WorldWideScience

Sample records for assessing breast cancer

  1. Human Papilloma Viruses and Breast Cancer - Assessment of Causality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, James Sutherland; Glenn, Wendy K; Whitaker, Noel James

    2016-01-01

    High risk human papilloma viruses (HPVs) may have a causal role in some breast cancers. Case-control studies, conducted in many different countries, consistently indicate that HPVs are more frequently present in breast cancers as compared to benign breast and normal breast controls (odds ratio 4.02). The assessment of causality of HPVs in breast cancer is difficult because (i) the HPV viral load is extremely low, (ii) HPV infections are common but HPV associated breast cancers are uncommon, and (iii) HPV infections may precede the development of breast and other cancers by years or even decades. Further, HPV oncogenesis can be indirect. Despite these difficulties, the emergence of new evidence has made the assessment of HPV causality, in breast cancer, a practical proposition. With one exception, the evidence meets all the conventional criteria for a causal role of HPVs in breast cancer. The exception is "specificity." HPVs are ubiquitous, which is the exact opposite of specificity. An additional reservation is that the prevalence of breast cancer is not increased in immunocompromised patients as is the case with respect to HPV-associated cervical cancer. This indicates that HPVs may have an indirect causal influence in breast cancer. Based on the overall evidence, high-risk HPVs may have a causal role in some breast cancers.

  2. Genetic Cancer Risk Assessment for Breast Cancer in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarri-Guerra, Yanin; Blazer, Kathleen Reilly; Weitzel, Jeffrey Nelson

    2017-01-01

    In Latin America, breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women, and limited available data suggest that up to 15% of all breast cancer cases in the region are hereditary. Genetic cancer risk assessment and counseling is a critical component of the appropriate clinical care of patients with hereditary breast cancer and their families. Unfortunately, genetic services are underdeveloped across Latin America, and access to genetic testing and counseling is very scarce in the region. Barriers contributing to the access to genetic care are high cost and lack of insurance coverage for genetic tests, insufficient oncogenetics training or expertise, nonexistence of genetic counseling as a clinical discipline and lack of supportive healthcare policies. In this review, we highlight relevant initiatives undertaken in several Latin American countries aimed at creating genetic cancer risk assessment programs. Additionally, we present a review of the scientific literature on the current status of breast cancer genomics in Latin America, with specific emphasis on demographic indicators, access to cancer genetic care, training and strategies to improve outcomes and international collaborations. PMID:28453507

  3. Using breast milk to assess breast cancer risk: the role of mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Sallie S; Aslebagh, Roshanak; Ngounou Wetie, Armand G; Sturgeon, Susan R; Darie, Costel C; Arcaro, Kathleen F

    2014-01-01

    Although mammography and treatment advances have led to declines in breast cancer mortality in the United States, breast cancer remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Breast cancer in young women is associated with increased mortality and current methods of detecting breast cancers in this group of women have known limitations. Tools for accurately assessing personal breast cancer risk in young women are needed to identify those women who would benefit the most from earlier intervention. Proteomic analysis of breast milk could identify biomarkers of breast cancer risk and provide a tool for identifying women at increased risk. A preliminary analysis of milk from four women provides a proof of concept for using breast milk to assess breast cancer risk.

  4. Establishing a family risk assessment clinic for breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mulsow, Jurgen

    2012-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer affecting European women and the leading cause of cancer-related death. A total of 15-20% of women who develop breast cancer have a family history and 5-10% a true genetic predisposition. The identification and screening of women at increased risk may allow early detection of breast cancer and improve prognosis. We established a family risk assessment clinic in May 2005 to assess and counsel women with a family history of breast cancer, to initiate surveillance, and to offer risk-reducing strategies for selected high-risk patients. Patients at medium or high risk of developing breast cancer according to NICE guidelines were accepted. Family history was determined by structured questionnaire and interview. Lifetime risk of developing breast cancer was calculated using Claus and Tyrer-Cuzick scoring. Risk of carrying a breast cancer-related gene mutation was calculated using the Manchester system. One thousand two hundred and forty-three patients have been referred. Ninety-two percent were at medium or high risk of developing breast cancer. Formal assessment of risk has been performed in 368 patients, 73% have a high lifetime risk of developing breast cancer, and 72% a Manchester score >or=16. BRCA1\\/2 mutations have been identified in 14 patients and breast cancer diagnosed in two. Our initial experience of family risk assessment has shown there to be a significant demand for this service. Identification of patients at increased risk of developing breast cancer allows us to provide individuals with accurate risk profiles, and enables patients to make informed choices regarding their follow-up and management.

  5. Common breast cancer risk alleles and risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Näslund-Koch, C; Nordestgaard, B G; Bojesen, S E

    2017-01-01

    mammography in Denmark, the average 5-year breast cancer risk was 1.5%, overall and 1.1%, 1.4%, 1.6%, 1.7%, 2.1%, for the 1(st) through 5(th) quintile, respectively. Based on age, nulliparity, familial history, and allele sum, 25% of women aged 50-69, and 94% of women aged 40-49, had absolute 5-year breast...... cancer risks ≤ 1.5%. Using polygenic risk score led to similar results. CONCLUSION: Common breast cancer risk alleles are associated with incidence and mortality of breast cancer in the general population, but not with other cancers. After including breast cancer allele sum in risk assessment, 25...

  6. Automatic breast cancer risk assessment from digital mammograms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal Raghunath; Brandt, Sami; Karssemeijer, N

    pixel location is represented by geodesic distance from nipple and parametric angle, instead of x and y in traditional Cartesian coordinate system within a breast coordinate system, thus locale tissue orientation is compared more accurately (G. Karemore et al, 2010). For every pixel, a collection......Purpose: Textural characteristics of the breast tissue structure on mammogram have been shown to improve breast cancer risk assessment in several large studies. Currently, however, the texture is not used to assess risk in standard clinical procedures or involved in general breast cancer risk...... of 0.64, which is statistically significant and different than other methods (P

  7. Optimizing HER2 assessment in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holten-Rossing, Henrik; Møller Talman, Maj-Lis; Kristensson, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In breast cancer, analysis of HER2 expression is pivotal for treatment decision. This study aimed at comparing digital, automated image analysis with manual reading using the HER2-CONNECT algorithm (Visiopharm) in order to minimize the number of equivocal 2+ scores and the need for reflex...

  8. Standardized assessment of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tramm, Trine; Di Caterino, Tina; Jylling, Anne Marie B.

