of variable lengths were connected for leak simulation. Leak flow was measured with the flow-through technique. In a leak-free system the mean relative volume error ±SD was 3.5 ± 2.6% (2–10 ml) and 5.9 ± 0.7% (20–60 ml), respectively. The influence of CPAP level, driving flow, respiratory rate and humidification of the breathing gas on the volume error was negligible. However, an increasing FiO2 caused the measured tidal volume to increase by up to 25% (FiO2 = 1.0). The relative error ±SD of the leak measurements was −0.2 ± 11.9%. For leaks >19%, measured tidal volume was underestimated by more than 10%. In conclusion, the present in vitro study showed that the Leoni allowed accurate volume monitoring under CPAP conditions similar to neonates. Air leaks of up to 90% of patient flow were reliably detected. For an FiO2 >0.4 and for leaks >19%, a numerical correction of the displayed volume should be performed

  5. Diet as a confounder of the association between air pollution and female lung cancer: Hong Kong studies on exposures to environmental tobacco smoke, incense, and cooking fumes as examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, L C; Ho, J H

    1996-03-01

    adjusting for smoking. The last finding may be explained by the relatively better diets among smoking women who burned incense versus those who did not. Although about 94% of the Chinese women cook on a regular basis, and the cooking fires were associated with increased airborne carcinogens, nonsmoking women who cooked for more than 25 years had a 60% reduction in lung cancer risk and the trend was highly significant (P air pollution exposure, and understanding the behavioral and dietary dynamics underlying lung cancer risk assessments. Our conclusion is that diet can be an important confounding factor affecting lung cancer risk estimates from air pollution exposures among Chinese women living in an affluent urban environment. PMID:8785667

  6. Comparison of rat olfactory mucosal responses to carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic chloracetanilides

    OpenAIRE

    Genter, M.B.; Warner, B.M.; Medvedovic, M.; Sartor, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Alachlor and butachlor are chloracetanilide herbicides that induce olfactory tumors in rats, whereas propachlor does not. The mechanism by which alachlor induces tumors is distinct from many other nasal carcinogens, in that alachlor induces a gradual de-differentiation of the olfactory mucosa (OM) to a more respiratory-like epithelium, in contrast to other agents that induce cytotoxicity, followed by an aberrant regenerative response. We studied biochemical and genomic effects of these compou...

  7. Lymphocyte reactivity of workers exposed to carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic chemicals.

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, S.; Taylor, G; Hurst, W; Wilson, P.; Costello, C B

    1981-01-01

    Immunological studies have shown an increased lymphocyte reactivity in patients with early stage bladder cancer and individuals with pre-stage T1 exposed to bladder carcinogens (2-naphthylamine and industrial 1-naphthylamine containing 4-8% 2-naphthylamine) before 1952-that is, those at high risk of developing bladder cancer. Because of the close chemical similarity of Tobias acid (2-naphthylamine-1 sulphonic acid) to 2-naphthylamine, the lymphocytotoxicity of workers exposed to this chemical...

  8. IARC Monographs: 40 Years of Evaluating Carcinogenic Hazards to Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Aaron; Vineis, Paolo; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Andersen, Aage; Anto, Josep M.; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Beland, Frederick A.; Berrington, Amy; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Birnbaum, Linda S.; Brownson, Ross C.; Bucher, John R.; Cantor, Kenneth P.; Cardis, Elisabeth; Cherrie, John W.; Christiani, David C.; Cocco, Pierluigi; Coggon, David; Comba, Pietro; Demers, Paul A.; Dement, John M.; Douwes, Jeroen; Eisen, Ellen A.; Engel, Lawrence S.; Fenske, Richard A.; Fleming, Lora E.; Fletcher, Tony; Fontham, Elizabeth; Forastiere, Francesco; Frentzel-Beyme, Rainer; Fritschi, Lin; Gerin, Michel; Goldberg, Marcel; Grandjean, Philippe; Grimsrud, Tom K.; Gustavsson, Per; Haines, Andy; Hartge, Patricia; Hansen, Johnni; Hauptmann, Michael; Heederik, Dick; Hemminki, Kari; Hemon, Denis; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Hoppin, Jane A.; Huff, James; Jarvholm, Bengt; Kang, Daehee; Karagas, Margaret R.; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Kjuus, Helge; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kriebel, David; Kristensen, Petter; Kromhout, Hans; Laden, Francine; Lebailly, Pierre; LeMasters, Grace; Lubin, Jay H.; Lynch, Charles F.; Lynge, Elsebeth; ‘t Mannetje, Andrea; McMichael, Anthony J.; McLaughlin, John R.; Marrett, Loraine; Martuzzi, Marco; Merchant, James A.; Merler, Enzo; Merletti, Franco; Miller, Anthony; Mirer, Franklin E.; Monson, Richard; Nordby, Karl-Cristian; Olshan, Andrew F.; Parent, Marie-Elise; Perera, Frederica P.; Perry, Melissa J.; Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Pirastu, Roberta; Porta, Miquel; Pukkala, Eero; Rice, Carol; Richardson, David B.; Ritter, Leonard; Ritz, Beate; Ronckers, Cecile M.; Rushton, Lesley; Rusiecki, Jennifer A.; Rusyn, Ivan; Samet, Jonathan M.; Sandler, Dale P.; de Sanjose, Silvia; Schernhammer, Eva; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Seixas, Noah; Shy, Carl; Siemiatycki, Jack; Silverman, Debra T.; Simonato, Lorenzo; Smith, Allan H.; Smith, Martyn T.; Spinelli, John J.; Spitz, Margaret R.; Stallones, Lorann; Stayner, Leslie T.; Steenland, Kyle; Stenzel, Mark; Stewart, Bernard W.; Stewart, Patricia A.; Symanski, Elaine; Terracini, Benedetto; Tolbert, Paige E.; Vainio, Harri; Vena, John; Vermeulen, Roel; Victora, Cesar G.; Ward, Elizabeth M.; Weinberg, Clarice R.; Weisenburger, Dennis; Wesseling, Catharina; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Zahm, Shelia Hoar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Programme for the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans has been criticized for several of its evaluations, and also for the approach used to perform these evaluations. Some critics have claimed that failures of IARC Working Groups to recognize study weaknesses and biases of Working Group members have led to inappropriate classification of a number of agents as carcinogenic to humans. Objectives: The authors of this Commentary are scientists from various disciplines relevant to the identification and hazard evaluation of human carcinogens. We examined criticisms of the IARC classification process to determine the validity of these concerns. Here, we present the results of that examination, review the history of IARC evaluations, and describe how the IARC evaluations are performed. Discussion: We concluded that these recent criticisms are unconvincing. The procedures employed by IARC to assemble Working Groups of scientists from the various disciplines and the techniques followed to review the literature and perform hazard assessment of various agents provide a balanced evaluation and an appropriate indication of the weight of the evidence. Some disagreement by individual scientists to some evaluations is not evidence of process failure. The review process has been modified over time and will undoubtedly be altered in the future to improve the process. Any process can in theory be improved, and we would support continued review and improvement of the IARC processes. This does not mean, however, that the current procedures are flawed. Conclusions: The IARC Monographs have made, and continue to make, major contributions to the scientific underpinning for societal actions to improve the public’s health. Citation: Pearce N, Blair A, Vineis P, Ahrens W, Andersen A, Anto JM, Armstrong BK, Baccarelli AA, Beland FA, Berrington A, Bertazzi PA, Birnbaum LS, Brownson RC, Bucher JR, Cantor KP

  9. Risk assessment of silicosis and lung cancer among construction workers exposed to respirable quartz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjoe Nij, E.; Heederik, D.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the magnitude of the silicosis and cancer risk among construction workers. Methods: In 1998, 1335 of 4173 invited construction workers with expected high cumulative exposure to quartz were studied for early signs of silicosis. In 2002 the study was rep

  10. Prenatal assessment of normal fetal pulmonary grey-scale and lung volume by three-dimensional ultrasonography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Objective To quantitatively analyze the fetal lung echo and right lung volume in the third trimester by real-time three-dimensional ultrasound(3-D US)and evaluate the feasibility of fetal lung maturity.Methods A total of 732 women with normal singleton pregnancies between 28 and 42 weeks of gestation underwent ultrasound examination.The 3-D US equipment with a 3.5-5 MHz transabdominal transducer was used for the fetal biometric measurement.The echogenicity ratio between fetal lung and liver was compared.The...

  11. Aptamer imaging with Cu-64 labeled AS1411: Preliminary assessment in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: AS1411 is a 26-base guanine-rich oligonucleotide aptamer shown binding to surface nucleolin, a protein over-expressed in multiple cancer cells, thus AS1411 labeled with a PET isotope can be explored as a potential diagnostic imaging agent. Our objective was to perform preliminary biological characterization of 64Cu-labeled AS1411 in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Four chelators (DOTA, CB-TE2A, DOTA-Bn and NOTA-Bn) were selected to label AS1411 with Cu-64. 185 kBq (5 μCi) of each tracer was incubated in each well with H460 cells at 37 °C for 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h, respectively (n = 4). For microPET/CT imaging, 7.4 MBq (200 μCi) of AS1411 labeled with either 64Cu-DOTA or 64Cu-CB-TE2A was I.V. injected and multiple scans were obtained at 1, 3, 6 and 24 h post injection. Afterward in vivo biodistribution studies were performed. Results: Percent uptake of 64Cu-DOTA-AS1411 and 64Cu-CB-TE2A-AS1411 was significantly higher than that of 64Cu-DOTA-Bn-AS1411 and 64Cu-NOTA-Bn-AS1411. About 90% of uptake for 64Cu-DOTA-AS1411 and 64Cu-CB-TE2A-AS1411 was internalized into cells within 3 h and the internalization process was completed before 24 h. Both tracers demonstrated reasonable in vivo stability and high binding affinity to the cells. MicroPET imaging with 64Cu-CB-TE2A-AS1411 showed clear tumor uptake at both legs from 1 to 24 h post injection, whereas both tumors were undetectable for up to 24 h with 64Cu-DOTA-AS1411. In addition, 64Cu-CB-TE2A-AS1411 had faster in vivo pharmacokinetics than 64Cu-DOTA-AS1411 with lower liver uptake and higher tumor to background contrast. Conclusion: CB-TE2A is a preferred chelator with higher tumor-to-background ratio, lower liver uptake and faster clearance than DOTA. Aptamer imaging with 64Cu-CB-TE2A-AS1411 may be feasible for detecting lung cancer, if an appropriate chelator can be identified and further validation can be performed with a known control oligonucleotide. It may also be used as a companion diagnostic

  12. Systematic review of the epidemiological evidence comparing lung cancer risk in smokers of mentholated and unmentholated cigarettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Peter N

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background US mentholated cigarette sales have increased considerably over 50 years. Preference for mentholated cigarettes is markedly higher in Black people. While menthol itself is not genotoxic or carcinogenic, its acute respiratory effects might affect inhalation of cigarette smoke. This possibility seems consistent with the higher lung cancer risk in Black men, despite Black people smoking less and starting smoking later than White people. Despite experimental data suggesting similar carcinogenicity of mentholated and non-mentholated cigarettes, the lack of convincing evidence that mentholation increases puffing, inhalation or smoke uptake, and the similarity of lung cancer rates in Black and White females, a review of cigarette mentholation and lung cancer is timely given current regulatory interest in the topic. Methods Epidemiological studies comparing lung cancer risk in mentholated and non-mentholated cigarette smokers were identified from MedLine and other sources. Study details were extracted and strengths and weaknesses assessed. Relative risk estimates were extracted, or derived, for ever mentholated use and for long-term use, overall and by gender, race, and current/ever smoking, and meta-analyses conducted. Results Eight generally good quality studies were identified, with valid cases and controls, and appropriate adjustment for age, gender, race and smoking. The studies afforded good power to detect possible effects. However, only one study presented results by histological type, none adjusted for occupation or diet, and some provided no results by length of mentholated cigarette use. The data do not suggest any effect of mentholation on lung cancer risk. Adjusted relative risk estimates for ever use vary from 0.81 to 1.12, giving a combined estimate of 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.84-1.02, n = 8, with no increase in males (1.01, 0.84-1.22, n = 5, females (0.80, 0.67-0.95, n = 5, White people (0.87, 0.75-1.03, n = 4

  13. Urban air pollution by carcinogenic and genotoxic polyaromatic hydrocarbons in the former USSR.

    OpenAIRE

    Khesina AYa,

    1994-01-01

    The content of major carcinogenic and genotoxic polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in urban air, vehicle, and industrial emissions is assessed. A sensitive, specific, and selective method for PAH and nitro-PAH quantitation was developed on the basis of low-temperature luminescence-spectra of frozen polycrystalline solutions. Polyarene contents in urban air and urban industrial emissions, as well as vehicle exhausts, are compared to the Russian Ministry of Health standard of maximal permissible c...

  14. A Critical Assessment of Geographic Clusters of Breast and Lung Cancer Incidences among Residents Living near the Tittabawassee and Saginaw Rivers, Michigan, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives. To assess previously determined geographic clusters of breast and lung cancer incidences among residents living near the Tittabawassee and Saginaw Rivers, Michigan, using a new set of environmental factors. Materials and Methods. Breast and lung cancer data were acquired from the Michigan Department of Community Health, along with point source pollution data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The datasets were used to determine whether there is a spatial association between disease risk and environmental contamination. GIS and spatial techniques were combined with statistical analysis to investigate local risk of breast and lung cancer. Results and Conclusion. The study suggests that neighborhoods in close proximity to the river were associated with a high risk of breast cancer, while increased risk of lung cancer was detected among neighborhoods in close proximity to point source pollution and major highways. Statistically significant (P=.001) clusters of cancer incidences were observed among residents living near the rivers. These findings are useful to researchers and governmental agencies for risk assessment, regulation, and control of environmental contamination in the flood plains.

  15. Soluble Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (sHER2 as a Potential Risk Assessment, Screening, and Diagnostic Biomarker of Lung Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre T. Baron

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Here, we evaluated the potential clinical utility of soluble human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (sHER2 for the risk assessment, screening, and diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC using an unmatched case-control study design. Serum sHER2 concentrations were measured by immunoassay in 244 primary NSCLC cases and 218 healthy controls. Wilcoxon rank-sum tests, logistic regression models, and receiver operating characteristic plots were used to assess whether sHER2 is associated with lung cancer. Median serum sHER2 concentrations are higher in patients with adenocarcinoma than squamous cell carcinoma regardless of gender, and sHER2 is a weak, independent biomarker of adenocarcinoma, but not of squamous cell carcinoma, adjusted for age and gender. The age-adjusted relative risk (odds of adenocarcinoma is 3.95 (95% CI: 1.22, 12.81 and 7.93 (95% CI: 2.26, 27.82 greater for women and men with high sHER2 concentrations (≥6.60 ng/mL vs. low sHER2 concentrations (≤1.85 ng/mL, respectively. When adjusted for each other, sHER2, age, and gender discern healthy controls from patients with primary adenocarcinomas of the lung with 85.9% accuracy. We conclude that even though serum sHER2 is not a strong, stand-alone discriminatory biomarker of adenocarcinoma, sHER2 may be a useful, independent covariate in multivariate risk assessment, screening, and diagnostic models of lung cancer.

