WorldWideScience

Sample records for assessing genetic diversity

  1. Assessing Plant Genetic Diversity by Molecular Tools

    OpenAIRE

    Linda Mondini; Arshiya Noorani; Pagnotta, Mario A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is an overview of the diverse, predominantly molecular techniques, used in assessing plant genetic diversity. In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the application of molecular genetic methods for assessing the conservation and use of plant genetic resources. Molecular techniques have been applied in the analysis of specific genes, as well as to increase understanding of gene action, generate genetic maps and assist in the development of gene transfer technologi...

  2. Synthesis and assessment of date palm genetic diversity studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    A thorough assessment of genetic diversity and population differentiation of Phoenix dactylifera are critical for its dynamic conservation and sustainable utilization of its genetic diversity. Estimates of genetic diversity based on phenotypic, biochemical and molecular markers; and fruit quality tr...

  3. Assessing Plant Genetic Diversity by Molecular Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Mondini

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an overview of the diverse, predominantly molecular techniques, used in assessing plant genetic diversity. In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the application of molecular genetic methods for assessing the conservation and use of plant genetic resources. Molecular techniques have been applied in the analysis of specific genes, as well as to increase understanding of gene action, generate genetic maps and assist in the development of gene transfer technologies. Molecular techniques have also had critical roles in studies of phylogeny and species evolution, and have been applied to increase our understanding of the distribution and extent of genetic variation within and between species. These techniques are well established and their advantages as well as limitations have been realized and described in this work. Recently, a new class of advanced techniques has emerged, primarily derived from a combination of earlier, more basic techniques. Advanced marker techniques tend to amalgamate advantageous features of several basic techniques, in order to increase the sensitivity and resolution to detect genetic discontinuity and distinctiveness. Some of the advanced marker techniques utilize newer classes of DNA elements, such as retrotransposons, mitochondrial and chloroplast based microsatellites, thereby revealing genetic variation through increased genome coverage. Techniques such as RAPD and AFLP are also being applied to cDNA-based templates to study patterns of gene expression and uncover the genetic basis of biological responses. The most important and recent advances made in molecular marker techniques are discussed in this review, along with their applications, advantages and limitations applied to plant sciences.

  4. Assessment of genetic diversity in Indian rice germplasm (Oryza ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Assessment of genetic diversity in a crop germplasm is a vital part of plant breeding. DNA markers such as microsatellite or simple sequence repeat markers have been widely used to estimate the genetic diversity in rice. The present study was carried out to decipher the pattern of genetic diversity in terms of both ...

  5. Using microsatellite markers to assess genetic diversity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bobby

    2013-05-15

    May 15, 2013 ... YAO et al. 2809. Table 1. Populations of tall coconut palm including three parental (G0) and three regenerated (G1) populations investigated in the present study of the genetic diversity by microsatellite markers. Population code, origin and sample size are also shown. Population. Generation. Codea. Origin.

  6. Assessment of genetic diversity in Indian rice germplasm (Oryza ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-12-11

    Dec 11, 2013 ... Abstract. Assessment of genetic diversity in a crop germplasm is a vital part of plant breeding. ... carried out to decipher the pattern of genetic diversity in terms of both phenotypic and genotypic variability, and to assess the efficiency of ..... allelic data was analysed using the computer package Dar- win (ver.

  7. Assessment of genetic diversity among sixty bread wheat ( Triticum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of genetic diversity among wheat cultivars is important to ensure that a continuous pool of cultivars with varying desirable traits is maintained. In view of this, a molecular study was conducted to assess the genetic diversity of sixty wheat cultivars using sixty microsatellite markers. Amplified alleles from each ...

  8. Assessment of genetic diversity among sixty bread wheat (Triticum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mwale

    Assessment of genetic diversity among wheat cultivars is important to ensure that a continuous pool of cultivars with varying desirable traits is maintained. In view of this, a molecular study was conducted to assess the genetic diversity of sixty wheat cultivars using sixty microsatellite markers. Amplified alleles from each ...

  9. Assessing the genetic diversity of five Tanzanian chicken ecotypes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diversity was assessed based on morphological measurements and 29 microsatellite markers recommended by ISAG/FAO advisory group on animal genetic diversity. A principal component analysis (PCA) of morphological measures distinguished individuals most by body sizes and body weight. Morogoro Medium, Pemba ...

  10. Assessment of genetic diversity in Sudanese maize (Zea mays L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-08

    Aug 8, 2011 ... 3Commission for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, National Centre for Research, P.O. Box 2404, Khartoum,. Sudan. Accepted 17 June, 2011. The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) molecular markers were used to assess genetic diversity in 27 Sudanese maize genotypes. Ten primers ...

  11. Assessment of genetic diversity of sweet potato in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Bonilla, Lorraine; Cuevas, Hugo E; Montero-Rojas, Milly; Bird-Pico, Fernando; Luciano-Rosario, Dianiris; Siritunga, Dimuth

    2014-01-01

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is the seventh most important food crop due to its distinct advantages, such as adaptability to different environmental conditions and high nutritional value. Assessing the genetic diversity of this important crop is necessary due to the constant increase of demand for food and the need for conservation of agricultural and genetic resources. In Puerto Rico (PR), the genetic diversity of sweet potato has been poorly understood, although it has been part of the diet since Pre-Columbus time. Thus, 137 landraces from different localities around PR were collected and subjected to a genetic diversity analysis using 23 SSR-markers. In addition, 8 accessions from a collection grown in Gurabo, PR at the Agricultural Experimental Station (GAES), 10 US commercial cultivars and 12 Puerto Rican accessions from the USDA repository collection were included in this assessment. The results of the analysis of the 23 loci showed 255 alleles in the 167 samples. Observed heterozygosity was high across populations (0.71) while measurements of total heterozygosity revealed a large genetic diversity throughout the population and within populations. UPGMA clustering method revealed two main clusters. Cluster 1 contained 12 PR accessions from the USDA repository collection, while cluster 2 consisted of PR landraces, US commercial cultivars and the PR accessions from GAES. Population structure analysis grouped PR landraces in five groups including four US commercial cultivars. Our study shows the presence of a high level of genetic diversity of sweet potato across PR which can be related to the genetic makeup of sweet potato, human intervention and out-crossing nature of the plant. The history of domestication and dispersal of sweet potato in the Caribbean and the high levels of genetic diversity found through this study makes sweet potato an invaluable resource that needs to be protected and further studied.

  12. Genetic diversity assessment of farmers' and improved potato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biniam M

    2016-08-31

    Aug 31, 2016 ... Sixty three potato clones (51 farmers' and 12 varieties) from Eritrea, 18 and 12 varieties from Kenya and. Rwanda, respectively were characterized using 12 highly polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. The study was designed to assess the genetic diversity and varietal distinctness among ...

  13. Assessment of Genetic diversity in mutant cowpea lines using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FKOLADE

    2016-11-09

    Nov 9, 2016 ... for crop improvement, hence the need to broaden the genetic base of any crop. This study was done in order to further enhance this in cowpea. While assessing diversity and phylogenetic relationship with other mutants and their parents, each unique mutant was also characterized. Randomly amplified ...

  14. Assessing genetic diversity in Valencia peanut germplasm using SSR markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia peanuts (Arachis hypogaea L.ssp. fastigiata var. fastigiata) are well known for their in-shell market value. Assessment of genetic diversity of the available Valencia germplasm is key to the success of developing improved cultivars with desirable agronomic and quality traits. In the pres...

  15. Assessment of genetic diversity in Isabgol (Plantago ovata Forsk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sandeep kaswan

    Assessment of genetic diversity in Isabgol (Plantago ovata Forsk.) using random amplified polymorphic DNA. (RAPD) and inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers for developing crop improvement strategies. Vineet Kaswan*, Arunabh Joshi and S. R. Maloo. Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, ...

  16. Assessing genetic diversity and phylogeographic structure of duck ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the maternal genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationship of Nigerian duck populations were assessed. A total of 591 base pair fragment of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop region of 87 indigenous ducks from two populations in Nigeria were analyzed. Seven haplotypes and 70 polymorphic sites were ...

  17. Genetic diversity assessment of wild and cultivated varieties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study deals with evaluation of genetic diversity and pedigree analysis through RAPD analysis. A total number of 40 Jatropha curcas accessions collected from different geographical regions and 43 random decamer primers were screened to assess polymorphism. 10 primers were amplified and 94 polymorphic ...

  18. High genetic diversity of Jatropha curcas assessed by ISSR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, B G; Argollo, D M; Franco, M C; Nucci, S M; Siqueira, W J; de Laat, D M; Colombo, C A

    2017-05-31

    Jatropha curcas L. is a highly promising oilseed for sustainable production of biofuels and bio-kerosene due to its high oil content and excellent quality. However, it is a perennial and incipiently domesticated species with none stable cultivar created until now despite genetic breeding programs in progress in several countries. Knowledge of the genetic structure and diversity of the species is a necessary step for breeding programs. The molecular marker can be used as a tool for speed up the process. This study was carried out to assess genetic diversity of a germplasm bank represented by J. curcas accessions from different provenance beside interspecific hybrid and backcrosses generated by IAC breeding programs using inter-simple sequence repeat markers. The molecular study revealed 271 bands of which 98.9% were polymorphic with an average of 22.7 polymorphic bands per primer. Genetic diversity of the germplasm evaluated was slightly higher than other germplasm around the world and ranged from 0.55 to 0.86 with an average of 0.59 (Jaccard index). Cluster analysis (UPGMA) revealed no clear grouping as to the geographical origin of accessions, consistent with genetic structure analysis using the Structure software. For diversity analysis between groups, accessions were divided into eight groups by origin. Nei's genetic distance between groups was 0.14. The results showed the importance of Mexican accessions, congeneric wild species, and interspecific hybrids for conservation and development of new genotypes in breeding programs.

  19. Assessing Date Palm Genetic Diversity Using Different Molecular Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atia, Mohamed A M; Sakr, Mahmoud M; Adawy, Sami S

    2017-01-01

    Molecular marker technologies which rely on DNA analysis provide powerful tools to assess biodiversity at different levels, i.e., among and within species. A range of different molecular marker techniques have been developed and extensively applied for detecting variability in date palm at the DNA level. Recently, the employment of gene-targeting molecular marker approaches to study biodiversity and genetic variations in many plant species has increased the attention of researchers interested in date palm to carry out phylogenetic studies using these novel marker systems. Molecular markers are good indicators of genetic distances among accessions, because DNA-based markers are neutral in the face of selection. Here we describe the employment of multidisciplinary molecular marker approaches: amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism, conserved DNA-derived polymorphism (CDDP), intron-targeted amplified polymorphism (ITAP), simple sequence repeats (SSR), and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) to assess genetic diversity in date palm.

  20. Assessment of genetic diversity among sugarcane cultivars using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity based on the characterization of genetic makeup, using molecular markers is of utmost importance for breeders in crop improvement programme. A total of 26 microsatellite primers were used to determine the genetic diversity among 40 sugarcane genotypes including their parents. The polymerase chain ...

  1. Molecular characterization and assessment of genetic diversity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    R Madhusudhana

    We studied genetic diversity in 31 sorghum parents using 413 sorghum simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers ..... BT × 623 and its derivative,. ICSB38 grouped ..... Pedigree- vs. DNA marker-based genetic similarity estimates in Cotton. Crop.

  2. DNA landmarks for genetic diversity assessment in tea genotypes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tea (Camellia sinensis) is one of the most important non-alcoholic beverages of the world. Natural genetic diversity in tea has been reduced due to continue selection in favor of desirable traits. The present study was conducted to estimate genetic diversity in tea genotypes cultivated in Pakistan using 20 randomly amplified ...

  3. Assessment of the genetic diversity in five generations of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    obtained for F5, F6, F7, F8 and F9 generations revealed a progressive increasing of genetic similarity throughout the five stocks, ... Key words: Litopenaeus vannamei, genetic diversity, genetic drift, inbreeding, RAPD. INTRODUCTION ..... here which could be accounted to inbreeding depression. The increase of the effective ...

  4. Assessing the genetic diversity of cultivars and wild soybeans using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increasing the diversity of the soybean germplasm base could introduce new genes affecting agronomic traits. In this study, we demonstrated the differences of genetic diversity level among 40 soybean accessions of cultivars, landraces and wild soybeans collected in the Shanxi Agricultural University using 40 simple ...

  5. Assessment of genetic diversity among accessions of two traditional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers were used to evaluate the genetic diversity and explore the genetic relationship among accessions of Acmella uliginosa and Justicia tenella, two leaf vegetables collected from different areas in the northwest and northeast parts of Benin (West Africa). The total ...

  6. Assessment of genetic diversity among maize accessions using inter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NRCC

    2011-11-07

    Nov 7, 2011 ... The narrow genetic base of popcorn has been of concern to the breeders of this cultivar, hence the present research ... the common maize assembled in the group I confirmed that the compared analysis of genetic diversity was more ..... inbreeding depression is also strong, thus favoring abrupt changes in ...

  7. Assessment of genetic diversity within sour cherry clones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, S. K.; Andersen, S. B.; Henriksen, K.

    2013-01-01

    of improved breeding material. However, no differences in allele profile were found between or within the clones, calling into question the extent of the available genetic diversity and indicating that the observed variance in yield may have to be explained by other genetic mechanisms, including epigenetic...

  8. Assessing genetic diversity of perennial ryegrass ( Lolium perenne L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers were used to compare genetic diversity between commercial cultivars and natural germplasm which were obtained from Europe, Africa, Asia, and North America. There was a relatively high genetic variation in the whole collection judged by the polymorphism rate ...

  9. Genetic diversity assessment of farmers' and improved potato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In summary, the farmers' cultivars are distinct from the Kenyan and Rwandese materials and represent more genetic diversity than the varieties imported into Eritrea. This finding is of interest to national breeding program to use the farmer's materials as source of genetic variation for traits of interest. Keywords: Potato, simple ...

  10. Assessment of genetic diversity in Brazilian barley using SSR markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Rosset Ferreira

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Barley is a major cereal grown widely and used in several food products, beverage production and animal fodder. Genetic diversity is a key component in breeding programs. We have analyzed the genetic diversity of barley accessions using microsatellite markers. The accessions were composed of wild and domesticated barley representing genotypes from six countries and three breeding programs in Brazil. A total of 280 alleles were detected, 36 unique to Brazilian barley. The marker Bmag120 showed the greatest polymorphism information content (PIC, with the highest mean value found on chromosome three, and the lowest on chromosomes four and six. The wild accessions presented the highest diversity followed by the foreign genotypes. Genetic analysis was performed using Principal Coordinates Analysis, UPGMA clustering, and Bayesian clustering analysis implemented in Structure. All results obtained by the different methods were similar. Loss of genetic diversity has occurred in Brazilian genotypes. The number of alleles detected in genotypes released in 1980s was higher, whereas most of the cultivars released thereafter showed lower PIC and clustered in separate subgroups from the older cultivars. The use of a more diverse panel of genotypes should be considered in order to exploit novel alleles in Brazilian barley breeding programs.

  11. Assessment of genetic diversity for some Iraqi date palms ( Phoenix ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) were used to evaluate the genetic diversity between 18 date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) varieties (11 females and 7 males) collected from the center of Iraq. Six primer pairs were applied to detect polymorphism between varieties. A total of 83 polymorphic AFLP fragments ...

  12. Assessment of genetic diversity in French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-08-09

    Aug 9, 2010 ... RAPD molecular markers were used to evaluate the genetic diversity in the fourteen varieties of French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) of three eco-geographical regions of Bangladesh. Out of the 20 primers only,. 6 yielded polymorphic banding patterns. In total, 40 different DNA bands were reproducibly ...

  13. Assessment of genetic diversity in French bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAPD molecular markers were used to evaluate the genetic diversity in the fourteen varieties of French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) of three eco-geographical regions of Bangladesh. Out of the 20 primers only, 6 yielded polymorphic banding patterns. In total, 40 different DNA bands were reproducibly obtained, out of which ...

  14. Assessment of genetic diversity in different clones of Dalbergia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity of forty (40) clones of Dalbergia sissoo Roxb was analyzed using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers by selecting 30 decamer primers, which were later reduced to 10 based on the preliminary PCR amplification. A total of 129 distinct DNA fragments (bands) were amplified, of which 104 ...

  15. Assessment of genetic diversity analysis in contrasting sugarcane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sugarcane is an important crop in the country economically, politically and sociologically. It is the second largest agro-industry next to textiles. The selection and combination of parents for crossing rely on an understanding of their genetic structures and molecular diversity. In the present study, 28 sugarcane genotypes were ...

  16. Assessing the genetic diversity of five Tanzanian chicken ecotypes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Charles Moses Lyimo

    2013-12-21

    Dec 21, 2013 ... Animal Science. Abstract. The study aimed to evaluate the genetic diversity of Tanzanian chicken populations through phylogenetic relationship, and to trace the history of Tanzanian indigenous chickens. Five ecotypes of. Tanzanian local chickens (Ching'wekwe, Kuchi, Morogoro-medium, Pemba and ...

  17. Assessment of genetic diversity of Lycoris longituba (Amaryllidaceae ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    On the other hand, the colour type in XY pop- ulation was mainly white. These results were in accordance with the analysis based on RAPDs in that the dissimilarity of morphological types among the three populations was con- firmed by the genetic diversity data. The reason may be that natural hybridization of many fertile ...

  18. Molecular based assessment of genetic diversity of xoconostle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Xoconostle or acidic prickly pear is an important fruit in Mexico; it is produced by a group of Opuntia plants known for their nutritional qualities and adapted to harsh environmental conditions. In this study, we report for the first time the estimation of genetic diversity within a set of 24 xoconostle accessions using inter simple ...

  19. DNA landmarks for genetic diversity assessment in tea genotypes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bilal

    2011-11-07

    Nov 7, 2011 ... As the available land for tea cultivation is limited, improved breeding strategies with reduced pro- duction costs are getting increasing importance. Natural genetic diversity in tea has been reduced at an alarming rate mainly because of selection and breeding for desirable traits (Kaundun and Park, 2002).

  20. Genetic Diversity Of Plukenetia Volubilis L. Assessed By ISSR Markers*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocelák M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The diversity and genetic relationships in 173 sacha inchi samples were analyzed using ISSR markers. Thirty ISSR primers were used, only 8 showed variability in tested samples. ISSR fragments ranged from 200 to 2500 bp. The mean number of bands per primer was 12 and the average number of polymorphic bands per primer was 11. The lowest percentages of polymorphic bands (27%, gene diversity (0.103, and Shannon’s information index (0.15 were exhibited by the Santa Lucia population, which was also geographically most distant. This fact may be attributed to a very small size of this group. In contrast, the Dos de Mayo population exhibited the highest percentage of polymorphic bands (78%, and the Santa Cruz population the highest Nei’s gene diversity index (0.238 and Shannon’s information index (0.357. The obtained level of genetic variability was 36% among tested populations and 64% within populations. Although the diversity indices were low, a cluster analysis revealed 8 clusters containing mainly samples belonging to individual populations. Principal coordinate analysis clearly distinguished Chumbaquihui, Pucallpa, Dos de Mayo, and Aguas de Oro populations, the others were intermixed. The obtained results indicated the level of genetic diversity present in this location of Peru, although it is influenced by anthropological aspects and independent on the geographical distances.

  1. Assessing genetic diversity of some Anthurium andraeanum Hort ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers fingerprinting were used to assess the level of genetic variations among 24 cut-flower Anthurium andraeanum Hort. cultivars. Eight decamer primers produced a total of 98 reproducible PCR bands that were used to calculate the Nei and Li's genetic distance (GDNL) ...

  2. Genetic diversity of Cuban pineapple germplasm assessed by AFLP Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermis Yanes Paz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cuban pineapple germplasm collection represents the genetic diversity of pineapple cultivated in that country and includes other important genotypes obtained from the germplasm collections in Brazil and Martinique. The collection has previously been characterized with morphological descriptors but a molecular characterization has been lacking. With this aim, 56 six genotypes of A. comosus and one of Bromelia pinguin were analyzed with a total of 191 AFLP markers. A dendrogram that represents the genetic relationships between these samples based on the AFLP results showed a low level of diversity in the Cuban pineapple collection. All Ananas comosus accessions, being the majority obtained from farmers in different regions in Cuba, are grouped at distances lower than 0.20. Molecular characterization was in line with morphological characterization. These results are useful for breeding and conservation purposes.

  3. Assessment of genetic diversity among maize accessions using inter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The narrow genetic base of popcorn has been of concern to the breeders of this cultivar, hence the present research aimed at assessing popcorn variability using inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) markers. From 52 accessions, nine groups were made at a cutoff value of 0.36 on the abscissa in the UPGMA dendrogram.

  4. Genetic diversity and population structure assessed by SSR and SNP markers in a large germplasm collection of grape

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emanuelli, Francesco; Lorenzi, Silvia; Grzeskowiak, Lukasz; Catalano, Valentina; Stefanini, Marco; Troggio, Michela; Myles, Sean; Martinez-Zapater, José M; Zyprian, Eva; Moreira, Flavia M; Grando, M Stella

    2013-01-01

    ... on genetic diversity, population structure and proper phenotypic assessment. The identification of representative and manageable subset of accessions would facilitate access to the diversity available in large collections...

  5. Assessment of the genetic diversity in five generations of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic variation among and within five generations of an inbred commercial captive line of Litopenaeus vannamei and genetic distance among them were evaluated by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), using descriptive and genetic similarity analyses for dominant markers at single- and multi-populational level ...

  6. Assessment of genetic diversity among accessions of two traditional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-04-11

    Apr 11, 2011 ... 1Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Sciences and Technology (FAST), University of Abomey-. Calavi (UAC), BP ... and explore the genetic relationship among accessions of Acmella uliginosa and Justicia tenella, two ... characterised with the use of modern molecular tools. Genetic ...

  7. Genetic diversity as assessed by morphological and microsatellite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lap

    2012-10-18

    Oct 18, 2012 ... 15092 Afr. J. Biotechnol. Table 1. List of greengram genotypes with pedigree used in the study. S/N. Variety. Parentage. Special feature. 1. Rajendran. Selection from ... Limited work has been done so far with nuclear DNA diversity in .... is an understanding of the structure of the germplasm collection. This in ...

  8. Assessment of the genetic diversity of Kenyan coconut germplasm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marker CAC23 had the highest PIC and revealed highest gene diversity values in this study. Analysis of the molecular variation indicated that within individual variation was 98% while among materials, variation was low at 2% suggesting that molecular variation was not defined by region of production. Cluster analysis was ...

  9. Molecular assessment of genetic diversity in mung bean germplasm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RAPD profiles were used to identify the extent of diversity among 54 accessions of mung bean that included both improved and local land races. Out of the 40 primers screened, seven primers generated 174 amplification products with an average of 24.85 bands per primer. The RAPD profiles were analysed for Jaccard's ...

  10. An assessment of the genetic diversity and structure within and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 85; Issue 1 ... Pest Animal Control Cooperative Research Centre, GPO Box 284, Canberra, ACT, Australia 2601; Queensland Department of Natural Resources and Mines, PO Box 187, Charters Towers, Queensland, Australia 4820; Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service, ...

  11. Assessment of genetic diversity among Capsicum annuum L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is a good source of vitamin C, A and E and chilli oleoresin has a considerable use in pharmaceutical industry. India being the largest producer of ... However, one large cluster consists of maximum of 8 genotypes revealing genetic closeness which could be efficiently used in breeding programme. Key words: Capsicum ...

  12. Assessment of genetic diversity in sorghum accessions using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    uwerhiavwe

    materials for genetic resource conservation (Food and. Agriculture ... targeted goals and food security (Gray, 1996). Conventional plant breeding is .... Table 1. List of sorghum accessions, collection sites and the status of accessions used for AFLP marker analysis. Number Acc. No./Name*. Major agroecology. Region. Zone.

  13. The use of microsatellite markers for genetic diversity assessment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-02-28

    Feb 28, 2011 ... Genetica, 71: 75-. 80. von Bothmer R, Jacobsen N, Baden C, Linde-Laursen I, Jorgensen RB. (1991). An ecogeographical study of the genus Hordeum. Systematic and ecogeographic studies on crop genepools 7. International. Board for Plant Genetics Resources, Rome, 2nd ed. Dellaporta SL, Hicks JB ...

  14. Assessment of genetic diversity in Triticum spp. and Aegilops spp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-03-04

    Mar 4, 2008 ... Crop Sci. 38: 1271-1278. Bassam BJ, Caetano-Anolles G, Gresshoff PM (1991). Fast and sensitive silver staining of DNA in polyacrylamide gels. Anal. Biochem. 196: 80-83. Bohn M, Utz HF, Melchinger AE (1999). Genetic similarities among winter wheat cultivars determined on the basis of RFLPs, AFLPs,.

  15. Assessing the impact of breeding strategies on inherited disorders and genetic diversity in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Grégoire; Rognon, Xavier

    2012-12-01

    In the context of management of genetic diversity and control of genetic disorders within dog breeds, a method is proposed for assessing the impact of different breeding strategies that takes into account the genealogical information specific to a given breed. Two types of strategies were investigated: (1) eradication of an identified monogenic recessive disorder, taking into account three different mating limitations and various initial allele frequencies; and (2) control of the population sire effect by limiting the number of offspring per reproducer. The method was tested on four dog breeds: Braque Saint Germain, Berger des Pyrénées, Coton de Tulear and Epagneul Breton. Breeding policies, such as the removal of all carriers from the reproduction pool, may have a range of effects on genetic diversity, depending on the breed and the frequency of deleterious alleles. Limiting the number of offspring per reproducer may also have a positive impact on genetic diversity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic diversity in different populations of sloths assessed by DNA fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MORAES N.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we analyzed a population of Bradypus torquatus with individuals originally distributed in different localities of Bahia, and two populations of B. variegatus with individuals from Bahia and São Paulo States. Using the DNA fingerprinting method, we assessed the genetic variability within and between populations. Analysis of the DNA profiles revealed genetic similarity indices ranging from 0.34 ± 0.07 to 0.87 ± 0.04. Similar low levels of genetic variability were found only in isolated mammalian populations or among related individuals. This study presents the first analyses of genetic diversity in sloth populations.

  17. Assessment of genetic diversity in Chinese eared pheasant using fluorescent-AFLP markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiujuan; Zhu, Yaohong; Liu, Panqi

    2010-01-01

    using Jaccard’s similarity coefficients (SC) and the corresponding dendrogram. It was found that there was a moderate genetic distance between the four species (SC = 0.674–0.832). Brown eared pheasant was genetically closely related to blue eared pheasant (SC = 0.832), while white eared pheasant...... on the list of the world’s threatened species. In this paper, 74 individuals from the four eared pheasant species were assessed for population genetic diversity by means of fluorescent-AFLP markers. A total of 429 AFLP peaks were amplified by 11 pairs of fluorescent EcoRI/TaqI primer combinations. Out of all...... markers, 329 AFLPs were polymorphic. Each primer combination produced in reactions from 19 to 72 fragments and the polymorphic peaks percentage ranged from 53.33% to 86.11% with an average of 74.36% polymorphic bands. Genetic distance between species and genetic diversity within species were evaluated...

  18. Comparative assessment of genetic diversity among Indian bamboo genotypes using RAPD and ISSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Parth; Gajera, Bhavesh; Mankad, Mounil; Shah, Shikha; Patel, Armi; Patil, Ghanshyam; Narayanan, Subhash; Kumar, Nitish

    2015-08-01

    Bamboo is one of the important plant for pulp, paper and charcoal industries. After China, India is the second largest bamboo reserve in Asia. Around the globe, wide genetic diversity of bamboo is present which serves as the base for selection and improvement. DNA based molecular markers appears to be a striking substitute for systematic assessment of the genetic diversity in conservation and genetic improvement of plants. DNA based molecular markers such as RAPD and ISSR were used to assess the genetic diversity in 13 bamboo genotypes. Total 120 RAPD and 63 ISSR primers were tested, of which only 42 polymorphic primers (30 RAPD and 12 ISSR), gave reproducible amplification profile and were used in this study. 30 RAPD primers yielded total 645 amplified fragments, of which 623 were polymorphic, and 20.76 polymorphic bands per primer were observed across 13 genotypes. 12 ISSR primers produced 246 amplified fragments, of which 241 were polymorphic, and 20.08 polymorphic bands per primer was observed across 13 different genotypes. The Jaccard's coefficient of RAPD, ISSR and pooled RAPD and ISSR dendrograms ranged from 0.26 to 0.83, 0.23 to 0.86 and 0.26 to 0.84 respectively. The present study found the large genetic diversity present between different elite genotypes of bamboo. Such investigation can deliver a well understanding of the available genotypes, which might be further exploited for the paper industry.

  19. Single nucleotide polymorphisms for assessing genetic diversity in castor bean (Ricinus communis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabinowicz Pablo D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Castor bean (Ricinus communis is an agricultural crop and garden ornamental that is widely cultivated and has been introduced worldwide. Understanding population structure and the distribution of castor bean cultivars has been challenging because of limited genetic variability. We analyzed the population genetics of R. communis in a worldwide collection of plants from germplasm and from naturalized populations in Florida, U.S. To assess genetic diversity we conducted survey sequencing of the genomes of seven diverse cultivars and compared the data to a reference genome assembly of a widespread cultivar (Hale. We determined the population genetic structure of 676 samples using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs at 48 loci. Results Bayesian clustering indicated five main groups worldwide and a repeated pattern of mixed genotypes in most countries. High levels of population differentiation occurred between most populations but this structure was not geographically based. Most molecular variance occurred within populations (74% followed by 22% among populations, and 4% among continents. Samples from naturalized populations in Florida indicated significant population structuring consistent with local demes. There was significant population differentiation for 56 of 78 comparisons in Florida (pairwise population ϕPT values, p Conclusion Low levels of genetic diversity and mixing of genotypes have led to minimal geographic structuring of castor bean populations worldwide. Relatively few lineages occur and these are widely distributed. Our approach of determining population genetic structure using SNPs from genome-wide comparisons constitutes a framework for high-throughput analyses of genetic diversity in plants, particularly in species with limited genetic diversity.

  20. Assessment of genetic diversity of a native population of Eplingiella fruticosa: a plant with therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, D C; Diniz, L E C; Blank, A F; Nizio, D A C; Pinto, J A O; Pereira, K L G; Arrigoni-Blank, M F

    2017-08-17

    Eplingiella fruticosa (Salzm. ex Benth.) Harley & J.F.B. Pastore, ex Hyptis fruticosa Salzm. ex Benth. is an aromatic and medicinal plant of the family Lamiaceae, found mainly in regions with intense anthropic activity. Information on the genetic diversity of this species is scarce. However, it can be assessed using molecular markers that identify the level of diversity among phenotypically identical individuals. The present study aimed to characterize the genetic diversity of a native population of E. fruticosa from the State of Sergipe using ISSR molecular markers. Samples of 100 plants were collected in 11 municipalities of the State of Sergipe and analyzed using eight ISSR primers, resulting in 72 informative bands. The cluster analysis obtained using the neighbor joining method resulted in three groups: Group I consisted of 50 plants, mainly from the municipalities of Areia Branca, Estância, Japaratuba, Moita Bonita, Pirambu, and Salgado; Group II was formed by 21 plants, with nine representatives from the municipality of Itaporanga d'Ajuda and 13 representatives from other municipalities; Group III was composed by 29 plants, being represented mainly by the municipalities of Malhada dos Bois and São Cristóvão. The smallest genetic distance occurred between plants EPF94 and EPF96 (0.250), and the greatest distance occurred between plants EPF50 and EPF96 (0.9778). The Shannon index had a mean value of 0.42, and diversity was considered moderate. Heterozygosity had a mean value of 0.267 and was considered low. Polymorphic information content (0.253) was considered moderately informative. Genetic diversity of E. fruticosa plants was intermediate, and the results of the present study can assist in the conservation and use of the genetic resources of this species.

  1. Genetic diversity and apple leaf spot disease resistance characterization assessed by SSR markers

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    Gustavo H.F. Klabunde

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Among the cultivation problems of apple production in Brazil, Apple Leaf Spot (ALS disease represents one of the main breeding challenges. This study aims at analyzing the genetic diversity among 152 apple scion accessions available at the Apple Gene Bank of EPAGRI, located in Caçador, Santa Catarina/ Brazil. Eleven genomic SSR loci were analyzed to assess genetic diversity of ALS resistant and susceptible accessions. Results revealed high genetic diversity of the studied accessions, being 120 exclusive alleles (67 unique from scion accessions resistant to ALS, and a mean PIC of 0.823. The locus Probability of Identity (I ranged from 0.017 to 0.089. The combined I was 4.11 x 10-16, and the Power of Exclusion was 99.99999259%. In addition, the DNA fingerprint patterns will contribute as additional descriptors to select parental for crosses and early identification of apple accessions for breeding purposes, and also for cultivar protection.

  2. Development of SSR Markers and Assessment of Genetic Diversity in Medicinal Chrysanthemum morifolium Cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shangguo; He, Renfeng; Lu, Jiangjie; Jiang, Mengying; Shen, Xiaoxia; Jiang, Yan; Wang, Zhi'an; Wang, Huizhong

    2016-01-01

    Chrysanthemum morifolium, is a well-known flowering plant worldwide, and has a high commercial, floricultural, and medicinal value. In this study, simple-sequence repeat (SSR) markers were generated from EST datasets and were applied to assess the genetic diversity among 32 cultivars. A total of 218 in silico SSR loci were identified from 7300 C. morifolium ESTs retrieved from GenBank. Of all SSR loci, 61.47% of them (134) were hexa-nucleotide repeats, followed by tri-nucleotide repeats (17.89%), di-nucleotide repeats (12.39%), tetra-nucleotide repeats (4.13%), and penta-nucleotide repeats (4.13%). In this study, 17 novel EST-SSR markers were verified. Along with 38 SSR markers reported previously, 55 C. morifolium SSR markers were selected for further genetic diversity analysis. PCR amplification of these EST-SSRs produced 1319 fragments, 1306 of which showed polymorphism. The average polymorphism information content of the SSR primer pairs was 0.972 (0.938-0.993), which showed high genetic diversity among C. morifolium cultivars. Based on SSR markers, 32 C. morifolium cultivars were separated into two main groups by partitioning of the clusters using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean dendrogram, which was further supported by a principal coordinate analysis plot. Phylogenetic relationship among C. morifolium cultivars as revealed by SSR markers was highly consistent with the classification of medicinal C. morifolium populations according to their origin and ecological distribution. Our results demonstrated that SSR markers were highly reproducible and informative, and could be used to evaluate genetic diversity and relationships among medicinal C. morifolium cultivars.

  3. Genetic Diversity Assessment of Portuguese Cultivated Vicia faba L. through IRAP Markers

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    Diana Tomás

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Faba bean have been grown in Portugal for a long time and locally adapted populations are still maintained on farm. The genetic diversity of four Portuguese faba bean populations that are still cultivated in some regions of the country was evaluated using the Inter Retrotransposons Amplified Polymorphism (IRAP technique. It was shown that molecular markers based on retrotransposons previously identified in other species can be efficiently used in the genetic variability assessment of Vicia faba. The IRAP experiment targeting Athila yielded the most informative banding patterns. Cluster analysis using the neighbor-joining algorithm generated a dendrogram that clearly shows the distribution pattern of V. faba samples. The four equina accessions are separated from each other and form two distinct clades while the two major faba bean accessions are not unequivocally separated by the IRAP. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH analysis of sequences amplified by IRAP Athila revealed a wide distribution throughout V. faba chromosomes, confirming the whole-genome coverage of this molecular marker. Morphological characteristics were also assessed through cluster analysis of seed characters using the unweighted pair group method arithmetic average (UPGMA and principal component analysis (PCA, showing a clear discrimination between faba bean major and equina groups. It was also found that the seed character most relevant to distinguish accessions was 100 seed weight. Seed morphological traits and IRAP evaluation give similar results supporting the potential of IRAP analysis for genetic diversity studies.

  4. Assessment of genetic diversity and population structure of Vietnamese indigenous cattle populations by microsatellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, Lan Doan; Do, Duy Ngoc; Binh, Nguyen Trong

    2013-01-01

    Cattle play a very important role in agriculture and food security in Vietnam. A high level of cattle diversity exists and serves different needs of Vietnamese cattle keepers but has not yet been molecularly characterized. This study evaluates the genetic diversity and structure of Vietnamese......) to 17 (ETH185). The level of gene diversity was high indicated by a mean expected heterozygosity (He) across populations and loci of 0.73. Level of inbreeding (mean FIS=0.05) and genetic differentiation (mean FST=0.04) was moderate. The phylogenetic tree based on Reynolds genetic distance reflected...... of genetic diversity and distinct genetic structures. Based on these results, we recommend that for conservation homogenous populations (Nghe An, Thanh Hoa and Phu Yen) can be grouped to reduce costs and U Dau Riu, Lang Son and Ha Giang populations should be conserved separately to avoid loss of genetic...

  5. Assessment of genetic diversity among faba bean genotypes using agro-morphological and molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Megahed H; Alghamdi, Salem S; Migdadi, Hussein M; Khan, Muhammad A; El-Harty, Ehab H; Al-Faifi, Sulieman A

    2015-05-01

    Forty faba bean (Vicia faba L.) genotypes were evaluated for their agro-morphological performance and molecular diversity under Central Region of Saudi Arabia conditions during 2010-11 and 2011-12 seasons. Field performance results showed that faba genotypes exhibited a significant amount of variation for their agro-morphological studied parameters. Giza40 recorded the tallest genotype (139.5 cm), highest number of seeds per plants (100.8), and the highest seed yield per plant (70.8 g). The best performing genotypes were Giza40, FLIP03-014FB, Gazira1 and Goff1. Genetic variability among genotypes was determined using Sequence Related Amplified Polymorphism (SRAP) and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers. A total of 183 amplified fragments (alleles) and 1758 polymorphic fragments (bands) in SRAP and 202 alleles and 716 bands in AFLP were obtained using six SRAP and four AFLP primer combinations respectively. Polymorphism information content (PIC) values for AFLP and SRAP markers were higher than 0.8, indicating the existence of a considerable amount of genetic diversity among faba tested genotypes. The UPGMA based clustering of faba genotypes was largely based on origin and/or genetic background. Result of cluster analysis based on SRAP showed weak and not significant correlation while, it was highly significant based on AFLP analysis with agro-morphological characters (r = 0.01, p > 0.54 and r = 0.26, p < 0.004 respectively). Combined SRAP and AFLP markers proved to be significantly useful for genetic diversity assessment at molecular level. They exhibited high discrimination power, and were able to distinguish the faba bean genotypes with high efficiency and accuracy levels.

  6. [Genetic diversity of microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2012-11-01

    Microorganisms are important components of the biosphere in maintaining the ecological balance. With the development of molecular biology techniques, researches on the microbial genetic diversity have been developed from morphological and/or protein levels to molecular level. The development of high-throughout sequencing and metagenomics technology not only provide more abundant information and powerful evidence for understanding microbial diversities, but also have great significance for rational utilization and protection of biological resources. The advances in research on genetic diversity of microorganisms, such as separation and identification, population genetic structure, speciation, phylogeny, and evolution of microorganisms, were discussed in this paper.

  7. Covering chemical diversity of genetically-modified tomatoes using metabolomics for objective substantial equivalence assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyako Kusano

    Full Text Available As metabolomics can provide a biochemical snapshot of an organism's phenotype it is a promising approach for charting the unintended effects of genetic modification. A critical obstacle for this application is the inherently limited metabolomic coverage of any single analytical platform. We propose using multiple analytical platforms for the direct acquisition of an interpretable data set of estimable chemical diversity. As an example, we report an application of our multi-platform approach that assesses the substantial equivalence of tomatoes over-expressing the taste-modifying protein miraculin. In combination, the chosen platforms detected compounds that represent 86% of the estimated chemical diversity of the metabolites listed in the LycoCyc database. Following a proof-of-safety approach, we show that % had an acceptable range of variation while simultaneously indicating a reproducible transformation-related metabolic signature. We conclude that multi-platform metabolomics is an approach that is both sensitive and robust and that it constitutes a good starting point for characterizing genetically modified organisms.

  8. Genetic diversity of Crotalaria germplasm assessed through phylogenetic analysis of EST-SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M L; Mosjidis, J A; Morris, J B; Dean, R E; Jenkins, T M; Pederson, G A

    2006-06-01

    The genetic diversity of the genus Crotalaria is unknown even though many species in this genus are economically valuable. We report the first study in which polymorphic expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat (EST-SSR) markers derived from Medicago and soybean were used to assess the genetic diversity of the Crotalaria germplasm collection. This collection consisted of 26 accessions representing 4 morphologically characterized species. Phylogenetic analysis partitioned accessions into 4 main groups generally along species lines and revealed that 2 accessions were incorrectly identified as Crotalaria juncea and Crotalaria spectabilis instead of Crotalaria retusa. Morphological re-examination confirmed that these 2 accessions were misclassified during curation or conservation and were indeed C. retusa. Some amplicons from Crotalaria were sequenced and their sequences showed a high similarity (89% sequence identity) to Medicago truncatula from which the EST-SSR primers were designed; however, the SSRs were completely deleted in Crotalaria. Highly distinguishing markers or more sequences are required to further classify accessions within C. juncea.

  9. Assessment of genetic diversity in natural European hophornbeam (Ostrya carpinifolia Scop. populations in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semsettin Kulac

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity is a crucial component for plant survivability and fitness in terms of adaptation, genetic stability and variability. In this study, a total of 160 genotypes were investigated using 12 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD primers to understand the genetic structure and diversity of nine naturally distributed Ostrya carpinifolia populations in Turkey. Twelve RAPD primers yielded 111 clearly identifiable DNA bands, of which 71 bands were found to be polymorphic (64%. Observed number of alleles (Na, effective number of alleles (Ne and Nei's gene diversity (h were found as 2, 1.53 and 0.32, respectively. Total genetic variation (HT, within-population genetic variation (HS and Nei's genetic differentiation coefficient (GST were found as 0.32, 0.09 and 0.70, respectively. Genetic diversity analysis (AMOVA revealed highly significant (P < 0.001 genetic variations among and within populations. 69.94% of total variation was observed among populations while 26.69% was within populations. Gene flow value was calculated as 0.21 (Nm < 0.5, which could homogenize the genetic structure of a population. Two geographically isolated populations demonstrated high gene diversity and polymorphic loci ratio, indicating a relationship between geographic distribution of populations and eco-geographic factors. The findings of this study will pave the way for understanding the genetic diversity between inter- and intra-populations of O. carpinifolia species, as well as they would provide valuable information for management, conservation and utilization of in situ and ex situ Ostrya germplasms.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF EST-SSR MARKERS TO ASSESS GENETIC DIVERSITY OF BROCCOLI AND ITS RELATED SPECIES

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    Nur Kholilatul Izzah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of Expressed Sequence Tag-Simple Sequence Repeat (EST-SSR markers derived from public database is known to be more efficient, faster and low cost. The objective of this study was to generate a new set of EST-SSR markers for broccoli and its related species and their usefulness for assessing their genetic diversity. A total of 202 Brassica oleracea ESTs were retrieved from NCBI and then assembled into 172 unigenes by means of CAP3 program. Identification of SSRs was carried out using web-based tool, RepeatMasker software. Afterwards, EST-SSR markers were developed using Primer3 program. Among the identified SSRs, trinucleotide repeats were the most common repeat types, which accounted for about 50%. A total of eight primer pairs were successfully designed and yielded amplification products. Among them, five markers were polymorphic and displayed a total of 30 alleles with an average number of six alleles per locus. The polymorphic markers were subsequently used for analyzing genetic diversity of 36 B. oleracea cultivars including 22 broccoli, five cauliflower and nine kohlrabi cultivars based on genetic similarity matrix as implemented in NTSYS program. At similarity coefficient of 61%, a UPGMA clustering dendrogram effectively separated 36 genotypes into three main groups, where 30 out of 36 genotypes were clearly discriminated. The result obtained in the present study would help breeders in selecting parental lines for crossing. Moreover, the novel EST-SSR markers developed in the study could be a valuable tool for differentiating cultivars of broccoli and related species.

  11. Genetic diversity in native and commercial breeds of pigs in Portugal assessed by microsatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, A A; Carolino, M I; Sousa, M C O; Ginja, C; Silva, F S; Martinez, A M; Vega-Pla, J L; Carolino, N; Gama, L T

    2008-10-01

    Population structure and genetic diversity in the Portuguese native breeds of pigs Alentejano (AL), Bísaro (BI), and Malhado de Alcobaça (MA) and the exotic breeds Duroc (DU), Landrace (LR), Large White (LW), and Pietrain were analyzed by typing 22 microsatellite markers in 249 individuals. In general, the markers used were greatly polymorphic, with mean total and effective number of alleles per locus of 10.68 and 4.33, respectively, and an expected heterozygosity of 0.667 across loci. The effective number of alleles per locus and expected heterozygosity were greatest in BI, LR, and AL, and least in DU. Private alleles were found in 9 of the 22 markers analyzed, mostly in AL, but also in the other breeds, with the exception of LW. The proportion of loci not in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in each breed analyzed ranged between 0.23 (AL) and 0.41 (BI, LW, and Pietrain), mostly because of a less than expected number of heterozygotes in those loci. With the exception of MA, all breeds showed a significant deficit in heterozygosity (F(IS); P < 0.05), which was more pronounced in BI (F(IS) = 0.175) and AL (F(IS) = 0.139), suggesting that inbreeding is a major concern, especially in these breeds that have gone through a genetic bottleneck in the recent past. The analysis of relationships among breeds, assessed by different methods, indicates that DU and AL are the more distanced breeds relative to the others, with the closest relationship being observed between LR and MA. The degree of differentiation between subpopulations (F(ST)) indicates that 0.184 of the total genetic variability can be attributed to differences among breeds. The analysis of individual distances based on allele sharing indicates that animals of the same breed generally cluster together, but subdivision is observed in the BI and LR breeds. Furthermore, the analysis of population structure indicates there is very little admixture among breeds, with each one being identified with a single ancestral

  12. Microsatellite primers in Parietaria judaica (Urticaceae) to assess genetic diversity and structure in urban landscapes1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossu, Angèle; Bertaudière-Montès, Valérie; Dubut, Vincent; Manel, Stéphanie

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Urbanization is one of the main factors contributing to loss of genetic diversity, as the resulting landscape fragmentation and habitat loss induce species isolation. However, studies of genetic structure and diversity in urbanized landscapes are still rare. We characterized microsatellite primers for Parietaria judaica to study this environment. • Methods and Results: Eleven microsatellite loci from P. judaica, an urban plant, were isolated using shotgun pyrosequencing, and the simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were screened in 20 individuals of P. judaica. The loci were tested on 166 individuals from three populations in different cities. The number of alleles ranged from two to 19, and expected and observed heterozygosity values ranged from 0.019 to 0.912 and 0.019 to 0.448, respectively. • Conclusions: The markers amplified well in the species and will be useful for examining genetic diversity and population genetic structure in this urban plant. PMID:25225626

  13. Microsatellite primers in Parietaria judaica (Urticaceae) to assess genetic diversity and structure in urban landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossu, Angèle; Bertaudière-Montès, Valérie; Dubut, Vincent; Manel, Stéphanie

    2014-09-01

    Urbanization is one of the main factors contributing to loss of genetic diversity, as the resulting landscape fragmentation and habitat loss induce species isolation. However, studies of genetic structure and diversity in urbanized landscapes are still rare. We characterized microsatellite primers for Parietaria judaica to study this environment. • Eleven microsatellite loci from P. judaica, an urban plant, were isolated using shotgun pyrosequencing, and the simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were screened in 20 individuals of P. judaica. The loci were tested on 166 individuals from three populations in different cities. The number of alleles ranged from two to 19, and expected and observed heterozygosity values ranged from 0.019 to 0.912 and 0.019 to 0.448, respectively. • The markers amplified well in the species and will be useful for examining genetic diversity and population genetic structure in this urban plant.