    2018-01-01

    by the International TILs Working Group 2014, applied to a cohort of breast cancers reflecting an average breast cancer population. Material and methods: Stromal TILs were assessed using full slide sections from 124 breast cancers with varying histology, malignancy grade and ER- and HER2 status. TILs were estimated......Introduction: In breast cancer, there is a growing body of evidence that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) may have clinical utility and may be able to direct clinical decisions for subgroups of patients. Clinical utility is, however, not sufficient for warranting the implementation of a new...... by nine dedicated breast pathologists using scanned hematoxylin–eosin stainings. TILs results were categorized using various cutoffs, and the inter-observer agreement was evaluated using the intraclass coefficient (ICC), Kappa statistics as well as individual overall agreements with the median value...

  9. Descriptive Biomarkers for Assessing Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    which is primarily leucocytes ) and finally assessing the gene-specific promoter methylation on bisulfite-modified DNA. In summary all of the proposed...breast milk: a comparison between epithelial cells and leucocytes . In preparation. Arcaro KF, Browne EP, Punska EC, Lenington S, Otis CN, Anderton DL

  10. Assessing breast cancer risk in a primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiely, Deirdre; Schwartz, Shira

    2014-10-15

    Individuals who are given a preventive exam by a primary care provider are more likely to agree to cancer screening. The provider recommendation has been identified as the strongest factor associated with screening utilization. This article provides a framework for breast cancer risk assessment for an advanced practice registered nurse working in primary care practice.

  11. Relationship of Predicted Risk of Developing Invasive Breast Cancer, as Assessed with Three Models, and Breast Cancer Mortality among Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Mark E; Ichikawa, Laura; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Miglioretti, Diana L; Kerlikowske, Karla; Tice, Jeffery; Vacek, Pamela M; Gierach, Gretchen L

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer risk prediction models are used to plan clinical trials and counsel women; however, relationships of predicted risks of breast cancer incidence and prognosis after breast cancer diagnosis are unknown. Using largely pre-diagnostic information from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) for 37,939 invasive breast cancers (1996-2007), we estimated 5-year breast cancer risk (models: BCSC 1-year risk model (BCSC-1; adapted to 5-year predictions); Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (BCRAT); and BCSC 5-year risk model (BCSC-5). Breast cancer-specific mortality post-diagnosis (range: 1-13 years; median: 5.4-5.6 years) was related to predicted risk of developing breast cancer using unadjusted Cox proportional hazards models, and in age-stratified (35-44; 45-54; 55-69; 70-89 years) models adjusted for continuous age, BCSC registry, calendar period, income, mode of presentation, stage and treatment. Mean age at diagnosis was 60 years. Of 6,021 deaths, 2,993 (49.7%) were ascribed to breast cancer. In unadjusted case-only analyses, predicted breast cancer risk ≥1.67% versus cancer death; BCSC-1: hazard ratio (HR) = 0.82 (95% CI = 0.75-0.90); BCRAT: HR = 0.72 (95% CI = 0.65-0.81) and BCSC-5: HR = 0.84 (95% CI = 0.75-0.94). Age-stratified, adjusted models showed similar, although mostly non-significant HRs. Among women ages 55-69 years, HRs approximated 1.0. Generally, higher predicted risk was inversely related to percentages of cancers with unfavorable prognostic characteristics, especially among women 35-44 years. Among cases assessed with three models, higher predicted risk of developing breast cancer was not associated with greater risk of breast cancer death; thus, these models would have limited utility in planning studies to evaluate breast cancer mortality reduction strategies. Further, when offering women counseling, it may be useful to note that high predicted risk of developing breast cancer does not imply that if cancer develops it will

  12. Early breast cancer in the elderly: assessment and management considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrand, Gilles; Terret, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is a common tumour in the elderly and management of early disease in particular is a major challenge for oncologists and geriatricians alike. The process should begin with the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA), which should be undertaken before any decisions about treatment are made. The important role of co-morbidities and their effect on life expectancy also need to be taken into account when making treatment decisions. The primary treatments for early breast cancer are surgery, adjuvant radiotherapy and adjuvant systemic therapy. Unfortunately, lack of a specific literature relating to early breast cancer in the elderly means formulating an evidence-based approach to treatment in this context is difficult. We have developed a new approach based on the CGA and comprehensive oncological assessment. This approach facilitates the development of an individualized oncogeriatric care plan and follow-up based on several considerations: the average patient's life expectancy at a given age; the patient's co-morbidities, level of dependence, and the impact of these considerations on diagnostic and therapeutic options as well as life expectancy; and the potential benefit-risk balance of treatment. In the elderly patient with breast cancer, the standard primary therapy is surgical resection (mastectomy or breast-conserving therapy). While node dissection is a major component of staging and local control of breast cancer, no data are available to guide decision-making in women aged >70 years. Primary endocrine therapy (tamoxifen) should be offered to elderly women with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer only if they are unfit for or refuse surgery. Trials are needed to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of aromatase inhibitors as primary therapy for infirm older patients with ER-positive tumours. Breast irradiation should be recommended to older women with a life expectancy >5 years, particularly those with large tumours, positive lymph nodes

  13. Korean risk assessment model for breast cancer risk prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyoung Park

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We evaluated the performance of the Gail model for a Korean population and developed a Korean breast cancer risk assessment tool (KoBCRAT based upon equations developed for the Gail model for predicting breast cancer risk. METHODS: Using 3,789 sets of cases and controls, risk factors for breast cancer among Koreans were identified. Individual probabilities were projected using Gail's equations and Korean hazard data. We compared the 5-year and lifetime risk produced using the modified Gail model which applied Korean incidence and mortality data and the parameter estimators from the original Gail model with those produced using the KoBCRAT. We validated the KoBCRAT based on the expected/observed breast cancer incidence and area under the curve (AUC using two Korean cohorts: the Korean Multicenter Cancer Cohort (KMCC and National Cancer Center (NCC cohort. RESULTS: The major risk factors under the age of 50 were family history, age at menarche, age at first full-term pregnancy, menopausal status, breastfeeding duration, oral contraceptive usage, and exercise, while those at and over the age of 50 were family history, age at menarche, age at menopause, pregnancy experience, body mass index, oral contraceptive usage, and exercise. The modified Gail model produced lower 5-year risk for the cases than for the controls (p = 0.017, while the KoBCRAT produced higher 5-year and lifetime risk for the cases than for the controls (p<0.001 and <0.001, respectively. The observed incidence of breast cancer in the two cohorts was similar to the expected incidence from the KoBCRAT (KMCC, p = 0.880; NCC, p = 0.878. The AUC using the KoBCRAT was 0.61 for the KMCC and 0.89 for the NCC cohort. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that the KoBCRAT is a better tool for predicting the risk of breast cancer in Korean women, especially urban women.

