WorldWideScience

Sample records for assessing deposition levels

  1. Assessing deposition levels of 55Fe, 60Co and 63Ni in the Ignalina NPP environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two RBMK-1500 reactor units operated in Lithuania in the 1987-2004 period (one of them was stopped for decommissioning in 2004). This study presents a preliminary investigation of surface deposition density levels of 55Fe and 63Ni in moss samples collected in the close vicinity of the Ignalina NPP. Non-destructive analysis by the HPGe gamma-spectrometry was followed by radiochemical separation. Radiochemical analysis was based on anion-exchange and extraction chromatography. 55Fe and 63Ni activities were measured by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The results indicate that the deposition values of 55Fe are generally higher than those of 60Co and 63Ni.

  2. Assessing deposition levels of 55Fe, 60Co and 63Ni in the Ignalina NPP environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudelis, A.; Druteikienė, R.; Lukšienė, B.;

    2010-01-01

    . Non-destructive analysis by the HPGe gamma-spectrometry was followed by radiochemical separation. Radiochemical analysis was based on anion-exchange and extraction chromatography. 55Fe and 63Ni activities were measured by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The results indicate that the deposition...

  3. Assessing deposition levels of {sup 55}Fe, {sup 60}Co and {sup 63}Ni in the Ignalina NPP environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudelis, A., E-mail: gudelis@ktl.mii.l [Nuclear and Environmental Radioactivity Research Laboratory, Institute of Physics, Savanoriu Avenue, 231, LT-02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Druteikiene, R.; Luksiene, B.; Gvozdaite, R. [Nuclear and Environmental Radioactivity Research Laboratory, Institute of Physics, Savanoriu Avenue, 231, LT-02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Nielsen, S.P.; Hou, X. [Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, P.O. Box 49, DK-4000, Roskilde (Denmark); Mazeika, J.; Petrosius, R. [Radioisotope Laboratory, Institute of Geology and Geography, Sevcenkos Street, 13, LT-03223 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2010-06-15

    Two RBMK-1500 reactor units operated in Lithuania in the 1987-2004 period (one of them was stopped for decommissioning in 2004). This study presents a preliminary investigation of surface deposition density levels of {sup 55}Fe and {sup 63}Ni in moss samples collected in the close vicinity of the Ignalina NPP. Non-destructive analysis by the HPGe gamma-spectrometry was followed by radiochemical separation. Radiochemical analysis was based on anion-exchange and extraction chromatography. {sup 55}Fe and {sup 63}Ni activities were measured by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The results indicate that the deposition values of {sup 55}Fe are generally higher than those of {sup 60}Co and {sup 63}Ni.

  4. Assessment of indoor radiation level in the environs of the uranium deposit area of West Khasi Hills District, Meghalaya, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    War, S.A. [Department of Physics, North Eastern Hill University, Shillong - 793 022, Meghalaya (India)], E-mail: aaron2416@yahoo.com; Nongkynrih, P.; Khathing, D.T. [Department of Physics, North Eastern Hill University, Shillong - 793 022, Meghalaya (India); Iongwai, P.S. [Department of Zoology, North Eastern Hill University, Shillong - 793 022, Meghalaya (India)

    2009-11-15

    An estimation of the indoor background radiation dose distribution was carried out in dwellings of eleven villages located within and around the uranium mineralization area of Kylleng-Pyndensohiong, Mawthabah in West Khasi Hills District of Meghalaya, India. The ambient indoor gamma radiation level was monitored using Thermo Luminescence Dosimeters (TLDs) while the indoor radon and thoron concentration was measured using twin-cup dosimeters employing Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs). Results obtained from the study reveals that the local inhabitants of villages located close to the mining site receive higher doses than those inhabitants of villages located at a much farther distance from the mining site. The average total annual effective dose was found to be varying from 1.2 mSv y{sup -1} in the village of Langpa to 3.4 mSv y{sup -1} in the village of Nongbah Jynrin. The data obtained will serve as a reference in documenting changes to environmental radioactivity if mining is to be carried out in the future.

  5. MESODIF-II: a variable trajectory plume segment model to assess ground-level air concentrations and deposition of effluent releases from nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MESODIF-II is a variable trajectory plume segment atmospheric transport model designed to predict normalized air concentrations and deposition of radioactive, but otherwise non-reactive, effluents released from one or two levels over the same position in an xy-plane. In such a model, calculated particle trajectories vary as synoptic scale wind varies. At all sampling times the particles are connected to form a segmented plume centerline; the lateral and vertical dimensions of the plume are determined by a parameterization of turbulence scale diffusion. The model development arose from the need to assess the radiological effects of routine operations of commercial nuclear power reactors. The purpose of the present document is to make MESODIF-II and its peripheral programs available to those who wish to use it directly. The theory and mathematics in the model are explained. A user's guide, which treats not only MESODIF-II descriptively, but also other programs that have to be used to generate the input wind and stability data is included. Two other peripheral programs that are used in conjunction with MESODIF-II are also described. One is Program Stagg, the other is Program RERITE. A complete test run of MESODIF-II is included, as is the complete code for the program and the control cards used on the CDC-6400. A glossary for the MESODIF-II code, and a reference list arealso provided

  6. Assessment after Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Geraint; Burnham, Sally

    2014-01-01

    Ten years ago, two heads of department in contrasting schools presented a powerfully-argued case for resisting the use of level descriptions within their assessment regimes. Influenced both by research into the nature of children's historical thinking and by principles of assessment "for" learning, Sally Burnham and Geraint Brown…

  7. Acceptance criteria for deposition of low-level and intermediate-level radiation levels radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This norm establishes the criteria for acceptance low and intermediate radiation level for safe deposition in repositories, for assuring the protection of workers, population and environment against the hazardous effects of the ionizing radiations. The criteria of this norm applies to the low and intermediate radiation levels

  8. Resource assessment of copper deposits in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qin-li; GU De-sheng; T. Shoji; H. Kaneda

    2005-01-01

    Copper-bearing deposits of China are statistically analyzed in terms of ore grade, metal amount and ore tonnage. Each of grade and metal amount shows more or less a lognormal distribution. Analysis gives 10 copper metallogenic districts, each having specific densities of deposit numbers and copper reserves larger than 3. Based on the ratio of copper in ore value (Rcu), Chinese copper deposits are classified into two groups: mainly copper-producing deposits (MC: Rcu≥0.5) and accessorily copper-producing deposits (AC: Rcu<0. 5). The grade-tonnage relation of MC deposits can be combined by two exponential functions approximating high grade (> 3.0 %) and low grade (<2.0%) parts. The critical copper grade, which is obtained from the low grade part of the relation, is 0. 34 %. Chinese copper resources are concluded to become pessimistic, because some mines are working with grades close to this critical value. Taking account of the fact that many copper deposits are actually polymetallic, Cu-equivalent grades, which are converted from ratios of metal prices to the copper price, are also introduced. The critical Cu-equivalent grade of MC deposits (0. 43 % ) also suggests that Chinese copper resources are pessimistic.

  9. Assessment of Global Mercury Deposition through Litterfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xun; Bao, Zhengduo; Lin, Che-Jen; Yuan, Wei; Feng, Xinbin

    2016-08-16

    There is a large uncertainty in the estimate of global dry deposition of atmospheric mercury (Hg). Hg deposition through litterfall represents an important input to terrestrial forest ecosystems via cumulative uptake of atmospheric Hg (most Hg(0)) to foliage. In this study, we estimate the quantity of global Hg deposition through litterfall using statistical modeling (Monte Carlo simulation) of published data sets of litterfall biomass production, tree density, and Hg concentration in litter samples. On the basis of the model results, the global annual Hg deposition through litterfall is estimated to be 1180 ± 710 Mg yr(-1), more than two times greater than the estimate by GEOS-Chem. Spatial distribution of Hg deposition through litterfall suggests that deposition flux decreases spatially from tropical to temperate and boreal regions. Approximately 70% of global Hg(0) dry deposition occurs in the tropical and subtropical regions. A major source of uncertainty in this study is the heterogeneous geospatial distribution of available data. More observational data in regions (Southeast Asia, Africa, and South America) where few data sets exist will greatly improve the accuracy of the current estimate. Given that the quantity of global Hg deposition via litterfall is typically 2-6 times higher than Hg(0) evasion from forest floor, global forest ecosystems represent a strong Hg(0) sink. PMID:27418119

  10. Sediment-hosted stratabound copper deposit model: Chapter M in Mineral deposit model for resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Timothy S.; Cox, Dennis P.; Bliss, James D.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R., II

    2015-01-01

    This report contains a descriptive model of sediment-hosted stratabound copper (SSC) deposits that supersedes the model of Cox and others (2003). This model is for use in assessments of mineral resource potential. SSC deposits are the second most important sources of copper in the world behind porphyry copper deposits. Around 20 percent of the copper in the world is produced from this class of deposits. They are also the most important sources of cobalt in the world, and they are fourth among classes of ore deposits in production of silver. SSC deposits are the basis of the economies of three countries: Democratic Republic of Congo, Poland, and Zambia. This report provides a description of the key features of SSC deposits; it identifies their tectonic-sedimentary environments; it illustrates geochemical, geophysical, and geoenvironmental characteristics of SSC deposits; it reviews and evaluates hypotheses on how these deposits formed; it presents exploration and assessment guides; and it lists some gaps in our knowledge about the SSC deposits. A summary follows that provides overviews of many subjects concerning SSC deposits.

  11. Measurements of atmospheric depositions in sites with different pollution levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparative measurements with different precipitation collectors were carried out for a period of three years in nine measuring sites with different pollutant levels. In addition to the total deposition, the dry and wet fractions were also determined. The specimens were analyzed as follows: Conductivity, PH, total dust precipitation with the lead and cadmium fractions; Anions: Chloride, fluoride, nitrate, sulfate and silicates; Cations: Aluminum, calcium, iron, copper, magnesium, manganese, sodium, nickel, zinc and ammonium. The statistical evaluations in principle yield no significant differences between the different deposition collectors. (orig.)

  12. Steam generator deposit control program assessment at Comanche Peak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comanche Peak has employed a variety of methods to assess the effectiveness of the deposit control program. These include typical methods such as an extensive visual inspection program and detailed corrosion product analysis and trending. In addition, a recently pioneered technique, low frequency eddy current profile analysis (LFEC) has been utilized. LFEC provides a visual mapping of the magnetite deposit profile of the steam generator. Analysis of the LFEC results not only provides general area deposition rates, but can also provide local deposition patterns, which is indicative of steam generator performance. Other techniques utilized include trending of steam pressure, steam generator hideout-return, and flow assisted corrosion (FAC) results. The sum of this information provides a comprehensive assessment of the deposit control program effectiveness and the condition of the steam generator. It also provides important diagnostic and predictive information relative to steam generator life management and mitigative strategies, such as special cleaning procedures. This paper discusses the techniques employed by Comanche Peak Chemistry to monitor the effectiveness of the deposit control program and describes how this information is used in strategic planning. (authors)

  13. Assessment of undiscovered sandstone copper deposits of the Kodar-Udokan area, Russia: Chapter M in Global mineral resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zientek, Michael L.; Chechetkin, Vladimir S.; Parks, Heather L.; Box, Stephen E.; Briggs, Deborah A.; Cossette, Pamela M.; Dolgopolova, Alla; Hayes, Timothy S.; Seltmann, Reimar; Syusyura, Boris; Taylor, Cliff D.; Wintzer, Niki E.

    2014-01-01

    Mineral resource assessments integrate and synthesize available information as a basis for estimating the location, quality, and quantity of undiscovered mineral resources. This probabilistic mineral resource assessment of undiscovered sandstone copper deposits within Paleoproterozoic metasedimentary rocks of the Kodar-Udokan area in Russia is a contribution to a global assessment led by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The purposes of this study are to (1) delineate permissive areas (tracts) to indicate where undiscovered sandstone-hosted copper deposits may occur within 2 km of the surface, (2) provide a database of known sandstone copper deposits and significant prospects, (3) estimate numbers of undiscovered deposits within these permissive tracts at several levels of confidence, and (4) provide probabilistic estimates of amounts of copper (Cu) and mineralized rock that could be contained in undiscovered deposits within each tract. The workshop for the assessment, held in October 2009, used a three-part form of mineral resource assessment as described by Singer (1993) and Singer and Menzie (2010).

  14. Teachers' Self-Assessed Level of Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan

    2013-01-01

    We asked high school physics teachers to assess their level of preparation across a number of domains. Almost all (98%) reported feeling adequately or well prepared in terms of their basic physics knowledge. The chart presents teachers' responses to their self-assessed level of preparation in six different areas. Almost all feel at least…

  15. Porphyry copper deposit model: Chapter B in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuso, Robert A.; Barton, Mark D.; Blakely, Richard J.; Bodnar, Robert J.; Dilles, John H.; Gray, Floyd; Graybeal, Fred T.; Mars, John L.; McPhee, Darcy K.; Seal, Robert R., II; Taylor, Ryan D.; Vikre, Peter G.

    2010-01-01

    This report contains a revised descriptive model of porphyry copper deposits (PCDs), the world's largest source (about 60 percent) and resource (about 65 percent) of copper and a major source of molybdenum, gold and silver. Despite relatively low grades (average 0.44 percent copper in 2008), PCDs have significant economic and societal impacts due to their large size (commonly hundreds of millions to billions of metric tons), long mine lives (decades), and high production rates (billions of kilograms of copper per year). The revised model describes the geotectonic setting of PCDs, and provides extensive regional- to deposit-scale descriptions and illustrations of geological, geochemical, geophysical, and geoenvironmental characteristics. Current genetic theories are reviewed and evaluated, knowledge gaps are identified, and a variety of exploration and assessment guides are presented. A summary is included for users seeking overviews of specific topics.

  16. Foundation-Level Dyslexia: Assessment and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Henryka M.; Seymour, Philip H. K.

    1999-01-01

    An assessment of foundation processes was administered to 51 Scottish children with reading difficulties and to 56 reading-level-matched controls. Results suggested the foundation is in place by the reading age of 7 years and that foundation-level dyslexia is identifiable in children with reading difficulty whose reading ages fall below this…

  17. Risk assessment of metals in road-deposited sediment along an urban–rural gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We applied the traditional risk assessment methods originally designed for soils and river sediments to evaluation of risk associated with metals in road-deposited sediment (RDS) along an urban–rural gradient that included central urban (UCA), urban village (UVA), central suburban county (CSA), rural town (RTA), and rural village (RVA) areas in the Beijing metropolitan region. A new indicator RIRDS was developed which integrated the RDS characteristics of mobility, grain size and amount with the potential ecological risk index. The risk associated with metals in RDS in urban areas was generally higher than that in rural areas based on the assessment using traditional methods, but the risk was higher in urban and rural village areas than the areas with higher administration units based on the indicator RIRDS. These findings implied that RDS characteristics variation with the urban–rural gradient must be considered in metal risk assessment and RDS washoff pollution control. Highlights: ► Spatial pattern of metal risk level associated with road-deposited sediment (RDS) along urban–rural gradients varied. ► Risk level of metals changed significantly when grain size was considered. ► A new index integrating RDS characteristics and potential ecological risk was developed. ► Results from the new index were improved relative to those of traditional assessment methods. -- A new index integrating road-deposited sediment characteristics and potential ecological risk was developed to assess metal risk along the urban–rural gradient

  18. Assessing the Emission Sources of Atmospheric Mercury in Wet Deposition Across Illinois, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gratz L. E.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available From August 2007 to August 2009, we collected event-based precipitation samples for mercury (Hg and trace element analysis at four sites in Illinois, USA. The objectives of these measurements were to quantify the levels of Hg wet deposition across the state, and to assess the contributions to Hg in precipitation from major local and regional emission sources. The measurement sites were located in Chicago, Peoria, Nilwood, and Carbondale, IL. We were not able to identify a clear spatial gradient in Hg wet deposition among the sites. At all four locations we frequently observed Hg concentrations in precipitation > 25 ng/L, while each site received > 10 μg/m2 of Hg wet deposition annually, suggesting a substantial impact from local and regional anthropogenic emission sources. We applied the multivariate statistical receptor model Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF to the measured Hg and trace element wet deposition amounts at the four sites. The results suggested that 60-83% of total Hg deposition at each site could be attributed to coal combustion emissions. Although we identified other source signatures in the precipitation composition, including cement manufacturing, metal smelting / waste incineration, and iron-steel production, these sources contributed substantially less to the measured amounts of Hg wet deposition. We also applied the hybrid receptor model Quantitative Transport Bias Analysis (QTBA to the Hg wet deposition data from each site to identify the major source regions associated with the measured values. Results suggested that sources in the Chicago/Gary, St. Louis, and Ohio River Valley urban/industrial areas had a substantial impact on Hg wet deposition, strongly supporting the conclusion that local and regional coal combustion was the largest source of Hg wet deposition in Illinois.

  19. Assessing the Emission Sources of Atmospheric Mercury in Wet Deposition Across Illinois, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Gratz L. E.; Keeler G. J.; Dvonch J. T.; Morishita M; Barres J. A.

    2013-01-01

    From August 2007 to August 2009, we collected event-based precipitation samples for mercury (Hg) and trace element analysis at four sites in Illinois, USA. The objectives of these measurements were to quantify the levels of Hg wet deposition across the state, and to assess the contributions to Hg in precipitation from major local and regional emission sources. The measurement sites were located in Chicago, Peoria, Nilwood, and Carbondale, IL. We were not able to identify a clear spatial gradi...

  20. Screening Level Risk Assessment for the New Waste Calcining Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. L. Abbott; K. N. Keck; R. E. Schindler; R. L. VanHorn; N. L. Hampton; M. B. Heiser

    1999-05-01

    This screening level risk assessment evaluates potential adverse human health and ecological impacts resulting from continued operations of the calciner at the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The assessment was conducted in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) report, Guidance for Performing Screening Level Risk Analyses at Combustion Facilities Burning Hazardous Waste. This screening guidance is intended to give a conservative estimate of the potential risks to determine whether a more refined assessment is warranted. The NWCF uses a fluidized-bed combustor to solidify (calcine) liquid radioactive mixed waste from the INTEC Tank Farm facility. Calciner off volatilized metal species, trace organic compounds, and low-levels of radionuclides. Conservative stack emission rates were calculated based on maximum waste solution feed samples, conservative assumptions for off gas partitioning of metals and organics, stack gas sampling for mercury, and conservative measurements of contaminant removal (decontamination factors) in the off gas treatment system. Stack emissions were modeled using the ISC3 air dispersion model to predict maximum particulate and vapor air concentrations and ground deposition rates. Results demonstrate that NWCF emissions calculated from best-available process knowledge would result in maximum onsite and offsite health and ecological impacts that are less then EPA-established criteria for operation of a combustion facility.

  1. Assessing the Sources of Atmospheric Mercury Wet Deposited in Florida, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvonch J. T.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available From October 2008 through August 2010, event-based precipitation samples for mercury (Hg, trace elements, and major ions analysis were collected at six monitoring sites in Florida, USA. The objectives of these measurements were to quantify the levels of Hg wet deposition across the state, and to assess the contributions to Hg in precipitation from major local and regional emission sources in support of a Hg Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL project. The measurement sites were located in Pensacola, Jacksonville, Orlando, Tampa, Davie, and Everglades National Park. For the period April 2009 through August 2010, Hg wet deposition rates ranged from 26.8 to 38.7 μg/m2 across the six sites. We observed a strong seasonal pattern, with increases in measured Hg concentrations and Hg wet deposition occurring during the summer months, which was further pronounced at the southern sites. We also observed a clear overall spatial gradient in Hg wet deposition, increasing across sites from north to south.

  2. Assessment of the effectiveness of uranium deposit searching methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following groups of uranium deposit searching methods are described: radiometric review of foreign work; aerial radiometric survey; automobile radiometric survey; emanation survey up to 1 m; emanation survey up to 2 m; ground radiometric survey; radiometric survey in pits; deep radiometric survey; combination of the above methods; and other methods (drilling survey). For vein-type deposits, the majority of Czech deposits were discovered in 1945-1965 by radiometric review of foreign work, automobile radiometric survey, and emanation survey up to 1 m. The first significant indications of sandstone type uranium deposits were observed in the mid-1960 by aerial radiometric survey and confirmed later by drilling. (P.A.)

  3. Ecotoxicity assessment at three tropical levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several ecotoxicity test methods have been standardised to ensure international acceptance of data for predicting environmental risk of chemical substances. Test organism, concentration exposure duration, and end point effects are fundamental consideration in these methods. While concentration-exposure and end-point effect such as 96LC50 are easily decided, the choice of test organism species is more complex. The aquatic ecosystem for example is teemed with multitude of species that may show differing response to the same toxicant or pollutant. The basic tests recommended by OECD includes three functionally important types of organisms namely alga, daphnia, and fish that represent three trophical levels. Alga presenting the phytoplankton level is food to daphnia, a zooplankton that is in turn food to fishes. Daphnia species hardly thrives in the tropical environment and is replaced instead by Moina sp. of the same Cladoceran order. The sensitivity of the three types of organisms differs. The LC50/EC50 values of cadmium chloride for tilapia, moina macrocopa and chlorella vulgaris (alga) range from 30 mg/1 to 0.2 mg/1 with moina macrocopa being the most sensitive. The least resistant species is not necessarily at the lowest trophical level. Tests on industrial effluents gave similar trends. Wastewater from an industrial drain that received discharge from chemical-based industries generated the lowest EC50 for moina macrocopa at 0.1%, algae at 0.3% and tilapia at 2.4%. Effluent from a paper processing factory however did not yield any EC50 value for moina while fish and alga had LC50 and EC50 values of 44% and 0.005%, respectively. The trends of acute toxicity tests on fish, moina and alga illustrate the necessity of conducting ecotoxicological testings on at least these three trophical levels. Assessment can be made based on the most sensitive species to ensure protection of the ecosystem through conservation of the food chain cycle. (Author)

  4. Atmospheric nitrogen compounds II: emissions, transport, transformation, deposition and assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aneja, Viney P.; Roelle, Paul A.; Murray, George C.; Southerland, James; Erisman, Jan Willem; Fowler, David; Asman, Willem A. H.; Patni, Naveen

    The Atmospheric Nitrogen Compounds II: Emissions, Transport, Transformation, Deposition and Assessment workshop was held in Chapel Hill, NC from 7 to 9 June 1999. This international conference, which served as a follow-up to the workshop held in March 1997, was sponsored by: North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources; North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, North Carolina Office of the State Health Director; Mid-Atlantic Regional Air Management Association; North Carolina Water Resources Research Institute; Air and Waste Management Association, RTP Chapter; the US Environmental Protection Agency and the North Carolina State University (College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, and North Carolina Agricultural Research Service). The workshop was structured as an open forum at which scientists, policy makers, industry representatives and others could freely share current knowledge and ideas, and included international perspectives. The workshop commenced with international perspectives from the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and Denmark. This article summarizes the findings of the workshop and articulates future research needs and ways to address nitrogen/ammonia from intensively managed animal agriculture. The need for developing sustainable solutions for managing the animal waste problem is vital for shaping the future of North Carolina. As part of that process, all aspects of environmental issues (air, water, soil) must be addressed as part of a comprehensive and long-term strategy. There is an urgent need for North Carolina policy makers to create a new, independent organization that will build consensus and mobilize resources to find technologically and economically feasible solutions to this aspect of the animal waste problem.

  5. A global assessment of forest surface albedo and its relationships with climate and atmospheric nitrogen deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Stefano; Magnani, Federico; Nolè, Angelo; Van Noije, Twan; Borghetti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We present a global assessment of the relationships between the short-wave surface albedo of forests, derived from the MODIS satellite instrument product at 0.5° spatial resolution, with simulated atmospheric nitrogen deposition rates (Ndep ), and climatic variables (mean annual temperature Tm and total annual precipitation P), compiled at the same spatial resolution. The analysis was performed on the following five forest plant functional types (PFTs): evergreen needle-leaf forests (ENF); evergreen broad-leaf forests (EBF); deciduous needle-leaf forests (DNF); deciduous broad-leaf forests (DBF); and mixed-forests (MF). Generalized additive models (GAMs) were applied in the exploratory analysis to assess the functional nature of short-wave surface albedo relations to environmental variables. The analysis showed evident correlations of albedo with environmental predictors when data were pooled across PFTs: Tm and Ndep displayed a positive relationship with forest albedo, while a negative relationship was detected with P. These correlations are primarily due to surface albedo differences between conifer and broad-leaf species, and different species geographical distributions. However, the analysis performed within individual PFTs, strengthened by attempts to select 'pure' pixels in terms of species composition, showed significant correlations with annual precipitation and nitrogen deposition, pointing toward the potential effect of environmental variables on forest surface albedo at the ecosystem level. Overall, our global assessment emphasizes the importance of elucidating the ecological mechanisms that link environmental conditions and forest canopy properties for an improved parameterization of surface albedo in climate models. PMID:25044609

  6. Lithostratigraphy, depositional history and sea level changes of the Cauvery Basin, southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthuvairvasamy Ramkumar

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The sedimentary sequence exposed in the erstwhile Tiruchirapalli district hosts a more or less complete geological record of the Upper Cretaceous-Tertiary period. Systematic field mapping, collation of data on the micro-meso scale lithology, sedimentary structures, petrography, faunal assemblage and facies relationships of these rocks, in the light of modern stratigraphic concepts, helped to enumerate the lithostratigraphic setup and depositional history of the basin. Spatial and temporal variations of the lithologies and revised stratigraphic units are presented in this paper. Many high frequency sea level cycles (presumably fourth or higher order which stack up to form third order sea level cycles (six in number, which in turn form part of second order cycles (two in number, including seven eustatic sea level peaks, have been recorded in this basin. Trend analysis of sea level curves indicates a gradual increase of the sea level from Barremian to Coniacian and a gradual decrease from Coniacian to Danian. Such lasting sea level trends had their influence on the sedimentation pattern and facies association. It is inferred that depositional bathymetry was maintained at a shallow-moderate level, primarily influenced by a lack of major subsidence during the depositional history of this basin. The study also revealed a prevalent simple basin filling process and dominant control by sea level changes, rather than tectonic movements over the depositional regime.

  7. The Influence of Strategic Alternatives on the Increasing Level Value of the Term Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Catalina Turkes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the influence of the strategic alternative on the value level increase of the term deposits attracted from the Romanian’s population households, during the period 2012 – Q1/2015, depending on the change of the standards related to deposits granting in RON, EURO and other currencies, but also depending on the aggregate volume of deposits demand at a national level. One-way ANOVA represents the ideal model to emphasize that the average of the term deposits attracted from the population’s households during the last four years is influenced by the strategic alternative used by the credit institutions. The results of this analysis underlined the fact that there is a strong link between the strategic alternative adopted by the banks and the change of the value level of the term deposits intended for the population. The strategies to attract RON deposits proved to be more efficient compared to the strategies adopted by the banks for other currencies.

  8. Benefits of deposition reduction for nature management; a nation-wide assessment of the relation between atmospheric deposition, ecological quality and avoidable management costs

    OpenAIRE

    Jong, de, M.C.M.; Wamelink, G.W.W.; Dobben, van, H.F.; Wijk, van, A.J.

    2004-01-01

    Alterra was commissioned by the Dutch Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment (VROM) to estimate the additional costs made by nature reserve managers to mitigate the effects of atmospheric deposition. The costs of increasing deposition levels - or the benefits of reducing deposition levels - were calculated from the costs for nature management per Nature Target Type (NTT) for both the current and reduced deposition levels, which result in a similar ecological quality. For th...

  9. Using foliar and forest floor mercury concentrations to assess spatial patterns of mercury deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated spatial patterns of mercury (Hg) deposition through analysis of foliage and forest floor samples from 45 sites across Adirondack Park, NY. Species-specific differences in foliar Hg were evident with the lowest concentrations found in first-year conifer needles and highest concentrations found in black cherry (Prunus serotina). For foliage and forest floor samples, latitude and longitude were negatively correlated with Hg concentrations, likely because of proximity to emission sources, while elevation was positively correlated with Hg concentrations. Elemental analysis showed moderately strong, positive correlations between Hg and nitrogen concentrations. The spatial pattern of Hg deposition across the Adirondacks is similar to patterns of other contaminants that originate largely from combustion sources such as nitrogen and sulfur. The results of this study suggest foliage can be used to assess spatial patterns of Hg deposition in small regions or areas of varied topography where current Hg deposition models are too coarse to predict deposition accurately. - Highlights: • Hg concentrations were negatively correlated with latitude and longitude. • This pattern suggests regional emissions may be affecting mercury deposition rates. • Hg deposition pattern was similar to deposition patterns for N and S. • Foliage samples are a useful indicator of atmospheric Hg deposition rates. - Foliar mercury concentrations reflect current mercury deposition rates and are useful for assessing regional patterns of atmospheric mercury deposition

  10. An investigation for the economic assessment of uranium deposits and mining projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is the aim of this thesis to supply a comprehensive basis for decisions to be made in connection with the detection, exploration, extraction processing and marketing of uranium. The deposit types and forms, the technologies of exploration, extraction and processing as well as the most economic procedure for the exploitation of such deposits are presented in detail. This results in an assessment system which serves to consider the necessity for the construction of uranium ore deposits. (orig./HP)

  11. Critical loads of nitrogen deposition and critical levels of atmospheric ammonia for semi-natural Mediterranean evergreen woodlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pinho

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N has emerged in recent years as a key factor associated with global changes, with impacts on biodiversity, ecosystems functioning and human health. In order to ameliorate the effects of excessive N, safety thresholds such as critical loads (deposition fluxes and levels (concentrations can be established. Few studies have assessed these thresholds for semi-natural Mediterranean ecosystems. Our objective was therefore to determine the critical loads of N deposition and long-term critical levels of atmospheric ammonia for semi-natural Mediterranean evergreen woodlands. We have considered changes in epiphytic lichen communities, one of the most sensitive comunity indicators of excessive N in the atmosphere. Based on a classification of lichen species according to their tolerance to N we grouped species into response functional groups, which we used as a tool to determine the critical loads and levels. This was done for a Mediterranean climate in evergreen cork-oak woodlands, based on the relation between lichen functional diversity and modelled N deposition for critical loads and measured annual atmospheric ammonia concentrations for critical levels, evaluated downwind from a reduced N source (a cattle barn. Modelling the highly significant relationship between lichen functional groups and annual atmospheric ammonia concentration showed the critical level to be below 1.9 μg m−3, in agreement with recent studies for other ecosystems. Modelling the highly significant relationship between lichen functional groups and N deposition showed that the critical load was lower than 26 kg (N ha−1 yr−1, which is within the upper range established for other semi-natural ecosystems. Taking into account the high sensitivity of lichen communities to excessive N, these values should aid development of policies to protect Mediterranean woodlands from the initial effects of excessive N.

  12. Financial Sector Assessment Program : Malaysia - Core Principles for Effective Deposit Insurance Systems

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund; World Bank

    2013-01-01

    This assessment of compliance with the Core Principles for Effective Deposit Insurance Systems (Core Principles) was conducted as a part of the Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP) performed by the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank at the request of the Malaysian government. This assessment was conducted by Claire McGuire, Senior Financial Sector Specialist with the Worl...

  13. Do N-isotopes in atmospheric nitrate deposition reflect air pollution levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyn, Fabian; Matthias, Volker; Aulinger, Armin; Dähnke, Kirstin

    2015-04-01

    Dry and wet deposition of atmospheric reactive nitrogen compounds mostly originate from anthropogenic NH3 and NOX sources. Regarding land-borne pollutants, coastal environments usually have a lower pollution level than terrestrial/urban areas, which have a greater anthropogenic imprint. To investigate this spatial characteristic, we measured NO3- and NH4+ deposition and N isotopes of NO3-(δ15N-NO3-) in 94 and 88 wet and dry deposition samples, respectively, at a coastal (List on Sylt) and a terrestrial/urban site (Geesthacht) in Germany from May 2012 to May 2013. A higher total N deposition rate was observed in Geesthacht (10.4 vs. 8.9 kg N ha-1 yr-1) due to higher NH4+ deposition, which can be explained by more agricultural influence. Surprisingly, overall NO3- fluxes were higher at the coastal site than at the terrestrial/urban site. We assume that sea-salt aerosols and the increased influence of NOX emissions from ships in most recent times compensate the higher terrestrial/urban pollution level and thus lead to higher NO3- fluxes in dry and comparable fluxes in wet deposition at the coastal site, despite a much lower impact of land-based sources. In line with this, overall mean N isotopes values of NO3- show higher values in List than in Geesthacht in dry (+3.1 vs. +1.9‰) as well as in wet deposition (-0.1 vs. -1.0‰). This surprising result can mainly be attributed to an emerging source of NOX, ship emissions, which have a distinctly higher impact at the coastal site. The usage of heavy oil and possibly new technologies in marine engines, which emit more enriched 15N in comparison to older engines, caused the spatial isotopic differences.

  14. A comparative analysis of deep level emission in ZnO layers deposited by various methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examined the origin of visible luminescence from ZnO layers deposited on p-Si substrates by various growth methods using temperature dependent photoluminescence measurements. The deep level emissions of ZnO layers are found to be strongly dependent on the growth conditions and growth methods used. For the samples grown by sputtering, the visible emission consisted of violet, green, and orange-red regions, which corresponded to zinc interstitial (Zni), oxygen vacancy (VO), and oxygen interstitial (Oi) defect levels, respectively. In contrast, the deep level emissions of metal organic chemical vapor deposition grown samples consisted of blue and green emissions and blue and orange-red emissions at low and high oxygen flow rates, respectively. The ZnO nanorods synthesized by thermal evaporation showed a dominant deep level emission at the green region, which is associated with oxygen vacancies (VO)

  15. Higher level learning outcomes attained through assessment.

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Carravilla; José Fernando Oliveira; Manuel Pina Marques

    2012-01-01

    Bloom#8217;s taxonomy for learning domains proposes six categories for the cognitive domain, that go from the basic remembering of facts and definitions to the complex creation act, in which new knowledge structures or patterns are built or new meanings assigned. The Bologna Declaration strained the emphasis on the learning outcomes and on their alignment with the assessment. In this paper a step forward is proposed, in which the assessment process itself has a central role in the attainment ...

  16. The Assessment of National Price Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Kravis, Irving B; Lipsey, Robert E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper attempts to find norms for long-run national price levels,and therefore, by implication, for exchange rates, that are superior to those implied by the absolute or relative versions of purchasing power parity theory. The structural variables we have found to determine these price levels, real income per capita, the openness of the economy, and the share of tradables in total output, are used to explain price levels in periods since 1960 and to some extent since 1950.The results sugg...

  17. Base level change and depositional filling response of Jurassic in the Qiangtang Basin of Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The base level during the deposition of Jurassic in the Qiangtang Basin shows a complete cycle from rising to falling. The base level change is closely connected with tectonic evolution of the basin,especially connected with Bangonghu-Nujiang ocean evolution process in the formation and evolution of the basin. It is also affected by climate. The Jurassic strata correspond to a long-term base level cycle sequence. The sequence is in fact a non-complete symmetrical cycle,consisting of rising hemicycle and falling hemicycle. It can be divided into 6 intermediate-term base level cycle sequences,including 2 carbonate sequences,3 mixture sedimentary sequences of carbonate and clastic rocks and one clastic sedimentary sequence. Depositional filling characteristics during base level change show that Bangonghu-Nujiang ocean spreads in Toarcian-Bajocian ages,and is at the height of spreading of Bangonghu-Nujiang ocean in Bathonian-Oxfordian ages. In that process,sea area became smaller because of the dry climate. Eventually,marine depositional filling is ended with the subduction and collision of Bangonghu-Nujiang ocean.

  18. Methodology for quantifying uncertainty in coal assessments with an application to a Texas lignite deposit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olea, Ricardo A.; Luppens, James A.; Tewalt, Susan J. [U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    A common practice for characterizing uncertainty in coal resource assessments has been the itemization of tonnage at the mining unit level and the classification of such units according to distance to drilling holes. Distance criteria, such as those used in U.S. Geological Survey Circular 891, are still widely used for public disclosure. A major deficiency of distance methods is that they do not provide a quantitative measure of uncertainty. Additionally, relying on distance between data points alone does not take into consideration other factors known to have an influence on uncertainty, such as spatial correlation, type of probability distribution followed by the data, geological discontinuities, and boundary of the deposit. Several geostatistical methods have been combined to formulate a quantitative characterization for appraising uncertainty. Drill hole datasets ranging from widespread exploration drilling to detailed development drilling from a lignite deposit in Texas were used to illustrate the modeling. The results show that distance to the nearest drill hole is almost completely unrelated to uncertainty, which confirms the inadequacy of characterizing uncertainty based solely on a simple classification of resources by distance classes. The more complex statistical methods used in this study quantify uncertainty and show good agreement between confidence intervals in the uncertainty predictions and data from additional drilling. (author)

  19. A deposit model for Mississippi Valley-Type lead-zinc ores: Chapter A in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, David L.; Taylor, Ryan D.; Fey, David L.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Saltus, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    This report is a descriptive model of Mississippi Valley-Type (MVT) lead-zinc deposits that presents their geological, mineralogical and geochemical attributes and is part of an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey Mineral Resources Program to update existing models and develop new models that will be used for an upcoming national mineral resource assessment. This deposit modeling effort by the USGS is intended to supplement previously published models for use in mineral-resource and mineral-environmental assessments. Included in this report are geological, geophysical and geochemical assessment guides to assist in mineral resource estimation. The deposit attributes, including grade and tonnage of the deposits described in this report are based on a new mineral deposits data set of all known MVT deposits in the world.

  20. Modelling pollutant deposition to vegetation: scaling down from the canopy to the biochemical level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the atmosphere, pollutants exist in either the gas, particle or liquid (rain and cloud water) phase. The most important gas-phase pollutants from a biological or ecological perspective are oxides of nitrogen (nitrogen dioxide, nitric acid vapor), oxides of sulfur (sulfur dioxide), ammonia, tropospheric ozone and mercury vapor. For liquid or particle phase pollutants, the suite of pollutants is varied and includes hydrogen ion, multiple heavy metals, and select anions. For many of these pollutants, plant canopies are a major sink within continental landscapes, and deposition is highly dependent on the (i) physical form or phase of the pollutant, (ii) meteorological conditions above and within the plant canopy, and (iii) physiological or biochemical properties of the leaf, both on the leaf surface and within the leaf interior. In large measure, the physical and chemical processes controlling deposition at the meteorological and whole-canopy levels are well characterized and have been mathematically modelled. In contrast, the processes operating on the leaf surface and within the leaf interior are not well understood and are largely specific for individual pollutants. The availability of process-level models to estimate deposition is discussed briefly at the canopy and leaf level; however, the majority of effort is devoted to modelling deposition at the leaf surface and leaf interior using the two-layer stagnant film model. This model places a premium on information of a physiological and biochemical nature, and highlights the need to distinguish clearly between the measurements of atmospheric chemistry and the physiologically effective exposure since the two may be very dissimilar. A case study of deposition in the Los Angeles Basin is used to demonstrate the modelling approach, to present the concept of exposure dynamics in the atmosphere versus that in the leaf interior, and to document the principle that most forest canopies are exposed to multiple chemical

  1. Attitude level of prospective science teachers towards assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efendi, Ridwan; Rustaman, Nuryani Y.

    2016-02-01

    A descriptive study about attitude level of prospective science teachers towards assessment was conducted with the involvement of 67 prospective science teachers from four state universities in western part of the Indonesian region and middle part of Indonesia region. Data collected by using the questionnaire consisted of four aspects, id est. prospective science teachers attitude towards assessment (cognitive level of assessment, type of assessment, and criterion of evaluation), prospective science teachers instructional practice, internal difficulties that prospective science teachers experienced related to their assessment skills, and the use of assessment process of prospective science teachers. Determination of attitude level detected from prospective science teachers was carried out in descriptive statistics, in the form of respondent average values. Research finding shows that attitude level of prospective science teachers towards assessment can be categorized as "close to constructivist".

  2. Itataia's deposit - Structural zoning of a pit until the level 480 meters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is part of Itataia Project-Geotechnics; in it are introduced several comments concerning the structural zoning of a pit in Itataias' phosphorous-uranipherous deposit, until the level 480 meters. The structural parameters (fractures, faults, foliations) obtained in surface and underground works were statistically treated. Stereographic projection was used to define eventual slipping into the pit. All the data were arranged in tables to make it easy the comparison with experimental pits. (author)

  3. Messinian evaporite deposition during sea level rise in the Gulf of Lions (Western Mediterranean)

    OpenAIRE

    Bache, François; Gargani, Julien; Suc, Jean-Pierre; Gorini, Christian; Rabineau, Marina; Popescu, Speranta-Maria; Leroux, Estelle; Do Couto, Damien; Rubino, Jean-Loup; Olivet, Jean-Louis; Clauzon, Georges; Dos Reis, Antonio Tadeu; Aslanian, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    International audience The Messinian Salinity Crisis resulted from desiccation of the Mediterranean Sea after its isolation from the Atlantic Ocean at the end of the Miocene. Stratal geometry tied to borehole data in the Gulf of Lions show that the pre-crisis continental shelf has been eroded during a major sea-level fall and that sedi-ments from this erosion have been deposited in the basin. This detrital package is onlapped by high amplitude seismic reflectors overlain by the "Messinian ...

  4. Performance assessment strategy for low-level waste disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff views on predicting the performance of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. Under the Atomic Energy Act, as amended, and the Low Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act, as amended, the NRC and Agreement States license land disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) using the requirements in 10 CFR Part 61 or comparable state requirements. The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe regulatory requirements for performance assessment in low-level waste licensing, a strategy for performance assessments to support license applications, and NRC staff licensing evaluation of performance assessments. NRC's current activities in developing a performance assessment methodology will provide an overall systems modeling approach for assessing the performance of LLW disposal facilities. NRC staff will use the methodology to evaluate performance assessments conducted by applicants for LLW disposal facilities. The methodology will be made available to states and other interested parties

  5. Energy absorption at cellular levels from curium isotopes deposited in the lung tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curium isotopes are generated hitherto as a waste product in nuclear energy production. Exposure in humans has occured mainly via inhalation. After reprocessing of spent reactor fuel these nuclides represent the highest alpha activity during the first 60 years. Therefore it is necessary to study the resulting radiation exposure in man after a accidental contamination. Lung tissue sections were analysed for histological characteristics by means of adaptive pattern recognition methods, using an electronic image analyzer. Alpha particle tracks were superimposed and interaction with cellular structures was simulated. Cell frequency distribution, along with specific hit-probability is used to assess quantitatively the resulting energy deposition in the single cells

  6. Assessment of toxicity in waters due to heavy metals derived from atmospheric deposition using Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukurluoglu, Sibel; Muezzinoglu, Aysen

    2013-01-01

    Water toxicity originating from the atmospheric deposition of six heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) was investigated on Vibrio fischeri activity in Izmir, Turkey. A LUMIStox® test was applied to dry and wet deposition samples and metal solutions. The inhibition levels and effective toxicity concentrations of these samples and solutions were determined. Interactive toxicity effects among the metals were investigated. When the impacts of the synthetic single heavy metal solutions were compared with each other, a toxicity ranking of Cr>Cd>Pb>Cu>Zn>Ni was obtained in order of decreasing severity. The total effective concentrations of these six metals were in the ranges of 0.074-0.221 mg/L and 0.071-0.225 mg/L for receiving aqueous solutions of dry and wet atmospheric depositions, respectively. The toxicity data showed that the wet deposition samples were 15% more toxic than the dry deposition samples. The interactive toxicity effects of the heavy metals in both dry and wet deposition samples were classified as antagonistic. High levels of heavy metals deposited in dissolved form may constitute an important input in the biochemical cycle and may have significant impacts. PMID:23030388

  7. The timing of Mediterranean sapropel deposition relative to insolation, sea-level and African monsoon changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, K. M.; Grimm, R.; Mikolajewicz, U.; Marino, G.; Ziegler, M.; Rohling, E. J.

    2016-05-01

    The Mediterranean basin is sensitive to global sea-level changes and African monsoon variability on orbital timescales. Both of these processes are thought to be important to the deposition of organic-rich sediment layers or 'sapropels' throughout the eastern Mediterranean, yet their relative influences remain ambiguous. A related issue is that an assumed 3-kyr lag between boreal insolation maxima and sapropel mid-points remains to be tested. Here we present new geochemical and ice-volume-corrected planktonic foraminiferal stable isotope records for sapropels S1 (Holocene), S3, S4, and S5 (Marine Isotope Stage 5) in core LC21 from the southern Aegean Sea. The records have a radiometrically constrained chronology that has already been synchronised with the Red Sea relative sea-level record, and this allows detailed examination of the timing of sapropel deposition relative to insolation, sea-level, and African monsoon changes. We find that sapropel onset was near-synchronous with monsoon run-off into the eastern Mediterranean, but that insolation-sapropel/monsoon phasings were not systematic through the last glacial cycle. These latter phasings instead appear to relate to sea-level changes. We propose that persistent meltwater discharges into the North Atlantic (e.g., at glacial terminations) modified the timing of sapropel deposition by delaying the timing of peak African monsoon run-off. These observations may reconcile apparent model-data offsets with respect to the orbital pacing of the African monsoon. Our observations also imply that the previous assumption of a systematic 3-kyr lag between insolation maxima and sapropel midpoints may lead to overestimated insolation-sapropel phasings. Finally, we surmise that both sea-level rise and monsoon run-off contributed to surface-water buoyancy changes at times of sapropel deposition, and their relative influences differed per sapropel case, depending on their magnitudes. Sea-level rise was clearly important for

  8. Proceedings for a Workshop on Deposit Modeling, Mineral Resource Assessment, and Their Role in Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briskey, Joseph A., (Edited By); Schulz, Klaus J.

    2007-01-01

    Preface The world's use of nonfuel mineral resources continues to increase to support a growing population and increasing standards of living. The ability to meet this increasing demand is affected especially by concerns about possible environmental degradation associated with minerals production and by competing land uses. What information does the world need to support global minerals development in a sustainable way? Informed planning and decisions concerning sustainability and future mineral resource supply require a long-term perspective and an integrated approach to resource, land use, economic, and environmental management worldwide. Such perspective and approach require unbiased information on the global distribution of identified and especially undiscovered resources, the economic and political factors influencing their development, and the potential environmental consequences of their exploitation. The U.S. Geological Survey and the former Deposit Modeling Program of the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) sponsored a workshop on 'Deposit Modeling, Mineral Resource Assessment, and Their Role in Sustainable Development' at the 31st International Geological Congress (IGC) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on August 18-19, 2000. The purpose of the workshop was to review the state-of-the-art in mineral deposit modeling and resource assessment and to examine the role of global assessments of nonfuel mineral resources in sustainable development. The workshop addressed questions such as the following: Which of the available mineral deposit models and assessment methods are best suited for predicting the locations, deposit types, and amounts of undiscovered nonfuel mineral resources remaining in the world? What is the availability of global geologic, mineral deposit, and mineral exploration information? How can mineral resource assessments be used to address economic and

  9. Quantitative measurement of aerosol deposition on skin, hair and clothing for dosimetric assessment. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past, very little thought has been given to the processes and implications of deposition of potentially hazardous aerosol directly onto humans. This state of unpreparedness is unsatisfactory and suitable protocols have been developed and validated for tracer experiments to investigate the deposition and subsequent fate of contaminant aerosol on skin, hair and clothing. The main technique applied involves the release and subsequent deposition on volunteers in test rooms of particles of different sizes labelled with neutron activatable rare earth tracers. Experiments indicate that the deposition velocity to skin increases linearly with the particle size. A wind tunnel experiment simulating outdoor conditions showed a dependence on skin deposition velocity of wind speed, indicating that outdoor deposition velocities may be great. Both in vivo and in vitro experiments were conducted, and the influence of various factors, such as surface type, air flow, heating and electrostatics were examined. The dynamics of particle removal from human skin were studied by fluorescence scanning. This technique was also applied to estimate the fraction of aerosol dust transferred to skin by contact with a contaminated surface. The various parameters determined were applied to establish a model for calculation of radiation doses received from deposition of airborne radioactive aerosol on human body surfaces. It was found that the gamma doses from deposition on skin may be expected to be of the same order of magnitude as the gamma doses received over the first year from contamination on outdoor surfaces. According to the calculations, beta doses from skin deposition to individuals in areas of Russia, where dry deposition of Chernobyl fallout led to very high levels of contamination, may have amounted to several Sievert and may thus be responsible for a significant cancer risk. (au)

  10. Quantitative measurement of aerosol deposition on skin, hair and clothing for dosimetric assessment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogh, C.L.; Byrne, M.A.; Andersson, K.G.; Bell, K.F.; Roed, J.; Goddard, A.J.H.; Vollmair, D.V.; Hotchkiss, S.A.M

    1999-06-01

    In the past, very little thought has been given to the processes and implications of deposition of potentially hazardous aerosol directly onto humans. This state of unpreparedness is unsatisfactory and suitable protocols have been developed and validated for tracer experiments to investigate the deposition and subsequent fate of contaminant aerosol on skin, hair and clothing. The main technique applied involves the release and subsequent deposition on volunteers in test rooms of particles of different sizes labelled with neutron activatable rare earth tracers. Experiments indicate that the deposition velocity to skin increases linearly with the particle size. A wind tunnel experiment simulating outdoor conditions showed a dependence on skin deposition velocity of wind speed, indicating that outdoor deposition velocities may be great. Both in vivo and in vitro experiments were conducted, and the influence of various factors, such as surface type, air flow, heating and electrostatics were examined. The dynamics of particle removal from human skin were studied by fluorescence scanning. This technique was also applied to estimate the fraction of aerosol dust transferred to skin by contact with a contaminated surface. The various parameters determined were applied to establish a model for calculation of radiation doses received from deposition of airborne radioactive aerosol on human body surfaces. It was found that the gamma doses from deposition on skin may be expected to be of the same order of magnitude as the gamma doses received over the first year from contamination on outdoor surfaces. According to the calculations, beta doses from skin deposition to individuals in areas of Russia, where dry deposition of Chernobyl fallout led to very high levels of contamination, may have amounted to several Sievert and may thus be responsible for a significant cancer risk. (au)

  11. Spring deposits and late pleistocene ground-wter levels in southern Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ground-water discharge deposits dating to the last glacial cycle and to several earlier cycles crop out in at least ten valleys in the southern Great Basin. The elevation and distribution of these deposits allow us to reconstruct the elevation of the water table during periods of wetter climate over much of the region, including the area around Yucca Mountain, site of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository. Results from areas undisturbed by recent ground-water pumpage reveal that water levels have varied by < 115 m, and in most cases much less, in the latter half of the Quaternary. The extent of ground-water discharge during older wet cycles is similar in scale to discharge during the last full-glacial period. This places most of the proposed repository horizon at least 85 to 285 m above the maximum levels attained by the water table under full-glacial climates. During the late-glacial period (∼11,500 to 8000 B.P.), a pulse of renewed discharge, perhaps corresponding to the Younger Dryas event well-documented elsewhere, produced organic-rich mats and flowing streams in many localities

  12. Assessing the emission sources of atmospheric mercury in wet deposition across Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratz, Lynne E; Keeler, Gerald J; Morishita, Masako; Barres, James A; Dvonch, J Timothy

    2013-03-15

    From August 4, 2007 to August 31, 2009, we collected event-based precipitation samples for mercury (Hg) and trace element analyses at four sites in Illinois (IL), USA. The objectives of these measurements were to quantify Hg wet deposition across the state, and to assess the contributions to Hg in precipitation from major local and regional emission sources. Monitoring sites were located, from north to south, in Chicago, Peoria, Nilwood, and Carbondale, IL. Measurements from these four sites demonstrated that a clear spatial gradient in Hg wet deposition was not evident across the state. Each site received>10μgm(-2) of Hg wet deposition annually, and these observed values were comparable to annual Hg wet deposition measurements from other event-based precipitation monitoring sites in source-impacted areas of the Midwestern U.S. We applied the multivariate statistical receptor model, Positive Matrix Factorization (EPA PMF v3.0), to the measured Hg and trace element wet deposition amounts at the four sites. Results suggested that 50% to 74% of total Hg wet deposition at each site could be attributed to coal combustion emissions. The other source signatures identified in the precipitation compositions included cement manufacturing, mixed metal smelting/waste incineration, iron-steel production, and a phosphorus source. We also applied a hybrid receptor model, Quantitative Transport Bias Analysis (QTBA), to the Hg wet deposition datasets to identify the major source regions associated with the measured values. The calculated QTBA probability fields suggested that transport from urban/industrial areas, such as Chicago/Gary, St. Louis, and the Ohio River Valley, resulted in some of the highest estimated event-based Hg wet deposition amounts at the four sites (potential mass transfer of up to 0.32μgm(-2)). The combined application of PMF and QTBA supported the hypothesis that local and regional coal combustion was the largest source of Hg wet deposition in Illinois

  13. Dynamic geochemical models to assess deposition impacts of metals for soils and surface waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenenberg, J.E.; Tipping, E.; Bonten, L.T.C.; Vries, de W.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of geochemical models to assess the impacts of the deposition of metals on the concentrations of metals in soils and surface waters. We describe three dynamic models: SMART2-metals, SMARTml and CHUM-AM, each with their specific purpose and geographical scale of applica

  14. Quantitative measurement of aerosol deposition on skin, hair and clothing for dosimetric assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deposition to human body surfaces of potentially hazardous aerosol has been investigated through tracer experiments. Particles of different sizes labelled with neutron activatable rare earth tracers were released in test rooms and deposited on volunteers. Various sampling techniques to examine the clearance and retention of the aerosol to skin, hair and clothing were investigated, and a protocol for the most efficient procedure was established and validated. Experiments indicate that the deposition velocity to skin increases linearly with the particle size. A wind tunnel experiment simulating outdoor conditions showed outdoor deposition velocities to be almost an order of magnitude higher than those recorded indoors. Both in vivo and in vitro experiments were conducted, and the influence of various factors, such as surface type, air flow, heating and electrostatics were examined. The dynamics of particle removal from human skin were studied by fluorescence scanning. Using the experimentally determined parameters, a model was established for calculation of radiation doses received from deposition of airborne radioactive aerosol on human body surfaces. It was found that the gamma doses that could be expected from deposition on skin were of the same order of magnitude as the gamma doses received over several years from contamination on outdoor surfaces. Assuming very high dry contamination levels, as were recorded in some areas of Russia after the Chernobyl accident, it was found that beta doses from skin deposition may amount to several Sievert and thus be responsible for a significant cancer risk. (au)

  15. Quantitative measurement of aerosol deposition on skin, hair and clothing for dosimetric assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roed, J.; Andersson, J.G.; Bell, K.F.; Byrne, M.A.; Fogh, C.L.; Goddard, A.J.H.; Vollmair, D.V.

    1998-01-01

    The deposition to human body surfaces of potentially hazardous aerosol has been investigated through tracer experiments. Particles of different sizes labelled with neutron activatable rare earth tracers were released in test rooms and deposited on volunteers. Various sampling techniques to examine the clearance and retention of the aerosol to skin, hair and clothing were investigated, and a protocol for the most efficient procedure was established and validated. Experiments indicate that the deposition velocity to skin increases linearly with the particle size. A wind tunnel experiment simulating outdoor conditions showed outdoor deposition velocities to be almost an order of magnitude higher than those recorded indoors. Both in vivo and in vitro experiments were conducted, and the influence of various factors, such as surface type, air flow, heating and electrostatics were examined. The dynamics of particle removal from human skin were studied by fluorescence scanning. Using the experimentally determined parameters, a model was established for calculation of radiation doses received from deposition of airborne radioactive aerosol on human body surfaces. It was found that the gamma doses that could be expected from deposition on skin were of the same order of magnitude as the gamma doses received over several years from contamination on outdoor surfaces. Assuming very high dry contamination levels, as were recorded in some areas of Russia after the Chernobyl accident, it was found that beta doses from skin deposition may amount to several Sievert and thus be responsible for a significant cancer risk. (au). 12 tabs., 9 ills., 43 refs.

  16. Economic filters for evaluating porphyry copper deposit resource assessments using grade-tonnage deposit models, with examples from the U.S. Geological Survey global mineral resource assessment: Chapter H in Global mineral resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gilpin R., Jr.; Menzie, W. David

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of the amount and location of undiscovered mineral resources that are likely to be economically recoverable is important for assessing the long-term adequacy and availability of mineral supplies. This requires an economic evaluation of estimates of undiscovered resources generated by traditional resource assessments (Singer and Menzie, 2010). In this study, simplified engineering cost models were used to estimate the economic fraction of resources contained in undiscovered porphyry copper deposits, predicted in a global assessment of copper resources. The cost models of Camm (1991) were updated with a cost index to reflect increases in mining and milling costs since 1989. The updated cost models were used to perform an economic analysis of undiscovered resources estimated in porphyry copper deposits in six tracts located in North America. The assessment estimated undiscovered porphyry copper deposits within 1 kilometer of the land surface in three depth intervals.

  17. METHODOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO THE ASSESSMENT LEVEL OF SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Vorona, E.

    2010-01-01

    A study of current approaches to assessing the level of social responsibility. Proposed methodological approach to evaluating the performance of the social responsibility of railway transport. Conceptual Basis of social reporting in rail transport.

  18. Population-level assessments should be emphasized over community/ecosystem-level assessments. Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 1535

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arguments are presented in favor of emphasizing population-level assessments over community/ecosystem-level assessments. The two approaches are compared on each of four issues: (1) the nature of entrainment/impingement impacts; (2) the ability to forecast reliably for a single fish population as contrasted to the ability to forecast for an aquatic community or ecosystem; (3) practical considerations involving money, manpower, time, and the need to make decisions; and (4) the nature of societal and economic concerns. The conclusion on each of these four issues is that population-level assessments provide the optimal approach for evaluating the effects of entrainment and impingement mortality

  19. B Plant low level waste system integrity assessment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides the report of the integrity assessment activities for the B Plant low level waste system. The assessment activities were in response to requirements of the Washington State Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC), 173-303-640. This integrity assessment report supports compliance with Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order interim milestone target action M-32-07-T03

  20. Improving reporting of uncertainties in sea level rise assessments

    OpenAIRE

    Kettle, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    Sea level rise (SLR) assessments are commonly used to identify the extent that coastal populations are at risk to flooding. However, the data and assumptions used to develop these assessments contain numerous sources and types of uncertainty, which limit confidence in the accuracy of modeled results. This study illustrates how the intersection of uncertainty in digital elevation models (DEMs) and SLR lead to a wide range of modeled outcomes. SLR assessments are then reviewed to id...

  1. Assessment of pulmonary aerosol deposition and epithelial permeability in 99mTc-DTPA inhalation scintigram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degree of lung injury in bronchiolo-alveolar lesions may be quantitated from the pulmonary epithelial permeability estimated by 99mTc-diethylene triamine penta acetate (DTPA) aerosol inhalation scintigram. However, significant aerosol deposition sometimes occurs in the central airways and obscures the peameability change in the lung periphery. The radioaerosol deposition pattern and its effct on assessing the pulmonary epithelial permeability was studied. 99mTc-DTPA aerosol scintigraphy was performed in 47 patients with pulmonary fibrosis (PF), 12 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD), and 27 non-smoking and 17 smoking healthy volunteers. The scintigraphic images of the lungs were classified into 4 grades: 0=homogeneous distribution; 1=patchy distribution; 2=hot spots with partial defects; and 3= hot spots with little deposition in the lung field. The rate constant was used as a parameter for the permeability. The smokers and patients with PF showed increased kep values of 2.36±1.21%/min (mean±SD) and 2.49±1.29% min as compared with the nonsmokers with 0.94±0.27% min, respectively. The nonsmokers, smokers and 36 patients with PF were classified as deposition grade 0 or 1, suggesting good aerosol penetration to the lung periphery. All patients with COPD showed either grade 2 or 3 deposition. Aerosol deposition in the central airways can cause underestimation of the permeability because of the thicker lining layer in the bronchus than in the alveolus. In conclusion, the aerosol deposition pattern should be analyzed when the method is applied clinically to assess the permeability of the bronchiolo-alveolar epithelium. (author)

  2. Guatemala - Poverty assessment : good performance at low levels

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2009-01-01

    This report is organized into three sections with seven chapters. The first section assesses poverty levels and changes over time within Guatemala and compares both the levels and changes to those of other countries. It summarizes the overall conditions and changes in Guatemala (chapter one); presents the country's poverty profile and analyzes the evolution of poverty over time and space u...

  3. Assessing Static and Dynamic Influences on Inmate Violence Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Inmate misconduct creates problems for other inmates as well as correctional staff. Most empirical assessments of the correlates of inmate misconduct have been conducted at the individual level; however, a facility's level of misconduct may be of equal importance to prison management and state officials because these numbers can reflect order, or…

  4. Hanford low-level tank waste interim performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Interim Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the disposal of the low-level fraction of the Hanford single and double-shell tank waste in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This report was prepared as a good management practice to provide needed information about the relationship between the disposal system design and performance early in the disposal system project cycle. The calculations in this performance assessment show that the disposal of the low-level fraction can meet environmental and health performance objectives

  5. Hanford low-level tank waste interim performance assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, F.M.

    1997-09-12

    The Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Interim Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the disposal of the low-level fraction of the Hanford single and double-shell tank waste in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This report was prepared as a good management practice to provide needed information about the relationship between the disposal system design and performance early in the disposal system project cycle. The calculations in this performance assessment show that the disposal of the low-level fraction can meet environmental and health performance objectives.

  6. Economic valuation of acidic deposition damages: Preliminary results from the 1985 NAPAP [National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program] damage assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper identifies methods used to evaluate the economic damages of acid deposition in the 1985 Damage Assessment being coordinated by the National Acid Precipitation Program. It also presents the preliminary estimates of economic damages for the Assessment. Economic damages are estimated for four effect areas: commercial agriculture and forests, recreational fishing and selected types of materials. In all but the last area, methods are used which incorporate the behavioral responses of individuals and firms or simulated physical damages to resources at risk. The preliminary nature of the estimated damages in each area is emphasized. Over all, the damage estimates should be interpreted with caution. 44 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  7. Advanced Level Biology Teachers' Attitudes towards Assessment and Their Engagement in Assessment for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramwell-Lalor, Sharon; Rainford, Marcia

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a Mixed Methods study involving an investigation into the attitudes of advanced level biology teachers towards assessment and describes the teachers' experiences while being engaged in Assessment for Learning (AfL) practices such as sharing of learning objectives and peer- and self-assessment. Quantitative data were collected…

  8. Process for Selecting System Level Assessments for Human System Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, James; Park, John

    2006-01-01

    The integration of many life support systems necessary to construct a stable habitat is difficult. The correct identification of the appropriate technologies and corresponding interfaces is an exhaustive process. Once technologies are selected secondary issues such as mechanical and electrical interfaces must be addressed. The required analytical and testing work must be approached in a piecewise fashion to achieve timely results. A repeatable process has been developed to identify and prioritize system level assessments and testing needs. This Assessment Selection Process has been defined to assess cross cutting integration issues on topics at the system or component levels. Assessments are used to identify risks, encourage future actions to mitigate risks, or spur further studies.