  14. Microsatellite Primers in Parietaria judaica (Urticaceae to Assess Genetic Diversity and Structure in Urban Landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angèle Bossu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Urbanization is one of the main factors contributing to loss of genetic diversity, as the resulting landscape fragmentation and habitat loss induce species isolation. However, studies of genetic structure and diversity in urbanized landscapes are still rare. We characterized microsatellite primers for Parietaria judaica to study this environment. Methods and Results: Eleven microsatellite loci from P. judaica, an urban plant, were isolated using shotgun pyrosequencing, and the simple sequence repeat (SSR markers were screened in 20 individuals of P. judaica. The loci were tested on 166 individuals from three populations in different cities. The number of alleles ranged from two to 19, and expected and observed heterozygosity values ranged from 0.019 to 0.912 and 0.019 to 0.448, respectively. Conclusions: The markers amplified well in the species and will be useful for examining genetic diversity and population genetic structure in this urban plant.

  15. Comparative assessment of genetic diversity in cytoplasmic and nuclear genome of upland cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egamberdiev, Sharof S; Saha, Sukumar; Salakhutdinov, Ilkhom; Jenkins, Johnie N; Deng, Dewayne; Y Abdurakhmonov, Ibrokhim

    2016-06-01

    The importance of the cytoplasmic genome for many economically important traits is well documented in several crop species, including cotton. There is no report on application of cotton chloroplast specific SSR markers as a diagnostic tool to study genetic diversity among improved Upland cotton lines. The complete plastome sequence information in GenBank provided us an opportunity to report on 17 chloroplast specific SSR markers using a cost-effective data mining strategy. Here we report the comparative analysis of genetic diversity among a set of 42 improved Upland cotton lines using SSR markers specific to chloroplast and nuclear genome, respectively. Our results revealed that low to moderate level of genetic diversity existed in both nuclear and cytoplasm genome among this set of cotton lines. However, the specific estimation suggested that genetic diversity is lower in cytoplasmic genome compared to the nuclear genome among this set of Upland cotton lines. In summary, this research is important from several perspectives. We detected a set of cytoplasm genome specific SSR primer pairs by using a cost-effective data mining strategy. We reported for the first time the genetic diversity in the cytoplasmic genome within a set of improved Upland cotton accessions. Results revealed that the genetic diversity in cytoplasmic genome is narrow, compared to the nuclear genome within this set of Upland cotton accessions. Our results suggested that most of these polymorphic chloroplast SSRs would be a valuable complementary tool in addition to the nuclear SSR in the study of evolution, gene flow and genetic diversity in Upland cotton.

  16. Genetic diversity and relationships among Italian Merino derived breeds assessed by microsatellites

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    Francesca Maria Sarti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The conservation of genetic variability is one of the main objectives in the field of genetics applied to domestic livestock. Among molecular markers, microsatellites are particularly appreciated and widely utilized for the study of animal genome. In this study a genetic characterization of three Italian Merino derived sheep breeds was carried out by 30 microsatellites markers; the genetic relationships between these breeds and the Spanish ancestors were also investigated. All the microsatellites examined resulted polymorphic and a total of 375 alleles were detected. FIS values of the three Italian Merinos demonstrate a low level of inbreeding. The results show a good genetic variability of all the studied breeds; at the same time, the genetic identity of each breed is confirmed. These molecular data can be utilized to improve the present selection schemes and the plans to preserve genetic diversity.

  17. Genetic bottlenecks in Turkish okra germplasm and utility of iPBS retrotransposon markers for genetic diversity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldız, M; Koçak, M; Baloch, F S

    2015-09-08

    Lack of requisite genetic variation in Turkish okra has necessitated the use of different types of markers for estimating the genetic diversity and identifying the source of variation. Transposable elements, present abundantly in plant genomes, generate genomic diversity through their replication and are thus an excellent source of molecular markers. We hypothesized that inter-primer binding site (iPBS)-retrotransposons could be the source of variation because of their genome plasticity nature. In the present study, genetic diversity of 66 okra landraces was analyzed using iPBS-retrotransposon markers. iPBS-retrotransposons detected 88 bands with 40.2% polymorphism and an average of 6.8 bands per primer. Gene diversity and Shannon's information index ranged from 0.01 to 0.13 and 0.02 to 0.21 for iPBS-retrotransposons and from 0.06 to 0.46 and 0.14 to 0.65 for simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, respectively. Polymorphism information content value for retrotransposons varied between 0.12 and 0.99, while that for SSR was from 0.52 to 0.81. Neighbor joining analysis based on retrotransposons and SSRs divided all the accessions into four clusters; however, SSR markers were more efficient in clustering the landraces based on their origin. Using the STRUCTURE software for determining population structure, and two populations (at the number of hypothetical subpopulations, K = 2) were identified among the landraces. Low genetic diversity in Turkish okra highlights the need for the introduction of plants from countries with greater genetic diversity for these crops. This study also demonstrates the utility and role of iPBS-retrotransposons, a dominant and ubiquitous part of eukaryotic genomes, for diversity studies in okra.

  18. Assessment of genetic diversity in indigenous turmeric (Curcuma longa) germplasm from India using molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sushma; Singh, Shweta; Sharma, Suresh; Tewari, S K; Roy, R K; Goel, A K; Rana, T S

    2015-04-01

    Curcuma longa L., commonly known as turmeric, is one of the economically and medicinally important plant species. It is predominantly cultivated in the tropical and sub tropical countries. India is the largest producer, and exporter of turmeric in the world, followed by China, Indonesia, Bangladesh and Thailand. In the present study, Directed Amplification of Minisatellite DNA (DAMD) and Inter Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSR), methods were used to estimate the genetic variability in indigenous turmeric germplasm. Cumulative data analysis for DAMD (15) and ISSR (13) markers resulted into 478 fragments, out of which 392 fragments were polymorphic, revealing 82 % polymorphism across the turmeric genotypes. Wide range of pairwise genetic distances (0.03-0.59) across the genotypes revealed that these genotypes are genetically quite diverse. The UPGMA dendrogram generated using cumulative data showed significant relationships amongst the genotypes. All 29 genotypes studied grouped into two clusters irrespective of their geographical affiliations with 100 % bootstrap value except few genotypes, suggesting considerable diversity amongst the genotypes. These results suggested that the current collection of turmeric genotypes preserve the vast majority of natural variations. The results further demonstrate the efficiency and reliability of DAMD and ISSR markers in determining the genetic diversity and relationships among the indigenous turmeric germplasm. DAMD and ISSR profiling have identified diverse turmeric genotypes, which could be further utilized in various genetic improvement programmes including conventional as well as marker assisted breeding towards development of new and desirable turmeric genotypes.

  19. Genetic diversity of cultivated flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) germplasm assessed by retrotransposon-based markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smýkal, P; Bačová-Kerteszová, N; Kalendar, R; Corander, J; Schulman, A H; Pavelek, M

    2011-05-01

    Retrotransposon segments were characterized and inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism (IRAP) markers developed for cultivated flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) and the Linum genus. Over 75 distinct long terminal repeat retrotransposon segments were cloned, the first set for Linum, and specific primers designed for them. IRAP was then used to evaluate genetic diversity among 708 accessions of cultivated flax comprising 143 landraces, 387 varieties, and 178 breeding lines. These included both traditional and modern, oil (86), fiber (351), and combined-use (271) accessions, originating from 36 countries, and 10 wild Linum species. The set of 10 most polymorphic primers yielded 141 reproducible informative data points per accession, with 52% polymorphism and a 0.34 Shannon diversity index. The maximal genetic diversity was detected among wild Linum species (100% IRAP polymorphism and 0.57 Jaccard similarity), while diversity within cultivated germplasm decreased from landraces (58%, 0.63) to breeding lines (48%, 0.85) and cultivars (50%, 0.81). Application of Bayesian methods for clustering resulted in the robust identification of 20 clusters of accessions, which were unstratified according to origin or user type. This indicates an overlap in genetic diversity despite disruptive selection for fiber versus oil types. Nevertheless, eight clusters contained high proportions (70-100%) of commercial cultivars, whereas two clusters were rich (60%) in landraces. These findings provide a basis for better flax germplasm management, core collection establishment, and exploration of diversity in breeding, as well as for exploration of the role of retrotransposons in flax genome dynamics.

  20. Genetic diversity among Juglans regia L. genotypes assessed by morphological traits and microsatellite markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoodi, R.; Rahmani, F.; Rezaee, R.

    2013-06-01

    In this study, genetic diversity was assayed among 16 accessions and five cultivars of Persian walnut (Juglans regia L.) using morphological traits and nine simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Samples were collected from Agriculture Research Center of Urmia city (North West Iran). Study on important morphological traits revealed genetic similarity of -0.6 to 0.99 based on CORR coefficient. The microsatellite marker system produced 34 alleles in range of 160-290 bp. The minimum (2) and maximum (7) number of alleles were obtained from WGA71 and WGA202 genetic loci, respectively. The mean number of alleles per locus was 4.25. Jaccards similarity coefficient ranged from 0.13 to 0.76. The results of this paper indicate high diversity among these genotypes which could be used for breeding management. (Author) 28 refs.

  1. Genetic Diversity Assessment in Several Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. Cultivars Using Microsatellite Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza BLORI-MOGHADAM

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, genetic diversity in seven cultivars of cultivated barley (Hordeum vulgare populations was evaluated using 10 microsatellite markers. Genomic DNA was extracted from fresh leaves and amplification reactions were done by PCR. The amplification products were separated on 6% denaturing polyacrylamide gels containing 7M urea and visualized via silver staining method. High level of polymorphism was observed among populations. Polymorphic bands ranged from 100 to 300 bp. Altogether 65 alleles were observed among all genotypes, with an average of 9.2 alleles per locus for all loci. Polymorphic information content (PIC ranged from 0.80 to 0.88 with an average of 0.84. Sahand populations showed the lowest mean of gene diversity whereas the highest mean of heterozygosity observed in Rayhan populations that can prepare a powerful resource of genetic diversity for breeding programs. The genotypes were clustered using unweight pair-group method on arithmetic average by POPGEN32 software. The dendrogram discriminated all the genotypes in several groups. The results showed that SSR markers have a high ability to reveal most of the information in a single locus and can be used for genetic analysis in molecular levels determination of genetic similarity and clustering barley cultivars.

  2. Genetic diversity of sorghum accessions resistant to greenbugs as assessed with AFLP markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y Q; Huang, Yinghua; Tauer, C G; Porter, David R

    2006-02-01

    Sorghum, Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench, is the fifth most important cereal crop grown worldwide and the fourth in the United States. Greenbug, Schizaphis graminum (Rondani), is a major insect pest of sorghum with several biotypes reported to date. Greenbug biotype I is currently the most prevalent and most virulent on sorghum plants. Breeding for resistance is an effective way to control greenbug damage. A successful breeding program relies in part upon a clear understanding of breeding materials. However, the genetic diversity and relatedness among the greenbug biotype I resistant accessions collected from different geographic origins have not been well characterized, although a rich germplasm collection is available. In this study, 26 sorghum accessions from 12 countries were evaluated for both resistance to greenbug biotype I and genetic diversity using fluorescence-labeled amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). Twenty-six AFLP primer combinations produced 819 polymorphic fragments indicating a relatively high level of polymorphism among the accessions. Genetic similarity coefficients among the sorghum accessions ranged from 0.69 to 0.90. Cluster analysis indicated that there were two major groups based on polymorphic bands. This study has led to the identification of new genetic sources of sorghum with substantial genetic variation and distinct groupings of resistant accessions that have the potential for use in the development of durable greenbug resistant sorghum.

  3. Assessment of Genetic Diversity in Bamboo Accessions of India Using Molecular Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Bharat Gami; Bakhtiyar Alam Syed; Beena Patel

    2015-01-01

    Bamboo is an important grass with wide scale applications in paper industries, medicines, constructions industries. It is potential feedstock for advanced biofuel production due to its favourable characteristics, natural abundance, rapid growth, perennial nature and higher CO2 sequestration. The objective of this study is to understand genetic diversity between the bamboo accessions with respect to geographical origin to correlate molecular information with feedstock characterization and adap...

  4. A Genomic Encyclopedia of the Root Nodule Bacteria: assessing genetic diversity through a systematic biogeographic survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Wayne; Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; Eshragi, Leila; Yoon, Je Won; Ngamwisetkun, Pinyaruk; Seshadri, Rekha; Ivanova, Natalia N; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2015-01-01

    Root nodule bacteria are free-living soil bacteria, belonging to diverse genera within the Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria, that have the capacity to form nitrogen-fixing symbioses with legumes. The symbiosis is specific and is governed by signaling molecules produced from both host and bacteria. Sequencing of several model RNB genomes has provided valuable insights into the genetic basis of symbiosis. However, the small number of sequenced RNB genomes available does not currently reflect the phylogenetic diversity of RNB, or the variety of mechanisms that lead to symbiosis in different legume hosts. This prevents a broad understanding of symbiotic interactions and the factors that govern the biogeography of host-microbe symbioses. Here, we outline a proposal to expand the number of sequenced RNB strains, which aims to capture this phylogenetic and biogeographic diversity. Through the Vavilov centers of diversity (Proposal ID: 231) and GEBA-RNB (Proposal ID: 882) projects we will sequence 107 RNB strains, isolated from diverse legume hosts in various geographic locations around the world. The nominated strains belong to nine of the 16 currently validly described RNB genera. They include 13 type strains, as well as elite inoculant strains of high commercial importance. These projects will strongly support systematic sequence-based studies of RNB and contribute to our understanding of the effects of biogeography on the evolution of different species of RNB, as well as the mechanisms that determine the specificity and effectiveness of nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation by RNB with diverse legume hosts.

  5. Population structure and genetic diversity of New World maize races assessed by DNA microsatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigouroux, Yves; Glaubitz, Jeffrey C; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Goodman, Major M; Sánchez G, Jesús; Doebley, John

    2008-10-01

    Because of the economic importance of maize and its scientific importance as a model system for studies of domestication, its evolutionary history is of general interest. We analyzed the population genetic structure of maize races by genotyping 964 individual plants, representing almost the entire set of ∼350 races native to the Americas, with 96 microsatellites. Using Bayesian clustering, we detected four main clusters consisting of highland Mexican, northern United States (US), tropical lowland, and Andean races. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the southwestern US was an intermediary stepping stone between Mexico and the northern US. Furthermore, southeastern US races appear to be of mixed northern flint and tropical lowland ancestry, while lowland middle South American races are of mixed Andean and tropical lowland ancestry. Several cases of post-Columbian movement of races were detected, most notably from the US to South America. Of the four main clusters, the highest genetic diversity occurs in highland Mexican races, while diversity is lowest in the Andes and northern US. Isolation by distance appears to be the main factor underlying the historical diversification of maize. We identify highland Mexico and the Andes as potential sources of genetic diversity underrepresented among elite lines used in maize breeding programs.

  6. An experimental design for assessing the genetic diversity of colonial waterbirds from the Danube Delta Biosphere Reserve (Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CIORPAC Mitica

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The extensive wetland complex of the Danube Delta provides internationally important stopover sites and breeding sites for millions of migratory birds. Worldwide, natural wetlands are facing an accelerated decline due to the increased urbanization and conversion of open spaces to agriculture. The Danube Delta is no exception, being subject to anthropogenic factors that affect this wildlife hotspot, in spite of considerable conservation efforts. Despite numerous studies focused on Danube Delta waterbird particularities, knowledge of them is limited and highly fragmented. To provide a framework for assessing colonial waterbird populations from the Danube Delta, we developed a comprehensive experimental design to answer existing questions regarding genetic diversity, genetic discontinuities and the degree of genetic differentiation. This paper describes a study which overlaps landscape genetics principles and a small genetic survey in order to provide a feasible framework for studying colonial waterbirds from the Danube Delta Biosphere Reserve

  7. A multi-farm assessment of Greek black pig genetic diversity using microsatellite molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, S; Kalivas, A; Ganopoulos, I; Stea, E; Michailidis, G; Tsaftaris, A; Argiriou, A

    2014-04-14

    Local breeds are important for the maintenance of genetic diversity and future food security. Nowadays, the worldwide distribution of pigs is dominated by a few breeds, tending towards a severe loss of pig biodiversity. Thus, it is critical to maintain distinct populations of pig breeds. The Greek black pig, a breed raised locally and known for the high quality of its meat for cured products, is the only traditional indigenous pig breed reared in Greece. We investigated the genetic diversity, based on microsatellite analysis, of the Greek black pig and evaluated its genetic uniqueness. One hundred and three pigs from 12 Greek farms were analyzed using 11 microsatellites. The total number of alleles amounted to 135, with a mean number of alleles per locus of 12.27, ranging between 10 and 16 alleles. The observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.363 to 0.825 per locus. The expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.471 to 0.707. The inbreeding coefficient ranged from -0.329 to 0.229. We conclude that the Greek black pig, despite its low population size, has a high degree of genetic variability, which will be useful for breeding programs aimed at maintaining long-term survival of this ancient breed.

  8. Assessment of genetic diversity among moderately drought tolerant landraces of rice using RAPD markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Shariful Islam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity and relationships among six rice genotypes were investigated using five random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers. A total of 69 alleles were amplified, of which 66 were polymorphic. The size of the amplified alleles was between 0.25 and 2.35 kbp. The number of polymorphic alleles detected with each primer ranged from 7 to 24 with an average of 13.2 per primer and the polymorphism information content (PIC values varied from 0.8672 to 0.9471. Pair-wise similarity estimated the range of 0.308 to 0.718 among all the genotypes and the highest genetic similarity was found between Maloti and BRRI dhan53. Cluster analysis using UPGMA (unweighted pair group method with arithmetic averages revealed three clusters at genetic similarity of 46%. A moderately drought tolerant landrace, Boalia, formed a single cluster and the remaining genotypes grouped into distinct clusters based on their relatedness. The results showed a high level of genetic diversity among studied genotypes and this information will assist in conservation as well as selection of parents during breeding programs for the development of drought tolerant rice varieties in near future.

  9. An assessment of the genetic diversity of Leishmania infantum isolates from infected dogs in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Luís Fábio da S; Segatto, Marcela; Guedes, Carlos Eduardo S; Sousa, Rosana S; Rodrigues, Cleusa A T; Brazuna, Júlia Cristina M; Silva, Joselli S; Santos, Silvana O; Larangeira, Daniela; Macedo, Andréa Mara; Schriefer, Albert; Veras, Patrícia S T

    2012-05-01

    Correlations between the genetic diversity of Leishmania infantum (syn. L. chagasi) isolates and their respective geographic origins support the theoretic assumption that visceral leishmaniasis probably originated in the Old World. Because dogs are widely considered to be the main reservoir of this disease, the present study aimed to investigate the degree of genetic divergence among 44 leishmanial canine isolates from two Brazilian cities, Jequié and Campo Grande, located approximately 2,028 km from each other. We hypothesized that a low degree of genetic divergence would be observed among these isolates. In fact, statistical analyses found no significant differences between the isolates using both random amplified polymorphic DNA and multilocus microsatellite typing genotyping techniques with three and seven markers, respectively. These findings provide support for the recent introduction of L. infantum into the New World.

  10. Assessment of the genetic diversity of the Tunisian citrus rootstock germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoussi, Hager; Duval, Marie-France; Garcia-Lor, Andres; Belfalah, Zina; Froelicher, Yann; Risterucci, Ange-Marie; Perrier, Xavier; Jacquemoud-Collet, Jean-Pierre; Navarro, Luis; Harrabi, Moncef; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2012-03-19

    Citrus represents a substantial income for farmers in the Mediterranean Basin. However, the Mediterranean citrus industry faces increasing biotic and abiotic constraints. Therefore the breeding and selection of new rootstocks are now of the utmost importance. In Tunisia, in addition to sour orange, the most widespread traditional rootstock of the Mediterranean area, other citrus rootstocks and well adapted to local environmental conditions, are traditionally used and should be important genetic resources for breeding. To characterize the diversity of Tunisian citrus rootstocks, two hundred and one local accessions belonging to four facultative apomictic species (C. aurantium, sour orange; C. sinensis, orange; C. limon, lemon; and C. aurantifolia, lime) were collected and genotyped using 20 nuclear SSR markers and four indel mitochondrial markers. Multi-locus genotypes (MLGs) were compared to references from French and Spanish collections. The differentiation of the four varietal groups was well-marked. The groups displayed a relatively high allelic diversity, primarily due to very high heterozygosity. Sixteen distinct MLGs were identified. Ten of these were noted in sour oranges. However, the majority of the analysed sour orange accessions corresponded with only two MLGs, differentiated by a single allele, likely due to a mutation. The most frequent MLG is shared with the reference sour oranges. No polymorphism was found within the sweet orange group. Two MLGs, differentiated by a single locus, were noted in lemon. The predominant MLG was shared with the reference lemons. Limes were represented by three genotypes. Two corresponded to the 'Mexican lime' and 'limonette de Marrakech' references. The MLG of 'Chiiri' lime was unique. The Tunisian citrus rootstock genetic diversity is predominantly due to high heterozygosity and differentiation between the four varietal groups. The phenotypic diversity within the varietal groups has resulted from multiple introductions

  11. Assessing genetic diversity of wild and hatchery samples of the Chinese sucker (Myxocyprinus asiaticus) by the mitochondrial DNA control region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiayun; Wu, Bo; Hou, Feixia; Chen, Yongbai; Li, Chong; Song, Zhaobin

    2016-01-01

    To restore the natural populations of Chinese sucker (Myxocyprinus asiaticus), a hatchery release program has been underway for nearly 10 years. Using DNA sequences of the mitochondrial control region, we assessed the genetic diversity and genetic structure among samples collected from three sites of the wild population as well as from three hatcheries. The haplotype diversity of the wild samples (h = 0.899-0.975) was significantly higher than that of the hatchery ones (h = 0.296-0.666), but the nucleotide diversity was almost identical between them (π = 0.0170-0.0280). Relatively high gene flow was detected between the hatchery and wild samples. Analysis of effective population size indicated that M. asiaticus living in the Yangtze River has been expanding following a bottleneck in the recent past. Our results suggest the hatchery release programs for M. asiaticus have not reduced the genetic diversity, but have influenced the genetic structure of the species in the upper Yangtze River.

  12. Assessment of genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships of Korean native chicken breeds using microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Joo Hee; Lee, Jun Heon; Kong, Hong Sik

    2017-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the basic information on genetic structure and characteristics of Korean Native chickens (NC) and foreign breeds through the analysis of the pure chicken populations and commercial chicken lines of the Hanhyup Company which are popular in the NC market, using the 20 microsatellite markers. In this study, the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships of 445 NC from five different breeds (NC, Leghorn [LH], Cornish [CS], Rhode Island Red [RIR], and Hanhyup [HH] commercial line) were investigated by performing genotyping using 20 microsatellite markers. The highest genetic distance was observed between RIR and LH (18.9%), whereas the lowest genetic distance was observed between HH and NC (2.7%). In the principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) illustrated by the first component, LH was clearly separated from the other groups. The correspondence analysis showed close relationship among individuals belonging to the NC, CS, and HH lines. From the STRUCTURE program, the presence of 5 clusters was detected and it was found that the proportion of membership in the different clusters was almost comparable among the breeds with the exception of one breed (HH), although it was highest in LH (0.987) and lowest in CS (0.578). For the cluster 1 it was high in HH (0.582) and in CS (0.368), while for the cluster 4 it was relatively higher in HH (0.392) than other breeds. Our study showed useful genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationship data that can be utilized for NC breeding and development by the commercial chicken industry to meet consumer demands.

  13. Assessment of genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships of Korean native chicken breeds using microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Hee Seo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study was conducted to investigate the basic information on genetic structure and characteristics of Korean Native chickens (NC and foreign breeds through the analysis of the pure chicken populations and commercial chicken lines of the Hanhyup Company which are popular in the NC market, using the 20 microsatellite markers. Methods In this study, the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships of 445 NC from five different breeds (NC, Leghorn [LH], Cornish [CS], Rhode Island Red [RIR], and Hanhyup [HH] commercial line were investigated by performing genotyping using 20 microsatellite markers. Results The highest genetic distance was observed between RIR and LH (18.9%, whereas the lowest genetic distance was observed between HH and NC (2.7%. In the principal coordinates analysis (PCoA illustrated by the first component, LH was clearly separated from the other groups. The correspondence analysis showed close relationship among individuals belonging to the NC, CS, and HH lines. From the STRUCTURE program, the presence of 5 clusters was detected and it was found that the proportion of membership in the different clusters was almost comparable among the breeds with the exception of one breed (HH, although it was highest in LH (0.987 and lowest in CS (0.578. For the cluster 1 it was high in HH (0.582 and in CS (0.368, while for the cluster 4 it was relatively higher in HH (0.392 than other breeds. Conclusion Our study showed useful genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationship data that can be utilized for NC breeding and development by the commercial chicken industry to meet consumer demands.

  14. Genetic diversity of the Northern Morocco goat population assessed with microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najat El Moutchou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this work was to study the genetic diversity of the Northern Morocco goat population through the analysis of 19 microsatellites in 144 animals from 61 herds. To detect a possible population structure, three distinct geographic subpopulations were characterized as a function of climate and environmental influences. Most of the markers were highly polymorphic, and the results revealed considerable genetic variation across the studied loci. A total of 204 alleles were detected, with an average number of 10.7 per locus. The PIC average was 0.728, and four microsatellites showed a significant deviation (p< 0.05 from Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA indicated that only 0.5% of the variation corresponded to differences among subpopulations, and 99.5% corresponded to differences among individuals. Factorial correspondence analysis showed intense admixtures across the putative subpopulations, and the subdivision related to geographical or environmental adaptation was undetectable. The Northern Morocco goat population presented high genetic diversity and a lack of population structure. The main reason for these findings is the absence of the breed concept (reproductively closed population, resulting in uncontrolled crossbreeding with exotic breeds and other local goats.

  15. Assessment of genetic diversity in lettuce (Lactuca sativaL.) germplasm using RAPD markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shubhangi; Kumar, Pankaj; Gambhir, Geetika; Kumar, Ramesh; Srivastava, D K

    2018-01-01

    The importance of germplasm characterization is an important link between the conservation and utilization of plant genetic resources in various breeding programmes. In the present study, genetic variability and relationships among 25 Lactuca sativa L. genotypes were tested using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) molecular markers. A total of 45 random decamer oligonucleotide primers were examined to generate RAPD profiles, out of these reproducible patterns were obtained with 22 primers. A total of 87 amplicon were obtained, out of which all were polymorphic and 7 were unique bands. The level of polymorphism across genotypes was 100% as revealed by RAPD. Genetic similarity matrix, based on Jaccard's coefficients ranged from 13.7 to 84.10% indicating a wide genetic base. Dendrogram was constructed by unweighted pair group method with arithmetic averages method. RAPD technology could be useful for identification of different accessions as well as assessing the genetic similarity among different genotypes of lettuce. The study reveals the limited genetic base and the needs to diversify using new sources from the germplasm.

  16. Genetic Diversity of Picocyanobacteria in Tibetan Lakes: Assessing the Endemic and Universal Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Anyi; Liu, Xiaobo; Chen, Feng; Yao, Tandong; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2014-01-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of picocyanobacteria in seven alkaline lakes on the Tibetan Plateau was analyzed using the molecular marker 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer sequence. A total of 1,077 environmental sequences retrieved from the seven lakes were grouped into seven picocyanobacterial clusters, with two clusters newly described here. Each of the lakes was dominated by only one or two clusters, while different lakes could have disparate communities, suggesting low alpha diversity but high beta diversity of picocyanobacteria in these high-altitude freshwater and saline lakes. Several globally distributed clusters were found in these Tibetan lakes, such as subalpine cluster I and the Cyanobium gracile cluster. Although other clusters likely exhibit geographic restriction to the plateau temporally, reflecting endemicity, they can indeed be distributed widely on the plateau. Lakes with similar salinities may have similar genetic populations despite a large geographic distance. Canonical correspondence analysis identified salinity as the only environmental factor that may in part explain the diversity variations among lakes. Mantel tests suggested that the community similarities among lakes are independent of geographic distance. A portion of the picocyanobacterial clusters appear to be restricted to a narrow salinity range, while others are likely adapted to a broad range. A seasonal survey of Lake Namucuo across 3 years did not show season-related variations in diversity, and depth-related population partitioning was observed along a vertical profile of the lake. Our study emphasizes the high dispersive potential of picocyanobacteria and suggests that the regional distribution may result from adaptation to specified environments. PMID:25281375

  17. Assessment of genetic diversity in lentils (Lens culinaris Medik.) based on SNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basheer-Salimia, R; Camilli, B; Scacchi, S; Noli, E; Awad, M

    2015-06-01

    This study is the first attempt to establish an SNP database for the purpose of estimating the genetic diversity and relatedness of Palestinian lentil genotypes. A total of 14 lentil accessions (11 local, two supplied by ICARDA, and one introduced from Italy) were investigated. By sequencing two genes, lectin and lipid transfer protein 5 (LTP5), four SNPs were detected (three in the first and one in latter gene) with average frequencies of one SNP every 228 and 578 bp, respectively. In addition, in LTP5 two single-nucleotide indels were observed in the non-coding part of the gene. Four haplotypes were identified in the lectin gene, three in LTP5. One lectin haplotype coincided with that present in GenBank belonging to two cultivated varieties, two were rather similar to this, whereas the last one turned out closer to the sequence of one wild lentil accession, indicating the existence of diversity in the Palestinian germplasm. These results, enhancing the available knowledge of lentil genetic resources in Palestine, may contribute to their conservation and utilization in breeding projects.

  18. Selection of Superior Lentil (Lens esculenta M.) Genotypes by Assessing Character Association and Genetic Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, U. K.; Rani, Santona; Paul, M. R.; Alam, M. N.; Horneburg, B.

    2014-01-01

    Lentil is one of the most important pulse crops in the world as well as in Bangladesh. It is now considered a main component for training and body building practising in first world countries. Yield varies tremendously from year to year and location to location. Therefore, it is very important to find genotypes that perform consistently well even in ecological farming systems without any intercultural operations. Twenty lentil genotypes were tested during the period from November 2010 to March 2011 and from December 2011 to March 2012 with three replicates in each season to determine genetic variability, diversity, characters association, and selection indices for better grain yield. The experiment was conducted at the breeding field of the Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh. This study revealed that all the genotypes possess a high amount of genetic diversity. Plant height and 100-grain weight showed significant positive correlation with grain yield plant−1 that was also confirmed by path analysis as the highest direct effect on grain yield. The genotypes BM-513 and BM-941 were found to be the best performer in both the seasons and were considered as consistent genotype. The genotypes were grouped into four clusters based on Euclidean distance following Ward's method and RAPD analysis. However, discriminant function analysis revealed a progressive increase in the efficiency of selection and BM-70 ranked as the best followed by the genotypes BM-739, BM-680, BM-185, and BM-513. These genotypes might be recommended for farmers' cultivation in ecological farming in Bangladesh. PMID:25580457

  19. Assessment of the genetic diversity of the Tunisian citrus rootstock germplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snoussi Hager

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Citrus represents a substantial income for farmers in the Mediterranean Basin. However, the Mediterranean citrus industry faces increasing biotic and abiotic constraints. Therefore the breeding and selection of new rootstocks are now of the utmost importance. In Tunisia, in addition to sour orange, the most widespread traditional rootstock of the Mediterranean area, other citrus rootstocks and well adapted to local environmental conditions, are traditionally used and should be important genetic resources for breeding. To characterize the diversity of Tunisian citrus rootstocks, two hundred and one local accessions belonging to four facultative apomictic species (C. aurantium, sour orange; C. sinensis, orange; C. limon, lemon; and C. aurantifolia, lime were collected and genotyped using 20 nuclear SSR markers and four indel mitochondrial markers. Multi-locus genotypes (MLGs were compared to references from French and Spanish collections. Results The differentiation of the four varietal groups was well-marked. The groups displayed a relatively high allelic diversity, primarily due to very high heterozygosity. Sixteen distinct MLGs were identified. Ten of these were noted in sour oranges. However, the majority of the analysed sour orange accessions corresponded with only two MLGs, differentiated by a single allele, likely due to a mutation. The most frequent MLG is shared with the reference sour oranges. No polymorphism was found within the sweet orange group. Two MLGs, differentiated by a single locus, were noted in lemon. The predominant MLG was shared with the reference lemons. Limes were represented by three genotypes. Two corresponded to the 'Mexican lime' and 'limonette de Marrakech' references. The MLG of 'Chiiri' lime was unique. Conclusions The Tunisian citrus rootstock genetic diversity is predominantly due to high heterozygosity and differentiation between the four varietal groups. The phenotypic diversity within the

  20. Genetic diversity of loquat germplasm (Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb) Lindl) assessed by SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, José Miguel; Romero, Carlos; Vilanova, Santiago; Llácer, Gerardo; Badenes, María Luisa

    2005-02-01

    Genetic relationships among 40 loquat (Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb) Lindl) accessions that originated from different countries and that are part of the germplasm collection of the Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Agrarias (IVIA) (Valencia, Spain) were evaluated using microsatellites. Thirty primer pairs flanking microsatellites previously identified in Malus x domestica (Borkh.) were assayed. Thirteen of them amplified polymorphic products and unambiguously distinguished 34 genotypes from the 40 accessions analyzed. Six accessions showing identical marker patterns were Spanish local varieties thought to have been derived from 'Algerie' by a mutational process very common in loquat species. A total of 39 alleles were detected in the population studied, with a mean value of 2.4 alleles per locus. The expected and observed heterozygosities were 0.46 and 51% on average, respectively, leading to a negative value of the Wright's fixation index (-0.20). The values of these parameters indicate a smaller degree of genetic diversity in the set of loquat accessions analyzed than in other members of the Rosaceae family. Unweighted pair-group method (UPGMA) cluster analysis, based on Nei's genetic distance, generally grouped genotypes according to their geographic origins and pedigrees. The high number of alleles and the high expected heterozygosity detected with SSR markers developed in Malus x domestica (Borkh.) make them a suitable tool for loquat cultivar identification, confirming microsatellite marker transportability among genera in the Rosaceae family.

  1. Low genetic diversity and genetic differentiation among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-21

    Dec 21, 2011 ... (2003) examined genetic diversity of tropical abalone H. asinina originating from Thai waters by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) of 18S and 16S rDNAs, and the lack of genetic heterogeneity were confirmed. Recently, significant genetic differentiation ...

  2. Assessment of genetic diversity in a highly valuable medicinal plant Catharanthus roseus using molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjan Kumar Shaw

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity was evaluated among 14 cultivars of Catharanthus roseus using RAPD and ISSR markers.The RAPD primers resulted in the amplification of 56 bands, among which 46 (82% bands were polymorphic Four ISSRprimers amplified 31 loci out of which 17 were polymorphic and 14 are monomorphic. The Jaccard's similarity derived fromthe combined marker system showed that the varieties First Kiss Coral and Cooler Orchid were the most closely relatedcultivars, with 98% similarity. In the dendrogram constructed on the basis of both RAPD and ISSR data two clear clusterswere obtained. The smaller cluster included C. roseus Cv Blue Pearl and C. roseus Cv. Patricia White and the larger clusterwas subdivided into two sub clusters with C. roseus Cv. First Kiss Polka Dot isolated from the rest of the cultivars. This maybe useful for breeding for improved quality.

  3. Importance of Genetic Diversity Assessment in Crop Plants and Its Recent Advances: An Overview of Its Analytical Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Govindaraj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of plant genetic diversity (PGD is now being recognized as a specific area since exploding population with urbanization and decreasing cultivable lands are the critical factors contributing to food insecurity in developing world. Agricultural scientists realized that PGD can be captured and stored in the form of plant genetic resources (PGR such as gene bank, DNA library, and so forth, in the biorepository which preserve genetic material for long period. However, conserved PGR must be utilized for crop improvement in order to meet future global challenges in relation to food and nutritional security. This paper comprehensively reviews four important areas; (i the significance of plant genetic diversity (PGD and PGR especially on agriculturally important crops (mostly field crops; (ii risk associated with narrowing the genetic base of current commercial cultivars and climate change; (iii analysis of existing PGD analytical methods in pregenomic and genomic era; and (iv modern tools available for PGD analysis in postgenomic era. This discussion benefits the plant scientist community in order to use the new methods and technology for better and rapid assessment, for utilization of germplasm from gene banks to their applied breeding programs. With the advent of new biotechnological techniques, this process of genetic manipulation is now being accelerated and carried out with more precision (neglecting environmental effects and fast-track manner than the classical breeding techniques. It is also to note that gene banks look into several issues in order to improve levels of germplasm distribution and its utilization, duplication of plant identity, and access to database, for prebreeding activities. Since plant breeding research and cultivar development are integral components of improving food production, therefore, availability of and access to diverse genetic sources will ensure that the global food production network becomes more

  4. Assessing Genetic Diversity among Brettanomyces Yeasts by DNA Fingerprinting and Whole-Genome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crauwels, Sam; Zhu, Bo; Steensels, Jan; Busschaert, Pieter; De Samblanx, Gorik; Marchal, Kathleen; Willems, Kris A.

    2014-01-01

    Brettanomyces yeasts, with the species Brettanomyces (Dekkera) bruxellensis being the most important one, are generally reported to be spoilage yeasts in the beer and wine industry due to the production of phenolic off flavors. However, B. bruxellensis is also known to be a beneficial contributor in certain fermentation processes, such as the production of certain specialty beers. Nevertheless, despite its economic importance, Brettanomyces yeasts remain poorly understood at the genetic and genomic levels. In this study, the genetic relationship between more than 50 Brettanomyces strains from all presently known species and from several sources was studied using a combination of DNA fingerprinting techniques. This revealed an intriguing correlation between the B. bruxellensis fingerprints and the respective isolation source. To further explore this relationship, we sequenced a (beneficial) beer isolate of B. bruxellensis (VIB X9085; ST05.12/22) and compared its genome sequence with the genome sequences of two wine spoilage strains (AWRI 1499 and CBS 2499). ST05.12/22 was found to be substantially different from both wine strains, especially at the level of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In addition, there were major differences in the genome structures between the strains investigated, including the presence of large duplications and deletions. Gene content analysis revealed the presence of 20 genes which were present in both wine strains but absent in the beer strain, including many genes involved in carbon and nitrogen metabolism, and vice versa, no genes that were missing in both AWRI 1499 and CBS 2499 were found in ST05.12/22. Together, this study provides tools to discriminate Brettanomyces strains and provides a first glimpse at the genetic diversity and genome plasticity of B. bruxellensis. PMID:24814796

  5. Assessment of the genetic and phenotypic diversity among rhizogenic Agrobacterium biovar 1 strains infecting solanaceous and cucurbit crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, Lien; Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; Moerkens, Rob; Wittemans, Lieve; Van Calenberge, Bart; Kerckhove, Stefan Van; Paeleman, Anneleen; De Mot, René; Rediers, Hans; Lievens, Bart

    2015-08-01

    Rhizogenic Agrobacterium biovar 1 strains have been found to cause extensive root proliferation on hydroponically grown Cucurbitaceae and Solanaceae crops, resulting in substantial economic losses. As these agrobacteria live under similar ecological conditions, infecting a limited number of crops, it may be hypothesized that genetic and phenotypic variation among such strains is relatively low. In this study we assessed the phenotypic diversity as well as the phylogenetic and evolutionary relationships of several rhizogenic Agrobacterium biovar 1 strains from cucurbit and solanaceous crops. A collection of 41 isolates was subjected to a number of phenotypic assays and characterized by MLSA targeting four housekeeping genes (16S rRNA gene, recA, rpoB and trpE) and two loci from the root-inducing Ri-plasmid (part of rolB and virD2). Besides phenotypic variation, remarkable genotypic diversity was observed, especially for some chromosomal loci such as trpE. In contrast, genetic diversity was lower for the plasmid-borne loci, indicating that the studied chromosomal housekeeping genes and Ri-plasmid-borne loci might not exhibit the same evolutionary history. Furthermore, phylogenetic and network analyses and several recombination tests suggested that recombination could be contributing in some extent to the evolutionary dynamics of rhizogenic Agrobacterium populations. Finally, a genomospecies-level identification analysis revealed that at least four genomospecies may occur on cucurbit and tomato crops (G1, G3, G8 and G9). Together, this study gives a first glimpse at the genetic and phenotypic diversity within this economically important plant pathogenic bacterium. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Genetic diversity and population structure of Polish Arabian horses assessed through breeding and microsatellite data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głażewska, Iwona; Gralak, Barbara; Naczk, Aleksandra M; Prusak, Beata

    2018-02-02

    Polish Arabian horses are one of the most important populations of this breed in the world. Their post-war history can be divided into two periods, with the dominant role of state studs until 1989, and the increasing significance of private breeding in the next years. The goal of the study was to evaluate genetic diversity and structure of the population under a new breeding policy. The analyses of breeding and microsatellite data from 1996 to 2012 provide a coherent picture of the population with constant flow of horses only in one direction from state to private studs. An increase in the number of broodmares was observed, from 396 mares in 1996 to 1021 mares in 2012. The proportion of foreign sires used in Polish studs also increased, from 7.1% to 37.0%. An increasing number of alleles and progressive differentiation in mares were observed. STRUCTURE analysis indicated that the Polish horses were clearly separated from foreign horses used in Polish breeding, although only one of the 75 alleles found can be considered as typically Polish. The high heterozygosity is an important feature of the Polish population; however, the decrease of heterozygosity in state broodmares was noted. This issue needs to be studied further. © 2018 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  7. Morphological and genetic diversity assessment of sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) accessions differing in origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sarita K; Das, Arna; Rai, Pooja; Dasgupta, Tapash

    2015-10-01

    Sesame is an important ancient oilseed crop of high medicinal value. In the present study, 37 characters including both quantitative and qualitative traits of sixty genotypes were characterized following IPGRI morphological descriptors for sesame. Multivariate analysis was computed to distinguish the varieties into different groups. Though thirty six microsatellite markers including genomic and Est-SSR markers were initially selected, but, finally, the accessions were genotyped by eight polymorphic primers. Altogether, 27 alleles were detected among the 60 genotypes, with an average of 3.37 alleles per locus. The number of alleles ranged from 2 to 6 alleles. From data of microsatellite markers, dissimilarity coefficients between varieties were computed following Jaccard's coefficient method. Principal co-ordinate analysis was used to represent the varieties in bi-directional space. Dendrogram was constructed using NJ method based on dissimilarity matrix. Cluster analysis based on morphological and molecular marker classified sesame genotypes into two major groups. Mantel test showed an insignificant correlation between phenotypic and molecular marker information. The genotypes belonging to the same geographical area did not always occupy the same cluster. The results confirmed that both genetic and phenotypic diversity in a combined way could efficiently evaluate the variation present in different sesame accessions in any breeding program.

  8. Assessment of Genetic Diversity and Structure of Large Garlic (Allium sativum) Germplasm Bank, by Diversity Arrays Technology "Genotyping-by-Sequencing" Platform (DArTseq).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Leticia A; Mérida-García, Rosa; Kilian, Andrzej; Hernandez, Pilar; Dorado, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Garlic ( Allium sativum ) is used worldwide in cooking and industry, including pharmacology/medicine and cosmetics, for its interesting properties. Identifying redundancies in germplasm blanks to generate core collections is a major concern, mostly in large stocks, in order to reduce space and maintenance costs. Yet, similar appearance and phenotypic plasticity of garlic varieties hinder their morphological classification. Molecular studies are challenging, due to the large and expected complex genome of this species, with asexual reproduction. Classical molecular markers, like isozymes, RAPD, SSR, or AFLP, are not convenient to generate germplasm core-collections for this species. The recent emergence of high-throughput genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) approaches, like DArTseq, allow to overcome such limitations to characterize and protect genetic diversity. Therefore, such technology was used in this work to: (i) assess genetic diversity and structure of a large garlic-germplasm bank (417 accessions); (ii) create a core collection; (iii) relate genotype to agronomical features; and (iv) describe a cost-effective method to manage genetic diversity in garlic-germplasm banks. Hierarchical-cluster analysis, principal-coordinates analysis and STRUCTURE showed general consistency, generating three main garlic-groups, mostly determined by variety and geographical origin. In addition, high-resolution genotyping identified 286 unique and 131 redundant accessions, used to select a reduced size germplasm-bank core collection. This demonstrates that DArTseq is a cost-effective method to analyze species with large and expected complex genomes, like garlic. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of high-throughput genotyping of a large garlic germplasm. This is particularly interesting for garlic adaptation and improvement, to fight biotic and abiotic stresses, in the current context of climate change and global warming.

  9. Assessment of Genetic Diversity and Structure of Large Garlic (Allium sativum) Germplasm Bank, by Diversity Arrays Technology “Genotyping-by-Sequencing” Platform (DArTseq)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Leticia A.; Mérida-García, Rosa; Kilian, Andrzej; Hernandez, Pilar; Dorado, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum) is used worldwide in cooking and industry, including pharmacology/medicine and cosmetics, for its interesting properties. Identifying redundancies in germplasm blanks to generate core collections is a major concern, mostly in large stocks, in order to reduce space and maintenance costs. Yet, similar appearance and phenotypic plasticity of garlic varieties hinder their morphological classification. Molecular studies are challenging, due to the large and expected complex genome of this species, with asexual reproduction. Classical molecular markers, like isozymes, RAPD, SSR, or AFLP, are not convenient to generate germplasm core-collections for this species. The recent emergence of high-throughput genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) approaches, like DArTseq, allow to overcome such limitations to characterize and protect genetic diversity. Therefore, such technology was used in this work to: (i) assess genetic diversity and structure of a large garlic-germplasm bank (417 accessions); (ii) create a core collection; (iii) relate genotype to agronomical features; and (iv) describe a cost-effective method to manage genetic diversity in garlic-germplasm banks. Hierarchical-cluster analysis, principal-coordinates analysis and STRUCTURE showed general consistency, generating three main garlic-groups, mostly determined by variety and geographical origin. In addition, high-resolution genotyping identified 286 unique and 131 redundant accessions, used to select a reduced size germplasm-bank core collection. This demonstrates that DArTseq is a cost-effective method to analyze species with large and expected complex genomes, like garlic. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of high-throughput genotyping of a large garlic germplasm. This is particularly interesting for garlic adaptation and improvement, to fight biotic and abiotic stresses, in the current context of climate change and global warming. PMID:28775737

  10. Assessment of Genetic Diversity and Structure of Large Garlic (Allium sativum Germplasm Bank, by Diversity Arrays Technology “Genotyping-by-Sequencing” Platform (DArTseq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia A. Egea

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Garlic (Allium sativum is used worldwide in cooking and industry, including pharmacology/medicine and cosmetics, for its interesting properties. Identifying redundancies in germplasm blanks to generate core collections is a major concern, mostly in large stocks, in order to reduce space and maintenance costs. Yet, similar appearance and phenotypic plasticity of garlic varieties hinder their morphological classification. Molecular studies are challenging, due to the large and expected complex genome of this species, with asexual reproduction. Classical molecular markers, like isozymes, RAPD, SSR, or AFLP, are not convenient to generate germplasm core-collections for this species. The recent emergence of high-throughput genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS approaches, like DArTseq, allow to overcome such limitations to characterize and protect genetic diversity. Therefore, such technology was used in this work to: (i assess genetic diversity and structure of a large garlic-germplasm bank (417 accessions; (ii create a core collection; (iii relate genotype to agronomical features; and (iv describe a cost-effective method to manage genetic diversity in garlic-germplasm banks. Hierarchical-cluster analysis, principal-coordinates analysis and STRUCTURE showed general consistency, generating three main garlic-groups, mostly determined by variety and geographical origin. In addition, high-resolution genotyping identified 286 unique and 131 redundant accessions, used to select a reduced size germplasm-bank core collection. This demonstrates that DArTseq is a cost-effective method to analyze species with large and expected complex genomes, like garlic. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of high-throughput genotyping of a large garlic germplasm. This is particularly interesting for garlic adaptation and improvement, to fight biotic and abiotic stresses, in the current context of climate change and global warming.