  14. Automatically assessed volumetric breast density and breast cancer risk : The era of digital screening mammography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, J.O.P .

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer among females worldwide. As the burden of breast cancer is high, many countries have introduced a breast cancer screening program with the aim to find and treat breast cancers in an early stage. In the Netherlands, women between the ages of 50

  15. Growth of breast cancer recurrences assessed by consecutive MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millet, Ingrid; Bouic-Pages, Emmanuelle; Hoa, Denis; Azria, David; Taourel, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Women with a personal history of breast cancer have a high risk of developing an ipsi- or contralateral recurrence. We aimed to compare the growth rate of primary breast cancer and recurrences in women who had undergone prior breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Three hundred and sixty-two women were diagnosed with breast cancer and had undergone breast MRI at the time of diagnosis in our institution (2005 - 2009). Among them, 37 had at least one prior breast MRI with the lesion being visible but not diagnosed as cancer. A linear regression of tumour volume measured on MRI scans and time data was performed using a generalized logistic model to calculate growth rates. The primary objective was to compare the tumour growth rate of patients with either primary breast cancer (no history of breast cancer) or ipsi- or contralateral recurrences of breast cancer. Twenty women had no history of breast cancer and 17 patients were diagnosed as recurrences (7 and 10 were ipsi- and contralateral, respectively). The tumour growth rate was higher in contralateral recurrences than in ipsilateral recurrences (growth rate [10 -3 days -1 ] 3.56 vs 1.38, p < .001) or primary cancer (3.56 vs 2.09, p = 0.01). Differences in tumour growth were not significant for other patient-, tumour- or treatment-related characteristics. These findings suggest that contralateral breast cancer presents accelerated growth compared to ipsilateral recurrences or primary breast events

  16. Ki67 assessment in breast cancer: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penault-Llorca, Frederique; Radosevic-Robin, Nina

    2017-02-01

    Although immunohistochemical detection of the Ki67 antigen has been used for many years to assess cancer proliferation, this marker is still not recommended for routine use in clinical management of breast cancer. The major reason for this situation is a lack of a standardised procedure for Ki67 assessment as well as persistence of several issues of debate with regards to the Ki67 assay interpretation and the marker's clinical utility. Nowadays Ki67 assessment is principally used for estimation of prognosis and guiding the decision on adjuvant treatment choice, as well as for prediction of response to neoadjuvant treatment in ER+/HER2- breast cancer. In ER-/HER2+ and ER-/HER2- tumours, high post-neoadjuvant Ki67 index is associated with unfavourable prognosis. We review here the elements impacting analytical validity of the Ki67 immunohistochemical assay, the evidence of its clinical utility and the current recommendations for its use in breast cancer management. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessment of quality of operable breast cancer care in a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breast cancer and its treatment constitute a great challenge in resource limited countries as found in Africa. A retrospective analysis of all breast cancer patients seen in our institution was conducted to assess the quality of operable breast cancer care in our setting and compare with the international standards.

  18. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  19. Proteomics analysis of human breast milk to assess breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslebagh, Roshanak; Channaveerappa, Devika; Arcaro, Kathleen F; Darie, Costel C

    2018-02-01

    Detection of breast cancer (BC) in young women is challenging because mammography, the most common tool for detecting BC, is not effective on the dense breast tissue characteristic of young women. In addition to the limited means for detecting their BC, young women face a transient increased risk of pregnancy-associated BC. As a consequence, reproductively active women could benefit significantly from a tool that provides them with accurate risk assessment and early detection of BC. One potential method for detection of BC is biochemical monitoring of proteins and other molecules in bodily fluids such as serum, nipple aspirate, ductal lavage, tear, urine, saliva and breast milk. Of all these fluids, only breast milk provides access to a large volume of breast tissue, in the form of exfoliated epithelial cells, and to the local breast environment, in the form of molecules in the milk. Thus, analysis of breast milk is a non-invasive method with significant potential for assessing BC risk. Here we analyzed human breast milk by mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics to build a biomarker signature for early detection of BC. Ten milk samples from eight women provided five paired-groups (cancer versus control) for analysis of dysregulatedproteins: two within woman comparisons (milk from a diseased breast versus a healthy breast of the same woman) and three across women comparisons (milk from a woman with cancer versus a woman without cancer). Despite a wide range in the time between milk donation and cancer diagnosis (cancer diagnosis occurred from 1 month before to 24 months after milk donation), the levels of some proteins differed significantly between cancer and control in several of the five comparison groups. These pilot data are supportive of the idea that molecular analysis of breast milk will identify proteins informative for early detection and accurate assessment of BC risk, and warrant further research. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier

  20. 3-D Ultrasound Vascularity Assessment for Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carson, Paul

    1997-01-01

    This project is to improve the diagnosis and management of patients with breast cancer through development and evaluation of 3D ultrasound imaging and quantification techniques emphasizing vascularity...

  1. Long-term Accuracy of Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Combining Classic Risk Factors and Breast Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brentnall, Adam R; Cuzick, Jack; Buist, Diana S M; Bowles, Erin J Aiello

    2018-04-05

    Accurate long-term breast cancer risk assessment for women attending routine screening could help reduce the disease burden and intervention-associated harms by personalizing screening recommendations and preventive interventions. To report the accuracy of risk assessment for breast cancer during a period of 19 years. This cohort study of the Kaiser Permanente Washington breast imaging registry included women without previous breast cancer, aged 40 to 73 years, who attended screening from January 1, 1996, through December 31, 2013. Follow-up was completed on December 31, 2014, and data were analyzed from March 2, 2016, through November 13, 2017. Risk factors from a questionnaire and breast density from the Breast Imaging and Reporting Data System at entry; primary risk was assessed using the Tyrer-Cuzick model. Incidence of invasive breast cancer was estimated with and without breast density. Follow-up began 6 months after the entry mammogram and extended to the earliest diagnosis of invasive breast cancer, censoring at 75 years of age, 2014, diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ, death, or health plan disenrollment. Observed divided by expected (O/E) numbers of cancer cases were compared using exact Poisson 95% CIs. Hazard ratios for the top decile of 10-year risk relative to the middle 80% of the study population were estimated. Constancy of relative risk calibration during follow-up was tested using a time-dependent proportional hazards effect. In this cohort study of 132 139 women (median age at entry, 50 years; interquartile range, 44-58 years), 2699 invasive breast cancers were subsequently diagnosed after a median 5.2 years of follow-up (interquartile range, 2.4-11.1 years; maximum follow-up, 19 years; annual incidence rate [IR] per 1000 women, 2.9). Observed number of cancer diagnoses was close to the expected number (O/E for the Tyrer-Cuzick model, 1.02 [95% CI, 0.98-1.06]; O/E for the Tyrer-Cuzick model with density, 0.98 [95% CI, 0.94-1.02]). The Tyrer

  2. Breast Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... from starting. Risk-reducing surgery . General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  3. Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  4. Stages of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  5. Breast cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammogram - breast cancer screening; Breast exam - breast cancer screening; MRI - breast cancer screening ... performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is more likely to be cured. ...