  9. Preliminary radiological assessments of low-level waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary assessments of the post-closure radiological impact from the disposal of low-level radioactive wastes in shallow engineered facilities at four sites are presented. This provides a framework to practice and refine a methodology that could be used, on behalf of the Department, for independent assessment of any similar proposal from Nirex. Information and methodological improvements that would be required are identified. (author)

  10. LEAF WASHING AS AN ASSESSMENT TOOL TO CHARACTERIZE DRY ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION

    OpenAIRE

    Livia Vittori Antisari; Serena Carbone; Chiara Ferronato; Andrea Simoni; Gilmo Vianello

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize dry atmospheric deposition after the washing of broad leaves and conifer foliage. To assess this method different sites chosen on the basis of different exposure to both point (e.g. waste incinerator plant (WIP), local crafts) and widespread (e.g. roads, agricultural practices) sources of anthropogenic pollution.The principal components analysis (PCA), performed on the major and trace elements identified after leaf washing, extracted four factors. F2 w...

  11. Extreme-wave deposits in the Caribbean - towards an improved tsunami hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Max; Oetjen, Jan; May, S. Matthias; Brückner, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    Coastal zones worldwide experience considerable population pressure and demand for a management of hazards such as tsunamis. Tsunami hazard assessment is the initial step of the management process and requires reliable information on frequency and magnitude. In areas with short historical documentation, these long-term frequency-magnitude patterns, which are best explained by inverse power-law functions, mainly rely on geological traces. According to the historical record covering the last 520 years, Caribbean tsunami hazard is demonstrated by more than 80 mostly regional or local seismically induced events. However, based on two numerical hydrodynamic models of tsunamis spawning at the Muertos Trough and the South Caribbean Deformed Belt (SCBD), two trigger scenarios only marginally considered so far, we show that pan-Caribbean tsunamis can be taken into account as well. We furthermore review more than 50 studies for possible geological evidence of tsunamis in the Caribbean including fine-grained subsurface deposits and subaerial coarse clasts, and re-evaluate their implications for tsunami hazard assessment against state-of-the-art models of tsunami deposition. Only a limited number of reliable palaeotsunami records with consistent and robust age control were identified, hampering inter-island or interregional correlation of deposits. Separating between storm and tsunami transport of solitary boulders is very difficult in most cases. Those arranged in ridges or incorporated into polymodal ridge complexes or ramparts, respectively, which line many windward coasts of the Caribbean, can mainly be attributed to long-term formation during strong storms implying the overprinting of potential tsunami signatures. The quantification of parameters of tsunami flooding based on tsunami deposits, such as flow depth, inundation distance or flow velocity, by applying inverse and forward numerical models of sediment transport is still underdeveloped in the Caribbean and needs to

  12. Assessment of LANL solid low-level waste management documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE Order 5820.2A requires that a system performance assessment be conducted to assure efficient and compliant management of all radioactive waste. The objective of this report is to determine the present status of the Radioactive Waste Operations Section's capabilities regarding preparation and maintenance of appropriate criteria, plans and procedures and identify particular areas where these documents are not presently in existence or being fully implemented. DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management, Chapter III sets forth the requirements and guidelines for preparation and implementation of criteria, plans and procedures to be utilized in the management of solid low-level waste. The documents being assessed in this report are: Solid Low-Level Waste Acceptance Criteria, Solid Low-Level Waste Characterization Plan, Solid Low-Level Waste Certification Plan, Solid Low-Level Waste Acceptance Procedures, Solid Low-Level Waste Characterization Procedures, Solid Low-Level Waste Certification Procedures, Solid Low-Level Waste Training Procedures, and Solid Low-Level Waste Recordkeeping Procedures. Suggested outlines for these documents are presented as Appendix A

  13. Assessment of Communication Skills Level among Healthcare Practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    Barati, M; A. Afsar; M. Ahmadpanah

    2012-01-01

    Introduction & Objective: Communication skills are the most important characteristics for healthcare providers. The aim of this study was to assess communication skills level and its related factors among healthcare practitioners in Bahar-Hamadan.Materials & Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was carried out on 309 employees in Bahar health care system. Data-gathering tools consisted of a 3-part questionnaire: communication skills level measuring feedback, listening, and verbal commun...

  14. Duration perception: assessing contributions of lower and higher level processes

    OpenAIRE

    Kliegl, Katrin M.

    2015-01-01

    Although time perception in the milliseconds to seconds range is crucial for human perception and performance, it is known that time perception is prone to distortions. In current models of duration perception, effects of arousal and attention are stressed. In the present work, the contributions of lower level sensory and higher level cognitive processes are assessed, and methods are developed helping to disentangle these influences. In a first series of experiments, effects of the retinal...

  15. STATE OF THE ART OF DRILLING LARGE DIAMETER BOREHOLES FOR DEPOSITION OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE AND SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trpimir Kujundžić

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Deep geological disposal is internationally recognized as the safest and most sustainable option for the long-term management of high-level radioactive waste. Mainly, clay rock, salt rock and crystalline rock are being considered as possible host rocks. Different geological environment in different countries led to the various repository concepts. Main feature of the most matured repository concept is that canisters with spent nuclear fuel are emplaced in vertical or horizontal large diameter deposition holes. Drilling technology of the deposition holes depends on repository concept and geological and geomechanical characteristics of the rock. The deposition holes are mechanically excavated since drill & blast is not a possible method due to requirements on final geometry like surface roughness etc. Different methods of drilling large diameter boreholes for deposition of high-level waste and spent nuclear fuel are described. Comparison of methods is made considering performance and particularities in technology.

  16. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition in world biodiversity hotspots: the need for a greater global perspective in assessing N deposition impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phoenix, G.K.; Hicks, W.K.; Cinderby, S.; Kuylenstierna, J.C.I.; Stock, W.D.; Dentener, F.J.; Giller, K.E.; Austin, A.T.; Lefroy, R.D.B.; Gimeno, B.S.; Ashmore, M.R.; Ineson, P.

    2006-01-01

    Increased atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition is known to reduce plant diversity in natural and semi-natural ecosystems, yet our understanding of these impacts comes almost entirely from studies in northern Europe and North America. Currently, we lack an understanding of the threat of N deposition t

  17. Accounting of 131l decomposition under retrospective assessment of its deposition on the basis of determination of 129l deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrilin Yu.l.

    2013-12-01

    given article aimed a justification of approaches to account of radioactive decay of 131l in the course of determination of its ground deposition density on the basis of determination of the ground deposition density of 129l at the late stage after the accident.

  18. Mid to late Holocene sea-level reconstruction of Southeast Vietnam using beachrock and beach-ridge deposits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stattegger, K.; Tjallingii, R.; Saito, Y.; Michelli, M.; Thanh, N.T.; Wetzel, A.

    2013-01-01

    AbstractBeachrocks, beach ridge, washover and backshore deposits along the tectonically stable south-eastern Vietnamese coast document Holocene sea level changes. In combination with data from the final marine flooding phase of the incised Mekong River valley, the sea-level history of South Vietnam

  19. Biomonitoring of airborne inorganic and organic pollutants by means of pine tree barks. II. Deposition types and impact levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 273 pine bark samples collected from various pine stands in Central and East Germany, South Norway, Poland, and Russia was analyzed with respect to 20 inorganic and organic substances (sulphate, nitrate, ammonia, calcium, 3 PAHs, 5 heavy metals, 9 other elements). Multivariate statistics were applied to characterize the multiple exposure of airborne pollutants in terms of major sources, deposition types and impact levels. The former was studied with factor analysis, whilst the latter two were addressed by applying cluster and discrimination analysis. Factor analysis of the concentration values suggest separation into three factors with the following characteristics: Factor 1 shows higher contributions from sulphate and calcium, factor 2 from fluoranthene, benzo(a)pyrene as well as from pyrene, and factor 3 from nitrate and ammonia, respectively. According to results from the cluster analysis, three major deposition types can be identified: 'Industry and House heating', 'Motor traffic', and 'Agriculture'. The first deposition type is characterized by high contents of sulphate and calcium. The other two deposition types contain specific composition profiles for nitrogen-containing components and PAHs. Impact levels are separately classified with the characteristic variables of main deposition types. Finally, discriminant analysis is used to allocate new bark samples to the classified deposition types and impact levels. The results demonstrate the usefulness of multivariate statistical techniques to characterize and evaluate multiple exposure patterns of airborne pollutants in forest ecosystems. (author)

  20. The Tracking and Analysis Framework (TAF): A tool for the integrated assessment of acid deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major challenge that has faced policy makers concerned with acid deposition is obtaining an integrated view of the underlying science related to acid deposition. In response to this challenge, the US Department of Energy is sponsoring the development of an integrated Tracking and Analysis Framework (TAF) which links together the key acid deposition components of emissions, air transport, atmospheric deposition, and aquatic effects in a single modeling structure. The goal of TAF is to integrate credible models of the scientific and technical issues into an assessment framework that can directly address key policy issues, and in doing so act as a bridge between science and policy. Key objectives of TAF are to support coordination and communication among scientific researchers; to support communications with policy makers, and to provide rapid response for analyzing newly emerging policy issues; and to provide guidance for prioritizing research programs. This paper briefly describes how TAF was formulated to meet those objectives and the underlying principals which form the basis for its development

  1. Levels of Biological Diversity: a Spatial Approach to Assessment Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEXANDRU-IONUŢ PETRIŞOR

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological diversity, interpreted as a variety of natural and man-dominated biological and ecological systems, plays an important role in assuring their stability and can be interpreted at different spatial scales, based on the hierarchical level of the system (biocoenose/ ecosystem, biome/complex of ecosystem, biosphere/ecosphere. Literature distinguishes six levels of biodiversity, namely alpha, beta, gamma, delta, epsilon, and omega. The current paper lists methodologies appropriate for assessing diversity at each of these levels, with a particular focus on regional diversity (gamma, delta, and epsilon diversities, i.e. CORINE land cover classification and the biogeographical regions of the European Union.

  2. Environmental income improves household-level poverty assessments and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walelign, Solomon Zena; Charlery, Lindy Callen; Smith-Hall, Carsten;

    2016-01-01

    Household-level poverty assessments and analyses of poverty dynamics in developing countries typically do not include environmental income. Using household (n = 427 in 2006, 2009 and 2012) total income panel data sets, with and without environmental income, from Nepal, we analysed the importance of...... environmental income in household-level poverty assessments (Foster-Greer-Thorbecke indices) and dynamics (movements in the Poverty Transition Matrix). Random effects logit and ordered logit models were applied to estimate variables covarying with poverty categories and compared for annual household incomes...... with and without environmental income. Using the without environmental income data set significantly changed the number of households classified as poor, as well as rates of movements in and out of poverty. Excluding household-level environmental income also distorted estimation of covariates of...

  3. Decision model for assessment of sandstone uranium deposits. National Uranium Resource Evaluation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program is an estimation of the uranium resources of the United States. To achieve this objective, a geologic evaluation and resource assessment program was initiated using NTMS 20 quadrangles as the basic work unit. The evaluation activity commences with data collection within th 20 quadrangles in order to identify and delineate geologic environments that are favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits. A favorable environment is depicted as a geologic setting that has the potential for containing at least 100 tons of U3O8 in rocks whose uranium grade exceeds 100 ppM. Geologic field reconnaissance, hydrochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance, aerial radiometric and magnetic surveys, and logging are the principal means by which favorable environments are identified. The principal investigator of each evaluation team is required to classify a favorable environments according to a preliminary classification of uranium occurrences and favorable environments. Based on this information the uranium potential in each quadrangle is estimated. The scope of this study is limited to development of an assessment procedure and a Bayesian decision model for estimating the endowed area A/sub e/ for three sandstone type uranium deposits: Wyoming roll-type, South Texas roll-type, and Uravan/Salt Wash tabular type deposits

  4. Assessment of LANL solid low-level mixed waste documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE Order 5820.2A requires that a system performance assessment be conducted to assure efficient and compliant management of all radioactive waste. The objective of this report is to determine the present status of the Radioactive Waste Operations Section and the Chemical Waste Operations Section capabilities regarding preparation and maintenance of appropriate criteria, plans, and procedures. Additionally, a comparison is made which identifies areas where these documents are not presently in existence or being fully implemented. The documents being assessed in this report are: Solid Low-Level Mixed Waste Acceptance Criteria, Solid Low-Level Mixed Waste Characterization Plan, Solid Low-Level Mixed waste Certification Plan, Solid Low-Level Mixed Waste Acceptance Procedures, Solid Low-Level Mixed Waste characterization Procedures, Solid Low-Level Mixed Waste Certification Procedures, Solid Low-Level Mixed Waste Training Procedures, and Solid Low-Level Mixed Waste Recordkeeping Requirements. This report compares the current status of preparation and implementation, by the Radioactive Waste Operations Section and the Chemical Waste Operations Section, of these documents to the requirements of DOE 5820.2A,. 40 CFR 260 to 270, and to recommended practice. Chapters 2 through 9 of the report presents the results of the comparison in tabular form for each of the documents being assessed, followed by narrative discussion of all areas which are perceived to be unsatisfactory or out of compliance with respect to the availability and content of the documents. The final subpart of each of the following chapters provides recommendations where documentation practices may be improved to achieve compliance or to follow the recommended practice

  5. Communicating uncertainties in assessments of future sea level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikman-Svahn, P.

    2013-12-01

    How uncertainty should be managed and communicated in policy-relevant scientific assessments is directly connected to the role of science and the responsibility of scientists. These fundamentally philosophical issues influence how scientific assessments are made and how scientific findings are communicated to policymakers. It is therefore of high importance to discuss implicit assumptions and value judgments that are made in policy-relevant scientific assessments. The present paper examines these issues for the case of scientific assessments of future sea level rise. The magnitude of future sea level rise is very uncertain, mainly due to poor scientific understanding of all physical mechanisms affecting the great ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica, which together hold enough land-based ice to raise sea levels more than 60 meters if completely melted. There has been much confusion from policymakers on how different assessments of future sea levels should be interpreted. Much of this confusion is probably due to how uncertainties are characterized and communicated in these assessments. The present paper draws on the recent philosophical debate on the so-called "value-free ideal of science" - the view that science should not be based on social and ethical values. Issues related to how uncertainty is handled in scientific assessments are central to this debate. This literature has much focused on how uncertainty in data, parameters or models implies that choices have to be made, which can have social consequences. However, less emphasis has been on how uncertainty is characterized when communicating the findings of a study, which is the focus of the present paper. The paper argues that there is a tension between on the one hand the value-free ideal of science and on the other hand usefulness for practical applications in society. This means that even if the value-free ideal could be upheld in theory, by carefully constructing and hedging statements characterizing

  6. Critical loads of sulphur and nitrogen for freshwaters in Great Britain and assessment of deposition reduction requirements with the First-order Acidity Balance (FAB model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Curtis

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The critical loads approach is widely used within Europe to assess the impacts of acid deposition on terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Recent work in Great Britain has focused on the national application of the First-order Acidity Balance (FAB model to a freshwaters dataset of 1470 lake and stream water chemistry samples from sites across Britain which were selected to represent the most sensitive water bodies in their corresponding 10 km grid square. A ``Critical Load Function' generated for each site is compared with the deposition load of S and N at the time of water chemistry sampling. The model predicts that when catchment processes reach steady-state with these deposition levels, increases in nitrate leaching will depress acid neutralizing capacity (ANC below the critical threshold of 0 μeql-1 at more than a quarter of the sites sampled, i.e. the critical load of acid deposition is exceeded at these sites. The critical load exceedances are generally found in upland regions of high deposition where acidification has been previously recognised, but critical loads in large areas of western Scotland are also exceeded where little biological evidence of acidification has yet been found. There is a regional variation in the deposition reduction requirements for protection of the sampled sites. The FAB model indicates that in Scotland, most of the sampled sites could be protected by sufficiently large reductions in S deposition alone. In the English and Welsh uplands, both S and N deposition must be reduced to protect the sites. Current international commitments to reduce S deposition throughout Europe will therefore be insufficient to protect the most sensitive freshwaters in England and Wales. Keywords: critical loads; acidification; nitrate; FAB model; acid deposition

  7. Black shale deposition during Toarcian super-greenhouse driven by sea level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hermoso

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the most elusive aspects of the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE is the paradox between carbon isotopes that indicate intense global primary productivity and organic carbon burial at a global scale, and the delayed expression of anoxia in Europe. During the earliest Toarcian, no black shales were deposited in the European epicontinental seaways, and most organic carbon enrichment of the sediments postdated the T-OAE (defined by the overarching positive trend in the carbon isotopes. In the present studied, we have attempted to establish a sequence stratigraphy framework for Early Toarcian deposits recovered from a core drilled in the Paris Basin using a combination of mineralogical (quartz and clay relative abundance and geochemical (Si, Zr, Ti and Al measurements. Combined with the evolution in redox sensitive elements (Fe, V and Mo, the data suggest that expression of anoxia was hampered in European epicontinental seas during most of the T-OAE due to insufficient water depth that prevented stratification of the water column. Only the first stratigraphic occurrence of black shales in Europe corresponds to the "global" event. This interval is characterised by > 10% Total Organic Carbon (TOC content that contains relatively low concentration of molybdenum compared to subsequent black shale horizons. Additionally, this first black shale occurrence is coeval with the record of the major negative Carbon Isotope Excursion (CIE, likely corresponding to a period of transient greenhouse intensification likely due to massive injection of carbon into the Atmosphere–Ocean system. As a response to enhanced weathering and riverine run-off, increased fresh water supply to the basin may have promoted the development of full anoxic conditions through haline stratification of the water column. In contrast, post T-OAE black shales were restricted to epicontinental seas (higher Mo to TOC ratios during a period of relative high sea level, and carbon

  8. Discrimination of hot versus cold avalanche deposits: Implications for hazard assessment at Mount Meager, B.C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Stewart

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The surficial deposits surrounding the Mount Meager volcanic complex include numerous avalanche deposits. These deposits share many attributes: (a they are nearly monolithologic and comprise mainly intermediate volcanic rock clasts, (b they lack internal structure, and (c they are very poorly sorted. Despite these similarities, the avalanche deposits represent two distinct processes. Mass wasting of the Mount Meager volcanic edifice has produced cold rock avalanche deposits, whereas gravitational collapse of active lava domes and flows has produced hot block and ash avalanche deposits. The ability to discriminate between these "hot" and "cold" avalanche deposits is a critical component in the assessment of hazards in volcanic terranes. Hot block and ash avalanche deposits can be distinguished by the presence of radially-oriented joints, breadcrust textures, and incipient welding, which are features indicative of high emplacement temperatures. Conversely, rock avalanche deposits resulting from mass wasting events may be distinguished by the presence of clasts that preserve pre-depositional weathering and jointing surfaces. Volcanic avalanches are mechanically similar to rock avalanches but pose a greater hazard due to high temperatures, increased fluidization from degassing and the potential to decouple highly mobile elutriated ash clouds. The increasing use of hazardous regions such as the Lillooet River valley requires more reliable risk assessment in order to minimize losses from future hazardous events.

  9. Atmospheric transport and deposition of pesticides: An assessment of current knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pul, W.A.J. van; Bidleman, T.F.; Brorström-Lunden, E.; Builtjes, P.J.H.; Dutchak, S.; Duyzer, J.H.; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Jones, K.C.; Dijk, H.F.G. van; Jaarsveld, J.A. van

    are present in the exchange processes at the interface between air and soil/water/vegetation. In all process descriptions the uncertainty in the physicochemical properties play an important role. Particularly those in the vapour pressure, Henry's law constant and its temperature dependency. More......The current knowledge on atmospheric transport and deposition of pesticides is reviewed and discussed by a working group of experts during the Workshop on Fate of pesticides in the atmosphere; implications for risk assessment, held in Driebergen, the Netherlands, 22-24 April, 1998. In general there...... is a shortage of measurement data to evaluate the deposition and reemission processes. It was concluded that the mechanisms of transport and dispersion of pesticides can be described similarly to those for other air pollution components and these mechanisms are rather well-known. Large uncertainties...

  10. Risk assessment of metals in road-deposited sediment along an urban-rural gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongtao; Li, Xuyong

    2013-03-01

    We applied the traditional risk assessment methods originally designed for soils and river sediments to evaluation of risk associated with metals in road-deposited sediment (RDS) along an urban-rural gradient that included central urban (UCA), urban village (UVA), central suburban county (CSA), rural town (RTA), and rural village (RVA) areas in the Beijing metropolitan region. A new indicator RI(RDS) was developed which integrated the RDS characteristics of mobility, grain size and amount with the potential ecological risk index. The risk associated with metals in RDS in urban areas was generally higher than that in rural areas based on the assessment using traditional methods, but the risk was higher in urban and rural village areas than the areas with higher administration units based on the indicator RI(RDS). These findings implied that RDS characteristics variation with the urban-rural gradient must be considered in metal risk assessment and RDS washoff pollution control. PMID:23291211

  11. Reconstructing temporal trends in heavy metal deposition: Assessing the value of herbarium moss samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shotbolt, L. [Geography Department, Queen Mary, University of London, London, E1 4NS (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: l.shotbolt@qmul.ac.uk; Bueker, P. [Stockholm Environment Institute, University of York, Heslington, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: pb25@york.ac.uk; Ashmore, M.R. [Environment Department, University of York, Heslington, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: ma512@york.ac.uk

    2007-05-15

    The use of the herbarium moss archive for investigating past atmospheric deposition of Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd and Pb was evaluated. Moss samples from five UK regions collected over 150 years were analysed for 26 elements using ICP-MS. Principal components analysis identified soil as a significant source of Ni and As and atmospheric deposition as the main source of Pb and Cu. Sources of Zn and Cd concentrations were identified to be at least partly atmospheric, but require further investigation. Temporal and spatial trends in metal concentrations in herbarium mosses showed that the highest Pb and Cu levels are found in Northern England in the late 19th century. Metal concentrations in herbarium moss samples were consistently higher than those in mosses collected from the field in 2000. Herbarium moss samples are concluded to be a useful resource to contribute to reconstructing trends in Pb and Cu deposition, but not, without further analysis, for Cd, Zn, As and Ni. - Herbarium moss samples can contribute to the reconstruction of past heavy metal deposition.

  12. A modelling study of regional deposition of inspired aerosols with reference to dosimetric assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved lung deposition model, agreeing well with a wide range of total and regional deposition data, was used to investigate some assumptions embodied in current ICRP recommendations. Following a comparison between predictions of the new model and the original ICRP Task Group deposition model, the possible influence upon dosimetric calculations caused by various different effects were investigated. Some significant differences between regional deposition predictions of the new model and the current ICRP recommendations embodied in Publication 30 were found, up to a factor of ∼ 4 in some cases. The impact of improved modelling, aerosol polydispersity, the possibility of mouth as compared to nose breathing and exercise level (especially if there is transition from nose to mouth breathing at high work rates) were observed to be the most important. The impact of different breathing patterns was found to be less significant while the effect of different particle densities could be relatively successfully accounted for via a suitable transition from geometric to aerodynamic diameter. (author)

  13. Assessment of radon levels in some water resources in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is produced by the radioactive decay of radium. Breathing high concentrations of radon can cause lung cancer. When radon gas migrates through the atmosphere, the solid radon progeny are deposited on the soil and water below, entering into the food chain. Radon generated from rocks containing its parents may escape to the underground or surface running water, which ultimately used as drinking water or for irrigation. In this work radon level was determined in different water resources in Egypt. Water from spring, tap water Nile and some commercially available drinking water were subjected to radon measurements using CR-39 detectors. Radon concentration in different water resources was found the range from 8.94 to 10.00 Bq/m3 while in trapped air above water was 9.3 to 10.38 Bq/m3

  14. Application of fuzzy synthetic assessment to assess human factors design level on reactor control panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor control panel design level on human factors must be considered by designer. The author evaluated the human factor design level of arrangement and combinations including the switch buttons, meter dials and indication lamps on Minjiang Reactor and High-Flux Engineer Test Reactor (HFETR) critical device by application of fuzzy synthetic assessment method in mathematics. From the assessment results, the advantages and shortcomings are fount, and some modification suggestions have also been proposed

  15. "Assessment Drives Learning": Do Assessments Promote High-Level Cognitive Processing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezuidenhout, M. J.; Alt, H.

    2011-01-01

    Students tend to learn in the way they know, or think, they will be assessed. Therefore, to ensure deep, meaningful learning, assessments must be geared to promote cognitive processing that requires complex, contextualised thinking to construct meaning and create knowledge. Bloom's taxonomy of cognitive levels is used worldwide to assist in…

  16. Energy level alignment in polymer organic solar cells at donor-acceptor planar junction formed by electrospray vacuum deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Hong, Jong-Am; Kwon, Dae-Gyeon; Seo, Jaewon; Park, Yongsup, E-mail: parky@khu.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Research Institute for Basic Sciences, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-21

    Using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), we have measured the energy level offset at the planar interface between poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and C{sub 61}-butyric acid methylester (PCBM). Gradual deposition of PCBM onto spin-coated P3HT in high vacuum was made possible by using electrospray vacuum deposition (EVD). The UPS measurement of EVD-prepared planar interface resulted in the energy level offset of 0.91 eV between P3HT HOMO and PCBM LUMO, which is considered as the upper limit of V{sub oc} of the organic photovoltaic cells.

  17. Energy level alignment in polymer organic solar cells at donor-acceptor planar junction formed by electrospray vacuum deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), we have measured the energy level offset at the planar interface between poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and C61-butyric acid methylester (PCBM). Gradual deposition of PCBM onto spin-coated P3HT in high vacuum was made possible by using electrospray vacuum deposition (EVD). The UPS measurement of EVD-prepared planar interface resulted in the energy level offset of 0.91 eV between P3HT HOMO and PCBM LUMO, which is considered as the upper limit of Voc of the organic photovoltaic cells

  18. Evidence for hydrogen two-level systems in atomic layer deposition oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, M. S.; Stoutimore, M. J. A.; Gladchenko, S.; Holder, A. M.; Musgrave, C. B.; Kozen, A. C.; Rubloff, G.; Liu, Y. Q.; Gordon, R. G.; Yum, J. H.; Banerjee, S. K.; Lobb, C. J.; Osborn, K. D.

    2013-10-01

    Two-level system (TLS) defects in dielectrics are known to limit the performance of electronic devices. We study TLS using millikelvin microwave (6.4 GHz) loss measurements of three atomic layer deposited (ALD) oxide films-crystalline BeO (c-BeO), amorphous Al2O3 (a-Al2O3), and amorphous LaAlO3 (a-LaAlO3)-and interpret them with room temperature characterization measurements. We find that the bulk loss tangent in the crystalline film is 6 times higher than in the amorphous films. In addition, its power saturation agrees with an amorphous distribution of TLS. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) impurity analysis of the c-BeO film showed excess surface carbon (C) impurities and a uniform hydrogen (H) impurity distribution, which coupled with the analysis of loss tangent strongly suggests H limited loss. Impurity analysis of the amorphous films reveals that they have excess H impurities at the ambient-exposed surface, and we extract the associated H-based surface loss tangent. We compare two a-Al2O3 films with drastically different C impurity concentrations and similar H impurity concentrations and conclude that H rather than C is the likely source of loss in the amorphous films and we find the loss per H concentration in a-Al2O3 to be KH =3×10-24 cm3.

  19. Deposition of volatile fission products during commercial high-level waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-level waste from spent commercial PWR fuel was vitrified during the Nuclear Waste Vitrification Project (NWVP), conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory in 1978 and 1979. The solidification equipment employed sintered metal filters and a conventional wet off-gas cleanup system to decontaminate the gases generated during waste processing. This report is a summary of a study completed under contract with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine the fate of volatile fission products in the filters and off-gas system. The study objectives were to determine (1) the extent of volatile fission product deposition within the sintered metal filters, (2) the distribution of fission products in the off-gas system, and (3) the factors that control the distribution. Such information is needed for the design and operation of future waste immobilization systems. The scope of the study included identification, preparation, and microprobe analyses of suitable filter samples and radiochemical analyses of off-gas system samples. The report describes the methods of sample selection and gathering, the analytical methods and results, and the interpretations of the results. Relationships to vitrification system operations are defined and operating conditions to minimize problems recommended. 37 figures, 14 tables

  20. A deposit model for carbonatite and peralkaline intrusion-related rare earth element deposits: Chapter J in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verplanck, Philip L.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Seal, Robert R., II; McCafferty, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    Carbonatite and alkaline intrusive complexes, as well as their weathering products, are the primary sources of rare earth elements. A wide variety of other commodities have been exploited from carbonatites and alkaline igneous rocks including niobium, phosphate, titanium, vermiculite, barite, fluorite, copper, calcite, and zirconium. Other elements enriched in these deposits include manganese, strontium, tantalum, thorium, vanadium, and uranium. Carbonatite and peralkaline intrusion-related rare earth element deposits are presented together in this report because of the spatial, and potentially genetic, association between carbonatite and alkaline rocks. Although these rock types occur together at many locations, carbonatite and peralkaline intrusion-related rare earth element deposits are not generally found together.

  1. Exploitation of massive deposits by unfilled mine chambers at intermediate levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deposits of the uranium mine at the Ecarpiere are in the form of almost vertical veins whose main direction is north 60 deg. west. These veins, which are for the most part irregular are filled by a breccia (Rubble) of granite and syenite high impregnated with fluorine. The points where there is an enrichment in uranium compounds are widely dispersed and take the form of small veins of pitchblende together with pyrites or of plating of pulverulent black oxides. The enclosing rock consists of fractured granite. In spite of the coating of kaolin in the numerous faults and fractures, the walls are fairly good. Some discordant veins but up against the central group of veins. At the meeting points between the discordant veins and the main vein, there is a thickening (up to 20-25 m) in the vein over quite a considerable height. These thickenings are very often impregnated by pitchblende, in which case the phenomena is termed a mass. Borings carried out from ground level have shown the presence of these important ore bearing zones, enclosed in sound granite, and which give grounds for expecting that from the start of exploitation the walls will hold well. It was therefore possible to envisage almost any method of exploitation. For economic reasons only, we have decided to adopt the method of exploitation of intermediate levels using unfilled chambers. Once this method had been adopted, exploratory galleries were opened up so as to determine the boundary of the ore bearing zone. Half of these galleries were excavated in marginal zones so as to find the limits of the zones to exploit. At the present time, the exploitation of one mass is almost terminated, on another the pillars are being removed, and a third is being reconnoitred. (author)

  2. Offshore Dredger Sounds: Source Levels, Sound Maps, and Risk Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Christ A F; Ainslie, Michael A; Heinis, Floor; Janmaat, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The underwater sound produced during construction of the Port of Rotterdam harbor extension (Maasvlakte 2) was measured, with emphasis on the contribution of the trailing suction hopper dredgers during their various activities: dredging, transport, and discharge of sediment. Measured source levels of the dredgers, estimated source levels of other shipping, and time-dependent position data from a vessel-tracking system were used as input for a propagation model to generate dynamic sound maps. Various scenarios were studied to assess the risk of possible effects of the sound from dredging activities on marine fauna, specifically on porpoises, seals, and fish. PMID:26610959

  3. Carbonate deposition, Pyramid Lake subbasin, Nevada: 2. Lake levels and polar jet stream positions reconstructed from radiocarbon ages and elevations of carbonates (tufas) deposited in the Lahontan basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, L.; Kashgarian, Michaele; Rubin, M.

    1995-01-01

    Most of the tufas in the Pyramid Lake subbasin were deposited within the last 35 000 yr, including most of the mound tufas that border the existing lake. Many of the older tufas (>21 000 yr BP) contained in the mounds were formed in association with groundwater discharge. Lake Lahontan experienced large and abrupt rises in level that are believed to indicate the passage of the polar jet stream over the Lahontan basin. During expansion of the Laurentide Ice Sheet, the jet stream moved south across the basin, and during the contraction of the Ice Sheet, the jet stream moved north across the basin. The bulk of the carbonate contained in the mound tufas was deposited during the last major lake cycle (~23 500-12 000 yr BP), indicating that ground- and surface-water discharges increased at ~23 500 and decreased at ~ 12 000 yr BP. -from Authors

  4. An assessment of undergraduate paramedic students' empathy levels

    OpenAIRE

    Brett Williams; Malcolm Boyle; Richard Brightwell; Scott Devenish; Peter Hartley; Michael McCall; Paula McMullen; Graham Munro; Peter O’Meara; Vanessa Webb; null null

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the extent of empathy in paramedic students across seven Australian universities. Methods: A cross-sectional study using a paper-based questionnaire employing a convenience sample of first, second, and third year undergraduate paramedic students. Student empathy levels were measured using the Medical Condition Regard Scale (MCRS). Results: A total of 783 students participated in the study of which 57were females. The medical conditions: inte...

  5. The four-level project success framework: application and assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Eskander Howsawi; David Eager; Ravindra Bagia; Klaus Niebecker

    2014-01-01

    Success is one of the ultimate goals of any project endeavour. Thus, clarifying the meaning of success is a vital step in achieving the desired success. In this study, the authors reviewed the project success literature and provided a framework for defining and evaluating project success. The framework consists of four levels that contain the possible criteria for assessing and evaluating success. The authors demonstrate the framework by case application. Further, experts in the field of proj...

  6. Methodology for quick assessment of deposited radioactivity on ground in a radiation emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prompt assessment of ground deposited radioactivity for planning effective counter measures in a radiation emergency has assumed a mandatory status after aircraft accident at Palomares, disintegration of Cosmos-954, nuclear accidents at TMI, Kyshtym and Chernobyl. Aerial gamma spectrometric survey is the most effective, rapid, comprehensive and economical technique in such eventualities to demark the large area surface contamination. Based on the computations carried out, air to ground correlation factors (AGCFs) and selection of optimum parameters like flight line spacing and survey altitudes for an effective aerial gamma spectrometric survey are discussed. (author)

  7. Developing micro-level urban ecosystem indicators for sustainability assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dizdaroglu, Didem, E-mail: dizdaroglu@bilkent.edu.tr

    2015-09-15

    Sustainability assessment is increasingly being viewed as an important tool to aid in the shift towards sustainable urban ecosystems. An urban ecosystem is a dynamic system and requires regular monitoring and assessment through a set of relevant indicators. An indicator is a parameter which provides information about the state of the environment by producing a quantitative value. Indicator-based sustainability assessment needs to be considered on all spatial scales to provide efficient information of urban ecosystem sustainability. The detailed data is necessary to assess environmental change in urban ecosystems at local scale and easily transfer this information to the national and global scales. This paper proposes a set of key micro-level urban ecosystem indicators for monitoring the sustainability of residential developments. The proposed indicator framework measures the sustainability performance of urban ecosystem in 3 main categories including: natural environment, built environment, and socio-economic environment which are made up of 9 sub-categories, consisting of 23 indicators. This paper also describes theoretical foundations for the selection of each indicator with reference to the literature [Turkish] Highlights: • As the impacts of environmental problems have multi-scale characteristics, sustainability assessment needs to be considered on all scales. • The detailed data is necessary to assess local environmental change in urban ecosystems to provide insights into the national and global scales. • This paper proposes a set of key micro-level urban ecosystem indicators for monitoring the sustainability of residential developments. • This paper also describes theoretical foundations for the selection of each indicator with reference to the literature.

  8. Using probabilistic risk assessment to derive financial assurance coverage levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents a risk assessment methodology to characterize the potential costs associated with transportation of low-level radioactive waste (LLRW). An application of this methodology is also provided for illustration. The risk assessment uses as inputs characterizations of (1) waste shipments by type of vehicle; and (2) environmental settings by generic route. The risk assessment analyzes potential events (e.g., small accident enroute) and their consequences (e.g., dispersion of released materials and subsequent human exposure) for each transport configuration (i.e., combination of vehicle type and generic route). Finally, the risk assessment estimates the probability and magnitude of corrective action costs (e.g., for cleanup of property and the environment) and third-party compensation costs (e.g., for bodily injury and property damage) attached to the consequences of each event. These estimates are then combined with the estimates of the probability of each event to construct a cost curve for corrective action costs and third-party compensation costs. Using these cost curves, financial assurance coverage levels can be derived by specifying a not-to-be-exceeded likelihood that potential costs would exceed the coverage amount

  9. Decision Assessment of Clearance Level on Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive waste on the safe level activity containing very small radioactive material gives small radiology influence to the human, it is not necessary to control by regulatory body. The radioactive waste on the safe level activity is safe to release as the common waste. For exemption of the control, it is required the safe activity level limits in which the value of clearance level is fulfilled by regulatory body, however until now it is not decided yet. The exemption decision is obtained if its activity is lower than or same with clearance level based on the annual effective dose receiving by public on the value is lower than or same with 0,01 mSv. The exposure pathways of radioactive waste to the human have important role for determination of clearance level. The decision assessment of clearance level on the radioactive waste management has been done by analysis of radioactive exposure pathways to the human for activities of the disposal and the recycle of solid wastes, also the release of liquid and gas effluent. For solid waste disposal, the exposure pathway was evaluated since the transportation of packed waste from the treatment facility to the disposal facility and during its operation. Exposure pathways for solid waste recycle consist of the pathways for handling and transportation of cleared material to the recycling facility, the fabrication and the utilization of its product. Exposure pathways for liquid and gas releases occur since its releases to the environment up to the human (public) by specific traffic lane. (author)

  10. SEM/EDS characterisation of dusty deposits in precipitation and assessment of their origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Miler

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Detailed scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS analysis of dusty material in rainfall residue, deposited and collected on February 19th 2014 in Ljubljana, was carried out with the intention to characterise it according to its chemical and mineral composition and to assess its origin. The material consists of poorly sorted and sharp-edged particles of mostly very fine-grained silt and clay fractions, which is consistent with long-range aerial transport. Particles are represented by illite, chlorite and kaolinite group clay minerals, quartz, feldspars, carbonates, accessory minerals and secondary Fe-oxy-hydroxide minerals. Quantities of minerals and illite/ kaolinite ratio (4.5 correspond to dusts in rainfall residues originating from Moroccan Atlas, while chlorite/kaolinite ratio (2.8 agrees better with dust from central Libya. The element ratios Al/Si, Ca/Al, K/Ca, Mg/Al, Fe/Al and (Ca+Mg/Fe in the studied dusty deposit are in good agreement with ratios in dusts from rainfall residues originating from Morocco and northern Mauritania. This was also confirmed by the trajectories of cloud movement that caused precipitation with dusty deposit, although the back trajectory HYSPLIT simulation of air masses indicated northern Mauritania, central Niger, southern Algeria, southwestern and central Libya as the most possible source regions.

  11. Estimation of surface deposited 210Po activity for the retrospective assessment of radon exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relation between increased risk of lung cancer and exposure to indoor radon is assessed in epidemiological studies. The short lived airborne radon decay products deposit on smooth glass surfaces. After deposition, subsequent alpha decay can lead to implantation of further decay products through alpha particle recoil. Hence, the progeny can remain fixed in a very thin surface layer of the glass, where it can be detected through alpha decay by means of track etch detectors. In present study the estimation of surface deposited polonium activity have been carried out in the Garhwal Himalaya region using (CR-LR) difference technique. In this area the polonium activity have been found to vary from 0.8 Bq/m2 to 35.2 Bq/m2 with an average of 6.4 Bq/m2. The estimated retrospective radon concentration based on the 210Po activity was found to vary from 29 Bq/m3 to 1173 Bq/m-3 with an average value 241 Bq/m-3. The detail significance of this study is also discussed from epidemiological point of view. (author)

  12. Quantitative assessment of inhalation exposure and deposited dose of aerosol from nanotechnology-based consumer sprays†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarenko, Yevgen; Lioy, Paul J.; Mainelis, Gediminas

    2015-01-01

    This study provides a quantitative assessment of inhalation exposure and deposited aerosol dose in the 14 nm to 20 μm particle size range based on the aerosol measurements conducted during realistic usage simulation of five nanotechnology-based and five regular spray products matching the nano-products by purpose of application. The products were also examined using transmission electron microscopy. In seven out of ten sprays, the highest inhalation exposure was observed for the coarse (2.5–10 μm) particles while being minimal or below the detection limit for the remaining three sprays. Nanosized aerosol particles (14–100 nm) were released, which resulted in low but measurable inhalation exposures from all of the investigated consumer sprays. Eight out of ten products produced high total deposited aerosol doses on the order of 101–103 ng kg−1 bw per application, ~85–88% of which were in the head airways, only <10% in the alveolar region and <8% in the tracheobronchial region. One nano and one regular spray produced substantially lower total deposited doses (by 2–4 orders of magnitude less), only ~52–64% of which were in the head while ~29–40% in the alveolar region. The electron microscopy data showed nanosized objects in some products not labeled as nanotechnology-based and conversely did not find nano-objects in some nano-sprays. We found no correlation between nano-object presence and abundance as per the electron microscopy data and the determined inhalation exposures and deposited doses. The findings of this study and the reported quantitative exposure data will be valuable for the manufacturers of nanotechnology-based consumer sprays to minimize inhalation exposure from their products, as well as for the regulators focusing on protecting the public health. PMID:25621175

  13. Assessment of atmospheric heavy metal deposition in the Tarkwa gold mining area of Ghana using epiphytic lichens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ lichens (Parmelia sulcata) have been used to assess atmospheric heavy metal deposition in the Tarkwa gold mining area of Ghana. Total heavy metal concentrations obtained by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) were processed by positive matrix factorization (PMF), principal component (PCA) and cluster (CA) analyses. The pollution index factor (PIF) and pollution load index (PLI) criteria revealed elevated levels of Sb, Mn, Cu, V, Al, Co, Hg, Cd and As in excess of the background values. The PCA and CA classified the examined elements into anthropogenic and natural sources, and PMF resolved three primary sources/factors: agricultural activities and other non-point anthropogenic origins, natural soil dust, and gold mining activities. Gold mining activities, which are characterized by dominant species of Sb, Th, As, Hg, Cd and Co, and significant contributions of Cu, Al, Mn and V, are the main contributors of heavy metals in the atmosphere of the study area.

  14. Assessment of atmospheric heavy metal deposition in the Tarkwa gold mining area of Ghana using epiphytic lichens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boamponsem, L.K. [Department of Theoretical and Applied Biology, College of Science, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, University Post Office, Kumasi (Ghana); Department of Laboratory Technology, School of Physical Sciences, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast (Ghana); Adam, J.I. [Department of Theoretical and Applied Biology, College of Science, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, University Post Office, Kumasi (Ghana); Dampare, S.B., E-mail: dampare@cc.okayama-u.ac.j [National Nuclear Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG 80, Legon-Accra (Ghana); Department of Earth Sciences, Okayama University, 1-1, Tsushima-Naka 3-Chome, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Nyarko, B.J.B. [National Nuclear Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG 80, Legon-Accra (Ghana); Essumang, D.K. [Department of Laboratory Technology, School of Physical Sciences, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast (Ghana)

    2010-05-01

    In situ lichens (Parmelia sulcata) have been used to assess atmospheric heavy metal deposition in the Tarkwa gold mining area of Ghana. Total heavy metal concentrations obtained by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) were processed by positive matrix factorization (PMF), principal component (PCA) and cluster (CA) analyses. The pollution index factor (PIF) and pollution load index (PLI) criteria revealed elevated levels of Sb, Mn, Cu, V, Al, Co, Hg, Cd and As in excess of the background values. The PCA and CA classified the examined elements into anthropogenic and natural sources, and PMF resolved three primary sources/factors: agricultural activities and other non-point anthropogenic origins, natural soil dust, and gold mining activities. Gold mining activities, which are characterized by dominant species of Sb, Th, As, Hg, Cd and Co, and significant contributions of Cu, Al, Mn and V, are the main contributors of heavy metals in the atmosphere of the study area.

  15. Assessing the impact of climate change on extreme sea levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Full text: Assessments of the impact of climate change on extreme sea levels along parts of the Victorian coast will be presented. The method involves identifying a large population of storm surge events in tide gauge records along the stretch of coastline of interest and modelling each event with a hydrodynamic model. Conditions under future climate regimes are considered by perturbing the atmospheric boundary conditions of the model in accordance with wind speed projections from climate models. Extreme value analysis is applied to the output of the hydrodynamic model to generate probabilities and return periods for storm surge heights. A Monte-Carlo approach is used to combine these heights with tide heights. Finally estimates of future mean sea level rise from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change are added in. Initial work on the possible impact of changes in extreme sea levels on the risk of inundation of low lying coastal land will also be presented

  16. Regulatory review of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) Level 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) is increasingly being used as part of the decision making process to assess the level of safety of nuclear power plants. The methodologies in use are maturing and the insights gained from the PSAs are being used along with those from deterministic analysis. Many regulatory authorities consider the current state of the art in PSA to be sufficiently well developed for results to be used centrally in the regulatory decision making process-referred to as risk informed regulation. For these applications to be successful, it will be necessary for the regulatory authority to have a high degree of confidence in the PSA. However, at the 1994 IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Use of PSA in the Regulatory Process and at the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Committee for Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) 'Special Issues' meeting in 1997 on Review Procedures and Criteria for Different Regulatory Applications of PSA, it was recognized that formal regulatory review guidance for PSA did not exist. The senior regulators noted that there was a need to produce some international guidance for reviewing PSAs to establish an agreed basis for assessing whether important technological and methodological issues in PSAs are treated adequately and to verify that conclusions reached are appropriate. In 1997, the IAEA and OECD Nuclear Energy Agency agreed to produce, in cooperation, guidance on Regulatory Review of PSA. This led to the publication of IAEA-TECDOC-1135 on the Regulatory Review of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) Level 1, which gives advice for the review of Level 1 PSA for initiating events occurring at power plants. This TECDOC extends the coverage to address the regulatory review of Level 2 PSA.These publications are intended to provide guidance to regulatory authorities on how to review the PSA for a nuclear power plant to gain confidence that it has been carried out to an acceptable level of quality so that it can be used as the

  17. Multi-hazards risk assessment at different levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolova, N.; Larionov, V.; Bonnin, J.

    2012-04-01

    Natural and technological disasters are becoming more frequent and devastating. Social and economic losses due to those events increase annually, which is definitely in relation with evolution of society. Natural hazards identification and analysis, as well natural risk assessment taking into account secondary technological accidents are the first steps in prevention strategy aimed at saving lives and protecting property against future events. The paper addresses methodological issues of natural and technological integrated risk assessment and mapping at different levels [1, 2]. At the country level the most hazardous natural processes, which may results in fatalities, injuries and economic loss in the Russian Federation, are considered. They are earthquakes, landslides, mud flows, floods, storms, avalanches. The special GIS environment for the country territory was developed which includes information about hazards' level and reoccurrence, an impact databases for the last 20 years, as well as models for estimating damage and casualties caused by these hazards. Federal maps of seismic individual and collective risk, as well as multi-hazards natural risk maps are presented. The examples of regional seismic risk assessment taking into account secondary accidents at fire, explosion and chemical hazardous facilities and regional integrated risk assessment are given for the earthquake prone areas of the Russian Federation. The paper also gives examples of loss computations due to scenario earthquakes taking into account accidents trigged by strong events at critical facilities: fire and chemical hazardous facilities, including oil pipe lines routes located in the earthquake prone areas. The estimations of individual seismic risk obtained are used by EMERCOM of the Russian Federation, as well as by other federal and local authorities, for planning and implementing preventive measures, aimed at saving lives and protecting property against future disastrous events. The

  18. High-level waste melter alternatives assessment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) Program's (hereafter referred to as HLW Program) Melter Candidate Assessment Activity performed in fiscal year (FY) 1994. The mission of the TWRS Program is to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford Site waste (current and future tank waste and encapsulated strontium and cesium isotopic sources) in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The goal of the HLW Program is to immobilize the HLW fraction of pretreated tank waste into a vitrified product suitable for interim onsite storage and eventual offsite disposal at a geologic repository. Preparation of the encapsulated strontium and cesium isotopic sources for final disposal is also included in the HLW Program. As a result of trade studies performed in 1992 and 1993, processes planned for pretreatment of tank wastes were modified substantially because of increasing estimates of the quantity of high-level and transuranic tank waste remaining after pretreatment. This resulted in substantial increases in needed vitrification plant capacity compared to the capacity of original Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). The required capacity has not been finalized, but is expected to be four to eight times that of the HWVP design. The increased capacity requirements for the HLW vitrification plant's melter prompted the assessment of candidate high-capacity HLW melter technologies to determine the most viable candidates and the required development and testing (D and T) focus required to select the Hanford Site HLW vitrification plant melter system. An assessment process was developed in early 1994. This document describes the assessment team, roles of team members, the phased assessment process and results, resulting recommendations, and the implementation strategy

  19. Late Quaternary sea level and environmental changes from relic carbonate deposits of the western margin of India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Purnachandra Rao; G Rajagopalan; K H Vora; F Almeida

    2003-03-01

    Relic carbonate deposits along the western margin of India occur as dolomite crusts, aragonite sands (pelletal / oolitic) and aragonite-cemented limestones, oyster shells, corals, encrusted coralline algal and foraminiferal-dominated nodules. The petrology and mineralogy of the deposits indicate that except for aragonite sands and foraminiferal nodules, the others were formed in shallow marine conditions and serve as sea level indicators. Radiocarbon dates were measured for 62 relic deposits covering the entire margin. The age of these deposits on the continental shelf off Cape Comorin and Mangalore, between 110 and 18m depth, ranges between 12, 610 14C yr BP and 6,390 14C yr BP. On the northwestern margin of India, especially on the carbonate platform (between 64 and 100 m), the age ranges from 17,250 to 6,730 14C yr BP. The relic deposits of the Gulf of Kachchh at depths between 35 and 25m are dated at 12,550-9,630 14C yr BP. The age vs. depth plot of the relic deposits further indicates that the Gulf of Kachchh was inundated much early, atleast by 15 ka, after the Last Glacial Maximum, and was subjected to uplift and subsidence during the Holocene. The carbonate platform subsided during the early Holocene. Some of the relic deposits between Cape Comorin and Mangalore plot on or, closely follow the glacio-eustatic sea level curve. Despite abundant siliciclastic flux discharged by the Narmada and Tapti during the early Holocene, the platform off these rivers is largely devoid of this flux and carbonate sedimentation continued until 6,700 14C yr BP. We suggest that the river-derived ediment flux diverted southwards under the influence of the SW monsoon current and, thereby, increased the turbidity on the shelf and slope southeast of the carbonate platform and facilitated the formation of deeper water foraminiferal nodules off Vengurla-Goa.

  20. Estimation of aerial deposition and foliar uptake of xenobiotics: Assessment of current models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, S.O.; Fellows, R.J.; Cataldo, D.A.; Droppo, J.G.; Van Voris, P.

    1987-10-01

    This report reviews existing mathematical and/or computer simulation models that estimate xenobiotic deposition to and transport through (both curricular and stomatal) vegetative surfaces. The report evaluates the potential for coupling the best of those models to the existing Uptake, Translocation, Accumulation, and Biodegradation model to be used for future xenobiotic exposure assessments. Here xenobiotic compounds are defined as airborne contaminants, both organic and gaseous pollutants, that are introduced into the environment by man. Specifically this document provides a detailed review of the state-of-the-art models that addressed aerial deposition of particles and gases to foliage; foliar and cuticular transport, metabolism, and uptake of organic xenobiotics; and stomatal transport of gaseous and volatile organic xenobiotic pollutants. Where detailed information was available, parameters for each model are provided on a chemical by chemical as well as species by species basis. Sufficient detail is provided on each model to assess the potential for adapting or coupling the model to the existing UTAB plant exposure model. 126 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. Assessment of human exposure level to PM10 in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Xingqin; Hou, Qing; Li, Nan; Zhai, Shixian

    2013-05-01

    Epidemiological studies have found that atmospheric particulate matter, especially PM10 (inhalable particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 10 μm) is one of the pollutants that are harmful to human health. In recent years, particulate matter pollution in China is becoming increasingly serious and PM10 has become the primary pollutant in Beijing and other cities. Therefore, it is necessary to carry out studies and a health damage assessment of PM10. In human health damage assessment, measuring human exposure level to PM10 is required and crucial to provide accurate exposure data for the exposure-response relationship, and also for the accurate quantitative assessment of human exposure. The spatial distribution of particle concentration in China is variable because of spatial differences in the local economic level and the geographical environment. Along with the accelerating urbanisation in China, city population density is high, and the population distribution is variable between and within cities, thus resulting in different population numbers exposed to different concentration ranges. Therefore, an accurate assessment of China's level of exposure to particulate matter is a priority and the basis for assessing the damage to public health caused by particle pollution. Using high accuracy population and PM10 monitoring data, this study analysed the human exposure to PM10 in different regions and typical cities of China. The results show that for most areas of China, the population-weighted PM10 exposure concentration is slightly higher than the annual mean concentration, meaning that more of the population is exposed to high concentrations, and most of the population is exposed to levels that meet the second national standard (between 40 and 100 μg m-3), occupying about 83.7% of population and 76.3% of area in China. The population exposure to PM10 is higher in two types of typical regions and cities: areas with dense human populations

  2. How to Assess the Biomechanical Risk Levels in Beekeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, G; Rossi, F; Baracco, A

    2016-01-01

    Beekeepers are at particular risk of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders, but many of the studies lack detailed exposure assessment. To evaluate the biomechanical overload exposure in a specific farming activity, a multitasking model has been developed through the characterization of 37 basic operational tasks typical of the beekeeping activity. The Occupational Repetitive Actions (OCRA) Checklist and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Lifting Index methodologies have been applied to these elementary tasks to evaluate the exposure, and the resulting risk indices have been time-weighted averaged. Finally, an easy access, computer-assisted toolkit has been developed to help the beekeepers in the biomechanical risk assessment process. The risk of biomechanical overload for the upper limbs ranges from acceptable (maintenance and recovery of woody material and honey packaging with dosing machine tasks) to high (distribution of the top supers) risk level. The risk for back injury is always borderline in women and increases with exposure time, whereas it ranges from acceptable to borderline in men. The definition of the biomechanical risk levels allows for planning of corrective actions aimed at preventing and reducing the risk of musculoskeletal disorders through engineering, administrative, and behavioral interventions. The methodology can be used for risk assessment in other mainly manual agricultural activities. PMID:26765780

  3. Descriptive risk assessment of the effects of acidic deposition on Rocky Mountain amphibians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn, Paul Stephen; Vertucci, Frank A.

    1992-01-01

    We evaluated the risk of habitat acidification to the six species of amphibians that occur in the mountains of Colorado and Wyoming. Our evaluation included extrinsic environmental factors (habitat sensitivity and amount of acidic atmospheric deposition) and species-specific intrinsic factors (sensitivity to acid conditions, habitat preferences, and timing of breeding). Only one of 57 surveyed localities had both acid neutralizing capacity μeq/L and sulfate deposition >10 kg/ha/yr, extrinsic conditions with a possible risk of acidification. Amphibian breeding habitats in the Rocky Mountains do not appear to be sufficiently acidic to kill amphibian embryos. Some species breed in high-elevation vernal pools during snowmelt, and an acidic pulse during snowmelt may pose a risk to embryos of these species. However, the acidic pulse, if present, probably occurs before open water appears and before breeding begins. Although inherent variability of amphibian population size may make detection of declines from anthropogenic effects difficult, acidic deposition is unlikely to have caused the observed declines of Bufo boreas and Rana pipiens in Colorado and Wyoming. Amphibians in the Rocky Mountains are not likely to be at risk with acidification inputs at present levels.

  4. Relic carbonate deposits along the western margin of India: Sea level and environmental changes during the Late Quaternary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.

    largely due to the melting of glacial ice. The sea level rise occurred at different steps and reached its present position at about 6000 years BP. The sea level rise is not uniform, and the rate of sea level rise at times varied from 23 m/ka to 1 m... of the proxy indicator, one can able to decipher factors influencing local and regional variations in sea level during the late Quaternary. In this lecture detailed investigations made on the relic carbonate deposits along the western margin of India...

  5. Developing micro-level urban ecosystem indicators for sustainability assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sustainability assessment is increasingly being viewed as an important tool to aid in the shift towards sustainable urban ecosystems. An urban ecosystem is a dynamic system and requires regular monitoring and assessment through a set of relevant indicators. An indicator is a parameter which provides information about the state of the environment by producing a quantitative value. Indicator-based sustainability assessment needs to be considered on all spatial scales to provide efficient information of urban ecosystem sustainability. The detailed data is necessary to assess environmental change in urban ecosystems at local scale and easily transfer this information to the national and global scales. This paper proposes a set of key micro-level urban ecosystem indicators for monitoring the sustainability of residential developments. The proposed indicator framework measures the sustainability performance of urban ecosystem in 3 main categories including: natural environment, built environment, and socio-economic environment which are made up of 9 sub-categories, consisting of 23 indicators. This paper also describes theoretical foundations for the selection of each indicator with reference to the literature

  6. Current directions in screening-level ecological risk assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsen, T M; Efroymson, R A

    2000-12-11

    Ecological risk assessment (ERA) is a tool used by many regulatory agencies to evaluate the impact to ecological receptors from changes in environmental conditions. Widespread use of ERAs began with the United States Environmental Protection Agency's Superfund program to assess the ecological impact from hazardous chemicals released to the environment. Many state hazardous chemical regulatory agencies have adopted the use of ERAs, and several state regulatory agencies are evaluating the use of ERAs to assess ecological impacts from releases of petroleum and gas-related products. Typical ERAs are toxicologically-based, use conservative assumptions with respect to ecological receptor exposure duration and frequency, often require complex modeling of transport and exposure and are very labor intensive. In an effort to streamline the ERA process, efforts are currently underway to develop default soil screening levels, to identify ecological screening criteria for excluding sites from formal risk assessment, and to create risk-based corrective action worksheets. This should help reduce the time spent on ERAs, at least for some sites. Work is also underway to incorporate bioavailability and spatial considerations into ERAs. By evaluating the spatial nature of contaminant releases with respect to the spatial context of the ecosystem under consideration, more realistic ERAs with respect to the actual impact to ecological receptors at the population, community or ecosystem scale should be possible. In addition, by considering the spatial context, it should be possible to develop mitigation and monitoring efforts to more appropriately address such sites within the context of an ecological framework.

  7. Taking risk assessment and management to the next level - 59395

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: A multi-level (facility and programmatic) risk assessment was conducted for the facilities in the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Readiness in Technical Base and Facilities (RTBF) Program and results were included in a new Risk Management Plan (RMP), which was incorporated into the fiscal year (FY) 2010 Integrated Plans. Risks, risk events, probability, consequence(s), and mitigation strategies were identified and captured, for most scope areas (i.e., risk categories) during the facilitated risk workshops. Risk mitigations (i.e., efforts in addition to existing controls) were identified during the facilitated risk workshops when the risk event was identified. Risk mitigation strategies fell into two broad categories: threats or opportunities. Improvement projects were identified and linked to specific risks they mitigate, making the connection of risk reduction through investments for the annual Site Execution Plan. Due to the amount of that was collected, analysis to be performed, and reports to be generated, a Risk Assessment/ Management Tool (RAMtool) database was developed to analyze the risks in real-time, at multiple levels, which reinforced the site-level risk management process and procedures. The RAMtool database was developed and designed to assist in the capturing and analysis of the key elements of risk: probability, consequence, and impact

  8. Effects of ethanolamine, pH change, and increased hydrazine levels on deposit-covered alloy 600 and brass corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical dissolution tests and electrochemical tests were carried out on alloy 600 (UNS N06600) specimens covered with synthetic deposit simulating the tube deposits in the steam generators at Indian Point 2 Station in Buchanan, New York. The tests showed that the introduction of ethanolamine (ETA) and a moderate increase in pH gave rise to lower corrosion rates, but enhancement of hydrazine levels caused them to rise. In the case of brass, both types of tests showed that raising the pH caused the corrosion rates to increase, but the introduction of ETA led to a mild decrease in these rates

  9. Decreased Circulating C3 Levels and Mesangial C3 Deposition Predict Renal Outcome in Patients with IgA Nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Seung Jun Kim; Hyang Mo Koo; Beom Jin Lim; Hyung Jung Oh; Dong Eun Yoo; Dong Ho Shin; Mi Jung Lee; Fa Mee Doh; Jung Tak Park; Tae-Hyun Yoo; Shin-Wook Kang; Kyu Hun Choi; Hyeon Joo Jeong; Seung Hyeok Han

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Mesangial C3 deposition is frequently observed in patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN). However, the role of complement in the pathogenesis or progression of IgAN is uncertain. In this observational cohort study, we aimed to identify the clinical implications of circulating C3 levels and mesangial C3 deposition and to investigate their utility as predictors of renal outcomes in patients with IgAN. METHODS: A total of 343 patients with biopsy-proven IgAN were enrolled betw...

  10. Risk assessment of groundwater level variability using variable Kriging methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanoudaki, Katerina; Kampanis, Nikolaos A.