  11. Human Capital and Genetic Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Sequeira, Tiago; Santos, Marcelo,; Ferreira-Lopes, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    The determinants of human capital have been studied sparsely in the literature. Although there is a huge literature on the determinants of schooling linked with the quality of schooling, there are not many contributions that explore the deep determinants of investment in, quantity and quality of human capital. This paper investigates the relationship between human capital and the ancestral genetic diversity of populations. It highlights a strong hump-shaped relationship between genetic divers...

  12. Genetic diversity of wheat grain quality and determination the best clustering technique and data type for diversity assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodadadi Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wheat is an important staple in human nutrition and improvement of its grain quality characters will have high impact on population's health. The objectives of this study were assessing variation of some grain quality characteristics in the Iranian wheat genotypes and identify the best type of data and clustering method for grouping genotypes. In this study 30 spring wheat genotypes were cultivated through randomized complete block design with three replications in 2009 and 2010 years. High significant difference among genotypes for all traits except for Sulfate, K, Br and Cl content, also deference among two years mean for all traits were no significant. Meanwhile there were significant interaction between year and genotype for all traits except Sulfate and F content. Mean values for crude protein, Zn, Fe and Ca in Mahdavi, Falat, Star, Sistan genotypes were the highest. The Ca and Br content showed the highest and the lowest broadcast heritability respectively. In this study indicated that the Root Mean Square Standard Deviation is efficient than R Squared and R Squared efficient than Semi Partial R Squared criteria for determining the best clustering technique. Also Ward method and canonical scores identified as the best clustering method and data type for grouping genotypes, respectively. Genotypes were grouped into six completely separate clusters and Roshan, Niknejad and Star genotypes from the fourth, fifth and sixth clusters had high grain quality characters in overall.

  13. Assessment of genetic diversity of Bacillus spp. isolated from eutrophic fish culture pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, R; Tripathy, S; Padhi, S K; Mohanty, S; Maiti, N K

    2015-08-01

    The genus Bacillus comprises of a diverse group with a wide range of nutritional requirements and physiological and metabolic diversity. Their role in nutrient cycle is well documented. 16S rDNA sequences do not always allow the species to be discriminated. In this study 40 Bacillus spp. obtained from fish culture pond and 10 culture type strains were analysed for their genomic diversity by PCR-RFLP of intergenic spacer region of 16S-23S and HSP60 genes. TaqI digestion of PCR products amplified by ITS PCR did not render distinctive RFLP patterns. Numerical analysis of ITS PCR-RFLP pattern differentiated the isolates into 11 clusters. Same species were found to be grouped in different clusters. But PstI digested PCR products amplified from HSP60 gene of the isolates showed distinctive RFLP patterns. The dendrogram constructed from HSP60 PCR-RFLP delineated the isolates into 11 clusters also. All the clusters, except cluster I grouped only one type of species. The results showed that Bacillus spp. could be clearly distinguished by PCR-RFLP of HSP60 gene. Therefore, the HSP60 gene is proposed as an additional molecular marker for discrimination of Bacillus group.

  14. Genetic diversity assessment of sesame core collection in China by phenotype and molecular markers and extraction of a mini-core collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is one of the four major oil crops in China. A sesame core collection (CC) was established in China in 2000, but no complete study on its genetic diversity has been carried out at either the phenotypic or molecular level. To provide technical guidance, a theoretical basis for further collection, effective protection, reasonable application, and a complete analysis of sesame genetic resources, a genetic diversity assessment of the sesame CC in China was conducted using phenotypic and molecular data and by extracting a sesame mini-core collection (MC). Results Results from a genetic diversity assessment of sesame CC in China were significantly inconsistent at the phenotypic and molecular levels. A Mantel test revealed the insignificant correlation between phenotype and molecular marker information (r = 0.0043, t = 0.1320, P = 0.5525). The Shannon-Weaver diversity index (I) and Nei genetic diversity index (h) were higher (I = 0.9537, h = 0.5490) when calculated using phenotypic data from the CC than when using molecular data (I = 0.3467, h = 0.2218). A mini-core collection (MC) containing 184 accessions was extracted based on both phenotypic and molecular data, with a low mean difference percentage (MD, 1.64%), low variance difference percentage (VD, 22.58%), large variable rate of coefficient of variance (VR, 114.86%), and large coincidence rate of range (CR, 95.76%). For molecular data, the diversity indices and the polymorphism information content (PIC) for the MC were significantly higher than for the CC. Compared to an alternative random sampling strategy, the advantages of capturing genetic diversity and validation by extracting a MC using an advanced maximization strategy were proven. Conclusions This study provides a comprehensive characterization of the phenotypic and molecular genetic diversities of the sesame CC in China. A MC was extracted using both phenotypic and molecular data. Low MD% and VD%, and large VR% and CR

  15. Genetic diversity assessment of sesame core collection in China by phenotype and molecular markers and extraction of a mini-core collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yanxin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sesame (Sesamum indicum L. is one of the four major oil crops in China. A sesame core collection (CC was established in China in 2000, but no complete study on its genetic diversity has been carried out at either the phenotypic or molecular level. To provide technical guidance, a theoretical basis for further collection, effective protection, reasonable application, and a complete analysis of sesame genetic resources, a genetic diversity assessment of the sesame CC in China was conducted using phenotypic and molecular data and by extracting a sesame mini-core collection (MC. Results Results from a genetic diversity assessment of sesame CC in China were significantly inconsistent at the phenotypic and molecular levels. A Mantel test revealed the insignificant correlation between phenotype and molecular marker information (r = 0.0043, t = 0.1320, P = 0.5525. The Shannon-Weaver diversity index (I and Nei genetic diversity index (h were higher (I = 0.9537, h = 0.5490 when calculated using phenotypic data from the CC than when using molecular data (I = 0.3467, h = 0.2218. A mini-core collection (MC containing 184 accessions was extracted based on both phenotypic and molecular data, with a low mean difference percentage (MD, 1.64%, low variance difference percentage (VD, 22.58%, large variable rate of coefficient of variance (VR, 114.86%, and large coincidence rate of range (CR, 95.76%. For molecular data, the diversity indices and the polymorphism information content (PIC for the MC were significantly higher than for the CC. Compared to an alternative random sampling strategy, the advantages of capturing genetic diversity and validation by extracting a MC using an advanced maximization strategy were proven. Conclusions This study provides a comprehensive characterization of the phenotypic and molecular genetic diversities of the sesame CC in China. A MC was extracted using both phenotypic and molecular data. Low MD% and VD%, and

  16. Genetic diversity in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, John C; Carlton, Jane M

    2013-09-01

    Recent advances in genetic characterisation of Trichomonas vaginalis isolates show that the extensive clinical variability in trichomoniasis and its disease sequelae are matched by significant genetic diversity in the organism itself, suggesting a connection between the genetic identity of isolates and their clinical manifestations. Indeed, a high degree of genetic heterogeneity in T vaginalis isolates has been observed using multiple genotyping techniques. A unique two-type population structure that is both local and global in distribution has been identified, and there is evidence of recombination within each group, although sexual recombination between the groups appears to be constrained. There is conflicting evidence in these studies for correlations between T vaginalis genetic identity and clinical presentation, metronidazole susceptibility, and the presence of T vaginalis virus, underscoring the need for adoption of a common standard for genotyping the parasite. Moving forward, microsatellite genotyping and multilocus sequence typing are the most robust techniques for future investigations of T vaginalis genotype-phenotype associations.

  17. Assessment of genetic diversity among four orchids based on ddRAD sequencing data for conservation purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Subhas Chandra; Moitra, Kaushik; De Sarker, Dilip

    2017-01-01

    Genetic diversity was assessed in the four orchid species using NGS based ddRAD sequencing data. The assembled nucleotide sequences (fastq) were deposited in the SRA archive of NCBI Database with accession number (SRP063543 for Dendrobium , SRP065790 for Geodorum, SRP072201 for Cymbidium and SRP072378 for Rhynchostylis ). Total base pair read was 1.1 Mbp in case of Dendrobium sp., 553.3 Kbp for Geodorum sp., 1.6 Gbp for Cymbidium , and 1.4 Gbp for Rhynchostylis . Average GC% was 43.9 in Geodorum , 43.7% in Dendrobium , 41.2% in Cymbidium and 42.3% in Rhynchostylis . Four partial gene sequences were used in DnaSP5 program for nucleotide diversity and phylogenetic relationship determination ( Ycf2 gene of Dendrobium, matK gene of Geodorum , psbD gene of Cymbidium and Ycf2 gene of Ryhnchostylis ). Nucleotide diversity (per site) Pi (π) was 0.10560 in Dendrobium, 0.03586 in Geodorum, 0.01364 in Cymbidium and 0.011344 in Rhynchostylis . Neutrality test statistics showed the negative value in all the four orchid species (Tajima's D value -2.17959 in Dendrobium , -2.01655 in Geodorum, -2.12362 in Rhynchostylis and -1.54222 in Cymbidium ) indicating the purifying selection. Result for these gene sequences ( mat K and Ycf 2 and psb D) indicate that they were not evolved neutrally, but signifying that selection might have played a role in evolution of these genes in these four groups of orchids. Phylogenetic relationship was analyzed by reconstructing dendrogram based on the matK, psbD and Ycf2 gene sequences using maximum likelihood method in MEGA6 program.

  18. Genetic diversity among sorghum landraces and polymorphism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSR) are playing an important role in molecular breeding. This investigation was undertaken to study the genetic diversity among local sorghum accessions from two different agro-ecological zones of Burkina Faso and to assess the polymorphism within local improved varieties ...

  19. Utility of some floral characters in the assessment of genetic diversity in sesame (Sesamum indicum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musibau Adewuyi Azeez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sesame collections were evaluated for quantitative floral characters and data obtained were subjected to various statistical analyses. Result showed narrow diversity in most of the quantitative floral characters with moderate variability in length of flower (2.03-3.27 cm, length of style (1.10-1.40 cm, length of capsule (2.33-2.98 cm and number of seeds per capsule (38.67 – 57.67. Correlation study revealed significantly (p < 0.01 positive correlations for length of ovary versus length of flower (r= 0.70 and length of capsule versus length of style (r= 0.77. The first two principal components accounted for 61.59 % of which the first component had 34.13 % and the second was 27.46 %. Dendrogram divided the seventeen accessions/landraces into two major groups (A and B. Group A had only one cluster with five members whilegroup B had three clusters (Cluster II, III and IV with seven, three and two members respectively. Each accession within a cluster could be employed as baseline parent in crossbreeding for improvement of yield in Nigerian sesame.

  20. Genetic diversity of Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench landraces from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The understanding of genetic diversity within local crop varieties constitutes an important step in the preservation of their genetic potential. The objective of this study was to assess the genetic diversity of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) cultivated in the Northwest of Benin and to reveal certain fundamental ...

  1. Use of ISSR markers to assess the genetic diversity in wild medicinal Ziziphus spina-christi (L. Willd. collected from different regions of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Alansi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ziziphus spina-christi (sidr is a shrub, sometimes a tree, native to a vast area of Africa stretching from Mauritania to West Africa. In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, it is an exotic medicinal plant for many diseases. The aim of this study was to assess the genetic diversity within and among 34 accessions of Z. spina-christi collected from different regions of Saudi Arabia. The amplification of genomic DNA with 11 inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR primers yielded 105 scorable loci, of which 93.4% were found to be polymorphic. The observed number of alleles (na, effective number of alleles (ne, Nei's gene diversity (h and genetic diversity estimated by Shannon's information index (I were 1.93, 1.44, 0.26 and 0.41, respectively. The total genetic diversity, Ht (0.266 ± 0.0289 was close to the average intrapopulation genetic diversity, Hs (0.2199 ± 0.0216. A high level of gene flow (Nm = 2.37 between populations, reflecting high genetic differentiation (Gst = 0.1739. The analysis of molecular variance showed that the maximum value of genetic variation was found within populations (90%, whereas a low value of genetic variance was observed among populations. The analysis using the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averages clustered the population from Farasan Island as an out-group due to its geographical origin. The obtained results demonstrate that the ISSR markers may be used for evaluation of the genetic diversity due to their efficiency in revealing polymorphism even in closely related germplasm and may help in Ziziphus genome analysis.

  2. Assessment of genetic diversity using RAPD analysis in a germplasm collection of sea buckthorn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.I. BARTISH

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers were used to characterize a part of a sea buckthorn gene bank collected for plant breeding purposes. Molecular markers were generated in 55 cultivars and accessions, representing five subspecies of Hippophae rhamnoides L. and intraspecific hybrids between different subspecies. Sixty-three markers were used to generate a Dice's similarity coefficient matrix of pairwise comparisons between individual RAPD profiles. Cluster (UPGMA and principal co-ordinate analyses, based on this matrix, revealed clustering of plants into groups which generally correspond to their taxonomic classification or geographic origin. The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA was found useful for estimating components of genetic variation between and within taxonomic and geographic groups of accessions and cultivars. Whereas both alternatives for grouping the material (taxonomic or geographic origin resulted in significant between-group variation, the major part of molecular variance (approximately 75% was still attributed to variation within groups. We conclude that the RAPD analysis is useful for clarification of taxonomic and geographic origin of accessions and cultivars of sea buckthorn.

  3. Assessment of genetic diversity of cotton genotypes for various economic traits against cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, M; Hussain, S B; Baber, M

    2017-02-08

    In Pakistan, cotton crop has been under enormous threat of cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD) over the last four decades. In order to estimate genetic diversity in cotton germplasm CLCuD resistance, we assessed 100 cotton genotypes for their CLCuD resistance/tolerance and other related agronomical traits. Various statistical analytical tools, including correlation analysis, cluster analysis, and principal component analysis (PCA), were used to select the best genotypes. These genotypes can be used in future breeding programs to generate CLCuD resistant varieties. The same set of procedures could be utilized for other diseases in other crops. CLCuD incidence showed a significant negative genotypic correlation with yield-contributing traits followed by a significant negative association for phenotypic correlation. The seed cotton yield showed significant positive genotypic and phenotypic correlations with plant height, number of bolls per plant, and boll weight. From the PCA we identified five principal components (PCs) that explained a significant amount of the variance among the variables, which may be used for selection of cotton genotypes with CLCuD resistance. Of the five PCs, the first four contributed more towards the total variability and had eigenvalues greater than one. The cluster analysis showed that the genotypes in one of the clusters performed particularly well with respect to CLCuD tolerance. These genotypes can be utilized for development of varieties with increased CLCuD tolerance.

  4. Personalized Medicine and Human Genetic Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Yi-Fan; Goldstein, David B.; Angrist, Misha; Cavalleri, Gianpiero

    2014-01-01

    Human genetic diversity has long been studied both to understand how genetic variation influences risk of disease and infer aspects of human evolutionary history. In this article, we review historical and contemporary views of human genetic diversity, the rare and common mutations implicated in human disease susceptibility, and the relevance of genetic diversity to personalized medicine. First, we describe the development of thought about diversity through the 20th century and through more mo...

  5. AFLP markers for the assessment of genetic diversity in european and North American potato varieties cultivated in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Tarkesh Esfahani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Information about the genetic diversity of potato germplasm in Iran is important for variety identification andto enhance the classification of germplasm collections and exploit them in breeding programs and for the development andintroduction of new varieties. AFLP fingerprinting was applied to a group of cultivated potato varieties to find if there is anygeographical differentiation in potato diversity from Europe and North America. The high level of polymorphism within potatovarieties and the high number of variety-specific bands suggest that AFLPs are powerful markers for diversity analysis inpotato varieties. No region-specific AFLP markers were found (present in varieties from the same origin and absent inothers. The UPGMA dendrogram revealed four distinct clusters corresponding almost to the geographical origin of thevarieties. However, the bootstrap support for branches was rather weak. No clusters clearly distinguished varieties fromEurope and North America. Varieties from the same geographical origins however tended to group together within eachcluster. The mean similarity and the UPGMA dendrogram both suggest that North American varieties have nearly identicalgenetic diversity to European varieties. The results of AMOVA revealed large within-region variations which accounted for94.5% of the total molecular variance. The between-region variation, although accounting for only 5.5% of the total variation,was statistically significant. AFLP technology was successfully used to evaluate diversity between different geographicalgroups of potatoes and is recommended for potato genetic studies.

  6. Assessing the Genetic Diversity and Genealogical Reconstruction of Cypress (Cupressus funebris Endl. Breeding Parents Using SSR Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanbo Yang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available To identify genetic diversity, genetic structure and the relationship among accessions, and further establish a core collection for the long-term breeding of cypress (Cupressus funebris Endl., the genealogy of breeding parents was reconstructed using simple sequence repeat (SSR molecular markers. Seventeen SSR markers were used to detect molecular polymorphisms among 290 cypress accessions from five provinces and 53 accessions with unknown origin in China. A total of 92 alleles (Na were detected with 5.412 alleles per locus and an average polymorphism information content (PIC of 0.593. The haplotype diversity (H ranged from 0.021 to 0.832, with an average of 0.406. The number of alleles (Na and the effective number of alleles (Ne ranged from 4.294 to 5.176 and from 2.488 to 2.817 among five populations, respectively. The pairwise population matrix of Nei’s genetic distance ranged from 0.008 to 0.023. Based on the results of unweighted pair group method average (UPGMA cluster and population structure analyses, 343 breeding parents were divided into two major groups. Lower genetic differentiation coefficients and closer genetic relationships were observed among cypress breeding parents, suggesting that the genetic basis was narrow, and the genetic relationship was confused by frequent introduction and wide cultivation. Moreover, we reconstructed the genealogy between breeding parents and 30 accessions of breeding parents from an identified core collection. According to the present study, not only geographic origin but also the relationship of the individuals should be considered in future crossbreeding work.

  7. Assessment of genetic diversity in Trigonella foenum-graecum and Trigonella caerulea using ISSR and RAPD markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjekar Prabhakar K

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various species of genus Trigonella are important from medical and culinary aspect. Among these, Trigonella foenum-graecum is commonly grown as a vegetable. This anti-diabetic herb can lower blood glucose and cholesterol levels. Another species, Trigonella caerulea is used as food in the form of young seedlings. This herb is also used in cheese making. However, little is known about the genetic variation present in these species. In this report we describe the use of ISSR and RAPD markers to study genetic diversity in both, Trigonella foenum-graecum and Trigonella caerulea. Results Seventeen accessions of Trigonella foenum-graecum and nine accessions of Trigonella caerulea representing various countries were analyzed using ISSR and RAPD markers. Genetic diversity parameters (average number of alleles per polymorphic locus, percent polymorphism, average heterozygosity and marker index were calculated for ISSR, RAPD and ISSR+RAPD approaches in both the species. Dendrograms were constructed using UPGMA algorithm based on the similarity index values for both Trigonella foenum-graecum and Trigonella caerulea. The UPGMA analysis showed that plants from different geographical regions were distributed in different groups in both the species. In Trigonella foenum-graecum accessions from Pakistan and Afghanistan were grouped together in one cluster but accessions from India and Nepal were grouped together in another cluster. However, in both the species accessions from Turkey did not group together and fell in different clusters. Conclusions Based on genetic similarity indices, higher diversity was observed in Trigonella caerulea as compared to Trigonella foenum-graecum. The genetic similarity matrices generated by ISSR and RAPD markers in both species were highly correlated (r = 0.78 at p = 0.001 for Trigonella foenum-graecum and r = 0.98 at p = 0.001 for Trigonella caerulea indicating congruence between these two systems

  8. The Use of Some Morphological Traits for the Assessment of Genetic Diversity in Spinach (Spinacia Oleracea L.) Landraces

    OpenAIRE

    Ebadi-Segheloo Asghar; ali Asadi-Gharneh Hossein; Mohebodini Mehdi; Janmohammadi Mohsen; Nouraein Mojtaba; Sabaghnia Naser

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of native accessions of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) would be aid in the development of new genetically improved varieties, so in this research 121 spinach landraces, collected from the various spinach growing areas of Iran, were evaluated to determine their diversity using several agro-morphological traits. High coefficients of variation (CV) were recorded in fresh yield, leaf area and dry yield. Using principal component (PC) analysis, the first three PCs with eigenvalues mo...

  9. Assessment of genetic diversity among Syrian durum (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum) and bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) using SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achtar, S; Moualla, M Y; Kalhout, A; Röder, M S; MirAli, N

    2010-11-01

    Genetic diversity among 49 wheat varieties (37 durum and 12 bread wheat) was assayed using 32 microsatellites representing 34 loci covering almost the whole wheat genome. The polymorphic information content (PIC) across the tested loci ranged from 0 to 0.88 with average values of 0.57 and 0.65 for durum and bread wheat respectively. B genome had the highest mean number of alleles (10.91) followed by A genome (8.3) whereas D genome had the lowest number (4.73). The correlation between PIC and allele number was significant in all genome groups accounting for 0.87, 074 and 0.84 for A, B and D genomes respectively, and over all genomes, the correlation was higher in tetraploid (0.8) than in hexaploid wheat varieties (0.5). The cluster analysis discriminated all varieties and clearly divided the two ploidy levels into two separate clusters that reflect the differences in genetic diversity within each cluster. This study demonstrates that microsatellites markers have unique advantages compared to other molecular and biochemical fingerprinting techniques in revealing the genetic diversity in Syrian wheat varieties that is crucial for wheat improvement.

  10. Genetic diversity and population differentiation of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum collected from canola in China and in USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic and phenotypic diversity and population differentiation of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum isolates infecting canola from China and the United States were investigated. Genetic diversity was assessed with eight microsatellite markers and mycelial compatibility groups (MCGs). Phenotypic diversity wa...

  11. Genetic diversity in a crop metapopulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerwaarden, van J.; Eeuwijk, van F.A.; Ross-Ibarra, J.

    2010-01-01

    The need to protect crop genetic resources has sparked a growing interest in the genetic diversity maintained in traditional farming systems worldwide. Although traditional seed management has been proposed as an important determinant of genetic diversity and structure in crops, no models exist that

  12. Combining phylogenetic and demographic inferences to assess the origin of the genetic diversity in an isolated wolf population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montana, Luca; Caniglia, Romolo; Galaverni, Marco; Fabbri, Elena; Ahmed, Atidje; Bolfíková, Barbora Černá; Czarnomska, Sylwia D; Galov, Ana; Godinho, Raquel; Hindrikson, Maris; Hulva, Pavel; Jędrzejewska, Bogumiła; Jelenčič, Maja; Kutal, Miroslav; Saarma, Urmas; Skrbinšek, Tomaž; Randi, Ettore

    2017-01-01

    The survival of isolated small populations is threatened by both demographic and genetic factors. Large carnivores declined for centuries in most of Europe due to habitat changes, overhunting of their natural prey and direct persecution. However, the current rewilding trends are driving many carnivore populations to expand again, possibly reverting the erosion of their genetic diversity. In this study we reassessed the extent and origin of the genetic variation of the Italian wolf population, which is expanding after centuries of decline and isolation. We genotyped wolves from Italy and other nine populations at four mtDNA regions (control-region, ATP6, COIII and ND4) and 39 autosomal microsatellites. Results of phylogenetic analyses and assignment procedures confirmed in the Italian wolves a second private mtDNA haplotype, which belongs to a haplogroup distributed mostly in southern Europe. Coalescent analyses showed that the unique mtDNA haplotypes in the Italian wolves likely originated during the late Pleistocene. ABC simulations concordantly showed that the extant wolf populations in Italy and in south-western Europe started to be isolated and declined right after the last glacial maximum. Thus, the standing genetic variation in the Italian wolves principally results from the historical isolation south of the Alps.

  13. Combining phylogenetic and demographic inferences to assess the origin of the genetic diversity in an isolated wolf population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Montana

    Full Text Available The survival of isolated small populations is threatened by both demographic and genetic factors. Large carnivores declined for centuries in most of Europe due to habitat changes, overhunting of their natural prey and direct persecution. However, the current rewilding trends are driving many carnivore populations to expand again, possibly reverting the erosion of their genetic diversity. In this study we reassessed the extent and origin of the genetic variation of the Italian wolf population, which is expanding after centuries of decline and isolation. We genotyped wolves from Italy and other nine populations at four mtDNA regions (control-region, ATP6, COIII and ND4 and 39 autosomal microsatellites. Results of phylogenetic analyses and assignment procedures confirmed in the Italian wolves a second private mtDNA haplotype, which belongs to a haplogroup distributed mostly in southern Europe. Coalescent analyses showed that the unique mtDNA haplotypes in the Italian wolves likely originated during the late Pleistocene. ABC simulations concordantly showed that the extant wolf populations in Italy and in south-western Europe started to be isolated and declined right after the last glacial maximum. Thus, the standing genetic variation in the Italian wolves principally results from the historical isolation south of the Alps.

  14. The genetic diversity of the noble scallop (Chlamys nobilis, Reeve 1852) in China assessed using five microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanhong; Fu, Dingkun; Xia, Jianjun

    2013-03-01

    Five highly variable microsatellite loci were used to investigate the genetic diversity and population structure of the noble scallop Chlamys nobilis, in the South China Sea. A total of 200 individual scallops from 4 populations were genotyped. All of the 5 microsatellite loci screened in this study showed polymorphism. A total of 32 different alleles were observed over all loci. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 3 to 12. The average allelic number of these polymorphic markers was 6.4. The averages of observed (Ho) and expected heterozygosity (He) ranged from 0.07 to 0.32 and from 0.119 to 0.459, respectively. A highly significant deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg Law, owing primarily to heterozygote deficiency, was found in all populations studied. The Nanao population exhibited more genetic diversity than the other three populations in terms of allele richness and observed and expected heterozygosity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessing Genetic Diversity and Population Differentiation of Colored Calla Lily (Zantedeschia Hybrid) for an Efficient Breeding Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zunzheng; Zhang, Huali; Wang, Yi; Li, Youli; Xiong, Min; Wang, Xian; Zhou, Di

    2017-01-01

    Plastome-genome incompatibility (PGI) is prevalent in several plants including the Zantedeschia species, a worldwide commercial flower crop native to South Africa. Generally, hybrids suffering from PGI appear less vigorous and more susceptible than normal plants. Previous reports revealed that the PGI level in interspecific hybrids is correlated with the relatedness of the parental species in the genus Zantedeschia. To provide a basis for utilizing and improving resources in breeding programs, a total of 117 accessions of colored calla lily (Zantedeschia hybrid), collected from New Zealand, the Netherlands and the United States, were genotyped using 31 transferable expressed sequence tags-simple sequence repeats (EST-SSR) markers from the white calla lily (Zantedeschia aethiopica). A moderately high level of genetic diversity was observed, with 111 alleles in total, an observed/expected heterozygosity (Ho/He) of 0.453/0.478, and polymorphism information content (PIC) of 0.26. Genetic distance and STRUCTURE-based analysis further clustered all accessions into four subgroups (G-Ia, G-Ib, G-IIa and G-IIb), which mostly consisted of Zantedeschia pentlandii, Zantedeschia elliotiana, Zantedeschia albomaculata and Zantedeschia rehmannii, respectively. Significant genetic differentiation was observed between all inferred subgroup pairs, with the Fst ranging from 0.142 to 0.281. Finally, the accessions assigned into G-IIb (Z. rehmannii) were recommended as top priority parents in efficient Zantedeschia breeding program designs. PMID:28635663

  16. Assessment of genetic diversity of zoonotic Brucella spp. recovered from livestock in Egypt using multiple locus VNTR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menshawy, Ahmed M S; Perez-Sancho, Marta; Garcia-Seco, Teresa; Hosein, Hosein I; García, Nerea; Martinez, Irene; Sayour, Ashraf E; Goyache, Joaquín; Azzam, Ragab A A; Dominguez, Lucas; Alvarez, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Brucellosis is endemic in most parts of Egypt, where it is caused mainly by Brucella melitensis biovar 3, and affects cattle and small ruminants in spite of ongoing efforts devoted to its control. Knowledge of the predominant Brucella species/strains circulating in a region is a prerequisite of a brucellosis control strategy. For this reason a study aiming at the evaluation of the phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of a panel of 17 Brucella spp. isolates recovered from domestic ruminants (cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goat) from four governorates during a period of five years (2002-2007) was carried out using microbiological tests and molecular biology techniques (PCR, MLVA-15, and sequencing). Thirteen strains were identified as B. melitensis biovar 3 while all phenotypic and genetic techniques classified the remaining isolates as B. abortus (n = 2) and B. suis biovar 1 (n = 2). MLVA-15 yielded a high discriminatory power (h = 0.801), indicating a high genetic diversity among the B. melitensis strains circulating among domestic ruminants in Egypt. This is the first report of the isolation of B. suis from cattle in Egypt which, coupled with the finding of B. abortus, suggests a potential role of livestock as reservoirs of several zoonotic Brucella species in the region.

  17. Assessment of Genetic Diversity of Zoonotic Brucella spp. Recovered from Livestock in Egypt Using Multiple Locus VNTR Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. S. Menshawy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is endemic in most parts of Egypt, where it is caused mainly by Brucella melitensis biovar 3, and affects cattle and small ruminants in spite of ongoing efforts devoted to its control. Knowledge of the predominant Brucella species/strains circulating in a region is a prerequisite of a brucellosis control strategy. For this reason a study aiming at the evaluation of the phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of a panel of 17 Brucella spp. isolates recovered from domestic ruminants (cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goat from four governorates during a period of five years (2002–2007 was carried out using microbiological tests and molecular biology techniques (PCR, MLVA-15, and sequencing. Thirteen strains were identified as B. melitensis biovar 3 while all phenotypic and genetic techniques classified the remaining isolates as B. abortus (n=2 and B. suis biovar 1 (n=2. MLVA-15 yielded a high discriminatory power (h=0.801, indicating a high genetic diversity among the B. melitensis strains circulating among domestic ruminants in Egypt. This is the first report of the isolation of B. suis from cattle in Egypt which, coupled with the finding of B. abortus, suggests a potential role of livestock as reservoirs of several zoonotic Brucella species in the region.

  18. Assessment of contemporary genetic diversity and inter-taxa/inter-region exchange of avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 in wild birds sampled in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Andrew M; Goraichuk, Iryna V; Hicks, Joseph T; Dimitrov, Kiril M; Poulson, Rebecca L; Stallknecht, David E; Bahl, Justin; Afonso, Claudio L

    2017-03-03

    Avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (APMV-1) viruses are globally distributed, infect wild, peridomestic, and domestic birds, and sometimes lead to outbreaks of disease. Thus, the maintenance, evolution, and spread of APMV-1 viruses are relevant to avian health. In this study we sequenced the fusion gene from 58 APMV-1 isolates recovered from thirteen species of wild birds sampled throughout the USA during 2007-2014. We analyzed sequence information with previously reported data in order to assess contemporary genetic diversity and inter-taxa/inter-region exchange of APMV-1 in wild birds sampled in North America. Our results suggest that wild birds maintain previously undescribed genetic diversity of APMV-1; however, such diversity is unlikely to be pathogenic to domestic poultry. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that APMV-1 diversity detected in wild birds of North America has been found in birds belonging to numerous taxonomic host orders and within hosts inhabiting multiple geographic regions suggesting some level of viral exchange. However, our results also provide statistical support for associations between phylogenetic tree topology and host taxonomic order/region of sample origin which supports restricted exchange among taxa and geographical regions of North America for some APMV-1 sub-genotypes. We identify previously unrecognized genetic diversity of APMV-1 in wild birds in North America which is likely a function of continued viral evolution in reservoir hosts. We did not, however, find support for the emergence or maintenance of APMV-1 strains predicted to be pathogenic to poultry in wild birds of North America outside of the order Suliformes (i.e., cormorants). Furthermore, genetic evidence suggests that ecological drivers or other mechanisms may restrict viral exchange among taxa and regions of North America. Additional and more systematic sampling for APMV-1 in North America would likely provide further inference on viral dynamics for this infectious agent

  19. Assessment of contemporary genetic diversity and inter-taxa/inter-region exchange of avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 in wild birds sampled in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Andy M.; Goraichuk, Iryna V.; Hicks, Joseph T.; Dimitrov, Kiril M.; Poulson, Rebecca L.; Stallknecht, David E.; Bahl, Justin; Afonso, Claudio L.

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundAvian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (APMV-1) viruses are globally distributed, infect wild, peridomestic, and domestic birds, and sometimes lead to outbreaks of disease. Thus, the maintenance, evolution, and spread of APMV-1 viruses are relevant to avian health.MethodsIn this study we sequenced the fusion gene from 58 APMV-1 isolates recovered from thirteen species of wild birds sampled throughout the USA during 2007–2014. We analyzed sequence information with previously reported data in order to assess contemporary genetic diversity and inter-taxa/inter-region exchange of APMV-1 in wild birds sampled in North America.ResultsOur results suggest that wild birds maintain previously undescribed genetic diversity of APMV-1; however, such diversity is unlikely to be pathogenic to domestic poultry. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that APMV-1 diversity detected in wild birds of North America has been found in birds belonging to numerous taxonomic host orders and within hosts inhabiting multiple geographic regions suggesting some level of viral exchange. However, our results also provide statistical support for associations between phylogenetic tree topology and host taxonomic order/region of sample origin which supports restricted exchange among taxa and geographical regions of North America for some APMV-1 sub-genotypes.ConclusionsWe identify previously unrecognized genetic diversity of APMV-1 in wild birds in North America which is likely a function of continued viral evolution in reservoir hosts. We did not, however, find support for the emergence or maintenance of APMV-1 strains predicted to be pathogenic to poultry in wild birds of North America outside of the order Suliformes (i.e., cormorants). Furthermore, genetic evidence suggests that ecological drivers or other mechanisms may restrict viral exchange among taxa and regions of North America. Additional and more systematic sampling for APMV-1 in North America would likely provide further inference on viral

  20. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Wild Olives from the North-western Mediterranean Assessed by SSR Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaj, Angjelina; Muñoz-Diez, Concepción; Baldoni, Luciana; Porceddu, Andrea; Barranco, Diego; Satovic, Zlatko

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims This study examines the pattern of genetic variability and genetic relationships of wild olive (Olea europaea subsp. europaea var. sylvestris) populations in the north-western Mediterranean. Recent bottleneck events are also assessed and an investigation is made of the underlying population structure of the wild olive populations. Methods The genetic variation within and between 11 wild olive populations (171 individuals) was analysed with eight microsatellite markers. Conventional and Bayesian-based analyses were applied to infer genetic structure and define the number of gene pools in wild olive populations. Key Results Bayesian model-based clustering identified four gene pools, which was in overall concordance with the Factorial Correspondence Analysis and Fitch–Margoliash tree. Two gene pools were predominantly found in southern Spain and Italian islands, respectively, in samples gathered from undisturbed forests of the typical Mediterranean climate. The other two gene pools were mostly detected in the north-eastern regions of Spain and in continental Italy and belong to the transition region between the temperate and Mediterranean climate zones. Conclusions On the basis of these results, it can be assumed that the population structure of wild olives from the north-western Mediterranean partially reflects the evolutionary history of these populations, although hybridization between true oleasters and cultivated varieties in areas of close contact between the two forms must be assumed as well. The study indicates a degree of admixture in all the populations, and suggests some caution regarding genetic differentiation at the population level, making it difficult to identify clear-cut genetic boundaries between candidate areas containing either genuinely wild or feral germplasm. PMID:17613587

  1. Evaluation of genetic diversity in Pyrus germplasm native to Azad ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2010-12-06

    Dec 6, 2010 ... ... and limits of the molecular technique in assessing the genetic diversity and relation- ..... ecological dissimilarity. These results also indicate .... interspecific hybrids and extent of self-fertility in Pyrus. Bull. Torrey. Bot. Club, 98: ...

  2. Population genetic diversity and fitness in multiple environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGreevy Thomas J

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When a large number of alleles are lost from a population, increases in individual homozygosity may reduce individual fitness through inbreeding depression. Modest losses of allelic diversity may also negatively impact long-term population viability by reducing the capacity of populations to adapt to altered environments. However, it is not clear how much genetic diversity within populations may be lost before populations are put at significant risk. Development of tools to evaluate this relationship would be a valuable contribution to conservation biology. To address these issues, we have created an experimental system that uses laboratory populations of an estuarine crustacean, Americamysis bahia with experimentally manipulated levels of genetic diversity. We created replicate cultures with five distinct levels of genetic diversity and monitored them for 16 weeks in both permissive (ambient seawater and stressful conditions (diluted seawater. The relationship between molecular genetic diversity at presumptive neutral loci and population vulnerability was assessed by AFLP analysis. Results Populations with very low genetic diversity demonstrated reduced fitness relative to high diversity populations even under permissive conditions. Population performance decreased in the stressful environment for all levels of genetic diversity relative to performance in the permissive environment. Twenty percent of the lowest diversity populations went extinct before the end of the study in permissive conditions, whereas 73% of the low diversity lines went extinct in the stressful environment. All high genetic diversity populations persisted for the duration of the study, although population sizes and reproduction were reduced under stressful environmental conditions. Levels of fitness varied more among replicate low diversity populations than among replicate populations with high genetic diversity. There was a significant correlation

  3. Molecular genetic diversity assessment of Citrus species grown in Iran revealed by SSR, ISSR and CAPS molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ata Allah Sharafi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, genetic diversity in 19 citrus cultivars was analyzed using Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR, Inter-simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR and cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS markers. Nine primers for SSR, nine ISSR primers and two primers for CAPS were used for allele scoring. One chloroplast DNA region (rbcL-ORF106 and one mitochondrial DNA region (18S-5S were analyzed using cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS marker in 19 citrus accessions grown in Iran. In total, 45 SSR and 131 ISSR polymorphic alleles and tree organelle genome types were detected. Cluster analysis of SSR and ISSR data was performed using UPGMA method and based on Jaccard's coefficient. The result of this investigation showed that the SSR and ISSR primers were highly informative and efficient in detecting genetic variability and relationships of the citrus accessions. And CAPS marker analysis Results showed that Bakraee and one of off type Mexican lime had banding pattern similar to Clementine Mandarin, while Pummelo regarded as maternal parent of other studied genotypes Citron regarded as father parent showed definite banding pattern among 19 studied genotypes which it confirmed Cytoplasmic inheritance from mother cellular organelles.

  4. Genetic diversity enhances restoration success by augmenting ecosystem services.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura K Reynolds

    Full Text Available Disturbance and habitat destruction due to human activities is a pervasive problem in near-shore marine ecosystems, and restoration is often used to mitigate losses. A common metric used to evaluate the success of restoration is the return of ecosystem services. Previous research has shown that biodiversity, including genetic diversity, is positively associated with the provision of ecosystem services. We conducted a restoration experiment using sources, techniques, and sites similar to actual large-scale seagrass restoration projects and demonstrated that a small increase in genetic diversity enhanced ecosystem services (invertebrate habitat, increased primary productivity, and nutrient retention. In our experiment, plots with elevated genetic diversity had plants that survived longer, increased in density more quickly, and provided more ecosystem services (invertebrate habitat, increased primary productivity, and nutrient retention. We used the number of alleles per locus as a measure of genetic diversity, which, unlike clonal diversity used in earlier research, can be applied to any organism. Additionally, unlike previous studies where positive impacts of diversity occurred only after a large disturbance, this study assessed the importance of diversity in response to potential environmental stresses (high temperature, low light along a water-depth gradient. We found a positive impact of diversity along the entire depth gradient. Taken together, these results suggest that ecosystem restoration will significantly benefit from obtaining sources (transplants or seeds with high genetic diversity and from restoration techniques that can maintain that genetic diversity.

  5. Genetic diversity enhances restoration success by augmenting ecosystem services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Laura K; McGlathery, Karen J; Waycott, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Disturbance and habitat destruction due to human activities is a pervasive problem in near-shore marine ecosystems, and restoration is often used to mitigate losses. A common metric used to evaluate the success of restoration is the return of ecosystem services. Previous research has shown that biodiversity, including genetic diversity, is positively associated with the provision of ecosystem services. We conducted a restoration experiment using sources, techniques, and sites similar to actual large-scale seagrass restoration projects and demonstrated that a small increase in genetic diversity enhanced ecosystem services (invertebrate habitat, increased primary productivity, and nutrient retention). In our experiment, plots with elevated genetic diversity had plants that survived longer, increased in density more quickly, and provided more ecosystem services (invertebrate habitat, increased primary productivity, and nutrient retention). We used the number of alleles per locus as a measure of genetic diversity, which, unlike clonal diversity used in earlier research, can be applied to any organism. Additionally, unlike previous studies where positive impacts of diversity occurred only after a large disturbance, this study assessed the importance of diversity in response to potential environmental stresses (high temperature, low light) along a water-depth gradient. We found a positive impact of diversity along the entire depth gradient. Taken together, these results suggest that ecosystem restoration will significantly benefit from obtaining sources (transplants or seeds) with high genetic diversity and from restoration techniques that can maintain that genetic diversity.

  6. An Anthropocene map of genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraldo, Andreia; Li, Sen; Borregaard, Michael K; Flórez-Rodríguez, Alexander; Gopalakrishnan, Shyam; Rizvanovic, Mirnesa; Wang, Zhiheng; Rahbek, Carsten; Marske, Katharine A; Nogués-Bravo, David

    2016-09-30

    The Anthropocene is witnessing a loss of biodiversity, with well-documented declines in the diversity of ecosystems and species. For intraspecific genetic diversity, however, we lack even basic knowledge on its global distribution. We georeferenced 92,801 mitochondrial sequences for >4500 species of terrestrial mammals and amphibians, and found that genetic diversity is 27% higher in the tropics than in nontropical regions. Overall, habitats that are more affected by humans hold less genetic diversity than wilder regions, although results for mammals are sensitive to choice of genetic locus. Our study associates geographic coordinates with publicly available genetic sequences at a massive scale, yielding an opportunity to investigate both the drivers of this component of biodiversity and the genetic consequences of the anthropogenic modification of nature. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Assessment of genetic diversity and relationships among Egyptian mango (Mangifera indica L.) cultivers grown in Suez Canal and Sinai region using RAPD markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Hassan; Mekki, Laila E; Hussein, Mohammed A

    2014-01-01

    DNA-based RAPD (Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA) markers have been used extensively to study genetic diversity and relationships in a number of fruit crops. In this study, 10 (7 commercial mango cultivars and 3 accessions) mango genotypes traditionally grown in Suez Canal and Sinai region of Egypt, were selected to assess genetic diversity and relatedness. Total genomic DNA was extracted and subjected to RAPD analysis using 30 arbitrary 10-mer primers. Of these, eleven primers were selected which gave 92 clear and bright fragments. A total of 72 polymorphic RAPD bands were detected out of 92 bands, generating 78% polymorphisms. The mean PIC values scores for all loci were of 0.85. This reflects a high level of discriminatory power of a marker and most of these primers produced unique band pattern for each cultivar. A dendrogram based on Nei's Genetic distance co-efficient implied a moderate degree of genetic diversity among the cultivars used for experimentation, with some differences. The hybrid which had derived from cultivar as female parent was placed together. In the cluster, the cultivars and accessions formed separate groups according to bearing habit and type of embryo and the members in each group were very closely linked. Cluster analysis clearly showed two main groups, the first consisting of indigenous to the Delta of Egypt cultivars and the second consisting of indigenous to the Suez Canal and Sinai region. From the analysis of results, it appears the majority of mango cultivars originated from a local mango genepool and were domesticated later. The results indicated the potential of RAPD markers for the identification and management of mango germplasm for breeding purposes.

  8. The Use of Some Morphological Traits for the Assessment of Genetic Diversity in Spinach (Spinacia Oleracea L. Landraces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebadi-Segheloo Asghar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of native accessions of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. would be aid in the development of new genetically improved varieties, so in this research 121 spinach landraces, collected from the various spinach growing areas of Iran, were evaluated to determine their diversity using several agro-morphological traits. High coefficients of variation (CV were recorded in fresh yield, leaf area and dry yield. Using principal component (PC analysis, the first three PCs with eigenvalues more than 0.9 contributed 80.56% of the variability among accessions. The first PC was related to leaf yield performance (fresh and dry yields, leaf numbers at flowering and lateral branches while the PC2 was related to leaf characteristic (leaf width, petiole length, petiole diameter and leaf area. The third PC was related to seed characteristic (seed yield and 1000-seed weight and was named as seed property component. The 121 spinach landraces were grouped into six clusters using cluster analysis. Each cluster had some specific characteristics of its own and the clusters I and II were clearly separated from clusters III and V and also from clusters IV and VI. The studied accessions are an important resource for the generation of a core collection of spinach in the world. The results of present research will support tasks of conservation and utilization of landraces in spinach breeding programs.

  9. Assessment of genetic diversity and population structure of an endemic Moroccan tree (Argania spinosa L.) based in IRAP and ISSR markers and implications for conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhrou, Ouafae; Medraoui, Leila; Yatrib, Chaimaa; Alami, Mohammed; Filali-Maltouf, Abdelkarim; Belkadi, Bouchra

    2017-07-01

    Argan Tree is well known for its precious oil extracted from its seeds particularly used for the nutritional and cosmetic benefits. Because of the high international demand, the argan tree suffers from overexploitation and its cultivation is rare. Thus, the assessment of the genetic variation of this endemic tree is critically important for designing conservation strategies. In the present study and for the first time, genetic diversity of the global natural distribution of argan tree (Argania spinosa L.) in Morocco was assessed. Four IRAP (inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism) primer combinations and seven ISSR (inter-simple sequence repeat) primers amplified 164 and 248 scorable polymorphic bands respectively. Polymorphic information content (PIC = 0.27), resolving power (Rp = 15) and marker index (MI = 10.81) generated by IRAP primer combinations were almost identical to those generated by ISSR primers (PIC = 0.27, Rp = 9.16 and MI = 12). AMOVA analysis showed that 49% of the genetic variation was partitioned within populations which is supported by Nei's genetic differentiation (Gst = 0.5391) and the overall estimate of gene flow (Nm) being 0.4274. The STRUCTURE analysis, PCoA (principal coordinate analysis) and UPGMA (unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean) based on the combined data matrices of IRAP and ISSR divided the 240 argan genotypes into two groups. The strong differentiation observed might be due to the geographical distribution of argan tree. Our results provide crucial insight for genetic conservation programs of this genetic resource.

  10. Analysis of genetic diversity in bambara groundnut [ Vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) was used to assess genetic diversity among 100 selected bambara groundnut [Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc] landraces from a diverse geographic area of Tanzania. Eleven informative AFLP primer combinations generated a total of 49 scorable polymorphic amplification ...

  11. Evaluation of genetic diversity in Sulla coronaria from different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five oligonucleotides generating 116 markers complementary to simple sequence repeats were used in order to characterize wild and cultivated ecotypes of Sulla coronaria and assess genetic diversity suitable in breeding programs. While analysing populations, a large genetic variability was revealed and supported by ...

  12. Genetic diversity and population structure of sweet cassava using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population structure was analyzed by means of genetic distances and probabilistic models; allelic frequencies were used in order to assess the genetic diversity indexes (Ht, Ho, PIC, % polymorphism and number of alleles) for each locus studied. All evaluated loci were polymorphic and the average was highly heterozygote ...

  13. Genetic diversity of Cameroon native goat populations revealed by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of seventeen caprine microsatellite markers were used on 169 goats to investigate genetic diversity of eight Cameroon native goats and to assess genetic differentiation with the east African small goat. All microsatellites showed a high polymorphic content (PIC) of more than 0.5 in almost all ecotypes.

  14. Genetic diversity among varieties and wild species accessions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity among varieties and wild species accessions of pea (Pisum sativum L.) based on SSR markers. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... To assess the genetic relations inPisum genus and to examine putative duplicate accessions, 20 pea varieties (Pisum sativum L.) with 57 accessions from wild Pisum ...

  15. Genetic diversity in Oroxylum indicum (L.) Vent. (Bignoniaceae), a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-02-05

    Feb 5, 2008 ... Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used to assess genetic diversity in. Oroxylum indicum (L.) Vent (Bignoniaceae) a vulnerable medicinal plant collected from eight locations in Andhra Pradesh, India. High level of genetic similarity was observed in the collected accessions.