  6. Individual Breast Cancer risk assessment in Underserved Populations: Integrating empirical Bioethics and Health Disparities Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Emily E.; Hoskins, Kent

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that individual breast cancer risk assessment may improve adherence to recommended screening and prevention guidelines, thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality. Further research on the use of risk assessment models in underserved minority populations is critical to informing national public health efforts to eliminate breast cancer disparities. However, implementing individual breast cancer risk assessment in underserved patient populations raises particular ethical issues that require further examination. After reviewing these issues, we will discuss how empirical bioethics research can be integrated with health disparities research to inform the translation of research findings. Our in-progress National Cancer Institute (NCI) funded study, How Do Underserved Minority Women Think About Breast Cancer?, conducted in the context of a larger study on individual breast cancer risk assessment, is presented as a model. PMID:23124498

  7. Breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Masayoshi

    1992-01-01

    More than 20-year follow-up of A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki has a crucial role in determining the relationship of radiation to the occurrence of breast cancer. In 1967, Wanebo et al have first reported 27 cases of breast cancer during the period 1950-1966 among the Adult Health Study population of A-bomb survivors. Since then, follow-up surveys for breast cancer have been made using the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort, and the incidence of breast cancer has increased year by year; that is breast cancer was identified in 231 cases by the first LSS series (1950-1969), 360 cases by the second LSS series (1950-1974), 564 cases by the third LSS series (1950-1980), and 816 cases in the fourth LSS series (1950-1085). The third LSS series have revealed a high risk for radiation-induced breast cancer in women aged 10 or less at the time of exposure (ATE). Both relative and absolute risks are found to be decreased with increasing ages ATE. Based on the above-mentioned findings and other studies on persons exposed medical radiation, radiation-induced breast cancer is characterized by the following: (1) the incidence of breast cancer is linearly increased with increasing radiation doses; (2) both relative and absolute risks for breast cancer are high in younger persons ATE; (3) age distribution of breast cancer in proximally exposed A-bomb survivors is the same as that in both distally A-bomb survivors and non-exposed persons, and there is no difference in histology between the former and latter groups. Thus, immature mammary gland cells before the age of puberty are found to be most radiosensitive. (N.K.)

  8. Breast cancer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Cancer specialists will soon be able to compare mammograms with computerized images of breast cancer from across Europe, in a bid to improve diagnosis and treatment....The new project, known as MammoGrid, brings together computer and medical imaging experts, cancer specialists, radiologists and epidemiologists from Bristol, Oxford, Cambridge, France and Italy" (1 page).

  9. The assessment of genetic risk of breast cancer : a set of GP guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bock, GH; Vlieland, TPMV; Hageman, GCHA; Oosterwijk, JC; Springer, MP; Kievit, J

    Background. Assessing a genetic risk for developing breast cancer is not an easy task for a GP. Current expert guidelines for referring and counselling women with a family history positive for breast cancer are complex and difficult to apply in general practice, and have only two strategies (to

  10. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... slow her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  11. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... modulators and aromatase inhibitors, reduce the risk of breast cancer in women with a high risk of the disease. These medications carry a risk of side effects, so doctors reserve these medications for women who ...

  12. Breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, L.; Krygier, G.; Castillo, C.

    2009-01-01

    This article is about the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of breast cancer. Positive diagnosis is based on clinical mammary exam, mammography, mammary ultrasonography, and histological study. Before the chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatment are evaluated the risks

  13. Assessing breast cancer masking risk in full field digital mammography with automated texture analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallenberg, Michiel Gijsbertus J; Lillholm, Martin; Diao, Pengfei

    2015-01-01

    and subsequently appeared as interval cancers. To obtain mammograms without cancerous tissue, we took the contralateral mammograms. We developed a novel machine learning based method called convolutional sparse autoencoder to characterize mammographic texture. The method was trained and tested on raw mammograms......Purpose: The goal of this work is to develop a method to assess the risk of breast cancer masking, based on image characteristics beyond breast density. Method: From the Dutch breast cancer screening program we collected 285 screen detected cancers, and 109 cancers that were screen negative...... to determine cancer detection status in a five-fold cross validation. To assess the interaction of the texture scores with breast density, Volpara Density Grade was determined for each image. Results: We grouped women into low (VDG 1/2) versus high (VDG 3/4) dense, and low (Quartile 1/2) versus high (Q 3...

  14. Assessing breast cancer masking risk with automated texture analysis in full field digital mammography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallenberg, Michiel Gijsbertus J; Lillholm, Martin; Diao, Pengfei

    2015-01-01

    negative and subsequently appeared as interval cancers. To obtain mammograms without cancerous tissue, we took the contralateral mammograms. We developed a novel machine learning based method called convolutional sparse autoencoder to characterize mammographic texture. The reason for focusing......PURPOSE The goal of this work is to develop a method to assess the risk of breast cancer masking, based on image characteristics beyond breast density. METHOD AND MATERIALS From the Dutch breast cancer screening program we collected 285 screen detected cancers, and 109 cancers that were screen...... on mammographic texture rather than the amount of breast density is that a developing cancer may not only be masked because it is obscured; it may also be masked because its mammographic signs resemble the texture of normal tissue. The method was trained and tested on raw mammograms to determine cancer detection...

