WorldWideScience

Sample records for assessing groundwater contamination

  1. A Contamination Vulnerability Assessment for the Sacramento Area Groundwater Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, J E; Hudson, G B; Eaton, G F; Leif, R

    2004-03-10

    In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as MtBE from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater-monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Ambient Groundwater Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the GAMA Program is to assess the water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey, the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement the groundwater assessment program in cooperation with local water purveyors. In 2001 and 2002, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the groundwater basin of Sacramento suburban area, located to the north of the American River and to the east of the Sacramento River. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3

  2. Nitrate contamination risk assessment in groundwater at regional scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniela, Ducci

    2016-04-01

    Nitrate groundwater contamination is widespread in the world, due to the intensive use of fertilizers, to the leaking from the sewage network and to the presence of old septic systems. This research presents a methodology for groundwater contamination risk assessment using thematic maps derived mainly from the land-use map and from statistical data available at the national institutes of statistic (especially demographic and environmental data). The potential nitrate contamination is considered as deriving from three sources: agricultural, urban and periurban. The first one is related to the use of fertilizers. For this reason the land-use map is re-classified on the basis of the crop requirements in terms of fertilizers. The urban source is the possibility of leaks from the sewage network and, consequently, is linked to the anthropogenic pressure, expressed by the population density, weighted on the basis of the mapped urbanized areas of the municipality. The periurban sources include the un-sewered areas, especially present in the periurban context, where illegal sewage connections coexist with on-site sewage disposal (cesspools, septic tanks and pit latrines). The potential nitrate contamination map is produced by overlaying the agricultural, urban and periurban maps. The map combination process is very easy, being an algebraic combination: the output values are the arithmetic average of the input values. The groundwater vulnerability to contamination can be assessed using parametric methods, like DRASTIC or easier, like AVI (that involves a limited numbers of parameters). In most of cases, previous documents produced at regional level can be used. The pollution risk map is obtained by combining the thematic maps of the potential nitrate contamination map and the groundwater contamination vulnerability map. The criterion for the linkages of the different GIS layers is very easy, corresponding to an algebraic combination. The methodology has been successfully

  3. Emerging contaminants in groundwater: occurrence and risk assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, Marianne; Lapworth, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Emerging groundwater contaminants (EGCs) are compounds previously not considered or known to be significant (in terms of distribution and/or concentration) but now being more widely detected. As analytical techniques improve, previously undetected micropollutants are observed. There is a paucity of information regarding EGC occurrence in groundwaters compared to surface waters. The types of organic micropollutants which can be found include, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, caffeine and nicotin...

  4. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Gunnison, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This is the second risk assessment of groundwater contamination at this site. The first risk assessment was performed primarily to evaluate existing domestic wells to determine the potential for immediate human health and environmental impacts. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated groundwater that flows beneath the processing site towards the Gunnison River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentration of most contaminants are used in this risk assessment. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site after the tailings are relocated. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the groundwater are cadmium, cobalt, iron, manganese, sulfate, uranium, and some of the products of radioactive decay of uranium

  5. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Gunnison, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Groundwater Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site Near Gunnison, Colorado evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This is the second risk assessment of groundwater contamination at this site. The first risk assessment was performed primarily to evaluate existing domestic wells. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated monitor wells at the processing site. It will be used to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site after the tailings are relocated. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the groundwater are cadmium, cobalt, iron, manganese, sulfate, uranium, and some of the products of radioactive decay of uranium

  6. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Gunnison, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Groundwater Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site Near Gunnison, Colorado evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This is the second risk assessment of groundwater contamination at this site. The first risk assessment was performed primarily to evaluate existing domestic wells. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated monitor wells at the processing site. It will be used to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site after the tailings are relocated. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the groundwater are cadmium, cobalt, iron, manganese, sulfate, uranium, and some of the products of radioactive decay of uranium.

  7. Assessing groundwater surface water interaction and groundwater discharge in a contaminated site in an industrial, sub-urbanized area

    OpenAIRE

    Batlle-Aguilar, Jordi; Brouyère, Serge

    2007-01-01

    A contaminated site related to a former coke factory, located in the alluvial plain of the Meuse River near Liège was investigated to characterize the nature and extend of underground contamination. The major objective of the investigation was to evaluate whether an interaction exists, at the level of this particular site, between groundwater and surface water, despite the existence of river embankment, to assess the dynamics of such interactions and finally to quantify groundwater fluxes as ...

  8. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Shiprock, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell on the site in 1986 by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Groundwater Project. This risk assessment follows the approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the floodplain groundwater are arsenic, magnesium, manganese, nitrate, sodium, sulfate, and uranium. The complete list of contaminants associated with the terrace groundwater could not be determined due to the lack of the background groundwater quality data. However, uranium, nitrate, and sulfate are evaluated since these chemicals are clearly associated with uranium processing and are highly elevated compared to regional waters. It also could not be determined if the groundwater occurring in the terrace is a usable water resource, since it appears to have originated largely from past milling operations. The next step in the risk assessment is to estimate how much of these contaminants people would be exposed to if a drinking well were installed in the contaminated groundwater or if there were exposure to surface expressions of contaminated water. Potential exposures to surface water include incidental contact with contaminated water or sediments by children playing on the floodplain and consumption of meat and milk from domestic animals grazed and watered on the floodplain

  9. Baseline risk assessment for groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Monument Valley, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site near Monument Valley, Arizona. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being relocated and stabilized in a disposal cell at Mexican Hat, Utah, through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The tailings removal is planned for completion by spring 1994. After the tailings are removed, groundwater contamination at the site will continue to be evaluated. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Groundwater Project. It will be used to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site

  10. Proceedings of hydrocarbon contaminated soils and groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book reports on hydrogen contaminated soils and groundwater. Topics covered include: perspectives on hydrocarbon contamination; emerging hydrocarbon contamination issues; analytical methodologies and site assessment for hydrocarbon contaminated soils and groundwater; environmental fate and modeling; remedial technologies for hydrocarbon contaminated soils and groundwater; and risk assessment and risk management

  11. A Contamination Vulnerability Assessment for the Santa Clara and San Mateo County Groundwater Basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as MtBE from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater-monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Ambient Groundwater Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the GAMA Program is to assess the water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey, the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement this groundwater assessment program. In 2001 and 2002, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the groundwater basins of Santa Clara County and San Mateo County, located to the south of the city of San Francisco. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3 method). In addition, stable oxygen isotope measurements

  12. A Contamination Vulnerability Assessment for the Santa Clara and San Mateo County Groundwater Basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, J E; Hudson, G B; Eaton, G F; Leif, R

    2004-01-06

    In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as MtBE from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater-monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Ambient Groundwater Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the GAMA Program is to assess the water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey, the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement this groundwater assessment program. In 2001 and 2002, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the groundwater basins of Santa Clara County and San Mateo County, located to the south of the city of San Francisco. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3 method). In addition, stable oxygen isotope measurements

  13. Establishing indices for groundwater contamination risk assessment in the vicinity of hazardous waste landfills in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater contamination by leachate is the most damaging environmental impact over the entire life of a hazardous waste landfill (HWL). With the number of HWL facilities in China rapidly increasing, and considering the poor status of environmental risk management, it is imperative that effective environmental risk management methods be implemented. A risk assessment indices system for HWL groundwater contamination is here proposed, which can simplify the risk assessment procedure and make it more user-friendly. The assessment framework and indices were drawn from five aspects: source term, underground media, leachate properties, risk receptors and landfill management quality, and a risk assessment indices system consisting of 38 cardinal indicators was established. Comparison with multimedia models revealed that the proposed indices system was integrated and quantitative, that input data for it could be easily collected, and that it could be widely used for environmental risk assessment (ERA) in China. - Highlights: ► No comprehensive environmental risk assessment method for hazardous waste management is proposed in China. ► An assessment indices system is established for groundwater contamination in the vicinity of hazardous waste landfill. ► All indicators are quantitative and applicable in China. - Capsule: This research identified critical indices and established a system for environmental risk assessment for groundwater contamination in the vicinity of HWLs in China.

  14. Integrated modelling for assessing the risk of TCE groundwater contamination to human and surface water ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKnight, Ursula S.; Funder, Simon Goltermann; Finkel, Michael; Binning, Philip John; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    2009-01-01

    The practical implementation of the European Water Framework Directive has resulted in an increased focus on the groundwater-surface water interaction zone. Due to increasing global exploitation of both stream water and groundwater resources, a better awareness of the connections between these two...... management tools designed to work with sparse data sets from preliminary site assessments are needed which can explicitly link contaminant point sources with groundwater, surface water and ecological impacts. Here, a novel integrated modelling approach was employed for evaluating the impact of a TCE...... systems and the roles they play in maintaining water quality is essential, as well as on how human activities may impair them. A gap exists with respect to preliminary assessment methodologies that are capable of evaluating and prioritising point sources of contamination. In particular, adaptive...

  15. Assessment of groundwater contamination from a hazardous dump site in Ranipet, Tamil Nadu, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, G. Tamma; Rao, V. V. S. Gurunadha; Ranganathan, K.; Surinaidu, L.; Mahesh, J.; Ramesh, G.

    2011-12-01

    Tanneries located in an industrial development area of Ranipet (India) manufactured chromate chemicals during 1976-1996. A large quantity of associated hazardous solid wastes has been stacked about 5-m high above ground level, spread over 3.5 ha inside one of the factory premises. The study area receives an average annual rainfall of 1,100 mm. The granitic formation in the northern part of Palar River catchment has high infiltration rates and has resulted in fast migration of the contamination to the water table. Chromium levels in the groundwater were found up to 275 mg/l. The available hydrogeological, geophysical and groundwater quality data bases have been used to construct a groundwater flow and mass transport model for assessing the groundwater contamination and it has been calibrated for the next 30 years. The migration has been found to be very slow, with a groundwater velocity of 10 m/year. This is the first field-scale study of its kind in this industrial area. The findings are of relevance to addressing the groundwater pollution due to indiscriminate disposal practices of hazardous waste in areas located on the phreatic aquifer. Further, it has been reported that the untreated effluent discharge adjacent to the chromium dump site is most influential in the migration of contaminants.

  16. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Gunnison, Colorado. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    This report evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This is the second risk assessment of groundwater contamination at this site. The first risk assessment was performed primarily to evaluate existing domestic wells to determine the potential for immediate human health and environmental impacts. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated groundwater that flows beneath the processing site towards the Gunnison River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentration of most contaminants are used in this risk assessment. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site after the tailings are relocated. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the groundwater are cadmium, cobalt, iron, manganese, sulfate, uranium, and some of the products of radioactive decay of uranium.

  17. Isotope hydrology: Investigating groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater quality has worsened in many regions, with sometimes serious consequences. Decontaminating groundwater is an extremely slow process, and sometimes impossible, because of the generally long residence time of the water in most geological formations. Major causes of contamination are poor groundwater management (often dictated by immediate social needs) and the lack of regulations and control over the use and disposal of contaminants. These types of problems have prompted an increasing demand for investigations directed at gaining insight into the behaviour of contaminants in the hydrological cycle. Major objectives are to prevent pollution and degradation of groundwater resources, or, if contamination already has occurred, to identify its origin so that remedies can be proposed. Environmental isotopes have proved to be a powerful tool for groundwater pollution studies. The IAEA has had a co-ordinated research programme since 1987 on the application of nuclear techniques to determine the transport of contaminants in groundwater. An isotope hydrology project is being launched within the framework of the IAEA's regional co-operative programme in Latin America (known as ARCAL). Main objectives are the application of environmental isotopes to problems of groundwater assessment and contamination in Latin America. In 1989, another co-ordinated research programme is planned under which isotopic and other tracers will be used for the validation of mathematical models in groundwater transport studies

  18. A national-scale assessment of micro-organic contaminants in groundwater of England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manamsa, Katya; Crane, Emily; Stuart, Marianne; Talbot, John; Lapworth, Dan; Hart, Alwyn

    2016-10-15

    A large variety of micro-organic (MO) compounds is used in huge quantities for a range of purposes (e.g. manufacturing, food production, healthcare) and is now being frequently detected in the aquatic environment. Interest in the occurrence of MO contaminants in the terrestrial and aquatic environments continues to grow, as well as in their environmental fate and potential toxicity. However, the contamination of groundwater resources by MOs has a limited evidence base compared to other freshwater resources. Of particular concern are newly 'emerging contaminants' such as pharmaceuticals and lifestyle compounds, particularly those with potential endocrine disrupting properties. While groundwater often has a high degree of protection from pollution due to physical, chemical and biological attenuation processes in the subsurface compared to surface aquatic environments, trace concentrations of a large range of compounds are still detected in groundwater and in some cases may persist for decades due to the long residence times of groundwater systems. This study provides the first national-scale assessment of micro-organic compounds in groundwater in England and Wales. A large set of monitoring data was analysed to determine the relative occurrence and detected concentrations of different groups of compounds and to determine relationships with land-use, aquifer type and groundwater vulnerability. MOs detected including emerging compounds such as caffeine, DEET, bisphenol A, anti-microbial agents and pharmaceuticals as well as a range of legacy contaminants including chlorinated solvents and THMs, petroleum hydrocarbons, pesticides and other industrial compounds. There are clear differences in MOs between land-use types, particularly for urban-industrial and natural land-use. Temporal trends of MO occurrence are assessed but establishing long-term trends is not yet possible. PMID:27073165

  19. Toxicological and chemical assessment of arsenic-contaminated groundwater after electrochemical and advanced oxidation treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radić, Sandra; Crnojević, Helena; Vujčić, Valerija; Gajski, Goran; Gerić, Marko; Cvetković, Želimira; Petra, Cvjetko; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera; Oreščanin, Višnja

    2016-02-01

    Owing to its proven toxicity and mutagenicity, arsenic is regarded a principal pollutant in water used for drinking. The objective of this study was the toxicological and chemical evaluation of groundwater samples obtained from arsenic enriched drinking water wells before and after electrochemical and ozone-UV-H2O2-based advanced oxidation processes (EAOP). For this purpose, acute toxicity test with Daphnia magna and chronic toxicity test with Lemna minor L. were employed as well as in vitro bioassays using human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs). Several oxidative stress parameters were estimated in L.minor. Physicochemical analysis showed that EAOP treatment was highly efficient in arsenic but also in ammonia and organic compound removal from contaminated groundwater. Untreated groundwater caused only slight toxicity to HPBLs and D. magna in acute experiments. However, 7-day exposure of L. minor to raw groundwater elicited genotoxicity, a significant growth inhibition and oxidative stress injury. The observed genotoxicity and toxicity of raw groundwater samples was almost completely eliminated by EAOP treatment. Generally, the results obtained with L. minor were in agreement with those obtained in the chemical analysis suggesting the sensitivity of the model organism in monitoring of arsenic-contaminated groundwater. In parallel to chemical analysis, the implementation of chronic toxicity bioassays in a battery is recommended in the assessment of the toxic and genotoxic potential of such complex mixtures. PMID:26580737

  20. Rapid Analysis of Eukaryotic Bioluminescence to Assess Potential Groundwater Contamination Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacariah L. Hildenbrand

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we present data using a bioluminescent dinoflagellate, Pyrocystis lunula, in a toxicological bioassay to rapidly assess potential instances of groundwater contamination associated with natural gas extraction. P. lunula bioluminescence can be quantified using spectrophotometry as a measurement of organismal viability, with normal bioluminescent output declining with increasing concentration(s of aqueous toxicants. Glutaraldehyde and hydrochloric acid (HCl, components used in hydraulic fracturing and shale acidization, triggered significant toxicological responses in as little as 4 h. Conversely, P. lunula was not affected by the presence of arsenic, selenium, barium, and strontium, naturally occurring heavy metal ions potentially associated with unconventional drilling activities. If exogenous compounds, such as glutaraldehyde and HCl, are thought to have been introduced into groundwater, quantification of P. lunula bioluminescence after exposure to water samples can serve as a cost-effective detection and risk assessment tool to rapidly assess the impact of putative contamination events attributed to unconventional drilling activity.

  1. Logistic regression modeling to assess groundwater vulnerability to contamination in Hawaii, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, Alan; El-Kadi, Aly I.

    2013-10-01

    Capture zone analysis combined with a subjective susceptibility index is currently used in Hawaii to assess vulnerability to contamination of drinking water sources derived from groundwater. In this study, we developed an alternative objective approach that combines well capture zones with multiple-variable logistic regression (LR) modeling and applied it to the highly-utilized Pearl Harbor and Honolulu aquifers on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Input for the LR models utilized explanatory variables based on hydrogeology, land use, and well geometry/location. A suite of 11 target contaminants detected in the region, including elevated nitrate (> 1 mg/L), four chlorinated solvents, four agricultural fumigants, and two pesticides, was used to develop the models. We then tested the ability of the new approach to accurately separate groups of wells with low and high vulnerability, and the suitability of nitrate as an indicator of other types of contamination. Our results produced contaminant-specific LR models that accurately identified groups of wells with the lowest/highest reported detections and the lowest/highest nitrate concentrations. Current and former agricultural land uses were identified as significant explanatory variables for eight of the 11 target contaminants, while elevated nitrate was a significant variable for five contaminants. The utility of the combined approach is contingent on the availability of hydrologic and chemical monitoring data for calibrating groundwater and LR models. Application of the approach using a reference site with sufficient data could help identify key variables in areas with similar hydrogeology and land use but limited data. In addition, elevated nitrate may also be a suitable indicator of groundwater contamination in areas with limited data. The objective LR modeling approach developed in this study is flexible enough to address a wide range of contaminants and represents a suitable addition to the current subjective approach.

  2. Groundwater Nitrate Contamination Risk Assessment: A Comparison of Parametric Systems and Simulation Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Sacco

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater nitrate contamination is a source of rising concern that has been faced through the introduction of several regulations in different countries. However the methodologies used in the definition of Nitrate Vulnerable Zones are not included in the regulations. The aim of this work was to compare different methodologies, used to asses groundwater nitrate contamination risks, based on parametric systems or simulation modelling. The work was carried out in Piedmont, Italy, in an area characterised by intensive animal husbandry, high N load, a shallow water table and a coarse type of sub-soil sediments. Only N loads from agricultural non-point sources were considered. Different methodologies with different level of information have been compared to determine the groundwater nitrate contamination risk assessment: N load, IPNOA index, the intrinsic contamination risk from nitrates, leached N and N concentration of the soil solution estimated by the simulation model. The good correlation between the IPNOA index and the intrinsic nitrate contamination risk revealed that the parameters that describe the soil in this area did not lead to a different classification of the parcels. The intrinsic nitrate contamination risk was greatly influenced by N fertilisation, however the effect of the soils increased the variability in comparison to the IPNOA index. The leached N and N concentration in the leaching were closely correlated. The dilution effect of percolated water was almost negligible. Both methodologies were slightly correlated to the N fertilisation and the two indexes. The correlations related to the intrinsic nitrate contamination risk was higher than those related to IPNOA, and this means that the effect of taking into account soil parameters increases the correlation to the prediction of the simulation model.

  3. Integrated modelling for assessing the risk of TCE groundwater contamination to human and surface water ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKnight, Ursula S.; Funder, Simon Goltermann; Finkel, Michael;

    2009-01-01

    management tools designed to work with sparse data sets from preliminary site assessments are needed which can explicitly link contaminant point sources with groundwater, surface water and ecological impacts. Here, a novel integrated modelling approach was employed for evaluating the impact of a TCE....... The model is tested on a Danish case study involving a 750 m long TCE groundwater plume discharging into a stream. Although little data exists regarding the source zone, measured TCE concentrations (in the mgL-1 range) reveal the presence of separate phase of contaminant and show that the source will...... not be depleted for many decades. However, measured and future predicted TCE concentrations in surface water were found to be below human health risk management targets. Volatilization was found to rapidly attenuate TCE concentrations in the surface water. Thus, only a 300 m stream reach failed to...

  4. Groundwater contamination in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tase, Norio

    1992-07-01

    Problems on groundwater contamination in Japan are briefly summarized in this paper. Although normal physical conditions in Japan restrict the possibilities of groundwater contamination, human activities are threatening groundwater resources. A survey by the Environment Agency of Japan showed nationwide spreading of organic substances, such as trichloroethylene as well as nitrogen compounds. Synthetic detergents have also been detected even in rural areas and in deep confined aquifers, although their concentrations are not as high. Public awareness of agrichemical or pesticides abuse, especially from golf courses, is apparent. Other problems such as nitrate-nitrogen, leachate from landfills, and the leaking of underground storage tanks are also discussed.

  5. Contaminated site risk and uncertainty assessment for impacts on surface and groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Nanna Isbak

    sites. In a conventional risk assessment of a contaminated site, risk is evaluated by assessing whether a concentration guideline is exceeded at a specific point of compliance in the water resource of interest. If the guideline is exceeded, it is concluded that the site poses a risk. However...... and samples collected in traditional groundwater boreholes. The detailed investigation revealed considerable variation in source composition, source strength and redox parameters. The variation was caused by the complex clay till geology and the heterogeneous nature of the landfill source. The impact on Risby......). This demonstrates that the method is flexible and that the beliefs can be assessed based on different types and levels of detail in the data. This work has addressed some important challenges in contaminated sites risk assessment and made great advances. These advances are now being applied by regulatory...

  6. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Shiprock, New Mexico. Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This report evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell on the site in 1986 by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Groundwater Project. This risk assessment follows the approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the floodplain groundwater are arsenic, magnesium, manganese, nitrate, sodium, sulfate, and uranium. The complete list of contaminants associated with the terrace groundwater could not be determined due to the lack of the background groundwater quality data. However, uranium, nitrate, and sulfate are evaluated since these chemicals are clearly associated with uranium processing and are highly elevated compared to regional waters. It also could not be determined if the groundwater occurring in the terrace is a usable water resource, since it appears to have originated largely from past milling operations. The next step in the risk assessment is to estimate how much of these contaminants people would be exposed to if a drinking well were installed in the contaminated groundwater or if there were exposure to surface expressions of contaminated water. Potential exposures to surface water include incidental contact with contaminated water or sediments by children playing on the floodplain and consumption of meat and milk from domestic animals grazed and watered on the floodplain.

  7. Baseline risk assessment for groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Monument Valley, Arizona. Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site near Monument Valley, Arizona. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being relocated and stabilized in a disposal cell at Mexican Hat, Utah, through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The tailings removal is planned for completion by spring 1994. After the tailings are removed, groundwater contamination at the site will continue to be evaluated. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Groundwater Project. It will be used to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site.

  8. Water use and groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general review of the groundwater resources in Saskatchewan and their vulnerability to contamination was provided. In particular, the use of water and the effects on water by the oil and gas industry in Saskatchewan were discussed. It was suggested that public concerns over scarcity and contamination of water are gradually changing perceptions about Canada's abundance of water. Saskatchewan's surface water covers 12 per cent of the province. About 90 per cent of the rural populations and 80 per cent of municipalities depend on groundwater supplies. Regulations affecting oil and gas operations that could affect water resources have become more stringent. Techniques used in the detection and monitoring of groundwater affected by salt and petroleum hydrocarbons were described. Electromagnetic surveys are used in detecting salt-affected soils and groundwater. Laboratory analysis of chloride concentrations are needed to define actual chloride concentrations in groundwater. Wells and barriers can be installed to control and recover chloride plumes. Deep well injection and reverse osmosis are other methods, but there is no cheap or simple treatment or disposal method for salt-impacted groundwater. Spills or leaks of petroleum hydrocarbons from various sources can also lead to contamination of groundwater. Various assessment and remediation methods are described. Although there is no scarcity of techniques, all of them are difficult, costly, and may take several years to complete. 11 refs., 1 tab

  9. Biosensor-based diagnostics of contaminated groundwater: assessment and remediation strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shallow groundwater beneath a former airfield site in southern England has been heavily contaminated with a wide range of chlorinated solvents. The feasibility of using bacterial biosensors to complement chemical analysis and enable cost-effective, and focussed sampling has been assessed as part of a site evaluation programme. Five different biosensors, three metabolic (Vibrio fischeri, Pseudomonas fluorescens 10568 and Escherichia coli HB101) and two catabolic (Pseudomonas putida TVA8 and E. coli DH5α), were employed to identify areas where the availability and toxicity of pollutants is of most immediate environmental concern. The biosensors used showed different sensitivities to each other and to the groundwater samples tested. There was generally a good agreement with chemical analyses. The potential efficacy of remediation strategies was explored by coupling sample manipulation to biosensor tests. Manipulation involved sparging and charcoal treatment procedures to simulate remediative engineering solutions. Sparging was sufficient at most locations. - Luminescent bacteria complement chemical analysis and support remediation technology

  10. Groundwater contamination and risk assessment of industrial complex in Busan Metropolitan City, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, S.-Y.; Ryu, S. M.; Cheong, J.-Y.; Woo, Y.-J.

    2003-04-01

    In Korea, the potential of groundwater contamination in urban areas is increasing by industrial and domestic waste waters, leakage from oil storage tanks and sewage drains, leachate from municipal landfill sites and so on. Nowadays, chlorinated organic compounds such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), which are driving residential area as well as industrial area, are recognized as major hazardous contaminants. As well known, TCE is wisely used industrial activities such as degreasing, metal stripping, chemical manufacturing, pesticide production, coal gasification plants, creosote operation, and also used in automobile service centers, photo shops and laundries as cleaning solvent. Thus, groundwater protection in urban areas is important issue in Korea This study is to understand groundwater quality and contamination characteristics and to estimate risk assessment in Sasang industrial complex, Busan Metropolitan City. Busan Metropolitan City is located on southeastern coast of the Korean peninsula and is the second largest city in South Korea with a population of 3.8 millions. The geology of the study area is composed of andesite, andesitic tuff, biotite granite and alluvium (Kim et al., 1998). However, geology cannot be identified on the surface due to pavement and buildings. According to drill logs in the study area, the geologic section consists in landfill, fine sand, clay, gravelly clay, and biotite granite from the surface. Biotite granite appears 5.5- 6 m depth. Groundwater samples were collected at twenty sites in Sasang industrial complex. The groundwater samples are plotted on Piper's trilinear diagram, which indicates Ca-Cl2 type. The groundwater may be influenced by salt water because Sasang industrial complex is located near the mouse of Nakdong river that flows to the South Sea. The Ca-Cl2 water type may be partly influenced by anthropogenic contamination in the study area, since water type in granite area generally belongs Ca

  11. Emerging contaminants in groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, M.E.; Manamsa, K.; J. C. Talbot; Crane, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    The term ‘emerging contaminants’ is generally used to refer to compounds previously not considered or known to be significant to groundwater (in terms of distribution and/or concentration) which are now being more widely detected. As analytical techniques improve, previously undetected organic micropollutants are being observed in the aqueous environment. Many emerging contaminants remain unregulated, but the number of regulated contaminants will continue to grow slowly over th...

  12. Assessment of ground-water contamination from a leaking underground storage tank at a defense supply center near Richmond, Virginia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1988-89, 24 wells were installed in the vicinity of the post-exchange gasoline station on the Defense General Supply Center, near Richmond, Virginia, to collect and analyze groundwater samples for the presence of gasoline contamination from a leaking underground storage tank. Concentrations of total petroleum hydrocarbons and benzene were as high as 8.2 mg/L and 9,000 microg/L, respectively, in water from wells in the immediate vicinity of the former leaking tank, and benzene concentrations were as high as 2,300 microg/L in a well 600 ft down gradient from the gasoline station. Groundwater flow rate are estimated to be about 60 to 80 ft/yr; on the basis of these flow rates, the contaminants may have been introduced into the groundwater as long as 7-10 yrs ago. Groundwater might infiltrate a subsurface storm sewer, where the sewer is below the water table, and discharge into a nearby stream. Preliminary risk assessment for the site identified no potential human receptors to the groundwater contamination because there were no groundwater users identified in the area. Remediation might be appropriate if exposure of future potential users is concern. Alternatives discussed for remediation of groundwater contamination in the upper aquifer at the PX Service Station include no-action, soil vapor extraction, and groundwater pumping and treatment alternatives

  13. Assessing Fecal Contamination in Groundwater from the Tulum Region, Quintana Roo, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa Ma. Leal-Bautista; Melissa Lenczewski; Cheyenne Morgan; Amy Gahala; McLain, Jean E.

    2013-01-01

    The Yucatan Peninsula’s groundwater is experiencing increases in degradation due to swelling population and tourism; yet little is known about sources and transport of contaminants in drinking water supplies. The karst allows for rapid transport of microbial and chemical contaminants to the subsurface, resulting in significantly increased potential for pollution of groundwater. The objective of this research is to determine the occurrence, source, and extent of fecal co...

  14. Assessment of in situ biodegradation of monochlorobenzene in contaminated groundwater treated in a constructed wetland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degradation of monochlorobenzene (MCB) was assessed in a constructed wetland treating MCB contaminated groundwater using a detailed geochemical characterisation, stable isotope composition analysis and in situ microcosm experiments. A correlation between ferrous iron mobilisation, decreasing MCB concentration and enrichment in carbon isotope composition was visible at increasing distance from the inflow point, indicating biodegradation of MCB in the wetland. Additionally, in situ microcosm systems loaded with 13C-labelled MCB were deployed for the first time in sediments to investigate the biotransformation of MCB. Incorporation of 13C-labelled carbon derived from the MCB into bacterial fatty acids substantiated in situ degradation of MCB. The detection of 13C-labelled benzene indicated reductive dehalogenation of MCB. This integrated approach indicated the natural attenuation of the MCB in a wetland system. Further investigations are required to document and optimise the in situ biodegradation of MCB in constructed and natural wetland systems treating contaminated groundwater. - An integrated approach including isotope composition analysis and in situ microcosm experiments provided evidences for in situ biodegradation of MCB in a wetland system

  15. Assessment of in situ biodegradation of monochlorobenzene in contaminated groundwater treated in a constructed wetland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braeckevelt, Mareike [Departments of Bioremediation, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Permoserstrasse 15, Leipzig D-04318, Saxonia (Germany); Rokadia, Hemal [Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Permoserstrasse 15, Leipzig D-04318, Saxonia (Germany); Imfeld, Gwenael [Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Permoserstrasse 15, Leipzig D-04318, Saxonia (Germany)]. E-mail: gwenael.imfeld@ufz.de; Stelzer, Nicole [Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Permoserstrasse 15, Leipzig D-04318, Saxonia (Germany); Paschke, Heidrun [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Permoserstrasse 15, Leipzig D-04318, Saxonia (Germany); Kuschk, Peter [Departments of Bioremediation, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Permoserstrasse 15, Leipzig D-04318, Saxonia (Germany); Kaestner, Matthias [Departments of Bioremediation, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Permoserstrasse 15, Leipzig D-04318, Saxonia (Germany); Richnow, Hans-H. [Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Permoserstrasse 15, Leipzig D-04318, Saxonia (Germany); Weber, Stefanie [Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Permoserstrasse 15, Leipzig D-04318, Saxonia (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    The degradation of monochlorobenzene (MCB) was assessed in a constructed wetland treating MCB contaminated groundwater using a detailed geochemical characterisation, stable isotope composition analysis and in situ microcosm experiments. A correlation between ferrous iron mobilisation, decreasing MCB concentration and enrichment in carbon isotope composition was visible at increasing distance from the inflow point, indicating biodegradation of MCB in the wetland. Additionally, in situ microcosm systems loaded with {sup 13}C-labelled MCB were deployed for the first time in sediments to investigate the biotransformation of MCB. Incorporation of {sup 13}C-labelled carbon derived from the MCB into bacterial fatty acids substantiated in situ degradation of MCB. The detection of {sup 13}C-labelled benzene indicated reductive dehalogenation of MCB. This integrated approach indicated the natural attenuation of the MCB in a wetland system. Further investigations are required to document and optimise the in situ biodegradation of MCB in constructed and natural wetland systems treating contaminated groundwater. - An integrated approach including isotope composition analysis and in situ microcosm experiments provided evidences for in situ biodegradation of MCB in a wetland system.

  16. A Stochastic Approach To Human Health Risk Assessment Due To Groundwater Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, F. P.; Rubin, Y.

    2006-12-01

    We present a probabilistic framework to addressing adverse human health effects due to groundwater contamination. One of the main challenges in health risk assessment is in relating it to subsurface data acquisition and to improvement in our understanding of human physiological responses to contamination. In this paper we propose to investigate this problem through an approach that integrates flow, transport and human health risk models with hydrogeological characterization. A human health risk cumulative distribution function is analytically developed to account for both uncertainty and variability in hydrogeological as well as human physiological parameters. With our proposed approach, we investigate under which conditions the reduction of uncertainties from flow physics, human physiology and exposure related parameters might contribute to a better understanding of human health risk assessment. Results indicate that the human health risk cumulative distribution function is sensitive to physiological parameters at low risk values associated with longer travel times. The results show that the worth of hydrogeological characterization in human health risk is dependent on the residence time of the contaminant plume in the aquifer and on the exposure duration of the population to certain chemicals.

  17. [Construction of groundwater contamination prevention mapping system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Jie; He, Jiang-Tao; Lu, Yan; Liu, Li-Ya; Zhang, Xiao-Liang

    2012-09-01

    Groundwater contamination prevention mapping is an important component of groundwater contamination geological survey and assessment work, which could provide the basis for making and implementing groundwater contamination prevention planning. A groundwater contamination prevention mapping system was constructed in view of the synthetic consideration on nature perspective derived from groundwater contamination sources and aquifer itself, social-economic perspective, policy perspective derived from outside. During the system construction process, analytic hierarchy process and relevant overlaying principles were used to couple groundwater contamination risk assessment, groundwater value as well as wellhead protection area zoning. Data processing and visualization of mapping results were achieved in the GIS environment. The research on groundwater contamination prevention mapping in Beijing Plain indicated that the final groundwater prevention map was in accordance with the actual conditions and well reflected the priorities of groundwater prevention, which could play a guidance role in designing and implementing further practical prevention and supervision measures. Besides, because of the dynamical properties of the system components, it was suggested to analyze the update frequency of the mapping. PMID:23243867

  18. Improving Modeling of Iodine-129 Groundwater Contamination Plumes Using the System Assessment Capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Years of production of radioactive materials at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State has resulted in contamination of surface, subsurface, and surface water environments. Cleanup of the site has been aided by various tools, including computer software used to predict contaminant migration in the future and estimate subsequent impacts. The System Assessment Capability (SAC) is a total systems tool designed to simulate the movement of contaminants from all waste sites at Hanford through the vadose zone, the unconfined aquifer, and the Columbia River. Except for iodine-129, most of the contaminants modeled by SAC have acceptably matched field measurements. The two most likely reasons for the inconsistency between the measured field data and SAC modeled predictions are an underestimated inventory and an overestimated sorption value (Kd). Field data tend to be point measurements taken from near the surface of the unconfined aquifer. Thus, the depth of the iodine-129 contamination plume on the site is not well characterized. Geostatistical analyses of the measured data were conducted to determine the mass of iodine-129 for four assumed plume depths within the unconfined aquifer. Several simulations for two different Kd's using the initial SAC inventory were run to determine the effect of an overestimated sorption value on SAC modeled predictions. The initial SAC inventory was then increased for the two different Kd's to determine the influence of an underestimated inventory on SAC modeled predictions. It was found that evidence for both an underestimated inventory and for an overestimated sorption value for iodine-129 exist. These results suggest that the Kd for iodine-129 should be reevaluated and that a more complete inventory must be generated in order to more accurately model iodine-129 groundwater contamination plumes that match available field data

  19. Groundwater risk assessment for a Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) contaminated site ; benchmarking and validation of numerical transport models

    OpenAIRE

    Rollin, Claire; Baroudi, Hafid; Ben Slimane, Férid

    2001-01-01

    The objective is to test the modelling approaches and the reliability of the codes used in water risk assessment. The final goal is to elaborate, for each group of pollutant, guidelines that could serve as a scientific support for pollutant transport modelling in groundwater and soil. The models performed by 5 teams to simulate a contamination of soils and groundwaters by PAH at a disused coke plant site were compared. Hydrogeology is characterised by a superficial and a chalk aquifer, the la...

  20. Assessment of Arsenic Contamination of Groundwater and Health Problems in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal K. Mitra

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Excessive amounts of arsenic (As in the groundwater in Bangladesh and neighboring states in India are a major public health problem. About 30% of the private wells in Bangladesh exhibit high concentrations of arsenic. Over half the country, 269 out of 464 administrative units, is affected. Similar problems exist in many other parts of the world, including the Unites States. This paper presents an assessment of the health hazards caused by arsenic contamination in the drinking water in Bangladesh. Four competing hypotheses, each addressing the sources, reaction mechanisms, pathways, and sinks of arsenic in groundwater, were analyzed in the context of the geologic history and land-use practices in the Bengal Basin. None of the hypotheses alone can explain the observed variability in arsenic concentration in time and space; each appears to have some validity on a local scale. Thus, it is likely that several bio-geochemical processes are active among the region’s various geologic environments, and that each contributes to the mobilization and release of arsenic. Additional research efforts will be needed to understand the relationships between underlying biogeochemical factors and the mechanisms for arsenic release in various geologic settings.

  1. Groundwater Nitrate Contamination Risk Assessment in Canicattì area (Sicily)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisciotta, Antonino; Cusimano, Gioacchino; Favara, Rocco

    2010-05-01

    Groundwaters play a dominant role in the Sicily, because as most part of Mediterranean countries this island is interested by the phenomenon of desertification and the quality of the groundwater reservoir is one of the most important aim for the management policy strategies. During last decade most of the Italian regions the nitrate levels in river and groundwaters have increased gradually over mainly as a consequence of large-scale agricultural application of manure and fertilizers, thereby threatening drinking water quality. The excessive use of chemicals and fertilizers increases the risk to pollution of surface and groundwater from diffuse source, an important reflex to human health and the environment. The studied area is located in Canicattì (central Sicily, Italy), the current land use (grape, olive grove and almond) is the main source of groundwater pollution. In order to investigate the effect of the over farming on the groundwater quality we report the study on the potential risk of contamination from nitrate of agricultural origin through the join of the application of two parametric methods: the IPNOA method (the intrinsic nitrate contamination risk from Agricultural sources) applied to define the Nitrate Vulnerable Zones and the SINTACS method applied to determine the aquifer vulnerability to contamination.

  2. ASSESSMENT OF GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION AROUND RECLAIMED MUNICIPAL LANDFILL – OTWOCK AREA, POLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Porowska

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The research was conducted around reclaimed landfill, located on the suburb of Otwock, around 25 km south-west of Warsaw. The objective of this study was to identify the chemical composition of groundwater and to determine the landfill impact on the chemical composition of groundwater downgrading from the landfill. Otwock landfill is located in very permeable area, where leachate quickly seeps into groundwater and plays a key role in controlling redox condition (and chemical composition of groundwater of the downgradient area. High concentrations of HCO3-, Cl-, Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+, Fetot. as well as DOC in groundwater downgradient from the landfill (in comparison to background water likely indicate that groundwater quality is being significantly affected by leachate percolation. Currently, the load of contamination is released from landfill periodically and slowly moves (70 m/y in the aquifer along the flow direction. The effect of distance of the piezometer from the pollution source was also investigated. As expected, water from the nearest piezometer to the landfill showed the highest values of contaminant (water temperature, specific electrical conductivity, sodium, iron, chlorides (except for summer and autumn analysis and calcium (except for winter analysis. Chemical status of groundwater downgradient from the landfill is poor.

  3. Costs of groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two factors determine the cost of groundwater contamination: (1) the ways in which water was being used or was expected to be used in the future and (2) the physical characteristics of the setting that constrain the responses available to regain lost uses or to prevent related damages to human health and the environment. Most contamination incidents can be managed at a low enough cost that uses will not be foreclosed. It is important to take into account the following when considering costs: (1) natural cleansing through recharge and dilution can take many years; (2) it is difficult and costly to identify the exact area and expected path of a contamination plume; and (3) treatment or replacement of contaminated water often may represent the cost-effective strategy for managing the event. The costs of contamination include adverse health effects, containment and remediation, treatment and replacement costs. In comparing the costs and benefits of prevention programs with those of remediation, replacement or treatment, it is essential to adjust the cost/benefit numbers by the probability of their actual occurrence. Better forecasts of water demand are needed to predict more accurately the scarcity of new supply and the associated cost of replacement. This research should include estimates of the price elasticity of water demand and the possible effect on demand of more rational cost-based pricing structures. Research and development of techniques for in situ remediation should be encouraged

  4. Solutions Remediate Contaminated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    During the Apollo Program, NASA workers used chlorinated solvents to clean rocket engine components at launch sites. These solvents, known as dense non-aqueous phase liquids, had contaminated launch facilities to the point of near-irreparability. Dr. Jacqueline Quinn and Dr. Kathleen Brooks Loftin of Kennedy Space Center partnered with researchers from the University of Central Florida's chemistry and engineering programs to develop technology capable of remediating the area without great cost or further environmental damage. They called the new invention Emulsified Zero-Valent Iron (EZVI). The groundwater remediation compound is cleaning up polluted areas all around the world and is, to date, NASA's most licensed technology.

  5. Assessment of the intrinsic vulnerability to groundwater contamination in lahore, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was intended to map intrinsic vulnerability of groundwater contamination in Lahore using GIS based DRASTIC model. The final output of DRASTIC model was reclassified into three equal interval classes, corresponding to low, moderate and high vulnerability regions. Most of the study area was found to have low to moderate vulnerability, with 27.48% area of low, 66.48% of moderate and only 6.04% area of high vulnerability. Most of the drinking water wells are installed in the residential area of the city, which shows low chances of contamination due to deep water table and almost no recharge. However, an industrial drain is located in the high vulnerable area in the southeastern part of the study area. The previous studies are in agreement with vulnerability zones. Further to remove any doubt in the suitability of assigned weight, map removal sensitivity analysis had been carried out. The assessment of the sensitivity analysis had been made through visual as well as quantitative methods. Priority order for contribution of the parameters in the vulnerability for the study area is D>I>C>R>A>T>S. (author)

  6. A national-scale assessment of micro-organic contaminants in groundwater of England and Wales

    OpenAIRE

    Manamsa, Katya; Crane, Emily; Stuart, Marianne; Talbot, John; Lapworth, Dan; HART Alwyn

    2016-01-01

    A large variety of micro-organic (MO) compounds is used in huge quantities for a range of purposes (e.g. manufacturing, food production, healthcare) and is now being frequently detected in the aquatic environment. Interest in the occurrence of MO contaminants in the terrestrial and aquatic environments continues to grow, as well as in their environmental fate and potential toxicity. However, the contamination of groundwater resources by MOs has a limited evidence base compared to other freshw...

  7. Assessment of potential impacts of major groundwater contaminants to fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Hanford Reach, Columbia River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Past operations of Hanford Site facilities have contaminated the groundwater adjacent to the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, Washington, with various chemical and radiological constituents. The groundwater is hydraulically connected to the river and contains concentrations of contaminants that sometimes exceed federal and/or state drinking water standards or standards for the protection of aquatic life. For example, concentrations of chromium in shoreline seeps and springs at most 100 Area operable units exceed concentrations found to be toxic to fish. Nitrate and tritium concentrations in shoreline seeps are generally below drinking water standards and concentrations potentially toxic to aquatic life, but nitrate concentrations may be high enough to synergistically interact with and exacerbate chromium toxicity. The Hanford Reach also supports the largest run of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Columbia River Basin. Numbers of fall chinook salmon returning to the Hanford Reach have increased relative to other mainstem populations during the last 30 years. Groundwater discharge appears to occur near some salmon spawning areas, but contaminants are generally not detectable in surface water samples. The concentration and potential toxicity of contaminants in the interstitial waters of the substrate where fall chinook salmon embryogenesis occurs are presently unknown. New tools are required to characterize the extent of groundwater contaminant discharge to the Hanford Reach and to resolve uncertainties associated with assessment of potential impacts to fall chinook salmon

  8. Assessing TNT and DNT groundwater contamination by compound-specific isotope analysis and 3H-3He groundwater dating: a case study in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Helena I F; Fernandes, Judite; Berg, Michael; Schwarzenbach, René P; Kipfer, Rolf

    2009-10-01

    Trinitrotoluene (TNT) and dinitrotoluene (DNT) originating from 50 years of explosives production have heavily contaminated two stacked aquifers in the vicinity of Lisboa, Portugal. To assess if these poly-nitroaromatic compounds (P-NACs) are being degraded in the subsurface, tracer-based groundwater dating techniques combined with compound-specific isotope analyses (CSIA) were applied. The groundwater residence times were distinctly different in the two aerobic aquifers, as determined by the tritium ((3)H)-(3)He method. In the contaminated zones, the upper aquifer exhibited groundwater ages of 25 years, whereas the lower (presumably confined) aquifer contained hardly any tritium which indicates water ages >55 years. P-NACs-containing waste waters are known to have leaked into the upper, unconfined aquifer. However, P-NACs were present in both aquifers in high concentrations (up to 33000 microg L(-1) TNT), which implies a hydraulic connection, although tritium concentrations and chemical data suggest two separated aquifers. Based on the (3)H-(3)He groundwater dating and the presence of very high P-NAC concentrations, the contamination of the lower aquifer must have happened during the early stage of the explosive production, i.e. >50 years ago. Despite this 'old' contamination, TNT and DNT have not been transformed until to date as is demonstrated by the negligible changes in their carbon isotopic signatures (delta(13)C). Thus, P-NACs are very recalcitrant to degradation at the investigated site. If the aquifers remain aerobic, TNT and DNT are expected to persist in the subsurface for many decades to centuries. The presented approach of assessing time scales of natural attenuation at the field scale by the combination of CSIA and (3)H-(3)He water dating has the potential to be applied to any other groundwater contaminants, such as chlorinated hydrocarbons, gasoline components, heterocyclic carbenes, or polyaromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:19740509

  9. Integrated modelling for assessing the risk of groundwater contaminants to human health and surface water ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKnight, Ursula S.; Rasmussen, Jes; Funder, Simon G.;

    2010-01-01

    evaluating the impact of a TCE groundwater plume, located in an area with protected drinking water interests, to human health and surface water ecosystems. This is accomplished by coupling the system dynamicsbased decision support system CARO-Plus to the aquatic ecosystem model AQUATOX via an analytical...... volatilisation model for the stream. The model is tested on a Danish case study involving a 750 m long TCE groundwater plume discharging into a stream. The initial modelling results indicate that TCE contaminant plumes with μgL-1 concentrations entering surface water systems do not pose a significant risk to...

  10. Sources of groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In spite of the importance of water for life, either for drinking, irrigation, industry or other wide uses in many fields, human beings seem to contaminate it and make it unsuitable for human uses. This is due to disposal of wastes in the environment without treatment. In addition to population increase and building expanding higher living costs, industrial and economical in growth that causes an increase in water consumption. All of these factors have made an increase pressure on our water environment quantitatively and qualitatively. In addition, there is an increase of potential risks to the water environmental due to disposal of domestic and industrial wastewater in areas near the water sources. Moreover, the use of unacceptable irrigation systems may increase soil salinity and evaporation rates. The present report discusses the some groundwater sources and problem, hot and mineral waters that become very important in our life and to our health due to its chemical and radioactivity characteristics.(authors)

  11. Isotope and chemical techniques in assessing groundwater contamination from Metro Manila landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first objective of the investigations is establishing benchmark isotopic characteristics of water sources and baseline concentrations of main environmental parameters related to contamination from the landfill. Water samples were collected from the production wells and surface water in the municipalities in proximity of the landfill, in Rodriguez and in San Mateo. Stable isotope characterization of the deep groundwater and rivers shows isotopic values clustering along the LMWL with ae 18O ranging from -7.5 promille to -6.5 promille and ae 2H ranging from - 53.59 promille to -42.91. The shallow groundwater are more isotopically enriched trending towards the evaporation line, with mean ae18O and aeD values of -6.46 promille and -44.14 promille, respectively. The mean isotopic signatures of surface water, with mean ae18O of -7.19 promille and deep groundwater, with mean ae18O of -6.67 promille, in Rodriguez are significantly distinct. San Mateo groundwater appear to be more isotopically enriched, indicating recharge different from that of Rodriguez groundwater. Leachate from the landfill exhibits a distinct isotopic composition from the freshwaters, with ae18O and aeD values of -5.58 promille and -31.66 promille. The significant differences in the isotopic signatures of the different water sources in the study area would facilitate detection of contamination from leachate run-off to the surface water, and eventually, to the groundwater. Trace metals in the water samples collected, generally, were below the regulatory limits for drinking water and surface water. Results of elemental determination in the sediment samples obtained from rivers showed that aside from the major crustal elements, Zn, Cu, and Ni were also present in significant amount. (author)

  12. Isotope and chemical techniques in assessing groundwater contamination from Metro Manila landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations were conducted to establish benchmark isotopic characteristics of water sources and baseline concentrations of trace elements related to contamination from the Montalban landfill. Water samples were collected from the production wells and surface water in Rodriguez and in San Mateo, both in the province of Rizal. These municipalities are nearest to the Montalban landfill. Stable isotope characterization of the deep groundwater and rivers shows isotopic values clustering along the LMWL with δ18O ranging from -7.5 per mille to -6.5 per mille and δ2H ranging from -53.59 per mille to -42.91. The shallow groundwater are more isotopically enriched trending towards the evaporation line, with mean δ18O and δD values of -6.46 per mille and -44.14 per mille, respectively. The mean isotopic signatures of surface water, with mean δ18O of -7.19 per mille, and deep groundwater, with mean δ18O of -6.67 per mile, in Rodriguez are significantly distinct. San Mateo groundwater appear to be more isotopically enriched, indicating recharge different from that of Rodriguez groundwater. Leachate from the landfill exhibits a distinct isotopic composition from the freshwaters, with most enriched δD values of +5.84 per mille for the leachate run-off and +16.55 per mille in the leachate pond. The significant differences in the isotopic signatures of the different water sources in the study area facilitates detection of contamination from leachate run-off to the surface water, and eventually, to the groundwater. Trace metals in the water samples collected, generally, were below the regulatory limits for drinking water and surface water. (author)

  13. Isotope and chemical techniques in assessing groundwater contamination from Metro Manila landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations were conducted to establish benchmark isotopic characteristics of water sources and baseline concentrations of trace elements related to contamination from the Montalban landfill. Water samples were collected from the production wells and surface water in Rodriguez and in San Mateo, both in the province of Rizal. These municipalities are nearest to the Montalban landfill. Stable isotope characterization of the deep ground water and rivers shows isotopic values clustering along the LMWL with δ18O ranging from -7.5 per mille to -6.5 per mille and δ2H ranging from -53.59 per mille to -42.91. Shallow groundwater is isotopically enriched, trending towards the evaporation line, with mean δ18O and δD values of -6.46 per mille and -44.14 per mille, respectively, The mean isotopic signatures of surface water, with mean δ18O of -7.19 per mille, and deep groundwater, with mean δ18O of -6.67 per mille, in Rodriguez are significantly distinct. San Mateo groundwater appear to be more isotopically enriched, indicating recharge different from that of Rodriguez groundwater. Leachate from the landfill exhibits a distinct isotopic composition from the freshwaters, with most enriched δD values of +5.84 per mille for the leachate run-off and + 16.55 per mille in the leachate pond. The significant differences in the isotopic signatures of the different water sources in the study area facilitates detection of contamination from leachate run-off to surface water, and eventually, to groundwater. Trace metals in the water samples collected, generally, were below the regulatory limits for drinking water and surface water. (author)

  14. Assessment of metal contamination in groundwater and soils in the Ahangaran mining district, west of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabi, Behzad; Mehrabani, Shiva; Rafiei, Behrouz; Yaghoubi, Behrouz

    2015-12-01

    In this study, 28 groundwater and 13 soil samples from Ahangaran mining district in Hamedan Province, west of Iran were collected to evaluate the level of contamination. Average concentrations of As, Cu, Pb, Zn, Mn, Sb, and Ni in groundwater samples were 1.39, 3.73, 2.18, 9.37, 2.35, 4.44, and 5.50 μg/L (wet season), and 11.64, 4.92, 4.32, 14.77, 5.43, 4.12, and 0.98 μg/L (dry season), respectively. Results of groundwater samples analysis showed that the average of analyzed metals in the wet and dry seasons were below the permissible limits, except As in the dry season which displays concentrations that exceed US EPA water quality criteria recommended for drinking water. Also, the heavy metal pollution index (HPI) values in each sampling station were less than the critical index limit and were suitable for drinking. Factor analysis revealed that variables influential to groundwater quality in one season may not be as important in another season. Average concentrations of Ag, As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Sb, and Zn in soil samples were 2.61, 31.44, 0.51, 55.90, 1284.9, 21.26, and 156.04 mg kg(-1), respectively. The results of the geoaccumulation index (I geo) showed the following decreasing order: Pb > Zn > Cu > As > Sb > Cd > Ag. Potential ecological risk index (RI) suggests that the contamination in the investigated area is moderate to very high risk and the ranking of the contaminants in decreasing order is Ag > Sb > Pb > Cd > As > Cu > Zn. PMID:26545371

  15. Mass transport modelling for assessement of groundwater contamination around Mathura oil refinery, Mathura, Uttar Pradesh, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurunadha Rao, V.V.S.; Dhar, R.L. [National Geophysical Research Inst., Hyderabad (India); Jayachand, T.; Khoker, C.S. [RITES, New Delhi (India)

    2000-09-01

    Mathura oil refinery was commissioned during 1977 and effluent storage ponds were constructed at the same time. These storage ponds receive wastewater from the refinery at a rate of 10000 m{sup 3}/day. After treatment, waste water is discharged through a 3-km pipeline to a stream leading to the Yamuna river. The groundwater-monitoring as well as water-quality monitoring was carried at 24 observation wells in the refinery site during 1997. The water quality measurements indicated total dissolved chloride and sulphate concentration of native groundwater as 400 mg/l, whereas elevated levels up to 600 mg/l were found at the wells close to polishing ponds. Thus combined transport of chloride and sulphate was simulated in the mass transport model. A three-dimensional flow, pathlines and mass transport model of the aquifer system were constructed to analyze the impact of seepage from polishing ponds contaminating the groundwater regime. The permeability of aquifer varies between 1.5-2.5 m/day. The porosity of formation was assumed as 0.2. The constant head and constant concentration boundaries were assigned to the nodes representing effluent storage ponds. Longitudinal dispersivity of 100 m, horizontal transverse dispersivity of 10 m and vertical transverse dispersivity of 0.01 m were assumed. The mass transport model was calibrated for 20 years by comparing total dissolved chloride and sulphate concentrations from 1997. The model predictions indicate further migration of contaminants on the east of effluent ponds in future. (orig.)

  16. An integrated model for assessing the risk of TCE groundwater contamination to human receptors and surface water ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKnight, Ursula S.; Funder, S.G.; Rasmussen, J.J.;

    2010-01-01

    accomplished by coupling the system dynamics-based decision support system CARO-PLUS to the aquatic ecosystem model AQUATOX using an analytical volatilization model for the stream. The model was applied to a case study where a TCE contaminated groundwater plume is discharging to a stream. The TCE source will...... not be depleted for many decades, however measured and predicted TCE concentrations in surface water were found to be below human health risk management targets. Volatilization rapidly attenuates TCE concentrations in surface water. Thus, only a 300 m stream reach fails to meet surface water quality...... criteria. An ecological risk assessment found that the TCE contamination did not impact the stream ecosystem. Uncertainty assessment revealed hydraulic conductivity to be the most important site-specific parameter. These results indicate that contaminant plumes with μgL-1 concentrations of TCE entering...

  17. Application of artificial neural networks to assess pesticide contamination in shallow groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, G.B.; Ray, C.; Mehnert, E.; Keefer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, a feed-forward back-propagation neural network (BPNN) was developed and applied to predict pesticide concentrations in groundwater monitoring wells. Pesticide concentration data are challenging to analyze because they tend to be highly censored. Input data to the neural network included the categorical indices of depth to aquifer material, pesticide leaching class, aquifer sensitivity to pesticide contamination, time (month) of sample collection, well depth, depth to water from land surface, and additional travel distance in the saturated zone (i.e., distance from land surface to midpoint of well screen). The output of the neural network was the total pesticide concentration detected in the well. The model prediction results produced good agreements with observed data in terms of correlation coefficient (R = 0.87) and pesticide detection efficiency (E = 89%), as well as good match between the observed and predicted "class" groups. The relative importance of input parameters to pesticide occurrence in groundwater was examined in terms of R, E, mean error (ME), root mean square error (RMSE), and pesticide occurrence "class" groups by eliminating some key input parameters to the model. Well depth and time of sample collection were the most sensitive input parameters for predicting the pesticide contamination potential of a well. This infers that wells tapping shallow aquifers are more vulnerable to pesticide contamination than those wells tapping deeper aquifers. Pesticide occurrences during post-application months (June through October) were found to be 2.5 to 3 times higher than pesticide occurrences during other months (November through April). The BPNN was used to rank the input parameters with highest potential to contaminate groundwater, including two original and five ancillary parameters. The two original parameters are depth to aquifer material and pesticide leaching class. When these two parameters were the only input parameters for the BPNN

  18. Unsaturated zone leaching models for assessing risk to groundwater of contaminated sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Mads; Binning, Philip John; Nielsen, Signe;

    2009-01-01

    , lateral gas diffusion, sorption and degradation; a simple one-dimensional screening model, and two one-dimensional radial gas diffusion models for use in simulating volatile organic contaminant diffusion in unsaturated soils with an impermeable cover. The models show that both degradation and diffusion......Risk assessments of sites contaminated with organic contaminants are typically conducted using models that ignore gas phase transport in the unsaturated zone. Here a general approach to developing analytical solutions to multiphase transport is presented. The approach is based on a combined gas and...

  19. Groundwater modeling of source terms and contaminant plumes for DOE low-level waste performance assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A, all sites within the DOE complex must analyze the performance of planned radioactive waste disposal facilities before disposal takes place through the radiological performance assessment process. These assessments consider both exposures to the public from radionuclides potentially released from disposal facilities and protection of groundwater resources. Compliance with requirements for groundwater protection is often the most difficult to demonstrate as these requirements are generally more restrictive than those for other pathways. Modeling of subsurface unsaturated and saturated flow and transport was conducted for two such assessments for the Savannah River site. The computer code PORFLOW was used to evaluate release and transport of radionuclides from different types of disposal unit configurations: vault disposal and trench disposal. The effectiveness of engineered barriers was evaluated in terms of compliance with groundwater protection requirements. The findings suggest that, due to the limited lifetime of engineered barriers, overdesign of facilities for long-lived radionuclides is likely to occur if compliance must be realized for thousands of years

  20. Evaluation of contaminated groundwater cleanup objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Restoration Program will be responsible for remediating the approximately 230 contaminated groundwater sites across the DOE Complex. A major concern for remediation is choosing the appropriate cleanup objective. The cleanup objective chosen will influence the risk to the nearby public during and after remediation; risk to remedial and non-involved workers during remediation; and the cost of remediation. This paper discusses the trends shown in analyses currently being performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratories' (ORNL's) Center for Risk Management (CRM). To evaluate these trends, CRM is developing a database of contaminated sites. This paper examines several contaminated groundwater sites selected for assessment from CRM's data base. The sites in this sample represent potential types of contaminated groundwater sites commonly found at an installation within DOE. The baseline risk from these sites to various receptors is presented. Residual risk and risk during remediation is reported for different cleanup objectives. The cost associated with remediating to each of these objectives is also estimated for each of the representative sites. Finally, the general trends of impacts as a function of cleanup objective will be summarized. The sites examined include the Savannah River site, where there was substantial ground pollution from radionuclides, oil, coal stockpiles, and other forms of groundwater contamination. The effects of various types of groundwater contamination on various types of future user is described. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Groundwater recharge and agricultural contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhlke, J.K.

    2002-01-01

    Agriculture has had direct and indirect effects on the rates and compositions of groundwater recharge and aquifer biogeochemistry. Direct effects include dissolution and transport of excess quantities of fertilizers and associated materials and hydrologic alterations related to irrigation and drainage. Some indirect effects include changes in water-rock reactions in soils and aquifers caused by increased concentrations of dissolved oxidants, protons, and major ions. Agrilcultural activities have directly or indirectly affected the concentrations of a large number of inorganic chemicals in groundwater, for example NO3-, N2, Cl, SO42-, H+, P, C, K, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra, and As, as well a wide variety of pesticides and other organic compounds. For reactive contaminants like NO3-, a combination of chemical, isotopic, and environmental-tracer analytical approaches might be required to resolve changing inputs from subsequent alterations as causes of concentration gradients in groundwater. Groundwater records derived from multi-component hydrostratigraphic data can be used to quantify recharge rates and residence times of water and dissolved contaminants, document past variations in recharging contaminant loads, and identify natural contaminant-remediation processes. These data indicate that many of the world's surficial aquifers contain transient records of changing agricultural contamination from the last half of the 20th century. The transient agricultural groundwater signal has important implications for long-term trends and spatial heterogeneity in discharge.

  2. Assessment of fluoride contaminations in groundwater of hard rock aquifers in Madurai district, Tamil Nadu (India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thivya, C.; Chidambaram, S.; Rao, M. S.; Thilagavathi, R.; Prasanna, M. V.; Manikandan, S.

    2015-07-01

    The fluoride contamination in drinking water is already gone to the alarming level and it needs the immediate involvement and attention of all people to solve this problem. Fluoride problem is higher in hard rock terrains in worldwide and Madurai is such type of hard rock region. Totally 54 samples were collected from the Madurai district of Tamilnadu with respect to lithology. The samples collected were analysed for major cations and anions using standard procedures. The higher concentration of fluoride is noted in the Charnockite rock types of northern part of the study area. 20 % of samples are below 0.5 ppm and 6 % of samples are above 1.5 ppm exceeding the permissible limit. The affinity between the pH and fluoride ions in groundwater suggests that dissolution of fluoride bearing minerals in groundwater. The higher concentration of fluoride ions are observed in the lower EC concentration. The isotopic study suggests that fluoride is geogenic in nature. In factor scores, fluoride is noted in association with pH which indicates the dissolution process.

  3. The role and limitations of groundwater vulnerability maps in evaluating groundwater pollution hazard beneath contaminated land

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Melinda; Stuart, Marianne; Robins, Nicholas; Davey, Ian R

    1997-01-01

    Groundwater vulnerability maps are currently being produced for the UK as a tool to aid decision making reagrding land use. The maps classify the hazard to groundwater in an underlying aquifer posed by a contaminant load on the ground surface. Their role in assessing the potential impact of contaminated land on groundwater is reviewed.