  16. Visual assessment of early emphysema and interstitial abnormalities on CT is useful in lung cancer risk analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wille, Mathilde M.W.; Dirksen, Asger; Shaker, Saher B. [Gentofte Hospital, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hellerup (Denmark); Thomsen, Laura H. [Hvidovre Hospital, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hvidovre (Denmark); Petersen, Jens [University of Copenhagen, Department of Computer Science, DIKU, Koebenhavn Oe (Denmark); Bruijne, Marleen de [University of Copenhagen, Department of Computer Science, DIKU, Koebenhavn Oe (Denmark); Erasmus MC -University Medical Center Rotterdam, Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Departments of Radiology and Medical Informatics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pedersen, Jesper H. [Copenhagen University Hospital, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Koebenhavn Oe (Denmark)

    2016-02-15

    Screening for lung cancer should be limited to a high-risk-population, and abnormalities in low-dose computed tomography (CT) screening images may be relevant for predicting the risk of lung cancer. Our aims were to compare the occurrence of visually detected emphysema and interstitial abnormalities in subjects with and without lung cancer in a screening population of smokers. Low-dose chest CT examinations (baseline and latest possible) of 1990 participants from The Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial were independently evaluated by two observers who scored emphysema and interstitial abnormalities. Emphysema (lung density) was also measured quantitatively. Emphysema was seen more frequently and its extent was greater among participants with lung cancer on baseline (odds ratio (OR), 1.8, p = 0.017 and p = 0.002) and late examinations (OR 2.6, p < 0.001 and p < 0.001). No significant difference was found using quantitative measurements. Interstitial abnormalities were more common findings among participants with lung cancer (OR 5.1, p < 0.001 and OR 4.5, p < 0.001).There was no association between presence of emphysema and presence of interstitial abnormalities (OR 0.75, p = 0.499). Even early signs of emphysema and interstitial abnormalities are associated with lung cancer. Quantitative measurements of emphysema - regardless of type - do not show the same association. (orig.)

  17. Visual assessment of early emphysema and interstitial abnormalities on CT is useful in lung cancer risk analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Screening for lung cancer should be limited to a high-risk-population, and abnormalities in low-dose computed tomography (CT) screening images may be relevant for predicting the risk of lung cancer. Our aims were to compare the occurrence of visually detected emphysema and interstitial abnormalities in subjects with and without lung cancer in a screening population of smokers. Low-dose chest CT examinations (baseline and latest possible) of 1990 participants from The Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial were independently evaluated by two observers who scored emphysema and interstitial abnormalities. Emphysema (lung density) was also measured quantitatively. Emphysema was seen more frequently and its extent was greater among participants with lung cancer on baseline (odds ratio (OR), 1.8, p = 0.017 and p = 0.002) and late examinations (OR 2.6, p < 0.001 and p < 0.001). No significant difference was found using quantitative measurements. Interstitial abnormalities were more common findings among participants with lung cancer (OR 5.1, p < 0.001 and OR 4.5, p < 0.001).There was no association between presence of emphysema and presence of interstitial abnormalities (OR 0.75, p = 0.499). Even early signs of emphysema and interstitial abnormalities are associated with lung cancer. Quantitative measurements of emphysema - regardless of type - do not show the same association. (orig.)

  18. Assessment of gas exchange in lung disease: balancing accuracy against feasibility

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Peter D.

    2007-01-01

    While the principles underlying alveolar gas exchange have been well-known for over 50 years, we still struggle to assess gas exchange in hypoxemic patients. Unfortunately, simple measurements lack discrimination while complex measurements are infeasible in clinical care. The paper by Karbing et al. in this issue seeks a middle ground based on the arterial PO2 (PaO2)/inspired O2 fraction (FIO2) ratio measured at different FIO2s with the outcomes fed into proprietary software to account for bo...

  19. Maximal mid-expiratory flow is a surrogate marker of lung clearance index for assessment of adults with bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Wei-Jie; Yuan, Jing-Jing; Gao, Yong-Hua; Li, Hui-Min; Zheng, Jin-Ping; Chen, Rong-Chang; Zhong, Nan-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the comparative diagnostic value of lung clearance index (LCI) and maximal mid-expiratory flow (MMEF) in bronchiectasis. We compared the diagnostic performance, correlation and concordance with clinical variables, and changes of LCI and MMEF% predicted during bronchiectasis exacerbations (BEs). Patients with stable bronchiectasis underwent history inquiry, chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), multiple-breath nitrogen wash-out test, spirometry and sputum culture. Patients who experienced BEs underwent these measurements during onset of BEs and 1 week following antibiotics therapy. Sensitivity analyses were performed in mild, moderate and severe bronchiectasis. We recruited 110 bronchiectasis patients between March 2014 and September 2015. LCI demonstrated similar diagnostic value with MMEF% predicted in discriminating moderate-to-severe from mild bronchiectasis. LCI negatively correlated with MMEF% predicted. Both parameters had similar concordance in reflecting clinical characteristics of bronchiectasis and correlated significantly with forced expiratory flow in one second, age, HRCT score, Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization, cystic bronchiectasis, ventilation heterogeneity and bilateral bronchiectasis. In exacerbation cohort (n = 22), changes in LCI and MMEF% predicted were equally minimal during BEs and following antibiotics therapy. In sensitivity analyses, both parameters had similar diagnostic value and correlation with clinical variables. MMEF% predicted is a surrogate of LCI for assessing bronchiectasis severity. PMID:27339787

  20. Visual assessment of early emphysema and interstitial abnormalities on CT is useful in lung cancer risk analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wille, Mathilde M W; Thomsen, Laura H.; Petersen, Jens;

    2016-01-01

    difference was found using quantitative measurements. Interstitial abnormalities were more common findings among participants with lung cancer (OR 5.1, p ....499). Conclusions: Even early signs of emphysema and interstitial abnormalities are associated with lung cancer. Quantitative measurements of emphysema—regardless of type—do not show the same association. Key Points: • Visually detected emphysema on CT is more frequent in individuals who develop lung cancer......Objectives: Screening for lung cancer should be limited to a high-risk-population, and abnormalities in low-dose computed tomography (CT) screening images may be relevant for predicting the risk of lung cancer. Our aims were to compare the occurrence of visually detected emphysema and interstitial...

  1. Metabolic activation of chemical carcinogens to reactive electrophiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiations and ultraviolet light constitute the principal known physical carcinogens. Likewise, a great variety and large number of chemicals and over 50 DNA and RNA viruses comprise the known chemical and viral carcinogens. These three categories of carcinogenic agents include the great majority of extrinsic agents known to induce cancer in mammals. Man is clearly susceptible to the action of physical and chemical carcinogens and, indeed, was the first species in which the activities of some of these agents were demonstated. It seems certain that viral carcinogenic information is involved in the etiology of at least some human tumors, but ethical and methodological problems have made it difficult to obtain unequivocal data. Given the long availability of experimental carcinogens of these three classes, there is surprisingly little known of their interrelationships in the production of cancer in experimental animals. The objective of this brief review is to present some salient aspects of experimental chemical carcinogenesis and an analysis of how some of these features relate to the mechanisms of action of radiation carcinogens

  2. Collapsed Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    A collapsed lung happens when air enters the pleural space, the area between the lung and the chest wall. If it is a ... is called pneumothorax. If only part of the lung is affected, it is called atelectasis. Causes of ...

  3. Identification and monitoring of non-radiological carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examines the feasibility of identifying and monitoring occupational exposures to non-radiological carcinogens in the workplace at Canadian nuclear establishments (Whiteshell Laboratories, Pickering Nuclear Generating Station, Cameco Limited and Canadian General Electric Company Limited). Recent epidemiological studies recommended that potential confounding factors of a non-radiological nature be identified and analyzed, particularly non-radiological carcinogens that may be present in the workplace at nuclear facilities. The feasibility of identifying and measuring occupational exposures to non-radiological carcinogens in Canadian nuclear facilities is examined. Also, the report describes the problem of chemical carcinogens and the mechanisms involved in chemical carcinogenesis; the epidemiology related to the problem, followed by a description of the analytical aspects of detection, monitoring and analysis of carcinogens, as well as a discussion on the regulatory aspects and the regulations in place; and the findings, recommendations and concluding remarks of this study. Several problem areas became apparent as the study proceeded. For example, the classification of a chemical as a human carcinogen is a difficult problem, as is its adequate monitoring and analysis. This situation reflects, in turn, the regulatory aspects in the workplace. A list of chemical carcinogens used industrially at the four Canadian nuclear facilities has been identified. The list includes arsenic, asbestos, benzene, cadmium, beryllium, nickel, polychlorinated biphenyls, lead and trichloroethylene. Several recommendations are made in relation to the need for practical and efficient monitoring methods for chemical carcinogens, the definition of radiation and chemical dose equivalencies, and the classification of human chemical carcinogens, as well as their disposal. (author). 122 refs., 8 tabs., 6 figs

  4. A new double-tracer gas single-breath washout to assess early cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Florian; Stern, Georgette; Thamrin, Cindy; Abbas, Chiara; Casaulta, Carmen; Frey, Urs; Latzin, Philipp

    2013-02-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), tests for ventilation inhomogeneity are sensitive but not established for clinical routine. We assessed feasibility of a new double-tracer gas single-breath washout (SBW) in school-aged children with CF and control subjects, and compared SBW between groups and with multiple-breath nitrogen washout (MBNW). Three SBW and MBNW were performed in 118 children (66 with CF) using a side-stream ultrasonic flowmeter setup. The double-tracer gas containing 5% sulfur hexafluoride and 26.3% helium was applied during one tidal breath. Outcomes were SBW phase III slope (SIII(DTG)), MBNW-derived lung clearance index (LCI), and indices of acinar (S(acin)) and conductive (S(cond)) ventilation inhomogeneity. SBW took significantly less time to perform than MBNW. SBW and MBNW were feasible in 109 (92.4%) and 98 (83.0%) children, respectively. SIII(DTG) differed between children with CF and controls, mean±sd was -456.7±492.8 and -88.4±129.1 mg·mol·L(-1), respectively. Abnormal SIII(DTG) was present in 36 (59%) children with CF. SIII(DTG) was associated with LCI (r= -0.58) and S(acin) (r= -0.58), but not with S(cond). In CF, steeply sloping SIII(DTG) potentially reflects ventilation inhomogeneity near the acinus entrance. This tidal SBW is a promising test to assess ventilation inhomogeneity in an easy and fast way. PMID:22599360

  5. Detection of genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens in Xpc{sup −/−}p53{sup +/−} mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melis, Joost P.M. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands); Speksnijder, Ewoud N. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands); Kuiper, Raoul V. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Dutch Molecular Pathology Center, Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Salvatori, Daniela C.F. [Leiden University Medical Center, Central Animal Facility, Leiden (Netherlands); Schaap, Mirjam M. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands); Maas, Saskia [Leiden University Medical Center, Central Animal Facility, Leiden (Netherlands); Robinson, Joke; Verhoef, Aart; Benthem, Jan van; Luijten, Mirjam [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Steeg, Harry van, E-mail: Harry.van.Steeg@rivm.nl [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-01-15

    An accurate assessment of the carcinogenic potential of chemicals and pharmaceutical drugs is essential to protect humans and the environment. Therefore, substances are extensively tested before they are marketed to the public. Currently, the rodent two-year bioassay is still routinely used to assess the carcinogenic potential of substances. However, over time it has become clear that this assay yields false positive results and also has several economic and ethical drawbacks including the use of large numbers of animals, the long duration, and the high cost. The need for a suitable alternative assay is therefore high. Previously, we have proposed the Xpa*p53 mouse model as a very suitable alternative to the two-year bioassay. We now show that the Xpc*p53 mouse model preserves all the beneficial traits of the Xpa*p53 model for sub-chronic carcinogen identification and can identify both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Moreover, Xpc*p53 mice appear to be more responsive than Xpa*p53 mice towards several genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Furthermore, Xpc*p53 mice are far less sensitive than Xpa*p53 mice for the toxic activity of DNA damaging agents and as such clearly respond in a similar way as wild type mice do. These advantageous traits of the Xpc*p53 model make it a better alternative for in vivo carcinogen testing than Xpa*p53. This pilot study suggests that Xpc*p53 mice are suited for routine sub-chronic testing of both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens and as such represent a suitable alternative to possibly replace the murine life time cancer bioassay. Highlights: ► The Xpc*p53 mouse model is able to identify genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. ► Time, animals and cost can be significantly reduced compared to the 2-year bioassay. ► Xpc*p53 mice are more advantageous for carcinogen identification than Xpa*p53 mice. ► Xpc*p53 mice exhibit a wild type response upon exposure to genotoxicants.

  6. Comparison of in vivo genotoxic and carcinogenic potency to augment mode of action analysis: Case study with hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Chad M; Bichteler, Anne; Rager, Julia E; Suh, Mina; Proctor, Deborah M; Haws, Laurie C; Harris, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    Recent analyses-highlighted by the International Workshops on Genotoxicity Testing Working Group on Quantitative Approaches to Genetic Toxicology Risk Assessment-have identified a correlation between (log) estimates of a carcinogen's in vivo genotoxic potency and in vivo carcinogenic potency in typical laboratory animal models, even when the underlying data have not been matched for tissue, species, or strain. Such a correlation could have important implications for risk assessment, including informing the mode of action (MOA) of specific carcinogens. When in vivo genotoxic potency is weak relative to carcinogenic potency, MOAs other than genotoxicity (e.g., endocrine disruption or regenerative hyperplasia) may be operational. Herein, we review recent in vivo genotoxicity and carcinogenicity data for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), following oral ingestion, in relevant tissues and species in the context of the aforementioned correlation. Potency estimates were generated using benchmark doses, or no-observable-adverse-effect-levels when data were not amenable to dose-response modeling. While the ratio between log values for carcinogenic and genotoxic potency was ≥1 for many compounds, the ratios for several Cr(VI) datasets (including in target tissue) were less than unity. In fact, the ratios for Cr(VI) clustered closely with ratios for chloroform and diethanolamine, two chemicals posited to have non-genotoxic MOAs. These findings suggest that genotoxicity may not play a major role in the cancers observed in rodents following exposure to high concentrations of Cr(VI) in drinking water-a finding consistent with recent MOA and adverse outcome pathway (AOP) analyses concerning Cr(VI). This semi-quantitative analysis, therefore, may be useful to augment traditional MOA and AOP analyses. More case examples will be needed to further explore the general applicability and validity of this approach for human health risk assessment. PMID:27085472

  7. Canadian population risk of radon induced lung cancer: A re-assessment based on the recent cross-Canada radon survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to indoor radon has been determined to be the second leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco smoking. Canadian population risk of radon induced lung cancer was assessed in 2005 with the radon distribution characteristics determined from a radon survey carried out in the late 1970's in 19 cities. In that survey, a grab sampling method was used to measure radon levels. The observed radon concentration in 14 000 Canadian homes surveyed followed a log-normal distribution with a geometric mean (GM) of 11.2 Bq m-3 and a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 3.9. Based on the information from that survey, it was estimated that ∼10 % of lung cancers in Canada resulted from indoor radon exposure. To gain a better understanding of radon concentrations in homes across the country, a national residential radon survey was launched in April 2009. In the recent survey, long-term (3 month or longer) indoor radon measurements were made in roughly 14 000 homes in 121 health regions across Canada. The observed radon concentrations follow, as expected, a log-normal distribution with a GM of 41.9 Bq m-3 and a GSD of 2.8. Based on the more accurate radon distribution characteristics obtained from the recent cross-Canada radon survey, a re-assessment of Canadian population risk for radon induced lung cancer was undertaken. The theoretical estimates show that 16 % of lung cancer deaths among Canadians are attributable to indoor radon exposure. These results strongly suggest the ongoing need for the Canadian National Radon Program. In particular, there is a need for a focus on education and awareness by all levels of government, and in partnership with key stakeholders, to encourage Canadians to take action to reduce the risk from indoor radon exposure. (authors)

  8. Study of Peak Expiratory Flow Rate as the Assessment of Lung Function in Occupationally Exposed Petrol Pump Workers of Western Maharashtra

    OpenAIRE

    Patil Smita V; Sumangala Patil; Sampada Kanitkar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fast urbanization trends, rapid industrial growth, globalization, and poor environmental conditions at work places have created a lot of healthrelated issues. Aim and Objectives: The aim of this study is to investigate Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) as the assessment of lung function in occupationally exposed petrol pump workers and also check whether PEFR increases or decreases with duration of exposure. Material and Methods: The study was conducted o...