  15. Practical clinical guidelines for assessing and managing menopausal symptoms after breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, M; Saunders, C; Partridge, A; Santoro, N; Joffe, H; Stearns, V

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide practical, evidence-based guidelines for evaluating and treating common menopausal symptoms following breast cancer. Literature review of the causes, assessment and management of menopausal symptoms in breast cancer patients. A number of nonhormonal treatments are effective in treating hot flashes. Whether pharmacological treatment is given will depend on the severity of symptoms and on patient wishes. For severe and frequent hot flashes, the best data support the use of venlafaxine, paroxetine and gabapentin in women with breast cancer. Side-effects are relatively common with all these agents. For vaginal dryness, topical estrogen treatment is the most effective but the safety of estrogens following breast cancer is not established. There are limited data on effective treatments for sexual dysfunction during menopause. Menopausal symptoms after breast cancer should be evaluated and managed as warranted using a systematic approach and may benefit from multidisciplinary input.

  16. Methodological and analytical aspects of proliferation assessment in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Focke, CM|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413647927

    2016-01-01

    Proliferation is a major determinant of prognosis in breast cancer and plays a key role in individualised treatment of the disease. While patients with tumours showing low proliferative activity can be spared chemotherapy in the early stages of the disease, a more aggressive treatment should be

  17. Assessment of Ki67 in Breast Cancer: Recommendations from the International Ki67 in Breast Cancer Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Torsten O.; A’Hern, Roger; Bartlett, John; Coombes, R. Charles; Cuzick, Jack; Ellis, Matthew; Henry, N. Lynn; Hugh, Judith C.; Lively, Tracy; McShane, Lisa; Paik, Soon; Penault-Llorca, Frederique; Prudkin, Ljudmila; Regan, Meredith; Salter, Janine; Sotiriou, Christos; Smith, Ian E.; Viale, Giuseppe; Zujewski, Jo Anne; Hayes, Daniel F.

    2011-01-01

    Uncontrolled proliferation is a hallmark of cancer. In breast cancer, immunohistochemical assessment of the proportion of cells staining for the nuclear antigen Ki67 has become the most widely used method for comparing proliferation between tumor samples. Potential uses include prognosis, prediction of relative responsiveness or resistance to chemotherapy or endocrine therapy, estimation of residual risk in patients on standard therapy and as a dynamic biomarker of treatment efficacy in samples taken before, during, and after neoadjuvant therapy, particularly neoadjuvant endocrine therapy. Increasingly, Ki67 is measured in these scenarios for clinical research, including as a primary efficacy endpoint for clinical trials, and sometimes for clinical management. At present, the enormous variation in analytical practice markedly limits the value of Ki67 in each of these contexts. On March 12, 2010, an international panel of investigators with substantial expertise in the assessment of Ki67 and in the development of biomarker guidelines was convened in London by the cochairs of the Breast International Group and North American Breast Cancer Group Biomarker Working Party to consider evidence for potential applications. Comprehensive recommendations on preanalytical and analytical assessment, and interpretation and scoring of Ki67 were formulated based on current evidence. These recommendations are geared toward achieving a harmonized methodology, create greater between-laboratory and between-study comparability, and allow earlier valid applications of this marker in clinical practice. PMID:21960707

  18. Breast cancer risk assessments to barrier contraception exposure. A new approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjorgov, N A

    2009-07-01

    (Full text is available at http://www.manu.edu.mk/prilozi). The risk prediction models for breast cancer remain unsatisfactory. The existing models of breast cancer risk assessment have failed to consider (calculate) the exposure to condom use, defined as the major risk factor of breast cancer. All the models, including the NCI-Gail model, are based on the so-called "known" breast cancer risk factors, such as, menarche, age at first birth, parity, OC pills, diet, physical activity, age at menopause, number of breast biopsies, family history, ethnicity (race), age and other. The commonest predictions of the models has been that "All women are at risk of breast cancer," which is deemed as a patently incorrect assessment. The risk assessments have served for identification and recruitment of women at "elevated risk" of breast cancer both for therapeutic randomized clinical trials (RCTs), and for implementing a possible clinical policy of "prophylactic" mastectomy and other prior surgical interventions. However, the models have raised questions lately about their adequacy and practical usefulness, because of the use of "weak" and inadequate risk factors. This study presents the results of a new approach and alternative model and results to the risk assessment of breast cancer, by calculating the exposure to barrier contraceptive practice (condom use and withdrawal practice) along with the factors of parity, age and other (non-barrier) birth-control methods, within a 5-year time period and the life span 20-54 years of age, by employing the Bayes' Probability Theorem. Key words: Breast cancer, Risk Assessment, New Approach, Bayes' Theorem, Parity, Condom Risk Factor, Primary prevention.

  19. Assessment of breast cancer disability: agreement between expert assessment and patient reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letellier, Marie-Eve; Mayo, Nancy

    2017-04-01

    To estimate the extent of agreement between health professionals' (ClinRO) and patients' (PRO) ratings on disabilities associated with breast cancer (impairments, activity limitations and participation restrictions). Cross-sectional. Health care professionals measured arm impairments, activity limitations and participation restrictions with the international classification of functioning (ICF) breast cancer core set. Participants filled five outcomes measures targeting health aspects of QOL that were previously mapped to the ICF. Agreement between ClinRO and PRO was estimated with quadratic Kappa. About 245 paired clinician and participant completed the outcomes measures. A total of 60 items mapped to 24 different ICF breast cancer core set codes, which provide 68 analyses for agreement. Impairment was better addressed with PROs (mostly poor and fair level of agreement); Activity limitations, both PROs and self-reported outcomes (SRO) (fair); participation restrictions, PROs (fair). Clinicians usually underestimate the symptoms and impairments of the patients, leading to a greater proportion of poor agreement. PRO's provide valuable information on impairments at the mental function level and pain. ClinRO's provide more valuable information on physically assessed impairments (oedema). Activity limitations and participation restrictions, excluding reporting the difficulty aspect of various life situations, can be either SRO or ObsRO. Implications for rehabilitation Impairments, activity limitation and participation restrictions are common sequelae of breast cancer treatment, which ultimately may affect the person's quality of life and should be investigated early on in the continuum of care. Clinicians should rely on the symptoms' reported by the patient regarding lymphedema and should identify the presence and severity of it. Patients inform best on the severity of pain, fatigue and mental distress experienced during and post-breast cancer treatment as clinicians

  20. Recurrent Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapy you may have received after your first breast cancer diagnosis was intended to kill any cancer cells that ... age 35 at the time of their original breast cancer diagnosis, face a higher risk of recurrent breast cancer. ...