  4. Characterization and assessment of contaminated soil and groundwater at an organic chemical plant site in Chongqing, Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Geng; Niu, Junjie; Zhang, Chao; Guo, Guanlin

    2016-04-01

    Contamination from organic chemical plants can cause serious pollution of soil and groundwater ecosystems. To characterize soil contamination and to evaluate the health risk posed by groundwater at a typical organic chemical plant site in Chongqing, China, 91 soil samples and seven groundwater samples were collected. The concentrations of different contaminants and their three-dimensional distribution were determined based on the 3D-krige method. Groundwater chemistry risk index (Chem RI) and cancer risk were calculated based on TRIAD and RBCA models. The chemistry risk indices of groundwater points SW5, SW18, SW22, SW39, SW52, SW80, and SW82 were 0.4209, 0.9972, 0.9324, 0.9990, 0.9991, 1.0000, and 1.0000, respectively, indicating that the groundwater has poor environmental status. By contrast, the reference Yangtse River water sample showed no pollution with a Chem RI of 0.1301. Benzene and 1,2-dichloroethane were the main contaminants in the groundwater and were responsible for the elevated cancer risk. The cumulative health risk of groundwater points (except SW5 and SW18) were all higher than the acceptable baselines of 10(-6), which indicates that the groundwater poses high cancer risk. Action is urgently required to control and remediate the risk for human health and groundwater ecosystems. PMID:26193833

  5. Assessment of groundwater vulnerability to contamination in Irbid govern orate, the north of Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main aquifers in northern Jordan showed little signs of contamination when modeled by the DRASTIC method, mainly due to topography and an invariably deep water table. Most of A7/B2 and B4/B5 aquifers are classified with low vulnerability and small regions classified as moderately vulnerable (0.20% and 0.80% respectivily). The dominance of low vulnerability in the study area is mainly attributed to the fact than DRASTIC assumes a very low vulnerability (rating value = 1) when water depths are greater than 30 m. Additionaly, DRASTIC does not demonstrate the capacity of satisfactorily outlining karst morphology. Both map removal and single-parameter sensitivity anayers showed that depth to water table and topography are the most decisive parameters in deteermining aquifer vulnerability. Net recharge, hydraulic conductivity, topography and depth to water table contribute significantly to the variation of the vulnerability index across the study area with the variation index being 75%. 71.5%. 66% and 63% respectively. These are higher than the theoretical topography have effective weights of 34%. 26% and 24%. respectively. These are higher than the theoretical weights assigned by the model (13%. 21.7% and 4.3% respectively). Wel AD1296 and spring AD0654 are the most contaminated water resources. The former is located within the vicinity of the Ramtha wastewater treatment plan and the latter is located within areas of agricultural activities and intensive cesspool usage. DRASTIC did not accurately predict the high concentrations of some chemicals, which highlight the need for new research into procedures for parmeter quantification and weighting. further investigations are also required in order to understand the mechanisms of groundwater recharge and contaminant transport in such aquifers. (authors).

  6. Assessment of the Extraction Methods for Monitoring Phthalate Emerging Contaminants in Groundwater and Tap Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotto, I.; Padilla, I. Y.; De Jesús, N. H.; Torres, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    Trace organic contaminants such as phthalates, among other chemicals of emerging concerns, have not historically been considered as pollutants but are being detected in water, posing a potential risk to public health and the environment. One of the most common phthalates of particular concern is di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), a plasticizer normally found in plastics and consumer products, including: cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, medical devices, food packages, water bottles, and wiring cables. DEHP has been associated with preterm birth, a major cause of neonatal mortality and health complications. This study aims at monitoring the presence and concentration of DEHP and other phthalates in groundwater and tap water systems in Puerto Rico, which has one of the highest rates of preterm birth in the U.S. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) suggests a liquid-liquid extraction method that uses methylene chloride as the preferred organic solvent for the extractions. This work presents modified EPA methods that reduce the volume of sample and solvent used, lower the time of analysis, increase productivity, and decrease hazards and waste. Distribution coefficient of DEHP between methylene chloride and water are estimated and related to sample extraction efficiency. Research results indicate that DEHP is in fact distributed between water and methylene chloride with a distribution coefficient average value of 1.24. The study concludes that the sample and solvent volumes have influence on the efficiency but have not an effect on the distribution coefficient. The tests show higher extraction efficiencies for lower DEHP concentrations and higher extraction volumes. Results from the water analysis show presence of DEHP in 55% of groundwater and 44% of tap water samples, indicating a potential exposure through water.

  7. Modeling bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Atlas, R M; Hazen, T.; Philp, J. C.; Prommer, H.; Barry, D. A.

    2005-01-01

    Bioremediation: Applied Microbial Solutions for Real-World Environmental Cleanup is a fascinating examination of research and its real-world application. Intended for both academics and practitioners, the book presents information on the legal, scientific, and engineering principles behind bioremediation for cleaning up contaminated soil and groundwater sources. Bioremediation incorporates a variety of international perspectives in detailing for industrial engineers and rese...

  8. GWSCREEN: A semi-analytical model for assessment of the groundwater pathway from surface or buried contamination: Version 2.0 theory and user`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rood, A.S.

    1993-06-01

    GWSCREEN was developed for assessment of the groundwater pathway from leaching of radioactive and non radioactive substances from surface or buried sources. The code was designed for implementation in the Track I and Track II assessment of CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act) sites identified as low probability hazard at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (DOE, 1992). The code calculates the limiting soil concentration such that, after leaching and transport to the aquifer, regulatory contaminant levels in groundwater are not exceeded. The code uses a mass conservation approach to model three processes: contaminant release from a source volume, contaminant transport in the unsaturated zone, and contaminant transport in the saturated zone. The source model considers the sorptive properties and solubility of the contaminant. Transport in the unsaturated zone is described by a plug flow model. Transport in the saturated zone is calculated with a semi-analytical solution to the advection dispersion equation in groundwater. In Version 2.0, GWSCREEN has incorporated an additional source model to calculate the impacts to groundwater resulting from the release to percolation ponds. In addition, transport of radioactive progeny has also been incorporated. GWSCREEN has shown comparable results when compared against other codes using similar algorithms and techniques. This code was designed for assessment and screening of the groundwater pathway when field data is limited. It was not intended to be a predictive tool.

  9. GWSCREEN: A semi-analytical model for assessment of the groundwater pathway from surface or buried contamination: Version 2.0 theory and user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GWSCREEN was developed for assessment of the groundwater pathway from leaching of radioactive and non radioactive substances from surface or buried sources. The code was designed for implementation in the Track I and Track II assessment of CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act) sites identified as low probability hazard at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (DOE, 1992). The code calculates the limiting soil concentration such that, after leaching and transport to the aquifer, regulatory contaminant levels in groundwater are not exceeded. The code uses a mass conservation approach to model three processes: contaminant release from a source volume, contaminant transport in the unsaturated zone, and contaminant transport in the saturated zone. The source model considers the sorptive properties and solubility of the contaminant. Transport in the unsaturated zone is described by a plug flow model. Transport in the saturated zone is calculated with a semi-analytical solution to the advection dispersion equation in groundwater. In Version 2.0, GWSCREEN has incorporated an additional source model to calculate the impacts to groundwater resulting from the release to percolation ponds. In addition, transport of radioactive progeny has also been incorporated. GWSCREEN has shown comparable results when compared against other codes using similar algorithms and techniques. This code was designed for assessment and screening of the groundwater pathway when field data is limited. It was not intended to be a predictive tool

  10. GWSCREEN: A semi-analytical model for assessment of the groundwater pathway from surface or buried contamination: Theory and user's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rood, A.S.

    1992-03-01

    GWSCREEN was developed for assessment of the groundwater pathway from leaching of radioactive and non radioactive substances from surface or buried sources. The code was designed for implementation in the Track 1 and Track 2 assessment of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites identified as low probability hazard at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (DOE, 1991). The code calculates the limiting soil concentration such that regulatory contaminant levels in groundwater are not exceeded. The code uses a mass conservation approach to model three processes: Contaminant release from a source volume, contaminant transport in the unsaturated zone, and contaminant transport in the saturated zone. The source model considers the sorptive properties and solubility of the contaminant. Transport in the unsaturated zone is described by a plug flow model. Transport in the saturated zone is calculated with a semi-analytical solution to the advection dispersion equation for transient mass flux input.

  11. GWSCREEN: A semi-analytical model for assessment of the groundwater pathway from surface or buried contamination: Theory and user`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rood, A.S.

    1992-03-01

    GWSCREEN was developed for assessment of the groundwater pathway from leaching of radioactive and non radioactive substances from surface or buried sources. The code was designed for implementation in the Track 1 and Track 2 assessment of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites identified as low probability hazard at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (DOE, 1991). The code calculates the limiting soil concentration such that regulatory contaminant levels in groundwater are not exceeded. The code uses a mass conservation approach to model three processes: Contaminant release from a source volume, contaminant transport in the unsaturated zone, and contaminant transport in the saturated zone. The source model considers the sorptive properties and solubility of the contaminant. Transport in the unsaturated zone is described by a plug flow model. Transport in the saturated zone is calculated with a semi-analytical solution to the advection dispersion equation for transient mass flux input.

  12. ASSESSMENT OF GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION AROUND RECLAIMED MUNICIPAL LANDFILL – OTWOCK AREA, POLAND

    OpenAIRE

    Dorota Porowska

    2014-01-01

    The research was conducted around reclaimed landfill, located on the suburb of Otwock, around 25 km south-west of Warsaw. The objective of this study was to identify the chemical composition of groundwater and to determine the landfill impact on the chemical composition of groundwater downgrading from the landfill. Otwock landfill is located in very permeable area, where leachate quickly seeps into groundwater and plays a key role in controlling redox condition (and chemical composition of gr...

  13. Assessment of in situ degradation of chlorinated ethenes and bacterial community structure in a complex contaminated groundwater system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imfeld, Gwenaël; Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Nikolausz, Marcell; Zeiger, Simone; Paschke, Heidrun; Drangmeister, Jörg; Grossmann, Jochen; Richnow, Hans H; Weber, Stefanie

    2008-02-01

    The occurrence of in situ degradation of chlorinated ethenes was investigated using an integrated approach in a complex groundwater system consisting of several geological units. The assessment of hydrogeochemistry and chlorinated ethenes distribution using principal component analysis (PCA) in combination with carbon stable isotope analysis revealed that chlorinated ethenes were subjected to substantial biodegradation. Shifts in isotopic values up to 20.4 per thousand, 13.9 per thousand, 20.1 per thousand and 31.4 per thousand were observed between geological units for tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), cis-dichloroethene (cDCE) and vinyl chloride (VC), respectively. The use of specific biomarkers (16S rRNA gene) indicated the presence of Dehalococcoides sp. DNA in 20 of the 33 evaluated samples. In parallel, the analysis of changes in the bacterial community composition in the aquifers using canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicated the predominant influence of the chlorinated ethene concentrations (56.3% of the variance, P=0.005). The integrated approach may open new prospects for the assessment of spatial and temporal functioning of bioattenuation in contaminated groundwater systems. PMID:17915287

  14. Remediation of bromate contaminated groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, R. M.

    2005-01-01

    Bromate (BrO3") is a by-product formed at concentrations of 0.4 - 60 µg L'' during potable water ozonation. Following World Health Organisation designation as a `possible human' carcinogen, a 10 pg L" drinking water limit was introduced in England and Wales. Discovery of bromate contamination within a UK aquifer highlighted a knowledge gap, addressed by this project, relating to environmental behaviour and groundwater remediation. Following selection of an anion analys...

  15. Using vadose zone data and spatial statistics to assess the impact of cultivated land and dairy waste lagoons on groundwater contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baram, S.; Ronen, Z.; Kurtzman, D.; Peeters, A.; Dahan, O.

    2013-12-01

    Land cultivation and dairy waste lagoons are considered to be nonpoint and point sources of groundwater contamination by chloride (Cl-) and nitrate (NO3-). The objective of this work is to introduce a methodology to assess the past and future impacts of such agricultural activities on regional groundwater quality. The method is based on mass balances and on spatial statistical analysis of Cl- and NO3-concentration distributions in the saturated and unsaturated zones. The method enables quantitative analysis of the relation between the locations of pollution point sources and the spatial variability in Cl- and NO3- concentrations in groundwater. The method was applied to the Beer-Tuvia region, Israel, where intensive dairy farming along with land cultivation has been practiced for over 50 years above the local phreatic aquifer. Mass balance calculations accounted for the various groundwater recharge and abstraction sources and sinks in the entire region. The mass balances showed that leachates from lagoons and the cultivated land have contributed 6.0 and 89.4 % of the total mass of Cl- added to the aquifer and 12.6 and 77.4 % of the total mass of NO3-. The chemical composition of the aquifer and vadose zone water suggested that irrigated agricultural activity in the region is the main contributor of Cl- and NO3- to the groundwater. A low spatial correlation between the Cl- and NO3- concentrations in the groundwater and the on-land location of the dairy farms strengthened this assumption, despite the dairy waste lagoon being a point source for groundwater contamination by Cl- and NO3-. Results demonstrate that analyzing vadose zone and groundwater data by spatial statistical analysis methods can significantly contribute to the understanding of the relations between groundwater contaminating sources, and to assessing appropriate remediation steps.

  16. Comparison of soil solution sampling techniques to assess metal fluxes from contaminated soil to groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutelot, F; Sappin-Didier, V; Keller, C; Atteia, O

    2014-12-01

    The unsaturated zone plays a major role in elemental fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems. A representative chemical analysis of soil pore water is required for the interpretation of soil chemical phenomena and particularly to assess Trace Elements (TEs) mobility. This requires an optimal sampling system to avoid modification of the extracted soil water chemistry and allow for an accurate estimation of solute fluxes. In this paper, the chemical composition of soil solutions sampled by Rhizon® samplers connected to a standard syringe was compared to two other types of suction probes (Rhizon® + vacuum tube and Rhizon® + diverted flow system). We investigated the effects of different vacuum application procedures on concentrations of spiked elements (Cr, As, Zn) mixed as powder into the first 20 cm of 100-cm columns and non-spiked elements (Ca, Na, Mg) concentrations in two types of columns (SiO2 sand and a mixture of kaolinite + SiO2 sand substrates). Rhizon® was installed at different depths. The metals concentrations showed that (i) in sand, peak concentrations cannot be correctly sampled, thus the flux cannot be estimated, and the errors can easily reach a factor 2; (ii) in sand + clay columns, peak concentrations were larger, indicating that they could be sampled but, due to sorption on clay, it was not possible to compare fluxes at different depths. The different samplers tested were not able to reflect the elemental flux to groundwater and, although the Rhizon® + syringe device was more accurate, the best solution remains to be the use of a lysimeter, whose bottom is kept continuously at a suction close to the one existing in the soil. PMID:25277861

  17. GWSCREEN: A semi-analytical model for assessment of the groundwater pathway from surface or buried contamination. Theory and user's manual, Version 2.0: Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multimedia exposure assessment of hazardous chemicals and radionuclides requires that all pathways of exposure be investigated. The GWSCREEN model was designed to perform initial screening calculations for groundwater pathway impacts resulting from the leaching of surficial and buried contamination at CERCLA sites identified as low probability hazard at the INEL. In Version 2.0, an additional model was added to calculate impacts to groundwater from the operation of a percolation pond. The model was designed to make best use of the data that would potentially be available. These data include the area and depth of contamination, sorptive properties and solubility limit of the contaminant, depth to aquifer, and the physical properties of the aquifer (porosity, velocity, and dispersivity). For the pond model, data on effluent flow rates and operation time are required. Model output includes the limiting soil concentration such that, after leaching and transport to the aquifer, regulatory contaminant levels in groundwater are not exceeded. Also, groundwater concentration as a function of time may be calculated. The model considers only drinking water consumption and does not include the transfer of contamination to food products due to irrigation with contaminated water. Radiological dose, carcinogenic risk, and the hazard quotient are calculated for the peak time using the user-defined input mass (or activity). Appendices contain sample problems and the source code listing

  18. Technical options for the remediation of contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a description of the nature and extent of problems related to radioactive groundwater contamination by outlining the environmental impacts, the sources of contamination and the contaminants of concern radionuclides and their associated contaminants - the main exposure pathways and transport processes and the assessment of risks associated with contaminated groundwater. The main emphasis of this report is on methodologies used in groundwater remediation and available technologies. The methodology section outlines the importance of an initial scoping analysis including the evaluation of uncertainties of the available data and the necessity for defining clear objectives for data collection. This is then followed by comprehensive site characterization, setting of goals and developing alternatives which will be analysed in detail. Available technologies are grouped generally into in situ methods aiming at a containment of the contaminants in place and engineered treatment methods involving an alteration of groundwater flow, quantity and/or quality to achieve compliance with set goals. Groundwater remediation by natural flushing allows the natural groundwater movement and geochemical processes to decrease the contaminant concentrations to acceptable levels over a specified period of time. This method is increasingly accepted in areas where the use of groundwater can be temporarily restricted or engineered cleanup methods do not offer particular advantage over the natural processes. The application of technological methods for remediating contaminated groundwaters has to be considered in conjunction with management options such as diversion and development of alternative water sources. The experience with groundwater contamination accrued in IAEA Member States is concentrated in those countries with active uranium mining and milling facilities and nuclear energy programmes. This experience is reported in the Annexes, which include case studies. It

  19. Assessing the effectiveness of drywells as tools for stormwater management and aquifer recharge and their groundwater contamination potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Emily C.; Harter, Thomas; Fogg, Graham E.; Washburn, Barbara; Hamad, Hamad

    2016-08-01

    Drywells are gravity-fed, excavated pits with perforated casings used to facilitate stormwater infiltration and groundwater recharge in areas where drainage and diversion of storm flows is problematic. Historically, drywells have predominantly been used as a form of stormwater management in locations that receive high volumes of precipitation; however the use of drywells is increasingly being evaluated as a method to supplement groundwater recharge, especially in areas facing severe drought. Studies have shown that drywells can be an effective means to increase recharge to aquifers; however, the potential for groundwater contamination caused by polluted stormwater runoff bypassing transport through surface soil and near surface sediment has prevented more widespread use of drywells as a recharge mechanism. Numerous studies have shown that groundwater and drinking water contamination from drywells can be avoided if drywells are used in appropriate locations and properly maintained. The effectiveness of drywells for aquifer recharge depends on the hydrogeologic setting and land use surrounding a site, as well as influent stormwater quantity and quality. These parameters may be informed for a specific drywell site through geologic and hydrologic characterization and adequate monitoring of stormwater and groundwater quality.

  20. ASSESSMENT OF FLUORIDE CONTAMINATION IN GROUNDWATER USING GIS, DHARMAPURI DISTRICT, TAMILNADU, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sendesh Kannan.K.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Water is essential natural resource for sustaining life and environment which we have always thought to available in abundance and free gift of nature. However, chemical composition of surface orsubsurface, geothermal or non - thermal, is one of the prime factors on which the suitability of the water for domestic, industrial or agriculture purpose depends. Groundwater forms a major source of drinking water in urban as well as in rural areas. More than 90% of the rural population uses groundwater for domestic purposes. However, around 300 million people still live in absolute poverty in both urban and rural areas, and often lack access to clean drinking water and basic sanitation; nearly half the population is illiterate, not at all aware of the water borne diseases affecting their health. Fluoride is a chemical element that has shown to cause significant effects on human health through drinking water. Fluoride has beneficial effects on teeth at low concentrations of 1mg/l by preventing and reducing the risk of tooth decay. Fluoride can also be quite detrimental at higher concentrations exceeding 1.5 to 2mg/l of water. High concentrations of fluoride pose a risk of dental fluorosis as well as skeletal fluorosis and osteoporosis.

  1. Groundwater quality assessment for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the Y-12 Plant. 1991 groundwater quality data and calculated rate of contaminant migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    This report contains groundwater quality data obtained during the 1991 calendar year at several waste management facilities and petroleum fuel underground storage tank (UST) sites associated with the Y-12 Plant. These sites are within the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (UEFPCHR), which is one of three regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater and surface-water quality monitoring and remediation. This report was prepared for informational purposes. Included are the analytical data for groundwater samples collected from selected monitoring wells during 1991 and the results for quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) samples associated with each groundwater sample. This report also contains summaries of selected data, including ion-charge balances for each groundwater sample, a summary of analytical results for nitrate (a principle contaminant in the UEFPCHR), results of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) analyses validated using the associated QA/QC sample data, a summary of trace metal concentrations which exceeded drinking-water standards, and a summary of radiochemical analyses and associated counting errors.

  2. Monitoring of Emerging and Legacy Contaminants in Groundwater and Tap Water of the Karst Region in Northern Puerto Rico for Assessment of Sources and Fate and Transport Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, I. Y.; Cotto, I.; Torres, P. M.

    2014-12-01

    The karst aquifer region of northern Puerto Rico is the area with the highest groundwater extraction in the island. Urban and industrial development has led to extensive contamination of the groundwater in the region. Of particular concern, is the presence of emerging and legacy organic contaminants, such as phthalates and chlorinated organic compounds (CVOCs), because there high risk for exposure and adverse health impact. Variable sources and the heterogeneous and dynamic conditions of karst groundwater systems, limits the ability to properly assess and manage the water quality of these precious water resources. This work develops a monitoring and water analysis scheme to assess spatial-temporal exposure of hazardous contaminants trough karst water in northern Puerto Rico. Groundwater and tap water are sampled in the region and analyzed for phthalates, CVOCs, and common ions. Detections and concentrations of phthalates and CVOCs are determined by using modified EPA methods, which rely on liquid-liquid extractions and gas chromatography techniques. The modified methods have reduced the volume of samples and solvent waste, decreased the time of analysis, increased analysis outcomes, and lower potential for hazardous exposure. Results show intermittent presence of di-ethyl, di-butyl and di (2-ethyl hexyl) phthalates in 36% of the groundwater and 53% of tap water samples, with detected concentrations ranging between 0.1-88.7 μg/L. These results indicate that karst groundwater can serve as a route of exposure for phthalates, but there are additional disperse sources in the water system. CVOCs are detected in groundwater at much higher frequencies (50%) than phthalates, and include trichloromethane (TCM), carbon tetrachloride (CT), trichloroethylene (TCE), and tetrachloroethylene (TCE). CVOCs, except for TCM, are found at lower frequencies on tap water (5.8%) than groundwater (27%). TCM is detected more frequently and at higher concentrations in tap water (56.8%) than

  3. Dilution and volatilization of groundwater contaminant discharges in streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aisopou, Angeliki; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Sonne, Anne Thobo;

    2015-01-01

    An analytical solution to describe dilution and volatilization of a continuous groundwater contaminant plume into streams is developed for risk assessment. The location of groundwater plume discharge into the stream (discharge through the side versus bottom of the stream) and different distributi......An analytical solution to describe dilution and volatilization of a continuous groundwater contaminant plume into streams is developed for risk assessment. The location of groundwater plume discharge into the stream (discharge through the side versus bottom of the stream) and different...... distributions of the contaminant plume concentration (Gaussian, homogeneous or heterogeneous distribution) are considered. The model considering the plume discharged through the bank of the river, with a uniform concentration distribution was the most appropriate for risk assessment due to its simplicity and...

  4. GWSCREEN: A Semi-analytical Model for Assessment of the Groundwater Pathway from Surface or Buried Contamination, Theory and User's Manual, Version 2.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rood, Arthur South

    1998-08-01

    GWSCREEN was developed for assessment of the groundwater pathway from leaching of radioactive and non-radioactive substances from surface or buried sources. The code was designed for implementation in the Track I and Track II assessment of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act sites identified as low probability hazard at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The code calculates 1) the limiting soil concentration such that, after leaching and transport to the aquifer regulatory contaminant levels in groundwater are not exceeded, 2) peak aquifer concentration and associated human health impacts, and 3) aquifer concentrations and associated human health impacts as a function of time and space. The code uses a mass conservation approach to model three processes: contaminant release from a source volume, vertical contaminant transport in the unsaturated zone, and 2D or 3D contaminant transport in the saturated zone. The source model considers the sorptive properties and solubility of the contaminant. In Version 2.5, transport in the unsaturated zone is described by a plug flow or dispersive solution model. Transport in the saturated zone is calculated with a semi-analytical solution to the advection dispersion equation in groundwater. Three source models are included; leaching from a surface or buried source, infiltration pond, or user-defined arbitrary release. Dispersion in the aquifer may be described by fixed dispersivity values or three, spatial-variable dispersivity functions. Version 2.5 also includes a Monte Carlo sampling routine for uncertainty/sensitivity analysis and a preprocessor to allow multiple input files and multiple contaminants to be run in a single simulation. GWSCREEN has been validated against other codes using similar algorithms and techniques. The code was originally designed for assessment and screening of the groundwater pathway when field data are limited. It was intended to simulate relatively simple

  5. Quantitative assessment of possible human health risk associated with consumption of arsenic contaminated groundwater and wheat grains from Ropar Wetand and its environs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sakshi; Kaur, Jagdeep; Nagpal, Avinash Kaur; Kaur, Inderpreet

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic (As) is a carcinogenic metalloid that enters food chain through food and water and poses health risk to living beings. It is important to assess the As status in the environment and risks associated with it. Hence, a risk assessment study was conducted across Ropar wetland, Punjab, India and its environs in pre-monsoon season of 2013, to estimate the risk posed to adults and children via daily consumption of As contaminated groundwater and wheat grains. Arsenic concentrations determined in groundwater, soil and wheat grain samples using atomic absorption spectrometer ranged from 2.90 to 10.56 μg L(-1), 0.06 to 0.12 mg kg(-1) and 0.03 to 0.21 mg kg(-1), respectively. Arsenic in wheat grains showed significant negative correlation with phosphate content in soil indicating a competitive uptake of arsenate and phosphate ions by plants. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis suggested that both natural and anthropogenic factors contribute to variation in As content and other variables studied in soil and groundwater samples. Total cancer risk and hazard index were higher than the USEPA safety limits of 1.00 × 10(-6) and 1, respectively, for both adults and children indicating a high risk of cancer and other health disorders. Consumption of As contaminated wheat grains was found to pose higher risk of cancer and non-cancer health disorders as compared to intake of As contaminated groundwater by both adults and children. Moreover, children were found to be more prone to cancer and other heath disorders due to As exposure via wheat grains and groundwater as compared to adults. PMID:27491949

  6. Assessment of the potential for groundwater contamination using the DRASTIC/EGIS technique, Cheongju area, South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youn Jong; Hamm, Se-Yeong

    Groundwater contamination is becoming a major environmental problem in South Korea with the marked expansion of the industrial base and the explosive growth of the population. Even in rural areas, the increased use of fertilizers and pesticides, the presence of acid-mine drainage, and increase of volumes of domestic wastewaters are adding to groundwater pollution. The DRASTIC/EGIS model was used to evaluate the potential for groundwater contamination in the Cheongju city area, the first of several pilot studies. The model allows the designation of hydrogeologic settings within the study area, based on a composite description of all the major geologic and hydrogeologic factors for each setting. Then, a scheme for relative ranking of the hydrogeologic factors is applied to evaluate the relative vulnerability to groundwater contamination of each hydrogeologic setting. DRASTIC/EGIS can serve as a tool to evaluate pollution potential and so facilitate programs to protect groundwater resources. Résumé La contamination de l'eau souterraine devient un problème environnemental majeur en Corée du Sud, en relation avec le développement industriel bien marqué et l'explosion démographique. Meme dans les zones rurales, l'utilisation accrue d'engrais et de pesticides, le drainage acide de mines et les rejets croissants d'eaux usées contribuent à la pollution des nappes. Le modèle DRASTIC/EGIS a été utilisé pour évaluer le potentiel de contamination des eaux souterraines dans la région de la ville de Cheongju, la première de plusieurs régions pilotes. Le modèle permet de définir des ensembles hydrogéologiques dans la région étudiée, à partir de la description composite de tous les facteurs géologiques et hydrogéologiques essentiels pour chaque ensemble. Ensuite, un schéma pour le classement des facteurs hydrogéologiques est mis en oeuvre pour évaluer la vulnérabilité relative à la contamination des eaux souterraines pour chaque ensemble. DRASTIC

  7. Groundwater Data Package for Hanford Assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorne, Paul D.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Williams, Mark D.; Freedman, Vicky L.

    2006-01-31

    This report presents data and interpreted information that supports the groundwater module of the System Assessment Capability (SAC) used in Hanford Assessments. The objective of the groundwater module is to predict movement of radioactive and chemical contaminants through the aquifer to the Columbia River or other potential discharge locations. This data package is being revised as part of the deliverables under the Characterization of Systems Project (#49139) aimed at providing documentation for assessments being conducted under the Hanford Assessments Project (#47042). Both of these projects are components of the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessments Projects, managed by the Management and Integration Project (#47043).

  8. Groundwater Impacts of Radioactive Wastes and Associated Environmental Modeling Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Liu, Chongxuan

    2012-11-01

    This article provides a review of the major sources of radioactive wastes and their impacts on groundwater contamination. The review discusses the major biogeochemical processes that control the transport and fate of radionuclide contaminants in groundwater, and describe the evolution of mathematical models designed to simulate and assess the transport and transformation of radionuclides in groundwater.

  9. The challenge of emerging groundwater contaminants

    OpenAIRE

    Lapworth, Dan; Stuart, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    A large variety of trace contaminants are starting to be detected in groundwater at potentially environmentally significant concentrations. Such emerging contaminants (ECs) include not only newly developed compounds but also compounds newly discovered in the environment, in some cases due to analytical developments, and compounds that have only recently been categorised as contaminants. ECs include a host of different compounds including; pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), pe...

  10. Association of leukemia with radium groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation exposure, including the ingestion of radium, has been causally associated with leukemia in man. Groundwater samples from 27 counties on or near Florida phosphate lands were found to exceed 5 pCi/L total radium in 12.4% of measurements. The incidence of leukemia was greater in those counties with high levels of radium contamination (greater than 10% of the samples contaminated) than in those with low levels of contamination. Rank correlation coefficients of .56 and .45 were observed between the radium contamination level and the incidence of total leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia, respectively. The standardized incidence density ratio for those in high-contamination counties was 1.5 for total leukemia and 2.0 for acute myeloid leukemia. Further investigation is necessary, however, before a causal relationship between groundwater radium content and human leukemia can be established

  11. Hydrogeochemistry of alluvial groundwaters in an agricultural area: an implication for groundwater contamination susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Gi-Tak; Kim, Kangjoo; Yun, Seong-Taek; Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Soon-Oh; Choi, Byoung-Young; Kim, Hyoung-Soo; Rhee, Chul Woo

    2004-04-01

    Alluvial groundwaters in the area where intensive agricultural activity takes place were geochemically investigated to evaluate factors regulating groundwater quality of alluvial aquifers. For this study, 55 groundwater samples were taken from the uniformly distributed irrigation wells and were classified into three distinct groups according to their geochemical characteristics. This study reveals that the groundwater quality and the geochemical characteristics of the clustered groups are consistent with the geology of the area. The samples collected from the area where a thick silt bed overlies the sand aquifer are clustered into Group II and show water quality that is only slightly affected by the contaminants originating from the land surface. However, groundwaters of this group are very high in Fe and Mn levels due to strong anoxic condition caused by the thick silt bed. In contrast, Group I shows water quality largely influenced by agricultural activities (i.e., fertilization, liming) and occurs in the area adjacent to the river where the silt bed is not observed and the sand aquifer is covered with sandy soils. Group III mostly occurs in the upgradient of Group I where a thin, silty soil covers the sand aquifer. In overall, the results show that the clustered groups closely reflect the groundwater susceptibility to the contaminants originated from the land surface. This suggests that groundwater clustering based on water chemistry could be applied to the contamination susceptibility assessment for groundwaters in the agricultural area. PMID:14987935

  12. Hanford sitewide groundwater remediation strategy - groundwater contaminant predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the shutdown of the last major operating plants in 1987, the mission of the Hanford Site has changed from nuclear materials production to environmental restoration and waste management. The principal goals of the ongoing cleanup programs include the protection of the Columbia River and control of the spread of groundwater contamination

  13. In situ remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an effort to develop cost-efficient techniques for remediating uranium contaminated groundwater at DOE Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites nationwide, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) deployed a pilot scale research project at an UMTRA site in Durango, CO. Implementation included design, construction, and subsequent monitoring of an in situ passive reactive barrier to remove Uranium from the tailings pile effluent. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by emplacing a reactant material (in this experiment - various forms of metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. Conceptually the iron media reduces and/or adsorbs uranium in situ to acceptable regulatory levels. In addition, other metals such as Se, Mo, and As have been removed by the reductive/adsorptive process. The primary objective of the experiment was to eliminate the need for surface treatment of tailing pile effluent. Experimental design, and laboratory and field preliminary results are discussed with regard to other potential contaminated groundwater treatment applications

  14. Complexity of Groundwater Contaminants at DOE Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Jordan, P.

    2010-12-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the remediation and long-term stewardship of one of the world's largest groundwater contamination portfolios, with a significant number of plumes containing various contaminants, and considerable total mass and activity. As of 1999, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management was responsible for remediation, waste management, or nuclear materials and facility stabilization at 144 sites in 31 states and one U.S. territory, out of which 109 sites were expected to require long-term stewardship. Currently, 19 DOE sites are on the National Priority List. The total number of contaminated plumes on DOE lands is estimated to be 10,000. However, a significant number of DOE sites have not yet been fully characterized. The most prevalent contaminated media are groundwater and soil, although contaminated sediment, sludge, and surface water also are present. Groundwater, soil, and sediment contamination are present at 72% of all DOE sites. A proper characterization of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites is critical for accomplishing one of the primary DOE missions -- planning basic research to understand the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites. Note that the definitions of the terms 'site' and 'facility' may differ from one publication to another. In this report, the terms 'site,' 'facility' or 'installation' are used to identify a contiguous land area within the borders of a property, which may contain more than one plume. The term 'plume' is used here to indicate an individual area of contamination, which can be small or large. Even though several publications and databases contain information on groundwater contamination and remediation technologies, no statistical analyses of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites has been prepared since the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The DOE Groundwater Data Base

  15. Transport of contaminations in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to follow up the percolation of nitrogen components from surface to groundwater a lysimeter research station has been established in an agriculture experimental field south of Graz. The geology is characterized by Quaternary gravels and sands with relatively high permeability representing an important shallow aquifer used for public water supply in a regional extent. On the other hand the frequent use of fertilizers and liquid manures provoked a continuous increase of the nitrate content in the shallow groundwater, thus reflecting a serious conflict between drinking water protection and agricultural activities. At the lysimeter station, located between two different agricultural test fields (maize monoculture and crop rotation), a number of parameters are measured automatically: meteorologic factors (from atmosphere), soil temperature, soil moisture, water tension, free oxygen (from unsaturated zone), groundwater level, water temperature and conductivity (from saturated zone). Furthermore water samples are collected for hydrochemical and environmental isotope analysis. As a conclusion from the present state of the lysimeter studies it can be stated that chemical changes of nitrogen components cannot be limited to the root zone from covering plants, hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes can be applied for the simulation of transport of dissolved substances neglecting hydro- and biochemical reactions, more emphasis should be directed to nitrogen isotopes and the most proper results for groundwater protection can be achieved by the combined application and comparison of hydrological, chemical, biological and isotopical methods. (author)

  16. Groundwater resources and regional environmental radionuclide contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drinking water of good quality is considered as an absolutely necessary component of sustainable development of territories and their inhabitants. The environmental radionuclide contamination problem after human activities is at the edge in modern world in accordance with the sustainable development task. The regional contamination is affected the local and regional surface water-catchment areas, as well as the recharge areas of shallow unconfined and some stratum aquifers used for centralized water supply of the population. The obtained new data (UNDP (United Nations Development Programme) Project RUS/95/004 of the Russian Federation) on the radioecological state and the preliminary predictions within contaminated territories do not enable to consider groundwater as throughout reliably protected against radionuclide contamination. During exploitation shallow water the location of water wells within divides essentially decreases the low-quality drinking water obtaining risk The strategy must be aimed at obligatory of reliably protected deep groundwater in water supply systems. (author)

  17. Method to Remove Uranium/Vanadium Contamination from Groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzler, Donald R.; Morrison Stanley

    2004-07-27

    A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

  18. Groundwater quality assessment for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime at the Y-12 Plant. 1991 groundwater quality data and calculated rate of contaminant migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    This report contains groundwater quality data obtained during the 1991 calendar year at several hazardous and non-hazardous waste- management facilities associated with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant (Figure 1). These sites are located south of the Y-12 Plant in the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (CRHR), which is one of the three regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater quality monitoring and remediation (Figure 2). The Health, Safety, Environment, and Accountability (HSEA) Division of the Y-12 Plant Environmental Management Department manages the groundwater monitoring activities in each regime as part of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP).

  19. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site, near Gunnison, Colorado. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the second site-specific risk assessment document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Gunnison site. A preliminary risk assessment was conducted in 1990 to determine whether long-term use of ground water from private wells near the Gunnison site had the potential for adverse health effects. Due to the results of that preliminary risk assessment, the residents were provided bottled water on an interim basis. In July 1994, the residents and the nearby Valco cement/concrete plant were given the option to connect to anew alternate water supply system, eliminating the bottled water option. This document evaluates current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether more action is needed to protect human health and the environment and to comply with the EPA standards

  20. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site, near Gunnison, Colorado. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This report is the second site-specific risk assessment document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Gunnison site. A preliminary risk assessment was conducted in 1990 to determine whether long-term use of ground water from private wells near the Gunnison site had the potential for adverse health effects. Due to the results of that preliminary risk assessment, the residents were provided bottled water on an interim basis. In July 1994, the residents and the nearby Valco cement/concrete plant were given the option to connect to anew alternate water supply system, eliminating the bottled water option. This document evaluates current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether more action is needed to protect human health and the environment and to comply with the EPA standards.

  1. Assessment of soil, surface-water, and ground-water contamination at selected sites at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Water resources investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelan, D.J.; Olsen, L.D.; Cashel, M.L.; Tegeler, J.L.; Marchand, E.H.

    1998-08-01

    J-Field is located at the southernmost tip of the Gunpowder Neck Peninsula in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, on the western shore of Chesapeake Bay, in Harford County, Maryland. J-Field has been used by the U. S. Army since World War I as a testing ground for munitions, including chemical- warfare agents. From shortly after World War II into the 1970`s, chemical- warfare agents, high-explosive munitions, and industrial chemicals were tested and disposed of at J-Field by open-pit burning and by high-explosive demolition. Only emergency disposal operations have been conducted at J-Field since the early 1980`s. Soil, surface-water, and ground-water contamination has resulted from the migration of unburned chemicals and fuels from the disposal areas. Discharge of contaminants from ground water and runoff has resulted in surface- water contamination in the marshes and ponds in J-Field. This investigation was conducted from 1989 to 1994 as part of a remedial investigation of J-Field in response to Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) requirements. The nature and extent of contamination was assessed at five sites: the toxic-materials disposal area, the white-phosphorus disposal area, the riot-control-agent disposal area, the Robins Point demolition area, and the prototype building area. The toxic-materials disposal area was the most contaminated of the five sites investigated. Most of the soil- and surface- water contamination was detected in the marsh area to the east of the disposal pits. High concentrations of lead, antimony, cadmium, copper, and mercury were detected in soils at the edge of this marsh. Lead concentrations as high as 51 micrograms per liter (micrograms/L) and concentrations of other trace metals were highest in surface water at the edge of the marsh.

  2. Use of LCA as decision support for the selection of remedial strategies for remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemming, Gitte; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    Groundwater is the dominant source of drinking water in Denmark and the general policy is to maintain the groundwater as a clean source of drinking water. The risk of groundwater contamination is therefore often the prime reason for remediating a contaminated site. Chlorinated solvents are among...... groundwater, e.g. chlorinated solvents, in the LCA. The poster discusses possible ways to assess the risk for contaminating the groundwater with chlorinated solvents within the LCA framework. This can be used to assess the potential groundwater impact of residual contamination when remediation techniques with...

  3. Groundwater quality assessment for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the Y-12 Plant: 1991 groundwater quality data and calculated rate of contaminant migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    The report contains groundwater and surface water quality data obtained during the 1991 calendar year at several hazardous and non- hazardous waste management facilities associated with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant (Figure 1). These sites are southwest of the Y-12 Plant complex within the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (BCHR), which is one of three regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater and surface-water quality monitoring and remediation (Figure 2). The Environmental Management Department of the Y-12 Plant Health, Safety, Environment, and Accountability (HSEA) Division manages the monitoring activities in each regime as part of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP).

  4. Nitrate contamination of groundwater and its countermeasures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitamura, Hisayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The inevitable increases of food production and energy consumption with an increase in world population become main causes of an increase of nitrate load to the environment. Although nitrogen is essential for the growth of animal and plant as a constituent element of protein, excessive nitrate load to the environment contaminates groundwater resources used as drinking water and leads to seriously adverse effects on the health of man and livestock. In order to clarify the problem of nitrate contamination of groundwater and search a new trend of technology development from the viewpoint of environment remediation and protection, the present paper has reviewed adverse effects of nitrate on human health, the actual state of nitrogen cycle, several kinds of nitrate sources, measures for reducing nitrate level, etc. (author)

  5. Nitrate contamination of groundwater and its countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inevitable increases of food production and energy consumption with an increase in world population become main causes of an increase of nitrate load to the environment. Although nitrogen is essential for the growth of animal and plant as a constituent element of protein, excessive nitrate load to the environment contaminates groundwater resources used as drinking water and leads to seriously adverse effects on the health of man and livestock. In order to clarify the problem of nitrate contamination of groundwater and search a new trend of technology development from the viewpoint of environment remediation and protection, the present paper has reviewed adverse effects of nitrate on human health, the actual state of nitrogen cycle, several kinds of nitrate sources, measures for reducing nitrate level, etc. (author)

  6. A meta-analysis of groundwater contamination by nitrates at the African scale

    OpenAIRE

    Ouedraogo, Issoufou; Vanclooster, Marnik

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of groundwater with nitrate poses a major health risk to millions of people around Africa. Assessing the space-time distribution of this contamination, as well as understanding the factors that explain this contamination is important to manage sustainable drinking water at the regional scale. This study aims to assess the variables that contribute to nitrate pollution in groundwater at the pan-African scale by statistical modeling. We compiled a literature database of nitrate co...

  7. Purification of contaminated groundwater by membrane technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, In Soo; Chung, Chin Ki; Kim, Byoung Gon [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    The objective of this study is to apply the membrane separation technology to the purification of contaminated ground water in Korea. Under this scope, the purification was aimed to the drinking water level. The scale of the membrane system was chosen to a small filtration plant for local clean water supplies and/or heavy purifiers for buildings and public uses. The actual conditions of ground water contamination in Korea was surveyed to determine the major components to remove under the drinking water requirements. To set up a hybrid process with membrane methods, conventional purification methods were also investigated for the comparison purpose. The research results are summarized as follows : 1) Contamination of the groundwater in Korea has been found to be widespread across the country. The major contaminant were nitrate, bacteria, and organic chlorides. Some solvents and heavy metals are also supposed to exist in the ground water of industrial complexes, cities, and abandoned mines. 2) The purification methods currently used in public filtration plants appear not to be enough for new contaminants from recent industrial expanding. The advanced purification technologies generally adopted for this problem have been found to be unsuitable due to their very complicated design and operation, and lack of confidence in the purification performance. 3) The reverse osmosis tested with FilmTec FT30 membrane was found to remove nitrate ions in water with over 90 % efficiency. 4) The suitable membrane process for the contaminated groundwater in Korea has been found to be the treatments composed of activated carbon, microfiltration, reverse osmosis or ultrafiltration, and disinfection. The activated carbon treatment could be omitted for the water of low organic contaminants. The microfiltration and the reverse osmosis treatments stand for the conventional methods of filtration plants and the advanced methods for hardly removable components, respectively. It is recommended

  8. Groundwater contamination downstream of a contaminant penetration site. I. Extension-expansion of the contaminant plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, H.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    This study concerns the possible use of boundary layer (BL) approach for the analysis and evaluation of contaminant transport in groundwater due to contaminant penetration into the groundwater aquifer through a site of limited size. The contaminant penetration may occur through either the upper (surface) or lower (bedrock) boundary of the aquifer. Two general cases of contaminant penetration mechanisms are considered: (1) the contaminant is transferred through an interface between a contaminating and freshwater fluid phases, and (2) the contaminant arrives at groundwater by leakage and percolation. For the purpose of BL evaluation the contaminant plume is divided into three different sections: (1) the penetration section, (2) the extension-expansion section, and (3) the spearhead section. In each section a different BL method approach yields simple analytical expressions for the description of the contaminant plume migration and contaminant transport. Previous studies of the BL method can be directly applied to the evaluation of contaminant transport at the contaminant penetration section. The present study extends those studies and concerns the contaminant transport in the two other sections, which are located downstream of the penetration section. This study shows that the contaminant concentration profiles in sections 2 and 3 incorporate two BLs: (1) an inner BL adjacent to the aquifer bottom or surface boundary, and (2) an outer BL, which develops above or below the inner one. The method developed in the present study has been applied to practical issues concerning salinity penetration into groundwater in south central Kansas.

  9. Heteroaromatic compounds and their biodegradation products in creosote-contaminated groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, S.S.; Arvin, E.; Mosbæk, H.;

    1998-01-01

    Creosote contamination of groundwater in the vicinity of old gasworks and woodtreatment facilities is a well‐known problem. Risk assessments typically include measurements of mono‐ and poly‐aromatic compounds and phenols. The content of nitrogen‐, sulphur‐ and oxygen‐containing heteroaromatic...... compounds (NSO) and their degradation products is seldom determined, although they often are strong smelling, toxic, and have high solubilities and hence constitute a potential for ground‐water contamination. This paper reviews state of the knowledge regarding the analysis of NSO and their degradation...... products, and their occurrence and fate in groundwater under various redox conditions to assess their potential as groundwater contaminants at creosote‐contaminated sites....

  10. Dilution and volatilization of groundwater contaminant discharges in streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisopou, Angeliki; Bjerg, Poul L.; Sonne, Anne T.; Balbarini, Nicola; Rosenberg, Louise; Binning, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    An analytical solution to describe dilution and volatilization of a continuous groundwater contaminant plume into streams is developed for risk assessment. The location of groundwater plume discharge into the stream (discharge through the side versus bottom of the stream) and different distributions of the contaminant plume concentration (Gaussian, homogeneous or heterogeneous distribution) are considered. The model considering the plume discharged through the bank of the river, with a uniform concentration distribution was the most appropriate for risk assessment due to its simplicity and limited data requirements. The dilution and volatilization model is able to predict the entire concentration field, and thus the mixing zone, maximum concentration and fully mixed concentration in the stream. It can also be used to identify groundwater discharge zones from in-stream concentration measurement. The solution was successfully applied to published field data obtained in a large and a small Danish stream and provided valuable information on the risk posed by the groundwater contaminant plumes. The results provided by the dilution and volatilization model are very different to those obtained with existing point source models, with a distributed source leading to a larger mixing length and different concentration field. The dilution model can also provide recommendations for sampling locations and the size of impact zones in streams. This is of interest for regulators, for example when developing guidelines for the implementation of the European Water Framework Directive.

  11. Hydrocone groundwater study delineates petroleum contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law Environmental, Inc., (LAW), conducted a groundwater survey at Myrtle Beach Air Force Base, South Carolina, to delineate the horizontal and vertical extent of petroleum contamination at the BX Service station. The survey was performed using the In-Situ Technology Hydrocone in conjunction with a field gas chromatograph. The Hydrocone proved to be a reliable, cost-effective method of extracting multi-depth groundwater samples without incurring the expenses associated with the installation and maintenance of monitoring wells. The process generates virtually no investigation-derived waste. The Hydrocone system consists of an elongated cylindrical steel sampler attached to drill rods on a direct push trailer mounted rig. A gas/electronic cable connects to the sampler, and a computer installed on the rig displays pressure on the tool, sampling time, and groundwater volume collected. A total of 18 groundwater samples were collected from 12 locations around the site at sampling depths of approximately 10, 20, and 30 feet below the ground surface. The Hydrocone/gas chromatograph method produced a large volume of groundwater quality data within a relatively short time interval

  12. GWSCREEN: A semi-analytical model for assessment of the groundwater pathway from surface or buried contamination. Theory and user`s manual, Version 2.0: Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rood, A.S.

    1994-06-01

    Multimedia exposure assessment of hazardous chemicals and radionuclides requires that all pathways of exposure be investigated. The GWSCREEN model was designed to perform initial screening calculations for groundwater pathway impacts resulting from the leaching of surficial and buried contamination at CERCLA sites identified as low probability hazard at the INEL. In Version 2.0, an additional model was added to calculate impacts to groundwater from the operation of a percolation pond. The model was designed to make best use of the data that would potentially be available. These data include the area and depth of contamination, sorptive properties and solubility limit of the contaminant, depth to aquifer, and the physical properties of the aquifer (porosity, velocity, and dispersivity). For the pond model, data on effluent flow rates and operation time are required. Model output includes the limiting soil concentration such that, after leaching and transport to the aquifer, regulatory contaminant levels in groundwater are not exceeded. Also, groundwater concentration as a function of time may be calculated. The model considers only drinking water consumption and does not include the transfer of contamination to food products due to irrigation with contaminated water. Radiological dose, carcinogenic risk, and the hazard quotient are calculated for the peak time using the user-defined input mass (or activity). Appendices contain sample problems and the source code listing.

  13. Public-health assessment for Wausau Ground-water Contamination, Wausau, Marathon County, Wisconsin, Region 5. CERCLIS No. WID980993521. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-07-01

    The Wausau Groundwater Contamination Superfund Site comprises part of the well field serving the City of Wausau in north-central Wisconsin, Marathon County. Contamination of city ground water was discovered in 1982. Sources of contamination include two sites on the west side of the Wisconsin River, and two sites on the east side. Minimizing the levels of VOCs in the water supply depends on the continued efficient operation of the equipment at the water treatment plant, the volume of contaminated water used, the level of pollution in the water as it comes into the plant, and the ability to blend treated water with uncontaminated water. Other ways residents could possibly be exposed to contamination from the site include breathing air near volatile organic compound (VOC) stripper towers at the water treatment plant, touching the water or sediments of Bos Creek, or touching contaminated soil at the Wausau Chemical property. These sources of contamination are not expected to cause health effects.

  14. A review of groundwater contamination near municipal solid waste landfill sites in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhiyong; Ma, Haining; Shi, Guozhong; He, Li; Wei, Luoyu; Shi, Qingqing

    2016-11-01

    Landfills are the most widely used method for municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal method in China. However, these facilities have caused serious groundwater contamination due to the leakage of leachate. This study, analyzed 32 scientific papers, a field survey and an environmental assessment report related to groundwater contamination caused by landfills in China. The groundwater quality in the vicinity of landfills was assessed as "very bad" by a comprehensive score (FI) of 7.85 by the Grading Method in China. Variety of pollutants consisting of 96 groundwater pollutants, 3 organic matter indicators, 2 visual pollutants and 6 aggregative pollutants had been detected in the various studies. Twenty-two kinds of pollutants were considered to be dominant. According to the Kruskal-Wallis test and the median test, groundwater contamination differed significantly between regions in China, but there were no significant differences between dry season and wet season measurements, except for some pollutants in a few landfill sites. Generally, the groundwater contamination appeared in the initial landfill stage after five years and peaked some years afterward. In this stage, the Nemerow Index (PI) of groundwater increased exponentially as landfill age increased at some sites, but afterwards decreased exponentially with increasing age at others. After 25years, the groundwater contamination was very low at selected landfills. The PI values of landfills decreased exponentially as the pollutant migration distance increased. Therefore, the groundwater contamination mainly appeared within 1000m of a landfill and most of serious groundwater contamination occurred within 200m. The results not only indicate that the groundwater contamination near MSW landfills should be a concern, but also are valuable to remediate the groundwater contamination near MSW landfills and to prevent the MSW landfill from secondary pollutions, especially for developing countries considering the similar

  15. Tracey - a simulation model of trace element fluxes in soil-plant system for long-term assessment of a radioactive groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a general trace element model called Tracey to simulate dynamically the possible accumulation of radionuclides as a result of an long-term radioactive contamination of groundwater in terrestrial ecosystems. The overall objectives of the study are to: 1) Develop and evaluate a multi-compartmental model that dynamically simulates the transport and accumulation of a radionuclide in the soil-plant system at a time scale relevant for risk assessment of nuclear fuel waste; and 2) Asses the possible accumulation of radionuclide in terrestrial ecosystems due to an eventual long-term continuous radioactive groundwater contamination. Specific objectives were to assess: - The proportion of the contamination accumulated and where it is stored in the ecosystem. - The importance of the plant uptake approach for accumulation of radionuclides. - The most important radionuclide properties and ecosystem characteristics for accumulation and losses. - The proportion of the contamination lost and how is it lost. - The circumstances which stimulated export of radionuclides to other ecosystems. The model presented here, called Tracey, is a stand-alone version to allow for long simulation periods relevant for the time scale of risk assessment of nuclear waste (i.e. several thousand years) with time steps as short as one day. Tracey is a multi-compartmental model in which fluxes and storage of radionuclide are described for different plant parts and for several soil layers. Each layer includes pools of slowly and quickly decomposing litter, humus, solved and absorbed trace element. The trace element fluxes are assumed to be proportional to either water or carbon fluxes, these fluxes are simulated using the dynamic model CoupModel for fluxes of water, carbon, nitrogen and carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. Two different model approaches were used to describe plant uptake of radionuclides. The one called passive uptake approach is driven by water uptake and the one called active

  16. Fluorine contamination in groundwater: a major challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Mithas Ahmad; Sankar, K; Dar, Imran A

    2011-02-01

    Fluoride in high concentration in groundwater has been reported from many parts of India. However, a systematic study is required to understand the behavior of fluoride in natural water in terms of local hydrogeological setting, climatic conditions, and agricultural practices. The present study is an attempt to assess hydrogeochemistry of groundwater in parts of Palar river basin pertaining to Kancheepuram district Tamil Nadu to understand the fluoride abundance in groundwater and to deduce the chemical parameters responsible for the dissolution activity of fluoride. The study area is geologically occupied by partly sedimentary and partly crystalline formations. A total of 50 dug cum borewell-water samples, representing an area of 2,628.92 km2. The results of the chemical analyses in September 2009 show fluoride abundance in the range of 1 to 3.24 mg/l with 86% of the samples in excess of the permissible limit of 1.5 mg/l. Presence of fluoride-bearing minerals in the host rock, chemical properties like decomposition, dissociation, and dissolution, and their interaction with water are considered to be the main causes for fluoride in groundwater. Chemical weathering with relatively high alkalinity favors high concentration of fluoride in groundwater. Villagers who consume nonpotable high fluoride water may suffer from yellow, cracked teeth; joint pains; and crippled limbs and also age rapidly. PMID:20364310

  17. Comparing Groundwater Contamination Vulnerability in Large, Urbanized Basins of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, J. E.; Hudson, G. B.; Leif, R.; Eaton, G. F.

    2002-12-01

    We have sampled over 700 public drinking water wells as part of a study to assess relative contamination susceptibility of the major groundwater basins in California. The parameters used to rank wells according to vulnerability are groundwater age dates (using the tritium-3helium method), stable isotopes of the water molecule (for water source determination), and occurrence of low level Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). Long-screened production wells supply clean, high quality samples, and sample the resource that is being used. However, the groundwater age distribution from production wells may be quite broad, and comparisons to the predicted initial tritium value for the measured mean age, along with analysis of radiogenic 4Helium are used to de-convolute the mixed age. Results from the Los Angeles and Orange County Basins, and Santa Clara Valley, will be presented. A large volume of both imported and locally captured water is artificially recharged in these intensively managed basins. An effective confining unit in the Santa Clara Valley basin prevents widespread vertical transport of contaminants down to drinking water wells. In the southern California basins, groundwater age and the frequency of occurrence of low-level VOCs are spatially correlated, with more recently recharged water likely to have VOC detections. 'Pre-modern' water is nearly always free of VOCs, except when a suspected 'short circuit', (e.g., loss of integrity in well casing) allows near surface contamination to reach 'old' water. Methyl-tertiary-Butyl Ether (MTBE) can be a useful time marker in groundwater basins, with water recharged after the 1980's showing traces of MTBE. Water resource managers can use these vulnerability assessments to focus monitoring efforts, site new wells, plan land use, and evaluate remediation activities. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under

  18. Tracing groundwater recharge in the San Luis Valley, Colorado: Groundwater contamination susceptibility in an agricultural watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Tanya; Hindshaw, Ruth; Singer, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Water is a vital resource in any agricultural watershed, yet in the arid western United States farming practices threaten the quality and availability of groundwater. This is a pressing concern in the San Luis Valley, southern Colorado, where agriculture comprises 30% of the local economy, and employs over half the valley population. Although 54 % of the water used for irrigation is surface water, farmers do not usually apply this water directly to their fields. Instead, the water is often diverted into pits which recharge the aquifer, and the water is subsequently pumped during the following irrigation season. The Rio Grande Water Conservation District recognises that recharge to the unconfined aquifer has been outpaced by commercial irrigation for at least four decades, resulting in a decline in groundwater levels. Recycled irrigation water, and leakage from unlined canals now represent the greatest recharge contribution to the unconfined aquifer in this region. This makes the shallow groundwater particularly susceptible to agricultural contamination. The purpose of this study is to assess groundwater contamination in the unconfined and upper confined aquifers of the San Luis Valley, which are the most susceptible to contamination due to their close proximity to the surface. Although concentrations of potentially harmful contaminants from agricultural runoff are regularly monitored, the large spatial and temporal fluctuations in values make it difficult to determine long-term trends. We have analysed δ18O, δ2H and major-ion chemistry of 57 groundwater, stream and precipitation samples, collected in June 2014, and interpreted them alongside regional stream flow data and groundwater levels. This will allow us to study the seasonality and locality of groundwater recharge to provide greater insight into the watershed's potential for pollution. A groundwater vulnerability assessment was performed using the model DRASTIC (Depth to water, Recharge, Aquifer media, Soil

  19. 有机污染场地地下水风险评价指标体系构建的探讨%Investigation on the Establishment of Index System for Groundwater Risk Assessment at the Organically Contaminated Site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓红; 张新钰; 林健

    2012-01-01

    污染场地中的有机污染物严重威胁着地下水环境。本文针对化工企业排放的废水、废渣对地下水环境的影响,在地下水环境承载力影响因素、污染场地污染物渗入影响因素识别的基础上,依据指标选取的科学性、针对性、可操作性原则,构建了风险评价指标体系,给出了各指标的选取原则和赋值方法,并应用于典型有机污染场地进行地下水风险评价指标体系的检验。结果表明,在地下水天然防污能力低、污染场地潜在风险高的区域,地下水处于高风险区,而地下水天然防污能力高、污染场地潜在风险低的区域,地下水风险等级低,评价结果可靠。该指标体系的构建、指标的选取原则和赋值方法是合理的,具有实际运用价值。%Organically contaminated site imposed serious threat to groundwater environment.This paper aims at the influence on groundwater environment of chemical industry's wastewater and waste solid.On the basis of distinguishing the factors affecting groundwater environmental bearing capacity and pollutant infiltration,the index system for groundwater risk assessment was established with scientific,pertinent and operational principles.Furthermore,the assignment method and selection principle of every index were given.Then,the index system was applied to groundwater risk assessment at a typical organically contaminated site.The assessment results showed the groundwater pollution risk was high in the area with high groundwater natural anti-fouling ability and low site contaminated risk.On the other hand,the groundwater pollution risk was low in the area with high groundwater natural anti-fouling ability and low potential site contaminated risk.The assessment result was reliable.The research showed the index system and its section principle and assignment method were reasonable,and it is of practical application value.

  20. Understanding arsenic contamination of groundwater in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of water contamination by naturally occurring arsenic confronts governments, public and private utilities, and the development community with a new challenge for implementing operational mitigation activities under difficult conditions of imperfect knowledge - especially for arsenic mitigation for the benefit of the rural poor. With more than a conservative estimate of 20 million of its 130 million people assumed to be drinking contaminated water and another 70 million potentially at risk, Bangladesh is facing what has been described as perhaps the largest mass poisoning in history. High concentrations of naturally occurring arsenic have already been found in water from tens of thousands of tube wells, the main source of potable water, in 59 out of Bangladesh's 64 districts. Arsenic contamination is highly irregular, so tube wells in neighboring locations or even different depths can be safe. Arsenic is extremely hazardous if ingested in drinking water or used in cooking in excess of the maximum permissible limit of 0.01 mg/liter over an extended period of time. Even in the early 1970s, most of Bangladesh's rural population got its drinking water from surface ponds and nearly a quarter of a million children died each year from water-borne diseases. Groundwater now constitutes the major source of drinking water in Bangladesh with 95% of the drinking water coming from underground sources. The provision of tube well water for 97 percent of the rural population has been credited with bringing down the high incidence of diarrheal diseases and contributing to a halving of the infant mortality rate. Paradoxically, the same wells that saved so many lives now pose a threat due to the unforeseen hazard of arsenic. The provenance of arsenic rich minerals in sediments of the Bengal basin as a component of geological formations is believed to be from the Himalayan mountain range. Arsenic has been found in different uncropped geological hard rock formations

  1. Tracey - a simulation model of trace element fluxes in soil-plant system for long-term assessment of a radioactive groundwater contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaerdenaes, Annemieke (Dept. of Soil and Environment, Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden)); Eckersten, Henrik (Dept. of Ecology and Crop Production, Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden)); Reinlert, Andre (Dept. of Physical Geography and Ecosystems Analysis, Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden)); Gustafsson, David; Jansson, Per-Erik (Dept. Land and WaterResources, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)); Ekstroem, Per-Anders; Avila, Rodolfo (Facilia AB, Bromma (Sweden)); Greger, Maria (Dept. of Botany, Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-10-15

    We developed a general trace element model called Tracey to simulate dynamically the possible accumulation of radionuclides as a result of an long-term radioactive contamination of groundwater in terrestrial ecosystems. The overall objectives of the study are to: 1) Develop and evaluate a multi-compartmental model that dynamically simulates the transport and accumulation of a radionuclide in the soil-plant system at a time scale relevant for risk assessment of nuclear fuel waste; and 2) Asses the possible accumulation of radionuclide in terrestrial ecosystems due to an eventual long-term continuous radioactive groundwater contamination. Specific objectives were to assess: - The proportion of the contamination accumulated and where it is stored in the ecosystem. - The importance of the plant uptake approach for accumulation of radionuclides. - The most important radionuclide properties and ecosystem characteristics for accumulation and losses. - The proportion of the contamination lost and how is it lost. - The circumstances which stimulated export of radionuclides to other ecosystems. The model presented here, called Tracey, is a stand-alone version to allow for long simulation periods relevant for the time scale of risk assessment of nuclear waste (i.e. several thousand years) with time steps as short as one day. Tracey is a multi-compartmental model in which fluxes and storage of radionuclide are described for different plant parts and for several soil layers. Each layer includes pools of slowly and quickly decomposing litter, humus, solved and absorbed trace element. The trace element fluxes are assumed to be proportional to either water or carbon fluxes, these fluxes are simulated using the dynamic model CoupModel for fluxes of water, carbon, nitrogen and carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. Two different model approaches were used to describe plant uptake of radionuclides. The one called passive uptake approach is driven by water uptake and the one called active

  2. Potassium ferrate treatment of RFETS' contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potassium ferrate treatment study of Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) groundwater was performed under the Sitewide Treatability Studies Program (STSP). This study was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of potassium ferrate in a water treatment system to remove the contaminants of concern (COCS) from groundwater at the RFETS. Potassium ferrate is a simple salt where the iron is in the plus six valence state. It is the iron at the plus six valence state (Fe +6) that makes it an unique water treatment chemical, especially in waters where the pH is greater than seven. In basic solutions where the solubility of the oxides/hydroxides of many of the COCs is low, solids are formed as the pH is raised. By using ferrate these solids are agglomerated so they can be effectively removed by sedimentation in conventional water treatment equipment. The objective of this study was to determine the quality of water after treatment with potassium ferrate and to determine if the Colorado Water Quality Control Commission (CWQCC) discharge limits for the COCs listed in Table 1.0-1 could be met. Radionuclides in the groundwater were of special concern

  3. Assessment of nitrate contamination risk: The Italian experience

    OpenAIRE

    Capri, E.; Delgado Huertas, Antonio; VASSALLO, M

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to show the results of the Italian research project of national interest (PRIN) launched in 2006 and finished in 2008, concerning the “assessment of groundwater contamination risk by nitrates assessment”. The project verified the IPNOA method for nitrate groundwater contamination risk assessment in four test-sites of Italy. The IPNOA is a parametric index which assesses the potential hazard of nitrate contamination originating from agriculture on a regional scale....