  16. Genetic diversity of Annona senegalensis Pers. populations as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2007-05-16

    May 16, 2007 ... assessment of the genetic diversity in A. senegalensis would assist in planning for future germplasm collection, conservation and fruit .... templates in 20 µl total volume. The amplifications were conducted ... The SSRs were screened on Genetic Analyzer model 3730 XL automated DNA sequencer, G5 dye ...

  17. Genetic diversity in cocoa germplasm of southern Cameroon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The range of polymorphism of about 194 cocoa accessions collected in farms in Southern Cameroon during field surveys and 71 Trinitario and Upper Amazon clones available in genebanks on-station was assessed using 13 SSR markers. The gene diversity, genetic differentiation and genetic similarities were analysed for ...

  18. Morphological and molecular genetic diversity of Syrian indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Domestic goats in Syria may provide an interesting source of genetic variability due to its proximity to the centers of domestication. This study aimed to assess the morphological variation, genetic diversity and population substructure of the Syrian goat populations. Commonly, three goat genotypes are distinguished in Syria, ...

  19. Genetic relationships and diversity of Jatropha curcas accessions in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study has been undertaken to assess the extent of genetic diversity in a representative set of 16 accessions of Jatropha curcas. Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) analysis was used to establish the genetic relationship among the accessions. From the eight ISSR primers used, the number of amplicons per primers ...

  20. Analysis of genetic diversity in accessions of Irvingia gabonensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2006-02-03

    Feb 3, 2006 ... Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) was used to assess genetic diversity and relationships among 15 accessions of Irvingia gabonensis collected from Cameroun, Gabon, and. Nigeria. Twelve AFLP+3 primers produced 384 polymorphic fragments. Average genetic distance. (AGD) between the ...

  1. Assessment of genetic diversity and yield performance in Jordanian barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) landraces grown under Rainfed conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abdallat, A M; Karadsheh, A; Hadadd, N I; Akash, M W; Ceccarelli, S; Baum, M; Hasan, M; Jighly, A; Abu Elenein, J M

    2017-11-02

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) is a major cereal crop, which is cultivated under variable environmental conditions and abiotic stresses in marginal areas around the globe. In this study, we evaluated 150 Jordanian landraces obtained from ICARDA Gene Bank and four local checks for yield and yield components related-traits in two locations across Jordan for three growing seasons under rainfed conditions. The study aims to identify superior Jordanian barley genotypes under dry conditions, to understand the genotype × environment (G × E) interactions, to analyze stability parameters and to identify markers associated with yield and yield components under rainfed conditions. The barley accessions exhibited significant variation for all traits studied. Three accessions with high yield, cultivar superiority and stability under specific environments were identified with accession G69 is the highest yielding and superior for Madaba and overall environments and G144 is the highest yielding at Ramtha. Accession G123 was high yielding in all environments and was stable across different environments. At the genetic level, the Jordanian landraces were found to be diverse with a clustering that was based on row-type. The GWAS analysis identified 77 significant markers-traits associations for multiple traits including grain yield (GY) with three significant QTLs located at 1H, 2H and 7H, which seem important for dry environments. Utilizing Jordanian barley landraces can effectively improve and adapt the current barley cultivars for cultivation under environmental stresses in dry regions. Utilization of markers associated with important agronomical traits and their incorporation in breeding using marker assisted selection can improve barley tolerance to drought stress.

  2. Genetic diversity and relationships among cabbage ( Brassica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The integration of our data with historical documents confirmed that traditional cabbage landraces cultivated in North of China were first introduced from Russia. Key words: Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), genetic diversity, cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata), landraces, population structure.

  3. Genetic diversity increases insect herbivory on oak saplings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastien Castagneyrol

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence from community genetics studies suggests that ecosystem functions supported by plant species richness can also be provided by genetic diversity within plant species. This is not yet true for the diversity-resistance relationship as it is still unclear whether damage by insect herbivores responds to genetic diversity in host plant populations. We developed a manipulative field experiment based on a synthetic community approach, with 15 mixtures of one to four oak (Quercus robur half-sib families. We quantified genetic diversity at the plot level by genotyping all oak saplings and assessed overall damage caused by ectophagous and endophagous herbivores along a gradient of increasing genetic diversity. Damage due to ectophagous herbivores increased with the genetic diversity in oak sapling populations as a result of higher levels of damage in mixtures than in monocultures for all families (complementarity effect rather than because of the presence of more susceptible oak genotypes in mixtures (selection effect. Assemblages of different oak genotypes would benefit polyphagous herbivores via improved host patch location, spill over among neighbouring saplings and diet mixing. By contrast, genetic diversity was a poor predictor of the abundance of endophagous herbivores, which increased with individual sapling apparency. Plant genetic diversity may not provide sufficient functional contrast to prevent tree sapling colonization by specialist herbivores while enhancing the foraging of generalist herbivores. Long term studies are nevertheless required to test whether the effect of genetic diversity on herbivory change with the ontogeny of trees and local adaptation of specialist herbivores.

  4. Genetic diversity of 11 European pig breeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavall, G.; Iannuccelli, N.; Legault, C.; Milan, D.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Andersson, L.; Fredholm, M.; Geldermann, H.; Foulley, J.L.; Chevalet, C.; Ollivier, L.

    2000-01-01

    A set of eleven pig breeds originating from six European countries, and including a small sample of wild pigs, was chosen for this study of genetic diversity. Diversity was evaluated on the basis of 18 microsatellite markers typed over a total of 483 DNA samples collected. Average breed

  5. Genetic diversity and population structure in Meconopsis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-05-24

    May 24, 2010 ... genetic structure of M. quintuplinervia has probably been shaped by its breeding modes, biogeographic history and human impact ... Key words: Meconopsis quintuplinervia Regel, genetic diversity, random amplified polymorphic DNA markers, ..... inbreeding depression and facilitate quality control of drug.

  6. RAPD markers demonstrate genetic diversity in Pterocarpus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAPD markers demonstrate genetic diversity in Pterocarpus angolensis from Zimbabwe and Zambia. E Chisha-Kasumu, S Woodward, A Price. Abstract. Understanding the availability, extent and apportionment of genetic variability in natural populations of the southern African savanna tree Pterocarpus angolensis can ...

  7. An analysis of the genetic diversity and genetic structure of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scientific approaches to conservation of threatened species depend on a good understanding of the genetic information of wild and artificial population. The genetic diversity and structure analysis of 10 Eucommia ulmoides population was analyzed using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers in this paper.

  8. Assessment of genetic diversity among barley cultivars and breeding lines adapted to the US Pacific Northwest, and its implications in breeding barley for imidazolinone-resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Rustgi

    Full Text Available Extensive application of imidazolinone (IMI herbicides had a significant impact on barley productivity contributing to a continuous decline in its acreage over the last two decades. A possible solution to this problem is to transfer IMI-resistance from a recently characterized mutation in the 'Bob' barley AHAS (acetohydroxy acid synthase gene to other food, feed and malting barley cultivars. We focused our efforts on transferring IMI-resistance to barley varieties adapted to the US Pacific Northwest (PNW, since it comprises ∼23% (335,000 ha of the US agricultural land under barley production. To effectively breed for IMI-resistance, we studied the genetic diversity among 13 two-rowed spring barley cultivars/breeding-lines from the PNW using 61 microsatellite markers, and selected six barley genotypes that showed medium to high genetic dissimilarity with the 'Bob' AHAS mutant. The six selected genotypes were used to make 29-53 crosses with the AHAS mutant and a range of 358-471 F1 seeds were obtained. To make informed selection for the recovery of the recipient parent genome, the genetic location of the AHAS gene was determined and its genetic nature assessed. Large F2 populations ranging in size from 2158-2846 individuals were evaluated for herbicide resistance and seedling vigor. Based on the results, F3 lines from the six most vigorous F2 genotypes per cross combination were evaluated for their genetic background. A range of 20%-90% recovery of the recipient parent genome for the carrier chromosome was observed. An effort was made to determine the critical dose of herbicide to distinguish between heterozygotes and homozygotes for the mutant allele. Results suggested that the mutant can survive up to the 10× field recommended dose of herbicide, and the 8× and 10× herbicide doses can distinguish between the two AHAS mutant genotypes. Finally, implications of this research in sustaining barley productivity in the PNW are discussed.

  9. Development, characterization and use of genomic SSR markers for assessment of genetic diversity in some Saudi date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L. cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulieman A. Al-Faifi

    2016-05-01

    Conclusions: The developed microsatellite markers are additional values to date palm characterization tools that can be used by researchers in population genetics, cultivar identification as well as genetic resource exploration and management. The tested cultivars exhibited a significant amount of genetic diversity and could be suitable for successful breeding program. Genomic sequences generated from this study are available at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI, Sequence Read Archive (Accession numbers. LIBGSS_039019.

  10. Nephronophthisis: A Genetically Diverse Ciliopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roslyn J. Simms

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nephronophthisis (NPHP is an autosomal recessive cystic kidney disease and a leading genetic cause of established renal failure (ERF in children and young adults. Early presenting symptoms in children with NPHP include polyuria, nocturia, or secondary enuresis, pointing to a urinary concentrating defect. Renal ultrasound typically shows normal kidney size with increased echogenicity and corticomedullary cysts. Importantly, NPHP is associated with extra renal manifestations in 10–15% of patients. The most frequent extrarenal association is retinal degeneration, leading to blindness. Increasingly, molecular genetic testing is being utilised to diagnose NPHP and avoid the need for a renal biopsy. In this paper, we discuss the latest understanding in the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of NPHP. We suggest an appropriate clinical management plan and screening programme for individuals with NPHP and their families.

  11. Integrating Fisheries Dependent and Independent Approaches to assess Fisheries, Abundance, Diversity, Distribution and Genetic Connectivity of Red Sea Elasmobranch Populations

    KAUST Repository

    Spaet, Julia L.

    2014-05-01

    The Red Sea has long been recognized as a global hotspot of marine biodiversity. Ongoing overfishing, however, is threatening this unique ecosystem, recently leading to the identification of the Red Sea as one of three major hotspots of extinction risk for sharks and rays worldwide. Elasmobranch catches in Saudi Arabian Red Sea waters are unregulated, often misidentified and unrecorded, resulting in a lack of species-specific landings information, which would be vital for the formulation of effective management strategies. Here we employed an integrated approach of fisheries dependent and independent survey methods combined with molecular tools to provide biological, ecological and fisheries data to aid in the assessment of the status of elasmobranch populations in the Red Sea. Over the course of two years, we conducted market surveys at the biggest Saudi Arabian fish market in Jeddah. Market landings were dominated by, mostly immature individuals - implying both recruitment and growth overfishing. Additionally, we employed baited remote underwater video (BRUVS) and longline surveys along almost the entire length of the Red Sea coast of Saudi Arabia as well as at selected reef systems in Sudan. The comparison of catch per unit effort (CPUE) data for Saudi Arabian Red Sea BRUVS and longline surveys to published data originating from non-Red Sea ocean systems revealed CPUE values several orders of magnitude lower for both survey methods in the Red Sea compared to other locations around the world. Finally, we infered the regional population structure of four commercially important shark species between the Red Sea and the Western Indian Ocean.We genotyped nearly 2000 individuals at the mitochondrial control region as well as a total of 20 microsatellite loci. Genetic homogeneity could not be rejected for any of the four species across the spatial comparison. Based on high levels of region-wide exploitation, we suggest that, for management purposes, the population

  12. MULTIVARIATE DIVERSITY, HERITABILITY AND GENETIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    La caractérisation de la variabilité génétique existante est une Characterisation of exiting genetic variability is a préalable dans des activités d'amélioration cultural. La présente étude était conçue pour évaluer la variabilité génétique parmi les génotypes svlectionnés de tef Eragrostis, Zucc.Trotter (Tef) dans cinq zones ...

  13. Genetic diversity of the myrtle rust pathogen (Austropuccinia psidii) in the Americas and Hawaii: Global implications for invasive threat assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. E. Stewart; A.L. Ross-Davis; R. N. Graҫa; A. C. Alfenas; T. L. Peever; J. W. Hanna; J. Y. Uchida; R. D. Hauff; C. Y. Kadooka; M.-S. Kim; P. G. Cannon; S. Namba; S. Simeto; C. A. Pérez; M. B. Rayamajhi; D.J. Lodge; M. Arguedas; R. Medel-Ortiz; M. A. López-Ramirez; P. Tennant; M. Glen; P. S. Machado; A. R. McTaggart; A. J. Carnegie; N. B. Klopfenstein; M. Cleary

    2017-01-01

    Since the myrtle rust pathogen (Austropuccinia psidii) was first reported (as Puccinia psidii) in Brazil on guava (Psidium guajava) in 1884, it has been found infecting diverse myrtaceous species. Because A. psidii has recently spread rapidly worldwide with an extensive host range,...

  14. ASSESSMENTS OF GENETIC DIVERSITY IN COUNTRY BEAN (Lablab purpureus L. USING RAPD MARKER AGAINST PHOTO-INSENSITIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BISWAS MD. SANAULLAH

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available RAPD marker was used to evaluate genetic relationships among 11 genotypes of country bean, including first three genotypes were photo-insensitive and the rests were sensitive. The genotypes were grouped into two major clusters where photo-insensitive genotypes remain in cluster I and sensitive genotypes remain in cluster II. A total of 26 bands were detected, of which 57.69% were polymorphic and the remaining were monomorphic across all genotypes. A highest level of genetic distance was observed between CB04 and CB06 while the lowest level of genetic distance showed between CB01 and CB03. The highest similarity index between the genotypes CB01 and CB03 indicated less divergence between them. Low similarity indices were observed between CB04 and CB06, which indicated more divergence. Crossing between the genotypes with low similarity coefficient will manifest high heterosis. The identified genetically distinct cultivars could be potentially important source of germplasm for further improvement of country bean.

  15. Genetic diversity in a crop metapopulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heerwaarden, J; van Eeuwijk, F A; Ross-Ibarra, J

    2010-01-01

    The need to protect crop genetic resources has sparked a growing interest in the genetic diversity maintained in traditional farming systems worldwide. Although traditional seed management has been proposed as an important determinant of genetic diversity and structure in crops, no models exist that can adequately describe the genetic effects of seed management. We present a metapopulation model that accounts for several features unique to managed crop populations. Using traditional maize agriculture as an example, we develop a coalescence-based model of a crop metapopulation undergoing pollen and seed flow as well as seed replacement. In contrast to metapopulation work on natural systems, we model seed migration as episodic and originating from a single source per population rather than as a constant immigration from the entire metapopulation. We find that the correlated origin of migrants leads to surprising results, including a loss of invariance of within-deme diversity and a parabolic relationship between F(ST) and migration quantity. In contrast, the effects of migration frequency on diversity and structure are more similar to classical predictions, suggesting that seed migration in managed crop populations cannot be described by a single parameter. In addition to migration, we investigate the effects of deme size and extinction rates on genetic structure, and show that high levels of pollen migration may mask the effects of seed management on structure. Our results highlight the importance of analytically evaluating the effects of deviations from classical metapopulation models, especially in systems for which data are available to estimate specific model parameters.

  16. Genetic and metabolite diversity of Sardinian populations of Helichrysum italicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Melito

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helichrysum italicum (Asteraceae is a small shrub endemic to the Mediterranean Basin, growing in fragmented and diverse habitats. The species has attracted attention due to its secondary metabolite content, but little effort has as yet been dedicated to assessing the genetic and metabolite diversity present in these populations. Here, we describe the diversity of 50 H. italicum populations collected from a range of habitats in Sardinia. METHODS: H. italicum plants were AFLP fingerprinted and the composition of their leaf essential oil characterized by GC-MS. The relationships between the genetic structure of the populations, soil, habitat and climatic variables and the essential oil chemotypes present were evaluated using Bayesian clustering, contingency analyses and AMOVA. KEY RESULTS: The Sardinian germplasm could be partitioned into two AFLP-based clades. Populations collected from the southwestern region constituted a homogeneous group which remained virtually intact even at high levels of K. The second, much larger clade was more diverse. A positive correlation between genetic diversity and elevation suggested the action of natural purifying selection. Four main classes of compounds were identified among the essential oils, namely monoterpenes, oxygenated monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and oxygenated sesquiterpenes. Oxygenated monoterpene levels were significantly correlated with the AFLP-based clade structure, suggesting a correspondence between gene pool and chemical diversity. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest an association between chemotype, genetic diversity and collection location which is relevant for the planning of future collections aimed at identifying valuable sources of essential oil.

  17. A SNP-Enabled Assessment of Genetic Diversity, Evolutionary Relationships and the Identification of Candidate Genes in Chrysanthemum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Xinran; Zhang, Fei; Wu, Yangyang; Yang, Xiaodong; Zhao, Nan; Wang, Haibin; Guan, Zhiyong; Fang, Weimin; Chen, Fadi

    2016-12-01

    Varieties of the economically important ornamental species chrysanthemum have been bred to fit a number of market niches, but the genetic basis and evolutionary relationships among various cultivated types are poorly understood. Here, a DNA marker-based analysis of 199 chrysanthemum entries representing each of the five cultivated types is presented. A set of >90,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with a minor allele frequency of at least 5% was defined, and used to perform a phylogenetic analysis which corresponded well with the phenotypic classification. The analysis revealed that the small-flowered types, spray cut chrysanthemum (SCC) and potted and ground chrysanthemum (PGC), are more closely related to the wild progenitor species (WC) than are the large-flowered ones, disbud cut chrysanthemum (DCC) and traditional chrysanthemum (TC); and the PGC type was closest. Some 550 genetic regions appeared to have experienced selection in the separation of potted and ground-cover types from disbud cut types, and that between potted and ground-cover types from traditional types. A genome-wide association analysis revealed that seven SNPs lying within six genes were predictive of three important traits (ray floret type, cultivated type and flower shape), but no association with flower color was detected. The study has provided a number of novel insights into evolutionary relationships, the population structure and the genetic basis of some key ornamental traits. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  18. Diversity of potato genetic resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida-Hirano, Ryoko

    2015-03-01

    A considerable number of highly diverse species exist in genus Solanum. Because they can adapt to a broad range of habitats, potato wild relatives are promising sources of desirable agricultural traits. Potato taxonomy is quite complex because of introgression, interspecific hybridization, auto- and allopolyploidy, sexual compatibility among many species, a mixture of sexual and asexual reproduction, possible recent species divergence, phenotypic plasticity, and the consequent high morphological similarity among species. Recent researchers using molecular tools have contributed to the identification of genes controlling several types of resistance as well as to the revision of taxonomical relationships among potato species. Historically, primitive forms of cultivated potato and its wild relatives have been used in breeding programs and there is still an enormous and unimaginable potential for discovering desirable characteristics, particularly in wild species Different methods have been developed to incorporate useful alleles from these wild species into the improved cultivars. Potato germplasm comprising of useful alleles for different breeding objectives is preserved in various gene banks worldwide. These materials, with their invaluable information, are accessible for research and breeding purposes. Precise identification of species base on the new taxonomy is essential for effective use of the germplasm collection.

  19. Assessment of genetic diversity among some accessions of sage (Salvia officinalis L. using electrophoresis of seed storage proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Abbas Mirjalili

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The genus Salvia (Lamiaceae comprises over 900 species in the world, with a relatively wide dispersion in the Iran’s flora. Until now, about 58 species of the genus have been reported and identified in Iran, in which 17 of them were endemic. In order to study, investigate and evaluate the intraspecific diversity, similarity and dissimilarity among Iranian Salvia officinalis accessions, an experiment was carried out using SDS-PAGE technique. In this study, the seeds from five accessions were collected from gene bank and were evaluated. The seed storage proteins were extracted by buffers and were measured. Phylogenetic relationships were analyzed according to presence and absence of bands on the gel. A dendrogram was prepared using calculation of the accession’s similarity index. Mean comparison were done by Tukey’s test. The seed protein contents showed significant differences (p≤0.01 among accessions. A total of 39 bands were indicated on the gel. The maximum diversity was detected in the accession No. 2 while, the lowest band’s number were recorded with the accessions No. 1 and 5. Based on dendrogram, the accessions were divided into two groups; one includes accession No. 1 and 4 other accessions were located in the second group further classified into two subgroup including accessions No. 2 and 3 in one clade and accessions No. 4 and 5 in the other ones.

  20. A Comparison of Microsatellites in Phytopathogenic Aspergillus Species in Order to Develop Markers for the Assessment of Genetic Diversity among Its Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfooz, Sahil; Singh, Satyendra P; Mishra, Nishtha; Mishra, Aradhana

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence of Microsatellites (SSRs) has been witnessed in most of the fungal genomes however its abundance varies across species. In the present study, we analyzed the frequency of SSRs in the whole genome and transcripts of two phyto-pathogenic (Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus) and compared them with two non-pathogenic (Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus oryzae) Aspergillus. Higher relative abundance and relative density of SSRs were observed in the whole genome and transcript sequences of the pathogenic Aspergillus when compared to the non-pathogenic. The relative abundance and density of SSRs were positively correlated with the G+C content of transcripts. Among the different classes of SSR, the percentage of tetra-nucleotide SSRs were maximum in A. niger (36.7%) and A. oryzae (35.9%) whereas A. nidulans and A. terreus preferred tri-nucleotide SSRs (38.2 and 42.1%) in whole genome sequences. In transcripts, tri-nucleotide SSRs were the most abundant whereas di-nucleotide SSRs were the least favored. Motif conservation study among the transcripts revealed conservation of only 27% motif within Aspergillus species. Furthermore, a similar relationship among the Ascomycetes was obtained on the basis of motif conservation and conserved genes (rDNA). To analyze the diversity present within the Indian isolates of Aspergillus, primers were successfully designed for 692 motifs in A. niger and A. terreus of which 20 were selected for diversity analysis. Among all the markers amplified, 10 markers (83.3%) were polymorphic, whereas remaining two markers (16.6%) were monomorphic. Ten polymorphic markers acquired in this investigation showed the utility of recently created SSR markers in the assessment of genetic diversity among various isolates of Aspergillus.

  1. Genetic diversity of salt tolerance in Miscanthus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Charlie; Schoot, van der Hanneke; Dehghan, Shiva; Alvim Kamei, Claire L.; Schwarz, Kai Uwe; Meyer, Heike; Visser, Richard G.F.; Linden, van der Gerard

    2017-01-01

    Miscanthus is a woody rhizomatous C4 grass that can be used as a CO2 neutral biofuel resource. It has potential to grow in marginal areas such as saline soils, avoiding competition for arable lands with food crops. This study explored genetic diversity for salt tolerance in Miscanthus and discovered

  2. Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The objective of this study was to quantify the molecular diversity and to determine the genetic relationships among Secale spp. and among cultivars of Secale cereale using RAPDs, ISSRs and sequence analysis of six exons of ScMATE1 gene. Thirteen ryes (cultivated and wild) were genotyped using 21 RAPD ...

  3. GENETIC DIVERSITY AND ECO-GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Classic F-statistics revealed the highest intra-specific polymorphism recorded for E. africana (32.45%), followed by E. coracana (16.83%); implying .... Genetic diversity and eco-geographical distribution of Eleusine species. 47 regions of Ethiopia as a ... were collected from the central highlands, west, northwest, northern and ...

  4. Cryptic genetic diversity in Dientamoeba fragilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J A; Clark, C G

    2000-12-01

    Uncertainty surrounding the role of Dientamoeba fragilis in human disease could be due in part to the existence of pathogenic and nonpathogenic variants. Evidence for two genetically distinct forms was obtained using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of ribosomal genes. Future studies in humans will need to take D. fragilis diversity into account.

  5. Cryptic Genetic Diversity in Dientamoeba fragilis

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Jeanette A.; Clark, C. Graham

    2000-01-01

    Uncertainty surrounding the role of Dientamoeba fragilis in human disease could be due in part to the existence of pathogenic and nonpathogenic variants. Evidence for two genetically distinct forms was obtained using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of ribosomal genes. Future studies in humans will need to take D. fragilis diversity into account.

  6. Genomic management of animal genetic diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenbroek, Kor

    2017-01-01

    Recently developed genomic tools, like SNP-genotyping and whole genome sequencing, and their analysis, offer great opportunities for the conservation and utilisation of animal genetic diversity, both among and within breeds. These genomic tools can be used to detect potentially valuable rare alleles

  7. Genetic diversity of Ascaris in southwestern Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betson, Martha; Nejsum, Peter; Llewellyn-Hughes, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Despite the common occurrence of ascariasis in southwestern Uganda, helminth control in the region has been limited. To gain further insights into the genetic diversity of Ascaris in this area, a parasitological survey in mothers (n=41) and children (n=74) living in two villages, Habutobere...

  8. Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The objective of this study was to quantify the molecular diversity and to determine the genetic relationships amongSecalespp. and among cultivars ofSecale cerealeusing RAPDs, ISSRs and sequence analysis of six exons ofScMATE1gene.Thirteen ryes (cultivated and wild) were genotyped using 21 RAPD and 16 ISSR ...

  9. A genetic assessment of the English bulldog

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Niels C.; Pooch, Ashley S.; Liu, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Background This study examines genetic diversity among 102 registered English Bulldogs used for breeding based on maternal and paternal haplotypes, allele frequencies in 33 highly polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) loci on 25 chromosomes, STR-linked dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) class I and II haplotypes, and the number and size of genome-wide runs of homozygosity (ROH) determined from high density SNP arrays. The objective was to assess whether the breed retains enough genetic diversity to ...

  10. Genetic diversity of eleven European pig breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laval, G; Iannuccelli, N; Legault, C; Milan, D; Groenen, M A; Giuffra, E; Andersson, L; Nissen, P H; Jørgensen, C B; Beeckmann, P; Geldermann, H; Foulley, J L; Chevalet, C; Ollivier, L

    2000-01-01

    A set of eleven pig breeds originating from six European countries, and including a small sample of wild pigs, was chosen for this study of genetic diversity. Diversity was evaluated on the basis of 18 microsatellite markers typed over a total of 483 DNA samples collected. Average breed heterozygosity varied from 0.35 to 0.60. Genotypic frequencies generally agreed with Hardy-Weinberg expectations, apart from the German Landrace and Schwäbisch-Hällisches breeds, which showed significantly reduced heterozygosity. Breed differentiation was significant as shown by the high among-breed fixation index (overall F(ST)= 0.27), and confirmed by the clustering based on the genetic distances between individuals, which grouped essentially all individuals in 11 clusters corresponding to the 11 breeds. The genetic distances between breeds were first used to construct phylogenetic trees. The trees indicated that a genetic drift model might explain the divergence of the two German breeds, but no reliable phylogeny could be inferred among the remaining breeds. The same distances were also used to measure the global diversity of the set of breeds considered, and to evaluate the marginal loss of diversity attached to each breed. In that respect, the French Basque breed appeared to be the most "unique" in the set considered. This study, which remains to be extended to a larger set of European breeds, indicates that using genetic distances between breeds of farm animals in a classical taxonomic approach may not give clear resolution, but points to their usefulness in a prospective evaluation of diversity.

  11. Genetic diversity of eleven European pig breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foulley Jean-Louis

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A set of eleven pig breeds originating from six European countries, and including a small sample of wild pigs, was chosen for this study of genetic diversity. Diversity was evaluated on the basis of 18 microsatellite markers typed over a total of 483 DNA samples collected. Average breed heterozygosity varied from 0.35 to 0.60. Genotypic frequencies generally agreed with Hardy-Weinberg expectations, apart from the German Landrace and Schwäbisch-Hällisches breeds, which showed significantly reduced heterozygosity. Breed differentiation was significant as shown by the high among-breed fixation index (overall FST = 0.27, and confirmed by the clustering based on the genetic distances between individuals, which grouped essentially all individuals in 11 clusters corresponding to the 11 breeds. The genetic distances between breeds were first used to construct phylogenetic trees. The trees indicated that a genetic drift model might explain the divergence of the two German breeds, but no reliable phylogeny could be inferred among the remaining breeds. The same distances were also used to measure the global diversity of the set of breeds considered, and to evaluate the marginal loss of diversity attached to each breed. In that respect, the French Basque breed appeared to be the most "unique" in the set considered. This study, which remains to be extended to a larger set of European breeds, indicates that using genetic distances between breeds of farm animals in a classical taxonomic approach may not give clear resolution, but points to their usefulness in a prospective evaluation of diversity.

  12. Microsatellite genotyping reveals high genetic diversity but low ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JMwacharos

    2016-03-16

    Mar 16, 2016 ... Genetic diversity and structure of goats within an early ... due to their recognized features and characteristics. The ... Genomic DNA was extracted from whole blood using. DNeasy® Blood and Tissue Kit (Qiagen GmbH, Germany). DNA concentration and purity were assessed using the BioPhotometer.

  13. Molecular genetic diversity study of Lepidium sativum population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vostro 2520

    Full Length Research Paper ... The study was conducted to assess the genetic diversity of L. sativum population from Ethiopia using inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) marker. Molecular data generated from ISSR ... the ISSR data was used to construct unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) and.

  14. Genetic diversity and in vitro antibiotic susceptibility profile of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We assessed the genetic diversity of forty Salmonella isolates obtained from selected domestic water and waste water sources in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa using DNA fingerprinting and antibiotic susceptibility profile as test indices. Restriction digests and SDS/PAGE as well as the DNA dendograms of the ...

  15. Genetic diversity and relationship analysis among accessions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) DNA markers were used to assess the genetic diversity and relationships between 55 accessions of genus Aegilops, including the species Aegilops triuncialis L. (UUCC), Aegilops geniculata Roth (MMUU), Aegilops cylindrica Host (CCDD) and Aegilops umbellulata Zhuk ...

  16. Evaluation of genetic diversity in rice using simple sequence repeats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dendrogram revealed 8 major distinct clusters. Higher range of similarity values for related genotypes using simple sequence repeats (SSR) provides greater confidence for the assessment of genetic diversity and relationships. The polymorphism information content (PIC) value for the SSR loci ranged from 0.36 to 0.98.

  17. Genetic diversity of Santalum album using random amplified ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-06

    Jul 6, 2009 ... Santalum album is a parasitic, evergreen tree growing primarily in south Central India, in the dry ... species belonging to the family santalaceae ... superior trees. Therefore, assessment of genetic diversity is vital in developing effective conservation strategies (Loveless, 1992) and sustainable manage-.

  18. Molecular genetic diversity study of Lepidium sativum population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vostro 2520

    was conducted to assess the genetic diversity of L. sativum population from Ethiopia using inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) marker. Molecular ... human abdominal ache and diarrhea. Moreover, L. sativum is also used to treat ..... Composition and Physical Properties of Cress (Lepidium sativum L.) and Field Pennycress ...

  19. Genetic diversity, phylogeographic structure and effect of selection ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, the maternal genetic diversity, phylogenetic relationship and effect of natural selection on indigenous chickens from Nigeria were assessed. A total of 397-bp fragment of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop region of 171 indigenous chickens from four populations of Nigeria and four commercial egg line ...

  20. Genetic diversity of Annona senegalensis Pers. populations as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annona senegalensis Pers. is one of the wild fruit tree for domestication in southern Africa. An assessment of the genetic diversity in A. senegalensis would assist in planning for future germplasm collection, conservation and fruit domestication programmes. During 2004 to 2006 nine populations were collected from different ...

  1. Molecular analysis of genetic diversity in elite II synthetic hexaploid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-20

    Jul 20, 2009 ... synthetic hexaploid wheat screened against Barley ... present study was conducted to assess the genetic diversity of Elite-II synthetic hexaploid (SH) wheat ..... (Saffdar, 2007). Similar results were also obser- ved by De Freitas et al. (2000) in relation to the stem rust disease. The dendrogram showed ...

  2. Study of genetic diversity in Sudanese sesame (Sesamum indicum L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used to assess genetic diversity in Sesame indicum (L.). RAPD technique was carried out in a set of 10 sesame germplasm collected from different regions of Sudan. A total of 64 polymorphisms (6.4 polymorphic markers per primer) out of 75 reproducible ...

  3. SSR Analysis of Genetic Diversity Among 192 Diploid Potato Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Song

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In potato breeding, it is difficult to improve the traits of interest at the tetraploid level due to the tetrasomic inheritance. A promising alternative is diploid breeding. Thus it is necessary to assess the genetic diversity of diploid potato germplasm for efficient exploration and deployment of desirable traits. In this study, we used SSR markers to evaluate the genetic diversity of diploid potato cultivars. To screen polymorphic SSR markers, 55 pairs of SSR primers were employed to amplify 39 cultivars with relatively distant genetic relationships. Among them, 12 SSR markers with high polymorphism located at 12 chromosomes were chosen to evaluate the genetic diversity of 192 diploid potato cultivars. The primers produced 6 to 18 bands with an average of 8.2 bands per primer. In total, 98 bands were amplified from 192 cultivars, and 97 of them were polymorphic. Cluster analysis using UPGMA showed the genetic relationships of all accessions tested: 186 of the 192 accessions could be distinguished by only 12 pairs of SSR primers, and the 192 diploid cultivars were divided into 11 groups, and 83.3% constituted the first group. Clustering results showed relatively low genetic diversity among 192 diploid cultivars, with closer relationship at the molecular level. The results can provide molecular basis for diploid potato breeding.

  4. Genetic diversity of Syrian Arabian horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almarzook, S; Reissmann, M; Arends, D; Brockmann, G A

    2017-08-01

    Although Arabian horses have been bred in strains for centuries and pedigrees have been recorded in studbooks, to date, little is known about the genetic diversity within and between these strains. In this study, we tested if the three main strains of Syrian Arabian horses descend from three founders as suggested by the studbook. We examined 48 horses representing Saglawi (n = 18), Kahlawi (n = 16) and Hamdani (n = 14) strains using the Equine SNP70K BeadChip. For comparison, an additional 24 Arabian horses from the USA and three Przewalski's horses as an out group were added. Observed heterozygosis (Ho ) ranged between 0.30 and 0.32, expected heterozygosity (He ) between 0.30 and 0.31 and inbreeding coefficients (Fis ) between -0.02 and -0.05, indicating high genetic diversity within Syrian strains. Likewise, the genetic differentiation between the three Syrian strains was very low (Fst  horses. Among Arabian horses, we found three clusters containing either horses from the USA or horses from Syria or horses from Syria and the USA together. Individuals from the same Syrian Arabian horse strain were spread across different sub-clusters. When analyzing Syrian Arabian horses alone, the best population differentiation was found with three distinct clusters. In contrast to expectations from the studbook, these clusters did not coincide with strain affiliation. Although this finding supports the hypothesis of three founders, the genetic information is not consistent with the currently used strain designation system. The information can be used to reconsider the current breeding practice. Beyond that, Syrian Arabian horses are an important reservoir for genetic diversity. © 2017 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  5. Genetic diversity of cultivated lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) and its relation to the world’s agro-ecological zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assessment of genetic diversity and population structure of germplasm collections plays a critical role in supporting conservation and crop genetic enhancement strategies. We used a cultivated lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) collection consisting of 352 accessions originating from 54 diverse countrie...

  6. Genetic gain and gene diversity of seed orchard crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kyu-Suk [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology

    2001-07-01

    Seed orchards are the major tool for deploying the improvement generated by breeding programs and assuring the consistent supply of genetically improved seed. Attainment of genetic gain and monitoring of gene diversity through selection and breeding were studied considering the factors: selection intensity; genetic value; coancestry; fertility variation; and pollen contamination. The optimum goal of a seed orchard is achieved when the orchard population is under an idealized situation, i.e., panmixis, equal gamete contributions from all parental genotypes, non-relatedness and no pollen contamination. In practice, however, due to relatedness among parents, variation in clonal fertility and ramet number, and gene migration from outside, the realized genetic gain and gene diversity deviate from the expectation. In the present study, the genetic value of seed orchard crops (genetic gain, G) could be increased by selective harvest, genetic thinning and/or both. Status number (N{sub S}) was used to monitor the loss of gene diversity in the process of forest tree domestication, and calculated to be reasonably high in most seed orchards. Fertility of parents was estimated based on the assessment of flowering or seed production, which was shown to be under strong genetic control. Variation in fertility among orchard parents was a general feature and reduced the predicted gene diversity of the orchard crop. Fertility variation among parents could be described by the sibling coefficient ({psi}). {psi} was estimated to be 2 (CV = 100% for fertility). In calculating {psi}, it was possible to consider, besides fertility variation, the phenotypic correlation between maternal and parental fertilities, and pollen contamination. Status number was increased by controlling parental fertility, e.g., equal seed harvest, mixing seed in equal proportions and balancing parental contribution. By equalizing female fertility among over-represented parents, it was possible to effect a

  7. Limited Genetic Diversity of Brucella spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Gándara, Benjamín; Merino, Ahidé López; Rogel, Marco Antonio; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2001-01-01

    Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) of 99 Brucella isolates, including the type strains from all recognized species, revealed a very limited genetic diversity and supports the proposal of a monospecific genus. In MLEE-derived dendrograms, Brucella abortus and a marine Brucella sp. grouped into a single electrophoretic type related to Brucella neotomae and Brucella ovis. Brucella suis and Brucella canis formed another cluster linked to Brucella melitensis and related to Rhizobium tropici....

  8. Genetic diversity increases population productivity in a sessile marine invertebrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, J David; Marshall, Dustin J

    2012-05-01

    Reductions in genetic diversity can have widespread ecological consequences: populations with higher genetic diversity are more stable, productive and resistant to disturbance or disease than populations with lower genetic diversity. These ecological effects of genetic diversity differ from the more familiar evolutionary consequences of depleting genetic diversity, because ecological effects manifest within a single generation. If common, genetic diversity effects have the potential to change the way we view and manage populations, but our understanding of these effects is far from complete, and the role of genetic diversity in sexually reproducing animals remains unclear. Here, we examined the effects of genetic diversity in a sexually reproducing marine invertebrate in the field. We manipulated the genetic diversity of experimental populations and then measured individual survival, growth, and fecundity, as well as the size of offspring produced by individuals in high and low genetic diversity populations. Overall, we found greater genetic diversity increased performance across all metrics, and that complementarity effects drove the increased productivity of our high-diversity populations. Our results show that differences in genetic diversity among populations can have pervasive effects on population productivity within remarkably short periods of time.

  9. Genetic diversity and population structure of maize landraces from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ivoire. However, no study on the genetic diversity of the species has been performed to date. This study aims at analyzing the diversity and genetic structure of 35 maize accessions using 10 microsatellite markers. These accessions are from ...

  10. Inbreeding levels in swine: Ramifications for Genetic Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globally, genetic diversity of livestock populations is contracting. Knowing the true extent of the contraction is needed to develop effective conservation strategies. While contractions of genetic diversity have been documented at the breed level, little within breed documentation has occurred. ...

  11. Global genetic diversity of Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloria-Soria, Andrea; Ayala, Diego; Bheecarry, Ambicadutt; Calderon-Arguedas, Olger; Chadee, Dave D; Chiappero, Marina; Coetzee, Maureen; Elahee, Khouaildi Bin; Fernandez-Salas, Ildefonso; Kamal, Hany A; Kamgang, Basile; Khater, Emad I M; Kramer, Laura D; Kramer, Vicki; Lopez-Solis, Alma; Lutomiah, Joel; Martins, Ademir; Micieli, Maria Victoria; Paupy, Christophe; Ponlawat, Alongkot; Rahola, Nil; Rasheed, Syed Basit; Richardson, Joshua B; Saleh, Amag A; Sanchez-Casas, Rosa Maria; Seixas, Gonçalo; Sousa, Carla A; Tabachnick, Walter J; Troyo, Adriana; Powell, Jeffrey R

    2016-11-01

    Mosquitoes, especially Aedes aegypti, are becoming important models for studying invasion biology. We characterized genetic variation at 12 microsatellite loci in 79 populations of Ae. aegypti from 30 countries in six continents, and used them to infer historical and modern patterns of invasion. Our results support the two subspecies Ae. aegypti formosus and Ae. aegypti aegypti as genetically distinct units. Ae. aegypti aegypti populations outside Africa are derived from ancestral African populations and are monophyletic. The two subspecies co-occur in both East Africa (Kenya) and West Africa (Senegal). In rural/forest settings (Rabai District of Kenya), the two subspecies remain genetically distinct, whereas in urban settings, they introgress freely. Populations outside Africa are highly genetically structured likely due to a combination of recent founder effects, discrete discontinuous habitats and low migration rates. Ancestral populations in sub-Saharan Africa are less genetically structured, as are the populations in Asia. Introduction of Ae. aegypti to the New World coinciding with trans-Atlantic shipping in the 16th to 18th centuries was followed by its introduction to Asia in the late 19th century from the New World or from now extinct populations in the Mediterranean Basin. Aedes mascarensis is a genetically distinct sister species to Ae. aegypti s.l. This study provides a reference database of genetic diversity that can be used to determine the likely origin of new introductions that occur regularly for this invasive species. The genetic uniqueness of many populations and regions has important implications for attempts to control Ae. aegypti, especially for the methods using genetic modification of populations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Genetic diversity among farmer-preferred cassava landraces in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Understanding of genetic diversity among a breeding population is an important requirement for crop improvement as it allows for the selection of diverse parental combinations and formation of heterotic pools for genetic gain. This study was carried out to determine genetic diversity within and among 51 farmer-preferred ...

  13. Global to local genetic diversity indicators of evolutionary potential in tree species within and outside forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, Lars; Aravanopoulos, Filippos; Bennadji, Zohra

    2014-01-01

    , trends and potentials of the world's tree genetic resources to support sustainable growth. The state of the genetic diversity will be based on trends in population distributions and diversity patterns for selected species. The productivity of the genetic resource of trees in current use will reflect...... distributions (patterns of genetic variation of key adaptive traits in the ecological space) of selected species is a realistic way of assessing the trend of intra-specific variation, and thus provides a state indicator of tree genetic diversity also able to reflect possible pressures threatening genetic...

  14. The impact of global climate change on genetic diversity within populations and species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauls, Steffen U; Nowak, Carsten; Bálint, Miklós; Pfenninger, Markus

    2013-02-01

    Genetic diversity provides the basic substrate for evolution, yet few studies assess the impacts of global climate change (GCC) on intraspecific genetic variation. In this review, we highlight the importance of incorporating neutral and non-neutral genetic diversity when assessing the impacts of GCC, for example, in studies that aim to predict the future distribution and fate of a species or ecological community. Specifically, we address the following questions: Why study the effects of GCC on intraspecific genetic diversity? How does GCC affect genetic diversity? How is the effect of GCC on genetic diversity currently studied? Where is potential for future research? For each of these questions, we provide a general background and highlight case studies across the animal, plant and microbial kingdoms. We further discuss how cryptic diversity can affect GCC assessments, how genetic diversity can be integrated into studies that aim to predict species' responses on GCC and how conservation efforts related to GCC can incorporate and profit from inclusion of genetic diversity assessments. We argue that studying the fate of intraspecifc genetic diversity is an indispensable and logical venture if we are to fully understand the consequences of GCC on biodiversity on all levels. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. RAPD and ISSR marker assessment of genetic diversity in Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrad: a unique source of germplasm highly adapted to drought and high-temperature stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Kumar Sambhav; Ul Haq, Shamshad; Kachhwaha, Sumita; Kothari, S L

    2017-10-01

    Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrad. (Cucurbitaceae) shows high levels of variation in fruit color, fruit stripe pattern, seed coat color, and size. Thirty-eight accessions of C. colocynthis plants from different parts of semi-arid Rajasthan were collected and genetic diversity was assessed using random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. Out of 65 RAPD decamer primers, 50 primers produced 549 scorable bands of which 318 were polymorphic. Polymorphic banding patterns with the number of amplified fragments varied from 5 (OPA-08 and OPF-9) to 19 (OPT-20) in the molecular size range of 150-6000 bp. Percent polymorphism ranged from 22.2% (OPA-09) to 83.3% (OPE-12) with 55.14% polymorphism. Out of the 20 ISSR primers screened, 13 primers produced 166 amplification products, of which 99 were polymorphic. The number of bands amplified per primer varied between 9 (UBC-807, 802) and 16 (UBC-803, 812) with average band size between 250 and 4000 bp. Percent polymorphism ranged from 45.4% (UBC-815) to 73.3% (UBC-814) with 65.05% polymorphism. Dendrogram constructed on the basis of RAPD + ISSR polymorphism separated the accessions into four distinct clusters at 72% variation with Jaccard's similarity coefficient ranging from minimum 0.64 to 0.95. The matrices for RAPD and ISSR were also compared using Mantel's test and obtained correlation value (r = 0.7947). Discriminating power of RAPD and ISSR markers was assessed by calculating polymorphic information content, multiplex ratio, marker index, and resolving power. Approx. 50% RAPD and ISSR markers showed PIC value and heterozygosity (H) ≥ 0.50, indicating marker as informative. The primers that showed higher polymorphism had higher RP, MR, and MI values.

  16. Determination of genetic diversity among Turkish durum wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wheat landraces represent an important source of genetic variation that can be used for future wheat breeding program. The rich wheat landraces from Turkey have not been sufficiently analyzed genetically. For this reason, genetic diversity and relationship of the landraces must be determined. In this study, genetic diversity ...

  17. Analysis of genetic diversity in some durum wheat ( Triticum durum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was conducted to examine the magnitude of genetic diversity and characters contributing to genetic diversity among 23 durum wheat genotypes grown at Adet, northwest Ethiopia, in 2010 main cropping season. Genetic divergence was carried out according to Mahalanobis D2 statistics. Genetic distance ...

  18. Chemical and genetic diversity of two Mediterranean subspecies of Teucrium polium L

    OpenAIRE

    DJABOU, Nassim; MUSELLI, Alain; ALLALI, Hocine; DIB, Mohammed El Amine; TABTI, Boufeldja; VARESI, Laurent; COSTA, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Chemical and genetic diversity of Teucrium polium L. subsp. polium from western Algeria and T. polium L. subsp. capitatum from Corsica were investigated. Diversity within and among the two populations of subspecies was assessed according to the chemical composition of their essential oils and the genetic diversity. Chemical analysis was performed using a combination of capillary GC-RI and GC/MS after fractionation using column chromatography. Genetic structures were mapped usin...

  19. Genetic diversity in Egyptian and Saudi goat breeds using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2013-12-30

    Dec 30, 2013 ... Objective: The genetic polymorphism within and among three indigenous goat breeds found in Egypt (Barki and ... with only little genetic exchange between the geographically isolated populations. Key words: Microsatellites, Goats, Genetic diversity, Genotype. INTRODUCTION ..... conservation strategies.

  20. Assessment of Functional EST-SSR Markers (Sugarcane in Cross-Species Transferability, Genetic Diversity among Poaceae Plants, and Bulk Segregation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamshad Ul Haq

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Expressed sequence tags (ESTs are important resource for gene discovery, gene expression and its regulation, molecular marker development, and comparative genomics. We procured 10000 ESTs and analyzed 267 EST-SSRs markers through computational approach. The average density was one SSR/10.45 kb or 6.4% frequency, wherein trinucleotide repeats (66.74% were the most abundant followed by di- (26.10%, tetra- (4.67%, penta- (1.5%, and hexanucleotide (1.2% repeats. Functional annotations were done and after-effect newly developed 63 EST-SSRs were used for cross transferability, genetic diversity, and bulk segregation analysis (BSA. Out of 63 EST-SSRs, 42 markers were identified owing to their expansion genetics across 20 different plants which amplified 519 alleles at 180 loci with an average of 2.88 alleles/locus and the polymorphic information content (PIC ranged from 0.51 to 0.93 with an average of 0.83. The cross transferability ranged from 25% for wheat to 97.22% for Schlerostachya, with an average of 55.86%, and genetic relationships were established based on diversification among them. Moreover, 10 EST-SSRs were recognized as important markers between bulks of pooled DNA of sugarcane cultivars through BSA. This study highlights the employability of the markers in transferability, genetic diversity in grass species, and distinguished sugarcane bulks.