  9. Reliable and valid assessment of competence in endoscopic ultrasonography and fine-needle aspiration for mediastinal staging of non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konge, L.; Vilmann, P.; Clementsen, P.; Annema, J. T.; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) guided by endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is important in mediastinal staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Training standards and implementation strategies of this technique are currently under discussion. The aim of this study was to explore the reliability...... and validity of a newly developed EUS Assessment Tool (EUSAT) designed to measure competence in EUS - FNA for mediastinal staging of NSCLC....

  10. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in assessing lung function in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a pilot study of comparison before and after posterior spinal fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Lam Wynnie WM; Lam Tsz-ping; Li Albert M; Ng Bobby KW; Chu Winnie CW; Cheng Jack CY

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Restrictive impairment is the commonest reported pulmonary deficit in AIS, which improves following surgical operation. However, exact mechanism of how improvement is brought about is unknown. Dynamic fast breath-hold (BH)-MR imaging is a recent advance which provides direct quantitative visual assessment of pulmonary function. By using above technique, change in lung volume, chest wall and diaphragmatic motion in AIS patients before and six months after posterior spinal f...

  11. Children with chronic lung diseases have cognitive dysfunction as assessed by event-related potential (auditory P300) and Stanford-Binet IQ (SB-IV) test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Terez Boshra; Abd Elmonaem, Mahmoud Tarek; Khalil, Lobna Hamed; Goda, Mona Hamdy; Sanyelbhaa, Hossam; Ramzy, Mourad Alfy

    2016-10-01

    Chronic lung disease (CLD) in children represents a heterogeneous group of many clinico-pathological entities with risk of adverse impact of chronic or intermittent hypoxia. So far, few researchers have investigated the cognitive function in these children, and the role of auditory P300 in the assessment of their cognitive function has not been investigated yet. This study was designed to assess the cognitive functions among schoolchildren with different chronic pulmonary diseases using both auditory P300 and Stanford-Binet test. This cross-sectional study included 40 school-aged children who were suffering from chronic chest troubles other than asthma and 30 healthy children of similar age, gender and socioeconomic state as a control group. All subjects were evaluated through clinical examination, radiological evaluation and spirometry. Audiological evaluation included (basic otological examination, pure-tone, speech audiometry and immittancemetry). Cognitive function was assessed by auditory P300 and psychological evaluation using Stanford-Binet test (4th edition). Children with chronic lung diseases had significantly lower anthropometric measures compared to healthy controls. They had statistically significant lower IQ scores and delayed P300 latencies denoting lower cognitive abilities. Cognitive dysfunction correlated to severity of disease. P300 latencies were prolonged among hypoxic patients. Cognitive deficits in children with different chronic lung diseases were best detected using both Stanford-Binet test and auditory P300. P300 is an easy objective tool. P300 is affected early with hypoxia and could alarm subtle cognitive dysfunction. PMID:27075686

  12. Clinical assessment of mean washout time and lung functional image by ventilatory steady state measurement with 133Xe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventilatory steady state measurement with 133Xe, using Ventil-Con (Radx) and a large area scintillation camera (Searle, LFOV) combined with a mini-computer system (Shimadzu, Scintipac 230) was employed to evaluate regional pulmonary function of 94 patients with chronic obstructive lung disease (COLD), fibrosis, carcinoma and other lung diseases. In the patients with COLD, mean washout times (anti t) were markedly prolonged in whole lung fields (anti m 130 +- 33 sec.) and ventilation indices (V*/V) (*: radical) and perfusion indices (Q*/V) (*: radical) were reduced in regional zones, especially in bilateral lower lung zones. For the patients with lung fibrosis, anti t values were short and the distribution of ventilation indices were uniform, and in contrast perfusion indices were reduced in the lower lung fields. In the area most affected by carcinoma, lung volumes (V) were reduced in parallel with the regional ventilation (V*) (*: radical) and perfusion (Q*) (*: radical). As the tumor approached the hilum, the relative ventilation and perfusion of cancerous side decreased remarkably in patients with obstructive findings on bronchoscopy. The mean washout times (anti t) for 133Xe, calculated by a modified height over area method without background subtraction, were significantly longer than indicated by the data yielded by the least squares curve fitting of initial washout curve after background subtraction. Although the accuracy of these data was limited, it appeared that the prolonged anti t is a good parameter of regional ventilatory disturbance because significant correlations were found between the whole lung anti t in patients with lung diseases and their FEV 1.0% r = -0.66, RV/TLC r = 0.64, % TLC r = 0.43, PaCO2 r = 0.41, PaO2 r = -0.35. (author)

  13. A complete audit cycle to assess adherence to a lung protective ventilation strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Joynes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is clear evidence for the use of a protective ventilation protocol in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. There is evidence to suggest that protective ventilation is beneficial in patients at risk of ARDS. A protective ventilation strategy was implemented on our intensive care unit in critical care patients who required mechanical ventilation for over 48 h, with and at risk for ARDS. A complete audit cycle was performed over 13 months to assess compliance with a safe ventilation protocol in intensive care. The ARDS network mechanical ventilation protocol was used as the standard for our protective ventilation strategy. This recommends ventilation with a tidal volume (Vt of 6 ml/kg of ideal body weight (IBW and plateau airway pressure of ≤30 cm H 2 O. The initial audit failed to meet this standard with Vt ′s of 9.5 ml/kg of IBW. Following the implementation of a ventilation strategy and an educational program, we demonstrate a significant improvement in practice with Vt ′s of 6.6 ml/kg of IBW in the re-audit. This highlights the importance of simple interventions and continuous education in maintaining high standards of care.

  14. Accuracy and Utility of Deformable Image Registration in 68Ga 4D PET/CT Assessment of Pulmonary Perfusion Changes During and After Lung Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Measuring changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose requires registration of the functional imaging to the radiation therapy treatment planning scan. This study investigates registration accuracy and utility for positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging in radiation therapy for non–small cell lung cancer. Methods: 68Ga 4-dimensional PET/CT ventilation-perfusion imaging was performed before, during, and after radiation therapy for 5 patients. Rigid registration and deformable image registration (DIR) using B-splines and Demons algorithms was performed with the CT data to obtain a deformation map between the functional images and planning CT. Contour propagation accuracy and correspondence of anatomic features were used to assess registration accuracy. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine statistical significance. Changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose were calculated for each registration method for each patient and averaged over all patients. Results: With B-splines/Demons DIR, median distance to agreement between lung contours reduced modestly by 0.9/1.1 mm, 1.3/1.6 mm, and 1.3/1.6 mm for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.01 for all), and median Dice score between lung contours improved by 0.04/0.04, 0.05/0.05, and 0.05/0.05 for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.001 for all). Distance between anatomic features reduced with DIR by median 2.5 mm and 2.8 for pretreatment and midtreatment time points, respectively (P=.001) and 1.4 mm for posttreatment (P>.2). Poorer posttreatment results were likely caused by posttreatment pneumonitis and tumor regression. Up to 80% standardized uptake value loss in perfusion scans was observed. There was limited change in the loss in lung perfusion between registration methods; however, Demons resulted in larger interpatient variation compared with rigid and B-splines registration. Conclusions

  15. Accuracy and Utility of Deformable Image Registration in {sup 68}Ga 4D PET/CT Assessment of Pulmonary Perfusion Changes During and After Lung Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardcastle, Nicholas, E-mail: nick.hardcastle@gmail.com [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong (Australia); Hofman, Michael S. [Molecular Imaging, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [Molecular Imaging, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Callahan, Jason [Molecular Imaging, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Kron, Tomas [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Monash University, Clayton (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne University, Victoria (Australia); MacManus, Michael P.; Ball, David L. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Jackson, Price [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Siva, Shankar [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: Measuring changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose requires registration of the functional imaging to the radiation therapy treatment planning scan. This study investigates registration accuracy and utility for positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging in radiation therapy for non–small cell lung cancer. Methods: {sup 68}Ga 4-dimensional PET/CT ventilation-perfusion imaging was performed before, during, and after radiation therapy for 5 patients. Rigid registration and deformable image registration (DIR) using B-splines and Demons algorithms was performed with the CT data to obtain a deformation map between the functional images and planning CT. Contour propagation accuracy and correspondence of anatomic features were used to assess registration accuracy. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine statistical significance. Changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose were calculated for each registration method for each patient and averaged over all patients. Results: With B-splines/Demons DIR, median distance to agreement between lung contours reduced modestly by 0.9/1.1 mm, 1.3/1.6 mm, and 1.3/1.6 mm for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.01 for all), and median Dice score between lung contours improved by 0.04/0.04, 0.05/0.05, and 0.05/0.05 for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.001 for all). Distance between anatomic features reduced with DIR by median 2.5 mm and 2.8 for pretreatment and midtreatment time points, respectively (P=.001) and 1.4 mm for posttreatment (P>.2). Poorer posttreatment results were likely caused by posttreatment pneumonitis and tumor regression. Up to 80% standardized uptake value loss in perfusion scans was observed. There was limited change in the loss in lung perfusion between registration methods; however, Demons resulted in larger interpatient variation compared with rigid and B-splines registration

  16. Assessment of lung X-ray computed tomographic findings in patients with nonspecific pneumothorax in late postoperative periods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are studied of examination of 54 patients operated on for nonspecific spontaneous pneumothorax (NSP). Conclusion is drawn that X-ray computed tomography (CT) is of high value. In addition to external respiratory function that identifies pulmonary functional changes, it is recommended that a comprehensive examination should include X-ray CT with parenchymal densitometry of the upper, middle and lower lung to reveal lung tissue structural changes. The examination of patients should be performed as soon as possible when the disease is detected and in the late postoperative period for early surgical correction of an emphysematous process in the lung

  17. Quality of life assessment in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients undergoing an accelerated radiotherapy regimen: report of ECOG study 4593

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the quality of life (QOL) before, at completion, and after therapy for patients receiving an accelerated fractionation schedule of radiotherapy for advanced, unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer in a Phase II multi-institutional trial. Methods and Materials: The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung (FACT-L) patient questionnaire was used to score the QOL in patients enrolled in the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Phase II trial (ECOG 4593) of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer. Radiotherapy (total dose 57.6 Gy in 36 fractions) was delivered during 15 days, with three radiation fractions given each treatment day. The protocol was activated in 1993, and 30 patients had accrued by November 1995. The FACT-L questionnaire was administered at study entry (baseline), on the last day of radiotherapy (assessment 2), and 4 weeks after therapy (assessment 3). The FACT-L includes scores for physical, functional, emotional, and social well-being (33 items), and a subscale of lung cancer symptoms (10 additional items). The summation of the physical, functional, and lung cancer symptom subscales (21 items) constitutes the Trial Outcome Index (TOI), considered the most clinically relevant outcome measure in lung cancer treatment trials. Results: The FACT-L completion rates at the designated study time points were as follows: baseline, 30 of 30 (100%); assessment 2, 29 (97%) of 30; and assessment 3, 24 (80%) of 30. At treatment completion, statistically significant declines in QOL scores were noted, compared with baseline for physical and functional well-being. Emotional well-being scores improved at both assessment 2 and assessment 3. The physical and functional scores returned approximately to baseline values at assessment 3. The change in TOI score was evaluated as a function of the clinical response to treatment, toxicity grade, and survival; no clear association was noted. A trend for the

  18. Preferential Formation of Benzo[a]pyrene Adducts at Lung Cancer Mutational Hotspots in P53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denissenko, Mikhail F.; Pao, Annie; Tang, Moon-Shong; Pfeifer, Gerd P.

    1996-10-01

    Cigarette smoke carcinogens such as benzo[a]pyrene are implicated in the development of lung cancer. The distribution of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE) adducts along exons of the P53 gene in BPDE-treated HeLa cells and bronchial epithelial cells was mapped at nucleotide resolution. Strong and selective adduct formation occurred at guanine positions in codons 157, 248, and 273. These same positions are the major mutational hotspots in human lung cancers. Thus, targeted adduct formation rather than phenotypic selection appears to shape the P53 mutational spectrum in lung cancer. These results provide a direct etiological link between a defined chemical carcinogen and human cancer.

  19. [Carcinogenic risk of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: classification and interpretation of the monitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalani, Simona; Fostinelli, Jacopo; Apostoli, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread contaminants characterized by various chemical, physical and toxic properties. The characterization of occupational and environmental exposures and the use of suitable measurements protocols are very significant because their presence in mixtures and environmental persistency. In the past few years, the knowledge concerning carcinogenicity of PAHs have been reviewed, the mechanisms involved are the interaction of PAH's metabolites with DNA and oxidative damages. The main requirement for research concerns lack of knowledge on reference values and occupational exposure's assessment in particular PAHs sampling methods that can lead to combined measurements of vapor and aerosol mixtures. Aims of this study are to describe a possible occupational sources of PAHs providing also an update of mechanism involved in their carcinogenicity and risk calculation as is done in the TEF approach. The classifications provided by International Agencies and Institutions and the limit values adopted have been reviewed and taken into account. PMID:25369710

  20. Trichloroethylene: Mechanistic, Epidemiologic and Other Supporting Evidence of Carcinogenic Hazard

    OpenAIRE

    Rusyn, Ivan; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Lawrence H. Lash; Kromhout, Hans; Hansen, Johnni; Guyton, Kathryn Z.

    2013-01-01

    The chlorinated solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The carcinogenic hazard of TCE was the subject of a 2012 evaluation by a Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Information on exposures, relevant data from epidemiologic studies, bioassays in experimental animals, and toxicity and mechanism of action studies was used to conclude that TCE is carcinogenic to humans (Group 1). This article summarizes the key evidence formin...

  1. Carcinogenicity evaluations and ongoing studies: the IARC databases.

    OpenAIRE

    Vainio, H.; Coleman, M.; Wilbourn, J

    1991-01-01

    Many thousands of chemicals are produced industrially and many more occur naturally. Information on the toxicology of these chemicals is often minimal or absent. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has published evaluations of the carcinogenic risk to humans of over 700 chemicals, groups of chemicals, and complex mixtures as a regular series of monographs. A database has been created containing summaries of all the relevant epidemiological, animal carcinogenicity, and other...

  2. Quantitative assessment of radiation-induced lung changes by computerized optical densitometry of routine chest x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a quantitative assay of radiological lung changes after postmastectomy radiotherapy applicable for analysis of routine chest x-rays. Methods and Materials: The assay relies on measurement of the optical density of chest x-rays by means of a standard personal computer-controlled film densitometer used for scanning dosimetry films. Density profiles were recorded at 1 mm steps along two reference lines in each lung. The crossing between the clavicula and the first rib in the x-ray projection was used as an easily identifiable anatomical landmark and was used to establish two parallel cranio-caudal reference lines separated by 20 mm. The starting point for recording optical densities was 5 mm below a line perpendicular to the reference lines and tangent to the top of the lung. Data were stored in a computer file for subsequent processing. The optical film densities in the apex of the lungs were converted into equivalent absorber thickness (EAT). To minimize the dependency on technical factors, the unirradiated lung was used as a control. Lung density changes were quantified by the relative change in EAT (REAT), which was evaluated as the difference between the summed EATs along the reference lines in the two lungs, corrected for any pretreatment difference in lung density, and taken as a percentage of the pretreatment EAT value of the lung. Results: Four different tests were carried out to investigate the reproducibility and validity of the proposed assay. (a) An anthropomorphic phantom was used to test the relationship between REAT and the layer of plastic absorber placed in front of one lung. A linear relationship was found with a correlation coefficient of 0.9993. (b) A series of 10 repeat measurements of the same arbitrarily chosen x-ray showed a mean REAT value of 9.8%, with a standard deviation of 0.21%. (c) Forty-three chest x-rays exposed on the same day were available from the clinical series. These were treated as double determinations of

  3. Registration-based assessment of regional lung function via volumetric CT images of normal subjects vs. severe asthmatics

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Sanghun; Eric A Hoffman; Sally E. Wenzel; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Yin, Youbing; Castro, Mario; Lin, Ching-Long

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore the use of image registration-derived variables associated with computed tomographic (CT) imaging of the lung acquired at multiple volumes. As an evaluation of the utility of such an imaging approach, we explored two groups at the extremes of population ranging from normal subjects to severe asthmatics. A mass-preserving image registration technique was employed to match CT images at total lung capacity (TLC) and functional residual capacity (FRC) for a...