    2015-04-01

    Assessment of the water table level spatial variability in aquifers provides useful information regarding optimal groundwater management. This information becomes more important in basins where the water table level has fallen significantly. The spatial variability of the water table level in this work is estimated based on hydraulic head measured during the wet period of the hydrological year 2007-2008, in a sparsely monitored basin in Crete, Greece, which is of high socioeconomic and agricultural interest. Three Kriging-based methodologies are elaborated in Matlab environment to estimate the spatial variability of the water table level in the basin. The first methodology is based on the Ordinary Kriging approach, the second involves auxiliary information from a Digital Elevation Model in terms of Residual Kriging and the third methodology calculates the probability of the groundwater level to fall below a predefined minimum value that could cause significant problems in groundwater resources availability, by means of Indicator Kriging. The Box-Cox methodology is applied to normalize both the data and the residuals for improved prediction results. In addition, various classical variogram models are applied to determine the spatial dependence of the measurements. The Matérn model proves to be the optimal, which in combination with Kriging methodologies provides the most accurate cross validation estimations. Groundwater level and probability maps are constructed to examine the spatial variability of the groundwater level in the basin and the associated risk that certain locations exhibit regarding a predefined minimum value that has been set for the sustainability of the basin's groundwater resources. Acknowledgement The work presented in this paper has been funded by the Greek State Scholarships Foundation (IKY), Fellowships of Excellence for Postdoctoral Studies (Siemens Program), 'A simulation-optimization model for assessing the best practices for the

  11. A global assessment of precipitation chemistry and deposition of sulfur, nitrogen, sea salt, base cations, organic acids, acidity and pH, and phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vet, Robert; Artz, Richard S.; Carou, Silvina

    2014-08-01

    Investigating and assessing the chemical composition of precipitation and atmospheric deposition is essential to understanding how atmospheric pollutants contribute to contemporary environmental concerns including ecosystem acidification and eutrophication, loss of biodiversity, air pollution and global climate change. Evidence of the link between atmospheric deposition and these environmental issues is well established. The state of scientific understanding of this link is that present levels of atmospheric deposition of sulfur and nitrogen adversely affect terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, putting forest sustainability and aquatic biodiversity at risk. Nitrogen and phosphorus loadings are linked to impacts on the diversity of terrestrial and aquatic vegetation through biological cycling, and atmospheric deposition plays a major role in the emission-transport-conversion-loss cycle of chemicals in the atmosphere as well as the formation of particulate matter and ozone in the troposphere. Evidence also shows that atmospheric constituents are changing the earth's climate through direct and indirect atmospheric processes. This Special Issue, comprising a single article titled "A global assessment of precipitation chemistry and deposition of sulfur, nitrogen, sea salt, base cations, organic acids, acidity and pH, and phosphorus", presents a recent comprehensive review of precipitation chemistry and atmospheric deposition at global and regional scales. The information in the Special Issue, including all supporting data sets and maps, is anticipated to be of great value not only to the atmospheric deposition community but also to other science communities including those that study ecosystem impacts, human health effects, nutrient processing, climate change, global and hemispheric modeling and biogeochemical cycling. Understanding and quantifying pollutant loss from the atmosphere is, and will remain, an important component of each of these scientific fields as they

  12. Reliability assessment of ultra-thin HfO2 films deposited on silicon wafer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Nano-mechanical properties on annealed ultra-thin HfO2 film are studied. ► By AFM analysis, hardness of the crystallized HfO2 film significantly increases. ► By nano-indention, the film hardness increases with less contact stiffness. ► Quality assessment on the annealed ultra-thin films can thus be achieved. - Abstract: Ultra-thin hafnium dioxide (HfO2) is used to replace silicon dioxide to meet the required transistor feature size in advanced semiconductor industry. The process integration compatibility and long-term reliability for the transistors depend on the mechanical performance of ultra-thin HfO2 films. The criteria of reliability including wear resistance, thermal fatigue, and stress-driven failure rely on film adhesion significantly. The adhesion and variations in mechanical properties induced by thermal annealing of the ultra-thin HfO2 films deposited on silicon wafers (HfO2/SiO2/Si) are not fully understood. In this work, the mechanical properties of an atomic layer deposited HfO2 (nominal thickness ≈10 nm) on a silicon wafer were characterized by the diamond-coated tip of an atomic force microscope and compared with those of annealed samples. The results indicate that the annealing process leads to the formation of crystallized HfO2 phases for the atomic layer deposited HfO2. The HfSixOy complex formed at the interface between HfO2 and SiO2/Si, where the thermal diffusion of Hf, Si, and O atoms occurred. The annealing process increases the surface hardness of crystallized HfO2 film and therefore the resistance to nano-scratches. In addition, the annealing process significantly decreases the harmonic contact stiffness (or thereafter eliminate the stress at the interface) and increases the nano-hardness, as measured by vertically sensitive nano-indentation. Quality assessments on as-deposited and annealed HfO2 films can be thereafter used to estimate the mechanical properties and adhesion of ultra-thin HfO2 films on SiO2/Si

  13. Probabilistic safety assessment for Hanford high-level waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives results from the first comprehensive level-3 probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), including consideration of external events, for the Hanford tank farm (HTF). This work was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy/Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Division (DOE/EM). At the HTF, there are 177 underground tanks in 18 separate tank farms containing accumulated liquid/sludge/saltcake radioactive wastes from 50 yr of weapons materials production activities. The total waste volume is ∼60 million gal, containing ∼200 million Ci of radioactivity

  14. Early herbivore alert matters: plant-mediated effects of egg deposition on higher trophic levels benefit plant fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashalidou, Foteini G; Frago, Enric; Griese, Eddie; Poelman, Erik H; van Loon, Joop J A; Dicke, Marcel; Fatouros, Nina E

    2015-09-01

    Induction of plant defences, specifically in response to herbivore attack, can save costs that would otherwise be needed to maintain defences even in the absence of herbivores. However, plants may suffer considerable damage during the time required to mount these defences against an attacker. This could be resolved if plants could respond to early cues, such as egg deposition, that reliably indicate future herbivory. We tested this hypothesis in a field experiment and found that egg deposition by the butterfly Pieris brassicae on black mustard (Brassica nigra) induced a plant response that negatively affected feeding caterpillars. The effect cascaded up to the third and fourth trophic levels (larval parasitoids and hyperparasitoids) by affecting the parasitisation rate and parasitoid performance. Overall, the defences induced by egg deposition had a positive effect on plant seed production and may therefore play an important role in the evolution of plant resistance to herbivores. PMID:26147078

  15. A Multihazard Regional Level Impact Assessment for South Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarnath, Giriraj; Alahacoon, Niranga; Aggarwal, Pramod; Smakhtin, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    To prioritize climate adaptation strategies, there is a need for quantitative and systematic regional-level assessments which are comparable across multiple climatic hazard regimes. Assessing which countries in a region are most vulnerable to climate change requires analysis of multiple climatic hazards including: droughts, floods, extreme temperature as well as rainfall and sea-level rise. These five climatic hazards, along with population densities were modelled using GIS which enabled a summary of associated human exposure and agriculture losses. A combined index based on hazard, exposure and adaptive capacity is introduced to identify areas of extreme risks. The analysis results in population climate hazard exposure defined as the relative likelihood that a person in a given location was exposed to a given climate-hazard event in a given period of time. The study presents a detailed and coherent approach to fine-scale climate hazard mapping and identification of risks areas for the regions of South Asia that, for the first time, combines the following unique features: (a) methodological consistency across different climate-related hazards, (b) assessment of total exposure on population and agricultural losses, (c) regional-level spatial coverage, and (d) development of customized tools using ArcGIS toolbox that allow assessment of changes in exposure over time and easy replacement of existing datasets with a newly released or superior datasets. The resulting maps enable comparison of the most vulnerable regions in South Asia to climate-related hazards and is among the most urgent of policy needs. Subnational areas (regions/districts/provinces) most vulnerable to climate change impacts in South Asia are documented. The approach involves overlaying climate hazard maps, sensitivity maps, and adaptive capacity maps following the vulnerability assessment framework of the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The study used data on the

  16. Assessment of Communication Skills Level among Healthcare Practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barati

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Communication skills are the most important characteristics for healthcare providers. The aim of this study was to assess communication skills level and its related factors among healthcare practitioners in Bahar-Hamadan.Materials & Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was carried out on 309 employees in Bahar health care system. Data-gathering tools consisted of a 3-part questionnaire: communication skills level measuring feedback, listening, and verbal communication. Subjects’ demographic variables such as age, gender, education level and job were also recorded. The obtained data was analyzed by means of the statistical software SPSS-13 using coefficient correlation, liner regression, t-test, and One-way Anova.Results: The subjects reported 62.2, 57.1, and 60.2% of receivable scores of verbal, listening, and feedback communication, respectively. Overall communication skills of 27.8% of the participants were evaluated at the desired level. Significant differences were observed in average score of communication skills related to age, gender, education degree, employment status, workhouse, and experience (P<0.05. In liner regression, factors influencing communication skills were age, gender, and education degree (P< 0.05.Conclusion: The results reveal that the communication skills of more than half of the medical practitioners are weak and moderate. It is recommended to design some program to improve medical practitioners' communication skills. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;19(1:62-69

  17. Environmental assessment of the material deposited on the former uranium mining disposal dump in Radoniow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radoniow is a small town in the district of Lubomierz near Jelenia Gora (south-western Poland). From the end of World War II up to the end of the 1960s, uranium mining activities were carried out near the town. The uranium deposits were almost entirely exploited, leaving traces of the mining activities in the form of waste disposal dumps on the east side of Mount Glebiec. The area of the terrain is 6.85 ha. The district authorities plan to use the material on the dumps (containing significant quantities of uranium) as a bedding for the construction of a road around the town (PHARE contract). The measurements performed by the Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection (CLOR) and ordered by MOSTOSTAL-Warszawa (the developer of the road) were aimed at assessing the usability of the dumped material for road construction. The assessment programme consisted of environmental measurements at the disposal site, an assessment of the usability of the materials from the disposal site for the construction of the road, and an analysis of the risk to workers exposed to the material deposited on the dumps. The following tasks were performed: (a) measurement of the whole area using a mobile spectrometric laboratory (creating a radiological map of the area); (b) measurement of the beta activity and gamma dose rate at the surface of the material deposited on the dumps at 41 measurement locations using an RKP-1 radiometer; (c) measurement of the gamma dose rate at the 41 locations using an Exploranium GR-130; (d) measurement of the gamma dose rate at 5 locations using an ionization chamber; (e) measurement of the gamma spectra at 3 locations on the dumps and at 2 locations representative of local background; and (f) sampling for further analysis at CLOR by gamma spectrometry using natural radioactive contamination analyzers AZAR-90 and MAZAR-95. The following samples were taken: 41 samples of the surface material of the dump (10 cm depth); 10 samples from the deep layers of the

  18. LEAF WASHING AS AN ASSESSMENT TOOL TO CHARACTERIZE DRY ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Vittori Antisari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to characterize dry atmospheric deposition after the washing of broad leaves and conifer foliage. To assess this method different sites chosen on the basis of different exposure to both point (e.g. waste incinerator plant (WIP, local crafts and widespread (e.g. roads, agricultural practices sources of anthropogenic pollution.The principal components analysis (PCA, performed on the major and trace elements identified after leaf washing, extracted four factors. F2 was lithogenic while the other three were anthropogenic. The enrichment factor (EF highlights that Cd, Cu and Zn had a purely anthropogenic origin. The sites were grouped according to the predominant source of exposure and the synthetic index of enrichment (SIE showed a decrease as follows: downwind from WIP > max exposure to WIP > min exposure to WIP > road > craft > rural zone.The leaf area allows to calculate the annual flow of elements and the deposition flux in the study area varied for Cd from 0.07 to 0.55 mg m-2, for Co from 0.1 to 0.48 mg m-2, for Cr from 0.63 to 3.7 mg m-2, for Cu from 14.5 to 32.27 mg m-2. The Cd flux in the Bologna area was lower than in some industrial zones of the World and the lowest values were found in the rural zones and under a minimum exposure to the incinerator plant, while the highest values were near the roads and under maximum exposure to the incinerator. The direct analysis of the leaf-washing water allows to discriminate the anthropogenic or geogenic metals deposited on the leaves using multivariate statistical analysis. It is also possible to predict the flow of metals in different areas of investigation.

  19. Assessing Locations of Energy Transfer/Deposit in the Ionosphere-Thermosphere System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, J.; Song, P.

    2014-12-01

    It has long been believed that most of energy transferred from the magnetosphere and deposited in the ionosphere-thermosphere system occurs in the auroral zone, the region of strong field-aligned current density. Recent observations of the Poynting flux to the ionosphere and theoretical investigations of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling show that the strongest energy transfer may be in the polar cap proper where the plasma flow speed is high and not where the flow reverses. This implies that the field-aligned current is not the primary agent of the energy transfer into the ionosphere-thermosphere system and that other physical progresses are at play. Recent simulation studies using an inductive-dynamic approach (including self-consistent solutions of Faraday's law and retaining inertia terms in the ion momentum equations) on the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere coupling indicate that the energy transfer is through Alfven waves propagating to the ionosphere/thermosphere and the energy deposition is via the frictional heating caused by relative motion between ions and neutrals. In this study we assess the locations of the energy transfer and deposition by employing a self-consistent inductive-dynamic ionosphere-thermosphere model. In a 2-D numerical simulation (dawn-dusk meridian plane), we solve the continuity, momentum, and energy equations for multiple species of ions and neutrals including photochemistry and Maxwell's equations. By simulating responses of the ionosphere-thermosphere system to enhanced magnetosphere convection, we show that the strongest energy transfer occurs in the polar cap proper instead of the auroral zone.

  20. Vulnerability assessment at a national level in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsereteli, N.; Arabidze, V.; Varazanashvili, O.; Gugeshashvili, T.

    2012-04-01

    Vulnerability assessment at a national level in Georgia Nino Tsereteli, Vakhtang Arabidze, Otar Varazanashvili, Tengiz Gugeshashvili The risk always exists when cities are built on. Population growth in cities and urbanization in natural hazard-prone zones leads to infrastructure expansion. The goal of the society is to construct natural hazards resistant infrastructure and minimize the expected losses. This is a complicated task as there is always knowledge deficiency on real seismic hazard and vulnerability. Assessment of vulnerability is vital in risk analysis, as vulnerability is defined in many different ways. Work presented here mostly deals with assessment of infrastructure's and population vulnerability at national level in Georgia. This work was initiated by NATO SFP project "seismic Hazard and Risk Assessment for Southern Caucasus - Eastern Turkey Energy Corridors" and the two work packages WP4 (seismic risk) and WP5 (city scenarios) of risk module of EMME (Earthquake Model of the Middle East Region) project. First step was creation databases (inventory) of elements at risk in GIS. Element at risk were the buildings, population, pipelines. The inventories was studied and Created in GIS for the following categories: Building material, number of stories, number of entrances, condition of building, building period. For pipelines pipe tipe (continous or segmented), material, pipe diameter. Very important is to estimate the initial cost of building for assessment of economic losses. From this purpose the attempt was done and the algorithm of this estimation were prepared taking into account obtained the inventory. Build quality, reliability and durability are of special importance to corresponding state agencies and include different aesthetic, engineering, practical, social, technological and economical aspects. The necessity that all of these aspects satisfy existing normative requirements becomes evident as the building and structures come into exploitation

  1. Regulatory review of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) level 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) is increasingly being used as part of the decision making process to assess the level of safety of nuclear power plants. The methodologies in use are maturing and the insights gained from the PSAs are being used along with those from the deterministic analysis. Many regulatory authorities consider that the current state of the art in PSA (especially Level 1 PSA) is sufficiently well developed that it can be used centrally in the regulatory decision making process - referred to as 'risk informed regulation'. For these applications to be successful, it will be necessary for regulatory authorities to have a high degree of confidence in PSA. However, at the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Use of PSA in the Regulatory Process in 1994 and at the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Committee for Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) 'Special Issues' Meeting in 1997 on Review Procedures and Criteria for Different Regulatory Applications of PSA, it was recognized that formal regulatory review guidance for PSA did not exist. The senior regulators noted that there was a need to produce some international guidance for reviewing PSAs to establish an agreed basis for assessing whether important technological and methodological issues in PSAs are treated adequately and to verify that conclusions reached are appropriate. In 1997 the IAEA and OECD Nuclear Energy Agency agreed to produce in co-operation a technical document on the regulatory review of PSA. This publication is intended to provide guidance to regulatory authorities on how to review the PSA for a nuclear power plant to gain confidence that it has been carried out to an acceptable standard so that it can be used as the basis for taking risk informed decisions within a regulatory decision making process. The document gives guidance on how to set about reviewing a PSA and on the technical issues that need to be addressed. This publication gives guidance for the review of Level 1 PSA for

  2. Bioaerosol Deposition to Food Crops near Manure Application: Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahne, Michael A; Rogers, Shane W; Holsen, Thomas M; Grimberg, Stefan J; Ramler, Ivan P; Kim, Seungo

    2016-03-01

    Production of both livestock and food crops are central priorities of agriculture; however, food safety concerns arise where these practices intersect. In this study, we investigated the public health risks associated with potential bioaerosol deposition to crops grown in the vicinity of manure application sites. A field sampling campaign at dairy manure application sites supported the emission, transport, and deposition modeling of bioaerosols emitted from these lands following application activities. Results were coupled with a quantitative microbial risk assessment model to estimate the infection risk due to consumption of leafy green vegetable crops grown at various distances downwind from the application area. Inactivation of pathogens ( spp., spp., and O157:H7) on both the manure-amended field and on crops was considered to determine the maximum loading of pathogens to plants with time following application. Overall median one-time infection risks at the time of maximum loading decreased from 1:1300 at 0 m directly downwind from the field to 1:6700 at 100 m and 1:92,000 at 1000 m; peak risks (95th percentiles) were considerably greater (1:18, 1:89, and 1:1200, respectively). Median risk was below 1:10,000 at >160 m downwind. As such, it is recommended that a 160-m setback distance is provided between manure application and nearby leafy green crop production. Additional distance or delay before harvest will provide further protection of public health. PMID:27065414

  3. Assessment of Acid Deposition Effects on Water Quality of the Upper Rio Grande River Section in Texas

    OpenAIRE

    John L. Gossage; Kaiming Yan; Qi Fu; Badri Parajuli; Qin Qian; Thomas Ho

    2013-01-01

    Airborne pollutants such as SO42- and NO3- that cause acid rain may pollute water resources via acid deposition. However, such effects on the water quality of the upper Rio Grande River section in Texas have not been systematically studied. The objective of this study is to collect and analyze field data, and perform hydrological and water chemistry analyses to assess acid deposition effects on the river water quality. The analysis of the precipitation data indicates that the concentrations ...

  4. An assessment of the variability in performance of wet atmospheric deposition samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, R.C.; Robertson, J.K.; Obal, John

    1987-01-01

    The variability in performance of two brands of wet/dry atmospheric deposition samplers were compared for 1 year at a sincle site. A total of nine samplers were used. Samples were collected weekly and analyzed for pH, specific conductance, common chemical constituents, and sample volume. Additionally, data on the duration of each sampler opening were recorded using a microdatalogger. These data disprove the common perception that samplers remain open throughout a precipitation event. The sensitivity of sampler sensors within the range tested did not have a defineable impact on sample collection. The nonnormal distribution within the data set necessitated application of the nonparametric Friedman Test to assess comparability of sample chemical composition and volume between and within sampler brands. Statistically significant differences existed for most comparisons, however the test did not permit quantification of their magnitudes. Differences in analyte concentrations between samplers were small. (USGS)

  5. Qualitative assessment of selected areas of the world for undiscovered sediment-hosted stratabound copper deposits: Chapter Y in Global mineral resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zientek, Michael L.; Wintzer, Niki E.; Hayes, Timothy S.; Parks, Heather L.; Briggs, Deborah A.; Causey, J. Douglas; Hatch, Shyla A.; Jenkins, M. Christopher; Williams, David J.

    2015-01-01

    A qualitative mineral resource assessment of sediment-hosted stratabound copper mineralized areas for undiscovered copper deposits was performed for 10 selected areas of the world. The areas, in alphabetical order, are (1) Belt-Purcell Basin, United States and Canada; (2) Benguela and Cuanza Basins, Angola; (3) Chuxiong Basin, China; (4) Dongchuan Group rocks, China; (5) Egypt–Israel–Jordan Rift, Egypt, Israel, and Jordan; (6) Maritimes Basin, Canada; (7) Neuquén Basin, Argentina; (8) Northwest Botswana Rift, Botswana and Namibia; (9) Redstone Copperbelt, Canada; and (10) Salta Rift System, Argentina. This assessment (1) outlines the main characteristics of the areas, (2) classifies known deposits by deposit model subtypes, and (3) ranks the areas according to their potential to contain undiscovered copper deposits.

  6. Malaysia; Publication of Financial Sector Assessment Program Documentation—Detailed Assessment of Observance of Core Principles for Effective Deposit Insurance Systems

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates and addresses Malaysia’s compliance with the Core Principles for Effective Deposit Insurance Systems (Core Principles), and reviews relevant laws, regulations and regulatory and supervisory practices related to conventional banking sector, and the operations of Perbadanan Insurans Deposit Malaysia (PIDM). Though several weaknesses in the legal framework have been noted in this assessment, there has been no experience with bank failures in Malaysia since PIDM’s establi...

  7. Road-deposited sediment, soil and precipitation (RDS) in Bratislava, Slovakia. Compositional and spatial assessment of contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krcmova, Katrina; Cveckova, Veronika; Rapant, Stanislav [Geological Survey of the Slovak Republic, Bratislava (Slovakia); Robertson, Davina [Manchester Metropolitan Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Environmental and Geographical Sciences

    2009-08-15

    Background, aim and scope: The urban environment in Bratislava is, in association with rapid urbanisation and industrialisation, significantly influenced by several potential sources of pollution, including automobile exhaust and industry emissions. Urban road-deposited sediments contain many potentially toxic elements such as Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn and also Fe at concentrations much higher than in soil. In this study, the chemical composition and spatial variability of road-deposited sediments in urban area of Bratislava were assessed for the elements As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Fe and Mn. Additional evaluation of archive data for soil, snow and atmospheric dust was undertaken to provide an integrated view on urban environment contamination. Materials and methods: Urban road-deposited sediments (RDS) were collected during summer 2003 and 2004 mainly from major city crossroads. RDS samples were analysed for total metal content, pseudo-total metal content (HNO{sub 3} digestion) and by a sequential extraction method, grain fraction composition and mineralogical composition (X-ray analysis). Metal concentrations in soil and snow samples from urban and non urban city area were compared. Results and discussion: The highest concentrations for all metals were found in the finest RDS fraction (<0.125 mm). Whilst in the fraction <1 mm mean concentrations of Cr, Cu and Pb reached 55.2, 143.8 and 34.4 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively, for the fraction <0.125 mm, markedly higher contents of these elements were documented at the level of 86.8, 218.4 and 63.1 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively. The soil contents of potentially toxic risk elements in the urban area including As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn were higher than in the non-urban area (except for Cd with similar contents). This distribution pattern of evaluated chemicals in urban and non-urban area is more evident in the case of winter precipitation (snow). The snow concentrations of As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn in the urban area

  8. Agenda, extended abstracts, and bibliographies for a workshop on Deposit modeling, mineral resources assessment, and their role in sustainable development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briskey, Joseph A., (Edited By); Schulz, Klaus J.

    2002-01-01

    Global demand for mineral resources continues to increase because of increasing global population and the desire and efforts to improve living standards worldwide. The ability to meet this growing demand for minerals is affected by the concerns about possible environmental degradation associated with minerals production and by competing land uses. Informed planning and decisions concerning sustainability and resource development require a long-term perspective and an integrated approach to land-use, resource, and environmental management worldwide. This, in turn, requires unbiased information on the global distribution of identified and especially undiscovered resources, the economic and political factors influencing their development, and the potential environmental consequences of their exploitation. The purpose of the IGC workshop is to review the state-of-the-art in mineral-deposit modeling and quantitative resource assessment and to examine their role in the sustainability of mineral use. The workshop will address such questions as: Which of the available mineral-deposit models and assessment methods are best suited for predicting the locations, deposit types, and amounts of undiscovered nonfuel mineral resources remaining in the world? What is the availability of global geologic, mineral deposit, and mineral-exploration information? How can mineral-resource assessments be used to address economic and environmental issues? Presentations will include overviews of assessment methods used in previous national and other small-scale assessments of large regions as well as resulting assessment products and their uses.

  9. A level 1+ probabilistic safety assessment for Dhruva reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Probabilistic safety assessment of Dhruva research reactor has been carried out. The scope of this work extends beyond level 1 PSA study to include the limited scope level 2 PSA study to give the likelihood of releases, during the postulated LOCA scenario, to the member of public. The work involved under this project include the reliability analysis of safety systems and safety support systems, estimation of failure frequency of the initiating events and modeling of accident sequences towards giving the statement of core damage frequency (CDF) for the plant. The uncertainty analysis has been carried out at system level as well as at CDF level to account for possible data and modeling error. The sensitivity analysis has been performed to check the affect of major assumptions and critical system parameters on the result of this analysis. The results of this analysis include the statement of CDF and important accident sequences for the plant. The important accident initiators identified in this study which contribute significantly to the CDF value. Though LOCA contribution is small to the CDF the consequences of LOCA have potential of radioactivity release into the containment. There exists potential, however small it may be, for release of radioactivity outside the plant depending on the performance of containment isolation and emergency exhaust system. Based on the results and findings of the deterministic safety analysis of the plant, further study was carried out to estimate the frequency of release of radioactivity during LOCA scenario. It was found that the likelihood of release of radioactivity of the order of around one-tenth of the permissible limit, to the member of public is very low

  10. Assessment of exposure to composite nanomaterials and development of a personal respiratory deposition sampler for nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cena, Lorenzo

    2011-12-01

    The overall goals of this doctoral dissertation are to provide knowledge of workers' exposure to nanomaterials and to assist in the development of standard methods to measure personal exposure to nanomaterials in workplace environments. To achieve the first goal, a field study investigated airborne particles generated from the weighing of bulk carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the manual sanding of epoxy test samples reinforced with CNTs. This study also evaluated the effectiveness of three local exhaust ventilation (LEV) conditions (no LEV, custom fume hood and biosafety cabinet) for control of exposure to particles generated during sanding of CNT-epoxy nanocomposites. Particle number and respirable mass concentrations were measured with direct-read instruments, and particle morphology was determined by electron microscopy. Sanding of CNT-epoxy nanocomposites released respirable size airborne particles with protruding CNTs very different in morphology from bulk CNTs that tended to remain in clusters (>1mum). Respirable mass concentrations in the operator's breathing zone were significantly greater when sanding took place in the custom hood (p workplace levels was found to have no significant effect (2-way ANOVA, p=0.257) on the performance of the impactor. The effective deposition of particles onto the diffusion stage was found to match the NPM criterion, showing that a sample collected with the NRD sampler represents the concentration of nanoparticles deposited in the human respiratory system.

  11. Assessing Levels of Attention using Low Cost Eye Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Per; Petersen, Michael Kai; Larsen, Jakob Eg

    2015-01-01

    Exploring whether we can quantify the engagement of a user interacting with a laptop, we apply mobile eye tracking to assess pupil size changes, related to attentional aspects of alertness, orientation and conflict resolution. Visually presenting conflicting cues and targets we hypothesize that it......'s feasible measure the allocated effort when responding to confusing stimuli. Although such experiments are normally carried out in a lab, we are able to differentiate between sustained alertness and complex decision making even with low cost eye tracking in the wild. From a quantified self perspective, the...... correlations between the pupil size and the task dependent reaction time and error rates provide further insight into individual users' strategies for coping with tasks prompting different levels of attention....

  12. Assessing Level of Ubiquitous Computing Services for Ubiquitous Business Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KWON Ohbyung

    2004-01-01

    We are entering into a new era of enterprise computing that is characterized by an emphasis on broadband convergence, knowledge sharing, and calm services. Some people refer to this as the "ubiquitous network" business model because its focus is on a high degree of connectivity between a company and its customers, suppliers, and channel partners. Moreover, immediate access to ideas, goods,and services will be of greater value than the traditional model of permanent and ponderous possession.This paper illustrates how ubiquitous computing technology can be combined with legacy computer-based information systems, along with thoughts on relevant issues of ubiquitous commerce. We also propose a model for how to assess levels of ubiquitous computing services.

  13. Impact of global seismicity on sea level change assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Melini, D

    2005-01-01

    We analyze the effect of seismic activity on sealevel variations, by computing the time-dependent vertical crustal movement and geoid change due to coseismic deformations and postseismic relaxation effects. Seismic activity can affect both the absolute sealevel, by changing the Earth gravity field and hence the geoid height, and the relative sealevel, i.e. the radial distance between seafloor and geoid level. By using comprehensive seismic catalogues we assess the net effect of seismicity on tidal relative sealevel measurements as well as on the global oceanic surfaces, and we obtain an estimate of absolute sealevel variations of seismic origin. Our results confirm that, on a global scale, most of the signal is associated with few giant thrust events, and that RSL estimates obtained using tide-gauge data can be sensibly affected by the seismic driven sealevel signal. The recent measures of sealevel obtained by satellite altimetry show a wide regional variation of sealevel trends over the oceanic surfaces, wit...

  14. Risk assessment methodology for Hanford high-level waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology is presented for applying Probabilistic Safety Assessment techniques to quantification of the health risks posed by the high-level waste (HLW) underground tanks at the Department of Energy's Hanford reservation. This methodology includes hazard screening development of a list of potential accident initiators, systems fault trees development and quantification, definition of source terms for various release categories, and estimation of health consequences from the releases. Both airborne and liquid pathway releases to the environment, arising from aerosol and spill/leak releases from the tanks, are included in the release categories. The proposed methodology is intended to be applied to a representative subset of the total of 177 tanks, thereby providing a baseline risk profile for the HLW tank farm that can be used for setting clean-up/remediation priorities. Some preliminary results are presented for Tank 101-SY

  15. Ambient levels and dry deposition fluxes of mercury to Lakes Huron, Erie and St. Clair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambient concentrations and dry deposition fluxes of Hg in the gas and particle phase to Lakes St. Clair, Erie and Huron were estimated with a hybrid receptor-deposition model (HRD). The ambient gas and particulate phase Hg concentrations were predicted to vary by a factor of 12 to 18 during the transport of air masses traversing the lakes. The ensemble average deposition fluxes of fine particle Hg ranged from 7 pg/m2-h to 15.3 pg/m2-h over Lake St. Clair, 0.5 to 4.2 pg/m2-h over Lake Huron and 5.1 to 20.6 pg/m2-h over Lake Huron and 5.1 to 20.6 pg/m2-h over Lake Erie. Gaseous Hg volatilized at a rate of 0.21 to 0.52 ng/m2-h and/or volatilized at a rate of 0.5 ng/m2-h from Lake St. Clair depending upon the location of the sampling site used in the HRD model. The effect of meteorological conditions, particle size distributions and type and location of the sampling sites played an important role in the transfer of atmospheric Hg to and/or from the lakes. 17 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  16. An assessment of undergraduate paramedic students' empathy levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Williams

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the extent of empathy in paramedic students across seven Australian universities. Methods: A cross-sectional study using a paper-based questionnaire employing a convenience sample of first, second, and third year undergraduate paramedic students. Student empathy levels were measured using the Medical Condition Regard Scale (MCRS. Results: A total of 783 students participated in the study of which 57were females. The medical conditions: intellectual disability, attempted suicide, and acute mental illness all produced mean scores above 50 suggesting good empathetic regard, while patients presenting with substance abuse produced the lowest mean score (M=41.57, SD= 12.29. There was a statistically significant difference between males (M=49.79 and females (M=51.61 for patients with intellectual disability (t[sub](778[/sub]=2.76, p=0.006. Conclusions: The findings from this study found that student reported poor empathetic regard for patients with substance abuse, while female students report higher levels of empathy than their male colleagues across each medical condition. The overall findings provide a framework for educators to begin constructing guidelines focusing on the need to incorporate, promote and instil empathy into paramedic students in order to better prepare them for future out-of-hospital healthcare practice.

  17. Decreased circulating C3 levels and mesangial C3 deposition predict renal outcome in patients with IgA nephropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Jun Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Mesangial C3 deposition is frequently observed in patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN. However, the role of complement in the pathogenesis or progression of IgAN is uncertain. In this observational cohort study, we aimed to identify the clinical implications of circulating C3 levels and mesangial C3 deposition and to investigate their utility as predictors of renal outcomes in patients with IgAN. METHODS: A total of 343 patients with biopsy-proven IgAN were enrolled between January 2000 and December 2008. Decreased serum C3 level (hypoC3 was defined as C3 <90 mg/dl. The study endpoint was end-stage renal disease (ESRD and a doubling of the baseline serum creatinine (D-SCr. RESULTS: Of the patients, there were 66 patients (19.2% with hypoC3. During a mean follow-up of 53.7 months, ESRD occurred in 5 patients (7.6% with hypoC3 compared with 9 patients (3.2% with normal C3 levels (P = 0.11. However, 12 patients (18.2% with hypoC3 reached D-SCr compared with 17 patients (6.1% with normal C3 levels [Hazard ratio (HR, 3.59; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.33-10.36; P = 0.018]. In a multivariable model in which serum C3 levels were treated as a continuous variable, hypoC3 significantly predicted renal outcome of D-SCr (per 1 mg/dl increase of C3; HR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.99; P = 0.011. The risk of reaching renal outcome was significantly higher in patients with mesangial C3 deposition 2+ to 3+ than in patients without deposition (HR 9.37; 95% CI, 1.10-80.26; P = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that hypoC3 and mesangial C3 deposition were independent risk factors for progression, suggesting that complement activation may play a pathogenic role in patients with IgAN.

  18. Indicators for assessing the safety level of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the political opening of the states of Central and Eastern Europe roughly one decade ago, Western industrialized countries in particular have been striving to achieve sustainable improvements in the safety of nuclear reactors in those countries. One objective of these efforts is to ensure a high level of nuclear safety and safety culture in line with worldwide endeavors. The enlargement of the European Union in the very near future offers an opportunity for reaching this goal in the participating countries. Existing international framework agreements refer to the appropriate safety guidelines. At EU level, the harmonization of nuclear safety standards has been an important topic for years, with specific constructive activities being initiated, e.g., by the industry and by regulatory authorities. Uniform safety standards should not be the basis of proven reviews conducted by the national licensing and supervisory authorities. The objective should be the development of key requirements as framework conditions, irrespective of their practical implementation. They could be applied to any nuclear power plant in an accession country, but likewise to plants in member states, in order to provide an overview of the current safety status of a nuclear power plant and the rules by which it is run. As deriving uniform safety standards is a very expensive and lengthy procedure, the approach shown here identifies six main areas of review for light water reactors (safety systems; integrity of the safety barriers; risk assessment; radiation exposure of the plant personnel and the environment; plant operations management; plant safety) and the associated safety indicators, with reference criteria formulated as concretely as possible. This proposal also lends itself to international individual evaluations of safety levels and could facilitate the review process already under way for the EU candidate countries. (orig.)

  19. Atmospheric deposition levels of chosen elements in the Czech Republic determined in the framework of the International Bryomonitoring Program 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to determine the atmospheric loads of 13 elements (Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mo, Ni, Pb, S, V, Zn), samples of Pleurozium schreberi (81.1%), Hypnum cupressiforme (11.2%) and Pseudoscleropodium purum (7.7%) bryophytes (mosses) were taken and analysed from an approx. 20x20-km grid extending over the entire territory (78-864 km2) of the Czech Republic (abbreviated 'the CZ' in this study). The level of the elements found in the bryophytes reflects the relative atmospheric deposition loads of the elements at the investigated sites. Five hot spots indicating relatively high deposition levels were identified in the CZ. The marginal hot spots are the following: the CZ part of the so-called Black Triangle I territory in northwestern CZ; the CZ part of the Black Triangle II territory in northeastern CZ; and the CZ part of the Sudeten mountains (Jizerske Mts and Giant Mts) and their foothills in northern CZ. Inland hot spots were found in the southwestern industrial part of central Bohemia and in the southern Moravian industrial district. The average element contents in CZ bryophytes were comparable with the respective average values obtained in Germany and Poland. However, the CZ average bryophyte values were higher and lower in comparison to the average Austrian and Slovak values, respectively. The CZ average relative atmospheric deposition loads of the elements were found to be 2-3 times higher than the respective loads in the cleanest parts of Europe (e.g. clean parts of Nordic countries). A comparison of the analytical results obtained repeatedly at 20 identical localities in the CZ showed a significant decrease in the relative deposition loads of all of the investigated elements in 1995 as compared to 1991. This decrease has been caused by the dramatic restriction of the industrial production, mainly that of the metallurgical and chemical industries, in the CZ. Desulphurisation programs and the effective trapping of flying dust particles in CZ power plants

  20. Bentonite deposits in china and its possible use as buffer material for China high level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive waste is produced from a wide range of nuclear activities and the safe disposal of radioactive waste is a key issue of the nuclear industry worldwide. In China, the work related to radioactive waste disposal is managed by the China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC). In 1985, CNNC proposed an R and D program called DGD program for the Deep Geological Disposal of HLW. The objective of the program is to build a granite-hosted national geological repository between 2030 and 2040, which is able to dispose of vitrified waste, transuranic waste and small amount of CANDU spent fuel. The concept of geological disposal of high level radioactive waste in China is based on a multi-barrier system which combines an isolating geological environment with an engineered barrier system. The buffer/backfill material is one of the main engineered barriers for HLW repository. The basic requirement of the buffer is to restrict radionuclide migration by restricting groundwater movement, providing a high sorption capacity for dissolved nuclides and acting as a filter for radionuclide - bearing colloids. To ensure safety over the long timescales of interest, it is necessary to demonstrate that no significant detrimental impacts on the physical properties of the buffer material. In parallel, it is also necessary to demonstrate the feasibility of manufacturing and installing the buffer. Natural clay is a material that can satisfy all the above functions, to a greater or lesser extent. Among the types of natural clay, bentonite, when compacted, is considered as a superior barrier because (1) it has exceptionally low water permeability to control the movement of water in buffer, (2) it fills void spaces in the buffer and fractures in the host rock as it swells upon water uptake, (3) it has the ability to exchange cations and to adsorb cationic radioelement. There are 84 main bentonite deposits discovered in China. In order to select a bentonite deposit for China high level waste

  1. Overview of calcite/opal deposits at or near the proposed high-level nuclear waste site, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA: Pedogenic, hypogene, or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, C. A.; Dublyansky, Y. V.; Harmon, R. S.; Schluter, C. M.

    1995-09-01

    Calcite/opal deposits (COD) at Yucca Mountain were studied with respect to their regional and field geology, petrology and petrography, chemistry and isotopic geochemistry, and fluid inclusions. They were also compared with true pedogenic deposits (TPD), groundwater spring deposits (GSD), and calcite vein deposits (CVD) in the subsurface. Some of the data are equivocal and can support either a hypogene or pedogenic origin for these deposits. However, Sr-, C-, and O-isotope, fluid inclusion, and other data favor a hypogene interpretation. A hypothesis that may account for all currently available data is that the COD precipitated from warm, CO2-rich water that episodically upwelled along faults during the Pleistocene, and which, upon reaching the surface, flowed downslope within existing alluvial, colluvial, eluvial, or soil deposits. Being formed near, or on, the topographic surface, the COD acquired characteristics of pedogenic deposits. This subject relates to the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a high-level nuclear waste site.

  2. Assessing the recovery potential of alpine moss-sedge heath: Reciprocal transplants along a nitrogen deposition gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armitage, Heather F., E-mail: h.armitage@abdn.ac.u [Macaulay Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH (United Kingdom); Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UU (United Kingdom); Britton, Andrea J. [Macaulay Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH (United Kingdom); Woodin, Sarah J. [Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UU (United Kingdom); Wal, Rene van der [Aberdeen Centre for Environmental Sustainability (ACES), School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UU (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    The potential of alpine moss-sedge heath to recover from elevated nitrogen (N) deposition was assessed by transplanting Racomitrium lanuginosum shoots and vegetation turfs between 10 elevated N deposition sites (8.2-32.9 kg ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) and a low N deposition site, Ben Wyvis (7.2 kg ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}). After two years, tissue N of Racomitrium shoots transplanted from higher N sites to Ben Wyvis only partially equilibrated to reduced N deposition whereas reciprocal transplants almost matched the tissue N of indigenous moss. Unexpectedly, moss shoot growth was stimulated at higher N deposition sites. However, moss depth and biomass increased in turfs transplanted to Ben Wyvis, apparently due to slower shoot turnover (suggested to result partly from decreased tissue C:N slowing decomposition), whilst abundance of vascular species declined. Racomitrium heath has the potential to recover from the impacts of N deposition; however, this is constrained by the persistence of enhanced moss tissue N contents. - Alpine moss-sedge heath, dominated by Racomitrium lanuginosum, from across the UK has the potential to recover from the impacts of N pollution; however, this is constrained by persistence of enhanced moss tissue N contents.

  3. Assessment of pulmonary aerosol deposition and epithelial permeability in [sup 99m]Tc-DTPA inhalation scintigram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanazawa, Minoru; Suzuki, Yukio; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Hasegawa, Naoki; Fujishima, Seitaro; Kawashiro, Takeo; Yokoyama, Tetsuro; Kubo, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Shozo (Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1993-05-01

    The degree of lung injury in bronchiolo-alveolar lesions may be quantitated from the pulmonary epithelial permeability estimated by [sup 99m]Tc-diethylene triamine penta acetate (DTPA) aerosol inhalation scintigram. However, significant aerosol deposition sometimes occurs in the central airways and obscures the peameability change in the lung periphery. The radioaerosol deposition pattern and its effct on assessing the pulmonary epithelial permeability was studied. [sup 99m]Tc-DTPA aerosol scintigraphy was performed in 47 patients with pulmonary fibrosis (PF), 12 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD), and 27 non-smoking and 17 smoking healthy volunteers. The scintigraphic images of the lungs were classified into 4 grades: 0=homogeneous distribution; 1=patchy distribution; 2=hot spots with partial defects; and 3= hot spots with little deposition in the lung field. The rate constant was used as a parameter for the permeability. The smokers and patients with PF showed increased kep values of 2.36[+-]1.21%/min (mean[+-]SD) and 2.49[+-]1.29% min as compared with the nonsmokers with 0.94[+-]0.27% min, respectively. The nonsmokers, smokers and 36 patients with PF were classified as deposition grade 0 or 1, suggesting good aerosol penetration to the lung periphery. All patients with COPD showed either grade 2 or 3 deposition. Aerosol deposition in the central airways can cause underestimation of the permeability because of the thicker lining layer in the bronchus than in the alveolus. In conclusion, the aerosol deposition pattern should be analyzed when the method is applied clinically to assess the permeability of the bronchiolo-alveolar epithelium. (author).

  4. Data Base for a National Mineral-Resource Assessment of Undiscovered Deposits of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, and Zinc in the Conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludington, S.D.; Cox, D.P.; McCammon, R.B.

    1996-01-01

    For this assessment, the conterminous United States was divided into 12 regions Adirondack Mountains, Central and Southern Rocky Mountains, Colorado Plateau, East Central, Great Basin, Great Plains, Lake Superior, Northern Appalachians, Northern Rocky Mountains, Pacific Coast, Southern Appalachians, and Southern Basin and Range. The assessment, which was conducted by regional assessment teams of scientists from the USGS, was based on the concepts of permissive tracts and deposit models. Permissive tracts are discrete areas of the United States for which estimates of numbers of undiscovered deposits of a particular deposit type were made. A permissive tract is defined by its geographic boundaries such that the probability of deposits of the type delineated occurring outside the boundary is neglible. Deposit models, which are based on a compilation of worldwide literature and on observation, are sets of data in a convenient form that describe a group of deposits which have similar characteristics and that contain information on the common geologic attributes of the deposits and the environments in which they are found. Within each region, the assessment teams delineated permissive tracts for those deposit models that were judged to be appropriate and, when the amount of information warranted, estimated the number of undiscovered deposits. A total of 46 deposit models were used to assess 236 separate permissive tracts. Estimates of undiscovered deposits were limited to a depth of 1 km beneath the surface of the Earth. The estimates of the number of undiscovered deposits of gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc were expressed in the form of a probability distribution. Commonly, the number of undiscovered deposits was estimated at the 90th, 50th, and 10th percentiles. A Monte Carlo simulation computer program was used to combine the probability distribution of the number of undiscovered deposits with the grade and tonnage data sets associated with each deposit model to

  5. Nitrogen deposition effects on Mediterranean-type ecosystems: An ecological assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochoa-Hueso, Raul, E-mail: raul.ochoa@ccma.csic.es [Department of Plant Physiology and Ecology, Centro de Ciencias Medioambientales, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, C/Serrano 115 Dpdo., 28006 Madrid (Spain); Allen, Edith B. [Department of Botany and Plant Sciences and Center for Conservation Biology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Branquinho, Cristina; Cruz, Cristina; Dias, Teresa [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Biologia Ambiental, Campo Grande, Bloco C4, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Fenn, Mark E. [US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive, Riverside, CA 92507 (United States); Manrique, Esteban [Department of Plant Physiology and Ecology, Centro de Ciencias Medioambientales, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, C/Serrano 115 Dpdo., 28006 Madrid (Spain); Perez-Corona, M. Esther [Department of Ecology, Faculty of Biology, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, C/Jose Antonio Novais 2, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Sheppard, Lucy J. [Centre of Ecology and Hydrology, Bush Estate, Penicuik EH26 0QB (United Kingdom); Stock, William D. [Centre for Ecosystem Management, School of Natural Sciences, Edith Cowan University, 100 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, Perth, WA 6027 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    We review the ecological consequences of N deposition on the five Mediterranean regions of the world. Seasonality of precipitation and fires regulate the N cycle in these water-limited ecosystems, where dry N deposition dominates. Nitrogen accumulation in soils and on plant surfaces results in peaks of availability with the first winter rains. Decoupling between N flushes and plant demand promotes losses via leaching and gas emissions. Differences in P availability may control the response to N inputs and susceptibility to exotic plant invasion. Invasive grasses accumulate as fuel during the dry season, altering fire regimes. California and the Mediterranean Basin are the most threatened by N deposition; however, there is limited evidence for N deposition impacts outside of California. Consequently, more research is needed to determine critical loads for each region and vegetation type based on the most sensitive elements, such as changes in lichen species composition and N cycling. - Highlights: > N deposition impacts are understudied in Mediterranean ecosystems out of California. > Dry N deposition is dominant and N flushes are common after rainless periods. > Water availability and P fertility regulate ecosystem responses to N deposition. > Research is needed to determine critical loads for each region and vegetation type. - Nitrogen deposition threatens the Mediterranean regions of the world.

  6. Nitrogen deposition effects on Mediterranean-type ecosystems: An ecological assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review the ecological consequences of N deposition on the five Mediterranean regions of the world. Seasonality of precipitation and fires regulate the N cycle in these water-limited ecosystems, where dry N deposition dominates. Nitrogen accumulation in soils and on plant surfaces results in peaks of availability with the first winter rains. Decoupling between N flushes and plant demand promotes losses via leaching and gas emissions. Differences in P availability may control the response to N inputs and susceptibility to exotic plant invasion. Invasive grasses accumulate as fuel during the dry season, altering fire regimes. California and the Mediterranean Basin are the most threatened by N deposition; however, there is limited evidence for N deposition impacts outside of California. Consequently, more research is needed to determine critical loads for each region and vegetation type based on the most sensitive elements, such as changes in lichen species composition and N cycling. - Highlights: → N deposition impacts are understudied in Mediterranean ecosystems out of California. → Dry N deposition is dominant and N flushes are common after rainless periods. → Water availability and P fertility regulate ecosystem responses to N deposition. → Research is needed to determine critical loads for each region and vegetation type. - Nitrogen deposition threatens the Mediterranean regions of the world.

  7. Measurement of the 36Cl deposition flux in central Japan: natural background levels and seasonal variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essential parameters for the applications of 36Cl as a tracer in groundwater studies include the initial 36Cl/Cl ratio, at the time of recharge, and/or the natural background deposition flux of 36Cl in the recharge area. To facilitate the hydrological use of 36Cl in central Japan, this study aimed to obtain a precise estimate of the long-term average local 36Cl flux and to characterize its seasonal variability. The 36Cl in precipitation was continuously monitored in Tsukuba, central Japan over a period of >5 years. The 36Cl flux showed a clear seasonal variation with an annual peak during the spring, which was attributed to the seasonal variability of tropopause height. The long-term average 36Cl flux (32 ± 2 atoms m−2 s−1), estimated from the measured data, was consistent with the prediction from the 36Cl latitudinal fallout model scaled using the global mean production rate of 20 atoms m−2 s−1. The initial 36Cl/Cl ratio was estimated to be (41 ± 6) × 10−15, which is similar to that of pre-bomb groundwater in the Tsukuba Upland. An observation period covering an 11-year solar cycle would yield more accurate estimates of the values, given the increased 36Cl flux during the solar minimum. - Highlights: ► We monitored 36Cl in precipitation in central Japan over a period of >5 years. ► The 36Cl flux varied seasonally, with a peak in spring. ► The long-term average 36Cl flux and the initial 36Cl/Cl ratio were 32 ± 2 atoms m−2 s−1 and (41 ± 6) × 10−15, respectively. ► An observation period covering an 11-year solar cycle would yield more accurate estimates of the values, given the increased 36Cl flux during the solar minimum.

  8. Preliminary studies on environment assessment around Wahkyn uranium deposit, West Khasi Hills District, Meghalaya: a hydro-pedo geochemical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental baseline study is an important step in the environmental impact assessment of the uranium deposit. It forms background for mining and milling project, on the local environment. Baseline data collection programme was initiated in the later part of 2001 after identifying sampling sites covering the Wahkyn uranium deposit. Workable size of uranium with an average grade of 0.101 % U3O8 has been established in coarse to medium grained, immature, grey to dark grey feldspathic sandstone with abundant carbonaceous matter and pyrite. Systematic stream water samples in conjunction with soil and stream sediment samples were collected periodically from 20 permanent sample sites spread over 4.5 sq km, located in perennial streams draining through the Wahkyn uranium deposit area

  9. Indices using external measurements for assessing fat deposition of adult feral raccoons (Procyon lotor) in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Takuya; Uno, Taiki; Fujioka, Yoshiyuki; Hayama, Shin-Ichi

    2012-02-01

    We examined the use of external measurements and relative fat deposition of adult feral raccoons (Procyon lotor) to develop relative indices of body fat deposition in post-growth feral raccoons. From March 2006 to March 2010, 288 adult raccoon carcasses (110 males, 178 females) collected in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, which were determined to be 24 months old, were subjected to external measurements of body weight (BW), girth measurement (GM), and body mass index (BMI). To assess relative body fat deposition, we visually classified abdominal subcutaneous fat into three grades (Visible Fat Index [VFI]: I-III). Significant differences in the means of BW (both sexes:Praccoons in Kanagawa Prefecture and may be generalizable to populations in other areas. PMID:21979454

  10. An assessment of issues related to determination of time periods required for isolation of high level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A commonly held perception is that disposal of spent nuclear fuel or high-level waste presents a risk of unprecedented duration. In 40 CFR 191, the EPA requires that projected releases of radioactivity be limited for 10,000 years after disposal with the intent that risks from the disposal repository be no greater than those from the uranium ore deposit from which the nuclear fuel was originally extracted. This study reviews issues involved in assessing compliance with the requirement. The determination of compliance is assumption dependent primarily due to uncertainties in dosi-metric data, and relative availability of the radioactivity for environmental transport and eventual assimilation by humans. A conclusion of this study is that, in time, a spent fuel disposal repository such as the projected Yucca Mountain Project Facility will become less hazardous than the original ore deposit

  11. Effects of atmospheric deposition of energy-related pollutants on water quality: a review and assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects on surface-water quality of atmospheric pollutants that are generated during energy production are reviewed and evaluated. Atmospheric inputs from such sources to the aquatic environment may include trace elements, organic compounds, radionuclides, and acids. Combustion is the largest energy-related source of trace-element emissions to the atmosphere. This report reviews the nature of these emissions from coal-fired power plants and discusses their terrestrial and aquatic effects following deposition. Several simple models for lakes and streams are developed and are applied to assess the potential for adverse effects on surface-water quality of trace-element emissions from coal combustion. The probability of acute impacts on the aquatic environment appears to be low; however, more subtle, chronic effects are possible. The character of acid precipitation is reviewed, with emphasis on aquatic effects, and the nature of existing or potential effects on water quality, aquatic biota, and water supply is considered. The response of the aquatic environment to acid precipitation depends on the type of soils and bedrock in a watershed and the chemical characteristics of the water bodies in question. Methods for identifying regions sensitive to acid inputs are reviewed. The observed impact of acid precipitation ranges from no effects to elimination of fish populations. Coal-fired power plants and various stages of the nuclear fuel cycle release radionuclides to the atmosphere. Radioactive releases to the atmosphere from these sources and the possible aquatic effects of such releases are examined. For the nuclear fuel cycle, the major releases are from reactors and reprocessing. Although aquatic effects of atmospheric releases have not been fully quantified, there seems little reason for concern for man or aquatic biota

  12. ASSESSMENT OF THE CHEMICAL POLLUTION OF THE SOIL, GROUND AND BOTTOM SEDIMENTS AT KLEN GOLD AND SILVER DEPOSIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryukhan' Fedor Fedorovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently, prospecting and design-related works are performed prior to the upcoming launch of mining operations at Klen gold and silver deposit in Chukot Autonomous District. The anthropogenic impact of the geological exploration in this intact territory has been produced since 1984. A considerable amount of borehole drilling, prospecting, road building, and temporary housing development has been performed. The engineering research, including ecological surveys, has been completed to assess the ecological impact of upcoming exploratory and mining operations at the deposit. Assessment of the geochemical condition of the landscape constituents, including the soil, ground and bottom sediments is of special importance in terms of their engineering protection and rational management of the natural environment. The above assessments were based on the field sampling made by «Sibgeoconsulting», CJSC (Krasnoyarsk and the laboratory research made by accredited laboratories of Federal State Unitary Geological Enterprise «Urangeolograzvedka» (Irkutsk and «Krasnoyarskgeologiya» (Krasnoyarsk. The analysis of the chemical pollution of soils, ground and bottom sediments is based on the examination of 30 samples. Peculiarities of the chemical composition of samples extracted at the deposit were identified. It has been discovered that pH values of the soil vary from 5.1 to 7.3. The concentration of metal in bottom sediments exceeds its concentration in the soil by far. Almost all irregular features of the sample water in the whole territory of the deposit are caused by the anthropogenic impact. In general, the metal content in soils, ground and bottom sediments within the territory of the deposit is slightly different from the regular clarke.

  13. Level 2 probabilistic safety assessment of the Paks NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the objectives, scope and organization of level 2 PSA of the Paks NPP is presented, including phases of the level 2, interface with level 1 and grouping of sequences. The performed containment event trees analysis, conditional probability of nodes and release categories description are discussed and main results are illustrated. The objective, present situation and two strategies for accident management are given. The results for the containment performance analysis are also shown

  14. The Effect of Peer Assessment on Project Performance of Students at Different Learning Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lan; Gao, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Peer assessment has been increasingly integrated in educational settings as a strategy to foster student learning. Yet little has been studied about how students at different learning levels may benefit from peer assessment. This study examined how peer-assessment and students' learning levels influenced students' project performance using a…

  15. ASSESSMENT OF THE CHEMICAL POLLUTION OF THE SOIL, GROUND AND BOTTOM SEDIMENTS AT KLEN GOLD AND SILVER DEPOSIT

    OpenAIRE

    Bryukhan' Fedor Fedorovich; Lebedev Viktor Vadimovich

    2012-01-01

    Currently, prospecting and design-related works are performed prior to the upcoming launch of mining operations at Klen gold and silver deposit in Chukot Autonomous District. The anthropogenic impact of the geological exploration in this intact territory has been produced since 1984. A considerable amount of borehole drilling, prospecting, road building, and temporary housing development has been performed. The engineering research, including ecological surveys, has been completed to assess t...

  16. Quality assessment of post-edited versus translated wildlife documentary films : a three-level approach

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz-Boix, Carla; Matamala, Anna

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study designed to evaluate the quality of post-edited wildlife documentary films (in comparison to translated) which are delivered using voiceover and off-screen dubbing. The study proposes a quality assessment at three levels: experts’ assessment, dubbing studio’s assessment and end-users’ assessment. The main contribution of this quality assessment proposal is the inclusion of end-users in the process of assessing the quality of post-edited and transla...

  17. Deep repository - engineered barrier systems. Assessment of backfill materials and methods for deposition tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objectives of this report are to: 1) present density criteria considering deposition tunnels for the investigated backfill materials, 2) evaluate what densities can be achieved with the suggested backfill methods, 3) compare the density criteria to achievable densities, 4) based on this comparison evaluate the safety margin for the combinations of backfill materials and methods and, 5) make recommendations for further investigations and development work. The backfilling methods considered in this report are compaction of backfill material in situ in the tunnel and placement of pre-compacted blocks and pellets. The materials investigated in the second phase of the SKB-Posiva backfilling project can be divided into three main categories: 1. Bentonite clays: two high-grade Na-bentonites from Wyoming (MX-80 and SPV200), one low-grade bentonite from Kutch (India Asha 230), and one high and one low-grade Ca-bentonite from Milos (Deponite CA-N and Milos backfill). The high-grade bentonites are used in different bentonite-ballast mixtures. 2. Smectite-rich mixed-layer clays: one from Dnesice-Plzensko Jih (DPJ) located in the Czech Republic and one from Northern Germany (Friedland clay). Mixtures of bentonite and ballast: Mixtures consisting of high-grade bentonite (0, 40 and 50 w-%) and crushed rock with different type of grain size distribution or sand. The relationships between dry densities and hydraulic conductivity, swelling pressure and compressibility in saturated state for these materials were investigated. Most of the tests were performed with a groundwater salinity of 3.5%. This salinity is comparable to sea water and can be expected to be at the high end of salinities occurring during the assessment period. The purpose of the investigations was to determine the dry densities required to meet the function indicator criteria. These densities are referred to as the density criteria. However throughout the assessment period a loss of material and thus

  18. Deep repository - engineered barrier systems. Assessment of backfill materials and methods for deposition tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunnarsson, David; Moren, Lena; Sellin, Patrik [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Keto, Paula [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-09-15

    The main objectives of this report are to: 1) present density criteria considering deposition tunnels for the investigated backfill materials, 2) evaluate what densities can be achieved with the suggested backfill methods, 3) compare the density criteria to achievable densities, 4) based on this comparison evaluate the safety margin for the combinations of backfill materials and methods and, 5) make recommendations for further investigations and development work. The backfilling methods considered in this report are compaction of backfill material in situ in the tunnel and placement of pre-compacted blocks and pellets. The materials investigated in the second phase of the SKB-Posiva backfilling project can be divided into three main categories: 1. Bentonite clays: two high-grade Na-bentonites from Wyoming (MX-80 and SPV200), one low-grade bentonite from Kutch (India Asha 230), and one high and one low-grade Ca-bentonite from Milos (Deponite CA-N and Milos backfill). The high-grade bentonites are used in different bentonite-ballast mixtures. 2. Smectite-rich mixed-layer clays: one from Dnesice-Plzensko Jih (DPJ) located in the Czech Republic and one from Northern Germany (Friedland clay). Mixtures of bentonite and ballast: Mixtures consisting of high-grade bentonite (0, 40 and 50 w-%) and crushed rock with different type of grain size distribution or sand. The relationships between dry densities and hydraulic conductivity, swelling pressure and compressibility in saturated state for these materials were investigated. Most of the tests were performed with a groundwater salinity of 3.5%. This salinity is comparable to sea water and can be expected to be at the high end of salinities occurring during the assessment period. The purpose of the investigations was to determine the dry densities required to meet the function indicator criteria. These densities are referred to as the density criteria. However throughout the assessment period a loss of material and thus

  19. Road Traffic Noise Level Assessment at an Institutional Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dev Swaroop

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Unplanned and rapid urbanization, industrialization, increasing number of vehicles, poor traffic management, poor road condition etc. are the major causes of higher noise levels in most of the Indian cities. Prolonged exposure to higher noise levels can lead to irreversible Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL. Noise-induced hearing loss is contributing one-third to the total persons suffering from hearing loss in every country in the world. The present study aims at measuring the noise levels in the university campus to analyze the current situation and suggesting noise control measures to be adopted in University campus and along MMA Jauhar Marg. The numbers of vehicles were counted during November 17-21, 2012 and noise levels were measured at various pre decided locations. The traffic load in horizon years 2013, 2017, 2022, 2027 and 2032 on the MMA Jauhar Marg Road is predicted on the basis of observed traffic data and expected annual growth rate as 8.0% for pre Metro and 3.5% for post Metro. The noise levels were measured using Larson Davis Model 831 Class 1 Sound Level Meter on both sides of road at foot paths along MMA Jauhar Marg and at various receptor locations inside the different buildings in the university campus. Model RLS-90 is used for prediction of noise levels. The prediction of metro noise is carried out using statistical calculations. The combined noise levels were compared with standard criteria for silent zone and found on higher side. Installation of environment noise barrier is suggested as one of the noise control measure to be adopted along MMA Jauhar Marg and along metro viaduct to save students and staff from exposure of higher noise levels.

  20. Los Alamos low-level waste performance assessment status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews the documented Los Alamos studies done to assess the containment of buried hazardous wastes. Five sections logically present the environmental studies, operational source terms, transport pathways, environmental dosimetry, and computer model development and use. This review gives a general picture of the Los Alamos solid waste disposal and liquid effluent sites and is intended for technical readers with waste management and environmental science backgrounds but without a detailed familiarization with Los Alamos. The review begins with a wide perspective on environmental studies at Los Alamos. Hydrology, geology, and meteorology are described for the site and region. The ongoing Laboratory-wide environmental surveillance and waste management environmental studies are presented. The next section describes the waste disposal sites and summarizes the current source terms for these sites. Hazardous chemical wastes and liquid effluents are also addressed by describing the sites and canyons that are impacted. The review then focuses on the transport pathways addressed mainly in reports by Healy and Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. Once the source terms and potential transport pathways are described, the dose assessment methods are addressed. Three major studies, the waste alternatives, Hansen and Rogers, and the Pantex Environmental Impact Statement, contributed to the current Los Alamos dose assessment methodology. Finally, the current Los Alamos groundwater, surface water, and environmental assessment models for these mesa top and canyon sites are described

  1. Alternative Assessment: Directed Creative Writing for Intermediate Level Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidalgo, Reyes I.

    Use of a directed creative writing exercise to assess intermediate language students' skills is discussed. The technique was developed for second-year college Spanish instruction as an alternative to conventional writing tests in which anxiety or lack of motivation may inhibit performance. Differences in the nature of language skills (listening,…

  2. Los Alamos low-level waste performance assessment status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenzel, W.J.; Purtymun, W.D.; Dewart, J.M.; Rodgers, J.E. (comps.)