  1. GENETIC DIVERSITY IN CZECH HAFLINGER HORSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luboš Vostrý

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Haflinger as a small moutain horse breed originated from the South Tyrol district as a cross of Alpen Mountain breeds with Araber. This breed was expanding to Czech Republic during the last 25 years. The aim of this study was to analyse genetic diversity within the population using microsatellite markers. A total of 95 alleles have been detected. The highest frequency 88.18% showed allele 101 (HTG 6. The heterosigosity varied from 0.25 (HTG 6 to 0.84 (VHL 20, genetic diversity reached 0.6–0.8. The heterozygosity of the whole population studied is FIS= -0.013. The average effective number of allele per locus was 2.93 with standard deviation 1.54, with minimal and maximal level 1.30 and 7.83, respectively. Average polymorphism information content per locus was 0.608 with standard derivation 0.146, with minimal and maximal level 0.208 and 0.824, respectively. The results showed that breeding program of Czech Haflinger is optimal, including optimized mating strategies. The diversity of the population Czech Haflinger, based on a small number of microsatellites, seems to be sufficient.

  2. Genetic Diversity of Koala Retroviral Envelopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqin Xu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity, attributable to the low fidelity of reverse transcription, recombination and mutation, is an important feature of infectious retroviruses. Under selective pressure, such as that imposed by superinfection interference, gammaretroviruses commonly adapt their envelope proteins to use alternative receptors to overcome this entry block. The first characterized koala retroviruses KoRV subgroup A (KoRV-A were remarkable in their absence of envelope genetic variability. Once it was determined that KoRV-A was present in all koalas in US zoos, regardless of their disease status, we sought to isolate a KoRV variant whose presence correlated with neoplastic malignancies. More than a decade after the identification of KoRV-A, we isolated a second subgroup of KoRV, KoRV-B from koalas with lymphomas. The envelope proteins of KoRV-A and KoRV-B are sufficiently divergent to confer the ability to bind and employ distinct receptors for infection. We have now obtained a number of additional KoRV envelope variants. In the present studies we report these variants, and show that they differ from KoRV-A and KoRV-B envelopes in their host range and superinfection interference properties. Thus, there appears to be considerable variation among KoRVs envelope genes suggesting genetic diversity is a factor following the KoRV-A infection process.

  3. Genetic diversity of koala retroviral envelopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenqin; Gorman, Kristen; Santiago, Jan Clement; Kluska, Kristen; Eiden, Maribeth V

    2015-03-17

    Genetic diversity, attributable to the low fidelity of reverse transcription, recombination and mutation, is an important feature of infectious retroviruses. Under selective pressure, such as that imposed by superinfection interference, gammaretroviruses commonly adapt their envelope proteins to use alternative receptors to overcome this entry block. The first characterized koala retroviruses KoRV subgroup A (KoRV-A) were remarkable in their absence of envelope genetic variability. Once it was determined that KoRV-A was present in all koalas in US zoos, regardless of their disease status, we sought to isolate a KoRV variant whose presence correlated with neoplastic malignancies. More than a decade after the identification of KoRV-A, we isolated a second subgroup of KoRV, KoRV-B from koalas with lymphomas. The envelope proteins of KoRV-A and KoRV-B are sufficiently divergent to confer the ability to bind and employ distinct receptors for infection. We have now obtained a number of additional KoRV envelope variants. In the present studies we report these variants, and show that they differ from KoRV-A and KoRV-B envelopes in their host range and superinfection interference properties. Thus, there appears to be considerable variation among KoRVs envelope genes suggesting genetic diversity is a factor following the KoRV-A infection process.

  4. Conservation implications of species–genetic diversity correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aapo Kahilainen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite its importance for the long-term viability of populations and functioning of ecosystems, the genetic diversity of populations is seldom given explicit consideration in conservation prioritization. Research on the species–genetic diversity correlation (SGDC suggests that species diversity within a community and intrapopulation genetic diversity are positively correlated, due to the parallel influences of environmental characteristics (area, connectivity, and environmental heterogeneity on both levels of diversity. A positive locality scale SGDC (i.e. α-SGDC thus provides potential for simultaneous conservation of both species diversity within a locality and intrapopulation genetic diversity. However, caution is needed, since in some situations environmental characteristics can influence species diversity and genetic diversity differently, resulting in a negative α-SGDC. In such cases there can be a conflict between conservation of species diversity within localities and genetic diversity within populations. SGDCs provide useful information also for conservation planning, which considers compositional differences between localities, since the mechanisms behind α-SGDCs can also drive correlations between differentiation of community and genetic compositions (i.e. β-SGDCs. We suggest that emphasizing locality area and connectivity between similar localities in conservation planning best conserves both species and intrapopulation genetic diversity, and that focusing on highly complementary species richness may compromise conservation of genetic diversity.

  5. Genetic diversity in Stylosanthes capitata ACCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Azevedo Martuscello

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity and the relative importance of morphological traits for the study of genetic diversity among Stylosanthes capitata genotypes. Ten open-pollinated families (297-2, 49-5, 1064-4, 49-4, 1095-5, 141-6, 1064-6, 297-6, 625-3, and 111-3, previously selected by the Embrapa Gado de Corte improvement program, and the Campo Grande cultivar as control were evaluated. A completely randomized design consisting of four repetitions was used. The following morphological traits were studied: type of growth, length, width and length-to-width ratio of the central and lateral leaflets, plant height, stem length, and number of secondary ramifications. Mahalanobis generalized distance was calculated using the phenotypic means for each trait and the matrix of residual variances and covariances. Once the dissimilarity matrix was obtained, the families and Campo Grande cultivar were grouped using Ward’s method. Canonical variables were also analyzed using the phenotypic mean of the traits studied and the matrix of residual variances and covariances. Cluster analysis by Ward’s method permitted to divide the 11 genotypes into five groups. Canonical analysis was efficient since it permitted to summarize the total variation observed in the nine morphological traits into only three canonical variables, which accounted for 81.65% of the total variation in the data. The importance of the traits for clustering was also analyzed. Central leaflet width, length-to-width ratio of the central and lateral leaflets, lateral leaflet width and secondary ramifications were the most important traits for the evaluation of genetic diversity among Stylosanthes capitata genotypes.

  6. Pyrosequencing and genetic diversity of microeukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Christoffer Bugge

    pathogens themselves. Protozoa is a morphological group which occurs in many different eukaryotic phyla, and many apparently morphologically similar types are very different from each others genetically. This complicates the development of good primers for analysis of their diversity with modern DNA based...... to identify the thousands of DNA sequences, and Article II contributes to this by a morphological and phylogenetic characterization and naming of two new genera of flagellates found in Danish soil. The fact that it is possible to find two unknown and genetically divergent lineages in a few grams of soil from...... to evaluate the explanatory power of individual genes and their mutual consistency. The fact that ITS, the most widely used marker in fungi, did not show the best taxonomic resolution serves to put the heavy reliance upon a single marker (18S) in protozoology into perspective....

  7. Assessment of the Genetic Diversity of Different Job's Tears (Coix lacryma-jobi L. Accessions and the Active Composition and Anticancer Effect of Its Seed Oil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Jie Xi

    Full Text Available Job's tears (Coix lachryma-jobi L. is an important crop used as food and herbal medicine in Asian countries. A drug made of Job's tears seed oil has been clinically applied to treat multiple cancers. In this study, the genetic diversity of Job's tears accessions and the fatty acid composition, triglyceride composition, and anti-proliferative effect of Job's tears seed oil were analyzed using morphological characteristics and ISSR markers, GC-MS, HPLC-ELSD, and the MTT method. ISSR analysis demonstrated low genetic diversity of Job's tears at the species level (h = 0.21, I = 0.33 and the accession level (h = 0.07, I = 0.10, and strong genetic differentiation (GST = 0.6702 among all accessions. It also clustered the 11 accessions into three cultivated clades corresponding with geographical locations and two evidently divergent wild clades. The grouping patterns based on morphological characteristics and chemical profiles were in accordance with those clustered by ISSR analysis. Significant differences in morphological characteristics, fatty acid composition, triglyceride composition, and inhibition rates of seed oil were detected among different accessions, which showed a highly significant positive correlation with genetic variation. These results suggest that the seed morphological characteristics, fatty acid composition, and triglyceride composition may be mainly attributed to genetic factors. The proportion of palmitic acid and linoleic acid to oleic acid displayed a highly significant positive correlation with the inhibition rates of Job's tears seed oil for T24 cells, and thus can be an important indicator for quality control for Job's tears.

  8. Assessment of the Genetic Diversity of Different Job's Tears (Coix lacryma-jobi L.) Accessions and the Active Composition and Anticancer Effect of Its Seed Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Xiu-Jie; Zhu, Yun-Guo; Tong, Ying-Peng; Yang, Xiao-Ling; Tang, Nan-Nan; Ma, Shu-Min; Li, Shan; Cheng, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Job's tears (Coix lachryma-jobi L.) is an important crop used as food and herbal medicine in Asian countries. A drug made of Job's tears seed oil has been clinically applied to treat multiple cancers. In this study, the genetic diversity of Job's tears accessions and the fatty acid composition, triglyceride composition, and anti-proliferative effect of Job's tears seed oil were analyzed using morphological characteristics and ISSR markers, GC-MS, HPLC-ELSD, and the MTT method. ISSR analysis demonstrated low genetic diversity of Job's tears at the species level (h = 0.21, I = 0.33) and the accession level (h = 0.07, I = 0.10), and strong genetic differentiation (GST = 0.6702) among all accessions. It also clustered the 11 accessions into three cultivated clades corresponding with geographical locations and two evidently divergent wild clades. The grouping patterns based on morphological characteristics and chemical profiles were in accordance with those clustered by ISSR analysis. Significant differences in morphological characteristics, fatty acid composition, triglyceride composition, and inhibition rates of seed oil were detected among different accessions, which showed a highly significant positive correlation with genetic variation. These results suggest that the seed morphological characteristics, fatty acid composition, and triglyceride composition may be mainly attributed to genetic factors. The proportion of palmitic acid and linoleic acid to oleic acid displayed a highly significant positive correlation with the inhibition rates of Job's tears seed oil for T24 cells, and thus can be an important indicator for quality control for Job's tears.

  9. Assessment of genetic diversity and variation of Robinia pseudoacacia seeds induced by short-term spaceflight based on two molecular marker systems and morphological traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, C Q; Li, Y F; Sun, P; Sun, Y H; Zhang, G J; Yang, M S; Zhang, Y Y; Li, Y; Wang, L

    2012-12-17

    The black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) is a forest legume that is highly valued as a honey plant and for its wood. We explored the effect of short-term spaceflight on development of R. pseudoacacia seedlings derived from seeds that endured a 15-day flight; the genetic diversity and variation of plants sampled from space-mutagenized seeds were compared to plants from parallel ground-based control seeds using molecular markers and morphological traits. In the morphology analysis, the space-mutagenized group had apparent variation compared with the control group in morphological traits, including plant height, basal diameter, number of branches, branch stipular thorn length, branch stipular thorn middle width, leaflet vertex angle, and tippy leaf vertex angle. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) molecular marker analyses showed a slightly higher levels of genetic diversity in the space-mutagenized group compared to the control group. In the SRAP analysis, the space-mutagenized group had 115 polymorphic bands vs 98 in the controls; 91.27% polymorphic loci vs 77.78% in the controls; 1.9127 ± 0.2834 alleles vs 1.7778 ± 0.4174 in the controls; Nei's genetic diversity (h) was 0.2930 ± 0.1631 vs 0.2688 ± 0.1862 in the controls, and the Shannon's information index (I) was 0.4452 ± 0.2177 vs 0.4031 ± 0.2596 in the controls. The number of alleles was significantly higher in the space-mutagenized group. In the SSR analysis, the space-mutagenized group also had more polymorphic bands (51 vs 46), a greater percentage of polymorphic loci (89.47% vs 80.70%); h was also higher (0.2534 ± 0.1533 vs 0.2240 ± 0.1743), as was I (0.3980 ± 0.2069 vs 0.3501 ± 0.2412). These results demonstrated that the range of genetic variation in the populations of R. pseudoacacia increased after spaceflight. It also suggested that the SSR and SRAP markers are effective markers for studying mutations and genetic diversity in R. pseudoacacia. The data

  10. Genetic diversity of Poa pratensis L. depending on geographical origin and compared with genetic markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Szenejko

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Poa pratensis is one of the most common species of meadow grass in Europe. Most cultivars of the species found in Poland were originally derived from its ecotypes. We compared the effectiveness of the RAPD and ISSR methods in assessing the genetic diversity of the selected populations of P. pratensis. We examined whether these methods could be useful for detecting a possible link between the geographical origin of a given population and its assessed genetic variation. Methods The molecular markers RAPD and ISSR were used and their efficiency compared using, inter alia, statistical multivariate methods (UPGMA and PCA. Results The low value of Dice’s coefficient (0.369 along with the significantly high percentage of polymorphic products indicates a substantial degree of genetic diversity among the studied populations. Our results found a correlation between the geographical origin of the studied populations and their genetic variations. For ISSR, which proved to be the more effective method in that respect, we selected primers with the greatest differentiating powers correlating to geographical origin. Discussion The populations evaluated in this study were characterized by a high genetic diversity. This seems to confirm the hypothesis that ecotypes of P. pratensis originating from different regions of Central Europe with different terrain structures and habitat conditions can be a source of great genetic variability.

  11. Do Farmers reduce genetic diversity when they domesticate tropical trees? a case study from Amazonia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollingsworth, P.M.; Dawson, I.K.; Goodall-Copestake, W.P.; Richardson, J.E.; Weber, J.C.; Sotelo Montes, C.; Pennington, R.T.

    2005-01-01

    Agroforestry ecosystems may be an important resource for conservation and sustainable use of tropical trees, but little is known of the genetic diversity they contain. Inga edulis, a widespread indigenous fruit tree in South America, is used as a model to assess the maintenance of genetic diversity

  12. Genetic diversity of the pampas deer (Ozotoceros bezoarticus) population in the Brazilian Pantanal assessed by combining fresh fecal DNA analysis and a set of heterologous microsatellite loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantellatto, Aline Meira Bonfim; Caparroz, Renato; Christofoletti, Maurício Durante; Piovezan, Ubiratan; Duarte, José Maurício Barbanti

    2017-10-02

    The pampas deer (Ozotoceros bezoarticus) is close to being classified as 'globally threatened', with the largest population occurring in the Brazilian Pantanal. Since capture is stressful to these animals, non-invasive sampling methods such as the use of feces can provide reliable sources of DNA. The aim of this study was to use fecal samples to evaluate the genetic variability of the Brazilian Pantanal population of pampas deer. Six heterologous microsatellite markers were used to screen 142 stool specimens. Seventy-four deer were identified, of which 50 adults were used to determine the genetic characteristics of the population. The Pantanal population showed high genetic diversity (mean number of alleles per locus = 11.5, expected heterozygosity = 0.75). This is the first investigation to characterize a South American deer species using fecal DNA and demonstrates the usefulness and efficiency of this approach, as well as the feasibility of obtaining information that could not have been easily obtained by traditional DNA sampling. Our findings suggest that management strategies for this species may be much more effective if applied now when the population still shows high genetic variability.

  13. Contrasting genetic diversity among Oryza longistaminata (A. Chev ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Contrasting genetic diversity among Oryza longistaminata (A. Chev et Roehr) populations from different geographic origins using AFLP. ... The mean Nei's genetic diversity for all the 176 loci in the 48 populations was 0.302 and diversity for populations within countries ranged from 0.1161 to 0.2126. Partitioning of between ...

  14. Genetic diversity of Chrysichthys nigrodigitatus in the Lagos lagoon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    s

    2012-11-13

    Nov 13, 2012 ... Mitochondrial DNA control region sequences were used to investigate the genetic diversity of populations of Chrysichthys ..... to our result. Therefore, combination of both mtDNA and nuclear DNA markers must be ... genetic structure pattern similar to freshwater species and genetic diversity similar to ...

  15. Analysis of genetic diversity in Eucalyptus grandis (Hill ex Maiden ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-04

    Jul 4, 2008 ... Population genetic theory predicts that the decrease in the genetic diversity limits species ability to keep pace with the changing selection pressure (Young and. Merrian, 1992). The release of genetically diverse material is a prere- quisite for preventing inbreeding depression in future generations. Hence ...

  16. Effects of landscape fragmentation on genetic diversity of Stipa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... determine if and how these disturbances have impacted on genetic structure of S. krylovii populations, ... Key words: Stipa krylovii roshev, genetic diversity, landscape fragmentation, patch, habitat isolation, ISSR marker, rangeland ..... duce inbreeding depression in order to maintain the diversity of genetic ...

  17. Genetic diversity in selected stud and commercial herds of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assignment methods (based on STRUCTURE software) revealed a real structure consisting of four genetic populations (K = 4). Estimates of genetic diversity did not support the hypothesis of significant loss of genetic diversity in any individual Afrikaner herd. Heterozygosity estimates ranged from 0.456 - 0.737 within ...

  18. AFLP analysis on genetic diversity and population structure of small ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-17

    Jun 17, 2009 ... Bohai Bay, Yellow Sea and East China Sea were analyzed using amplified fragment length polymorphism. (AFLP). Ninety-one ... Key words: Small yellow croaker, Larimichthys polyactis, genetic population structure, genetic diversity, AFLP. ... gene mapping, linkage and genetic diversity of species.

  19. Genetic Diversity of Local and Introduced Sweet Potato [Ipomoea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efficient use of plant genetic diversity is a prerequisite for the development of crop varieties in meeting the challenges of food security and poverty alleviation. Understanding the variation and diversity of the genetic resources of crop species is therefore the first step to efficient utilization and genetic resource conservation.

  20. Genetic diversity and population structure of endangered Aquilaria ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The endangered Aquilaria malaccensis, is an important plant with high economic values. Characterization of genetic diversity and population structure is receiving tremendous attention for effective conservation of genetic resources. Considering important repositories of biological diversity, the genetic relationships of 127 A.

  1. Genetic diversity in Oroxylum indicum (L.) Vent. (Bignoniaceae), a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity in Oroxylum indicum (L.) Vent. (Bignoniaceae), a vulnerable medicinal plant by random amplified polymorphic DNA marker. ... results show that the genetic diversity of this species is low, possibly depicting a difficulty in adapting to environmental variations. This distributive pattern of genetic variation of O.

  2. Protein landmarks for diversity assessment in wheat genotypes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grain proteins from 20 Indian wheat genotypes were evaluated for diversity assessment based seed storage protein profiling on sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Genetic diversity was evaluated using Nei's index, Shannon index and Unweighted pair group method with arithmetic ...

  3. Development of DArT marker platforms and genetic diversity assessment of the U.S. collection of the new oilseed crop lesquerella and related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Von Mark V; Kilian, Andrzej; Dierig, David A

    2013-01-01

    The advantages of using molecular markers in modern genebanks are well documented. They are commonly used to understand the distribution of genetic diversity in populations and among species which is crucial for efficient management and effective utilization of germplasm collections. We describe the development of two types of DArT molecular marker platforms for the new oilseed crop lesquerella (Physaria spp.), a member of the Brassicaceae family, to characterize a collection in the National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS) with relatively little known in regards to the genetic diversity and traits. The two types of platforms were developed using a subset of the germplasm conserved ex situ consisting of 87 Physaria and 2 Paysonia accessions. The microarray DArT revealed a total of 2,833 polymorphic markers with an average genotype call rate of 98.4% and a scoring reproducibility of 99.7%. On the other hand, the DArTseq platform developed for SNP and DArT markers from short sequence reads showed a total of 27,748 high quality markers. Cluster analysis and principal coordinate analysis indicated that the different accessions were successfully classified by both systems based on species, by geographical source, and breeding status. In the germplasm set analyzed, which represented more than 80% of the P. fendleri collection, we observed that a substantial amount of variation exists in the species collection. These markers will be valuable in germplasm management studies and lesquerella breeding, and augment the microsatellite markers previously developed on the taxa.

  4. Assessing Genetic Diversity in Four Stink Bug Species, Chinavia hilaris, Chlorochroa uhleri, Chlorochroa sayi, and Thyanta pallidovirens (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), Using DNA Barcodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, A K; Joyce, A L; Torres, R; Higbee, B S

    2017-12-05

    Stink bugs (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) are an economically important group of insects that attack numerous crops in the central valley of California. Management of these pests using pheromones or biological control can be species specific, and proper identification of insect species is essential for effective management. The objective was to examine genetic variability in four species of stink bugs, which included Chinavia hilaris (Say) (= Acrosternum hilare) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) , Chlorochroa uhleri (Stål) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) , Chlorochroa sayi (Stål) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), and Thyanta pallidovirens (Stål) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) and to determine whether there may be cryptic species present. Stink bugs were collected in pistachios or on adjacent vegetation when abundant in the central valley of California. The mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene region (i.e., the barcode) was sequenced for each individual. Data were combined with available GenBank accessions for each species and used to construct a phylogenetic tree. Divergence between genera ranged from 11.2 to 15.7%, whereas divergence between the two Chlorochroa spp. was 4.6%. Genetic variation within Chinavia hilaris collections was up to 4.7%, which suggests the presence of a cryptic species. Genetic divergence was highest between individuals of Chinavia hilaris from the west coast and the east coast of the United States. In contrast, genetic variation within individuals of C. uhleri and Ch. sayi was less than 1%. Nine haplotypes were found for Chinavia hilaris, five for C. uhleri, three for Ch. sayi, and five for T. pallidovirens. The relevance of correct species identification and genetic diversity to stink bug management practices was discussed. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  5. Rarity and genetic diversity in Indo–Pacific Acropora corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Zoe T; Oppen, Madeleine J H

    2012-01-01

    Among various potential consequences of rarity is genetic erosion. Neutral genetic theory predicts that rare species will have lower genetic diversity than common species. To examine the association between genetic diversity and rarity, variation at eight DNA microsatellite markers was documented for 14 Acropora species that display different patterns of distribution and abundance in the Indo–Pacific Ocean. Our results show that the relationship between rarity and genetic diversity is not a positive linear association because, contrary to expectations, some rare species are genetically diverse and some populations of common species are genetically depleted. Our data suggest that inbreeding is the most likely mechanism of genetic depletion in both rare and common corals, and that hybridization is the most likely explanation for higher than expected levels of genetic diversity in rare species. A significant hypothesis generated from our study with direct conservation implications is that as a group, Acropora corals have lower genetic diversity at neutral microsatellite loci than may be expected from their taxonomic diversity, and this may suggest a heightened susceptibility to environmental change. This hypothesis requires validation based on genetic diversity estimates derived from a large portion of the genome. PMID:22957189

  6. Rarity and genetic diversity in Indo-Pacific Acropora corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Zoe T; Oppen, Madeleine J H

    2012-08-01

    Among various potential consequences of rarity is genetic erosion. Neutral genetic theory predicts that rare species will have lower genetic diversity than common species. To examine the association between genetic diversity and rarity, variation at eight DNA microsatellite markers was documented for 14 Acropora species that display different patterns of distribution and abundance in the Indo-Pacific Ocean. Our results show that the relationship between rarity and genetic diversity is not a positive linear association because, contrary to expectations, some rare species are genetically diverse and some populations of common species are genetically depleted. Our data suggest that inbreeding is the most likely mechanism of genetic depletion in both rare and common corals, and that hybridization is the most likely explanation for higher than expected levels of genetic diversity in rare species. A significant hypothesis generated from our study with direct conservation implications is that as a group, Acropora corals have lower genetic diversity at neutral microsatellite loci than may be expected from their taxonomic diversity, and this may suggest a heightened susceptibility to environmental change. This hypothesis requires validation based on genetic diversity estimates derived from a large portion of the genome.

  7. Genetic diversity and species diversity of stream fishes covary across a land-use gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, M.J.; Bagley, M.J.; Walters, D.M.; Jackson, S.A.; Daniel, F.B.; Chaloud, D.J.; Cade, B.S.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic diversity and species diversity are expected to covary according to area and isolation, but may not always covary with environmental heterogeneity. In this study, we examined how patterns of genetic and species diversity in stream fishes correspond to local and regional environmental conditions. To do so, we compared population size, genetic diversity and divergence in central stonerollers (Campostoma anomalum) to measures of species diversity and turnover in stream fish assemblages among similarly sized watersheds across an agriculture-forest land-use gradient in the Little Miami River basin (Ohio, USA). Significant correlations were found in many, but not all, pair-wise comparisons. Allelic richness and species richness were strongly correlated, for example, but diversity measures based on allele frequencies and assemblage structure were not. In-stream conditions related to agricultural land use were identified as significant predictors of genetic diversity and species diversity. Comparisons to population size indicate, however, that genetic diversity and species diversity are not necessarily independent and that variation also corresponds to watershed location and glaciation history in the drainage basin. Our findings demonstrate that genetic diversity and species diversity can covary in stream fish assemblages, and illustrate the potential importance of scaling observations to capture responses to hierarchical environmental variation. More comparisons according to life history variation could further improve understanding of conditions that give rise to parallel variation in genetic diversity and species diversity, which in turn could improve diagnosis of anthropogenic influences on aquatic ecosystems. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  8. Genetic diversity and species diversity of stream fishes covary across a land-use gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Michael J; Bagley, Mark J; Walters, David M; Jackson, Suzanne A; Daniel, F Bernard; Chaloud, Deborah J; Cade, Brian S

    2012-01-01

    Genetic diversity and species diversity are expected to covary according to area and isolation, but may not always covary with environmental heterogeneity. In this study, we examined how patterns of genetic and species diversity in stream fishes correspond to local and regional environmental conditions. To do so, we compared population size, genetic diversity and divergence in central stonerollers (Campostoma anomalum) to measures of species diversity and turnover in stream fish assemblages among similarly sized watersheds across an agriculture-forest land-use gradient in the Little Miami River basin (Ohio, USA). Significant correlations were found in many, but not all, pair-wise comparisons. Allelic richness and species richness were strongly correlated, for example, but diversity measures based on allele frequencies and assemblage structure were not. In-stream conditions related to agricultural land use were identified as significant predictors of genetic diversity and species diversity. Comparisons to population size indicate, however, that genetic diversity and species diversity are not necessarily independent and that variation also corresponds to watershed location and glaciation history in the drainage basin. Our findings demonstrate that genetic diversity and species diversity can covary in stream fish assemblages, and illustrate the potential importance of scaling observations to capture responses to hierarchical environmental variation. More comparisons according to life history variation could further improve understanding of conditions that give rise to parallel variation in genetic diversity and species diversity, which in turn could improve diagnosis of anthropogenic influences on aquatic ecosystems.

  9. Molecular research on the genetic diversity of Tunisian date palm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular research on the genetic diversity of Tunisian date palm ( Phoenix dactylifera L.) using the random amplified microsatellite polymorphism (RAMPO) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) methods.

  10. Genetic Diversity of Croatian Common Bean Landraces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaudija Carović-Stanko

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In Croatia, the majority of the common bean production is based on local landraces, grown by small-scale farmers in low input production systems. Landraces are adapted to the specific growing conditions and agro-environments and show a great morphological diversity. These local landraces are in danger of genetic erosion caused by complex socio-economic changes in rural communities. The low profitability of farms and their small size, the advanced age of farmers and the replacement of traditional landraces with modern bean cultivars and/or other more profitable crops have been identified as the major factors affecting genetic erosion. Three hundred accessions belonging to most widely used landraces were evaluated by phaseolin genotyping and microsatellite marker analysis. A total of 183 different multi-locus genotypes in the panel of 300 accessions were revealed using 26 microsatellite markers. Out of 183 accessions, 27.32% were of Mesoamerican origin, 68.31% of Andean, while 4.37% of accessions represented putative hybrids between gene pools. Accessions of Andean origin were further classified into phaseolin type II (“H” or “C” and III (“T”, the latter being more frequent. A model-based cluster analysis based on microsatellite markers revealed the presence of three clusters in congruence with the results of phaseolin type analysis.

  11. Genetic Diversity of Croatian Common Bean Landraces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carović-Stanko, Klaudija; Liber, Zlatko; Vidak, Monika; Barešić, Ana; Grdiša, Martina; Lazarević, Boris; Šatović, Zlatko

    2017-01-01

    In Croatia, the majority of the common bean production is based on local landraces, grown by small-scale farmers in low input production systems. Landraces are adapted to the specific growing conditions and agro-environments and show a great morphological diversity. These local landraces are in danger of genetic erosion caused by complex socio-economic changes in rural communities. The low profitability of farms and their small size, the advanced age of farmers and the replacement of traditional landraces with modern bean cultivars and/or other more profitable crops have been identified as the major factors affecting genetic erosion. Three hundred accessions belonging to most widely used landraces were evaluated by phaseolin genotyping and microsatellite marker analysis. A total of 183 different multi-locus genotypes in the panel of 300 accessions were revealed using 26 microsatellite markers. Out of 183 accessions, 27.32% were of Mesoamerican origin, 68.31% of Andean, while 4.37% of accessions represented putative hybrids between gene pools. Accessions of Andean origin were further classified into phaseolin type II ("H" or "C") and III ("T"), the latter being more frequent. A model-based cluster analysis based on microsatellite markers revealed the presence of three clusters in congruence with the results of phaseolin type analysis.

  12. Application of SRAP in the genetic diversity of Tricholoma matsutake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... genetic variation was detected within individual populations. Dongning maintained a higher genetic diversity while Hunchun was lower. The analyses found a significant positive correlation between genetic distance and geographical distance and no correlation between genetic distance and altitudinal differences among ...

  13. Genetic diversity of Przewalski's gazelle using noninvasive DNA and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cynthia

    2015-04-01

    Apr 1, 2015 ... Microsatellites are currently one of the markers of choice for the molecular characterization of animal genetic diversity and conservation genetics. In this study, we examined the genetic structure of six populations in the Qinghai Lake region and Tianjun using noninvasive genetic methods. This study is to ...

  14. Investigating Genetic Diversity of Foeniculum Vulgare Mill using Molecular Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Omid Jadidi; Mansour Kalantar

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal plants are considered valuable genetic resources in Iran. One of these medicinal as well as spice plants is Foeniculum Vulgare Mill from Umbellifetae family used in different industries such as food, medicine, and cosmetics. It seems that due to different climate conditions in Iran this plant represents a high and valuable genetic diversity; therefore, management of genetic resources protection and obtaining information about genetic diversity will help awareness of evolution pro...

  15. Genetic diversity and trait genomic prediction in a pea diversity panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstin, Judith; Salloignon, Pauline; Chabert-Martinello, Marianne; Magnin-Robert, Jean-Bernard; Siol, Mathieu; Jacquin, Françoise; Chauveau, Aurélie; Pont, Caroline; Aubert, Grégoire; Delaitre, Catherine; Truntzer, Caroline; Duc, Gérard

    2015-02-21

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.), a major pulse crop grown for its protein-rich seeds, is an important component of agroecological cropping systems in diverse regions of the world. New breeding challenges imposed by global climate change and new regulations urge pea breeders to undertake more efficient methods of selection and better take advantage of the large genetic diversity present in the Pisum sativum genepool. Diversity studies conducted so far in pea used Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) and Retrotransposon Based Insertion Polymorphism (RBIP) markers. Recently, SNP marker panels have been developed that will be useful for genetic diversity assessment and marker-assisted selection. A collection of diverse pea accessions, including landraces and cultivars of garden, field or fodder peas as well as wild peas was characterised at the molecular level using newly developed SNP markers, as well as SSR markers and RBIP markers. The three types of markers were used to describe the structure of the collection and revealed different pictures of the genetic diversity among the collection. SSR showed the fastest rate of evolution and RBIP the slowest rate of evolution, pointing to their contrasted mode of evolution. SNP markers were then used to predict phenotypes -the date of flowering (BegFlo), the number of seeds per plant (Nseed) and thousand seed weight (TSW)- that were recorded for the collection. Different statistical methods were tested including the LASSO (Least Absolute Shrinkage ans Selection Operator), PLS (Partial Least Squares), SPLS (Sparse Partial Least Squares), Bayes A, Bayes B and GBLUP (Genomic Best Linear Unbiased Prediction) methods and the structure of the collection was taken into account in the prediction. Despite a limited number of 331 markers used for prediction, TSW was reliably predicted. The development of marker assisted selection has not reached its full potential in pea until now. This paper shows that the high-throughput SNP arrays that are being

  16. Genetic diversity assessment of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp ciceris isolates of Indian chickpea fields as revealed by the SRAP marker system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soren, K R; Gangwar, Priyanka; Khatterwani, Payal; Chaudhary, Ram Ganesh; Datta, Subhojit

    2016-11-01

    An experiment was conducted to study the precise geographical distribution and racial complexity of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp ciceris (Foc) isolates representing 12 states of 4 agro-climatic zones of India at morphological, pathogenic and molecular level. The DNA based sequence related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers was employed to differentiate Foc isolates at genome level. The genotypic data output of the isolates was examined for diversity parameter as marker's Polymorphic percentage (PM %), Polymorphic Information Content (PIC), Marker Index (MI) and Gene Diversity Index (DI). As a result, 15 primers used in this study could generated total of 154 reproducible alleles ranging from 100-2100 bp (average allele per marker 10.26) in size, of that 149 (97%) were found to be polymorphic. The neighbor-joining analysis effectively classified the isolates of North East Plain Zone (NEPZ), Central Zone (CZ), North West Plain Zone (NWPZ) and South Zone (SZ) into four clusters. In summary, DNA based marker analysis could differentiate as per isolates geographical location, however pathogenic interaction of isolates from same geographical location could not match the genetic differentiation. Accordingly, considering the present complexity in racial profile, precise classification based on homologs virulence genes specific to races would give a more meaningful in correlating isolates with their native geographical distribution and helps in future resistance breeding programs for sustainable management of vascular wilt disease.

  17. A preliminary examination of genetic diversity in the Indian false vampire bat Megaderma lyra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuvel Rajan, K.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Habitat loss and fragmentation have serious consequences for species extinction as well as genetic diversity within a species. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis was employed to assess the genetic diversity within and between four natural populations of M. lyra. Our results suggest that the genetic diversity varied from 0.21 to 0.26 with a mean of 0.11 to 0.13 (± SD. The mean Gst value of 0.15 was obtained from all four populations and estimated average Nm (1.41 showing gene flow between the populations. AMOVA analysis showed 88.96% within and 11.04% among the studied populations. Cluster analyses of RAPD phenotypes showed that specimens were not grouped by geographical origin. The genetic diversity found in the M. lyra population may be explained by its breeding behaviors. Though preliminary, the results indicate that all four populations should be considered to maintain the genetic diversity.

  18. Genetic and phenotypic diversity of Rhizobium isolates from Southern Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roldán Torres-Gutiérrez

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Rhizobium-legume symbioses play relevant roles in agriculture but have not been well studied in Ecuador. The aim of this study was to characterize the genetic and phenotypic diversity of Rhizobium isolates associated with Phaseolus vulgaris from southern Ecuador. Morpho-cultural characterization, biochemical tests and physiological analyses were conducted to authenticate and determine the diversity of bacteria Rhizobium-like isolates. The genetic diversity of the isolates was determined by molecular techniques, which consisted of bacteria DNA extraction and amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The nodulation parameters and nitrogen fixation for P. vulgaris under greenhouse conditions were also assessed to determine the phenotypic diversity among isolates. Furthermore, bacteria indole-acetic-acid production was evaluated by the colorimetric method. Morpho-cultural and biochemical characteristic assessments demonstrated that Rhizobium-like bacteria was associated with the P. vulgaris nodules. The diversity among the isolates, as determined by physiological analyses, revealed the potential of several isolates to grow at different pH values, salinity conditions and temperatures. Partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene identified the Rhizobium genus in every sampling site. From a total of 20 aligned sequences, nine species of Rhizobium were identified. Nodule formation and biomass, as well as nitrogen fixation, showed an increase in plant phenotypic parameters, which could be influenced by IAA production, especially for the strains R. mesoamericanum NAM1 and R. leguminosarum bv. viciae COL6. These results demonstrated the efficiency of native symbiotic diazotrophic strains inoculants for legume production. This work can serve as the basis for additional studies of native Rhizobium strains and to help spread the use of biofertilizers in Ecuadorian fields.

  19. Genetic diversity of noroviruses in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Monassa Fioretti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Norovirus (NoV infections are a major cause of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks around the world. In Brazil, the surveillance system for acute diarrhoea does not include the diagnosis of NoV, precluding the ability to assess its impact on public health. The present study assessed the circulation of NoV genotypes in different Brazilian states by partial nucleotide sequencing analysis of the genomic region coding for the major capsid viral protein. NoV genogroup II genotype 4 (GII.4 was the prevalent (78% followed by GII.6, GII.7, GII.12, GII.16 and GII.17, demonstrating the great diversity of NoV genotypes circulating in Brazil. Thus, this paper highlights the importance of a virological surveillance system to detect and characterize emerging strains of NoV and their spreading potential.

  20. Genetic diversity of human RNase 8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Calvin C

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ribonuclease 8 is a member of the RNase A family of secretory ribonucleases; orthologs of this gene have been found only in primate genomes. RNase 8 is a divergent paralog of RNase 7, which is lysine-enriched, highly conserved, has prominent antimicrobial activity, and is expressed in both normal and diseased skin; in contrast, the physiologic function of RNase 8 remains uncertain. Here, we examine the genetic diversity of human RNase 8, a subject of significant interest given the existence of functional pseudogenes (coding sequences that are otherwise intact but with mutations in elements crucial for ribonucleolytic activity in non-human primate genomes. Results RNase 8 expression was detected in adult human lung, spleen and testis tissue by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. Only two single-nucleotide polymorphisms and four unique alleles were identified within the RNase 8 coding sequence; nucleotide sequence diversity (π = 0.00122 ± 0.00009 per site was unremarkable for a human nuclear gene. We isolated transcripts encoding RNase 8 via rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE and RT-PCR which included a distal potential translational start site followed by sequence encoding an additional 30 amino acids that are conserved in the genomes of several higher primates. The distal translational start site is functional and promotes RNase 8 synthesis in transfected COS-7 cells. Conclusions These results suggest that RNase 8 may diverge considerably from typical RNase A family ribonucleases and may likewise exhibit unique function. This finding prompts a reconsideration of what we have previously termed functional pseudogenes, as RNase 8 may be responding to constraints that promote significant functional divergence from the canonical structure and enzymatic activity characteristic of the RNase A family.

  1. Evaluation of genetic diversity in the golden apple snail, Pomacea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The genetic diversity of Pomacea canaliculata, collected from Los Banos (LB) in Philippines and Yuyao (YY), Taizhou (TZ), Fuzhou (FZ), Guangzhou (GZ), Nanning (NN), ... A relatively high level of genetic differentiation among populations was detected based on Nei's gene diversity analysis (Gst = 0.2001) and analysis of ...

  2. Genetic diversity in green gram accessions as revealed by STMS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-28

    Nov 28, 2011 ... gram using wild relatives. Key words: Genetic diversity, green gram, Vigna radiata, STMS. INTRODUCTION. Among Vigna group, in economic terms, green gram is the most ... Molecular markers employed for the analysis of genetic diversity in green ..... and is critical to their conservation and management.

  3. Genetic diversity and association of ISSR markers with the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tung tree is a useful woody oil plant in the world. In this study, both the genetic diversity and biochemical traits were analyzed in order to improve the breeding methods on tung tree. The mean genetic similarity coefficient (Gs), the mean Nei's gene diversity (h) and the mean Shannon's information index (I) of tung tree were ...

  4. Application of SRAP in the genetic diversity of Tricholoma matsutake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-20

    Sep 20, 2010 ... mushrooms. The study firstly applied SRAP technique into genetic diversity of T. matsutake. A total of. 129 strains from 13 geographical locations in northeastern China, were amplified by using ... of the most delicious and valuable edible mushrooms in ..... to examine the genetic diversity in basidiomycetes.

  5. Study on genetic diversity in Pakistani wheat varieties using simple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Common wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) is a grass species, cultivated world wide. Globally, it is the most important human food grain and ranks second in total production as a cereal crop behind maize. Genetic diversity evaluation of germplasm is the basis of improvement in wheat. In the present study genetic diversity of 10 ...

  6. Genetic diversity and population structure of Chinese honeybees ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity and population structure of Chinese honeybees (Apis cerana) under microsatellite markers. T Ji, L Yin, G Chen. Abstract. Using 21 microsatellite markers and PCR method, the polymorphisms of 20 Apis cerana honeybee populations across China was investigated and the genetic structure and diversity of ...

  7. Genetic diversity of Pakistani maize genotypes using chromosome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For improvement of maize crop presence of genetic diversity in the germplasm is very important. This study was conducted to determine genetic diversity among 17 Pakistani maize genotypes using 10 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer sets. All the amplification products were in the range of <250-750 bp. To estimate the ...

  8. Genetic diversity in some Turkish pepper (Capsicum annuum L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-15

    Sep 15, 2009 ... genotypes had comparatively higher genetic diversity. Key words: Capsicum annuum, AFLP, Genetic diversity. INTRODUCTION. Pepper (Capsicum annuum L; 2n = 2x = 24) are important vegetable species both worldwide and in. Turkey with the 24.80 and 1.75 million t of production on. 1.725 millions and ...

  9. Genetic diversity among natural populations of Ottelia acuminata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-16

    Nov 16, 2009 ... Genetic diversity among geographically separated populations of Nepenthes mirabilis. Biologia Brat. 61: 295-298. Farès K, Guasmi F, Touil L, Triki T, Ferchichi A (2009). Genetic diversity of pistochio tree using inter-simple sequence repeat markers. ISSR supported by morphological and chemical markers.

  10. Genetic diversity and population structure of common bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Ethiopian genetic center is considered to be one of the secondary centers of diversity for the common bean. This study was conducted to characterize the distribution of genetic diversity between and within ecological/geographical regions of Ethiopia. A germplasm sample of 116 landrace accessions was developed, ...

  11. Genetic diversity and bottleneck studies in the Marwari horse breed

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genetic diversity within the Marwari breed of horses was evaluated using 26 different microsatellite pairs with 48 DNA samples from unrelated horses. This molecular characterisation was undertaken to evaluate the problem of genetic bottlenecks also, if any, in this breed. The estimated mean (± s.e.) allelic diversity was 5.9 ...

  12. Analysis of genetic diversity and estimation of inbreeding coefficient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was undertaken to genetically evaluate Caspian horses for genetic diversity and to asses whether they have experienced recent population bottlenecks. A total of 100 individuals were characterized for within breed diversity using 16 microsatellite markers. The estimated mean number of alleles was 8.69 ...

  13. Genetic diversity of the monomeric prolamins and hordein in hulless ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-04

    May 4, 2009 ... Alvarez GB, Broccoli A, Martin LM (2006a). Genetic diversity and structure in a natural Hordeum chilense populations based on gliadins analysis.PL. Syst. Evol. 261: 11-18. Alvarez GB, Broccoli A, Martin LM (2006b). Variability and genetic diversity for gliadins in natural populations of Hordeum chilense.

  14. Molecular analysis of genetic diversity in elite II synthetic hexaploid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of sufficient genetic diversity in the germplam is an important prerequisite for the improve-ment and efficient use of available material. Traditionally, the data on agronomic, morphological and physiological plants traits are used to estimate the genetic diversity. But now molecular markers are available for ...

  15. Genetic diversity in cultivated carioca common beans based on molecular marker analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Morini Küpper Cardoso Perseguini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide array of molecular markers has been used to investigate the genetic diversity among common bean species. However, the best combination of markers for studying such diversity among common bean cultivars has yet to be determined. Few reports have examined the genetic diversity of the carioca bean, commercially one of the most important common beans in Brazil. In this study, we examined the usefulness of two molecular marker systems (simple sequence repeats - SSRs and amplified fragment length polymorphisms - AFLPs for assessing the genetic diversity of carioca beans. The amount of information provided by Roger's modified genetic distance was used to analyze SSR data and Jaccards similarity coefficient was used for AFLP data. Seventy SSRs were polymorphic and 20 AFLP primer combinations produced 635 polymorphic bands. Molecular analysis showed that carioca genotypes were quite diverse. AFLPs revealed greater genetic differentiation and variation within the carioca genotypes (Gst = 98% and Fst = 0.83, respectively than SSRs and provided better resolution for clustering the carioca genotypes. SSRs and AFLPs were both suitable for assessing the genetic diversity of Brazilian carioca genotypes since the number of markers used in each system provided a low coefficient of variation. However, fingerprint profiles were generated faster with AFLPs, making them a better choice for assessing genetic diversity in the carioca germplasm.

  16. Genetic diversity of Echinococcus spp. in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konyaev, Sergey V; Yanagida, Tetsuya; Nakao, Minoru; Ingovatova, Galina M; Shoykhet, Yakov N; Bondarev, Alexandr Y; Odnokurtsev, Valeriy A; Loskutova, Kyunnyay S; Lukmanova, Gulnur I; Dokuchaev, Nikolai E; Spiridonov, Sergey; Alshinecky, Mikhail V; Sivkova, Tatyana N; Andreyanov, Oleg N; Abramov, Sergey A; Krivopalov, Anton V; Karpenko, Sergey V; Lopatina, Natalia V; Dupal, Tamara A; Sako, Yasuhito; Ito, Akira

    2013-11-01

    In Russia, both alveolar and cystic echinococcoses are endemic. This study aimed to identify the aetiological agents of the diseases and to investigate the distribution of each Echinococcus species in Russia. A total of 75 Echinococcus specimens were collected from 14 host species from 2010 to 2012. Based on the mitochondrial DNA sequences, they were identified as Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (s.s.), E. canadensis and E. multilocularis. E. granulosus s.s. was confirmed in the European Russia and the Altai region. Three genotypes, G6, G8 and G10 of E. canadensis were detected in Yakutia. G6 was also found in the Altai region. Four genotypes of E. multilocularis were confirmed; the Asian genotype in the western Siberia and the European Russia, the Mongolian genotype in an island of Baikal Lake and the Altai Republic, the European genotype from a captive monkey in Moscow Zoo and the North American genotype in Yakutia. The present distributional record will become a basis of public health to control echinococcoses in Russia. The rich genetic diversity demonstrates the importance of Russia in investigating the evolutionary history of the genus Echinococcus.

  17. Beauveria bassiana: quercetinase production and genetic diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eula Maria de M. B Costa

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Beauveria bassiana genetic diversity and ability to synthesize quercetin 2,3-dioxygenase (quercetinase were analyzed. B. bassiana isolates, obtained from Brazilian soil samples, produced quercetinase after induction using 0.5 g/L quercetin. B. bassiana ATCC 7159 (29.6 nmol/mL/min and isolate IP 11 (27.5 nmol/ml/min showed the best performances and IP 3a (9.5 nmol/mL/min presented the lowest level of quercetinase activity in the culture supernatant. A high level of polymorphism was detected by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis. The use of internal-transcribed-spacer ribosomal region restriction fragment length polymorphism (ITS-RFLP did not reveal characteristic markers to differentiate isolates. However, the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region sequence analysis provided more information on polymorphism among the isolates, allowing them to be clustered by relative similarity into three large groups. Correlation was tested according to the Person's correlation. Data of our studies showed, that lower associations among groups, level of quercetinase production, or geographical origin could be observed. This study presents the production of a novel biocatalyst by B. bassiana and suggests the possible industrial application of this fungal species in large-scale biotechnological manufacture of quercetinase.