  4. Functional residual capacity tool: A practical method to assess lung volume changes during pulmonary complications in mechanically ventilated patients

    OpenAIRE

    Veena S; Palepu Sudeep; Umamaheswara Rao G; Ramesh V

    2010-01-01

    In this report, we describe a patient in whom we used a functional residual capacity (FRC) tool available on a critical care ventilator to identify the loss of lung volume associated with pulmonary complications and increase in FRC with the application of a recruitment maneuver. The case report underlines the utility of the FRC tool in rapid visualization of the lung volume changes and the effects of application of corrective strategies in patients receiving mechanical ventilation.

  5. Functional residual capacity tool: A practical method to assess lung volume changes during pulmonary complications in mechanically ventilated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report, we describe a patient in whom we used a functional residual capacity (FRC tool available on a critical care ventilator to identify the loss of lung volume associated with pulmonary complications and increase in FRC with the application of a recruitment maneuver. The case report underlines the utility of the FRC tool in rapid visualization of the lung volume changes and the effects of application of corrective strategies in patients receiving mechanical ventilation.

  6. The function and significance of SELENBP1 downregulation in human bronchial epithelial carcinogenic process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu-Qing Zeng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our quantitative proteomic study showed that selenium-binding protein 1 (SELENBP1 was progressively decreased in human bronchial epithelial carcinogenic process. However, there is little information on expression and function of SELENBP1 during human lung squamous cell cancer (LSCC carcinogenesis. METHODS: iTRAQ-tagging combined with 2D LC-MS/MS analysis was used to identify differentially expressed proteins in the human bronchial epithelial carcinogenic process. SELENBP1, member of selenoproteins family and progressively downregulated in this process, was selected to further study. Both Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were performed to detect SELENBP1 expression in independent sets of tissues of bronchial epithelial carcinogenesis, and ability of SELENBP1 for discriminating NBE (normal bronchial epithelium from preneoplastic lesions from invasive LSCC was evaluated. The effects of SELENBP1 downregulation on the susceptibility of benzo(apyrene (B[a]P-induced human bronchial epithelial cell transformation were determined. RESULTS: 102 differentially expressed proteins were identified by quantitative proteomics, and SELENBP1 was found and confirmed being progressively decreased in the human bronchial epithelial carcinogenic process. The sensitivity and specificity of SELENBP1 were 80% and 79% in discriminating NBE from preneoplastic lesions, 79% and 82% in discriminating NBE from invasive LSCC, and 77% and 71% in discriminating preneoplastic lesions from invasive LSCC, respectively. Furthermore, knockdown of SELENBP1 in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell line 16HBE cells significantly increased the efficiency of B[a]P-induced cell transformation. CONCLUSIONS: The present data shows for the first time that decreased SELENBP1 is an early event in LSCC, increases B[a]P-induced human bronchial epithelial cell transformation, and might serve as a novel potential biomarker for early detection of LSCC.

  7. Trichloroethylene: Mechanistic, epidemiologic and other supporting evidence of carcinogenic hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusyn, Ivan; Chiu, Weihsueh A; Lash, Lawrence H; Kromhout, Hans; Hansen, Johnni; Guyton, Kathryn Z

    2014-01-01

    The chlorinated solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The carcinogenic hazard of TCE was the subject of a 2012 evaluation by a Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Information on exposures, relevant data from epidemiologic studies, bioassays in experimental animals, and toxicity and mechanism of action studies was used to conclude that TCE is carcinogenic to humans (Group 1). This article summarizes the key evidence forming the scientific bases for the IARC classification. Exposure to TCE from environmental sources (including hazardous waste sites and contaminated water) is common throughout the world. While workplace use of TCE has been declining, occupational exposures remain of concern, especially in developing countries. The strongest human evidence is from studies of occupational TCE exposure and kidney cancer. Positive, although less consistent, associations were reported for liver cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. TCE is carcinogenic at multiple sites in multiple species and strains of experimental animals. The mechanistic evidence includes extensive data on the toxicokinetics and genotoxicity of TCE and its metabolites. Together, available evidence provided a cohesive database supporting the human cancer hazard of TCE, particularly in the kidney. For other target sites of carcinogenicity, mechanistic and other data were found to be more limited. Important sources of susceptibility to TCE toxicity and carcinogenicity were also reviewed by the Working Group. In all, consideration of the multiple evidence streams presented herein informed the IARC conclusions regarding the carcinogenicity of TCE. PMID:23973663

  8. 4. DNA REPAIR CAPACITY IN LUNG CANCER PATIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@The ability for DNA repair is an important host factor which influences the individual susceptibility to genotoxic carcinogen exposures. It has been shown in different case-control studies that DNA repair capacity (DRC) can be reduced in lung cancer patients.We have used an alkaline comet assay to measure the cellular DRC in peri-pheral blood lymphocytes of lung cancer patients and tumor-free control

  9. Diesel engine exhaust and lung cancer: an unproven association.

    OpenAIRE

    Muscat, J E; Wynder, E. L.

    1995-01-01

    The risk of lung cancer associated with diesel exhaust has been calculated from 14 case-control or cohort studies. We evaluated the findings from these studies to determine whether there is sufficient evidence to implicate diesel exhaust as a human lung carcinogen. Four studies found increased risks associated with long-term exposure, although two of the four studies were based on the same cohort of railroad workers. Six studies were inconclusive due to missing information on smoking habits, ...

  10. Changes in lung parenchyma after acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS): assessment with high-resolution computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the appearance, extent, and distribution of parenchymal changes in the lung after acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) as a function of disease severity and therapeutic procedures. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), clinical examination, and lung function tests were performed in 15 patients, 6-10 months after ARDS. The appearance and extent of parenchymal changes were compared with the severity of ARDS, as well as with clinical and therapeutic data. Lung parenchymal changes resembling those found in the presence of pulmonary fibrosis were observed in 13 of 15 patients (87%). The changes were significantly more frequent and more pronounced in the ventral than in the dorsal portions of the lung (p<0.01). A significant correlation was observed between the extent of lung alterations and the severity of ARDS (p<0.01), and the duration in which patients had received mechanical ventilation either with a peak inspiratory pressure greater than 30 mmHg (p<0.05), or with more than 70% oxygen (p<0.01). Acute respiratory distress syndrome frequently is followed by fibrotic changes in lung parenchyma. The predominantly ventral distribution of these changes indicates that they may be caused by the ventilation regimen and the oxygen therapy rather than by the ARDS. (orig.)

  11. Differences in regional pulmonary pressure–impedance curves before and after lung injury assessed with a novel algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global pressure–volume (PV) curves are an adjunct measure to describe lung characteristics in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). There is convincing evidence that high peak inspiratory pressures (PIP) cause barotrauma, while optimized positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) helps avoid mechanical injury to the lungs by preventing repeated alveolar opening and closing. The optimal values of PIP and PEEP are deduced from the shape of the PV curve by the identification of so-called lower and upper inflection points. However, it has been demonstrated using electrical impedance tomography (EIT) that the inflection points vary across the lung. This study employs a simple curve-fitting technique to automatically define inflection points on both pressure–volume (PV) and pressure–impedance (PI) curves to asses the differences between global PV and regional PI estimates in animals before and after induced lung injury. The results demonstrate a clear increase in lower inflection point (LIP) along the gravitational axis both before and after lung injury. Moreover, it is clear from comparison of the local EIT-derived LIPs with those derived from global PV curves that a ventilation strategy based on the PV curve alone may leave dependent areas of the lung collapsed. EIT-based PI curve analysis may help choosing an optimal ventilation strategy

  12. Establishment of Airborne Nanoparticle Exposure Chamber System to Assess Nano TiO2 Induced Mice Lung Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Hua; Li, Jui-Ping; Huang, Nai-Chun; Yang, Chung-Shi; Chen, Jen-Kun

    2011-12-01

    A great many governments have schemed their top priority to support the research and development of emerging nanotechnology, which lead to increasing products containing nanomaterials. However, platforms and protocols to evaluate the safety of nanomaterials are not yet established. We therefore design and fabricate a nanoparticle exposure chamber system (NECS) and try to standardize protocols to assess potential health risk of inhalable nanoparticles. This platform comprises: (1) nano-aerosol generators to produce homogeneous airborne nanoparticles, (2) double isolated container to prevent from unexpected exposure to humans, (3) gas supply system for housing animals or incubating cultured cells, and (4) system for automatic control and airborne nanoparticle analysis. The NECS providing multiple functions includes: (1) a secure environment to handle nanomaterials, (2) real-time measurement for the size and distribution of airborne nanoparticles, (3) SOP of safety evaluation for nanomaterials, and (4) key technology for the development of inhalable pharmaceuticals. We used NECS to mimic occupational environment for exploring potential adverse effects of TiO2 nanoparticles. The adult male ICR mice were exposed to 25nm, well-characterized TiO2 particles for 1 and 4 weeks. More than 90% of the inhaled TiO2 nanoparticles deposit in lung tissue, which tends to be captured by alveolar macrophages. Pulmonary function test does not show significant physiological changes between one and 4 weeks exposure. For plasma biochemistry analysis, there are no obvious inflammation responses after exposure for one and 4 weeks; however, disruption of alveolar septa and increased thickness of alveolar epithelial cells were observed. According to our results, the NECS together with our protocols show comprehensive integration and ideally fit the standard of OECD guildelines-TG403, TG412, TG413; it can be further customized to fulfill diverse demands of industry, government, and third party

  13. Lung density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnett, E S; Webber, C E; Coates, G;

    1977-01-01

    The density of a defined volume of the human lung can be measured in vivo by a new noninvasive technique. A beam of gamma-rays is directed at the lung and, by measuring the scattered gamma-rays, lung density is calculated. The density in the lower lobe of the right lung in normal man during quiet...

  14. Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spreads in different ways, and each is treated differently. Non-small cell lung cancer is more common than small cell lung cancer. Small cell lung cancer grows more quickly and is more likely to spread to other organs in the body. Learn more about non-small cell lung cancer. Learn ...

  15. Induction of active melanocytes in mouse skin by carcinogens: a new method for detection of skin carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, K; Inui, N; Takeuchi, T

    1981-01-01

    Application of potent skin carcinogens, such as 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, 3-methylcholanthrene, benzo[a]pyrene and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide, induced numerous dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa)-positive cells in the interfollicular epidermis of C57BL/6 mice in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Chrysene, a weak skin carcinogen, and croton oil, a tumor promoter, also induced 3--4 times more dopa-positive cells than acetone. Liver carcinogens, such as 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene and N-2-acetylaminofluorene, and non-carcinogenic aromatic hydrocarbons, such as anthracene, fluoranthene, fluorene and pyrene, did not induce increase in these cells. These results indicate that increase in the number of dopa-positive cells after application of chemicals is well correlated with the abilities of these compounds to induce skin carcinogenesis and suppress sebaceous glands. PMID:7273337

  16. Development of lung function in very low birth weight infants with or without bronchopulmonary dysplasia: Longitudinal assessment during the first 15 months of corrected age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmalisch Gerd

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Very low birth weight (VLBW infants ( Methods Comprehensive lung function assessment was performed at about 50, 70, and 100 weeks of postmenstrual age in 55 sedated VLBW infants (29 with former BPD [O2 supplementation was given at 36 weeks of gestational age] and 26 VLBW infants without BPD [controls]. Mean gestational age (26 vs. 29 weeks, birth weight (815 g vs. 1,125 g, and the proportion of infants requiring mechanical ventilation for ≥7 d (55% vs. 8%, differed significantly between BPD infants and controls. Results Both body weight and length, determined over time, were persistently lower in former BPD infants compared to controls, but no significant between-group differences were noted in respiratory rate, respiratory or airway resistance, functional residual capacity as determined by body plethysmography (FRCpleth, maximal expiratory flow at the FRC (V'max FRC, or blood gas (pO2, pCO2 levels. Tidal volume, minute ventilation, respiratory compliance, and FRC determined by SF6 multiple breath washout (representing the lung volume in actual communication with the airways were significantly lower in former BPD infants compared to controls. However, these differences became non-significant after normalization to body weight. Conclusions Although somatic growth and the development of some lung functional parameters lag in former BPD infants, the lung function of such infants appears to develop in line with that of non-BPD infants when a body weight correction is applied. Longitudinal lung function testing of preterm infants after discharge from hospital may help to identify former BPD infants at risk of incomplete recovery of respiratory function; such infants are at risk of later respiratory problems.

  17. Lung cancer in the meat industry.

    OpenAIRE

    Coggon, D; Pannett, B.; Pippard, E C; Winter, P. D.

    1989-01-01

    Routine statistics of occupational mortality and incidence of cancer have consistently shown high rates of lung cancer in butchers. Possible explanations include infection by carcinogenic papilloma viruses, exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrites in the preservation of meat, or a confounding effect of tobacco. To explore these possibilities, we have examined the mortality of 1610 men employed at three British companies processing pork, beef, lamb, bacon, and other meat produ...

  18. Quantitative assessment of lung volumes using multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the clinical value of the multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) in the quantitative assessment of lung volumes and to assess the relationship between the MDCT results and disease severity as determined by a pulmonary function test (PFT) in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients. We performed a PFT and MDCT on 39 COPD patients. Using the GOLD classifications, we divided the patients into three groups according to disease severity; stage I (mild, n = 10), stage II (moderate, n = 15), and stage III (severe, n = 14). Using the pulmo-CT software program, we measured the proportion of lung volumes with attenuation values below -910 and -950 HU. The mean FEV1 (% of predicted) and FEV1/FVC was 82.2 ± 2% and 66.2 ± 3% in stage I, 53.5 ± 11% and 52 ± 6% in stage II, and 32.3 ± 7% and 44.2% ± 13% in stage III, respectively. Differences in lung volume percentage at each of the thresholds (-910 and -950 HU) among the 3 stages were statistically significant (ρ < 0.01, ρ < 0.01) and correlated well with the FEV1 and FEV1/FVC (r = -0.803, r -0.766, r = -0.817, and r = -0.795, respectively). The volumetric measurement obtained by MDCT provides an accurate means of quantifying pulmonary emphysema

  19. Quantitative assessment of lung volumes using multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Min; Hur, Jin; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Sang Jin; Kim, Hyung Jung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    To evaluate the clinical value of the multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) in the quantitative assessment of lung volumes and to assess the relationship between the MDCT results and disease severity as determined by a pulmonary function test (PFT) in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients. We performed a PFT and MDCT on 39 COPD patients. Using the GOLD classifications, we divided the patients into three groups according to disease severity; stage I (mild, n = 10), stage II (moderate, n = 15), and stage III (severe, n = 14). Using the pulmo-CT software program, we measured the proportion of lung volumes with attenuation values below -910 and -950 HU. The mean FEV1 (% of predicted) and FEV1/FVC was 82.2 {+-} 2% and 66.2 {+-} 3% in stage I, 53.5 {+-} 11% and 52 {+-} 6% in stage II, and 32.3 {+-} 7% and 44.2% {+-} 13% in stage III, respectively. Differences in lung volume percentage at each of the thresholds (-910 and -950 HU) among the 3 stages were statistically significant ({rho} < 0.01, {rho} < 0.01) and correlated well with the FEV1 and FEV1/FVC (r = -0.803, r -0.766, r = -0.817, and r = -0.795, respectively). The volumetric measurement obtained by MDCT provides an accurate means of quantifying pulmonary emphysema.