    1986-06-01

    This report reviews the documented Los Alamos studies done to assess the containment of buried hazardous wastes. Five sections logically present the environmental studies, operational source terms, transport pathways, environmental dosimetry, and computer model development and use. This review gives a general picture of the Los Alamos solid waste disposal and liquid effluent sites and is intended for technical readers with waste management and environmental science backgrounds but without a detailed familiarization with Los Alamos. The review begins with a wide perspective on environmental studies at Los Alamos. Hydrology, geology, and meteorology are described for the site and region. The ongoing Laboratory-wide environmental surveillance and waste management environmental studies are presented. The next section describes the waste disposal sites and summarizes the current source terms for these sites. Hazardous chemical wastes and liquid effluents are also addressed by describing the sites and canyons that are impacted. The review then focuses on the transport pathways addressed mainly in reports by Healy and Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. Once the source terms and potential transport pathways are described, the dose assessment methods are addressed. Three major studies, the waste alternatives, Hansen and Rogers, and the Pantex Environmental Impact Statement, contributed to the current Los Alamos dose assessment methodology. Finally, the current Los Alamos groundwater, surface water, and environmental assessment models for these mesa top and canyon sites are described.

  3. Saliva: A tool in assessing glucose levels in Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Satish, B N V S; Srikala, P; Maharudrappa, B; Awanti, Sharanabasappa M; Kumar, Prashant; Hugar, Deepa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder affecting people worldwide, which require constant monitoring of their glucose levels. Commonly employed procedures include collection of blood or urine samples causing discomfort to the patients. Hence the need for an alternative non invasive technique is required to monitor glucose levels. Saliva present in the oral cavity not only maintains the health of the oral cavity but plays a important role in diagnosis of ...

  4. Assessment of Serum Vitamin D Levels in Hypertensive Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High blood pressure is very prevalent worldwide, as well as vitamin D deficiency. There are several observation data that support the concept that vitamin D is involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Also some clinical data demonstrate positive effect of vitamin D therapy on hypertension. We studied serum levels of vitamin D and its association with blood pressure in 30 hypertensive patients and 20 age and socioeconomic status matched healthy controls. There was no statistically significant difference in serum vitamin D levels in the group of patients compared with controls. In patients group, patients with body mass index (BMI) > 30 kg/m2 showed statistically significant decrease in serum vitamin D levels as compared to those with BMI ≤ 30 kg/m2 (P = 0.021). There was no significant association between serum vitamin D levels and age, systolic and diastolic blood pressure in the group of patients. A negative correlation between serum vitamin D levels and BMI was found in patients group (P = 0.045). In conclusion, no association between serum levels of vitamin D and blood pressure in hypertensive patients, but it is statistically associated with BMI. Further large scale studies are needed putting in consideration the effect of genetic factor

  5. Assessment of Prospecting Potentiality for Superlarge Continental Volcanic Rock—Type Uranium Deposits in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈贵华; 陈名佐; 等

    1999-01-01

    The superlarge continental volcanic rock-type uranium deposits,which were discovered abroad long ago,have not ye been reported up to now in China.This is an important problem that needs to be urgently solved by uranium geologists at present.In this paper,on the basis of analyzing the metallogenic settings and geological conditions of the superlarge continental volcanic rock-type uranium deposits discovered in the world along with the metallogenic characteristics of those of the same type in China,the space-time distribution patterns of continental volcanics and the metallogenic potential of main tectono-volcanic belts in China are discussed,and a synthetic conclusion has been drawn that there is a possibility to discover the superlarge continental volcanic rock-type uranium deposits in China.Moreover,it is evidenced that the Ganhang,Nanling,Yanliao,Da Hinggan Ling and other tectono-volcanic belts possess favorable geological conditions for the formation of ssuperlarge ore deposits of the continental volcanic rock type.The intersecting and overlapping locations of the aforementioned main belts with other tectono-volcanic(-intrusive)belts are the most potential areas where the superlarge continental volcanic rock-type uranium deposits would be found.

  6. Infiltration in layered loessial deposits: Revised numerical simulations and recharge assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafny, Elad; Šimůnek, Jirka

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to assess recharge rates and their timing under layered loessial deposits at the edge of arid zones. Particularly, this study is focused on the case of the coastal plain of Israel and Gaza. First, results of a large-scale field infiltration test were used to calibrate the van Genuchten parameters of hydraulic properties of the loessial sediments using HYDRUS (2D/3D). Second, optimized soil hydraulic parameters were used by HYDRUS-1D to simulate the water balance of the sandy-loess sediments during a 25-year period (1990-2015) for three environmental conditions: bare soil, and soil with both sparse and dense natural vegetation. The best inverse parameter optimization run fitted the infiltration test data with the RMSE of 0.27 d (with respect to a moisture front arrival) and R2 of 96%. The calibrated model indicates that hydraulic conductivities of the two soil horizons, namely sandy loam and sandy clay loam, are 81 cm/d and 17.5 cm/d, respectively. These values are significantly lower than those previously reported, based on numerical simulations, for the same site. HYDRUS-1D simulation of natural recharge under bare soil resulted in recharge estimates (to the aquifer) in the range of 21-93 mm/yr, with an average recharge of 63 mm/yr. Annual precipitation in the same period varied between 100 and 300 mm/yr, with an average of 185 mm/yr. For semi-stabilized dunes, with 26% of the soil surface covered by local shrub (Artemisia monosperma), the mean annual recharge was 28 mm. For the stabilized landscape, with as much as 50% vegetation coverage, it was only 2-3 mm/yr. In other words, loessial sediments can either be a source of significant recharge, or of no recharge at all, depending on the degree of vegetative cover. Additionally, the time lag between specific rainy seasons and corresponding recharge events at a depth of 22 m, increased from 2.5 to 5 years, and to about 20 years, respectively, with an increasing vegetative cover. For

  7. Soil radioactivity levels and radiological risk assessment in the highlands of Hunza, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the determination of 226Ra, 232Th, 40K and 137Cs in 42 soil samples collected from eight towns of Hunza district, at an average altitude of 2267 m, using gamma-ray spectrometry. The activity concentration data were analysed for frequency distribution and other descriptive measures. Risk assessment was done by calculating the hazard indices, air absorbed dose rate and external annual effective dose rate due to cosmic radiations, terrestrial radionuclides and 137Cs deposited on the surface of the earth. Both indoor and outdoor occupancy factors were taken into account. The average dose rate due to cosmic radiation was estimated as 828+87 μSv y-1, from external terrestrial radiation as 97+20 mSv y-1 and from 137Cs as 1.05 mSv y-1 for a total annual effective dose rate of 926+92 mSv. The results of the present study were discussed and compared with other similar studies performed in East Asia. The present study indicates that Hunza can be ranked among those areas having a high level of dose rate not only from cosmic rays but also from terrestrial radionuclides. This paper also proposes another measure of radiation hazard called 'radium equivalent for internal exposure'. (authors)

  8. Assessment of hand hygiene levels among healthcare professionals in India

    OpenAIRE

    Rameswarapu, Rohin; K, Surendranath Sai; Valsangkar, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    IntroductionHand hygiene, either by hand disinfection or hand washing remains to be most pivotal in controlling infection in healthcare settings. Simple preventive measures have been proven effective to contain infections. The exiguity on studies done in healthcare settings in India has galvanized us to undertake this study on hand hygiene assessment among nurses in a healthcare setting in IndiaMaterials and methodsA cross sectional study was done in one of leading organization in preventive ...

  9. Low-level radioactive waste management: an economic assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper has presented an overview of the economics of low-level radioactive waste disposal. It is hoped that this paper will assist the states in their efforts to determine their approach to the management of low-level wastes. Although the economies of scale realized by a larger facility are emphasized, the conclusion is that every state and region must examine its need for low-level waste disposal services and consider the interrelated factors that affect the volume of waste to be disposed, including waste reduction techniques, interim storage for not a single recommended capacity for a facility, but an acknowledgement of contingencies. In theory, per cubic foot disposal costs decrease as facility size increases. But theory does not preclude a state from constructing its own site, or a region generating small volumes of waste from building a shared facility. All factors should be weighed before a site is chosen and its size is determined

  10. Use of reconnaissance level information for environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reconnaissance level information (RLI) sufficient for comparing the environmental and socio-economic features of candidate sites for nuclear power stations and for guiding plant design, baseline surveys, and operational practices is usually available from published reports, public records, and knowledgeable individuals. Environmental concerns of special importance for site evaluation include: aquatic ecology, terrestrial ecology, land and water use, socio-economics, and institutional constraints. A scheme is suggested for using RLI to assign classifications to candidate sites based on the potential level of concern associated with the different environmental features

  11. Assessing Juvenile Sex Offenders to Determine Adequate Levels of Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdes, Karen E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This study analyzed the internal consistency of four inventories used by Utah probation officers to determine adequate and efficacious supervision levels and placement for juvenile sex offenders. Three factors accounted for 41.2 percent of variance (custodian's and juvenile's attitude toward intervention, offense characteristics, and historical…

  12. Assessing the Preparedness Level of Incoming Principles of Accounting Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imel, Phillip W.

    2000-01-01

    Reports that the introductory level Principles of Accounting classes at Southwest Virginia Community College (SVCC) had high unsuccessful grade rates between 1989 and 1999. Describes a study conducted to determine whether there was a statistical difference in the test scores and GPA of successful versus unsuccessful accounting students. Finds that…

  13. Assessment of dose level of ionizing radiation in army scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection is the science of protecting people and the environment from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation, which includes both particle radiation and high energy radiation. Ionizing radiation is widely used in industry and medicine. Any human activity of nuclear technologies should be linked to the foundation of scientific methodology and baseline radiation culture to avoid risk of radiation and should be working with radioactive materials and expertise to understand, control practices in order to avoid risks that could cause harm to human and environment. The study was conducted in warehouses and building of Sudan air force Khartoum basic air force during September 2010. The goal of this study to estimate the radiation dose and measurement of radioactive contamination of aircraft scrap equipment and increase the culture of radiological safety as well as the concept of radiation protection. The results showed that there is no pollution observed in the contents of the aircraft and the spire part stores outside, levels of radiation dose for the all contents of the aircraft and spire part within the excitable level, except temperature sensors estimated radiation dose about 43 μSv/h outside of the shielding and 12 μSv/h inside the shielding that exceeded the internationally recommended dose level. One of the most important of the identification of eighteen (18) radiation sources used in temperature and fuel level sensors. These are separated from the scrap, collected and stored in safe place. (Author)

  14. Multi -risk assessment at a national level in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsereteli, Nino; Varazanashvili, Otar; Amiranashvili, Avtandil; Tsereteli, Emili; Elizbarashvili, Elizbar; Saluqvadze, Manana; Dolodze, Jemal

    2013-04-01

    Work presented here was initiated by national GNSF project " Reducing natural disasters multiple risk: a positive factor for Georgia development " and two international projects: NATO SFP 983038 "Seismic hazard and Rusk assessment for Southern Caucasus-eastern Turkey Energy Corridors" and EMME " Earthquake Model for Middle east Region". Methodology for estimation of "general" vulnerability, hazards and multiple risk to natural hazards (namely, earthquakes, landslides, snow avalanches, flash floods, mudflows, drought, hurricanes, frost, hail) where developed for Georgia. The electronic detailed databases of natural disasters were created. These databases contain the parameters of hazardous phenomena that caused natural disasters. The magnitude and intensity scale of the mentioned disasters are reviewed and the new magnitude and intensity scales are suggested for disasters for which the corresponding formalization is not yet performed. The associated economic losses were evaluated and presented in monetary terms for these hazards. Based on the hazard inventory, an approach was developed that allowed for the calculation of an overall vulnerability value for each individual hazard type, using the Gross Domestic Product per unit area (applied to population) as the indicator for elements at risk exposed. The correlation between estimated economic losses, physical exposure and the magnitude for each of the six types of hazards has been investigated in detail by using multiple linear regression analysis. Economic losses for all past events and historical vulnerability were estimated. Finally, the spatial distribution of general vulnerability was assessed, and the expected maximum economic loss was calculated as well as a multi-risk map was set-up.

  15. Assessment of the natural radioactivity levels in Kirkuk oil field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali H. Taqi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The natural radioactivity levels of Kirkuk oil field are studied using high resolution gamma rays spectrometry. For this reason, soil samples were collected from three sites in the Iraq North Oil Company: Baba Gurgur, Shurau and old process plant (Terkiz. The activity concentrations obtained for 238U-series (226Ra, 214Pb, and 214Bi, 232Th-series (228Ac, 212Pb, and 208Tl and 40K. The results have been compared with the worldwide average values. The radium equivalent activity (Raeq, the absorbed dose rate (D, the annual effective dose rate (AEDE, the external hazard (Hex, the internal hazard (Hin and Gamma radiation representative level Index (Iγ were also obtained and compared with the international recommended values.

  16. Assessments of blood lead levels in children with febrile convulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Khosravi, Nastaran; Izadi, Anahita; Noorbakhsh, Samileh; Javadinia, Shima; Tabatabaei, Azardokht; Ashouri, Sarvenaz; Asgarian, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Lead elements have an adverse effect on human health. The most important complications of lead poisoning are disorders of nervous system particularly seizure .This study aimed to evaluate the blood lead levels and its association with convulsion in a group of hospitalized febrile children. Methods: In this analytic cross-sectional study, 60 hospitalized febrile children with 1- 60 month old participated in the study via non-probability convenience sampling method. All of the infor...

  17. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis: Dispersion and deposition uncertainty assessment, appendices A and B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, F.T.; Young, M.L.; Miller, L.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States); Lui, C.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Goossens, L.H.J.; Cooke, R.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Paesler-Sauer, J. [Research Center, Karlsruhe (Germany); Helton, J.C. [and others

    1995-01-01

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, completed in 1990, estimate the risks presented by nuclear installations based on postulated frequencies and magnitudes of potential accidents. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) began a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The objective was to develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the input variables of the codes. Expert elicitation, developed independently, was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for the selected consequence parameters. The study was formulated jointly and was limited to the current code models and to physical quantities that could be measured in experiments. To validate the distributions generated for the wet deposition input variables, samples were taken from these distributions and propagated through the wet deposition code model along with the Gaussian plume model (GPM) implemented in the MACCS and COSYMA codes. Resulting distributions closely replicated the aggregated elicited wet deposition distributions. Project teams from the NRC and CEC cooperated successfully to develop and implement a unified process for the elaboration of uncertainty distributions on consequence code input parameters. Formal expert judgment elicitation proved valuable for synthesizing the best available information. Distributions on measurable atmospheric dispersion and deposition parameters were successfully elicited from experts involved in the many phenomenological areas of consequence analysis. This volume is the second of a three-volume document describing the project and contains two appendices describing the rationales for the dispersion and deposition data along with short biographies of the 16 experts who participated in the project.

  18. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis: Dispersion and deposition uncertainty assessment, appendices A and B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, completed in 1990, estimate the risks presented by nuclear installations based on postulated frequencies and magnitudes of potential accidents. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) began a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The objective was to develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the input variables of the codes. Expert elicitation, developed independently, was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for the selected consequence parameters. The study was formulated jointly and was limited to the current code models and to physical quantities that could be measured in experiments. To validate the distributions generated for the wet deposition input variables, samples were taken from these distributions and propagated through the wet deposition code model along with the Gaussian plume model (GPM) implemented in the MACCS and COSYMA codes. Resulting distributions closely replicated the aggregated elicited wet deposition distributions. Project teams from the NRC and CEC cooperated successfully to develop and implement a unified process for the elaboration of uncertainty distributions on consequence code input parameters. Formal expert judgment elicitation proved valuable for synthesizing the best available information. Distributions on measurable atmospheric dispersion and deposition parameters were successfully elicited from experts involved in the many phenomenological areas of consequence analysis. This volume is the second of a three-volume document describing the project and contains two appendices describing the rationales for the dispersion and deposition data along with short biographies of the 16 experts who participated in the project

  19. The effect of airway deposition on the assessment of lung injury by 99mTc-DTPA clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 99mTc-DTPA aerosol inhalation method permits detection of pulmonary epithelial damage. We investigated one of several problems, airway deposition of inhaled aerosol, on the assessment of pulmonary epithelial permeability in healthy nonsmokers and patients with interstitial lung diseases. We used the rate constant of pulmonary 99mTc-DTPA clearance curve, k, as a parameter of the epithelial permeability. The alveolar-peripheral airway deposition of aerosol was estimated by the duplicated inhalation method, which we newly developed. The mean k in patients with interstitial lung disease (2.52±0.72%/min, n=8; pc) was higher in patients with interstitial lung disease (4.08±1.63%/min; pc in both groups (pc obtained among the subjects (r=0.951; p99mTc-DTPA aerosol inhalation method although the correction was significant in the individual subjects. (author)

  20. Analysis and assessment on heavy metal sources in the coastal soils developed from alluvial deposits using multivariate statistical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinling; He, Ming; Han, Wei; Gu, Yifan

    2009-05-30

    An investigation on heavy metal sources, i.e., Cu, Zn, Ni, Pb, Cr, and Cd in the coastal soils of Shanghai, China, was conducted using multivariate statistical methods (principal component analysis, clustering analysis, and correlation analysis). All the results of the multivariate analysis showed that: (i) Cu, Ni, Pb, and Cd had anthropogenic sources (e.g., overuse of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, industrial and municipal discharges, animal wastes, sewage irrigation, etc.); (ii) Zn and Cr were associated with parent materials and therefore had natural sources (e.g., the weathering process of parent materials and subsequent pedo-genesis due to the alluvial deposits). The effect of heavy metals in the soils was greatly affected by soil formation, atmospheric deposition, and human activities. These findings provided essential information on the possible sources of heavy metals, which would contribute to the monitoring and assessment process of agricultural soils in worldwide regions. PMID:18976857

  1. Assessment of the relative importance of nitrogen deposition, climate change and forest management on the sequestration of carbon by forest in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    De, Vries, J.A.; Wamelink, G.W.W.; G. J. Reinds; Wieggers, H.J.J.; Mol-Dijkstra, J. P.; J. Kros; NABUURS G. J.; Pussinen, A.; Solberg, S.; Dobbertin, M.; Laubhann, D.; H. Sterba; Oijen, van, P.H.

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes results of studies assessing and predicting changes in forest growth and carbon sequestration in forests and forest soils in response to various scenarios with respect to changes in CO2 concentration, climate (precipitation and temperature), atmospheric deposition (N and S deposition) and forest management (forest management scenarios), using empirical and process oriented models, respectively

  2. Assessment of the natural radioactivity levels in Kirkuk oil field

    OpenAIRE

    Ali H. Taqi; Laith Abdul Aziz Al-Ani; Abbas M. Ali

    2016-01-01

    The natural radioactivity levels of Kirkuk oil field are studied using high resolution gamma rays spectrometry. For this reason, soil samples were collected from three sites in the Iraq North Oil Company: Baba Gurgur, Shurau and old process plant (Terkiz). The activity concentrations obtained for 238U-series (226Ra, 214Pb, and 214Bi), 232Th-series (228Ac, 212Pb, and 208Tl) and 40K. The results have been compared with the worldwide average values. The radium equivalent activity (Raeq), the abs...

  3. Assessing the Impacts of Low Level Jets over Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez Rodriguez, Walter; Araya, Guillermo; Ruiz-Columbie, Arquimedes; Tutkun, Murat; Castillo, Luciano

    2015-11-01

    Low Level Jets (LLJs) are defined as regions of relatively strong winds in the lower part of the atmosphere. They are a common feature over the Great Plains in the United States. This paper is focused on the determination of the static/dynamic impacts that real LLJs in West Texas have over wind turbines and wind farms. High-frequency (50Hz) observational data from the 200-m meteorological tower (Reese, Texas) have been input as inflow conditions into the NREL FAST code in order to evaluate the LLJ's structural impacts on a typical wind turbine. Then, the effect of the LLJ on the wind turbine's wake is considered to evaluate the overall impact on the wind farm. It has been observed that during a LLJ event the levels of turbulence intensity and turbulence kinetic energy are significantly much lower than those during unstable conditions. Also, low-frequency oscillations prevail during stable conditions when LLJs are present, as opposed to high-frequency oscillations which are more prevalent during unstable conditions. Additionally, in LLJs the energy concentrates in particular frequencies that stress the turbine whereas turbine signals show frequencies that are also present in the incoming wind. Grants: NSF-CBET #1157246, NSF-CMMI #1100948, NSF-PIRE # NSF-OISE-1243482.

  4. Computer codes for level 1 probabilistic safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) entails several laborious tasks suitable for computer codes assistance. This guide identifies these tasks, presents guidelines for selecting and utilizing computer codes in the conduct of the PSA tasks and for the use of PSA results in safety management and provides information on available codes suggested or applied in performing PSA in nuclear power plants. The guidance is intended for use by nuclear power plant system engineers, safety and operating personnel, and regulators. Large efforts are made today to provide PC-based software systems and PSA processed information in a way to enable their use as a safety management tool by the nuclear power plant overall management. Guidelines on the characteristics of software needed for management to prepare a software that meets their specific needs are also provided. Most of these computer codes are also applicable for PSA of other industrial facilities. The scope of this document is limited to computer codes used for the treatment of internal events. It does not address other codes available mainly for the analysis of external events (e.g. seismic analysis) flood and fire analysis. Codes discussed in the document are those used for probabilistic rather than for phenomenological modelling. It should be also appreciated that these guidelines are not intended to lead the user to selection of one specific code. They provide simply criteria for the selection. Refs and tabs

  5. Assessing risks from occupational exposure to low-level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, several epidemiological studies of workers who have been exposed occupationally to radiation are being conducted. These include workers in the United States, Great Britain, and Canada, involved in the production of both defense materials and nuclear power. A major reason for conducting these studies is to evaluate possible adverse health effects that may have resulted because of the radiation exposure received. The general subject of health effects resulting from low levels of radiation, including these worker studies, has attracted the attention of various news media, and has been the subject of considerable controversy. These studies provide a good illustration of certain other aspects of the statistician's role; namely, communication and adequate subject matter knowledge. A competent technical job is not sufficient if these other aspects are not fulfilled

  6. A global assessment of precipitation chemistry and deposition of sulfur, nitrogen, sea salt, base cations, organic acids, acidity and pH, and phosphorus

    OpenAIRE

    Vet, Robert; Pienaar, Jacobus J.; Artz, Richard S.; Carou, Silvina; Shaw, Mike; Ro, Chul-Un; Aas, Wenche

    2014-01-01

    A global assessment of precipitation chemistry and deposition has been carried out under the direction of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) Scientific Advisory Group for Precipitation Chemistry (SAG-PC). The assessment addressed three questions: (1) what do measurements and model estimates of precipitation chemistry and wet, dry and total deposition of sulfur, nitrogen, sea salt, base cations, organic acids, acidity, and phosphorus show glob...

  7. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis: Dispersion and deposition uncertainty assessment, main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, F.T.; Young, M.L.; Miller, L.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States); Lui, C.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Goossens, L.H.J.; Cooke, R.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Paesler-Sauer, J. [Research Center, Karlsruhe (Germany); Helton, J.C. [and others

    1995-01-01

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the risks presented by nuclear installations based on postulated frequencies and magnitudes of potential accidents. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) began a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of the joint effort was to develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the input variables of the codes. Expert elicitation was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for the selected consequence parameters. The study was formulated jointly and was limited to the current code models and to physical quantities that could be measured in experiments. Experts developed their distributions independently. To validate the distributions generated for the wet deposition input variables, samples were taken from these distributions and propagated through the wet deposition code model. Resulting distributions closely replicated the aggregated elicited wet deposition distributions. To validate the distributions generated for the dispersion code input variables, samples from the distributions and propagated through the Gaussian plume model (GPM) implemented in the MACCS and COSYMA codes. Project teams from the NRC and CEC cooperated successfully to develop and implement a unified process for the elaboration of uncertainty distributions on consequence code input parameters. Formal expert judgment elicitation proved valuable for synthesizing the best available information. Distributions on measurable atmospheric dispersion and deposition parameters were successfully elicited from experts involved in the many phenomenological areas of consequence analysis. This volume is the first of a three-volume document describing the project.

  8. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis: Dispersion and deposition uncertainty assessment, main report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the risks presented by nuclear installations based on postulated frequencies and magnitudes of potential accidents. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) began a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of the joint effort was to develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the input variables of the codes. Expert elicitation was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for the selected consequence parameters. The study was formulated jointly and was limited to the current code models and to physical quantities that could be measured in experiments. Experts developed their distributions independently. To validate the distributions generated for the wet deposition input variables, samples were taken from these distributions and propagated through the wet deposition code model. Resulting distributions closely replicated the aggregated elicited wet deposition distributions. To validate the distributions generated for the dispersion code input variables, samples from the distributions and propagated through the Gaussian plume model (GPM) implemented in the MACCS and COSYMA codes. Project teams from the NRC and CEC cooperated successfully to develop and implement a unified process for the elaboration of uncertainty distributions on consequence code input parameters. Formal expert judgment elicitation proved valuable for synthesizing the best available information. Distributions on measurable atmospheric dispersion and deposition parameters were successfully elicited from experts involved in the many phenomenological areas of consequence analysis. This volume is the first of a three-volume document describing the project

  9. Impact of dust deposition on carbon budget: a tentative assessment from a mesocosm approach

    OpenAIRE

    C. Guieu; Ridame, C.; E. Pulido-Villena; Bressac, M.; Desboeufs, K.; Dulac, F.

    2014-01-01

    By bringing new nutrients and particles to the surface ocean, atmospheric deposition impacts biogeochemical cycles. The extent to which those changes are modifying the carbon balance in oligotrophic environments such as the Mediterranean Sea that receives important Saharan dust fluxes is unknown. The DUNE (DUst experiment in a low Nutrient, low chlorophyll Ecosystem) project provides the first attempt to evaluate the changes induced in the carbon budget of a large body of oligo...

  10. An assessment of variations in mercury deposition to Antarctica over the past 34,000 years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹雪斌; 孙立广; 谢周清

    2003-01-01

    We performed a comparison analysis of the variations in Mercury (Hg)concentrations and the precipitation proxies (e. g. , 18 O values and 10 Be concentrations) in the Dome C ice core. The results showed that there were significant correlations between Hg and δ 18 O values, 10 Be concentrations, indicating that the accumulation rate in Dome C is one of the key factors controlling the variations of Hg concentrations in the past 34,000 years, and implying that Hg concentrations in ice core can be used as another reliable proxy of precipitation rate in Antarctica. Based upon the high-resolution δ 18 O values, we estimated the variations in mercury deposition flux to Antarctica over the past 34,000 years. The highest mercury deposition flux is about 3.80 pg cm -2 yr-1 during the Last Glacial Maxium (LGM) as high as 3.5 times of the mercury deposition flux (about 1.08 pg em-2 yr -1 ) in Holocene due to the fluctuations in natural mercury emissions such as the oceanic biological emissions.

  11. Assessing nurses’ knowledge levels in the nutritional management of diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Mogre

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although nutrition education for diabetes patients is the responsibility of dieticians and/or nutritionist, nurses have an important role to play. This study measured the knowledge level of nurses’ and associated factors in the nutritional management of diabetes. In this cross-sectional study a sample of 200 nurses completed a 21-item nutritional management of diabetes knowledge test developed based on the ADA and WHO guidelines for the nutritional management of diabetes. Using Cronbach's alpha, reliability was 0.62. The nurses (n = 200 had almost a 1:1 male to female ratio (n = 99, 49.5% and n = 101, 50.5% and a mean age of 27.24 ± 3.66 years. Total mean score was 12.13 ± 3.17 (44.9% correct. Over 70% of the nurses said diabetes patients could exclude any of the major nutrients from their meals. Almost 90% (n = 179 of the nurses did not know the recommended daily caloric intake of carbohydrates for diabetes patients. Higher mean scores were found in nurses who have ever had a refresher course in nutrition, ever counseled a diabetes patient and took 2–3 nutrition courses during school. Nurses’ knowledge in the nutritional management of diabetes was poor. It raises questions about the adequacy of nurses’ knowledge in the nutritional management of diabetes.

  12. Assessment of coverage levels of single dose measles vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the consequences of low coverage levels of a single dose of measles vaccine. Results: mean age observed in measles cases was 2 years and 8 months with a range from 3 months to 8 years. Maximum number of cases reported were <1 year of age (n=22,32%). Fifty percent of cases were seen among vaccinated children. Seventy-five percent (n=51) had history of contact with a measles case. Pneumonia was the commonest complication followed by acute gastroenteritis, encephalitis, febrile convulsions, oral ulcers, oral thrush, eye changes of vitamin-A deficiency and pulmonary tuberculosis (T.B.) in descending order of frequency. Fifty four cases were successfully treated for complications of measles and discharged. Nine cases left against medical advice. Five patients died all of them had encephalitis either alone (n=1) or in combination with pneumonia and acute gastroenteritis (n=4). Conclusion: There is a dire need to increase the immunization coverage to reduce the rate of vaccine failure and achieve effective control of measles.(author)

  13. Toward Guidelines for Population-level Ecological Risk Assessment: Results of a U.S. EPA Risk Assessment Forum Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    The choice of levels of biological organization reflected in ecological risk assessment (ERA) is receiving increasing attention. Most ERAs conducted for chemicals by the U.S. EPA, and indeed by most organizations worldwide, focus on organism-level attributes (e.g., survival, gro...

  14. Aggregation of estimated numbers of undiscovered deposits: an R-script with an example from the Chu Sarysu Basin, Kazakhtan: Chapter B in Global mineral resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuenemeyer, John H.; Zientek, Michael L.; Box, Stephen E.

    2011-01-01

    Mineral resource assessments completed by the U.S. Geological Survey during the past three decades express geologically based estimates of numbers of undiscovered mineral deposits as probability distributions. Numbers of undiscovered deposits of a given type are estimated in geologically defined regions. Using Monte Carlo simulations, these undiscovered deposit estimates are combined with tonnage and grade models to derive a probability distribution describing amounts of commodities and rock that could be present in undiscovered deposits within a study area. In some situations, it is desirable to aggregate the assessment results from several study areas. This report provides a script developed in open-source statistical software, R, that aggregates undiscovered deposit estimates of a given type, assuming independence, total dependence, or some degree of correlation among aggregated areas, given a user-specified correlation matrix.

  15. Cost-risk analysis of protective actions for a low-level deposition of radionuclides. Contract report (final)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the results of a cost-effectiveness analysis of protective actions following a low-level deposition of radionuclides. The media contaminated were land, property, water supplies, persons, and biota. The end products of the investigation of such phase are dose and costs associated with dose reduction techniques. The mechanisms by which radionuclides may be taken up by humans were modelled, and control technologies (protective actions) which result in a reduction in the dose were defined. With the exception of Phase VI, the consequences were expressed as the 100-year collective dose commitment equivalent, in person-rem. In Phase VI, the dose calculated was the dose equivalent, also expressin in person-rem. The dose commitment is defined as the sum of all doses to individuals over the entire time period that radioactive material persists in the environment in a state available for interaction with humans. There are two time periods involved, (1) the intake period, during which radionuclides are taken up by humans, in this study taken to be 100 years, and (2) the time interval over which the dose rate is integrated, which was seventy years. The collective dose commitment is obtained by integrating the individual dose commitments over the affected population

  16. Validation of radiolabeling of drug formulations for aerosol deposition assessment of orally inhaled products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devadason, Sunalene G; Chan, Hak-Kim; Haeussermann, Sabine; Kietzig, Claudius; Kuehl, Philip J; Newman, Stephen; Sommerer, Knut; Taylor, Glyn

    2012-12-01

    Radiolabeling of inhaler formulations for imaging studies is an indirect method of determining lung deposition and regional distribution of drug in human subjects. Hence, ensuring that the radiotracer and drug exhibit similar aerodynamic characteristics when aerosolized, and that addition of the radiotracer has not significantly altered the characteristics of the formulation, are critical steps in the development of a radiolabeling method. The validation phase should occur during development of the radiolabeling method, prior to commencement of in vivo studies. The validation process involves characterization of the aerodynamic particle size distribution (APSD) of drug in the reference formulation, and of both drug and radiotracer in the radiolabeled formulation, using multistage cascade impaction. We propose the adoption of acceptance criteria similar to those recommended by the EMA and ISAM/IPAC-RS for determination of therapeutic equivalence of orally inhaled products: (a) if only total lung deposition is being quantified, the fine particle fraction ratio of both radiolabeled drug and radiotracer to that of the reference drug should fall between 0.85 and 1.18, and (b) if regional lung deposition (e.g., outer and inner lung regions) is to be quantified, the ratio of both radiolabeled drug and radiotracer to reference drug on each impactor stage or group of stages should fall between 0.85 and 1.18. If impactor stages are grouped together, at least four separate groups should be provided. In addition, while conducting in vivo studies, measurement of the APSD of the inhaler used on each study day is recommended to check its suitability for use in man. PMID:23215848

  17. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis: Dispersion and deposition uncertainty assessment. Volume 3, Appendices C, D, E, F, and G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, completed in 1990, estimate the risks presented by nuclear installations based on postulated frequencies and magnitudes of potential accidents. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) began a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The objective was to develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the input variables of the codes. Expert elicitation, developed independently, was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for the selected consequence parameters. The study was formulated jointly and was limited to the current code models and to physical quantities that could be measured in experiments. To validate the distributions generated for the wet deposition input variables, samples were taken from these distributions and propagated through the wet deposition code model along with the Gaussian plume model (GPM) implemented in the MACCS and COSYMA codes. Resulting distributions closely replicated the aggregated elicited wet deposition distributions. Project teams from the NRC and CEC cooperated successfully to develop and implement a unified process for the elaboration of uncertainty distributions on consequence code input parameters. Formal expert judgment elicitation proved valuable for synthesizing the best available information. Distributions on measurable atmospheric dispersion and deposition parameters were successfully elicited from experts involved in the many phenomenological areas of consequence analysis. This volume is the third of a three-volume document describing the project and contains descriptions of the probability assessment principles; the expert identification and selection process; the weighting methods used; the inverse modeling methods; case structures; and summaries of the consequence codes

  18. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis: Dispersion and deposition uncertainty assessment. Volume 3, Appendices C, D, E, F, and G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, F.T.; Young, M.L.; Miller, L.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-01

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, completed in 1990, estimate the risks presented by nuclear installations based on postulated frequencies and magnitudes of potential accidents. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) began a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The objective was to develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the input variables of the codes. Expert elicitation, developed independently, was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for the selected consequence parameters. The study was formulated jointly and was limited to the current code models and to physical quantities that could be measured in experiments. To validate the distributions generated for the wet deposition input variables, samples were taken from these distributions and propagated through the wet deposition code model along with the Gaussian plume model (GPM) implemented in the MACCS and COSYMA codes. Resulting distributions closely replicated the aggregated elicited wet deposition distributions. Project teams from the NRC and CEC cooperated successfully to develop and implement a unified process for the elaboration of uncertainty distributions on consequence code input parameters. Formal expert judgment elicitation proved valuable for synthesizing the best available information. Distributions on measurable atmospheric dispersion and deposition parameters were successfully elicited from experts involved in the many phenomenological areas of consequence analysis. This volume is the third of a three-volume document describing the project and contains descriptions of the probability assessment principles; the expert identification and selection process; the weighting methods used; the inverse modeling methods; case structures; and summaries of the consequence codes.

  19. Quantitative measurement of aerosol deposition on skin, hair and clothing for dosimetric assessment. Final report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogh, C.L.; Byrne, M.A.; Andersson, Kasper Grann;

    1999-01-01

    In the past, very little thought has been given to the processes and implications of deposition of potentially hazardous aerosol directly onto humans. This state of unpreparedness is unsatisfactory and suitable protocols have been developed and validatedfor tracer experiments to investigate the...... influence of various factors, such as surface type, air flow, heating and electrostatics were examined. Thedynamics of particle removal from human skin were studied by fluorescence scanning. This technique was also applied to estimate the fraction of aerosol dust transferred to skin by contact with a...

  20. Atmospheric transport and deposition of pesticides: An assessment of current knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pul, W.A.J. van; Bidleman, T.F.; Brorström-Lunden, E.;

    1999-01-01

    there is a shortage of measurement data to evaluate the deposition and reemission processes. It was concluded that the mechanisms of transport and dispersion of pesticides can be described similarly to those for other air pollution components and these mechanisms are rather well-known. Large uncertainties are present...... in the exchange processes at the interface between air and soil/water/vegetation. In all process descriptions the uncertainty in the physicochemical properties play an important role. Particularly those in the vapour pressure, Henry's law constant and its temperature dependency. More accurate data...

  1. Spatial distribution assessment of particulate matter in an urban street canyon using biomagnetic leaf monitoring of tree crown deposited particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, biomagnetic monitoring of tree leaves has proven to be a good estimator for ambient particulate concentration. This paper investigates the usefulness of biomagnetic leaf monitoring of crown deposited particles to assess the spatial PM distribution inside individual tree crowns and an urban street canyon in Ghent (Belgium). Results demonstrate that biomagnetic monitoring can be used to assess spatial PM variations, even within single tree crowns. SIRM values decrease exponentially with height and azimuthal effects are obtained for wind exposed sides of the street canyon. Edge and canyon trees seem to be exposed differently. As far as we know, this study is the first to present biomagnetic monitoring results of different trees within a single street canyon. The results not only give valuable insights into the spatial distribution of particulate matter inside tree crowns and a street canyon, but also offer a great potential as validation tool for air quality modelling. Highlights: ► Spatial distribution of tree crown deposited PM was evaluated. ► SIRM values decrease exponentially with height. ► Azimuthal effects were observed at wind exposed sides of the street canyon. ► Edge and canyon trees seem to be exposed differently. ► Biomagnetic monitoring offers a great potential as validation of air quality models. -- Biomagnetic leaf monitoring provides useful insights into the spatial distribution of particulates inside individual tree crowns and an urban street canyon in Ghent (Belgium)

  2. Assessment of lake sensitivity to acidic deposition in national parks of the Rocky Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanus, L.; Williams, M.W.; Campbell, D.H.; Tonnessen, K.A.; Blett, T.; Clow, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    The sensitivity of high-elevation lakes to acidic deposition was evaluated in five national parks of the Rocky Mountains based on statistical relations between lake acid-neutralizing capacity concentrations and basin characteristics. Acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) of 151 lakes sampled during synoptic surveys and basin-characteristic information derived from geographic information system (GIS) data sets were used to calibrate the statistical models. The explanatory basin variables that were considered included topographic parameters, bedrock type, and vegetation type. A logistic regression model was developed, and modeling results were cross-validated through lake sampling during fall 2004 at 58 lakes. The model was applied to lake basins greater than 1 ha in area in Glacier National Park (n = 244 lakes), Grand Teton National Park (n = 106 lakes), Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve (n = 11 lakes), Rocky Mountain National Park (n = 114 lakes), and Yellowstone National Park (n = 294 lakes). Lakes that had a high probability of having an ANC concentration 3000 m, with 80% of the catchment bedrock having low buffering capacity. The modeling results indicate that the most sensitive lakes are located in Rocky Mountain National Park and Grand Teton National Park. This technique for evaluating the lake sensitivity to acidic deposition is useful for designing long-term monitoring plans and is potentially transferable to other remote mountain areas of the United States and the world.

  3. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Uncertainty assessment for deposited material and external doses. Volume 2: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P.; Cooke, R.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Boardman, J. [AEA Technology (United Kingdom); Jones, J.A. [National Radiological Protection Board (United Kingdom); Harper, F.T.; Young, M.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA deposited material and external dose models. This volume contains appendices that include (1) a summary of the MACCS and COSYMA consequence codes, (2) the elicitation questionnaires and case structures, (3) the rationales and results for the panel on deposited material and external doses, (4) short biographies of the experts, and (5) the aggregated results of their responses.

  4. Performance assessment handbook for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Performance assessments of proposed low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities must be conducted to support licensing. This handbook provides a reference document that can be used as a resource by management and staff responsible for performance assessments. Brief discussions describe the performance assessment process and emphasize selected critical aspects of the process. References are also provided for additional information on many aspects of the performance assessment process. The user's manual for the National Low-Level Waste Management Program's Performance Assessment Center (PAC) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Cray computer is included as Appendix A. The PAC provides users an opportunity to experiment with a number of performance assessment computer codes on a Cray computer. Appendix B describes input data required for 22 performance assessment codes

  5. Performance assessment for the water level control system in steam generator of the nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We consider the two PI controller steam generator water level control systems. ► We develop performance assessment methods for plants with stable and unstable zeros. ► The examples show the effectiveness of the proposed method. - Abstract: The steam generator water level control system is the most important components of a nuclear power plant. The operating steam generator water level control system is increasingly recognized as a capital asset that should be routinely maintained and monitored. However, the control loop performance assessment is still an open problem; thus, the performance assessment technology will be brought into the steam generator water level control system in nuclear power plants. Performance assessment methods for the plant with stable and unstable zeros of two PI controller systems are developed at all specific power levels. The numerical examples will demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Level-2 probabilistic safety assessment for 220 MWe Indian PHWR (KAPS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) is increasingly being used as part of the decision making process to assess the level of safety of nuclear power plants. The methodologies in use are maturing and the insights gained from the PSAs are being used to complement, enhance and validate conclusions that are based on deterministic design principles. The Level-2 PSA for Kakrapara Atomic Power Station (KAPS), an Indian PHWR, is an extension of Level-l PSA where Plant Damage States (PDSs) form the interface between the two. The ultimate product of a Level 2 PSA study are identification of various challenges to the containment, the possible containment responses and their estimated probabilities and an assessment of the consequent releases to the environment. This paper discusses the significance of level-2 PSA, The main contributors to large Early Release Frequency (LERF) come from severe accident sequences

  7. POTENTIAL FUTURE EFFECTS OF CURRENT LEVELS OF SULFUR DEPOSITION ON STREAM CHEMISTRY IN THE SOUTHERN BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAINS, U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using newly available regional data sets we examine the potential for future changes in stream acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) for the Southern Blue Ridge Province (SBRP) of the U.S. as related to (1) levels of S deposition, (2) retention of S within watersheds, (3) current surf...

  8. Growth and initial experiments demonstrating watt level output from Yb:YAG planar waveguides grown by pulsed laser deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Beecher, Stephen; Grant-Jacob, James; Parsonage, Tina; Hua, Ping; Choudhary, Amol; Mackenzie, Jacob; Shepherd, David; Eason, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We report on the growth and initial characterization of pulsed laser deposited Yb:YAG. When used as a planar waveguide laser slope efficiencies of at least 34% are observed for a 45% reflectivity output coupler.

  9. Application of physiological parameters of a sample of the Brazilian population in different levels of exercise, on the deposition model of the ICRP Publication 66

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) proposed by the ICRP Publication 66 accounts for the morphology and physiology of the respiratory tract. The characteristics of air drawn into the lungs and exhaled are greatly influenced by the morphology of the respiratory tract, which causes numerous changes in pressure, flow rate, direction and humidity as air moves into and out of the lungs. The model uses morphological and physiological parameters from the Caucasian man to establish deposition fractions in the respiratory tract regions. The ICRP recommends, for a reliable evaluation of the regional deposition, the use of parameters from a local population when information is available. The main purpose of this study is to verify the influence in using the morphology and physiology parameters representative of a sample of the Brazilian population, in different levels of exercise, on the deposition model of the ICRP Publication 66. The deposition model was implemented using software Excel for Windows (version 2000). The results suggest a significant variation in fractional deposition when Brazilian parameters are applied in the model. The variations are not the same for all regions of the respiratory tract and depend on levels of exercise. (author)

  10. Expression levels of candidate genes for intramuscular fat deposition in two Banna mini-pig inbred lines divergently selected for fatness traits

    OpenAIRE

    Su-Mei Zhao; Wei-Zhen Li; Hong-Bin Pan; Ying Huang; Ming-Hua Yang; Hong-Jiang Wei; Shi-Zheng Gao

    2012-01-01

    Intramuscular fat (IMF) content plays an important role in meat quality. Many genes involved in lipid and energy metabolism were identified as candidate genes for IMF deposition, since genetic polymorphisms within these genes were associated with IMF content. However, there is less information on the expression levels of these genes in the muscle tissue. This study aimed at investigating the expression levels of sterol regulating element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), diacylglycerol acyltrans...

  11. Assessment of permissible low-level releases of radionuclides into the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of this paper is radio-ecological assessment of permissible low-level releases of radionuclides in sea waters ensuring the radiological protection of the human population, as well as marine biota. (author)

  12. Role of sea-level change in deep water deposition along a carbonate shelf margin, Early and Middle Permian, Delaware Basin: implications for reservoir characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shunli; Yu, Xinghe; Li, Shengli; Giles, Katherine A.

    2015-04-01

    The architecture and sedimentary characteristics of deep water deposition can reflect influences of sea-level change on depositional processes on the shelf edge, slope, and basin floor. Outcrops of the northern slope and basin floor of the Delaware Basin in west Texas are progressively exposed due to canyon incision and road cutting. The outcrops in the Delaware Basin were measured to characterize gravity flow deposits in deep water of the basin. Subsurface data from the East Ford and Red Tank fields in the central and northeastern Delaware Basin were used to study reservoir architectures and properties. Depositional models of deep water gravity flows at different stages of sea-level change were constructed on the basis of outcrop and subsurface data. In the falling-stage system tracts, sandy debris with collapses of reef carbonates are deposited on the slope, and high-density turbidites on the slope toe and basin floor. In the low-stand system tracts, deep water fans that consist of mixed sand/mud facies on the basin floor are comprised of high- to low-density turbidites. In the transgression and high-stand system tracts, channel-levee systems and elongate lobes of mud-rich calciturbidite deposits formed as a result of sea level rise and scarcity of sandy sediment supply. For the reservoir architecture, the fan-like debris and high-density turbidites show high net-to-gross ratio of 62 %, which indicates the sandiest reservoirs for hydrocarbon accumulation. Lobe-like deep water fans with net-to-gross ratio of 57 % facilitate the formation of high quality sandy reservoirs. The channel-levee systems with muddy calciturbidites have low net-to-gross ratio of 30 %.

  13. Integrated assessment of farm level adaptation to climate change in agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Mandryk, M.

    2016-01-01

    The findings of the thesis allowed assessing plausible futures of agriculture in Flevoland around 2050 with insights in effective adaptation to climate change at different levels. Besides empirical findings, this thesis contributed methodologically to the portfolio of climate change impact and adaptation assessment. Overall, this thesis performed a prospective (using scenarios), multi-scale (taking into account crop, farm and regional level), integrated (notably multi-objective) and participa...

  14. A methodology to assess the maturity level of brewery business processes

    OpenAIRE

    Armendáriz, Mikel

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop a procedure to assess the maturity level of the brewery business processes to be able to determine the required level of process automation & IT for a brewery.This procedure is made up by several tailored questionnaires that have been based on the Process and Enterprise Maturity Model management assessment tool. This tool is described in the article called The Process Audit written by Michael Hammer and published by Harvard Business Review in 2007...

  15. Defining and Assessing College-Level Learning: Perceptions from Faculty Assessors of Prior Learning Assessment Portfolios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Cynthia Rae

    2013-01-01

    Prior learning assessment (PLA) is a non-traditional component of higher education that recognizes that life experiences and learning from outside of academia can be deemed valid and awarded college credit. This qualitative study explored the perceptions of faculty assessors of PLA portfolios. This study sought to understand, through a…

  16. Guidance Manual for Conducting Screening Level Ecological Risk Assessments at the INEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. L. VanHorn; N. L. Hampton; R. C. Morris

    1995-06-01

    This document presents reference material for conducting screening level ecological risk assessments (SLERAs)for the waste area groups (WAGs) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included in this document are discussions of the objectives of and processes for conducting SLERAs. The Environmental Protection Agency ecological risk assessment framework is closely followed. Guidance for site characterization, stressor characterization, ecological effects, pathways of contaminant migration, the conceptual site model, assessment endpoints, measurement endpoints, analysis guidance, and risk characterization are included.

  17. The application of assessment principles to an operational low level waste disposal site in England

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the current assessment principles utilized in England and discusses their application to the Drigg low-level Radioactive Waste Disposal Site. The Drigg Site was established in 1959 and the assessment principles were published in 1985; therefore, although the Drigg Site has operated successfully, the application of the assessment principles has caused changes in operations and the establishment of further site research by the Department of the Environment

  18. Assessing the Conceptual Understanding about Heat and Thermodynamics at Undergraduate Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Vasudeo Digambar; Tambade, Popat Savaleram

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a Thermodynamic Concept Test (TCT) was designed to assess student's conceptual understanding heat and thermodynamics at undergraduate level. The different statistical tests such as item difficulty index, item discrimination index, point biserial coefficient were used for assessing TCT. For each item of the test these indices…

  19. Performance Assessment: Looking at the "Real" Achievement of Middle Level Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseltine, James M.

    1993-01-01

    Performance assessment may be the best vehicle for validating student achievement. Performance assessment, in theory and practice, is compatible with middle-school philosophy, stated mission, organizational structure, and instructional models. The challenge is to reexamine program outcomes and decide what middle-level students should know and be…

  20. Electrocatalytic glucose oxidation at binary catalyst of nickel and manganese oxides nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode: Optimization of the loading level and order of deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work addresses the electrocatalytic activity of a new catalyst composed of nickel and manganese binary oxides, prepared by electrodeposition, toward glucose electro-oxidation in alkaline medium. Cyclic voltammetry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were used to characterize those electrocatalysts. It has been found that the electrocatalytic activity critically depends on the loading level and the order of deposition of the two oxides; the NiOx/MnOx/GC electrode (MnOx deposited first) showed an excellent electrocatalytic activity and stability toward glucose oxidation compared to NiOx/GC, MnOx/GC or MnOx/NiOx/GC electrodes (NiOx deposited first). At the present work conditions, it has found that, the optimum loading level is 60 cycles of MnOx followed by 10 min deposition of nickel. At this loading level, it has been found that, the relation between Ip/v1/2 function and scan rate gives the characteristic feature of a catalytic process

  1. Assessing the atmospheric deposition of mercury to Lake Michigan: The importance of the Chicago/Gary urban area on wet and dry deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Matthew Scott

    1998-12-01

    Mercury is a toxic bioaccumulative substance found in aquatic ecosystems. The results of the first study of atmospheric mercury deposition into Lake Michigan and the relative importance of the Chicago/Gary urban area were investigated as part of the Lake Michigan Mass Balance Study (LMMBS) and the Atmospheric Exchange Over Lakes and Oceans Study (AEOLOS). Event wet-only precipitation, total aerosol, and vapor phase samples were collected for mercury and trace element determinations from five sites around Lake Michigan from July 1994 through October 1995 as part of the LMMBS. In addition, intensive over-water measurements were conducted aboard the EPA research vessel Lake Guardian during the summer of 1994 and the winter of 1995 as part of the AEOLOS. Atmospheric mercury concentrations were from two to ten times higher in the Chicago/Gary urban area. Wet and dry Hg deposition (including reactive gaseous Hg) were calculated to Lake Michigan using a hybrid receptor modeling framework. The model utilized mercury monitoring data collected during the LMMBS and AEOLOS together with high resolution over-water meteorological data provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Atmospheric deposition was found to be the primary pathway for mercury input to Lake Michigan, contributing approximately 84% of the estimated 1419 Kg annual flux. Wet deposition (10.6 μg m-2) and dry deposition (10.0 μg m-2) contributed almost equally to the annual atmospheric Hg deposition of 20.6 μg m-2 (1189 Kg). A strong urban influence was observed in the over-water mercury deposition estimates in the southern portion of the lake. An independent meteorological transport analysis determined that local sources in the Chicago/Gary urban area significantly impacted the LMMBS sites around Lake Michigan. The Chicago/Gary urban area was found to contribute about 20% (127 Kg) of the annual atmospheric mercury deposition to Lake Michigan. Multivariate statistical analysis of

  2. Environmental impact assessment of trace metal deposition around the petrol filling stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wide use of petroleum products causes contamination of air, water, soil and plants. The present study was conducted to monitor the trace metal deposition in road side soil around the petrol filling stations along the busy roads of Karachi, Pakistan. Total 21 road side soil samples were collected from selected locations of busy roads. The soil samples were digested using acid digestion method and atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS) was used for the elemental analysis. Results of the study showed that concentration of lead was highest in the soil samples ranging from 41.3 to 361 mg/kg, then copper from 23.0 to 101 mg/kg, manganese from 36.2 to 125.0 mg/kg and zinc from 27.5 to 213.0 mg/kg, respectively. The correlation-coefficient (r) was also calculated between the metals in soil samples. The correlation matrix showed that all the pollution is coming from the same source. The gravitational sedimentation and impact on vegetation of coarse fraction is responsible for the high lead contamination of vegetation and soils. Collected data showed that, almost all the pollution being generated by automobile exhaust in urban areas of Karachi. The soil acts as an important sink for pollutants released through different activities. (author)

  3. Atmospheric aerosol in an urban area: Comparison of measurement instruments and methodologies and pulmonary deposition assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In March 1995 a measurement campaign of atmospheric aerosol in the Bologna urban area (Italy) was carried out. A transportable laboratory, set up by ENEA (Italian national Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment) Environmental Department (Bologna), was utilized with instruments for measurement of atmospheric aerosol and meteorological parameters. The aim of this campaign was of dual purpose: to characterize aerosol in urban area and to compare different instruments and methodologies of measurements. Mass concentrations measurements, evaluated on a 23-hour period with total filter, PM10 dichotomous sampler and low pressure impactor (LPI Berner), have provided information respectively about total suspended particles, respirable fraction and granulometric parameters of aerosol. Eight meteorologic parameters, number concentration of submicromic fraction of aerosol and mass concentration of micromic fraction have been continually measured. Then, in a daytime period, several number granulometries of atmospheric aerosol have also been estimated by means of diffusion battery system. Results related to different measurement methodologies and granulometric characteristics of aerosol are presented here. Pulmonary deposition of atmospheric aerosol is finally calculated, using granulometries provided by LPI Brener and ICRP 66 human respiratory tract model

  4. Preliminary assessment of the current impact and potential risk of acidic deposition on walleye populations in Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wales, D.L.; Liimatainen, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    Netting survey and field bioassay data were used to determine a pH threshold for survival of walleye. Established pH thresholds were then used to assess the current impact and potential risk of acidic deposition on walleye populations in Ontario. Extinction of walleye appeared to occur in lakes with pH < 5.5. Some losses may also have occurred in lakes with pH 5.5-6.0. An estimated 0.3% (number of lakes (N)=12) of the Ontario walleye lakes currently have pH < 5.5 and have likely lost walleye populations. A further 1.5% (N=60) of the lakes have pH 5.5-6.0 and may show signs of acidification stress. An estimated 2.0% (N=79) of the province's walleye lakes have very low alkalinities (0.0-2.0 mg/l) and are classified as extremely sensitive to continued high deposition of acidic precipitation. 19 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Assessment of atmospheric deposition of heavy metals and other elements in Belgrade using the moss biomonitoring technique and neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study aimed at assessing atmospheric deposition of heavy metals and other elements using the moss genera Brachythecium sp. (B. rutabulum and B. salebrosum) and Eurhynchium sp. (E. hians and E. striatum) collected in autumn 2004 in the urban area of Belgrade. The concentrations of 36 elements (Na, Mg, Al, Cl, K, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Mo, Sb, I, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Sm, Tb, Dy, Hf, Ta, W, Hg, Th, U) were determined in moss and local topsoil samples by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The concentration of elements in moss positively correlated to those obtained for topsoil. High enrichment factors for As, Zn, Mo, Br, Sb, Se, Hg, and Cl, calculated to continental crust composition, gave an evidence for anthropogenic impact on urban area, mainly due to intensive vehicular traffic and fossil fuel combustion. The concentrations of elements in moss, characteristic for fossil fuel combustion, obtained in this study, were substantially lower than in the previous investigation (2000) conducted in the area of Belgrade. The level of concentrations for V, Cr, Ni, and As in moss from this study correlated to those measured for neighboring countries, and were several times higher than the base-level data from low polluted areas. The level of accumulated elements in both investigated moss genera were similar and all studied species could be combined for biomonitoring purposes in urban areas

  6. Study of the electrochemical deposition of Mg in the atomic level: Why it prefers the non-dendritic morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a Density Functional Theory (DFT) study on the electrochemical deposition process of Mg. We studied the impact of the thermodynamics and the kinetics to the morphologies of the deposited phases. Our analysis showed that the free energy difference between high dimensional and low dimensional phases was higher for Mg than for Li as a result of the stronger Mg-Mg bond strength. On the other hand, the migration barriers of Li and Mg showed close values. These findings indicated that the electrochemically deposited Mg essentially prefers to form crystalline layers in comparison with Li due to the intrinsic thermodynamic properties. It suggested that Mg anode provides not only high energy densities, but also the potential to avoid the issues caused by the growth of dendrites.

  7. Deep repository - engineered barrier systems. Assessment of backfill materials and methods for deposition tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objectives of this report are to: (1) present density criteria considering deposition tunnels for the investigated backfill materials, (2) evaluate what densities can be achieved with the suggested backfill methods, (3) compare the density criteria to achievable densities, (4) based on this comparison evaluate the safety margin for the combinations of backfill materials and methods and, (5) make recommendations for further investigations and development work. The backfilling methods considered in this report are compaction of backfill material in situ in the tunnel and placement of pre-compacted blocks and pellets. The materials investigated in the second phase of the SKB-Posiva backfilling programme can be divided into three main categories: (1) Bentonite clays: two high-grade Na-bentonites from Wyoming (MX-80 and SPV200), one low-grade bentonite from Kutch (India Asha 2 0), and one high- and one low-grade Ca-bentonite from Milos (Deponite CA-N and Milos backfill). The highgrade bentonites are used in different bentonite-ballast mixtures. (2) Smectite-rich mixed-layer clays: one from Dnesice-Plzensko Jih (DPJ) located in the Czech Republic and one from Northern Germany (Friedland clay). (3) Mixtures of bentonite and ballast: Mixtures consisting of high-grade bentonite (30, 40 and 50 w-%) and crushed rock with different type of grain size distribution or sand. The general conclusion from the comparison between estimated achievable densities and the density criteria is that placing pre-compacted blocks of swelling clay or 50/50 mixture and pellets in the tunnel results in the highest safety margin. (orig.)

  8. FORMATION THE SYSTEM OF INDICATORS TO ASSESSMENT OF THE LEVEL OF INFORMATION SECURITY OF THE ENTERPRISE

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuravel, M.; Polozova, T.; Storozhenko, O.

    2011-01-01

    Diagnostic the level of information security of the enterprise proposed to carry out in three main directions: evaluation of program-technical protection of information; evaluation of informational reliability of personnel; evaluation of information provided to decision makers. The system of indicators to assessment the level of information security for each proposed direction was formed.

  9. AGGREGATIONS OF LEVEL III ECOREGIONS FOR NATIONAL NUTRIENT ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggregations of level III Ecoregions for the National Nutrient Assessment and Management Strategy: This map of draft aggregation of level III ecoregions of the conterminous United States defines broad areas within which there are general similarities in the quality and types of e...

  10. Low-level waste disposal performance assessments - Total source-term analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhite, E.L.

    1995-12-31

    Disposal of low-level radioactive waste at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities is regulated by DOE. DOE Order 5820.2A establishes policies, guidelines, and minimum requirements for managing radioactive waste. Requirements for disposal of low-level waste emplaced after September 1988 include providing reasonable assurance of meeting stated performance objectives by completing a radiological performance assessment. Recently, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board issued Recommendation 94-2, {open_quotes}Conformance with Safety Standards at Department of Energy Low-Level Nuclear Waste and Disposal Sites.{close_quotes} One of the elements of the recommendation is that low-level waste performance assessments do not include the entire source term because low-level waste emplaced prior to September 1988, as well as other DOE sources of radioactivity in the ground, are excluded. DOE has developed and issued guidance for preliminary assessments of the impact of including the total source term in performance assessments. This paper will present issues resulting from the inclusion of all DOE sources of radioactivity in performance assessments of low-level waste disposal facilities.

  11. Assessment of noise levels in clinical and laboratory areas of dental teaching institution, Ahmedabad

    OpenAIRE

    Parkar, Sujal M; Sagar H Parekh; Lopa M Shah; Abhishek S Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To measure and assess the noise levels produced by different dental equipments. Materials and Methods: Measurement of the noise level was performed in preclinics, clinics, and dental laboratory of different departments of Ahmedabad Dental College and Hospital. The noise levels were determined using a Mini sound meter (CEM USA), which was placed at the dentist′s and laboratory technician′s ear level and at a distance of 1 m from a main noise source. The level of noise was measured in deci...

  12. Assessment of the Fire Risk Levels in an Office Building and a Nightclub with Prescriptive Designs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yilmaz, D.; Steffensen, F.B.; Jomaas, Grunde; Valkvist, Morten Birk Sabroe

    2014-01-01

    A comparison of the risk level of an office building and a nightclub with code compliant prescriptive designs was conducted in order to evaluate whether an uniform safety level of the two occupancy types can be established. A risk assessment method using Monte Carlo simulations and 1- and 2-zone...... difference in risk levels, with that of the nightclub being substantially higher. The higher risk level in the nightclub is caused by a relatively fast mean value of the fire growth rate and the high number of occupants. Hence, the requirements in the prescriptive code do not ensure a similar safety level...

  13. Deposition of 7Be and 137Cs in Sweden 2001 - 2008. With Radionuclides in ground level air in Sweden. Yearly report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deposition of 7Be and 137Cs for four stations in Sweden are reported for the period 2001- 2008. For 7Be a correlation with total precipitation is seen. For 137Cs there is no correlation with precipitation and no correlation with surface air concentrations of 137Cs. The overall levels of 137Cs fallout is higher in areas that were largely affected by the Chernobyl fallout in 1986. The 137Cs deposition seen in the Gaevle area are mostly due to resuspension of this 137Cs fallout, but for other areas the total yearly deposition and resuspension are down to pre Chernobyl levels. Filtering of ground level air is performed continuously at six different locations in Sweden: Kiruna, Umeaa, Gaevle, Kista, Visby and Ljungbyhed. The filters are pressed into weekly samples and the contents of different radionuclides are measured by gamma spectroscopy. Precipitation is also collected at four of the stations: Kiruna, Gaevle, Kista and Ljungbyhed, the samples are ashed and the contents of radionuclides are measured. The levels of Be-7 and Cs-137 during 2008 in air and precipitation are presented for the different stations. Other anthropogenic radionuclides detected, if any, are also presented

  14. Deposited radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements were carried out to determine the fall-out levels of radionuclides in Finland including those from the surroundings of the nuclear power plants at Loviisa and Olkiluoto. Deposition samples were analysed for their 3H, 89Sr and 90Sr as well as 137Cs and other gamma radionuclide contents. 90Sr, 239,240Pu, as well as 137Cs and other gamma radionuclides deposited in soil were also measured. The 90Sr and 137Cs levels in deposition in 1978 remained at almost the same level as in 1977. The slightly increasing trend in 3H concentrations continued in 1978. The mean annual deposition of tritium at different sampling stations varied from 120 nCi/m2 (4.4 kBq/m2) to 200 nCi/m2 (7.4 kBq/m2). The total annual deposits of various fission product radionuclides during 1978 were smaller than during 1977. No increase in radioactivity originating from nuclear power plants could be observed. (author)

  15. On the Accuracy of Iranian EFL Students' Reading Self-assessment and their Level of Reading Proficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Moein Shokr

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing the literature on self-assessment as an alternative method of assessment we find advocates claiming for the accuracy of the students’ self-assessments in general with little focus on their level of proficiency. With an eye on the students’ level of reading proficiency, the present study aimed at investigating the relationship between students’ reading self-assessment (as a formative and alternative method of assessment) on the one hand, and teacher assessment (as a formative type of...