  18. Beauveria bassiana: Quercetinase production and genetic diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eula Maria de M. B., Costa; Fabiana Cristina, Pimenta; Christian, Luz; Valéria de, Oliveira; Marília, Oliveira; Elda, Bueno; Silvana, Petrofeza

    2011-01-01

    Beauveria bassiana genetic diversity and ability to synthesize quercetin 2,3-dioxygenase (quercetinase) were analyzed. B. bassiana isolates, obtained from Brazilian soil samples, produced quercetinase after induction using 0.5 g/L quercetin. B. bassiana ATCC 7159 (29.6 nmol/mL/min) and isolate IP 11 (27.5 nmol/ml/min) showed the best performances and IP 3a (9.5 nmol/mL/min) presented the lowest level of quercetinase activity in the culture supernatant. A high level of polymorphism was detected by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. The use of internal-transcribed-spacer ribosomal region restriction fragment length polymorphism (ITS-RFLP) did not reveal characteristic markers to differentiate isolates. However, the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region sequence analysis provided more information on polymorphism among the isolates, allowing them to be clustered by relative similarity into three large groups. Correlation was tested according to the Person's correlation. Data of our studies showed, that lower associations among groups, level of quercetinase production, or geographical origin could be observed. This study presents the production of a novel biocatalyst by B. bassiana and suggests the possible industrial application of this fungal species in large-scale biotechnological manufacture of quercetinase. PMID:24031599

  19. Genetic Diversity of Salt Tolerance in Miscanthus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-Lin; van der Schoot, Hanneke; Dehghan, Shiva; Alvim Kamei, Claire L.; Schwarz, Kai-Uwe; Meyer, Heike; Visser, Richard G. F.; van der Linden, C. Gerard

    2017-01-01

    Miscanthus is a woody rhizomatous C4 grass that can be used as a CO2 neutral biofuel resource. It has potential to grow in marginal areas such as saline soils, avoiding competition for arable lands with food crops. This study explored genetic diversity for salt tolerance in Miscanthus and discovered mechanisms and traits that can be used to improve the yield under salt stress. Seventy genotypes of Miscanthus (including 57 M. sinensis, 5 M. sacchariflorus, and 8 hybrids) were evaluated for salt tolerance under saline (150 mM NaCl) and normal growing conditions using a hydroponic system. Analyses of shoot growth traits and ion concentrations revealed the existence of large variation for salt tolerance in the genotypes. We identified genotypes with potential for high biomass production both under control and saline conditions that may be utilized for growth under marginal, saline conditions. Several relatively salt tolerant genotypes had clearly lower Na+ concentrations and showed relatively high K+/Na+ ratios in the shoots under salt stress, indicating that a Na+ exclusion mechanism was utilized to prevent Na+ accumulation in the leaves. Other genotypes showed limited reduction in leaf expansion and growth rate under saline conditions, which may be indicative of osmotic stress tolerance. The genotypes demonstrating potentially different salt tolerance mechanisms can serve as starting material for breeding programs aimed at improving salinity tolerance of Miscanthus. PMID:28261243

  20. Genetic variants regulating expression levels and isoform diversity during embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavò, Enrico; Koelling, Nils; Harnett, Dermot; Garfield, David; Casale, Francesco P; Ciglar, Lucia; Gustafson, Hilary E; Viales, Rebecca R; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Degner, Jacob F; Zhao, Bingqing; Stegle, Oliver; Birney, Ewan; Furlong, Eileen E M

    2017-01-19

    Embryonic development is driven by tightly regulated patterns of gene expression, despite extensive genetic variation among individuals. Studies of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) indicate that genetic variation frequently alters gene expression in cell-culture models and differentiated tissues. However, the extent and types of genetic variation impacting embryonic gene expression, and their interactions with developmental programs, remain largely unknown. Here we assessed the effect of genetic variation on transcriptional (expression levels) and post-transcriptional (3' RNA processing) regulation across multiple stages of metazoan development, using 80 inbred Drosophila wild isolates, identifying thousands of developmental-stage-specific and shared QTL. Given the small blocks of linkage disequilibrium in Drosophila, we obtain near base-pair resolution, resolving causal mutations in developmental enhancers, validated transcription-factor-binding sites and RNA motifs. This fine-grain mapping uncovered extensive allelic interactions within enhancers that have opposite effects, thereby buffering their impact on enhancer activity. QTL affecting 3' RNA processing identify new functional motifs leading to transcript isoform diversity and changes in the lengths of 3' untranslated regions. These results highlight how developmental stage influences the effects of genetic variation and uncover multiple mechanisms that regulate and buffer expression variation during embryogenesis.

  1. Endemic insular and coastal Tunisian date palm genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehdi-Azouzi, Salwa; Cherif, Emira; Guenni, Karim; Abdelkrim, Ahmed Ben; Bermil, Aymen; Rhouma, Soumaya; Salah, Mohamed Ben; Santoni, Sylvain; Pintaud, Jean Christophe; Aberlenc-Bertossi, Frédérique; Hannachi, Amel Salhi

    2016-04-01

    The breeding of crop species relies on the valorisation of ancestral or wild varieties to enrich the cultivated germplasm. The Tunisian date palm genetic patrimony is being threatened by diversity loss and global climate change. We have conducted a genetic study to evaluate the potential of spontaneous coastal resources to improve the currently exploited Tunisian date palm genetic pool. Eighteen microsatellite loci of Phoenix dactylifera L. were used to compare the genetic diversity of coastal accessions from Kerkennah, Djerba, Gabès and continental date palm accessions from Tozeur. A collection of 105 date palms from the four regions was analysed. This study has provided us with an extensive understanding of the local genetic diversity and its distribution. The coastal date palm genotypes exhibit a high and specific genetic diversity. These genotypes are certainly an untapped reservoir of agronomically important genes to improve cultivated germplasm in continental date palm.

  2. Genetic diversity of Sclerocarya birrea subspecies birrea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-03

    Jan 3, 2012 ... population. Shannon's index was also estimated for the whole sample considered as a single population. To analyse genetic structure, genetic distances were constructed using the Nei's original measures of genetic identity and genetic distance (Nei, 1972). The degree of differentiation among popu-.

  3. Molecular Markers for Genetic Diversity Studies in African Leafy Vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    Omondi, Emmanuel O.; Debener, Thomas; Linde, Marcus; Abukutsa-Onyango, Mary; Dinssa, Fekadu F.; Winkelmann, Traud

    2016-01-01

    African leafy vegetables are becoming important crops in tackling nutrition and food security in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa, since they provide important micronutrients and vitamins, and help resource-poor farm families bridge lean periods of food shortage. Genetic diversity studies are essential for crop improvement programmes as well as germplasm conservation efforts, and research on genetic diversity of these vegetables using molecular markers has been increasing over time. Diversity...

  4. Analysis of the genetic relationships and diversity among 11 populations of Xanthoceras sorbifolia using phenotypic and microsatellite marker data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Shen

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: Microsatellite markers can be used to efficiently distinguish X. sorbifolia populations and assess their genetic diversity. The information we have provided will contribute to the conservation and management of this important plant genetic resource.

  5. Phenotypic diversity in the Ethiopian noug germplasm | Genet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on the characters studied and small collections evaluated, the centres of diversity for noug appears to be in Gojjam, Welega and Shewa, and further exploration efforts should be undertaken in these regions. Key Words: Diversity index, genetic diversity, germplasm, Guizotia abyssinica Cass., oilseed (African Crop ...

  6. Patterns of genetic structure and phenotypic diversity in sorghum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The importance of phenotypic intra-varietal diversity in early, intermediate and late maturing varieties varied in relation to the observed trait. The genetic analysis specified that the highest diversity rates were in the late maturing varieties (3.3 for allelic richness and 0.47 for gene diversity). Factorial Discriminant Analysis on ...

  7. Assessment of genetic diversity and population structure of mung bean (Vigna radiata) germplasm using EST-based and genomic SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Honglin; Qiao, Ling; Wang, Lixia; Wang, Suhua; Blair, Matthew Wohlgemuth; Cheng, Xuzhen

    2015-07-25

    Mung bean is an important legume crop in tropical and subtropical countries of Asia and has high nutritional and economic value. However the genetic diversity of mung bean is poorly characterized. In this study, our goal was to develop and use microsatellite simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers for germplasm evaluation. In total, 500 novel expression sequence tag EST-based SSRs (eSSRs) and genomic SSRs (gSSRs) were developed from mung bean transcriptome and genome sequences. Of these, only 58 were useful for diversity evaluation in a panel of 157 cultivated and wild mung bean accessions from different collection sites in East Asia. A total of 2.66 alleles were detected on average per locus which shows that polymorphism is generally low for the species. The average polymorphic information content (PIC) of gSSRs was higher than eSSRs and most of the polymorphic gSSRs were composed of di- and tri-nucleotide repeats (52.4% and 38.1% of all loci, respectively). The genotypes were differentiated into nine subgroups by cluster analysis, and the wild mung bean accessions separated well from the cultivated accessions. Analysis of molecular variance indicated that 22% of variance was observed among populations and 78% was due to differences within populations. Clustering, population structure analyses showed that non-Chinese cultivated and wild mung bean accessions were separated from Chinese accessions, but no geographical distinctions existed between genotypes collected in China. Interestingly, the average PIC value of cultivated mung bean (0.36) was higher than that of wild mung bean (0.25) showing that further collecting and wide crosses are necessary for mung bean improvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Differences in genetic diversity in Holstein cattle with high and low genetic merit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelsma, K.A.; Veerkamp, R.F.; Calus, M.P.L.; Windig, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluations of genetic diversity in Holstein cattle based on pedigree data, indicate a decrease in genetic diversity in Holstein cattle, because of a lower effective population size and a higher relatedness compared to other cattle breeds. However, pedigree based diversity reflects only the overall

  9. Genetic diversity and population structure of endangered Aquilaria ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-12-03

    Dec 3, 2015 ... tant repositories of biological diversity, the genetic relationships of 127 A. malaccensis accessions from 10 home gardens of ..... Peakall R. and Smouse P. E. 2012 GenAlEx 6.5: genetic analysis in. Excel. Population genetic software for teaching and research—an update. Bioinformatics 28, 2537–2539.

  10. An understanding of the underlying genetic diversity within and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AMuchugi

    2016-08-03

    Aug 3, 2016 ... understanding of the genetic diversity and the extent of distribution of genetic variation available within a species. (Muchugi et al., 2012). A wide genetic base provides the ability to withstand potential inbreeding depression through future generations of farmer propagation. (Frankham, 2010). However, little ...

  11. Genetic diversity and population structure of 10 Chinese indigenous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The genetic structure and diversity of 10 Chinese indigenous egg-type duck breeds were investigated using 29 microsatellite markers. ... genetic variability originated from differences among breeds, with all loci contributing significantly. An unrooted ..... be made for this breed to avoid inbreeding depression and genetic drift.

  12. Genetic diversity analysis of Labeo gonius (Hamilton, 1822) in three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    2013-05-08

    May 8, 2013 ... gonius from three different sized reservoirs viz., Dhaura, Baigul and Nanak Sagar reservoir of. Uttarakhand by applying allozyme ... Key words: Allozyme, Labeo gonius, genetic diversity, population genetics. INTRODUCTION ... Generally, individuals with greater genetic variability have higher growth rates ...

  13. Genetic diversity of four protected indigenous chicken breeds in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The genetic diversity of four protected indigenous chicken breeds was evaluated with 25 microsatellite markers. Polymorphism information content (PIC), heterozygosity with the estimator of genetic differentiation FST and Nei's genetic distance were evaluated. The results showed that these four protected local chicken ...

  14. Genetic Diversity of Indigenous Chickens in Cameroon | Fotsa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this condition, the gene pool of local chicken is experiencing a dangerous erosion of its original genetic diversity. The presence of relevant tropical genetic mutations can be associated with any poultry genetic improvement. Urgent conservation measures that will pave the way for subsequent progress are imperative.

  15. Genetic diversity of indigenous chicken ecotypes in Jordan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2010-10-11

    Oct 11, 2010 ... vation of genetic resources of indigenous chicken ecotypes in Jordan. Key words: Polymorphism, conservation, allele numbers, genetic distance, RAPD markers. INTRODUCTION. DNA diversity is continuously suffering erosion in several fields of animal genetic resources. This is especially true.

  16. Analysis of genetic diversity in Arrhenatherum elatius Germplasm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-25

    Jul 25, 2011 ... Key words: Arrhenatherum elatius, genetic diversity, inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. INTRODUCTION. Arrhenatherum elatius (L.) ... markers, to provide evidence for genetic improvement, and to evaluate the applicability of this ..... cations in aquaculture. Genet. Aquacult. 238: 31-37. Mahmoud ...

  17. Genetic diversity of tropical-adapted onion germplasm assessed by RAPD markers Diversidade genética em germoplasma tropical de cebola estimada via marcadores RAPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Desterro M dos Santos

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Onion is a crop of significant socioeconomic importance to Brazil. Onion germplasm with adaptation to tropical and sub-tropical conditions has played an important role in the development of this crop in the country. In this context, we studied the genetic diversity in a germplasm collection potentially useful for the development of cultivars for tropical and subtropical regions. The genetic variability of 21 accessions/cultivars that have been used as germplasm and/or were developed by onion breeding programs in Brazil was evaluated via RAPD markers. The following accessions were included in the study :'Red Creole', 'Roxa IPA-3', 'Valenciana 14', 'Beta Cristal', 'Diamante', 'Composto IPA-6', 'Aurora', 'Bojuda Rio Grande', 'Alfa Tropical', 'Pêra IPA-4', 'Primavera', 'Belém IPA-9', 'Crioula Alto Vale', 'Conquista', 'Pira-Ouro', 'Vale-Ouro IPA-11', 'Franciscana IPA-10', 'Serrana', 'CNPH 6400', 'Petroline', and 'Baia Periforme'. From the 520 primers used in the initial screening only 38 displayed stable polymorphisms. They produced 624 amplicons, of which 522 (83.7% were monomorphic and 102 (16.3% were polymorphic. An average similarity coefficient of 0.72 was calculated among accessions based upon this subgroup of polymorphic amplicons. This allowed the discrimination of this germplasm collection into six groups with only one of them comprising more than one accession. The main group was formed by 16 accessions ('Diamante', 'Composto IPA-6', 'Aurora', 'Bojuda Rio Grande', 'Conquista', 'Pira-Ouro', 'Serrana', 'Vale-Ouro IPA-11', 'Baia Periforme', 'Primavera', 'Franciscana IPA-10', 'Belém IPA-9', 'Crioula Alto Vale', 'Petroline', 'Pêra IPA-4' and 'Alfa Tropical', for which the genetic origin (with few exceptions can be traced back to the variety 'Baia Periforme'. The populations 'Red Creole', 'Roxa IPA-3', 'Beta Cristal', 'CNPH 6400', and 'Valenciana 14' comprised a set of five isolated groups, showing genetic divergence among them and in

  18. Mapping genetic and phylogenetic diversity of a temperate forest using remote sensing based upscaling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escriba, C. G.; Yamasaki, E.; Leiterer, R.; Tedder, A.; Shimizu, K.; Morsdorf, F.; Schaepman, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Functioning and resilience of forest ecosystems under environmental pressures increases when biodiversity at genetic, species, canopy and ecosystem level is higher. Therefore mapping and monitoring diversity becomes a necessity to assess changes in ecosystems and understanding their consequences. Diversity can be assessed by using different metrics, such as diversity of functional traits or genetic diversity amongst others. In-situ approaches have provided useful, but usually spatially constrained information, often dependent on expert knowledge. We propose using remote sensing in combination with in-situ sampling at different spatial scales. We map phylogenetic and genetic diversity using airborne imaging spectroscopy in combination with terrestrial and airborne laser scanning, as well as exhaustive in-situ sampling schemes. To this end, we propose to link leaf optical properties using a taxonomic approach (spectranomics) to genetic and phylogenetic diversity. The test site is a managed mixed temperate forest on the south-facing slope of Laegern Mountain, Switzerland (47°28'42.0" N, 8°21'51.8" E, 682 m.a.s.l.). The intensive sampling area is roughly 300m x 300m and dominant species are European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Ash (Fraxinus excelsior). We perform phylogenetic and intraspecific genetic variation analyses for the five most dominant tree species at the test site. For these species, information on functional biochemical and architectural plant traits diversity is retrieved from imaging spectroscopy and laser scanning data and validated with laboratory and in-situ measurements. To assess regional-scale genetic diversity, the phylogenetic and genetic signals are quantified using the remote sensing data, resulting in spatially distributed intra-specific genetic variation. We discuss the usefulness of combined remote sensing and in-situ sampling, to bridge diversity scales from genetic to canopy level.

  19. Moderate Genetic Diversity and Genetic Differentiation in the Relict Tree Liquidambar formosana Hance Revealed by Genic Simple Sequence Repeat Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rongxi; Lin, Furong; Huang, Ping; Zheng, Yongqi

    2016-01-01

    Chinese sweetgum (Liquidambar formosana) is a relatively fast-growing ecological pioneer species. It is widely used for multiple purposes. To assess the genetic diversity and genetic differentiation of the species, genic SSR markers were mined from transcriptome data for subsequent analysis of the genetic diversity and population structure of natural populations. A total of 10645 potential genic SSR loci were identified in 80482 unigenes. The average frequency was one SSR per 5.12 kb, and the dinucleotide unit was the most abundant motif. A total of 67 alleles were found, with a mean of 6.091 alleles per locus and a mean polymorphism information content of 0.390. Moreover, the species exhibited a relatively moderate level of genetic diversity (He = 0.399), with the highest was found in population XY (He = 0.469). At the regional level, the southwestern region displayed the highest genetic diversity (He = 0.435) and the largest number of private alleles (n = 5), which indicated that the Southwestern region may be the diversity hot spot of L. formosana. The AMOVA results showed that variation within populations (94.02%) was significantly higher than among populations (5.98%), which was in agreement with the coefficient of genetic differentiation (Fst = 0.076). According to the UPGMA analysis and principal coordinate analysis and confirmed by the assignment test, 25 populations could be divided into three groups, and there were different degrees of introgression among populations. No correlation was found between genetic distance and geographic distance (P > 0.05). These results provided further evidence that geographic isolation was not the primary factor leading to the moderate genetic differentiation of L. formosana. As most of the genetic diversity of L. formosana exists among individuals within a population, individual plant selection would be an effective way to use natural variation in genetic improvement programs. This would be helpful to not only protect the

  20. Microsatellite variability reveals high genetic diversity and low genetic differentiation in a critical giant panda population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiandong YANG, Zhihe ZHANG, Fujun SHEN, Xuyu YANG, Liang ZHANG, Limin CHEN, Wenping ZHANG, Qing ZHU, Rong HOU

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding present patterns of genetic diversity is critical in order to design effective conservation and management strategies for endangered species. Tangjiahe Nature Reserve (NR is one of the most important national reserves for giant pandas Ailuropoda melanoleuca in China. Previous studies have shown that giant pandas in Tangjiahe NR may be threatened by population decline and fragmentation. Here we used 10 microsatellite DNA markers to assess the genetic variability in the Tangjiahe population. The results indicate a low level of genetic differentiation between the Hongshihe and Motianling subpopulations in the reserve. Assignment tests using the Bayesian clustering method in STRUCTURE identified one genetic cluster from 42 individuals of the two subpopulations. All individuals from the same subpopulation were assigned to one cluster. This indicates high gene flow between subpopulations. F statistic analyses revealed a low FIS-value of 0.024 in the total population and implies a randomly mating population in Tangjiahe NR. Additionally, our data show a high level of genetic diversity for the Tangjiahe population. Mean allele number (A, Allelic richness (AR and mean expected heterozygosity (HE for the Tangjiahe population was 5.9, 5.173 and 0.703, respectively. This wild giant panda population can be restored through concerted effort [Current Zoology 57 (6: 717–724, 2011].

  1. Genetic diversity of canine olfactory receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitte Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolution has resulted in large repertoires of olfactory receptor (OR genes, forming the largest gene families in mammalian genomes. Knowledge of the genetic diversity of olfactory receptors is essential if we are to understand the differences in olfactory sensory capability between individuals. Canine breeds constitute an attractive model system for such investigations. Results We sequenced 109 OR genes considered representative of the whole OR canine repertoire, which consists of more than 800 genes, in a cohort of 48 dogs of six different breeds. SNP frequency showed the overall level of polymorphism to be high. However, the distribution of SNP was highly heterogeneous among OR genes. More than 50% of OR genes were found to harbour a large number of SNP, whereas the rest were devoid of SNP or only slightly polymorphic. Heterogeneity was also observed across breeds, with 25% of the SNP breed-specific. Linkage disequilibrium within OR genes and OR clusters suggested a gene conversion process, consistent with a mean level of polymorphism higher than that observed for introns and intergenic sequences. A large proportion (47% of SNP induced amino-acid changes and the Ka/Ks ratio calculated for all alleles with a complete ORF indicated a low selective constraint with respect to the high level of redundancy of the olfactory combinatory code and an ongoing pseudogenisation process, which affects dog breeds differently. Conclusion Our demonstration of a high overall level of polymorphism, likely to modify the ligand-binding capacity of receptors distributed differently within the six breeds tested, is the first step towards understanding why Labrador Retrievers and German Shepherd Dogs have a much greater potential for use as sniffer dogs than Pekingese dogs or Greyhounds. Furthermore, the heterogeneity in OR polymorphism observed raises questions as to why, in a context in which most OR genes are highly polymorphic, a subset of

  2. Temporal genetic patterns of diversity and structure evidence chaotic genetic patchiness in a spiny lobster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villacorta-Rath, Cecilia; Souza, Carla A; Murphy, Nicholas P; Green, Bridget S; Gardner, Caleb; Strugnell, Jan M

    2018-01-01

    Population structure of many marine organisms is spatially patchy and varies within and between years, a phenomenon defined as chaotic genetic patchiness. This results from the combination of planktonic larval dispersal and environmental stochasticity. Additionally, in species with bi-partite life, postsettlement selection can magnify these genetic differences. The high fecundity (up to 500,000 eggs annually) and protracted larval duration (12-24 months) and dispersal of the southern rock lobster, Jasus edwardsii, make it a good test species for chaotic genetic patchiness and selection during early benthic life. Here, we used double digest restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq) to investigate chaotic genetic patchiness and postsettlement selection in this species. We assessed differences in genetic structure and diversity of recently settled pueruli across four settlement years and between two sites in southeast Australia separated by approximately 1,000 km. Postsettlement selection was investigated by identifying loci under putative positive selection between recently settled pueruli and postpueruli and quantifying differences in the magnitude and strength of the selection at each year and site. Genetic differences within and among sites through time in neutral SNP markers indicated chaotic genetic patchiness. Recently settled puerulus at the southernmost site exhibited lower genetic diversity during years of low puerulus catches, further supporting this hypothesis. Finally, analyses of outlier SNPs detected fluctuations in the magnitude and strength of the markers putatively under positive selection over space and time. One locus under putative positive selection was consistent at both locations during the same years, suggesting the existence of weak postsettlement selection. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Genetic diversity and population structure in Meconopsis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results exhibit a strong genetic differentiation which is obviously due to genetic drift in the isolated populations. The genetic structure of M. quintuplinervia has probably been shaped by its breeding modes, biogeographic history and human impact (both grazing and collection for medicinal purposes). This research might ...

  4. Reduction of Genetic Diversity of the Harpy Eagle in Brazilian Tropical Forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aureo Banhos

    Full Text Available Habitat loss and fragmentation intensify the effects of genetic drift and endogamy, reducing genetic variability of populations with serious consequences for wildlife conservation. The Harpy Eagle (Harpia harpyja is a forest dwelling species that is considered near threatened and suffers from habitat loss in the forests of the Neotropical region. In this study, 72 historical and current samples were assessed using eight autosomal microsatellite markers to investigate the distribution of genetic diversity of the Harpy Eagle of the Amazonian and Atlantic forests in Brazil. The results showed that the genetic diversity of Harpy Eagle decreased in the regions where deforestation is intense in the southern Amazon and Atlantic Forest.

  5. Tartary Buckwheat Genetic Diversity in the Himalayas Associated with Farmer Landrace Diversity and Low Dietary Dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Weijuan Huang; Devra I. Jarvis; Selena Ahmed; Chunlin Long

    2017-01-01

    While crop genetic diversity supports ecological processes and food security, there have been few cross-cultural studies evaluating the influence of cultural and dietary factors on the conservation of genetic resources. This study examines genetic diversity patterns of tartary buckwheat in 18 smallholder farming communities across five regions of China (Yunnan Province, Tibet Autonomous Region and Sichuan Province) and Bhutan managed by Yi, Tibetan, and Bhutanese farmers using ethnobotanical ...

  6. Genetic diversity of Vietnamese domestic chicken populations as decision-making support for conservation strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, H.T.M.; Berthouly-Salazar, C.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the genetic diversity of 17 populations of Vietnamese local chickens (VNN) and one Red Jungle Fowl population, together with six chicken populations of Chinese origin (CNO), and to provide priorities supporting the conservation of genetic resources using 20

  7. Limited intra-genetic diversity in Dientamoeba fragilis housekeeping genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensvold, Christen Rune; Clark, C Graham; Röser, Dennis

    2013-08-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a common intestinal parasite of unsettled clinical significance. Differences in clinical outcome of parasitic infections may reflect parasite genetic diversity, and so tools to study intra-genetic diversity that could potentially reflect differences in clinical phenotypes are warranted. Here, we show that genetic analysis of three D. fragilis housekeeping genes enables clear distinction between the two known genotypes, but that integration of housekeeping genes in multi-locus sequencing tools for D. fragilis may have limited epidemiological and clinical value due to no further added genetic resolution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Low genetic diversity and high genetic differentiation among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Possible reasons for the high population genetic differentiation and the low levels of genetic variation within populations are inbreeding and genetic drift. Of a total of 26 known populations, 14 are now extinct, five during the course of this study. Action to prevent complete extinction of the species is therefore urgent.

  9. GENETIC DIVERSITY AND ECO-GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    V.P., Rajaram, V., Hash, C.T. and Thakur, R.P.. 2010. SSR allelic diversity in relation to morphological traits and resistance to grain mould in sorghum. Crop and Pasture Science. 61:230-240. Salimath, S., Olivera, A., Godwin, I. and. Bennetzen, J. 1995. Assesment of genome origins and diversity in the genus Eleusine.

  10. Genetic diversity analysis of various red spider mite- resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-05-02

    resistant cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) cultivars that are applied in cultivar identification and breeder's right protection of cottons. The genomic DNA was used as template and random primers were used to analyze the genetic diversity.

  11. Genetic diversity in Satureja species determined by sequence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ANITA NAMAYANDEH

    www.ias.ac.in/jgenet/OnlineResources/96/e5.pdf]. Introduction. The genetic diversity of 50 Satureja species was evaluated in three distinct geographical regions of Iran using sequence- related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers. Eleven.

  12. Analysis of Genetic diversity and reltionships in local Tunisian barley ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    evaluated using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and simple sequence repeat (SSR). A high level of ... Key words: Barley, RAPD markers, SSR markers, genetic diversity. INTRODUCTION ..... regression approach. Cancer. Res.

  13. Population genetic diversity of marble goby (Oxyeleotris marmoratus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    2017-03-31

    Innovation Center for Marine Bio-Industry Technology of Jiangsu Province,. Lianyungang, Jiangsu 222005, China. #These authors contributed equally to this work. Short title: Population genetic diversity analysis of marble goby.

  14. Genetic diversity of natural Tunisian Lavandula multifida L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proprietaire

    2013-02-13

    Feb 13, 2013 ... Key words: Lavandula multifida, genetic diversity, population structure, isozymes, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPDs). ... based on morphological, cytogenetic and reproductive traits (Upson et al., 2000; ...... leucanthemifolius var. casablancae): evidence from chloroplast DNA and random amplified ...

  15. Genetic diversity of Escherichia coli isolated from commercial swine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PCR) for the analysis of genetic diversity among Escherichia coli strains isolated from commercial swine farms in Sichuan province of China. Thirty four strains of E. coli were selected by selective medium and conventional biochemical test from ...

  16. Genetic diversity analysis of various red spider miteresistant upland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    resistant cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) cultivars that are applied in cultivar identification and breeder's right protection of cottons. The genomic DNA was used as template and random primers were used to analyze the genetic diversity of 21 accessions ...

  17. Genetic diversity of grape germplasm as revealed by microsatellite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    group method with arithmetic averages (UPGMA) clustering analysis. These results will be useful for the exploitation of grape germplasm in basic and applied research. Key words: Vitis vinifera L., simple sequence repeat (SSR), genetic diversity, ...

  18. Genetic diversity and historical demography of Chinese shrimp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity and historical demography of Chinese shrimp Feneropenaeus chinensis in Yellow Sea and Bohai Sea based on mitochondrial DNA analysis. YL Li, XY Kong, ZN Yu, J Kong, S Ma, LM Chen ...

  19. Genetic diversity in the SIR model of pathogen evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Gordo

    Full Text Available We introduce a model for assessing the levels and patterns of genetic diversity in pathogen populations, whose epidemiology follows a susceptible-infected-recovered model (SIR. We model the population of pathogens as a metapopulation composed of subpopulations (infected hosts, where pathogens replicate and mutate. Hosts transmit pathogens to uninfected hosts. We show that the level of pathogen variation is well predicted by analytical expressions, such that pathogen neutral molecular variation is bounded by the level of infection and increases with the duration of infection. We then introduce selection in the model and study the invasion probability of a new pathogenic strain whose fitness (R(0(1+s is higher than the fitness of the resident strain (R(0. We show that this invasion probability is given by the relative increment in R(0 of the new pathogen (s. By analyzing the patterns of genetic diversity in this framework, we identify the molecular signatures during the replacement and compare these with those observed in sequences of influenza A.

  20. Genetic diversity analysis of Tinospora cordifolia germplasm ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-04-03

    Apr 3, 2012 ... T. cordifolia is dio- cious in nature and is primarily propagated through vegeta- tive means. This condition precludes genetic recombination and reshuffling of genes that is manifested in the form of genetic variation. The species is used in almost every house- hold in the Himalayan region of India for the cure ...

  1. Assessment of morphological and molecular diversity among okra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cophenetic r correlation value was found to be 0.94 suggesting that the cluster analysis strongly represents the similarity matrix. Genetic diversity as assessed by DARwin (based on quantitative morphological data) revealed that grouping of genotypes into different constellations did not follow any specific pattern suggesting ...

  2. Characterization and diversity assessment in coconut collections of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SUBDIC

    Characterization and genetic diversity assessment among 30 conserved coconut accessions collected from Pacific Ocean Islands and Nicobar Islands for morphological traits, physico-chemical traits of tender nut water, leaf biochemical parameters and molecular characterization by using random amplified polymorphic ...

  3. Genetic diversity and structure in two protected Posidonia oceanica meadows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheli, Carla; D'Esposito, Daniela; Belmonte, Alessandro; Peirano, Andrea; Valiante, Luigi Maria; Procaccini, Gabriele

    2015-08-01

    Posidonia oceanica meadows growing along the west Mediterranean coastline are under continuous anthropogenic pressure. The way meadow health correlates with genetic and genotypic diversity in P. oceanica, is still under debate. Here we report a microsatellite analysis of two P. oceanica meadows living in protected areas of the Ligurian (Monterosso al Mare, MPA of "Cinque Terre") and central Tyrrhenian Sea (Santa Marinella, regional Site of Community Importance). Both meadows were recently classified as "disturbed", according to shoot density and other phenological parameters. Between the two meadows, Santa Marinella showed higher genetic diversity, while clear genetic substructure was present in both sites, reflecting high spatial heterogeneity. The present study suggests that genetic diversity does not match unequivocally with shoot density and leaf morphology and that small scale intra-meadow heterogeneity is an important factor to consider for establishing the relation between genetic/genotypic variability and health of natural seagrass meadows. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Culture, population structure, and low genetic diversity in Pleistocene hominins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premo, L S; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2009-01-06

    Paleogenomic research has shown that modern humans, Neanderthals, and their most recent common ancestor have displayed less genetic diversity than living great apes. The traditional interpretation that low levels of genetic diversity in modern humans resulted from a relatively recent demographic bottleneck cannot account for similarly low levels of genetic diversity in Middle Pleistocene hominins. A more parsimonious hypothesis proposes that the effective population size of the human lineage has been low for more than 500,000 years, but the mechanism responsible for suppressing genetic diversity in Pleistocene hominin populations without similarly affecting that of their hominoid contemporaries remains unknown. Here we use agent-based simulation to study the effect of culturally mediated migration on neutral genetic diversity in structured populations. We show that, in populations structured by culturally mediated migration, selection can suppress neutral genetic diversity over thousands of generations, even in the absence of bottlenecks or expansions in census population size. In other words, selection could have suppressed the effective population size of Pleistocene hominins for as long as the degree of cultural similarity between regionally differentiated groups played an important role in mediating intraspecific gene flow.

  5. Inference of genetic diversity in popcorn S3 progenies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, G F; do Amaral, A T; Ribeiro, R M; Ramos, H C C; Boechat, M S B; Santos, J S; Mafra, G S; Kamphorst, S H; de Lima, V J; Vivas, M; de Souza Filho, G A

    2016-05-09

    Molecular markers are a useful tool for identification of complementary heterotic groups in breeding programs aimed at the production of superior hybrids, particularly for crops such as popcorn in which heterotic groups are not well-defined. The objective of the present study was to analyze the genetic diversity of 47 genotypes of tropical popcorn to identify possible heterotic groups for the development of superior hybrids. Four genotypes of high genetic value were studied: hybrid IAC 125, strain P2, and varieties UENF 14 and BRS Angela. In addition, 43 endogamous S3 progenies obtained from variety UENF 14 were used. Twenty-five polymorphic SSR-EST markers were analyzed. A genetic distance matrix was obtained and the following molecular diversity parameters were estimated: number of alleles, number of effective alleles, polymorphism information content (PIC), observed and expected heterozygosities, Shannon diversity index, and coefficient of inbreeding. We found a moderate PIC and high diversity index, indicating that the studied population presents both good discriminatory ability and high informativeness for the utilized markers. The dendrogram built based on the dissimilarity matrix indicated six distinct groups. Our findings demonstrate the genetic diversity among the evaluated genotypes and provide evidence for heterotic groups in popcorn. Furthermore, the functional genetic diversity indicates that there are informative genetic markers for popcorn.

  6. A call for tiger management using "reserves" of genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Rachael A; Ramakrishnan, Uma; Hadly, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Tigers (Panthera tigris), like many large carnivores, are threatened by anthropogenic impacts, primarily habitat loss and poaching. Current conservation plans for tigers focus on population expansion, with the goal of doubling census size in the next 10 years. Previous studies have shown that because the demographic decline was recent, tiger populations still retain a large amount of genetic diversity. Although maintaining this diversity is extremely important to avoid deleterious effects of inbreeding, management plans have yet to consider predictive genetic models. We used coalescent simulations based on previously sequenced mitochondrial fragments (n = 125) from 5 of 6 extant subspecies to predict the population growth needed to maintain current genetic diversity over the next 150 years. We found that the level of gene flow between populations has a large effect on the local population growth necessary to maintain genetic diversity, without which tigers may face decreases in fitness. In the absence of gene flow, we demonstrate that maintaining genetic diversity is impossible based on known demographic parameters for the species. Thus, managing for the genetic diversity of the species should be prioritized over the riskier preservation of distinct subspecies. These predictive simulations provide unique management insights, hitherto not possible using existing analytical methods.

  7. Genetic diversity of seagrass seeds influences seedling morphology and biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall Hughes, A; Hanley, Torrance C; Schenck, Forest R; Hays, Cynthia G

    2016-12-01

    Genetic diversity can influence ecological processes throughout ontogeny, yet whether diversity at early life history stages is important in long-lived taxa with overlapping generations is unclear. Seagrass systems provide some of the best evidence for the ecological effects of genetic diversity among adult shoots, but we do not know if the genetic diversity of seeds and seedlings also influences seagrass ecology. We tested the effects of seagrass (Zostera marina) seed diversity and relatedness on germination success, seedling morphology, and seedling production by comparing experimental assemblages of seeds collected from single reproductive shoots ("monocultures") to assemblages of seeds collected from multiple reproductive shoots ("polycultures"). There was no difference in seedling emergence, yet seedlings from polycultures had larger shoots above and below ground than seedlings from monocultures at the end of the 1-yr experiment. Genetic relatedness of the seedlings predicted some aspects of shoot morphology, with more leaves and longer roots and shoots at intermediate levels of relatedness, regardless of seed diversity. Our results suggest that studies of only adult stages may underestimate the importance of genetic diversity if the benefits at early life history stages continue to accrue throughout the life cycle. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  8. The characterization of goat genetic diversity : Towards a genomic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ajmone-Marsan, P.; Colli, L.; Han, J. L.; Achilli, A.; Lancioni, H.; Joost, S.; Crepaldi, P.; Pilla, F.; Stella, A.; Taberlet, P.; Boettcher, P.; Negrini, R.; Lenstra, J. A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067852335

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of genetic diversity at molecular level has been proposed as a valuable complement and sometimes proxy to phenotypic diversity of local breeds and is presently considered as one of the FAO priorities for breed characterization. By recommending a set of selected molecular markers

  9. Genetic diversity in pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-05-31

    May 31, 2010 ... Genetic relationships among 88 pigeonpea accessions from a presumed centre of origin and diversity,. India and a presumed secondary centre of diversity in East Africa were evaluated using six microsatellite markers. Forty-seven (47) alleles were detected in the populations studied, with a mean of.

  10. Genetic diversity of endangered populations of Butia capitata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The flora and fauna of the Cerrado biome in central Brazil both show great diversity and high levels of endemism. Butia capitata is a palm native to this biome that has significant economic, social, and environmental value. We sought to identify and quantify the genetic diversity of four fragmented populations of B. capitata ...

  11. Genetic diversity in pigeonpea [ Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic relationships among 88 pigeonpea accessions from a presumed centre of origin and diversity, India and a presumed secondary centre of diversity in East Africa were evaluated using six microsatellite markers. Forty-seven (47) alleles were detected in the populations studied, with a mean of eight alleles per locus.

  12. Classification of genetic diversity and choice of parents for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty-one accessions of cowpea of diverse eco-geographic origins were evaluated for genetic diversity using principal component analysis (PCA), single linkage cluster analysis (SLCA) and canonical techniques. The accessions were classified into six groups by PCA and SLCA while canonical technique identified five ...

  13. Genetic diversity is a predictor of mortality in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.A. Bihlmeyer (Nathan A.); J. Brody (Jennifer); G.D. Smith; K.L. Lunetta (Kathryn); M.A. Nalls (Michael); J.A. Smith (Jennifer A); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); G. Davies (Gail); L. Yu (Lei); S.S. Mirza (Saira); A. Teumer (Alexander); J. Coresh (Josef); J.S. Pankow (James); N. Franceschini (Nora); A. Scaria (Anish); J. Oshima (Junko); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); T.B. Harris (Tamara); H. Li (Hanyue); D. Karasik (David); D.P. Kiel (Douglas P.); M. Garcia (Melissa); Y. Liu (YongMei); J.D. Faul (Jessica D.); S.L. Kardia (Sharon L.r); W. Zhao (Wei); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); M.M. Allerhand (Michael); D.C. Liewald (David C.); P. Redmond (Paul); J.M. Starr (John); P.L. de Jager (Philip); D.A. Evans (Denis); N. Direk (Nese); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); G. Homuth (Georg); R. Lorbeer (Roberto); H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); L.J. Launer (Lenore); J. Murabito (Joanne); A. Singleton (Andrew); D.R. Weir (David); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); D.A. Bennett (David A.); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); T. Kocher (Thomas); T. Lumley (Thomas); D.E. Arking (Dan)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: It has been well-established, both by population genetics theory and direct observation in many organisms, that increased genetic diversity provides a survival advantage. However, given the limitations of both sample size and genome-wide metrics, this hypothesis has not been

  14. Genetic diversity in Chinese natural zoysiagrass based on inter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zoysiagrass (Zoysia sp.) is extensively used in turf establishment and livestock herbage due to its many outstanding characters. Native Zoysia sp. are widely distributed in China. Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers were used to investigate the genetic diversity and genetic relationships of 81 Chinese wild ...

  15. Genetic diversity of Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FORRESTER

    2015-01-28

    Jan 28, 2015 ... The existence of genetic diversity in germplasm collections is crucial for cultivar development. Genetic relationships .... 10 µl volume mix consisting of 5 U Dreamtaq polymerase enzyme. (Thermo scientific corp ..... constraints in bambara groundnut production, marketing and consumption in the brong ahafo ...

  16. Genetic diversity and differentiation in roses: A gardenrose perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vukosavljev, M.; Zhang, J.; Esselink, G.; Westende, van 't W.P.C.; Cox, P.; Visser, R.G.F.; Arens, P.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    tFor the first time genetic diversity among modern garden rose cultivars has been evaluated using a setof 24 microsatellite markers covering most chromosomes. A total of 518 different alleles were obtainedin the set of 138 rose cultivars and this led to the conclusion that in terms of genetic

  17. Evaluation of genetic diversity of Portuguese Pinus sylvestris L ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 92; Online resources. Evaluation of genetic diversity of Portuguese Pinus sylvestris L. populations based on molecular data and inferences about the future use of this germplasm. J. Cipriano A. Carvalho C. Fernandes M. J. Gaspar J. Pires J. Bento L. Roxo J. Louzada J. Lima- ...

  18. Supplementary data: Genetic diversity among old Portuguese bread ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary data: Genetic diversity among old Portuguese bread wheat cultivars and botanical varieties evaluated by ITS rDNA PCR-RFLP markers. A. Carvalho, H. Guedes-Pinto and J. Lima-Brito. J. Genet. 88, 363–367. Table 1. Passport data of the old Portuguese bread wheat cultivars (2n = 6x = 42;. AABBDD).

  19. Hierarchical Approaches to the Analysis of Genetic Diversity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hierarchical analysis highlights the nature of relationship between and among type samples as outlined by standard descriptors. It produces an output called dendrogram, which depicts the hierarchical structure of genetic interaction in clusters/groups. Genetic diversity is the variation of heritable characteristics in a ...

  20. Analysis of genetic diversity and estimation of inbreeding coefficient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-01-18

    Jan 18, 2010 ... Analysis of genetic diversity and estimation of inbreeding coefficient within Caspian horse population using microsatellite markers. Hosein Shahsavarani and Ghodrat Rahimi-Mianji*. Laboratory for Molecular Genetics and Animal Biotechnology, Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Animal Science.

  1. The loss of genetic diversity in the Chinese paddlefish (Psephurus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The loss of genetic diversity in the Chinese paddlefish. (Psephurus gladius Martens) as revealed by DNA fingerprinting. XUE-CHANG WU*. College of Life Sciences and the Key Laboratory of Conservation Genetics and Reproductive Biology for Endangered. Wild Animals of the Ministry of Education, Zhejiang University, ...

  2. Genetic diversity in African nutmeg (Monodora myristica) accessions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mean polymorphic information content (PIC) and genetic diversity (He) were 0.673 and 0.697, respectively, indicating high genetic variation among the accessions. Cluster analysis delineated the accessions into four major groups. The maximum similarity index (0.88) based on Dice coefficient was recorded between ...

  3. Genetic diversity, population structure and marker trait associations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary data: Genetic diversity, population structure and marker trait associations for seed quality traits in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). Ashok Badigannavar and Gerald O. Myers. J. Genet. 94, 87–94. Table 1. List of cotton germplasm lines used in this study. Germplasm no. Cultivar. Region. Germplasm no. Cultivar.

  4. Genetic diversity of taraxacum germplasm revealed by sequence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity of taraxacum germplasm revealed by sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) analysis. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... The genetic relationships analyzed with un-weighed pairgroup method with arithmetic mean (UPMGA) showed that 11 population of taraxacum were grouped into three ...

  5. Genetic diversity in Egyptian and Saudi goat breeds using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity in Egyptian and Saudi goat breeds using microsatellite markers. KF Mahrous, SYM Alakilli, LM Salem, SHA El-Aziem, AA El-Hanafy. Abstract. Objective: The genetic polymorphism within and among three indigenous goat breeds found in Egypt (Barki and Zaraibi) and in Saudi Arabia (Ardi) was detected by ...

  6. Genetic diversity of intensive cultured and wild tiger shrimp Penaeus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inbreeding as negative factor perhaps promote a significant increase of the genetic similarity of the captive populations, consequently leading to greater disease susceptibility and impairment of both the growth and final size of the shrimps. Therefore evaluating genetic diversity and inbreeding required for improvement of ...

  7. Analysis of genetic diversity among cultivated enset (Ensete ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-11-09

    Nov 9, 2011 ... Genetic diversity of wild Cofea arabica populations in. Ethiopia as a contribution to conservation and use planning. Ecology and Development series. Doctoral Thesis. University of Bonn,. Germany, No. 44. Yeh FC, Yang RC, Boyle T (1999). Population genetic analysis of codominant markers and qualitative ...

  8. Genetic diversity and population structure of blue-crested lizard ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 96; Issue 2. Genetic diversity and population structure of blue-crested lizard, Calotes ... These two lineages are separated by mountain ranges, which play an important role as natural barriers blocking gene flow. Our finding reveal at least two cryptic lineages represented in C.

  9. Evaluation of genetic diversity of Portuguese Pinus sylvestris L ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Okhotsk Sea in eastern Siberia, and from beyond the sub- arctic forests of northern Scandinavia to arid, mountain- ous southern areas of Spain (Labra et al. 2006; Pyhäjärvi et al. ... in light of global climatic changes. Keywords. genetic diversity; ISSR; RAPD; Pinus sylvestris L. Journal of Genetics Vol. 92, Online Resources.

  10. Genetic diversity of Indonesia milkfish ( Chanos chanos ) using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity of milkfish (Chanos chanos) from Indonesia was investigated using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. A total of 255 loci were detected by combination of seven primers from 130 individuals collected at seven locations. AFLP analysis provided useful information in determining genetic ...

  11. Genetic diversity of Pakistani maize genotypes using chromosome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-02-04

    Feb 4, 2009 ... Genetic diversity of Pakistani maize genotypes using chromosome specific simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer sets. Zamarud Shah1*, Iqbal Munir1 Shahid Ali2, Arshad Iqbal1, Saqib Mumtaz1, Rab Nwaz3 and. Zahoor Ahmed Swati1. 1Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, Faculty of Crop ...

  12. Genetic diversity Study of Dioscoreas Using Morphological Traits ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    or molecular markers. Isozymes, being biochemical expressions of the genetic make-up of the plant, can be used to greatly improve the accuracy of cultivar identification. Bressan et al. (2014) used isozymes analysis in delineating yam cultivars into different species. The results revealed clear genetic diversity of the yam.

  13. Molecular evaluation of genetic diversity and association studies in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecular evaluation of genetic diversity and association studies in rice. (Oryza sativa L.) C. Vanniarajan, K. K. Vinod and Andy Pereira. J. Genet. 91, 9–19. Table 1. Chromosome-wise distribution of SSR alleles and their number (k), polymorphic information content (PIC) and allele discrimination index (Dm). Chromosome.

  14. Genetic diversity of Bambara groundnut ( Vigna subterranea (L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The existence of genetic diversity in germplasm collections is crucial for cultivar development. Genetic relationships among 105 Bambara groundnuts (Vigna subterranea (L) Verdc.) accessions from Kenya were evaluated using 12 microsatellite markers. The Bambara landraces were collected from farmers in the western ...

  15. Analysis of genetic diversity in pigeon pea germplasm using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan), an important legume crop is predominantly cultivated in tropical and subtropical regions of Asia and Africa. It is normally considered to have a low degree of genetic diversity, an impediment in undertaking crop improvement programmes.We have analysed genetic polymorphism of domesticated ...

  16. Genetic diversity in Indian FCV and burley tobacco cultivars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    term tobacco improvement and reduction of vulnerability of the crop. Prior to the availability of DNA-based markers, most genetic diversity studies in various crops were carried out using morphological markers. Molecular markers have become useful tools to provide a relatively unbiased method of quantifying genetic ...

  17. Inter simple sequence repeat analysis of genetic diversity of five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper studied the genetic diversity of five cultivated pepper species using inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) analysis. The amplicons of 13 out of 15 designed primers were stable polymorphic and therefore were used as genetic biomarkers. 135 total clear bands were obtained, of which 102 were polymorphic bands ...

  18. Genetic diversity analysis and conservation of the Chinese herb ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is an economically important floral herb. However, little work has been conducted to further our understanding of the genetics of this herb. In this study, a representative set of germplasm of. S. miltiorrhiza populations was used to analyze genetic diversity using amplified fragment length polymorphism ...