  4. Assessment of radon concentration and heavy metal contamination in groundwater samples from some areas of Fazilka District, Punjab, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater samples taken from 20 villages of Fazilka district, Punjab, India were analysed for Radon (Rn) concentration using RAD7, an electronic radon detector (Durridge Co.). Radon concentration varies from 1.4±1.0 Bq/l to 4.9±3.0Bq/l which is much below the safe limits proposed by USEPA and UNSCEAR. The mean annual effective dose calculated for these samples was also found to be within the limits provided by WHO and EU council. These samples were also analysed for concentration of certain heavy elements like As, Pb, Zn, Cu, Hg, Ni, and Cd using Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES). Out of these, concentration of As and Pb were found to exceed the permissible limits suggested by USEPA. (author)

  5. Intrinsic bioremediation of diesel-contaminated cold groundwater in bedrock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural attenuation refers to the natural process by which contaminants in groundwater or soil are reduced through a combination of physico-chemical processes and biodegradation by indigenous organisms. The physico chemical processes include advection, dilution, dispersion, sorption, volatilization and abiotic transformation. This study evaluated the historical contaminant and geochemical evidence of natural attenuation at a well site where groundwater had been contaminated by a diesel fuel leak in 1982. In particular, evidence of intrinsic bioremediation was evaluated. Evidence of microbial activity was determined by most probably number (MPN) and commercial biological activity reaction tests. Groundwater samples from the site were incubated in a laboratory under aerobic and anaerobic conditions with electron acceptor and nutrient amendment to assess microbial activity. Mineralization of carbon 14-dodecane was measured to determine aerobic biodegradation rates. Anaerobic biodegradation rates were calculated from the depletion of total extractable hydrocarbon over 717 days. Nutrient addition increased the anaerobic first-order biodegradation rate from 0.0005 to 0.0016 per day. It was suggested controlled nutrient addition can improve the current slow rates of intrinsic bioremediation. 33 refs., 9 tabs., 5 figs

  6. Stable isotopic and hydrochemical study on groundwater contamination at IARI farm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study reveals that stable isotope (18O) technique in integration with hydrochemical information is a potential tool to assess the cause of groundwater contamination. The wide range of δ18O values indicate that the Indian Agriculture Research Institute (IARI) farm area, has non-homogeneous groundwater system in its lateral extent. δ18O and Cl relationship suggest that the groundwater mixing is taking place along specific flow pathways. The study further indicates the leaching of salts during recharge with evaporative conditions and due to regular application of nitrogen fertilizers there is nitrate contamination in the groundwater. (author). 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  7. Performance assessment techniques for groundwater recovery and treatment systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, G.L. [Environmental Resources Management, Inc., Exton, PA (United States)

    1993-03-01

    Groundwater recovery and treatment (pump and treat systems) continue to be the most commonly selected remedial technology for groundwater restoration and protection programs at hazardous waste sites and RCRA facilities nationwide. Implementing a typical groundwater recovery and treatment system includes the initial assessment of groundwater quality, characterizing aquifer hydrodynamics, recovery system design, system installation, testing, permitting, and operation and maintenance. This paper focuses on methods used to assess the long-term efficiency of a pump and treat system. Regulatory agencies and industry alike are sensitive to the need for accurate assessment of the performance and success of groundwater recovery systems for contaminant plume abatement and aquifer restoration. Several assessment methods are available to measure the long-term performance of a groundwater recovery system. This paper presents six assessment techniques: degree of compliance with regulatory agency agreement (Consent Order of Record of Decision), hydraulic demonstration of system performance, contaminant mass recovery calculation, system design and performance comparison, statistical evaluation of groundwater quality and preferably, integration of the assessment methods. Applying specific recovery system assessment methods depends upon the type, amount, and quality of data available. Use of an integrated approach is encouraged to evaluate the success of a groundwater recovery and treatment system. The methods presented in this paper are for engineers and corporate management to use when discussing the effectiveness of groundwater remediation systems with their environmental consultant. In addition, an independent (third party) system evaluation is recommended to be sure that a recovery system operates efficiently and with minimum expense.

  8. Groundwater and contaminant transport modelling at the Sydney Tar Ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, M. [Groundwater Insight Inc., Halifax, NS (Canada); Check, G. [Jacques Whitford Environment Ltd., Halifax, NS (Canada); Carey, G. [Environmental Inst. for Continuing Education, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Abbey, D. [Waterloo Hydrogeologic, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Baechler, F. [ADI Ltd., Sydney, NS (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    The Muggah Creek Watershed, a tidal estuary located in Sydney, Nova Scotia, is known locally as the Tar Ponds. Over the past century, the Tar Ponds have accumulated contaminants in the contributing watershed from the iron, steel and coke manufacturing. There are sediments contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). A groundwater modelling program was developed to estimate current contaminant fluxes to the estuary and site streams, through groundwater. Attempts were made to incorporate a complex stratigraphic profile, where groundwater flow and contaminant transport is strongly controlled by shallow fractured bedrock, into the conceptual model developed for the site. This conceptual model for groundwater flow and contaminant transport at the Sydney Tar Ponds site was presented. The complex flow patterns between bedrock and overburden, and between the bedrock units and surface water bodies were illustrated with model simulations. It was found that groundwater flow was dominated by discharge to the streams and the estuary. 6 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs.

  9. Selection of Dispersivity in Groundwater Risk Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武晓峰; 唐杰

    2004-01-01

    The Domenico model is used in combination with ASTM E 1739 in a Tier 2 risk assessment of chlorinated organic solvents contaminated groundwater sites to predict potential contaminant concentration in groundwater down-gradient from the point of exposure (POE). A knowledge of the dispersivity parameters is necessary for carrying out this calculation. A constant longitudinal dispersivity of 10 m is often used in analytical and numerical calculation. However, because of the scale effect of dispersion, two other main approaches are currently often used. From the viewpoint of conservative principle in risk assessment, it is necessary to determine which dispersivity data will give a higher predicted concentration, corresponding to a more conservative risk calculation. Generally, it is considered that a smaller dispersivity leads to a higher predicted concentration. This assumption is correct when dispersion is the only natural attenuation factor. However, degradation of commonly encountered chlorinated organic solvents in environment under natural condition has been widely reported. Calculations given in this paper of several representative cases show that a general consideration of the influence of dispersivity on concentration prediction is not always correct when a degradation term is included in the calculation. To give a conservative risk calculation, the scale effect of dispersion is considered. Calculations also show that the dispersivity parameters need to be determined by considering the POE distance from the source, the groundwater velocity, and the degradation rate of the contaminant.

  10. Significance of groundwater flux on contaminant concentration and mass discharge in the nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contaminated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianting; Sun, Dongmin

    2016-09-01

    Groundwater flowing through residual nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source zone will cause NAPL dissolution and generate large contaminant plume. The use of contaminant mass discharge (CMD) measurements in addition to NAPL aqueous phase concentration to characterize site conditions and assess remediation performance is becoming popular. In this study, we developed new and generic numerical models to investigate the significance of groundwater flux temporal variations on the NAPL source dynamics. The developed models can accommodate any temporal variations of groundwater flux in the source zone. We examined the various features of groundwater flux using a few selected functional forms of linear increase/decrease, gradual smooth increase/decrease, and periodic fluctuations with a general trend. Groundwater flux temporal variations have more pronounced effects on the contaminant mass discharge dynamics than the aqueous concentration. If the groundwater flux initially increases, then the reduction in contaminant mass discharge (CMDR) vs. NAPL mass reduction (MR) relationship is mainly downward concave. If the groundwater flux initially decreases, then CMDR vs. MR relationship is mainly upward convex. If the groundwater flux variations are periodic, the CMDR vs. MR relationship tends to also have periodic variations ranging from upward convex to downward concave. Eventually, however, the CMDR vs. MR relationship approaches 1:1 when majority of the NAPL mass becomes depleted.

  11. Onsite disposal of radioactive waste: Estimating potential groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volumes 1 and 2 of this report describe the NRC's methodology for assessing the potential public health and environmental impacts associated with onsite disposal of very low activity radioactive materials. This volume (Vol. 3) describes a general methodology for predicting potential groundwater contamination from onsite disposal. The methodology includes formulating a conceptual model, representing the conceptual model mathematically, estimating conservative parameters, and predicting receptor concentrations. Processes which must generally be considered in the methodology include infiltration, leaching of radionuclides from the waste, transport to the saturated zone, transport within the saturated zone, and withdrawal at a receptor location. A case study of shallow burial of iodine-125 illustrates application of the MOCMOD84 version of the US Geological Survey's 2-D solute transport model and a corresponding analytical solution. The appendices include a description and listing of MOCMOD84, descriptions of several analytical solution techniques, and a procedure for estimating conservative groundwater velocity values

  12. Petroleum contaminated ground-water: Remediation using activated carbon.

    OpenAIRE

    Ayotamuno, M. J.; Kogbara, R. B.; Ogaji, S. O. T.; Probert, S. D.

    2006-01-01

    Ground-water contamination resulting from the leakage of crude oil and refined petroleum products during extraction and processing operations is a serious and a growing environmental problem in Nigeria. Consequently, a study of the use of activated carbon (AC) in the clean up was undertaken with the aim of reducing the water contamination to a more acceptable level. In the experiments described, crude-oil contamination of ground water was simulated under laboratory conditions using ground-wat...

  13. Temporal dynamics of pore water concentrations of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, and Zn and their controlling factors in a contaminated floodplain soil assessed by undisturbed groundwater lysimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We aimed to assess the dynamics of pore water concentrations of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Zn and their controlling factors (EH, pH, DOC, Fe, Mn, and SO42−) in a contaminated floodplain soil under different flood-dry-cycles. Two parallel undisturbed groundwater lysimeters (mean values presented) were used for long term (LT; 94 days) and short term (ST; 21 days) flood-dry-cycles. Reducing conditions under LT lead to low EH and pH, while DOC, Co, Fe, Mn, and Ni increased. Cadmium, Cu, Zn, and SO42− increased under oxidizing conditions during ST. Cobalt and Ni revealed a similar behavior which seem to governed by EH/pH, Mn, Fe, and DOC. Cadmium, Cu, and Zn reveal a similar fate; their dynamics were affected by EH/pH, DOC, and SO42−. Our findings suggest that a release of Cd, Cu, Co, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Zn under different flood-dry-cycles can assumed what might create potential environmental risks in using metal-enriched floodplain soils. - Highlights: • Flooding durations and frequency affect soil metal dynamics in undisturbed lysimeters. • Long term flooding released DOC, Co, Fe, Mn, and Ni to soil solution. • During short term cycles Cd, Cu, Zn, and SO42− tended to be mobilized at high EH. • Dynamics of Co and Ni were controlled mainly by chemistry of Fe, Mn, and DOC. • Dynamics of Cd, Cu, and Zn were governed mainly by DOC and SO42−. - Flooding duration and frequency affect dynamics of metals in a floodplain soil

  14. Hanford Sitewide Groundwater Remediation Strategy. Groundwater Contaminant Predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DOE and other signatories of the Tri-Party Agreement recognized that the complexity of the groundwater cleanup necessitated the development of a Hanford Sitewide Groundwater Remediation Strategy to guide the effort and the Groundwater Protection Management Plan to help coordinate and manage the program. The groundwater remediation and associated technology development activities are directly related to the initial approach to groundwater remediation as defined in the Strategy. Active projects to remediate groundwater are ongoing in the 200 Areas for uranium, technetium-99, and organics, and in the 100 Area for chromium and strontium-90.It was also recognized that final remediation decisions needed information collected from field activities and predictions of groundwater conditions over time. Field-scale remediation will define the effectiveness of the selected approaches in Hanford geohydrologic conditions. Future predictions will be used to define the scope of the remediation effort needed to meet specific water quality or risk-based numerical goals

  15. Evaluation of Deep Vadose Zone Contaminant Flux into Groundwater: Approach and Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Last, George V.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.

    2016-03-09

    For sites with a contaminant source located in the vadose zone, the nature and extent of groundwater contaminant plumes are a function of the contaminant flux from the vadose zone to groundwater. Especially for thick vadose zones, transport may be relatively slow making it difficult to directly measure contaminant flux. An integrated assessment approach, supported by site characterization and monitoring data, is presented to explain current vadose zone contaminant distributions and to estimate future contaminant flux to groundwater in support of remediation decisions. The U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site (WA, USA) SX Tank Farm was used as a case study because of a large existing contaminant inventory in its deep vadose zone, the presence of a limited-extent groundwater plume, and the relatively large amount of available data for the site. A predictive quantitative analysis was applied to refine a baseline conceptual model through the completion of a series of targeted simulations. The analysis revealed that site recharge is the most important flux-controlling process for future contaminant flux. Tank leak characteristics and subsurface heterogeneities appear to have a limited effect on long-term contaminant flux into groundwater. The occurrence of the current technetium-99 groundwater plume was explained by taking into account a considerable historical water-line leak adjacent to one of the tanks. The analysis further indicates that the vast majority of technetium-99 is expected to migrate into the groundwater during the next century. The approach provides a template for use in evaluating contaminant flux to groundwater using existing site data and has elements that are relevant to other disposal sites with a thick vadose zone.

  16. Evaluation of deep vadose zone contaminant flux into groundwater: Approach and case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostrom, M.; Truex, M. J.; Last, G. V.; Strickland, C. E.; Tartakovsky, G. D.

    2016-06-01

    For sites with a contaminant source located in the vadose zone, the nature and extent of groundwater contaminant plumes are a function of the contaminant flux from the vadose zone to groundwater. Especially for thick vadose zones, transport may be relatively slow making it difficult to directly measure contaminant flux. An integrated assessment approach, supported by site characterization and monitoring data, is presented to explain current vadose zone contaminant distributions and to estimate future contaminant flux to groundwater in support of remediation decisions. The U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site (WA, USA) SX Tank Farm was used as a case study because of a large existing contaminant inventory in its deep vadose zone, the presence of a limited-extent groundwater plume, and the relatively large amount of available data for the site. A predictive quantitative analysis was applied to refine a baseline conceptual model through the completion of a series of targeted simulations. The analysis revealed that site recharge is the most important flux-controlling process for future contaminant flux. Tank leak characteristics and subsurface heterogeneities appear to have a limited effect on long-term contaminant flux into groundwater. The occurrence of the current technetium-99 groundwater plume was explained by taking into account a considerable historical water-line leak adjacent to one of the tanks. The analysis further indicates that the vast majority of technetium-99 is expected to migrate into the groundwater during the next century. The approach provides a template for use in evaluating contaminant flux to groundwater using existing site data and has elements that are relevant to other disposal sites with a thick vadose zone.

  17. Evaluation of deep vadose zone contaminant flux into groundwater: Approach and case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostrom, M; Truex, M J; Last, G V; Strickland, C E; Tartakovsky, G D

    2016-06-01

    For sites with a contaminant source located in the vadose zone, the nature and extent of groundwater contaminant plumes are a function of the contaminant flux from the vadose zone to groundwater. Especially for thick vadose zones, transport may be relatively slow making it difficult to directly measure contaminant flux. An integrated assessment approach, supported by site characterization and monitoring data, is presented to explain current vadose zone contaminant distributions and to estimate future contaminant flux to groundwater in support of remediation decisions. The U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site (WA, USA) SX Tank Farm was used as a case study because of a large existing contaminant inventory in its deep vadose zone, the presence of a limited-extent groundwater plume, and the relatively large amount of available data for the site. A predictive quantitative analysis was applied to refine a baseline conceptual model through the completion of a series of targeted simulations. The analysis revealed that site recharge is the most important flux-controlling process for future contaminant flux. Tank leak characteristics and subsurface heterogeneities appear to have a limited effect on long-term contaminant flux into groundwater. The occurrence of the current technetium-99 groundwater plume was explained by taking into account a considerable historical water-line leak adjacent to one of the tanks. The analysis further indicates that the vast majority of technetium-99 is expected to migrate into the groundwater during the next century. The approach provides a template for use in evaluating contaminant flux to groundwater using existing site data and has elements that are relevant to other disposal sites with a thick vadose zone. PMID:27107320

  18. Assessment of Halon-1301 as a groundwater age tracer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Beyer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater dating is an important tool to assess groundwater resources in regards to their dynamics, i.e. direction and time scale of groundwater flow and recharge, to assess contamination risks and manage remediation. To infer groundwater age information, a combination of different environmental tracers, such as tritium and SF6, are commonly used. However, ambiguous age interpretations are often faced, due to a limited set of available tracers and their individual restricted application ranges. For more robust groundwater dating multiple tracers need to be applied complementarily and it is vital that additional, groundwater age tracers are found to ensure robust groundwater dating in future. We recently suggested that Halon-1301, a water soluble and entirely anthropogenic gaseous substance, may be a promising candidate, but its behaviour in water and suitability as a groundwater age tracer had not yet been assessed in detail. In this study, we determine Halon-1301 and infer age information in 17 New Zealand groundwaters and various modern (river water samples. The samples are simultaneously analysed for Halon-1301 and SF6, which allows identification of issues such as contamination of the water with modern air during sampling. Water at all analysed groundwater sites have also been previously dated with tritium, CFC-12, CFC-11 and SF6, and exhibit mean residence times ranging from modern (close to 0 years to over 100 years. The investigated groundwater ranged from oxic to highly anoxic, and some showed evidence of CFC contamination or degradation. This allowed us to make a first attempt of assessing the conservativeness of Halon-1301 in water, in terms of presence of local sources and its sensitivity towards degradation etc., which could affect the suitability of Halon-1301 as groundwater age tracer. Overall we found Halon-1301 reliably inferred the mean residence time of groundwater recharged between 1980 and 2014. Where direct age comparison

  19. Assessment of Halon-1301 as a groundwater age tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, M.; van der Raaij, R.; Morgenstern, U.; Jackson, B.

    2015-06-01

    Groundwater dating is an important tool to assess groundwater resources in regards to their dynamics, i.e. direction and timescale of groundwater flow and recharge, contamination risks and manage remediation. To infer groundwater age information, a combination of different environmental tracers, such as tritium and SF6, are commonly used. However, ambiguous age interpretations are often faced, due to a limited set of available tracers and their individual restricted application ranges. For more robust groundwater dating multiple tracers need to be applied complementarily (or other characterisation methods need to be used to complement tracer information). It is important that additional, groundwater age tracers are found to ensure robust groundwater dating in future. We have recently suggested that Halon-1301, a water soluble and entirely anthropogenic gaseous substance, may be a promising candidate, but its behaviour in water and suitability as a groundwater age tracer had not yet been assessed in detail. In this study, we determined Halon-1301 and inferred age information in 17 New Zealand groundwater samples and various modern (river) water samples. The samples were simultaneously analysed for Halon-1301 and SF6, which allowed for identification of issues such as contamination of the water with modern air during sampling. All analysed groundwater sites had also been previously dated with tritium, CFC-12, CFC-11 and SF6, and exhibited mean residence times ranging from modern (close to 0 years) to over 100 years. The investigated groundwater samples ranged from oxic to highly anoxic. All samples with available CFC data were degraded and/or contaminated in one or both of CFC-11 and CFC-12. This allowed us to make a first attempt of assessing the conservativeness of Halon-1301 in water, in terms of presence of local sources and its sensitivity towards degradation, which could affect the suitability of Halon-1301 as groundwater age tracer. Overall we found Halon-1301

  20. Predicting groundwater arsenic contamination in Southeast Asia from surface parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Lenny; Berg, Michael; Amini, Manouchehr; Hug, Stephan J.; Annette Johnson, C.

    2008-08-01

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater resources threatens the health of millions of people worldwide, particularly in the densely populated river deltas of Southeast Asia. Although many arsenic-affected areas have been identified in recent years, a systematic evaluation of vulnerable areas remains to be carried out. Here we present maps pinpointing areas at risk of groundwater arsenic concentrations exceeding 10μgl-1. These maps were produced by combining geological and surface soil parameters in a logistic regression model, calibrated with 1,756 aggregated and geo-referenced groundwater data points from the Bengal, Red River and Mekong deltas. We show that Holocene deltaic and organic-rich surface sediments are key indicators for arsenic risk areas and that the combination of surface parameters is a successful approach to predict groundwater arsenic contamination. Predictions are in good agreement with the known spatial distribution of arsenic contamination, and further indicate elevated risks in Sumatra and Myanmar, where no groundwater studies exist.

  1. Transport of contaminated groundwater to a river

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scenario B7 deals with the discharges of Cs-137, Sr-90, Pu-239 and Np-237 with the groundwater from an aquifer into a river, through the river sediment. The contamination of agricultural soil, brought about through the dredging of top sediment from the river, was also considered. Four models participated in this exercise, providing best estimate values. Only one model supplied uncertainty estimates. Brief descriptions of the models and their aims are given. the modelling of the processes taken into account for the computation of the radionuclide concentrations in river and soil compartments are described and the input parameter values are given. The model results are discussed and the reasons for the differences between the models are explained. Important discrepancies were observed. As far as the steady-state concentrations are concerned they were due to differences in the parameter values and transfer processes considered. The time-dependent concentration values depended strongly on the approach adopted for the modelling of the migration of the nuclides through the deep sediment in the source region. The major source of uncertainty pointed out by the model which performed an uncertainty analysis, was the distribution coefficient in the deep sediment. The conclusions and recommendations for improvement of the models, given at the end of the report, accentuate the lack of understanding of the phenomena occurring at the geosphere-biosphere interface and the importance of good communications between scientists of different disciplines. (au)

  2. FEASIBILITY OF USING FIBER OPTICS FOR MONITORING GROUNDWATER CONTAMINANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report contains the results of the initial feasibility study for a research program undertaken to develop the technology needed to use fiber optics for monitoring groundwater contaminants. The technology appears especially well suited to the requirements of detection monitori...

  3. Groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braids, Olin C.; Gillies, Nola P.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of groundwater quality covering publications of 1977. This review includes: (1) sources of groundwater contamination; and (2) management of groundwater. A list of 59 references is also presented. (HM)

  4. NOVEL PHOTOCHEMICAL PROCEDURE FOR REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATERS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lipšová, Hana; Jirkovský, Jaromír; Datel, J. V.

    Salzburg : PEER, 2010, 1. [ConSoil 2010. 11th International UFZ-Deltares/TNO Conference on Management of Soil, Groundwater & Sediments in cooperation with Land Salzburg. Salzburg (AT), 22.09.2010-24.09.2010] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : Permeable reactive barrier * contaminated groundwater * old environmental burdens Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  5. Preventing pesticide contamination of groundwater while maximizing irrigated crop yield

    OpenAIRE

    Peralta, R C; Hegazy, M. A.; Musharrafieh, G.

    1994-01-01

    A simulation/optimization model is developed for maximizing irrigated crop yield while avoiding unacceptable pesticide leaching. The optimization model is designed to help managers prevent non-point source contamination of shallow groundwater aquifers. It computes optimal irrigation amounts for given soil, crop, chemical, and weather data and irrigation frequencies. It directly computes the minimum irrigated crop yield reduction needed to prevent groundwater contamination. Constraint equation...

  6. GROUNDWATER QUALITY AND CONTAMINATION INDEX MAPPING IN CHANGCHUN CITY, CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamadoun BOKAR; TANG Jie; LIN Nian-feng

    2004-01-01

    Groundwater in Changchun City, Jilin Province of China tends to be influenced by human activities.Chemical types of groundwater were detected in both shallow and deep groundwater were: HCO3- - Ca2+ and HCO3-of groundwater quality due to the increase of TDS, NO3- + NO2 (as Nitrogen) and TH contents have been observed from 1991 to 1998. Scatter analyses showed strong positive correlations between Ca2+, Cl- and NO3- ions and weak negative correlations between the depth of water table and Ca2+, 8O42-. C1- and NO3-ions. A mapping of contaminant index based on Chinese standard of groundwater showed that a large proportion of the groundwater in 1998 was deteriorated by human process. Despite their low values of sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), the most of the sampled wells were not suitable for drinking and agriculture purposes due to higher contents of NO3-, NO2 and Mn2+ ions.

  7. Pollution potential of oil-contaminated soil on groundwater resources in Kuwait

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The only natural freshwater resource of Kuwait occurs as lenses floating on the saline groundwater in the northern part of the country, near to the oil fields. Rainwater is the only means of recharge of this limited groundwater resource. This groundwater is used as bottled drinking water and the fresh groundwater aquifer is considered as a strategic drinking water reserve for Kuwait. As a result of the 1991 Gulf War, the upper soil layer has been widely contaminated with crude oil and crude oil combustion products, which are potential pollutants likely affecting the groundwater resources. Significant efforts have been made to assess this pollution. These included: (a) a soil survey for assessing the soil contamination, and (b) leaching experiments to characterise the mobilization of the soil-associated pollutants. Fluorescence measurement techniques were used during field surveys as well as for laboratory testing. In addition, determination of the total extractable matter (TEM), total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), and GC/MS measurement of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were performed for the assessments. The laser induced fluorescence (LIF) measurement, having good correlation with the other laboratory measurements, was proved to provide necessary information for the assessment of the oil-contamination level in the desert soil. The subsequent leaching test with water demonstrated the mobilization of the fluorescing compounds (e.g. PAHs), and the alteration in the leaching characteristics of the contamination during the long term environmental weathering of the oil. (author)

  8. Distribution of Groundwater Contaminants at the RCA Taoyuan Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, I.; Wang, Y.; Chia, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The RCA Taoyuan plant is the first announced remediation site due to groundwater contamination in Taiwan in 2004. From 1970 through 1992, Radio Corporation of America (RCA) Taoyuan Plant in Taiwan operated as a television assembly plant producing related electronic equipment. In 1987, the soil and the groundwater of the site area were discovered with contamination of chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). The primary contaminants are tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and 1, 1, 1- trichloroethane (1, 1, 1-TCA). The source of the contamination may be caused by improper dumping or leakage of the chemical solvents. The remediation of soil were finished in 1998 and qualified with Republic of China Environmental Protection Administration (ROCEPA) soil pollution control standards. On the other hand, after more detailed site investigations and many pilot tests, the remediation of groundwater has been started since 2005 and is still in progress. Because the chlorinated VOCs are Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs), they are hardly dissolved in groundwater and couldn't be cleaned up by extraction and treatment. In addition, the densities of DNAPLs are higher than water, so they would keep moving downward till aquitards or interval mud layers between aquifers. The movement was controlled by many complex factors, including the gravity, hydraulic gradient, capillary pressure, etc. Then DNAPLs would move along the surface of layers horizontally leaving slight remains on the paths. The remains would keep slowly dissolving in groundwater to become long-term contamination sources. The Enhanced Reductive Dechlorination (ERD) method has been conducted to remediate the groundwater in site area with successful effects, but some of the monitoring wells in off-site area are still detected with high concentrations of VOCs, exceeding the pollution standards. Furthermore, the concentration of primary contaminants was lowered by the remediation, but some secondary

  9. Evaluation of groundwater sampling techniques for the investigation and monitoring of contaminated sites

    OpenAIRE

    Teutsch, Georg; Barczewski, Baldur; Kobus, Helmut

    1990-01-01

    The collection of representative groundwater samples is an essential prerequisite in hydrogeological site evaluation and groundwater monitoring. Erroneous or insufficent sampling may lead to wrong conclusions, possibly causing considerable health and/or financial risks, especially in respect to the assessment of contaminated sites. The collection of representative water samples therefore requires the use of appropriate sampling techniques, taking into account the prevailing aquifer conditions...

  10. Groundwater Risk Assessment Model (GRAM: Groundwater Risk Assessment Model for Wellfield Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nara Somaratne

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A groundwater risk assessment was carried out for 30 potable water supply systems under a framework of protecting drinking water quality across South Australia. A semi-quantitative Groundwater Risk Assessment Model (GRAM was developed based on a “multi-barrier” approach using likelihood of release, contaminant pathway and consequence equation. Groundwater vulnerability and well integrity have been incorporated to the pathway component of the risk equation. The land use of the study basins varies from protected water reserves to heavily stocked grazing lands. Based on the risk assessment, 15 systems were considered as low risk, four as medium and 11 systems as at high risk. The GRAM risk levels were comparable with indicator bacteria—total coliform—detection. Most high risk systems were the result of poor well construction and casing corrosion rather than the land use. We carried out risk management actions, including changes to well designs and well operational practices, design to increase time of residence and setting the production zone below identified low permeable zones to provide additional barriers to contaminants. The highlight of the risk management element is the well integrity testing using down hole geophysical methods and camera views of the casing condition.

  11. As contamination in Mercedes (Uruguay) aquifer groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study presents data on the concentration of arsenic in groundwater aquifer Mercedes, where the highest concentration area is located in New Palmira.A geological formation decryption of the Mercedes for the Upper Cretaceous is made.

  12. As contamination in Mercedes aquifer groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is about the quality of the groundwater an the arsenic content in different aquifers in Uruguay. The first data obtained of arsenic concentrations are from subterranes water in the Mercedes aquifers

  13. Groundwater contamination downstream of a contaminant penetration site. II. Horizontal penetration of the contaminant plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, H.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    Part I of this study (Rubin, H.; Buddemeier, R.W. Groundwater Contamination Downstream of a Contaminant Penetration Site Part 1: Extension-Expansion of the Contaminant Plume. J. of Environmental Science and Health Part A (in press).) addressed cases, in which a comparatively thin contaminated region represented by boundary layers (BLs) developed within the freshwater aquifer close to contaminant penetration site. However, at some distance downstream from the penetration site, the top of the contaminant plume reaches the top or bottom of the aquifer. This is the location of the "attachment point," which comprises the entrance cross section of the domain evaluated by the present part of the study. It is shown that downstream from the entrance cross section, a set of two BLs develop in the aquifer, termed inner and outer BLs. It is assumed that the evaluated domain, in which the contaminant distribution gradually becomes uniform, can be divided into two sections, designated: (a) the restructuring section, and (b) the establishment section. In the restructuring section, the vertical concentration gradient leads to expansion of the inner BL at the expense of the outer BL, and there is almost no transfer of contaminant mass between the two layers. In the establishment section, each of the BLs occupies half of the aquifer thickness, and the vertical concentration gradient leads to transfer of contaminant mass from the inner to the outer BL. By use of BL approximations, changes of salinity distribution in the aquifer are calculated and evaluated. The establishment section ends at the uniformity point, downstream from which the contaminant concentration profile is practically uniform. The length of the restructuring section, as well as that of the establishment section, is approximately proportional to the aquifer thickness squared, and is inversely proportional to the transverse dispersivity. The study provides a convenient set of definitions and terminology that are

  14. Construction of a bioreporter by heterogeneously expressing a Vibrio natriegens recA::luxCDABE fusion in Escherichia coli, and genotoxicity assessments of petrochemical-contaminated groundwater in northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo; Huang, Wei E; Li, Guanghe

    2016-06-15

    Here, we constructed an Escherichia coli recA::luxCDABE bioreporter for genotoxicity assessments. The recA promoter was cloned from the marine bacterium Vibrio natriegens. This bioreporter showed a dose-response relationship following induction by mitomycin C, and other pollutants or environmental samples could be calculated as mitomycin C equivalents, which provided a way to quantitatively compare the genotoxicities of different environmental samples. This bioreporter was used to evaluate the genotoxicity under a wide range of external environmental conditions, like temperatures ranging from 15 °C to 42 °C, pH between 4.0 and 9.0, and salinity ranging from 0% to 3%. This successfully extended its application from the laboratory to the field, and allowed the bioreporter to assess the genotoxicity and bioavailability of genotoxins in various environmental media, including surface water, groundwater, seawater, and soil matrix. Expression of V. natriegens recA in E. coli indicated a LexA-like regulator in V. natriegens, and the putative SOS box of V. natriegens recA was similar to that of E. coli. The genotoxicities of groundwater samples from a petrochemical-contaminated site in northern China were evaluated by this bioreporter assay, and the genotoxic levels were in accordance with contamination levels obtained by chemical analyses. PMID:27258332

  15. Nitrate contamination of groundwater in the catchment of Goczałkowice reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czekaj, Joanna; Witkowski, Andrzej J.

    2014-05-01

    Goczałkowice dammed reservoir (area - 26 km2 , volume - 100 million m3 at a typical water level) is a very important source of drinking water for Upper Silesian agglomeration. At the catchment of the reservoir there are many potential sources of groundwater pollution (agriculture, bad practices in wastewater management, intensive fish farming). Thus local groundwater contamination, mainly by nitrogen compounds. The paper presents groundwater monitoring system and preliminary results of the research carried on at Goczałkowice reservoir and its catchment in 2010 - 2014 within the project "Integrated system supporting management and protection of dammed reservoir (ZiZoZap)'. The main objective for hydrogeologists in the project is to assess the role of groundwater in total water balance of the reservoir and the influence of groundwater on its water quality. During research temporal variability of groundwater - surface water exchange has been observed. Monitoring Network of groundwater quality consists of 22 observation wells (nested piezometers included) located around the reservoir - 13 piezometers is placed in two transects on northern and southern shore of reservoir. Sampling of groundwater from piezometers was conducted twice - in autumn 2011 and spring 2012. Maximum observed concentrations of nitrate, nitrite and ammonium were 255 mg/L, 0,16 mg/L and 3,48 mg/L, respectively. Surface water in reservoir (8 points) has also been sampled. Concentrations of nitrate in groundwater are higher than in surface water. Nitrate and ammonium concentrations exceeding standards for drinking water were reported in 18% and 50% of monitored piezometers, respectively. High concentration of nitrate (exceeding more than 5 times maximal admissible concentration) have been a significant groundwater contamination problem in the catchment of the reservoir. Periodically decrease of surface water quality is possible. Results of hydrogeological research indicate substantial spatial

  16. Arsenic Contamination of Groundwater in Nepal—An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Kumar Singh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In Nepal, arsenic (As contamination is a major issue of current drinking water supply systems using groundwater and has recently been one of the major environmental health management issues especially in the plain region, i.e., in the Terai districts, where the population density is very high. The Terai inhabitants still use hand tube and dug wells (with hand held pumps that are bored at shallow to medium depth for their daily water requirements, including drinking water. The National Sanitation Steering Committee (NSSC, with the help of many other organizations, has completed arsenic blanket test in 25 districts of Nepal by analysing 737,009 groundwater samples. Several organizations, including academic institutions, made an effort to determine the levels of arsenic concentrations in groundwater and their consequences in Nepal. The results of the analyses on 25,058 samples tested in 20 districts, published in the status report of arsenic in Nepal (2003, demonstrated that the 23% of the samples were containing 10–50 µg/L of As, and the 8% of the samples were containing more than 50 µg/L of As. Recent status of over 737,009 samples tested, the 7.9% and 2.3% were contaminated by 10–50 µg/L and >50 µg/L, respectively of As. The present paper examines the various techniques available for the reduction of arsenic concentrations in Nepal in combination with the main results achieved, the socio-economic status and the strategies. This paper aims to comprehensively compile all existing data sets and analyze them scientifically, by trying to suggest a common sustainable approach for identifying the As contamination in the nation, that can be easily adopted by local communities for developing a sustainable society. The paper aims also to find probable solutions to quantify and mitigate As problem without any external support. The outcome of this paper will ultimately help to identify various ways for: identify risk areas; develop awareness; adopt

  17. Assessment of groundwater vulnerability and risk to pollution in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sangam; Semkuyu, Dickson John; Pandey, Vishnu P

    2016-06-15

    Groundwater vulnerability and risk assessment is a useful tool for groundwater pollution prevention and control. In this study, GIS based DRASTIC model have been used to assess intrinsic aquifer vulnerability to pollution whereas Groundwater Risk Assessment Model (GRAM) was used to assess the risk to groundwater pollution in the groundwater basin of Kathmandu Valley. Seven hydrogeological factors were used in DRASTIC model to produce DRASTIC Index (DI) map which represent intrinsic groundwater vulnerability to pollution of the area. The seven hydrogeological factors used were depth to water, net recharge, aquifer media, soil media, topography, impact of vadose zone, and hydraulic conductivity of aquifer. GIS based GRAM was used to produce likelihood of release of hazards, likelihood of detection of hazards, consequence of hazards and residual risk of groundwater contamination in terms of nitrate in the groundwater basin. It was found that more than 50% of the groundwater basin area in the valley is susceptible to groundwater pollution and these areas are mostly in Northern groundwater district Low and very low vulnerable areas account for only 13% and are located in Central and Southern groundwater districts. However after taking into account the barriers to groundwater pollution and likelihood of hazards release and detection, it was observed that most areas i.e. about 87% of the groundwater basin are at moderate residual risk to groundwater pollution. The resultant groundwater vulnerability and risk map provides a basis for policy makers and planner's ability to use information effectively for decision making at protecting the groundwater from pollutants. PMID:26971207

  18. Identification and Tracing Groundwater Contamination by Livestock Burial Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, K.; Ha, K.; Park, S.; Kim, Y.; Lee, K.

    2011-12-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) or hoof-and-mouth disease is a severe plague for animal farming that affects cloven-hoofed animals such as cattle, pigs, sheep, and goats. Since it is highly infectious and can be easily proliferated by infected animals, contaminated equipments, vehicles, clothing, people, and predators. It is widely known that the virus responsible for FMD is a picornavirus, the prototypic member of the genus Aphthovirus. A serious outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease, leading to the stamping out of 3.53 millions of pigs and cattle and the construction of 4,538 burial sites until 15th March, 2011. The build-up of carcass burial should inevitably produce leachate by the decomposition of buried livestock affecting the surround environment such as air, soil, groundwater, and surface water. The most important issues which are currently raised by scientists are groundwater contamination by leachate from the livestock burial sites. This study examined the current status of FMD outbreak occurred in 2010-2011 and the issues of groundwater contamination by leachate from livestock burial sites. The hydrogeochemical, geophysical, and hydrogeological studies were executed to identify and trace groundwater contamination by leachate from livestock burial sites. Generally livestock mortality leachate contains high concentrations of NH3-N, HCO3-, Cl-, SO42-, K+, Na+, P along with relative lesser amounts of iron, calcium, and magnesium. The groundwater chemical data around four burial sites showed high NH3-N, HCO3-, and K+ suggesting the leachate leakage from burial sites. This is also proved by resistivity monitoring survey and tracer tests. The simulation results of leachate dispersion showed the persistent detrimental impacts for groundwater environment for a long time (~50 years). It is need to remove the leachate of burial sites to prevent the dispersion of leachate from livestock burial to groundwater and to monitor the groundwater quality. The most important

  19. Accounting for Transport Parameter Uncertainty in Geostatistical Groundwater Contaminant Release History Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, J.; Shlomi, S.; Michalak, A.

    2007-12-01

    The process of estimating the release history of a contaminant in groundwater relies on coupling a limited number of concentration measurements with a groundwater flow and transport model in an inverse modeling framework. The information provided by available measurements is generally not sufficient to fully characterize the unknown release history; therefore, an accurate assessment of the estimation uncertainty is required. The modeler's level of confidence in the transport parameters, expressed as pdfs, can be incorporated into the inverse model to improve the accuracy of the release estimates. In this work, geostatistical inverse modeling is used in conjunction with Monte Carlo sampling of transport parameters to estimate groundwater contaminant release histories. Concentration non-negativity is enforced using a Gibbs sampling algorithm based on a truncated normal distribution. The method is applied to two one-dimensional test cases: a hypothetical dataset commonly used in validating contaminant source identification methods, and data collected from a tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene plume at the Dover Air Force Base in Delaware. The estimated release histories and associated uncertainties are compared to results from a geostatistical inverse model where uncertainty in transport parameters is ignored. Results show that the a posteriori uncertainty associated with the model that accounts for parameter uncertainty is higher, but that this model provides a more realistic representation of the release history based on available data. This modified inverse modeling technique has many applications, including assignment of liability in groundwater contamination cases, characterization of groundwater contamination, and model calibration.

  20. Development of Relative Risk Model for Regional Groundwater Risk Assessment: A Case Study in the Lower Liaohe River Plain, China

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xianbo; Zuo, Rui; Teng, Yanguo; Wang, Jinsheng; Wang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Increasing pressure on water supply worldwide, especially in arid areas, has resulted in groundwater overexploitation and contamination, and subsequent deterioration of the groundwater quality and threats to public health. Environmental risk assessment of regional groundwater is an important tool for groundwater protection. This study presents a new approach for assessing the environmental risk assessment of regional groundwater. It was carried out with a relative risk model (RRM) coupled wit...

  1. Determination of micro-organic contaminants in groundwater (Maribor, Slovenia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroša, A; Auersperger, P; Mali, N

    2016-11-15

    Micro-organic (MO) contaminants in groundwater can have adverse effects on both the environment and on human health. They enter the natural environment as a result of various processes, their presence in groundwater is the result of current anthropogenic activity and pollution loads from the past. A study on the occurrence and concentrations levels of selected contaminants in water was performed in the city of Maribor, Slovenia. A total of 56 groundwater and 4 surface water samples were collected in together four rounds in different hydrogeological periods (dry and wet seasons), and a total of 13 selected contaminants were analysed in this study. Carbamazepine, propyphenazone, caffeine, 2-methyl-2H-benzotriazole (2-MBT) and 2.4-dimethyl-2H-benzotriazole (2.4-DMBT) were determined as indicators of urban pollution, while pesticides and their metabolites (atrazine, desethylatrazine, deisopropylatrazine, terbuthylazine, desethylterbuthylazine, metolachlor, simazine, propazine) were mainly defined as indicators of crop production. All of the selected MO contaminants were detected both in the aquifer and Drava River. The most frequently detected MO compounds in groundwater were desethylatrazine (frequency of detection 98.2%; max. concentration 103.0ngL(-1)), atrazine (94.6%; 229ngL(-1)), 2.4-DMBT (92.9%; 273ngL(-1)), carbamazepine (80.4%; 88.00ngL(-1)), desethylterbuthylazine (76.8%; 7.0ngL(-1)) and simazine (76.8%; 29.6ngL(-1)), whereas propyphenazone (14.3%; 10.7ngL(-1)) was the least frequently detected. Detected MO concentrations in the study were compared with results published elsewhere around the world. Concentrations in groundwater indicate specific land use in their recharge areas. On the basis of correlations and the spatial distribution of selected MOs, groundwater origin for every sampling point was determined. Sampling sites were divided into three different groups for which indicative groundwater quality properties were defined. PMID:27395079

  2. Heteroaromatic compounds and their biodegradation products in creosote-contaminated groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, S.S.; Arvin, E.; Mosbæk, H.; Hansen, Asger B.

    Creosote contamination of groundwater in the vicinity of old gasworks and woodtreatment facilities is a well‐known problem. Risk assessments typically include measurements of mono‐ and poly‐aromatic compounds and phenols. The content of nitrogen‐, sulphur‐ and oxygen‐containing heteroaromatic com...

  3. Remediation of soil and groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contamination of groundwater by volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) is widespread at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites. This problem is also encountered at other Federal sites listed in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Priority List (NPL), and private sector sites. These sites represent a variety of geologic, geophysical, climatic, and water-quality conditions. Since DOE sites are scattered across the country, dissimilarity in climatic conditions, such as aridity, becomes significant. The remediation of these sites by conventional pump-and-treat techniques based on extraction of contaminants through vertical wells or boreholes, is a costly and time consuming process. Although a number of technologies for remediation of subsurface contamination are available, it was found that more efficient and cost-effective technologies are needed to address the widespread problem of contamination of groundwater by VOCs. (author)

  4. Assessing groundwater policy with coupled economic-groundwater hydrologic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Kevin B.; Brown, Casey; Yang, Yi-Chen E.; Ahlfeld, David P.

    2014-03-01

    This study explores groundwater management policies and the effect of modeling assumptions on the projected performance of those policies. The study compares an optimal economic allocation for groundwater use subject to streamflow constraints, achieved by a central planner with perfect foresight, with a uniform tax on groundwater use and a uniform quota on groundwater use. The policies are compared with two modeling approaches, the Optimal Control Model (OCM) and the Multi-Agent System Simulation (MASS). The economic decision models are coupled with a physically based representation of the aquifer using a calibrated MODFLOW groundwater model. The results indicate that uniformly applied policies perform poorly when simulated with more realistic, heterogeneous, myopic, and self-interested agents. In particular, the effects of the physical heterogeneity of the basin and the agents undercut the perceived benefits of policy instruments assessed with simple, single-cell groundwater modeling. This study demonstrates the results of coupling realistic hydrogeology and human behavior models to assess groundwater management policies. The Republican River Basin, which overlies a portion of the Ogallala aquifer in the High Plains of the United States, is used as a case study for this analysis.

  5. 土壤污染对地下水影响的2种评估方法的应用与比较%Comparison of Two Methods for Assessing Impact of Contaminated Soil on Groundwater Quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李婷婷; 钟茂生; 姜林; 樊艳玲; 姚珏君; 夏天翔; 贾晓洋

    2013-01-01

    以某含1,2-二氯乙烷等10种有机物污染土壤回填项目为例,介绍了2种方法(三相平衡耦合地下水稀释模型和Sesoil耦合地下水稀释模型)在评估土壤污染对地下水影响中的具体应用并进行了比较.结果表明,采用US EPA(美国国家环境保护局)推荐的三相平衡耦合地下水稀释模型预测的地下水中目标污染物浓度高于新泽西州推荐的Sesoil耦合地下水稀释模型的3~10倍,污染物亨利常数及碳水分配系数越高,二者的差异越明显,达到1个数量级.对于多环芳烃类的强疏水性有机污染物,2种方法的评估结论无本质差异.出于保守性及调查成本的考虑,在制订国家或区域范围基于保护地下水的土壤通用筛选值时,建议采用所需参数相对较少的三相平衡耦合地下水稀释模型的方法,以节约调查成本.对于具体评估项目,当污染物浓度超过通用筛选值时,建议进一步对场地水文地质条件进行调查,采用Sesoil耦合地下水稀释模型重新评估并计算该特定场地的筛选值,以节约修复成本.%Two assessment methods,three-phase equilibrium in combination with groundwater dilution model recommended by US EPA and Sesoil in combination with groundwater dilution model recommended by New Jersey,were compared for evaluating impacts on groundwater through backfilling soil contaminated by 1,2-dichloroethane and other 9 organic pollutants.The results showed that the concentrations of the 10 contaminants in groundwater predicted by the US EPA method were 3-10 times of those predicted by the New Jersey method.The difference was much more obvious by an order of magnitude,when the Henry's law constants and the carbon-water adsorption factors of the contaminants were high.However,the difference was not significant regarding to strong hydrophobic contaminants such as PAHs.Generally,the method recommended by US EPA was conservative and needs less parameter inputs,which would be a

  6. Arsenic contamination of groundwater in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shallow groundwater with high arsenic concentrations from naturally occurring sources is the primary source of drinking water for millions of people in Bangladesh. It has resulted in a major public health crisis with as many as 70 million people possibly at risk. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is supporting international efforts and the Government of Bangladesh to find alternative, safe and sustainable sources of drinking water. (IAEA)

  7. Nitrate Contamination of Groundwater: Determinants and Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Wick, Katharina; Heumesser, Christine; Schmid, Erwin

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen is an important input to agricultural production but also detrimentally affects the environmental quality of air, soil and water. Identifying the determinants of nitrate pollution and in turn defining sensible performance indicators to design, enforce and monitor regulatory policies is therefore of utmost importance. Using data on more than 1000 Austrian municipalities, we provide a detailed econometric analysis of (1) the determinants of nitrate concentration in groundwater, and (2)...

  8. Sources of Nitrate Contamination in Groundwater Under Developing Asian Megacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezawa, Y.; Hosono, T.; Onodera, S.; Siringan, F.; Buapeng, S.; Delinom, R. M.; Yoshimizu, C.; Tayasu, I.; Nagata, T.; Taniguchi, M.

    2008-12-01

    The status of nitrate, nitrite and ammonium contamination in the water systems, and the mechanisms controlling their sources, pathways, and distributions were investigated for the Southeast Asian cities of Metro Manila, Bangkok, and Jakarta. GIS-based monitoring and dual isotope approach (nitrate d15N and d18O) suggested that human waste via severe sewer leakage was the major source of nutrient contaminants in Metro Manila and Jakarta urban areas. Furthermore, the characteristics of the nutrient contamination differed depending on the agricultural land use pattern in the suburban areas. The exponential increase in nitrate d15N along with the nitrate reduction and clear d18O/d15N slopes of nitrate (~0.5) indicated the occurrence of denitrification. An anoxic subsurface system associated with the natural geological setting (e.g., the old tidal plain at Bangkok) and artificial pavement coverage served to buffer nitrate contamination via active denitrification and reduced nitrification. Our results showed that nitrate and ammonium contamination of the aquifers in Metro Manila, Bangkok, and Jakarta was not excessive, suggesting low risk of drinking groundwater to human health, at present. However, the increased nitrogen load and increased per capita gross domestic product (GDP) in these developing cities may increase this contamination in the very near future. Continuous monitoring and management of the groundwater system is needed to minimize groundwater pollution in these areas.

  9. Preventing pesticide contamination of groundwater while maximizing irrigated crop yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, R. C.; Hegazy, M. A.; Musharrafieh, G. R.

    1994-11-01

    A simulation/optimization model is developed for maximizing irrigated crop yield while avoiding unacceptable pesticide leaching. The optimization model is designed to help managers prevent non-point source contamination of shallow groundwater aquifers. It computes optimal irrigation amounts for given soil, crop, chemical, and weather data and irrigation frequencies. It directly computes the minimum irrigated crop yield reduction needed to prevent groundwater contamination. Constraint equations used in the model maintain a layered soil moisture volume balance; describe percolation, downward unsaturated zone solute transport and pesticide degradation; and limit the amount of pesticide reaching groundwater. Constraints are linear, piecewise linear, nonlinear, and exponential. The problem is solved using nonlinear programming optimization. The model is tested for different scenarios of irrigating corn. The modeling approach is promising as a tool to aid in the development of environmentally sound agricultural production practices. It allows direct estimation of trade-offs between crop production and groundwater protection for different management approaches. More frequent irrigation tends to give better crop yield and reduce solute movement. Trade-offs decrease with increasing irrigation frequency. More frequent irrigation reduces yield loss due to moisture stress and requires less water to fill the root zone to field capacity. This prevents the solute from moving to deeper soil layers. Yield-environmental quality trade-offs are smaller for deeper groundwater tables because deeper groundwater allows more time for chemical degradation.

  10. Effect of Particles on Fenton Oxidation of Organic Contaminated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Kim, Y.; Gwak, J.; Lee, C.; Ha, J.

    2009-12-01

    Fenton oxidation has been widely applied for a variety of water treatment due to non-selectively oxidative capability at a high reaction rate and cost effectiveness. Even though wide and deep range of studies were conducted for understanding the Fenton reaction with various contaminants, effect of particles on Fenton reaction has been little studied. This study explored the performance of Fenton oxidation for organic contaminated groundwater treatment in the presence of particles. The contaminated groundwater was a free oil separated groundwater obtained from a pilot scale bioslurping process for LNAPL treatment. The groundwater was characterized by a high suspended solid (SS) concentration relative to total organic carbon (TOC) concentration varying from 4 to 7.3. It was found that the optimum ratio of Fenton’s reagent (Fe2+:H2O2) was 1:10 in terms of TOC removal efficiency. Presence of solid particles significantly affected the TOC removal efficiency by Fenton’s reaction accounting for 37% for raw groundwater and 61% for soluble groundwater. Particles larger than 5 µm could be effectively settled out by a quiescent settling for 3 hr based on particle size distribution analysis. The TOC removal efficiency for the supernatant after settling was a similar to that of soluble sample. Total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) was mostly present in the adsorbed form to the particles in the groundwater and was potentially persistent to Fenton oxidation. TPH removal efficiency by Fenton oxidation was 24% which was less than that of the total groundwater indicating that hydroxyl radicals generated from Fenton oxidation did not directly attack the adsorbed organic carbon and removal of the adsorbed organic carbon was dependent on its mass transfer to bulk region. The concept for particle effect on Fenton oxidation was confirmed in another experiment spiking washed soil to the soluble groundwater. TOC removal efficiency was lowered by addition of the soil probably because the

  11. Biomarkers study in rainbow trout exposed to industrially contaminated groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadjet Benchalgo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The spill of liquid industrial waste from chemical and petrochemical industries in Mercier lagoons located 20 km south of Montreal, Quebec, caused a major groundwater contamination by industrial contaminants. The aim of this study was to investigate the toxic effects of Mercier groundwater, following 4 and 14 days of exposure to graded concentrations from three wells at increasing distances 1.2, 2.7 and 5.4 km from the source of contamination. Rainbow trout were examined for several biomarkers of defense [ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD and gluthatione S-transferase (GST activities] and those of tissue damage [lipid peroxidation (LPO and DNA strand breaks]. The results showed that EROD activity was significantly enhanced in hepatic tissue at 1.2 and 5.4 km, whereas inhibition in activity was observed in group at 2.7 km. Therefore, GST activity was significantly increased at 3.1% concentration for the 2.7 km well. No change in LPO was observed. However, a significant induction of DNA strand breaks in liver was obtained at each distance. In conclusion, the data suggest that the release of these contaminants in groundwater leads to increased biotransformation for coplanar aromatic hydrocarbons and DNA damage in groundwater.

  12. Statistical Performance Evaluation of Spatiotemporal Characteristics of Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Mass Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiatos, Ioannis; Papadopoulou, Maria P.; Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.

    2016-04-01

    As groundwater remains one of the most critical natural resources worldwide, numerical models of groundwater flow and contaminant mass transport provide a reliable tool for the efficient protection, planning and sustainable management of groundwater resources. This work focuses on the evaluation of the performance of different numerical models which have been developed to simulate spatiotemporal groundwater flow and contaminant mass transport in a coastal aquifer system. The evaluation of the models' performance has been based on 9 different statistical measures and indices of goodness of fit. Overall, the simulation of groundwater level and contaminant mass concentration delivered very good calibration and validation results in all cases, quite close to the desired values. Maps of aquifer water level and contaminant mass concentrations are provided for all cases in order the differences to be discussed and assessed. The selection of the appropriate model(s) is case oriented and it should be based on the problem's characteristics in order the spatiotemporal variability of the components under study to be optimally estimated.

  13. Assessment of groundwater contamination from land-use/cover change in rural-urban fringe of national capital territory of Delhi (India)

    OpenAIRE

    Rai, Suresh Chand; Kumari, Preeti

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between groundwater depletion/pollution and land-use/cover change in rural-urban fringe of Delhi, where agro-ecosystems and populations are dependent on access to reliable groundwater supplies. Results indicate a significant relationship between high proportionate decrease in groundwater and land being removed from irrigation. The higher values of most of the parameters were found in the agricultural field and industrial area. The study results suggest tha...

  14. Groundwater and soil contaminations in Romania. Monitoring and remediation feasibilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petzold, E. [Petzold Consultant, Muenster (Germany); Luering, E.-M.; Morariu, A. [Chim. A. Morariu, Sef Serviciu M.I.F.M., Inspectoratul de Protectie a Mediului Sibiu, Sibiu (Russian Federation)

    2003-07-01

    From the thirties of the nineties of the last century the industrial plant of Copsa Mica near Sibiu/central Romania was producing soot and non-ferrous metal products. Not careing for the environment over such a long time made a 'black city' and a 'black country' out of the area. After closing down the soot production and changes in the metal treatment technologies, green tried to come back, but heavy metals still remained in the environment. Soils are heavy contaminated, and also groundwater contaminations are known. The environmental authorities of Sibiu county have been taking samples over the last years, to document the state of art, resp. soil contamination. Heavy contaminations with lead, cadmium and copper were reported for the city area of Copsa Mica and its vicinity, exceeding any limits and threshold values. Due to the size of contamination and the size of contaminated areas a mechanical treatment and soil cleaning is impossible an not financiable. Thus, there is only a chance for bio-remediation, which needs at least the same time for remediation, as is took to contaminate the area. Research and tests are going on to find out suitable plants for bio-remediation. In parallel, more information on the horizontal and vertical spreading of the contaminants is necessary. So further sampling and soil analyses will be carried out. Additionally, treatment of contaminated groundwater might be necessary in certain cases, when this groundwater has to be used as drinking water. For these cases ion exchange techniques seem to be suitable, and are tested for suitability. (orig.)

  15. Inclusion of emerging organic contaminants in groundwater monitoring plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamastra, Lucrezia; Balderacchi, Matteo; Trevisan, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Groundwater is essential for human life and its protection is a goal for the European policies. All the anthropogenic activities could impact on water quality. •Conventional pollutants and more than 700 emerging pollutants, resulting from point and diffuse source contamination, threat the aquatic ecosystem.•Policy-makers and scientists will have to cooperate to create an initial groundwater emerging pollutant priority list, to answer at consumer demands for safety and to the lack of conceptual models for emerging pollutants in groundwater.•Among the emerging contaminants and pollutants this paper focuses on organic wastewater contaminants (OWCs) mainly released into the environment by domestic households, industry, hospitals and agriculture. This paper starts from the current regulatory framework and from the literature overview to explain how the missing conceptual model for OWCs could be developed.•A full understanding of the mechanisms leading to the contamination and the evidence of the contamination must be the foundation of the conceptual model. In this paper carbamazepine, galaxolide and sulfamethozale, between the OWCs, are proposed as "environmental tracers" to identify sources and pathways ofcontamination/pollution. PMID:27366676

  16. Passive treatment of wastewater and contaminated groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phifer, Mark A.; Sappington, Frank C.; Millings, Margaret R.; Turick, Charles E.; McKinsey, Pamela C.

    2007-11-06

    A bioremediation system using inorganic oxide-reducing microbial consortia for the treatment of, inter alia coal mine and coal yard runoff uses a containment vessel for contaminated water and a second, floating phase for nutrients. Biodegradable oils are preferred nutrients.

  17. Salt contamination assessment and remediation guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental impacts associated with excess salt in oil and surface water or groundwater (a frequent occurrence in oil and gas production) may be manifested as degradation of soil chemical or physical properties, impaired vegetable growth and degraded surface or groundwater quality. Spill prevention is by far the most effective and most efficient way of avoiding these adverse effects and the attendant remediation costs. However, when spills do occur effective response, based on a comprehensive understanding of impacts, salt movements and remediation procedures can mitigate the adverse environmental effects. This guide is designed to assist those involved in the prevention, assessment, remediation and management of salt-contaminated sites. It summarizes the regulatory requirements in Alberta, including salt remediation objectives, and provides an overview of salt spill problems and effective site assessment and remediation procedures. Background information on the sources of salt, the movement of salt in soil and groundwater, and the adverse effects of salt on soil, vegetation and groundwater is provided in an appendix attached to the Guide. A selected bibliography and a glossary of terms are also included. 42 refs., tabs., figs

  18. Groundwater impact assessment for the 216-U-17 Crib, 200 West Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement milestone M-17-00A), this report assesses the impact to groundwater from discharge of process condensate to the ground at the 216-U-17 Crib. The assessment considers impacts associated with moisture movement through soil beneath the crib and the potential transport of contaminants to the groundwater

  19. Comparative metagenomics reveals impact of contaminants on groundwater microbiomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L Hemme

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available To understand patterns of geochemical cycling in pristine versus contaminated groundwater ecosystems, pristine shallow groundwater (FW301 and contaminated groundwater (FW106 samples from the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Center (OR-IFRC were sequenced and compared to each other to determine phylogenetic and metabolic difference between the communities. Proteobacteria (e.g., Burkholderia, Pseudomonas are the most abundant lineages in the pristine community, though a significant proportion (>55% of the community is composed of poorly characterized low abundance (individually <1% lineages. The phylogenetic diversity of the pristine community contributed to a broader diversity of metabolic networks than the contaminated community. In addition, the pristine community encodes redundant and mostly complete geochemical cycles distributed over multiple lineages and appears capable of a wide range of metabolic activities. In contrast, many geochemical cycles in the contaminated community appear truncated or minimized due to decreased biodiversity and dominance by Rhodanobacter populations capable of surviving the combination of stresses at the site. These results indicate that the pristine site contains more robust and encodes more functional redundancy than the stressed community, which contributes to more efficient nutrient cycling and adaptability than the stressed community.

  20. Nitrate contamination of groundwater: A conceptual management framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In many countries, public concern over the deterioration of groundwater quality from nitrate contamination has grown significantly in recent years. This concern has focused increasingly on anthropogenic sources as the potential cause of the problem. Evidence indicates that the nitrate (NO3) levels routinely exceed the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 mg/l NO3-N in many aquifer systems that underlie agriculture-dominated watersheds. Degradation of groundwater quality due to nitrate pollution along with the increasing demand for potable water has motivated the adoption of restoration actions of the contaminated aquifers. Restoration efforts have intensified the dire need for developing protection alternatives and management options such that the ultimate nitrate concentrations at the critical receptors are below the MCL. This paper presents a general conceptual framework for the management of groundwater contamination from nitrate. The management framework utilizes models of nitrate fate and transport in the unsaturated and saturated zones to simulate nitrate concentration at the critical receptors. To study the impact of different management options considering both environmental and economic aspects, the proposed framework incorporates a component of a multi-criteria decision analysis. To enhance spatiality in model development along with the management options, the utilization of a land use map is depicted for the allocation and computation of on-ground nitrogen loadings from the different sources

  1. Evidence for Groundwater Contamination Vulnerability in California?s Central Valley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The California Water Resources Control Board, in collaboration with the US Geological Survey and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, has implemented a program to assess the susceptibility of groundwater resources. Advanced techniques such as groundwater age dating using the tritium-helium method, extensive use of oxygen isotopes of the water molecule ((delta)18O) for recharge water provenance, and analysis of common volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at ultra-low levels are applied with the goal of assessing the contamination vulnerability of deep aquifers, which are frequently used for public drinking water supply. Over 1200 public drinking water wells have been tested to date, resulting in a very large, tightly spaced collection of groundwater ages in some of the heavily exploited groundwater basins of California. Smaller scale field studies that include shallow monitoring wells are aimed at assessing the probability that nitrate will be transported to deep drinking water aquifers. When employed on a basin-scale, groundwater ages are an effective tool for identifying recharge areas, defining flowpaths, and determining the rate of transport of water and entrained contaminants. De-convolution of mixed ages, using ancillary dissolved noble gas data, gives insight into the water age distribution drawn at a well, and into the effective dilution of contaminants such as nitrate at long-screened production wells. In combination with groundwater ages, low-level VOCs are used to assess the impact of vertical transport. Special studies are focused on the fate and transport of nitrate with respect to vulnerability of aquifers in agricultural and formerly agricultural areas

  2. Evidence for Groundwater Contamination Vulnerability in California?s Central Valley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, J E; Leif, R; Esser, B K; Singleton, M J

    2005-12-13

    The California Water Resources Control Board, in collaboration with the US Geological Survey and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, has implemented a program to assess the susceptibility of groundwater resources. Advanced techniques such as groundwater age dating using the tritium-helium method, extensive use of oxygen isotopes of the water molecule ({delta}{sup 18}O) for recharge water provenance, and analysis of common volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at ultra-low levels are applied with the goal of assessing the contamination vulnerability of deep aquifers, which are frequently used for public drinking water supply. Over 1200 public drinking water wells have been tested to date, resulting in a very large, tightly spaced collection of groundwater ages in some of the heavily exploited groundwater basins of California. Smaller scale field studies that include shallow monitoring wells are aimed at assessing the probability that nitrate will be transported to deep drinking water aquifers. When employed on a basin-scale, groundwater ages are an effective tool for identifying recharge areas, defining flowpaths, and determining the rate of transport of water and entrained contaminants. De-convolution of mixed ages, using ancillary dissolved noble gas data, gives insight into the water age distribution drawn at a well, and into the effective dilution of contaminants such as nitrate at long-screened production wells. In combination with groundwater ages, low-level VOCs are used to assess the impact of vertical transport. Special studies are focused on the fate and transport of nitrate with respect to vulnerability of aquifers in agricultural and formerly agricultural areas.