  16. MRI assessment of changes in liver iron deposition post-venesection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beddy, P., E-mail: pbeddy@eircom.net [Department of Radiology, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom); McCann, J., E-mail: jwjmccann@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, St James' Hospital and Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland); Ahern, M., E-mail: mahern@stjames.ie [Department of Radiology, St James' Hospital and Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland); Norris, S., E-mail: snorris@stjames.ie [Department of Hepatology, St James' Hospital and Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland); Keogan, M., E-mail: mkeogan@stjames.ie [Department of Radiology, St James' Hospital and Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine if changes in hepatic iron content in patients with hemochromatosis pre- and post-venesection could be detected by changes in liver signal intensity with MRI. Materials and methods: The study was performed with institutional ethics approval and with informed consent. Gradient echo images were performed on 20 patients with hemochromatosis pre- and post-venesection and 10 control subjects: gradient echo T1-weighted in- and out-phases (4.54 (in)/2.27 (out), 167 [TE/TR], Flip 70{sup o}) and gradient echo T2* (5/18 [TE/TR], Flip 10{sup o}). The liver to muscle signal ratio was compared pre- and post-venesection. Results: All MRI sequences showed significant correlation between the liver to muscle signal intensity ratio and the serum ferritin pre-venesection [r = -0.70, -0.65, -0.74, -0.72, in/out/T2*r/T2*, respectively]. There was a significant increase on all sequences in the liver to muscle signal intensity ratio post-venesection (p < 0.001). The control group and patients post-venesection had almost identical liver to muscle signal intensity ratios. Conclusion: The reduction in liver signal intensity caused by iron excess in hemochromatosis returns to normal post-venesection. Measurement of liver to muscle signal intensity ratios may be a useful tool in assessing treatment response in iron overload states.

  17. MRI assessment of changes in liver iron deposition post-venesection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine if changes in hepatic iron content in patients with hemochromatosis pre- and post-venesection could be detected by changes in liver signal intensity with MRI. Materials and methods: The study was performed with institutional ethics approval and with informed consent. Gradient echo images were performed on 20 patients with hemochromatosis pre- and post-venesection and 10 control subjects: gradient echo T1-weighted in- and out-phases (4.54 (in)/2.27 (out), 167 [TE/TR], Flip 70o) and gradient echo T2* (5/18 [TE/TR], Flip 10o). The liver to muscle signal ratio was compared pre- and post-venesection. Results: All MRI sequences showed significant correlation between the liver to muscle signal intensity ratio and the serum ferritin pre-venesection [r = -0.70, -0.65, -0.74, -0.72, in/out/T2*r/T2*, respectively]. There was a significant increase on all sequences in the liver to muscle signal intensity ratio post-venesection (p < 0.001). The control group and patients post-venesection had almost identical liver to muscle signal intensity ratios. Conclusion: The reduction in liver signal intensity caused by iron excess in hemochromatosis returns to normal post-venesection. Measurement of liver to muscle signal intensity ratios may be a useful tool in assessing treatment response in iron overload states.

  18. Consequence assessment for the high-level waste tanks probabilistic risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the US DOE Hanford Site, there are 177 underground tanks in 18 separate tank farms containing accumulated liquid radioactive wastes from 50 yr of weapons materials production activities. The total volume is about 60 million gallons containing approximately 120 Curies of radioactivity. The radioactive material consists primarily of 137Cs, 90Sr, and transuranics. Risk concerns with the tanks are associated with possible energy releases because of the presence of flammable gases, organic liquids, reactive chemical compounds, and radioactive decay heat. Because of the high concentration of radioactivity in the wastes and because a large number of the older single-shell tanks have some history or evidence of leaking, there is a public perception that they pose a serious risk to the onsite workers and the offsite public. The tank farm probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) was performed for two reasons: (1) to develop a baseline estimate of the risks these wastes pose to the workers and the public for the present tank contents and configurations and (2) to provide a relative ranking of the risks associated with individual groups of tanks. The latter information would be helpful in planning the order of the tank remediation work by indicating which tanks pose the greatest risk; the former could help allay concerns

  19. 78 FR 15746 - Compendium of Analyses To Investigate Select Level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment End-State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... COMMISSION Compendium of Analyses To Investigate Select Level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment End-State... document entitled: Compendium of Analyses to Investigate Select Level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment End... Analyses to Investigate Select Level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment End-State Definition and...

  20. Assessing atmospheric nitrogen deposition to natural and semi-natural ecosystems – experience from Danish studies using the DAMOS system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel, Ole; Geels, Camilla; Frohn, Lise;

    2013-01-01

    reactive nitrogen. In general there is a gradient in atmospheric deposition over the country, with the highest depositions in the South-Western part of Denmark (Case 3) due to long-range transport contributions from North-Western Europe, but also due to local ammonia deposition associated with the high...

  1. Environmental health risk assessment of ambient lead levels in Lisbon, Portugal: A full chain study approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casimiro, E.; Philippe Ciffroy, P.; Serpa, P.;

    2011-01-01

    useful for integrated full-chain human health risk assessments. In this study we use a newly developed computational tool – the 2FUN player to conduct a full-chain assessment combining measured ambient air lead concentrations with multi-media modelling and PBPK simulations to estimate the health risks...... calculate the Pb levels in the various body systems. Our results showed a low health risk from Pb exposures. It also identified that ingestion of leafy vegetables (i.e. lettuce, cabbage, and spinach) and fruits contribute the most to total Pb blood levels. This full chain assessment approach of the 2FUN...... player is likely to be very useful for local health risk assessment studies (i.e. EIA and SEA studies)....

  2. Quantitative Mineral Resource Assessment of Copper, Molybdenum, Gold, and Silver in Undiscovered Porphyry Copper Deposits in the Andes Mountains of South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Charles G.; Zappettini, Eduardo O.; Vivallo S., Waldo; Celada, Carlos Mario; Quispe, Jorge; Singer, Donald A.; Briskey, Joseph A.; Sutphin, David M.; Gajardo M., Mariano; Diaz, Alejandro; Portigliati, Carlos; Berger, Vladimir I.; Carrasco, Rodrigo; Schulz, Klaus J.

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative information on the general locations and amounts of undiscovered porphyry copper resources of the world is important to exploration managers, land-use and environmental planners, economists, and policy makers. This publication contains the results of probabilistic estimates of the amounts of copper (Cu), molybdenum (Mo), gold (Au), and silver (Ag) in undiscovered porphyry copper deposits in the Andes Mountains of South America. The methodology used to make these estimates is called the 'Three-Part Form'. It was developed to explicitly express estimates of undiscovered resources and associated uncertainty in a form that allows economic analysis and is useful to decisionmakers. The three-part form of assessment includes: (1) delineation of tracts of land where the geology is permissive for porphyry copper deposits to form; (2) selection of grade and tonnage models appropriate for estimating grades and tonnages of the undiscovered porphyry copper deposits in each tract; and (3) estimation of the number of undiscovered porphyry copper deposits in each tract consistent with the grade and tonnage model. A Monte Carlo simulation computer program (EMINERS) was used to combine the probability distributions of the estimated number of undiscovered deposits, the grades, and the tonnages of the selected model to obtain the probability distributions for undiscovered metals in each tract. These distributions of grades and tonnages then can be used to conduct economic evaluations of undiscovered resources in a format usable by decisionmakers. Economic evaluations are not part of this report. The results of this assessment are presented in two principal parts. The first part identifies 26 regional tracts of land where the geology is permissive for the occurrence of undiscovered porphyry copper deposits of Phanerozoic age to a depth of 1 km below the Earth's surface. These tracts are believed to contain most of South America's undiscovered resources of copper. The

  3. The assessment of the evasion of mercury from an mercuriferous shale deposit using both micrometeorological and dynamic chamber methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full text:' As part of a five year program to better quantify the emission of mercury vapour from natural geogenic sources a three week study was undertaken over a mercuriferous shale deposit. The mineralized shale studied, extends over vast areas of Northern Canada. The research was carried out over a three week period, summer 2001, in the Yukon Territories, Canada. The measurements were taken over an open shale outcropping with an average substrate concentration of 350 ppb. In addition, measurements were performed over the shale's natural overburden (i.e., moss). Concurrently, a gradient micrometeorological method and a dynamic chamber method were used to assess the mercury flux. The micrometeorological method has a flux detection limit (i.e., site specific) on the order of 1.7 ng m -2 h -1 while the chamber method allows for detecting the mercury flux as low as 0.1 ng m -2 h -1 . Both methods are based on the Tekran (model 2537A) mercury vapour analyzer. The experimental design includes the collection of related environmental correlates in order to evaluate controlling processes. The shale deposit studied offers the unique opportunity to compare, on average, the two methods as measurement conditions were ideal and the emission footprint were reasonably homogenous. The average emission rate for the measurement period obtained for the chamber method was 9.2± 0.5 compared to the micrometeorological techniques average rate of 7.4±0.7. The good agreement between the two methods raises the question: is this fortuitous or real? This paper presents the methodologies used and the data collected in the context of quantifying this source of mercury to the atmospheric environment. (author)

  4. Effect of X-ray beam vertical angulation on radiographic assessment of alveolar crest level.

    OpenAIRE

    Zulqarnain B; Almas K

    1998-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are diagnosed and monitored by various methods. Probing pocket depth measurements and dental radiographs are two of the most commonly used methods. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of x-ray beam vertical angulation on radiographic assessment of alveolar crest level in five human mandibles. A standardized technique was used to take bitewing radiographs with -10 degrees, 0 degree and +10 degrees angulation of X-Ray beam. The range of the mean difference...

  5. Investigating the level of awareness of building assessment tools in the construction industry of Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Ntshwene, Keneilwe; Essah, Emmanuel; Dixon, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Environmental building assessment tools have been developed to measure how well or poorly a building is performing, or likely to perform, against a declared set of criteria, or environmental considerations, in order to achieve sustainability principles. Knowledge of environmental building assessment tools is therefore important for successful design and construction of environmentally friendly buildings for countries. The purpose of the research is to investigate the knowledge and level of aw...

  6. A framework for sea level rise vulnerability assessment for southwest U.S. military installations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, B.; Flick, Reinhard; Helly, J.; Nishikawa, T.; Pei, Fang Wang; O'Reilly, W.; Guza, R.; Bromirski, Peter; Young, A.; Crampton, W.; Wild, B.; Canner, I.

    2011-01-01

    We describe an analysis framework to determine military installation vulnerabilities under increases in local mean sea level as projected over the next century. The effort is in response to an increasing recognition of potential climate change ramifications for national security and recommendations that DoD conduct assessments of the impact on U.S. military installations of climate change. Results of the effort described here focus on development of a conceptual framework for sea level rise vulnerability assessment at coastal military installations in the southwest U.S. We introduce the vulnerability assessment in the context of a risk assessment paradigm that incorporates sources in the form of future sea level conditions, pathways of impact including inundation, flooding, erosion and intrusion, and a range of military installation specific receptors such as critical infrastructure and training areas. A unique aspect of the methodology is the capability to develop wave climate projections from GCM outputs and transform these to future wave conditions at specific coastal sites. Future sea level scenarios are considered in the context of installation sensitivity curves which reveal response thresholds specific to each installation, pathway and receptor. In the end, our goal is to provide a military-relevant framework for assessment of accelerated SLR vulnerability, and develop the best scientifically-based scenarios of waves, tides and storms and their implications for DoD installations in the southwestern U.S. ?? 2011 MTS.

  7. Performance assessment for future low-level waste disposal facilities at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the strategy for waste management on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and the approach to preparing future performance assessments that has evolved from previous performance assessment studies of low-level radioactive waste disposal on the ORR. The strategy for waste management is based on the concept that waste classification should be determined by performance assessment other than the sources of waste. This dose-based strategy for waste classification and management places special importance on the preparation and interpretation of waste disposal performance assessments for selecting appropriate disposal technologies and developing waste acceptance criteria. Additionally, the challenges to be overcome in the preparation of performance assessments are discussed. 7 refs

  8. Regulation and performance assessment for the Drigg low level waste disposal site in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper briefly describes the low level waste disposal facility at Drigg and the framework of UK regulations that apply to it. Particular attention is paid to the approach that the Environment Agency of England and Wales is likely to adopt regarding the assessment of that part of a safety case dealing with long term post-closure radiological performance. This assessment comprises two parts, a scientific and technical peer review, followed by an independent quantitative analysis based upon the probabilistic risk assessment centred approach developed during the past 14 years by the Environment Agency of England and Wales. (author). 11 refs, 3 figs

  9. Modeling and Analysis on Radiological Safety Assessment of Low- and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Jung, Jong Tae; Kang, Chul Hyung (and others)

    2008-04-15

    Modeling study and analysis for technical support for the safety and performance assessment of the low- and intermediate level (LILW) repository partially needed for radiological environmental impact reporting which is essential for the licenses for construction and operation of LILW has been fulfilled. Throughout this study such essential area for technical support for safety and performance assessment of the LILW repository and its licensing as gas generation and migration in and around the repository, risk analysis and environmental impact during transportation of LILW, biosphere modeling and assessment for the flux-to-dose conversion factors for human exposure as well as regional and global groundwater modeling and analysis has been carried out.

  10. Modeling and Analysis on Radiological Safety Assessment of Low- and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modeling study and analysis for technical support for the safety and performance assessment of the low- and intermediate level (LILW) repository partially needed for radiological environmental impact reporting which is essential for the licenses for construction and operation of LILW has been fulfilled. Throughout this study such essential area for technical support for safety and performance assessment of the LILW repository and its licensing as gas generation and migration in and around the repository, risk analysis and environmental impact during transportation of LILW, biosphere modeling and assessment for the flux-to-dose conversion factors for human exposure as well as regional and global groundwater modeling and analysis has been carried out

  11. Deposited radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results presented are from the nationwide programme to survey the fall-out levels of radionuclides in Finland. This programme includes results from the vicinities of the nuclear power plants at Loviisa and Olkiluoto. Analysis of deposition samples for their 3H, 89Sr and 90Sr, as well as 137Cs and other gamma radionuclide contents was continued. The results are given as a follow-up to the previous results. The cumulative deposition of long-lived radionuclides retained in soil was measured near the Finnish nuclear power stations. The 90Sr and 137Cs levels in deposition in 1979 were lower than in the previous two years, and no 89Sr was detected. The trend to slightly increasing 3H concentrations of previous years was reversed in 1979. The mean annual deposition of tritium at different sampling stations varied from 85 nCi/m2 (3.1 kBq/m2) to 180 nCi/m2 (6.7 kBq/m2). The total annual deposits of various fission product radionuclides have decreased continuously since the maximum in 1977. No short-lived radionuclides originating from either nuclear explosions or nuclear power plants were observed in 1979. (author)

  12. Deposited radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurements presented here were carried out for determination of the fallout levels of radionuclides throughout the country, including the areas surrounding the nuclear power plants at Loviisa and Olkiluoto. The 90Sr, 137Cs and 3H contents of deposition were determined and the results are given as a follow-up to the previous results. 89Sr and other gammaradionuclides in addition to 137Cs were measured from wet and dry deposition. Also 89-90Sr, 239-240Pu, 137Cs and other gammaradionuclides deposited in soil were measured. The radiochemical separation technique was used to determine 89Sr, 90Sr, 137Cs and 239-240Pu. Tritium contents were determined by liquid scintillation counting after electrolytic enrichment. Gammaradionuclides were measured by Ge(Li) spectrometry. In 1977 the contents of the long-lived radionuclides 90Sr and 137Cs in deposition increased to almost the same level as in the early '70s. This is due to the high-yield atmospheric nuclear weapon tests carried out by China. A slight increase in 3H deposition can also be noticed in 1977. The results of soil sample measurements indicate that practically all the activity is found in the top 20 cm layer. (author)

  13. EFFECTIVENESS OF POLICY LEVEL ENVIRONMENTAL AND SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT: CHALLENGES AND LESSONS FROM RECENT PRACTICE

    OpenAIRE

    RICHARD P. EALES; WILLIAM R. SHEATE

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the challenges and lessons from recent practice and experience of applying tools such as Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) and Sustainability Appraisal at the policy level in the UK and Europe. It investigates whether or not these tools have been effective and helped to deliver more sustainable development at the high level of national policy development. The analysis is illustrated by case examples from the UK, such as Eco-towns and Energy Planning. The paper concl...

  14. Radiographers’ self-assessed level and use of competencies—a national survey

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Bodil T.; Christensson, Lennart; Jakobsson, Ulf; Fridlund, Bengt; Broström, Anders

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe radiographers' self-assessed level and use of competencies as well as how sociodemographic and situational factors are associated with these competencies, particularly related to work experience. METHODS: A cross-sectional design was employed. Radiographers (n = 406) completed the self-administered 28-item questionnaire encompassing two dimensions: 'Nurse-initiated care' and 'Technical and radiographic processes'. The level of competencies was rated on a 10-point scale...

  15. Assessment of Teachers’ Classroom Management Profiles in First-Level Elementary Education

    OpenAIRE

    Ekici, Gülay; Gazi Üniversitesi Teknik Eğitim Fakültesi, Eğitim Bilimleri Bölümü

    2004-01-01

    The first aim of this study is to provide general information about the classroom management profiles, and the second aim is to assess teachers’ classroom management profiles in the first-level elementary education with respect to different variables. In the study, authoritarian, authoritative, laissez-faire and indifferent classroom management profiles are investigated. The study population consisted of 234 first- level elementary education teachers. The reliability analysis of the Classroom...

  16. Multifunctionality assessment in forest planning at landscape level. The study case of Matese Mountain Community (Italy).

    OpenAIRE

    Umberto Di Salvatore; Fabrizio Ferretti; Paolo Cantiani; Alessandro Paletto; Isabella De Meo; Ugo Chiavetta

    2013-01-01

    The main objective is to improve a method that aims at evaluating forest multifunctionality from a technical and practical point of view. A methodological approach - based on the index of forest multifunctionality level - is proposed to assess the “fulfilment capability” of a function providing an estimate of performance level of each function in a given forest. This method is aimed at supporting technicians requested to define most suitable management guidelines and silvicultural practices i...

  17. Assessment of the Levels of Airborne Bacteria, Gram-Negative Bacteria, and Fungi in Hospital Lobbies

    OpenAIRE

    Dong-Uk Park; Jeong-Kwan Yeom; Won Jae Lee; Kyeong-Min Lee

    2013-01-01

    Aims: We assessed the levels of airborne bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria (GNB), and fungi in six hospital lobbies, and investigated the environmental and hospital characteristics that affected the airborne microorganism levels. Methods: An Andersen single-stage sampler equipped with appropriate nutrition plate agar was used to collect the samples. The three types of microorganisms were repeatedly collected at a fixed location in each hospital (assumed to be representative of the entire hospi...

  18. Promoting social responsibility for health: health impact assessment and healthy public policy at the community level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelmark, M B

    2001-09-01

    The 1997 Jakarta Declaration on Health Promotion into the 21st Century called for new responses to address the emerging threats to health. The declaration placed a high priority on promoting social responsibility for health, and it identified equity-focused health impact assessment as a high priority for action. This theme was among the foci at the 2000 Fifth Global Conference on Health Promotion held in Mexico. This paper, which is an abbreviation of a technical report prepared for the Mexico conference, advances arguments for focusing on health impact assessment at the local level. Health impact assessment identifies negative health impacts that call for policy responses, and identifies and encourages practices and policies that promote health. Health impact assessment may be highly technical and require sophisticated technology and expertise. But it can also be a simple, highly practical process, accessible to ordinary people, and one that helps a community come to grips with local circumstances that need changing for better health. To illustrate the possibilities, this paper presents a case study, the People Assessing Their Health (PATH) project from Eastern Nova Scotia, Canada. It places ordinary citizens, rather than community elites, at the very heart of local decision-making. Evidence from PATH demonstrates that low technology health impact assessment, done by and for local people, can shift thinking beyond the illness problems of individuals. It can bring into consideration, instead, how programmes and policies support or weaken community health, and illuminate a community's capacity to improve local circumstances for better health. This stands in contrast to evidence that highly technological approaches to community-level health impact assessment can be self-defeating. Further development of simple, people-centred, low technology approaches to health impact assessment at the local level is called for. PMID:11509463

  19. A Quantitative Assessment of the Sea Level Drop in the Messinian Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartol, J.; Topper, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    In the Late Miocene progressive restriction of the gateway(s) between the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean initiated the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC). The restriction caused a salinity rise and the formation of extremely thick evaporite deposits within the Mediterranean basin. Subsequently, the closure of the connection between the Mediterranean Sea and Atlantic Ocean resulted in a dramatic sea level drop. The lithosphere adepts to changes in loads (sediments and water) on the surface by flexural adjustment of the Earth's surface. This can have a significant impact on the connectivity of basins and the temporal evolution of the sea level drop in each basin. The Mediterranean Sea is characterized by two deep basins with different amounts of river input (western/eastern Mediterranean basin) separated by the relatively shallow Sicily sill. The temporal evolution of the sea level drop in the western/eastern Mediterranean basin is therefore very sensitive to the temporal and spatial evolution of the Sicily gateway and hence flexure response of the earth surface due to the changes in waterload. However, studies of the MSC sea level drop haven't taken this flexural response into consideration (e.g. Meijer and Krijgsman, 2005). Here we use an elastic model (TISC) coupled with a simple hydrology model to calculate the temporal evolution of the sea level drop in and the flexural response of the western and eastern Mediterranean basins. Preliminary results show that when sea level drops below the Sicily sill, the rate of sea level increases in the western but decreases in the eastern Mediterranean. Following a relative sea level drop of ~1300 m, resulting in a flexural uplift of ~700m, the eastern Mediterranean reaches equilibrium. At the time the western Mediterranean (flexural uplift of ~900m) reaches an equilibrium it is almost completely desiccated. The magnitudes of the sea level drops and flexural response are, however, highly dependent on the hypsometry

  20. Electro-Deposition Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The electro-deposition laboratory can electro-deposit various coatings onto small test samples and bench level prototypes. This facility provides the foundation for...

  1. Skills in clinical communication: Are we correctly assessing them at undergraduate level?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Zamora Cervantes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Communicating with the patient in clinical practice refers to the way in which the doctor and the patient interact both verbally and nonverbally, in order to achieve a shared understanding of problems and solutions. Traditional learning and assessment systems are overwhelmed when it comes to addressing the complex and multi-dimensional problems of professional practice. Problem Based Learning (PBL has been put forward as an alternative to the mere reproduction of knowledge and pre-established patterns, enabling students to develop their own learning strategies to overcome problems in their future professional practice. The challenge is to determine how to assess the acquisition of clinical communication skills. The authors have recommended a summative assessment of clinical communication skills based on the combination of different methods. It highlights the importance of feedback-based formative assessment. This raises the need to develop and validate assessment scales in clinical communication at an undergraduate level. Based on this work, the authors put forward a "fanned out" assessment in terms of clinical communication skills in Medicine degrees, with the use of different instruments in a "spiraled" manner, where the greater the contact with clinical practice in the various degree and integral courses, the greater difficulty experienced, with the participation of all the stakeholders involved (self, hetero and peer assessment without precluding the involvement of patients (real or simulated in the design of assessment instruments.

  2. Contemporary deposition and long-term accumulation of sediment and nutrients by tidal freshwater forested wetlands impacted by sea level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe, Gregory; Hupp, Cliff R.; Bernhardt, Christopher E.; Krauss, Ken W.

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary deposition (artificial marker horizon, 3.5 years) and long-term accumulation rates (210Pb profiles, ~150 years) of sediment and associated carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) were measured in wetlands along the tidal Savannah and Waccamaw rivers in the southeastern USA. Four sites along each river spanned an upstream-to-downstream salinification gradient, from upriver tidal freshwater forested wetland (TFFW), through moderately and highly salt-impacted forested wetlands, to oligohaline marsh downriver. Contemporary deposition rates (sediment, C, N, and P) were greatest in oligohaline marsh and lowest in TFFW along both rivers. Greater rates of deposition in oligohaline and salt-stressed forested wetlands were associated with a shift to greater clay and metal content that is likely associated with a change from low availability of watershed-derived sediment to TFFW and to greater availability of a coastal sediment source to oligohaline wetlands. Long-term accumulation rates along the Waccamaw River had the opposite spatial pattern compared to contemporary deposition, with greater rates in TFFW that declined to oligohaline marsh. Long-term sediment and elemental mass accumulation rates also were 3–9× lower than contemporary deposition rates. In comparison to other studies, sediment and associated nutrient accumulation in TFFW are lower than downriver/estuarine freshwater, oligohaline, and salt marshes, suggesting a reduced capacity for surface sedimentation (short-term) as well as shallow soil processes (long-term sedimentation) to offset sea level rise in TFFW. Nonetheless, their potentially large spatial extent suggests that TFFW have a large impact on the transport and fate of sediment and nutrients in tidal rivers and estuaries.

  3. ASSESSMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINANTS FOUND IN LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE STREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.H. Little, P.R. Maul, J.S.S. Penfoldag

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes and presents the findings from two studies undertaken for the European Commission to assess the long-term impact upon the environment and human health of non-radioactive contaminants found in various low level radioactive waste streams. The initial study investigated the application of safety assessment approaches developed for radioactive contaminants to the assessment of nonradioactive contaminants in low level radioactive waste. It demonstrated how disposal limits could be derived for a range of non-radioactive contaminants and generic disposal facilities. The follow-up study used the same approach but undertook more detailed, disposal system specific calculations, assessing the impacts of both the non-radioactive and radioactive contaminants. The calculations undertaken indicated that it is prudent to consider non-radioactive, as well as radioactive contaminants, when assessing the impacts of low level radioactive waste disposal. For some waste streams with relatively low concentrations of radionuclides, the potential post-closure disposal impacts from non-radioactive contaminants can be comparable with the potential radiological impacts. For such waste streams there is therefore an added incentive to explore options for recycling the materials involved wherever possible.

  4. Use of ecotoxicological screening action levels in ecological risk assessment at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulatory drivers found in several environmental statutes require that ecological risk assessment and Natural Resource Damage Assessment be performed to assess potential environmental impact from contaminated sites and from proposed remedial alternatives. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, the initial phase of the ecological risk assessment process required preliminary evaluation of contaminated sites to determine whether potential for ecological impact exists. The preliminary evaluations were made using Ecotoxicological Screening Action Levels (ESALS) calculated as a function of reference toxicity dose, body weight, food/water/air intake, and fraction of soil intake with food. Reference toxicity doses were derived from the Environmental Protection Agency Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) and Health Effects Assessment Summary Tables (HEAST) toxicology databases. Other parameters required for ESAL calculations were derived from physiological, metabolic, and behavioral data available in the literature. The Los Alamos ESALs were derived for guilds of animals with similar behavioral patterns, which were identified from natural resource survey data collected at Los Alamos. Subsequent to development of Ecotoxicological Screening Action Levels, Hazard Quotients, which are ratios of soil concentrations to Ecotoxicological Screening Action Levels, were calculated for potential contaminants of concern. The Hazard Quotients were used to identify which potential contaminants of concern should be evaluated further for ecological impact. There is potential for ecological impact when the Hazard Quotient is equal to or greater than one

  5. Performance assessment methodology (PAM) for low level radioactive waste (LLRW) disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is given for Performance Assessment Methodology (PAM) for Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) disposal technologies, as required for licensing and safety studies. This is a multi-disciplinary activity, emphasizing applied mathematics, mass transfer, geohydrology and radiotoxicity effects on humans. (author). 2 refs

  6. Diagnostic Assessment of Preparedness of Level One Sports Science Students for Biomechanics Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Sharon J.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the use of a diagnostic test to assess the preparedness of level one students for a sports biomechanics module. During their first week at university, a cohort of 108 students completed a diagnostic test at the end of their first lecture in sports biomechanics, with no prior notice. Upon…

  7. Assessing Knowledge Levels of Secondary School Physical Education and Sports Teachers about Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Mensure

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the research is to assess knowledge levels of physical education teachers in inclusive education in secondary schools. For the research, the survey method was employed. It consisted of 55 physical education teachers employed in 47 secondary schools included in inclusive education program under Kocaeli Provincial Directorate of…

  8. Clinical and biochemical assessment of high serum vitamin B12 levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendt, Johan Frederik Berg; Nexø, Ebba

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Measurement of serum cobalamin (Cbl) is routinely used to assess suspected Cbl deficiency. Surprisingly, 15% of all samples analysed for serum Cbl show values above the reference range of 200-600 pmol/L. Aim: We hypothesized that increased Cbl levels are caused by alterations in the...

  9. A Critical Analysis of Conventional Descriptions of Levels Employed in the Assessment of Basic Learning Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Ian; McElwee, John; Ming, Siri

    2010-01-01

    The Assessment of Basic Learning Abilities (ABLA) is a tabletop-based protocol employing manipulables that is used to gauge whether individuals with severe developmental disabilities can learn to perform a series of discrimination tasks of varying levels of difficulty. Empirical research suggests that the ABLA is useful in terms of predicting…

  10. Modelling and assessment work in support of the Drigg low-level radioactive waste disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Associated with low-level radioactive waste disposal operations at Drigg in Cumbria is a programme of technical support work. The role of this work in the recent review of the site authorisation is described, with particular emphasis on the hydrogeological modelling and radiological assessment studies. The scope of the ongoing technical programme is described. (author)

  11. The assessment of risks from exposure to low-levels of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is concerned with risk assessments for human populations receiving low level radiation doses; workers routinely exposed to radiation, Japanese victims of nuclear bombs, and the general public are all considered. Topics covered include risk estimates for cancer, mortality rates, risk estimates for nuclear site workers, and dosimetry

  12. Assessment of Positive Psychology Course According to Comments and Life Satisfaction Levels of Counselor Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, Asli Uz

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the "Positive Psychology" course according to comments and life satisfaction levels of counselor candidates. The course was offered in Guidance and Psychological Counseling undergraduate program as an elective course. The participants of the study were 56 senior undergraduate students attended…

  13. Integrated assessment of farm level adaptation to climate change in agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandryk, M.

    2016-01-01

    The findings of the thesis allowed assessing plausible futures of agriculture in Flevoland around 2050 with insights in effective adaptation to climate change at different levels. Besides empirical findings, this thesis contributed methodologically to the portfolio of climate change impact and adapt

  14. The assessment of risks from exposure to low-levels of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1992-06-01

    This report is concerned with risk assessments for human populations receiving low level radiation doses; workers routinely exposed to radiation, Japanese victims of nuclear bombs, and the general public are all considered. Topics covered include risk estimates for cancer, mortality rates, risk estimates for nuclear site workers, and dosimetry.

  15. Colorado Upper-Division Electrostatics Diagnostic: A Conceptual Assessment for the Junior Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasteen, Stephanie V.; Pepper, Rachel E.; Caballero, Marcos D.; Pollock, Steven J.; Perkins, Katherine K.

    2012-01-01

    As part of an effort to systematically improve our junior-level E&M I course, we have developed a tool to assess student conceptual learning of electrostatics at the upper division. Together with a group of physics faculty, we established a list of learning goals for the course that, with results from student observations and interviews, served as…

  16. An assessment of Raman spectroscopy to detect iodine deposited on thin oxide films formed on Type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodine-131 is one of the most important volatile fission product elements with respect to radiobiological impact, and the characterisation of its chemical state and distribution on reactor surfaces is required for reactor safety assessments. To this end, duplicate samples of Type 316 (17%Cr/12%Ni) stainless steel oxidised in Co2/CH3I gas mixtures and previously characterised using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy have been examined using Raman spectroscopy. The aim is to improve our understanding of the way in which iodine is distributed throughout the oxide scale and to identify its chemical state. In this report we present Raman spectra recorded from a series of stainless steel specimens together with spectra recorded from a number of standard iodine compounds. It is demonstrated that the technique is well suited as a fingerprint method of species identification, can differentiate between the chemical state of iodine as iodide and iodate and can analyse thin oxide films (5-50 nm). Identification of iodine deposits in these oxide films at concentrations of ≤1 At% was not achieved however, there being insufficient iodine present to distinguish any peaks present from the background signal. It is concluded that local concentrations of iodine in oxide inclusions of different composition/morphology on the steel surface does not occur to any extent. (author)

  17. Environmental assessment model for shallow land disposal of low-level radioactive wastes: interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PRESTO (Prediction of Radiation Effects from Shallow Trench Operations) is a computer code developed under US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) funding to evaluate possible health effects from shallow land burial trenches. The model is intended to be generic and to assess radionuclide transport, ensuing exposure, and health impact to a static local population for a 1000-y period following the end of burial operations. Human exposure scenarios considered by the model include normal releases (including leaching and operational spillage), human intrusion, and site farming or reclamation. Pathways and processes of transit from the trench to an individual or population include: groundwater transport, overland flow, erosion, surface water dilution, resuspension, atmospheric transport, deposition, inhalation, and ingestion of contaminated beef, milk, crops, and water. Both population doses and individual doses are calculated as well as doses to the intruder and farmer

  18. Environmental Assessment Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, low-level and mixed waste processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0843, for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) low-level and mixed waste processing. The original proposed action, as reviewed in this EA, was (1) to incinerate INEL`s mixed low-level waste (MLLW) at the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF); (2) reduce the volume of INEL generated low-level waste (LLW) through sizing, compaction, and stabilization at the WERF; and (3) to ship INEL LLW to a commercial incinerator for supplemental LLW volume reduction.

  19. Development of radiological impact assessments for the Drigg low-level radioactive waste disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Drigg low-level waste disposal site has developed from simple trenches cut in clay, accepting loosely tipped waste, to an engineered vault constructed of reinforced concrete receiving containerised waste. The paper describes the associated development of the radiological impact assessments and how those assessments have been influenced by the development of legislation and Government policy. The current deterministic risk assessment is described and the major conclusions presented. The successor to this model is based on a 3-D network approach to the representation of site specific engineering and geological features, with compartmental modelling of the biosphere. The development of this model, which will be used in deterministic and probabilistic modes for the next assessment, is described. 12 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  20. A new assessment of RELAP5-3D using a General Electric level swell problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aumiller, D.L.; Tomlinson, E.T.; Clarke, W.G.

    2000-09-01

    The RELAP5-3D (version bt) computer program was used to assess a GE level swell experiment. The primary goal of the new assessment models was to faithfully represent the experimental facility and instrumentation. In developing the new models, a non-physical representation of the vessel heads in a previous assessment was found. This distortion resulted in predictions that closely matched the experimental data, but were in error. The new assessment also highlighted an instability in the calculation of interfacial drag. To explore this issue, analyses were performed using three different interfacial drag correlations appropriate for large diameter pipes and/or vessels. The results of this study show that the Kataoka-Ishii correlation, which is currently used in RELAP5-3D, compares most favorably with the experimental data. Additionally, a numerical instability was uncovered with the analysis performed using the Gardner correlation and was traced to the calculation of bubble diameter in the bubbly flow regime.

  1. Low- and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Environmental and Safety Assessment Activities in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The protection of the environment is one of the main concerns in the management of radioactive waste, especially in repository planning. In different stages of repository lifetime the environmental assessment has different functions: it can be used as a decision making process and as a planning, communication and management tool. Safety assessment as a procedure for evaluating the performance of a disposal system, and its potential radiological impact on human health and environment, is also required. Following the international recommendations and Slovene legislation, a presentation is given of the role and importance of the environmental and safety assessment activities in the early stages following concept development and site selection for a low- and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) repository in Slovenia. As a case study, a short overview is also given of the preliminary safety assessment that has been carried out in the analysis of possibilities for long-lived LILW disposal in Slovenia. (author)

  2. Several High Level Issues in Reliability Assessment of Safety-Critical Software in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Man Cheol; Jang, Seung Cheol [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    For the purpose of developing a consensus method for the reliability assessment of safety-critical digital instrumentation and control systems in nuclear power plants, several high level issues in reliability assessment of the safety-critical software based on Bayesian belief network modeling and statistical testing are discussed. Related to the Bayesian belief network modeling, the relation between the assessment approach and the sources of evidence, the relation between qualitative evidence and quantitative evidence, and how to consider qualitative evidence are discussed. Related to the statistical testing, the need of the consideration of context-specific software failure probabilities and the inability to perform a huge number of tests in the real world are discussed. The discussions in this paper are expected to provide a common basis for future discussions on the reliability assessment of safety-critical software.

  3. A 5-yr change in Norwegian 9-yr-olds' objectively assessed physical activity level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolle, Elin; Steene-Johannessen, Jostein; Klasson-Heggebø, Lena;

    2009-01-01

    activity assessments that met all inclusion criteria. General linear models were used to assess the changes in physical activity between 1999-2000 and 2005. RESULTS: A significant increase in mean physical activity level and physical activity during weekends was observed between the two study periods (P...... = 0.02 and <0.001, respectively), with the patterns being similar for girls and boys. Interactions were found between change in physical activity and SES. Although the mean physical activity level and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) among children from low-SES groups showed no change...... over time, an increase was seen among children from middle-SES groups. Moreover, in high-SES groups, an increase was observed for mean physical activity level (girls only) between study periods, whereas no change was seen for MVPA participation. CONCLUSIONS: Nine-year-old children living in Oslo...

  4. Facies and depositional sequences of the Late Pleistocene Göçü shoreline system, Konya basin, Central Anatolia: Implications for reconstructing lake-level changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabiyikoǧlu, Mustafa; Kuzucuoǧlu, Catherine; Fontugne, Michel; Kaiser, Brigitte; Mouralis, Damase

    1999-04-01

    Well-developed coarse-grained palaeo-shoreline deposits are found along the rising margins of the Konya basin, marking the former extent of a now desiccated Late Pleistocene lake. This study evaluates the depositional environments and the sequential evolution of a shoreline system that developed at the northern margin of the Konya palaeolake near Göçü. Several laterally continuous quarry sections provided an excellent opportunity for studying spatial and temporal changes of depositional environments and related lake-level fluctuations. Eight principal sedimentary facies and six major lithostratigaphic units have been identified in these deposits representing progradational and retrogradational episodes of shoreline development. The lowest sequence is an aggradational unit formed by wind-driven currents and waves in a sand-dominant lake bottom above the wave base. It is overlain by a convoluted palaeosol 14C dated to ca 28,300 BP representing a major lowering of lake levels. Following an unconformity, the next sequence is characterised by large-scale gravelly clinoforms that progressively offlap/downlap onto the underlying sequence, and correspond to progradation of a foreshore resulting from storm-originated oscillating and unidirectional currents, avalanching processes and minor subaqueous debris flows. It is overlain by an areally extensive lensoid body of structureless clays comprising a thin organic layer, abundant rootlets and freshwater mollusc shells, formed from suspension fallout in a quiet, very shallow freshwater lagoonal environment. This phase, representing a more minor lake regression, has been 14C dated to ca. 21,960-20,730 BP. The final sequences include large-scale sand waves and bars, which developed by storm-originated wave surges and strong shoreline currents, and prograding delta foresets. These sequences indicate a renewed lake transgression to higher water levels, before a final regression after 17,500 BP. Lack of tectonic deformation and

  5. Assessment of the radiological protection aspects of disposal of high level waste on the ocean floor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is a preliminary assessment of the potential radiological consequences of disposal of solidified high-level radioactive waste on the floor of the deep ocean. As an input to the modelling used in the assessment, an arbitrary choice is made to consider the total high-level waste which would be generated by a postulated world nuclear power programme to the year 2000. It is assumed that all this waste, in solidified form, is disposed of on to the floor of the North Atlantic. The body of this report is the modelling of the subsequent release of activity into the water, its dispersion in the ocean and eventual uptake in marine organisms and sediments. The consequent radiation exposure of man is assessed in terms of both individual and collective doses. It is intended that only broad conclusions should be drawn from this study. The objective of the assessment is to highlight those subject areas where more study of information is required before a decision can be reached regarding this method of disposal. No overriding reason connected with the radiological protection considerations has been identified which would preclude the disposal of suitably conditioned high-level waste on the ocean floor. Further evaluation of this disposal option is therefore justified. (author)

  6. A National Assessment of Sea Level Rise Exposure Using Lidar Elevation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, B.; Kulp, S. A.; Tebaldi, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Third National Climate Assessment addressed sea level rise and aggravated coastal flood exposure in all regions, but was completed before high quality lidar-based elevation data became available throughout the entire coastal United States (excluding Alaska). Here we present what we believe to be the first full national assessment incorporating these data. The assessment includes tabulation of land less than 1-6 m above the local high tide line, and of a wide range of features sitting on that land, including total population, socially vulnerable population, housing, property value, road miles, power plants, schools, hospitals, and a wide range of other infrastructure and critical facilities, as well as EPA-listed facilities that are potential sources of contamination during floods or permanent inundation. Tabulations span from zip code to national levels. Notable patterns include the strong concentration of exposure across multiple scales, with a small number of states accounting for most of the total national exposure; and a small number of zip codes accounting for a large proportion of the exposure within many states. Additionally, different features show different exposure patterns; in one example, land and road miles have relatively high exposure but population and property have relatively low exposure in North Carolina. The assessment further places this exposure analysis in the context of localized sea level rise projections integrated with coastal flood risk.

  7. Assessing Reservoir Depositional Environments to Develop and Quantify Improvements in CO2 Storage Efficiency. A Reservoir Simulation Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okwen, Roland [University of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Frailey, Scott [University of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Leetaru, Hannes [University of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Moulton, Sandy [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The storage potential and fluid movement within formations are dependent on the unique hydraulic characteristics of their respective depositional environments. Storage efficiency (E) quantifies the potential for storage in a geologic depositional environment and is used to assess basinal or regional CO2 storage resources. Current estimates of storage resources are calculated using common E ranges by lithology and not by depositional environment. The objectives of this project are to quantify E ranges and identify E enhancement strategies for different depositional environments via reservoir simulation studies. The depositional environments considered include deltaic, shelf clastic, shelf carbonate, fluvial deltaic, strandplain, reef, fluvial and alluvial, and turbidite. Strategies considered for enhancing E include CO2 injection via vertical, horizontal, and deviated wells, selective completions, water production, and multi-well injection. Conceptual geologic and geocellular models of the depositional environments were developed based on data from Illinois Basin oil fields and gas storage sites. The geologic and geocellular models were generalized for use in other US sedimentary basins. An important aspect of this work is the development of conceptual geologic and geocellular models that reflect the uniqueness of each depositional environment. Different injection well completions methods were simulated to investigate methods of enhancing E in the presence of geologic heterogeneity specific to a depositional environment. Modeling scenarios included horizontal wells (length, orientation, and inclination), selective and dynamic completions, water production, and multiwell injection. A Geologic Storage Efficiency Calculator (GSECalc) was developed to calculate E from reservoir simulation output. Estimated E values were normalized to diminish their dependency on fluid relative permeability. Classifying depositional environments according to

  8. Assessment of human health risk of reported soil levels of metals and radionuclides in Port Hope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk assessment methods are applied to the question of health implications of contaminated soil in the Port Hope area. Soil-related as well as other pathways of exposure are considered. Exposures to the reported levels of uranium, antimony, chromium, copper, nickel, cadmium, cobalt, selenium, and zinc in Port Hope soils are not expected to result in adverse health consequences. Oral exposure to arsenic in soil at the reported levels is estimated to result in incremental cancer risk levels in the negligible range (10-5). Estimated exposures also fall well below suggested toxic thresholds for arsenic. For the two small areas within the >50 μg/g isopleth, assessment of exposure is difficult without more definitive data on soil concentrations in these zones. Contamination of soils with lead is overall quite limited. In general, the reported soil levels of lead are not anticipated to pose a hazard. The site with the highest concentrations of lead is located on the west bank of the Ganaraska River, a popular fishing area. Depending on the level and extent of contamination, as well as degree of contact with the site, potential exposures could exceed tolerable intakes for children. Exposures to the radionuclides Ra(226), Pb(210), and U(238) in soil at the reported levels are estimated to fall well within recommended population limits

  9. Photosynthesis and oxidative stress in the restinga plant species Eugenia uniflora L. exposed to simulated acid rain and iron ore dust deposition: potential use in environmental risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Natália Rust; Oliva, Marco Antonio; da Cruz Centeno, Danilo; Costa, Alan Carlos; Ribas, Rogério Ferreira; Pereira, Eduardo Gusmão

    2009-06-01

    The Brazilian sandy coastal plain named restinga is frequently subjected to particulate and gaseous emissions from iron ore factories. These gases may come into contact with atmospheric moisture and produce acid rain. The effects of the acid rain on vegetation, combined with iron excess in the soil, can lead to the disappearance of sensitive species and decrease restinga biodiversity. The effects of iron ore dust deposition and simulated acid rain on photosynthesis and on antioxidant enzymes were investigated in Eugenia uniflora, a representative shrub species of the restinga. This study aimed to determine the possible utility of this species in environmental risk assessment. After the application of iron ore dust as iron solid particulate matter (SPM(Fe)) and simulated acid rain (pH 3.1), the 18-month old plants displayed brown spots and necrosis, typical symptoms of iron toxicity and injuries caused by acid rain, respectively. The acidity of the rain intensified leaf iron accumulation, which reached phytotoxic levels, mainly in plants exposed to iron ore dust. These plants showed the lowest values for net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, transpiration, chlorophyll a content and electron transport rate through photosystem II (PSII). Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities were decreased by simulated acid rain. Peroxidase activity and membrane injury increased following exposure to acid rain and simultaneous SPM(Fe) application. Eugenia uniflora exhibited impaired photosynthetic and antioxidative metabolism in response to combined iron and acid rain stresses. This species could become a valuable tool in environmental risk assessment in restinga areas near iron ore pelletizing factories. Non-invasive evaluations of visual injuries, photosynthesis and chlorophyll a fluorescence, as well as invasive biochemical analysis could be used as markers. PMID:19321190

  10. Photosynthesis and oxidative stress in the restinga plant species Eugenia uniflora L. exposed to simulated acid rain and iron ore dust deposition: Potential use in environmental risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rust Neves, Natalia; Oliva, Marco Antonio; Cruz Centeno, Danilo da; Costa, Alan Carlos; Ferreira Ribas, Rogerio [Departamento de Biologia Vegetal, Universidade Federal de Vicosa, Av. PH Rolfs, Campus, Vicosa, Minas Gerais, 36570-000 (Brazil); Gusmao Pereira, Eduardo, E-mail: egpereira@gmail.com [Departamento de Biologia Vegetal, Universidade Federal de Vicosa, Av. PH Rolfs, Campus, Vicosa, Minas Gerais, 36570-000 (Brazil)

    2009-06-01

    The Brazilian sandy coastal plain named restinga is frequently subjected to particulate and gaseous emissions from iron ore factories. These gases may come into contact with atmospheric moisture and produce acid rain. The effects of the acid rain on vegetation, combined with iron excess in the soil, can lead to the disappearance of sensitive species and decrease restinga biodiversity. The effects of iron ore dust deposition and simulated acid rain on photosynthesis and on antioxidant enzymes were investigated in Eugenia uniflora, a representative shrub species of the restinga. This study aimed to determine the possible utility of this species in environmental risk assessment. After the application of iron ore dust as iron solid particulate matter (SPM{sub Fe}) and simulated acid rain (pH 3.1), the 18-month old plants displayed brown spots and necrosis, typical symptoms of iron toxicity and injuries caused by acid rain, respectively. The acidity of the rain intensified leaf iron accumulation, which reached phytotoxic levels, mainly in plants exposed to iron ore dust. These plants showed the lowest values for net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, transpiration, chlorophyll a content and electron transport rate through photosystem II (PSII). Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities were decreased by simulated acid rain. Peroxidase activity and membrane injury increased following exposure to acid rain and simultaneous SPM{sub Fe} application. Eugenia uniflora exhibited impaired photosynthetic and antioxidative metabolism in response to combined iron and acid rain stresses. This species could become a valuable tool in environmental risk assessment in restinga areas near iron ore pelletizing factories. Non-invasive evaluations of visual injuries, photosynthesis and chlorophyll a fluorescence, as well as invasive biochemical analysis could be used as markers.

  11. Photosynthesis and oxidative stress in the restinga plant species Eugenia uniflora L. exposed to simulated acid rain and iron ore dust deposition: Potential use in environmental risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brazilian sandy coastal plain named restinga is frequently subjected to particulate and gaseous emissions from iron ore factories. These gases may come into contact with atmospheric moisture and produce acid rain. The effects of the acid rain on vegetation, combined with iron excess in the soil, can lead to the disappearance of sensitive species and decrease restinga biodiversity. The effects of iron ore dust deposition and simulated acid rain on photosynthesis and on antioxidant enzymes were investigated in Eugenia uniflora, a representative shrub species of the restinga. This study aimed to determine the possible utility of this species in environmental risk assessment. After the application of iron ore dust as iron solid particulate matter (SPMFe) and simulated acid rain (pH 3.1), the 18-month old plants displayed brown spots and necrosis, typical symptoms of iron toxicity and injuries caused by acid rain, respectively. The acidity of the rain intensified leaf iron accumulation, which reached phytotoxic levels, mainly in plants exposed to iron ore dust. These plants showed the lowest values for net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, transpiration, chlorophyll a content and electron transport rate through photosystem II (PSII). Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities were decreased by simulated acid rain. Peroxidase activity and membrane injury increased following exposure to acid rain and simultaneous SPMFe application. Eugenia uniflora exhibited impaired photosynthetic and antioxidative metabolism in response to combined iron and acid rain stresses. This species could become a valuable tool in environmental risk assessment in restinga areas near iron ore pelletizing factories. Non-invasive evaluations of visual injuries, photosynthesis and chlorophyll a fluorescence, as well as invasive biochemical analysis could be used as markers.

  12. Site descriptions for preliminary radiological assessments of low-level waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental contexts of four sites, previously under investigation by UK Nirex Ltd. as potential locations for low-level waste disposal facilities, are described. Information on geographical setting, climate, surface hydrology, land use, agriculture, fisheries, geology and hydrogeology is presented. The geological and hydrogeological data are interpreted with the support of deterministic modelling of groundwater conditions. The routes by which radionuclides may migrate from the site are identified and reduced to 1D statistical descriptions suitable for use in probabilistic risk assessments. Additional data required to improve the assessment of the performance of the site are identified. (author)

  13. National plan for siting high-level radioactive waste repositories and environmental assessment: Public draft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    The process used to find sites suitable for disposal of high level radioactive waste is described. Existing and planned activities for screening successively smaller portions of land to identify suitable candidate sites, and for subsequently selecting one or more of these sites for permanent disposal of radioactive wastes are discussed. Environmental effects of the proposed action, including the anticipate range of field studies to characterize various land areas and reasonable alternative siting strategies, are assessed. The environmental assessment provides the basis for a finding of whether or not implementation of this plan will result in significant environmental impacts.

  14. Ultrasensitive electroanalysis of low-level free microRNAs in blood by maximum signal amplification of catalytic silver deposition using alkaline phosphatase-incorporated gold nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Yanmei; Sun, Zongzhao; Zhang, Ning; Qi, Wei; Li, Shuying; Chen, Lijun; Wang, Hua

    2014-10-21

    An ultrasensitive sandwich-type analysis method has been initially developed for probing low-level free microRNAs (miRNAs) in blood by a maximal signal amplification protocol of catalytic silver deposition. Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) were first synthesized and in-site incorporated into alkaline phosphatase (ALP) to form the ALP-AuNCs. Unexpectedly, the so incorporated AuNCs could dramatically enhance the catalysis activities of ALP-AuNCs versus native ALP. A sandwiched hybridization protocol was then proposed using ALP-AuNCs as the catalytic labels of the DNA detection probes for targeting miRNAs that were magnetically caught from blood samples by DNA capture probes, followed by the catalytic ligation of two DNA probes complementary to the targets. Herein, the ALP-AuNC labels could act as the bicatalysts separately in the ALP-catalyzed substrate dephosphorylation reaction and the AuNCs-accelerated silver deposition reaction. The signal amplification of ALP-AuNCs-catalyzed silver deposition was thereby maximized to be measured by the electrochemical outputs. The developed electroanalysis strategy could allow for the ultrasensitive detection of free miRNAs in blood with the detection limit as low as 21.5 aM, including the accurate identification of single-base mutant levels in miRNAs. Such a sandwich-type analysis method may circumvent the bottlenecks of the current detection techniques in probing short-chain miRNAs. It would be tailored as an ultrasensitive detection candidate for low-level free miRNAs in blood toward the diagnosis of cancer and the warning or monitoring of cancer metastasis in the clinical laboratory. PMID:25242013

  15. Assessment of natural radionuclide content in deposits from drinking water purification station and excess lifetime cancer risk due to gamma radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentrations of natural radionuclide in deposits samples taken from Thirty-six drinking water purification stations have been measured and determined using gamma-ray spectrometry system using (sodium iodide NaI (Tl) detector). Knowledge of radioactivity present in deposits of drinking water purification station enables one to assess any possible radiological hazard to humankind by the use of such materials. The natural radionuclide (226Ra, 232Th and 40K) contents have been analyzed for the deposits samples with an aim of evaluating the radiation hazard nature. The Absorbed dose rate, The annual effective dose equivalent, Radium equivalent activities, Hazard indices (Hex and Hin), Gamma index, Excess lifetime cancer risk and Annual gonadal dose equivalent were calculated for investigated area. Results of the study could serve as an important baseline radiometric data for future epidemiological studies and monitoring initiatives in the study area.

  16. Interplay of salt dynamics, sea-level change and climate on the depositional evolution of a Paleogene economic coal bearing salt rim syncline, Schoeningen, Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, A.; Pollok, L.; Brandes, C.; Winsemann, J. [Leibniz Univ. Hannover (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie

    2013-08-01

    The Paleogene basin fill (maximum 300 m thick) of the Schoeningen rim syncline in northern Germany is well known for its economic lignitic coal deposits. The fill provides an example of the interaction of basin subsidence, sea-level, and climate changes on depositional environment and gives insight into the development of the coal seams within a sequence stratigraphic context. The rim syncline records thirteen Lower to Middle Eocene coal seams with intervening clastic layers that were deposited during a long-lived transgression of the Central German Estuary, which lasted until the Late Oligocene (Standke, 2008). The previous analysis of the rim syncline fill has primarily focused on coal deposits, their lateral extent and paleo-botanical habitat. In this work, 357 lithologic logs were calibrated to outcrop profiles and integrated with previous studies to provide a facies analysis and sequence stratigraphy interpretation of the syncline fill. This improves understanding of the depositional environments of the lesser-studied clastics that intervene the coals (Osman et al., in review). Four 3{sup rd} order sequences are recorded in the Lower to Middle Eocene basin fill. Sequences 1 and 2 document the interplay of sands and coals within a transgressive estuarine phase. The sands show a regime change from tide- to more wave-dominated estuarine conditions before a turnaround to a regressive deltaic phase. This succession typifies an incised valley fill. However, the accommodation space generated for the initial estuary development is thought to have originated via continual salt withdrawal (Brandes et al. 2012) instead of by incision during relative sea-level fall. The observed tide to wave estuary regime change is linked to increased subsidence rates at 57 Ma that generated a higher tidal prism. As the subsidence rates slowed and the syncline broadened, the tidal prism decreased, leading to the development of more wave-dominated facies. The intervening coal seams

  17. The performance assessment process for DOE low-level waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety of the low-level waste disposal facilities, as well as al US DOE facilities, is a primary criterion in their design and operation. Safety of low-level waste disposal facilities is evaluated from two perspectives. Operational safety is evaluated based on the perceived level of hazard of the operation. The safety evaluations vary from simple safety assessments to very complex safety analysis reports, depending on the degree of hazard associated with the facility operation. Operational requirements for the Department's low-level waste disposal facilities, including long-term safety are contained in DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management (1). This paper will focus on the process of conducting long-term performance analyses rather than on operational safety analysis

  18. Calibration of a liquid scintillation counter to assess tritium levels in various samples

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Haddad, M N; Abu-Jarad, F A

    1999-01-01

    An LKB-Wallac 1217 Liquid Scintillation Counter (LSC) was calibrated with a newly adopted cocktail. The LSC was then used to measure tritium levels in various samples to assess the compliance of tritium levels with the recommended international levels. The counter was calibrated to measure both biological and operational samples for personnel and for an accelerator facility at KFUPM. The biological samples include the bioassay (urine), saliva, and nasal tests. The operational samples of the light ion linear accelerator include target cooling water, organic oil, fomblin oil, and smear samples. Sets of standards, which simulate various samples, were fabricated using traceable certified tritium standards. The efficiency of the counter was obtained for each sample. The typical range of the efficiencies varied from 33% for smear samples down to 1.5% for organic oil samples. A quenching curve for each sample is presented. The minimum detectable activity for each sample was established. Typical tritium levels in bio...

  19. Descriptive models, grade-tonnage relations, and databases for the assessment of sediment-hosted copper deposits: with emphasis on deposits in the Central Africa Copperbelt, Democratic Republic of the Congo and Zambia: Chapter J in Global mineral resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Cliff D.; Causey, J. Douglas; Denning, Paul D.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Hayes, Timothy S.; Horton, John D.; Kirschbaum, Michael J.; Parks, Heather L.; Wilson, Anna B.; Wintzer, Niki E.; Zientek, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The Central African Copperbelt (CACB) is one of the most important copper-producing regions of the world. The majority of copper produced in Africa comes from this region defined by the Neoproterozoic Katanga sedimentary basin of the southern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and northern Zambia. Copper in the CACB is mined from sediment-hosted stratabound copper deposits associated with red beds and includes the giant deposits in the Kolwezi and Tenge-Fungurume districts in the DRC and the Konkola-Musoshi and Nchanga-Chingola districts in Zambia. In recent years, sediment-hosted structurally controlled replacement and vein (SCRV) copper deposits, such as the giant Kansanshi deposit in Zambia have become important exploration targets in the CACB region.

  20. Value of assessing adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH levels in differential diagnosis of hypercorticism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penezić Zorana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis and differential diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome remains a challenge in clinical endocrinology. The aim of this study was to establish the value of assessing adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH levels in differential diagnosis of hypercorticism using receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve. We have evaluated 114 patients with Cushing's syndrome testing the value of pathohistological examination and postoperative testing. The control group consisted of 53 obese healthy persons. ACTH level was determined using a commercial RIA (CIS, France. ACTH secreting pituitary adenoma was found in 56.14% examinees, ectopic secretion in 6.14%, cortisol secreting adrenal adenoma in 37.57%, and adrenal carcinoma in 6.14% of all patients with Cushing's syndrome. Basal ACTH level for pituitary adenoma was 107.29±75.69 pg/mL; for ectopic secretion 181.63±149.84 pg/mL; for adrenal adenoma 4.22±2.32 pg/mL; for adrenal carcinoma 5.50 ±7.72 pg/mL; and 34.76 ±10.07 pg/mL in control group. Testing the value of assessing ACTH the area under ROC curve was 0.9965±0.0071. Test sensitivity was 99.89% and test specificity was 97%. For ACTH cut-off level of 8 pg/mL, test sensitivity was 88.50%, with specificity of 99%. For ACTH cut-off level of 22 pg/mL, test sensitivity was 99.30%, with specificity of 98%. Our intermediate zone from 8 to 22 pg/mL confirms that assessment of ACTH level is a reliable tool in differential diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome.

  1. Radioactivity concentrations and dose assessment for bitumen and soil samples around a bituminous deposit in Ondo State, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitumen samples and soil samples around a bituminous deposit in Ondo State, Nigeria, were analysed for 40K, 226Ra and 232Th employing gamma-ray spectrometry. The activity concentrations of 40K, 226Ra and 232Th in soil varied from (45.2 ± 5.3) to (484.2 ± 25.9), BDL (below detectable limit) to (27.7 ± 2.1) and (22.8 ± 2.7) to (62.4 ± 6.8) Bq.kg-1, respectively. The corresponding mean values were (240.2 ± 133.5), (13.3 ± 8.0) and (40.0 ± 10.2) Bq.kg-1, respectively. The mean activity concentrations of the radionuclides in the bitumen were (58.4 ± 36.4), (16.1 ± 13.3) and (32.5 ± 13.1) Bq.kg-1, respectively, for 40K, 226Ra and 232Th. The mean absorbed dose and effective dose for the soil samples were (41.5 ± 8.9) nGy.h-1 and (50.7 ± 10.9) μSv.y-1, respectively, while those of the bitumen samples were (29.5 ± 15.6) nGy.h-1 and (36.1 ± 19.1) μSv.y-1, respectively. For radiological hazard assessment, the radium equivalent activity and the external hazard index were determined. The values of the radium equivalent activity and external hazard index obtained for the soil and bitumen samples were lower than the recommended limit. (authors)

  2. MELCOR 1.8.5 modeling aspects of fission product release, transport and deposition. An assessment with recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    formal model is needed. Deposition patterns in the Phebus FPT-1 circuit were also significantly improved by using the modified ORNL-Booth parameters, where retention of lower volatile Cs2MoO4 is now predicted in the heated exit regions of the FPT-1 test, bringing down depositions in the FPT-1 steam generator tube to be in closer alignment with the experimental data. This improvement in 'RCS' deposition behavior preserves the overall correct release of cesium to the containment that was observed even with the default CORSOR-M model. Not correctly treated however is the release and transport of Ag to the FPT-1 containment. A model for Ag release from control rods is presently not available in MELCOR. Lack of this model is thought to be responsible for the underprediction by a factor of two of the total aerosol mass to the FPT-1 containment. It is suggested that this underprediction of airborne mass led to an underprediction of the aerosol agglomeration rate. Underprediction of the agglomeration rate leads to low predictions of the aerosol particle size in comparison to experimentally measured ones. Small particle size leads low predictions of the gravitational settling rate relative to the experimental data. This error, however, is a conservative one in that too-low settling rate would result in a larger source term to the environment. Implementation of an interim Ag release model is currently under study. In the course of this assessment, a review of MELCOR release models was performed and led to the identification of several areas for future improvements to MELCOR. These include upgrading the Booth release model to account for changes in local oxidizing/reducing conditions and including a fuel oxidation model to accommodate effects of fuel stoichiometry. Models such as implemented in the French ELSA code and described by Lewis are considered appropriate for MELCOR. A model for ruthenium release under air oxidizing conditions is also needed and should be included as part

  3. Correlation test to assess low-level processing of high-density oligonucleotide microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergh Jonas

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are currently a number of competing techniques for low-level processing of oligonucleotide array data. The choice of technique has a profound effect on subsequent statistical analyses, but there is no method to assess whether a particular technique is appropriate for a specific data set, without reference to external data. Results We analyzed coregulation between genes in order to detect insufficient normalization between arrays, where coregulation is measured in terms of statistical correlation. In a large collection of genes, a random pair of genes should have on average zero correlation, hence allowing a correlation test. For all data sets that we evaluated, and the three most commonly used low-level processing procedures including MAS5, RMA and MBEI, the housekeeping-gene normalization failed the test. For a real clinical data set, RMA and MBEI showed significant correlation for absent genes. We also found that a second round of normalization on the probe set level improved normalization significantly throughout. Conclusion Previous evaluation of low-level processing in the literature has been limited to artificial spike-in and mixture data sets. In the absence of a known gold-standard, the correlation criterion allows us to assess the appropriateness of low-level processing of a specific data set and the success of normalization for subsets of genes.