  1. Oral Health-Related Complications of Breast Cancer Treatment: Assessing Dental Hygienists' Knowledge and Professional Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichman, L Susan; Gomez, Grace; Inglehart, Marita Rohr

    2015-06-01

    Approximately 200,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in the U.S. every year. These patients commonly suffer from oral complications of their cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to assess dental hygienists' knowledge and professional practice related to providing care for breast cancer patients. A pre-tested 43-item survey was mailed to a random sample of 10% of all licensed dental hygienists in the state of Michigan (n=962). The survey assessed the respondents' knowledge of potential oral complications of breast cancer treatments as well as their professional practices when treating patients with breast cancer. After 2 mailings, the response rate was 37% (n=331). Descriptive and inferential analyses were conducted using SAS. Many dental hygienists were unaware of the recommended clinical guidelines for treating breast cancer patients and lacked specific knowledge concerning the commonly prescribed anti-estrogen medications for pre-and postmenopausal breast cancer patients. Over 70% of the respondents indicated they were unfamiliar with the AI class of medications. Only 13% of dental hygienists correctly identified the mechanism of action of anti-estrogen therapy. Dental hygienists reported increased gingival inflammation, gingival bleeding, periodontal pocketing, xerostomia and burning tissues in patients receiving anti-estrogen therapies. Less than 10% believed that their knowledge of breast cancer treatments and the potential oral side effects is up to date. Results indicate a need for more education about the oral effects of breast cancer therapies and about providing the best possible care for patients undergoing breast cancer treatment. Copyright © 2015 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  2. Oral Health-Related Complications of Breast Cancer Treatment: Assessing Dental Hygienists’ Knowledge and Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichman, L. Susan; Gomez, Grace; Inglehart, Marita Rohr

    2017-01-01

    Objective Approximately 200,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in the U.S. every year. These patients commonly suffer from oral complications of their cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to assess dental hygienists’ knowledge and professional practice related to providing care for breast cancer patients. Methods A pre-tested 43-item survey was mailed to a random sample of 10% of all licensed dental hygienists in the State of Michigan (N=962). The survey assessed the respondents’ knowledge of potential oral complications of breast cancer treatments as well as their professional practices when treating patients with breast cancer. After two mailings, the response rate was 37% (N=331). Descriptive and inferential analyses were conducted using SAS. Results Many dental hygienists were unaware of the recommended clinical guidelines for treating breast cancer patients and lacked specific knowledge pertaining to the commonly prescribed anti-estrogen medications for pre-and postmenopausal breast cancer patients. Over 70% of the respondents indicated they were unfamiliar with the AI class of medications. Only 13% of dental hygienists correctly identified the mechanism of action of anti-estrogen therapy. Dental hygienists reported increased gingival inflammation, gingival bleeding, periodontal pocketing, xerostomia and burning tissues in patients receiving anti-estrogen therapies. Less than 10% believed that their knowledge of breast cancer treatments and the oral side effects is up to date. Conclusions Results indicate a need for more education about the potential oral effects of breast cancer therapies and about providing the best possible care for patients undergoing breast cancer treatment. PMID:26338905

  3. Assessing Breast Cancer Risk with an Artificial Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepandi, Mojtaba; Taghdir, Maryam; Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Rahimikazerooni, Salar

    2018-04-25

    Objectives: Radiologists face uncertainty in making decisions based on their judgment of breast cancer risk. Artificial intelligence and machine learning techniques have been widely applied in detection/recognition of cancer. This study aimed to establish a model to aid radiologists in breast cancer risk estimation. This incorporated imaging methods and fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) for cyto-pathological diagnosis. Methods: An artificial neural network (ANN) technique was used on a retrospectively collected dataset including mammographic results, risk factors, and clinical findings to accurately predict the probability of breast cancer in individual patients. Area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC), accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were used to evaluate discriminative performance. Result: The network incorporating the selected features performed best (AUC = 0.955). Sensitivity and specificity of the ANN were respectively calculated as 0.82 and 0.90. In addition, negative and positive predictive values were respectively computed as 0.90 and 0.80. Conclusion: ANN has potential applications as a decision-support tool to help underperforming practitioners to improve the positive predictive value of biopsy recommendations. Creative Commons Attribution License

  4. Accuracy and Reliability of Infrared Thermography in Assessment of the Breasts of Women Affected by Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto; Oliveira Lima Leite Vaz, Maíta Marade; das Neves, Lais Mara Siqueira; Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Carrara, Hélio Humberto Angotti; de Oliveira Guirro, Elaine Caldeira

    2017-05-01

    Evaluate reliability and accuracy of infrared thermography in the assessment of women wth breasts cancer. Thirty-five participants had unilateral breast cancer and 17 control subjects were assessed using infrared thermography. To evaluate reliability, two professionals, who were experienced, measured the temperature of the infrared images in two different moments, with a one-week interval. Biopsy was used as a gold standard exam with regard identify breast cancer. The analysis illustrated excellent reliability in terms of the affected, contralateral and control breasts with the intra-class correlation coefficient values ranging from 0.948 to 0.999. Standard measurement error ranged from 0.04 to 0.28 °C, and minimum detectable change deviated from 0.11 to 0.78 °C. Moreover, low to moderate accuracy were observed in terms of the establishment of the breast cancer diagnosis with values of the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve ranging from 0.571 and 0.749. Breasts affected by cancer present higher skin temperature compared to contralateral and control. Furthermore, excellent reliability of the analysis of the infrared images and low-moderate accuracy in terms diagnosis were observed. Considering the results, infrared thermography can be applied as an instrument complement the assessment of breast cancer patients, but not for diagnostic purposes.

  5. Impact of Breast Density Legislation on Breast Cancer Risk Assessment and Supplemental Screening: A Survey of 110 Radiology Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Lina; Miyake, Kanae K; Leung, Jessica W T; Price, Elissa R; Liu, Yueyi I; Joe, Bonnie N; Sickles, Edward A; Thomas, William R; Lipson, Jafi A; Daniel, Bruce L; Hargreaves, Jonathan; Brenner, R James; Bassett, Lawrence W; Ojeda-Fournier, Haydee; Lindfors, Karen K; Feig, Stephen A; Ikeda, Debra M