  20. The foot posture index, ankle lunge test, Beighton scale and the lower limb assessment score in healthy children: a reliability study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans Angela M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Outcome measures are important when evaluating treatments and physiological progress in paediatric populations. Reliable, relevant measures of foot posture are important for such assessments to be accurate over time. The aim of the study was to assess the intra- and inter-rater reliability of common outcome measures for paediatric foot conditions. Methods A repeated measures, same-subject design assessed the intra- and inter-rater reliability of measures of foot posture, joint hypermobility and ankle range: the Foot Posture Index (FPI-6, the ankle lunge test, the Beighton scale and the lower limb assessment scale (LLAS, used by two examiners in 30 healthy children (aged 7 to 15 years. The Oxford Ankle Foot Questionnaire (OxAFQ-C was completed by participants and a parent, to assess the extent of foot and ankle problems. Results The OxAFQ-C demonstrated a mean (SD score of 6 (6 in adults and 7(5 for children, showing good agreement between parents and children, and which indicates mid-range (transient disability. Intra-rater reliability was good for the FPI-6 (ICC = 0.93 - 0.94, ankle lunge test (ICC = 0.85-0.95, Beighton scale (ICC = 0.96-0.98 and LLAS (ICC = 0.90-0.98. Inter-rater reliability was largely good for each of the: FPI-6 (ICC = 0.79, ankle lunge test (ICC = 0.83, Beighton scale (ICC = 0.73 and LLAS (ICC = 0.78. Conclusion The four measures investigated demonstrated adequate intra-rater and inter-rater reliability in this paediatric sample, which further justifies their use in clinical practice.

  1. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) evaluation of the carcinogenicity of outdoor air pollution:focus on China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dana Loomis; Wei Huang; Guosheng Chen

    2014-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has classified outdoor air pol ution and the particulate matter (PM) in outdoor air pol ution as carcinogenic to humans, as based on sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in humans and experimental animals and strong support by mechanistic studies. The data with important contributions to the evaluation are reviewed, highlighting the data with particular relevance to China, and implications of the evaluation with respect to China are discussed. The air pol ution levels in Chinese cities are among the highest observed in the world today and frequently exceed health-based national and international guidelines. Data from high-quality epidemiologic studies in Asia, Europe, and North America consistently show positive associations between lung cancer and PM exposure and other indicators of air pol ution, which persist after adjustment for important lung cancer risk factors, such as tobacco smoking. Epidemiologic data from China are limited but nevertheless indicate an increased risk of lung cancer associated with several air pol utants. Excess cancer risk is also observed in experimental animals exposed to pol uted outdoor air or extracted PM. The exposure of several species to outdoor air pollution is associated with markers of genetic damage that have been linked to increased cancer risk in humans. Numerous studies from China, especially genetic biomarker studies in exposed populations, support that the polluted air in China is genotoxic and carcinogenic to humans. The evaluation by IARC indicates both the need for further research into the cancer risks associated with exposure to air pol ution in China and the urgent need to act to reduce exposure to the population.

  2. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC evaluation of the carcinogenicity of outdoor air pollution: focus on China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Loomis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC has classified outdoor air pollution and the particulate matter (PM in outdoor air pollution as carcinogenic to humans, as based on sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in humans and experimental animals and strong support by mechanistic studies. The data with important contributions to the evaluation are reviewed, highlighting the data with particular relevance to China, and implications of the evaluation with respect to China are discussed. The air pollution levels in Chinese cities are among the highest observed in the world today and frequently exceed health-based national and international guidelines. Data from high-quality epidemiologic studies in Asia, Europe, and North America consistently show positive associations between lung cancer and PM exposure and other indicators of air pollution, which persist after adjustment for important lung cancer risk factors, such as tobacco smoking. Epidemiologic data from China are limited but nevertheless indicate an increased risk of lung cancer associated with several air pollutants. Excess cancer risk is also observed in experimental animals exposed to polluted outdoor air or extracted PM. The exposure of several species to outdoor air pollution is associated with markers of genetic damage that have been linked to increased cancer risk in humans. Numerous studies from China, especially genetic biomarker studies in exposed populations, support that the polluted air in China is genotoxic and carcinogenic to humans. The evaluation by IARC indicates both the need for further research into the cancer risks associated with exposure to air pollution in China and the urgent need to act to reduce exposure to the population

  3. Isolation and (111)In-Oxine Labeling of Murine NK Cells for Assessment of Cell Trafficking in Orthotopic Lung Tumor Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malviya, Gaurav; Nayak, Tapan; Gerdes, Christian; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Signore, Alberto; de Vries, Erik F J

    2016-04-01

    A noninvasive in vivo imaging method for NK cell trafficking is essential to gain further understanding of the pathogenesis of NK cell mediated immune response to the novel cancer treatment strategies, and to discover the homing sites and physiological distribution of NK cells. Although human NK cells can be labeled for in vivo imaging, little is known about the murine NK cell labeling and its application in animal models. This study describes the isolation and ex vivo radiolabeling of murine NK cells for the evaluation of cell trafficking in an orthotopic model of human lung cancer in mice. Scid-Tg(FCGR3A)Blt transgenic SCID mice were used to isolate NK cells from mouse splenocytes using the CD49b (DX5) MicroBeads positive selection method. The purity and viability of the isolated NK cells were confirmed by FACS analysis. Different labeling buffers and incubation times were evaluated to optimize (111)In-oxine labeling conditions. Functionality of the radiolabeled NK cell was assessed by (51)Cr-release assay. We evaluated physiological distribution of (111)In-oxine labeled murine NK cells in normal SCID mice and biodistribution in irradiated and nonirradiated SCID mice with orthotopic A549 human lung tumor lesions. Imaging findings were confirmed by histology. Results showed that incubation with 0.011 MBq of (111)In-oxine per million murine NK cells in PBS (pH 7.4) for 20 min is the best condition that provides optimum labeling efficiency without affecting cell viability and functionality. Physiological distribution in normal SCID mice demonstrated NK cells homing mainly in the spleen, while (111)In released from NK cells was excreted via kidneys into urine. Biodistribution studies demonstrated a higher lung uptake in orthotopic lung tumor-bearing mice than control mice. In irradiated mice, lung tumor uptake of radiolabeled murine NK cells decreased between 24 h and 72 h postinjection (p.i.), which was accompanied by tumor regression, while in nonirradiated mice

  4. Estimating the incidence of lung cancer attributable to occupational exposure in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousavi-Jarrahi Yasaman

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The aim of this study was to estimate the fraction of lung cancer incidence in Iran attributed to occupational exposures to the well-established lung cancer carcinogens, including silica, cadmium, nickel, arsenic, chromium, diesel fumes, beryllium, and asbestos. Methods Nationwide exposure to each of the mentioned carcinogens was estimated using workforce data from the Iranian population census of 1995, available from the International Labor Organization (ILO website. The prevalence of exposure to carcinogens in each industry was estimated using exposure data from the CAREX (CARcinogen EXposure database, an international occupational carcinogen information system kept and maintained by the European Union. The magnitude of the relative risk of lung cancer for each carcinogen was estimated from local and international literature. Using the Levin modified population attributable risk (incidence fraction, lung cancer incidence (as estimated by the Tehran Population-Based Cancer Registry attributable to workplace exposure to carcinogens was estimated. Results The total workforce in Iran according to the 1995 census identified 12,488,020 men and 677,469 women. Agriculture is the largest sector with 25% of the male and 0.27% of female workforce. After applying the CAREX exposure estimate to each sector, the proportion exposed to lung carcinogens was 0.08% for male workers and 0.02% for female workers. Estimating a relative risk of 1.9 (95% CI of 1.7–2.1 for high exposure and 1.3 (95% CI 1.2–1.4 for low exposure, and employing the Levin modified formula, the fraction of lung cancer attributed to carcinogens in the workplace was 1.5% (95% CI of 1.2–1.9 for females and 12% (95% CI of 10–15 for males. These fractions correspond to an estimated incidence of 1.3 and 0.08 cases of lung cancer per 100,000 population for males and females, respectively. Conclusion The incidence of lung cancer due to occupational exposure is low in

  5. Involvement of pulmonary endothelial cell injury in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis: clinical assessment by {sup 123}I-MIBG lung scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takabatake, Noriaki; Arao, Tsuyoshi; Sata, Makoto; Abe, Shuichi; Inoue, Sumito; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Kubota, Isao [Yamagata University School of Medicine, First Department of Internal Medicine, Yamagata (Japan); Shibata, Yoko [Yamagata University School of Medicine, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Yamagata (Japan)

    2005-02-01

    Pulmonary microvascular endothelial injury may be involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis (PF). The aim of this study was to evaluate the pulmonary vascular status in patients with PF by lung scintigraphic assessment of {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ({sup 123}I-MIBG), which reflects latent endothelial cell lesions. We assessed lung {sup 123}I-MIBG kinetics and clinical indices in 23 PF patients and 16 controls. Mean uptake ratios of lung to mediastinum (L/M) were calculated in anterior planar images at 30 (early image) and 270 (delayed image) min after intravenous injection of {sup 123}I-MIBG. The pulmonary mean washout rate (WR) of {sup 123}I-MIBG was also calculated. The L/Mratio in early images, but not in delayed images, was significantly lower in the PF patients than in the controls (L/M{sub early} 1.41{+-}0.14 vs 1.53{+-}0.10, p<0.01; L/M{sub delayed} 1.28{+-}0.10 vs 1.33{+-}0.07, p=NS). WR was significantly reduced in the PF patients compared with the controls (28.6%{+-}3.1% vs 34.2%{+-}5.1%, p<0.001). In the study subjects (PF patients plus controls) there were significant relationships between lung WR of {sup 123}I-MIBG and other diagnostic parameters for the severity of PF, such as vital capacity (r=0.625, p<0.0001), total lung capacity (r=0.691, p<0.0001), carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (r=0.622, p<0.0001), serum angiotensin-converting enzyme activity (r=0.422, p<0.01), carbohydrate antigen KL-6 levels (r=-0.495, p<0.01) and surfactant protein-D levels (r=-0.461, p<0.01). When control subjects were excluded, similar significant correlations were observed between WR and %TLC (r=0.508, p<0.05), DL{sub CO} (r=0.593, p<0.01) and serum ACE activity (r=0.515, p<0.05) in the PF patients. These results suggest that endothelial cell injury plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of PF, and that lung WR of {sup 123}I-MIBG, which is a specific marker of endothelial damage, can serve as a novel diagnostic tool to evaluate the functional

  6. Functional Mechanism of Lung Mosaic CT Attenuation: Assessment with Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Perfusion SPECT-CT Fusion Imaging and Non-Breath-Hold Technegas SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suga, K.; Yasuhiko, K. (Dept. of Radiology, St. Hill Hospital, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan)); Iwanaga, H.; Tokuda, O.; Matsunaga, N. (Dept. of Radiology, Yamaguchi Univ. School of Medicine, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan))

    2009-01-15

    Background: The functional mechanism of lung mosaic computed tomography attenuation (MCA) in pulmonary vascular disease (PVD) and obstructive airway disease (OAD) has not yet been fully clarified. Purpose: To clarify the mechanism of MCA in these diseases by assessing the relationship between regional lung function and CT attenuation change at MCA sites with the use of automated deep-inspiratory breath-hold (DIBrH) perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-CT fusion images and non-breath-hold Technegas SPECT. Material and Methods: Subjects were 42 PVD patients (31 pulmonary thromboembolism, four primary/two secondary pulmonary hypertension, and five Takayasu arteritis), 12 OAD patients (five acute asthma, four obliterative bronchiolitis, and three bronchiectasis), and 12 normal controls, all of whom had MCA on DIBrH CT. The relationship between regional lung function and CT attenuation change at the lung slices with MCA was assessed using DIBrH perfusion SPECT-CT fusion images and non-breath-hold Technegas SPECT. The severity of perfusion defects with or without MCA was quantified by regions-of-interest analysis. Results: On DIBrH CT and perfusion SPECT, in contrast to no noticeable CT attenuation abnormality and fairly uniform perfusion in controls, 60 MCA and 274 perfusion defects in PVD patients, and 18 MCA and 61 defects in OAD patients were identified, with a total of 77 ventilation defects on Technegas SPECT in all patients. SPECT-CT correlation showed that, throughout the 78 MCA sites of all patients, lung perfusion was persistently decreased at low CT attenuation and preserved at intervening high CT attenuation, while lung ventilation was poorly correlated with CT attenuation change. The radioactivity ratios of reduced perfusion and the intervening preserved perfusion at the 78 perfusion defects with MCA were significantly lower than those at the remaining 257 defects without MCA (P<0.0001). Conclusion: Although further validation is

  7. Functional Mechanism of Lung Mosaic CT Attenuation: Assessment with Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Perfusion SPECT-CT Fusion Imaging and Non-Breath-Hold Technegas SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The functional mechanism of lung mosaic computed tomography attenuation (MCA) in pulmonary vascular disease (PVD) and obstructive airway disease (OAD) has not yet been fully clarified. Purpose: To clarify the mechanism of MCA in these diseases by assessing the relationship between regional lung function and CT attenuation change at MCA sites with the use of automated deep-inspiratory breath-hold (DIBrH) perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-CT fusion images and non-breath-hold Technegas SPECT. Material and Methods: Subjects were 42 PVD patients (31 pulmonary thromboembolism, four primary/two secondary pulmonary hypertension, and five Takayasu arteritis), 12 OAD patients (five acute asthma, four obliterative bronchiolitis, and three bronchiectasis), and 12 normal controls, all of whom had MCA on DIBrH CT. The relationship between regional lung function and CT attenuation change at the lung slices with MCA was assessed using DIBrH perfusion SPECT-CT fusion images and non-breath-hold Technegas SPECT. The severity of perfusion defects with or without MCA was quantified by regions-of-interest analysis. Results: On DIBrH CT and perfusion SPECT, in contrast to no noticeable CT attenuation abnormality and fairly uniform perfusion in controls, 60 MCA and 274 perfusion defects in PVD patients, and 18 MCA and 61 defects in OAD patients were identified, with a total of 77 ventilation defects on Technegas SPECT in all patients. SPECT-CT correlation showed that, throughout the 78 MCA sites of all patients, lung perfusion was persistently decreased at low CT attenuation and preserved at intervening high CT attenuation, while lung ventilation was poorly correlated with CT attenuation change. The radioactivity ratios of reduced perfusion and the intervening preserved perfusion at the 78 perfusion defects with MCA were significantly lower than those at the remaining 257 defects without MCA (P<0.0001). Conclusion: Although further validation is

  8. An update on direct genotoxicity as a molecular mechanism of ochratoxin a carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfohl-Leszkowicz, Annie; Manderville, Richard A

    2012-02-20

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a naturally occurring chlorophenolic fungal toxin that contaminates a wide range of food products and poses a cancer threat to humans. The mechanism of action (MOA) for OTA renal carcinogenicity is a controversial issue. In 2005, direct genotoxicity (covalent DNA adduct formation) was proposed as a MOA for OTA-mediated carcinogenicity [ Manderville , R. A. ( 2005 ) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 18 , 1091 - 1097 ]. At that time, inconsistent results had been published on OTA genotoxicity/mutagenicity, and conclusive evidence for OTA-mediated DNA adduction had been lacking. In this update, published data from the past 6-7 years are presented that provide new hypotheses for the MOA of OTA-mediated carcinogenicity. While direct genotoxicity remains a controversial issue for OTA, new findings from the Umemura and Nohmi laboratories provide definitive results for the mutagenicity of OTA in the target tissue (outer medulla) of male rat kidney that rules out oxidative DNA damage. These findings, coupled with our own efforts that provide new structural evidence for DNA adduction by OTA, has strengthened the argument for involvement of direct genotoxicity in OTA-mediated renal carcinogenesis. This MOA should be taken into consideration for OTA human risk assessment. PMID:22054007

  9. Visualisation and assessment of the protein synthesis rate of lung cancer using carbon-11 tyrosine and positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the potential role of L-(1-11C)-tyrosine positron emission tomography (TYR PET) for visualisation and quantification of protein metabolism in lung cancer. Dynamic TYR PET scans of the thorax were performed in 17 patients with lung cancer. Protein synthesis rate (PSR in μmol/min.l) and standardised uptake value (SUV, corrected for body measurements) of tumour tissue and contralateral normal tissue were calculated before and after chemotherapy or radiotherapy. All tumours [11 non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs), five small cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs), and one pleural mesothelioma] were visualised as a hot spot. The median PSR in tumour tissue was higher than that in corresponding contralateral normal lung tissue before [1.88 μmol/min.l (range 1.10-3.42) vs 0.40 μmol/min.l (range 0.12-0.86); P=0.003] and after treatment [1.33 μmol/min.l (range 0.45-2.21) vs 0.28 μmol/min.l (range 0.18-0.51); P<0.02]. In contrast to PSR of normal lung tissue, PSR of tumour tissue decreased significantly after therapy (P=0.03). Before therapy, no significant difference in PSR between NSCLCs and SCLCs was observed, but after therapy the PSR differed significantly between the subgroups [1.69 μmol/min.l (range 0.63-2.78) for NSCLC vs 0.67 μmol/min.l (range 0.45-0.92) for SCLC; P=0.03], irrespective of the treatment modality. The median SUV of tumour tissue was higher than that in corresponding contralateral normal lung both before and after therapy. Only a weak correlation between PSR and SUV was found when the latter was corrected for body surface area or lean body mass. Carbon-11 labelled tyrosine appears to be a good tracer for visualising lung cancer. PSR of tumour tissue can be used to quantify reduction in the metabolic rate of the tumour. Future studies need to be performed to determine whether TYR PET will supply additional clinical information with treatment implications in patients with lung cancer. (orig.)