  4. Level 1 environmental assessment of cupola emissions at the Tioga Foundry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzies, K.T.; Adams, J.W.; Thrun, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    Sampling and analysis was undertaken to characterize and quantify particulate, organic and inorganic chemical concentrations in gaseous effluents downstream of an afterburner (AFB) or stack air addition (SAA) system in a cupola at the Tioga Casting Company in Owego, New York. The US Environmental Protection Agency/Industrial Environmental Research Laboratory (EPA/IERL) Level 1 environmental assessment procedures were used to determine if the level of pollutants present differed when using the AFB versus the SAA control device for reduction of carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations.

  5. Environmental health risk assessment of ambient lead levels in Lisbon, Portugal: A full chain study approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casimiro, E.; Philippe Ciffroy, P.; Serpa, P.; Johansson, E.; Legind, Charlotte Nielsen; Brochot, C.

    The multi-causality interactions between environment and health are complex and call for an integrated multidisciplinary study approach. Emerging computational toxicology tools that link toxicology, chemistry, environmental sciences, biostatistics, and computer sciences are proving to be very...... then used to calculate the Pb concentration in various biota (leafy vegetables, root vegetables, grain, potatoes, and fruits) produced in the area as well as the amount of Pb a typical adult would inhale and ingest during this ten-year assessment period. The PBPK model of the 2FUN player was used to...... calculate the Pb levels in the various body systems. Our results showed a low health risk from Pb exposures. It also identified that ingestion of leafy vegetables (i.e. lettuce, cabbage, and spinach) and fruits contribute the most to total Pb blood levels. This full chain assessment approach of the 2FUN...

  6. Feasibility of disposal of high-level radioactive waste into the seabed. Volume 2: Radiological assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the options suggested for disposal of high-level radioactive waste resulting from the generation of nuclear power is burial beneath the deep ocean floor in geologically stable sediment formations which have no economic value. The 8-volume series provides an assessment of the technical feasibility and radiological safety of this disposal concept based on the results obtained by ten years of co-operation and information exchange among the Member countries participating in the NEA Seabed Working Group. This report presents the results of the radiological assessment which consists in estimating the detriment to man and to the environment which could result from the disposal of high level nuclear waste within seabed sediments in the deep oceans

  7. Psacoin level 1A intercomparison probabilistic system assessment code (PSAC) user group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes an international code intercomparison exercise conducted by the NEA Probabilistic System Assessment Code (PSAC) User Group. The PSACOIN Level 1A exercise is the third of a series designed to contribute to the verification of probabilistic codes that may be used in assessing the safety of radioactive waste disposal systems or concepts. Level 1A is based on a more realistic system model than that used in the two previous exercises, and involves deep geological disposal concepts with a relatively complex structure of the repository vault. The report compares results and draws conclusions with regard to the use of different modelling approaches and the possible importance to safety of various processes within and around a deep geological repository. In particular, the relative significance of model uncertainty and data variability is discussed

  8. Proceedings from the technical workshop on near-field performance assessment for high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the proceedings of 'Technical workshop of near-filed performance assessment for high-level waste' held in Madrid October 15-17, 1990. It includes the invited presentations and summaries of the scientific discussions. The workshop covered several topics: * post-emplacement environment, * benchmarking of computer codes, * glass release, * spent-fuel release, * radionuclide solubility, * near-field transport processes, * coupled processes in the near-field, * integrated assessments, * sensitivity analyses and validation. There was an invited presentation on each topic followed by an extensive discussion. One of the points highlighted in the closing discussion of the workshop was the need for international cooperation in the field of near-field performance assessment. The general opinion was that this was best achieved in smaller groups discussing specific questions. (au) Separate abstracts were prepared for 9 papers in this volume

  9. Computer models for safety assessment on land disposal of low level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, a storage and land disposal of the low level wastes (LLW) has been expected to start at the Shimokita site, Aomori prefecture, in a few years. The objectives of this paper are to develop the computer models for the safety assessment of the land disposal of the LLW and to provide the reliable results needed for the safety assessment at the Shimokita site. In this paper, the authors calculated preliminarily not only the geoenvironmental diffusion of radionuclide discharged from the site under predetermined conditions but also the internal radiation dose to individual, by using the computer codes developed by CRIEPI. From the results of this trial estimation, they obtained 0.003 mrem/yr as radiation dose derived from the activities of the storage and land disposal, and clarified that the computer codes were available for the preliminary safety assessment

  10. Uncertainty characteristics of EPA's ground-water transport model for low-level waste performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Performance assessment is an essential step either in design or in licensing processes to ensure the safety of any proposed radioactive waste disposal facilities. Since performance assessment requires the use of computer codes, understanding the characteristics of computer models used and the uncertainties of the estimated results is important. The PRESTO-EPA code, which was the basis of the Environmental Protection Agency's analysis for low-level-waste rulemaking, is widely used for various performance assessment activities in the country with no adequate information available for the uncertainty characteristics of the results. In this study, the groundwater transport model PRESTO-EPA was examined based on the analysis of 14C transport along with the investigation of uncertainty characteristics

  11. Assessing grain-size correspondence between flow and deposits of controlled floods in the Colorado River, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draut, Amy; Rubin, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Flood-deposited sediment has been used to decipher environmental parameters such as variability in watershed sediment supply, paleoflood hydrology, and channel morphology. It is not well known, however, how accurately the deposits reflect sedimentary processes within the flow, and hence what sampling intensity is needed to decipher records of recent or long-past conditions. We examine these problems using deposits from dam-regulated floods in the Colorado River corridor through Marble Canyon–Grand Canyon, Arizona, U.S.A., in which steady-peaked floods represent a simple end-member case. For these simple floods, most deposits show inverse grading that reflects coarsening suspended sediment (a result of fine-sediment-supply limitation), but there is enough eddy-scale variability that some profiles show normal grading that did not reflect grain-size evolution in the flow as a whole. To infer systemwide grain-size evolution in modern or ancient depositional systems requires sampling enough deposit profiles that the standard error of the mean of grain-size-change measurements becomes small relative to the magnitude of observed changes. For simple, steady-peaked floods, 5–10 profiles or fewer may suffice to characterize grain-size trends robustly, but many more samples may be needed from deposits with greater variability in their grain-size evolution.

  12. The assessment of spatial correlation between location of deposits and faults using geostatistical methods: case study, Yazd province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Dehghani Ahmadabad

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Determining the promising area for ore deposits is one of the most important steps of prospecting in regional scales. There are many different methods for identifying these areas including geochemical and geophysical methods, remote sensing and sophisticated statistical methods. Based on the theory of spatial relations between the dispersion pattern of ore deposits and metallogenic provinces, mineralization belts, faults and structural factors, some new interpretative methods can be proposed in the preliminary exploration phase of the potential areas. In this study, the geostatistical methods were used, where the spatial location of faults and known metallic deposits were considered as the primary source of data to obtain their correlation (case study of metallic deposits in Yazd province. The research was performed on 807 major and minor faults and 76 metallic deposits, mainly from hydrothermal origins. The data was arranged in ArcViewGIS software environment. The geostatistical analysis was performed by defining the regionalized variable (distance between faults and deposits in a Mathematica subroutine. Variography operations, in order to find the spatial structure, were performed on regionalized variable using Surpac software. It was also shown that the theory of spatial correlation was valid for the defined variable. In this work, the variography operation was used to find the direction and the range of the effect of faults and deposits. Variograms indicated that the possibility of ore deposits existence in an area could depend on the direction of the faults. By drawing the directional variogram and variogram map, the best stretches for more exploratory studies is shown to be parallel along the Azimuth 130◦ and 64 km distance. By revealing the spatial structure in different directions, the area of mineralization related to the faults and the number of ore deposits associated with major faults have been marked.

  13. Street-level alcohol policy: Assessing intoxication at drinking venues in Oslo

    OpenAIRE

    Buvik, Kristin; Baklien, Bergljot

    2014-01-01

    This article examines liquor inspectors' assessment of intoxication at drinking establishments in Norway. It draws upon Lipsky's theory of street-level bureaucrats (1980) to study a situation where laws and informal norms seem to pull in opposite directions. We conducted 26 ethnographic observations of liquor inspectors' visits to drinking venues in Oslo, as well as qualitative interviews and field conversations with liquor inspectors. The study reveals that inspectors interpret the N...

  14. Integrative-index method of assessment of the countries’ financial globalization level

    OpenAIRE

    Oleh Mozhovyi; Nataliia Stukalo

    2009-01-01

    The article considers the relevant problems of the complex evaluation of the countries’ financial globalization level. There were investigated methodological principles and assessment tools of both the economic globalization in general and its financial component. It offers an integrative index of the countries’ financial globalization based on which calculations we analyzed characteristic features and dynamism of the globalization processes development in the sphere of finance of some count...

  15. Level and intensity of objectively assessed physical activity among pregnant women from urban Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Hjorth Mads F; Kloster Stine; Girma Tsinuel; Faurholt-Jepsen Daniel; Andersen Gregers; Kæstel Pernille; Brage Søren; Friis Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Women in low-income countries are generally considered to have a high physical workload which is sustained during pregnancy. Although most previous studies have been based on questionnaires a recent meta-analysis of doubly labeled water data has raised questions about the actual amount of physical activity performed. In this study we report objectively assessed levels of physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness and muscular fitness among pregnant urban Ethiopian women,...

  16. The Dark Side of Internet Searches: A Macro Level Assessment of Rape Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Makin, David A; Morczek, Amber L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Assessing the promulgation of rape culture in society or merely establishing at an empirical level the degree to which a nation reflects such attitudes or behaviors has remained of interest to scholars across numerous disciplines. One common limitation (or criticism) within prior empirical research is claims of lack of generalizability or influences of social desirability. This research employs the use of Google Trends data from 2004-2012, via nine keyword searches specific to rap...

  17. Blood oxygenation level-dependent MRI for assessment of renal oxygenation

    OpenAIRE

    Neugarten J; Golestaneh L

    2014-01-01

    Joel Neugarten, Ladan Golestaneh Renal Division, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA Abstract: Blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD MRI) has recently emerged as an important noninvasive technique to assess intrarenal oxygenation under physiologic and pathophysiologic conditions. Although this tool represents a major addition to our armamentarium of methodologies to investigate the role of hypoxia in the pathogenesis of acute...

  18. Quantitative Assessment of Safety Integrity Level of Message Transmission Between Safety-Related Equipment

    OpenAIRE

    Karol Rástočný; Mária Franeková; Iveta Zolotová; Karol Rástočný, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes and analyses the possibilities of a quantitative assessment of message transmission between safety-related equipment for control and communication systems with a guarantee of a higher safety integrity level (SIL). The theoretical methods and standards recommended for industrial safety-related control, information and communication systems with SIL3 are described. The main part of the contribution covers theoretical methods and practical procedures used within a safety ana...

  19. Assessment of the breath alcohol concentration in emergency care patients with different level of consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    Kaisdotter Andersson, Annika; Kron, Josefin; Castren, Maaret; Muntlin Athlin, Åsa; Hök, Bertil; Wiklund, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Background Many patients seeking emergency care are under the influence of alcohol, which in many cases implies a differential diagnostic problem. For this reason early objective alcohol screening is of importance not to falsely assign the medical condition to intake of alcohol and thus secure a correct medical assessment. Objective At two emergency departments, demonstrate the feasibility of accurate breath alcohol testing in emergency patients with different levels of cooperation. Method As...

  20. Vulnerability of mangroves to sea level rise in Qatar: Assessment and identification of vulnerable mangroves areas

    OpenAIRE

    Shehadi, Mohammad Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Qatar is one of few countries in Arabian Gulf where mangrove ecosystem exist. They are essential number of ecosystem function; however, this valuable ecosystem is threatened by both anthropogenic and global climatic factors. This study is aimed at investigating the vulnerability of mangroves resulting from the rise in sea level. Remote sensing, GIS and soil analysis were used to achieve this assessment. Four main research questions including the change in mangrove area over tim...

  1. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis methodology in a level-I PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents a methodology for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis, applicable to a probabilistic safety assessment level I. The work contents are: correct association of distributions to parameters, importance and qualification of expert opinions, generations of samples according to sample sizes, and study of the relationships among system variables and system response. A series of statistical-mathematical techniques are recommended along the development of the analysis methodology, as well different graphical visualization for the control of the study. (author)

  2. Performance assessment for low-level waste disposal in the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashworth, A.B. [UK Dept. of the Environment, London (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) operate a site for the disposal of Low Level Radioactive Waste at Drigg in West Cumbria, in North-West England. HMIP are responsible for the regulation of the site with regard to environmental discharges of radioactive materials, both operational and post-closure. This paper is concerned with post-closure matters only. Two post-closure performance assessments have been carried out for this site: one by the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) in 1987; and a subsequent one carried out on behalf of HMIP, completed in 1991. Currently, BNFL are preparing a Safety Case for continued operation of the Drigg site, and it expected that the core of this Case will comprise BNFL`s own analysis of post-closure performance. HMIP has developed procedures for the assessment of this Case, based upon experience of the previous Drigg assessments, and also upon the experience of similar work carried out in the assessment of Intermediate Level Waste (ILW) disposal at both deep and shallow potential sites. This paper describes the more important features of these procedures.

  3. Performance assessment for low-level waste disposal in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) operate a site for the disposal of Low Level Radioactive Waste at Drigg in West Cumbria, in North-West England. HMIP are responsible for the regulation of the site with regard to environmental discharges of radioactive materials, both operational and post-closure. This paper is concerned with post-closure matters only. Two post-closure performance assessments have been carried out for this site: one by the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) in 1987; and a subsequent one carried out on behalf of HMIP, completed in 1991. Currently, BNFL are preparing a Safety Case for continued operation of the Drigg site, and it expected that the core of this Case will comprise BNFL's own analysis of post-closure performance. HMIP has developed procedures for the assessment of this Case, based upon experience of the previous Drigg assessments, and also upon the experience of similar work carried out in the assessment of Intermediate Level Waste (ILW) disposal at both deep and shallow potential sites. This paper describes the more important features of these procedures

  4. Iron deposition in cranial bone marrow with sickle cell disease: MR assessment using a fat suppression technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirteen patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) undergoing transfusion therapy and 8 control patients were examined by magnetic resonance imaging to discriminate bone marrow change due to iron deposition from hematologic marrow hyperplasia. Using T1-weighted spin echo images, only two subjects showed extremely low signal intensity marrow compatible with iron deposition. However, using T2-weighted fast spin echo images with fat suppression, cranial bone marrow in SCD patients with transfusion therapy showed considerably lower signal than that of controls. The main cause of marrow signal decrease in SCD patients with transfusion therapy was considered to be iron deposition due to repeated transfusion therapy rather than red marrow hyperplasia. (orig.)

  5. Comparison of gamma scintigraphy and a pharmacokinetic technique for assessing pulmonary deposition of terbutaline sulphate delivered by pressurized metered dose inhaler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, S; Steed, K; Hooper, G; Källén, A; Borgström, L

    1995-02-01

    A comparison has been made of pulmonary deposition of terbutaline sulphate from a pressurized metered dose inhaler (pMDI), measured in 8 healthy male subjects by gamma scintigraphy and by a pharmacokinetic (charcoal-block) method, involving drug recovery in urine. Measurements were carried out with a pMDI at slow (27 l/min) and fast (151 l/min) inhaled flows and with Nebuhaler large volume spacer device (average inhaled flow 17 l/min). Overall, the two methods did not differ significantly in their estimates of whole lung deposition, although values obtained by gamma scintigraphy exceeded those from the charcoal-block method for the pMDI with fast inhalation. The regional distribution of drug within the lungs and deposition in the oropharynx could be assessed by gamma scintigraphy, but not by the charcoal-block method. It is concluded that either method may be used to assess whole lung deposition of terbutaline sulphate from pMDIs, both with and without a spacer, although each method has its own inherent advantages and disadvantages. PMID:7784338

  6. Performance Assessment for the Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annette L. Schafer; A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Arthur S. Rood

    2012-05-01

    This performance assessment for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory documents the projected radiological dose impacts associated with the disposal of low-level radioactive waste at the facility. This assessment evaluates compliance with the applicable radiological criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the public and the environment. The calculations involve modeling transport of radionuclides from buried waste to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the public via air, groundwater, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses are calculated for both offsite receptors and individuals who inadvertently intrude into the waste after site closure. The results of the calculations are used to evaluate the future performance of the low-level radioactive waste disposal facility and to provide input for establishment of waste acceptance criteria. In addition, one-factor-at-a-time, Monte Carlo, and rank correlation analyses are included for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. The comparison of the performance assessment results to the applicable performance objectives provides reasonable expectation that the performance objectives will be met

  7. Level-2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment for 220 MWe Indian PHWR (KAPS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) is increasingly being used as part of the decision making process to assess the level of safety of nuclear power plants. The methodologies in use are maturing and the insights gained from the PSAs are being used to complement, enhance and validate conclusions that are based on deterministic design principles. This paper discusses various stages and insights drawn from Level-2 PSA study performed for Kakrapara Atomic Power Station (KAPS), an Indian PHWR. The Level-2 PSA deals with frequency and magnitude of releases to environment and consists of probabilistic and deterministic analysis elements. The probabilistic element consists of the development and quantification of containment logic models for each PDS. The deterministic element consists of calculating the release magnitude from the core, physical process of accident progression including containment response and source term analysis of radionuclide releases to the environment for the representative events from each PDS using appropriate codes. Some intended objectives of this Level-2 PSA study were : - To gain insights into the progression of severe accidents and containment performance and identify and prioritise scenarios requiring further and more refined analysis. - To identify major containment failure modes and to estimate the corresponding releases of radionuclides. - To identify any weak links in the plant design and suggest plant specific back-fit measures as risk reduction options. The Level-2 is an extension of Level-1 PSA The Plant Damage States form the interface between the two analyses are developed according to the requirement of Level-2 analysis. The containment Engineered Safety Features (ESFs) are treated as part of the Level-2 analysis. The ultimate product of a Level 2 PSA, is a discussion of a number of challenges to the containment, of the possible containment responses and their estimated probabilities and an assessment of the consequent releases

  8. Assessing coastal flood risk and sea level rise impacts at New York City area airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohman, K. A.; Kimball, N.; Osler, M.; Eberbach, S.

    2014-12-01

    Flood risk and sea level rise impacts were assessed for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ) at four airports in the New York City area. These airports included John F. Kennedy International, LaGuardia, Newark International, and Teterboro Airports. Quantifying both present day and future flood risk due to climate change and developing flood mitigation alternatives is crucial for the continued operation of these airports. During Hurricane Sandy in October 2012 all four airports were forced to shut down, in part due to coastal flooding. Future climate change and sea level rise effects may result in more frequent shutdowns and disruptions in travel to and from these busy airports. The study examined the effects of the 1%-annual-chance coastal flooding event for present day existing conditions and six different sea level rise scenarios at each airport. Storm surge model outputs from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) provided the present day storm surge conditions. 50th and 90thpercentile sea level rise projections from the New York Panel on Climate Change (NPCC) 2013 report were incorporated into storm surge results using linear superposition methods. These projections were evaluated for future years 2025, 2035, and 2055. In addition to the linear superposition approach for storm surge at airports where waves are a potential hazard, one dimensional wave modeling was performed to get the total water level results. Flood hazard and flood depth maps were created based on these results. In addition to assessing overall flooding at each airport, major at-risk infrastructure critical to the continued operation of the airport was identified and a detailed flood vulnerability assessment was performed. This assessment quantified flood impacts in terms of potential critical infrastructure inundation and developed mitigation alternatives to adapt to coastal flooding and future sea level changes. Results from this project are advancing the PANYNJ

  9. A new global dataset with extreme sea levels and its application for assessing flood risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muis, Sanne; Verlaan, Martin; Winsemius, Hessel; Aerts, Jeroen; Ward, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Extreme sea levels, caused by storm surges and high tides, can have devastating societal impacts. The global coastal population is faced with an increasing trend in flood risk, induced by socio-economic development and climate change. Without action, the increasing trends in flood hazard and exposure will be associated with catastrophic flood losses in the future. The adequate allocation of global investments in adaptation requires an accurate understanding of the current and future coastal flood risk on a global-scale. Here we present the first global reanalysis of storm surges and extreme sea levels (GTSR dataset) based on dynamical modelling. GTSR covers the entire world's coastline and consists of time series of tides and surges and estimates of extreme values for various return periods. The dataset is based on two different hydrodynamic models: FES2012 for modelling tides, and GSTM for modelling storm surges. GSTM is forced by meteorological fields from ERA-Interim to simulate storm surges for the period 1979-2014. Validation showed that there is very good agreement between modelled and observed sea levels. Only in regions prone to tropical cyclones, extreme sea levels are severely underestimated due to the limited resolution of the meteorological forcing. This will be resolved for future updates of GTSR. As a first application of GSTR, we estimate that 99 million people are exposed to a 1 in 100 year flood. This is almost 40% lower than estimates based the DIVA dataset, another global dataset of extreme sea level. We foresee other applications in assessing impacts of climate change and risk management, such as assessing changes in storminess, estimating the impacts of sea level, and providing warning levels to operational models.

  10. Photoluminescence spectroscopy and energy-level analysis of metal-organic-deposited Ga2O3:Cr3+ films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokida, Yoshinori; Adachi, Sadao

    2012-09-01

    The aims of this study are (i) to demonstrate the synthesis of Cr3+-activated β-Ga2O3 films by metal-organic deposition and (ii) to report the temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) properties of such films from 20 to 300 K. An activation energy of ˜0.9 eV for the Cr3+ ions in β-Ga2O3 is determined from a plot of PL intensity vs calcination temperature. The red-line emission doublet R1 and R2 at ˜1.8 eV and the broad emission band with a peak at ˜1.7 eV are ascribed to the Cr3+ ions in the β-Ga2O3 host. The energies of the excited states, i.e., 2E, 4T2, 2T2, 4T1, and 4T1, in Cr3+ are determined from the experimental PL and PL excitation spectra using a newly developed analysis model. The high-energy luminescence tail of the broad 4T2 → 4A2 emission band can be explained by the hot-carrier effect of the photoexcited electrons in the 4T2 state. The relative intensities of the R-line emission doublet can also be explained very well by the population and depopulation of the electron numbers in the E¯ (R1) and 2A¯ (R2) states. PL properties, such as the temperature-dependent PL intensity, peak energy, and spectral width, are analyzed in detail.

  11. Lightning-driven inner radiation belt energy deposition into the atmosphere: implications for ionisation-levels and neutral chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Rodger

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Lightning-generated whistlers lead to coupling between the troposphere, the Van Allen radiation belts and the lower-ionosphere through Whistler-induced electron precipitation (WEP. Lightning produced whistlers interact with cyclotron resonant radiation belt electrons, leading to pitch-angle scattering into the bounce loss cone and precipitation into the atmosphere. Here we consider the relative significance of WEP to the lower ionosphere and atmosphere by contrasting WEP produced ionisation rate changes with those from Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR and solar photoionisation. During the day, WEP is never a significant source of ionisation in the lower ionosphere for any location or altitude. At nighttime, GCR is more significant than WEP at altitudes <68 km for all locations, above which WEP starts to dominate in North America and Central Europe. Between 75 and 80 km altitude WEP becomes more significant than GCR for the majority of spatial locations at which WEP deposits energy. The size of the regions in which WEP is the most important nighttime ionisation source peaks at ~80 km, depending on the relative contributions of WEP and nighttime solar Lyman-α. We also used the Sodankylä Ion Chemistry (SIC model to consider the atmospheric consequences of WEP, focusing on a case-study period. Previous studies have also shown that energetic particle precipitation can lead to large-scale changes in the chemical makeup of the neutral atmosphere by enhancing minor chemical species that play a key role in the ozone balance of the middle atmosphere. However, SIC modelling indicates that the neutral atmospheric changes driven by WEP are insignificant due to the short timescale of the WEP bursts. Overall we find that WEP is a significant energy input into some parts of the lower ionosphere, depending on the latitude/longitude and altitude, but does not play a significant role in the neutral chemistry of the mesosphere.

  12. A performance assessment methodology for high-level radioactive waste disposal in unsaturated, fractured tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandia National Laboratories, has developed a methodology for performance assessment of deep geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The applicability of this performance assessment methodology has been demonstrated for disposal in bedded salt and basalt; it has since been modified for assessment of repositories in unsaturated, fractured tuff. Changes to the methodology are primarily in the form of new or modified ground water flow and radionuclide transport codes. A new computer code, DCM3D, has been developed to model three-dimensional ground-water flow in unsaturated, fractured rock using a dual-continuum approach. The NEFTRAN 2 code has been developed to efficiently model radionuclide transport in time-dependent velocity fields, has the ability to use externally calculated pore velocities and saturations, and includes the effect of saturation dependent retardation factors. In order to use these codes together in performance-assessment-type analyses, code-coupler programs were developed to translate DCM3D output into NEFTRAN 2 input. Other portions of the performance assessment methodology were evaluated as part of modifying the methodology for tuff. The scenario methodology developed under the bedded salt program has been applied to tuff. An investigation of the applicability of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques to non-linear models indicate that Monte Carlo simulation remains the most robust technique for these analyses. No changes have been recommended for the dose and health effects models, nor the biosphere transport models. 52 refs., 1 fig

  13. Technology Readiness Level Assessment Process as Applied to NASA Earth Science Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leete, Stephen J.; Romero, Raul A.; Dempsey, James A.; Carey, John P.; Cline, Helmut P.; Lively, Carey F.

    2015-01-01

    Technology assessments of fourteen science instruments were conducted within NASA using the NASA Technology Readiness Level (TRL) Metric. The instruments were part of three NASA Earth Science Decadal Survey missions in pre-formulation. The Earth Systematic Missions Program (ESMP) Systems Engineering Working Group (SEWG), composed of members of three NASA Centers, provided a newly modified electronic workbook to be completed, with instructions. Each instrument development team performed an internal assessment of its technology status, prepared an overview of its instrument, and completed the workbook with the results of its assessment. A team from the ESMP SEWG met with each instrument team and provided feedback. The instrument teams then reported through the Program Scientist for their respective missions to NASA's Earth Science Division (ESD) on technology readiness, taking the SEWG input into account. The instruments were found to have a range of TRL from 4 to 7. Lessons Learned are presented; however, due to the competition-sensitive nature of the assessments, the results for specific missions are not presented. The assessments were generally successful, and produced useful results for the agency. The SEWG team identified a number of potential improvements to the process. Particular focus was on ensuring traceability to guiding NASA documents, including the NASA Systems Engineering Handbook. The TRL Workbook has been substantially modified, and the revised workbook is described.

  14. Review of performance assessments for DOE [Department of Energy] LLW [low-level waste] disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors have long been pioneers in the field of radiological performance assessment (RPA). Much effort has been expended in developing technology and acquiring data to facilitate the assessment process. This is reflected in DOE's newly revised order governing the management of radioactive waste, DOE Order 5820.2A. The order was issued on September 16, 1988. Chapter III of the order details policy and requirements to manage DOE's low-level waste (LLW). The performance objectives for LLW management are described. Chapter III also requires that LLW disposal facilities prepare and maintain an RPA to demonstrate compliance with the performance objectives. The order further requires that an Oversight and Peer Review Panel be established to ensure consistency and technical quality around the DOE complex in the development and application of performance assessment models that include site-specific geohydrology and waste composition. This paper presents the work of the panel in reviewing radiological performance assessments of DOE LLW disposal facilities and an overview of LLW performance assessment across the DOE complex

  15. On the Accuracy of Iranian EFL Students' Reading Self-assessment and their Level of Reading Proficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moein Shokr

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Reviewing the literature on self-assessment as an alternative method of assessment we find advocates claiming for the accuracy of the students’ self-assessments in general with little focus on their level of proficiency. With an eye on the students’ level of reading proficiency, the present study aimed at investigating the relationship between students’ reading self-assessment (as a formative and alternative method of assessment on the one hand, and teacher assessment (as a formative type of assessment as well as students’ final examination scores (as a summative and traditional method of assessment on the other. To this end, 65 students of Islamic Azad University- Tehran South Branch were selected to participate in this study. Initially, participants received PET test as pretest for assigning them into different levels of reading proficiency. Based upon the results of the pretest, participants were assigned to elementary and intermediate levels. Throughout the whole semester self-assessment questionnaire was employed for five times. Descriptive statistics and Pearson correlation were the data analysis techniques performed. The results of the study revealed a significant relationship between the intermediate learners’ self-ratings and teacher assessments; however, the results indicated no significant relationship between elementary learners’ self-assessments and teacher assessments. Also, the correlations between students’ self-assessments and their final examination scores were not significant for both levels. Therefore, given the teacher assessment as the yardstick, the accuracy of the intermediate levels and the inaccuracy of the elementary learners’ self-assessments could be concluded. Finally, the low correlation between the learners’ self-assessments and their scores on traditional final examination led the researcher to attribute it to the different nature of these two assessment types.

  16. Atmospheric deposition of trace elements around point sources and human health risk assessment. I: Impact zones around a lead source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moseholm, L.; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Andersen, B.;

    1992-01-01

    The deposition of lead was monitored over 8 years in the area around a car battery factory north of Copenhagen, Denmark. The area also has heavy traffic. Deposition was measured by in-situ grown vegetables, transplant grass culture biomonitors, bulk deposition and soil samples. Three impact zones...... were identified by a multivariate statistical analysis. Within each zone, the total dietary intake of lead was estimated for adults and children as a percentage of the provisional tolerably weekly intake (PTWI), and as a result recommendation on restrictions in use of locally grown fruit and vegetables...... were given to the public. The pattern of lead deposition in the area during the period 1981-1988 was monitored and the amount of lead ingested via vegetables was toxically evaluated. Lead emission reduction measures introduced in the factory and in the traffic during the period produced significant...

  17. Multi-hazard national-level risk assessment in Africa using global approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Stuart; Jongman, Brenden; Simpson, Alanna; Murnane, Richard

    2016-04-01

    In recent years Sub-Saharan Africa has been characterized by unprecedented opportunity for transformation and sustained growth. However, natural disasters such as droughts, floods, cyclones, earthquakes, landslides, volcanic eruptions and extreme temperatures cause significant economic and human losses, and major development challenges. Quantitative disaster risk assessments are an important basis for governments to understand disaster risk in their country, and to develop effective risk management and risk financing solutions. However, the data-scarce nature of many Sub-Saharan African countries as well as a lack of financing for risk assessments has long prevented detailed analytics. Recent advances in globally applicable disaster risk modelling practices and data availability offer new opportunities. In December 2013 the European Union approved a € 60 million contribution to support the development of an analytical basis for risk financing and to accelerate the effective implementation of a comprehensive disaster risk reduction. The World Bank's Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR) was selected as the implementing partner of the Program for Result Area 5: the "Africa Disaster Risk Assessment and Financing Program." As part of this effort, the GFDRR is overseeing the production of national-level multi-hazard risk profiles for a range of countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, using a combination of national and global datasets and state-of-the-art hazard and risk assessment methodologies. In this presentation, we will highlight the analytical approach behind these assessments, and show results for the first five countries for which the assessment has been completed (Kenya, Uganda, Senegal, Niger and Ethiopia). The presentation will also demonstrate the visualization of the risk assessments into understandable and visually attractive risk profile documents.

  18. Assessment on the environment impact of mining and milling process of an uranium deposit in north China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main radioactive pollution sources were analyzed comprehensively during the mining and milling process of an uranium deposit in North China, the possible radioactive environmental impact from these source was evaluated and predicted. The paper also analyzed the non-radioactive environmental impact from the mining and milling, and presented the main evaluation conclusion. Some useful measures of radioactive protection and environmental reservation were proposed for the efforts of uranium deposit mining. (authors)

  19. Improving Correlated SERS Measurements with Scanning Electron Microscopy: An Assessment of the Problem Arising from the Deposition of Amorphous Carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, Christine H.; Xia, Xiaohu; Xia, Younan

    2013-01-01

    For surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates with nonspherical symmetry, it is critical to correlate spectroscopy measurements with imaging by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). However, the deposition of carbon resulting from e-beam exposure during SEM imaging contaminates the surface of nanoparticles, potentially preventing their further functionalization with Raman probe molecules. In addition, the deposited carbon leads to unwanted background SERS signals. In this study, we sy...

  20. MELCOR 1.8.3 assessment: GE large vessel blowdown and level swell experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MELCOR is a fully integrated, engineering-level computer code, being developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the USNRC, that models the entire spectrum of severe accident phenomena in a unified framework for both BWRs and PWRS. As part of an ongoing assessment program, the MELCOR computer code has been used to analyze a series of blowdown tests performed in the early 1980s at General Electric. The GE large vessel blowdown and level swell experiments are a set of primary system thermal/hydraulic separate effects tests studying the level swell phenomenon for BWR transients and LOCAS; analysis of these GE tests is intended to validate the new implicit bubble separation algorithm added since the release of MELCOR 1.8.2. Basecase MELCOR results are compared to test data, and a number of sensitivity studies on input modelling parameters and options have been done. MELCOR results for these experiments also are compared to MAAP and TRAC-B qualification analyses for the same tests. Time-step and machine-dependency calculations were done to identify whether any numeric effects exist in our GE large vessel blowdown and level swell assessment analyses

  1. Implementation of E.U. Water Framework Directive: source assessment of metallic substances at catchment levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Ho-Sik; Ohandja, Dieudonne-Guy; Voulvoulis, Nikolaos

    2010-01-01

    The E.U. Water Framework Directive (WFD) aims to prevent deterioration of water quality and to phase out or reduce the concentrations of priority substances at catchment levels. It requires changes in water management from a local scale to a river basin scale, and establishes Environmental Quality Standards (EQS) as a guideline for the chemical status of receiving waters. According to the Directive, the standard and the scope of the investigation for water management are more stringent and expanded than in the past, and this change also needs to be applied to restoring the level of metals in water bodies. The aim of this study was to identify anthropogenic emission sources of metallic substances at catchment levels. Potential sources providing substantial amounts of such substances in receiving waters included stormwater, industrial effluents, treated effluents, agricultural drainage, sediments, mining drainage and landfill leachates. Metallic substances have more emission sources than other dangerous substances at catchment levels. Therefore, source assessment for these substances is required to be considered more significantly to restore their chemical status in the context of the WFD. To improve source assessment quality, research on the role of societal and environmental parameters and contribution of each source to the chemical distribution in receiving waters need to be carried out. PMID:20081997

  2. Assessment of a career development program for executive amd mid-level managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, James R., Sr.

    1994-01-01

    This project sought to validate the competencies required of mid-level and executive managers at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), in order to enable an assessment of the Resident Management Education Program (RMEP). Forty (40) statements describing management competencies were presented to a sample of 37 KSC managers, who judged each as essential, useful but not essential, or not needed at each of two management levels. A content validity ratio (CVR) was calculated for each competency statement at the two management levels. There was general agreement on the validity of 36 or the 40 competency statements. Based on the content validity ratios and comments from respondents, recommendations for improvement of the RMEP were made.

  3. Assessment of Atmospheric heavy metal deposition in North Egypt aerosols using neutron activation analysis and optical emission inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study is to assess the current level of atmospheric heavy metal pollution of aerosols in different cities of North Egypt using the neutron activation analysis and optical emission inductively coupled plasma techniques. The results revealed that the highest concentrations of particulate matter PM10 and total suspended particulate matter were close to industrial areas. From the results of the enrichment factor calculations, the most significant elements of anthropogenic origin are Ba, Sb, Ce and Zn. - Highlights: → Average concentration of Cd using OE-ICP is below detection limit for all the samples. → Maximum average concentration of Pb in PM10 and TSP is 5425 and 570.3, respectively. → Concentration of 20 elements in PM10 and TSP aerosols are determined using the NAA. → EF revealed that Pb, Ba, Br, Ce, Hf, La Sb and Zn are of anthropogenic origin.

  4. Assessment of Atmospheric heavy metal deposition in North Egypt aerosols using neutron activation analysis and optical emission inductively coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Araby, E.H., E-mail: elaraby_20032000@yahoo.com [Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Jezan University, KSA (Saudi Arabia); Abd El-Wahab, M., E-mail: wahab_magda@yahoo.com [Faculty of women for Arts, Science and Education, Physics Department, Ain Shams University, PO11757 Cairo (Egypt); Diab, H.M., E-mail: hnndiab@yahoo.co.uk [National Center of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control, Atomic Energy Authority Cairo (Egypt); El-Desouky, T.M., E-mail: trkhegazy@yahoo.com [Faculty of women for Arts, Science and Education, Physics Department, Ain Shams University, PO11757 Cairo (Egypt); Mohsen, M., E-mail: m1mohsen@yahoo.com [Faculty of Science. Physics Department, Ain-Shams University, PO 11566 Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-10-15

    The aim of the present study is to assess the current level of atmospheric heavy metal pollution of aerosols in different cities of North Egypt using the neutron activation analysis and optical emission inductively coupled plasma techniques. The results revealed that the highest concentrations of particulate matter PM{sub 10} and total suspended particulate matter were close to industrial areas. From the results of the enrichment factor calculations, the most significant elements of anthropogenic origin are Ba, Sb, Ce and Zn. - Highlights: > Average concentration of Cd using OE-ICP is below detection limit for all the samples. > Maximum average concentration of Pb in PM10 and TSP is 5425 and 570.3, respectively. > Concentration of 20 elements in PM{sub 10} and TSP aerosols are determined using the NAA. > EF revealed that Pb, Ba, Br, Ce, Hf, La Sb and Zn are of anthropogenic origin.

  5. Eco-efficiency of agricultural water systems: Methodological approach and assessment at meso-level scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorovic, Mladen; Mehmeti, Andi; Scardigno, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a methodological framework for the meso-level eco-efficiency assessment of agricultural water systems using a life-cycle system-based approach. The methodology was applied to the Sinistra Ofanto irrigation scheme, located in Southern Italy, where about 28,165 ha are under irrigation. The environmental performance of the system was evaluated through a set of selected mid-point environmental impact categories while the economic performance was measured using the total value added to the system's final products due to water use and the adopted management practices. Both economic performance and environmental performance were measured at different stages and for each stakeholder in the value chain. A distinction was made between foreground and background systems referring, respectively, to the processes that occurred inside the water system boundaries and those used for the production of supplementary resources. The analysis revealed that the major environmental burdens are: i) the freshwater resource depletion (i.e. excessive groundwater pumping), ii) climate change (i.e. direct emissions due to fertilizer use and diesel combustion), and iii) eutrophication (as a result of excessive application of N and P fertilizers). A considerable impact was observed on the background system where energy, fuel and agrochemicals were produced thereby confirming the prominent role of background processes in the comprehensive eco-efficiency assessment. The presented methodology aimed at the quantitative assessment of the eco-efficiency level rather than at the identification of the most affected environmental category. Hence, the results can be used to compare the performance of the system from one year to the next, among different stakeholders (water users) and/or to assess the impact of adopting innovative technologies and management practices. Moreover, the presented approach is useful for comparing the performance among different agricultural water systems and

  6. Assessment of Hammocks (Petenes) Resilience to Sea Level Rise Due to Climate Change in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Montilla, Mariana C; Martínez-Morales, Miguel Angel; Posada Vanegas, Gregorio; de Jong, Bernardus H J

    2016-01-01

    There is a pressing need to assess resilience of coastal ecosystems against sea level rise. To develop appropriate response strategies against future climate disturbances, it is important to estimate the magnitude of disturbances that these ecosystems can absorb and to better understand their underlying processes. Hammocks (petenes) coastal ecosystems are highly vulnerable to sea level rise linked to climate change; their vulnerability is mainly due to its close relation with the sea through underground drainage in predominantly karstic soils. Hammocks are biologically important because of their high diversity and restricted distribution. This study proposes a strategy to assess resilience of this coastal ecosystem when high-precision data are scarce. Approaches and methods used to derive ecological resilience maps of hammocks are described and assessed. Resilience models were built by incorporating and weighting appropriate indicators of persistence to assess hammocks resilience against flooding due to climate change at "Los Petenes Biosphere Reserve", in the Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico. According to the analysis, 25% of the study area is highly resilient (hot spots), whereas 51% has low resilience (cold spots). The most significant hot spot clusters of resilience were located in areas distant to the coastal zone, with indirect tidal influence, and consisted mostly of hammocks surrounded by basin mangrove and floodplain forest. This study revealed that multi-criteria analysis and the use of GIS for qualitative, semi-quantitative and statistical spatial analyses constitute a powerful tool to develop ecological resilience maps of coastal ecosystems that are highly vulnerable to sea level rise, even when high-precision data are not available. This method can be applied in other sites to help develop resilience analyses and decision-making processes for management and conservation of coastal areas worldwide. PMID:27611802

  7. Technology assessment: environmental, health, and safety impacts associated with oil recovery from US tar-sand deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, J.I.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Ricker, Y.E.

    1981-10-13

    The tar-sand resources of the US have the potential to yield as much as 36 billion barrels (bbls) of oil. The tar-sand petroleum-extraction technologies now being considered for commercialization in the United States include both surface (above ground) systems and in situ (underground) procedures. The surface systems currently receiving the most attention include: (1) thermal decomposition processes (retorting); (2) suspension methods (solvent extraction); and (3) washing techniques (water separation). Underground bitumen extraction techniques now being field tested are: (1) in situ combustion; and (2) in situ steam-injection procedures. At this time, any commercial tar-sand facility in the US will have to comply with at least 7 major federal regulations in addition to state regulations; building, electrical, and fire codes; and petroleum-industry construction standards. Pollution-control methods needed by tar-sand technologies to comply with regulatory standards and to protect air, land, and water quality will probably be similar to those already proposed for commercial oil-shale systems. The costs of these systems could range from about $1.20 to $2.45 per barrel of oil produced. Estimates of potential pollution-emisson levels affecting land, air, and water were calculated from available data related to current surface and in situ tar-sand field experiments in the US. These data were then extrapolated to determine pollutant levels expected from conceptual commercial surface and in situ facilities producing 20,000 bbl/d. The likelihood-of-occurrence of these impacts was then assessed. Experience from other industries, including information concerning health and ecosystem damage from air pollutants, measurements of ground-water transport of organic pollutants, and the effectiveness of environmental-control technologies was used to make this assessment.

  8. Procedure for conducting probabilistic safety assessment: level 1 full power internal event analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides guidance on conducting a Level I PSA for internal events in NPPs, which is based on the method and procedure that was used in the PSA for the design of Korea Standard Nuclear Plants (KSNPs). Level I PSA is to delineate the accident sequences leading to core damage and to estimate their frequencies. It has been directly used for assessing and modifying the system safety and reliability as a key and base part of PSA. Also, Level I PSA provides insights into design weakness and into ways of preventing core damage, which in most cases is the precursor to accidents leading to major accidents. So Level I PSA has been used as the essential technical bases for risk-informed application in NPPs. The report consists six major procedural steps for Level I PSA; familiarization of plant, initiating event analysis, event tree analysis, system fault tree analysis, reliability data analysis, and accident sequence quantification. The report is intended to assist technical persons performing Level I PSA for NPPs. A particular aim is to promote a standardized framework, terminology and form of documentation for PSAs. On the other hand, this report would be useful for the managers or regulatory persons related to risk-informed regulation, and also for conducting PSA for other industries

  9. Development of sea level rise scenarios for climate change assessments of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Thomas W.; Day, Richard H.; Michot, Thomas C.

    2010-01-01

    Rising sea level poses critical ecological and economical consequences for the low-lying megadeltas of the world where dependent populations and agriculture are at risk. The Mekong Delta of Vietnam is one of many deltas that are especially vulnerable because much of the land surface is below mean sea level and because there is a lack of coastal barrier protection. Food security related to rice and shrimp farming in the Mekong Delta is currently under threat from saltwater intrusion, relative sea level rise, and storm surge potential. Understanding the degree of potential change in sea level under climate change is needed to undertake regional assessments of potential impacts and to formulate adaptation strategies. This report provides constructed time series of potential sea level rise scenarios for the Mekong Delta region by incorporating (1) aspects of observed intra- and inter-annual sea level variability from tide records and (2) projected estimates for different rates of regional subsidence and accelerated eustacy through the year 2100 corresponding with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) climate models and emission scenarios.

  10. Assessment of the Levels of Airborne Bacteria, Gram-Negative Bacteria, and Fungi in Hospital Lobbies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Uk Park

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: We assessed the levels of airborne bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria (GNB, and fungi in six hospital lobbies, and investigated the environmental and hospital characteristics that affected the airborne microorganism levels. Methods: An Andersen single-stage sampler equipped with appropriate nutrition plate agar was used to collect the samples. The three types of microorganisms were repeatedly collected at a fixed location in each hospital (assumed to be representative of the entire hospital lobby from 08:00 through 24:00, with a sampling time of less than 5 min. Temperature and relative humidity were simultaneously monitored. Results: Multiple regression analysis was used to identify the major factors affecting microorganism levels. The average levels of bacteria (7.2 × 102 CFU/m3, GNB (1.7 × 10 CFU/m3, and fungi (7.7 × 10 CFU/m3 indicated that all hospital lobbies were generally contaminated. Season was the only factor that significantly affected the levels of all microorganisms (p < 0.0001, where contamination was the highest during the summer, significantly higher than during the winter. Other significant factors varied by microorganism, as follows: airborne bacteria (number of people in the lobby, sampling time, GNB (scale of hospital, and fungi (humidity and air temperature. Conclusions: Hospital lobby air was generally contaminated with microorganisms, including bacteria, GNB, and fungi. Environmental factors that may significantly influence the airborne concentrations of these agents should be managed to minimize airborne levels.

  11. One size fits all? An assessment tool for solid waste management at local and national levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Waste management schemes are generally implemented at national or regional level. ► Local conditions characteristics and constraints are often neglected. ► We developed an economic model able to compare multi-level waste management options. ► A detailed test case with real economic data and a best-fit scenario is described. ► Most efficient schemes combine clear National directives with local level flexibility. - Abstract: As environmental awareness rises, integrated solid waste management (WM) schemes are increasingly being implemented all over the world. The different WM schemes usually address issues such as landfilling restrictions (mainly due to methane emissions and competing land use), packaging directives and compulsory recycling goals. These schemes are, in general, designed at a national or regional level, whereas local conditions and constraints are sometimes neglected. When national WM top-down policies, in addition to setting goals, also dictate the methods by which they are to be achieved, local authorities lose their freedom to optimize their operational WM schemes according to their specific characteristics. There are a myriad of implementation options at the local level, and by carrying out a bottom-up approach the overall national WM system will be optimal on economic and environmental scales. This paper presents a model for optimizing waste strategies at a local level and evaluates this effect at a national level. This is achieved by using a waste assessment model which enables us to compare both the economic viability of several WM options at the local (single municipal authority) level, and aggregated results for regional or national levels. A test case based on various WM approaches in Israel (several implementations of mixed and separated waste) shows that local characteristics significantly influence WM costs, and therefore the optimal scheme is one under which each local authority is able to implement its best

  12. Antarctic Glacial Retreats and the Records of Sea Level Change in Deposits at the North Bank of the Shenzhen Bay,South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑洪汉; 黄宝林

    1997-01-01

    In view of the huge ice cover of 24.5×106 km3 in Antarctica,which accounts for over 90% by volume of the ice body on earth,the movement of Antarctic glaciers is a major control on global sea-level change and climatic fluctuation.As recorded in the Quaternary de posits in King George Island,West Antarctica,Three rapid ablations can be recognized at 11000,9000and 6100 years ago and the global climate within the past 6000 years is characterized by small-amplitude warm-cold fluctuation.Intertibal deposits at the north bank of the Shenzhen Bay suggest a periodic variation in sea level in about every 670 years over the last 6000 years with low sea levels recorded in the periods of 5500-4900,3900-3600,2400-2200and 1300-1200 years ago.Between these periods the sea level rised for about 80 cm on average.The modern warming climate in the last century corresponds with a rise of sea level at the rate of 2-3mm/a.

  13. On the assessment of shooting sounds : Loudness-level weightings versus A- and C-weighted sound exposure levels (L)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.; Geurtsen, F.W.M.

    2003-01-01

    As an alternative to the A-weighted sound exposure level (ASEL) Schomer et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 110, 2390-2397 (2001)] used the equal-loudness level contours as a dynamic filter to determine the loudness-level-weighted sound exposure level (LLSEL). From their analyses they concluded that the LLS

  14. Level 1 and 2 probabilistic safety assessment for designing a 300 MW NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The software for Level 1, 2 and 3 probabilistic safety assessments (PSA) was developed based on the PSA code by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and independent research. It was applied to integrating the design of a 300 MW nuclear power plant, unit 2 (C-2). It includes the analysis of initiating events, event trees, fault trees,dependency analysis, human reliability analysis, database analysis, event sequence quantification, plant damage state analysis, accident progression and containment response analysis, source term analysis, large early release frequency (LERF) analysis, uncertainty analysis, importance/sensitivity analysis, applications during design phase, etc. The model of Level 1 and 2 PSA was established for the C-2 unit.Several design improvements based on the PSA were implemented in the design, such as the isolation valves on the mini-flow line of the safety injection pump and spray pump, reciprocating charging pump in chemical and volume control system, essential service water system, etc. The unit's internal events at power generation were assessed as 7.25 x 10-6/ry for core damage frequency (CDF) and 3.24 x 10-7/ry for LERF. The C-2 PSA has not only justified the balance of its design, but also provided the probability assessment information for optimizing C-2 design and operation strategies, reducing the risk of severe accidents efficiently. (authors)

  15. Issues in performance assessments for disposal of US Department of Energy low-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors have long been pioneers in the field of radiological performance assessment (PA). Much effort has been expended in developing technology and acquiring data to facilitate the assessment process. This is reflected in DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management Chapter III of the Order lists policy and requirements to manage the DOEs low-level waste; performance objectives for low-level waste management are stated to ensure the protection of public health and the environment. A radiological PA is also required to demonstrate compliance with the performance objectives. DOE Order 5820.2A further requires that an Oversight and Peer Review Panel be established to ensure consistency and technical quality around the DOE complex in the development and application of PA models that include site-specific geohydrology and waste composition. The DOE has also established a Performance Assessment Task Team (PATT) to integrate the activities of sites that are preparing PAs. The PATT's purpose is to recommend policy and guidance to DOE on issues that impact PAs so that the approaches taken are as consistent as possible across the DOE complex

  16. National plan for siting high-level radioactive waste repositories and environmental assessment. Public draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Plan for Siting High-Level Radioactive Waste Repositories describes the process the Department of Energy (DOE) is using to find sites suitable for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Potential environmental impacts of implementing the Plan are included in an attached Environmental Assessment. The Plan is one element of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program being conducted by DOE to develop the necessary technology and to qualify sites to establish mined geologic repositories for these wastes. The Plan describes existing and planned activities for screening successively smaller portions of land within the United States to identify suitable candidate sites, and for subsequently selecting one or more of these sites, for permanent disposal of radioctive wastes. Environmental effects of the proposed action, including the anticipated range of field studies to characterize various land areas and reasonable alternative siting strategies, are assessed. The Environmental Assessment provides the basis for a finding of whether or not implementation of this plan will result in signficant environmental impacts

  17. Atomic force microscopy and Langmuir–Blodgett monolayer technique to assess contact lens deposits and human meibum extracts☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Sarah; Drolle, Elizabeth; Lorentz, Holly; Srinivasan, Sruthi; Leonenko, Zoya; Jones, Lyndon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate the differences in meibomian gland secretions, contact lens (CL) lipid extracts, and CL surface topography between participants with and without meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). Methods Meibum study: Meibum was collected from all participants and studied via Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) deposition with subsequent Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) visualization and surface roughness analysis. CL Study: Participants with and without MGD wore both etafilcon A and balafilcon A CLs in two different phases. CL lipid deposits were extracted and analyzed using pressure-area isotherms with the LB trough and CL surface topographies and roughness values were visualized using AFM. Results Meibum study: Non-MGD participant meibum samples showed larger, circular aggregates with lower surface roughness, whereas meibum samples from participants with MGD showed more lipid aggregates, greater size variability and higher surface roughness. CL Study: Worn CLs from participants with MGD had a few large tear film deposits with lower surface roughness, whereas non-MGD participant-worn lenses had many small lens deposits with higher surface roughness. Balafilcon A pore depths were shallower in MGD participant worn lenses when compared to non-MGD participant lenses. Isotherms of CL lipid extracts from MGD and non-MGD participants showed a seamless rise in surface pressure as area decreased; however, extracts from the two different lens materials produced different isotherms. Conclusions MGD and non-MGD participant-worn CL deposition were found to differ in type, amount, and pattern of lens deposits. Lipids from MGD participants deposited irregularly whereas lipids from non-MGD participants showed more uniformity. PMID:25620317

  18. PRESTO-II: a low-level waste environmental transport and risk assessment code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, D.E.; Emerson, C.J.; Chester, R.O.; Little, C.A.; Hiromoto, G.

    1986-04-01

    PRESTO-II (Prediction of Radiation Effects from Shallow Trench Operations) is a computer code designed for the evaluation of possible health effects from shallow-land and, waste-disposal trenches. The model is intended to serve as a non-site-specific screening model for assessing radionuclide transport, ensuing exposure, and health impacts to a static local population for a 1000-year period following the end of disposal operations. Human exposure scenarios considered include normal releases (including leaching and operational spillage), human intrusion, and limited site farming or reclamation. Pathways and processes of transit from the trench to an individual or population include ground-water transport, overland flow, erosion, surface water dilution, suspension, atmospheric transport, deposition, inhalation, external exposure, and ingestion of contaminated beef, milk, crops, and water. Both population doses and individual doses, as well as doses to the intruder and farmer, may be calculated. Cumulative health effects in terms of cancer deaths are calculated for the population over the 1000-year period using a life-table approach. Data are included for three example sites: Barnwell, South Carolina; Beatty, Nevada; and West Valley, New York. A code listing and example input for each of the three sites are included in the appendices to this report.

  19. Assessment of the evolution of the redox conditions in a low and intermediate level nuclear waste repository (SFR1, Sweden)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We present a model of the evolution of the redox conditions in the SFR1 repository. • Steel provides the highest reducing capacity to the system. • The Eh–pH values are framed within [−700, −10] mV and [13.5, 10.5] respectively. • Microbially mediated degradation is a short transient after repository closure. - Abstract: The evaluation of the redox conditions in an intermediate and low level radioactive waste repository such as SFR1 (Sweden) is of high relevance in the assessment of its future performance. The SFR1 repository contains heterogeneous types of wastes, of different activity levels and with very different materials, both in the waste itself and as immobilisation matrices and packaging. The level of complexity also applies to the different reactivity of the materials, so that an assessment of the uncertainties in the study of how the redox conditions would evolve must consider different processes, materials and parameters. This paper provides an assessment of the evolution of the redox conditions in the SFR1. The approach followed is based on the evaluation of the evolution of the redox conditions and the reducing capacity in 15 individual waste package types, selected as being representative of most of the different waste package types present or planned to be deposited in the SFR1. The model considers different geochemical processes of redox relevance in the system. The assessment of the redox evolution of the different vaults of the repository is obtained by combining the results of the modelled individual waste package types. According to the model results, corrosion of the steel-based material present in the repository keeps the system under reducing conditions for long time periods. The simulations have considered both the presence and the absence of microbial activity. In the initial step after the repository closure, the microbial mediated oxidation of organic matter rapidly causes the depletion of oxygen in the system

  20. Assessment of noise levels in clinical and laboratory areas of dental teaching institution, Ahmedabad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujal M Parkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To measure and assess the noise levels produced by different dental equipments. Materials and Methods: Measurement of the noise level was performed in preclinics, clinics, and dental laboratory of different departments of Ahmedabad Dental College and Hospital. The noise levels were determined using a Mini sound meter (CEM USA, which was placed at the dentist′s and laboratory technician′s ear level and at a distance of 1 m from a main noise source. The level of noise was measured in decibel (dB while the instruments were at maximum running speed. Results: In dental laboratory, the nosiest dental equipment was gypsum lathe trimmer with the noise level ranging from 87.36 to 98.3 dB. In preclinical area, the sound produced by low-speed air-rotor ranges from 66.68 to 69.28 dB. In clinical areas, the highest noise produced was by high-speed air-rotor (73.36 to 81.8 dB. The noise created by suction pump when in contact with mucosa was in range from 73.1 to 80.32 dB. The noise levels generated during cutting were significantly higher (P < 0.05 than those of noncutting, which was proved in the course of the measurements. Conclusion: At the end of the study it can be concluded that the sound levels are below that causes damage to the human ear (85 dB. However, dental technicians and other personnel working all day in noisy laboratories could be at risk of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss if they did not choose not to wear ear protection.

  1. Environmental assessment approaches and results for the low level radioactive waste disposal site at Drigg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, L.; Lean, C

    2005-09-15

    A Post-Closure Radiological Safety Assessment (PCRSA) was undertaken by British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) to support the Post-Closure Safety Case produced in September 2002 for the low level radioactive waste disposal site at Drigg, Cumbria. The PCRSA provided a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the long-term radiological impacts from disposals at the Drigg site. A structured, iterative approach to the PCRSA was used to define the context and scenarios for consideration, to describe the engineered disposal system and its environment, to assess the impact through calculations and qualitative arguments and to feed back the results to the safety case and forward programme of technical work. The results of the PCRSA have identified that the most important radionuclides in terms of radiological impact are disposed uranium and thorium and their daughter products. The key exposure pathways relating to future impacts are the migration of radionuclides in groundwater and release to future terrestrial environments, exposures resulting from the potential disruption of the site by natural events, such as coastal erosion and glaciation, and speculative inadvertent human intrusion into the site. The PCRSA results have been used to identify areas for potential future work to address key areas of uncertainty, as part of the iterative assessment approach. Further focused analysis has enabled key pessimisms and uncertainties to be identified and assessed in support of the evaluation and development of options for the future management of the Drigg site. (author)

  2. Environmental assessment approaches and results for the low level radioactive waste disposal site at Drigg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Post-Closure Radiological Safety Assessment (PCRSA) was undertaken by British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) to support the Post-Closure Safety Case produced in September 2002 for the low level radioactive waste disposal site at Drigg, Cumbria. The PCRSA provided a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the long-term radiological impacts from disposals at the Drigg site. A structured, iterative approach to the PCRSA was used to define the context and scenarios for consideration, to describe the engineered disposal system and its environment, to assess the impact through calculations and qualitative arguments and to feed back the results to the safety case and forward programme of technical work. The results of the PCRSA have identified that the most important radionuclides in terms of radiological impact are disposed uranium and thorium and their daughter products. The key exposure pathways relating to future impacts are the migration of radionuclides in groundwater and release to future terrestrial environments, exposures resulting from the potential disruption of the site by natural events, such as coastal erosion and glaciation, and speculative inadvertent human intrusion into the site. The PCRSA results have been used to identify areas for potential future work to address key areas of uncertainty, as part of the iterative assessment approach. Further focused analysis has enabled key pessimisms and uncertainties to be identified and assessed in support of the evaluation and development of options for the future management of the Drigg site. (author)

  3. Comparison of two risk assessment methodologies for high-level waste disposal in unsaturated media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for designing, obtaining a license for, and constructing a geologic repository for the disposal of commercial high-level radioactive waste. The candidate repository site is currently at Yucca Mountain in Nevada. Part of DOE's responsibility is to assess compliance with the appropriate environmental regulations, including the Environmental Protection Agency's containment requirements in 40 CFR Part 191. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) have been contracted to aid DOE in the assessment of total systems performance. SNL has been tasked with evaluating and comparing the performance assessment methodologies developed by PNL and SNL, as applied to one conceptual model. In this report, SNL has attempted to reproduce, by way of a benchmark exercise, the results of PNL's preliminary risk assessment of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. In general, the results of the PNL analysis and the SNL benchmark of that analysis agreed quite well, in terms of both ground-water flow and transport of unretarded radionuclides. The largest discrepancy between the analyses was noted for transport of retarded radionuclides, and was the result of different techniques for calculating retardation factors. 27 refs., 28 figs., 17 tabs

  4. Assessing the state-level consequences of global warming: Socio-economic and energy demand impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The large body of research on climate change has begun to recognize a significant deficiency: the lack of analysis of the impact of climate change at a spatial level consistent with the anticipated occurrence of climate change. Climate change is likely to vary by region, while impact analysis has focused on much larger political units. Clearly, adaptation/mitigation strategies must be developed at a level consistent with political and policy-making processes. This paper specifically addresses this deficiency by identifying the potential socio-economic and energy demand consequences of climate change for subnational regions. This is accomplished via the development and application of a regional simultaneous equation, econometric simulation model that focuses on five states (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin) in the Great Lakes region of the US. This paper presents a process for obtaining state-specific assessments of the consequences of climate change for the socio-economic system. As such, it provides an indication of which economic sectors are most sensitive to climate change for a specific state (Indiana), a set of initial mitigation/adaptation strategies for this state, and the results of testing these strategies in the policy analysis framework enabled by the model. In addition, the research demonstrates an effective methodology for assessing impacts and policy implications of climate change at a level consistent with policy making authority

  5. Spatial vulnerability assessment : methodology for the community and district level applied to floods in Buzi, Mozambique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within this thesis a conceptual model is presented which allows for the definition of a vulnerability assessment according to its time and spatial scale and within a multi-dimensional framework, which should help to design and develop appropriate methodologies and adaptation of concepts for the required scale of implementation. Building on past experiences with participatory approaches in community mapping in the District of Buzi in Mozambique, the relevance of such approaches for a community-based disaster risk reduction framework is analysed. Finally, methodologies are introduced which allow the assessment of vulnerability and the prioritisation of vulnerability factors at the community level. At the district level, homogenous vulnerability regions are identified through the application of integrated modelling approaches which build on expert knowledge and weightings. A set of indicators is proposed, which allow the modelling of vulnerability in a data-scarce environment. In developing these different methodologies for the community and district levels, it has been identified that the monitoring of vulnerability and the identification of trends is essential to addressing the objective of a continuous and improved disaster risk management. In addition to the technical and methodological challenges discussed in this thesis, the commitment from different stakeholders and the availability of capacity in different domains is essential for the successful, practical implementation of the developed approaches. (author)

  6. Methodological approaches to assessing the innovativeness level of investment and construction projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolzhenko Yuliya Aleksandrovna

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the analysis of the existing approaches to innovations evaluation in international and Russian practice. The authors examine the nature of the concept of “innovation”, especially innovation projects, methodological tools to measure various objects’ innovativeness level as well as innovative project economic efficiency assessing methods. It should be noted that at the legislative level up to date in the process of formation and implementation of capital construction projects there are no eligible requirements and assistance from public authorities to the developer for creating innovative products, providing the appropriate level of services. And if the financial indicators of the project are more or less clear, the level of innovativeness of them is much more complicated, although the requirements on the innovativeness of the projects are included in the Strategy of innovative development of Russia. The analysis shows that in Russian and international practice there are many approaches to assessing innovations, but they cannot be considered universal and they are applied differentially depending on the goals and tasks of applying the results of scientific achievements in the form of intellectual property to improve the efficiency and competitiveness of industries, products, services. In this case individual, specific evaluation method is selected and implemented basing on taking into account all the legal, economic, technical and other aspects. As a result, the author concluded that the innovativeness level rating requires development, which is in its analytical capabilities to provide flexible management tool, which can be applied at all the stages of the investment and construction project life cycle.