    2016-09-01

    Breast density notification laws, passed in 19 states as of October 2014, mandate that patients be informed of their breast density. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of this legislation on radiology practices, including performance of breast cancer risk assessment and supplemental screening studies. A 20-question anonymous web-based survey was emailed to radiologists in the Society of Breast Imaging between August 2013 and March 2014. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's exact test. Around 121 radiologists from 110 facilities in 34 USA states and 1 Canadian site responded. About 50% (55/110) of facilities had breast density legislation, 36% of facilities (39/109) performed breast cancer risk assessment (one facility did not respond). Risk assessment was performed as a new task in response to density legislation in 40% (6/15) of facilities in states with notification laws. However, there was no significant difference in performing risk assessment between facilities in states with a law and those without (p legislation, 33% (16/48), 6% (3/48), and 6% (3/48) of facilities in states with laws implemented handheld whole breast ultrasound (WBUS), automated WBUS, and tomosynthesis, respectively. The ratio of facilities offering handheld WBUS was significantly higher in states with a law than in states without (p legislation, more than 33% of facilities are offering supplemental screening with WBUS and tomosynthesis, and many are performing formal risk assessment for determining patient management. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Digital image analysis outperforms manual biomarker assessment in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stålhammar, Gustav; Fuentes Martinez, Nelson; Lippert, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In the spectrum of breast cancers, categorization according to the four gene expression-based subtypes 'Luminal A,' 'Luminal B,' 'HER2-enriched,' and 'Basal-like' is the method of choice for prognostic and predictive value. As gene expression assays are not yet universally available, routine...... immunohistochemical stains act as surrogate markers for these subtypes. Thus, congruence of surrogate markers and gene expression tests is of utmost importance. In this study, 3 cohorts of primary breast cancer specimens (total n=436) with up to 28 years of survival data were scored for Ki67, ER, PR, and HER2 status...... other for Cox regression hazard ratios for all-cause mortality. When the Nottingham combined histologic grade (Elston-Ellis) was used as a prognostic surrogate, stronger Spearman's rank-order correlations were produced by DIA. Prognostic value of Ki67 scores in terms of likelihood ratio χ 2 (LR χ 2...

  7. Comparing Visually Assessed BI-RADS Breast Density and Automated Volumetric Breast Density Software : A Cross-Sectional Study in a Breast Cancer Screening Setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waal, Danielle; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; Schuur, Klaas H.; Timmers, Johanna M. H.; Verbeek, Andre L. M.; Broeders, Mireille J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study is to compare different methods for measuring breast density, both visual assessments and automated volumetric density, in a breast cancer screening setting. These measures could potentially be implemented in future screening programmes, in the context of

  8. Comparing Visually Assessed BI-RADS Breast Density and Automated Volumetric Breast Density Software: A Cross-Sectional Study in a Breast Cancer Screening Setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, D. van der; Heeten, GJ. den; Pijnappel, R.M.; Schuur, K.H.; Timmers, J.M.; Verbeek, A.L.; Broeders, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study is to compare different methods for measuring breast density, both visual assessments and automated volumetric density, in a breast cancer screening setting. These measures could potentially be implemented in future screening programmes, in the context of

  9. Comparing Visually Assessed BI-RADS Breast Density and Automated Volumetric Breast Density Software: A Cross-Sectional Study in a Breast Cancer Screening Setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waal, Daniëlle; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; Schuur, Klaas H.; Timmers, Johanna M. H.; Verbeek, André L. M.; Broeders, Mireille J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to compare different methods for measuring breast density, both visual assessments and automated volumetric density, in a breast cancer screening setting. These measures could potentially be implemented in future screening programmes, in the context of personalised

  10. Breast Cancer -- Male

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  11. Breast Cancer Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer Breast Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  12. Radioimmunoassay of ferritin, CEA and prolactin for assessment of prognosis and efficacy of breast cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sklyar, S.Yu.; Chebotareva, Eh.D.; Ganul, V.L.; Korolev, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    The levels of tumor markers - CEA, deritin and prolactin (the hormone of the anterior pituitary gland) were studied in the blood serum of 178 breast cancer patients in the menopause during combined therapy using a radioimmunoassay. This combination was shown to be informative for assessment of prognosis of disease and efficacy of antitumor therapy which was confirmed by clinical and x-ray findings and observation of a tumor process in breast cancer patients over a 5-year period

  13. Digital Microscopy Assessment of Angiogenesis in Different Breast Cancer Compartments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Haisan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Tumour angiogenesis defined by microvessel density (MVD is generally accepted as a prognostic factor in breast cancer. However, due to variability of measurement systems and cutoffs, it is questionable to date whether it contributes to predictive outline. Our study aims to grade vascular heterogeneity by comparing clear-cut compartments: tumour associated stroma (TAS, tumour parenchyma, and tumour invasive front. Material and Methods. Computerized vessel area measurement was performed using a tissue cytometry system (TissueFAXS on slides originated from 50 patients with breast cancer. Vessels were marked using immunohistochemistry with CD34. Regions of interest were manually defined for each tumour compartment. Results. Tumour invasive front vascular endothelia area was 2.15 times higher than that in tumour parenchyma and 4.61 times higher than that in TAS (P<0.002. Worth to mention that the lymph node negative subgroup of patients show a slight but constant increase of vessel index in all examined compartments of breast tumour. Conclusion. Whole slide digital examination and region of interest (ROI analysis are a valuable tool in scoring angiogenesis markers and disclosing their prognostic capacity. Our study reveals compartments’ variability of vessel density inside the tumour and highlights the propensity of invasive front to associate an active process of angiogenesis with potential implications in adjuvant therapy.

  14. Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  15. Communication Assessment of the Most Frequented Breast Cancer Websites: Evaluation of Design and Theoretical Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitten, Pamela; Smith, Sandi; Munday, Samantha; LaPlante, Carolyn

    2008-07-01

    The internet is a prominent source of health information for the public. This research evaluated both basic use and design tenets and the presence of theoretical components to motivate healthy breast cancer behavior for users of the most frequented breast cancer websites. Each website was evaluated with 2 sets of questions. The first attends to the basic use and design tenets of the website. The second coding form assessed the websites use of 3 behavior change theories. The majority of the websites fared well with regards to their use of basic tenet and design principles. Theoretical components were used sparingly on the majority of websites. The most frequented breast cancer websites are currently well equipped with basic use and design tenets. However, their lack of behavioral change components is likely to impede users' motivations to protect themselves against breast cancer.

  16. Breast Cancer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACTS FOR LIFE Breast Cancer Surgery The goal of breast cancer surgery is to remove the whole tumor from the breast. Some lymph nodes ... might still be in the body. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two types of breast cancer ...