  19. Genetic diversity studies and identification of SSR markers ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genetic diversity studies and identification of SSR markers associated with Fusarium wilt (Fusarium udum) resistance in cultivated pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) ... Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanas 221 005, India; Department of Mycology and ...

  20. Genetic diversity in Egyptian and Saudi goat breeds using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2013-12-30

    Dec 30, 2013 ... Serrano M, Calvo JH, Martínez M, Marcos-Carcavilla A,. Cuevas J, González C, Jurado JJ, de Tejada PD. (2009). Microsatellite based genetic diversity and population structure of the endangered. Spanish Guadarrama goat breed. BMC Genet. 10: 61. Slatkin, M. (1985): Gene flow in natural populations.

  1. Genetic diversity in farm animals - A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, L. F.; Lenstra, J. A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067852335; Eding, H.; Toro, M. A.; Scherf, B.; Pilling, D.; Negrini, R.; Finlay, E. K.; Jianlin, H.; Groeneveld, E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315030267; Weigend, S.

    2010-01-01

    Domestication of livestock species and a long history of migrations, selection and adaptation have created an enormous variety of breeds. Conservation of these genetic resources relies on demographic characterization, recording of production environments and effective data management. In addition,

  2. Species-genetic diversity correlations in habitat fragmentation can be biased by small sample sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazareno, Alison G; Jump, Alistair S

    2012-06-01

    Predicted parallel impacts of habitat fragmentation on genes and species lie at the core of conservation biology, yet tests of this rule are rare. In a recent article in Ecology Letters, Struebig et al. (2011) report that declining genetic diversity accompanies declining species diversity in tropical forest fragments. However, this study estimates diversity in many populations through extrapolation from very small sample sizes. Using the data of this recent work, we show that results estimated from the smallest sample sizes drive the species-genetic diversity correlation (SGDC), owing to a false-positive association between habitat fragmentation and loss of genetic diversity. Small sample sizes are a persistent problem in habitat fragmentation studies, the results of which often do not fit simple theoretical models. It is essential, therefore, that data assessing the proposed SGDC are sufficient in order that conclusions be robust.

  3. Genetic Diversity in Urban and Rural Indigenous Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    López, John Emilio William

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the genetic diversity of indigenous (and semi-indigenous) populations in Mexico and determine if any genetic variation correlated to culture and language. Mexico’s indigenous populations have not been extensively studied using contemporary genetic typing systems; the ones conducted used too few loci, or very small sample sizes. Mexico has 291 living native languages derived from twelve separate and distinct linguistic families divided into 68 major ...

  4. Genetic diversity among five T4-like bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Claire

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteriophages are an important repository of genetic diversity. As one of the major constituents of terrestrial biomass, they exert profound effects on the earth's ecology and microbial evolution by mediating horizontal gene transfer between bacteria and controlling their growth. Only limited genomic sequence data are currently available for phages but even this reveals an overwhelming diversity in their gene sequences and genomes. The contribution of the T4-like phages to this overall phage diversity is difficult to assess, since only a few examples of complete genome sequence exist for these phages. Our analysis of five T4-like genomes represents half of the known T4-like genomes in GenBank. Results Here, we have examined in detail the genetic diversity of the genomes of five relatives of bacteriophage T4: the Escherichia coli phages RB43, RB49 and RB69, the Aeromonas salmonicida phage 44RR2.8t (or 44RR and the Aeromonas hydrophila phage Aeh1. Our data define a core set of conserved genes common to these genomes as well as hundreds of additional open reading frames (ORFs that are nonconserved. Although some of these ORFs resemble known genes from bacterial hosts or other phages, most show no significant similarity to any known sequence in the databases. The five genomes analyzed here all have similarities in gene regulation to T4. Sequence motifs resembling T4 early and late consensus promoters were observed in all five genomes. In contrast, only two of these genomes, RB69 and 44RR, showed similarities to T4 middle-mode promoter sequences and to the T4 motA gene product required for their recognition. In addition, we observed that each phage differed in the number and assortment of putative genes encoding host-like metabolic enzymes, tRNA species, and homing endonucleases. Conclusion Our observations suggest that evolution of the T4-like phages has drawn on a highly diverged pool of genes in the microbial world. The T4

  5. Genetic Diversity of Plasmodium falciparum in Haiti: Insights from Microsatellite Markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar E Carter

    Full Text Available Hispaniola, comprising Haiti and the Dominican Republic, has been identified as a candidate for malaria elimination. However, incomplete surveillance data in Haiti hamper efforts to assess the impact of ongoing malaria control interventions. Characteristics of the genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum populations can be used to assess parasite transmission, which is information vital to evaluating malaria elimination efforts. Here we characterize the genetic diversity of P. falciparum samples collected from patients at seven sites in Haiti using 12 microsatellite markers previously employed in population genetic analyses of global P. falciparum populations. We measured multiplicity of infections, level of genetic diversity, degree of population geographic substructure, and linkage disequilibrium (defined as non-random association of alleles from different loci. For low transmission populations like Haiti, we expect to see few multiple infections, low levels of genetic diversity, high degree of population structure, and high linkage disequilibrium. In Haiti, we found low levels of multiple infections (12.9%, moderate to high levels of genetic diversity (mean number of alleles per locus = 4.9, heterozygosity = 0.61, low levels of population structure (highest pairwise Fst = 0.09 and no clustering in principal components analysis, and moderate linkage disequilibrium (ISA = 0.05, P<0.0001. In addition, population bottleneck analysis revealed no evidence for a reduction in the P. falciparum population size in Haiti. We conclude that the high level of genetic diversity and lack of evidence for a population bottleneck may suggest that Haiti's P. falciparum population has been stable and discuss the implications of our results for understanding the impact of malaria control interventions. We also discuss the relevance of parasite population history and other host and vector factors when assessing transmission intensity from genetic diversity data.

  6. A genetic assessment of the English bulldog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Niels C; Pooch, Ashley S; Liu, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    This study examines genetic diversity among 102 registered English Bulldogs used for breeding based on maternal and paternal haplotypes, allele frequencies in 33 highly polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) loci on 25 chromosomes, STR-linked dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) class I and II haplotypes, and the number and size of genome-wide runs of homozygosity (ROH) determined from high density SNP arrays. The objective was to assess whether the breed retains enough genetic diversity to correct the genotypic and phenotypic abnormalities associated with poor health, to allow for the elimination of deleterious recessive mutations, or to make further phenotypic changes in body structure or coat. An additional 37 English bulldogs presented to the UC Davis Veterinary Clinical Services for health problems were also genetically compared with the 102 registered dogs based on the perception that sickly English bulldogs are products of commercial breeders or puppy-mills and genetically different and inferior. Four paternal haplotypes, with one occurring in 93 % of dogs, were identified using six Y-short tandem repeat (STR) markers. Three major and two minor matrilines were identified by mitochondrial D-loop sequencing. Heterozygosity was determined from allele frequencies at genomic loci; the average number of alleles per locus was 6.45, with only 2.7 accounting for a majority of the diversity. However, observed and expected heterozygosity values were nearly identical, indicating that the population as a whole was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). However, internal relatedness (IR) and adjusted IR (IRVD) values demonstrated that a number of individuals were the offspring of parents that were either more inbred or outbred than the population as a whole. The diversity of DLA class I and II haplotypes was low, with only 11 identified DLA class I and nine class II haplotypes. Forty one percent of the breed shared a single DLA class I and 62 % a single class II haplotype. Nineteen

  7. The structural diversity of artificial genetic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anosova, Irina; Kowal, Ewa A; Dunn, Matthew R; Chaput, John C; Van Horn, Wade D; Egli, Martin

    2016-02-18

    Synthetic genetics is a subdiscipline of synthetic biology that aims to develop artificial genetic polymers (also referred to as xeno-nucleic acids or XNAs) that can replicate in vitro and eventually in model cellular organisms. This field of science combines organic chemistry with polymerase engineering to create alternative forms of DNA that can store genetic information and evolve in response to external stimuli. Practitioners of synthetic genetics postulate that XNA could be used to safeguard synthetic biology organisms by storing genetic information in orthogonal chromosomes. XNA polymers are also under active investigation as a source of nuclease resistant affinity reagents (aptamers) and catalysts (xenozymes) with practical applications in disease diagnosis and treatment. In this review, we provide a structural perspective on known antiparallel duplex structures in which at least one strand of the Watson-Crick duplex is composed entirely of XNA. Currently, only a handful of XNA structures have been archived in the Protein Data Bank as compared to the more than 100 000 structures that are now available. Given the growing interest in xenobiology projects, we chose to compare the structural features of XNA polymers and discuss their potential to access new regions of nucleic acid fold space. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Genetic diversity in Populus nigra plantations from west of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afrooz Alimohamadi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to adopt strategies for forest conservation and development,it is necessary to estimate the amount and distribution of genetic diversity in existing populations of poplar in Iran. In this study, the genetic diversity between eight stands of Populus nigra established in Kermanshah province was evaluated on the basis of molecular and morphological markers. To amplify microsatellite loci (WPMS09, WPMS16 and WPMS18, DNA extraction from young and fresh leaveswas done. Various conditions of the PCR assay were examined and to evaluate the morphological variation of the morphological characters leaves (consist of 19 traits were measured. In addition, height growth was measured, to evaluate the growth function of the stands in homogeneous conditions. Genetic diversity in termof polymorphic loci was 0%, because three investigated microsatellite loci were monomorphic. The total number of alleles for 3 microsatellite loci was 6 (na = 2, ne = 2, heo = 1, hee = 0.51. Genetic identity based on Nei was 100%, so genetic distance was 0%. The whole sampled trees represented the same thus the genotype. No significant differences between the mean values of all morphological characters and height growth were revealed. Observed genetic similarity gave indication that same ramets had been selected to plant in poplar plantation established in Kermanshah province.These results suggest the need for an initial evaluation of the genetic diversity in selected ramets for planting in plantation to avoid repetition.

  9. Genetic diversity in Populus nigra plantations from west of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afrooz Alimohamadi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to adopt strategies for forest conservation and development, it is necessary to estimate the amount and distribution of genetic diversity in existing populations of poplar in Iran. In this study, the genetic diversity between eight stands of Populus nigra established in Kermanshah province was evaluated on the basis of molecular and morphological markers. To amplify microsatellite loci (WPMS09, WPMS16 and WPMS18, DNA extraction from young and fresh leaveswas done. Various conditions of the PCR assay were examined and to evaluate the morphological variation of the morphological characters leaves (consist of 19 traits were measured. In addition, height growth was measured, to evaluate the growth function of the stands in homogeneous conditions. Genetic diversity in term of polymorphic loci was 0%, because three investigated microsatellite loci were monomorphic. The total number of alleles for 3 microsatellite loci was 6 (na = 2, ne = 2, heo = 1, hee = 0.51. Genetic identity based on Nei was 100%, so genetic distance was 0%. The whole sampled trees represented the same thus the genotype. No significant differences between the mean values of all morphological characters and height growth were revealed. Observed genetic similarity gave indication that same ramets had been selected to plant in poplar plantation established in Kermanshah province. These results suggest the need for an initial evaluation of the genetic diversity in selected ramets for planting in plantation to avoid repetition.  

  10. Analysis of genetic diversity of certain species of Piper using RAPD-based molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Utpal; Tanti, Bhaben; Rethy, Parakkal; Gajurel, Padma Raj

    2014-09-01

    The utility of RAPD markers in assessing genetic diversity and phenetic relationships of six different species of Piper from Northeast India was investigated. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with four arbitrary 10-mer oligonucleotide primers applied to the six species produced a total of 195 marker bands, of which, 159 were polymorphic. On average, six RAPD fragments were amplified per reaction. In the UPGMA phenetic dendrogram based on Jaccard's coefficient, the different accessions of Piper showed a high level of genetic variation. This study may be useful in identifying diverse genetic stocks of Piper, which may then be conserved on a priority basis.

  11. Do farmers reduce genetic diversity when they domesticate tropical trees? A case study from Amazonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, P M; Dawson, I K; Goodall-Copestake, W P; Richardson, J E; Weber, J C; Sotelo Montes, C; Pennington, R T

    2005-02-01

    Agroforestry ecosystems may be an important resource for conservation and sustainable use of tropical trees, but little is known of the genetic diversity they contain. Inga edulis, a widespread indigenous fruit tree in South America, is used as a model to assess the maintenance of genetic diversity in five planted vs. five natural stands in the Peruvian Amazon. Analysis of five SSR (simple sequence repeat) loci indicated lower allelic variation in planted stands [mean corrected allelic richness 31.3 (planted) and 39.3 (natural), P = 0.009]. Concerns regarding genetic erosion in planted Amazonian tree stands appear valid, although allelic variation on-farm is still relatively high.

  12. mycobacterium tuberculosis genetic diversity and drug resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-12-12

    Dec 12, 2011 ... with Mycobacterium tuberculosisBeijing genotype strains is associated with polymorphisms in SLC11A1/NRAMP1 in Indonesian patients with tuberculosis. J. Infect. Dis. 2009; 200: 1671-1674. Hershberg, R., Lipatov, M., Small, P. M.,. 16. et al. High functional diversity inMycobacterium tuberculosisdriven.

  13. mycobacterium tuberculosis genetic diversity and drug resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-12-12

    Dec 12, 2011 ... (11, 13), or in the Canary Islands in Spain (14). Finally, recent studies have reported associations between. M. tuberculosis lineages and specific ..... 27. et al. Genetic biodiversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in. Cameroon. J. Clin. Microbiol. 2003 ...

  14. Genetic fingerprinting and phylogenetic diversity of Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic fingerprinting of 18 different isolates of Staphylococcus aureus from Nigeria using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was carried out. Ten out of 100 Operon primers showed polymorphism among the isolates tested generating 88 bands, 51 of which were polymorphic with sizes ranging between 200 and ...

  15. Genetic diversity of grasscutter (Thryonomys swinderianus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pairwise FST values however indicated that all populations were significantly differentiated (p < 0.01). STRUCTURE clustering analysis showed that Volta population split from the Guinea Savanna population. Grasscutter populations in Ghana are genetically differentiated according to agro-ecological zones and the Volta ...

  16. Genetic diversity and population structure among sorghum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Western Ethiopian region harbors a unique set of sorghum germplasm adapted to conditions not conventional to sorghums grown in other parts of the world. Accessions from the region possess unique resistance to multiple leaf and grain diseases. This study is aimed at exploring the extent of genetic variation and ...

  17. Great ape genetic diversity and population history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prado-Martinez, Javier; Sudmant, Peter H.; Kidd, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Most great ape genetic variation remains uncharacterized; however, its study is critical for understanding population history, recombination, selection and susceptibility to disease. Here we sequence to high coverage a total of 79 wild- and captive-born individuals representing all six great ape...

  18. COMPARITIVE GENETIC DIVERSITY ANALYSIS OF OAT (Avena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    knsccf

    The genotypic classification agreed closely with the grouping observed in .... reaction was performed in the form of master mix to minimize error. Amplification .... Relationships among 20 genotypes of oat visualized by principal component analysis (PCoA) of rainfed plot observations based genetic similarities. The numbers ...

  19. Genetic diversity of Carica papaya as revealed by AFLP markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M S; Moore, P H; Zee, F; Fitch, M M M; Steiger, D L; Manshardt, R M; Paull, R E; Drew, R A; Sekioka, T; Ming, R

    2002-06-01

    Genetic relationships among Carica papaya cultivars, breeding lines, unimproved germplasm, and related species were established using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Seventy-one papaya accessions and related species were analyzed with nine EcoRI-MseI primer combinations. A total of 186 informative AFLP markers was generated and analyzed. Cluster analysis suggested limited genetic variation in papaya, with an average genetic similarity among 63 papaya accessions of 0.880. Genetic diversity among cultivars derived from the same or similar gene pools was smaller, such as Hawaiian Solo hermaphrodite cultivars and Australian dioecious cultivars with genetic similarity at 0.921 and 0.912, respectively. The results indicated that self-pollinated hermaphrodite cultivars were as variable as open-pollinated dioecious cultivars. Genetic diversity between C. papaya and six other Carica species was also evaluated. Carica papaya shared the least genetic similarity with these species, with an average genetic similarity of 0.432; the average genetic similarity among the six other species was 0.729. The results from AFLP markers provided detailed estimates of the genetic variation within and among papaya cultivars, and supported the notion that C. papaya diverged from the rest of Carica species early in the evolution of this genus.

  20. Effect of Heavy Metals Pollution on Soil Microbial Diversity and Bermudagrass Genetic Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yan; Fan, Jibiao; Zhu, Weixi; Amombo, Erick; Lou, Yanhong; Chen, Liang; Fu, Jinmin

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metal pollution is a serious global environmental problem as it adversely affects plant growth and genetic variation. It also alters the composition and activity of soil microbial communities. The objectives of this study were to determine the soil microbial diversity, bermudagrass genetic variation in Cd contaminated or uncontaminated soils from Hunan province of China, and to evaluate Cd-tolerance of bermudagrass at different soils. The Biolog method, hydroponic experiments and simple sequence repeat markers were used to assess the functional diversity of microorganisms, Cd-tolerance and the genetic diversity of bermudagrass, respectively. Four of the sampling sites were heavily contaminated with heavy metals. The total bioactivity, richness, and microbial diversity decreased with increasing concentration of heavy metal. The hydroponic experiment revealed that bermudagrass populations collected from polluted sites have evolved, encompassing the feature of a higher resistance to Cd toxicity. Higher genetic diversity was observed to be more in contaminated populations than in uncontaminated populations. Heavy metal pollution can result in adverse effects on plant growth, soil microbial diversity and activity, and apparently has a stronger impact on the genetic structure. The results of this study provide new insights and a background to produce a genetic description of populations in a species that is suitable for use in phytoremediation practices.

  1. Effect of heavy metals pollution on soil microbial diversity and bermudagrass genetic variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan eXie

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metal pollution is a serious global environmental problem as it adversely affects plant growth and genetic variation. It also alters the composition and activity of soil microbial communities. The objectives of this study were to determine the soil microbial diversity, bermudagrass genetic variation in Cd contaminated or uncontaminated soils from Hunan province of China, and to evaluate Cd tolerance of bermudagrass at different soils. The Biolog method, hydroponic experiments and simple sequence repeat markers were used to assess the functional diversity of microorganisms, Cd tolerance and the genetic diversity of bermudagrass, respectively. Four of the sampling sites were heavily contaminated with heavy metal. The total bioactivity, richness, and microbial diversity decreased with increasing concentration of heavy metal. The hydroponic experiment revealed that bermudagrass populations collected from polluted sites have evolved, encompassing the feature of a higher resistance to Cd toxicity. Higher genetic diversity was observed to be more in contaminated populations than in uncontaminated populations. Heavy metal pollution can result in adverse effects on plant growth, soil microbial diversity and activity, and apparently has a stronger impact on the genetic structure. The results of this study provide new insights and a background to produce a genetic description of populations in a species that is suitable for use in phytoremediation practices.

  2. Non-random distribution of individual genetic diversity along an environmental gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porlier, Mélody; Bélisle, Marc; Garant, Dany

    2009-06-12

    Improving our knowledge of the links between ecology and evolution is especially critical in the actual context of global rapid environmental changes. A critical step in that direction is to quantify how variation in ecological factors linked to habitat modifications might shape observed levels of genetic variability in wild populations. Still, little is known on the factors affecting levels and distribution of genetic diversity at the individual level, despite its vital underlying role in evolutionary processes. In this study, we assessed the effects of habitat quality on population structure and individual genetic diversity of tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) breeding along a gradient of agricultural intensification in southern Québec, Canada. Using a landscape genetics approach, we found that individual genetic diversity was greater in poorer quality habitats. This counter-intuitive result was partly explained by the settlement patterns of tree swallows across the landscape. Individuals of higher genetic diversity arrived earlier on their breeding grounds and settled in the first available habitats, which correspond to intensive cultures. Our results highlight the importance of investigating the effects of environmental variability on individual genetic diversity, and of integrating information on landscape structure when conducting such studies.

  3. Polishing the craft of genetic diversity creation in directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Kang Lan; Wong, Tuck Seng

    2013-12-01

    Genetic diversity creation is a core technology in directed evolution where a high quality mutant library is crucial to its success. Owing to its importance, the technology in genetic diversity creation has seen rapid development over the years and its application has diversified into other fields of scientific research. The advances in molecular cloning and mutagenesis since 2008 were reviewed. Specifically, new cloning techniques were classified based on their principles of complementary overhangs, homologous sequences, overlapping PCR and megaprimers and the advantages, drawbacks and performances of these methods were highlighted. New mutagenesis methods developed for random mutagenesis, focused mutagenesis and DNA recombination were surveyed. The technical requirements of these methods and the mutational spectra were compared and discussed with references to commonly used techniques. The trends of mutant library preparation were summarised. Challenges in genetic diversity creation were discussed with emphases on creating "smart" libraries, controlling the mutagenesis spectrum and specific challenges in each group of mutagenesis methods. An outline of the wider applications of genetic diversity creation includes genome engineering, viral evolution, metagenomics and a study of protein functions. The review ends with an outlook for genetic diversity creation and the prospective developments that can have future impact in this field. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Potential for Incorporation of Genetic Polymorphism Data in Human Health Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    This overview summarizes several EPA assessment publications evaluating the potential impact of genetic polymorphisms in ten metabolizing enzymes on the variability in enzyme function across ethnically diverse populations.

  5. Methodologies for conservation assessments of the genetic biodiversity of aquatic macro-organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BERT T. M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available International organizations and biodiversity scientists recognize three levels of biodiversity: genetic, species, and ecosystem. However, most studies with the goal of assessing biodiversity collect data at only a single level -- that of the species. Even when multiple levels of biodiversity are considered, usually only ecosystem diversity is also evaluated. Genetic diversity is virtually never considered. Yet, genetic diversity is essential for the maintenance of populations and species over ecological and evolutionary time periods. Moreover, because components of genetic diversity are independent of either species or ecosystem diversity, genetic diversity can provide a unique measure by which to assess the value of regions for conservation. Regions can be valuable for conservation of their genetic resources regardless of their levels of species or ecosystem uniqueness or diversity. In general, the same methods and statistical programs that are used to answer questions about population genetics and phylogenetics are applicable to conservation genetics. Thus, numerous genetic techniques, laboratory methods, and statistical programs are available for assessing regional levels of genetic diversity for conservation considerations. Here, we provide the rationale, techniques available, field and laboratory protocols, and statistical programs that can be used to estimate the magnitude and type of genetic diversity in regions. We also provide information on how to obtain commonly utilized statistical programs and the type of analyses that they include. The guide that we present here can be used to conduct investigations of the genetic diversity of regions under consideration for conservation of their natural resources.

  6. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homar R. Gill-Langarica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each, as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA and molecular variance (AMOVA analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus. AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  7. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill-Langarica, Homar R; Muruaga-Martínez, José S; Vargas-Vázquez, M L Patricia; Rosales-Serna, Rigoberto; Mayek-Pérez, Netzahualcoyotl

    2011-10-01

    A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico) Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions) was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each), as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA) and molecular variance (AMOVA) analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic) while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus). AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  8. Genetic diversity study of important Indian rice genotypes using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rice is a staple food for 90% of the world. Genetic characterization of natural resources is an essential step to understand genetic resources. In the present study, commonly using 25 Indian rice genotypes were collected / procured from four different states of India. Genetic variation was assessed using isozyme and RAPD ...

  9. Genetic assessment of captive red panda (Ailurus fulgens) population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun; Rai, Upashna; Roka, Bhupen; Jha, Alankar K; Reddy, P Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Red panda (Ailurus fulgens) is threatened across its range by detrimental human activities and rapid habitat changes necessitating captive breeding programs in various zoos globally to save this flagship species from extinction. One of the ultimate aims of ex situ conservation is reintroduction of endangered animals into their natural habitats while maintaining 90 % of the founder genetic diversity. Advances in molecular genetics and microsatellite genotyping techniques make it possible to accurately estimate genetic diversity of captive animals of unknown ancestry. Here we assess genetic diversity of the red panda population in Padmaja Naidu Himalayan Zoological Park, Darjeeling, which plays a pivotal role in ex situ conservation of red panda in India. We generated microsatellite genotypes of fifteen red pandas with a set of fourteen loci. This population is genetically diverse with 68 % observed heterozygosity (H O ) and mean inbreeding (F IS ) coefficient of 0.05. However population viability analysis reveals that this population has a very low survival probability (<2 %) and will rapidly loose its genetic diversity to 37 % mainly due to small population size and skewed male-biased sex ratio. Regular supplementation with a pair of adult individuals every five years will increase survival probability and genetic diversity to 99 and 61 % respectively and will also support future harvesting of individuals for reintroduction into the wild and exchange with other zoos.

  10. Genetic diversity and population structure of an important wild berry crop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoratti, Laura; Palmieri, Luisa; Jaakola, Laura; Häggman, Hely

    2015-01-01

    The success of plant breeding in the coming years will be associated with access to new sources of variation, which will include landraces and wild relatives of crop species. In order to access the reservoir of favourable alleles within wild germplasm, knowledge about the genetic diversity and the population structure of wild species is needed. Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) is one of the most important wild crops growing in the forests of Northern European countries, noted for its nutritional properties and its beneficial effects on human health. Assessment of the genetic diversity of wild bilberry germplasm is needed for efforts such as in situ conservation, on-farm management and development of plant breeding programmes. However, to date, only a few local (small-scale) genetic studies of this species have been performed. We therefore conducted a study of genetic variability within 32 individual samples collected from different locations in Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Finland and Germany, and analysed genetic diversity among geographic groups. Four selected inter-simple sequence repeat primers allowed the amplification of 127 polymorphic loci which, based on analysis of variance, made it possible to identify 85 % of the genetic diversity within studied bilberry populations, being in agreement with the mixed-mating system of bilberry. Significant correlations were obtained between geographic and genetic distances for the entire set of samples. The analyses also highlighted the presence of a north–south genetic gradient, which is in accordance with recent findings on phenotypic traits of bilberry. PMID:26483325

  11. Molecular genetic diversity and genetic structure of Vietnamese indigenous pig populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, L. D.; Do, Duy Ngoc; Nam, L. Q.

    2014-01-01

    of alleles (MNA = 10.1), gene diversity (He = 0.82), allele richness (5.33) and number of private alleles (10). Thirteen percentage of the total genetic variation observed was due to differences among populations. The neighbour-joining dendrogram obtained from Nei's standard genetic distance differentiated......% (Ha Lang) to 98% (Mong Cai). individuals in indigenous pigs were assigned to their own populations. The results confirmed high level of genetic diversity and shed a new light on genetic structure of Vietnam indigenous pig populations.......The study characterized genetic diversity and genetic structure of five indigenous pig populations (Ha Lang, Muong Te, Mong Cai, Lung and Lung Pu), two wild pig populations (Vietnamese and Thai wild pigs) and an exotic pig breed (Yorkshire) using FAO/ISAG recommended 16 microsatellite markers...

  12. Internal lattice reconfiguration for diversity tuning in Cellular Genetic Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Reyes, Alicia; Erdogan, Ahmet T

    2012-01-01

    Cellular Genetic Algorithms (cGAs) have attracted the attention of researchers due to their high performance, ease of implementation and massive parallelism. Maintaining an adequate balance between exploitative and explorative search is essential when studying evolutionary optimization techniques. In this respect, cGAs inherently possess a number of structural configuration parameters that are able to sustain diversity during evolution. In this study, the internal reconfiguration of the lattice is proposed to constantly or adaptively control the exploration-exploitation trade-off. Genetic operators are characterized in their simplest form since algorithmic performance is assessed on implemented reconfiguration mechanisms. Moreover, internal reconfiguration allows the adjacency of individuals to be maintained. Hence, any improvement in performance is only a consequence of topological changes. Two local selection methods presenting opposite selection pressures are used in order to evaluate the influence of the proposed techniques. Problems ranging from continuous to real world and combinatorial are tackled. Empirical results are supported statistically in terms of efficiency and efficacy.

  13. Genetic diversity of human blastocystis isolates in khorramabad, central iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Badparva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available There are some genetic differences in Blastocystis that show the existence of species or genotypes. One of these genes that help in identifying Blastocystis is SSUrRNA. The aim of this study was assessment of genetic diversity of Blastocystis by PCR with seven pairs of STS primers.This study was done on 511 stool samples collected from patients referred to the health care centers of Khorramabad, Central Iran, in 2012. Genomic DNA was extracted and in order to determine the Blastocystis subtype in contaminated samples, seven pairs of primers STS (subtype specific sequence-tagged site were used.Out of 511 samples, 33 (6.5% samples were infected with Blastocystis. Subtype (ST of 30 samples was identified and three subtypes 2, 3 and 4 were determined. Mix infection was reported 10% which 3.33% of the infection was for the mixture of ST 3 and ST5 and 6.67% was for the mixture of ST 2 and ST 3.The predominant subtype was ST3 that is the main human subtype. The dominance of ST2 and 5 are important in this study. This superiority has been reported in some of the studies in ST 2 which is different from the studies in other countries, because they have announced priorities of the ST1 and ST6 after ST3.

  14. Genetic Diversity among Ancient Nordic Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, Linea; Lynnerup, Niels; Siegismund, Hans R.; Kivisild, Toomas; Dissing, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    Using established criteria for work with fossil DNA we have analysed mitochondrial DNA from 92 individuals from 18 locations in Denmark ranging in time from the Mesolithic to the Medieval Age. Unequivocal assignment of mtDNA haplotypes was possible for 56 of the ancient individuals; however, the success rate varied substantially between sites; the highest rates were obtained with untouched, freshly excavated material, whereas heavy handling, archeological preservation and storage for many years influenced the ability to obtain authentic endogenic DNA. While the nucleotide diversity at two locations was similar to that among extant Danes, the diversity at four sites was considerably higher. This supports previous observations for ancient Britons. The overall occurrence of haplogroups did not deviate from extant Scandinavians, however, haplogroup I was significantly more frequent among the ancient Danes (average 13%) than among extant Danes and Scandinavians (∼2.5%) as well as among other ancient population samples reported. Haplogroup I could therefore have been an ancient Southern Scandinavian type “diluted” by later immigration events. Interestingly, the two Neolithic samples (4,200 YBP, Bell Beaker culture) that were typed were haplogroup U4 and U5a, respectively, and the single Bronze Age sample (3,300–3,500 YBP) was haplogroup U4. These two haplogroups have been associated with the Mesolithic populations of Central and Northern Europe. Therefore, at least for Southern Scandinavia, our findings do not support a possible replacement of a haplogroup U dominated hunter-gatherer population by a more haplogroup diverse Neolithic Culture. PMID:20689597

  15. Genetic diversity among ancient Nordic populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linea Melchior

    Full Text Available Using established criteria for work with fossil DNA we have analysed mitochondrial DNA from 92 individuals from 18 locations in Denmark ranging in time from the Mesolithic to the Medieval Age. Unequivocal assignment of mtDNA haplotypes was possible for 56 of the ancient individuals; however, the success rate varied substantially between sites; the highest rates were obtained with untouched, freshly excavated material, whereas heavy handling, archeological preservation and storage for many years influenced the ability to obtain authentic endogenic DNA. While the nucleotide diversity at two locations was similar to that among extant Danes, the diversity at four sites was considerably higher. This supports previous observations for ancient Britons. The overall occurrence of haplogroups did not deviate from extant Scandinavians, however, haplogroup I was significantly more frequent among the ancient Danes (average 13% than among extant Danes and Scandinavians (approximately 2.5% as well as among other ancient population samples reported. Haplogroup I could therefore have been an ancient Southern Scandinavian type "diluted" by later immigration events. Interestingly, the two Neolithic samples (4,200 YBP, Bell Beaker culture that were typed were haplogroup U4 and U5a, respectively, and the single Bronze Age sample (3,300-3,500 YBP was haplogroup U4. These two haplogroups have been associated with the Mesolithic populations of Central and Northern Europe. Therefore, at least for Southern Scandinavia, our findings do not support a possible replacement of a haplogroup U dominated hunter-gatherer population by a more haplogroup diverse Neolithic Culture.

  16. Genetic Diversity of Cultivated Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) and Its Relation to the World's Agro-ecological Zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaei, Hamid; Caron, Carolyn T; Fedoruk, Michael; Diapari, Marwan; Vandenberg, Albert; Coyne, Clarice J; McGee, Rebecca; Bett, Kirstin E

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of genetic diversity and population structure of germplasm collections plays a critical role in supporting conservation and crop genetic enhancement strategies. We used a cultivated lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) collection consisting of 352 accessions originating from 54 diverse countries to estimate genetic diversity and genetic structure using 1194 polymorphic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers which span the lentil genome. Using principal coordinate analysis, population structure analysis and UPGMA cluster analysis, the accessions were categorized into three major groups that prominently reflected geographical origin (world's agro-ecological zones). The three clusters complemented the origins, pedigrees, and breeding histories of the germplasm. The three groups were (a) South Asia (sub-tropical savannah), (b) Mediterranean, and (c) northern temperate. Based on the results from this study, it is also clear that breeding programs still have considerable genetic diversity to mine within the cultivated lentil, as surveyed South Asian and Canadian germplasm revealed narrow genetic diversity.

  17. The study of relatedness and genetic diversity in cranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, G.F.; Dessauer, H.C.; Longmire, J.; Briles, W.E.; Simon, R.C.; Wood, Don A.

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is responsible for recovery of endangered species in the wild and, when necessary, maintenance in captivity. These programs provide an immediate measure of insurance against extinction. A prerequisite inherent in all of these programs is the preservation of enough genetic diversity to maintain a viable population and to maintain the capacity of the population to respond to change. Measures of genetic diversity examine polymorphic genes that are not influenced by selection pressures. Examples of these techniques and those used to determine relatedness are discussed. Studies of genetic diversity, electrophoresis of blood proteins, relatedness, blood typing, and restriction fragment length polymorphisms which are being used by the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center are discussed in detail.

  18. Tartary Buckwheat Genetic Diversity in the Himalayas Associated with Farmer Landrace Diversity and Low Dietary Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijuan Huang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available While crop genetic diversity supports ecological processes and food security, there have been few cross-cultural studies evaluating the influence of cultural and dietary factors on the conservation of genetic resources. This study examines genetic diversity patterns of tartary buckwheat in 18 smallholder farming communities across five regions of China (Yunnan Province, Tibet Autonomous Region and Sichuan Province and Bhutan managed by Yi, Tibetan, and Bhutanese farmers using ethnobotanical surveys and DNA barcoding. Findings emphasize that high dietary dependence linked to a single crop may result in simplification of genetic diversity as well as agricultural systems and landscapes more broadly. We advocate for the diversification of crops in agricultural systems as well as diets through the integration of scientific research and farmers’ ecological knowledge and practices towards meeting global food security while supporting environmental well-being through biodiversity conservation.

  19. Genetic diversity detection of the domestic horse (Equus caballus by genes associated with coat color

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Correa A

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the population structure and genetic diversity in populations of domestic horse (Equus caballus in the municipality Cienaga de Oro-Córdoba (Colombia. Materials and methods. Random sampling were conducted between August and October 2013, in adult animals on farms seven districts, which was carried out phenotypic characterization of each animal, based on autosomal markers encoding morphological Extension (E , Agouti (A, Cream (C, White (W, Gray (G, Tobiano (TO, Overo (O and Roan (RN. Population genetic parameters: allele frequency, genetic diversity, gene flow, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and genetic distance were calculated through the program POPGENE 1.31; the genetic structure was assessed using the program FSTAT v. 2.9.3.2. Results. 341 individuals were analyzed in the seven populations studied, where the Extension gene Was the MOST faq frequently as the Overo and Tobiano genes showed the lowest values. Insignificant values of genetic variability and population recorded a global level, likewise, low genetic differentiation among populations, accompanied by a high gene flow was obtained; an excess of heterozygotes at population and global level was observed; to this is added the presence of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in all populations relative to the markers studied and low genetic distance values were reported. Conclusions. The populations are highly genetically related, a situation that may result from the existing geographical proximity between them, favoring genetic exchange and the establishment of a metapopulation.

  20. Genetic diversity of Actinobacillus lignieresii isolates from different hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisgaard Magne

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genetic diversity detected by analysis of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs of 54 Actinobacilus lignieresii isolates from different hosts and geographic localities is described. On the basis of variances in AFLP profiles, the strains were grouped in two major clusters; one comprising strains isolated from horses and infected wounds of humans bitten by horses and another consisting of strains isolated from bovine and ovine hosts. The present data indicate a comparatively higher degree of genetic diversity among strains isolated from equine hosts and confirm the existence of a separate genomospecies for A. lignieresi-like isolates from horses. Among the isolates from bovine and ovine hosts some clonal lines appear to be genetically stable over time and could be detected at very distant geographic localities. Although all ovine strains investigated grouped in a single cluster, the existence of distinct genetic lineages that have evolved specificity for ovine hosts is not obvious and needs to be confirmed in other studies.

  1. Landscape, population structure and genetic diversity of Stomoxys calcitrans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dsouli Aymes, N; Mavoungou, J F; De Stordeur, E; Duvallet, G

    2009-03-01

    To investigate whether different landscapes could affect genetic diversity and structure of the cosmopolitan diptera Stomoxys calcitrans, populations from Gabon and southern France were studied using dominant amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Gabon is characterized by a forested closed landscape, and southern France by an open Mediterranean landscape. The genetic diversity between Gabon and France populations did not differ significantly (P > 0.05). Contrary to our expectation, this study shows a moderate level of genetic differentiation between these two distant countries (Fst = 0.0979) and a low genetic structure among Gabonese and French populations (Fst = 0.0291 and 0.0275 respectively). This result could indicate the capacities of S. calcitrans populations to sustain a high level of gene flow, despite geographic distance and isolation.

  2. Genetic diversity analysis of fruit characteristics of hawthorn germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, K; Guo, Y S; Wang, G; Zhao, Y H; Dong, W X

    2015-12-07

    One hundred and six accessions of hawthorn intraspecific resources, from the National Germplasm Repository at Shenyang, were subjected to genetic diversity and principal component analysis based on evaluation data of 15 fruit traits. Results showed that the genetic diversity of hawthorn fruit traits varied. Among the 15 traits, the fruit shape variable coefficient had the most obvious evaluation, followed by fruit surface state, dot color, taste, weight of single fruit, sepal posture, peduncle form, and metula traits. These are the primary traits by which hawthorn could be classified in the future. The principal component demonstrated that these traits are the most influential factors of hawthorn fruit characteristics.

  3. Bartonella Prevalence and Genetic Diversity in Small Mammals from Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meheretu, Yonas; Leirs, Herwig E.l.; Welegerima, Kiros

    2013-01-01

    More than 500 small mammals were trapped at 3 localities in northern Ethiopia to investigate Bartonella infection prevalence and the genetic diversity of the Bartonella spp. We extracted total DNA from liver samples and performed PCR using the primers 1400F and 2300R targeting 852 bp of the Barto......More than 500 small mammals were trapped at 3 localities in northern Ethiopia to investigate Bartonella infection prevalence and the genetic diversity of the Bartonella spp. We extracted total DNA from liver samples and performed PCR using the primers 1400F and 2300R targeting 852 bp...

  4. Danish apple cultivars: genetic diversity, parentage and breeding potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bjarne; Pedersen, Carsten; Ørgaard, Marian

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We made a genetic analysis of about 500 apple cultivars, which either originate from Denmark or have been of greater importance in Denmark. To study the diversity and parentage among the cultivars, 15 SSR markers were used. A new PCR-based protocol for identification of S-alleles was dev......Abstract We made a genetic analysis of about 500 apple cultivars, which either originate from Denmark or have been of greater importance in Denmark. To study the diversity and parentage among the cultivars, 15 SSR markers were used. A new PCR-based protocol for identification of S...

  5. Castor bean organelle genome sequencing and worldwide genetic diversity analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximo Rivarola

    Full Text Available Castor bean is an important oil-producing plant in the Euphorbiaceae family. Its high-quality oil contains up to 90% of the unusual fatty acid ricinoleate, which has many industrial and medical applications. Castor bean seeds also contain ricin, a highly toxic Type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein, which has gained relevance in recent years due to biosafety concerns. In order to gain knowledge on global genetic diversity in castor bean and to ultimately help the development of breeding and forensic tools, we carried out an extensive chloroplast sequence diversity analysis. Taking advantage of the recently published genome sequence of castor bean, we assembled the chloroplast and mitochondrion genomes extracting selected reads from the available whole genome shotgun reads. Using the chloroplast reference genome we used the methylation filtration technique to readily obtain draft genome sequences of 7 geographically and genetically diverse castor bean accessions. These sequence data were used to identify single nucleotide polymorphism markers and phylogenetic analysis resulted in the identification of two major clades that were not apparent in previous population genetic studies using genetic markers derived from nuclear DNA. Two distinct sub-clades could be defined within each major clade and large-scale genotyping of castor bean populations worldwide confirmed previously observed low levels of genetic diversity and showed a broad geographic distribution of each sub-clade.

  6. The role of propagule pressure, genetic diversity and microsite availability for Senecio vernalis invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Erfmeier

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity is supposed to support the colonization success of expanding species, in particular in situations where microsite availability is constrained. Addressing the role of genetic diversity in plant invasion experimentally requires its manipulation independent of propagule pressure. To assess the relative importance of these components for the invasion of Senecio vernalis, we created propagule mixtures of four levels of genotype diversity by combining seeds across remote populations, across proximate populations, within single populations and within seed families. In a first container experiment with constant Festuca rupicola density as matrix, genotype diversity was crossed with three levels of seed density. In a second experiment, we tested for effects of establishment limitation and genotype diversity by manipulating Festuca densities. Increasing genetic diversity had no effects on abundance and biomass of S. vernalis but positively affected the proportion of large individuals to small individuals. Mixtures composed from proximate populations had a significantly higher proportion of large individuals than mixtures composed from within seed families only. High propagule pressure increased emergence and establishment of S. vernalis but had no effect on individual growth performance. Establishment was favoured in containers with Festuca, but performance of surviving seedlings was higher in open soil treatments. For S. vernalis invasion, we found a shift in driving factors from density dependence to effects of genetic diversity across life stages. While initial abundance was mostly linked to the amount of seed input, genetic diversity, in contrast, affected later stages of colonization probably via sampling effects and seemed to contribute to filtering the genotypes that finally grew up. In consequence, when disentangling the mechanistic relationships of genetic diversity, seed density and microsite limitation in colonization of

  7. The spatio-temporal dynamics of neutral genetic diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnefon, Olivier; Coville, Jérôme; Garnier, Jimmy; Hamel, François; Roques, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    International audience; The notions of pulled and pushed solutions of reaction-dispersal equations introduced by Garnier et al. (2012) and Roques et al. (2012) are based on a decomposition of the solutions into several components. In the framework of population dynamics, this decomposition is related to the spatio-temporal evolution of the genetic structure of a population. The pulled solutions describe a rapid erosion of neutral genetic diversity, while the pushed solutions are associated wi...

  8. Moderate genetic diversity and genetic differentiation in the relict tree Liquidambar formosana Hance revealed by genic simple sequence repeat markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong xi Sun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chinese sweetgum (Liquidambar formosana is a relatively fast-growing ecological pioneer species. It is widely used for multiple purposes. To assess the genetic diversity and genetic differentiation of the species, genic SSR markers were mined from transcriptome data for subsequent analysis of the genetic diversity and population structure of natural populations. A total of 10645 potential genic SSR loci were identified in 80482 unigenes. The average frequency was one SSR per 5.12 kb, and the dinucleotide unit was the most abundant motif. A total of 67 alleles were found, with a mean of 6.091 alleles per locus and a mean polymorphism information content of 0.390. Moreover, the species exhibited a relatively moderate level of genetic diversity (He=0.399, with the highest was found in population XY (He=0.469. At the regional level, the southwestern region displayed the highest genetic diversity (He=0.435 and the largest number of private alleles (n=5, which indicated that the Southwestern region may be the diversity hot spot of L. formosana. The AMOVA results showed that variation within populations (94.02% was significantly higher than among populations (5.98%, which was in agreement with the coefficient of genetic differentiation (Fst = 0.076. According to the UPGMA analysis and principal coordinate analysis and confirmed by the assignment test, 25 populations could be divided into three groups, and there were different degrees of introgression among populations. No correlation was found between genetic distance and geographic distance (P>0.05. These results provided further evidence that geographic isolation was not the primary factor leading to the moderate genetic differentiation of L. formosana. As most of the genetic diversity of L. formosana exists among individuals within a population, individual plant selection would be an effective way to use natural variation in genetic improvement programs. This would be helpful to not only protect the

  9. Natural Selection and Genetic Diversity in the Butterfly Heliconius melpomene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Simon H; Möst, Markus; Palmer, William J; Salazar, Camilo; McMillan, W Owen; Jiggins, Francis M; Jiggins, Chris D

    2016-05-01

    A combination of selective and neutral evolutionary forces shape patterns of genetic diversity in nature. Among the insects, most previous analyses of the roles of drift and selection in shaping variation across the genome have focused on the genus Drosophila A more complete understanding of these forces will come from analyzing other taxa that differ in population demography and other aspects of biology. We have analyzed diversity and signatures of selection in the neotropical Heliconius butterflies using resequenced genomes from 58 wild-caught individuals of Heliconius melpomene and another 21 resequenced genomes representing 11 related species. By comparing intraspecific diversity and interspecific divergence, we estimate that 31% of amino acid substitutions between Heliconius species are adaptive. Diversity at putatively neutral sites is negatively correlated with the local density of coding sites as well as nonsynonymous substitutions and positively correlated with recombination rate, indicating widespread linked selection. This process also manifests in significantly reduced diversity on longer chromosomes, consistent with lower recombination rates. Although hitchhiking around beneficial nonsynonymous mutations has significantly shaped genetic variation in H. melpomene, evidence for strong selective sweeps is limited overall. We did however identify two regions where distinct haplotypes have swept in different populations, leading to increased population differentiation. On the whole, our study suggests that positive selection is less pervasive in these butterflies as compared to fruit flies, a fact that curiously results in very similar levels of neutral diversity in these very different insects. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  10. Low genetic diversity in Melanaphis sacchari aphid populations at the worldwide scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nibouche, Samuel; Fartek, Benjamin; Mississipi, Stelly; Delatte, Hélène; Reynaud, Bernard; Costet, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have examined the genetic diversity and genetic structure of invading species, with contrasting results concerning the relative roles of genetic diversity and phenotypic plasticity in the success of introduced populations. Increasing evidence shows that asexual lineages of aphids are able to occupy a wide geographical and ecological range of habitats despite low genetic diversity. The anholocyclic aphid Melanaphis sacchari is a pest of sugarcane and sorghum which originated in the old world, was introduced into the Americas, and is now distributed worldwide. Our purpose was to assess the genetic diversity and structuring of populations of this species according to host and locality. We used 10 microsatellite markers to genotype 1333 individuals (57 samples, 42 localities, 15 countries) collected mainly on sugarcane or sorghum. Five multilocus lineages (MLL) were defined, grouping multilocus genotypes (MLG) differing by only a few mutations or scoring errors. Analysis of a 658 bp sequence of mitochondrial COI gene on 96 individuals revealed five haplotypes, with a mean divergence of only 0.19 %. The distribution of MLL appeared to be strongly influenced by geography but not by host plant. Each of the five MLL grouped individuals from (A) Africa, (B) Australia, (C) South America, the Caribbean and the Indian Ocean including East Africa, (D) USA, and (E) China. The MLL A and C, with a wide geographic distribution, matched the definition of superclone. Among aphids, M. sacchari has one of the lowest known rates of genetic diversity for such a wide geographical distribution.