  3. Metro Manila and Metro Cebu Groundwater Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    David, Cristina C.; Inocencio, Arlene B.; Clemente, Roberto S.; Abracosa, Ramon P.; Tabios, Guillermo Q.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the methodologies adopted and the results obtained in assessing the groundwater resources of Metro Manila and Metro Cebu. Also some early and recent studies on the aquifer systems in the two metropolis are presented to draw some comparisons on the assessment and data acquisition methods and identify some gaps involved and the improvements needed. Some of the indicators used in assessing groundwater potential and associated problems include storage coefficient, transmissiv...

  4. Porosity, Dispersivity, and Contaminant Transport in Groundwater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MOIWO Juana P.

    2001-01-01

    Porosity (n) and Dispersivity (D) were modeled in relation to Solute Transport Time (t) in a saturated, homogeneous, isotropic, unconfined aquifer using the MOC model. It was noted that n and D have an important influence on solute transport time t in groundwater, with a consistently strong and direct relationship between n, D, and t. In the case of porosity, the relationship was found to be directly related to t when other aquifer properties remained unchanged. This was also mathematically argued using a form of the flow equation put forward by Henry Darcy (1856). Dispersivity on the other hand had somehow the same relationship with solute transport time t as porosity, but with much less effect. That is, higher dispersions lead to longer solute transport time within the aquifer system. This was because as the individual solute particles set off from the average seepage velocity, they traversed through longer distances due to tortuosity, mechanical mixing, diffusion, and microscopic heterogeneity latent in the porous media. Also when n and D were co- treated over t, n was noted to be dominant over D with regard t. This follows that the effect of porosity on solute transport time far out shadowed that of dispersivity. Stated in other words, the dispersivity of a substance in any porous medium is to a large extent a function of the porosity of that medium.

  5. Biostimulation-enhanced Biodegradation of Nitrobenzene in Contaminated Groundwater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Yong-lei; ZHANG Lan-ying; LIU Na; ZHANG Lei; GAO Huan-fang

    2012-01-01

    In this study,biostimulation technology was used for bioremediation of nitrobenzene-contaminated groundwater by adding a mixture of lactose and phosphate,peptone,and beef extract.During the process of biostimulation,the remediation effectiveness,microbial dehydrogenase activities and microbial densities were investigated;the varieties of microbial community structure and composition were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis(PCR-DGGE) technique and the relative abundances of nitrobenzene-degrading gene(nbzA) were determined by fluorescence quantitative real-time PCR(RT-PCR).Findings show that the removal rate of nitrobenzene in groundwater could reach about 60% by biostimulation with lactose and phosphate,70% with peptone and 68% with beef extract.The microbial dehydrogenase activities and microbial densities were all improved obviously via biostimulation.The results of PCR-DGGE show that the microbial diversities were improved,and more than ten kinds of dominant microorganisms were detected after biostimulation.RT-PCR results show that the relative abundances of nbzA gene of microbes in groundwater were increased significantly,which indicated that biostimulation actually enhanced the growth of nitrobenzene-degrading bacteria.Therefore,biostimulation is a cost-effective and feasible bioremediation technique for nitrobenzene-contaminated groundwater.

  6. Demonstration of technologies to remove contamination from groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company has been testing various technologies for decontaminating groundwaters and liquid effluents. The results of preliminary testing of three technologies are reported. The technologies are iron coprecipitation/filtration, supported liquid membranes, and reverse osmosis. The processes were tested to determine their capability to remove uranium, chromium, nitrates, and technetium. All processes removed contaminants to less than maximum contaminant limits. The secondary waste volumes were estimated for each process. The supported liquid membranes secondary waste volume was the smallest, followed by iron coprecipitation, and the largest volume was created by the reverse osmosis process. 5 refs., 7 tabs

  7. Metaldehyde and its relationship with groundwater contamination and landfill leachate

    OpenAIRE

    Bullock, Max

    2014-01-01

    Increasing attention is directed towards many chemicals and microbial constituents which have not been historically considered as contaminants. These “emerging contaminants” are commonly derived from municipal, agricultural and industrial wastewater sources and pathways. Among others, metaldehyde, a widely used molluscicide, has been detected in groundwater at levels exceeding the 0.1 μg L-1[microgram per liter] limit required by the Water Framework Directive. This has raise...

  8. Mapping organic contaminant plumes in groundwater using spontaneous potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Sarah

    Increased water demands have raised awareness of its importance. One of the challenges facing water resource management is dealing with contaminated groundwater; delineating, characterizing and remediating it. In the last decade, spontaneous potentials have been proposed as a method for delineating degrading organic contaminant plumes in groundwater. A hypothesis proposed that the redox potential gradient due to degradation of contaminants generated an electrical potential gradient that could be measured at the ground surface. This research was undertaken to better understand this phenomenon and find under what conditions it occurs. Spontaneous potentials are electrical potentials generated by three sources that act simultaneously: electrokinetic, thermoelectric and electrochemical sources. Over contaminant plumes electrochemical sources are those of interest. Thermoelectric sources are negligible unless in geothermal areas, but we hypothesized that electrokinetic potentials could be impacted by contaminants altering sediment surface properties. We built and calibrated a laboratory apparatus to make measurements that allowed us to calculate streaming current coupling coefficients. We tested sediment from hydrocarbon impacted sites with clean and hydrocarbon polluted groundwater and found a measurable though inconsistent effect. Moreover, numerical modelling was used to demonstrate that the impact of these changes on field measurements was negligible. Spontaneous potential surveys were conducted on two field sites with well characterized degrading hydrocarbon plumes in groundwater. We did not find a correlation between redox conditions and spontaneous potential, even after the electrical measurements were corrected for anthropogenic noise. In order to determine why the expected signal was not seen, we undertook numerical modelling based on coupled fluxes using two hypothesized types of current: redox and diffusion currents. The only scenarios that produced

  9. Dissipation of the herbicide oxyfluorfen in subtropical soils and its potential to contaminate groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Jui-Hung; Sheu, Wey-Shin; Wang, Yei-Shung

    2003-02-01

    The dissipation and mobility of the herbicide oxyfluorfen (2-chloro-alpha,alpha,alpha-trifluoro-p-tolyl 3-ethoxy-4-nitrophenyl ether) in field soil of Taiwan were investigated in the laboratory with six tea garden soils. The dissipation coefficients of oxyfluorfen in soils of different moisture content (30%, 60%, and 90% of soil field capacity) and soil temperature (10 degrees C, 25 degrees C, and 40 degrees C) were studied. Results indicate that the half-life of oxyfluorfen ranged from 72 to 160 days for six tea garden soils. It was found that if the temperature is high, the dissipation rate is rapid, and there is almost no dissipation at 10 degrees C. Possible contamination of groundwater by the herbicide oxyfluorfen was assessed using the behavior assessment model and the groundwater pollution-potential (GWP) model. The results obtained after evaluating the residue and travel time using the GWP model illustrated that oxyfluorfen is not very mobile in soil and may not contaminate groundwater under normal conditions. But in the case of soil of extremely low organic carbon content and coarse texture, oxyfluorfen has the potential to contaminate groundwater less than 3m deep. PMID:12550092

  10. Groundwater contamination at the inactive Riverton, Wyoming uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low pH process waters contained in a number of inactive and abandoned uranium mill tailings in the United States represent potential sources of radionuclide and trace metal contamination of ground water. Detailed investigation at a typical site at Riverton, Wyo., U.S.A. indicates chemical transport occurs from initial dewatering of the tailings, downward infiltration due to precipitation, and groundwater intrusion into the base of the tailings pile. Relict contaminant plumes, including sulfate, in the shallow groundwater, indicate past periods of tailing dewatering. Except for elevated uranium and molybdenum concentrations, radionuclide and trace metal transport are limited by near-neutral pH conditions in the groundwater. pH is controlled by neutralization of acid tailings water by soil carbonates. A geochemical mixing model employing the PHREEQE computer code is used to estimate current rates of the ground water contamination by tailings water. Significant reactions are the dissolution of calcite, formation of CO2 and precipitation of gypsum and iron and aluminum hydroxides. Calculated results indicate a mixing rate of 1.5 x 10-4 m3.s-1 beneath the tailings and an evapotranspiration loss of 1.8 x 10-3 m3.s-1 from the tailings surface

  11. Managing Groundwater Radioactive Contamination at the Daiichi Nuclear Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marui, Atsunao; Gallardo, Adrian H.

    2015-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami of March 2011 severely damaged three reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station, leading to a major release of radiation into the environment. Groundwater flow through these crippled reactors continues to be one of the main causes of contamination and associated transport of radionuclides into the Pacific Ocean. In this context, a number of strategies are being implemented to manage radioactive pollution of the water resources at the nuclear plant site. Along with water treatment and purification, it is critical to restrict the groundwater flow to and from the reactors. Thus, the devised strategies combine walls containment, bores abstraction, infiltration control, and the use of tanks for the temporary storage of contaminated waters. While some of these techniques have been previously applied in other environments, they have never been tested at such a large scale. Therefore, their effectiveness remains to be seen. The present manuscript presents an overview of the methods being currently implemented to manage groundwater contamination and to mitigate the impact of hydrological pathways in the dispersion of radionuclides at Fukushima. PMID:26197330

  12. Managing Groundwater Radioactive Contamination at the Daiichi Nuclear Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marui, Atsunao; Gallardo, Adrian H

    2015-07-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami of March 2011 severely damaged three reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station, leading to a major release of radiation into the environment. Groundwater flow through these crippled reactors continues to be one of the main causes of contamination and associated transport of radionuclides into the Pacific Ocean. In this context, a number of strategies are being implemented to manage radioactive pollution of the water resources at the nuclear plant site. Along with water treatment and purification, it is critical to restrict the groundwater flow to and from the reactors. Thus, the devised strategies combine walls containment, bores abstraction, infiltration control, and the use of tanks for the temporary storage of contaminated waters. While some of these techniques have been previously applied in other environments, they have never been tested at such a large scale. Therefore, their effectiveness remains to be seen. The present manuscript presents an overview of the methods being currently implemented to manage groundwater contamination and to mitigate the impact of hydrological pathways in the dispersion of radionuclides at Fukushima. PMID:26197330

  13. Managing Groundwater Radioactive Contamination at the Daiichi Nuclear Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsunao Marui

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami of March 2011 severely damaged three reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station, leading to a major release of radiation into the environment. Groundwater flow through these crippled reactors continues to be one of the main causes of contamination and associated transport of radionuclides into the Pacific Ocean. In this context, a number of strategies are being implemented to manage radioactive pollution of the water resources at the nuclear plant site. Along with water treatment and purification, it is critical to restrict the groundwater flow to and from the reactors. Thus, the devised strategies combine walls containment, bores abstraction, infiltration control, and the use of tanks for the temporary storage of contaminated waters. While some of these techniques have been previously applied in other environments, they have never been tested at such a large scale. Therefore, their effectiveness remains to be seen. The present manuscript presents an overview of the methods being currently implemented to manage groundwater contamination and to mitigate the impact of hydrological pathways in the dispersion of radionuclides at Fukushima.

  14. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Extent Of The Primary Groundwater Contaminants At The Y-12 National Security Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-12-01

    This report presents data summary tables and maps used to define and illustrate the approximate lateral extent of groundwater contamination at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The data tables and maps address the primary (i.e., most widespread and mobile) organic, inorganic, and radiological contaminants in the groundwater. The sampling locations, calculated contaminant concentrations, plume boundary values, and paired map format used to define, quantify, delineate, and illustrate the approximate extent of the primary organic, inorganic, and radiological contaminants in groundwater at Y-12 are described.

  15. Spatial control of groundwater contamination, using principal component analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Subba Rao

    2014-06-01

    A study on the geochemistry of groundwater was carried out in a river basin of Andhra Pradesh to probe into the spatial controlling processes of groundwater contamination, using principal component analysis (PCA). The PCA transforms the chemical variables, pH, EC, Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+, HCO$^{−}_{3}$, Cl−, SO$^{2−}_{4}$, NO$^{−}_{3}$ and F−, into two orthogonal principal components (PC1 and PC2), accounting for 75% of the total variance of the data matrix. PC1 has high positive loadings of EC, Na+, Cl−, SO$^{2−}_{4}$, Mg2+ and Ca2+, representing a salinity controlled process of geogenic (mineral dissolution, ion exchange, and evaporation), anthropogenic (agricultural activities and domestic wastewaters), and marine (marine clay) origin. The PC2 loadings are highly positive for HCO$^{−}_{3}$, F−, pH and NO$^{−}_{3}$, attributing to the alkalinity and pollution controlled processes of geogenic and anthropogenic origins. The PC scores reflect the change of groundwater quality of geogenic origin from upstream to downstream area with an increase in concentration of chemical variables, which is due to anthropogenic and marine origins with varying topography, soil type, depth of water levels, and water usage. Thus, the groundwater quality shows a variation of chemical facies from Na+ > Ca2+ > Mg2+ > K+: HCO$^{−}_{3}$ > Cl− > SO$^{2−}_{4}$ > NO$^{−}_{3}$ > F− at high topography to Na+ > Mg2+ > Ca2+ > K+: Cl− > HCO$^{−}_{3}$ > SO$^{2−}_{4}$ > NO$^{−}_{3}$ > F− at low topography. With PCA, an effective tool for the spatial controlling processes of groundwater contamination, a subset of explored wells is indexed for continuous monitoring to optimize the expensive effort.

  16. Robust decision analysis for environmental management of groundwater contamination sites

    CERN Document Server

    Vesselinov, Velimir V; Katzman, Danny

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to many other engineering fields, the uncertainties in subsurface processes (e.g., fluid flow and contaminant transport in aquifers) and their parameters are notoriously difficult to observe, measure, and characterize. This causes severe uncertainties that need to be addressed in any decision analysis related to optimal management and remediation of groundwater contamination sites. Furthermore, decision analyses typically rely heavily on complex data analyses and/or model predictions, which are often poorly constrained as well. Recently, we have developed a model-driven decision-support framework (called MADS; http://mads.lanl.gov) for the management and remediation of subsurface contamination sites in which severe uncertainties and complex physics-based models are coupled to perform scientifically defensible decision analyses. The decision analyses are based on Information Gap Decision Theory (IGDT). We demonstrate the MADS capabilities by solving a decision problem related to optimal monitoring ...

  17. Groundwater impact assessment report for the 100-D Ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 183-D Water Treatment Facility (WTF) discharges effluent to the 120-0-1 Ponds (100-D Ponds) located north of the 100-D Area perimeter fence. This report satisfies one of the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-17-00B as agreed by the US Department of Energy, Washington State Department of Ecology, and the US Environmental Protection Agency. Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00B includes a requirement to assess impacts to groundwater from disposal of the 183-D WTF effluent to the 100-D Ponds. In addition, the 100-D Ponds are a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 treatment, storage, and disposal facility covered by the 100-D Ponds Closure Plan (DOE-RL 1993a). There is evidence of groundwater contamination, primarily nitrate, tritium, and chromium, in the unconfined aquifer beneath the 100-D Area and 100 Areas in general. The contaminant plumes are area wide and are a result of past-practice reactor and disposal operations in the 100-D Area currently being investigated as part of the 100-DR-1 and 100-HR-3 Operable Units (DOE-RL 1992b, 1992a). Based on current effluent conditions, continued operation of the 100-D Ponds will not adversely affect the groundwater quality in the 100-D Area. Monitoring wells near the pond have slightly higher alkaline pH values than wells in the rest of the area. Concentrations of known contaminants in these wells are lower than ambient 100-D Area groundwater conditions and exhibit a localized dilution effect associated with discharges to the pond. Hydraulic impact to the local groundwater system from these discharges is minor. The groundwater monitoring well network for the 100-D Ponds is adequate

  18. Data Assimilation for Management of Industrial Groundwater Contamination at a Regional Scale

    KAUST Repository

    El Gharamti, Mohamad

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater is one of the main sources for drinking water and agricultural activities. Various activities of both humans and nature may lead to groundwater pollution. Very often, pollution, or contamination, of groundwater goes undetected for long periods of time until it begins to a ect human health and/or the environment. Cleanup technologies used to remediate pollution can be costly and remediation processes are often protracted. A more practical and feasible way to manage groundwater contamination is to monitor and predict contamination and act as soon as there is risk to the population and the environment. Predicting groundwater contamination requires advanced numerical models of groundwater ow and solute transport. Such numerical modeling is increasingly becoming a reference criterion for water resources assessment and environmental protection. Subsurface numerical models are, however, subject to many sources of uncertainties from unknown parameters and approximate dynamics. This dissertation considers the sequential data assimilation approach and tackles the groundwater contamination problem at the port of Rotterdam in the Netherlands. Industrial concentration data are used to monitor and predict the fate of organic contaminants using a threedimensional coupled ow and reactive transport model. We propose a number of 5 novel assimilation techniques that address di erent challenges, including prohibitive computational burden, the nonlinearity and coupling of the subsurface dynamics, and the structural and parametric uncertainties. We also investigate the problem of optimal observational designs to optimize the location and the number of wells. The proposed new methods are based on the ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF), which provides an e cient numerical solution to the Bayesian ltering problem. The dissertation rst investigates in depth the popular joint and dual ltering formulations of the state-parameters estimation problem. New methodologies, algorithmically

  19. Risk assessment of groundwater pollution using sensitivity analysis and a worst-case scenario analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Huysmans, Marijke; Madarasz, Tamas; Dassargues, Alain

    2006-01-01

    This paper illustrates how sensitivity analysis and a worst-case scenario analysis can be useful tools in risk assessment of groundwater pollution. The approach is applied to a study area in Hungary with several known groundwater pollution sources and nearby drinking water production wells. The main concern is whether the contamination sources threaten the drinking water wells of the area. A groundwater flow and transport model is set up to answer this question. Due to limited data availabili...

  20. Persistent and emerging micro-organic contaminants in Chalk groundwater of England and France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chalk aquifer of Northern Europe is an internationally important source of drinking water and sustains baseflow for surface water ecosystems. The areal distribution of microorganic (MO) contaminants, particularly non-regulated emerging MOs, in this aquifer is poorly understood. This study presents results from a reconnaissance survey of MOs in Chalk groundwater, including pharmaceuticals, personal care products and pesticides and their transformation products, conducted across the major Chalk aquifers of England and France. Data from a total of 345 sites collected during 2011 were included in this study to provide a representative baseline assessment of MO occurrence in groundwater. A suite of 42 MOs were analysed for at each site including industrial compounds (n = 16), pesticides (n = 14) and pharmaceuticals, personal care and lifestyle products (n = 12). Occurrence data is evaluated in relation to land use, aquifer exposure, well depth and depth to groundwater to provide an understanding of vulnerable groundwater settings. - Highlights: • Broad range of microorganics detected in Chalk groundwater in England and France. • Plasticisers, pesticides, BPA and THM detected at the highest concentrations. • Pesticides higher in outcrop Chalk, caffeine and BPA at concealed sites. • Occurrences show some relationship to land use, borehole depth and water level. - Broad screening reveals for the first time the extent of emerging microorganic pollution in Chalk groundwater sources across England and France

  1. Groundwater impact assessment report for the 216-U-14 Ditch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singleton, K.M.; Lindsey, K.A.

    1994-01-01

    Groundwater impact assessments are conducted at liquid effluent receiving sites on the Hanford Site to determine hydrologic and contaminant impacts caused by discharging wastewater to the soil column. The assessments conducted are pursuant to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-17-00A and M-17-00B, as agreed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (Ecology et al. 1992). This report assesses impacts on the groundwater and vadose zone from wastewater discharged to the 216-U-14 Ditch. Contemporary effluent waste streams of interest are 242-S Evaporator Steam Condensate and UO{sub 3}/U Plant wastewater.

  2. Modeling the migration of radioactive contaminants in groundwater of in situ leaching uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioactive contamination of groundwater from in situ leaching (ISL) of uranium mining is a widespread environmental problem. This paper analyzed the monitor results of groundwater contaminations for a in situ leaching uranium mine. A dynamic model of contaminants transport in groundwater in ISL well field was established. The processes and mechanisms of contaminant transport in groundwater were simulated numerically for a ISL well field. A small quantity of U and SO42- migrate to outside of well field during ISL production stage. But the migration velocity and distance of contaminations is small, and the concentration is low. Contaminants migrate as anomalistic tooth-shape. The migration trend of U and SO42- is consistent. Numerical modeling can provide an effective approach to analyse the transport mechanism, and forecast and control the migration of contaminants in groundwater in ISL well field. (authors)

  3. Development of Enhanced Remedial Techniques for Petroleum Fuel and Related Contaminants in Soil and Groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Fallgren

    2009-02-10

    Western Research Institute (WRI) in conjunction with Earth Tech and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) was to identify proper sites with soils and/or groundwater contaminated by petroleum constituents and MTBE. Biodegradation rates would have been quantitatively assessed in both laboratory and field tests to achieve the optimal destruction of contaminants of concern. WRI and Earth Tech identified a site contaminated with high concentrations of methanol associated with petroleum hydrocarbons. The site was assessed and a remediation project plan was prepared; however, the site was soon acquired by a new company. An agreement between Earth Tech, WRI, and the new site owners could not be reached; therefore, a work was performed to identify a new project site. Task 33 was terminated and the available funding was redeployed to other Tasks after receiving approval from the U.S. DOE task manager.

  4. Driving mechanism and sources of groundwater nitrate contamination in the rapidly urbanized region of south China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qianqian; Sun, Jichao; Liu, Jingtao; Huang, Guanxing; Lu, Chuan; Zhang, Yuxi

    2015-11-01

    Nitrate contamination of groundwater has become an environmental problem of widespread concern in China. We collected 899 groundwater samples from a rapidly urbanized area, in order to identify the main sources and driving mechanisms of groundwater nitrate contamination. The results showed that the land use has a significant effect on groundwater nitrate concentration (P industrial development, and population growth. This study revealed that domestic wastewater and industrial wastewater were the main sources of groundwater nitrate pollution. Therefore, the priority method for relieving groundwater nitrate contamination is to control the random discharge of domestic and industrial wastewater in regions undergoing rapid urbanization. Capsule abstract. The main driving mechanism of groundwater nitrate contamination was determined to be urban construction and the secondary and tertiary industrial development, and population growth.

  5. Degradation of sucralose in groundwater and implications for age dating contaminated groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, W D; Van Stempvoort, D R; Spoelstra, J; Brown, S J; Schiff, S L

    2016-01-01

    The artificial sweetener sucralose has been in use in Canada and the US since about 2000 and in the EU since 2003, and is now ubiquitous in sanitary wastewater in many parts of the world. It persists during sewage treatment and in surface water environments and as such, has been suggested as a powerful tracer of wastewater. In this study, longer-term persistence of sucralose was examined in groundwater by undertaking a series of three sampling snapshots of a well constrained wastewater plume in Canada (Long Point septic system) over a 6-year period from 2008 to 2014. A shrinking sucralose plume in 2014, compared to earlier sampling, during this period when sucralose use was likely increasing, provides clear evidence of degradation. However, depletion of sucralose from a mean of 40 μg/L in the proximal plume zone, occurred at a relatively slow rate over a period of several months to several years. Furthermore, examination of septic tank effluent and impacted groundwater at six other sites in Canada, revealed that sucralose was present in all samples of septic tank effluent (6-98 μg/L, n = 32) and in all groundwater samples (0.7-77 μg/L, n = 64). Even though sucralose degradation is noted in the Long Point plume, its ubiquitous presence in the groundwater plumes at all seven sites implies a relatively slow rate of decay in many groundwater septic plume environments. Thus, sucralose has the potential to be used as an indicator of 'recent' wastewater contamination. The presence of sucralose identifies groundwater that was recharged after 2000 in Canada and the US and after 2003 in the EU and many Asian countries. PMID:26575474

  6. Contaminated groundwater characterization at the Chalk River Laboratories, Ontario, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilk, A.J.; Robertson, D.E.; Thomas, C.W.; Lepel, E.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Champ, D.R.; Killey, R.W.D.; Young, J.L.; Cooper, E.L. [Chalk River Labs., Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    1993-03-01

    The licensing requirements for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste (10 CFR 61) specify the performance objectives and technical requisites for federal and commercial land disposal facilities, the ultimate goal of which is to contain the buried wastes so that the general population is adequately protected from harmful exposure to any released radioactive materials. A major concern in the operation of existing and projected waste disposal sites is subterranean radionuclide transport by saturated or unsaturated flow, which could lead to the contamination of groundwater systems as well as uptake by the surrounding biosphere, thereby directly exposing the general public to such materials. Radionuclide transport in groundwater has been observed at numerous commercial and federal waste disposal sites [including several locations within the waste management area of Chalk River Laboratories (CRL)], yet the physico-chemical processes that lead to such migration are still not completely understood. In an attempt to assist in the characterization of these processes, an intensive study was initiated at CRL to identify and quantify the mobile radionuclide species originating from three separate disposal sites: (a) the Chemical Pit, which has received aqueous wastes containing various radioisotopes, acids, alkalis, complexing agents and salts since 1956, (b) the Reactor Pit, which has received low-level aqueous wastes from a reactor rod storage bay since 1956, and (c) the Waste Management Area C, a thirty-year-old series of trenches that contains contaminated solid wastes from CRL and various regional medical facilities. Water samples were drawn downgradient from each of the above sites and passed through a series of filters and ion-exchange resins to retain any particulate and dissolved or colloidal radionuclide species, which were subsequently identified and quantified via radiochemical separations and gamma spectroscopy. These groundwaters were also analyzed for anions

  7. REMEDIATION OF NITRATE-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER USING A BIOBARRIER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A biobarrier system has been developed for use in remediating shallow alluvial groundwater. This barrier is made from highly porous materials that are relatively long-lasting, carbon-based (to supply a limiting nutrient in nitrate destruction, in most cases), and extremely inexpensive and easy to emplace. In a series of laboratory studies, we have determined the effectiveness of this barrier at destroying nitrate and perchlorate in groundwater from Mortandad Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This groundwater was obtained from a monitoring well, MCO-5, which is located in the flowpath of the discharge waters from the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF). Water with elevated nitrate levels has been discharged from this plant for many years, until recently when the nitrate levels have been brought under the discharge limits. However, the historical discharge has resulted in a nitrate plume in the alluvial groundwater in this canyon. The LANL Multi-Barrier project was initiated this past year to develop a system of barriers that would prevent the transport of radionuclides, metals, colloids and other contaminants, including nitrate and perchlorate, further down the canyon in order to protect populations down-gradient. The biobarrier. will be part of this Multi-Barrier system. We have demonstrated the destruction of nitrate at levels up to 6.5-9.7 mhl nitrate (400-600 mg/L), and that of perchlorate at levels of about 4.3 microM perchlorate (350 ppb). We have quantified the populations of microorganisms present in the biofilm that develops on the biobarrier. The results of this research will be discussed along with other potential applications of this system

  8. REMEDIATION OF NITRATE-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER USING A BIOBARRIER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. STRIETELMEIER; M. ESPINOSA

    2001-01-01

    A biobarrier system has been developed for use in remediating shallow alluvial groundwater. This barrier is made from highly porous materials that are relatively long-lasting, carbon-based (to supply a limiting nutrient in nitrate destruction, in most cases), extremely inexpensive, and easy to replace. In a series of laboratory studies, we have determined the effectiveness of this barrier at destroying nitrate and perchlorate in groundwater from Mortandad Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This groundwater was obtained from a monitoring well, MCO-5, which is located in the flowpath of the discharge waters from the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF). Water with elevated nitrate levels was discharged from this plant for many years. Recently, the nitrate levels have been brought under the discharge limits. However, the historical discharge has resulted in a nitrate plume in the alluvial groundwater in this canyon. The LANL Multi-Barrier project was initiated in 1999 to develop a system of barriers that would prevent the transport of radionuclides, metals, colloids and other contaminants, including nitrate and perchlorate, further down the canyon in order to protect populations down-gradient. The biobarrier will be part of this Multi-Barrier system. We have demonstrated the destruction of nitrate at levels up to 6.5-9.7 mM nitrate (400-600 mg/L), and that of perchlorate at levels of about 4.3 {micro}M perchlorate (350 ppb). We have quantified the populations of microorganisms present in the biofilm that develops on the biobarrier. The results of this research will be discussed along with other potential applications of this system.

  9. REMEDIATION OF NITRATE-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER USING A BIOBARRIER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. STRIETELMEIR; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    A biobarrier system has been developed for use in remediating shallow alluvial groundwater. This barrier is made from highly porous materials that are relatively long-lasting, carbon-based (to supply a limiting nutrient in nitrate destruction, in most cases), and extremely inexpensive and easy to emplace. In a series of laboratory studies, we have determined the effectiveness of this barrier at destroying nitrate and perchlorate in groundwater from Mortandad Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This groundwater was obtained from a monitoring well, MCO-5, which is located in the flowpath of the discharge waters from the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF). Water with elevated nitrate levels has been discharged from this plant for many years, until recently when the nitrate levels have been brought under the discharge limits. However, the historical discharge has resulted in a nitrate plume in the alluvial groundwater in this canyon. The LANL Multi-Barrier project was initiated this past year to develop a system of barriers that would prevent the transport of radionuclides, metals, colloids and other contaminants, including nitrate and perchlorate, further down the canyon in order to protect populations down-gradient. The biobarrier. will be part of this Multi-Barrier system. We have demonstrated the destruction of nitrate at levels up to 6.5-9.7 mhl nitrate (400-600 mg/L), and that of perchlorate at levels of about 4.3 {micro}M perchlorate (350 ppb). We have quantified the populations of microorganisms present in the biofilm that develops on the biobarrier. The results of this research will be discussed along with other potential applications of this system.

  10. Transport of reactive carriers and contaminants in groundwater systems : a dynamic competitive happening

    OpenAIRE

    Weerd, van, J.

    2000-01-01

    Transport of contaminants constitutes a potential threat for public health and ecosystems. One of the potential pathways for contaminant transport in groundwater systems is transport adsorbed to carriers (colloidal particles, large molecules). Figure 1 shows a detail of a groundwater system with carriers and contaminants. In this thesis adsorption and transport models for carriers and contaminants are developed and applied in order to increase the understanding of the behavior of carriers and...

  11. Groundwater Quality Assessment for Waste Management Area U: First Determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste Management Area U (TWA U) is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The area includes the U Tank Farm, which contains 16 single-shell tanks and their ancillary equipment and waste systems. WMA U is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) as stipulated in 40 CFR Part 265, Subpart F, which is incorporated into the Washington State dangerous waste regulations (WAC 173-303400) by reference. Groundwater monitoring at WMA U has been guided by an interim status indicator evaluation program. As a result of changes in the direction of groundwater flow, background values for the WMA have been recalculated several times during its monitoring history. The most recent recalculation revealed that one of the indicator parameters, specific conductance, exceeded its background value in downgradient well 299-W19-41. This triggered a change from detection monitoring to a groundwater quality assessment program. The major contributors to the higher specific conductance are nonhazardous constituents, such as bicarbonate, calcium, chloride, magnesium, sodium and sulfate. Chromium, nitrate, and technetium-99 are present and are increasing; however, they are significantly below their drinking water standards. The objective of this study is to determine whether the increased concentrations of chromium, nitrate, and technetium-99 in groundwater are from WMA U or from an upgradient source. Interpretation of groundwater monitoring data indicates that both the nonhazardous constituents causing elevated specific conductance in groundwater and the tank waste constituents present in groundwater at the WMA are a result of surface water infiltration in the southern portion of the WMA. There is evidence that both upgradient and WMA sources contribute to the nitrate concentrations that were detected. There is no indication of an upgradient source for the chromium and technetium-99 that was detected. Therefore, a source of contamination appears to

  12. Groundwater Contamination. Instructor Guide. Working for Clean Water: An Information Program for Advisory Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Charles A.

    Described is a presentation and learning session on groundwater, which is intended to educate advisory groups interested in improving water quality decision making. Among the areas addressed are the importance of groundwater, sources of contamination, and groundwater pollution control programs. These materials are part of the Working for Clean…

  13. Geogenic Groundwater Contamination: A Case Study Of Canakkale - Western Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, Ozan; Çalık, Ayten

    2016-04-01

    Study area is located NW of Turkey. Total area of the drainage basin is 465 square kilometers and mostly covered by volcanic rocks. Majority of these rocks have highly altered and lost their primary properties because of alteration processes. Especially argillic alteration is common. Tectonic movements and cooling fractures were created suitable circulation environment of groundwater in the rocks (secondary porosity). Alteration affects the composition of groundwater and some rock elements pass into groundwater during the movement of water in the cavities of rocks. High concentration of natural contaminants related to water-rock interaction in spring water has been studied in this research. Field measurements such as pH, electrical conductivity, temperature, oxidation-reduction potential and salinity carried out in 500 water points (spring, drilling, well and stream). 150 water samples taken from the water points and 50 rock samples taken from the source of springs has been investigated in point of major anion-cations, heavy metals and trace elements. Some components in the water such as pH (3.5-9.1), specific electrical conductivity (84-6400 microS/cm), aluminum (27-44902 ppb), iron (10-8048 ppb), manganese (0.13-8740 ppb), nickel (0.2-627 ppb), lead (0.1-42.5 ppb) and sulphate (10 to 1940 ppm) extremely high or low in the springs sourced from especially highly altered Miocene aged volcanic rocks. Some measured parameters highly above according to European Communities Drinking Water Regulations (2007) and TS266 (2015-Intended for Human Consumption Water Regulations of Turkey) drinking water standards. The most common element which is found in the groundwater is aluminum that is higher than to the drinking water standards (200 microg/L). The highest levels of the Al values measured in acidic waters with very low pH (3.4) emerging from altered volcanic rocks because of acid mine drainage in Obakoy district, north of the study area. The abundance of this element in

  14. Integrated risk/decision analysis for protection of groundwater from hazardous material contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Public concern over groundwater contamination has focused attention on the management of hazardous materials in the U.S. Recent developments in the field of risk assessment can provide the engineering profession with the necessary tools for responding to this public concern. This paper presents an integrated risk/decision analysis methodology needed for systematically analyzing alternative courses of actions and their probable impact on groundwater resources. The analysis begins with the development of an event tree. A list of all possible event sequences to be considered has been compiled and a detailed analysis of the consequences of each event is conducted. Stemming from a decision on development over the recharge zone of an aquifer, and leading to the introduction of hazardous materials into the groundwater and contamination of the potable water supply, all events have been sequentially structured with both their positive and negative outcomes. The next step is to develop a comprehensive fault tree from the event tree. The logic relationships described by the fault tree are translated into algebraic operations allowing the objective determination of risk for any pathway leading from the initial policy decisions to the final consequence of contaminated groundwater. Risk acceptability analysis is based on historical risk data for the situations being considered. Probability limits for each potential risk are determined for each risk category associated with the specific situation and based on the revealed preference concept in quantitative psychology. The categorization of risks permits the assessment of acceptable risk for situations not considered in the past. Comparison of these risk limits with the risk probability values calculated from the event tree/fault tree analysis allows decision-makers to screen alternative courses of action based on their risk acceptabilities

  15. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER STRATEGIES FOR REMEDIATION OF ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results are presented from laboratory batch tests using zero-valent iron to treat arsenic-contaminated groundwater. The laboratory tests were conducted using near- neutral pH groundwater from a contaminated aquifer located adjacent to a custom smelting facility. Experiments we...

  16. Inspection and monitoring plan, contaminated groundwater seeps 317/319/ENE Area, Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the course of completing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) in the 317/319/East-Northeast (ENE) Area of Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E), groundwater was discovered moving to the surface through a series of groundwater seeps. The seeps are located in a ravine approximately 600 ft south of the ANL-E fence line in Waterfall Glen Forest Preserve. Samples of the seep water were collected and analyzed for selected parameters. Two of the five seeps sampled were found to contain detectable levels of organic contaminants. Three chemical species were identified: chloroform (14--25 microg/L), carbon tetrachloride (56--340 microg/L), and tetrachloroethylene (3--6 microg/L). The other seeps did not contain detectable levels of volatile organics. The nature of the contaminants in the seeps will also be monitored on a regular basis. Samples of surface water flowing through the bottom of the ravine and groundwater emanating from the seeps will be collected and analyzed for chemical and radioactive constituents. The results of the routine sampling will be compared with the concentrations used in the risk assessment. If the concentrations exceed those used in the risk assessment, the risk calculations will be revised by using the higher numbers. This revised analysis will determine if additional actions are warranted

  17. Risk-based remediation guidelines for petroleum contaminated soil and groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standards and practices for the remediation of soil and groundwater contaminated by petroleum products vary widely between jurisdications and between petroleum industry operators. In addition to statutory requirements, various guidelines have been developed by operators and industry groups. Attention has focused in recent years on the significant problem of leaking underground storage tanks (USTs). Many provinces and states have implemented regulations designed to ensure proper management, installation, replacement and abandonment of USTs. However, these regulations often do not cover levels to which groundwater and soil must be remediated in the event of a UST spill, leak or closure. The province of Alberta has recently initiated a project to develop a strategy for the management of underground storage tanks under which specific remediation guidelines for soil and groundwater have been recommended. The recommended guidelines explicitly embrace the principles of risk assessment and risk management, both in the numerical clean-up procedure and in the application of the guidelines. Site sensitivity ranking is a measure of human and environmental risk based on receptor sensitivity and site specific factors that govern likelihood of impact. The petroleum constituents considered include toxic volatile aromatic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, phenols and lead. Two alternatives to numerical criteria are site-specific criteria on the basis of risk assessment, and a risk management/reduction strategy that allows contaminants to remain in the subsurface at higher concentrations provided measures are taken to manage, control and reduce associated risks. 1 fig., 3 tabs

  18. Development of a complex groundwater model to assess the relation among groundwater resource exploitation, seawater intrusion and land subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsi Ting, Fang; Yih Chi, Tan; Chen, Jhong Bing

    2016-04-01

    The land subsidence, which is usually irreversible, in Taiwan Pintung Plain occurred due to groundwater overexploitation. Many of the land subsidence areas in Taiwan are located in coastal area. It could not only result in homeland loss, but also vulnerability to flooding because the function of drainage system and sea wall are weakened for the lowered ground surface. Groundwater salinization and seawater intrusion could happen more easily as well. This research focuses on grasping the trend of environmental change due to the damage and impact from inappropriate development of aquaculture in the last decades. The main task is developing the artificial neural networks (ANNs) and complex numerical model for conjunctive use of surface and groundwater which is composed of a few modules such as land use, land subsidence, contamination transportation and etc. An approach based on self-organizing map (SOM) is proposed to delineate groundwater recharge zones. Several topics will be studied such as coupling of surface water and groundwater modeling, assessing the benefit of improving groundwater resources by recharge, identifying the improper usage of groundwater resources, and investigating the effect of over-pumping on land subsidence in different depth. In addition, a complete plan for managing both the flooding and water resources will be instituted by scheming non-engineering adaptation strategies for homeland planning, ex. controlling pumping behavior in area vulnerable to land subsidence and increasing groundwater recharge.

  19. Two- and Three-Dimensional Depiction of Subsurface Geology Using Commercial Software for Support of Groundwater Contaminant Fate and Transport Analysis - 13345

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivarson, Kristine A. [North Wind, Inc. Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Miller, Charles W.; Arola, Craig C. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Groundwater contamination by hexavalent chromium and other nuclear reactor operation-related contaminants has resulted in the need for groundwater remedial actions within the Hanford Site reactor areas (the Hanford Site 100 Area). The large geographic extent of the resultant contaminant plumes requires an extensive level of understanding of the aquifer structure, characteristics, and configuration to support assessment and design of remedial alternatives within the former 100-D, 100-H, and 100-K reactor areas. The authors have prepared two- and three-dimensional depictions of the key subsurface geologic structures at two Hanford Site reactor operable units (100-K and 100-D/H). These depictions, prepared using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) visualization software, provide a basis for expanding the understanding of groundwater contaminant migration pathways, including identification of geologically-defined preferential groundwater flow pathways. These identified preferential flow pathways support the conceptual site model and help explain both historical and current contaminant distribution and transport. (authors)

  20. Remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil and groundwater at a building construction site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Construction of new buildings is proposed in two different areas at Fort Myer in Arlington, Virginia. Investigations conducted in these areas revealed the presence of active and inactive underground storage tanks (USTs). Contents of these USTs were gasoline, diesel fuel and heating oil. Many of these USTs were found to be leaking. Based on sampling and analyses, the soil and groundwater were found to be contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. Before constructing any buildings in these contaminated areas, remediation must be conducted in accordance with State, Federal and other applicable regulations. Due to the scheduled construction, a fast track project was conducted to characterize the contamination, conduct the remediation and begin construction. Investigative techniques included Hydropunch trademark, Field Screening using Immunoassay Tests, delineation of a perched water zone, and conduct of a pilot scale test for dual phase extraction. Additional monitoring wells were installed and more soil and water samples were analyzed. In addition to other reports, a Corrective Action Plan and a Site Clearance Report were prepared. This paper discusses: (a) field activities for a site where leaking underground storage tanks were found; (b) the methodology adopted in the Risk Assessment to calculate Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs); (c) delineation of contamination; (d) development of various remedial alternatives; (e) selection of preferred alternatives to remediate soil and groundwater; and (f) consideration of various regulatory issues

  1. Study on the Groundwater Vulnerability Assessment in Sanjiang Plain in Northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Y.; Tang, W. K.; Liu, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Sanjiang Plain is located in eastern part of China's Heilongjiang Province.It's total area is 109 000 km2, with cultivated land area being 3.6677 million hm2. It is a major national commodity grain base. Rice planting area in Sanjiang Plain has been increasing year by year. Groundwater exploitation is increasing rapidly as a result of rapid increase of paddy field area. It is necessary to research and analyze spatial diversity of groundwater pollution vulnerability for Sanjiang Plain, so as to fulfill the goal of integrated planning, rational utilization of land and water resource, avoiding or minimizing groundwater contamination, and protecting grain security of China. Based on the commonly used DRASTIC method internationally, and according to hydrogeology, land use and other characteristics of Sanjiang Plain, this paper establishes groundwater vulnerability assessment index system. Since the Sanjiang Plain is an area that gives priority to agriculture, and impact of agricultural land and agricultural activity on groundwater vulnerability can not be ignored. Two indicators of agricultural land use rate (L) and population density (P) are increased in the DRASTC index system, the remaining 5 indicators are groundwater depth (D), aquifer net recharge(R), aquifer media type (A), soil type(S), aquifer hydraulic conductivity (C). Taking ArcGis as a calculation analysis platform to assess groundwater vulnerability of the Sanjiang Plain, by using hierarchical analysis method of the fuzzy mathematics method to calculate each index weigh of evaluation vulnerability. This paper applies 6 levels of assessment standard as follows: vulnerability index DI 8 stands for extremely vulnerable. Groundwater vulnerably contaminated area is delineated based on the groundwater vulnerability spatial distribution of Sanjiang Plain. Reasonable land use plan should be made, and strictly groundwater protection measures should be taken to reduce the risk of groundwater contamination.

  2. Degradability of chlorophenols using ferrate(VI) in contaminated groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homolková, M; Hrabák, P; Kolář, M; Černík, M

    2016-01-01

    The production and use of chlorophenolic compounds in industry has led to the introduction of many xenobiotics, among them chlorophenols (CPs), into the environment. Five CPs are listed in the priority pollutant list of the U.S. EPA, with pentachlorophenol (PCP) even being proposed for listing under the Stockholm Convention as a persistent organic pollutant (POP). A green procedure for degrading such pollutants is greatly needed. The use of ferrate could be such a process. This paper studies the degradation of CPs (with an emphasis on PCP) in the presence of ferrate both in a spiked demineralized water system as well as in real contaminated groundwater. Results proved that ferrate was able to completely remove PCP from both water systems. Investigation of the effect of ferrate purity showed that even less pure and thus much cheaper ferrate was applicable. However, with decreasing ferrate purity, the degradability of CPs may be lower. PMID:26370812

  3. Prevention and mitigation of groundwater contamination from radioactive releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document gives basic information on potential pathways and mechanisms, by which radioactive materials from releases can reach man, and on modelling considerations to predict the behaviour of radioactive materials in the ground. The main objective is to present an overview of existing techniques for preventing the offsite releases of contaminants into the groundwater systems and techniques for mitigation of effects of such releases should they occur. The recommended techniques are fully applicable to any hazardous materials, such as organic liquids, and toxic materials or otherwise dangerous materials, the presence of which in the accessible biosphere can represent health risks as well as economic losses to the general public. 11 refs, 2 figs, 8 tabs

  4. Contaminant Transport from Disposal Sites and Potential Impact on Groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Agunwamba

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of groundwater reserve pollution by disposal sites was carried out using the Avu dumpsite situated at Owerri-Port Harcourt expressway, Owerri, Imo state. This was achieved through the use of an analytical solution to the Advective-Dispersive solute transport model. The contaminant compounds of interest were Nitrates and Phosphates due to their hazardous nature and predominance in environmental and health problem issues. The actual concentrations of Nitrates and Phosphates were determined experimentally by obtaining samples at a regular depth interval of 0.5 m from two locations at the dumpsite and at a control location. The predicted values were compared with the actual concentration values; a statistical analysis conducted to establish the relationship between the two variables. The Product-Moment coefficient of correlation, r between the predicted concentration values and the actual concentration values are high for both Nitrate and Phosphate. In addition, an inference test was conducted which positively established the fact that the presence of the dumpsite has a significant adverse effect on the surrounding soil and water environment. The predictions showed that the groundwater reserve might be polluted by the excessive Phosphate concentration (>0.02 mg L-1, while Nitrate is within the standard for use as drinking water (>10 mg L-1.

  5. Quantifying Groundwater and Contaminant Flux in Fractured Rock Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, J.; Newman, M. A.; Klammler, H.; Hatfield, K.; Annable, M. D.; Parker, B. L.; Cherry, J.; Kroeker, R.; Pedler, W. H.

    2011-12-01

    Complex hydrogeologic conditions such as fractured and karst bedrock settings pose substantial economic and technical challenges both to the characterization and remediation of DNAPL source zones. The objective of this project is to demonstrate and validate the fractured rock passive flux meter (FRPFM) as new technology for measuring the magnitudes and directions of cumulative water and contaminant fluxes in fractured rock aquifers. The sensor consists of an inflatable core that compresses a reactive fabric against the wall of a borehole and to any water-filled fractures intersected by a borehole. The reactive fabric is designed to intercept and retain target groundwater contaminants (e.g. TCE, DCE, VC); in addition, the fabric releases non-toxic tracers, some of which visibly indicate active fracture location, aperture, orientation, and direction of fracture flow along a borehole, while others quantify cumulative groundwater discharge within the fractures. Field demonstration tests are ongoing at a site in Guelph, Ontario and at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) in West Trenton, NJ. The tests are comparing multiple technologies including fractured rock passive flux meters, hydrophysical logging, temperature logging, and borehole dilution tests. The technologies are being evaluated based upon their ability to: identify flowing fractures, determine flow direction, and quantify both water and contaminant mass flux in flowing fractures. Laboratory tests comparing the capabilities of each technology were previously performed in two separate flow simulators representing a range of likely field conditions: a planar single fracture simulator (fracture aperture = 0.5 mm; specific discharge range 25 - 2500 cm/day) and a large-scale three-dimensional aquifer box with layered high contrast flow zones simulating fractured zones (physical flow domain 2 m length, 0.5 m width, and 1 m height; specific discharge range 25 to 4000 cm/day (per layer)). Based upon initial field and

  6. Assessment of natural arsenic in groundwater in Cordoba Province, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisca, Franco M; Carro Perez, Magalí E

    2009-12-01

    Groundwater in the central part of Argentina contains arsenic concentrations that, in most cases, exceed the value suggested by international regulations. In this region, Quaternary loessical sediments with a very high volcanic glass fraction lixiviate arsenic and fluoride after weathering. The objectives of this study are to analyze the spatial distribution of arsenic in different hydrogeological regions, to define the naturally expected concentration in an aquifer by means of hydrogeochemistry studies, and to identify emergent health evidences related to cancer mortality in the study area. The correlation between arsenic and fluoride concentrations in groundwater is analyzed at each county in the Cordoba Province. Two dimensionless geoindicators are proposed to identify risk zones and to rapidly visualize the groundwater quality related to the presence of arsenic and fluoride. A surface-mapping system is used to identify the spatial variability of concentrations and for suggesting geoindicators. The results show that the Chaco-Pampean plain hydrogeologic region is the most affected area, with arsenic and fluoride concentrations in groundwater being generally higher than the values suggested by the World Health Organization (WHO) for drinking water. Mortality related to kidney, lung, liver, and skin cancer in this area could be associated to the ingestion of arsenic-contaminated water. Generated maps provide a base for the assessment of the risk associated to the natural occurrence of arsenic and fluoride in the region. PMID:19165608

  7. Groundwater Impact Assessment of Tailings Storage Facility, Western Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peksezer-Sayit, A.; Yazicigil, H.

    2015-12-01

    A tailings storage facility (TSF) is a fundamental part of the mining process and should be carefully designed and managed to prevent any adverse environmental effects. TSF is site-specific and its design criteria are determined by regulations. The new mine waste regulation for the deposition of hazardous waste in a tailings storage facility in Turkey enforces, from bottom to top, 0.5 m thick compacted clay layer with K less than or equal to 1X10-9 m/s , 2 mm thick HDPE geomembrane, and a protective natural material or geotextile. Although these criteria seem to be enough to prevent leakage from the base, in practice, manufacturing and application errors may cause leakage and subsequent contamination of groundwater. The purpose of this study is to assess potential impacts of leakage from the base of TSF on groundwater quality both in operational and post-closure period of a mine site in western Turkey. For this purpose, analytical and 2-D and 3-D numerical models are used together. The potential leakage rate of sulphate-bearing solution from the base of TSF is determined from analytical model. 2-D finite element models (SEEP/W and CTRAN/W) are used to simulate unsaturated flow conditions and advective-dispersive contaminant transport below the TSF under steady-state and transient conditions for the operating period. The long-term impacts of leakage from the base of TSF on groundwater resources are evaluated by 3-D numerical groundwater flow (MODFLOW) and contaminant transport models (MT3DMS). The model results suggest that sulphate-bearing solution leaking from the base of TSF can reach water table in about 290 years. Hence, during the operational period (i.e. 21 years), no interaction is expected between the solution and groundwater. Moreover, long-term simulation results show that about 500 years later, the sulphate concentration in groundwater will be below the maximum allowable limits (i.e. 250 mg/L).

  8. A Review of Groundwater Arsenic Contamination in Bangladesh: The Millennium Development Goal Era and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Fakir Md.; Khan, Safayet; Chowdhury, Priyanka; Milton, Abul Hasnat; Hussain, Sumaira; Rahman, Mahfuzar

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water has a detrimental impact on human health which profoundly impairs the quality of life. Despite recognition of the adverse health implications of arsenic toxicity, there have been few studies to date to suggest measures that could be taken to overcome arsenic contamination. After the statement in 2000 WHO Bulletin that Bangladesh has been experiencing the largest mass poisoning of population in history, we researched existing literature to assess the magnitude of groundwater arsenic contamination in Bangladesh. The literature reviewed related research that had been initiated and/or completed since the implementation of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) under four domains: (1) extent of arsenic contamination; (2) health consequences; (3) mitigation and technologies and (4) future directions. To this means, a review matrix was established for analysis of previous literature based on these four core domains. Our findings revealed that several high-quality research articles were produced at the beginning of the MDG period, but efforts have dwindled in recent years. Furthermore, there were only a few studies conducted that focused on developing suitable solutions for managing arsenic contamination. Although the government of Bangladesh has made its population’s access to safe drinking water a priority agenda item, there are still pockets of the population that continue to suffer from arsenic toxicity due to contaminated water supplies. PMID:26891310

  9. Groundwater quality assessment of one former industrial site in Belgium using a TRIAD-like approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contaminated industrial sites are important sources of pollution and may result in ecotoxicological effects on terrestrial, aquatic and groundwater ecosystems. An effect-based approach to evaluate and assess pollution-induced degradation due to contaminated groundwater was carried out in this study. The new concept, referred to as 'Groundwater Quality TRIAD-like' (GwQT) approach, is adapted from classical TRIAD approaches. GwQT is based on measurements of chemical concentrations, laboratory toxicity tests and physico-chemical analyses. These components are combined in the GwQT using qualitative and quantitative (using zero to one subindices) integration approaches. The TRIAD approach is applied for the first time on groundwater from one former industrial site located in Belgium. This approach will allow the classification of sites into categories according to the degree of contaminant-induced degradation. This new concept is a starting point for groundwater characterization and is open for improvement and adjustment. - Highlights: → This study presents the first application of the TRIAD approach on groundwater system. → Groundwater Quality TRIAD-like approach is based on measurements of chemical concentrations, laboratory toxicity tests and physico-chemical analyses. → None of the three TRIAD components could reliably predict the other one. - This study presents the first application of the TRIAD approach on groundwater system. None of the TRIAD components (chemistry, physico-chemistry and ecotoxicity) could reliably predict the other one.

  10. Pulsed gas injection: A minimum effort approach for enhanced natural attenuation of chlorobenzene in contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcke, Gerd Ulrich, E-mail: gerd.balcke@metanomics.d [Department of Hydrogeology, UFZ Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Theodor-Lieser-Strasse 4, D-06120 Halle/Saale (Germany); Paschke, Heidrun [Department of Groundwater Remediation, UFZ Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Vogt, Carsten [Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, UFZ Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Schirmer, Mario [EAWAG, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Water Resources and Drinking Water, Ueberlandstrasse 133, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2009-07-15

    Chlorobenzene-contaminated groundwater was used to assess pulsed gas sparging as a minimum effort aeration strategy to enhance intrinsic natural attenuation. In contrast to existing biosparging operations, oxygen was supplied at minimum rate by reducing the gas injection frequency to 0.33 day{sup -1}. Field tests in a model aquifer were conducted in a 12 m long reactor, filled with indigenous aquifer material and continuously recharged with polluted groundwater over 3 years. The closed arrangement allowed yield balances, cost accounting as well as the investigation of spatial distributions of parameters which are sensitive to the biodegradation process. Depending on the injection frequency and on the gas chosen for injection (pure oxygen or air) oxygen-deficient conditions prevailed in the aquifer. Despite the limiting availability of dissolved oxygen in the groundwater, chlorobenzene degradation under oxygen-deficient conditions proved to be more effective than under conditions with dissolved oxygen being available in high concentrations. - Minimum rate gas sparging resulted in sustained biodegradation of chlorobenzene in a polluted groundwater aquifer.

  11. Pulsed gas injection: A minimum effort approach for enhanced natural attenuation of chlorobenzene in contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorobenzene-contaminated groundwater was used to assess pulsed gas sparging as a minimum effort aeration strategy to enhance intrinsic natural attenuation. In contrast to existing biosparging operations, oxygen was supplied at minimum rate by reducing the gas injection frequency to 0.33 day-1. Field tests in a model aquifer were conducted in a 12 m long reactor, filled with indigenous aquifer material and continuously recharged with polluted groundwater over 3 years. The closed arrangement allowed yield balances, cost accounting as well as the investigation of spatial distributions of parameters which are sensitive to the biodegradation process. Depending on the injection frequency and on the gas chosen for injection (pure oxygen or air) oxygen-deficient conditions prevailed in the aquifer. Despite the limiting availability of dissolved oxygen in the groundwater, chlorobenzene degradation under oxygen-deficient conditions proved to be more effective than under conditions with dissolved oxygen being available in high concentrations. - Minimum rate gas sparging resulted in sustained biodegradation of chlorobenzene in a polluted groundwater aquifer.

  12. Bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated surface water, groundwater, and soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioremediation is currently receiving considerable attention as a remediation option for sites contaminated with hazardous organic compounds. There is an enormous amount of interest in bioremediation, and numerous journals now publish research articles concerning some aspect of the remediation approach. A review of the literature indicates that two basic forms of bioremediation are currently being practiced: the microbiological approach and the microbial ecology approach. Each form has its advocates and detractors, and the microbiological approach is generally advocated by most of the firms that practice bioremediation. In this paper, the merits and disadvantages of these forms are reviewed and a conceptual approach is presented for assessing which form may be most useful for a particular contaminant situation. I conclude that the microbial ecology form of bioremediation may be the most useful for the majority of contaminant situations, and I will present two case histories in support of this hypothesis

  13. Groundwater impact assessment report for the 216-S-26 Crib, 200 West Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report assesses the impact of wastewater discharged to the 216-S-26 Crib on groundwater quality. The 216-S-26 Crib, located in the southern 200 West Area, has been in use since 1984 to dispose of liquid effluents from the 222-S Laboratory Complex. The 222-S Laboratory Complex effluent stream includes wastewater from four sources: the 222-S Laboratory, the 219-S Waste Storage Facility, the 222-SA Chemical Standards Laboratory, and the 291-S Exhaust Fan Control House and Stack. Based on assessment of groundwater chemistry and flow data, contaminant transport predictions, and groundwater chemistry data, the 216-S-26 Crib has minimal influence on groundwater contamination in the southern 200 West Area

  14. Groundwater impact assessment report for the 216-S-26 Crib, 200 West Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindberg, J.W.; Evelo, S.D.; Alexander, D.J.

    1993-11-01

    This report assesses the impact of wastewater discharged to the 216-S-26 Crib on groundwater quality. The 216-S-26 Crib, located in the southern 200 West Area, has been in use since 1984 to dispose of liquid effluents from the 222-S Laboratory Complex. The 222-S Laboratory Complex effluent stream includes wastewater from four sources: the 222-S Laboratory, the 219-S Waste Storage Facility, the 222-SA Chemical Standards Laboratory, and the 291-S Exhaust Fan Control House and Stack. Based on assessment of groundwater chemistry and flow data, contaminant transport predictions, and groundwater chemistry data, the 216-S-26 Crib has minimal influence on groundwater contamination in the southern 200 West Area.

  15. Karst groundwaters vulnerability assessment methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Vlaicu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A major socio-economic and scientific issue is represented by karst hydrostructures vulnerability mapping, which qualitatively and quantitatively highlights their exposure degree. Two research trends have been developed, one taking into account the environment features exclusively – the aquifer and protective cover type, permeability, aquifer depth, recharge rate, etc. (intrinsic vulnerability, the other focused on the types and quantities of pollutants (specific vulnerability. MAGIERA (2000 described and compared 69 methods, grouped in 5 types: hydrogeological complex and setting methods, index models and analogical relations (AF, AVI, Ekv, ΔhT’, parametric system models (DRASTIC, DWSAP, SINTACS, EPPNA, GOD, EPIK, REKS, PI, GSI, GLA, mathematical models (VULK, FAVA and statistical methods (CALVUL. However, it is also possible to classify the methods on the basis of other criteria, such as scale (local, regional, national, aim (land use planning, protection zoning, site assessment and target (source or resource vulnerability.

  16. Contaminant sorption/desorption rates: Implications for groundwater restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is widely recognized that contaminants sorb appreciably to solids during groundwater treatment. Most early attempts to model the transport of sorbin solutes were restricted by assuming that local equilibrium prevailed with respect to sorption and desorption. More recent evidence from both field and laboratory experiments demonstrates that both sorption and desorption are rate-limited, and that the local equilibrium assumption is untenable as a basis for exact simulation of groundwater transport. The rate limitation can be explained in terms of physical diffusion processes; diffusional mass transfer resistances are believed to exert substantial effects a range of scales: microporous solids, aggregates, and layers. This paper will present data that quantify the magnitude of such diffusional resistances in terms of effective times to achieve equilibrium, and will demonstrate how slow equilibrium influences the performance of aquifer restoration. Roberts et al presented field evidence indicating that sorption equilibrium was not attained during the course of a two year transport experiment conducted at the Borden Ontario field site at a scale of tens of meters. Ball and Roberts showed that the sorption capacity of aquifer material is saturated very slowly, requiring equilibration times on the order of tens days for a moderately strong sorbing compound such as tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and hundreds of days for a more strongly sorbing compounds, tetrachlorobenzene (TeCB). Special care is required to conduct sorption measurements over such long time periods; as an expedient, the aquifer can be finely ground to expedite the sorption equilibrium measurements. A pore diffusion model applied to the rate data succeeded in interpreting the data consistently

  17. Management of Ground and Groundwater Contamination on a Compact Site Constrained by Ongoing Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the design of a new characterisation project has had to be constantly reworked to ensure fragile plants, site services, current operations and decommissioning projects are not impacted. 2. Assessment of Risk to the public and workforce. Risks need to be assessed for the short, medium and long term. The main pathways to receptors are through groundwater or excavations. Risks to the public are complicated through the proximity of the site to major receptors such as the sea and a near-by farm. As entry to the site is controlled, excavations into contaminated ground are only possible by members of the workforce whose activities are managed to minimise any risk. This is through a system of excavation permits and authorisations for disposal of excavated material which can add significant time and cost to construction projects on site. 3. Prioritisation of remediation. Large volumes of impacted ground and groundwater sit beneath fragile buildings with significant inventories. With current decommissioning schedules whole-scale remediation of ground and groundwater near or under key buildings cannot commence for at least another 40 plus years. Early remediation and/or containment of groundwater further away from the source terms and remediation of smaller accessible areas of contamination are being considered and will be assessed through a comprehensive optioneering process. Long term clean-up strategies run into the early part of the 22. Century, making any predictions as to the end-use of the site and therefore clean-up criteria for current projects difficult to determine. Management of information and data is key in establishing this strategy and information relevant to contaminated land has been collected in various forms over the 60 year history of the site. This data and information is currently being pulled together by the Land Quality team where it can be put into a form that can be easily assessed, visualised and modelled as well as being managed and stored for future

  18. Contamination of nitrate in groundwater and its potential human health: a case study of lower Mae Klong river basin, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsanit, Jaturong; Teartisup, Piyakarn; Kerdsueb, Prapeut; Tharnpoophasiam, Prapin; Worakhunpiset, Suwalee

    2015-08-01

    Nitrate contamination in groundwater is a worldwide problem especially in agricultural countries. Environmental factors, such as land-use pattern, type of aquifer, and soil-drainage capacity, affect the level of contamination. Exposure to high levels of nitrate in groundwater may contribute to adverse health effects among residents who use groundwater for consumption. This study aimed to determine the relationship between nitrate levels in groundwater with land-use pattern, type of aquifer, and soil-drainage capacity, in Photharam District, Ratchaburi Province, lower Mae Klong basin, Thailand. Health risk maps were created based on hazard quotient to quantify the potential health risk of the residents using US Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) health risk assessment model. The results showed the influence of land-use patterns, type of aquifer, and soil-drainage capacity on nitrate contamination. It was found that most of the residents in the studied area were not at risk; however, a groundwater nitrate monitoring system should be implemented. PMID:25874425

  19. Comparison of interpolation methods for the estimation of groundwater contamination in Andimeshk-Shush Plain, Southwest of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Rouhollah; Sakizadeh, Mohamad

    2016-02-01

    Selection of appropriate interpolation methods for the conversion of discrete samples into continuous maps is a controversial issue in the environmental researches. The main objective of this study was to analyze the suitability of three interpolation methods for the discrimination of groundwater with respect to the water quality index (WQI). The groundwater quality data consisted of 17 variables associated with 65 wells located in Andimeshk-Shush Plain. Three spatial interpolation methods including ordinary kriging (OK), empirical Bayesian kriging (EBK), and inverse distance weighting (IDW) were utilized for modeling the groundwater contamination. In addition, different cross-validation indicators were applied to assess the performance of different interpolation methods. The results showed that the performance differed slightly among different methods, although the best performed interpolation method in this study was the empirical Bayesian kriging. Among the interpolation methods, IDW with weighting power of 4 estimated the most contaminated area, while OK estimated the lowest contaminated area. The weighting power of IDW had a significant influence on the estimation, meaning that the estimated contaminated area was increased when a greater weighting power was selected. The subtraction results indicated that there are slightly spatial differences among the contamination assessment results. Results of both standard deviation (SD) and coefficient of variation (CV) also showed that uncertainty was highest in the southern part of the study area, where the distribution of wells were more intensive than that of the northern part. PMID:26446732

  20. Groundwater-soil-crop relationship with respect to arsenic contamination in farming villages of Bangladesh - A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurosawa, Kiyoshi [Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi -Ku, Fukuoka 812 8581 (Japan)], E-mail: kurosawa@agr.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Egashira, Kazuhiko [Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812 8581 (Japan); Tani, Masakazu [Faculty of Design, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 815 8540 (Japan); Jahiruddin, M.; Moslehuddin, Abu Zofar Md. [Department of Soil Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202 (Bangladesh); Rahman, Zulfikar Md. [Department of Agricultural Extension Education, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202 (Bangladesh)

    2008-11-15

    To clarify the groundwater-soil-crop relationship with respect to arsenic (As) contamination, As concentration was measured in tubewell (TW) water, surface soil from farmyards and paddy fields, and fresh taro (Colocasia esculenta) leaves from farmyards in the farming villages of Bangladesh. The As concentration in TW water from farmyards was at least four times higher than the Bangladesh drinking water standard, and the concentration in fresh taro leaves was equal to or higher than those reported previously for leafy vegetables in Bangladesh. As concentration of surface soils in both farmyards and paddy fields was positively correlated with that of the TW water. Further, the concentration in surface soil was positively correlated with levels in fresh taro leaves in the farmyard. This study, therefore, clarified the groundwater-soil-crop relationship in farmyards and the relationship between groundwater-soil in paddy fields to assess the extent of As contamination in Bangladeshi villages. - By extracting arsenic contaminated groundwater from a well, surface soil surrounding the well and crops planted in the surface soil became contaminated with arsenic.