  10. Spatiotemporal air pollution exposure assessment for a Canadian population-based lung cancer case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hystad Perry

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few epidemiological studies of air pollution have used residential histories to develop long-term retrospective exposure estimates for multiple ambient air pollutants and vehicle and industrial emissions. We present such an exposure assessment for a Canadian population-based lung cancer case-control study of 8353 individuals using self-reported residential histories from 1975 to 1994. We also examine the implications of disregarding and/or improperly accounting for residential mobility in long-term exposure assessments. Methods National spatial surfaces of ambient air pollution were compiled from recent satellite-based estimates (for PM2.5 and NO2 and a chemical transport model (for O3. The surfaces were adjusted with historical annual air pollution monitoring data, using either spatiotemporal interpolation or linear regression. Model evaluation was conducted using an independent ten percent subset of monitoring data per year. Proximity to major roads, incorporating a temporal weighting factor based on Canadian mobile-source emission estimates, was used to estimate exposure to vehicle emissions. A comprehensive inventory of geocoded industries was used to estimate proximity to major and minor industrial emissions. Results Calibration of the national PM2.5 surface using annual spatiotemporal interpolation predicted historical PM2.5 measurement data best (R2 = 0.51, while linear regression incorporating the national surfaces, a time-trend and population density best predicted historical concentrations of NO2 (R2 = 0.38 and O3 (R2 = 0.56. Applying the models to study participants residential histories between 1975 and 1994 resulted in mean PM2.5, NO2 and O3 exposures of 11.3 μg/m3 (SD = 2.6, 17.7 ppb (4.1, and 26.4 ppb (3.4 respectively. On average, individuals lived within 300 m of a highway for 2.9 years (15% of exposure-years and within 3 km of a major industrial emitter for 6.4 years (32% of exposure-years. Approximately 50

  11. Different imaging methods in the assessment of radiation-induced lung injury following hemithorax irradiation for pleural mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have characterized the radiation-induced lung-injury on serial chest X-rays, CTs and ultralow field MRs and evaluated the clinical value and cost/benefit ratio of the different imaging methods in 30 patients receiving high-dose hemithorax irradiation for pleural mesothelioma. Lung injury was severe in all patients, but non-specific and essentially as described in text-books. CT provided no clinically relevant, cost effective diagnostic advantage over conventional X-rays in the detection of early or late radiation-induced lung injury, but it was necessary for the evaluation of the disease status of the mesothelioma. The possible advantage of MR over CT could not be evaluated and needs further studies. Optimal time-points for imaging CTs or MRs to detect early radiation-induced lung injury following high dose hemithorax irradiation were during the latter part of the treatment or very shortly after the end of the irradiation. Late injury or irreversible fibrosis develop rapidly after 6 months and was clearly documented by chest X-rays. The authors recommend serial chest X-rays at 1-2, 6 and 12 months following radiotherapy as a cost-effective method for the detection of radiation-induced lung injury with additional CTs to document the stage of mesothelioma, when needed. (author). 31 refs.; 4 figs

  12. Carcinogenicity of deuterium-labeled 1,2-dimethylhydrazine in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the effect of deuterium substitution on the carcinogenicity of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) in mice, two comparisons were made between DMH and its fully methyl-deuterated analogue, [2H6]DMH. In a lifetime study with the CBA strain, groups of 19-30 animals of each sex were dosed s.c. weekly with 8 mg/kg of either DMH or [2H6]DMH for 8, 16, or 32 weeks. In the second study, female CF-1 mice were given DMH or [2H6]DMH in 10 weekly s.c. doses of 12 mg/kg each (13.2 mg/kg for [2H6]DMH) and examined for colon tumors 36 weeks after the first dose. Deuteration significantly decreased tumor incidence in the colon of males (P less than 0.01) and the anal tissue of both sexes (P less than 0.05) but increased that of hepatomas and lung tumors in males (P less than 0.01). Substrate deuteration did not significantly affect overall incidence of any other tumor type, however, including hemangioendotheliomas and kidney tumors in both sexes, as well as colon, uterine, ovarian, liver, and lung tumors in females. The results indicate that C--H bond breakage is kinetically important in the activation of DMH to its ultimately carcinogenic form in organs such as the male colon (relative risk in DMH-versus [2H6]DMH-treated animals approximately equal to 6), and that inhibition of this process by substrate deuteration allows a diversionary mechanism having a smaller isotope effect to become relatively more extensive. The qualitatively different effect in other organs (e.g., kidney, relative risk approximately equal to 1) supports recent suggestions that the net mechanism of activation can differ from one target tissue to another, possibly by striking a different balance between parallel metabolic pathways

  13. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes intratracheally instilled into the rat lung induce development of pleural malignant mesothelioma and lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzui, Masumi; Futakuchi, Mitsuru; Fukamachi, Katsumi; Numano, Takamasa; Abdelgied, Mohamed; Takahashi, Satoru; Ohnishi, Makoto; Omori, Toyonori; Tsuruoka, Shuji; Hirose, Akihiko; Kanno, Jun; Sakamoto, Yoshimitsu; Alexander, David B; Alexander, William T; Jiegou, Xu; Tsuda, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) have a fibrous structure and physical properties similar to asbestos and have been shown to induce malignant mesothelioma of the peritoneum after injection into the scrotum or peritoneal cavity in rats and mice. For human cancer risk assessment, however, data after administration of MWCNT via the airway, the exposure route that is most relevant to humans, is required. The present study was undertaken to investigate the carcinogenicity of MWCNT-N (NIKKISO) after administration to the rat lung. MWCNT-N was fractionated by passing it through a sieve with a pore size of 25 μm. The average lengths of the MWCNT were 4.2 μm before filtration and 2.6 μm in the flow-through fraction; the length of the retained MWCNT could not be determined. For the present study, 10-week-old F344/Crj male rats were divided into five groups: no treatment, vehicle control, MWCNT-N before filtration, MWCNT-N flow-through and MWCNT-N retained groups. Administration was by the trans-tracheal intrapulmonary spraying (TIPS) method. Rats were administered a total of 1 mg/rat during the initial 2 weeks of the experiment and then observed up to 109 weeks. The incidences of malignant mesothelioma and lung tumors (bronchiolo-alveolar adenomas and carcinomas) were 6/38 and 14/38, respectively, in the three groups administered MWCNT and 0/28 and 0/28, respectively, in the control groups. All malignant mesotheliomas were localized in the pericardial pleural cavity. The sieve fractions did not have a significant effect on tumor incidence. In conclusion, administration of MWCNT to the lung in the rat induces malignant mesothelioma and lung tumors. PMID:27098557

  14. Mechanism-Based Classification of PAH Mixtures to Predict Carcinogenic Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, Susan C; Siddens, Lisbeth K; Krueger, Sharon K; Larkin, Andrew J; Löhr, Christiane V; Williams, David E; Baird, William M; Waters, Katrina M

    2015-07-01

    We have previously shown that relative potency factors and DNA adduct measurements are inadequate for predicting carcinogenicity of certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and PAH mixtures, particularly those that function through alternate pathways or exhibit greater promotional activity compared to benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). Therefore, we developed a pathway-based approach for classification of tumor outcome after dermal exposure to PAH/mixtures. FVB/N mice were exposed to dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC), BaP, or environmental PAH mixtures (Mix 1-3) following a 2-stage initiation/promotion skin tumor protocol. Resulting tumor incidence could be categorized by carcinogenic potency as DBC > BaP = Mix2 = Mix3 > Mix1 = Control, based on statistical significance. Gene expression profiles measured in skin of mice collected 12 h post-initiation were compared with tumor outcome for identification of short-term bioactivity profiles. A Bayesian integration model was utilized to identify biological pathways predictive of PAH carcinogenic potential during initiation. Integration of probability matrices from four enriched pathways (P < .05) for DNA damage, apoptosis, response to chemical stimulus, and interferon gamma signaling resulted in the highest classification accuracy with leave-one-out cross validation. This pathway-driven approach was successfully utilized to distinguish early regulatory events during initiation prognostic for tumor outcome and provides proof-of-concept for using short-term initiation studies to classify carcinogenic potential of environmental PAH mixtures. These data further provide a 'source-to-outcome' model that could be used to predict PAH interactions during tumorigenesis and provide an example of how mode-of-action-based risk assessment could be employed for environmental PAH mixtures. PMID:25908611

  15. [A new update of the SIMLII Guidelines on carcinogens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pira, Enrico; Giachino, Gian Mario; Discalzi, Gianluigi

    2011-01-01

    The second update of the Italian Society of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene (SIMLII) guidelines on Cancerogens and Mutagens, first published in 2003 and reviewed in 2007, is presented. The general setting of the guidelines remaines unmodified. In this new release some important developments on regulatory system, risk assessment, and health surveillance are discussed. The relevant evolution of the regulatory rules is illustrated in detail, with particular reference to the recent implementation in European Union and in Italy of the Regulation (EC) 1272/2008 on Classification, Labelling and Packaging of substances and mixtures. The recent tendencies of the European Scientific Committee on Occupational Exposure Limits in risk assessment, are presented. Some remarks on the use of new biomarkers in health surveillance, with reference to lung and bladder cancer, are discussed. The more recent results on the effectiveness of the use of LDTC scan on screening in asymptomatic persons at high risk for lung cancer, are presented. The use of this imaging technique in health surveillance of special group of workers (i.e., subjects with relevant past asbestos exposure and smokers) could be adopted. PMID:22073679

  16. Increased lung cancer risks are similar whether arsenic is ingested or inhaled

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Allan H; Ercumen, Ayse; Yuan, Yan; Steinmaus, Craig M.

    2009-01-01

    In 1980, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) determined there was sufficient evidence that inorganic arsenic was a human lung carcinogen based on studies involving exposure through inhalation. In 2004, IARC listed arsenic in drinking water as a cause of lung cancer, making arsenic the first substance established to cause human cancer by two unrelated pathways of exposure. It may initially seem counterintuitive that arsenic in drinking water would cause human lung cancer, an...

  17. MRI of the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich (ed.) [University Clinic Heidelberg (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2009-07-01

    For a long time, only chest X-ray and CT were used to image lung structure, while nuclear medicine was employed to assess lung function. During the past decade significant developments have been achieved in the field of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), enabling MRI to enter the clinical arena of chest imaging. Standard protocols can now be implemented on up-to-date scanners, allowing MRI to be used as a first-line imaging modality for various lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension and even lung cancer. The diagnostic benefits stem from the ability of MRI to visualize changes in lung structure while simultaneously imaging different aspects of lung function, such as perfusion, respiratory motion, ventilation and gas exchange. On this basis, novel quantitative surrogates for lung function can be obtained. This book provides a comprehensive overview of how to use MRI for imaging of lung disease. Special emphasis is placed on benign diseases requiring regular monitoring, given that it is patients with these diseases who derive the greatest benefit from the avoidance of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  18. MRI of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a long time, only chest X-ray and CT were used to image lung structure, while nuclear medicine was employed to assess lung function. During the past decade significant developments have been achieved in the field of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), enabling MRI to enter the clinical arena of chest imaging. Standard protocols can now be implemented on up-to-date scanners, allowing MRI to be used as a first-line imaging modality for various lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension and even lung cancer. The diagnostic benefits stem from the ability of MRI to visualize changes in lung structure while simultaneously imaging different aspects of lung function, such as perfusion, respiratory motion, ventilation and gas exchange. On this basis, novel quantitative surrogates for lung function can be obtained. This book provides a comprehensive overview of how to use MRI for imaging of lung disease. Special emphasis is placed on benign diseases requiring regular monitoring, given that it is patients with these diseases who derive the greatest benefit from the avoidance of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  19. Food Additives of Public Concern for their Carcinogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Gultekin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available No-Observed-Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL of food additives has been long determined on the basis of toxicological studies. Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI levels of food additives for human are derived from these NOAEL, and their legal limits are then established for the food products, intentionally added with food additives. However, recent studies demonstrated that consumption of some processed food containing certain food additives might have increased the risk of cancer in human although the legal limits of these additives in processed foods are well respected by the manufacturers. Possible reasons for increased carcinogenicity risk in processed foods containing these additives can be due to various factors: -interaction of additives with some food ingredients, -food processing may change the chemical formula of food additive to a formula to be acting similarly as carcinogenic compound, -a negative synergistic effects when combined with other additives, -improper storage conditions, and -unknown carcinogenic by-products occurring during the food processing. Due to the above mentioned factors we recommend that an additive, intentionally added to the food during processing must be traced officially for its carcinogenicity. In this review, we overviewed all of the food additives authorized in European Union. Therefore, the traceability issues of processed foods containing certain food additives, which have a negligible probability of carcinogenicity in legal limits, must be reinforced in the perspective of public health concerns.

  20. Source apportionment of the carcinogenic potential of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) associated to airborne PM10 by a PMF model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callén, M S; Iturmendi, A; López, J M; Mastral, A M

    2014-02-01

    In order to perform a study of the carcinogenic potential of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), benzo(a)pyrene equivalent (BaP-eq) concentration was calculated and modelled by a receptor model based on positive matrix factorization (PMF). Nineteen PAH associated to airborne PM10 of Zaragoza, Spain, were quantified during the sampling period 2001-2009 and used as potential variables by the PMF model. Afterwards, multiple linear regression analysis was used to quantify the potential sources of BaP-eq. Five sources were obtained as the optimal solution and vehicular emission was identified as the main carcinogenic source (35 %) followed by heavy-duty vehicles (28 %), light-oil combustion (18 %), natural gas (10 %) and coal combustion (9 %). Two of the most prevailing directions contributing to this carcinogenic character were the NE and N directions associated with a highway, industrial parks and a paper factory. The lifetime lung cancer risk exceeded the unit risk of 8.7 x 10(-5) per ng/m(3) BaP in both winter and autumn seasons and the most contributing source was the vehicular emission factor becoming an important issue in control strategies. PMID:24022101

  1. Assessment of DNA damage of Lewis lung carcinoma cells irradiated by carbon ions and X-rays using alkaline comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA damage and cell reproductive death determined by alkaline comet and clonogenic survival assays were examined in Lewis lung carcinoma cells after exposure to 89.63 MeV/u carbon ion and 6 MV X-ray irradiations, respectively. Based on the survival data, Lewis lung carcinoma cells were verified to be more radiosensitive to the carbon ion beam than to the X-ray irradiation. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) value, which was up to 1.77 at 10% survival level, showed that the DNA damage induced by the high-LET carbon ion beam was more remarkable than that induced by the low-LET X-ray irradiation. The dose response curves of 'Tail DNA (%)' (TD) and 'Olive tail moment' (OTM) for the carbon ion irradiation showed saturation beyond about 8 Gy. This behavior was not found in the X-ray curves. Additionally, the carbon ion beam produced a lower survival fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) value and a higher initial Olive tail moment 2 Gy (OTM2) than those for the X-ray irradiation. These results suggest that carbon ion beams having high-LET values produced more severe cell reproductive death and DNA damage in Lewis lung carcinoma cells in comparison with X-rays and comet assay might be an effective predictive test even combining with clonogenic assay to assess cellular radiosensitivity

  2. Assessment of DNA damage of Lewis lung carcinoma cells irradiated by carbon ions and X-rays using alkaline comet assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Zhou, Li-Bin; Jin, Xiao-Dong; He, Jing; Dai, Zhong-Ying; Zhou, Guang-Ming; Gao, Qing-Xiang; Li, Sha; Li, Qiang

    2008-01-01

    DNA damage and cell reproductive death determined by alkaline comet and clonogenic survival assays were examined in Lewis lung carcinoma cells after exposure to 89.63 MeV/u carbon ion and 6 MV X-ray irradiations, respectively. Based on the survival data, Lewis lung carcinoma cells were verified to be more radiosensitive to the carbon ion beam than to the X-ray irradiation. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) value, which was up to 1.77 at 10% survival level, showed that the DNA damage induced by the high-LET carbon ion beam was more remarkable than that induced by the low-LET X-ray irradiation. The dose response curves of “Tail DNA (%)” (TD) and “Olive tail moment” (OTM) for the carbon ion irradiation showed saturation beyond about 8 Gy. This behavior was not found in the X-ray curves. Additionally, the carbon ion beam produced a lower survival fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) value and a higher initial Olive tail moment 2 Gy (OTM2) than those for the X-ray irradiation. These results suggest that carbon ion beams having high-LET values produced more severe cell reproductive death and DNA damage in Lewis lung carcinoma cells in comparison with X-rays and comet assay might be an effective predictive test even combining with clonogenic assay to assess cellular radiosensitivity.