  11. Low genetic diversity in Melanaphis sacchari aphid populations at the worldwide scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Nibouche

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have examined the genetic diversity and genetic structure of invading species, with contrasting results concerning the relative roles of genetic diversity and phenotypic plasticity in the success of introduced populations. Increasing evidence shows that asexual lineages of aphids are able to occupy a wide geographical and ecological range of habitats despite low genetic diversity. The anholocyclic aphid Melanaphis sacchari is a pest of sugarcane and sorghum which originated in the old world, was introduced into the Americas, and is now distributed worldwide. Our purpose was to assess the genetic diversity and structuring of populations of this species according to host and locality. We used 10 microsatellite markers to genotype 1333 individuals (57 samples, 42 localities, 15 countries collected mainly on sugarcane or sorghum. Five multilocus lineages (MLL were defined, grouping multilocus genotypes (MLG differing by only a few mutations or scoring errors. Analysis of a 658 bp sequence of mitochondrial COI gene on 96 individuals revealed five haplotypes, with a mean divergence of only 0.19 %. The distribution of MLL appeared to be strongly influenced by geography but not by host plant. Each of the five MLL grouped individuals from (A Africa, (B Australia, (C South America, the Caribbean and the Indian Ocean including East Africa, (D USA, and (E China. The MLL A and C, with a wide geographic distribution, matched the definition of superclone. Among aphids, M. sacchari has one of the lowest known rates of genetic diversity for such a wide geographical distribution.

  12. Population structure and genetic diversity of black redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei) in a highly fragmented watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, S.M.; Wilson, C.C.; Mandrak, N.E.; Carl, L.M.

    2008-01-01

    Dams have the potential to affect population size and connectivity, reduce genetic diversity, and increase genetic differences among isolated riverine fish populations. Previous research has reported adverse effects on the distribution and demographics of black redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei), a threatened fish species in Canada. However, effects on genetic diversity and population structure are unknown. We used microsatellite DNA markers to assess the number of genetic populations in the Grand River (Ontario) and to test whether dams have resulted in a loss of genetic diversity and increased genetic differentiation among populations. Three hundred and seventy-seven individuals from eight Grand River sites were genotyped at eight microsatellite loci. Measures of genetic diversity were moderately high and not significantly different among populations; strong evidence of recent population bottlenecks was not detected. Pairwise FST and exact tests identified weak (global FST = 0.011) but statistically significant population structure, although little population structuring was detected using either genetic distances or an individual-based clustering method. Neither geographic distance nor the number of intervening dams were correlated with pairwise differences among populations. Tests for regional equilibrium indicate that Grand River populations were either in equilibrium between gene flow and genetic drift or that gene flow is more influential than drift. While studies on other species have identified strong dam-related effects on genetic diversity and population structure, this study suggests that barrier permeability, river fragment length and the ecological characteristics of affected species can counterbalance dam-related effects. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  13. SSR-based genetic diversity and structure of garlic accessions from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Camila Pinto; Resende, Francisco Vilela; Zucchi, Maria Imaculada; Pinheiro, José Baldin

    2014-10-01

    Garlic is a spice and a medicinal plant; hence, there is an increasing interest in 'developing' new varieties with different culinary properties or with high content of nutraceutical compounds. Phenotypic traits and dominant molecular markers are predominantly used to evaluate the genetic diversity of garlic clones. However, 24 SSR markers (codominant) specific for garlic are available in the literature, fostering germplasm researches. In this study, we genotyped 130 garlic accessions from Brazil and abroad using 17 polymorphic SSR markers to assess the genetic diversity and structure. This is the first attempt to evaluate a large set of accessions maintained by Brazilian institutions. A high level of redundancy was detected in the collection (50 % of the accessions represented eight haplotypes). However, non-redundant accessions presented high genetic diversity. We detected on average five alleles per locus, Shannon index of 1.2, HO of 0.5, and HE of 0.6. A core collection was set with 17 accessions, covering 100 % of the alleles with minimum redundancy. Overall FST and D values indicate a strong genetic structure within accessions. Two major groups identified by both model-based (Bayesian approach) and hierarchical clustering (UPGMA dendrogram) techniques were coherent with the classification of accessions according to maturity time (growth cycle): early-late and midseason accessions. Assessing genetic diversity and structure of garlic collections is the first step towards an efficient management and conservation of accessions in genebanks, as well as to advance future genetic studies and improvement of garlic worldwide.

  14. Defining the landscape of adaptive genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Andrew J; Dyer, Rodney J

    2012-06-01

    Whether they are used to describe fitness, genome architecture or the spatial distribution of environmental variables, the concept of a landscape has figured prominently in our collective reasoning. The tradition of landscapes in evolutionary biology is one of fitness mapped onto axes defined by phenotypes or molecular sequence states. The characteristics of these landscapes depend on natural selection, which is structured across both genomic and environmental landscapes, and thus, the bridge among differing uses of the landscape concept (i.e. metaphorically or literally) is that of an adaptive phenotype and its distribution across geographical landscapes in relation to selective pressures. One of the ultimate goals of evolutionary biology should thus be to construct fitness landscapes in geographical space. Natural plant populations are ideal systems with which to explore the feasibility of attaining this goal, because much is known about the quantitative genetic architecture of complex traits for many different plant species. What is less known are the molecular components of this architecture. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Parchman et al. (2012) pioneer one of the first truly genome-wide association studies in a tree that moves us closer to this form of mechanistic understanding for an adaptive phenotype in natural populations of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.). © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Genetic diversity among sorghum landraces and polymorphism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for 2 hours using a licor DNA analyser unit. Two control panel DNA samples were used in each electrophoresis. For polymorphism assessment, the bands on the gel were coded as ''a'', ''b'', ''c'', ''d'', “e”, “f” and “g” based on their allele number. The missing data were scored as ''x''. Data analysis. The software PowerMarker ...

  16. Landscape genetics, adaptive diversity and population structure in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Monica; Rau, Domenico; Bitocchi, Elena; Bellucci, Elisa; Biagetti, Eleonora; Carboni, Andrea; Gepts, Paul; Nanni, Laura; Papa, Roberto; Attene, Giovanna

    2016-03-01

    Here we studied the organization of genetic variation of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in its centres of domestication. We used 131 single nucleotide polymorphisms to investigate 417 wild common bean accessions and a representative sample of 160 domesticated genotypes, including Mesoamerican and Andean genotypes, for a total of 577 accessions. By analysing the genetic spatial patterns of the wild common bean, we documented the existence of several genetic groups and the occurrence of variable degrees of diversity in Mesoamerica and the Andes. Moreover, using a landscape genetics approach, we demonstrated that both demographic processes and selection for adaptation were responsible for the observed genetic structure. We showed that the study of correlations between markers and ecological variables at a continental scale can help in identifying local adaptation genes. We also located putative areas of common bean domestication in Mesoamerica, in the Oaxaca Valley, and the Andes, in southern Bolivia-northern Argentina. These observations are of paramount importance for the conservation and exploitation of the genetic diversity preserved within this species and other plant genetic resources. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Genetic diversity analysis of rice (Oryza sativa L.) landraces through RAPD markers

    OpenAIRE

    Alam, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular marker is a useful tool for assessing genetic variations and resolving cultivar identities. Information on genetic diversity and relationships among rice landraces from Bangladesh is currently very limited. Thirty-five rice genotypes including 33 landraces and 01 HYV of Bangladesh and 1 Indian landrace of particular interest to breeding programs were evaluated by means of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. For molecular characterization, RAPD markers viz., OPC 03...

  18. Combined use of a new SNP-based assay and multilocus SSR markers to assess genetic diversity of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca infecting citrus and coffee plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-Borrego, Miguel; Lopes, Joao R S; Jiménez-Díaz, Rafael M; Landa, Blanca B

    2015-03-01

    Two haplotypes of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca (Xfp) that correlated with their host of origin were identified in a collection of 90 isolates infecting citrus and coffee plants in Brazil, based on a single-nucleotide polymorphism in the gyrB sequence. A new single-nucleotide primer extension (SNuPE) protocol was designed for rapid identification of Xfp according to the host source. The protocol proved to be robust for the prediction of the Xfp host source in blind tests using DNA from cultures of the bacterium, infected plants, and insect vectors allowed to feed on Xfp-infected citrus plants. AMOVA and STRUCTURE analyses of microsatellite data separated most Xfp populations on the basis of their host source, indicating that they were genetically distinct. The combined use of the SNaPshot protocol and three previously developed multilocus SSR markers showed that two haplotypes and distinct isolates of Xfp infect citrus and coffee in Brazil and that multiple, genetically different isolates can be present in a single orchard or infect a single tree. This combined approach will be very useful in studies of the epidemiology of Xfp-induced diseases, host specificity of bacterial genotypes, the occurrence of Xfp host jumping, vector feeding habits, etc., in economically important cultivated plants or weed host reservoirs of Xfp in Brazil and elsewhere. Copyright© by the Spanish Society for Microbiology and Institute for Catalan Studies.

  19. Genetic diversity of Actinobacillus lignieresii isolates from different hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokotovic, Branko; Angen, Øystein; Bisgaard, Magne

    2011-01-01

    strains isolated from horses and infected wounds of humans bitten by horses and another consisting of strains isolated from bovine and ovine hosts. The present data indicate a comparatively higher degree of genetic diversity among strains isolated from equine hosts and confirm the existence of a separate...

  20. Genetic diversity, phylogeographic structure and effect of selection ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abdulhakeem B. Ajibike

    2017-12-11

    Dec 11, 2017 ... culture to address poverty in Africa: opportunities and challenges. (eds. J. E. O. Rege, A. M. Nyamu and D. Sendalo), pp. 293–298. ILRI Publications, Nairobi. Mtileni B. J., Muchadeyi F. C., Maiwashe A., Groeneveld. E., Groeneveld L. F., Dzama K. and Weigend S. 2011. Genetic diversity and conservation of ...

  1. Does genetic diversity hinder parasite evolution in social insect colonies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, William Owen Hamar; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan

    2006-01-01

    Polyandry is often difficult to explain because benefits of the behaviour have proved elusive. In social insects, polyandry increases the genetic diversity of workers within a colony and this has been suggested to improve the resistance of the colony to disease. Here we examine the possible impact...... hinder the ability of parasites to adapt while cycling within social insect colonies....

  2. Genetic diversity in coastal and inland desert populations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-14

    Nov 14, 2011 ... This study compared the genetic diversity within and among six naturally growing coastal and inland populations of Peganum harmala by using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. Seven primers generated a total of 63 RAPD bands (loci) of which 60 (95.24%) were polymorphic across.

  3. Genetic diversity of intensive cultured and wild tiger shrimp Penaeus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mahdi

    2011-02-25

    Feb 25, 2011 ... Brood stock showed lower genetic diversity value than wild population. However, with an observed heterozygosity (Hobs) below expectations it would be necessary to introduce cross breeding among hatcheries to reduce the risk of inbreeding depression. Microsatellite markers analysis was able to ...

  4. Cameroon native goat populations' genetic diversity and maternal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on the previous migratory scenarios, the Cameroon native goats may have various maternal origins, Indian, Middle East and south Mediterranean regions. The results are useful for conservation and subsequent investigations may be undertaken to broaden genetic diversity particularly for production purpose.

  5. Genetic diversity of ochratoxigenic Aspergillus section Nigri , using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluates the genetic diversity of ochratoxigenic Aspergillus section Nigri using RAPD and VCG techniques. Results obtained revealed OPX 07 as the most informative of the tested RAPD markers generating 12 polymorphic bands while the least bands were generated by OPR 19. Of the 40 Aspergillus section ...

  6. Molecular research on the genetic diversity of Tunisian date palm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular research on the genetic diversity of Tunisian date palm ( Phoenix dactylifera L.) using the random amplified microsatellite polymorphism (RAMPO) and amplified fragment ... In addition, due to the greater number of markers per assay, the AFLP technique seems to be more informative than the RAMPO method.

  7. Analysis of genetic Diversity and relationships of Tanzania local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity among seven Tanzanian goat populations (Ujiji, Sukuma, Ugogo, Maasai, Mbeya, Newala and Coastal goats) was investigated by determining polymorphisms at 19 microsatellite DNA loci, West African Dwarf Tswana, Landim and Toggenburg were included to serve as reference breeds. Among the ...

  8. Genetic diversity of Pogonatherum paniceum (Lam.) Hack in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inter-simple sequence repeats markers were used to estimate the genetic diversity of Pogonatherum paniceum (Lam.) Hack. from Sichuan Province, Yunnan Province, Chongqing City and Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region in China. 100 primers were carried out on 22 wild populations, 14 could produce highly ...

  9. Genetic diversity of Pogonatherum paniceum (Lam.) Hack. in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers were used to estimate the genetic diversity of Pogonatherum paniceum (Lam.) Hack. from Sichuan Province, Yunnan Province, Chongqing City and. Guangxi Zhuang autonomous Region in China. 10 primer combinations were carried out on 180 different individuals ...

  10. A study of patrilineal genetic diversity in Iranian indigenous horse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autosomal markers and mtDNA have been used in horse phylogenetic studies. These studies display evolutionary events that happened in both sexes or only in females. It is necessary to investigate genetic diversity in Y-specific markers for clarifying contribution of males in horse domestication. The Y chromosome ...

  11. Genetic diversity and population structure of 10 Chinese indigenous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The genetic structure and diversity of 10 Chinese indigenous egg-type duck breeds were investigated using 29 microsatellite markers. The total number of animals examined were 569, on average 57 animals per breed were selected. The microsatellite marker set analysed provided 177 alleles (mean 6.1 alleles per locus, ...

  12. Genetic diversity and population structure of begomoviruses infecting sweet potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begomoviruses infecting sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) exhibit high genetic diversity, and approximately eight species including Sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV) have been described from different regions around the world. In this study, the complete genomic sequences of 17 geographically dist...

  13. Comparative evaluation of genetic diversity using RAPD, SSR and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [Panwar P., Nath M., Yadav V. K. and Kumar A. 2010 Comparative evaluation of genetic diversity using RAPD, SSR and cytochome P450 gene based markers ... sity analysis, the present study aimed to evaluate the relative usefulness of RAPD .... primer ranged from 3 to 15, and size of the products ranged from 300 bp to ...

  14. A study of patrilineal genetic diversity in Iranian indigenous horse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-28

    Nov 28, 2011 ... evolutionary events that happened in both sexes or only in females. It is necessary to investigate genetic diversity in Y-specific markers for clarifying contribution of males in horse domestication. The. Y chromosome, excluding the pseudoautosomal region, is inherited as a single nonrecombinant unit.

  15. Appraisal of biochemical and genetic diversity of mango cultivars ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is one of the oldest fruit crops and is broadly cultivated worldwide. To determine the level of genetic diversity, a total of 13 mango genotypes have been collected from different farms of Fayoum oasis in Egypt and were analyzed using molecular (DNA) and biochemical (SDS-PAGE) markers ...

  16. Genetic Diversity in Ethiopian Field Pea (Pisum sativum L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethiopian field pea germplasm were investigated using SSR markers. ... that markers used in this study would be useful for genetic diversity analysis of pea. .... Statistical Analysis. Euclidean distance was used for the cluster analysis, i.e. the square distance between two vectors. Principal component analysis (PC) was done ...

  17. Genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Mbarara, South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: We determined the genetic diversity of mycobacteria isolated from tuberculosis patients in Mbarara Uganda, using region of difference (RD) analysis and spacer oligonucleotide typing (spoligotyping). Methods: Sputum samples were cultured on Lowenstein Jensen media. The isolates were characterized using ...

  18. Examination of genetic diversity in common bean ( Phaseolus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To study the pattern of genetic diversity in 45 genotypes of common bean, 19 RAPD primers were used. Of 253 bands produced, 236 bands (94.22%) were polymorphic in which maximum number (20 polymorphic bands) were observed in the profiles of the primer OPB-07. Highest PIC value (0.79) was observed for the ...

  19. (SSR) marker- assisted genetic diversity among upland Bt- and non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Student

    2011-11-02

    Nov 2, 2011 ... new elite cotton cultivars. Key words: Bt-cotton, dissimilarity matrix, DNA polymorphism, genetic diversity, SSR marker. INTRODUCTION. Cotton is the world's most imperative natural textile fiber and a valuable oil seed crop. Cotton is the main cash crop of Pakistan and provides cotton fiber to the national.

  20. Genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates from south ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The allelic distributions however were similar to those previously reported in other endemic malaria countries. Future studies will be designed to include other malaria endemic regions of Nigeria such as the oil exploration regions. Keywords: Genetic diversity; Plasmodium; Merozoite surface protein, monoclonal ...

  1. Genetic diversity of Santalum album using random amplified ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is of great economic importance because of its fragrant heartwood and oil. In the present study Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique was used to accesses the genetic diversity among 30 accessions of S. album collected from different parts of South India. A total of 248 polymorphic amplicons were ...

  2. Genetic diversity and in vitro antibiotic susceptibility profile of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-04-06

    Apr 6, 2009 ... sulfomethoxazole. Key words: Genetic diversity, Salmonella, water, antibiotic susceptibility. INTRODUCTION ... The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacterial patho- gens has become a major public health .... sludge tank; strains 26, 32, 36, 37, 38, 39 and 40 isolated from Amalinda waste water plant's ...

  3. Investigation of genetic diversity in flixweed ( Descurainia sophia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Flixweed plant bearing the scientific title of 'Descurainia sophia' is recognized across the planet as well as in Iran, as an herbal medicine. The present study investigates the genetic diversity of germplasm of flixweed in Kerman Province using and inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and random amplified polymorphic DNA ...

  4. Genetic diversity and population structure of Caragana microphylla ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Caragana microphylla Lam. is a long-lived shrub species in the semi-arid, arid and desert regions. To determine the genetic diversity and population structure of C. microphylla Lam., 17 wild populations from the central and eastern part of Inner Mongolia were analyzed by inter-simple sequence repeat. 18 primers produced ...

  5. Genetic diversity analysis in the Hypericum perforatum populations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity analysis in the Hypericum perforatum populations in the Kashmir valley by using inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) markers. Shazia Farooq, MA Siddiqui, PC Ray, MQ Sheikh, Sheikh Shahnawaz, M Ashraf Bhat, MR Mir, MZ Abdin, Imtiyaz Ahmad, Jamsheed Javid, Prasant Yadav, M Masroor, Mariyam ...

  6. Genetic diversity of two Tunisian sheep breeds using random ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used to study genetic diversity and population structure in six sheep populations belonging to two native Tunisian breeds (the Barbarine and the Western thin tail). A total of 96 samples were typed using eight RAPD primers. 62 bands were scored, of which 44 ...

  7. Study on genetic diversity in Pakistani wheat varieties using simple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-01

    Sep 1, 2009 ... Key words: Triticum aestivum L., SSR markers, genetic diversity. INTRODUCTION. In Pakistan wheat is grown on 8358 thousand hectares with a total production of 21.6 million/tons giving an aver- age yield of 2.39 tons ha-1. Wheat occupies 70% of Rabi and 37% of total cropped area of Pakistan. In NWFP,.

  8. An understanding of the underlying genetic diversity within and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AMuchugi

    2016-08-03

    Aug 3, 2016 ... Four primer combinations produced a total of 223 polymorphic bands. Both the natural and on-farm populations had high genetic diversity ranging from H = 0.2892 to H = 0.1278. Principal ... The integrity and quality of the DNA was ... amplified fragments with fluorescent-labeled EcoRI primers having.

  9. Low genetic diversity of Phytophthora infestans population in potato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans is the most important disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum). This study reveals the genetic diversity of P. infestans population in north China. A total of 134 strains of P. infestans were isolated from different agricultural fields in Hebei, Liaoning, Jinlin and Heilongjiang Provinces ...

  10. AFLP analysis on genetic diversity and population structure of small ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The population genetic structure and diversity of small yellow croaker Larimichthys polyactis in the Bohai Bay, Yellow Sea and East China Sea were analyzed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). Ninety-one individuals were collected from six locations representing three stocks of small yellow croaker.

  11. Genetic diversity among some blackberry cultivars and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... America in this study. Key words: Blackberry, Boysenberry, raspberry, genetic diversity, AFLP markers. INTRODUCTION ... Germplasm Resources Information Network describes 13 subgenera for the genus Rubus ... polymorphisms) markers are highly reproducible multi-locus marker system developed by ...

  12. Genetic diversity and differentiation of Pseudophoenix (Arecaceae) in Hispaniola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Abstract Pseudophoenix ekmanii Burret, P. lediniana Read, and P. vinifera (Mart.) Becc. (Arecaceae) are endemic to Hispaniola. The more wide-ranging P. sargentii H.Wendl. ex Sarg. occurs on this island as well. The population genetic diversity and structure of Pseudophoenix was investigate...

  13. Microsatellite based investigation of genetic diversity in 24 synthetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Common bread wheat has very low genetic diversity. Plant breeders find it difficult to get appropriate germplasm which can be used for bread wheat improvement. Wild plant species is one of the potential sources for conferring resistant genes which can be exploited for bread wheat improvement. The challenge is to utilize ...

  14. Genetic diversity, classification and comparative study on the larval ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity, classification and comparative study on the larval phenotypic data in 54 oval cocoon strains of Iran silkworm Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera: ... However, the strains of the same origin did not grouped together, demonstrating that they might have from different biological and development performance.

  15. Genetic diversity and relationship analysis of the Brassica napus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) is an important oilseed crop worldwide. The objective of this research was to study the genetic diversity and relationships of B. napus accessions using simple sequence repeat (SSR). A set of 217 genotypes was characterized using 37 SSR markers of mapping on the B. napus genome.

  16. Genetic diversity analysis of some exotic, Indian and mutant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-28

    Jun 28, 2010 ... Key words: Brassica carinata, Brassica juncea, Brassica napus, RAPD markers, polymorphism, genetic diversity. INTRODUCTION. Brassica is cosmopolitan in distribution occupying a pro- minent place in world's agrarian economy as vegetables, oilseed, feed and fodder, green manure and condiment.

  17. Genetic diversity of Kenyan Prosopis populations based on random ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MUTURI

    In combination, these traits may enhance the invasiveness of plant hybrids. The introduction of Prosopis ... Description of sample populations, plant sampling and reference species. Six naturally established Prosopis ...... boosted genetic diversity in the invasive range of black cherry. (Prunus serotina; Rosaceae). Ann. Bot.

  18. Multi-objective Uniform-diversity Genetic Algorithm (MUGA)

    OpenAIRE

    Jamali, Ali; Nariman-zadeh, Nader; Atashkari, Kazem

    2008-01-01

    A new multi-objective uniform-diversity genetic algorithm (MUGA) has been proposed and successfully used for some test functions and for thermodynamic cycle optimization of ideal turbojet engines. It has been shown that the performance of this algorithm is superior to that

  19. Genetic diversity and reproductive success in mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpentier, M; Setchell, J M; Prugnolle, F; Knapp, L A; Wickings, E J; Peignot, P; Hossaert-McKey, M

    2005-11-15

    Recent studies of wild animal populations have shown that estimators of neutral genetic diversity, such as mean heterozygosity, are often correlated with various fitness traits, such as survival, disease susceptibility, or reproductive success. We used two estimators of genetic diversity to explore the relationship between heterozygosity and reproductive success in male and female mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) living in a semifree ranging setting in Gabon. Because social rank is known to influence reproductive success in both sexes, we also examined the correlation between genetic diversity and social rank in females, and acquisition of alpha status in males, as well as length of alpha male tenure. We found that heterozygous individuals showed greater reproductive success, with both females and males producing more offspring. However, heterozygosity influenced reproductive success only in dominant males, not in subordinates. Neither the acquisition of alpha status in males, nor social rank in females, was significantly correlated with heterozygosity, although more heterozygous alpha males showed longer tenure than homozygous ones. We also tested whether the benefits of greater genetic diversity were due mainly to a genome-wide effect of inbreeding depression or to heterosis at one or a few loci. Multilocus effects best explained the correlation between heterozygosity and reproductive success and tenure, indicating the occurrence of inbreeding depression in this mandrill colony.

  20. Ortholog identification in genera of high genetic diversity and evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jane Lind Nybo; Vesth, Tammi Camilla; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    In the era of high-throughput sequencing, comparative genomics is vastly used in the discovery of genetic diversity between species, but also in defining the core and pan genome of single species to whole genera. Current comparative approaches are implementing ortholog identification to establish...... genome annotations, gene or protein evolutions or defining functional features in individual species and groups....

  1. Low genetic diversity of Phytophthora infestans population in potato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    compositions and changes in population genetic structure of P. infestans, especially the .... Allele frequencies for SSR markers in 134 P. infestans strains from the four provinces collected in 2008 and 2009. SSR locus Allele Hebei Liaoning Jilin Heilongjiang 2008 2009 Overall Gene diversity. G11. 156. 0.02. 0.00. 0.13. 0.03.

  2. Evaluation of genetic diversity in rice using SSR markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hemant

    2012-10-18

    Oct 18, 2012 ... como doadora de alelos para aumento da producao e da tolerancia a seca do arroz (Oryza sativa) via analise de ABQTLs. Thesis,. Universidade Federal de Goias. Ravi M, Geethanjali S, Sameeyafarheen F, Maheswaran M (2003). Molecular marker based genetic diversity analysis in rice (Oryza sativa L.) ...

  3. Genetic diversity of Pogonatherum paniceum (Lam.) Hack. in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-04-06

    Apr 6, 2009 ... Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers were used to estimate the genetic diversity of. Pogonatherum paniceum (Lam.) Hack. from Sichuan Province, Yunnan Province, Chongqing City and. Guangxi Zhuang autonomous Region in China. 10 primer combinations were carried out on 180.

  4. Genetic diversity of Escherichia coli isolated from commercial swine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-07

    Sep 7, 2011 ... strains of E. coli were selected by selective medium and conventional biochemical test from fresh stool samples of swines in ... extragenic palindrome PCR (REP-PCR), 34 E. coli isolates were clustered to 19 ERIC-PCR genotypes ..... genetic diversity of Clostridium perfringens from chicken by REP-. PCR.

  5. Genetic diversity, taxonomy and legumins implications of seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conrad Prof

    2013-04-24

    Apr 24, 2013 ... protein mix, and the resultant relationship based on seed storage proteins instigates a review of erstwhile taxonomic, agricultural ... Key words: Fabaceae, seed protein, polymorphism, genetic diversity, taxonomy, single protein. ..... Fassini PG, Noda RB, Ferreira ES, Silva MA, Neves VA, Demonte A. (2011).

  6. Genetic diversity and bottleneck analysis of Yunnan mithun ( Bos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mithun or gayal (Bos frontalis) is endemic to the Gaoligongshan Mountains and Drung River Basin in Yunnan, China; a rare and endangered Bos species. To evaluate the genetic diversity and bottleneck effect of Yunnan mithun population, we screened 16 bovine microsatellite loci of Yunnan mithun (N = 34) to provide ...

  7. Genetic diversity and conservation of Mexican forest trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Wehenkel; S. Mariscal-Lucero; J.P. Jaramillo-Correa; C.A. López-Sánchez; J.J. Vargas Hernández; C. Sáenz-Romero

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 200 years, humans have impacted the genetic diversity of forest trees. Because of widespread deforestation and over-exploitation, about 9,000 tree species are listed worldwide as threatened with extinction, including more than half of the ~600 known conifer taxa. A comprehensive review of the floristic-taxonomic literature compiled a list of 4,331...

  8. Genetic diversity studies of Kherigarh cattle based on microsatellite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We report a genetic diversity study of Kherigarh cattle, a utility draught-purpose breed of India, currently declining at a startling rate, by use of microsatellite markers recommended by the Food and Agriculture Organization. Microsatellite genotypes were derived, and allelic and genotypic frequencies, heterozygosities and ...

  9. Genetic diversity and molecular characterization of physic nut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl

    2013-02-27

    Feb 27, 2013 ... 4Agricultural Research Company of Minas Gerais (EPAMIG), Uberaba, Minas Gerais, Brazil. 5Departament of Agricultural Sciences, State University of Montes Claros, Janaúba, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Accepted 5 October, 2012. The genetic diversity among 46 accessions of physic nut was estimated with Nei ...

  10. Morphological and molecular genetic diversity of Syrian indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuoyo Aghomotsegin

    2016-05-04

    May 4, 2016 ... for molecular characterization of domestic animals. Therefore, the present study was aimed to analyse the. Syrian goat genetic diversity and differentiation using recommended morphological traits (FAO, 2012) and microsatellite markers (FAO, 2004) to inform the design of rational goat breeds improvement ...

  11. Population structure and genetic diversity of Sudanese native chickens

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives of this study were to analyze genetic diversity and population structure of Sudanese native chicken breeds involved in a conservation program. Five Sudanese native chicken breeds were compared with populations studied previously, which included six purebred lines, six African populations and one ...

  12. Genetic diversity and population structure of common bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fire7-

    2016-12-28

    Dec 28, 2016 ... The Ethiopian genetic center is considered to be one of the secondary centers of diversity for the ... accessions was developed, which represented different common bean production ecologies and seed .... The size of the bubbles does not correspond to number of genotypes sampled in each location.

  13. Genetic diversity of the blast fungus, Magnaporthe grisea (Hebert ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity of the blast fungus, Magnaporthe grisea (Hebert) Barr, in Burkina Faso. Y Séré, A Onasanya, A Afolabi, HD Mignouna, K Akator. Abstract. Trapping nurseries trialed at two screening sites in Burkina Faso appeared to be an effective tool to characterize the virulence spectrum of blast populations using limited ...

  14. Genetic diversity in barley landraces (Hordeum vulgare L. subsp ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genetic diversity in barley landraces (Hordeum vulgare L. subsp. vulgare) originated from Crescent Fertile region as detected by seed storage proteins. RIM MZID FARHAT CHIBANI RAYDA BEN AYED MOHSEN HANANA JOELLE BREIDI RABIH KABALAN SAMIH EL-HAJJ HASSAN MACHLAB AHMED REBAI LAMIS ...

  15. Genetic diversity in barley landraces (Hordeum vulgare L. subsp ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genetic diversity in barley landraces (Hordeum vulgare L. subsp. vulgare) originated from Crescent Fertile region as detected by seed storage proteins. RIM MZID1∗, FARHAT CHIBANI2, RAYDA BEN AYED3, MOHSEN HANANA1, JOELLE BREIDI4,. RABIH KABALAN4, SAMIH EL-HAJJ5, HASSAN MACHLAB6, AHMED ...

  16. Genetic structure and diversity of East African taro [ Colocasia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Taro [Colocasia esculenta (L) Schott] is mainly produced in Africa by small holder farmers and plays an important role in the livelihood of millions of poor people in less developed countries. The genetic diversity of East African taro has not been determined. This study utilizes six microsatellite primers to analyze five ...

  17. Estimate of genetic diversity in cassutinga ( Croton heliotropiifolius ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Croton heliotropiifolius (Euphorbiaceae family) is a shrubby plant that has attracted attention both by the need for conservation as for their pharmacological potential. The present study aimed to characterize the diversity and structure genetic of a population of C. heliotropiifolius present in a forest fragment in the city of ...

  18. RAPD analysis for genetic diversity of two populations of Mystus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-01

    Sep 1, 2009 ... Res. 5: 643-652. Capili JB (1990). Isozyme and mitochondrial DNA restriction endonuclease analysis of three strains of O. nilitocus. Dissertation,. University of Wales. D'Amato ME, Corach D (1996). Genetic diversity of populations of the freshwater shrimp Macrobrachium bordello (Caridae: Palaemonidae).

  19. Preliminary molecular analysis of the genetic diversity of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the arid and semi arid areas, salt bush (Atriplex) represents an important forage resource. The characterization of the genetic diversity of these species is useful for their classification, their conservation and their improvement. In this context, we used the random amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction ...

  20. Evaluation of genetic diversity in barley ( Hordeum vulgare L.) from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to determine the genetic diversity and relationships among barley varieties (Hordeum vulgare L.) growing at Wollo Highland areas by using hordein and agro-morphological traits. Twenty (20) varieties were laid down in randomized complete block design (RCBD) design with three replications; they were ...

  1. Genetic diversity in Ethiopian field pea ( Pisum sativum L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, genetic diversity of 142 contrasting Ethiopian field pea germplasm were investigated using SSR markers. Euclidean Distance Matrix clustered the collections into seven distinct groups. There were 20 collections in Cluster I, 11 in Cluster II, 5 in Cluster III, 41 in Cluster IV, 17 in Cluster V, 18 in Cluster VI and 30 in ...

  2. Genetic diversity and historical demography of kuruma shrimp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two varieties (I and II) of kuruma shrimp (Penaeus japonicus) were found in the north of South China Sea (SCS) and Taiwan Strait (TS). To estimate the demographic history and genetic diversity of this species complex off China, 141 individuals were collected from the East China Sea (ECS), TS and SCS and 27 variety 2 ...

  3. Genetic diversity studies and identification of SSR markers ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-08-13

    Aug 13, 2013 ... Abstract. Genetic diversity and identification of simple sequence repeat markers correlated with Fusarium wilt resistance was performed in a set of 36 elite cultivated pigeonpea genotypes differing in levels of resistance to Fusarium wilt. Twenty-four polymorphic sequence repeat markers were screened ...

  4. Genetic diversity of important rice cultivars of Kashmir valley using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    27,RM-72, RM-107 and RM-154 were used to estimate the genetic diversity of eight indica rice cultivars significant for rice breeding programme in the temperate Kashmir Province of India. The SSR primers used, specific to five different ...

  5. Genetic diversity among selected genotypes of almond Prunus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic relatedness and diversity in 32 almond genotypes were analysed using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. All the genotypes maintained at Dr. Y.S. Parmar University of Horticulture and Forestry, Solan, India comprised ten exotic introductions and 22 indigenous selections. Using 16 selected ...

  6. Review: Genetic diversity and population structure of cotton ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review: Genetic diversity and population structure of cotton ( Gossypium hirsutum L. race latifolium H. ) using microsatellite markers. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... Four groups were identified applying different methods (the probabilistic method, Principal Coordinates Analysis and Neighbor Joining tree). American ...

  7. Genetic diversity of Entamoeba: Novel ribosomal lineages from cockroaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Tetsuro; Imada, Mihoko; Chamavit, Pennapa; Kobayashi, Seiki; Hashimoto, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    Our current taxonomic perspective on Entamoeba is largely based on small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes (SSU rDNA) from Entamoeba species identified in vertebrate hosts with minor exceptions such as E. moshkovskii from sewage water and E. marina from marine sediment. Other Entamoeba species have also been morphologically identified and described from non-vertebrate species such as insects; however, their genetic diversity remains unknown. In order to further disclose the diversity of the genus, we investigated Entamoeba spp. in the intestines of three cockroach species: Periplaneta americana, Blaptica dubia, and Gromphadorhina oblongonota. We obtained 134 Entamoeba SSU rDNA sequences from 186 cockroaches by direct nested PCR using the DNA extracts of intestines from cockroaches, followed by scrutinized BLASTn screening and phylogenetic analyses. All the sequences identified in this study were distinct from those reported from known Entamoeba species, and considered as novel Entamoeba ribosomal lineages. Furthermore, they were positioned at the base of the clade of known Entamoeba species and displayed remarkable degree of genetic diversity comprising nine major groups in the three cockroach species. This is the first report of the diversity of SSU rDNA sequences from Entamoeba in non-vertebrate host species, and should help to understand the genetic diversity of the genus Entamoeba. PMID:28934335

  8. Genetic diversity of Entamoeba: Novel ribosomal lineages from cockroaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuro Kawano

    Full Text Available Our current taxonomic perspective on Entamoeba is largely based on small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes (SSU rDNA from Entamoeba species identified in vertebrate hosts with minor exceptions such as E. moshkovskii from sewage water and E. marina from marine sediment. Other Entamoeba species have also been morphologically identified and described from non-vertebrate species such as insects; however, their genetic diversity remains unknown. In order to further disclose the diversity of the genus, we investigated Entamoeba spp. in the intestines of three cockroach species: Periplaneta americana, Blaptica dubia, and Gromphadorhina oblongonota. We obtained 134 Entamoeba SSU rDNA sequences from 186 cockroaches by direct nested PCR using the DNA extracts of intestines from cockroaches, followed by scrutinized BLASTn screening and phylogenetic analyses. All the sequences identified in this study were distinct from those reported from known Entamoeba species, and considered as novel Entamoeba ribosomal lineages. Furthermore, they were positioned at the base of the clade of known Entamoeba species and displayed remarkable degree of genetic diversity comprising nine major groups in the three cockroach species. This is the first report of the diversity of SSU rDNA sequences from Entamoeba in non-vertebrate host species, and should help to understand the genetic diversity of the genus Entamoeba.

  9. Genetic diversity and conservation status of managed vicuña (Vicugna vicugna) populations in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anello, M; Daverio, M S; Romero, S R; Rigalt, F; Silbestro, M B; Vidal-Rioja, L; Di Rocco, F

    2016-02-01

    The vicuña (Vicugna vicugna) was indiscriminately hunted for more than 400 years and, by the end of 1960s, it was seriously endangered. At that time, a captive breeding program was initiated in Argentina by the National Institute of Agricultural Technology (INTA) with the aim of preserving the species. Nowadays, vicuñas are managed in captivity and in the wild to obtain their valuable fiber. The current genetic status of Argentinean vicuña populations is virtually unknown. Using mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite markers, we assessed levels of genetic diversity of vicuña populations managed in the wild and compared it with a captive population from INTA. Furthermore, we examined levels of genetic structure and evidence for historical bottlenecks. Overall, all populations revealed high genetic variability with no signs of inbreeding. Levels of genetic diversity between captive and wild populations were not significantly different, although the captive population showed the lowest estimates of allelic richness, number of mitochondrial haplotypes, and haplotype diversity. Significant genetic differentiation at microsatellite markers was found between free-living populations from Jujuy and Catamarca provinces. Moreover, microsatellite data also revealed genetic structure within the Catamarca management area. Genetic signatures of past bottlenecks were detected in wild populations by the Garza Williamson test. Results from this study are discussed in relation to the conservation and management of the species.

  10. Population structure and genetic diversity in Gynaikothrips uzeli (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae): is there a correlation between genetic and geographic proximity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, A L S; Waldschmidt, A M; Silva, J C

    2015-08-19

    Gynaikothrips uzeli (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae) is a minuscule insect species, which forms galls, is subsocial, and parthenogenetic. It is associated with Ficus benjamina L. (Moraceae) and has a pantropical occurrence. The paucity of genetic studies on the order Thysanoptera led us to use inter-simple sequence repeat molecular marker to assess intra- and inter-gall, as well as intra- and inter-site, genetic variability and population structure of G. uzeli. Analyses indicated low genetic variability, probably related to haplodiploidy, genetic drift, the galling habit, and the low dispersal ability of G. uzeli. Populations were highly structured, with higher variation within populations than among them. Geographic distance does not appear to affect structure and genetic diversity, the latter being influenced by G. uzeli's bioecological traits, by numerous introductions during a short period, and by a possible recent, common ancestry.

  11. [Study on Genetic Diversity of Twelve Natural Zanthoxylum dissitum Populations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Wang, Ping; Sun, Ji-kang; Zhou, Tao; Fe, Ming-liang

    2014-12-01

    The genetic diversity of twelve natural Zanthoxylum dissitum populations, which is a species of Chinese herbal medicines to four provinces of southwest China, has been investigated. By inter-simple sequence repeat markers (ISSR), the eight primers, which could amplify stable, clear and highly polymorphic bands, were screened from 100 candidate primers. 150 total ISSR discernible bands and 147 polymorphic were amplified by the eight checked primers. On one hand, the percentage of polymorphic bands was 98.0%, on the other hand, the population level the percent of polymorphic bands ranged from 26.0% to 62.0%. The Shannon's information index within species (Hsp) was 0.4175, while the values within population (Hpop) were ranged from 0.1328 to 0.3267. Analysis of molecular variance (ANOVA) revealed that the population genetic variation accounted for 47.98% but the intraspecific variation for 52.02%. The high level of genetic diversity exists not only in population but also in species. A high degree of genetic differentiation populations is approved to exist in Zanthoxylum dissitum. These results lay a theoretical foundation for genetic diversity analysis of Zanthoxylum dissitum.

  12. An Assessment of Genetic Diversity and Drought Tolerance in Argan Tree (Argania spinosa) Populations: Potential for the Development of Improved Drought Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakhchar, Abdelghani; Haworth, Matthew; El Modafar, Cherkaoui; Lauteri, Marco; Mattioni, Claudia; Wahbi, Said; Centritto, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    The argan tree ( Argania spinosa ) occurs in a restricted area of Southwestern Morocco characterized by low water availability and high evapotranspirative demand. Despite the adaptation of the argan tree to drought stress, the extent of the argan forest has declined markedly due to increased aridity, land use changes and the expansion of olive cultivation. The oil of the argan seed is used for cooking and as the basis for numerous cosmetics. The identification of argan tree varieties with enhanced drought tolerance may minimize the economic losses associated with the decline of the argan forest and constrain the spread of desertification. In this study we collected argan ecotypes from four contrasting habitats and grew them under identical controlled environment conditions to investigate their response to drought. Leaf gas exchange analysis indicated that the argan ecotypes showed a high degree of adaptation to drought stress, maintaining photosynthetic activity at low levels of foliar water content and co-ordinating photosynthesis, stomatal behavior and metabolism. The stomata of the argan trees were highly sensitive to increased leaf to air vapor pressure deficit, representing an adaptation to growth in an arid environment where potential evapotranspiration is high. However, despite originating in contrasting environments, the four argan ecotypes exhibited similar gas exchange characteristics under both fully irrigated and water deficit conditions. Population genetic analyses using microsatellite markers indicated a high degree of relatedness between the four ecotypes; indicative of both artificial selection and the transport of ecotypes between different provinces throughout centuries of management of the argan forest. The majority of genetic variation across the four populations (71%) was observed between individuals, suggesting that improvement of argan is possible. Phenotypic screening of physiological responses to drought may prove effective in identifying

  13. Thai pigs and cattle production, genetic diversity of livestock and strategies for preserving animal genetic resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesinee Gatphayak

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current situation of livestock production in Thailand, genetic diversity and evaluation, as well as management strategies for animal genetic resources focusing on pigs and cattle. Sustainable conservation of indigenous livestock as a genetic resource and vital components within the agricultural biodiversity domain is a great challenge as well as an asset for the future development of livestock production in Thailand.

  14. Genetics of equine insect bite hypersensitivity and genetic diversity in horses

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Merina

    2017-01-01

    Genetic variation contributing to the phenotypic variation was utilized in this thesis to understand the genetic background of a complex trait IBH, and to understand genetic diversity and relationships between various horse populations. IBH is the most common skin allergic disorder in horses, caused by bites of midges, predominantly Culicoides species. It affects various horse breeds worldwide. With no effective treatment, IBH degrades horse health and causes economic loss. In this th...

  15. Genetic Diversity and Spatial Genetic Structure of the Grassland Perennial Saxifraga granulata along Two River Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha van der Meer

    Full Text Available Due to changes in land use, the natural habitats of an increasing number of plant species have become more and more fragmented. In landscapes that consist of patches of suitable habitat, the frequency and extent of long-distance seed dispersal can be expected to be an important factor determining local genetic diversity and regional population structure of the remaining populations. In plant species that are restricted to riparian habitats, rivers can be expected to have a strong impact on the dynamics and spatial genetic structure of populations as they may enable long-distance seed dispersal and thus maintain gene flow between fragmented populations. In this study, we used polymorphic microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure of 28 populations of Saxifraga granulata along two rivers in central Belgium. We hypothesized that rivers might be essential for gene flow among increasingly isolated populations of this species. Genetic diversity was high (HS = 0.68, which to a certain extent can be explained by the octoploid nature of S. granulata in the study area. Populations along the Dijle and Demer rivers were also highly differentiated (G"ST = 0.269 and 0.164 and DEST = 0.190 and 0.124, respectively and showed significant isolation-by-distance, indicating moderate levels of gene flow primarily between populations that are geographically close to each other. Along the river Demer population genetic diversity was higher upstream than downstream, suggesting that seed dispersal via the water was not the primary mode of dispersal. Overall, these results indicate that despite increasing fragmentation populations along both rivers were highly genetically diverse. The high ploidy level and longevity of S. granulata have most likely buffered negative effects of fragmentation on genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure of populations in riparian grasslands.

  16. Genetic Diversity and Spatial Genetic Structure of the Grassland Perennial Saxifraga granulata along Two River Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Sascha; Jacquemyn, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Due to changes in land use, the natural habitats of an increasing number of plant species have become more and more fragmented. In landscapes that consist of patches of suitable habitat, the frequency and extent of long-distance seed dispersal can be expected to be an important factor determining local genetic diversity and regional population structure of the remaining populations. In plant species that are restricted to riparian habitats, rivers can be expected to have a strong impact on the dynamics and spatial genetic structure of populations as they may enable long-distance seed dispersal and thus maintain gene flow between fragmented populations. In this study, we used polymorphic microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure of 28 populations of Saxifraga granulata along two rivers in central Belgium. We hypothesized that rivers might be essential for gene flow among increasingly isolated populations of this species. Genetic diversity was high (HS = 0.68), which to a certain extent can be explained by the octoploid nature of S. granulata in the study area. Populations along the Dijle and Demer rivers were also highly differentiated (G"ST = 0.269 and 0.164 and DEST = 0.190 and 0.124, respectively) and showed significant isolation-by-distance, indicating moderate levels of gene flow primarily between populations that are geographically close to each other. Along the river Demer population genetic diversity was higher upstream than downstream, suggesting that seed dispersal via the water was not the primary mode of dispersal. Overall, these results indicate that despite increasing fragmentation populations along both rivers were highly genetically diverse. The high ploidy level and longevity of S. granulata have most likely buffered negative effects of fragmentation on genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure of populations in riparian grasslands.

  17. Comparison of genetic diversity and population structure of Pacific Coast whitebark pine across multiple markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew D. Bower; Bryce A. Richardson; Valerie Hipkins; Regina Rochefort; Carol Aubry

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of "neutral" molecular markers and "adaptive" quantitative traits are common methods of assessing genetic diversity and population structure. Molecular markers typically reflect the effects of demographic and stochastic processes but are generally assumed to not reflect natural selection. Conversely, quantitative (or "adaptive")...

  18. Genetic Diversity of Spanish Melons (Cucumis melo L.) of the Madrid Provenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genetic diversity of five Group Inodorus landraces having a historic presence in the town of Villaconejos, Spain (near Madrid) and four reference accessions (one accession Group Flexuosus) (Lopez-Sese et al, 2002), was assessed using the allelic variation at 19 SSR loci. Seventy-two polymorphic...

  19. Genetic diversity of Hajar1 and Hajar2 local Saudi chicken lines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to assess genetic diversity of Hajar1 and Hajar2 local Saudi chicken lines using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop partial sequences. One hundred blood samples were obtained equally from Hajar1 and Hajar2 Saudi chicken lines as 50 samples from each line. The D-loop region was partially ...

  20. Population connectivity buffers genetic diversity loss in a seabird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Oscar; Gómez-Díaz, Elena; Olalde, Iñigo; Illera, Juan Carlos; Rando, Juan Carlos; González-Solís, Jacob; Lalueza-Fox, Carles

    2013-05-20

    Ancient DNA has revolutionized conservation genetic studies as it allows monitoring of the genetic variability of species through time and predicting the impact of ecosystems' threats on future population dynamics and viability. Meanwhile, the consequences of anthropogenic activities and climate change to island faunas, particularly seabirds, remain largely unknown. In this study, we examined temporal changes in the genetic diversity of a threatened seabird, the Cory's shearwater (Calonectris borealis). We analysed the mitochondrial DNA control region of ancient bone samples from the late-Holocene retrieved from the Canary archipelago (NE Atlantic) together with modern DNA sequences representative of the entire breeding range of the species. Our results show high levels of ancient genetic diversity in the Canaries comparable to that of the extant population. The temporal haplotype network further revealed rare but recurrent long-distance dispersal between ocean basins. The Bayesian demographic analyses reveal both regional and local population size expansion events, and this is in spite of the demographic decline experienced by the species over the last millennia. Our findings suggest that population connectivity of the species has acted as a buffer of genetic losses and illustrate the use of ancient DNA to uncover such cryptic genetic events.