  1. Indicators to identify the source of pesticide contamination to groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorling, Lærke; Brüsch, Walter; Tuxen, Nina;

    In Denmark groundwater is synonym with drinking water. The mainstream Danish political approach favors prevention and action at source over advanced treatments of polluted groundwater. The main pollutants are nitrate and pesticides. Pesticides in groundwater can originate from either diffuse or p...

  2. Current Conditions Risk Assessment for the 300-FF-5 Groundwater Operable Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miley, Terri B.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Napier, Bruce A.; Peterson, Robert E.; Becker, James M.

    2007-11-01

    This report updates a baseline risk assessment for the 300 Area prepared in 1994. The update includes consideration of changes in contaminants of interest and in the environment that have occurred during the period of interim remedial action, i.e., 1996 to the present, as well as the sub-regions, for which no initial risk assessments have been conducted. In 1996, a record of decision (ROD) stipulated interim remedial action for groundwater affected by releases from 300 Area sources, as follows: (a) continued monitoring of groundwater that is contaminated above health-based levels to ensure that concentrations continue to decrease, and (b) institutional controls to ensure that groundwater use is restricted to prevent unacceptable exposure to groundwater contamination. In 2000, the groundwater beneath the two outlying sub-regions was added to the operable unit. In 2001, the first 5-year review of the ROD found that the interim remedy and remedial action objectives were still appropriate, although the review called for additional characterization activities. This report includes a current conditions baseline ecological and human health risk assessment using maximum concentrations in the environmental media of the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit and downstream conditions at the City of Richland, Washington. The scope for this assessment includes only current measured environmental concentrations and current use scenarios. Future environmental concentrations and future land uses are not considered in this assessment.

  3. Emerging organic contaminants in groundwater: A review of sources, fate and occurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emerging organic contaminants (EOCs) detected in groundwater may have adverse effects on human health and aquatic ecosystems. This paper reviews the existing occurrence data in groundwater for a range of EOCs including pharmaceutical, personal care, ‘life-style’ and selected industrial compounds. The main sources and pathways for organic EOCs in groundwater are reviewed, with occurrence data for EOCs in groundwater included from both targeted studies and broad reconnaissance surveys. Nanogram-microgram per litre concentrations are present in groundwater for a large range of EOCs as well as metabolites and transformation products and under certain conditions may pose a threat to freshwater bodies for decades due to relatively long groundwater residence times. In the coming decades, more of these EOCs are likely to have drinking water standards, environmental quality standards and/or groundwater threshold values defined, and therefore a better understanding of the spatial and temporal variation remains a priority. - Highlights: ► First review to focus on EOCs in groundwater. ► A large range (n > 180) of EOCs are detected in groundwater. ► Significant concentrations (102–104 ng/L) for a range of EOCs, including endocrine disruptors. ► Groundwater EOC occurrence is poorly characterised compared to other freshwater resources. - A large range of emerging organic contaminants are now being detected in groundwater as a result of recent and historical anthropogenic activities.

  4. Toxic fluoride and arsenic contaminated groundwater in the Lahore and Kasur districts, Punjab, Pakistan and possible contaminant sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study is the first attempt to put forward possible sources of As, F- and SO42- contaminated groundwater in the Kalalanwala area, Punjab, Pakistan. Five rainwater and 24 groundwater samples from three different depths were analyzed. Shallow groundwater from 24 to 27 m depth contained high F- (2.47-21.1 mg/L), while the groundwater samples from the deeper depth were free from fluoride contamination. All groundwater samples contained high As (32-1900 μg/L), in excess of WHO drinking water standards. The SO42- ranges from 110 to 1550 mg/L. δ 34S data indicate three sources for SO42- air pollutants (5.5-5.7 per mille ), fertilizers (4.8 per mille ), and household waste (7.0 per mille ). Our important finding is the presence of SO42-, As and F- in rainwater, indicating the contribution of these elements from air pollution. We propose that pollutants originate, in part, from coal combusted at brick factories and were mobilized promotionally by the alkaline nature of the local groundwater. - Simultaneous As and F- contamination of groundwater and possible pollutant sources are discussed

  5. Independent technical evaluation and recommendations for contaminated groundwater at the department of energy office of legacy management Riverton processing site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, Brain B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Denham, Miles E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Eddy-Dilek, Carol A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (DOE-LM) manages the legacy contamination at the Riverton, WY, Processing Site – a former uranium milling site that operated from 1958 to 1963. The tailings and associated materials were removed in 1988-1989 and contaminants are currently flushing from the groundwater. DOE-LM commissioned an independent technical team to assess the status of the contaminant flushing, identify any issues or opportunities for DOE-LM, and provide key recommendations. The team applied a range of technical frameworks – spatial, temporal, hydrological and geochemical – in performing the evaluation. In each topic area, an in depth evaluation was performed using DOE-LM site data (e.g., chemical measurements in groundwater, surface water and soil, water levels, and historical records) along with information collected during the December 2013 site visit (e.g., plant type survey, geomorphology, and minerals that were observed, collected and evaluated).

  6. Assessment of groundwater quality in Puri City, India: an impact of anthropogenic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Ritesh; Khobragade, Puja; Mohapatra, P K

    2011-06-01

    Puri City is situated on the east coast of India and receives water supply only from the groundwater sources demarcated as water fields. The objective of this paper is to assess and evaluate the groundwater quality due to impact of anthropogenic activities in the city. Groundwater samples were collected from the water fields, hand pumps, open wells, and open water bodies during post-monsoon 2006 and summer 2007. Groundwater quality was evaluated with drinking water standards as prescribed by Bureau of Indian Standards and Environmental Protection Agency to assess the suitability. The study indicated seasonal variation of water-quality parameters within the water fields and city area. Groundwater in the water fields was found to be suitable for drinking after disinfection. While in city area, groundwater quality was impacted by onsite sanitary conditions. The study revealed that groundwater quality was deteriorated due to the discharge of effluent from septic tanks, soak pits, pit latrines, discharges of domestic wastewater in leaky drains, and leachate from solid waste dumpsite. Based on observed groundwater quality, various mitigation measures were suggested to protect the water fields and further groundwater contamination in the city. PMID:20714928

  7. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER STRATEGIES FOR REMEDIATION OF ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER: ABSTRACT

    Science.gov (United States)

    NRMRL-ADA-01152 Wilkin*, R.T., and Paul*, C.J. "Permeable Reactive Barrier Strategies for Remediation of Arsenic- Contaminated Groundwater." In: Geological Society of America, Abstracts with programs., Geological Society of America Annua...

  8. Prediction of contamination potential of groundwater arsenic in Cambodia, Laos, and Thailand using artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    The arsenic (As) contamination of groundwater has increasingly been recognized as a major global issue of concern. As groundwater resources are one of most important freshwater sources for water supplies in Southeast Asian countries, it is important to investigate the spatial distribution of As cont...

  9. Alternative Endpoints and Approaches for the Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater at Complex Sites - 13426

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of United States (U.S.) Department of Energy's (DOE)'s environmental remediation programs is to restore groundwater to beneficial use, similar to many other Federal and state environmental cleanup programs. Based on past experience, groundwater remediation to pre-contamination conditions (i.e., drinking water standards or non-detectable concentrations) can be successfully achieved at many sites. At a subset of the most complex sites, however, complete restoration is not likely achievable within the next 50 to 100 years using today's technology. This presentation describes several approaches used at complex sites in the face of these technical challenges. Many complex sites adopted a long-term management approach, whereby contamination was contained within a specified area using active or passive remediation techniques. Consistent with the requirements of their respective environmental cleanup programs, several complex sites selected land use restrictions and used risk management approaches to accordingly adopt alternative cleanup goals (alternative endpoints). Several sites used long-term management designations and approaches in conjunction with the alternative endpoints. Examples include various state designations for groundwater management zones, technical impracticability (TI) waivers or greater risk waivers at Superfund sites, and the use of Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) or other passive long-term management approaches over long time frames. This presentation will focus on findings, statistics, and case studies from a recently-completed report for the Department of Defense's Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) (Project ER-0832) on alternative endpoints and approaches for groundwater remediation at complex sites under a variety of Federal and state cleanup programs. The primary objective of the project was to provide environmental managers and regulators with tools, metrics, and information needed to evaluate

  10. Results of RCRA groundwater quality assessment at the 216-B-3 Pond Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes a groundwater quality assessment of the 216-B-3 pond system, a Resources Conservation and Recovery act of 1976 (RCRA) waste facility. In 1990, sampling and chemical analysis of groundwater underlying the facility indicated that the contamination indicator parameters, total organic halogens (TOX), and total organic carbon (TOC) had exceeded established limits in two wells. This discovery placed the facility into RCRA groundwater assessment status and subsequently led to a more detailed hydrochemical analysis of groundwater underlying the facility. Comprehensive chemical analyses of groundwater samples from 1994 through 1996 revealed one compound, tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TRIS2CH), that may have contributed to elevated TOX concentrations. No compound was identified as a contributor to TOC. Detailed evaluations of TOX, TOC, and TRIS2CH and comparison of occurrences of these parameters led to conclusions that (1) with few exceptions, these constituents occur at low concentrations below or near limits of quantitation; (2) it is problematic whether the low concentrations of TRIS2CH represent a contaminant originating from the facility or if it is a product of well construction; and (3) given the low and diminishing concentration of TOX, TOC, and TRIS2CH, no further investigation into the occurrent of these constituents is justified. Continued groundwater monitoring should include an immediate recalculation of background critical means of upgradient/downgradient comparisons and a return to seminannual groundwater monitoring under a RCRA indicator parameter evaluation program

  11. Application of environmental isotopes in studies of biodegradation of organic contaminants in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater contamination by organic contaminants is of major concern for implementing efficient water management strategies in aquifers used for domestic and industrial uses. Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) has been chosen as a method to manage groundwater contamination at many sites. Biodegradation is usually the main process limiting the spreading of dissolved contaminants and protocols are required to assess biodegradation. Successful implementation of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) requires a monitoring strategy that does not only demonstrate diminishing contaminant concentrations but also provides insight into the processes responsible for contaminant attenuation. Analysis of compound-specific isotope ratios is a new approach to gain such process-specific information. During microbial and chemical transformations, the reaction rate is often faster for molecules with light isotopes compared to molecules with heavy isotopes. This leads to a characteristic pattern of isotope ratios of reactants and transformation products. Stable isotope ratios can provide information on predominant biodegradation pathways in two ways: A degradation pathway may be identified based on an enrichment of heavy isotopes in the reactant as the reaction proceeds. Or, an intermediate of a degradation pathway can have a distinct isotopic composition, which makes it possible to distinguish it from other sources of the compound. Most of the isotope research has concentrated on BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes) and chlorinated compounds, the two more important groups of compounds commonly found in groundwater. Several studies have been carried out under laboratory conditions (microcosm experiments) to evaluate carbon isotope fractionation during aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation of organic contaminants. These studies have shown the occurrence of large carbon isotope fractionation for biodegradation of chlorinated compounds such as cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis

  12. Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination of groundwater in the vicinity of an oil refinery -- A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater in the vicinity of an oil refinery in Algeria was found to be contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. Free floating product, which was found after analysis to be crude oil, was noticed in some of the domestic water supply wells, and also in some irrigation wells which were situated close to the refinery. It was observed that the water in none of the shallow dug wells was contaminated. On the other hand, most of the borewells had contaminated groundwater. The studies included detailed hydrogeological investigations, verification of all the installations carrying crude oil, such as reservoirs and pipe lines. Due to the huge withdrawals from the regional water supply wells, steep hydraulic gradients were observed towards the well field. By modifying the pattern of groundwater withdrawals in the area a provisional containment of the contamination was achieved. The above ground storage tanks were found to be heavily pitted, and corroded at the bottom. Nine monitoring wells were drilled around the storage tanks. Soil and groundwater samples were analyzed from these monitoring wells. From these analyses, the contaminant plume was delineated. Tracer tests in these monitoring wells were conducted to determine the groundwater flow direction. To remediate the problems, the existing crude oil tanks were verified, cleaned and painted with non corrosive paints; the contaminated wells were pumped and the water was treated in the normal treatment system installed at the refinery. Groundwater quality was monitored over a period of six months to ensure the quality of water

  13. Intrinsic bioremediation of MTBE-contaminated groundwater at a petroleum-hydrocarbon spill site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K. F.; Kao, C. M.; Chen, T. Y.; Weng, C. H.; Tsai, C. T.

    2006-06-01

    An oil-refining plant site located in southern Taiwan has been identified as a petroleum-hydrocarbon [mainly methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX)] spill site. In this study, groundwater samples collected from the site were analyzed to assess the occurrence of intrinsic MTBE biodegradation. Microcosm experiments were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of biodegrading MTBE by indigenous microorganisms under aerobic, cometabolic, iron reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Results from the field investigation and microbial enumeration indicate that the intrinsic biodegradation of MTBE and BTEX is occurring and causing the decrease in MTBE and BTEX concentrations. Microcosm results show that the indigenous microorganisms were able to biodegrade MTBE under aerobic conditions using MTBE as the sole primary substrate. The detected biodegradation byproduct, tri-butyl alcohol (TBA), can also be biodegraded by the indigenous microorganisms. In addition, microcosms with site groundwater as the medium solution show higher MTBE biodegradation rate. This indicates that the site groundwater might contain some trace minerals or organics, which could enhance the MTBE biodegradation. Results show that the addition of BTEX at low levels could also enhance the MTBE removal. No MTBE removal was detected in iron reducing and methanogenic microcosms. This might be due to the effects of low dissolved oxygen (approximately 0.3 mg/L) within the plume. The low iron reducers and methanogens (bioremediation using indigenous microorganisms would be a feasible technology to clean up this MTBE-contaminated site.

  14. A calcite permeable reactive barrier for the remediation of Fluoride from spent potliner (SPL) contaminated groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turner, B.D.; Binning, Philip John; Sloan, S.W.

    2008-01-01

    The use of calcite (CaCO3) as a substrate for a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for removing fluoride from contaminated groundwater is proposed and is illustrated by application to groundwater contaminated by spent potliner leachate (SPL), a waste derived from the aluminium smelting process. The...... paper focuses on two issues in the implementation of calcite permeable reactive barriers for remediating fluoride contaminated water: the impact of the groundwater chemical matrix and CO2 addition on fluoride removal. Column tests comparing pure NaF solutions, synthetic SPL solutions, and actual SPL...... leachate indicate that the complex chemical matrix of the SPL leachate can impact fluoride removal significantly. For SPL contaminant mixtures, fluoride removal is initially less than expected from idealized, pure, solutions. However, with time, the effect of other contaminants on fluoride removal...

  15. Applying Hybrid Heuristic Approach to Identify Contaminant Source Information in Transient Groundwater Flow Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hund-Der Yeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous identification of the source location and release history in aquifers is complicated and time-consuming if the release of groundwater contaminant source varies in time. This paper presents an approach called SATSO-GWT to solve complicated source release problems which contain the unknowns of three location coordinates and several irregular release periods and concentrations. The SATSO-GWT combines with ordinal optimization algorithm (OOA, roulette wheel approach, and a source identification algorithm called SATS-GWT. The SATS-GWT was developed based on simulated annealing, tabu search, and three-dimensional groundwater flow and solute transport model MD2K-GWT. The OOA and roulette wheel method are utilized mainly to reduce the size of feasible solution domain and accelerate the identification of the source information. A hypothetic site with one contaminant source location and two release periods is designed to assess the applicability of the present approach. The results indicate that the performance of SATSO-GWT is superior to that of SATS-GWT. In addition, the present approach works very effectively in dealing with the cases which have different initial guesses of source location and measurement errors in the monitoring points as well as problems with large suspicious areas and several source release periods and concentrations.

  16. Assessing regional groundwater stress for nations using multiple data sources with the groundwater footprint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater is a critical resource for agricultural production, ecosystems, drinking water and industry, yet groundwater depletion is accelerating, especially in a number of agriculturally important regions. Assessing the stress of groundwater resources is crucial for science-based policy and management, yet water stress assessments have often neglected groundwater and used single data sources, which may underestimate the uncertainty of the assessment. We consistently analyze and interpret groundwater stress across whole nations using multiple data sources for the first time. We focus on two nations with the highest national groundwater abstraction rates in the world, the United States and India, and use the recently developed groundwater footprint and multiple datasets of groundwater recharge and withdrawal derived from hydrologic models and data synthesis. A minority of aquifers, mostly with known groundwater depletion, show groundwater stress regardless of the input dataset. The majority of aquifers are not stressed with any input data while less than a third are stressed for some input data. In both countries groundwater stress affects agriculturally important regions. In the United States, groundwater stress impacts a lower proportion of the national area and population, and is focused in regions with lower population and water well density compared to India. Importantly, the results indicate that the uncertainty is generally greater between datasets than within datasets and that much of the uncertainty is due to recharge estimates. Assessment of groundwater stress consistently across a nation and assessment of uncertainty using multiple datasets are critical for the development of a science-based rationale for policy and management, especially with regard to where and to what extent to focus limited research and management resources. (letter)

  17. Arsenic contamination of groundwater: Mitigation strategies and policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaerts, Guy J.; Khouri, Nadim

    Contamination of groundwater by arsenic from natural geochemical sources is at present a most serious challenge in the planning of large-scale use of groundwater for drinking and other purposes. Recent improvements in detection limits of analytical instruments are allowing the correlation of health impacts such as cancer with large concentrations of arsenic in groundwater. However, there are at present no known large-scale technological solutions for the millions of people-mostly rural-who are potentially affected in developing countries. An overall framework of combating natural resource degradation is combined with case studies from Chile, Mexico, Bangladesh and elsewhere to arrive at a set of strategic recommendations for the global, national and local dimensions of the arsenic ``crisis''. The main recommendations include: the need for flexibility in the elaboration of any arsenic mitigation strategy, the improvement and large-scale use of low-cost and participatory groundwater quality testing techniques, the need to maintain consistent use of key lessons learned worldwide in water supply and sanitation and to integrate arsenic as just one other factor in providing a sustainable water supply, and the following of distinct but communicable tracks between arsenic-related developments and enhanced, long-term, sustainable water supplies. La contamination des eaux souterraines par l'arsenic provenant de sources naturelles est actuellement un sujet des plus graves dans l'organisation d'un recours à grande échelle des eaux souterraines pour la boisson et d'autres usages. De récentes améliorations dans les limites de détection des équipements analytiques permettent de corréler les effets sur la santé tels que le cancer à de fortes concentrations en arsenic dans les eaux souterraines. Toutefois, il n'existe pas actuellement de solutions technologiques à grande échelle connues pour des millions de personnes, surtout en zones rurales, qui sont potentiellement

  18. Are interventions to reduce the impact of arsenic contamination of groundwater on human health in developing countries effective?: a systematic review protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearson M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic arsenic pollution is now recognised as a worldwide problem, with 21 countries experiencing arsenic groundwater contamination. It is a particularly important issue in developing countries, where groundwater is generally the preferred drinking source (as an alternative to polluted surface water. Technologies to remove or mitigate arsenic contamination of groundwater include pre-oxidation, adsorption, biological removal, and deep tubewells. Whilst technologies such as these may be effective in stable conditions (for example, at a laboratory scale, their effectiveness in real-world circumstances needs to be assessed to inform policy making. Methods This protocol details our proposed methods for conducting a systematic review to identify, appraise, and synthesise evidence to answer the following policy-relevant questions: a In developing countries, are interventions to reduce the impact of arsenic contamination of groundwater on human health effective?, and b What factors enable or constrain the effectiveness of these interventions in developing countries?

  19. Development of relative risk model for regional groundwater risk assessment: a case study in the lower Liaohe River Plain, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianbo; Zuo, Rui; Teng, Yanguo; Wang, Jinsheng; Wang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Increasing pressure on water supply worldwide, especially in arid areas, has resulted in groundwater overexploitation and contamination, and subsequent deterioration of the groundwater quality and threats to public health. Environmental risk assessment of regional groundwater is an important tool for groundwater protection. This study presents a new approach for assessing the environmental risk assessment of regional groundwater. It was carried out with a relative risk model (RRM) coupled with a series of indices, such as a groundwater vulnerability index, which includes receptor analysis, risk source analysis, risk exposure and hazard analysis, risk characterization, and management of groundwater. The risk map is a product of the probability of environmental contamination and impact. The reliability of the RRM was verified using Monte Carlo analysis. This approach was applied to the lower Liaohe River Plain (LLRP), northeastern China, which covers 23604 km2. A spatial analysis tool within GIS which was used to interpolate and manipulate the data to develop environmental risk maps of regional groundwater, divided the level of risk from high to low into five ranks (V, IV, III, II, I). The results indicate that areas of relative risk rank (RRR) V cover 2324 km2, covering 9.8% of the area; RRR IV covers 3986 km2, accounting for 16.9% of the area. It is a new and appropriate method for regional groundwater resource management and land use planning, and is a rapid and effective tool for improving strategic decision making to protect groundwater and reduce environmental risk. PMID:26020518

  20. Development of relative risk model for regional groundwater risk assessment: a case study in the lower Liaohe River Plain, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianbo Li

    Full Text Available Increasing pressure on water supply worldwide, especially in arid areas, has resulted in groundwater overexploitation and contamination, and subsequent deterioration of the groundwater quality and threats to public health. Environmental risk assessment of regional groundwater is an important tool for groundwater protection. This study presents a new approach for assessing the environmental risk assessment of regional groundwater. It was carried out with a relative risk model (RRM coupled with a series of indices, such as a groundwater vulnerability index, which includes receptor analysis, risk source analysis, risk exposure and hazard analysis, risk characterization, and management of groundwater. The risk map is a product of the probability of environmental contamination and impact. The reliability of the RRM was verified using Monte Carlo analysis. This approach was applied to the lower Liaohe River Plain (LLRP, northeastern China, which covers 23604 km2. A spatial analysis tool within GIS which was used to interpolate and manipulate the data to develop environmental risk maps of regional groundwater, divided the level of risk from high to low into five ranks (V, IV, III, II, I. The results indicate that areas of relative risk rank (RRR V cover 2324 km2, covering 9.8% of the area; RRR IV covers 3986 km2, accounting for 16.9% of the area. It is a new and appropriate method for regional groundwater resource management and land use planning, and is a rapid and effective tool for improving strategic decision making to protect groundwater and reduce environmental risk.

  1. Perched-Water Analysis Related to Deep Vadose Zone Contaminant Transport and Impact to Groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Carroll, KC; Chronister, Glen B.

    2013-11-15

    Perched-water conditions have been observed in the vadose zone above a fine-grained zone that is located just a few meters above the water table beneath the B-complex at the Hanford Site. The perched water, containing elevated concentrations of uranium and technetium-99, is important to consider in evaluating the future flux of contaminated water into the groundwater. A study was conducted to examine the perched-water conditions and quantitatively evaluate 1) factors that control perching behavior, 2) contaminant flux toward groundwater, and, 3) associated groundwater impact. Based on the current vertical transport pathways and large areal extent of the perched system, the evaluation was conducted using a one-dimensional (1-D) analysis. Steady-state scoping calculations showed that the perching-layer hydraulic conductivity is likely to be up to two orders of magnitude less than the base case value obtained from Hanford site literature. Numerical flow and transport simulations provided both steady-state and transient system estimates of water and contaminant behavior and were used to further refine the range of conditions consistent with current observations of perched water height and to provide estimates of future water and contaminant flux to groundwater. With a recharge rate of 6 cm/yr, representative of current disturbed surface conditions, contaminant flux from the perched water occurs over a time interval of tens of years. However, if the recharge rate is 0.35 cm/yr, representative of returning recharge to pre-Hanford Site levels, the contaminant flux into the groundwater is spread over hundreds of years. It was also demonstrated that removal of perched water by pumping would reduce the flux of water (and associated contaminants) to the groundwater, thereby impacting the long-term rate of contaminant movement to the groundwater.

  2. Case studies illustrating in-situ remediation methods for soil and groundwater contaminated with petrochemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Robert A.; Lance, P.E.; Downs, A.; Kier, Brian P. [EMCON Northwest Inc., Portland, OR (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Four case studies of successful in-situ remediation are summarized illustrating cost-effective methods to remediate soil and groundwater contaminated with volatile and non-volatile petrochemicals. Each site is in a different geologic environment with varying soil types and with and without groundwater impact. The methods described include vadose zone vapor extraction, high-vacuum vapor extraction combined with groundwater tab.le depression, air sparging with groundwater recovery and vapor extraction, and bio remediation of saturated zone soils using inorganic nutrient and oxygen addition

  3. Groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI]: a health survey and clinical examination of community inhabitants (Kanpur, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priti Sharma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We assessed the health effects of hexavalent chromium groundwater contamination (from tanneries and chrome sulfate manufacturing in Kanpur, India. METHODS: The health status of residents living in areas with high Cr (VI groundwater contamination (N = 186 were compared to residents with similar social and demographic features living in communities having no elevated Cr (VI levels (N = 230. Subjects were recruited at health camps in both the areas. Health status was evaluated with health questionnaires, spirometry and blood hematology measures. Cr (VI was measured in groundwater samples by diphenylcarbazide reagent method. RESULTS: Residents from communities with known Cr (VI contamination had more self-reports of digestive and dermatological disorders and hematological abnormalities. GI distress was reported in 39.2% vs. 17.2% males (AOR = 3.1 and 39.3% vs. 21% females (AOR = 2.44; skin abnormalities in 24.5% vs. 9.2% males (AOR = 3.48 and 25% vs. 4.9% females (AOR = 6.57. Residents from affected communities had greater RBCs (among 30.7% males and 46.1% females, lower MCVs (among 62.8% males and less platelets (among 68% males and 72% females than matched controls. There were no differences in leucocytes count and spirometry parameters. CONCLUSIONS: Living in communities with Cr (VI groundwater is associated with gastrointestinal and dermatological complaints and abnormal hematological function. Limitations of this study include small sample size and the lack of long term follow-up.

  4. Technical Basis for Evaluating Surface Barriers to Protect Groundwater from Deep Vadose Zone Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayer, Michael J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Freedman, Vicky L.

    2010-02-03

    This document presents a strategy for evaluating the effectiveness of surface barriers for site-specific deep vadose zone remediation. The strategy provides a technically defensible approach to determine the depth to which a surface barrier can effectively isolate contaminants in the vadose at a specific site as a function of subsurface properties, contaminant distribution, barrier design, and infiltration control performance. The strategy also provides an assessment of additional data and information needs with respect to surface barrier performance for deep vadose zone applications. The strategy addresses the linkage between surface barriers and deep vadose zone in situ remediation activities, monitoring issues, and emerging science, technology, and regulatory objectives. In short, the report documents the existing knowledge base, identifies knowledge needs (based on data gaps), and suggests tasks whose outcomes will address those knowledge needs. More important, the report serves as a starting point to engage the regulator and stakeholder community on the viability of deploying surface barriers for deep vadose zone contamination. As that engagement unfolds, a systematic methodology can be formalized and instituted. The strategy is focused on deep vadose zone contamination and the methods needed to determine the impact to groundwater from those deep vadose zone contaminants. Processes that affect surface barrier performance, recharge in the areas surrounding the surface barrier, and the near-surface vadose zone beneath the barrier are acknowledged but are not addressed by this strategy. In addition, the collection of site-specific data on contaminant distribution and geologic structure and properties are programmatic responsibilities and are not provided by this strategy.

  5. Natural attenuation of organic contaminants at the interface between groundwater and surface water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middeldorp, P.; Staps, S.; Rijnaarts, H. [TNO-MEP Environment, Energy and Process Innovation, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Roelofsen, F.; Valstar, J. [TNO-NITG, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Smits, J. [WL/Delf Hydraulics (Netherlands)

    2003-07-01

    There are strong indications that the interface between groundwater and surface water plays an important role in the natural degradation of organic contaminants (NA-interface). This is especially the case for mobile contaminants that are relatively persistent in an anaerobic (subsurface) environment, and are mineralised relatively easy under more oxidized environmental conditions (e.g. benzene, chlorobenzene, vinyl chloride, the light aliphatic fraction of mineral oil, etc.). These compounds are often also present as degradation products of natural or stimulated in situ biodegradation processes. Previous investigations have indicated indirectly that NA-interface processes contribute to a reduction of contaminant flux into surface water systems. Until now, no straightforward assessment and quantification of NA-interface has been performed. Moreover, limit values for allowable influx of contamination from a site into a surface water system do not exist. This prevents a possible beneficial use of NA-interface processes as a part of a cost-effective and integrated soil and water quality management. This project aims to gain more understanding of the occurrence of NA-interface processes, to quantify their contribution to emission reduction towards the surface water system and, in case of substantial contribution, to promote application of NA-interface as a part of a cost-effective integrated environmental management of contaminated sites and surrounding water bodies. The project's starting point is that the surface water is regarded as an object of risk and not as a reactor. Thus, effective degradation in the interface does not move environmental problems to surface water systems, but eliminates contaminants by natural occurring processes, thus protecting the aquatic ecosystem. (orig.)

  6. Vulnerability of groundwater to contamination in the municipality of Humaitá, Amazonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miqueias Lima Duarte

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater has been used intensively throughout Brazil. In southern Amazonas state, the water supplies of some municipalities are derived exclusively from wells. Yet this region generally has no wastewater treatment, leading to potential contamination of the underground water. We classified and mapped the vulnerability of groundwater supplies to contamination in the urban and peri-urban area of Humaitá in southern Amazonas State. We used the GOD method (Groundwater occurrence; Overall Lithology of the unsaturated zone; Depth of the water table to score vulnerability classes. The results revealed the existence of average and high vulnerability of aquifer contamination in the area, indicating the fragility of the aquifer system that supplies the municipality, and showing the need for public policies aimed at the protection of the region’s groundwater resources.

  7. Mobilisation processes responsible for iron and manganese contamination of groundwater in Central Adriatic Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmucci, William; Rusi, Sergio; Di Curzio, Diego

    2016-06-01

    Iron and manganese are two of the most common contaminants that exceed the threshold imposed by international and national legislation. When these contamination occurs in groundwater, the use of the water resource is forbidden for any purposes. Several studies investigated these two metals in groundwater, but research focused in the Central Adriatic area are still lacking. Thus, the objective of this study is to identify the origin of Fe and Mn contamination in groundwater and the hydrogeochemical processes that can enrich aquifers with these metals. This work is based on hydrogeochemical and multivariate statistical analysis of analytical results undertaken on soils and groundwater. Fe and Mn contamination are widespread in the alluvial aquifers, and their distribution is regulated by local conditions (i.e. long residence time, presence of peat or organic-rich fine sediments or anthropic pollution) that control redox processes in the aquifers and favour the mobilisation of these two metals in groundwater. The concentration of iron and manganese identified within soil indicates that the latter are a concrete source of the two metals. Anthropic impact on Fe and Mn contamination of groundwater is not related to agricultural activities, but on the contrary, the contribution of hydrocarbons (e.g. spills) is evident. PMID:26948970

  8. The effect of source removal on MGP site contaminants in groundwater at Site 24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remediation of groundwater at former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites can be very complicated because of the nature of MGP contamination. For example, the tarry wastes generated during gas production processes between the 1850s and the 1950s were sometimes left on-site in old tanks, trenches, or other convenient locations. Some of the residues from these tarry wastes still exist today as nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLS) which can release a variety of vapor and dissolved phased tar constituents to soil and groundwater over time. This paper focuses on a case study of a site contaminated with MGP tars. The tarry source material was removed from the site and the impact of that source removal on groundwater contamination is being monitored over a ten-year period. The results of the monitoring effort during the first three years after source removal show that the zone of highest contaminant concentrations in the groundwater plume has moved down gradient and has dissipated significantly. In the near source area, the plume dissipation occurred much more rapidly and to a greater extent than model predictions. In addition, results of dissolved oxygen determinations in the groundwater and other research indicate that natural microbial degradation is occurring within the plume. Based on this study, the removal of source tar with natural plume dissipation can be an effective action for the reduction of groundwater contamination at some former MGP sites without the need for pump and treat or other remedial systems

  9. Use of Additives in Bioremediation of Contaminated Groundwater and Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter reviews application of additives used in bioremediation of chlorinated solvents and fuels for groundwater and soil remediation. Soluble carbon substrates are applicable to most site conditions except aquifers with very high or very low groundwater flow. Slow-release ...

  10. Relationships between groundwater contamination and major-ion chemistry in a karst aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, B. R.

    1990-11-01

    Groundwater contamination was examined within a rural setting of the Inner Bluegrass Karst Region of central Kentucky where potential contaminant sources include soil-organic matter, organic and inorganic fertilizer, and septic-tank effluent. To evaluate controls on groundwater contamination, data on nitrate concentrations and indicator bacteria in water from wells and springs were compared with physical and chemical attributes of the groundwater system. Bacterial densities greater than the recommended limit were found in all springs and approximately half of the wells, whereas nitrate concentrations >45 mg l -1 were restricted to 20% of the springs and 10% of the wells. Nitrate concentrations varied markedly in closely spaced wells and springs, which indicates that land use is not the primary control on groundwater contamination. Groundwater contamination is related to the distribution of chemical water types in the study area. All Ca subtype water was contaminated with nitrate and bacteria. Ca subtype water occurs in the shallow, rapidly circulating groundwater zone, which is most susceptible to contamination. The similarity in nitrate concentrations between local springs, major springs, and wells that contain Ca subtype water indicates that the occurrence of large conduits is not the main control on nitrate and bacterial contamination of groundwater. Temporal fluctuations in nitrate concentrations of Ca subtype water are attributed to seasonal fluctuations in recharge and in plant growth. Ca-Mg water subtype was generally not contaminated, and Na-HCO 3 and Na-Cl water types were not contaminated. Ca-Mg water subtype, and Na-HCO 3 and Na-Cl water types are associated with longer residence times and reducing conditions, which allow bacterial die-off and denitrification, respectively. Differences in residence time and reducing conditions among the chemical water types and subtypes are attributed to variations in rock permeability and to the occurrence of horizontal

  11. Optimal design of active spreading systems to remediate sorbing groundwater contaminants in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscopo, Amy N.; Neupauer, Roseanna M.; Kasprzyk, Joseph R.

    2016-07-01

    The effectiveness of in situ remediation to treat contaminated aquifers is limited by the degree of contact between the injected treatment chemical and the groundwater contaminant. In this study, candidate designs that actively spread the treatment chemical into the contaminant are generated using a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm. Design parameters pertaining to the amount of treatment chemical and the duration and rate of its injection are optimized according to objectives established for the remediation - maximizing contaminant degradation while minimizing energy and material requirements. Because groundwater contaminants have different reaction and sorption properties that influence their ability to be degraded with in situ remediation, optimization was conducted for six different combinations of reaction rate coefficients and sorption rates constants to represent remediation of the common groundwater contaminants, trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and toluene, using the treatment chemical, permanganate. Results indicate that active spreading for contaminants with low reaction rate coefficients should be conducted by using greater amounts of treatment chemical mass and longer injection durations relative to contaminants with high reaction rate coefficients. For contaminants with slow sorption or contaminants in heterogeneous aquifers, two different design strategies are acceptable - one that injects high concentrations of treatment chemical mass over a short duration or one that injects lower concentrations of treatment chemical mass over a long duration. Thus, decision-makers can select a strategy according to their preference for material or energy use. Finally, for scenarios with high ambient groundwater velocities, the injection rate used for active spreading should be high enough for the groundwater divide to encompass the entire contaminant plume.

  12. Guidelines for active spreading during in situ chemical oxidation to remediate contaminated groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effectiveness of in situ chemical oxidation to remediate contaminated aquifers depends on the extent and duration of contact between the injected treatment chemical and the groundwater contaminant (the reactants). Techniques that inject and extract in the aquifer to ‘ac...

  13. Chlorobenzene removal efficiencies and removal processes in a pilot-scale constructed wetland treating contaminated groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braeckevelt, M.; Reiche, N.; Trapp, Stefan;

    2011-01-01

    Low-chlorinated benzenes (CBs) are widespread groundwater contaminants and often threaten to contaminate surface waters. Constructed wetlands (CWs) in river floodplains are a promising technology for protecting sensitive surface water bodies from the impact of CBs. The efficiency and seasonal var...

  14. DEMONSTRATION OF THE HIPOX ADVANCED OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT OF MTBE-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The HiPOx technology is an advanced oxidation process that incorporates high-precision delivery of ozone and hydrogen peroxide to chemically destroy organic contaminants with the promise of minimizing bromate formation. A MTBE-contaminated groundwater from the Ventura County Nav...

  15. Field demonstration of ex situ biological treatability of contaminated groundwater at the Strachan gas plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multi-phase study was conducted to deal with the issues of groundwater and soil contamination by sour gas processing plants in Alberta. Phase One consisted of a review of all soil and groundwater monitoring data submitted to Alberta Environment by sour gas plants in accordance with the Canadian Clean Water Act. The current phase involves the development, evaluation and demonstration of selected remediation technologies to address subsurface contamination of sediments and groundwater at sour gas treatment plants with special attention to the presence of natural gas condensate in the subsurface. Results are presented from a pilot-scale biological treatability test that was performed at the Gulf Strachan Natural Gas Processing Plant in Rocky Mountain House, Alberta, where contaminated groundwater from the plant was being pumped to the surface through many recovery wells to control contaminant migration. The recovered groundwater was directed to a pump-and-treat system that consisted of oil-water separation, iron removal, hardness removal, and air stripping, before being reinjected. The pilot-scale biological treatability testing was conducted to evaluate process stability in treating groundwater without pretreatment for iron and hardness reduction and to evaluate the removal of organic contaminants. Results of a groundwater characterization analysis are discussed. Chemical characteristics of the groundwater at the Strachan Gas Plant showed that an ex situ remediation technology would address the dissolved volatile and semi-volatile organic contamination from natural gas condensates, as well as the nitrogenous compounds resulting from the use of amine-based process chemicals. 4 refs., 5 tabs., 4 figs

  16. Groundwater Dynamics and Quality Assessment in an Agricultural Area

    OpenAIRE

    Stefano L. Russo; Adriano Fiorucci; Bartolomeo Vigna

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: The analysis of the relationships among the different hydrogeological Units and the assessment of groundwater quality are fundamental to adopt suitable territorial planning measures aimed to reduce the potential groundwater pollution especially in agricultural regions. In this study, the characteristics of groundwater dynamics and the assessment of its quality in the Cuneo Plain (NW Italy) were examined. Approach: In order to define the geological setting an intense bibliog...

  17. Modeling to Support Groundwater Contaminant Boundaries for the Shoal Underground Nuclear Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to characterize groundwater flow and contaminant transport at the Shoal underground nuclear test through numerical modeling using site-specific hydrologic data. The ultimate objective is the development of a contaminant boundary, a model-predicted perimeter defining the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater from the underground test throughout 1,000 years at a prescribed level of confidence. This boundary will be developed using the numerical models described here, after they are approved for that purpose by DOE and NDEP

  18. Modeling to Support Groundwater Contaminant Boundaries for the Shoal Underground Nuclear Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Pohlmann; G. Pohll; J. Chapman; A. Hassan; R. Carroll; C. Shirley

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize groundwater flow and contaminant transport at the Shoal underground nuclear test through numerical modeling using site-specific hydrologic data. The ultimate objective is the development of a contaminant boundary, a model-predicted perimeter defining the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater from the underground test throughout 1,000 years at a prescribed level of confidence. This boundary will be developed using the numerical models described here, after they are approved for that purpose by DOE and NDEP.

  19. Application of compound specific 13C isotope investigations of chlorinated hydrocarbons in contaminated groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Chlorinated hydrocarbons are one of the most common pollutants found in groundwater. Due to complex contamination situations with overlapping contamination plumes the assessment of the organic contaminants requires the installation of expensive observation wells and high analytical effort. Here the determination of the stable isotope ratio 13C/12C of the organic compounds offers a promising and efficient tool to investigate the origin and the biodegradation characteristics of the chlorinated hydrocarbons in groundwater. The application of the method is based on characteristic isotope fingerprints, differing in chlorinated solvents. This isotope fingerprint is derived from different production pathways and is not influenced by transport or by retardation processes in the underground. Due to the fact, that two different contaminations can easily be distinguished by isotope ratios, an improved distinction of spatially and temporally different contamination plumes might be possible. In course of biologically mediated degradation processes a shift of the isotope ratios between the precursor and the product can frequently be observed, such as with denitrification or sulfate reduction processes. The isotope fractionation is due to a preferential reaction of the bonds formed by the lighter isotopes and leads to a progressive enrichment of the heavy isotopes in the precursor while the product becomes depleted in the heavy isotopes. Biological degradation of the highly chlorinated hydrocarbons is due to a co-metabolic dechlorinisation. Tetrachloroethene (PCE) for example degrades under anoxic conditions via trichloroethene (TCE) to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE). Subsequent degradation to vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene may appear under aerobic as well as reducing environments depending on the site specific conditions. In several laboratory studies it has been shown, that biodegradation of the chlorinated hydrocarbons is accompanied by an isotope fractionation of

  20. Experimental and modelling studies of radionuclide migration from contaminated groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysimeter-based studies of radionuclide uptake by winter wheat are being undertaken to investigate soil-to-plant transfer processes. A five year multi-disciplinary research project has concentrated on the upward migration of contaminants from near surface water-tables and their subsequent uptake by a winter wheat crop. A weighted transfer factor approach and a physically based modelling methodology, for the simulation and prediction of radionuclide uptake, have been developed which offer alternatives to the traditional transfer factor approach. Integrated hydrological and solute transport models are used to simulate contaminant movement and subsequent root uptake. This approach enables prediction of radionuclide transport for a wide range of soil, plant and radionuclide types. This paper presents simulated results of 22Na plant uptake and soil activity profiles, which are verified with respect to lysimeter data. The results demonstrate that a simple modelling approach can describe the variability in radioactivity in both the harvested crop and the soil profile, without recourse to a large number of empirical parameters. The proposed modelling technique should be readily applicable to a range of scales and conditions, since it embodies an understanding of the underlying physical processes of the system. This work constitutes part of an ongoing research programme being undertaken by UK Nirex Ltd., to assess the long term safety of a deep level repository for low and intermediate level nuclear waste. (author)

  1. Development of a biotreatment system for the remediation of groundwater contaminated with hydrocarbons and trichloroethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inadvertent release of fuels and solvents into soil has resulted in groundwater contamination across the United States. This paper reports on the development of biologically based systems for treating mixtures of chemical contaminants which often requires knowledge of both degradative pathways and interactions between individual chemicals. These issues may necessitate the use of specialized microorganisms and/or treatment systems designed to overcome these limitations. One strategy for the treatment of chemical mixtures which cannot be source separated, such as contaminated groundwater, is a modular system to sequentially biodegrade groups of compatible chemicals. A two-stage bioreactor system was constructed for the treatment of groundwater contaminated with benzene and TCE. This treatment system is undergoing development for a field pilot demonstration. Successful implementation of this system should result in significant cost and time savings compared to competitive technologies

  2. Effects of the Chernobyl accident on radioactive contamination of groundwater utilized for water supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the notions of classic hydrogeology, the groundwaters of deep-laying aquifers were considered to be safely protected against various external contaminants, due to high sorption properties of aeration zone soils, regional distribution of aquitards, and very long periods of ground water formation. Contamination of upper subsurface aquifer and a part of artesian aquifers is exclusively significant in Chernobyl exclusion zone characterized by high levels of surface contamination with radionuclides

  3. HISTORICAL CONTAMINATION OF GROUNDWATER RESOURCES IN THE NORTH COAST KARST AQUIFERS OF PUERTO RICO

    OpenAIRE

    Padilla, Ingrid; Irizarry, Celys; Steele, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    The North Coast Karst Aquifer System of Puerto Rico is the island’s most productive aquifer. The characteristics that make it highly productive also make it vulnerable to contamination. This research, which addresses the historical contamination of groundwater resources in the northern karst region was conducted through integration of spatial hydrogeologic and contaminant concentration data in the La Plata-Arecibo area. The study used GIS technologies and focused on phthalates and chlorinated...

  4. An integrative method to quantify contaminant fluxes in the groundwater of urban areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiedek, T.; Beier, M.; Ebhardt, G. [Technical Univ. of Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. of Applied Geosciences

    2007-08-15

    Background, Aim and Scope: Background, Aims, and Scope. Groundwater in urban areas is often contaminated and emission sources can be located close to groundwater wells. The delineation of contaminant plumes is difficult because of the various potential emission sources. Thus, detection, quantification and remediation of contaminated sites in a city need more integrative approaches. Materials and Methods: A method has been developed which allows quantification of mass fluxes of contaminants in groundwater between control planes. Budget zones along the flow path are defined to calculate a contaminant balance and to quantitatively reveal input areas. Concentrations and water budgets are used to calculate mass balances for each contaminant. The city of Darmstadt (Germany) was chosen to evaluate the method. Results: The groundwater monitoring wells (GMWs) upstream of the city showed anthropogenically superposed background values for all naturally occurring inorganic species. The contaminant concentrations increased in the city (probably influenced by road traffic, gas stations, leaking sewers, etc.). Downstream from the city, concentrations usually decreased. Organic compounds typical for urban environments, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), locally exceeded drinking water regulations. In GMWs with high concentrations of organic contaminants in the city or downstream from industrial areas, a significant increase in Fe{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 2+} could be observed, in some cases coinciding with a decrease in NO{sub 3}, SO{sub 4} and an increase in NH{sub 4}. Discussion: For typical urban contaminants, a positive budget was calculated in several zones, which shows that emissions from urban sources are reaching the groundwater. Negative budgets can be mainly explained with diving plumes and degradation. The input calculated from the individual budget zones is usually higher than the input estimated from urban emissions. Differences between the calculated and the

  5. RCRA Groundwater Quality Assessment Report for Waste Management Area S-SX (November 1997 through April 2000)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Vernon G.; Chou, Charissa J.

    2001-02-23

    This report updates a continuing groundwater quality assessment for single-shell tank Waste Management Area S-SX at the Hanford Site. This report covers November 1997 through April 2000. Major new findings include the following: groundwater contamination continues to persist in both the northern half of the Waste Management Area as well as the southern half; evaluation of changes in water table elevations indicates a gradual shift in the direction of groundwater flow from the southeast to a more easterly direction; discrete depth sampling suggests mobile tank waste contaminants are at the very top of the aquifer in downgradient wells along the southeast side of the SX tank farm.

  6. California GAMA Program: A Contamination Vulnerability Assessment for the Bakersfield Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, J E; Hudson, G B; Eaton, G F; Leif, R

    2004-11-01

    In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as MTBE from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater-monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the GAMA Program is to assess the water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement this groundwater assessment program. In 2003, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the groundwater basin that underlies Bakersfield, in the southern San Joaquin Valley. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3 method). In addition, stable oxygen isotope measurements help determine the recharge water

  7. California GAMA Program: A Contamination Vulnerability Assessment for the Bakersfield Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as MTBE from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater-monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the GAMA Program is to assess the water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement this groundwater assessment program. In 2003, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the groundwater basin that underlies Bakersfield, in the southern San Joaquin Valley. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3 method). In addition, stable oxygen isotope measurements help determine the recharge water

  8. Characterization of redox conditions in groundwater contaminant plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Banwarth, Steven A.; Jakobsen, Rasmus; Heron, Gorm; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    Evaluation of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behaviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few...... cases have been reported. No standardised or generally accepted approach exists. Slow electrode kinetics and the common lack of internal equilibrium of redox processes in pollution plumes make, with a few exceptions, direct electrochemical measurement and rigorous interpretation of redox potentials...... dubious, if not erroneous. Several other approaches have been used in addressing redox conditions in pollution plumes: redox-sensitive compounds in groundwater samples, hydrogen concentrations in groundwater, concentrations of volatile fatty acids in groundwater, sediment characteristics and microbial...

  9. Treatment of groundwater contaminated with low levels of military munitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The site of interest is a military base that was established in the late 1800s. In its early history this facility was used as a powder depot to fill projectiles with miximite (a propellant). Since World War I, this facility was used to produce artillery ammunition, bombs, high explosives, pyrotechnics and other ordinances. Weapons production at this facility has ceased, but as a result of the past activities at this facility, contaminants are migrating into the groundwater. One source of drinking water for this installation is a screened well in a stratified-drift aquifer system at a depth of 75-85 feet below land surface. In the 1980s sampling of this well revealed low level contamination of trichloroethylene (TCE), RDX and HMX. TCE levels exceeded drinking water standards and an air stripping column was installed to remove the TCE. RDX and HMX, concentrations were below drinking water standards. Health Advisory (HA) levels for RDX and HMX were published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in November 1988. The lifetime HA levels are 2 ppb and 400 ppb for RDX and HMX, respectively (McLellan et al. 1988a, and McLellan et al. 1988b). It is expected that continuous withdrawals from this well will increase RDX and HMX concentrations. In addition, it is believed that future USEPA regulations will adapt the HA as a drinking water standard. This study was initiated in an effort to have an appropriate cost effective technology ready to meet any such standard. RDX and HMX RDX and HMX are military explosives. RDX (Hexahydro-l,3,5-trinitro-l,3,5-triazine) is a code name for Research Department Explosive. This explosive is described as a white crystalline solid with about 1.3 times the explosive power of trinitrotoluene (TNT). RDX is classified as a EPA Group C compound: Possible Human Carcinogen (McLellan et. al. 1988a). HMX (Octahydro-1, 3, 5, 7- tetranitro-l, 3, 5, 7-tetrazocine) is a code name for High Melting Explosive. This explosive is described as a

  10. Assessing the Groundwater Quality at a Saudi Arabian Agricultural Site and the Occurrence of Opportunistic Pathogens on Irrigated Food Produce

    KAUST Repository

    Alsalah, Dhafer

    2015-10-05

    This study examines the groundwater quality in wells situated near agricultural fields in Saudi Arabia. Fruits (e.g., tomato and green pepper) irrigated with groundwater were also assessed for the occurrence of opportunistic pathogens to determine if food safety was compromised by the groundwater. The amount of total nitrogen in most of the groundwater samples exceeded the 15 mg/L permissible limit for agricultural irrigation. Fecal coliforms in densities > 12 MPN/100 mL were detected in three of the groundwater wells that were in close proximity to a chicken farm. These findings, coupled with qPCR-based fecal source tracking, show that groundwater in wells D and E, which were nearest to the chicken farm, had compromised quality. Anthropogenic contamination resulted in a shift in the predominant bacterial phyla within the groundwater microbial communities. For example, there was an elevated presence of Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria in wells D and E but a lower overall microbial richness in the groundwater perturbed by anthropogenic contamination. In the remaining wells, the genus Acinetobacter was detected at high relative abundance ranging from 1.5% to 48% of the total groundwater microbial community. However, culture-based analysis did not recover any antibiotic-resistant bacteria or opportunistic pathogens from these groundwater samples. In contrast, opportunistic pathogenic Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated from the fruits irrigated with the groundwater from wells B and F. Although the groundwater was compromised, quantitative microbial risk assessment suggests that the annual risk incurred from accidental consumption of E. faecalis on these fruits was within the acceptable limit of 10−4. However, the annual risk arising from P. aeruginosa was 9.55 × 10−4, slightly above the acceptable limit. Our findings highlight that the groundwater quality at this agricultural site in western Saudi Arabia is not pristine and that better

  11. Assessing the Groundwater Quality at a Saudi Arabian Agricultural Site and the Occurrence of Opportunistic Pathogens on Irrigated Food Produce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhafer Alsalah

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the groundwater quality in wells situated near agricultural fields in Saudi Arabia. Fruits (e.g., tomato and green pepper irrigated with groundwater were also assessed for the occurrence of opportunistic pathogens to determine if food safety was compromised by the groundwater. The amount of total nitrogen in most of the groundwater samples exceeded the 15 mg/L permissible limit for agricultural irrigation. Fecal coliforms in densities > 12 MPN/100 mL were detected in three of the groundwater wells that were in close proximity to a chicken farm. These findings, coupled with qPCR-based fecal source tracking, show that groundwater in wells D and E, which were nearest to the chicken farm, had compromised quality. Anthropogenic contamination resulted in a shift in the predominant bacterial phyla within the groundwater microbial communities. For example, there was an elevated presence of Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria in wells D and E but a lower overall microbial richness in the groundwater perturbed by anthropogenic contamination. In the remaining wells, the genus Acinetobacter was detected at high relative abundance ranging from 1.5% to 48% of the total groundwater microbial community. However, culture-based analysis did not recover any antibiotic-resistant bacteria or opportunistic pathogens from these groundwater samples. In contrast, opportunistic pathogenic Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated from the fruits irrigated with the groundwater from wells B and F. Although the groundwater was compromised, quantitative microbial risk assessment suggests that the annual risk incurred from accidental consumption of E. faecalis on these fruits was within the acceptable limit of 10−4. However, the annual risk arising from P. aeruginosa was 9.55 × 10−4, slightly above the acceptable limit. Our findings highlight that the groundwater quality at this agricultural site in western Saudi Arabia is not

  12. Modelling accumulation of radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems originating from a long-term groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted as part of the risk assessment of final deposits of nuclear fuel waste. The overall objective is to assess the possible accumulation of radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems after an eventual long-term groundwater contamination. The specific objectives are to assess: i) What proportion of the contamination will accumulate in the soil-plant-system? ii) Where in the soil-plant- system will it accumulate? iii) Which ecosystem characteristics and radionuclides properties are important for the accumulation? and iv) Under which circumstances do losses from the ecosystems occur? We developed the dynamic model Tracey (Gaerdenaes et al. 2009) describing cycling of radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems with high temporal resolution (1 day). The model is a multi-compartmental model in which fluxes and storage of radionuclides are described for different plant parts and soil pools in each of the 10 soil layers. The radionuclide fluxes are driven either by water or carbon fluxes. The water and the carbon fluxes are simulated with the dynamic, bio-geophysical Coup Model (Jansson and Karlberg, 2004). Tracey includes two root uptake approaches of radionuclides; (i) passive uptake driven by root water uptake and (ii) active uptake driven by plant growth. A linear approach describes the adsorption of radionuclides to soil particles and organic matter. Tracey was applied on two ecosystems with contrasting hydrology, the mixed Pinus-Picea forests found in the dry, elevated areas and the Alnus forests found in the wet, low-land areas of Uppland in central east Sweden. Different varieties of the two forest types were created by varying the root depth and radiation use efficiency. The climate was cold-temperate and based on 30-year daily weather data from Uppsala. The assumed groundwater contamination was close to 1 mg of an unspecified radionuclide per m2 and year. This load corresponds to 1 Bq per m2 and year of 238U, a common long-living radionuclide in

  13. The migration of ground-water contaminants from uranium mill tailings piles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milling of uranium ore by acid or alkaline leaching methods produces high solution concentrations of both radioactive and nonradioactive species in the mill tailings piles. Seepage of solution from these tailing piles may contaminate local ground-water supplies. As part of the DOE-sponsored Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, the movement of contaminants from the tailing piles at inactive mill tailings sites is being characterized. Study to date has shown that many of the potential contaminants, including radium and thorium, are reduced to very low solution levels as a result of water/rock interactions. However, uranium, sulfate, and nitrate have been found at contaminant levels in the ground water at several sites. Spatial distributions of contaminant concentration are used to estimate values of dispersivity and distribution coefficients by calibrating contaminant transport models to site-specific hydrologic conditions. This paper describes the existing contamination at representative sites and discusses the physical and geochemical processes that affect contaminant migration

  14. Two-stage bioreactor to destroy chlorinated and nonchlorinated organic groundwater contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both chlorinated and nonchlorinated volatile organic compounds are found as common contaminants of groundwater across the nation. Two field-pilot bioreactors successfully treated contaminated groundwater at Robins Air Force Base (AFB). The fluidized-bed bioreactor (FBR) effectively removed >97% of the 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB) and >95% of the benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene(s) (BTEX) from more than 210,000 gal of contaminated groundwater. The FBR removed 84% of the trichloroethylene (TCE), also found in this groundwater, based on a total mass balance beyond carbon adsorption. Enhanced operational stability was demonstrated for the gas-phase reactor (GPR) with 10 months of continuous operation in the laboratory and 2 months in the field. TCE concentrations in contaminated air entering the pilot GPR were reduced by 75% on average. Capital and operating costs for the FBR system were compared to other treatment options including ultraviolet (UV)-peroxidation, air stripping with carbon adsorption, and wet carbon adsorption. GPR economics were compared to carbon adsorption at two TCE concentrations. These bioreactor systems provide economical, destructive technologies for treating either contaminated water or contaminated air originating from air stripping, air sparging, or soil vapor extraction operations and will be effective remedial options at many sites

  15. Groundwater Supply in Metro Manila: Distribution, Environmental and Economic Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    David, Cristina C.; Arlene B. Inocencio; Clemente, Roberto S.; Abracosa, Ramon P.; Tabios, Guillermo Q.

    2001-01-01

    Early studies on the groundwater supply of Metro Manila have indicated inefficient resource use that could lead to the eventual decline in the groundwater level, salt water intrusion, and other similar negative externalities. Based on the preceding premise, the paper intends to present a review and assessment of how groundwater resources are developed and utilized in Metro Manila. The study has evaluated technical reports and published literature. It has also adopted water balance models as w...

  16. Groundwater redox conditions and conductivity in a contaminant plume from geoelectrical investigations

    OpenAIRE

    Naudet, V.; Revil, A.; Rizzo, E.; J.-Y. Bottero; Bégassat, P.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate mapping of the electrical conductivity and of the redox potential of the groundwater is important in delineating the shape of a contaminant plume. A map of redox potential in an aquifer is indicative of biodegradation of organic matter and of concentrations of redox-active components; a map of electrical conductivity provides information on the mineralisation of the groundwater. Both maps can be used to optimise the position of pumping wells for remediation. The self-potent...

  17. Groundwater redox conditions and conductivity in a contaminant plume from geoelectrical investigations

    OpenAIRE

    Naudet, V.; Revil, A.; Rizzo, E.; Bottero, J.-Y.; Bégassat, P.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate mapping of the electrical conductivity and of the redox potential of the groundwater is important in delineating the shape of a contaminant plume. A map of redox potential in an aquifer is indicative of biodegradation of organic matter and of concentrations of redox-active components; a map of electrical conductivity provides information on the mineralisation of the groundwater. Both maps can be used to optimise the position of pumping wel...

  18. Contamination of groundwater under cultivated fields in an arid environment, Central Arava Valley, Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to understand the processes of contamination of groundwater in arid environments due to agriculture activity. A combination of physical, chemical and isotopic analyses was used to describe the hydrologic system and the trends in recharge of water and salts into the aquifer. The results indicate that intensive irrigation and fertilization substantially affected the quantity and quality of groundwater recharge

  19. Assessment of Groundwater Quality Using Gis: A Case Study of Walayar Watershed, Parambikulam-Aliyar-Palar Basin, Tamilnadu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Balathandayutham

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Good groundwater quality is essential for crop yield, soil productivity and environmental protection. Suitability of groundwater for irrigation purposes is determined by its geochemistry. Groundwater geochemistry explains links between chemical composition of groundwater and subsurface geological and non-geological pollutants. Subsurface rock formations control the composition of soil and hence that of water and vegetation. The ground water samples were analyzed for physico-chemical parameters like Electrical Conductivity (EC, Hydrogen ion concentration (pH, Bicarbonate (HCO3-, Calcium (Ca2+, Magnesium (Mg2+, Sodium (Na+, Potassium (K+, Sulphate (SO42-, Nitrate (NO3-, and Chloride (Cl-. Inverse distance weighted method of the Geographical Information Systems is used to prepare the distribution map of physio-chemical parameters of groundwater while overlay method is used to assess spatial, temporal changes and prepare groundwater quality zones of Walayar watershed in Parambikulam-Aliyar-Palar basin situated in Coimbatore district, Tamil Nadu, India. The results of study show that the quality of groundwater varies both spatially and temporally in Walayar watershed. The groundwater samples in some of the wells showed deviation from water quality standards indicating groundwater contamination. Hence, proper care must be taken to avoid any contamination of groundwater and its quality be monitored periodically.

  20. Ultrasonic process for remediation of organics-contaminated groundwater/wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technology is being developed that employs ultrasonic-wave energy for remediation of groundwater/wastewater contaminated with volatile organic compounds such as carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and trichloroethylene (TCE). This paper presents the updated results of a laboratory investigation of ultrasonic groundwater remediation using synthetic groundwaters prepared with laboratory deionized water. Key process parameters investigated included steady-state temperature, contaminant concentration, solution pH, sonication time, and intensity of the applied ultrasonics-wave energy. High destruction efficiencies of the target contaminants were achieved, and the sonication time required for a given degree of destruction decreased with increasing intensity of the applied ultrasonic energy. The sonication time can be further reduced by adding a chemical oxidant such as hydrogen peroxide

  1. Scoping assessment of groundwater doses to biota at the Sellafield site, UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the current climate of investigating the impact of discharges from the nuclear industry on non-human biota, much attention has been given to biota in marine and terrestrial environments in receipt of authorised discharges of liquid and gaseous effluent. Relatively little attention to date has been given to the exposure of biota to groundwater containing man-made radio-nuclides. This area of interest is growing especially in the field of nuclear waste repositories. A scoping assessment has been performed here to determine the impacts due to radiological contamination on organisms living within or coming into contact with groundwater at the Sellafield site, UK. The following potential exposure routes to biota were identified: 1) Organisms living within groundwater; 2) Groundwater discharges to the surface at beach springs (i.e. emerging above the low water line; 3) Groundwater discharges to nearby surface water bodies (e.g. rivers); 4) Groundwater discharges directly to the Irish Sea.. In order to evaluate impacts on organisms living within, contacting or ingesting groundwater, it was necessary to determine the activity concentration of radio-nuclides in the groundwater. For time periods up to 2120, modeling of contaminant release from in-ground inventories and transport in groundwater was carried out for this scoping study using a relatively simple assessment methodology with the MONDRIAN modeling suite. Screening assessments of radiological impacts upon wildlife have been performed for liquid discharges to groundwater from the Sellafield Ltd reprocessing plant at Sellafield, Cumbria. Impacts have been considered for biota at sites within reach of the groundwater flow network. Most calculated total weighted absorbed doses appear to be of no radiological significance whatsoever in relation to the new Environment Agency freshwater ecosystem trigger level (40 microGy h-1), thereby obviating the need to conduct further investigations. The one exception to this is for

  2. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Modesto Groundwater Contamination, Modesto, CA, September 26, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This decision document presents the selected interim remedial action (IRA) for the Modesto Ground Water Contamination Site in Modesto, Stanislaus County, California. The primary components of the selected remedy include groundwater extraction, groundwater treatment by air stripping with carbon adsorption, discharge of treated groundwater to the City of Modesto's water system, and soil vapor extraction (SVE) followed by carbon adsorption. The selected alternative is expected to remove a substantial portion of dissolved PCE from the groundwater. EPA will be monitoring the downgradient edge of the plume to determine if the remaining PCE would be removed through natural attenuation. If necessary to comply with discharge requirements, extracted groundwater will also be treated using an ion exchange unit to remove naturally occurring uranium

  3. Methods for assessing the long term radiological consequences of radionuclide entry into groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methods have been developed to model the transport of radionuclides in groundwater, based on an analytical approach to the governing transport equations, are sufficiently general to enable assessments to be made of the long term radiological significance of groundwater contamination for a range of possible problems. Although the methods are not as flexible as those based on numerical solutions of the transport equations, they have several advantages, including reduced computing time. The methods described can be used to identify critical parameters and assess the significance of data uncertainties in ground-water transport calculations. Such an analysis, combined with experimental measurements where necessary, can provide a sound basis for assessing potential radiation hazards. (U.K.)