  3. Assessment of uncertainties in the lung activity measurement of low-energy photon emitters using Monte Carlo simulation of ICRP male thorax voxel phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of intake due to long-lived actinides by inhalation pathway is carried out by lung monitoring of the radiation workers inside totally shielded steel room using sensitive detection systems such as Phoswich and an array of HPGe detectors. In this paper, uncertainties in the lung activity estimation due to positional errors, chest wall thickness (CWT) and detector background variation are evaluated. First, calibration factors (CFs) of Phoswich and an array of three HPGe detectors are estimated by incorporating ICRP male thorax voxel phantom and detectors in Monte Carlo code 'FLUKA'. CFs are estimated for the uniform source distribution in lungs of the phantom for various photon energies. The variation in the CFs for positional errors of ±0.5, 1 and 1.5 cm in horizontal and vertical direction along the chest are studied. The positional errors are also evaluated by re-sizing the voxel phantom. Combined uncertainties are estimated at different energies using the uncertainties due to CWT, detector positioning, detector background variation of an uncontaminated adult person and counting statistics in the form of scattering factors (SFs). SFs are found to decrease with increase in energy. With HPGe array, highest SF of 1.84 is found at 18 keV. It reduces to 1.36 at 238 keV. (authors)

  4. Assessment of quality of life in patients with advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma treated with a combination of carboplatin and paclitaxel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Uanne Resende Avelino

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC is the most common type of lung cancer. Most patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage, palliative chemotherapy therefore being the only treatment option. This study was aimed at evaluating the health-related quality of life (HRQoL of advanced-stage NSCLC patients receiving palliative chemotherapy with carboplatin and paclitaxel. METHODS: This was a multiple case study of advanced-stage NSCLC outpatients receiving chemotherapy at a public hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire was used in conjunction with its supplemental lung cancer-specific module in order to assess HRQoL. RESULTS: Physical and cognitive functioning scale scores differed significantly among chemotherapy cycles, indicating improved and worsened HRQoL, respectively. The differences regarding the scores for pain, loss of appetite, chest pain, and arm/shoulder pain indicated improved HRQoL. CONCLUSIONS: Chemotherapy was found to improve certain aspects of HRQoL in patients with advanced-stage NSCLC.

  5. Assessment of Monte Carlo algorithm for compliance with RTOG 0915 dosimetric criteria in peripheral lung cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Damodar; Sood, Sumit; Badkul, Rajeev; Jiang, Hongyu; McClinton, Christopher; Lominska, Christopher; Kumar, Parvesh; Wang, Fen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate Monte Carlo-generated dose distributions with the X-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) algorithm in the treatment of peripheral lung cancer patients using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with non-protocol dose-volume normalization and to assess plan outcomes utilizing RTOG 0915 dosimetric compliance criteria. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocols for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) currently require radiation dose to be calculated using tissue density heterogeneity corrections. Dosimetric criteria of RTOG 0915 were established based on superposition/convolution or heterogeneities corrected pencil beam (PB-hete) algorithms for dose calculations. Clinically, more accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based algorithms are now routinely used for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) dose calculations. Hence, it is important to determine whether MC calculations in the delivery of lung SBRT can achieve RTOG standards. In this report, we evaluate iPlan generated MC plans for peripheral lung cancer patients treated with SBRT using dose-volume histogram (DVH) normalization to determine if the RTOG 0915 compliance criteria can be met. This study evaluated 20 Stage I-II NSCLC patients with peripherally located lung tumors, who underwent MC-based SBRT with heterogeneity correction using X-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) algorithm (Brainlab iPlan version 4.1.2). Total dose of 50 to 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions was delivered to the planning target vol-ume (PTV) with at least 95% of the PTV receiving 100% of the prescription dose (V100% ≥ 95%). The internal target volume (ITV) was delineated on maximum intensity projection (MIP) images of 4D CT scans. The PTV included the ITV plus 5 mm uniform margin applied to the ITV. The PTV ranged from 11.1 to 163.0 cc (mean = 46.1 ± 38.7 cc). Organs at risk (OARs) including ribs were delineated on mean intensity projection (MeanIP) images of 4D CT scans. Optimal clinical MC SBRT plans were

  6. Assessment of fetal lung volumes using three-dimensional ultrasonography%三维超声对胎儿肺体积的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖珍; 马小燕

    2009-01-01

    目的 应用三维超声建立不同孕周胎儿左肺、右肺及总肺体积的正常参考值范围.方法 对正常单胎妊娠16~37周324例胎儿进行肺三维超声体积扫查,采用VOCAL分析软件30°旋转法分别测定左肺及右肺体积,应用相关回归分析拟合左肺、右肺及总肺体积随孕周增长的回归方程.结果 正常妊娠胎儿左肺、右肺及总肺体积三维超声测量值均与孕周高度相关(左肺:r=0.966,P<0.001;右肺:r=0.973,P<0.001;总肺:r=0.990,P<0.001).左肺、右肺及总肺体积随孕周增长的最适方程均为指数曲线回归方程(左肺:y=0.207exp~(0.143X),右肺:y=0.301exp~(0.14X),总肺:y=0.508exp~(0.142X)).结论 三维超声测量16~37周胎儿肺体积的正常参考值为产前诊断肺发育不良提供有价值的参考指标.%Objective To build a nomogram of normal fetal lung volumes (left,right and total)throughout gestational age estimated by 3-dimensional ultrasonography.Methods Left and right lung volumes were assessed in 324 normal and singleton fetuses of gestational age 16-37 weeks by 3-dimensional ultrasonography using the technique of virtual organ computer-aided analysis(VOCAL) at a rotational step of 30 degrees.The relationships between left,right,and total lung volumes,and gestational age were assessed by correlation and regression analysis.Results The right,left,and total lung volumes were highly correlated with gestational age (P<0.001),and the correlation coefficient was 0.966,0.973 and 0.990respectively.The best-fit exponential curve regression equations of left lung volume was:y=0.207exp~(0.143X);right lung volume was:y=0.301 exp~(0.14X);total lung volume was:y=0.508 exp~(0.142X).Conclusions A nomogram of fetal lung volumes estimated by 3-dimensional ultrasonography from 16 to 37weeks gestation is described,and reference values may be useful for the prenatal prediction of pulmonary hypoplasia.

  7. Relationships between the lung-heart ratio assessed from post-exercise thallium-201 myocardial tomograms, myocardial ischemia and the extent of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uptake of thallium (Tl)-201 in the lungs has been proposed as a measure of left ventricular dysfunction. In this study we were interested in pursuing two goals: (1) to assess possible relationships between the post-exercise Tl-201 lung-heart (LH)-ratio determined from the anterior view during SPECT-acquisition, myocardial ischemia and the extent of coronary artery disease; and (2) to explore the effects of coronary revascularisation procedures on the LH-ratio. The study group consisted of 145 patients with early and late postexercise Tl-201 tomograms, including 32 PTCA-patients with pre- and post-PTCA studies and 20 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) with corresponding pre- and post-CABG studies. Ischemia was defined as evoked angina during the exercise test in combination with greater than or equal to 1 mm horizontal or downsloping ST-depression on the ECG. The severity of coronary obstructions was assessed from coronary angiograms with a PC-based digital caliper technique; a stenosis was defined to be significant when its severity exceeded 50% diameter stenosis. The LH-ratio was defined by the ratio of the mean pulmonary counts and the mean myocardial counts assessed from corresponding regions of interest (ROI's) positioned over the left lung and the heart, respectively in the anterior view of a tomographic data acquisition procedure. Our results made clear that the LH-ratio was not significantly different between patients with and without ischemia during exercise, and between patients with single vs. multiple vessel disease

  8. Lung disease assessment in primary ciliary dyskinesia: a comparison between chest high-field magnetic resonance imaging and high-resolution computed tomography findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iacotucci Paola

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD is associated with pulmonary involvement that requires periodical assessment. Chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT has become the method of choice to evaluate chronic lung disease, but entails exposure to ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been proposed as a potential radiation-free technique in several chest disorders. Aim of our study is to evaluate whether high-field MRI is as effective as HRCT in identifying PCD pulmonary abnormalities. We also analyzed the relationships between the severity and extension of lung disease, and functional data. Methods Thirteen PCD patients (8 children/5 adults; median age, 15.2 yrs underwent chest HRCT and high-field 3T MRI, spirometry, and deep throat or sputum culture. Images were scored using a modified version of the Helbich system. Results HRCT and MRI total scores were 12 (range, 6–20 and 12 (range, 5–17, respectively. Agreement between HRCT and MRI scores was good or excellent (r > 0.8. HRCT and MRI total scores were significantly related to forced vital capacity (r = -0.5, p = 0.05; and r = -0.7, p = 0.009, respectively and forced expiratory volume at 1 second (r = -0.6, p = 0.03; and r = -0.7, p = 0.009, respectively. Conclusion Chest high-field 3T MRI appears to be as effective as HRCT in assessing the extent and severity of lung abnormalities in PCD. MRI scores might be used for longitudinal assessment and be an outcome surrogate in future studies.

  9. The influence of different contrast medium concentrations and injection protocols on quantitative and clinical assessment of FDG–PET/CT in lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verburg, Frederik A., E-mail: fverburg@ukaachen.de [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P. Debyelaan 25, 6229 HX Maastricht (Netherlands); Kuhl, Christiane K. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Pietsch, Hubertus [Bayer Pharma AG, Berlin, Müllerstrasse 178, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Palmowski, Moritz [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Mottaghy, Felix M. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P. Debyelaan 25, 6229 HX Maastricht (Netherlands); Behrendt, Florian F. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    Objectives: To compare the effects of two different contrast medium concentrations for use in computed X-ray tomography (CT) employing two different injection protocols on positron emission tomography (PET) reconstruction in combined 2-{sup 18}F-desoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT in patients with a suspicion of lung cancer. Methods: 120 patients with a suspicion of lung cancer were enrolled prospectively. PET images were reconstructed with the non-enhanced and venous phase contrast CT obtained after injection of iopromide 300 mg/ml or 370 mg/ml using either a fixed-dose or a body surface area adapted injection protocol. Maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUVmax and SUVmean) and contrast enhancement (HU) were determined in the subclavian vein, ascending aorta, abdominal aorta, inferior vena cava, portal vein, liver and kidney and in the suspicious lung lesion. PET data were evaluated visually for the presence of malignancy and image quality. Results: At none of the sites a significant difference in the extent of the contrast enhancement between the four different protocols was found. However, the variability of the contrast enhancement at several anatomical sites was significantly greater in the fixed dose groups than in the BSA groups for both contrast medium concentrations. At none of the sites a significant difference was found in the extent of the SUVmax and SUVmean increase as a result of the use of the venous phase contrast enhanced CT for attenuation. Visual clinical evaluation of lesions showed no differences between contrast and non-contrast PET/CT (P = 0.32). Conclusions: Contrast enhanced CT for attenuation correction in combined PET/CT in lung cancer affects neither the clinical assessment nor image quality of the PET-images. A body surface adapted contrast medium protocol reduces the interpatient variability in contrast enhancement.

  10. The influence of different contrast medium concentrations and injection protocols on quantitative and clinical assessment of FDG–PET/CT in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To compare the effects of two different contrast medium concentrations for use in computed X-ray tomography (CT) employing two different injection protocols on positron emission tomography (PET) reconstruction in combined 2-18F-desoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT in patients with a suspicion of lung cancer. Methods: 120 patients with a suspicion of lung cancer were enrolled prospectively. PET images were reconstructed with the non-enhanced and venous phase contrast CT obtained after injection of iopromide 300 mg/ml or 370 mg/ml using either a fixed-dose or a body surface area adapted injection protocol. Maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUVmax and SUVmean) and contrast enhancement (HU) were determined in the subclavian vein, ascending aorta, abdominal aorta, inferior vena cava, portal vein, liver and kidney and in the suspicious lung lesion. PET data were evaluated visually for the presence of malignancy and image quality. Results: At none of the sites a significant difference in the extent of the contrast enhancement between the four different protocols was found. However, the variability of the contrast enhancement at several anatomical sites was significantly greater in the fixed dose groups than in the BSA groups for both contrast medium concentrations. At none of the sites a significant difference was found in the extent of the SUVmax and SUVmean increase as a result of the use of the venous phase contrast enhanced CT for attenuation. Visual clinical evaluation of lesions showed no differences between contrast and non-contrast PET/CT (P = 0.32). Conclusions: Contrast enhanced CT for attenuation correction in combined PET/CT in lung cancer affects neither the clinical assessment nor image quality of the PET-images. A body surface adapted contrast medium protocol reduces the interpatient variability in contrast enhancement

  11. Toxicity and Carcinogenicity Mechanisms of Fibrous Antigorite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Balazy

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available We studied the effects of fibrous antigorite on mesothelial MeT-5A and monocyte-macrophage J774 cell lines to further understand cellular mechanisms induced by asbestos fibers leading to lung damage and cancer. Antigorite is a mineral with asbestiform properties, which tends to associate with chrysotile or tremolite, and frequently occurs as the predominant mineral in the veins of several serpentinite rocks found abundantly in the Western Alps. Particles containing antigorite are more abundant in the breathing air of this region than those typically found in urban ambient air. Exposure of MeT-5A and J774 cells to fibrous antigorite at concentrations of 5-100 μg/ml for 72 hr induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity. Antigorite also stimulated the ROS production, induced the generation of nitrite and PGE2. MeT-5A cells were more sensitive to antigorite than J774 cells. The results of this study revealed that the fibrous antigorite stimulates cyclooxygenase and formation of hydroxyl and nitric oxide radicals. These changes represent early cellular responses to antigorite fibers, which lead to a host of pathological and neoplastic conditions because free radicals and PGE2 play important roles as mediators of tumor pathogenesis. Understanding the mechanisms of the cellular responses to antigorite and other asbestos particles should be helpful in designing rational prevention and treatment approaches.

  12. Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of ... in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  13. Lung transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung transplants are done at the same time (heart-lung transplant) if the heart is also diseased. ... people develop cancers or have problems with the heart. For most ... transplant. They have better exercise endurance and are able ...

  14. Lung transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diseases that may require a lung transplant are: Cystic fibrosis Damage to the arteries of the lung because ... BC; Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pulmonary Therapies Committee; Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Pulmonary Therapies Committee. Cystic fibrosis pulmonary guidelines: ...