  7. Quantitative assessment of developmental levels in overarm throwing using wearable inertial sensing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimpampi, Eleni; Masci, Ilaria; Pesce, Caterina; Vannozzi, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Motor proficiency in childhood has been recently recognised as a public health determinant, having a potential impact on the physical activity level and possible sedentary behaviour of the child later in life. Among fundamental motor skills, ballistic skills assessment based on in-field quantitative observations is progressively needed in the motor development community. The aim of this study was to propose an in-field quantitative approach to identify different developmental levels in overarm throwing. Fifty-eight children aged 5-10 years performed an overarm throwing task while wearing three inertial sensors located at the wrist, trunk and pelvis level and were then categorised using a developmental sequence of overarm throwing. A set of biomechanical parameters were defined and analysed using multivariate statistics to evaluate whether they can be used as developmental indicators. Trunk and pelvis angular velocities and time durations before the ball release showed increasing/decreasing trends with increasing developmental level. Significant differences between developmental level pairs were observed for selected biomechanical parameters. The results support the suitability and feasibility of objective developmental measures in ecological learning contexts, suggesting their potential supportiveness to motor learning experiences in educational and youth sports training settings. PMID:26818205

  8. Assessment of modification level of hypoeutectic Al-Si alloys by pattern recognition of cooling curves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiang; GENG Hui-yuan; LI Yan-xiang

    2005-01-01

    Most evaluations of modification level are done according to a specific scale based on an American Foundry Society (AFS) standard wall chart as qualitative analysis in Al-Si casting production currently. This method is quite dependent on human experience when making comparisons of the microstructure with the standard chart. And the structures depicted in the AFS chart do not always resemble those seen in actual Al-Si castings. Therefore, this qualitative analysis procedure is subjective and can introduce human-caused errors into comparative metallographic analyses. A quantization parameter of the modification level was introduced by setting up the relationship between mean area weighted shape factor of eutectic silicon phase and the modification level using image analysis technology. In order to evaluate the modification level, a new method called "intelligent evaluating of melt quality by pattern recognition of thermal analysis cooling curves" has also been introduced. The results show that silicon modification level can be precisely assessed by comparison of the cooling curve of the melt to be evaluated with the one most similar to it in a database.

  9. The disposal of high level radioactive waste and the need for assessing the radiological impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different options for the disposal of high level radioactive waste are being considered in several different countries. When assessing the possible future impact of these disposal concepts, very large uncertainties are associated with the predictions. These uncertainties include scenario representation, conceptual and mathematical modelling, parameter evaluation and finally the interpretation of the results. Some of these uncertainties cannot be eliminated regardless of research efforts, e.g. the evolution of the society and the environment. The paper discusses in general terms to what extent uncertainties in the predictions could be reduced and in the light of this discussion the authors present their point of view regarding the fruitfulness of assessing radiological impact in the far future. (orig.)

  10. Performance assessment for a hypothetical low-level waste disposal facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.S.; Rohe, M.J.; Ritter, P.D. [and others

    1997-01-01

    Disposing of low-level waste (LLW) is a concern for many states throughout the United States. A common disposal method is below-grade concrete vaults. Performance assessment analyses make predictions of contaminant release, transport, ingestion, inhalation, or other routes of exposure, and the resulting doses for various disposal methods such as the below-grade concrete vaults. Numerous assumptions are required to simplify the processes associated with the disposal facility to make predictions feasible. In general, these assumptions are made conservatively so as to underestimate the performance of the facility. The objective of this report is to describe the methodology used in conducting a performance assessment for a hypothetical waste facility located in the northeastern United States using real data as much as possible. This report consists of the following: (a) a description of the disposal facility and site, (b) methods used to analyze performance of the facility, (c) the results of the analysis, and (d) the conclusions of this study.

  11. Selection of a computer code for Hanford low-level waste engineered-system performance assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrail, B.P.; Mahoney, L.A.

    1995-10-01

    Planned performance assessments for the proposed disposal of low-level waste (LLW) glass produced from remediation of wastes stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Washington will require calculations of radionuclide release rates from the subsurface disposal facility. These calculations will be done with the aid of computer codes. Currently available computer codes were ranked in terms of the feature sets implemented in the code that match a set of physical, chemical, numerical, and functional capabilities needed to assess release rates from the engineered system. The needed capabilities were identified from an analysis of the important physical and chemical process expected to affect LLW glass corrosion and the mobility of radionuclides. The highest ranked computer code was found to be the ARES-CT code developed at PNL for the US Department of Energy for evaluation of and land disposal sites.

  12. Procedures for conducting probabilistic safety assessments of nuclear power plants (Level 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides guidance for conducting a Level 1 of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), that is a PSA concerned with events leading to core damage. The scope of this report is confined to internal initiating events (excluding internal fires and floods). A particular aim is to promote a standardized framework, terminology and form of documentation for PSAs so as to facilitate external review of the results of such studies. The report is divided into the following major sections: management and organization; identification of sources of radioactive releases and accident initiators; accident sequence modelling; data assessment and parameter estimation; accident sequence quantification; documentation of the analysis: display and interpretation of result. 45 refs, 7 figs, 23 tabs

  13. Level 3 Baseline Risk Assessment for Building 3515 at Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The baseline risk assessment for the Fission Product Pilot Plant (Building 3515) at the Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) provides the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) Program at ORNL and Building 3515 project managers with information concerning the results of the Level 3 baseline risk assessment performed for this building. The document was prepared under Work Breakdown Structure 1.4.12.6.2.01 (Activity Data Sheet 3701, Facilities D ampersand D) and includes information on the potential long-term impacts to human health and the environment if no action is taken to remediate Building 3515. Information provided in this document forms the basis for the development of remedial alternatives and the no-action risk portion of the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis report

  14. Feasibility of hair sampling to assess levels of organophosphate metabolites in rural areas of Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipe, D.W.; Jayasumana, C.; Siribaddana, S.; Priyadarshana, C.; Pearson, M.; Gunnell, D.; Metcalfe, C.; Tzatzarakis, M.N.; Tsatsakis, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Measuring chronic pesticide exposure is important in order to investigate the associated health effects. Traditional biological samples (blood/urine) are difficult to collect, store and transport in large epidemiological studies in settings such as rural Asia. We assessed the acceptability of collecting hair samples from a rural Sri Lankan population and found that this method of data collection was feasible. We also assessed the level of non-specific metabolites (DAPS) of organophosphate pesticides in the hair samples. The median concentration (pg/mg) of each DAP was: diethyl phosphate: 83.3 (IQI 56.0, 209.4); diethyl thiophosphate: 34.7 (IQI 13.8, 147.9); diethyl dithiophosphate: 34.5 (IQI 23.4, 55.2); and dimethyl phosphate: 3 (IQI 3, 109.7). Total diethylphosphates were recovered in >80% of samples and were positively correlated with self-reported pesticide exposure. PMID:26894816

  15. Feasibility of hair sampling to assess levels of organophosphate metabolites in rural areas of Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipe, D W; Jayasumana, C; Siribaddana, S; Priyadarshana, C; Pearson, M; Gunnell, D; Metcalfe, C; Tzatzarakis, M N; Tsatsakis, A M

    2016-05-01

    Measuring chronic pesticide exposure is important in order to investigate the associated health effects. Traditional biological samples (blood/urine) are difficult to collect, store and transport in large epidemiological studies in settings such as rural Asia. We assessed the acceptability of collecting hair samples from a rural Sri Lankan population and found that this method of data collection was feasible. We also assessed the level of non-specific metabolites (DAPS) of organophosphate pesticides in the hair samples. The median concentration (pg/mg) of each DAP was: diethyl phosphate: 83.3 (IQI 56.0, 209.4); diethyl thiophosphate: 34.7 (IQI 13.8, 147.9); diethyl dithiophosphate: 34.5 (IQI 23.4, 55.2); and dimethyl phosphate: 3 (IQI 3, 109.7). Total diethylphosphates were recovered in >80% of samples and were positively correlated with self-reported pesticide exposure. PMID:26894816

  16. Level 3 Baseline Risk Assessment for Building 3515 at Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollert, D.A.; Cretella, F.M.; Golden, K.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    The baseline risk assessment for the Fission Product Pilot Plant (Building 3515) at the Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) provides the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program at ORNL and Building 3515 project managers with information concerning the results of the Level 3 baseline risk assessment performed for this building. The document was prepared under Work Breakdown Structure 1.4.12.6.2.01 (Activity Data Sheet 3701, Facilities D&D) and includes information on the potential long-term impacts to human health and the environment if no action is taken to remediate Building 3515. Information provided in this document forms the basis for the development of remedial alternatives and the no-action risk portion of the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis report.

  17. Selection of a computer code for Hanford low-level waste engineered-system performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planned performance assessments for the proposed disposal of low-level waste (LLW) glass produced from remediation of wastes stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Washington will require calculations of radionuclide release rates from the subsurface disposal facility. These calculations will be done with the aid of computer codes. Currently available computer codes were ranked in terms of the feature sets implemented in the code that match a set of physical, chemical, numerical, and functional capabilities needed to assess release rates from the engineered system. The needed capabilities were identified from an analysis of the important physical and chemical process expected to affect LLW glass corrosion and the mobility of radionuclides. The highest ranked computer code was found to be the ARES-CT code developed at PNL for the US Department of Energy for evaluation of and land disposal sites

  18. Economic assessment on vitrification facility of low-and intermediate-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usefulness of vitrification technology of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes was demonstrated due to volume reduction and mechanical and chemical stability of final waste forms. Therefore economic assessment that is considering by the economic propriety and predicted cost is needed at the preliminary of facility operation. Economic assessment of vitrification facility that is expected to construct in Ulchin 5 and 6 is established. In this study, characteristics and yearly generation of radioactive wastes are based on Ulchin 5 and 6 PSAR. The present worth analysis is worked through the cost-benefit when the vitrification facility will be installed. In conclusion, it would be good choices if it treats radioactive wastes from more than 4 nuclear power plants

  19. Performance Assessment Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Site Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As directed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), Fluor Hanford, Inc. will implement the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, as the requirements relate to the continued operation of the low-level waste disposal facilities on the Hanford Site. DOE Order 435.1 requires a disposal authorization statement authorizing operation (or continued operation) of a low-level waste disposal facility. The objective of this Order is to ensure that all DOE radioactive waste is managed in a manner that protects the environment and personnel and public health and safety. The manual (DOE Order 435.1 Manual) implementing the Order states that a disposal authorization statement shall be issued based on a review of the facility's performance assessment and composite analysis or appropriate Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 documentation. The disposal authorization shall specify the limits and conditions on construction, design, operations, and closure of the low-level waste facility. Failure to obtain a disposal authorization statement shall result in shutdown of an operational disposal facility. In fulfillment of the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, a disposal authorization statement was issued on October 25, 1999, authorizing the Hanford Site to transfer, receive, possess, and dispose of low-level radioactive waste at the 200 East Area and the 200 West Area Low-Level Burial Grounds. The disposal authorization statement constitutes approval of the performance assessment and composite analysis, authorizes operation of the facility, and includes conditions that the disposal facility must meet. One of the conditions is that monitoring plans for the 200 East Area and 200 West Area Low-Level Burial Grounds be written and approved by the DOE-RL. The monitoring plan is to be updated and implemented within 1 year following issuance of the disposal authorization statement to

  20. Assessment on vulnerability of coastal wetlands to sea level rise in the Yangtze Estuary, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, L.; Ge, Z.; Zhang, L.

    2013-12-01

    The Yangtze Delta in China is vital economic hubs in terms of settlement, industry, agriculture, trade and tourism as well as of great environmental significance. In recent decades, the prospect of climate change, in particular sea level rise and its effects on low lying coastal areas have generated worldwide attention to coastal ecosystems. Coastal wetlands, as important parts of coastal ecosystem, are particularly sensitive to sea level rise. To study the responses of coastal wetlands to climate change, assess the impacts of climate change on coastal wetlands and formulate feasible and practical mitigation strategies are the important prerequisites for securing the coastal zone ecosystems. In this study, taking the coastal wetlands in the Yangtze Estuary as a case study, the potential impacts of sea-level rise to coastal wetlands habitat were analyzed by the Source-Pathway-Receptor-Consequence (SPRC) model. The key indicators, such as the sea-level rise rate, subsidence rate, elevation, daily inundation duration of habitat and sedimentation rate, were selected to build a vulnerability assessment system according to the IPCC definition of vulnerability, i.e. the aspects of exposure, sensitivity and adaptation. A quantitatively spatial assessment method on the GIS platform was established by quantifying each indicator, calculating the vulnerability index and grading the vulnerability. The vulnerability assessment on the coastal wetlands in the Yangtze Estuary under the sea level rise rate of the present trend and IPCC A1F1 scenario were performed for three sets of projections of short-term (2030s), mid-term (2050s) and long-term (2100s). The results showed that at the present trend of sea level rise rate of 0.26 cm/a, 92.3 % of the coastal wetlands in the Yangtze Estuary was in the EVI score of 0 in 2030s, i.e. the impact of sea level rise on habitats/species of coastal wetlands was negligible. While 7.4 % and 0.3 % of the coastal wetlands were in the EVI score of

  1. Detailed Flood Modeling and Hazard Assessment from Storm Tides, Rainfall and Sea Level Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, P. M.; Hall, T. M.; Georgas, N.; Conticello, F.; Cioffi, F.; Lall, U.; Vinogradov, S. V.; Blumberg, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    A flood hazard assessment has been conducted for the Hudson River from New York City to Troy at the head of tide, using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model and merging hydrologic inputs and storm tides from tropical and extra-tropical cyclones, as well as spring freshet floods. Our recent work showed that neglecting freshwater flows leads to underestimation of peak water levels at up-river sites and neglecting stratification (typical with two-dimensional modeling) leads to underestimation all along the Hudson. The hazard assessment framework utilizes a representative climatology of over 1000 synthetic tropical cyclones (TCs) derived from a statistical-stochastic TC model, and historical extra-tropical cyclones and freshets from 1950-present. Hydrodynamic modeling is applied with seasonal variations in mean sea level and ocean and estuary stratification. The model is the Stevens ECOM model and is separately used for operational ocean forecasts on the NYHOPS domain (http://stevens.edu/NYHOPS). For the synthetic TCs, an Artificial Neural Network/ Bayesian multivariate approach is used for rainfall-driven freshwater inputs to the Hudson, translating the TC attributes (e.g. track, SST, wind speed) directly into tributary stream flows (see separate presentation by Cioffi for details). Rainfall intensity has been rising in recent decades in this region, and here we will also examine the sensitivity of Hudson flooding to future climate warming-driven increases in storm precipitation. The hazard assessment is being repeated for several values of sea level, as projected for future decades by the New York City Panel on Climate Change. Recent studies have given widely varying estimates of the present-day 100-year flood at New York City, from 2.0 m to 3.5 m, and special emphasis will be placed on quantifying our study's uncertainty.

  2. Multifunctionality assessment in forest planning at landscape level. The study case of Matese Mountain Community (Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Di Salvatore

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 14 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The main objective is to improve a method that aims at evaluating forest multifunctionality from a technical and practical point of view. A methodological approach - based on the index of forest multifunctionality level - is proposed to assess the “fulfilment capability” of a function providing an estimate of performance level of each function in a given forest. This method is aimed at supporting technicians requested to define most suitable management guidelines and silvicultural practices in the framework of a Forest Landscape Management Plan (FLMP. The study area is the Matese district in southern Apennines (Italy, where a landscape planning experimentation was implemented. The approach includes the qualitative and quantitative characterization of selected populations, stratified by forest category by a sampling set of forest inventory plots. A 0.5 ha area around the sample plot was described by filling a form including the following information: site condition, tree species composition, stand origin and structure, silvicultural system, health condition, microhabitats presence. In each sample plot, both the multifunctionality assessment and the estimate of the effect of alternative management options on ecosystem goods and services, were carried out. The introduction of the term “fulfilment capability” and the modification of the concept of priority level - by which the ranking of functions within a plot is evaluated - is an improvement of current analysis method. This enhanced approach allows to detect the current status of forest plot and its potential framed within the whole forest. Assessing functional features of forests with this approach reduces the inherent subjectivity and allows to get useful information on forest multifunctionality to support forest planners in defining management guidelines consistent with current status and potential evolutive pattern.

  3. Studies on assessment of traffic noise level in Aurangabad city, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B J Bhosale

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid rate of urbanization of Aurangabad city due to the expanding industrialization, the problem of noise pollution has become a concern for urban dwellers and government authority too. Noise pollution due to vehicular traffic is one of the growing environmental problems of urban centers. The study deals with the assessment of traffic noise levels in Aurangabad city. With respect to the total number of vehicles passing the road in unit time, which was surveyed by direct count method, six different sites from Aurangabad city, viz., Nagar Naka, Kranti Chowk, CIDCO bus stand, Railway station area, Dhoot Hospital and Baba petrol pump were selected to study the vehicular noise level. Noise measurements were carried out at these six locations on both working day and holiday during the peak traffic hours, i.e. 8:00 a.m. - 11:a.m., 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m., in the morning, afternoon and evening sessions, respectively, after 5 minutes time interval. The noise level was monitored using noise level meter. The results obtained from this investigation showed that the Nagar Naka, Kranti chowk and CIDCO bus stand area have dense traffic zones when compared with the Railway station area, Dhoot Hospital and Baba petrol pump. The minimum and the maximum noise levels are 74 and 86 dB, respectively, on working day and 70 and 81 dB, respectively, on holiday. The measured noise level values exceed the prescribed noise level.

  4. Safety assessment for the bituminization facility of the medium-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety assessment for the home-made bituminization facility of the medium-level waste during hot test is made. The average external dose equivalent per month is 0.136 x 10-2 Sv. The radioactive substance released into the environment is much lower than the permissible limit. The danger of burning and exploding of the bituminized product is avoided because the operation temperature is controlled strictly below 170 C degree. The report also briefly describes the structural characteristic of the facility, the main process and radiation protection and safety measures

  5. Performance assessment overview for subseabed disposal of high level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klett, R.D.

    1997-06-01

    The Subseabed Disposal Project (SDP) was part of an international program that investigated the feasibility of high-level radioactive waste disposal in the deep ocean sediments. This report briefly describes the seven-step iterative performance assessment procedures used in this study and presents representative results of the last iteration. The results of the performance are compared to interim standards developed for the SDP, to other conceptual repositories, and to related metrics. The attributes, limitations, uncertainties, and remaining tasks in the SDP feasibility phase are discussed.

  6. A priori assessment of safety impacts of traffic management operations: Level of service based approach

    OpenAIRE

    PRINCETON, J; Cohen, S.

    2011-01-01

    The number of accidents that occur on a road is often linked to traffic flow whereas the severity is related to mean speed. The method developed in this paper links the level of service-described by both traffic mean flow and speed-to the number of accidents observed on a road section. The objective is to use this relationship in a priori assessment of traffic management strategies by using traffic simulation tools. Flows and speed represent the main outputs of such models and are assumed to...

  7. Assessing the sources of high fecal coliform levels at an urban tropical beach

    OpenAIRE

    Aline Mendonça Cavalcante Davino; Milena Bandeira de Melo; Roberto Augusto Caffaro Filho

    2015-01-01

    Recreational water quality is commonly assessed by microbial indicators such as fecal coliforms. Maceió is the capital of Alagoas state, located in tropical northeastern Brazil. Its beaches are considered as the most beautiful urban beaches in the country. Jatiúca Beach in Maceió was found to be unsuitable for bathing continuously during the year of 2011. The same level of contamination was not observed in surrounding beaches. The aim of this study was to initiate the search for the sources o...

  8. Chemical and biological toxicity assessment of simulated Hanford site low-level waste grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defining the potential damage to the biosphere associated with exposure to low-level waste grouting operations at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, is difficult and controversial. Combined chemical and biological assessment of grout toxicity is needed to provide information on the potential risks of animal and plant exposure to the grouts. This paper will identify and predict the chemical components of the grout that will have the greatest potential of causing deleterious effects on fish and wildlife indigenous to the Hanford Site. This paper will also determine whether the current grout technology is adequate in controlling toxicant and pollutant releases for regulatory compliance

  9. Community-level assessment of dental plaque bacteria susceptibility to triclosan over 19 years

    OpenAIRE

    Haraszthy, Violet I; Sreenivasan, Prem K; Joseph J. Zambon

    2014-01-01

    Background Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent used in toothpaste to reduce dental plaque, gingivitis and oral malodor. This community-level assessment evaluated the susceptibility of dental plaque bacteria to triclosan in samples collected over 19 years. Methods A total of 155 dental plaque samples were collected at eleven different times over 19 years from 58 adults using 0.3% triclosan, 2% copolymer, 0.243% sodium fluoride toothpaste and from 97 adults using toothpaste withou...

  10. The central electricity generating board approach to low level waste activity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of the activity of low level waste (LLW) within Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) has historically been achieved by a combination of dose rate measurements and empirical isotopic composition data. Because of changes in regulatory requirements and the increased costs of disposal, it became clear in 1986/87 that fundamental changes in the method of assay of LLW were needed. This paper describes the approach adopted by CEGB to introduce these changes. Details of the philosophy of 'area fingerprints' and the programme of work for their determination are outlined together with a description of an on-site monitoring system which represents a practical implementation of the approach

  11. The safety assessment of high level waste in Sweden-SR97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system for nuclear waste management of spent nuclear fuel and operational waste from nuclear power plant has been developed in Sweden during the last two decades. An important part of the system is high-level waste storage for spent nuclear fuel. This facility will be built within the next decade in crystalline rock at approximately 500 m depth. To guide siting and test the performance of the planned facility regularly safety assessments are made. The purpose is also to develop safety assessments that are appropriate for licensing a future facility. Presently a safety assessment, SR97, has been performed. SR97 covers the system with repository canisters surrounded by bentonite-buffer, repository tunnels, overlying rock and the surface ecosystems. Models describe important processes affecting the repository and transport of radionuclides in the nearfield around the canisters and tunnels, farfield and surface ecosystems. Data from three geologically investigated sites in Sweden are used as input for assessing three hypothetical sites. Several scenarios are handled: 1. Normal development for a repository working as planned. 2. A failure in quality control of canister leading to a small hole corroding. 3. Different future climates. 4. Tectonic activity. 5. Future human actions. A conceptual outline of the models is presented and the assessment of doses in the surface ecosystems is detailed. The main results show that under most circumstances the repository system is robust to withstand environmental changes for more than million years. Hypothetical canister failures will produce doses below dose-limits and in the far future. Although there are differences at the three sites all sites will be well below dose-limits. (author)

  12. High-throughput imaging method for direct assessment of GM1 ganglioside levels in mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Acosta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available GM1-gangliosidosis is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene GLB1, which encodes acid β-galactosidase (β-gal. The lack of activity in this lysosomal enzyme leads to accumulation of GM1 gangliosides (GM1 in cells. We have developed a high-content-imaging method to assess GM1 levels in fibroblasts that can be used to evaluate substrate reduction in treated GLB1−/− cells [1]. This assay allows fluorescent quantification in a multi-well system which generates unbiased and statistically significant data. Fluorescently labeled Cholera Toxin B subunit (CTXB, which specifically binds to GM1 gangliosides, was used to detect in situ GM1 levels in a fixed monolayer of fibroblasts. This sensitive, rapid, and inexpensive method facilitates in vitro drug screening in a format that allows a high number of replicates using low working volumes.

  13. High-throughput imaging method for direct assessment of GM1 ganglioside levels in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Walter; Martin, Reid; Radin, David N; Cramer, Carole L

    2016-03-01

    GM1-gangliosidosis is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene GLB1, which encodes acid β-galactosidase (β-gal). The lack of activity in this lysosomal enzyme leads to accumulation of GM1 gangliosides (GM1) in cells. We have developed a high-content-imaging method to assess GM1 levels in fibroblasts that can be used to evaluate substrate reduction in treated GLB1(-/-) cells [1]. This assay allows fluorescent quantification in a multi-well system which generates unbiased and statistically significant data. Fluorescently labeled Cholera Toxin B subunit (CTXB), which specifically binds to GM1 gangliosides, was used to detect in situ GM1 levels in a fixed monolayer of fibroblasts. This sensitive, rapid, and inexpensive method facilitates in vitro drug screening in a format that allows a high number of replicates using low working volumes. PMID:26958633

  14. Assessment of natural radioactivity concentrations and gamma dose levels around Shorapur, Karnataka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, S.; Avinash, P.; Kerur, B. R.; Anilkumar, S.

    2015-08-01

    This study assesses the level of background radiation around Shorapur. The study region locates the western part of the Yadgir district of Karnataka. Shorapur and Shahapur talukas are mostly composed of clay, shale sandstone, granite rock and part of study area is black soil. Thirty sample locations were selected along the length and breadth of Shorapur and Shahapur taluka. Natural radionuclide activity concentrations in soil samples were determined using 4"X4" NaI (Tl) gamma spectroscopy. Outdoor gamma dose measurements in air at 1 m above ground level were determined using Rad Eye PRD survey meter. Estimated dose values are compared with the survey meter values and found to be good agreement between them and also with the data obtained from different other areas of Karnataka and India. The average values were found to be slightly higher in the present investigation.

  15. Assessment of natural radioactivity concentrations and gamma dose levels around Shorapur, Karnataka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajesh, S.; Avinash, P.; Kerur, B. R., E-mail: kerurpbk@rediffmail.com.com [Department of Physics, Gulbarga University Kalaburagi – 585 106 India (India); Anilkumar, S. [Radiation Safety Systems Division, BARC, Mumbai - 400 085 (India)

    2015-08-28

    This study assesses the level of background radiation around Shorapur. The study region locates the western part of the Yadgir district of Karnataka. Shorapur and Shahapur talukas are mostly composed of clay, shale sandstone, granite rock and part of study area is black soil. Thirty sample locations were selected along the length and breadth of Shorapur and Shahapur taluka. Natural radionuclide activity concentrations in soil samples were determined using 4'X4' NaI (Tl) gamma spectroscopy. Outdoor gamma dose measurements in air at 1 m above ground level were determined using Rad Eye PRD survey meter. Estimated dose values are compared with the survey meter values and found to be good agreement between them and also with the data obtained from different other areas of Karnataka and India. The average values were found to be slightly higher in the present investigation.

  16. Assessment of natural radioactivity concentrations and gamma dose levels around Shorapur, Karnataka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study assesses the level of background radiation around Shorapur. The study region locates the western part of the Yadgir district of Karnataka. Shorapur and Shahapur talukas are mostly composed of clay, shale sandstone, granite rock and part of study area is black soil. Thirty sample locations were selected along the length and breadth of Shorapur and Shahapur taluka. Natural radionuclide activity concentrations in soil samples were determined using 4'X4' NaI (Tl) gamma spectroscopy. Outdoor gamma dose measurements in air at 1 m above ground level were determined using Rad Eye PRD survey meter. Estimated dose values are compared with the survey meter values and found to be good agreement between them and also with the data obtained from different other areas of Karnataka and India. The average values were found to be slightly higher in the present investigation

  17. A needs assessment for a graduate level course in optical networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Reisslein, Jana; Klein, James; Reisslein, Martin

    2003-10-01

    To explore the need for a graduate level engineering course in optical networking, a needs assessment consisting of (i) an investigation of 14 existing optical networking courses, (ii) an analysis of online surveys among the networking community and the ASU electrical engineering department, (iii) faculty interviews, and (iv) focus groups was conducted. Survey responses from a total of 61 respondents were received and analyzed. The results support the need for a graduate level course in optical networking. Our analyses indicate that a graduate course in optical networking should (i) focus on the basic mechanisms and current trends in optical networking, (ii) be based on a text book and instructor slides combined with collections of examples and problems. Regarding the optimal delivery method it was found that current students and faculty strongly prefer face-to-face delivery complemented by on-line readings and assignments, whereas working engineering professionals are more open to the idea of online courses.

  18. A performance assessment methodology for low-level radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate compliance with the performance objectives governing protection of the general population in 10 CFR 61.41, applicants for land disposal of low-level radioactive waste are required to conduct a pathways analysis, or quantitative evaluation of radionuclide release, transport through environmental media, and dose to man. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff defined a strategy and initiated a project at Sandia National Laboratories to develop a methodology for independently evaluating an applicant's analysis of postclosure performance. This performance assessment methodology was developed in five stages: identification of environmental pathways, ranking the significance of the pathways, identification and integration of models for pathway analyses, identification and selection of computer codes and techniques for the methodology, and implementation of the codes and documentation of the methodology. This paper summarizes the NRC approach for conducting evaluations of license applications for low-level radioactive waste facilities. 23 refs

  19. Key tasks in healthcare marketing: assessing importance and current level of knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennett, Pamela A; Henson, Steve W; Crow, Stephen M; Hartman, Sandra J

    2005-01-01

    When examining the healthcare industry, the need for continuing education in internal functions (i.e., HR management) has been documented. However, equally important to success in the healthcare industry are external functions such as marketing. In an expansion of research on internally focused functions, we report findings from an exploratory study designed to examine the perceptions of executives about managerial skill needs in the externally focused area of marketing. Specifically, we examine eight key tasks in marketing and ask executives to rate the level of knowledge required for each and then to assess current, or actual, levels of knowledge in the field. Findings suggest that pricing strategy, product strategy, and segmentation and targeting were the tasks that require the most knowledge for healthcare marketers, and that they do, in fact, perceive various gaps in all of the areas examined. Implications and suggestions for future research are provided. PMID:16318012

  20. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory low-level waste systems performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) Systems Performance Assessment (PA) presents a systematic analysis of the potential risks posed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) waste management system. Potential risks to the public and environment are compared to established performance objectives as required by DOE Order 5820.2A. The report determines the associated maximum individual committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) to a member of the public from LLW and mixed waste. A maximum annual CEDE of 0.01 mrem could result from routine radioactive liquid effluents. A maximum annual CEDE of 0.003 mrem could result from routine radioactive gaseous effluents. No other pathways for radiation exposure of the public indicated detectable levels of exposure. The dose rate, monitoring, and waste acceptance performance objectives were found to be adequately addressed by the LLNL Program. 88 refs., 3 figs., 17 tabs

  1. Assessment of ambient gamma radiation levels in the sedimentary environment of Khasi Hills, Meghalaya (India)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the north east based Khasi Hills of Meghalaya, constitute major part of Mahadek basin. Systematic exploration work undertaken by the Department (AMD) over the last four decades have established country's two largest sandstone-type uranium deposits, viz. Domiasiat and Wahkyn. Stretched over 180 km between Jaintia Hills in the east to Garo Hills in the west, environmental conditions such as high rain fall, thick forest, wild life, difficult terrain with poor logistics (roads and communication) often makes exploration task most challenging in the basin. Direct geological evidence in the basin indicates huge potential of uranium reserves of medium to small ore pockets of grade 3O8 disposed at shallow depth. This paper examines ambient gamma radiation levels in parts of Khasi Hills in relation to the major lithological occurrences over Mahadek basin of Meghalaya and prepares an environmental baseline database on outdoor gamma measurements in the area often characterized by inaccessibility and other impediments. Study findings can be used for identifying corelatable radiometric anomalies in the uranium hosting environments of Mahadek basin and comparative dose rates owing to natural phenomena in the area

  2. Influencing factors on the functional level of haemophilic patients assessed by FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachooei, A R; Badiei, Z; Zandinezhad, M E; Ebrahimzadeh, M H; Mazloumi, S M; Omidi-Kashani, F; Moradi, A; Mahdavian-Naghashzargar, R; Razi, S

    2014-03-01

    Joint destruction in early adulthood brings the patients to the orthopaedic clinics. If a haemophilic patient becomes disabled, it shows a number of factors such as timely diagnosis, availability of appropriate treatment depending on the country, access and affordability to treatments and equally importantly the responsibility of the patient in managing self care by remaining compliant by prescribed treatment regimen. We assessed the functional level by functional independence score in haemophilia (FISH). Overall, 104 patients with haemophilia A and 29 with haemophilia B were evaluated. We assessed the function of the patients by FISH. We divided the sum scores into weak (FISH score 8-16), moderate (17-24), and good (25-32). For evaluating the level of functional deficit in a 2 × 2 table, we categorized the weak and moderate levels into Disordered Group and the good level into Not-Disordered Group. The average age was 26.9 ± 14.24. Each 1 year increase in age can increase 1.07 fold the possibility of being placed in Disordered Function Group. Severe haemophilia can increase 7.34 fold, presence of inhibitor can increase 9.75 fold and home self-care increases 3.89 fold the possibility of being placed in Disordered Function Group. To decrease the burden of the cost on patient, family and the government, education plays the most important role. We suggest that we send a trained team of physician and nurses to the deprived villages and cities instead of waiting for the patient to refer to our Care Center. PMID:24118441

  3. Assessment of heavy metal contamination, levels in topsoil at selected auto-workshops in Accra, Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research was conducted to assess the levels of contamination of heavy metals in the topsoil at selected auto-workshops in Accra to determine the anthropogenic and crustal contributions and the human heath risk associated with them. Soil samples collected from four auto-workshops were analysed using Atomic Absorption Spectrometer. Eleven (11) elements: Co, Fe, Cu, Mn, Cr, As, Hg, Zn, Pb, Ni, and Cd were identified in each sample collected from the auto-workshops. Pollution indices; contamintion factor (Cf) index of geoaccumulation (Igeo) and pollution load index (PLI) were used to assess the contamination levels. It revealed the extent of contamination at the auto-workshops for most of the elements which range from low to considerate contamintion. Lead (Pb) recorded the greatest contamination levels at the auto-electrical location. The results from the index of geoccumulation showed no pollution to highly pollution indicting high variations of pollution levels at different locations. The results of the PLI in almost all locations ranged from moderately to extremely polluted. Noncancer effect on children and adults due to exposure to the topsoil were also estimated with some selected metal elements. The hazard quotient (HQ) evaluation, showed ingestion to be the route of exposure to soil dust that results in a higher risk for heavy metals, followed by dermal contact. The effect due to inhalation of resuspended dust particles through the mouth and nose is relatively low. It was observed that, the auto-workshops are generally polluted with heavy metals and therefore posing ill-health effect to the humans and the environment. (au)

  4. Corporate marketing potential assessment model in the context of operational, tactical and strategic levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Potrashkova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The aim of this research is to develope the mathematic model structure of result-oriented evaluation of corporate marketing potential in the context of management potential levels (operational, tactical and strategic that takes into account multiple possible uses of marketing resources and various options for the development of corporate environment. The results of the analysis. The new scientific result of this research is represented by the developed structure of the system of analytical mathematic models for assessing marketing potential of the company in the context of its management levels – operational, tactical and strategic. According to the proposed system of models every level of marketing potential (operational, tactical and strategic is described through a set of possible enterprise production sales volumes for different states of the environment parameters and the parameters of a certain level of marketing resources management at corresponding period of time (short, medium and long term. The proposed system of models has the following clue characteristics: marketing potential assessment is based on the result-oriented approach. It characterizes enterprise capability for creating demand for its products in different conditions of corporate environment and for different variants of managerial decisions concerning different parameters of production promotion and distribution (e.g. for different pricing options; different variants of corporate investment and innovations program; marketing potential assessment is implemented in the context of management levels of the potential – operational, tactical and strategic – so, it reflects operational, tactical and strategic capabilities of the company concerning production promotion and distribution; the models for assessing different levels of potential (operational, tactical and strategic differ in such of ways: by specification of the resources` characteristics

  5. Spatially valid data of atmospheric deposition of heavy metals and nitrogen derived by moss surveys for pollution risk assessments of ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Winfried; Nickel, Stefan; Schönrock, Simon; Meyer, Michaela; Wosniok, Werner; Harmens, Harry; Frontasyeva, Marina V; Alber, Renate; Aleksiayenak, Julia; Barandovski, Lambe; Carballeira, Alejo; Danielsson, Helena; de Temmermann, Ludwig; Godzik, Barbara; Jeran, Zvonka; Karlsson, Gunilla Pihl; Lazo, Pranvera; Leblond, Sebastien; Lindroos, Antti-Jussi; Liiv, Siiri; Magnússon, Sigurður H; Mankovska, Blanka; Martínez-Abaigar, Javier; Piispanen, Juha; Poikolainen, Jarmo; Popescu, Ion V; Qarri, Flora; Santamaria, Jesus Miguel; Skudnik, Mitja; Špirić, Zdravko; Stafilov, Trajce; Steinnes, Eiliv; Stihi, Claudia; Thöni, Lotti; Uggerud, Hilde Thelle; Zechmeister, Harald G

    2016-06-01

    For analysing element input into ecosystems and associated risks due to atmospheric deposition, element concentrations in moss provide complementary and time-integrated data at high spatial resolution every 5 years since 1990. The paper reviews (1) minimum sample sizes needed for reliable, statistical estimation of mean values at four different spatial scales (European and national level as well as landscape-specific level covering Europe and single countries); (2) trends of heavy metal (HM) and nitrogen (N) concentrations in moss in Europe (1990-2010); (3) correlations between concentrations of HM in moss and soil specimens collected across Norway (1990-2010); and (4) canopy drip-induced site-specific variation of N concentration in moss sampled in seven European countries (1990-2013). While the minimum sample sizes on the European and national level were achieved without exception, for some ecological land classes and elements, the coverage with sampling sites should be improved. The decline in emission and subsequent atmospheric deposition of HM across Europe has resulted in decreasing HM concentrations in moss between 1990 and 2010. In contrast, hardly any changes were observed for N in moss between 2005, when N was included into the survey for the first time, and 2010. In Norway, both, the moss and the soil survey data sets, were correlated, indicating a decrease of HM concentrations in moss and soil. At the site level, the average N deposition inside of forests was almost three times higher than the average N deposition outside of forests. PMID:27068915

  6. Assessing the impact of sea-level rise on a vulnerable coastal community in Accra, Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwasi Appeaning Addo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Climate change and its associated sea-level rise are expected to significantly affect vulnerable coastal communities. Although the extent of the impact will be localised, its assessment will adopt a monitoring approach that applies globally. The topography of the beach, the type of geological material and the level of human intervention will determine the extent of the area to be flooded and the rate at which the shoreline will move inland. Gleefe, a coastal community in Ghana, has experienced frequent flooding in recent times due to the increasing occurrence of storm surge and sea-level rise. This study used available geospatial data and field measurements to determine how the beach topography has contributed to the incidence of flooding at Gleefe. The topography is generally low-lying. Sections of the beach have elevations of around 1 m, which allows seawater to move inland during very high tide. Accelerated sea-level rise as predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC will destroy homes of the inhabitants and inundate the Densu wetlands behind the beach. Destruction of infrastructure will render the inhabitants homeless, whilst flooding of the wetlands will destroy the habitats of migratory birds and some endangered wildlife species such as marine turtle. Effective adaptation measures should be adopted to protect this very important coastal environment, the ecology of the wetlands and the livelihoods of the community dwellers.

  7. Environmental assessment: waste-form selection for SRP high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE has recently decided to construct and operate a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) to immobilize the high-level radioactive waste generated and stored pending disposal in a federal geologic repository. In the immobilization process the high-activity fraction of the SRP high-level waste is mixed with glass frit to form the feed for the melter. The glass is cast from an electric-heated, ceramic-lined melter into canisters. Crystalline ceramic, the leading alternative to borosilicate glass, also appears to be an acceptable form for immobilizing the SRP high-level waste. Both are expected to meet regulations and repository acceptance criteria. The assessment also shows that the environmental effects of disposing of SRP high-level waste as a crystalline ceramic form would not differ significantly from the projected effects for disposal of the borosilicate glass form. A comprehensive evaluation program led to the recommendation of borosilicate glass as the preferred waste form. 10 figures, 19 tables

  8. Knowledge Level Assessment in e-Learning Systems Using Machine Learning and User Activity Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazeeh Ghatasheh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electronic Learning has been one of the foremost trends in education so far. Such importance draws the attention to an important shift in the educational paradigm. Due to the complexity of the evolving paradigm, the prospective dynamics of learning require an evolution of knowledge delivery and evaluation. This research work tries to put in hand a futuristic design of an autonomous and intelligent e-Learning system. In which machine learning and user activity analysis play the role of an automatic evaluator for the knowledge level. It is important to assess the knowledge level in order to adapt content presentation and to have more realistic evaluation of online learners. Several classification algorithms are applied to predict the knowledge level of the learners and the corresponding results are reported. Furthermore, this research proposes a modern design of a dynamic learning environment that goes along the most recent trends in e-Learning. The experimental results illustrate an overall performance superiority of a support vector machine model in evaluating the knowledge levels; having 98.6%of correctly classified instances with 0.0069 mean absolute error.

  9. Is. gamma. -camera imaging of platelet deposition useful to assess the effectiveness of prostacyclin (PGI/sub 2/) treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitscha, P.; Kaliman, J.; Sinziger, H. (Vienna Univ. (Austria))

    Platelet labelling with /sup 111/In-oxinesulfate allows visualization of platelet deposition in the vascular bed. Scintigraphic studies were performed in 6 patients with 'active' (platelet uptake ratio (PUR) > 1.20) and 8 patients with 'inactive' (PUR < 1.20) atherosclerotic lesions of the femoral artery. Platelet deposition was also studied in 11 patients with implanted prosthetic vascular grafts and in 21 patients with an abnormal aneurysm of the aorta. Infusing 5 ng/kg/min PGI/sub 2/ during 6 hours for 5 days into patients with 'active'-atherosclerosis and aneurysms of the aorta resulted in a significant decrease of platelet deposition even after having stopped the infusion. There was no influence of PGI/sub 2/ on PUR in patients with 'inactive' lesions. The group of patients with implanted prosthetic grafts demonstrated also a significant decrease of PUR values during the PGI/sub 2/ infusion, but reached baseline values soon after stopping the infusion. When platelet deposition is increased ..gamma..-camera imaging provides valuable data on the influence of any kind of therapy on the in-vivo platelet function.

  10. Application of a pilot control banding tool for risk level assessment and control of nanoparticle exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paik, S Y; Zalk, D M; Swuste, P

    2008-03-03

    Control Banding (CB) strategies offer simplified solutions for controlling worker exposures to constituents that are found in the workplace in the absence of firm toxicological and exposure data. These strategies may be particularly useful in nanotechnology applications, considering the overwhelming level of uncertainty over what nanomaterials and nanotechnologies present as potential work-related health risks, what about these materials might lead to adverse toxicological activity, how risk related to these might be assessed, and how to manage these issues in the absence of this information. This study introduces a pilot CB tool or 'CB Nanotool' that was developed specifically for characterizing the health aspects of working with engineered nanoparticles and determining the level of risk and associated controls for five ongoing nanotechnology-related operations being conducted at two Department of Energy (DOE) research laboratories. Based on the application of the CB Nanotool, four of the five operations evaluated in this study were found to have implemented controls consistent with what was recommended by the CB Nanotool, with one operation even exceeding the required controls for that activity. The one remaining operation was determined to require an upgrade in controls. By developing this dynamic CB Nanotool within the realm of the scientific information available, this application of CB appears to be a useful approach for assessing the risk of nanomaterial operations, providing recommendations for appropriate engineering controls, and facilitating the allocation of resources to the activities that most need them.

  11. Selection of bentonite deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The selection of bentonite deposits is to offer a supply base of backfill/buffer materials for high-level radioactive waste repository in China. In this paper the comprehensive evaluation criteria were discussed first, then a comprehensive comment on bentonite deposits in China was given. The properties of geographic distribution, origin, reserves and ore quality of bentonite deposits were also discussed. The comprehensive comparison studies on 12 large-sized bentonite deposits was presented. Based on the results obtained Gaomiaozi bentonite deposit, Inner Mongolia, was recommended as the first choice of backfill/buffer materials for repository in China. (author)

  12. Continental level landslide susceptibility assessment in the context of the European Union's Soil Thematic Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, A.; Van Den Eeckhaut, M.; Reichenbach, P.; Hervás, J.; Malet, J.; Guzzetti, F.

    2011-12-01

    In the context of the European Union's Soil Thematic Strategy, and the formulation of a draft of a European framework directive devoted to the sustainable protection of soil, landslides are recognized as one of the eight soil threats requiring harmonized spatial hazard assessments over the EU territory. The general framework for the harmonized assessment of soil threats (namely erosion, organic matter decline, salinisation, compaction, landslides, contamination, sealing and loss of biodiversity) consists of a nested geographical approach based on "Tiers", where a semi-quantitative, low-resolution (1:1 million) evaluation ("Tier 1") using already available pan-European datasets should enable the delineation of priority areas requiring more detailed quantitative inventory-based assessments with additional data ("Tier 2"). In this contribution, we present the elaboration of a continental level "Tier 1" generic landslide susceptibility model based on a heuristic, spatial multi-criteria evaluation (SMCE) approach exploiting the most important conditioning factors for landslides being slope gradient, lithology and land cover. Additionally, extensive landslide locations available at regional and national levels were collected, harmonized and standardized over the EU territory to obtain a signal for input parameter specification and model calibration, evaluation and classification. Since the analyzed area is highly complex in terms of climatic, physiographic and seismotectonic conditions controlling landslide occurrences, a terrain differentiation based on climatic and geomorphologic criteria is proposed to delineate distinct zones to which specific predictor class weights have been allocated through the SMCE approach for susceptibility evaluation. The heuristic indexing scheme is cross-validated with multivariate statistical evaluations in representative areas for which detailed inventory information is available. The resulting pan-European susceptibility estimate

  13. SUMO, System performance assessment for a high-level nuclear waste repository: Mathematical models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslinger, P.W.; Miley, T.B.; Engel, D.W.; Chamberlain, P.J. II

    1992-09-01

    Following completion of the preliminary risk assessment of the potential Yucca Mountain Site by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in 1988, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) requested the Performance Assessment Scientific Support (PASS) Program at PNL to develop an integrated system model and computer code that provides performance and risk assessment analysis capabilities for a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. The system model that has been developed addresses the cumulative radionuclide release criteria established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and estimates population risks in terms of dose to humans. The system model embodied in the SUMO (System Unsaturated Model) code will also allow benchmarking of other models being developed for the Yucca Mountain Project. The system model has three natural divisions: (1) source term, (2) far-field transport, and (3) dose to humans. This document gives a detailed description of the mathematics of each of these three divisions. Each of the governing equations employed is based on modeling assumptions that are widely accepted within the scientific community.

  14. Assessing high-level scientific reasoning in a physics exam: Pipe-dream or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, David

    2012-02-01

    What do we want students to be able to do when they have finished their introductory physics course? In addition to learning the physics content, we want students to learn to think like physicists. We want students to develop specific scientific reasoning abilities that are the hall-mark of scientific thinking. These include, analyzing and interpreting experimental data, designing an experiment to test different hypotheses, identifying assumptions in a physical model amongst many others. Physics courses such as the Investigative Science Learning Environment (ISLE) have been developed to focus specifically on developing students' scientific reasoning abilities. Research has shown that ISLE is successful in achieving its goal. We would like our assessments to directly reflect our learning goals for our students. In order to measure higher-level scientific reasoning, we can, for example, require students to participate in a laboratory practical exam in which they have to engage in experimental design and analysis. However, this assessment method could become very difficult to administer and grade in a large-enrollment class. Is it possible to assess scientific thinking abilities of students using traditional formats such as paper and pencil exams? In this talk I will present some of our latest ideas about how to re-design traditional exam questions to measure a range of scientific reasoning abilities.

  15. Biosphere modeling for safety assessment of high-level radioactive waste geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the safety assessment of a high-level radioactive waste disposal system, it is required to estimate future radiological impacts on human beings. Consideration of living habits and the human environment in the future involves a large degree of uncertainty. To avoid endless speculation aimed at reducing such uncertainty, an approach is applied for identifying and justifying a 'reference biosphere' for use in safety assessment in Japan. Considering a wide range of Japanese geological environments, some specific reference biospheres' are developed using an approach consistent with the BIOMOVS II reference biosphere methodology. The models represent the components of the surface environment using compartments between which fluxes of materials (solid/water) and radionuclides are defined by transfer factors. A range of exposure pathways via which such radionuclides enter the food-chain, along with uptake and concentration factors, are also defined. The response to a step function of unit flux from the geosphere is determined for each model. The results show that it is reasonable to use steady-state biosphere responses to a unit-input flux to define nuclide-dependent factors for converting fluxes from the geosphere to doses. This simplifies safety assessment calculations, which then require only look-up tables for such flux to dose conversion rather than fully coupled biosphere models. (author)

  16. Transuranic and Low-Level Boxed Waste Form Nondestructive Assay Technology Overview and Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) identified the need to perform an assessment of the functionality and performance of existing nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques relative to the low-level and transuranic waste inventory packaged in large-volume box-type containers. The primary objectives of this assessment were to: (1) determine the capability of existing boxed waste form NDA technology to comply with applicable waste radiological characterization requirements, (2) determine deficiencies associated with existing boxed waste assay technology implementation strategies, and (3) recommend a path forward for future technology development activities, if required. Based on this assessment, it is recommended that a boxed waste NDA development and demonstration project that expands the existing boxed waste NDA capability to accommodate the indicated deficiency set be implemented. To ensure that technology will be commercially available in a timely fashion, it is recommended this development and demonstration project be directed to the private sector. It is further recommended that the box NDA technology be of an innovative design incorporating sufficient NDA modalities, e.g., passive neutron, gamma, etc., to address the majority of the boxed waste inventory. The overall design should be modular such that subsets of the overall NDA system can be combined in optimal configurations tailored to differing waste types

  17. Biosphere modeling for safety assessment of high-level radioactive waste geological disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, T.; Ishihara, Y.; Ishiguro, K. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Waste Management and Fuel Cycle Research Center, Tokai Works, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Suzuki, Y. [Nuclear Energy System Incorporated, Tokyo (Japan); Naito, M. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Geological Isolation Research Project, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Ikeda, T. [Japan Gas Corporation, Tokyo (Japan); Little, R. [QuantiSci Ltd, Henley-on-Thames, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    1999-11-01

    In the safety assessment of a high-level radioactive waste disposal system, it is required to estimate future radiological impacts on human beings. Consideration of living habits and the human environment in the future involves a large degree of uncertainty. To avoid endless speculation aimed at reducing such uncertainty, an approach is applied for identifying and justifying a 'reference biosphere' for use in safety assessment in Japan. Considering a wide range of Japanese geological environments, some specific reference biospheres' are developed using an approach consistent with the BIOMOVS II reference biosphere methodology. The models represent the components of the surface environment using compartments between which fluxes of materials (solid/water) and radionuclides are defined by transfer factors. A range of exposure pathways via which such radionuclides enter the food-chain, along with uptake and concentration factors, are also defined. The response to a step function of unit flux from the geosphere is determined for each model. The results show that it is reasonable to use steady-state biosphere responses to a unit-input flux to define nuclide-dependent factors for converting fluxes from the geosphere to doses. This simplifies safety assessment calculations, which then require only look-up tables for such flux to dose conversion rather than fully coupled biosphere models. (author)

  18. SUMO, System performance assessment for a high-level nuclear waste repository: Mathematical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following completion of the preliminary risk assessment of the potential Yucca Mountain Site by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in 1988, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) requested the Performance Assessment Scientific Support (PASS) Program at PNL to develop an integrated system model and computer code that provides performance and risk assessment analysis capabilities for a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. The system model that has been developed addresses the cumulative radionuclide release criteria established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and estimates population risks in terms of dose to humans. The system model embodied in the SUMO (System Unsaturated Model) code will also allow benchmarking of other models being developed for the Yucca Mountain Project. The system model has three natural divisions: (1) source term, (2) far-field transport, and (3) dose to humans. This document gives a detailed description of the mathematics of each of these three divisions. Each of the governing equations employed is based on modeling assumptions that are widely accepted within the scientific community

  19. Performance assessment review guide for DOE low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodge, R.L.; Hansen, W.R.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Layton, D.W.; Lee, D.W.; Maheras, S.T.; Neuder, S.M.; Wilhite, E.L.; Curl, R.U.; Grahn, K.F.; Heath, B.A.; Turner, K.H. [Dames and Moore, Denver, CO (United States)

    1991-10-01

    This report was prepared under the direction of the Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel. The intent is to help Department of Energy sites prepare performance assessments that meet the Panel`s expectations in terms of detail, quality, content, and consistency. Information on the Panel review process and philosophy are provided, as well as important technical issues that will be focused on during a review. This guidance is not intended to provide a detailed review plan as in NUREG-1200, Standard Review Plan for Review of a License Application for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (January 1988). The focus and intent of the Panel`s reviews differ significantly from a regulatory review. The review of a performance assessment by the Panel uses the collective professional judgment of the members to ascertain that the approach taken the methodology used, the assumptions made, etc., are technically sound and adequately justified. The results of the Panel`s review will be used by Department of Energy Headquarters in determining compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5820.2A, ``Radioactive Waste Management.``

  20. Performance assessment review guide for DOE low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was prepared under the direction of the Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel. The intent is to help Department of Energy sites prepare performance assessments that meet the Panel's expectations in terms of detail, quality, content, and consistency. Information on the Panel review process and philosophy are provided, as well as important technical issues that will be focused on during a review. This guidance is not intended to provide a detailed review plan as in NUREG-1200, Standard Review Plan for Review of a License Application for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (January 1988). The focus and intent of the Panel's reviews differ significantly from a regulatory review. The review of a performance assessment by the Panel uses the collective professional judgment of the members to ascertain that the approach taken the methodology used, the assumptions made, etc., are technically sound and adequately justified. The results of the Panel's review will be used by Department of Energy Headquarters in determining compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5820.2A, ''Radioactive Waste Management.''

  1. Performance assessment review guide for DOE low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodge, R.L.; Hansen, W.R.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Layton, D.W.; Lee, D.W.; Maheras, S.T.; Neuder, S.M.; Wilhite, E.L.; Curl, R.U.; Grahn, K.F.; Heath, B.A.; Turner, K.H. (Dames and Moore, Denver, CO (United States))

    1991-10-01

    This report was prepared under the direction of the Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel. The intent is to help Department of Energy sites prepare performance assessments that meet the Panel's expectations in terms of detail, quality, content, and consistency. Information on the Panel review process and philosophy are provided, as well as important technical issues that will be focused on during a review. This guidance is not intended to provide a detailed review plan as in NUREG-1200, Standard Review Plan for Review of a License Application for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (January 1988). The focus and intent of the Panel's reviews differ significantly from a regulatory review. The review of a performance assessment by the Panel uses the collective professional judgment of the members to ascertain that the approach taken the methodology used, the assumptions made, etc., are technically sound and adequately justified. The results of the Panel's review will be used by Department of Energy Headquarters in determining compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management.''

  2. Probabilistic calculations and sensitivity analysis of parameters for a reference biosphere modell assessing final deposition of radioaktive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioecological models are used for the assessment of potential exposures of a population to radionuclides from final repositories for high level radioactive waste. Due to the long disposal time frame, changes in model relevant exposure pathways need to be accounted for. Especially climate change will result in changes of the modelled system. Reference biosphere models are used to asses climate related changes in the far field of a final repository. In this approach, model scenarios are developed for potential future climate states and defined by parameters derived from currently existing, similar climate regions. It is assumed, that habits and agricultural practices of a population will adapt to the new climate over long periods of time, until they mirror the habits of a contemporary population living in a similar climate. As an end point of the models, Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCF) are calculated. These radionuclide specific BDCF describe the exposure of a hypothetical population resulting from a standardized radionuclide contamination in near surface ground water. Model results are subject to uncertainties due to inherent uncertainties of assumed future developments, habits and empirically measured parameters. In addition to deterministic calculations, sensitivity analysis and probabilistic calculations were done for several model scenarios, to control the quality of the model and due to the high number of parameters used to define different climate states, soil types and consumption habits.

  3. Assessment of site conditions for disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes: A case study in southern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Near surface disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes (LILW) requires evaluating the field conditions of the candidate site. However, assessment of the site conditions may be challenging due to the limited prior knowledge of some remote sites, and various multi-disciplinary data requirements at any given site. These situations arise in China as in the rest of the industrialized world, particularly since a regional strategy for LILW disposal has been implemented to protect humans and the environment. This paper presents a demonstration of the site assessment process through a case study focusing mainly on the geologic, hydrogeologic and geochemical characteristics of the candidate site. A joint on-site and laboratory investigation, supplemented by numerical modeling, was implemented in this assessment. Results indicate that no fault is present in the site area, although there are some minor joints and fractures, primarily showing a north–south trend. Most of the joints are filled with quartz deposits and would thus function hydraulically as impervious barriers. Investigation of local hydrologic boundaries has shown that the candidate site represents an essentially isolated hydrogeologic unit, and that little or no groundwater flow occurs across its boundaries on the north or east, or across the hilly areas to the south. Groundwater in the site area is recharged by precipitation and discharges primarily by evapo-transpiration and surface flow through a narrow outlet to the west. Groundwater flows slowly from the hilly area to the foot of the hills and discharges mainly into the inner brooks and marshes. Some groundwater circulates in deeper granite in a slower manner. The vadose zone in the site was investigated specially for their significant capability for restraining the transport of radionuclides. Results indicate that the vadose zone is up to 38 m in thickness and is made up of alluvial clay soils and very highly weathered granite. The vadose

  4. Levels and risk assessment of chemical contaminants in byproducts for animal feed in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Alicja; Granby, Kit; Eriksen, Folmer D; Cederberg, Tommy Licht; Friis-Wandall, Søren; Simonsen, Yvonne; Broesbøl-Jensen, Birgitte; Bonnichsen, Rikke

    2014-01-01

    With aim to provide information on chemical contaminants in byproducts in animal feed, the data from an official control by the Danish Plant Directorate during 1998-2009, were reviewed and several samples of citrus pulp and dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) were additionally collected for analysis and risk assessment. The levels of contaminants in the samples from the official control were below maximum limits from EU regulations with only a few exceptions in the following groups; dioxins and dioxin-like polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) in fish-containing byproducts and dioxins in vegetable and animal fat, hydrogen cyanide in linseed, and cadmium in sunflowers. The levels of pesticides and mycotoxins in the additionally collected samples were below maximum limits. Enniatin B (ENN B) was present in all DDGS samples. The hypothetical cases of carry-over of contamination from these byproducts were designed assuming total absorption and accumulation of the ingested contaminant in meat and milk and high exposure (a byproduct formed 15-20% of the feed ration depending on the species). The risk assessment was refined based on literature data on metabolism in relevant animal species. Risk assessment of contaminants in byproducts is generally based on a worst-case approach, as data on carry-over of a contaminant are sparse. This may lead to erroneous estimation of health hazards. The presence of ENN B in all samples of DDGS indicates that potential impact of this emerging mycotoxin on feed and food safety deserves attention. A challenge for the future is to fill up gaps in toxicological databases and improve models for carry-over of contaminants. PMID:25190554

  5. Characterization of heterojunctions via x-ray and uv photoemission spectroscopy: energy level implications for single and mixed monolayer SAMs, cadmium selenide nanoparticle films, and organic semiconductor depositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Amy L.