  4. Calculational Tool for Skin Contamination Dose Assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, R L

    2002-01-01

    Spreadsheet calculational tool was developed to automate the calculations preformed for dose assessment of skin contamination. This document reports on the design and testing of the spreadsheet calculational tool.

  5. To study the effects of groundwater contamination in Kasur due to Nallah Rohi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater contamination is a worldwide known problem. Pakistan, being a developing country, is also facing the problem created by groundwater pollution. Disposal of domestic wastes and agricultural treatments has been reported to be a considerable factor for causing the pollution, especially the groundwater contamination. In the rural areas of Pakistan, latrines and septic tanks have become common because of the advancement in the living standards. All of the domestic wastes is disposed off into the ponds or nearby passing streams. In the similar fashion, drains in the big and well developed cities of Pakistan lead the domestic waste, along with the industrial waste, into the passing by streams, canals and rivers. All of such disposed off waste is untreated because of the lack of legislation and its improper implementation. The contaminated water affects the health of human beings and also destroys the crops when this water is used for irrigation. So this paper deals with the effects and condition of the disposal of the harmful chemicals, which ultimately through seepage reach the groundwater and make it hazardous. Also, the lateral distances of the contaminated groundwater were found out. For experimentation, major city of Kasur which is in the vicinity of Nullah Rohi, was selected. All the wastes including both the industrial as well as domestic, of the whole area, is disposed off into the Nullah. The percolation of the harmful chemicals and its mixing with groundwater has resulted in the hazardous effects on the inhabitants of the area on the irrigation land as well. So the water in the vicinity, at different locations was tested and the degree of contamination and the lateral distances of contaminated water were also worked out. (author)

  6. ChemSensor: Response to gasoline and diesel contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ChemSensor is a field portable device that uses fiber optic technology to measure levels of organic contamination in water. The device relies on partitioning of organic species into an organophyllic coating on an optical fiber to change the light transmitting properties of the fiber. The response is non-selective and dependent upon the aqueous solubility of the contaminant(s). The response of ChemSensor to water samples contaminated with gasoline or diesel fuel is discussed. Correlation of the response to the BTEX and TPH concentrations is shown. A discussion of the temporal response of ChemSensor is also provided

  7. Exchange between a river and groundwater, assessed with hydrochemical data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hoehn

    2010-11-01

    pristine. The land use in the flood plain and the seasonal and climatic conditions (e.g., hot dry summer 2003 result in alterations of the natural geochemical groundwater composition. Time-series measurements of nitrate (from agricultural impact in the catchment and chloride showed temporal changes in groundwater composition. Bed enlargements in river corridors can lead to a reduction of groundwater residence times and to an increase of riverbank filtration in nearby wells, which increases their contamination risk.

  8. Modeling to Support Groundwater Contaminant Boundaries for the Shoal Underground Nuclear Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Pohlmann; G. Pohll; J. Chapman; A. Hassan; R. Carroll; C. Shirley

    2004-03-01

    Groundwater flow and radionuclide transport at the Shoal underground nuclear test are characterized using three-dimensional numerical models, based on site-specific hydrologic data. The objective of this modeling is to provide the flow and transport models needed to develop a contaminant boundary defining the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater at the site throughout 1,000 years at a prescribed level of confidence. This boundary will then be used to manage the Project Shoal Area for the protection of the public and the environment.

  9. A stratigraphic model to support remediation of groundwater contamination in the southern San Francisco Bay area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some early regional studies in the southern San Francisco Bay Area applied the term 'older bay mud' to Wisconsin and older deposits thought to be estuarine in origin. This outdated interpretation has apparently contributed to an expectation of laterally-continuous aquifers and aquitards. In fact, heterogeneous alluvial deposits often create complex hydrogeologic settings that defy simple remedial approaches. A more useful stratigraphic model provides a foundation for conducting site investigations and assessing the feasibility of remediation. A synthesis of recent regional studies and drilling results at one site on the southwest margin of the Bay indicate that the upper quaternary stratigraphy consists of four primary units in the upper 200 feet of sediments (oldest to youngest): (1) Illinoian glacial-age alluvium (an important groundwater source); (2) Sangamon interglacial-age deposits, which include fine-grained alluvial deposits and estuarine deposits equivalent to the Yerba Buena Mud (a regional confining layer); (3) Wisconsin glacial-age alluvial fan and floodplain deposits; and (4) Holocene interglacial-age sediments, which include fine-grained alluvial and estuarine deposits equivalent to the 'younger bay mud'. Remedial investigations generally focus on groundwater contamination in the Wisconsin and Holocene alluvial deposits. Detailed drilling results indicate that narrow sand and gravel channels occur in anastomosing patterns within a Wisconsin to Holocene floodplain sequence dominated by interchannel silts and clays. The identification of these small-scale high-permeability conduits is critical to understanding and predicting contaminant transport on a local scale. Discontinuous site-specific aquitards do not provide competent separation where stacked channels occur and the correlation of aquitards over even small distance is often tenuous at best

  10. Chromium isotope variation along a contaminated groundwater plume: a coupled Cr(VI)- reduction, advective mixing perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullen, T.; Izbicki, J.

    2007-12-01

    Chromium (Cr) is a common contaminant in groundwater, used in electroplating, leather tanning, wood preservation, and as an anti-corrosion agent. Cr occurs in two oxidation states in groundwater: Cr(VI) is highly soluble and mobile, and is a carcinogen; Cr(III) is generally insoluble, immobile and less toxic than Cr(VI). Reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) is thus a central issue in approaches to Cr(VI) contaminant remediation in aquifers. Aqueous Cr(VI) occurs mainly as the chromate (CrO22-) and bichromate (HCrO2-) oxyanions, while Cr(III) is mainly "hexaquo" Cr(H2O)63+. Cr has four naturally-occurring stable isotopes: 50Cr, 52Cr, 53Cr and 54Cr. When Cr(VI) is reduced to Cr(III), the strong Cr-O bond must be broken, resulting in isotopic selection. Ellis et al. (2002) demonstrated that for reduction of Cr(VI) on magnetite and in natural sediment slurries, the change of isotopic composition of the remnant Cr(VI) pool was described by a Rayleigh fractionation model having fractionation factor ɛCr(VI)-Cr(III) = 3.4‰. We attempted to use Cr isotopes as a monitor of Cr(VI) reduction at a field site in Hinkley, California (USA) where groundwater contaminated with Cr(VI) has been under assessment for remediation. Groundwater containing up to 5 ppm Cr(VI) has migrated down-gradient from the contamination source through the fluvial to alluvial sediments to form a well-defined plume. Uncontaminated groundwater in the aquifer immediately adjacent to the plume has naturally-occurring Cr(VI) of 4 ppb or less (CH2M-Hill). In early 2006, colleagues from CH2M-Hill collected 17 samples of groundwater from within and adjacent to the plume. On a plot of δ53Cr vs. log Cr(VI), the data array is strikingly linear and differs markedly from the trend predicted for reduction of Cr(VI) in the contaminated water. There appear to be two groups of data: four samples with δ53Cr >+2‰ and Cr(VI) 15 ppb. Simple mixing lines between the groundwater samples having <4 ppb Cr(VI), taken to be

  11. Health Risk-Based Assessment and Management of Heavy Metals-Contaminated Soil Sites in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zueng-Sang Chen

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Risk-based assessment is a way to evaluate the potential hazards of contaminated sites and is based on considering linkages between pollution sources, pathways, and receptors. These linkages can be broken by source reduction, pathway management, and modifying exposure of the receptors. In Taiwan, the Soil and Groundwater Pollution Remediation Act (SGWPR Act uses one target regulation to evaluate the contamination status of soil and groundwater pollution. More than 600 sites contaminated with heavy metals (HMs have been remediated and the costs of this process are always high. Besides using soil remediation techniques to remove contaminants from these sites, the selection of possible remediation methods to obtain rapid risk reduction is permissible and of increasing interest. This paper discusses previous soil remediation techniques applied to different sites in Taiwan and also clarified the differences of risk assessment before and after soil remediation obtained by applying different risk assessment models. This paper also includes many case studies on: (1 food safety risk assessment for brown rice growing in a HMs-contaminated site; (2 a tiered approach to health risk assessment for a contaminated site; (3 risk assessment for phytoremediation techniques applied in HMs-contaminated sites; and (4 soil remediation cost analysis for contaminated sites in Taiwan.

  12. Modeling groundwater contamination transport for the Hanford Environmental Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary groundwater analyses were performed for the Hanford Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) to demonstrate compliance With dose limit performance objectives in DOE Order 5820.2A. These analyses were designed to determine peak radionuclide concentrations in a theoretical drinking-water well 100 m downstream from the facility. The resulting peak concentrations can be used to determine inventory limits for the facility

  13. Characterization of redox conditions in groundwater contaminant plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Banwarth, Steven A.;

    2000-01-01

    Evaluation of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behaviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few...

  14. Development of Chemical Indicators of Groundwater Contamination Near the Carcass Burial Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Choi, J.; Kim, M.; Choi, J.; Lee, M.; Lee, H.; Jeon, S.; Bang, S.; Noh, H.; Yoo, J.; Park, S.; Kim, H.; Kim, D.; Lee, Y.; Han, J.

    2011-12-01

    A serious outbreak of foot and mouth disease (FMD) and avian influenza (AI) led to the culling of millions of livestock in South Korea from late 2010 to earlier 2011. Because of the scale of FMD and AI epidemic in Korea and rapid spread of the diseases, mass burial for the disposal of carcass was conducted to halt the outbreak. The improper construction of the burial site or inappropriate management of the carcass burial facility can cause the contamination of groundwater mainly due to the discharges of leachate through the base of disposal pit. The leachate from carcass burial contains by products of carcass decay such as amino acids, nitrate, ammonia and chloride. The presence of these chemical components in groundwater can be used as indicators demonstrating contamination of groundwater with leachate from carcass. The major concern about using these chemical indicators is that other sources including manures, fertilizers and waste waters from human or animal activities already exist in farming area. However, we lack the understanding of how groundwater contamination due to mass burial of carcass can be differentiated from the contamination due to livestock manures which shows similar chemical characteristics. The chemical compositions of the leachate from carcass burial site and the wastewater from livestock manure treatment facilities were compared. The chemical compositions considered include total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), nitrate, organic nitrogen (Organic nitrogen =TN-Ammonium Nitrogen- Nitrate nitrogen), ammonia, chloride, sodium, potassium and amino acids (20 analytes). The ratios of concentrations of the chemical compositions as indicators of contamination were determined to distinguish the sources of contamination in groundwater. Indicators which showed a linear relationship between two factors and revealed a distinct difference between the carcass leachate and livestock manure were chosen. In addition, the background level of the

  15. Pre/post-closure assessment of groundwater pharmaceutical fate in a wastewater‑facility-impacted stream reach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul M.; Barber, Larry B.; Clark, Jimmy M.; Duris, Joseph; Foreman, William; Furlong, Edward T.; Givens, Carrie E.; Hubbard, Laura E.; Hutchinson, Kasey J.; Journey, Celeste A.; Keefe, Steffanie H.; Kolpin, Dana W.

    2016-01-01

    Pharmaceutical contamination of contiguous groundwater is a substantial concern in wastewater-impacted streams, due to ubiquity in effluent, high aqueous mobility, designed bioactivity, and to effluent-driven hydraulic gradients. Wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) closures are rare environmental remediation events; offering unique insights into contaminant persistence, long-term wastewater impacts, and ecosystem recovery processes. The USGS conducted a combined pre/post-closure groundwater assessment adjacent to an effluent-impacted reach of Fourmile Creek, Ankeny, Iowa, USA. Higher surface-water concentrations, consistent surface-water to groundwater concentration gradients, and sustained groundwater detections tens of meters from the stream bank demonstrated the importance of WWTF effluent as the source of groundwater pharmaceuticals as well as the persistence of these contaminants under effluent-driven, pre-closure conditions. The number of analytes (110 total) detected in surface water decreased from 69 prior to closure down to 8 in the first post-closure sampling event approximately 30 d later, with a corresponding 2 order of magnitude decrease in the cumulative concentration of detected analytes. Post-closure cumulative concentrations of detected analytes were approximately 5 times higher in proximal groundwater than in surface water. About 40% of the 21 contaminants detected in a downstream groundwater transect immediately before WWTF closure exhibited rapid attenuation with estimated half-lives on the order of a few days; however, a comparable number exhibited no consistent attenuation during the year-long post-closure assessment. The results demonstrate the potential for effluent-impacted shallow groundwater systems to accumulate pharmaceutical contaminants and serve as long-term residual sources, further increasing the risk of adverse ecological effects in groundwater and the near-stream ecosystem.

  16. Pre/post-closure assessment of groundwater pharmaceutical fate in a wastewater-facility-impacted stream reach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul M; Barber, Larry B; Clark, Jimmy M; Duris, Joseph W; Foreman, William T; Furlong, Edward T; Givens, Carrie E; Hubbard, Laura E; Hutchinson, Kasey J; Journey, Celeste A; Keefe, Steffanie H; Kolpin, Dana W

    2016-10-15

    Pharmaceutical contamination of contiguous groundwater is a substantial concern in wastewater-impacted streams, due to ubiquity in effluent, high aqueous mobility, designed bioactivity, and to effluent-driven hydraulic gradients. Wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) closures are rare environmental remediation events; offering unique insights into contaminant persistence, long-term wastewater impacts, and ecosystem recovery processes. The USGS conducted a combined pre/post-closure groundwater assessment adjacent to an effluent-impacted reach of Fourmile Creek, Ankeny, Iowa, USA. Higher surface-water concentrations, consistent surface-water to groundwater concentration gradients, and sustained groundwater detections tens of meters from the stream bank demonstrated the importance of WWTF effluent as the source of groundwater pharmaceuticals as well as the persistence of these contaminants under effluent-driven, pre-closure conditions. The number of analytes (110 total) detected in surface water decreased from 69 prior to closure down to 8 in the first post-closure sampling event approximately 30 d later, with a corresponding 2 order of magnitude decrease in the cumulative concentration of detected analytes. Post-closure cumulative concentrations of detected analytes were approximately 5 times higher in proximal groundwater than in surface water. About 40% of the 21 contaminants detected in a downstream groundwater transect immediately before WWTF closure exhibited rapid attenuation with estimated half-lives on the order of a few days; however, a comparable number exhibited no consistent attenuation during the year-long post-closure assessment. The results demonstrate the potential for effluent-impacted shallow groundwater systems to accumulate pharmaceutical contaminants and serve as long-term residual sources, further increasing the risk of adverse ecological effects in groundwater and the near-stream ecosystem. PMID:27350092

  17. 3D Geospatial Models for Visualization and Analysis of Groundwater Contamination at a Nuclear Materials Processing Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirewalt, G. L.; Shepherd, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    /liter) around the MPB and elevated nitrate (> 2000 milligrams/ liter) around storage ponds. Vertical connectivity was suggested between the TGWS and SGWS, while the DGWS appeared relatively isolated from the overlying aquifers. Lateral movement of uranium was also suggested over time. For example, lateral migration in the TGWS is suggested along a shallow depression in the bedrock surface trending south-southwest from the southwest corner of the MPB. Another pathway atop the buried bedrock surface, trending west-northwest from the MPB and partially reflected by current surface topography, suggested lateral migration of nitrate in the SGWS. Lateral movement of nitrate in the SGWS was also indicated north, south, and west of the largest storage pond. Definition of contaminant plume movement over time is particularly important for assessing direction and rate of migration and the potential need for preventive measures to control contamination of groundwater outside facility property lines. The 3D geospatial property models proved invaluable for visualizing and analyzing variations in subsurface uranium and nitrate contamination in space and time within and between the three aquifers at the site. The models were an exceptional visualization tool for illustrating extent, volume, and quantitative amounts of uranium and nitrate contamination in the subsurface to regulatory decision-makers in regard to site decommissioning issues, including remediation concerns, providing a perspective not possible to achieve with traditional 2D maps. The geohydrologic framework model provides a conceptual model for consideration in flow and transport analyses.

  18. Land-use change and costs to rural households: a case study in groundwater nitrate contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loss of grassland from conversion to agriculture threatens water quality and other valuable ecosystem services. Here we estimate how land-use change affects the probability of groundwater contamination by nitrate in private drinking water wells. We find that conversion of grassland to agriculture from 2007 to 2012 in Southeastern Minnesota is expected to increase the future number of wells exceeding 10 ppm nitrate-nitrogen by 45% (from 888 to 1292 wells). We link outputs of the groundwater well contamination model to cost estimates for well remediation, well replacement, and avoidance behaviors to estimate the potential economic value lost due to nitrate contamination from observed land-use change. We estimate $0.7–12 million in costs (present values over a 20 year horizon) to address the increased risk of nitrate contamination of private wells. Our study demonstrates how biophysical models and economic valuation can be integrated to estimate the welfare consequences of land-use change. (letter)

  19. A Spatial and Temporal Assessment of Non-Point Groundwater Pollution Sources, Tutuila Island, American Samoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuler, C. K.; El-Kadi, A. I.; Dulaiova, H.; Glenn, C. R.; Fackrell, J.

    2015-12-01

    The quality of municipal groundwater supplies on Tutuila, the main island in American Samoa, is currently in question. A high vulnerability for contamination from surface activities has been recognized, and there exists a strong need to clearly identify anthropogenic sources of pollution and quantify their influence on the aquifer. This study examines spatial relationships and time series measurements of nutrients and other tracers to identify predominant pollution sources and determine the water quality impacts of the island's diverse land uses. Elevated groundwater nitrate concentrations are correlated with areas of human development, however, the mixture of residential and agricultural land use in this unique village based agrarian setting makes specific source identification difficult using traditional geospatial analysis. Spatial variation in anthropogenic impact was assessed by linking NO3- concentrations and δ15N(NO3) from an extensive groundwater survey to land-use types within well capture zones and groundwater flow-paths developed with MODFLOW, a numerical groundwater model. Land use types were obtained from high-resolution GIS data and compared to water quality results with multiple-regression analysis to quantify the impact that different land uses have on water quality. In addition, historical water quality data and new analyses of δD and δ18O in precipitation, groundwater, and mountain-front recharge waters were used to constrain the sources and mechanisms of contamination. Our analyses indicate that groundwater nutrient levels on Tutuila are controlled primarily by residential, not agricultural activity. Also a lack of temporal variation suggests that episodic pollution events are limited to individual water sources as opposed to the entire aquifer. These results are not only valuable for water quality management on Tutuila, but also provide insight into the sustainability of groundwater supplies on other islands with similar hydrogeology and land

  20. Fingerprinting groundwater pollution in catchments with contrasting contaminant sources using microorganic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Marianne E; Lapworth, Dan J; Thomas, Jenny; Edwards, Laura

    2014-01-15

    Evaluating the occurrence of microorganics helps to understand sources and processes which may be controlling the transport and fate of emerging contaminants (ECs). A study was carried out at the contrasting instrumented environmental observatory sites at Oxford, on the peri-urban floodplain gravel aquifer of the River Thames and Boxford, in the rural valley of the River Lambourn on the chalk aquifer, in Southern England to explore the use of ECs to fingerprint contaminant sources and flow pathways in groundwater. At Oxford compounds were typical of a local waste tip plume (not only plasticisers and solvents but also barbiturates and N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET)) and of the urban area (plasticisers and mood-enhancing drugs such as carbamazepine). At Boxford the results were different with widespread occurrence of agricultural pesticides, their metabolites and the solvent trichloroethene, as well as plasticisers, caffeine, butylated food additives, DEET, parabens and trace polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Groups of compounds used in pharmaceuticals and personal care products of different provenance in the environment could be distinguished, i) historical household and medical waste, ii) long-term household usage persistent in groundwater and iii) current usage and contamination from surface water. Co-contaminant and degradation products can also indicate the likely source of contaminants. A cocktail of contaminants can be used as tracers to provide information on catchment pathways and groundwater/surface water interactions. A prominent feature in this study is the attenuation of many EC compounds in the hyporheic zone. PMID:24055671

  1. Life cycle assessment of soil and groundwater remediation technologies: literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemming, Gitte; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    2010-01-01

    technologies was reviewed. Remediation of a contaminated site reduces a local environmental problem, but at the same time, the remediation activities may cause negative environmental impacts on the local, regional, and global scale. LCA can be used to evaluate the inherent trade-off and to compare remediation...... scenarios in terms of their associated environmental burden. Main features An overview of the assessed remediation technologies and contaminant types covered in the literature is presented. The LCA methodologies of the 12 reviewed studies were compared and discussed with special focus on their goal and...... that only few life cycle assessments have been conducted for in situ remediation technologies aimed at groundwater-threatening contaminants and that the majority of the existing literature focuses on ex situ remediation of contaminated soil. The functional unit applied in the studies is generally based...

  2. Applicability and Limits of Bioremediation of Contaminated Groundwater by Organic Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taboure Aboubacar; Lin Xueyu

    2001-01-01

    This paper gives in some ways a broad look at the Bioremediation Technology in the treatment of polluted groundwater. Environmentalists and Hydrologeologists around the world, especially in the developed countries welcomed this revolutionizing technique at a moment when other methods were becoming rather expensive and sources of secondary and more challenging pollution problems across sole fresh groundwater. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater is based on the use of bacteria which breakdown organic matters to more stable forms, which will not create nuisance or give off foul odors. The Applicability of this technology at a specific site lies in the understanding of the site's hydrogeologic, physiochemical backgrounds and the knowledge of the properties of the designated bacteria colonies, which would likely stabilize the contaminants. These are key points, which determine the success of the all process. Only, by complying with all those measures, Bioremediation can meet all the expectations.

  3. Heavy metal contamination and its indexing approach for groundwater of Goa mining region, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurdeep; Kamal, Rakesh Kant

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the study is to reveal the seasonal variations in the groundwater quality with respect to heavy metal contamination. To get the extent of the heavy metals contamination, groundwater samples were collected from 45 different locations in and around Goa mining area during the monsoon and post-monsoon seasons. The concentration of heavy metals, such as lead, copper, manganese, zinc, cadmium, iron, and chromium, were determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Most of the samples were found within limit except for Fe content during the monsoon season at two sampling locations which is above desirable limit, i.e., 300 µg/L as per Indian drinking water standard. The data generated were used to calculate the heavy metal pollution index (HPI) for groundwater. The mean values of HPI were 1.5 in the monsoon season and 2.1 in the post-monsoon season, and these values are well below the critical index limit of 100.

  4. SURFACE-ALTERED ZEOLITES AS PERMEABLE BARRIERS FOR IN SITU TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall objective of this effort is to develop and test a zeolite-based permeable barrier system for containing and remediating contaminated groundwater. The projected product is an engineered and tested permeable barrier system that can be adopted by the commercial sector

  5. SURFACE-ALTERED ZEOLITES AS PERMEABLE BARRIERS FOR IN SITU TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert S. Bowman; Zhaohui Li; Stephen J. Roy; Todd Burt; Timothy L. Johnson; Richard L. Johnson

    1999-08-30

    The overall objective of this effort is to develop and test a zeolite-based permeable barrier system for containing and remediating contaminated groundwater. The projected product is an engineered and tested permeable barrier system that can be adopted by the commercial sector.

  6. Grand challenge problems in environmental modeling and remediation: groundwater contaminant transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd Arbogast; Steve Bryant; Clint N. Dawson; Mary F. Wheeler

    1998-08-31

    This report describes briefly the work of the Center for Subsurface Modeling (CSM) of the University of Texas at Austin (and Rice University prior to September 1995) on the Partnership in Computational Sciences Consortium (PICS) project entitled Grand Challenge Problems in Environmental Modeling and Remediation: Groundwater Contaminant Transport.

  7. Evidence for groundwater contamination by heavy metals through soil passage under acidifying conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkens, B.J.

    1995-01-01

    The research reported here is aimed at improving the knowledge of the mobility of the heavy metals cadmium and zinc in vulnerable soil types. We use the term vulnerable with reference to vulnerability of groundwater for contamination by soil leaching. At diffuse soil immissions of heavy metals, accu

  8. Testing of a benchscale Reverse Osmosis/Coupled Transport system for treating contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reverse Osmosis/Coupled Transport process is a innovative means of removing radionuclides from contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site. Specifically, groundwater in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site has been contaminated with uranium, technetium, and nitrate. Investigations are proceeding to determine the most cost effective method to remove these contaminants. The process described in this paper combines three different membrane technologies (reverse osmosis, coupled transport, and nanofiltration to purify the groundwater while extracting and concentrating uranium, technetium, and nitrate into separate solutions. This separation allows for the future use of the radionuclides, if needed, and reduces the amount of waste that will need to be disposed of. This process has the potential to concentrate the contaminants into solutions with volumes in a ratio of 1/10,000 of the feed volume. This compares to traditional volume reductions of 10 to 100 for ion exchange and stand-alone reverse osmosis. The successful demonstration of this technology could result in significant savings in the overall cost of decontaminating the groundwater

  9. Testing of a benchscale Reverse Osmosis/Coupled Transport system for treating contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, K.M.; Lunsford, T.R.; Panjabi, G.

    1994-01-01

    The Reverse Osmosis/Coupled Transport process is a innovative means of removing radionuclides from contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site. Specifically, groundwater in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site has been contaminated with uranium, technetium, and nitrate. Investigations are proceeding to determine the most cost effective method to remove these contaminants. The process described in this paper combines three different membrane technologies (reverse osmosis, coupled transport, and nanofiltration to purify the groundwater while extracting and concentrating uranium, technetium, and nitrate into separate solutions. This separation allows for the future use of the radionuclides, if needed, and reduces the amount of waste that will need to be disposed of. This process has the potential to concentrate the contaminants into solutions with volumes in a ratio of 1/10,000 of the feed volume. This compares to traditional volume reductions of 10 to 100 for ion exchange and stand-alone reverse osmosis. The successful demonstration of this technology could result in significant savings in the overall cost of decontaminating the groundwater.

  10. Effect of hydrocarbon-contaminated fluctuating groundwater on magnetic properties of shallow sediments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ameen, N. N.; Klueglein, N.; Appel, E.; Petrovský, Eduard; Kappler, A.; Leven, C.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 3 (2014), s. 442-460. ISSN 0039-3169 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13042 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : environmental magnetism * magnetic susceptibility * groundwater table fluctuation * hydrocarbon contamination * magnetite formation Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.806, year: 2014

  11. Contaminated groundwater transport using an adaptive 3-D finite element model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three-dimensional, h-adapting finite element model has been developed to calculate subsurface transport and dispersion of contaminant. The model is based on a hybrid finite element scheme previously developed for two-dimensional groundwater and species transport

  12. Change of magnetic properties due to fluctuations of hydrocarbon contaminated groundwater in unconsolidated sediments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rijal, M. L.; Appel, E.; Petrovský, Eduard; Blaha, U.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 158, č. 5 (2010), s. 1756-1762. ISSN 0269-7491 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : hydrocarbon contamination * groundwater table fluctuation * magnetic properties * environmental magnetism Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 3.395, year: 2010

  13. Vertical contamination in the unconfined groundwater at the Hanford Site, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disposal to the ground at Hanford of large volumes of low- and intermediate-level wastes in the local unconfined groundwater flow system has raised concern about the movement and distribution of this waste. Previous work produced information on the horizontal movement of the waste, but little or no information exists on its vertical distribution within the unconfined groundwater flow system. In 1975 Phase I of a study was started to determine the vertical distribution of contaminants in three existing wells (699-28-40, 699-31-31, and 699-37-43). Because of negative results, only one well that produced positive results (699-31-31) was chosen for Phase II. Phase II consisted of tests conducted on this well by a testing company, with samples cross-checked by two different laboratories. Phase III was a cooperative study with Rockwell Hanford Operations, which included the installation, testing, and sampling of piezometers. The data were then analyzed using predictive codes and models in order to determine if vertical movement did occur. The present groundwater flow system shows some vertical contamination. However, concentrations are relatively higher near the surface of the flow system, indicating possible radial flow patterns from the groundwater mounds known to have developed under the chemical processing area disposal sites. Upward flow from deeper aquifers may be diluting the contaminant and masking a possible downward migration of contaminants

  14. Groundwater Monitoring and Assessment Plan for the 100-K Area Fuel Storage Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents a revised groundwater monitoring plan for the K Basins on the Hanford Site. The 100-K Fuel Storage Basins (K Basins) contain irradiated nuclear fuel from past operations at the N Reactor. The fuel is in the process of being removed, stabilized, and transported to a Central Plateau location for interim storage under the Spent Nuclear Fuels Project. The various remediation activities and schedule associated with the K Basins are described in Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-34-00. Groundwater monitoring and impact assessment are conducted as a task within the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project, which is managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The regulatory driver for this task is DOE Order 5400.1, which implements requirements of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 with respect to environmental monitoring. This document updates an existing groundwater monitoring and assessment plan for the K Basins to reflect current conditions and revises the monitoring strategy to reflect changing information needs. The goals and purpose associated with this updated plan are: (1) Characterize groundwater conditions between the K Basins and the Columbia River--to provide a periodic status of current conditions and the attenuation of plumes. (2) Distinguish between groundwater contamination associated with K Basins and contamination from other past-practices sources--to help guide operational and remedial action decisions. (3) Maintain a strategy for the potential expansion of monitoring capabilities--to respond to future basin-related issues. The principal elements of the revised strategy include characterizing groundwater movement, monitoring groundwater quality characteristics, identifying evidence for basin shielding water leakage, evaluation and interpretation of results, potential expansion of monitoring location coverage, and earthquake seismicity monitoring. Specific objectives are included in this plan for each of these elements. Primary

  15. California GAMA Program: Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Results for the Sacramento Valley and Volcanic Provinces of Northern California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, J E; Hudson, G B; Eaton, G F; Leif, R

    2005-01-20

    In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as methyl tert butyl ether (MTBE) from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the California Aquifer Susceptibility (CAS) project (under the GAMA Program) is to assess water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey, the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement this groundwater assessment program. In 2003, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the Sacramento Valley and Volcanic Provinces. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3 method). In addition, stable oxygen isotope measurements

  16. Rapid assessment of soil and groundwater tritium by vegetation sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid and relatively inexpensive technique for defining the extent of groundwater contamination by tritium has been investigated. The technique uses existing vegetation to sample the groundwater. Water taken up by deep rooted trees is collected by enclosing tree branches in clear plastic bags. Water evaporated from the leaves condenses on the inner surface of the bag. The water is removed from the bag with a syringe. The bags can be sampled many times. Tritium in the water is detected by liquid scintillation counting. The water collected in the bags has no color and counts as well as distilled water reference samples. The technique was used in an area of known tritium contamination and proved to be useful in defining the extent of tritium contamination

  17. An evaluation of the bioremediation potential of near surface groundwater contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons in the Yukon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of two separate studies relating to the assessment of the bioremediation potential for the in situ restoration of petroleum contaminated soil and groundwater at an abandoned oil refinery in Haynes Junction, Yukon, and at the Whitehorse International Airport are reported. The report is based on detailed site assessment and a chemical/microbiological characterization of each site. Higher levels of psychrotropic (cold-adapted) than mesophilic bacteria were found within each aquifer system. The psychrotropic bacteria which contain genes similar to alkB, which is involved in alkane degradation, was found to be present within the aquifer material. The ability of naturally occurring bacteria to mineralize the organic contaminants at 5 degrees C was also demonstrated by a hydrodynamic column test and various soil and ground water microcosm tests. Overall, the results demonstrate that in situ biostimulation with nutrient amendment or an intrinsic bioremediation treatment technique may be sufficient to restore the contaminated groundwater system at ambient temperatures. 9 refs.3 tabs., 8 figs

  18. Soil treatment and groundwater control for No. 6 fuel oil and PCB contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that as part of a Short-Term Measure ordered by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), soil contaminated by No. 6 fuel oil and low-level polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was excavated, treated and recycled on-site as an asphalt base course for a parking lot at an industrial complex in New Bedford, Massachusetts. Approximately 300 cubic yards of contaminated soil were treated with an asphalt emulsion and utilized as a aggregate component for asphalt processed at ambient temperatures during the month of December 1990. In order to determine if the contaminated soils to be recycled would be classified as a hazardous waste (as defined by the Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Regulations, 310 CMR 30.000), or if the soil to be recycled would pose a significant risk to health, safety or the environment, analytical testing of the contaminated soil was conducted prior, during and after treatment. Analytical testing included Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP) analyses of the untreated and treated soil. An alternative solution to the standard groundwater pump-and-treat method was designed and constructed to control and recover the highly viscous floating petroleum product. A series of precast leaching galleys (oil collection chambers) and a precast leach pit (groundwater discharge structure) were constructed to alter the local groundwater table to induce groundwater flow by gravity into the leaching chambers. Passive (i.e., nonpumping) groundwater flow to the leaching chambers was induced by placing of the groundwater discharge structure hydraulically downgradient of the leaching chambers. Collected oil, separated by gravity, will be periodically vacuumed, as necessary, for proper off-site disposal. Excess water discharges to the downgradient leach pit

  19. Assessment of groundwater quality data for the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation, Rolette County, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Robert F.; Vining, Kevin C.

    2013-01-01

    The Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation relies on groundwater supplies to meet the demands of community and economic needs. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians, examined historical groundwater-level and groundwater-quality data for the Fox Hills, Hell Creek, Rolla, and Shell Valley aquifers. The two main sources of water-quality data for groundwater were the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System database and the North Dakota State Water Commission database. Data included major ions, trace elements, nutrients, field properties, and physical properties. The Fox Hills and Hell Creek aquifers had few groundwater water-quality data. The lack of data limits any detailed assessments that can be made about these aquifers. Data for the Rolla aquifer exist from 1978 through 1980 only. The concentrations of some water-quality constituents exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency secondary maximum contaminant levels. No samples were analyzed for pesticides and hydrocarbons. Numerous water-quality samples have been obtained from the Shell Valley aquifer. About one-half of the water samples from the Shell Valley aquifer had concentrations of iron, manganese, sulfate, and dissolved solids that exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency secondary maximum contaminant levels. Overall, the data did not indicate obvious patterns in concentrations.

  20. Assessment of Groundwater and Surface Water Pollution at Mitm Area, Ibb City, Yemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmail A. Sabahi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater and surface water samples were collected from Mitm area to study the possible impact of wastewater treatment percolation into the groundwater and surface water. The objective of the study is to assess the groundwater and surface water pollution due to wastewater treatment at Mitm area of Ibb city, in the Republic of Yemen. The concentrations of various physiochemical parameters include heavy metals (Pb, Zn, Ni, Cr, Cd, Cu pH, temperature, Electrical Conductivity (EC, Total Dissolved Solids (TDS, and Dissolved Oxygen (DO, anions and nutrients (F-, Cl-, SO4-2, NO2, NO3-,NH3-N, major cations (Fe, Na, K, Ca, Mg and parameters (COD, BOD5, and coliform group bacteria were measured from the groundwater samples. The results show that three out of five boreholes are contaminated, where the concentration of physic-chemical parameters are above the standard acceptable levels which required for drinking water adapted by Yemen's Ministry of Water and Environment (YMWE, 1999. On the other hand, surface water is affected by the discharge of untreated wastewater. The concentrations of physiochemical parameters are above the standard acceptable levels which required for irrigation purpose adopted by Yemen's Ministry of Water and Environment (YMWE, 1999. Boreholes 1 and 2 are suitable for drinking water, whereas boreholes 3, 4 and 5 are not suitable for drinking water. Therefore, urgency for wastewater treatment at this site is recommended to prevent further contamination to surface and groundwater.

  1. Evaluating Ecosystem Services for Reducing Groundwater Nitrate Contamination: Nitrate Attenuation in the Unsaturated and Saturated Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrates are the most common type of groundwater contamination in agricultural regions. Environmental policies targeting nitrates have focused on input control (e.g., restricted fertilizer application), intermediate loads control (e.g., reduce nitrate leached from crop fields), and final loads control (e.g., reduce catchment nitrate loads). Nitrate loads can be affected by hydrological processes in both unsaturated and saturated zones. Although many of these processes have been extensively investigated in literature, they are commonly modeled as exogenous to farm management. A couple of recent studies by scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory show that in some situations nitrate attenuation processes in the unsaturated/saturated zone, particularly denitrification, can be intensified by certain management practices to mitigate nitrate loads. Therefore, these nitrate attenuation processes can be regarded as a set of ecosystem services that farmers can take advantage of to reduce their cost of complying with environmental policies. In this paper, a representative California dairy farm is used as a case study to show how such ecosystem attenuation services can be framed within the farm owner's decision-making framework as an option for reducing groundwater nitrate contamination. I develop an integrated dynamic model, where the farmer maximizes discounted net farm profit over multiple periods subject to environmental regulations. The model consists of three submodels: animal-waste-crop, hydrologic, and economic model. In addition to common choice variables such as irrigation, fertilization, and waste disposal options, the farmer can also endogenously choose from three water sources: surface water, deep groundwater (old groundwater in the deep aquifer that is not affected by farm effluent in the short term), and shallow groundwater (drainage water that can be recycled via capture wells at the downstream end of the farm). The capture wells not only

  2. Remediation of gasoline-contaminated soil and groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation describes the selection, implementation, and initial performance of the S.A.V.E. Spray Aeration, Vacuum Extraction system, manufactured by Remediation Service, Int'l for the remediation of fuel-impacted soil and groundwater at a former leaking underground fuel tank site in San Jose, California. The site addressed in the presentation is a commercial facility involved in the manufacturing of finished wood products. The present and previous operators of the facility operated underground fuel storage tanks at the site to fuel vehicles used in their business

  3. Simulation of Groundwater Contaminant Transport at a Decommissioned Landfill Site—A Case Study, Tainan City, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao-Shi; Tu, Chia-Huei; Chen, Shih-Jen; Chen, Cheng-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Contaminant transport in subsurface water is the major pathway for contamination spread from contaminated sites to groundwater supplies, to remediate a contaminated site. The aim of this paper was to set up the groundwater contaminant transport model for the Wang-Tien landfill site, in southwestern Taiwan, which exhibits high contamination of soil and groundwater and therefore represents a potential threat for the adjacent Hsu-Hsian Creek. Groundwater Modeling System software, which is the most sophisticated groundwater modeling tool available today, was used to numerically model groundwater flow and contaminant transport. In the simulation, the total mass of pollutants in the aquifer increased by an average of 72% (65% for ammonium nitrogen and 79% for chloride) after 10 years. The simulation produced a plume of contaminated groundwater that extends 80 m in length and 20 m in depth northeastward from the landfill site. Although the results show that the concentrations of ammonium nitrogen and chlorides in most parts are low, they are 3.84 and 467 mg/L, respectively, in the adjacent Hsu-Hsian Creek. PMID:27153078

  4. Assessment of groundwater vulnerability by combining drastic and susceptibility index: Application to Annaba superficial aquifer (Algeria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedrati, Nassima; Djabri, Larbi; Chaffai, Hicham; Bougherira, Nabil

    2016-07-01

    Groundwater pollution due to anthropogenic activities is one of the major environmental problems in urban and industrial areas. The aim of this work is to propose a new integrated methodology to assess actual and forecasted groundwater vulnerability by combining Drastic and susceptibility index. The contamination susceptibility index (SI) at a given location was calculated by taking the product of the vulnerability DRASTIC index (VI) and the quality index (QI): SI=VI x QI. The superficial aquifer of Annaba plain was the study case proposed for the application of this methodology. The study revealed that the area with Very High vulnerability would increase 73 % in this superficial layer. This result can be explained by the susceptibility index map shows both hydrogeological and hydrochemical data related to the contamination problem including areas that should be taken into consideration during water management planning. The index map indicates that the most susceptible groundwater is occupies the majority of the study area. The validity of the DRASTIC and the susceptibility index methods, verified by comparing the distribution of some pollutants (Daouad, 2013) in the groundwater and the different vulnerability classes, shows a high contamination that affect the water quality in study areas.

  5. In situ treatment of mixed contaminants in groundwater: Application of zero-valence iron and palladized iron for treatment of groundwater contaminated with trichloroethene and technetium-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall goal of this portion of the project was to package one or more unit processes, as modular components in vertical and/or horizontal recirculation wells, for treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) [e.g., trichloroethene (TCE)] and radionuclides [e.g., technetium (Tc)99] in groundwater. The project was conceived, in part, because the coexistence of chlorinated hydrocarbons and radionuclides has been identified as the predominant combination of groundwater contamination in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Thus, a major component of the project was the development of modules that provide simultaneous treatment of hydrocarbons and radionuclides. The project objectives included: (1) evaluation of horizontal wells for inducing groundwater recirculation, (2) development of below-ground treatment modules for simultaneous removal of VOCs and radionuclides, and (3) demonstration of a coupled system (treatment module with recirculation well) at a DOE field site where both VOCs and radionuclides are present in the groundwater. This report is limited to the innovative treatment aspects of the program. A report on pilot testing of the horizontal recirculation system was the first report of the series (Muck et al. 1996). A comprehensive report that focuses on the engineering, cost and hydrodynamic aspects of the project has also been prepared (Korte et al. 1997a)

  6. In situ treatment of mixed contaminants in groundwater: Application of zero-valence iron and palladized iron for treatment of groundwater contaminated with trichloroethene and technetium-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, N.E.; Muck, M.T.; Zutman, J.L.; Schlosser, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Liang, L.; Gu, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Siegrist, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.]|[Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Houk, T.C. [Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, OH (United States); Fernando, Q. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The overall goal of this portion of the project was to package one or more unit processes, as modular components in vertical and/or horizontal recirculation wells, for treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) [e.g., trichloroethene (TCE)] and radionuclides [e.g., technetium (Tc){sup 99}] in groundwater. The project was conceived, in part, because the coexistence of chlorinated hydrocarbons and radionuclides has been identified as the predominant combination of groundwater contamination in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Thus, a major component of the project was the development of modules that provide simultaneous treatment of hydrocarbons and radionuclides. The project objectives included: (1) evaluation of horizontal wells for inducing groundwater recirculation, (2) development of below-ground treatment modules for simultaneous removal of VOCs and radionuclides, and (3) demonstration of a coupled system (treatment module with recirculation well) at a DOE field site where both VOCs and radionuclides are present in the groundwater. This report is limited to the innovative treatment aspects of the program. A report on pilot testing of the horizontal recirculation system was the first report of the series (Muck et al. 1996). A comprehensive report that focuses on the engineering, cost and hydrodynamic aspects of the project has also been prepared (Korte et al. 1997a).

  7. Groundwater sustainability assessment in coastal aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathashri, U. A.; Mahesha, A.

    2016-08-01

    The present work investigates the response of shallow, coastal unconfined aquifers to anticipated overdraft conditions and climate change effect using numerical simulation. The groundwater flow model MODFLOW and variable density groundwater model SEAWAT are used for this investigation. The transmissivity and specific yield estimated from the existing database range from 10 to 810 m 2/day and 0.08% to 10.92% respectively. After successful calibration with Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency greater than 0.80, the values of horizontal hydraulic conductivity and specific yield of the unconfined aquifer were set in the range 1.85-61.90 m/day and 0.006-0.24 respectively. After validating the model, it is applied for forecasting the aquifer's response to anticipated future scenarios of groundwater draft, recharge rate and sea level rise. The findings of the study illustrate that saltwater intrusion is intensified in the area adjoining the tidal rivers, rather than that due to the sea alone. Of all the scenarios simulated, the immense negative impact on groundwater quality emerges due to overdraft conditions and reduced recharge with the areal extent of seawater intrusion exceeding about 67% (TDS >1 kg/m 3). The study also arrives at the conclusion that, regional sea level rise of 1 mm/year has no impact on the groundwater dynamics of the aquifer.

  8. Groundwater sustainability assessment in coastal aquifers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U A Lathashri; A Mahesha

    2016-08-01

    The present work investigates the response of shallow, coastal unconfined aquifers to anticipated overdraft conditions and climate change effect using numerical simulation. The groundwater flow model MODFLOW and variable density groundwater model SEAWAT are used for this investigation. The transmissivity and specific yield estimated from the existing database range from 10 to 810 m^2/day and 0.08% to 10.92% respectively. After successful calibration with Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency greater than 0.80, the values of horizontal hydraulic conductivity and specific yield of the unconfined aquifer were set in the range 1.85–61.90 m/day and 0.006–0.24 respectively. After validating the model, it is applied for forecasting the aquifer’s response to anticipated future scenarios of groundwater draft, recharge rate and sea level rise. The findings of the study illustrate that saltwater intrusion is intensified in the area adjoining the tidal rivers, rather than that due to the sea alone. Of all the scenarios simulated, the immense negative impact on groundwater quality emerges due to overdraft conditions and reduced recharge with the areal extent of seawater intrusion exceeding about 67% (TDS>1 kg/m^3). The study also arrivesat the conclusion that, regional sea level rise of 1 mm/year has no impact on the groundwater dynamics of the aquifer.

  9. Groundwater quality assessment plan for single-shell waste management area B-BX-BY at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a first determination groundwater quality assessment at the Hanford Site. This work was performed for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, in accordance with the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement during the time period 1996--1998. The purpose of the assessment was to determine if waste from the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area (WMA) B-BX-BY had entered the groundwater at levels above the drinking water standards (DWS). The resulting assessment report documented evidence demonstrating that waste from the WMA has, most likely, impacted groundwater quality. Based on 40 CFR 265.93 [d] paragraph (7), the owner-operator must continue to make the minimum required determinations of contaminant level and of rate/extent of migrations on a quarterly basis until final facility closure. These continued determinations are required because the groundwater quality assessment was implemented prior to final closure of the facility

  10. Groundwater quality assessment plan for single-shell waste management area B-BX-BY at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SM Narbutovskih

    2000-03-31

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a first determination groundwater quality assessment at the Hanford Site. This work was performed for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, in accordance with the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement during the time period 1996--1998. The purpose of the assessment was to determine if waste from the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area (WMA) B-BX-BY had entered the groundwater at levels above the drinking water standards (DWS). The resulting assessment report documented evidence demonstrating that waste from the WMA has, most likely, impacted groundwater quality. Based on 40 CFR 265.93 [d] paragraph (7), the owner-operator must continue to make the minimum required determinations of contaminant level and of rate/extent of migrations on a quarterly basis until final facility closure. These continued determinations are required because the groundwater quality assessment was implemented prior to final closure of the facility.

  11. Groundwater PAHs Contamination Risk Assessment of Reclaimed Wastewater Irrigation Area, South-east Part of Beijing, China%北京市东南郊再生水灌区地下水多环芳烃污染风险评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玮; 何江涛; 马文洁; 纪亚萍

    2012-01-01

    In order to better understand the migration and attenuation of pollutants and its potential pollution risk to groundwater during the reclaimed wastewater irrigation, a model based on Multi-cell was developed, which combined with mass conservation, adsorption and re-distribution and biodegradation mechanism. This one-dimensional model was aimed at groundwater contaminants risk assessment which can calculate the attenuation of pollutants during the vertical migration through the soil profiles. This paper used the model to perform groundwater pollution risk assessment in Tongzhou,Daxing agriculture district, a typical reclaimed wastewater irrigation area in South-east of Beijing. During the calculation, two typical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, naphthalene and phenanthrene were selected to represent the reclaimed wastewater pollutants, and local data of well drilling and quality of irrigation water and groundwater were used. Conclusions suggested that the concentration of naphthalene and phenanthrene migrating into aquifer of most part of Tongzhou,Daxing district after long-term of reclaimed wastewater irrigation was low except of Lucheng town in Tongzhou district; the groundwater vulnerability of Daxing district was better than Tongzhou district because of its thickness of vadose zone; the major accumulated layer of naphthalene and phenanthrene in soil was the clay layer, and its adsorption capacity was much higher than coarse sand; the migration capability of low molecular PAHs in the surface of soil was better. Through this assessment, the difference of groundwater contamination risk for naphthalene and phenanthrene could be identified, and this could help to better understand the risk of reclaimed wastewater irrigation in Tongzhou and Daxing.%为研究污染物随再生水进入地下环境后其迁移衰减情况及对地下水的潜在危害性,以Multi-cell模型为基础,结合污染物质量守恒、在水土中吸附再分配、生物降解等机理,

  12. Ground-water contamination near a uranium tailings disposal site in Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contaminants from uranium tailings disposed of at an active mill in Colorado have seeped into the shallow ground water onsite. This ground water discharges into the Arkansas River Valley through a superposed stream channel cut in the resistant sandstone ridge at the edge of a synclinal basin. In the river valley, seasonal surface-water irrigation has a significant impact on hydrodynamics. Water levels in residential wells fluctuate up to 20 ft and concentrations of uranium, molybdenum, and other contaminants also vary seasonally, with highest concentrations in the Spring, prior to irrigation, and lowest concentrations in the Fall. Results of a simple transient mixing cell model support the hypothesis that lateral ground-water inflow, and not irrigation recharge, is the source of ground-water contamination

  13. LCA of contaminated site remediation - integration of site-specific impact assessment of local toxic impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemming, Gitte; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia;

    2011-01-01

    -generic assessments poorly reflect the fate of frequent soil contaminants such as chloroethenes as they exclude the groundwater compartment and assume that the main part escapes to the atmosphere. Another important limitation of the generic impact assessment models is that they do not include the formation of......The environmental impacts from remediation can be divided into primary and secondary impacts. Primary impacts cover the local impacts associated with the on-site contamination, whereas the secondary impacts are impacts on the local, regional and global scale generated by the remediation activities...... impacts have typically been assessed using site-generic characterization models representing a continental scale and excluding the groundwater compartment. Soil contaminants have therefore generally been assigned as emissions to surface soil or surface water compartments. However, such site...

  14. {In Situ} Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater via Enhanced Reductive Dehalogenation and Dual-Screened Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, J. A.; Hoelen, T. P.; Hopkins, G. D.; Reinhard, M.; Lebrón, C. A.

    2003-12-01

    Groundwater contaminated by chlorinated solvents, principally cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), was cleaned {in situ} by a technology that combines enhanced reductive dechlorination with dual-screened treatment wells. The prolonged historic presence of cis-DCE at the contaminated site suggested that natural attenuation rates were limited by the supply of electron donors. Therefore, propionate was added to the contaminated groundwater to serve as an electron donor and to accelerate the reductive dechlorination process. Propionate was added from the ground surface via a pair of dual-screened wells emplaced in the contaminated portion of the aquifer. The wells were screened at two depths, from 3.0--7.6 m below ground surface (bgs) and from 9.1--12.2 m bgs. These wells functioned to intercept the contaminant plume, augment the contaminated water with propionate, recirculate a portion of the contaminated water, and release treated water for continued downgradient migration. Treatment occurred wholly {in situ}. Within the recirculation zone of the well pair, cis-DCE was effectively removed during a two-month period of operation. In the lower aquifer zone, 800 μ g/L cis-DCE was converted stoichiometrically to ethene. In the upper aquifer zone, the concentration of cis-DCE was reduced from over 400 μ g/L to less than 40 μ g/L. Dechlorination was accompanied by significant sulfate reduction, but not by methanogenesis. The hydraulics of the groundwater flow are described with a relatively simple analytical mathematical model. Measured concentrations of a bromide tracer agree very well with model predictions, suggesting that the model is valid for this contaminated site. At this site, it appears sufficient to model the aquifer as consisting of two homogeneous layers separated by an impermeable aquitard; smaller-scale heterogeneity in the hydraulic conductivity can apparently be ignored.

  15. Municipal waste management and groundwater contamination processes in Córdoba Province, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Emilio Martínez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In Coronel Moldes, Argentina, waste management practices consist in municipal waste being tipped directly onto an area of sand dunes at the municipal waste disposal site (MWDS. Moreover, untreated liquid waste from septic tanks and latrines from urban areas are discharged in the same place. This co-disposal waste management is very common in many regions of Argentina and its impact on the groundwater of Coronel Moldes has not been evaluated. The study area is located in the vicinity of a MWDS in a flatlands environment that is typical of Argentina. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the impacts on groundwater quality of current waste management practices in order to consider the requirement for new guidelines for sustainable groundwater management. Three groundwater monitoring wells were installed up-, across- and down-gradient of the MWDS. The principal aquifer is formed by sandy silt sediments (loess. Groundwater levels in the area of the MWDS are between 5.6 m and 7.8 m. The Vulnerability index indicates that groundwater in this area has a high vulnerability. Groundwater in the vicinity of the MWDS shows elevated electrical conductivity, high concentrations of Cl-, Na+, and HCO3- ions, COD, BOD5 and aerobic bacteria and less dissolved oxygen than the background values indicating the presence of organic matter. Municipal waste management represents a significant omission in current groundwater protection policy at Coronel Moldes. Strict supervision of solid and liquid municipal waste disposal needs to be instigated in order to ensure that the groundwater remains free of contamination and to allow a sustainable environmental management.

  16. Analysis of the potential contamination risk of groundwater resources circulating in areas with anthropogenic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Spizzico

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The area investigated is located in the province of Brindisi (Italy. It is a generally flat area separated from the nearby carbonatic plateau of the Murgia by quite indistinct and high fault scarps. As regards the geological features, carbonatic basement rocks and post-cretaceous terrains made up of calabrian calcarenites and middle-upper Pleistocenic marine terraced deposits can be distinguished. In the examined area there are two different hydrogeological environments. The first is represented by deep groundwater, the main groundwater resource in Apulia. The second hydrogeological environment, now of lesser importance than the deep aquifer in terms of size and use, is made up of some small shallow groundwater systems situated in post-calabrian sands and located in the eastern area. During some sampling cycles carried out in the studied area, water was withdrawn from both the deep aquifer and from the shallow groundwater. For every sample, the necessary parameters were determined for the physical and chemical characterisation of two different hydrogeological environments. Moreover, some chemical parameters indicating anthropogenic activities were determined. Analysis of the aerial distribution of the measured parameters has shown some main areas subject to different conditions of contamination risk, in accordance with the hydrogeological and geological features of the investigated area. In the south-eastern part of the investigated area, the important action performed by the surface aquifer for protecting the deep groundwater from contamination of anthropogenic origin is clear. On the other hand, in the shallow groundwater, areas of nitrate and nitrite contamination have been identified, which result from the extensive use of fertilizers.

  17. Groundwater chemistry in the nitrate contaminated area in Shimabara, Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, K.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater contamination by nitrate from agricultural fields is a problem shared by many parts of the world. Shimabara, Nagasaki prefecture, Japan is an important agricultural district experiencing this problem. In Shimabara, drinking water relies on the groundwater. In this study, groundwater samples were collected at 40 locations such as residents and municipal waterworks wells, springs and rivers from August 2011 to November 2013. NO3-N concentration of 15 samples exceeded 10 mg L-1 (drinking water standard in Japan). Maximum NO3-N concentration was 26.6 mg L-1. Correlation coefficients were calculated between ion components of collected samples (n=277). NO3- had the highest positive correlation with Cl-(r =0.956) and had positive correlation with K+(r=0.679), SO42-(r=0.654) and Ca2+(r=0.593), respectively. The results revealed that Cl- and K+ related to livestock wastes, SO42- related to chemical fertilizers and Ca2+ related to calcareous materials. Main source of NO3- is from livestock wastes. To understand groundwater chemistry in detail, principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis were carried out. Result from the PCA, chemical characteristics of groundwater was summarized by the first principal component and the second principal component. Both of two principal components reflected nitrate contamination and ion dissolution from aquifer matrix during groundwater flows. Result from the cluster analysis, chemical characteristics of groundwater was classified into four clusters. Nitrate polluted samples into specific cluster and the rest samples were classified into other clusters depending on the original water quality.

  18. Cometabolic biotreatment of TCE-contaminated groundwater: Laboratory and bench-scale development studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory is conducting a demonstration of two cometabolic technologies for biotreatment of groundwater contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) and other organics. Technologies based on methanotrophic (methane-utilizing) and toluene-degrading microorganisms will be compared side-by-side on the same groundwater stream. Laboratory and bench-scale bioreactor studies have been conducted to guide selection of microbial cultures and operating conditions for the field demonstration. This report presents the results of the laboratory and bench-scale studies for the methanotrophic system

  19. Cometabolic biotreatment of TCE-contaminated groundwater - Laboratory and bench-scale development studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory is conducting a demonstration of two cometabolic technologies for biotreatment of groundwater contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) and other organics. Technologies based on methanotrophic (methane-utilizing) and toluene-degrading microorganisms will be compared side-by-side on the same groundwater stream. Laboratory and bench-scale bioreactor studies have been conducted to guide selection of microbial cultures and operating conditions for the field demonstration. This report presents the results of the laboratory and bench-scale studies for the methanotrophic system. (author)

  20. Pathways of sulfate and hydrogen sulfide transformations in a BTEX- contaminated groundwater system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einsiedl, Florian; Anneser, B.; Griebler, C.

    2010-01-01

    The gradually increasing anthropogenic impact on the environment over the last 60 years has altered the groundwater quality in many areas around the world. Groundwater represents the main drinking water resource in nearly all European countries. Therefore, the task of ensuring good status of...... intermediate during abiotic oxidation of hydrogen sulphide, with the latter formed during bacterial sulfate reduction. The formed elemental sulfur may be used by the specific microbial community found in this aquifer for the oxidation of organic contaminants such as toluene. In contrast, reoxidation of...

  1. Metropol: A computer code for the simulation of transport of contaminants with groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report a description is given of the computer code Metropol. This code simulates the three-dimensional flow of groundwater with varying density and the simultaneous transport of contaminants in low concentration and is based on the finite element method. The basic equations for groundwater flow and transport are described as well as the mathematical techniques used to solve these equations. Pre-processing facilities for mesh generation and post-processing facilities such as particle tracking are also discussed. This work was part of the Community Mirage project Second phase, research area Calculation tools

  2. Dutch Risk Assessment System for New Chemicals: Soil Groundwater Module

    OpenAIRE

    Swartjes FA; Linden AMA van der; van den Berg R

    1993-01-01

    A new Soil-Groundwater Module has been developed for incorporation in the Dutch Risk Assessment System for New Chemicals. In this module, the exposure of humans and the environment to xenobiotic substances due to sewage sludge application have been determined. Exposure criteria were: 1. accumulation in the uppermost soil layer one year after sewage sludge application, and 2. the maximal substance-concentration of the deeper groundwater. The calculation procedure is incorporated in the menu dr...

  3. Evaluation of Using Caged Clams to Monitor Contaminated Groundwater Exposure in the Near-Shore Environment of the Hanford Site 300 Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Kyle B.; Poston, Ted M.; Tiller, Brett L.

    2008-01-31

    The Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) has been identified as an indicator species for locating and monitoring contaminated groundwater in the Columbia River. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a field study to explore the use of caged Asiatic clams to monitor contaminated groundwater upwelling in the 300 Area near-shore environment and assess seasonal differences in uranium uptake in relation to seasonal flow regimes of the Columbia River. Additional objectives included examining the potential effects of uranium accumulation on growth, survival, and tissue condition of the clams. This report documents the field conditions and procedures, laboratory procedures, and statistical analyses used in collecting samples and processing the data. Detailed results are presented and illustrated, followed by a discussion comparing uranium concentrations in Asiatic clams collected at the 300 Area and describing the relationship between river discharge, groundwater indicators, and uranium in clams. Growth and survival, histology, and other sources of environmental variation also are discussed.

  4. Advances in Dynamic Transport of Organic Contaminants in Karst Groundwater Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, I. Y.; Vesper, D.; Alshawabkeh, A.; Hellweger, F.

    2011-12-01

    Karst groundwater systems develop in soluble rocks such as limestone, and are characterized by high permeability and well-developed conduit porosity. These systems provide important freshwater resources for human consumption and ecological integrity of streams, wetlands, and coastal zones. The same characteristics that make karst aquifers highly productive make them highly vulnerable to contamination. As a result, karst aquifers serve as an important route for contaminants exposure to humans and wildlife. Transport of organic contaminants in karst ground-water occurs in complex pathways influenced by the flow mechanism predominating in the aquifer: conduit-flow dominated systems tend to convey solutes rapidly through the system to a discharge point without much attenuation; diffuse-flow systems, on the other hand, can cause significant solute retardation and slow movement. These two mechanisms represent end members of a wide spectrum of conditions found in karst areas, and often a combination of conduit- and diffuse-flow mechanisms is encountered, where both flow mechanisms can control the fate and transport of contaminants. This is the case in the carbonate aquifers of northern Puerto Rico. This work addresses advances made on the characterization of fate and transport processes in karst ground-water systems characterized by variable conduit and/or diffusion dominated flow under high- and low-flow conditions. It involves laboratory-scale physical modeling and field-scale sampling and historical analysis of contaminant distribution. Statistical analysis of solute transport in Geo-Hydrobed physical models shows the heterogeneous character of transport dynamics in karstic units, and its variability under different flow regimes. Field-work analysis of chlorinated volatile organic compounds and phthalates indicates a large capacity of the karst systems to store and transmit contaminants. This work is part of the program "Puerto Rico Testsite for Exploring Contamination

  5. Sources of nitrate and ammonium contamination in groundwater under developing Asian megacities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-) and ammonium (NH4+) contamination in the water systems, and the mechanisms controlling their sources, pathways, and distributions were investigated for the Southeast Asian cities of Metro Manila, Bangkok, and Jakarta. GIS-based monitoring and dual isotope approach (nitrate δ15N and δ18O) suggested that human waste via severe sewer leakage was the major source of nutrient contaminants in Metro Manila and Jakarta urban areas. Furthermore, the characteristics of the nutrient contamination differed depending on the agricultural land use pattern in the suburban areas: high nitrate contamination was observed in Jakarta (dry fields), and relatively lower nutrients consisting mainly of ammonium were detected in Bangkok (paddy fields). The exponential increase in NO3--δ15N along with the NO3- reduction and clear δ18O/δ15N slopes of NO3- (∼ 0.5) indicated the occurrence of denitrification. An anoxic subsurface system associated with the natural geological setting (e.g., the old tidal plain at Bangkok) and artificial pavement coverage served to buffer NO3- contamination via active denitrification and reduced nitrification. Our results showed that NO3- and NH4+ contamination of the aquifers in Metro Manila, Bangkok, and Jakarta was not excessive, suggesting low risk of drinking groundwater to human health, at present. However, the increased nitrogen load and increased per capita gross domestic product (GDP) in these developing cities may increase this contamination in the very near future. Continuous monitoring and management of the groundwater system is needed to minimize groundwater pollution in these areas, and this information should be shared among adjacent countries with similar geographic and cultural settings

  6. Evaluating Contaminant Flux from the Vadose Zone to the Groundwater in the Hanford Central Plateau. SX Tank Farms Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Oostrom, Martinus [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Last, George V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Strickland, Christopher E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tartakovsky, Guzel D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    At the DOE Hanford Site, contaminants were discharged to the subsurface through engineered waste sites in the Hanford Central Plateau. Additional waste was released through waste storage tank leaks. Much of the contaminant inventory is still present within the unsaturated vadose zone sediments. The nature and extent of future groundwater contaminant plumes and the growth or decline of current groundwater plumes beneath the Hanford Central Plateau are a function of the contaminant flux from the vadose zone to the groundwater. In general, contaminant transport is slow through the vadose zone and it is difficult to directly measure contaminant flux in the vadose zone. Predictive analysis, supported by site characterization and monitoring data, was applied using a structured, systems-based approach to estimate the future contaminant flux to groundwater in support of remediation decisions for the vadose zone and groundwater (Truex and Carroll 2013). The SX Tank Farm was used as a case study because of the existing contaminant inventory in the vadose zone, observations of elevated moisture content in portions of the vadose zone, presence of a limited-extent groundwater plume, and the relatively large amount and wide variety of data available for the site. Although the SX Tank Farm case study is most representative of conditions at tank farm sites, the study has elements that are also relevant to other types of disposal sites in the Hanford Central Plateau.