  15. The OSIRIS Weight of Evidence approach: ITS mutagenicity and ITS carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buist, Harrie; Aldenberg, Tom; Batke, Monika; Escher, Sylvia; Klein Entink, Rinke; Kühne, Ralph; Marquart, Hans; Pauné, Eduard; Rorije, Emiel; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Kroese, Dinant

    2013-11-01

    Risk assessment of chemicals usually implies data evaluation of in vivo tests in rodents to conclude on their hazards. The FP7 European project OSIRIS has developed integrated testing strategies (ITS) for relevant toxicological endpoints to avoid unnecessary animal testing and thus to reduce time and costs. This paper describes the implementation of ITS mutagenicity and carcinogenicity in the public OSIRIS webtool. The data requirements of REACH formed the basis for these ITS. The main goal was to implement procedures to reach a conclusion on the adequacy and validity of available data. For the mutagenicity ITS a quantitative Weight of Evidence approach based on Bayesian statistics was developed and implemented. The approach allows an overall quality assessment of all available data for the five types of mutagenicity data requirements: in vitro bacterial mutagenicity, in vitro and in vivo chromosome aberration, in vitro and in vivo mammalian mutagenicity. For the carcinogenicity ITS a tool was developed to evaluate the quality of studies not conforming (entirely) to guidelines. In a tiered approach three quality aspects are assessed: documentation (reliability), study design (adequacy) and scope of examination (validity). The quality assessment is based on expert and data driven quantitative Weight of Evidence. PMID:23357514

  16. Gene discovery for the carcinogenic human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasser Robin B

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA – cancer of the bile ducts – is associated with chronic infection with the liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini. Despite being the only eukaryote that is designated as a 'class I carcinogen' by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, little is known about its genome. Results Approximately 5,000 randomly selected cDNAs from the adult stage of O. viverrini were characterized and accounted for 1,932 contigs, representing ~14% of the entire transcriptome, and, presently, the largest sequence dataset for any species of liver fluke. Twenty percent of contigs were assigned GO classifications. Abundantly represented protein families included those involved in physiological functions that are essential to parasitism, such as anaerobic respiration, reproduction, detoxification, surface maintenance and feeding. GO assignments were well conserved in relation to other parasitic flukes, however, some categories were over-represented in O. viverrini, such as structural and motor proteins. An assessment of evolutionary relationships showed that O. viverrini was more similar to other parasitic (Clonorchis sinensis and Schistosoma japonicum than to free-living (Schmidtea mediterranea flatworms, and 105 sequences had close homologues in both parasitic species but not in S. mediterranea. A total of 164 O. viverrini contigs contained ORFs with signal sequences, many of which were platyhelminth-specific. Examples of convergent evolution between host and parasite secreted/membrane proteins were identified as were homologues of vaccine antigens from other helminths. Finally, ORFs representing secreted proteins with known roles in tumorigenesis were identified, and these might play roles in the pathogenesis of O. viverrini-induced CCA. Conclusion This gene discovery effort for O. viverrini should expedite molecular studies of cholangiocarcinogenesis and accelerate research focused on developing new interventions

  17. Lung scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of lung scintigraphy, perfusion scintigraphy with SPECT, lung ventilation SPECT, blood pool SPECT. The procedure of lung perfusion studies, radiopharmaceutical, administration and clinical applications, imaging processing .Results encountered and evaluation criteria after Biello and Pioped. Recommendations and general considerations have been studied about relation of this radiopharmaceutical with other pathologies

  18. Transplacental carcinogenicity of inorganic arsenic in the drinking water: induction of hepatic, ovarian, pulmonary, and adrenal tumors in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic is a known human carcinogen, but development of rodent models of inorganic arsenic carcinogenesis has been problematic. Since gestation is often a period of high sensitivity to chemical carcinogenesis, we performed a transplacental carcinogenicity study in mice using inorganic arsenic. Groups (n=10) of pregnant C3H mice were given drinking water containing sodium arsenite (NaAsO2) at 0 (control), 42.5, and 85 ppm arsenite ad libitum from day 8 to 18 of gestation. These doses were well tolerated and body weights of the dams during gestation and of the offspring subsequent to birth were not reduced. Dams were allowed to give birth, and offspring were weaned at 4 weeks and then put into separate gender-based groups (n=25) according to maternal exposure level. The offspring received no additional arsenic treatment. The study lasted 74 weeks in males and 90 weeks in females. A complete necropsy was performed on all mice and tissues were examined by light microscopy in a blind fashion. In male offspring, there was a marked increase in hepatocellular carcinoma incidence in a dose- related fashion (control, 12%; 42.5 ppm, 38%; 85 ppm, 61%) and in liver tumor multiplicity (tumors per liver; 5.6-fold over control at 85 ppm). In males, there was also a dose-related increase in adrenal tumor incidence and multiplicity. In female offspring, dose-related increases occurred in ovarian tumor incidence (control, 8%; 42.5 ppm, 26%; 85 ppm, 38%) and lung carcinoma incidence (control, 0%; 42.5 ppm, 4%; 85 ppm, 21%). Arsenic exposure also increased the incidence of proliferative lesions of the uterus and oviduct. These results demonstrate that oral inorganic arsenic exposure, as a single agent, can induce tumor formation in rodents and establishes inorganic arsenic as a complete transplacental carcinogen in mice. The development of this rodent model of inorganic arsenic carcinogenesis has important implications in defining the mechanism of action for this common environmental

  19. Vinyl carbamate epoxide, a major strong electrophilic, mutagenic and carcinogenic metabolite of vinyl carbamate and ethyl carbamate (urethane).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, K K; Liem, A; Stewart, B C; Miller, J A

    1993-03-01

    Vinyl carbamate epoxide (VCO) was found to possess strong electrophilic, mutagenic and carcinogenic activities. It reacted with water at 37 degrees C and pH 7.4 (phosphate buffer) to form glycolaldehyde and several related reducing compounds; none of these products were mutagenic for Salmonella typhimurium TA1535. Under these conditions VCO had a half-life (determined chemically and mutagenically) of approximately 10.5 min. This half-life was progressively lowered by increasing concentrations of chloride ion (liver, serum and isotonic levels). This ion reacted with VCO to form chloroacetaldehyde. VCO also reacted with other nucleophiles such as glutathione, DNA and its constituent guanine and adenine bases. The purine adducts formed by VCO in DNA in vitro and in vivo were released by weak acid treatment and consisted of 7-(2'-oxoethyl)guanine and N2,3-ethenoguanine as major products with 1,N6-ethenoadenine as a minor product. VCO was a strong direct mutagen in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535 and TA100 but was only weakly active in the TA98 mutant. VCO was a stronger initiator of carcinogenesis in the skin of CD-1 mice and in the liver of infant male B6C3F1 mice than its metabolic precursors vinyl carbamate (VC) and ethyl carbamate (EC). Unlike VC and EC, VCO was a strong complete carcinogen in the skin of CD-1 mice and induced papillomas and carcinomas following repetitive administration of sub-ulcerogenic doses. VCO also exhibited some carcinogenic activity in the lungs of mice and in the s.c. and mammary tissue of female Sprague-Dawley rats. These data and those from other recent studies support the conclusion that VCO is a major strong electrophilic, mutagenic and carcinogenic metabolite of EC and VC in the mouse. PMID:8453720

  20. Current issues in carcinogenic effect of low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of publications dealing with study of radiation sources and biological evaluation of increasing doses of people irradiation under occupational and usual living conditions is presented. The existing natural and artifial irradiation sources are considered. It is noted that all types of ionizing radiations are characterized by high carcinogenic efficiency and can induce benign and malignant tumors practically in all organs. Statistically reliable data in experimental and epidemiological investigations were recorded under the effect of large and mean doses. Minor radiation doses not responsible for visible functional and morphological changes in early periods can cause pathological changes in delayed periods. The data on carcinogenic effect of relatively small radiation doses are available

  1. Environmental carcinogens in human target tissues in culture: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have accumulated more experimental evidences that demonstrated the comparative approaches with human cells will allow us to predict human risk with good accuracy following exposure to toxic chemicals. We also synthesized several carcinogenic DNA adducts, i.e., the major benzo[a]pyrene DNA adduct, 06-methyldeoxyguanosine, 7-methyl- deoxyguanosine and 2-methyl-deoxyguanosine to be used as standards for quantitating DNA adduct formation in carcinogen exposed cells. A simple synthetic method was developed for preparation of the major B[a]p DNA adduct with yields better than those reported. The main accomplishments related to the originally stated objectives are summarized. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  2. Review of carcinogenicity of asbestos and proposal of approval standards of an occupational cancer caused by asbestos in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Sanghyuk; Youn, Kan-Woo; Shin, Donghee; Lee, Myeoung-Jun; Choi, Sang-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Carcinogenicity of asbestos has been well established for decades and it has similar approval standards in most advanced countries based on a number of studies and international meetings. However, Korea has been lagging behind such international standards. In this study, we proposed the approval standards of an occupational cancer due to asbestos through intensive review on the Helsinki Criteria, post-Helsinki studies, job exposure matrix (JEM) based on the analysis of domestic reports and recognized occupational lung cancer cases in Korea. The main contents of proposed approval standards are as follows; ① In recognizing an asbestos-induced lung cancer, diagnosis of asbestosis should be based on CT. In addition, initial findings of asbestosis on CT should be considered. ② High Exposure industries and occupations to asbestos should be also taken into account in Korea ③ An expert's determination is warranted in case of a worker who has been concurrently exposed to other carcinogens, even if the asbestos exposure duration is less than 10 years. ④ Determination of a larynx cancer due to asbestos exposure has the same approval standards with an asbestos-induced lung cancer. However, for an ovarian cancer, an expert's judgment is necessary even if asbestosis, pleural plaque or pleural thickening and high concentration asbestos exposure are confirmed. ⑤ Cigarette smoking status or the extent should not affect determination of an occupational cancer caused by asbestos as smoking and asbestos have a synergistic effect in causing a lung cancer and they are involved in carcinogenesis in a complicated manner. PMID:26719804

  3. In vivo assessments of pulmonary toxicity following exposure to inhaled fibers: Utilization of bronchoalvelolar lavage (BAL) and fixed lung tissue to assess fiber deposition patterns and early cellular responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a great need for the development of a rapid and reliable short-term bioassay to evaluate the toxicity of inhaled particles and fibers. We have hypothesized that the pulmonary toxicity of particulates can be assessed by exposing animals to aerosols for short duration (1-5 days) and measuring a variety of biochemical, cellular and histopathologic endpoints at several time point postexposure. In this presentation, we have attempted to test the efficacy of our shortterm inhalation bioassay, by exposing rats to various doses of either α-quartz silica or crocidolite asbestos, known fibrogenic materials, as well as wollastonite fibers or carbonyl iron particles. Following exposures, fluids and cells from sham and dust exposed rats were recovered by lavage (BAL) and measured for enzymes, protein, cellular differentials an cytochemical analysis. Pulmonary macrophages were cultured and studied for morphology, chemotaxis and phagocytosis. The lungs of additional animals were fixed for light microscopic histopathology and autoradiography, as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy, where particle/fiber deposition and translocation were assessed. The results from biochemical and cellular studies support the conclusion that silica and crocidolite are substantially more toxic to the lungs than wollastonite or carbonyl iron, and serves to lend support to the establishment of this method as a reliable shortterm bioassay for evaluating the lung toxicity following inhalation of a variety of inhaled materials

  4. Involvement of pulmonary endothelial cell injury in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis: clinical assessment by 123I-MIBG lung scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary microvascular endothelial injury may be involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis (PF). The aim of this study was to evaluate the pulmonary vascular status in patients with PF by lung scintigraphic assessment of 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (123I-MIBG), which reflects latent endothelial cell lesions. We assessed lung 123I-MIBG kinetics and clinical indices in 23 PF patients and 16 controls. Mean uptake ratios of lung to mediastinum (L/M) were calculated in anterior planar images at 30 (early image) and 270 (delayed image) min after intravenous injection of 123I-MIBG. The pulmonary mean washout rate (WR) of 123I-MIBG was also calculated. The L/Mratio in early images, but not in delayed images, was significantly lower in the PF patients than in the controls (L/Mearly 1.41±0.14 vs 1.53±0.10, pdelayed 1.28±0.10 vs 1.33±0.07, p=NS). WR was significantly reduced in the PF patients compared with the controls (28.6%±3.1% vs 34.2%±5.1%, p123I-MIBG and other diagnostic parameters for the severity of PF, such as vital capacity (r=0.625, pCO (r=0.593, p123I-MIBG, which is a specific marker of endothelial damage, can serve as a novel diagnostic tool to evaluate the functional severity of PF. (orig.)

  5. Lung function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005200 The effect of body position changes on lung function, lung CT imaging and pathology in an oleic acid induced acute lung injury model. JI Xin-ping (戢新平), et al. Dept Emergency, 1st Affili Hosp, China Med Univ, Shenyang 110001. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis, 2005;28(1) :33-36. Objective: To study the effect of body position changes on lung mechanics, oxygenation, CT images and pathology in an oleic acid-induced acute lung injury (ALl) model. Methods: The study groups con-

  6. What Is Lung Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... starts in the lungs, it is called lung cancer. Lung cancer begins in the lungs and may spread ... lung cancer. For more information, visit the National Cancer Institute’s Lung Cancer. Previous Basic Information Basic Information Basic Information ...

  7. Brady-tachycardia syndrome after radiotherapy for lung cancer. Assessment by computed tomography and carbon-11 methionine positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 74-year-old male who had received radiotherapy (total 54 Gy) for right lung cancer 7 months earlier developed a symptomatic brady-tachycardia syndrome requiring the implantation of a permanent pacemaker. Chest CT showed a pulmonary tumor of 2-cm diameter in the right lower lobe with direct extension into the surrounding tissue, suggesting the possibility of cardiac invasion. Carbon-11 methionine positron emission tomography (PET) indicated the absence of visible invasion of the heart with lung cancer. The brady-tachycardia syndrome, therefore, was considered to be associated with sinus node injury due to radiation. Carbon-11 methionine PET metabolic imaging might play an important role in evaluating noninvasively the cause of the arrhythmia in this patient. (author)

  8. Serum alpha-antitrypsin in patients with lung cancer or abnormal sputum cytology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, C.C.; Cohen, M.H.; Connor, R.; Primack, A.; Saccomanno, G.; Talamo, R.C.

    1976-10-01

    Scrum alpha/sub 1/-antitrypsin Pi types and trypsin inhibitory capacity (TIC) were measured in 72 patients with lung cancer and in 196 patients with abnormal sputum cytology but no clinical evidence of lung cancer to determine if a genetic deficiency of alpha/sub 1/-antitrypsin (AAT) predisposes to lung cancer. The distributions of Pi types in these two groups of patients and healthy adults are similar. Serum TIC and AAT concentrations are elevated in lung cancer patients. However, patients with abnormal sputum cytology and no clinical lung cancer have normal levels of serum TIC and AAT. A genetic deficiency of AAT probably does not produce a state of increased susceptibility to the carcinogenic effects of respiratory carcinogens such as tobacco smoke.

  9. The Impact of Homogeneous Versus Heterogeneous Emphysema on Dynamic Hyperinflation in Patients With Severe COPD Assessed for Lung Volume Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Boutou, Afroditi K.; Zoumot, Zaid; Nair, Arjun; Davey, Claire; Hansell, David M; Jamurtas, Athanasios; Polkey, Michael I.; Hopkinson, Nicholas S

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dynamic hyperinflation (DH) is a pathophysiologic hallmark of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of emphysema distribution on DH during a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) in patients with severe COPD. This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data among severe COPD patients who underwent thoracic high-resolution computed tomography, full lung function measurements and maximal CPET with inspi...

  10. Poster — Thur Eve — 66: Robustness Assessment of a Novel IMRT Planning Method for Lung Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahanj, M. [Department of Physics, R