    This work has centered on the interface dipoles arising at heterojunctions between metals, semiconductor nanoparticles, self-assembled monolayers, and organic semiconductor materials. Alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers, CdSe nanocrystals, and the organic semiconductors zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and Buckminster fullerene (C60) were the basis of these investigations. UV photoemission spectroscopy has proven to be an invaluable tool to observe the vacuum level shifts for these analyses while using XPS to corroborate surface structure. With a full evaluation of these surfaces, the shifts in the vacuum level, valence ionizations, and core ionizations, the impact of these interfaces, as well as their influence on the subsequent deposition of organic semiconductor layers is established. Alkanethiols possessing varying dipole moments were examined on gold and silver substrates. The viability of these alkanethiols was demonstrated to predictively adjust the work function of these metals as a function of their intrinsic dipole moments projected to surface normal, and established differences between Ag---S and Au---S bonds. The capability of the SAMs to modify the work function of gold provided an opportunity for mixed monolayers of the alkanethiols to produce a precise range of work functions by minimal adjustments of solution concentration, which were examined with a simple point dipole model. Photoemission spectroscopy offers a thorough analysis of CdSe nanoparticle films. Despite a plethora of research on these nanocrystals, there still is controversy on the magnitude of the shift in the valence band with diameter. In our research we found the majority of the valence band shift could be attributed to the interface dipole, ignored previously. Meanwhile, the valence band tethered films was obscured by the sulfur of the thiol tether. Finally, organic semiconductor layers deposited on SAMs on gold exhibited various interface dipole effects at these heterojunctions. Charge

  6. Level and intensity of objectively assessed physical activity among pregnant women from urban Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hjorth Mads F

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Women in low-income countries are generally considered to have a high physical workload which is sustained during pregnancy. Although most previous studies have been based on questionnaires a recent meta-analysis of doubly labeled water data has raised questions about the actual amount of physical activity performed. In this study we report objectively assessed levels of physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness and muscular fitness among pregnant urban Ethiopian women, and their association with demographic characteristics and anthropometric measures. Methods Physical activity was measured for seven consecutive days in 304 women using a combined uniaxial accelerometer and heart rate sensor. Activity energy expenditure was determined using a group calibration in a branched equation model framework. Type and duration of activities were reported using a 24-hour physical activity recall and grip strength was assessed using a dynamometer. Results Median (interquartile-range, IQR activity energy expenditure was 31.1 (23.7-42.0 kJ/kg/day corresponding to a median (IQR physical activity level of 1.46 (1.39-1.58. Median (IQR time in sedentary, light, and moderate-to-vigorous intensity was 1100 (999–1175, 303 (223–374 and 40 (22–69 min/day, respectively. Mean (standard deviation sleeping heart rate was 73.6 (8.0 beats/min and grip strength was 21.6 (4.5 kg. Activity energy expenditure was 14% higher for every 10 cm2 difference in arm muscle area and 10% lower for every 10 cm2 difference in arm fat area and 10-week difference in gestational age. Conclusion The level and intensity of physical activity among pregnant women from urban Ethiopia is low compared to non-pregnant women from other low income countries as well as pregnant European women from high-income countries.

  7. Assessment of Growth and Oxidized High-Density Lipoprotien Level in Children on Regular Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheir Bahgat Fayed*, Manal Abd EL-Salam*, Iman Mouhamed El-Bagoury**,

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The cause of growth failure in chronic kidney disease (CKD is multi-factorial with linear impairment being a final common pathway of various factors including malnutrition, increased catabolism, loss of nutrients and antioxidants, and aggressive dietary restrictions during dialysis .Anemia, metabolic acidosis and persistent micro inflammations are also causative factors.Objectives: To assess growth in children with CKD on regular hemodialysis and measure oxidized high density lipoprotein (OX-HDL, highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP and to discuss their roles as a risk factors of malnutrition among studied cases.Patients and Methods: The study included 25 children with end stage renal disease (ESRD on regular hemodialysis more than 6 months. Their ages ranged from 5-15 years with a mean of 10.76 years, also 25 of apparently healthy, age and sex matched were included. The study sample was selected from pediatric dialysis unit and outpatients clinic, of AL-Zahraa University hospital .Anthropometric measurements were assessed with determination of OX-HDL and hsCRP serum levels in both cases and the controls.Results: Anthropometry showed significant decrease in weight, height, body mass index, mid arm circumference and triceps skin fold thickness in patients when compared to the controls. 100% of patients had high level of OX-HDL and hsCRP, and positive correlation between OX-HDL and Z-score for Wt and Ht were detected.Conclusion: Malnutrition, and growth delay are common in children with chronic kidney disease on regular hemodialysis. High rate of inflammation in dialysis children as there were high level of hsCRP and OX HDL. HDL, in regular hemodialysis children loses its protective function as an anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and becomes pro-inflammatory factor

  8. Assessment of the effectiveness of low level laser in the treatment of alveolar osteitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Goran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Alveolar osteitis (AO is the extraction wound healing disorder with a presence of severe pain. Low level laser therapy stimulates cell metabolism and microcirculation, have has pronounced analgesic, antiedematous and anti-inflammatory effect and speeds up wound healing process. The aim of this study was to present results of clinical research that examined the effectiveness of low level laser in pain relief and healing of extraction wounds with alveolar osteitis in the lower jaw which was formed on the second day after tooth extraction. Methods. The study was conducted on 60 subjects divided into the study and the control group. In both groups extraction wounds were processed in similar way, except that in the study group was applied daily treatment of low level laser with a total of eight sessions of radiation, while in the control group extraction wounds were dressed with zinc oxide eugenol paste, which was changed every 48 hours up to the pain cessation. Measurement of pain intensity was done with a visual analogue scale (VAS 10 min prior to processing of extraction wounds and daily for the next eight days. Assessment of the effectiveness of low level laser on healing of extraction wounds was performed on the day eight of the treatment. Results. On the day five after beginning of the treatment of extraction wounds with alveolar osteitis in the patients of the study group a lower average value of pain as compared to the control group was registered. This difference was increased within the following days. Extraction wounds healing in the study group was more successful and faster than in the control group. Conclusion. This study suggested that the reduction of pain was more pronounced in the patients with alveolar osteitis whose extraction wounds were subjected to low level laser radiation in comparison to those in which extraction wounds were treated with zinc oxide eugenol paste.

  9. Mapping return levels of absolute NDVI variations for the assessment of drought risk in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonini, F.; Hochmair, H. H.; Jona Lasinio, G.

    2012-12-01

    The analysis and forecasting of extreme climatic events has become increasingly relevant to planning effective financial and food-related interventions in third-world countries. Natural disasters and climate change, both large and small scale, have a great impact on non-industrialized populations who rely exclusively on activities such as crop production, fishing, and similar livelihood activities. It is important to identify the extent of the areas prone to severe drought conditions in order to study the possible consequences of the drought on annual crop production. In this paper, we aim to identify such areas within the South Tigray zone, Ethiopia, using a transformation of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) called Absolute Difference NDVI (ADVI). Negative NDVI shifts from the historical average can generally be linked to a reduction in the vigor of local vegetation. Drought is more likely to increase in areas where negative shifts occur more frequently and with high magnitude, making it possible to spot critical situations. We propose a new methodology for the assessment of drought risk in areas where crop production represents a primary source of livelihood for its inhabitants. We estimate ADVI return levels pixel per pixel by fitting extreme value models to independent monthly minima. The study is conducted using SPOT-Vegetation (VGT) ten-day composite (S10) images from April 1998 to March 2009. In all short-term and long-term predictions, we found that central and southern areas of the South Tigray zone are prone to a higher drought risk compared to other areas.; Temporal autocorrelation among monthly minima within the Alamata woreda. (a) ACF-Boxplot and (b) PACF-Boxplot. ; ADVI return level estimates. (a) 10-Month return levels. (b) 100-Month return levels. (c) 1000-Month return levels.

  10. Climate uncertainty and implications for U.S. state-level risk assessment through 2050.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loose, Verne W.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Stamber, Kevin Louis; Kelic, Andjelka; Backus, George A.; Warren, Drake E.; Zagonel, Aldo A.; Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Klise, Geoffrey T.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

    2009-10-01

    Decisions for climate policy will need to take place in advance of climate science resolving all relevant uncertainties. Further, if the concern of policy is to reduce risk, then the best-estimate of climate change impacts may not be so important as the currently understood uncertainty associated with realizable conditions having high consequence. This study focuses on one of the most uncertain aspects of future climate change - precipitation - to understand the implications of uncertainty on risk and the near-term justification for interventions to mitigate the course of climate change. We show that the mean risk of damage to the economy from climate change, at the national level, is on the order of one trillion dollars over the next 40 years, with employment impacts of nearly 7 million labor-years. At a 1% exceedance-probability, the impact is over twice the mean-risk value. Impacts at the level of individual U.S. states are then typically in the multiple tens of billions dollar range with employment losses exceeding hundreds of thousands of labor-years. We used results of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report 4 (AR4) climate-model ensemble as the referent for climate uncertainty over the next 40 years, mapped the simulated weather hydrologically to the county level for determining the physical consequence to economic activity at the state level, and then performed a detailed, seventy-industry, analysis of economic impact among the interacting lower-48 states. We determined industry GDP and employment impacts at the state level, as well as interstate population migration, effect on personal income, and the consequences for the U.S. trade balance.

  11. Assessing spatial fluctuations, temporal variability, and measurement error in estimated levels of disinfection by-products in tap water: implications for exposure assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Symanski, E; Savitz, D; SINGER, P

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To assess spatial fluctuations, temporal variability, and errors due to sampling and analysis in levels of disinfection by-products in routine monitoring tap water samples and in water samples collected in households within the same distribution system for an exposure assessment study.

  12. Performance Assessment Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Site Low-Level Burial Grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2006-03-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, requires a disposal authorization statement authorizing operation (or continued operation) for low-level waste disposal facilities. In fulfillment of these requirements, a disposal authorization statement was issued on October 25, 1999, authorizing the Hanford Site to transfer, receive, possess, and dispose of low-level radioactive waste at the 200 East Area burial grounds and the 200 West Area burial grounds. One of the conditions is that monitoring plans for the 200 East Area and 200 West Area low-level burial grounds be written and approved by the Richland Operations Office. As a result of a record of decision for the Hanford Site Solid Waste Program and acceptance of the Hanford Site Solid Waste Environmental Impact Statement, the use of the low-level burial ground (LLBG) as a disposal facility for low-level and mixed low-level wastes has been restricted to lined trenches and the Navy reactor-compartment trench only. Hence, as of July 2004, only the two lined trenches in burial ground 218-W-5 (trenches 31 and 34, see Appendix A) and the Navy reactor-compartment trench in burial ground 218 E 12B (trench 94) are allowed to receive waste. When the two lined trenches are filled, the LLBG will cease to operate except for reactor compartment disposal at trench 94. Remaining operational lifetime of the LLBG is dependent on waste volume disposal rates. Existing programs for air sampling and analyses and subsidence monitoring are currently adequate for performance assessment at the LLBG. The waste disposal authorization for the Hanford Site is based (in part) on the post-closure performance assessments for the LLBG. In order to maintain a useful link between operational monitoring (e.g., Resource Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA], Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, and State Waste Discharge Permits), constituents, monitoring frequencies, and boundaries require

  13. Performance Assessment Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Site Low-Level Burial Grounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, requires a disposal authorization statement authorizing operation (or continued operation) for low-level waste disposal facilities. In fulfillment of these requirements, a disposal authorization statement was issued on October 25, 1999, authorizing the Hanford Site to transfer, receive, possess, and dispose of low-level radioactive waste at the 200 East Area burial grounds and the 200 West Area burial grounds. One of the conditions is that monitoring plans for the 200 East Area and 200 West Area low-level burial grounds be written and approved by the Richland Operations Office. As a result of a record of decision for the Hanford Site Solid Waste Program and acceptance of the Hanford Site Solid Waste Environmental Impact Statement, the use of the low-level burial ground (LLBG) as a disposal facility for low-level and mixed low-level wastes has been restricted to lined trenches and the Navy reactor-compartment trench only. Hence, as of July 2004, only the two lined trenches in burial ground 218-W-5 (trenches 31 and 34, see Appendix A) and the Navy reactor-compartment trench in burial ground 218 E 12B (trench 94) are allowed to receive waste. When the two lined trenches are filled, the LLBG will cease to operate except for reactor compartment disposal at trench 94. Remaining operational lifetime of the LLBG is dependent on waste volume disposal rates. Existing programs for air sampling and analyses and subsidence monitoring are currently adequate for performance assessment at the LLBG. The waste disposal authorization for the Hanford Site is based (in part) on the post-closure performance assessments for the LLBG. In order to maintain a useful link between operational monitoring (e.g., Resource Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA], Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, and State Waste Discharge Permits), constituents, monitoring frequencies, and boundaries require

  14. Assessment of studies and researches on warehousing - High-level and intermediate-level-long-lived radioactive wastes - December 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This large report first presents the approach adopted for the study and research on the warehousing of high-level and intermediate-level-long-lived radioactive wastes. It outlines how reversible storage and warehousing are complementary, discusses the lessons learned from researches performed by the CEA on long duration warehousing, presents the framework of studies and researches performed since 2006, and presents the scientific and technical content of studies and researches (warehousing need analysis, search for technical options providing complementarity with storage, extension or creation of warehousing installations). The second part addresses high-level and intermediate-level-long-lived radioactive waste parcels, indicates their origins and quantities. The third part proposes an analysis of warehousing capacities: existing capacities, French industrial experience in waste parcel warehousing, foreign experience in waste warehousing. The fourth part addresses reversible storage in deep geological formation: storage safety functions, storage reversibility, storage parcels, storage architecture, chronicle draft. The fifth part proposes an inventory of warehousing needs in terms of additional capacities for the both types of wastes (high-level, and intermediate-level-long-lived), and discusses warehousing functionalities and safety objectives. The sixth and seventh parts propose a detailed overview of design options for warehousing installations, respectively for high-level and for intermediate-level-long-lived waste parcels: main technical issues, feasibility studies of different concepts or architecture shapes, results of previous studies and introduction to studies performed since 2011, possible evolutions of the HA1, HA2 and MAVL concepts. The eighth chapter reports a phenomenological analysis of warehousing and the optimisation of material selection and construction arrangements. The last part discusses the application of researches to the extension of the

  15. Methods, quality assurance, and data for assessing atmospheric deposition of pesticides in the Central Valley of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Celia; Majewski, Michael S.; Foreman, William T.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey monitored atmospheric deposition of pesticides in the Central Valley of California during two studies in 2001 and 2002–04. The 2001 study sampled wet deposition (rain) and storm-drain runoff in the Modesto, California, area during the orchard dormant-spray season to examine the contribution of pesticide concentrations to storm runoff from rainfall. In the 2002–04 study, the number and extent of collection sites in the Central Valley were increased to determine the areal distribution of organophosphate insecticides and other pesticides, and also five more sample types were collected. These were dry deposition, bulk deposition, and three sample types collected from a soil box: aqueous phase in runoff, suspended sediment in runoff, and surficial-soil samples. This report provides concentration data and describes methods and quality assurance of sample collection and laboratory analysis for pesticide compounds in all samples collected from 16 sites. Each sample was analyzed for 41 currently used pesticides and 23 pesticide degradates, including oxygen analogs (oxons) of 9 organophosphate insecticides. Analytical results are presented by sample type and study period. The median concentrations of both chloryprifos and diazinon sampled at four urban (0.067 micrograms per liter [μg/L] and 0.515 μg/L, respectively) and four agricultural sites (0.079 μg/L and 0.583 μg/L, respectively) during a January 2001 storm event in and around Modesto, Calif., were nearly identical, indicating that the overall atmospheric burden in the region appeared to be fairly similar during the sampling event. Comparisons of median concentrations in the rainfall to those in the McHenry storm-drain runoff showed that, for some compounds, rainfall contributed a substantial percentage of the concentration in the runoff; for other compounds, the concentrations in rainfall were much greater than in the runoff. For example, diazinon concentrations in rainfall were about

  16. Safety Assessment of Low- and Intermediate-Level Waste Disposal at Vaalputs, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, M. W.; Beyleveld, C.; Carolissen, A.

    2006-12-01

    The South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (Necsa ) owns and operates the Vaalputs radioactive waste disposal site, which is South Africa's designated facility for the disposal of low-and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW). The bulk of the currently authorized LILW disposal at Vaalputs was generated at the Koeberg Nuclear Power Station (KNPS) near Cape Town. However, Necsa has generated wastes associated with research and uranium enrichment that are currently in storage, which are intended for disposal at Vaalputs. In addition, South Africa is currently considering expansion of its nuclear power generating capabilities, both through construction of a second pressurized water reactor (PWR) and through the development of the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) design. The proposed change in waste characteristics warrants a safety review of the Vaalputs authorization for the disposal of LILW. As part of the safety review, an updated postclosure safety assessment is being conducted. This current safety assessment is being conducted according to an internationally accepted state-of-the-art safety assessment methodology (IAEA, 2004), and is defensible, transparent, and credible. A formal scenario-generation methodology is being applied, which has led to the identification of a number of site-specific scenarios for further consideration. Specific features of the site, the disposal facility design, and local behavior patterns were used to screen Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) from consideration. Specific FEPs were chosen as initiating FEPs for scenarios to be considered in the safety assessment, based on a combination of reasonable likelihood and high consequence for the analysis. Scenarios identified by this process are A nominal scenario represents the intended design basis for the long-term function of the repository. A late-subsidence scenario is included, in which subsidence occurs after active institutional control measures cease, such that

  17. Assessment of the requirements for DOE's annual report to congress on low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Low-level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (PL99-240; LLRWPAA) requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to ''submit to Congress on an annual basis a report which: (1) summarizes the progress of low-level waste disposal siting and licensing activities within each compact region, (2) reviews the available volume reduction technologies, their applications, effectiveness, and costs on a per unit volume basis, (3) reviews interim storage facility requirements, costs, and usage, (4) summarizes transportation requirements for such wastes on an inter- and intra-regional basis, (5) summarizes the data on the total amount of low-level waste shipped for disposal on a yearly basis, the proportion of such wastes subjected to volume reduction, the average volume reduction attained,, and the proportion of wastes stored on an interim basis, and (6) projects the interim storage and final disposal volume requirements anticipated for the following year, on a regional basis (Sec. 7(b)).'' This report reviews and assesses what is required for development of the annual report specified in the LLRWPAA. This report addresses each of the subject areas set out in the LLRWPAA

  18. Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) Synthetic Instrument Capabilities Assessment and Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Bradish, Martin A.

    2011-01-01

    The role of synthetic instruments (SIs) for Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) is to provide an external lower-level diagnostic and functional test capability beyond the built-in-test capabilities of spacecraft electronics. Built-in diagnostics can report faults and symptoms, but isolating the root cause and performing corrective action requires specialized instruments. Often a fault can be revealed by emulating the operation of external hardware. This implies complex hardware that is too massive to be accommodated in spacecraft. The SI strategy is aimed at minimizing complexity and mass by employing highly reconfigurable instruments that perform diagnostics and emulate external functions. In effect, SI can synthesize an instrument on demand. The SI architecture section of this document summarizes the result of a recent program diagnostic and test needs assessment based on the International Space Station. The SI architecture addresses operational issues such as minimizing crew time and crew skill level, and the SI data transactions between the crew and supporting ground engineering searching for the root cause and formulating corrective actions. SI technology is described within a teleoperations framework. The remaining sections describe a lab demonstration intended to show that a single SI circuit could synthesize an instrument in hardware and subsequently clear the hardware and synthesize a completely different instrument on demand. An analysis of the capabilities and limitations of commercially available SI hardware and programming tools is included. Future work in SI technology is also described.

  19. Development and methodology of level 1 probability safety assessment at PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maskin, Mazleha; Tom, Phongsakorn Prak; Lanyau, Tonny Anak; Saad, Mohamad Fauzi; Ismail, Ahmad Razali; Abu, Mohamad Puad Haji [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, MOSTI, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Brayon, Fedrick Charlie Matthew [Atomic Energy Licensing Board, MOSTI, 43800 Dengkil, Selangor (Malaysia); Mohamed, Faizal [Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-02-12

    As a consequence of the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan, the safety aspects of the one and only research reactor (31 years old) in Malaysia need be reviewed. Based on this decision, Malaysian Nuclear Agency in collaboration with Atomic Energy Licensing Board and Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia develop a Level-1 Probability Safety Assessment on this research reactor. This work is aimed to evaluate the potential risks of incidents in RTP and at the same time to identify internal and external hazard that may cause any extreme initiating events. This report documents the methodology in developing a Level 1 PSA performed for the RTP as a complementary approach to deterministic safety analysis both in neutronics and thermal hydraulics. This Level-1 PSA work has been performed according to the procedures suggested in relevant IAEA publications and at the same time numbers of procedures has been developed as part of an Integrated Management System programme implemented in Nuclear Malaysia.

  20. An examination of silver nanoparticles in socks using screening-level life cycle assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Screening-level life cycle assessment (LCA) can provide a quick tool to identify the life cycle hot spots and focus research efforts to help to minimize the burdens of a technology while maximizing its benefits. The use of nanoscale silver in consumer products has exploded in popularity. Although its use is considered beneficial because of antimicrobial effects, some attention must be given to the potential environmental impacts it could impart on the life cycle of these nanoproducts as production demands escalate. This work examines the environmental impact of including silver nanoparticles in commercially available socks using screening-level LCA. Initial results suggest washing during the use phase contributes substantially more than the manufacturing phase to the product life cycle impacts. Comparison of nanoparticles prepared by either chemical reduction, liquid flame spray (LFS), or plasma arc demonstrate how the type of manufacturing process used for the nanoscale silver can change the resulting life cycle impact of the sock product. The magnitude of this impact will depend on the type of process used to manufacture the nanoscale silver, with LFS having the most impact because of the need for large quantities of hydrogen and oxygen. Although the increased impacts for a single nanoproduct may be relatively small, the added environmental load can actually be a significant quantity when considered at the regional or global production level.

  1. Development and methodology of level 1 probability safety assessment at PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full-text: As a consequence of the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan, the safety aspects of the one and only research reactor (31 years old) in Malaysia need be reviewed. Based on this decision, Malaysian Nuclear Agency in collaboration with Atomic Energy Licensing Board and Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia develop a Level-1 Probability Safety Assessment on this research reactor. This work is aimed to evaluate the potential risks of incidents in RTP and at the same time to identify internal and external hazard that may cause any extreme initiating events. This report documents the methodology in developing a Level 1 PSA performed for the RTP as a complementary approach to deterministic safety analysis both in neutronics and thermal hydraulics. This Level-1 PSA work has been performed according to the procedures suggested in relevant IAEA publications and at the same time numbers of procedures has been developed as part of an Integrated Management System programme implemented in Nuclear Malaysia. (author)

  2. Safety Assessment of the New Very Low-Level Waste Disposal Installation at El Cabril, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sixth General Radioactive Waste Plan approved by the Spanish government in 2006, foresees important volumes of wastes with a very low content of radioactivity mainly coming from the dismantling of nuclear power plants, along with the occurrence of some radiological industrial incidents in the past. This fact has boosted the construction of a new disposal installation, specifically designed for this category of waste. This new installation is part of the existing low and intermediate level waste (LILW) disposal facility at El Cabril, and includes four cells with a total capacity of around 130,000 m3. The design of the cells is consistent with the European Directive for the disposal of hazardous waste and fulfils the same basic safety criteria as the present facility for LILW. The safety assessment methodology applied for the very low level waste (VLLW) installation is fully coherent with the approach adopted for the existing disposal facility for low and intermediate level waste (concrete vaults disposal system) and takes into account the potential impact of the new installation during both the operational and long-term periods. The license for the VLLW installation was granted by the Spanish Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Commerce (MITYC) in July 2008, following technical approval by the Nuclear Safety Council (CSN), and the first disposal operation occurred in October 2008. (authors)

  3. IMPROVEMENT OF THE ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUE OF THE ORGANIZATIONAL LEVEL OF CONCENTRATED CONSTRUCTION TERRITORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kievskiy Leonid Vladimirovich

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article the kinds of the concentrated construction are considered, which differ by types of construction production with account of branch and regional estimate factors. The methods of assessing the level of preparation of the territories taking into account different types of models and the purposes of regional planning are given. Despite the approved postulates, which are available in the theory and practice of organizational preparation of the territories, many questions still have not been solved and are handled using ineffective methods. The authors believe, that during preparation of territories it is necessary to introduce the elements of cycles’ combination of engineering calculations and laying design of communications to a building site. Defining the sequence of these works’ performance for objects is modelled taking into account the cyclic-combined method of preparing the sites for construction. The development of the territory can be provided only in case of annual investment into various objects of cluster construction, in order to uniformly or rhythmically load the construction capacities upon condition of the rhythmical preparation level of the territories of concentrated construction. As the generalizing indicator the criterion of rhythm of means planning can be used. Thus, using a rhythm indicator as a criterion of organizational preparation of territorial clusters it is possible to provide the necessary level of investment of preparation and construction programs for a certain period.

  4. Australia’s first national level quantitative environmental justice assessment of industrial air pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Jayajit; Green, Donna

    2014-04-01

    This study presents the first national level quantitative environmental justice assessment of industrial air pollution in Australia. Specifically, our analysis links the spatial distribution of sites and emissions associated with industrial pollution sources derived from the National Pollution Inventory, to Indigenous status and social disadvantage characteristics of communities derived from Australian Bureau of Statistics indicators. Our results reveal a clear national pattern of environmental injustice based on the locations of industrial pollution sources, as well as volume, and toxicity of air pollution released at these locations. Communities with the highest number of polluting sites, emission volume, and toxicity-weighted air emissions indicate significantly greater proportions of Indigenous population and higher levels of socio-economic disadvantage. The quantities and toxicities of industrial air pollution are particularly higher in communities with the lowest levels of educational attainment and occupational status. These findings emphasize the need for more detailed analysis in specific regions and communities where socially disadvantaged groups are disproportionately impacted by industrial air pollution. Our empirical findings also underscore the growing necessity to incorporate environmental justice considerations in environmental planning and policy-making in Australia.

  5. The Assessment of Self-Efficacy Level According to University StudentsAND#8217; Smoking Situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Ozlem Kilinc

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT AIM: This essay is made with the aim of assessing of self-efficacy level according to university students’ smoking situation. METHOD: The study that is descriptive type was made in between September 2009-June 2010 in University of Bingol. Totally 920 students who attend Bingol Universty in 2009-2010 academic year consist of the universe of the study. The choice of sample wasn’t used in the study, the study completed with 765 students who were volunteer to join the study data was collected by using the form including socio-demographic data and self-efficacy scale. Evaluating data was made by descriptive tests in computer environment, t test and analysis of variance. RESULTS: The rate of students’ smoking is 6,9 % among girls, 37,4 % among boys and it is totally 44,3 %. It was determined that place that they live, their fathers’ education of smoking students idea quit smoking effect their self-efficacy level. It was determined that family type, marital status, fathers’ education of non-smoking students effect their self-efficacy level. CONCLUSION: It is found that self-efficacy of non-smoking students is higher than the self-efficacy of smoking students. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(3.000: 255-264

  6. Australia’s first national level quantitative environmental justice assessment of industrial air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents the first national level quantitative environmental justice assessment of industrial air pollution in Australia. Specifically, our analysis links the spatial distribution of sites and emissions associated with industrial pollution sources derived from the National Pollution Inventory, to Indigenous status and social disadvantage characteristics of communities derived from Australian Bureau of Statistics indicators. Our results reveal a clear national pattern of environmental injustice based on the locations of industrial pollution sources, as well as volume, and toxicity of air pollution released at these locations. Communities with the highest number of polluting sites, emission volume, and toxicity-weighted air emissions indicate significantly greater proportions of Indigenous population and higher levels of socio-economic disadvantage. The quantities and toxicities of industrial air pollution are particularly higher in communities with the lowest levels of educational attainment and occupational status. These findings emphasize the need for more detailed analysis in specific regions and communities where socially disadvantaged groups are disproportionately impacted by industrial air pollution. Our empirical findings also underscore the growing necessity to incorporate environmental justice considerations in environmental planning and policy-making in Australia. (paper)

  7. Monitoring strategy to assessment the air pollution level in Salamanca (México)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrón-Adame, J. M.; Cortina-Januchs, M. G.; Andina, D.; Vega-Corona, A.

    2009-04-01

    Air pollution affects not only the quality of life and the health of the urban population but also forests and agriculture. Agricultural crops can be injured when exposed to high concentrations of various air pollutants. Air pollutants can generally be classed as either local or widespread. Local pollutants are those emitted from a specific stationary source and result in a well-defined zone of vegetation injury or contamination. Most common among the local pollutants are sulphur dioxide, fluorides, ammonia and particulate matter. The paper presents an air monitoring strategy based on data fusion and Artificial Neural Networks. The main objective is to classify automatically the air pollution level as a proposal to assessment the air pollution level affecting the agriculture in Salamanca (Mexico). Salamanca is catalogued as one of the most polluted cities in Mexico. Pollutant concentrations and meteorological variables have been consider in data fusion process in order to build a Representative Pollution Vector (RPV). Meteorological variables (Wind Direction and Wind Speed) are taken as a decision factor in the air pollutant concentration level. RPV is used to train an Artificial Neural Network in order to classify new pollutant events. In the experiments, real time series gathered from the Automatic Environmental Monitoring Network (AEMN) in Salamanca have been used.

  8. Development and methodology of level 1 probability safety assessment at PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskin, Mazleha; Tom, Phongsakorn Prak; Lanyau, Tonny Anak; Brayon, Fedrick Charlie Matthew; Mohamed, Faizal; Saad, Mohamad Fauzi; Ismail, Ahmad Razali; Abu, Mohamad Puad Haji

    2014-02-01

    As a consequence of the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan, the safety aspects of the one and only research reactor (31 years old) in Malaysia need be reviewed. Based on this decision, Malaysian Nuclear Agency in collaboration with Atomic Energy Licensing Board and Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia develop a Level-1 Probability Safety Assessment on this research reactor. This work is aimed to evaluate the potential risks of incidents in RTP and at the same time to identify internal and external hazard that may cause any extreme initiating events. This report documents the methodology in developing a Level 1 PSA performed for the RTP as a complementary approach to deterministic safety analysis both in neutronics and thermal hydraulics. This Level-1 PSA work has been performed according to the procedures suggested in relevant IAEA publications and at the same time numbers of procedures has been developed as part of an Integrated Management System programme implemented in Nuclear Malaysia.

  9. ASSESSMENT OF AWARENESS LEVEL OF OWN DISEASE IN PATIENTS WITH STABLE ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. F. Andreeva

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Arterial hypertension (AH is the most frequent risk factor of cardiovascular diseases and related mortality in all developed countries. Altough therapy with antihypertensive drugs significantly reduces this risk, patients with stable mild hypertension have poor compliance with the treatment. The reasons and levels of inadequacy of antihypertensive therapy in this group of patients are well-known.Aim. To evaluate the awareness level of own disease, adequacy of therapy only in those patients with stable mild arterial hypertension, who are complied with recommendations of physicians concerning AH treatment and changing of mode of life. It was also planned to reveal possible grounds for inadequate secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.Materials and methods. 76 patiens with stable mild arterial hypertension were included into study. They didn’t have any serious concomitant diseases and were complied with the recommendations of physicians concerning secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Questionnaire of State Research Center for Preventive Medicine “Assessment of awareness level of own disease in patients with stable arterial hypertension” was used in the study.Results. It was revealed, that the majority of patients, invoved in the study, were nonsmokers and regularly took antihypertensive drugs. 70% of questioned patients reached the target arterial blood pressure levels, while patients with arterial hypertension in general Russia population received regular and efficient treatment in less than 30-20%. Drugs treatment of questioned patients almost didn’t differ from that, which received patients in out-patient clinics of Moscow: in both cases ACE inhibitors were preferred. Only 29% of questioned patients knew their lipid levels in blood and none of the patients took drugs, reducing levels of lipids in blood. Half of the patients, that took part in our study, had increased level of body mass index.Conclusions. Inadequate

  10. E AREA LOW LEVEL WASTE FACILITY DOE 435.1 PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhite, E

    2008-03-31

    This Performance Assessment for the Savannah River Site E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility was prepared to meet requirements of Chapter IV of the Department of Energy Order 435.1-1. The Order specifies that a Performance Assessment should provide reasonable assurance that a low-level waste disposal facility will comply with the performance objectives of the Order. The Order also requires assessments of impacts to water resources and to hypothetical inadvertent intruders for purposes of establishing limits on radionuclides that may be disposed near-surface. According to the Order, calculations of potential doses and releases from the facility should address a 1,000-year period after facility closure. The point of compliance for the performance measures relevant to the all pathways and air pathway performance objective, as well as to the impact on water resources assessment requirement, must correspond to the point of highest projected dose or concentration beyond a 100-m buffer zone surrounding the disposed waste following the assumed end of active institutional controls 100 years after facility closure. During the operational and institutional control periods, the point of compliance for the all pathways and air pathway performance measures is the SRS boundary. However, for the water resources impact assessment, the point of compliance remains the point of highest projected dose or concentration beyond a 100-m buffer zone surrounding the disposed waste during the operational and institutional control periods. For performance measures relevant to radon and inadvertent intruders, the points of compliance are the disposal facility surface for all time periods and the disposal facility after the assumed loss of active institutional controls 100 years after facility closure, respectively. The E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility is located in the central region of the SRS known as the General Separations Area. It is an elbow-shaped, cleared area, which curves to the northwest

  11. Effects of pulsed laser annealing on deep level defects in electrochemically-deposited and furnace annealed CuInSe2 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CuInSe2 (CISe) is a prototype material for the I–III–VI chalcopyrites such as Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 used as absorber layers in thin film photovoltaic cells. Carefully-controlled pulsed-laser annealing (PLA) is a unique annealing process that has been demonstrated to improve the device performance of chalcopyrite solar cells. Here, we investigate the changes in defect populations after PLA of electrochemically-deposited CISe thin films previously furnace annealed in selenium vapor. The films were irradiated in the sub-melting regime at fluences inducing temperatures up to 840 ± 100 K. Deep-level transient spectroscopy on Schottky diodes reveals that the activation energy of the dominant majority carrier trap changes non-monotonically from 215 ± 10 meV for the reference sample, to 330 ± 10 meV for samples irradiated at 20 and 30 mJ/cm2, and then back to 215 ± 10 meV for samples irradiated at 40 mJ/cm2. A hypothesis involving competing processes of diffusion of Cu and laser-induced generation of In vacancies may explain this behavior. - Highlights: ► Pulsed laser annealing (PLA) effects studied on CuInSe2 films ► PLA improves crystalline order parameter. ► PLA induces changes in majority carrier defect levels

  12. Assessment of medical resident's attention to the health literacy level of newly admitted patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecile Karsenty

    2013-12-01

    their patients’ health literacy. Our assessment revealed much room for improvement. This checklist can be used as a tool to teach future residents how to better assess and take into consideration their patients’ health literacy level and as a result communicate with patients more effectively.

  13. The use of multi temporal LiDAR to assess basin-scale erosion and deposition following the catastrophic January 2011 Lockyer flood, SE Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croke, Jacky; Todd, Peter; Thompson, Chris; Watson, Fiona; Denham, Robert; Khanal, Giri

    2013-02-01

    Advances in remote sensing and digital terrain processing now allow for a sophisticated analysis of spatial and temporal changes in erosion and deposition. Digital elevation models (DEMs) can now be constructed and differenced to produce DEMs of Difference (DoD), which are used to assess net landscape change for morphological budgeting. To date this has been most effectively achieved in gravel-bed rivers over relatively small spatial scales. If the full potential of the technology is to be realised, additional studies are required at larger scales and across a wider range of geomorphic features. This study presents an assessment of the basin-scale spatial patterns of erosion, deposition, and net morphological change that resulted from a catastrophic flood event in the Lockyer Creek catchment of SE Queensland (SEQ) in January 2011. Multitemporal Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) DEMs were used to construct a DoD that was then combined with a one-dimensional flow hydraulic model HEC-RAS to delineate five major geomorphic landforms, including inner-channel area, within-channel benches, macrochannel banks, and floodplain. The LiDAR uncertainties were quantified and applied together with a probabilistic representation of uncertainty thresholded at a conservative 95% confidence interval. The elevation change distribution (ECD) for the 100-km2 study area indicates a magnitude of elevation change spanning almost 10 m but the mean elevation change of 0.04 m confirms that a large part of the landscape was characterised by relatively low magnitude changes over a large spatial area. Mean elevation changes varied by geomorphic feature and only two, the within-channel benches and macrochannel banks, were net erosional with an estimated combined loss of 1,815,149 m3 of sediment. The floodplain was the zone of major net deposition but mean elevation changes approached the defined critical limit of uncertainty. Areal and volumetric ECDs for this extreme event provide a

  14. The assessment of knowledge level about their disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Yavuz Karahan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims to evaluate, the level of knowledge about the disease of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and its relationship with the disease activity. Methods: A total of 50 patients with RA, diagnosed according to 2010 ACR/EULAR Rheumatoid Arthritis classification criteria, included in this study. Demographic features of patients were recorded. Turkish version of Patient Knowledge Questionnaire (PKQ used to evaluate the level of knowledge about the disease of patients with RA. Daily activity score (DAS-28, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ and visual analog scale (VAS were used to evaluate the activity of the disease. Results: The mean age of patients was 57.2±12.2 (36 females and 14 males. The mean of disease duration was 6.2±5.8 years. The mean was 3.2 (maximum value 9 for etiology, symptom and laboratory components, the mean of medication component: 2.9 (maximum value 7, the mean of exercise component: 2.4 (maximum value 7, the mean of protection of joints and energy component: 2.4 (maximum value 7 of PKQ. The total mean point was 10.9 (maximum value 30. There was no correlation between PKQ points and HAQ, DAS-28 and VAS parameters but there was a positive correlation between disease duration and PKQ points. Conclusion: The results of the study show no relationship between level of knowledge about the disease and disease activity and also functional status. On the other hand the level of knowledge about disease of patients with RA is very low. The results show the need for education programs and informative activities about RA. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (3: 429-434

  15. Mercury contamination in human hair and fish from Cambodia: levels, specific accumulation and risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercury (Hg) concentrations in human hair and fish samples from Phnom Penh, Kien Svay, Tomnup Rolork and Batrong, Cambodia, collected in November 1999 and December 2000 were determined to understand the status of contamination, and age- and sex-dependent accumulation in humans and to assess the intake of mercury via fish consumption. Mercury concentrations in human hair ranged from 0.54 to 190 μg/g dry wt. About 3% of the samples contained Hg levels exceeding the no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL) of WHO (50 μg/g) and the levels in some hair samples of women also exceeded the NOAEL (10 μg/g) associated with fetus neurotoxicity. A weak but significant positive correlation was observed between age and Hg levels in hair of residents. Mercury concentrations in muscle of marine and freshwater fish from Cambodia ranged from <0.01 to 0.96 μg/g wet wt. Mercury intake rates were estimated on the basis of the Hg content in fish and daily fish consumption. Three samples of marine fish including sharp-tooth snapper and obtuse barracuda, and one sample of sharp-tooth snapper exceeded the guidelines by US EPA and by Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), respectively, which indicates that some fish specimens examined (9% and 3% for US EPA and JECFA guidelines, respectively) were hazardous for consumption at the ingestion rate of Cambodian people (32.6 g/day). It is suggested that fish is probably the main source of Hg for Cambodian people. However, extremely high Hg concentrations were observed in some individuals and could not be explained by Hg intake from fish consumption, indicating some other contamination sources of Hg in Cambodia. - A source other than fish may be responsible for high Hg in some Cambodians

  16. Methodology for assessment of low level laser therapy (LLLT) irradiation parameters in muscle inflammation treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantineo, M.; Pinheiro, J. P.; Morgado, A. M.

    2013-11-01

    Several studies in human and animals show the clinical effectiveness of low level laser therapy (LLLT) in reducing some types of pain, treating inflammation and wound healing. However, more scientific evidence is required to prove the effectiveness of LLLT since many aspects of the cellular and molecular mechanisms triggered by irradiation of injured tissue with laser remain unknown. Here, we present a methodology that can be used to evaluate the effect of different LLLT irradiation parameters on the treatment of muscle inflammation on animals, through the quantification of four cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-2 and IL-6) in systemic blood and histological analysis of muscle tissue. We have used this methodology to assess the effect of LLLT parameters (wavelength, dose, power and type of illumination) in the treatment of inflammation induced in the gastrocnemius muscle of Wistar rats. Results obtained for laser dose evaluation with continuous illumination are presented.

  17. Radioactive Waste Management Complex low-level waste radiological performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the projected radiological dose impacts associated with the disposal of radioactive low-level waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This radiological performance assessment was conducted to evaluate compliance with applicable radiological criteria of the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the public and the environment. The calculations involved modeling the transport of radionuclides from buried waste, to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the public via air, groundwater, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses were made for both offsite receptors and individuals inadvertently intruding onto the site after closure. In addition, uncertainty and sensitivity analyses were performed. The results of the analyses indicate compliance with established radiological criteria and provide reasonable assurance that public health and safety will be protected

  18. JNC thermodynamic database for performance assessment of high-level radioactive waste disposal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a summary of status, frozen datasets, and future tasks of the JNC (Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute) thermodynamic database (JNC-TDB) for assessing performance of high-level radioactive waste in geological environments. The JNC-TDB development was carried out after the first progress report on geological disposal research in Japan (H-3). In the development, thermodynamic data (equilibrium constants at 25degC, I=0) for important radioactive elements were selected/determined based on original experimental data using different models (e.g., SIT, Pitzer). As a result, the reliability and traceability of the data for most of the important elements were improved over those of the PNC-TDB used in H-3 report. For detailed information of data analysis and selections for each element, see the JNC technical reports listed in this document. (author)

  19. Assessment of the radiological impact of disposal of low and intermediate level wastes on the seabed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes progress in the development of models for use in a radiological assessment of the disposal of low and intermediate level waste on the ocean floor. In particular the report describes the waste package model, the ocean dispersion model and the sedimentation model. Five types of waste package have been identified and models have been developed for them. A flow pattern for the Atlantic Ocean has been derived from the existing distribution of temperature and salinity in the Atlantic Ocean. However a number of discrepancies between the calculated and predicted pattern were found; the model has been extended to include all the world's oceans to correct this. The sedimentation model describes two types of scavenging particles in the water column, a well mixed benthic boundary layer and the top two metres of the bed sediments. Good agreement with the GESAMP ocean model results has been found. (author)

  20. Performance assessment for a high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that the EPRI effort in high-level waste repository performance assessment has added capabilities in several important technical areas, over previous models. Gaseous release of C14 is included, as are human intrusion scenarios. The model uses detailed calculations of precipitation events as a function of climate, along with a specific model of surface infiltration that accounts for ground vegetation and topography. The model also makes time-dependent calculations of hydrologic flow, accounting for changes in climate and flux. heat pulse effects are included, specifically the effect of heat on container performance, the response of the host tuff to high temperatures, and the solubility of waste material as a function of temperature. Specific models are used to calculate a source term as a function of saturated, unsaturated, or wet-drip conditions at the location of waste containers, and element solubility as well as waste dissolution are checked to determine the limiting condition on nuclide solution

  1. Radioactive Waste Management Complex low-level waste radiological performance assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maheras, S.J.; Rood, A.S.; Magnuson, S.O.; Sussman, M.E.; Bhatt, R.N.

    1994-04-01

    This report documents the projected radiological dose impacts associated with the disposal of radioactive low-level waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This radiological performance assessment was conducted to evaluate compliance with applicable radiological criteria of the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the public and the environment. The calculations involved modeling the transport of radionuclides from buried waste, to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the public via air, groundwater, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses were made for both offsite receptors and individuals inadvertently intruding onto the site after closure. In addition, uncertainty and sensitivity analyses were performed. The results of the analyses indicate compliance with established radiological criteria and provide reasonable assurance that public health and safety will be protected.

  2. Relation between estimated dry deposition and throughfall in a coniferous forest exposed to controlled levels of SO2 and NO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granat, L; Hällgren, J E

    1992-01-01

    Throughfall was collected in a Scots pine forest exposed to about 14 microg m(-3) of both SO2 and NO2, and in a control forest with 1 microg m(-3) SO2 and Precipitation was collected in a nearby open field. Collection was performed on an event basis during the whole vegetation period. Exposure was made by an open-air release system during the vegetation period, except during rain and at night. Additional sulfate deposition in the exposed forest (compared to control forest) was nearly equal to dry deposition of sulfur dioxide, as estimated with a stomatal conductance model adapted for the particular forest. It is thus concluded that essentially all of the dry deposited sulfur dioxide is eventually extracted and appears in throughfall-including the fraction that has been deposited through stomata. Attempts to relate net throughfall deposition to dry deposition of sulfate in the control forest were inconclusive, since a minor (10%) uncertainty in the water balance had a major influence on calculated deposition velocity for particulate sulfate. Nitrate throughfall deposition is about half of the open field wet deposition, both for the exposed and control forest. Thus, a long-term exposure with about 14 microg m(-3) NO2 decreased nitrate throughfall deposition. PMID:15092039

  3. CLINICAL ASSESSMENT OF THE EFFECT OF LOW LEVEL LASER TREATMENT OF ORAL MUCOSA DECUBITUS ULCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristina Lalabonova

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Decubitus ulcers in the oral mucosa tend to be very painful causing discomforting sensation in patients in speaking and eating. Low energy lasers can provide an alternative method for the treatment of these ulcers.The aim of the present paper was to assess clinically the healing effect of low level laser irradiation on oral mucosa decubitus ulcers.Material and methods: A total of 90 patients with decubitus ulcers were treated in the present study; they were randomly assigned to three groups: group I included 30 patients treated with low level laser (LLL irradiation (wavelength of irradiation 658 nm; group II - 30 patients treated with laser irradiation of 904 nm; and group III (controls - 30 patients who received a standard conventional treatment with "granofurin" and "solcoseryl".The treatment sessions in all three groups were administered once daily. The patients in groups I and II were irradiated with focused irradiation at an angle from a distance using a conically shaped light probe 3 mm in diameter. The irradiated area was 0.5 cm2. The light was focused on the oral mucosa ulcer and the surrounding inflamed mucosa at a distance of 0.5 to 1 cm. Diode lasers were used in the study. The dosage of irradiation was 1.2 J/cm2.Results and discussion: The treatment effect was evaluated by changes in the studied parameters: pain intensity, erythema, and epithelialization. They were assessed at baseline, and at days 1, 3 and 5. Conclusions: LLLT administered with the proposed methodology manages pain rapidly and accelerates the process of epithelialization of decubitus ulcers in the soft tissues of the mouth.

  4. Volcanic hazard assessment for disposal of high-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volcanic hazard studies for disposal of high-level radioactive waste pose a number of unique problems. These include the long time frame of hazard assessment (104 to 106 yr), the limited geologic record of volcanic activity at disposal sites and the political sensitivity of this national problem. The major variables affecting volcanic hazards are the structure of magma feeder systems at repository depths and the magma fragmentation and dispersal energy of eruptions. The latter is generally controlled by magma composition and the presence or absence of groundwater. Long-lived volcanic fields (> 1 m.y.) provide the greatest potential risk for waste disposal, but these can be avoided by proper site selection. Short-lived volcanic fields are more difficult to avoid but are generally mafic in composition, which results in smaller disruption zones and explosive eruptions of lower energy than those of long-lived centers. Volcanic hazards are evaluated through risk assessment, which is a product of probability and consequences. These studies have been completed for a potential waste disposal site in the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Cenozoic volcanism of the NTS region is divided into three distinct episodes. The youngest episode, 3.7 to 0.3 m.y., comprises scattered, monogenetic Strombolian centers of small volume (3). Rates of volcanic activity for the NTS region are estimated to be about 10-6 event/yr, based on vent counts through time and calculation of rates of magma production. The conditions probability of disruption of the possible waste disposal site at the NTS by basaltic volcanism is bounded by the range of 10-8 to 10-10 yr-1. Consequences, expressed as radiological release levels, were evaluated by assuming disruption of a repository by basaltic magmas fed along narrow dikes

  5. A proposed methodology for the assessment of arsenic, nickel, cadmium and lead levels in ambient air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Germán; Fernández-Olmo, Ignacio

    2016-06-01

    Air quality assessment, required by the European Union (EU) Air Quality Directive, Directive 2008/50/EC, is part of the functions attributed to Environmental Management authorities. Based on the cost and time consumption associated with the experimental works required for the air quality assessment in relation to the EU-regulated metal and metalloids, other methods such as modelling or objective estimation arise as competitive alternatives when, in accordance with the Air Quality Directive, the levels of pollutants permit their use at a specific location. This work investigates the possibility of using statistical models based on Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) to estimate the levels of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni) and lead (Pb) in ambient air and their application for policy purposes. A methodology comprising the main steps that should be taken into consideration to prepare the input database, develop the model and evaluate their performance is proposed and applied to a case of study in Santander (Spain). It was observed that even though these approaches present some difficulties in estimating the individual sample concentrations, having an equivalent performance they can be considered valid for the estimation of the mean values - those to be compared with the limit/target values - fulfilling the uncertainty requirements in the context of the Air Quality Directive. Additionally, the influence of the consideration of input variables related to atmospheric stability on the performance of the studied statistical models has been determined. Although the consideration of these variables as additional inputs had no effect on As and Cd models, they did yield an improvement for Pb and Ni, especially with regard to ANN models. PMID:26950629

  6. Biomass energy use at the household level in two villages of Bangladesh: assessment of field methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted to assess biomass energy supply and use in two villages in different agro-ecological regions of Bangladesh using three different techniques: broad questionnaire survey, sample questionnaire survey, and physical monitoring in order to see which methodology was more appropriate for the accurate assessment of biomass cooking energy supply and demand. The study included four broad socio-economic groups, i.e. large, medium, small and landless households. It was found that, per capita cooking energy demand varied significantly between the villages, socio-economic groups, and the first two methods of survey. Energy used was found to be strongly correlated with family size and energy use decreased according to landholding size. The broad questionnaire survey showed an average cooking energy use of 11.8 and 10.1 GJ per capita/year, for Kazirshimla and Noagaon village, respectively, while the sample questionnaire survey estimated energy use at 9.2 an 8.5 GJ per capita/year. With physical monitoring, however, the respective figures were found as 9.0 and 8.2 GJ per capita/year. It was also found that energy use was at the subsistence level in both villages. In Kazirishimla village biomass supply was found to be marginally surplus to use, while Noagaon had a supply deficit. The study showed that a broad questionnaire survey gives a fairly general picture of both biomass supply and use, but to assess cooking energy use more accurately successive sample questionnaire surveys followed by physical monitoring are more effective. (author)

  7. Addressing the challenge of assessing physician-level screening performance: mammography as an example.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth S Burnside

    Full Text Available Motivated by the challenges in assessing physician-level cancer screening performance and the negative impact of misclassification, we propose a method (using mammography as an example that enables confident assertion of adequate or inadequate performance or alternatively recognizes when more data is required.Using established metrics for mammography screening performance-cancer detection rate (CDR and recall rate (RR-and observed benchmarks from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC, we calculate the minimum volume required to be 95% confident that a physician is performing at or above benchmark thresholds. We graphically display the minimum observed CDR and RR values required to confidently assert adequate performance over a range of interpretive volumes. We use a prospectively collected database of consecutive mammograms from a clinical screening program outside the BCSC to illustrate how this method classifies individual physician performance as volume accrues.Our analysis reveals that an annual interpretive volume of 2770 screening mammograms, above the United States' (US mandatory (480 and average (1777 annual volumes but below England's mandatory (5000 annual volume is necessary to confidently assert that a physician performed adequately. In our analyzed US practice, a single year of data uniformly allowed confident assertion of adequate performance in terms of RR but not CDR, which required aggregation of data across more than one year.For individual physician quality assessment in cancer screening programs that target low incidence populations, considering imprecision in observed performance metrics due to small numbers of patients with cancer is important.

  8. Performance assessment for a below-ground vault low-level radioactive waste disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for assisting in the evaluation of alternative technologies for disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). Part of this effort has included the development of a prototype Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for a below-ground vault (BGV) disposal facility. The SAR has been prepared following guidance provided by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The objectives of the project were to (a) extend the available body of knowledge on alternative LLW disposal technologies, (b) identify and address potential licensing issues, (c) provide for NRC review and comment, and (d) develop prototype license documentation using NRC guidance. The BGV LLW disposal facility is designed to accomplish all the performance objectives and functional requirements of 10CFR61. The principal design features provided to accomplish these functions include class A vaults, class B/C vaults, disposal unit cover systems, a surface water drainage system, and a percolating water drainage system. The results of this performance assessment show that the doses for all pathways assessed are below the current regulatory limit of 25 mrem/yr. While all possible exposure scenarios and pathways cannot be evaluated, a reasonable comprehensive set of scenarios has been addressed

  9. Chernobyl case study increases confidence level in radionuclide transport assessments in the geosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are presented from the ongoing international study (i.e., Chernobyl pilot site project) on characterization and modeling of fallout nuclear fuel particles dissolution behavior and subsequent radionuclide transport from the near-surface waste disposal site in Chernobyl zone to the geo-environment. The reported experimental work includes: - characterization of radionuclide physico-chemical speciation inside the waste site (trench); - evaluation of infiltration recharge regime through the trench body; and determination of waste soil matrix sorption parameters. In order to describe radionuclide releases from the waste, the multi-component source term model accounting for several types of fuel particles (UO2, UO2+X, and U-Zr-O matrix) was developed. Application of the source-term model to the Pilot Site data has given satisfactory and encouraging results. The modeling approach has proved to be capable of rather accurately reproducing independent field characterization and monitoring data relevant to 90Sr speciation inside the trench and radionuclide releases from the trench to the aquifer. The developed parameter database and modeling approach are of general value for radiological assessments of Chernobyl contaminated areas, and for possible similar accidental situations in future. Thus, acquired knowledge and data serve to increase the confidence level in radionuclide transport assessments from nuclear fuel source term to soils and geo-sphere. (orig.)

  10. Whole effluent toxicity testing -- Usefulness, level of protection, and risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, P.M.

    2000-01-01

    The general status of whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests is assessed relative to their generally accepted purpose of identifying, characterizing, and eliminating effects of effluents on aquatic resources. Although WET tests are useful, they are not perfect tools. Imperfections include the innate variability of these tests, due both to biotic and anthropogenic factors; the reality of species differences both between the laboratory and the field and within the field; and differences between the laboratory and the receiving environment. Whole effluent toxicity tests may be overprotective, underprotective, or offer an uncertain level of protection. The implication of hormesis and inverted U-shaped dose responses for WET testing are reviewed in particular detail. Comparisons to field conditions indicate that WET tests are not reliable predictors of effects or lack of effects in the receiving environment. Whole effluent toxicity tests are only the first stage in a risk assessment and as such identify hazard, not risk. Identification of risk requires discarding the concept of independent applicability. The appropriate use of WET tests is identified in the context of their advantages and disadvantages.

  11. Analysis of source term modeling for low-level radioactive waste performance assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Site-specific radiological performance assessments are required for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at both commercial and US Department of Energy facilities. This work explores source term modeling of LLW disposal facilities by using two state-of-the-art computer codes, SOURCEI and SOURCE2. An overview of the performance assessment methodology is presented, and the basic processes modeled in the SOURCE1 and SOURCE2 codes are described. Comparisons are made between the two advective models for a variety of radionuclides, transport parameters, and waste-disposal technologies. These comparisons show that, in general, the zero-order model predicts undecayed cumulative fractions leached that are slightly greater than or equal to those of the first-order model. For long-lived radionuclides, results from the two models eventually reach the same value. By contrast, for short-lived radionuclides, the zero-order model predicts a slightly higher undecayed cumulative fraction leached than does the first-order model. A new methodology, based on sensitivity and uncertainty analyses, is developed for predicting intruder scenarios. This method is demonstrated for 137Cs in a tumulus-type disposal facility. The sensitivity and uncertainty analyses incorporate input-parameter uncertainty into the evaluation of a potential time of intrusion and the remaining radionuclide inventory. Finally, conclusions from this study are presented, and recommendations for continuing work are made

  12. Blood oxygenation level-dependent MRI for assessment of renal oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neugarten J

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Joel Neugarten, Ladan Golestaneh Renal Division, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA Abstract: Blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD MRI has recently emerged as an important noninvasive technique to assess intrarenal oxygenation under physiologic and pathophysiologic conditions. Although this tool represents a major addition to our armamentarium of methodologies to investigate the role of hypoxia in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury and progressive chronic kidney disease, numerous technical limitations confound interpretation of data derived from this approach. BOLD MRI has been utilized to assess intrarenal oxygenation in numerous experimental models of kidney disease and in human subjects with diabetic and nondiabetic chronic kidney disease, acute kidney injury, renal allograft rejection, contrast-associated nephropathy, and obstructive uropathy. However, confidence in conclusions based on data derived from BOLD MRI measurements will require continuing advances and technical refinements in the use of this technique. Keywords: kidney, hypoxia, oxygenation, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, acute kidney injury, contrast-associated nephropathy, BOLD MRI

  13. Assessment of the level of male involvement in safe motherhood in southern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwakwuo, Geoffrey Chima; Oshonwoh, Ferdinand Ebiarede

    2013-04-01

    Pregnancy and the events surrounding it are generally viewed as feminine issues exclusively for women. In sub-Saharan Africa, believing that pregnancy and the events that follow are guided by nature, a lot of superstition is attributed in the event of complications, which result in poor maternal outcomes. Maternal mortality remains a public health challenge worldwide, and Nigeria has one of the highest levels of maternal mortality in the world (545 per 100,000 live births). The involvement of men in ensuring and enhancing maternal health was a great idea hatched at the Cairo conference in 1994, but since then, not much has been done in practical terms in most of the developing world. This study is aimed at assessing the level of male involvement in their spouses' reproductive health events before pregnancy, during pregnancy, delivery and peuperium. A descriptive cross-sectional study design in which questionnaires were incorporated with an in-depth interview was used and a multistage sampling technique was used to select respondents. After house numbering, a total of 400 houses were selected from a cluster of four quarters in Patani Town. Participants were systematically sampled from each household using random number table. Results from data collected on the study indicated that (61.1 %) of men were aware of maternal health issues and the level of education was shown to have significant relationship (χ² = 5.139, df = 3, p = 0.162) with the knowledge of maternal health issues. Though the level of male involvement in safe motherhood was shown to be of good proportion, strategies to create awareness on male support for their parous spouses should be given a broader frontier, both in clinics, household and community levels. Men should be more involved than before, as they have a priceless role to play towards a significant improvement in maternal health. The Government, development partners and NGOs at all levels should be committed with a strong political

  14. A county level assessment of water withdrawals for hydraulic fracturing: Where are impacts most likely? [Poster 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to assess, at the county level, the potential for hydraulic fracturing (HF) water withdrawals to impact the quantity of drinking water resources, and identify where potential impacts may be most frequent or severe.

  15. Prevalence of leptospira in acute hepatitis syndrome and assessment of IL-8 and TNF-alpha level in leptospiral hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Rizvi, M; Azam, M; Ajmal, M. R.; Shukla, I; Malik, A.

    2011-01-01

    To study the prevalence of leptospira in acute hepatitis syndrome and to assess interleukin (IL)-8 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha levels in the pathogenesis of hepatitis due to leptospiral infection.

  16. Accuracy assessment of airphoto interpretation of vegetation types and disturance levels on winter seismic trails, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An accuracy assessment was conducted to evaluate the photointerpretation of vegetation types and disturbance levels along seismic trails in the Arctic National...

  17. Accuracy assessment of airphoto interpretation of vegetation types and disturance levels on winter seismic trails, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An accuracy assessment was conducted to evaluate the photo-interpretation of vegetation types and disturbance levels along seismic trails in the Arctic National...

  18. p-EMA (II): evaluating ecological risks of pesticides for a farm-level risk assessment system

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, Andy; Brown, Colin; Lewis, Kathy; Tzilivakis, John

    2003-01-01

    International audience This paper reports the development of methods for assessing the environmental risks of pesticide use in a farm-level evaluation tool. The basic risk indices that were used, and the criteria used to define different levels of risk, were designed to be consistent with national and EU regulatory risk assessment procedures. They took account of both toxicity and exposure and were responsive to the influence of local conditions and practices, such as pesticide application...

  19. LIFE ESTIMATION OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK STEEL FOR F-TANK FARM CLOSURE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, K

    2007-10-01

    High level radioactive waste (HLW) is stored in underground storage tanks at the Savannah River Site. The SRS is proceeding with closure of the 22 tanks located in F-Area. Closure consists of removing the bulk of the waste, chemical cleaning, heel removal, stabilizing remaining residuals with tailored grout formulations and severing/sealing external penetrations. A performance assessment is being performed in support of closure of the F-Tank Farm. Initially, the carbon steel construction materials of the high level waste tanks will provide a barrier to the leaching of radionuclides into the soil. However, the carbon steel liners will degrade over time, most likely due to corrosion, and no longer provide a barrier. The tank life estimation in support of the performance assessment has been completed. The estimation considered general and localized corrosion mechanisms of the tank steel exposed to the contamination zone, grouted, and soil conditions. The estimation was completed for Type I, Type III, and Type IV tanks in the F-Tank Farm. The tank life estimation in support of the F-Tank Farm closure performance assessment has been completed. The estimation considered general and localized corrosion mechanisms of the tank steel exposed to the contamination zone, grouted, and soil conditions. The estimation was completed for Type I, Type III, and Type IV tanks in the F-Tank Farm. Consumption of the tank steel encased in grouted conditions was determined to occur either due to carbonation of the concrete leading to low pH conditions, or the chloride-induced de-passivation of the steel leading to accelerated corrosion. A deterministic approach was initially followed to estimate the life of the tank liner in grouted conditions or in soil conditions. The results of this life estimation are shown in Table 1 and Table 2 for grouted and soil conditions respectively. The tank life has been estimated under conservative assumptions of diffusion rates. However, the same process of

  20. Integrated Modeling for the Assessment of Ecological Impacts of Sea Level Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, S. C.; Lewis, G.; Bartel, R.; Batten, B.; Huang, W.; Morris, J.; Slinn, D. N.; Sparks, J.; Walters, L.; Wang, D.; Weishampel, J.; Yeh, G.

    2010-12-01

    Sea level rise (SLR) has the potential to affect a variety of coastal habitats with a myriad of deleterious ecological effects and to overwhelm human settlements along the coast. SLR should be given serious consideration when more than half of the U.S. population lives within 50 miles of the coast. SLR effects will be felt along coastal beaches and in estuarine waters, with consequences to barrier islands, submerged aquatic vegetation beds, sand and mud flats, oyster reefs, and tidal and freshwater wetlands. Managers of these coastal resources must be aware of potential consequences of SLR and adjust their plans accordingly to protect and preserve the resources under their care. The Gulf Coast provides critical habitats for a majority of the commercially important species in the Gulf of Mexico, which depend on inshore waters for either permanent residence or nursery area. The ecosystem services provided by these coastal habitats are at risk from rising sea level. Our team will assess the risk to coasts and coastal habitats from SLR in a 5-year project. We will apply existing models of circulation and transport from the watershed to the sea. The ultimate prediction will be of sediment loadings to the estuary as a result of overland flow, shoreline and barrier island erosion, and salinity transport, all of which will be used to model the evolution of intertidal marshes (MEM II). Over the five-year course of our research we will be simulating hydrodynamics and transport for all three NERRS reserves, including: Apalachicola, Weeks Bay and Grand Bay. The project will result in products whereby managers will be able to assess marshes, oyster reefs, submerged aquatic vegetation, predict wetland stability and indentify restoration locations for marsh and oyster habitats. In addition, we will produce Decision Support tools that will enable managers to predict future coastal erosion rates for management-specified shorelines. Project outcomes will enable the management