  7. Groundwater-derived contaminant fluxes along a channelized Coastal Plain stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaSage, Danita M.; Fryar, Alan E.; Mukherjee, Abhijit; Sturchio, Neil C.; Heraty, Linnea J.

    2008-10-01

    SummaryRecent studies in various settings across eastern North America have examined the movement of volatile organic compound (VOC) plumes from groundwater to streams, but few studies have addressed focused discharge of such plumes in unlithified sediments. From 1999 through 2002, we monitored concentrations of trichloroethene (TCE) and the non-volatile co-contaminant technetium-99 ( 99Tc) along Little Bayou Creek, a first-order perennial stream in the Coastal Plain of western Kentucky. Spring flow contributed TCE and 99Tc to the creek, and TCE concentrations tended to vary with 99Tc in springs. Contaminant concentrations in stream water fluctuated seasonally, but not always synchronously with stream flow. However, contaminant influxes varied seasonally with stream flow and were dominated by a few springs. Concentrations of O 2, NO3-, and SO42-, values of δ 37Cl DOCl in groundwater, and the lack of less-chlorinated ethenes in groundwater and stream water indicated that anaerobic biodegradation of TCE was unlikely. Losses of TCE along Little Bayou Creek resulted mainly from volatilization, in contrast to streams receiving diffuse contaminated discharge, where intrinsic bioremediation of VOCs appears to be prevalent.

  8. Groundwater-derived contaminant fluxes along a channelized Coastal Plain stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaSage, Danita m [JL Sexton and Son; Fryar, Alan E [Dept of Earth and Geoligical Sciences, Univ of KY,; Mukherjee, Abhijit [Univ of Tx, Jackson School of Geosciences, Bur of Econ. Geology; Sturchio, Neil C [Dept of earth and Env. Sciences, Univ of Ill at Chicago; Heraty, Linnea J [Dept of earth and Env. Sciences, Univ of Ill at Chicago

    2008-10-01

    Recent studies in various settings across eastern North America have examined the movement of volatile organic compound (VOC) plumes from groundwater to streams, but few studies have addressed focused discharge of such plumes in unlithified sediments. From 1999 through 2002, we monitored concentrations of trichloroethene (TCE) and the non-volatile co-contaminant technetium-99 along Little Bayou Creek, a first -order perennial stream in the Coastal Plain of western Kentucky. Spring flow contributed TCE and technetium-99 to the creek, and TCE concentrations tended to vary with technetium-99 in springs. Contaminant concentrations in stream water fluctuated seasonally, but not always synchronously with stream flow. However, contaminant influxes varied seasonally with stream flow and were dominated by a few springs. Concentrations of O2, NO3⁻, and SO2-4, values of δ37CL in groundwater, and the lack of less-chlorinated ethenes in groundwater and stream water indicated that aerobic biodegradation of TCE was unlikely. Losses of TCE along Little Bayou Creek resulted mainly from volatilization, in contrast to streams receiving diffuse contaminated discharge, where intrinsic bioremediation of VOCs appears to be prevalent.

  9. Delineating the movement of rainwater driven contaminate caused by oil spillage toward groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ground surface in northern Kuwait is polluted by oil lakes formed by the flow and collection of crude oil that flowed from damaged oil wells following the Gulf war; oil sludge; and soot, formed by the fallout of products of combustion from the burning the oil wells. In addition, the many pits that were constructed during a cleanup effort in 1991 are an additional source of contamination and have developed into a central gathering center for crude oil contamination. This paper presented a method to reduce the impact of ground surface pollution on groundwater quality in northern Kuwait, by correlating the movement of detected pollution with leaching of contamination by rainwater and retardation by sorption processes in soils of the relevant areas. The paper presented the methodology which required large-scale monitoring of groundwater pollutant and the use of fiber optic based sensor technology represented by laser induced fluorescence, spectrofluorometric techniques, as well as conventional chemical analytical techniques. It was concluded that the transfer of contamination from the surface to the aquifer is generally localized to the surface contaminated areas of the depressions and most probably in locations where the subsurface gatch layers are fragmented and non-uniformly dispersed. It was also found that oil pits are most likely a source of oil-related contamination reaching the aquifer. However, those included in the investigations, were located within the fringes of oil lakes. 8 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  10. Bat groundwater monitoring system in contaminant studies. Doctoral thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mines, B.S.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide an in-depth, comprehensive study to compare results from the BAT probe and Teflon bailers from nearby monitoring wells. Volatile organic compounds are typically the most difficult contaminants to sample. The research was performed by taking samples within a small radius around monitoring wells at two leaking underground storage tank sites and taking bailer samples from the monitoring wells. BAT sampling will also be performed inside the monitoring wells to ensure basically the same water is being sampled.

  11. Assessment of Groundwater Quality by Chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Agelos; Rigas, George; Kella, Sotiria; Lokkas, Filotheos; Dinouli, Dimitra; Papakonstantinou, Argiris; Spiliotis, Xenofon; Plageras, Panagiotis

    2016-07-01

    Chemometric methods were used to analyze large data sets of groundwater quality from 18 wells supplying the central drinking water system of Larissa city (Greece) during the period 2001 to 2007 (8.064 observations) to determine temporal and spatial variations in groundwater quality and to identify pollution sources. Cluster analysis grouped each year into three temporal periods (January-April (first), May-August (second) and September-December (third). Furthermore, spatial cluster analysis was conducted for each period and for all samples, and grouped the 28 monitoring Units HJI (HJI=represent the observations of the monitoring site H, the J-year and the period I) into three groups (A, B and C). Discriminant Analysis used only 16 from the 24 parameters to correctly assign 97.3% of the cases. In addition, Factor Analysis identified 7, 9 and 8 latent factors for groups A, B and C, respectively. PMID:27329059

  12. Metagenomic insights into evolution of heavy metal-contaminated groundwater microbial community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemme, C.L.; Deng, Y.; Gentry, T.J.; Fields, M.W.; Wu, L.; Barua, S.; Barry, K.; Green-Tringe, S.; Watson, D.B.; He, Z.; Hazen, T.C.; Tiedje, J.M.; Rubin, E.M.; Zhou, J.

    2010-07-01

    Understanding adaptation of biological communities to environmental change is a central issue in ecology and evolution. Metagenomic analysis of a stressed groundwater microbial community reveals that prolonged exposure to high concentrations of heavy metals, nitric acid and organic solvents ({approx}50 years) has resulted in a massive decrease in species and allelic diversity as well as a significant loss of metabolic diversity. Although the surviving microbial community possesses all metabolic pathways necessary for survival and growth in such an extreme environment, its structure is very simple, primarily composed of clonal denitrifying {gamma}- and {beta}-proteobacterial populations. The resulting community is overabundant in key genes conferring resistance to specific stresses including nitrate, heavy metals and acetone. Evolutionary analysis indicates that lateral gene transfer could have a key function in rapid response and adaptation to environmental contamination. The results presented in this study have important implications in understanding, assessing and predicting the impacts of human-induced activities on microbial communities ranging from human health to agriculture to environmental management, and their responses to environmental changes.

  13. Metagenomic Insights into Evolution of a Heavy Metal-Contaminated Groundwater Microbial Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemme, Christopher L.; Deng, Ye; Gentry, Terry J.; Fields, Matthew W.; Wu, Liyou; Barua, Soumitra; Barry, Kerrie; Tringe, Susannah G.; Watson, David B.; He, Zhili; Hazen, Terry C.; Tiedje, James M.; Rubin, Edward M.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-02-15

    Understanding adaptation of biological communities to environmental change is a central issue in ecology and evolution. Metagenomic analysis of a stressed groundwater microbial community reveals that prolonged exposure to high concentrations of heavy metals, nitric acid and organic solvents (~;;50 years) have resulted in a massive decrease in species and allelic diversity as well as a significant loss of metabolic diversity. Although the surviving microbial community possesses all metabolic pathways necessary for survival and growth in such an extreme environment, its structure is very simple, primarily composed of clonal denitrifying ?- and ?-proteobacterial populations. The resulting community is over-abundant in key genes conferring resistance to specific stresses including nitrate, heavy metals and acetone. Evolutionary analysis indicates that lateral gene transfer could be a key mechanism in rapidly responding and adapting to environmental contamination. The results presented in this study have important implications in understanding, assessing and predicting the impacts of human-induced activities on microbial communities ranging from human health to agriculture to environmental management, and their responses to environmental changes.

  14. Leaching and soil/groundwater transport of contaminants from coal combustion residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this project the results of accelerated laboratory leaching tests on coal fly ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) products from the spray dryer absorption process (SDA) were evaluated by comparison to the results of large scale lysimeter leaching tests on the same residues. The mobility of chromium and molybdenum - two of the kev contaminants of coal combustion residue leachates - in various typical soil types was investigated by batch and column methods in the laboratory. Some of the results were confirmed by field observations at an old coal fly ash disposal site and by a lysimeter attenuation test with coal fly ash leachate on a clayed till. A large number of groundwater transport models and geochemical models were reviewed, and two of the models (Gove-Stollenwerk and CHMTRNS) were modified and adjusted and used to simulate column attenuation tests performed in the laboratory. One of the models (Grove-Stollenwerk) was used to illustrate a recommended method of environmental impact assessment, using lysimeter leaching data and laboratory column attenuation data to describe the emission and migration of Mo from a coal fly ash disposal site

  15. Assessment of SRS radiological liquid and airborne contaminants and pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannik, G.T.

    1997-04-01

    This report compiles and documents the radiological critical-contaminant/critical-pathway analysis performed for SRS. The analysis covers radiological releases to the atmosphere and to surface water, which are the principal media that carry contaminants off site. During routine operations at SRS, limited amounts of radionuclides are released to the environment through atmospheric and/or liquid pathways. These releases potentially result in exposure to offsite people. Though the groundwater beneath an estimated 5 to 10 percent of SRS has been contaminated by radionuclides, there is no evidence that groundwater contaminated with these constituents has migrated offsite (Arnett, 1996). Therefore, with the notable exception of radiological source terms originating from shallow surface water migration into site streams, onsite groundwater was not considered as a potential exposure pathway to offsite people.

  16. Assessment of SRS radiological liquid and airborne contaminants and pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report compiles and documents the radiological critical-contaminant/critical-pathway analysis performed for SRS. The analysis covers radiological releases to the atmosphere and to surface water, which are the principal media that carry contaminants off site. During routine operations at SRS, limited amounts of radionuclides are released to the environment through atmospheric and/or liquid pathways. These releases potentially result in exposure to offsite people. Though the groundwater beneath an estimated 5 to 10 percent of SRS has been contaminated by radionuclides, there is no evidence that groundwater contaminated with these constituents has migrated offsite (Arnett, 1996). Therefore, with the notable exception of radiological source terms originating from shallow surface water migration into site streams, onsite groundwater was not considered as a potential exposure pathway to offsite people

  17. Assessment of slope stability endangered by groundwater

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházka, P.; Trčková, Jiřina

    Southampton : WIT Press, 2006 - (Brebbia, C.; Conti, M.; Tiezzi, E.), s. 709-718 ISBN 978-1-84564-048-4. [Ravage of Planet. Baryloche (AR), 12.12.2006-14.12.2006] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2119402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : physical and numerical modelling * slope stability * groundwater Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering

  18. Agricultural contamination in soil-groundwater-surface water systems in the North China Plain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brauns, Bentje

    water and groundwater pollution by nitrogen and pesticides, soil degradation, bioaccumulation of toxic compounds, and more. It is crucial for China to do improve the safeguarding of its water resources in order to sustain the livelihoods of its people and ensure safe supply of drinking water. Recently...... herbicides at a sample field site in the NCP; and (d) to provide a new basis for discussion and guidance on how to address the issue of water pollution caused by the improper use of agrochemicals in China. For the field investigation, a study site located within the NCP with river water......-groundwater interaction was chosen, and field work was performed between October 2012 and March 2014. Results from the field study showed that fertilizer inputs were excessive, and could be reduced substantially. Contaminated river water was infiltrating – and carrying ammonium pollution – into the shallow groundwater...

  19. Microbial contamination of groundwater at small community water supplies in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, Tarja; Karinen, Päivi; Miettinen, Ilkka T; Lettojärvi, Heidi; Heikkilä, Annika; Maunula, Reetta; Aula, Vesa; Kuronen, Henry; Vepsäläinen, Asko; Nousiainen, Liina-Lotta; Pelkonen, Sinikka; Heinonen-Tanski, Helvi

    2011-06-01

    The raw water quality and associations between the factors considered as threats to water safety were studied in 20 groundwater supplies in central Finland in 2002-2004. Faecal contaminations indicated by the appearance of Escherichia coli or intestinal enterococci were present in five small community water supplies, all these managed by local water cooperatives. Elevated concentrations of nutrients in raw water were linked with the presence of faecal bacteria. The presence of on-site technical hazards to water safety, such as inadequate well construction and maintenance enabling surface water to enter into the well and the insufficient depth of protective soil layers above the groundwater table, showed the vulnerability of the quality of groundwater used for drinking purposes. To minimize the risk of waterborne illnesses, the vulnerable water supplies need to be identified and appropriate prevention measures such as disinfection should be applied. PMID:21809781

  20. Numerical Simulation of Potential Groundwater Contaminant Pathways from Hydraulically Fractured Oil Shale in the Nevada Basin and Range Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybarski, S.; Pohll, G.; Pohlmann, K.; Plume, R.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, hydraulic fracturing (fracking) has become an increasingly popular method for extraction of oil and natural gas from tight formations. Concerns have been raised over a number of environmental risks associated with fracking, including contamination of groundwater by fracking fluids, upwelling of deep subsurface brines, and methane migration. Given the potentially long time scale for contaminant transport associated with hydraulic fracturing, numerical modeling remains the best practice for risk assessment. Oil shale in the Humboldt basin of northeastern Nevada has now become a target for hydraulic fracturing operations. Analysis of regional and shallow groundwater flow is used to assess several potential migration pathways specific to the geology and hydrogeology of this basin. The model domain in all simulations is defined by the geologic structure of the basin as determined by deep oil and gas well bores and formation outcrops. Vertical transport of gaseous methane along a density gradient is simulated in TOUGH2, while fluid transport along faults and/or hydraulic fractures and lateral flow through more permeable units adjacent to the targeted shale are modeled in FEFLOW. Sensitivity analysis considers basin, fault, and hydraulic fracturing parameters, and results highlight key processes that control fracking fluid and methane migration and time scales under which it might occur.

  1. Characterization of contaminated soil and groundwater surrounding an illegal landfill (S. Giuliano, Venice, Italy) by principal component analysis and kriging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information on soil and groundwater contamination was used to develop a site conceptual model and to identify exposure scenarios. - The characterization of a hydrologically complex contaminated site bordering the lagoon of Venice (Italy) was undertaken by investigating soils and groundwaters affected by the chemical contaminants originated by the wastes dumped into an illegal landfill. Statistical tools such as principal components analysis and geostatistical techniques were applied to obtain the spatial distribution of chemical contaminants. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), SO42- and Cl- were used to trace the migration of the contaminants from the top soil to the underlying groundwaters. The chemical and hydrogeological available information was assembled to obtain the schematic of the conceptual model of the contaminated site capable to support the formulation of major exposure scenarios, which are also provided

  2. Groundwater quality assessment plan for single-shell tank waste management Area U at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste Management Area U (WMA U) includes the U Tank Farm, is currently regulated under RCRA interim-status regulations, and is scheduled for closure probably post-2030. Groundwater monitoring has been under an evaluation program that compared general contaminant indicator parameters from downgradient wells to background values established from upgradient wells. One of the indicator parameters, specific conductance, exceeded its background value in one downgradient well triggering a change from detection monitoring to a groundwater quality assessment program. The objective of the first phase of this assessment program is to determine whether the increased concentrations of nitrate and chromium in groundwater are from WMA U or from an upgradient source. Based on the results of the first determination, if WMA U is not the source of contamination, then the site will revert to detection monitoring. If WMA U is the source, then a second part of the groundwater quality assessment plan will be prepared to define the rate and extent of migration of contaminants in the groundwater and their concentrations

  3. Characterization and fingerprinting of soil and groundwater contamination sources around a fuel distribution station in Galicia (NW Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balseiro-Romero, María; Macías, Felipe; Monterroso, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    Soil and groundwater contamination around a fuel distribution station in Tomiño (NW Spain) was evaluated. For this purpose, top and subsoil (up to 6.4 m) and groundwater were sampled around the station, approximately in a 60-m radius. Samples were analysed by HS-SPME-GC-MS to identify and quantify volatile fuel organic compounds (VFOC) (MTBE, ETBE and BTEX) and diesel range organics (DRO). Analysis and fingerprinting data suggested that the contamination of soil and groundwater was provoked by a fuel leak from underground storage tanks. This was reflected by hydrocarbon indices and principal component analysis, which discriminated a direct source of contamination of the subsoil samples around the station. The contaminants probably migrated from tank nearby soils to surrounding soils and leached to groundwater, following a SW direction. Irrigation with contaminated groundwater provoked a severe contamination of topsoils, which were enriched with the lightest components of gasoline and diesel. Fingerprinting also revealed the continuity of the leak, reflected by the presence of volatiles in some samples, which principally appeared in fresh leaks. MTBE was detected in a very high concentration in groundwater samples (up to 690 μg L(-1)), but it was not detected in fresh gasoline. This also evidenced an old source of contamination, probably starting in the mid-1990s, when the use of MTBE in gasoline was regulated. PMID:27080856

  4. Hydrogeologic and soil gas evaluation of groundwater contamination at a municipal landfill in New York State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hydrogeologic study of municipal sanitary landfill located in east-central New York was performed under contract with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC). Project activities included a volatile organic soil gas survey using the Petrex Static Collection Technique, installation of six monitoring wells, surface and downhole geophysics, surface and groundwater sampling and hydrogeologic interpretation. The soil gas survey identified downgradient areas of soil and/or groundwater contamination which were further investigated by the installation of monitoring wells. At the site the unconfined water table aquifer consists of fluvial (K = 3.5 x 10-3 cm/sec), glaciodeltaic (K = 8.5 x 10-3 cm/sec) and glaciolacustrine (K = 4.1 x 10-3 cm/sec) sediments. Groundwater flow is generally to the south in a semi-radial pattern at approximately 2 to 5 feet per day. The base of this primary water supply aquifer is defined by a leaky glacial till aquitard which occurs above the siltstone-shale bedrock aquifer. Reasonably good correlation exists between volatile organic soil gas mapping and groundwater contamination. Headspace analysis of pre-existing monitoring wells substantiated the migration and volatilization of organic compounds. Groundwater quality results include elevated levels of chlorinated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon, metal and indicator parameters with respect to background conditions. Iron, manganese, phenol, benzene, 1,2-dichloroethane and two PCB compounds exceeded New York State groundwater standards or guidance values. GC/MS and Carbon-14 analyses indicate a significant amount of methane gas has been generated by landfilling activities

  5. Change of magnetic properties due to fluctuations of hydrocarbon contaminated groundwater in unconsolidated sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijal, Moti L; Appel, Erwin; Petrovský, Eduard; Blaha, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    Sediments affected by fluctuations of hydrocarbon contaminated groundwater were studied at a former military site. Due to remediation, groundwater table fluctuation (GWTF) extends over approximately one meter. Three cores were collected, penetrating through the GWTF zone. Magnetic parameters, sediment properties and hydrocarbon content were measured. We discovered that magnetic concentration parameters increased towards the top of the GWTF zone. Magnetite is responsible for this enhancement; rock magnetic parameters indicate that the newly formed magnetite is in a single domain rather than a superparamagnetic state. The presence of hydrocarbons is apparently essential for magnetite to form, as there is clearly less magnetic enhancement in the core, which is outside of the strongly contaminated area. From our results we conclude that the top of the fluctuation zone has the most intensive geomicrobiological activity probably responsible for magnetite formation. This finding could be relevant for developing methods for simply and quickly detecting oil spills. PMID:19954870

  6. Resolving superimposed ground-water contaminant plumes characterized by chromium, nitrate, uranium, and technetium--99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leakage from a liquid waste storage and solar evaporation basin at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State has resulted in a ground-water contaminant plume characterized by nitrate, hexavalent chromium, uranium, and technetium-99. The plume is superimposed on a larger, pre-existing plume extending from upgradient sites and having the same suite of contaminants. However, the relative abundance of contaminant species is quite different for each plume source. Thus, characteristic concentration ratios, rather than concentrations of individual species, are used as geochemical tracers, with emphasis on graphical analysis. Accordingly, it has been possible to resolve the boundaries of the smaller plume and to estimate the contribution of each plume to the observed contamination downgradient from the storage basin. 11 refs., 7 figs

  7. Risk assessment using ICP-MS of heavy metals in groundwater in Upper Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Bassioni

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available It is of great importance to assess the pollution of groundwater as it makes up about twenty percent of the world’s freshwater supply. Environmental laws in Egypt are correlated with protecting water resources from contamination and generally set the maximum limits for the concentration of different hazardous components in wastewater before it is discharged to sea water, rivers, groundwater and the public sewer system. Groundwater from Samalout, Al Minya governorate, Egypt, is studied by analysing its heavy metal content using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS. Furthermore, the obtained heavy metal concentrations are compared with permissible limits set by environmental organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US-EPA. Comparing the heavy metal concentrations with the groundwater in question clearly demonstrated that the water in this resource should not be directly used for drinking and requires some degree of treatment before usage. For example, concentrations of chromium and lead are far above the maximum permissible limit. The consequent health risks due to the usage of contaminated water are identified in this study as well.

  8. Modeling and preliminary assessment of crude oil contaminated soil in Ogoni (Nigeria)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiergaertner, Hannes [Free Univ. Berlin (Germany). Faculty of Geosciences; Holtzmann, Kay

    2014-07-01

    In 2010, a severe contamination of soil and groundwater caused by the production and transportation of crude oil were detected in the Ogoni area, Federal Republic of Nigeria. A linear correlation between aliphatics and aromatics and the missing link between the degree of contamination and the depth of the soil samples indicate incomplete earlier remediation activities. 665 analyzed samples were mathematically reduced to 28 contamination patterns that can be distinguished by type and degree of pollution, environmentally assessed and visualized by a quasi 3-D model. Case studies taken from the Local Government Areas Eleme, Gokana, Khana, and Tai show the methodology and results.

  9. Modeling and preliminary assessment of crude oil contaminated soil in Ogoni (Nigeria)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2010, a severe contamination of soil and groundwater caused by the production and transportation of crude oil were detected in the Ogoni area, Federal Republic of Nigeria. A linear correlation between aliphatics and aromatics and the missing link between the degree of contamination and the depth of the soil samples indicate incomplete earlier remediation activities. 665 analyzed samples were mathematically reduced to 28 contamination patterns that can be distinguished by type and degree of pollution, environmentally assessed and visualized by a quasi 3-D model. Case studies taken from the Local Government Areas Eleme, Gokana, Khana, and Tai show the methodology and results.

  10. Organic Contaminants in Riverine and Groundwater Systems: Aspects of the Anthropogenic Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzbauer, Jan

    This book summarizes a selection of organic-geochemical investigations, which deal with the characterization and environmental behaviour of organic contaminations of German river and groundwater systems. The aim is to resume and present an overview of comprehensive current research activities, which have been published diversely in specialised scientific journals and, are therefore not easily available in a concise and clearly arranged way. Important topics include comprehensive non-target screening as well as isotope analysis of contaminants in water and sediments, detailed characterisation of bound residues, recording river ine pollution histories and an extensive application of the anthropogenic marker approach.

  11. Relating groundwater and sediment chemistry to microbial characterization at a BTEX-contaminated site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Center for Manufacturing Science is investigating bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon at a site in Belleville, Michigan. As part of this study we examined the microbial communities to help elucidate biodegradative processes currently active at the site. We observed high densities of aerobic hydrocarbon degraders and denitrifiers in the less-contaminated sediments. Low densities of iron and sulfate reducers were measured in the same sediments. In contrast, the highly-contaminated sediments showed low densities of aerobic hydrocarbon degraders and denitrifiers and high densities of iron and sulfate reducers. Methanogens were also found in these highly-contaminated sediments. These contaminated sediments also showed a higher biomass, by phospholipid fatty acids, and greater ratios of phospholipid fatty acids which indicate stress within the microbial community. Aquifer chemistry analyses indicated that the more-contaminated area was more reduced and had lower sulfate than the less-contaminated area. These conditions suggest that the subsurface environment at the highly-contaminated area had progressed into sulfate reduction and methanogensis. The less-contaminated area, although less reduced, also appeared to be progressing into primarily iron- and sulfate-reducing microbial communities. The proposed treatment to stimulate bioremediation includes addition of oxygen and nitrate. Groundwater chemistry and microbial analyses revealed significant differences resulted from the injection of dissolved oxygen and nitrate in the subsurface. These differences included increases in pH and Eh and large decreases in BTEX, dissolved iron, and sulfate concentrations at the injection well

  12. A Geochemical Reaction Model for Titration of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater at the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F.; Parker, J. C.; Gu, B.; Luo, W.; Brooks, S. C.; Spalding, B. P.; Jardine, P. M.; Watson, D. B.

    2007-12-01

    This study investigates geochemical reactions during titration of contaminated soil and groundwater at the Oak Ridge Reservation in eastern Tennessee. The soils and groundwater exhibits low pH and high concentrations of aluminum, calcium, magnesium, manganese, various trace metals such as nickel and cobalt, and radionuclides such as uranium and technetium. The mobility of many of the contaminant species diminishes with increasing pH. However, base additions to increase pH are strongly buffered by various precipitation/dissolution and adsorption/desorption reactions. The ability to predict acid-base behavior and associated geochemical effects is thus critical to evaluate remediation performance of pH manipulation strategies. This study was undertaken to develop a practical but generally applicable geochemical model to predict aqueous and solid-phase speciation during soil and groundwater titration. To model titration in the presence of aquifer solids, an approach proposed by Spalding and Spalding (2001) was utilized, which treats aquifer solids as a polyprotic acid. Previous studies have shown that Fe and Al-oxyhydroxides strongly sorb dissolved Ni, U and Tc species. In this study, since the total Fe concentration is much smaller than that of Al, only ion exchange reactions associated with Al hydroxides are considered. An equilibrium reaction model that includes aqueous complexation, precipitation, ion exchange, and soil buffering reactions was developed and implemented in the code HydroGeoChem 5.0 (HGC5). Comparison of model results with experimental titration curves for contaminated groundwater alone and for soil- water systems indicated close agreement. This study is expected to facilitate field-scale modeling of geochemical processes under conditions with highly variable pH to develop practical methods to control contaminant mobility at geochemically complex sites.

  13. Agriculture and groundwater nitrate contamination in the Seine basin. The STICS-MODCOU modelling chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A software package is presented here to predict the fate of nitrogen fertilizers and the transport of nitrate from the rooting zone of agricultural areas to surface water and groundwater in the Seine basin, taking into account the long residence times of water and nitrate in the unsaturated and aquifer systems. Information on pedological characteristics, land use and farming practices is used to determine the spatial units to be considered. These data are converted into input data for the crop model STICS which simulates the water and nitrogen balances in the soil-plant system with a daily time-step. A spatial application of STICS has been derived at the catchment scale which computes the water and nitrate fluxes at the bottom of the rooting zone. These fluxes are integrated into a surface and groundwater coupled model MODCOU which calculates the daily water balance in the hydrological system, the flow in the rivers and the piezometric variations in the aquifers, using standard climatic data (rainfall, PET). The transport of nitrate and the evolution of nitrate contamination in groundwater and to rivers is computed by the model NEWSAM. This modelling chain is a valuable tool to predict the evolution of crop productivity and nitrate contamination according to various scenarios modifying farming practices and/or climatic changes. Data for the period 1970-2000 are used to simulate the past evolution of nitrogen contamination. The method has been validated using available data bases of nitrate concentrations in the three main aquifers of the Paris basin (Oligocene, Eocene and chalk). The approach has then been used to predict the future evolution of nitrogen contamination up to 2015. A statistical approach allowed estimating the probability of transgression of different concentration thresholds in various areas in the basin. The model is also used to evaluate the cost of the damage resulting of the treatment of drinking water at the scale of a groundwater management

  14. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF GROUNDWATER CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AND DETERMINATION OF LONGITUDINAL DISPERSIVITY

    OpenAIRE

    AKSOY, Ayşegül ÖZGENÇ; Bombar, Gökçen; GÜNEY, Mehmet Şükrü

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater is the safest and most important source of available freshwater. However, it is threatened by pollution arising from various activities. In this study the contaminant transport in homogeneous medium is investigated by means of an experimental set-up designed for the hydrologic cycle available in Hydraulics Laboratory. The experiments are carried out in the physical aquiferchamber 2 m long, 1 m wide and 0.10 m high. The piezometer tubes and observation wells are placed at the botto...

  15. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF GROUNDWATER CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AND DETERMINATION OF LONGITUDINAL DISPERSIVITY

    OpenAIRE

    AKSOY, Ayşegül ÖZGENÇ; Bombar, Gökçen; GÜNEY, Mehmet Şükrü

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater is the safest and most important source of available freshwater. However, it is threatened by pollution arising from various activities. In this study the contaminant transport in homogeneous medium is investigated by means of an experimental set-up designed for the hydrologic cycle available in Hydraulics Laboratory. The experiments are carried out in the physical aquifer chamber 2 m long, 1 m wide and 0.10 m high. The piezometer tubes and observation wells are placed at the bott...

  16. Groundwater redox conditions and conductivity in a contaminant plume from geoelectrical investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Naudet

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate mapping of the electrical conductivity and of the redox potential of the groundwater is important in delineating the shape of a contaminant plume. A map of redox potential in an aquifer is indicative of biodegradation of organic matter and of concentrations of redox-active components; a map of electrical conductivity provides information on the mineralisation of the groundwater. Both maps can be used to optimise the position of pumping wells for remediation. The self-potential method (SP and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT have been applied to the contaminant plume associated with the Entressen landfill in south-east France. The self-potential depends on groundwater flow (electrokinetic contribution and redox conditions ('electro-redox' contribution. Using the variation of the piezometric head in the aquifer, the electrokinetic contribution is removed from the SP signals. A good linear correlation (R2=0.85 is obtained between the residual SP data and the redox potential values measured in monitoring wells. This relationship is used to draw a redox potential map of the overall contaminated site. The electrical conductivity of the subsoil is obtained from 3D-ERT analysis. A good linear correlation (R2=0.91 is observed between the electrical conductivity of the aquifer determined from the 3D-ERT image and the conductivity of the groundwater measured in boreholes. This indicates that the formation factor is nearly homogeneous in the shallow aquifer at the scale of the ERT. From this correlation, a map of the pore water conductivity of the aquifer is obtained. Keywords: self-potential, redox potential, electrical resistivity tomography, fluid conductivity, contaminant plume

  17. Screening Approach to the Activation of Soil and Contamination of Groundwater at Linear Proton Accelerator Sites

    CERN Document Server

    Otto, Thomas

    The activation of soil and the contamination of groundwater at proton accelerator sites with the radionuclides 3H and 22Na are estimated with a Monte-Carlo calculation and a conservative soil- and ground water model. The obtained radionuclide concentrations show that the underground environment of future accelerators must be adequately protected against a migration of activation products. This study is of particular importance for the proton driver accelerator in the planned EURISOL facility.

  18. Microbial Contamination of Groundwater at Small Community Water Supplies in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Pitkänen, Tarja; Karinen, Päivi; Ilkka T. Miettinen; Lettojärvi, Heidi; Heikkilä, Annika; Maunula, Reetta; Aula, Vesa; Kuronen, Henry; Vepsäläinen, Asko; Nousiainen, Liina-Lotta; Pelkonen, Sinikka; Heinonen-Tanski, Helvi

    2010-01-01

    The raw water quality and associations between the factors considered as threats to water safety were studied in 20 groundwater supplies in central Finland in 2002–2004. Faecal contaminations indicated by the appearance of Escherichia coli or intestinal enterococci were present in five small community water supplies, all these managed by local water cooperatives. Elevated concentrations of nutrients in raw water were linked with the presence of faecal bacteria. The presence of on-site technic...

  19. Profiling micro-organic contaminants in groundwater using multi-level piezometers

    OpenAIRE

    White, Debbie; Lapworth, Dan; Stuart, Marianne; Williams, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The presence of micro-organic pollutants, including ‘emerging contaminants’ within groundwater is of increasing interest. Robust protocols are required to minimise the introduction of contamination during the sampling process. Below we discuss the sampling protocols used to reduce inputs of plasticisers during the sampling process, as well as the techniques used to characterise the distribution of micro-organic pollutants in the subsurface. In this study multi-level piezometers...

  20. Evidence for groundwater contamination by heavy metals through soil passage under acidifying conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkens, B. J.

    1995-01-01

    The research reported here is aimed at improving the knowledge of the mobility of the heavy metals cadmium and zinc in vulnerable soil types. We use the term vulnerable with reference to vulnerability of groundwater for contamination by soil leaching. At diffuse soil immissions of heavy metals, accumulation is often supposed to occur mainly in the topsoil. Binding of heavy metals in this soil compartment is relatively strong, because of de presence of soil organic matter, clay-minerals and se...

  1. Integrated hydrochemical and geophysical studies for assessment of groundwater pollution in basaltic settings in Central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujari, Paras R; Padmakar, C; SuriNaidu, L; Vaijnath, V U; Kachawe, Bhusan; Gurunadha Rao, V V S; Labhasetwar, P K

    2012-05-01

    The Pithampur Industrial sectors I, II, and III, located approximately, 45 km from Indore in Central India have emerged as one of the largest industrial clusters in the region. Various types of industries ranging from automobiles to chemicals and pharmaceuticals have been set up in the region since 1990. Most of the industries have effluent treatment plants (ETP) for treating wastewater before its disposal on land and/or in water body. The present study is an attempt to assess the groundwater quality in the watersheds surrounding these industrial sectors to develop the baseline groundwater quality in order to enable the policy makers to facilitate decisions on the development of industries in this region. The industries are located in two sub-watersheds, namely, Gambhir river sub-watershed and Chambal river sub-watershed. Geologically, the study area is located in the Deccan traps of Cretaceous to Paleocene age. The different basaltic flow units underlie clayey soils varying in thickness from 2-3 m. The aquifer is mostly of unconfined nature. Samples have been collected from a network of observation wells set up in the watersheds. The water quality analysis of the groundwater samples has been carried out six times during three hydrological cycles of 2004, 2005, and 2006. The results indicate that a few observation wells in the vicinity of the industrial clusters have very high TDS concentration and exceed the Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) guideline for TDS concentration. The contamination of groundwater has been more severe in the Gambhir watershed as compared to the Chambal watershed. The presence of the impermeable clay layers has resulted in a slow migration of contaminants from the sources. The findings reveal that there is no significant groundwater contamination in the Pithampur industrial sectors except in the vicinity of the industrial clusters, which indicates that there is good environmental space available for the expansion of industrial units in

  2. Groundwater Vulnerability to Seawater Intrusion along Coastal Urban Areas: A Quantitative Comparative Assessment of EPIK and DRASTIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momjian, Nanor; Abou Najm, Majdi; Alameddine, Ibrahim; El-Fadel, Mutasem

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater vulnerability assessment models are invariably coupled with Geographic Information Systems to provide decision makers with easier visualization of complex systems. In this study, we examine the uncertainty associated with such models (DRASTIC, EPIK) in assessing seawater intrusion, a growing threat along coastal urban cities due to overexploitation of groundwater resources associated with population growth and more recently, exacerbated by climate change impacts. For this purpose, a mapping of groundwater vulnerability was first conducted at a country level (Lebanon) and coupled with a groundwater quality monitoring program in three coastal cities for cross-validation. Then, six water quality categories were defined and mapped based on water quality standards ranging from drinking to seawater with weighted scores assigned for each category in both DRASTIC and EPIK for cross-validation. Finally, the results of groundwater quality tests were compared with vulnerability predictions at sampling points using two indicators (Chloride and TDS). While field measurements demonstrated the high vulnerability to seawater intrusion in coastal urbanized areas, the modelling results exhibited variations from field measurements reaching up to two water quality categories. Vertical-based vulnerability models demonstrated poor correlation when the anthropogenic impact was introduced through a process that depends on lateral groundwater flow thus highlighting (1) the limited ability of such models to capture vulnerability to lateral seawater intrusion induced primarily by vertical groundwater withdrawal, and (2) the need to incorporate depth and underlying lithology into the layers of groundwater vulnerability models when examining horizontally induced contamination such as seawater intrusion.

  3. Groundwater Quality Assessment for Drinking and Irrigation Purposes in Obuasi Municipality of Ghana, A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Ewusi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater quality of the Obuasi municipality was assessed to understand the contamination processes due to the presence of various contaminant sources and complicated geochemical processes and the suitability of groundwater for irrigation and drinking purpose for a sustainable agriculture and basic human needs. Water samples were collected during the raining season when a rise in water table was expected and during the dry season. They were analyzed for major cations and anions. Parameters like sodium adsorption ratio, % sodium, electrical conductivity, total hardness, total dissolve solutes and stoechiometric relations were calculated on the basis of chemical data. A questionnaire was also used to investigate perception of consumers on taste and odour. Comparison of the concentration of the chemical constituents with World Health Organization (WHO drinking water standards of 2004 and various classifications show that present status of groundwater in Obuasi is good for drinking and irrigation purposes. Concentrations of major cations and anions in the groundwater systems vary spatially and temporally. Abundance of these anions is in the following order: Ca2+>Na+>Mg2+>K+ = HCO3->Cl-> SO24->H2SiO4Br->PO24->F-. In terms of rainy season impact, Obuasi groundwater shows dilution and flushing, however, samples show excessive leaching of different chemical components into the groundwater system leading to the enrichment of different anions and cations and this indicate pollution from extraneous sources. No clear correlation between the quality parameters and perceived quality in terms of satisfactory taste response were obtained at electrical conductivity values lower than the threshold minimum acceptable value.

  4. The aftermath of the Fukushima nuclear accident: Measures to contain groundwater contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, Adrian H; Marui, Atsunao

    2016-03-15

    Several measures are being implemented to control groundwater contamination at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant. This paper presents an overview of work undertaken to contain the spread of radionuclides, and to mitigate releases to the ocean via hydrological pathways. As a first response, contaminated water is being held in tanks while awaiting treatment. Limited storage capacity and the risk of leakage make the measure unsustainable in the long term. Thus, an impervious barrier has been combined with a drain system to minimize the discharge of groundwater offshore. Caesium in seawater at the plant port has largely dropped, although some elevated concentrations are occasionally recorded. Moreover, a dissimilar decline of the radioactivity in fish could indicate additional sources of radionuclides intake. An underground frozen shield is also being constructed around the reactors. This structure would reduce inflows to the reactors and limit the interaction between fresh and contaminated waters. Additional strategies include groundwater abstraction and paving of surfaces to lower water levels and further restrict the mobilisation of radionuclides. Technical difficulties and public distrust pose an unprecedented challenge to the site remediation. Nevertheless, the knowledge acquired during the initial work offers opportunities for better planning and more rigorous decisions in the future. PMID:26789364

  5. Evaluation of the fate of arsenic-contaminated groundwater at different aquifers of Thar coalfield Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Jamshed; Kazi, Tasneem G; Baig, Jameel A; Afridi, Hassan I; Arain, Mariam S; Ullah, Naeem; Brahman, Kapil D; Arain, Sadaf S; Panhwar, Abdul H

    2015-12-01

    In present study, the ground water at different aquifers was evaluated for physicochemical parameters, iron, total arsenic, total inorganic arsenic and arsenic species (arsenite and arsenate). The samples of groundwater were collected at different depths, first aquifer (AQ1) 50-60 m, second aquifer (AQ2) 100-120 m, and third aquifer (AQ3) 200-250 m of Thar coalfield, Pakistan. Total inorganic arsenic was determined by solid phase extraction using titanium dioxide as an adsorbent. The arsenite was determined by cloud point extraction using ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate as a chelating reagent, and resulted complex was extracted by Triton X-114. The resulted data of groundwater were reported in terms of basic statistical parameters, principal component, and cluster analysis. The resulted data indicated that physicochemical parameters of groundwater of different aquifers were exceeded the World Health Organization provisional guideline for drinking water except pH and SO4(2-). The positive correlation was observed between arsenic species and physicochemical parameters of groundwater except F(-) and K(+), which might be caused by geochemical minerals. Results of cluster analysis indicated that groundwater samples of AQ1 was highly contaminated with arsenic species as compared to AQ2 and AQ3 (p > 0.05). PMID:26254562

  6. Assessing the Impact of Chlorinated-Solvent Sites on Metropolitan Groundwater Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Brusseau, Mark L.; Narter, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Chlorinated-solvent compounds are among the most common groundwater contaminants in the U.S.A. The majority of the many sites contaminated by chlorinated-solvent compounds are located in metropolitan areas, and most such areas have one or more chlorinated-solvent contaminated sites. Thus, contamination of groundwater by chlorinated-solvent compounds may pose a potential risk to the sustainability of potable water supplies for many metropolitan areas. The impact of chlorinated-solvent sites on...

  7. Assessing mixed trace elements in groundwater and their health risk of residents living in the Mekong River basin of Cambodia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the potential contamination of trace elements in shallow Cambodian groundwater. Groundwater and hair samples were collected from three provinces in the Mekong River basin of Cambodia and analyzed by ICP-MS. Groundwater from Kandal (n = 46) and Kraite (n = 12) were enriched in As, Mn, Ba and Fe whereas none of tube wells in Kampong Cham (n = 18) had trace elements higher than Cambodian permissible limits. Risk computations indicated that 98.7% and 12.4% of residents in the study areas of Kandal (n = 297) and Kratie (n = 89) were at risk of non-carcinogenic effects from exposure to multiple elements, yet none were at risk in Kampong Cham (n = 184). Arsenic contributed 99.5%, 60.3% and 84.2% of the aggregate risk in Kandal, Kratie and Kampong Cham, respectively. Sustainable and appropriate treatment technologies must therefore be implemented in order for Cambodian groundwater to be used as potable water. -- Highlights: •We investigated the potential contamination of trace elements in Cambodian groundwater. •Residents of Kandal (98.7%) and Kratie (12.4%) were at risk of non-carcinogenic effects. •Significant positive correlation between As, Mn and Ba in groundwater and hair were found. -- Risk assessment indicated that 98.7% of residents in Kandal and 12.4% of Kratie study areas were at risk of non-carcinogenic effects of multiple elements in groundwater

  8. Assessment of pollution index of heavy metals in groundwater resources of Qaleh Shahin plain (2013-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Nazari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today's development of industrial and agricultural activities is among the leading causes of groundwater pollution. Therefore, this study was conducted to evaluate the quality of groundwater resources of Qaleh Shahin plain using pollution index of heavy metals. Methods: Groundwater samples were collected from 20 randomly selected stations in Qaleh Shahin during two seasons, winter and spring in 2014. After going through laboratory preparation processes and reading the concentration of elements by ICP machine, the qualitative assessment of the samples was carried out by HPI. All statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS statistical package. Results: The results showed that the maximum mean concentrations of As and Zn in groundwater samples in winter season were 12.0±0.11 and 19.40±0.50 ppb for stations 19 and 7, respectively, and the maximum mean concentrations of these elements in groundwater samples in spring season were 19.80±0.20 and 48.60±0.40 ppb for stations 15 and 13, respectively. Also, the maximum values of HPI were 11.40 and 19.5 for stations 19 and 7, respectively. Conclusion: Currently, the groundwater resources of Qaleh Shahin plain are not contaminated with heavy metals. However, long-term excessive use of agricultural inputs can contaminate the groundwater resources of this area, thereby causing the incidence of health risks for the drinking water consumers.

  9. Assessment of Tritium Activity in Groundwater at the Nuclear Objects Sites in Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vigilija Cidzikienė

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of nuclear objects sites in Lithuania, including groundwater characterization, took place in the last few years. Tritium activity in groundwater is a very useful tool for determining how groundwater systems function. Natural and artificial tritium was measured in 8 wells in different layers (from 1.5 to 15 meters depth. The results were compared with other regions of Lithuania also. The evaluated tritium activities varied from 1.8 to 6.4 Bq/L at nuclear objects sites in Lithuania and they are coming to background level (1.83 Bq/L and other places in Lithuania. The data show, that groundwater at the nuclear power objects sites is not contaminated with artificial tritium. In this work, the vertical tritium transfer from soil water to the groundwater well at nuclear objects site was estimated. The data show that the main factor for vertical tritium transfer to the well depends on the depth of wells.

  10. Preliminary Assessment of Effects of Paint Industry Effluents on Local Groundwater Regime in Ibadan, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaoye, R. A.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Although, groundwater constitutes a major source of water supply especially in developing countries, however wastes generated arising from industrial growth and further complication caused by its indiscriminate disposal have been a major risk to groundwater vulnerability. Hence in this study, preliminary impact assessment of wastewater discharged from paint industry on proximal groundwater regime was carried out. Representative groundwater and effluent samples were collected from locations within the study area, and analyzed in accordance to the American Public Health Association standard methods. The values of the measured concentration of the parameters were compared with regulatory standards for drinking water. The concentrations of Mn2+ , total Fe, Ca2+ , TDS, TSS, total hardness and SO4 2- were mostly higher than the permissible regulatory standards. Total alkalinity values were very low in all the groundwater samples, while the presence of E-coli across all the sampling points indicated wide spread pathogenic contamination. The results showed average lead concentration of 1.18 mg/l compared to the permissible level of 0.01 mg/l. Corresponding higher values of the physicochemical and biological parameters were observed in the discharged effluent samples. The observed high lead concentration have potential toxic consequences, and hence enforcement of localized waste minimization is recommended in order to promote waste recycling, and ensure adequate protection of public health and the environment.

  11. Groundwater vulnerability assessment in agricultural areas using a modified DRASTIC model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat-Noori, Mahmood; Ebrahimi, Kumars

    2016-01-01

    Groundwater contamination is a major concern for groundwater resource managers worldwide. We evaluated groundwater pollution potential by producing a vulnerability map of an aquifer using a modified Depth to water, Net recharge, Aquifer media, Soil media, Topography, Impact of vadose zone, and Hydraulic conductivity (DRASTIC) model within a Geographic Information System (GIS) environment. The proposed modification which incorporated the use of statistical techniques optimizes the rating function of the DRASTIC model parameters, to obtain a more accurate vulnerability map. The new rates were computed using the relationships between the parameters and point data chloride concentrations in groundwater. The model was applied on Saveh-Nobaran plain in central Iran, and results showed that the coefficient of determination (R (2)) between the point data and the relevant vulnerability map increased significantly from 0.52 to 0.78 after modification. As compared to the original DRASTIC model, the modified version produced better vulnerability zonation. Additionally, single-parameter and parameter removal sensitivity analyses were performed to evaluate the relative importance of each DRASTIC parameter. The results from both analyses revealed that the vadose zone is the most sensitive parameter influencing the variability of the aquifers' vulnerability index. Based on the results, for non-point source pollution in agricultural areas, using the modified DRASTIC model is efficient compared to the original model. The proposed method can be effective for future groundwater assessment and plain-land management where agricultural activities are dominant. PMID:26650205

  12. Screening tool to evaluate the vulnerability of down-gradient receptors to groundwater contaminants from uncapped landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Ronald J.; Reilly, Timothy J. [U.S. Geological Survey, 3450 Princeton Pike, Suite 110, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 (United States); Lopez, Anthony [Bayer-Risse Engineering, Inc., 78 Route 173 West, Suite 6, Hampton, NJ 08827 (United States); Romanok, Kristin [U.S. Geological Survey, 3450 Princeton Pike, Suite 110, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 (United States); Wengrowski, Edward W. [New Jersey Pinelands Commission, 15 Springfield Road, New Lisbon, NJ 08064 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A spreadsheet-based risk screening tool for groundwater affected by landfills is presented. • Domenico solute transport equations are used to estimate downgradient contaminant concentrations. • Landfills are categorized as presenting high, moderate or low risks. • Analysis of parameter sensitivity and examples of the method’s application are given. • The method has value to regulators and those considering redeveloping closed landfills. - Abstract: A screening tool for quantifying levels of concern for contaminants detected in monitoring wells on or near landfills to down-gradient receptors (streams, wetlands and residential lots) was developed and evaluated. The tool uses Quick Domenico Multi-scenario (QDM), a spreadsheet implementation of Domenico-based solute transport, to estimate concentrations of contaminants reaching receptors under steady-state conditions from a constant-strength source. Unlike most other available Domenico-based model applications, QDM calculates the time for down-gradient contaminant concentrations to approach steady state and appropriate dispersivity values, and allows for up to fifty simulations on a single spreadsheet. Sensitivity of QDM solutions to critical model parameters was quantified. The screening tool uses QDM results to categorize landfills as having high, moderate and low levels of concern, based on contaminant concentrations reaching receptors relative to regulatory concentrations. The application of this tool was demonstrated by assessing levels of concern (as defined by the New Jersey Pinelands Commission) for thirty closed, uncapped landfills in the New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve, using historic water-quality data from monitoring wells on and near landfills and hydraulic parameters from regional flow models. Twelve of these landfills are categorized as having high levels of concern, indicating a need for further assessment. This tool is not a replacement for conventional numerically

  13. Screening tool to evaluate the vulnerability of down-gradient receptors to groundwater contaminants from uncapped landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A spreadsheet-based risk screening tool for groundwater affected by landfills is presented. • Domenico solute transport equations are used to estimate downgradient contaminant concentrations. • Landfills are categorized as presenting high, moderate or low risks. • Analysis of parameter sensitivity and examples of the method’s application are given. • The method has value to regulators and those considering redeveloping closed landfills. - Abstract: A screening tool for quantifying levels of concern for contaminants detected in monitoring wells on or near landfills to down-gradient receptors (streams, wetlands and residential lots) was developed and evaluated. The tool uses Quick Domenico Multi-scenario (QDM), a spreadsheet implementation of Domenico-based solute transport, to estimate concentrations of contaminants reaching receptors under steady-state conditions from a constant-strength source. Unlike most other available Domenico-based model applications, QDM calculates the time for down-gradient contaminant concentrations to approach steady state and appropriate dispersivity values, and allows for up to fifty simulations on a single spreadsheet. Sensitivity of QDM solutions to critical model parameters was quantified. The screening tool uses QDM results to categorize landfills as having high, moderate and low levels of concern, based on contaminant concentrations reaching receptors relative to regulatory concentrations. The application of this tool was demonstrated by assessing levels of concern (as defined by the New Jersey Pinelands Commission) for thirty closed, uncapped landfills in the New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve, using historic water-quality data from monitoring wells on and near landfills and hydraulic parameters from regional flow models. Twelve of these landfills are categorized as having high levels of concern, indicating a need for further assessment. This tool is not a replacement for conventional numerically

  14. Potential for saturated ground-water system contamination at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A program of hydrogeologic investigation has been carried out to determine the likelihood of contaminant movement to the saturated zone from near the ground surface at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). A companion survey of potential contaminant sources was also conducted at the LLNL. Water samples from selected LLNL wells were analyzed to test the water quality in the uppermost part of the saturated zone, which is from 14 to 48 m (45 to 158 ft) beneath the surface. Only nitrate and tritium were found in concentrations above natural background. In one well, the nitrate was slightly more concentrated than the drinking water limit. The nitrate source has not been found. The tritium in all ground-water samples from wells was found far less concentrated than the drinking water limit. The extent of infiltration of surface water was traced with environmental tritium. The thickness and stratigraphy of the unsaturated zone beneath the LLNL, and nearby area, was determined with specially constructed wells and boreholes. Well hydrograph analysis indicated where infiltration of surface water reached the saturated ground-water system. The investigation indicates that water infiltrating from the surface, through alluvial deposits, reaches the saturated zone along the course of Arroyo Seco, Arroyo Las Positas, and from the depression near the center of the site where seasonal water accumulates. Several potential contaminant sources were identified, and it is likely that contaminants could move from near the ground surface to the saturated zone beneath LLNL. Additional ground-water sampling and analysis will be performed and ongoing investigations will provide estimates of the speed with which potential contaminants can flow laterally in the saturated zone beneath LLNL. 34 references, 61 figures, 16 tables

  15. Bioremediation of benzene-, MTBE- and ammonia-contaminated groundwater with pilot-scale constructed wetlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this pilot-scale constructed wetland (CW) study for treating groundwater contaminated with benzene, MTBE, and ammonia-N, the performance of two types of CWs (a wetland with gravel matrix and a plant root mat) was investigated. Hypothesized stimulative effects of filter material additives (charcoal, iron(III)) on pollutant removal were also tested. Increased contaminant loss was found during summer; the best treatment performance was achieved by the plant root mat. Concentration decrease in the planted gravel filter/plant root mat, respectively, amounted to 81/99% for benzene, 17/82% for MTBE, and 54/41% for ammonia-N at calculated inflow loads of 525/603 mg/m2/d, 97/112 mg/m2/d, and 1167/1342 mg/m2/d for benzene, MTBE, and ammonia-N. Filter additives did not improve contaminant depletion, although sorption processes were observed and elevated iron(II) formation indicated iron reduction. Bacterial and stable isotope analysis provided evidence for microbial benzene degradation in the CW, emphasizing the promising potential of this treatment technique. - Highlights: → BTEX compounds contaminated groundwater can be efficiently treated by CWs. → The removal efficiency depended on CW type, season and contaminant. → The plant root mat revealed better treatment results than the gravel filter CW. → Best results achieved by the plant root mat (99% benzene concentration decrease). → Stable isotope analysis and MPN indicated high benzene remediation potential. - Gravel bed constructed wetlands and a plant root mat system efficiently eliminated fuel hydrocarbons (benzene, MTBE) and ammonia-N from groundwater at a pilot-scale.

  16. Performance of three resin-based materials for treating uranium-contaminated groundwater within a PRB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three materials that are designed to treat uranium-contaminated water were investigated. These are a cation exchange resin, IRN 77; an anion exchange resin, Varion AP; and a recently developed material called PANSIL (quartz sand coated with 2% amidoxime resin by weight). The reaction rate, capacity, and effective pH range of the three materials are reported. The capacity and conditional distribution coefficient in neutral, uranyl-contaminated synthetic groundwater containing carbonate are also reported. The suitability of each material for treating uranium-contaminated groundwater using a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) approach is then discussed. All three materials react rapidly in the pH range 5-7, reaching equilibrium in less than 4 h at ∼23 deg. C. The unconditioned cation exchange resin removed 8 g UO22+ per kg of resin from neutral synthetic groundwater containing 30 mg/l of UO22+, but a lower capacity is anticipated in groundwater with either higher ionic strength or lower UO22+ concentrations. It operates by first acidifying the solution, then sorbing UO22+, and can release UO22+ when its buffering capacity has been exhausted. The anion exchange resin is very effective at removing anionic uranyl carbonate species from solutions with a pH above 5, with good specificity. Up to 50 g/kg of uranium is removed from contaminated groundwater at neutral pH. PANSIL is effective at sequestering cationic and neutral uranyl species from solutions in the pH range 4.5-7.5, with very good specificity. The capacity of PANSIL is pH-dependent, increasing from about 0.4 g/kg at pH 4.5, to about 1 g/kg at pH 6, and 1.5 g/kg around pH 7.5. In neutral groundwater containing carbonate, both the anion exchange resin and PANSIL exhibit conditional distribution coefficients exceeding 1470 ml/g, which is about an order of magnitude higher than comparable reactive barrier materials reported in the literature

  17. Migration of contaminants in groundwater at a landfill: A case study. 1. Groundwater flow and plume delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarlane, D. S.; Cherry, J. A.; Gillham, R. W.; Sudicky, E. A.

    1983-05-01

    A landfill-derived contaminant plume with a maximum width of ˜600 m, a length of ˜700 m and a maximum depth of 20 m in an unconfined sand aquifer was delineated by means of a monitoring network that includes standpipe piezometers, multilevel point-samplers and bundle-piezometers. The extent of detectable contamination caused by the landfill, which began operation in 1940 and which became inactive in 1976, was determined from the distributions of chloride, sulfate and electrical conductance in the sand aquifer, all of which have levels in the leachate that are greatly above those in uncontaminated groundwater. The maximum temperature of groundwater in the zone of contamination beneath the landfill is 12°C, which is 4-5°C above background. The thermal plume in the aquifer extends ˜150 m downgradient from the centre of the landfill. A slight transient water-table mound exists beneath the landfill in the late spring and summer in response to snowmelt and heavy rainfall. Beneath the landfill, the zone of leachate contamination extends to the bottom of the aquifer, apparently because of transient downward components of hydraulic gradient caused by the water-table mound and possibly because of the higher density and lower viscosity of the contaminated water. Values of hydraulic conductivity, which show variations due to local heterogeneity, were obtained from slug tests of piezometers, from pumping tests and from laboratory tests. Because of the inherent uncertainty in the aquifer parameter values, the 38-yr. frontal position of the plume calculated using the Darcy equation with the assumption of plug flow can differ from the observed frontal position by many hundreds of metres, although the use of mean parameter values produces a close agreement. The width of the plume is large relative to the width of the landfill and can be accounted for primarily by variable periods of lateral east- and westward flow caused by changes in water-table configuration due to the

  18. Stable Isotopes of Dissolved Nitrate and Boron as Indicators of the Origin and Fate of Nitrate Contamination in Groundwater. Results from the Western Po Plain (Northern Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stable isotopes of dissolved nitrates and boron represent a powerful tool, complementary to existing monitoring data, enabling the identification of nitrate sources, the assessment of their relative contribution to nitrate pollution and the quantification of nitrate transport and removal processes. This contribution aims to present groundwater isotope data obtained in an area of 15 000 km2 of the western Po plain. Nitrate isotope data show that synthetic fertilisers and anthropogenic organic matter are the main sources of contamination. δ11B allows the discrimination between manure derived and sewage derived contamination. Results indicate that even in agricultural areas, contamination from sewage exists. Samples from the suburban area of Milan, where sewage was considered the most likely source of contamination, show instead a δ11B typical for cattle manure. This study demonstrates that the attribution of the contamination to a source based solely on present-day land use may lead to inappropriate conclusions. (author)

  19. Risk assessment of mercury contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At two sites, highly contaminated with mercury, risk assessment was executed. Methods were developed to determine organomercury compounds in water, air and soil. Toxicity tests demonstrated the high toxicity of organomercury compounds compared to inorganic mercury. Besides highly toxic methylmercury, ethylmercury was found in soils close to a chemical plant in Marktredwitz. In ultrafiltration-experiments mercury showed great affinity to high molecular substances in water. Lysimeter-experiments proved, that organomercury compounds are adsorbed and transformed to inorganic and elemental mercury. (orig.)

  20. Proceedings of the fifth international groundwater conference on the assessment and management of groundwater resources in hard rock systems with special reference to basaltic terrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    many contaminant processes, a precautionary approach should generally be adopted for the groundwater resources. Such an approach is always aimed to avert danger or at least minimize the risk of groundwater pollution and promote protection of its quality. The main emphasis of the conference was on the groundwater shortage and quality deterioration and the main topics discussed were: resources assessment and aquifer characterisation; recharge estimation process and augmentation; agricultural stress and water management; water and environment; models and its application in groundwater management; and groundwater management issues/options and policies. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  1. Screening tool to evaluate the vulnerability of down-gradient receptors to groundwater contaminants from uncapped landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ronald J; Reilly, Timothy J; Lopez, Anthony; Romanok, Kristin; Wengrowski, Edward W

    2015-09-01

    A screening tool for quantifying levels of concern for contaminants detected in monitoring wells on or near landfills to down-gradient receptors (streams, wetlands and residential lots) was developed and evaluated. The tool uses Quick Domenico Multi-scenario (QDM), a spreadsheet implementation of Domenico-based solute transport, to estimate concentrations of contaminants reaching receptors under steady-state conditions from a constant-strength source. Unlike most other available Domenico-based model applications, QDM calculates the time for down-gradient contaminant concentrations to approach steady state and appropriate dispersivity values, and allows for up to fifty simulations on a single spreadsheet. Sensitivity of QDM solutions to critical model parameters was quantified. The screening tool uses QDM results to categorize landfills as having high, moderate and low levels of concern, based on contaminant concentrations reaching receptors relative to regulatory concentrations. The application of this tool was demonstrated by assessing levels of concern (as defined by the New Jersey Pinelands Commission) for thirty closed, uncapped landfills in the New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve, using historic water-quality data from monitoring wells on and near landfills and hydraulic parameters from regional flow models. Twelve of these landfills are categorized as having high levels of concern, indicating a need for further assessment. This tool is not a replacement for conventional numerically-based transport model or other available Domenico-based applications, but is suitable for quickly assessing the level of concern posed by a landfill or other contaminant point source before expensive and lengthy monitoring or remediation measures are taken. In addition to quantifying the level of concern using historic groundwater-monitoring data, the tool allows for archiving model scenarios and adding refinements as new data become available. PMID:26092474

  2. Integrated assessment of sources, chemical stressors and stream quality along a groundwater fed stream system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løgstrup Bjerg, Poul; Sonne, Anne T.; Rønde, Vinni; McKnight, Ursula S.

    2016-04-01

    Streams are impacted by significant contamination at the catchment scale, as they are often locations of multiple chemical stressor inputs. The European Water Framework Directive requires EU member states to ensure good chemical and ecological status of surface water bodies by 2027. This requires monitoring of stream water quality, comparison with environmental quality standards (EQS) and assessment of ecological status. However, the achievement of good status of stream water also requires a strong focus on contaminant sources, pathways and links to stream water impacts, so source management and remedial measures can be implemented. Fate and impacts of different contaminant groups are governed by different processes and are dependent on the origin (geogenic, anthropogenic), source type (point or diffuse) and pathway of the contaminant. To address this issue, we identified contaminant sources and chemical stressors on a groundwater-fed stream to quantify the contaminant discharges, link the chemical impact and stream water quality and assess the main chemical risk drivers in the stream system potentially driving ecological impact. The study was conducted in the 8 m wide Grindsted stream (Denmark) along a 16 km stream stretch that is potentially impacted by two contaminated sites (Grindsted Factory site, Grindsted Landfill), fish farms, waste water discharges, and diffuse sources from agriculture and urban areas. Water samples from the stream and the hyporheic zone as well as bed sediment samples were collected during three campaigns in 2012 and 2014. Data for xenobiotic organic groundwater contaminants, pesticides, heavy metals, general water chemistry, physical conditions and stream flow were collected. The measured chemical concentrations were converted to toxic units (TU) based on the 48h acute toxicity tests with D. magna. The results show a substantial impact of the Grindsted Factory site at a specific stretch of the stream. The groundwater plume caused

  3. Natural releases from contaminated groundwater, Example Reference Biosphere 2B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, I. [CIEMAT/PIRA, Avda Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: isc@csn.es; Naito, M. [Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO), 4-1-23 Shiba, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 108-0014 (Japan); Thorne, M.C. [Mike Thorne and Associates Limited, Abbotsleigh, Kebroyd Mount, Ripponden, Halifax, West Yorkshire HX6 3JA (United Kingdom); Walke, R. [Enviros QuantiSci, Building D5, Culham Science Centre, Culham, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    Safety assessment is a tool which, by means of an iterative procedure, allows the evaluation of the performance of a disposal system and its potential impact on human health and the environment. Radionuclides from a deep geological disposal facility may not reach the surface environment until many tens of thousands of years after closure of the facility. The BIOMASS Programme on BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment developed Examples of 'Reference Biospheres' to illustrate the use of the methodology and to demonstrate how biosphere models can be developed and justified as being fit for purpose. The practical examples are also intended to be useful in their own right. The Example Reference Biosphere 2B presented here involves the consideration of alternative types of geosphere-biosphere interfaces and calculation of doses to members of hypothetical exposure groups arising from a wide range of exposure pathways within agricultural and semi-natural environments, but without allowing for evolution of the corresponding biosphere system. The example presented can be used as a generic analysis in some situations although it was developed around a relatively specific conceptual model. It should be a useful practical example, but the above numerical results are not intended to be understood as prescribed biosphere 'conversion factors'.

  4. Solving the inverse problem of parameter estimation by genetic algorithms: the case of a groundwater contaminant transport model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathematical models are widely used within the performance assessment of radioactive waste repositories to describe the behaviour of groundwater systems under the various physical conditions encountered throughout the long time scales involved. The effectiveness of such predictive models largely depends on the accuracy with which the involved parameters can be determined. In the present paper, we investigate the feasibility of using genetic algorithms for estimating the parameters of a groundwater contaminant transport model. The genetic algorithms are numerical search tools aiming at finding the global optimum of a given real objective function of one or more real variables, possibly subject to various linear or non linear constraints. The search procedures provided by the genetic algorithms resemble certain principles of natural evolution. In the case study here, the transport of contaminants through a three-layered monodimensional saturated medium is numerically simulated by a monodimensional advection-dispersion model. The associated velocity and dispersivity parameters are estimated by a genetic algorithm whose objective function is the sum of the squared residuals between pseudo-experimental data, obtained with the true values of the parameters, and the concentration profiles computed with the model using the estimated values of the parameters. The results indicate that the method is capable of estimating the parameters values with accuracy, also when in presence of substantial noise. Furthermore, we investigate the possibility of extracting some qualitative information regarding the sensitivity of the model to the unknown input parameters from the speed of convergence and stabilization of the identification procedure

  5. Comparative efficiency of microbial systems for destroying carbon tetrachloride contamination in Hanford groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Past waste disposal practices at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford site have resulted in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and nitrate contamination in the groundwater. In situ bioremediation is currently being investigated as a cost effective means to destroy these groundwater contaminants. The cost effectiveness of bioremediation is significantly influenced by the nutrient amendments required to sustain the contaminant destruction reactions. This is particularly important for bioremediation of CCl4 because its biodestruction is the result of a cometabolic process. Nutrient amendments are also important in controlling the growth characteristics of the bacteria to prevent biofouling. Current and previous research has focused on determining the reaction kinetics and microbial processes for CCl4 destruction using acetate as the electron donor for indigenous microbes. This study was conducted to determine if electron donors other than acetate may be more cost effective, or may provide a better means of process control, for in situ bioremediation of CCl4 contamination. Three alternative electron donors, glycerol, methanol, and ethanol, were screened for their ability to stimulate CCl4 destruction. Detailed reaction kinetic experiments using an indigenous microbial consortium with these substrates and with acetate were conducted to determine the efficiency of each in destroying CCl4

  6. Benzene-contaminated groundwaters-transport parameters and isotopic evidence for natural attenuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The area of investigation is located on the site of a former hydrogenation plant in Zeitz (Saxonia-Anhalt, Germany). The plant was founded in 1938 to produce gasoline and lubricants originally for the German war industry and was subject of severe bomb strikes in 1944 and 1945 spilling about 250 m3 hydrocarbons into soil. In 1946 it was rebuilt and in the beginning of the 1960s upgraded with a benzene production plant in the eastern part of hydrogenation plant. From 1963 till 1990 the latter produced more than 750,000 t of benzene with maximum production rate in 1979 (79,000 t per year). Leaks and production accidents contaminated groundwater. Contaminations were found in two aquifers. The upper aquifer (I) is a 5-10 m layer of sandy and clayey deposits from the Pleistocene Elster-glacial. The Tertiary aquifer (II) is composed of gravel deposited by an Eocene river, partly overlain by a lignite seam or silt and clay layer of Tertiary age. The prevailing contaminants of aquifer I are BTEX, dominated by high benzene concentrations up to 500 mg L-1. BTEX-concentrations in the aquifer of Tertiary age are considerably lower (100 mg L-1), and benzene is again the dominant pollutant. At three positions, groundwater samples for tritium and 3He analyses were taken from both aquifers trying to match beginning, centre, and end of the contamination plume. Samples exhibit tritium contents of about 10 TU, the groundwater from deepest well 11.7 TU. Tritiugenic 3He contents are in the upper aquifer between 0 and 3.3 TUequivalent (1 TUequivalent is the 3He content yielded by the decay of 1 TU tritium) corresponding to 3He/tritium ratios of 0.31 and less, whereas in the deeper aquifer tritiugenic 3He was found between 19 and 37 TTUequivalent, i.e. 3He/tritium varies in flow direction from 2.0 to 3.1. In terms of apparent groundwater ages these contents correspond to 3 - 5 years in the upper and 10 - 25 years in the deeper aquifer. In case of samples from the deeper aquifer even

  7. Groundwater redox conditions and conductivity in a contaminant plume from geoelectrical investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudet, V.; Revil, A.; Rizzo, E.; Bottero, J.-Y.; Bégassat, P.

    Accurate mapping of the electrical conductivity and of the redox potential of the groundwater is important in delineating the shape of a contaminant plume. A map of redox potential in an aquifer is indicative of biodegradation of organic matter and of concentrations of redox-active components; a map of electrical conductivity provides information on the mineralisation of the groundwater. Both maps can be used to optimise the position of pumping wells for remediation. The self-potential method (SP) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) have been applied to the contaminant plume associated with the Entressen landfill in south-east France. The self-potential depends on groundwater flow (electrokinetic contribution) and redox conditions ("electro-redox" contribution). Using the variation of the piezometric head in the aquifer, the electrokinetic contribution is removed from the SP signals. A good linear correlation (R2=0.85) is obtained between the residual SP data and the redox potential values measured in monitoring wells. This relationship is used to draw a redox potential map of the overall contaminated site. The electrical conductivity of the subsoil is obtained from 3D-ERT analysis. A good linear correlation (R2=0.91) is observed between the electrical conductivity of the aquifer determined from the 3D-ERT image and the conductivity of the groundwater measured in boreholes. This indicates that the formation factor is nearly homogeneous in the shallow aquifer at the scale of the ERT. From this correlation, a map of the pore water conductivity of the aquifer is obtained.

  8. Evaluation of groundwater contamination in a coastal area of south-eastern Sicily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licciardello, Feliciana; Antoci, Maria Lucia; Brugaletta, Luana; Cirelli, Giuseppe Luigi

    2011-01-01

    This investigation was under taken to evaluate the groundwater resources contamination due to intensive agricultural practices (particularly greenhouses). The study-area is located in the coastal area of the Ragusa province (South-East Sicily), where numerous existing greenhouses may cause the contamination of groundwater systems (unconfined and confined aquifers) beneath the cropped land. The pollution risk is mainly related with the seepage process of macro-elements nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), potassium (K), held in the irrigation water and the massive use of fertilizers and pesticides, that may pass through the unsaturated zone of the soil profile. Moreover, the area is characterized by the presence of several wells (about 15 wells/km²) for agricultural use that cause the aquifer overexploitation and the consequent risk of seawater intrusion. The agriculture practices adopted in the study area (irrigation volumes, fertilizer concentrations, use of pesticides…) were monitored since February 2009; moreover, the pollution risk of the aquifers was evaluated through the analysis of groundwater water samples collected (monthly) in the monitoring wells; in particular, nitrogen compounds, soluble phosphorous (PO₄²⁻), potassium, as well as the main pesticides commonly used in the study area, were measured.The results show that electrical conductivity and chloride concentration values can cause reduction of production and leaf damage problems, respectively, for most of the monitored farm systems. The high nitrogen compounds concentrations observed in the monitored wells can cause health and environmental problems. Moreover high pesticide contamination of groundwater was found in two of the five monitored wells. PMID:21726148

  9. Mercury removal from contaminated groundwater: Performance and limitations of amalgamation through brass shavings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Jan-Helge; Biester, Harald

    2016-08-01

    Brass shavings have been proposed as a cost-effective filter material to remove Hg from contaminated groundwater. This method, which is based on the reduction of reactive Hg(II) and subsequent formation of amalgams, has been shown to be fast and effective in the short term. However, the effectiveness of brass filters and their stability over the long term, especially if used in passive filter systems such as permeable reactive barriers (PRB) under high flow conditions, is unknown. To evaluate the performance and limitations of brass shavings for Hg removal from contaminated groundwater, we performed long-term pilot scale filtration tests (6 and 28 months) at two former wood impregnation sites with severe groundwater contamination (up to 870 μg L(-1) Hg). The results showed that even under high flow conditions (>60 m d(-1)), 60-80% of the Hg was removed in the first 8 mm of the brass shavings filter bed. The kinetics of filtration, Hg total removal performance (>99.95%), and loading capacity (164 g L(-1)) surpassed those of a Hg-specific synthetic resin (LEWATIT(®)MonoPlus TP-214). However, under natural pH conditions (pH 6.4 and 6.7), Zn was leached from the brass and exceeded the threshold value (0.5 mg L(-1)) in the filter outflow by up to a factor of 40. Increasing pH (>8.5) decreased the Zn concentration (filter material in PRBs is restricted to aquifers with high pH. However, brass is ideal as a low-cost, thin-bed prefilter in onsite systems to remove the main Hg load from groundwater when Zn release is managed. PMID:27176550

  10. The effect of remedial measures upon groundwater quality in connection with soil contamination by chlorinated hydrocarbons and the related costs - by example of the City of Hanover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effectiveness of remedial actions on the groundwater quality was investigated in the aquifer of the City of Hannover. The improvement of groundwater quality was related to the costs for the remedial actions. The attention was focussed on groundwater pollution by chlorinated hydrocarbons as the most important contaminants of groundwater in urban areas. (orig.)

  11. The Relationship Between Partial Contaminant Source Zone Remediation and Groundwater Plume Attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falta, R. W.

    2004-05-01

    Analytical solutions are developed that relate changes in the contaminant mass in a source area to the behavior of biologically reactive dissolved contaminant groundwater plumes. Based on data from field experiments, laboratory experiments, numerical streamtube models, and numerical multiphase flow models, the chemical discharge from a source region is assumed to be a nonlinear power function of the fraction of contaminant mass removed from the source zone. This function can approximately represent source zone mass discharge behavior over a wide range of site conditions ranging from simple homogeneous systems, to complex heterogeneous systems. A mass balance on the source zone with advective transport and first order decay leads to a nonlinear differential equation that is solved analytically to provide a prediction of the time-dependent contaminant mass discharge leaving the source zone. The solution for source zone mass discharge is coupled semi-analytically with a modified version of the Domenico (1987) analytical solution for three-dimensional reactive advective and dispersive transport in groundwater. The semi-analytical model then employs the BIOCHLOR (Aziz et al., 2000; Sun et al., 1999) transformations to model sequential first order parent-daughter biological decay reactions of chlorinated ethenes and ethanes in the groundwater plume. The resulting semi-analytic model thus allows for transient simulation of complex source zone behavior that is fully coupled to a dissolved contaminant plume undergoing sequential biological reactions. Analyses of several realistic scenarios show that substantial changes in the ground water plume can result from the partial removal of contaminant mass from the source zone. These results, however, are sensitive to the nature of the source mass reduction-source discharge reduction curve, and to the rates of degradation of the primary contaminant and its daughter products in the ground water plume. Aziz, C.E., C.J. Newell, J

  12. Ground-water contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons: Natural biodegradation in a dynamic hydrologic and geochemical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A surficial aquifer contaminated with gasoline was studied as part of the US Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology Program to determine how ground-water chemistry is controlled by microbial degradation processes. This paper presents a study of the temporal changes in hydrologic and geochemical conditions in an aquifer in the Atlantic coastal plain that was affected by hydrocarbon contaminants. The biogeochemical reactions and the resulting chemical composition of shallow ground water were controlled by (1) microbially-mediated reactions that occurred at a small spatial scale, and by (2) changes in these reactions over time due to mixing with infiltrating water, and rising and falling water levels. The concentration gradients observed in contaminated ground water were complicated by seasonal changes in the local hydrology that caused variability in the availability of electron acceptors. Shifts in the biogeochemical reactions occurred rapidly in response to these changes in the hydrogeochemical conditions

  13. The Investigation of Groundwater Contamination in Wicomico County's Morris Mill Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCintio, Dennis

    2016-03-01

    In 2012, the Wicomico County Health Department began investigating groundwater contamination in the Morris Mill community. The contamination was due to high levels of trichloroethylene (TCE). TCE is a colorless nonflammable liquid that has a sweet odor and a burning taste. Exposures can lead to acute effects as well as more chronic conditions such as cancer. A total of 300 wells were sampled during the course of the investigation. Fifty wells showed levels of TCE above the maximum contaminant level of 5 parts per billion. Timely communication with the residents and risk management played integral parts in assisting the community towards a long-term solution. In December 2013, the Wicomico County Urban Services Commission created an urban service district to provide public water from the city of Fruitland to the entire affected area. Completion of the water tower and distribution system for the 273 affected homes was expected in early 2016. PMID:27197350

  14. Overflow and microbiological contamination in surface and groundwaters in La Costa city (Canelones department, Uruguay)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the results of a geological risk study made during 2005 related to overflow and microbiological water contamination at Ciudad de la Costa City (Canelones department) are shown. This city has been showed a great urban growth for the last three decades. New hydrogeological studies looking forward the phreatic level and its bacteriological quality allow to know the level of the risk along 2005´s first semester. The top of the phreatic table in 40% of the studied area is below than 0.50 meter depth. The results of fourteen bacteriologic analyses in groundwater samples show extreme contamination values in faecal colliform, Pseudomona sp. and Aeruginosa content. Both surface drainage and beach water bacteriologic analyses did not show contamination values except those corresponding to Carrasco creek

  15. Overflow and microbiological contamination in surface and groundwaters in La Costa city (Canelones department, Uruguay)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the results of a geological risk study made during 2005 related to overflow and microbiological water contamination at Ciudad de la Costa City (Canelones department) are shown. This city has been showed a great urban growth for the last three decades. New hydrogeological studies looking forward the phreatic level and its bacteriological quality allow to know the level of the risk along 2005 s first semester. The top of the phreatic table in 40% of the studied area is below than 0.50 meter depth. The results of fourteen bacteriologic analyses in groundwater samples show extreme contamination values in faecal colliform, Pseudo mona sp. and Aeruginosa content. Both surface drainage and beach water bacteriologic analyses did not show contamination values except those corresponding to Carrasco creek

  16. Isotope techniques in groundwater contamination studies in urbanized and industrialized areas, Hat Yai Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthropogenic activities are mainly responsible for changing the hydrological cycle as well as the climate warming. Assessing the impacts of human activities on hydrological environments is becoming a wide-focused topic. In this research, the author attempt to link the urbanization, agricultural development, and the subsequent water resources exploitation with the change of water environments in Hat Yai Basin, southern of Thailand. The source of water for domestic use mainly comes from Utapao River which flows through the area. Now this area is facing the shortage of water in dry season and pollution due to domestic and industrial activities. Isotope techniques in conjunction with hydrological and chemical data can play the important role for identifying recharge mechanism and surface and groundwater interaction. By using the numerical model the information for proper groundwater management can be obtained. As a result, the quality of groundwater in Hat Yai Basin showed that the iron (Fe) content at many locations was higher than the permissible level for groundwater quality standards for drinking purposes in the Notification of the Ministry of Industry. Groundwater from such locations should not be used for drinking. The water types of Hat Yai aquifer were Na-Cl and Ca-HCO3, while that of Khu Tao aquifer and Kho Hong aquifer were CA-Mg-HCO3 and Ca-Mg-HCO3, respectively. The origin of groundwater in Hat Yai aquifer is local rainfall. The origin of groundwater in Khu Tao and Kho Hong aquifers come from ancient rainfall indicating old water and low flow rate. The groundwater is recharged from the zones located in the eastern and western parts of Hat Yai Basin and flows to middle basin and northward to Songkhla Lake. (author)

  17. Estimation of contaminant transport in groundwater beneath radioactive waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Performance assessments are required for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities to demonstrate compliance with the performance objectives, consider human exposures from water, air, and inadvertent intruder pathways. Among these, the groundwater pathway analysis usually involves complex numerical simulations with results which are often difficult to verify and interpret. This paper presents a technique to identify and simplify the essential parts of the groundwater analysis. The transport process of radionuclides including infiltration of precipitation, leachate generation, and advection and dispersion in the groundwater is divided into several steps. For each step, a simple analytical model is constructed and refined to capture the dominant phenomena represented in the complex analysis included in a site-specific performance assessment. This step-wise approach provides a means for gaining insights into the transport process and obtaining reasonable estimates of relevant quantities for facility design and site evaluation

  18. Lateral Gene Transfer in a Heavy Metal-Contaminated-Groundwater Microbial Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemme, Christopher L.; Green, Stefan J.; Rishishwar, Lavanya; Prakash, Om; Pettenato, Angelica; Chakraborty, Romy; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Jordan, I. King; Arkin, Adam P.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Unraveling the drivers controlling the response and adaptation of biological communities to environmental change, especially anthropogenic activities, is a central but poorly understood issue in ecology and evolution. Comparative genomics studies suggest that lateral gene transfer (LGT) is a major force driving microbial genome evolution, but its role in the evolution of microbial communities remains elusive. To delineate the importance of LGT in mediating the response of a groundwater microbial community to heavy metal contamination, representative Rhodanobacter reference genomes were sequenced and compared to shotgun metagenome sequences. 16S rRNA gene-based amplicon sequence analysis indicated that Rhodanobacter populations were highly abundant in contaminated wells with low pHs and high levels of nitrate and heavy metals but remained rare in the uncontaminated wells. Sequence comparisons revealed that multiple geochemically important genes, including genes encoding Fe2+/Pb2+ permeases, most denitrification enzymes, and cytochrome c553, were native to Rhodanobacter and not subjected to LGT. In contrast, the Rhodanobacter pangenome contained a recombinational hot spot in which numerous metal resistance genes were subjected to LGT and/or duplication. In particular, Co2+/Zn2+/Cd2+ efflux and mercuric resistance operon genes appeared to be highly mobile within Rhodanobacter populations. Evidence of multiple duplications of a mercuric resistance operon common to most Rhodanobacter strains was also observed. Collectively, our analyses indicated the importance of LGT during the evolution of groundwater microbial communities in response to heavy metal contamination, and a conceptual model was developed to display such adaptive evolutionary processes for explaining the extreme dominance of Rhodanobacter populations in the contaminated groundwater microbiome. PMID:27048805

  19. In situ Remediation of Petroleum Contaminated Groundwater by Permeable Reactive Barrier with Hydrothermal Palygorskite as Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Sheng-yu; ZHANG Yu-ling; SU Xiao-si; ZHANG Ying

    2013-01-01

    The permeable reactive barrier(PRB) has proven to be a cost-effective technique to remediate the petroleum contaminated groundwater at a northeast field site in China.In this study,the geology,hydrogeology and contamination characterization of the field site were investigated and the natural hydrothermal palygorskite was chosen as a reactive medium.Furthermore,the adsorption of the total petroleum hydrocarbons(TPH) in the groundwater onto hydrothermal palygorskite and the adsorption kinetics were investigated.The results indicate that the removal rates of TPH,benzene,naphthalene and phenantharene could all reach up to 90% by hydrothermal palygorskite with a diameter of 0.25-2.00 mm that had been thermally pretreated at 140 ℃.The adsorption of TPH onto hydrothermal palygorskite after pretreatment followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model and a Langmuir adsorption isotherm,suggesting that the theoretic adsorption capacity of hydrothermal palygorskite for adsorbate could be 4.2 g/g.Scanning electron microscopy(SEM),infrared spectroscopy(IR),X-ray diffraction(XRD) and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy(XRF) were carried out to analyze the adsorption mechanism.The results reveal that hydrothermal palygorskite is a fibrous silicate mineral enriched in Mg and A1 with large surface area and porosity.The dense cluster acicular and fibrous crystal of hydrothermal palygorskite,and its effect polar group —OH played an important role in the physical and chemical adsorption processes of it for contaminants.This study has demonstrated hydrothermal palygorskite is a reliable reactive medium for in situ remediation of petroleum contaminated groundwater at field sites.

  20. Groundwater Quality Assessment Based on Geographical Information System and Groundwater Quality Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Derakhshan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Iran is located in an arid and semi-arid part of the world. Accordingly, the management of the water resources in the country is a priority. In this regard, determining the quality and pollution of surface water and groundwater is very important, especially in areas where groundwater resources are used for drinking. Groundwater quality index (GQI checks the components of the available water with various quality levels. To assess the quality of drinking groundwater of Yazd-Ardakan plain according to GQI in geographical information system (GIS environment, the electrical conductivity, sodium, calcium, magnesium, chlorine, pH, sodium adsorption ratio, bicarbonate, sulfate, potassium, water hardness, and all substances dissolved in the waters of 80 wells were determined. The samples were obtained from Yazd Regional Water Organization from 2005 to 2014. Using this data, the map components were plotted by Kriging geostatistical method. Then, the map of GQI was prepared after normalizing each map component, switching to a rating map, and extracting the weight of each component from the rating map. Based on the GQI index map, the index point which was 87 in 2005 has increased to 81 in 2014. These maps show a decline in groundwater quality from west to the east region. This decline in groundwater quality is due to the existence of Neogene Organizations in the east and geomorphologic unit of the bare epandage pediment in the west. The map removal and single-parameter sensitivity analysis showed that GQI index in Yazd-Ardakan plain is more sensitive to the components of electrical conductivity (EC, total dissolved solids (TDS, and total hardness (TH. Therefore, these components should be monitored more carefully and repeatedly.

  1. Assessment of groundwater quality at a MSW landfill site using standard and AHP based water quality index: a case study from Ranchi, Jharkhand, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Shubhrasekhar; Kumar, R Naresh

    2016-06-01

    Landfill leachate generated from open MSW dumpsite can cause groundwater contamination. The impact of open dumping of MSW on the groundwater of adjacent area was studied. To assess the spatial and temporal variations in groundwater quality, samples were collected around an open MSW dumping site in Ranchi city, Jharkhand, India. Groundwater samples were analysed for various physicochemical and bacteriological parameters for 1 year. Results indicated that the groundwater is getting contaminated due to vertical and horizontal migration of landfill leachate. Extent of contamination was higher in areas closer to the landfill as indicated by high alkalinity, total dissolved solids and ammonia concentration. Metals such as lead, iron, and manganese were present at concentrations of 0.097, 0.97 and 0.36 mg/L, respectively exceeding the Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) 10,500 for drinking water. Enterobacteriaceae were also detected in several groundwater samples and highest coliform count of 2.1×10(4) CFU/mL was recorded from a dug well. In order to determine the overall groundwater quality, water quality index (WQI) was calculated using weighted arithmetic index method and this index was further modified by coupling with the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) to get specific information. WQI values indicated that the overall groundwater quality of the region came under "poor" category while zone wise classification indicated the extent of impact of landfill leachate on groundwater. PMID:27155859

  2. Use of tritium-helium groundwater age and anthropogenic VOCs to assess deep groundwater susceptibility in California urban and agricultural basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, B. K.; Singleton, M. J.; Leif, R. N.; Hillegonds, D. J.; Moran, J. E.

    2008-12-01

    With the discovery of MTBE contamination in public supply wells in the 1990's and the subsequent demonstration that most public supply wells were in close proximity to leaking underground fuel tanks, the State of California recognized the need to rapidly assess the vulnerability of public supply wells throughout the State. The California Aquifer Susceptibility project funded by the State of California GAMA Program used a cost-effective approach to assess ambient groundwater susceptibility at large scales through the use of groundwater age (using the tritium/helium-3 method), the presence of anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at ultra-trace levels, and stable isotopes of water. To date, over 2000 wells have been sampled in the major agricultural and urban basins in California. One pattern that has emerged is a significantly greater vulnerability to contamination in the alluvial aquifers of the Central Valley than in either southern or northern Coastal Basins. The project also has allowed investigation of the utility of the tritium/helium-3 method for vulnerability assessment. This method in conjunction with noble gas analysis allows determination of mean apparent groundwater age from 2 to 50 years, and the fraction of water recharged before atmospheric weapons testing in mid-century. Long-screened supply wells can produce waters with old mean apparent ages (indicating that they are not vulnerable) and still contain small fractions of young highly vulnerable water (through improper well construction, short-circuiting, screening across shallow zones, and dispersive transport). The recent introduction and wide dispersion of anthropogenic VOCs into the environment coupled with our ability to detect these compounds at ultra-trace levels (low ppt) allow their use as proxies for small mixing fractions of young contaminated water. The occurrence of anthropogenic VOCs in tritium-dead groundwater is infrequent but not rare, evidence for apparent groundwater age

  3. A Risk-Based Decision tool to support remediation decision-making for groundwater contaminated with chlorinated solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selection of remediation alternatives for large groundwater plumes containing chlorinated solvents are often complex and difficult, in part because they involve competing objectives, e.g. reduction of health risk vs. increased cost. The Department of Energy (DOE) supported development of a Decision Tool to provide a risk-based process for evaluating and comparing remedial options fairly and consistently. The Decision Tool is also intended to provide a process for constructive discussion of alternatives among the appropriate stakeholders. To use the Decision Tool, which is implemented in an Excel spreadsheet, a site manager must evaluate each alternative being considered against six objectives using detailed performance metrics. The impacts of each alternative on the individual objectives are combined through a formal multi-attribute utility analysis. Predetermined or user-specified relative weights for the objectives can be used, and a variety of visual outputs are generated. The usefulness and validity of the Decision Tool was demonstrated through a Pilot Study application for the A-Area Burning Rubble Pits/Miscellaneous Chemical Basin groundwater plume at the DOE Savannah River Site. The Pilot Study results provided a new perspective on the alternatives and objectives by demonstrating: 1) the relatively small public health risks associated with groundwater contamination at this site, 2) that more active approaches had benefits over monitored natural attenuation (MNA) in reducing time required to meet the maximum contaminant level (MCL) and maximizing regulatory responsiveness, 3) that MNA has acceptable public and worker health and safety risks, while enabling a reduction in costs. Use of the Decision Tool also promoted valuable discussion among the various stakeholders, and provided options for sensitivity analyses that can quickly be visualized to assess relative benefits of each of the alternatives. (authors)

  4. Application of environmental tracers to delineate recharge patterns and nitrate contamination in shallow groundwater around a river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaown, Dugin; Koh, Eunhee; Park, Byeong-Hak; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogeochemical data, stable isotopes, chlorofluorocarbon (CFCs) and 3H-3He in groundwater were applied to characterize residence time, recharge patterns and nitrate contamination of groundwater in a small agricultural area, Yangpyung, Korea. The study area is located around a river and the measured groundwater table ranges from 1.5 to 2.65 m during the year. Most residents in the study area practice agriculture and potato, strawberry, and cabbage are the typical vegetables grown. Vegetable fields are mostly located in the upgradient area of the study area while forest and residence areas are located in the downgradient area. A lot of chemical and organic fertilizers are applied in the upgradient area. The concentration of NO3-N in groundwater showed 9.8-83.7 mg/L in the upgradient area and 0.1-22.6 mg/L in the downgradient area in 2014. It is necessary to monitor groundwater recharge patterns and transport processes of nitrate to protect surface water around the study area. The values of δ18O and δD showed that groundwater is recharged mainly from summer precipitation. The apparent groundwater ages using 3H-3He and CFCs ranged from 13 to 27 years in the upgradient area and from 25 to 35 years in the downgradient area. The NO3-N in more recently recharged groundwater showed higher concentrations while the NO3-N in older groundwater showed low concentrations. Some shallow wells in the downgradient area showed similar apparent groundwater age with that of the river water indicating groundwater-surface water interactions. A conceptual model of groundwater-surface water interactions using stable isotopes, apparent 3H-3He and CFCs age in groundwater will be useful to understand the hydrological processes and nitrate contamination of the study area.

  5. A national reconnaissance of pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater contaminants in the United States - I) Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, K.K.; Kolpin, D.W.; Furlong, E.T.; Zaugg, S.D.; Meyer, M.T.; Barber, L.B.

    2008-01-01

    As part of the continuing effort to collect baseline information on the environmental occurrence of pharmaceuticals, and other organic wastewater contaminants (OWCs) in the Nation's water resources, water samples were collected from a network of 47 groundwater sites across 18 states in 2000. All samples collected were analyzed for 65 OWCs representing a wide variety of uses and origins. Site selection focused on areas suspected to be susceptible to contamination from either animal or human wastewaters (i.e. down gradient of a landfill, unsewered residential development, or animal feedlot). Thus, sites sampled were not necessarily used as a source of drinking water but provide a variety of geohydrologic environments with potential sources of OWCs. OWCs were detected in 81% of the sites sampled, with 35 of the 65 OWCs being found at least once. The most frequently detected compounds include N,N-diethyltoluamide (35%, insect repellant), bisphenol A (30%, plasticizer), tri(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (30%, fire retardant), sulfamethoxazole (23%, veterinary and human antibiotic), and 4-octylphenol monoethoxylate (19%, detergent metabolite). Although sampling procedures were intended to ensure that all groundwater samples analyzed were indicative of aquifer conditions it is possible that detections of some OWCs could have resulted from leaching of well-construction materials and/or other site-specific conditions related to well construction and materials. Future research will be needed to identify those factors that are most important in determining the occurrence and concentrations of OWCs in groundwater.

  6. Coupled Geochemical Impacts of Leaking CO2 and Contaminants from Subsurface Storage Reservoirs on Groundwater Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Hongbo; Qafoku, Nikolla P; Lawter, Amanda R; Bowden, Mark E; Brown, Christopher F

    2015-07-01

    The leakage of CO2 and the concomitant brine from deep storage reservoirs to overlying groundwater aquifers is considered one of the major potential risks associated with geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS). In this work both batch and column experiments were conducted to determine the fate of trace metals in groundwater in the scenarios of CO2 and metal-contaminated brine leakage. The sediments for this study were from an unconsolidated sand and gravel aquifer in Kansas, containing 0-4 wt % carbonates. Cd (114 μg/L) and As (40 μg/L) were spiked into the reaction system to represent potential contaminants from the reservoir brine. Through this research we demonstrated that Cd and As were adsorbed on the sediments, in spite of the lowered pH due to CO2 dissolution in the groundwater. Cd concentrations in the effluent were below the Cd MCL, even for sediments without detectable carbonate to buffer the pH. Arsenic concentrations in the effluent were also significantly lower than the influent concentration, suggesting that the sediments tested have the capacity to mitigate the coupled adverse effects of CO2 leakage and brine intrusion. The mitigation capacity of sediment is a function of its geochemical properties (e.g., the presence of carbonate minerals, adsorbed As, and phosphate). PMID:26039150

  7. Impact of cemeteries on groundwater contamination by bacteria and viruses - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żychowski, Józef; Bryndal, Tomasz

    2015-06-01

    In the process of decomposition of a human body, 0.4-0.6 litres of leachate is produced per 1 kg of body weight. The leachate contains pathogenic bacteria and viruses that may contaminate the groundwater and cause disease when it is used for drinking. So far, this topic has been investigated in several regions of the world (mainly Brazil, Australia, the Republic of South Africa, Portugal, the United Kingdom and Poland). However, recently more and more attention has been focused on this issue. This study reviews the results of investigations related to the impact of cemeteries on groundwater bacteriology and virology. This topic was mainly discussed in the context of the quantities and qualities of changes in types of microorganisms causing groundwater contamination. In some cases, these changes were related to the environmental setting of a place, where a cemetery was located. The review is completed by a list of recommendations. Their implementation aims to protect the local environment, employees of funeral homes and the residents living in the vicinity of cemeteries. In this form, this review aims to familiarize the reader with the results of this topic, and provide practical guidance for decision-makers in the context of expansion and management of cemeteries, as well as the location of new ones. PMID:26042963

  8. Potential effect of natural gas wells on alluvial groundwater contamination at the Kansas City Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the result of a request for further information about several abandoned natural gas wells at the US Department of Energy's Kansas City Plant (KCP). The request was prompted by an old map showing several, possibly eight, natural gas wells located under or near what is now the southeast corner of the Main Manufacturing Building at KCP. Volatile organic compound contamination in the alluvial aquifer surrounding the gas wells might possibly contaminate the bedrock aquifer if the gas wells still exist as conduits. Several circumstances exist that make it doubtful that contamination is entering the bedrock aquifers: (1) because regional groundwater flow in the bedrock beneath the KCP is expected to be vertically upward, contaminants found in the alluvial aquifer should not migrate down the old wells; (2) because of the low hydraulic conductivity of the bedrock units, contaminant transport would be extremely slow if the contaminants were migrating down the wells; and (3) casing, apparently set through the alluvium in all of the wells, would have deteriorated and may have collapsed; if the casing collapsed, the silty clays in the alluvium would also collapse and seal the well. No definitive information has been discovered about the exact location of the wells. No further search for or consideration of the old gas wells is recommended

  9. Potential effect of natural gas wells on alluvial groundwater contamination at the Kansas City Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickering, D.A.; Laase, A.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Locke, D.A. (Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States))

    1993-05-01

    This report is the result of a request for further information about several abandoned natural gas wells at the US Department of Energy's Kansas City Plant (KCP). The request was prompted by an old map showing several, possibly eight, natural gas wells located under or near what is now the southeast corner of the Main Manufacturing Building at KCP. Volatile organic compound contamination in the alluvial aquifer surrounding the gas wells might possibly contaminate the bedrock aquifer if the gas wells still exist as conduits. Several circumstances exist that make it doubtful that contamination is entering the bedrock aquifers: (1) because regional groundwater flow in the bedrock beneath the KCP is expected to be vertically upward, contaminants found in the alluvial aquifer should not migrate down the old wells; (2) because of the low hydraulic conductivity of the bedrock units, contaminant transport would be extremely slow if the contaminants were migrating down the wells; and (3) casing, apparently set through the alluvium in all of the wells, would have deteriorated and may have collapsed; if the casing collapsed, the silty clays in the alluvium would also collapse and seal the well. No definitive information has been discovered about the exact location of the wells. No further search for or consideration of the old gas wells is recommended.

  10. Potential effect of natural gas wells on alluvial groundwater contamination at the Kansas City Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickering, D.A.; Laase, A.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Locke, D.A. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1993-05-01

    This report is the result of a request for further information about several abandoned natural gas wells at the US Department of Energy`s Kansas City Plant (KCP). The request was prompted by an old map showing several, possibly eight, natural gas wells located under or near what is now the southeast corner of the Main Manufacturing Building at KCP. Volatile organic compound contamination in the alluvial aquifer surrounding the gas wells might possibly contaminate the bedrock aquifer if the gas wells still exist as conduits. Several circumstances exist that make it doubtful that contamination is entering the bedrock aquifers: (1) because regional groundwater flow in the bedrock beneath the KCP is expected to be vertically upward, contaminants found in the alluvial aquifer should not migrate down the old wells; (2) because of the low hydraulic conductivity of the bedrock units, contaminant transport would be extremely slow if the contaminants were migrating down the wells; and (3) casing, apparently set through the alluvium in all of the wells, would have deteriorated and may have collapsed; if the casing collapsed, the silty clays in the alluvium would also collapse and seal the well. No definitive information has been discovered about the exact location of the wells. No further search for or consideration of the old gas wells is recommended.

  11. Queries with effect of the groundwater bypass as countermeasures for contaminated water in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'Mid-and -Long-Term Roadmap' for the reactor decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (hereafter referred to 'FDNPP') is drastically behind schedule due to the inadequate management by Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (hereafter referred to 'TEPCO'). The contaminated water has been increasing with 400 m3/day on average continuously by the groundwater inflow into the reactor buildings after the earthquake disaster due to loss for the pumping function of the sub-drain which was originally installed by TEPCO. TEPCO and the Committee on Countermeasures for Contaminated Water Treatment (hereafter referred to as 'CCCWT') have only considered the groundwater in the upper permeable layer as the inflow of groundwater into the reactor buildings, so that TEPCO excludes the role of the groundwater in the lower permeable layer as another source of contaminated water. The groundwater in the lower permeable layer plays an important role in flow into the reactor buildings based on the information in regards to the existing geological cross-section and groundwater table publicly announced by TEPCO. The data also suggest that the upper permeable layer is contiguous to the lower permeable layer in some parts. In addition, as the result of the analysis for the data measured by TEPCO, the amount of retaining water has not ever reduced after operation of the Groundwater Bypass. Not only the effective countermeasures by the Groundwater Bypass will not be expected, but also the expansion of the contaminated water into the sea area will be occurred by the misunderstanding of the aquifer structure by TEPCO. TEPCO and CCCWT should reconsider the method of the Groundwater Bypass for the protection of the contaminated water in FDNPP. (author)

  12. Hydrogeochemical assessment of groundwater in Kashmir Valley, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeelani, G. H.; Shah, Rouf Ahmad; Hussain, Aadil

    2014-06-01

    Groundwater samples ( n = 163) were collected across Kashmir Valley in 2010 to assess the hydrogeochemistry of the groundwater in shallow and deep aquifers and its suitability for domestic, agriculture, horticulture, and livestock purposes. The groundwater is generally alkaline in nature. The electrical conductivity (EC) which is an index to represent the total concentration of soluble salts in water was used to measure the salinity hazard to crops as it reflects the TDS in groundwater ranging from 97 to 1385 μS/cm, except one well in Sopore. The average concentration of major ions was higher in shallow aquifers than in deeper aquifers. In general, Ca2+ is the dominant cation and HCO the dominant anion. Ca-HCO3, Mg-HCO3, Ca-Mg-HCO3, Na-HCO3 were the dominant hydrogeochemical facies. High concentration of HCO3 and pH less than 8.8 clearly indicated that intense chemical weathering processes have taken place in the study area. The groundwater flow pattern in the area follows the local surface topography which not only modifies the hydrogeochemical facies but also controls their distribution. The groundwater in valley flows into four directions, i.e., SW-NE, NE-W, SE-NW and SE-NE directions. The results suggest that carbonate dissolution is the dominant source of major ions followed by silicate weathering and ion-exchange processes. The concentrations of all the major ions determined in the present study are within the permissible limits of WHO and BIS standards. The results of Total Hardness, SAR, Na%, Kelly Index, USDA classification, Magnesium absorption ratio, residual sodium carbonate, and PI suggested that groundwater is good for drinking, livestock, and irrigation purposes.

  13. Hydrogeochemical assessment of groundwater in Kashmir Valley, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G H Jeelani; Rouf Ahmad Shah; Aadil Hussain

    2014-07-01

    Groundwater samples ( = 163) were collected across Kashmir Valley in 2010 to assess the hydrogeochemistry of the groundwater in shallow and deep aquifers and its suitability for domestic, agriculture, horticulture, and livestock purposes. The groundwater is generally alkaline in nature. The electrical conductivity (EC) which is an index to represent the total concentration of soluble salts in water was used to measure the salinity hazard to crops as it reflects the TDS in groundwater ranging from 97 to 1385 S/cm, except one well in Sopore. The average concentration of major ions was higher in shallow aquifers than in deeper aquifers. In general, Ca2+ is the dominant cation and HCO$^{−}_{3}$ the dominant anion. Ca–HCO3, Mg–HCO3, Ca–Mg–HCO3, Na–HCO3 were the dominant hydrogeochemical facies. High concentration of HCO3 and pH less than 8.8 clearly indicated that intense chemical weathering processes have taken place in the study area. The groundwater flow pattern in the area follows the local surface topography which not only modifies the hydrogeochemical facies but also controls their distribution. The groundwater in valley flows into four directions, i.e., SW–NE, NE–W, SE–NW and SE–NE directions. The results suggest that carbonate dissolution is the dominant source of major ions followed by silicate weathering and ion-exchange processes. The concentrations of all the major ions determined in the present study are within the permissible limits ofWHO and BIS standards. The results of Total Hardness, SAR, Na%, Kelly Index, USDA classification, Magnesium absorption ratio, residual sodium carbonate, and PI suggested that groundwater is good for drinking, livestock, and irrigation purposes.

  14. Particulate Pyrite Autotrophic Denitrification (PPAD) for Remediation of Nitrate-contaminated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, S.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, L. C.; Henderson, M.; Feng, C.; Ergas, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    The rapid movement of human civilization towards urbanization, industrialization, and increased agricultural activities has introduced a large amount of nitrate into groundwater. Nitrate is a toxic substance discharged from groundwater to rivers and leads to decreased dissolved oxygen and eutrophication. For this experiment, an electron donor is needed to convert nitrate into non-toxic nitrogen gas. Pyrite is one of the most abundant minerals in the earth's crust making it an ideal candidate as an electron donor. The overall goal of this research was to investigate the potential for pyrite to be utilized as an electron donor for autotrophic denitrification of nitrate-contaminated groundwater. Batch studies of particulate pyrite autotrophic denitrification (PPAD) of synthetic groundwater (100 mg NO3--N L-1) were set up with varying biomass concentration, pyrite dose, and pyrite particle size. Reactors were seeded with mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (VSS) from a biological nitrogen removal wastewater treatment facility. PPAD using small pyrite particles (treatment and promoted the utilization of pyrite in the field of environmental remediation.

  15. Leachable 226Ra in Philippine phosphogypsum and its implication in groundwater contamination in Isabel, Leyte Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphogypsum (PG), the major waste material in phosphate fertilizer processing, has been known to contain enhanced levels of naturally-occurring radionuclides especially 226Ra. The lack of radioactivity data regarding Philippine phosphogypsum and its environmental behavior in the Philippine setting has brought concern on possible contamination of groundwater beneath the phosphogypsum ponds in Isabel, Leyte, Philippines. The radioactivity of Philippine phosphogypsum was determined and the leaching of 226Ra from phosphogypsum and through local soil was quantified. Level of 226Ra in groundwater samples in Isabel, Leyte, Philippines was also quantified to address the primary concern. It was found that the 226Ra activity in Philippine phosphogypsum is distributed in a wide range from 91.5 to 935 Bq/kg. As much as 5% of 226Ra can be leached from Philippine PG with deionized water. In vitro soil leach experiments suggest that the soil in the phosphate fertilizer plant area would be able to deter the intrusion of 226Ra into the water table. Compared to reported values of natural groundwater levels of 226Ra, the concentration of this radionuclide in Isabel, Leyte groundwater suggest that there is no 226Ra intrusion brought about by the presence of phosphogypsum ponds in the area. (Authors)

  16. Groundwater Dynamics and Quality Assessment in an Agricultural Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano L. Russo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The analysis of the relationships among the different hydrogeological Units and the assessment of groundwater quality are fundamental to adopt suitable territorial planning measures aimed to reduce the potential groundwater pollution especially in agricultural regions. In this study, the characteristics of groundwater dynamics and the assessment of its quality in the Cuneo Plain (NW Italy were examined. Approach: In order to define the geological setting an intense bibliographic analysis has been performed by the authors. This analysis was implemented by several correlated land controls and specific surveys that have permitted to analyze to certain reliability the Quaternary evolution of the entire plain sector and the current relationships among the different geological bodies that strongly affect the groundwater dynamics. Results: The Quaternary alluvial deposits overlap a Tertiary sedimentary succession through a series of erosional unconformity surfaces. These Quaternary deposits highlight a variable thickness ranging from 80-100 m in the foothills of the mountains up to a few meters in the more distal portion of the plain. In these deposits there are several unconfined aquifers which are not hydraulically interconnected due to the deep fluvial incisions that reach the underlying tertiary substrate. The Cuneo plain is intensively populated and lot of villages and farms characterize the landscape. In the overall area it is present an intensive agricultural and livestock activity predominantly represented by crops of wheat and corn and farms of cattle and pigs. All these activities represent point and diffuse groundwater pollution sources and require a considerable amount of groundwater which is withdrawn from the Quaternary aquifers by means of thousands of water wells. The groundwater quality is strongly influenced by the content of nitrates and manganese. The nitrates are linked to pollution due to agricultural activities

  17. 18O isotopic characterisation of non-point source contributed heavy metals (Zn and Cu) contamination of groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In many urbanised areas, fast depletion and severe degradation of the of groundwater resource with contaminants such as nitrate, fluoride, and heavy metals is a common phenomenon, resulting in zonal disparity in fresh water availability. Therefore, for protection of groundwater from pollution and depletion, it is a matter of concern for the planners and decision makers to clearly characterise the sources of contamination and to search for an alternative approach for groundwater development and management. In this context, a new approach is presented here, based on monitoring of 18O stable isotopic and heavy metals composition of groundwater, to clearly characterise non-point source contributed heavy metals pollution of groundwater in northern parts of Delhi area. In the investigated area, the Cu content in the groundwater ranges from 3-41 μg/l and Zn content ranges from 5-182 μg/l, showing considerable variation from location to location as well as within the small parts of a location. Wide variation in the 18O stable isotope content of groundwater (δ value of -5.7 per mille to -8.5 per mille) is due to significant variation in the δ18O-contents of rainfall with space and time, as well as intensity and distribution of rainfall. Enrichment in 18O composition with increasing Cu and Zn levels in groundwater suggest that infiltration of rain water, irrigation water and surface run-off water from the surrounding farm lands, along with agrochemicals and other salts present in the soil, to be the main processes causing groundwater contamination. The concentration of Cu and Zn in groundwater vary spatially, due to different degrees of evaporation/recharge, amounts of fertiliser applied and wastes disposed, adsorption/dispersion of species in the soils and lateral mixing of groundwater. Two opposite mechanisms adsorption and redistribution of infiltrating water along with Zn and Cu species in the soil zone are likely to affect the movement of the Zn and Cu species

  18. 15N and 18O isotopes as tracers of agricultural groundwater contamination in Osona (NE, Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Osona District (NE Spain) is classified as vulnerable zone of nitrate contamination from agricultural sources by the Directive 91/767/CEE. In this region (1,263.8 km2) more than 1000 pig farm exploitations exist, most of them situated in the central part of the area. In 1999, livestock in the area consisted of 927,250 pigs, 90,024 cows and 57,391 sheep. This intensive activity produces large quantities of manure, mainly coming from the pig farms; a small part of them is processed in treatment plants and the rest is spread onto the fields as organic fertilisers. This practise produces a diffused contamination in the aquifers of the area with high concentrations of nitrates, up to 365 ppm, which is more than 7 times the permitted concentration in drinking waters. Additionally, synthetic fertilisers are also used in the area, contributing to the groundwater contamination. An area of 31 km2 is used in order to study the complexity of its groundwater hydrodynamics, to characterise the nitrate contamination, to evaluate the contribution of each pollutant source (i.e. fertilisers and pig manure) and to identify the fractionation processes of ammonium volatilisation, nitrification and denitrification. To do this, 38 groundwater samples were collected during October 2001 and chemical and isotope data (15NNO3 and 18ONO3) were determined. A correlation between chloride and nitrate concentrations exists, indicating that they have the same origin. Their spatial isoconcentrations are distributed comparably to the piezometry showing an accumulation of nitrates and chlorides downflow. Therefore, as chloride is a conservative ion, it can be used as tracer to know where the maximum inputs of nitrogen have been applied and/or to study the hydrodynamics of the pollutant constituents. Isotopic values range from +2.2 per mille to +21.0 per mille for the δ15NNO3 and from +5.1 to +11.8 per mille for the δ18ONO3. Most of the groundwater samples have δ15NNO3 values heavier than +8

  19. Life cycle assessment of active and passive groundwater remediation technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Peter; Finkel, Michael

    2006-02-01

    Groundwater remediation technologies, such as pump-and-treat (PTS) and funnel-and-gate systems (FGS), aim at reducing locally appearing contaminations. Therefore, these methodologies are basically evaluated with respect to their capability to yield local improvements of an environmental situation, commonly neglecting that their application is also associated with secondary impacts. Life cycle assessment (LCA) represents a widely accepted method of assessing the environmental aspects and potential impacts related to a product, process or service. This study presents the set-up of a LCA framework in order to compare the secondary impacts caused by two conceptually different technologies at the site of a former manufactured gas plant in the city of Karlsruhe, Germany. As a FGS is already operating at this site, a hypothetical PTS of the same functionality is adopted. During the LCA, the remediation systems are evaluated by focusing on the main technical elements and their significance with respect to resource depletion and potential adverse effects on ecological quality, as well as on human health. Seven impact categories are distinguished to address a broad spectrum of possible environmental loads. A main point of discussion is the reliability of technical assumptions and performance predictions for the future. It is obvious that a high uncertainty exists when estimating impact specific indicator values over operation times of decades. An uncertainty analysis is conducted to include the imprecision of the underlying emission and consumption data and a scenario analysis is utilised to contrast various possible technological variants. Though the results of the study are highly site-specific, a generalised relative evaluation of potential impacts and their main sources is the principle objective rather than a discussion of the calculated absolute impacts. A crucial finding that can be applied to any other site is the central role of steel, which particularly derogates

  20. Effect of contaminant concentration on in situ bacterial sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in phenol-contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of dissolved O2 can limit biodegradation of organic compounds in aquifers. Where O2 is depleted, biodegradation proceeds via anaerobic processes, including NO3-, Mn(IV)-, Fe(III)- and SO4-reduction and fermentation/methanogenesis. The environmental controls on these anaerobic processes must be understood to support implementation of management strategies such as monitored natural attenuation (MNA). In this study stable isotope analysis is used to show that the relative significance of two key anaerobic biodegradation processes (bacterial SO4 reduction (BSR) and methanogenesis) in a phenol-contaminated sandstone aquifer is sensitive to spatial and temporal changes in total dissolved phenols concentration (TPC) (= phenol + cresols + dimethylphenols) over a 5-a period. In general, 34SO4-enrichment (characteristic of bacterial SO4 reduction) is restricted spatially to locations where TPC −1. In contrast, 13C-depleted CH4 and 13C-enriched CO2 isotope compositions (characteristic of methanogenesis) were measured at TPC up to 8000 mg L−1. This is consistent with previous studies that demonstrate suppression of BSR at TPC of >500 mg L−1, and suggests that methanogenic microorganisms may have a higher tolerance for TPC in this contaminant plume. It is concluded that isotopic enrichment trends can be used to identify conditions under which in situ biodegradation may be limited by the properties of the biodegradation substrate (in this case TPC). Such data may be used to deduce the performance of MNA for contaminated groundwater in similar settings.

  1. Permeable sorptive walls for treatment of hydrophobic organic contaminant plumes in groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grathwohl, P.; Peschik, G. [Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    Highly hydrophobic contaminants are easily adsorbed from aqueous solutions. Since for many of these compounds sorption increases with increasing organic carbon content natural materials such as bituminous shales and coals may be used in permeable sorptive walls. This, however, only applies if sorption is at equilibrium, which may not always be the case in groundwater treatment using a funnel-and-gate system. In contrast to the natural solids, granular activated carbons (GACs) have very high sorption capacities and reasonably fast sorption kinetics. The laboratory results show that application of GACs (e.g. F100) is economically feasible for in situ removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from groundwater at a former manufactured gas plant site (MGP). For less sorbing compounds (such as benzene, toluene, xylenes) a combination of adsorption and biodegradation is necessary (i.e. sorptive + reactive treatment).

  2. Remediation of groundwater contaminated by exa valent chromium. Part 1.: Treatment technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium compounds have been used in several industrial activities and they are often found in soil and groundwater of former industrial sites. Chromium exists in various oxidation states, but the trivalent and hexavalent oxidation ones are of major environmental concern due to their stability in the environment. In particular, Cr(V I) is highly soluble and mobile and is very toxic with mutagenic and carcinogenic effects. The present paper describes the main chemical, physical and toxicological properties of Cr(V I), its fate in the subsoil and both the conventional and innovative technologies for its removal from contaminated groundwater. The paper includes also a brief description of few interesting foreign case studies.

  3. Coupled Geochemical Impacts of Leaking CO2 and Contaminants from Subsurface Storage Reservoirs on Groundwater Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Hongbo; Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2015-07-07

    The leakage of CO2 and the concomitant saline solutions from deep storage reservoirs to overlying groundwater aquifers is considered one of the major potential risks associated with geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS). Batch and column experiments were conducted to determine the fate of trace metals in groundwater in the scenarios of CO2 and metal contaminated brine leakage. The sediments used in this work were collected from an unconsolidated sand and gravel aquifer in Kansas, and contained 0-4 wt% carbonates. Cd and As were spiked into the reaction system to represent potential contaminants from the reservoir brine that could intrude into groundwater aquifers with leaking CO2 at initial concentrations of 114 and 40 ppb, respectively. Through this research we demonstrated that Cd and As were adsorbed on the sediments, in spite of the lowered pH due to CO2 dissolution in the groundwater. Cd concentrations were well below its MCL in both batch and column studies, even for sediment samples without detectable carbonate to buffer the pH. Arsenic concentrations in the effluent were also significantly lower than influent concentration, suggesting that the sediments tested have the capacity to mitigate the coupled adverse effects of CO2 leakage and brine intrusion. However, the mitigation capacity of sediment is a function of its geochemical properties [e.g., the calcite content; the presence of adsorbed As(III); and the presence of P in the natural sediment]. The competitive adsorption between phosphate and arsenate may result in higher concentrations of As in the aqueous phase.

  4. Identification of Groundwater Nitrate Contamination from Explosives Used in Road Construction: Isotopic, Chemical, and Hydrologic Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degnan, James R; Böhlke, J K; Pelham, Krystle; Langlais, David M; Walsh, Gregory J

    2016-01-19

    Explosives used in construction have been implicated as sources of NO3(-) contamination in groundwater, but direct forensic evidence is limited. Identification of blasting-related NO3(-) can be complicated by other NO3(-) sources, including agriculture and wastewater disposal, and by hydrogeologic factors affecting NO3(-) transport and stability. Here we describe a study that used hydrogeology, chemistry, stable isotopes, and mass balance calculations to evaluate groundwater NO3(-) sources and transport in areas surrounding a highway construction site with documented blasting in New Hampshire. Results indicate various groundwater responses to contamination: (1) rapid breakthrough and flushing of synthetic NO3(-) (low δ(15)N, high δ(18)O) from dissolution of unexploded NH4NO3 blasting agents in oxic groundwater; (2) delayed and reduced breakthrough of synthetic NO3(-) subjected to partial denitrification (high δ(15)N, high δ(18)O); (3) relatively persistent concentrations of blasting-related biogenic NO3(-) derived from nitrification of NH4(+) (low δ(15)N, low δ(18)O); and (4) stable but spatially variable biogenic NO3(-) concentrations, consistent with recharge from septic systems (high δ(15)N, low δ(18)O), variably affected by denitrification. Source characteristics of denitrified samples were reconstructed from dissolved-gas data (Ar, N2) and isotopic fractionation trends associated with denitrification (Δδ(15)N/Δδ(18)O ≈ 1.31). Methods and data from this study are expected to be applicable in studies of other aquifers affected by explosives used in construction. PMID:26709616

  5. Evaluating a groundwater supply contamination incident attributed to Marcellus Shale gas development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, Garth T; Dorman, Frank; Westland, J L; Yoxtheimer, D; Grieve, Paul; Sowers, Todd; Humston-Fulmer, E; Brantley, Susan L

    2015-05-19

    High-volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF) has revolutionized the oil and gas industry worldwide but has been accompanied by highly controversial incidents of reported water contamination. For example, groundwater contamination by stray natural gas and spillage of brine and other gas drilling-related fluids is known to occur. However, contamination of shallow potable aquifers by HVHF at depth has never been fully documented. We investigated a case where Marcellus Shale gas wells in Pennsylvania caused inundation of natural gas and foam in initially potable groundwater used by several households. With comprehensive 2D gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-TOFMS), an unresolved complex mixture of organic compounds was identified in the aquifer. Similar signatures were also observed in flowback from Marcellus Shale gas wells. A compound identified in flowback, 2-n-Butoxyethanol, was also positively identified in one of the foaming drinking water wells at nanogram-per-liter concentrations. The most likely explanation of the incident is that stray natural gas and drilling or HF compounds were driven ∼ 1-3 km along shallow to intermediate depth fractures to the aquifer used as a potable water source. Part of the problem may have been wastewaters from a pit leak reported at the nearest gas well pad-the only nearby pad where wells were hydraulically fractured before the contamination incident. If samples of drilling, pit, and HVHF fluids had been available, GCxGC-TOFMS might have fingerprinted the contamination source. Such evaluations would contribute significantly to better management practices as the shale gas industry expands worldwide. PMID:25941400

  6. Isotope techniques on groundwater contamination studies in urbanized and industrialized areas, Hat Yai Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthropogenic activities are of a major force in changing the hydrological cycle as well as the climate warming. Assessing the impacts of human activities on hydrological environments is becoming a wide-focused topic. In this research, the authors attempt to link the urbanization, agricultural development, and the subsequent water resources exploitation with the change of water environments in Hat Yai basin, southern of Thailand. The source of water for domestic use mainly comes from Utapao River which flows through the area. Now this area is facing the shortage of water in dry season and pollution due to domestic and industrial activities. Isotope techniques in conjunction with hydrological and chemical data can play the important role for identifying recharge zone, flow dynamic, recharge mechanism and surface and groundwater interaction. By using the numerical model the information for proper groundwater management, can be obtained. As a result, the quality of ground water in Hat Yai basin was show that the quality of iron (Fe) was higher than Notification of the Ministry of Industry permissible level for groundwater quality standards for drinking purposes at many locations. Groundwater in many locations should not use to drinking water. The water types of Hat Yai Aquifer were Na-Cl and Ca-HCO3. The water type of Kliu Tao aquifer was Ca-Mg-HCO3 and Kho Hong aquifer was Ca-Mg-HCO3. The Origin of groundwater in Hat Yai aquifer is local rainfall. The Origin of groundwater in Khu Tao and Kho Hong aquifer come from ancient rainfall.The ground water from Khu Tao and Kho Hong aquifer were old water and low flow rate. The recharge zone was located west and east of Hat Yai Basin. After that the groundwater will flow to middle basin and northward to Songkhla Lake. (author)

  7. Exposure assessment of groundwater transport of tritium from the Central Nevada Test Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This exposure assessment provides a range of possible human health risk at two locations due to groundwater transport from the Faultless underground nuclear test. These locations correspond to the boundary of the land under DOE control (where no wells currently exist) and the closest existing well (Six Mile Well). The range in excess risk is within the EPA goal for excess risk due to environmental contaminants (10-6) at Six Mile Well. Calculations considering high spatial variability in hydraulic properties and/or high uncertainty in the mean groundwater velocity are also within the EPA goal. At the DOE boundary, the range in excess risk exceeds the EPA goal, regardless of the values of spatial variability and uncertainty. The range in values of excess risk can be reduced with additional field data from the site; however, incorporation of additional data, which would likely be obtained at great expense, is unlikely to result in significant refinement of the results

  8. Use of environmental isotopes in organic contaminants research in groundwater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents two case studies that explore the use of environmental isotopes (13Cl, 37Cl) in organic contaminants research in groundwater systems. Carbon-13 data on soil CO2 were collected at a gas plant site where the degradation of organic contaminants by bioventing is being investigated. The isotope study was done to contribute to the evaluation of biodegradation of organic contaminants, especially under field conditions where results obtained by standard techniques are not conclusive. The results show enriched δ13C values on soil CO2, in comparison with the natural gas condensate source, a by-product of gas plants. Degradation of the condensate in a controlled laboratory microcosm did not show any significant isotopic fractionation during degradation. These results suggest that preferential degradation of enriched 13C hydrocarbons is occurring during bioventing. This hypothesis is being tested under field and laboratory conditions. The isotope research on chlorinated solvents aims to evaluate the use of 37Cl and 13C as tracers to provide information about sources and transformation of chlorinated solvents in groundwater systems. Chlorine-37 and 13C data in chlorinated solvents, perchlorethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,1,1, trichloroethane (TCA), supplied by different manufacturers range from -3.5 to +6.0 per mille for δ37Cl and from -37.2 to -23.3 per mille for δ13C. These results indicated that these compounds have a different and distinct isotopic composition, which results from the individual manufacturing practices. These results show the potential of 37Cl and 13Cl as tracers to provide information to identify source areas of chlorinated solvent plumes in groundwater. (author). 25 refs, 3 figs

  9. Risk assessment of groundwater level variability using variable Kriging methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanoudaki, Katerina; Kampanis, Nikolaos A.

    2015-04-01

    Assessment of the water table level spatial variability in aquifers provides useful information regarding optimal groundwater management. This information becomes more important in basins where the water table level has fallen significantly. The spatial variability of the water table level in this work is estimated based on hydraulic head measured during the wet period of the hydrological year 2007-2008, in a sparsely monitored basin in Crete, Greece, which is of high socioeconomic and agricultural interest. Three Kriging-based methodologies are elaborated in Matlab environment to estimate the spatial variability of the water table level in the basin. The first methodology is based on the Ordinary Kriging approach, the second involves auxiliary information from a Digital Elevation Model in terms of Residual Kriging and the third methodology calculates the probability of the groundwater level to fall below a predefined minimum value that could cause significant problems in groundwater resources availability, by means of Indicator Kriging. The Box-Cox methodology is applied to normalize both the data and the residuals for improved prediction results. In addition, various classical variogram models are applied to determine the spatial dependence of the measurements. The Matérn model proves to be the optimal, which in combination with Kriging methodologies provides the most accurate cross validation estimations. Groundwater level and probability maps are constructed to examine the spatial variability of the groundwater level in the basin and the associated risk that certain locations exhibit regarding a predefined minimum value that has been set for the sustainability of the basin's groundwater resources. Acknowledgement The work presented in this paper has been funded by the Greek State Scholarships Foundation (IKY), Fellowships of Excellence for Postdoctoral Studies (Siemens Program), 'A simulation-optimization model for assessing the best practices for the

  10. Health Risk Assessment of Groundwater Arsenic Pollution in Southern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ching-Ping

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the risk of arsenic (As) exposure to the residents in Pingtung Plain of Taiwan, where more than 50% of people extracts groundwater to meet the drinking purpose and monitoring groundwater shows that a considerable portion of groundwater has an As concentration of more than safe drinking water guideline of 10μg/L-1. Exposure and risk assessment are carried out in accordance with the provisional daily intake (PTDI) recommended by the FAO/WHO as well as hazard quotient and cancer risk standards based on the US Environmental