  17. Breast cancer in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Iris; Lindsay, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Pregnancy-associated breast cancer is defined as breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy or in the first postpartum year. Breast cancer is one of the more common malignancies to occur during pregnancy and, as more women delay childbearing, the incidence of breast cancer in pregnancy is expected to increase. This article provides an overview of diagnosis, staging, and treatment of pregnancy-associated breast cancer. Recommendations for management of breast cancer in pregnancy are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Breast cancer in systemic lupus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernatsky, S.; Ramsey-Goldman, R.; Petri, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective There is a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) versus the general population. We assessed a large sample of SLE patients, evaluating demographic and clinical characteristics and breast cancer risk. Methods We performed case-cohort analyses within a multi......-center international SLE sample. We calculated the breast cancer hazard ratio (HR) in female SLE patients, relative to demographics, reproductive history, family history of breast cancer, and time-dependent measures of anti-dsDNA positivity, cumulative disease activity, and drugs, adjusted for SLE duration. Results...... There were 86 SLE breast cancers and 4498 female SLE cancer-free controls. Patients were followed on average for 7.6 years. Versus controls, SLE breast cancer cases tended to be white and older. Breast cancer cases were similar to controls regarding anti-dsDNA positivity, disease activity, and most drug...

  19. Comprehensive geriatric assessment for older women with early breast cancer – a systematic review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parks Ruth M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA is an analytical tool increasingly implemented in clinical practice. Breast cancer is primarily a disease of older people; however, most evidence-based research is aimed at younger patients. Methods A systematic review of literature was carried out to assess the use of CGA in older breast cancer patients for clinical decision making. The PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched. Results A total of nine useful full text article results were found. Only five of these were exclusively concerned with early breast cancer; thus, studies involving a variety of cancer types, stages and treatments were accepted, as long as they included early breast cancer.The results comprised a series of low sources of evidence. However, all results shared a common theme: the CGA has a use in determining patient suitability for different types of cancer treatment and subsequently maximizing the patient’s quality of life. Conclusions There is not yet sufficient high level evidence to instate CGA guidelines as a mandatory practice in the management of breast cancer, due to the heterogeneity of available studies. More studies need to be conducted to cement current work on the benefits of the CGA. An area of particular interest is with regard to treatment options, especially surgery and chemotherapy, and identifying patients who may be suitable for these treatments.

  20. Comprehensive geriatric assessment for older women with early breast cancer - a systematic review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Ruth M; Lakshmanan, Radhika; Winterbottom, Linda; Al Morgan, David; Cox, Karen; Cheung, Kwok-Leung

    2012-05-17

    The Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) is an analytical tool increasingly implemented in clinical practice. Breast cancer is primarily a disease of older people; however, most evidence-based research is aimed at younger patients. A systematic review of literature was carried out to assess the use of CGA in older breast cancer patients for clinical decision making. The PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched. A total of nine useful full text article results were found. Only five of these were exclusively concerned with early breast cancer; thus, studies involving a variety of cancer types, stages and treatments were accepted, as long as they included early breast cancer.The results comprised a series of low sources of evidence. However, all results shared a common theme: the CGA has a use in determining patient suitability for different types of cancer treatment and subsequently maximizing the patient's quality of life. There is not yet sufficient high level evidence to instate CGA guidelines as a mandatory practice in the management of breast cancer, due to the heterogeneity of available studies. More studies need to be conducted to cement current work on the benefits of the CGA. An area of particular interest is with regard to treatment options, especially surgery and chemotherapy, and identifying patients who may be suitable for these treatments.

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  2. General Information about Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  3. Assessment of Cytokeratin-19 Gene Expression in Peripheral Blood of Breast Cancer Patients and Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeideh Keyvani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection of cytokeratin-19 (CK19 expression as an epithelial-specific marker in circulating tumor cells (CTCs of breast cancer patients can be important for diagnostic purposes. Comparison of CK19 expression in breast cancer cell lines can indicate that expression of this marker is different in various breast cancer cell lines based on their category. Thirty-five breast cancer patients were evaluated for detection of CK19 mRNA in their peripheral blood using CK19-specific primers and a nested reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR technique. CK19 expression levels were detected in MCF7, T47D, SK-BR-3, and MDA-MB-231 cell lines by semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analyses. Statistical analysis of our data indicates that there is no significant difference between CK19 expression and histopathological parameters and some molecular markers, including Ki-67, HER-2, and P53, but there are statistically significant correlations between estrogen receptor (P = 0.040 and progesterone receptor ( P = 0.046 with CK19 expression. CK19 expression was detected in MCF7, T47D, and SK-BR-3 cell lines but not in MDA-MB-231 cell line. More studies are needed to determine the relationship between this marker and other markers in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. On the other hand, the study of different markers using breast cancer cell lines as experimental models of breast cancer could have an impact on improving the health outcomes of patients with breast cancer.

  4. High-performance broad-band spectroscopy for breast cancer risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawluczyk, Olga; Blackmore, Kristina; Dick, Samantha; Lilge, Lothar

    2005-09-01

    Medical diagnostics and screening are becoming increasingly demanding applications for spectroscopy. Although for many years the demand was satisfied with traditional spectrometers, analysis of complex biological samples has created a need for instruments capable of detecting small differences between samples. One such application is the measurement of absorbance of broad spectrum illumination by breast tissue, in order to quantify the breast tissue density. Studies have shown that breast cancer risk is closely associated with the measurement of radiographic breast density measurement. Using signal attenuation in transillumination spectroscopy in the 550-1100nm spectral range to measure breast density, has the potential to reduce the frequency of ionizing radiation, or making the test accessible to younger women; lower the cost and make the procedure more comfortable for the patient. In order to determine breast density, small spectral variances over a total attenuation of up to 8 OD have to be detected with the spectrophotometer. For this, a high performance system has been developed. The system uses Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) transmission grating, a 2D detector array for simultaneous registration of the whole spectrum with high signal to noise ratio, dedicated optical system specifically optimized for spectroscopic applications and many other improvements. The signal to noise ratio exceeding 50,000 for a single data acquisition eliminates the need for nitrogen cooled detectors and provides sufficient information to predict breast tissue density. Current studies employing transillumination breast spectroscopy (TIBS) relating to breast cancer risk assessment and monitoring are described.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging as an Adjunct to Mammography for Breast Cancer Screening in Women at Less Than High Risk for Breast Cancer: A Health Technology Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Screening with mammography can detect breast cancer early, before clinical symptoms appear. Some cancers, however, are not captured with mammography screening alone. Among women at high risk for breast cancer, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been suggested as a safe adjunct (supplemental) screening tool that can detect breast cancers missed on screening mammography, potentially reducing the number of deaths associated with the disease. However, the use of adjunct screening tests may also increase the number of false-positive test results, which may lead to unnecessary follow-up testing, as well as patient stress and anxiety. We investigated the benefits and harms of MRI as an adjunct to mammography compared with mammography alone for screening women at less than high risk (average or higher than average risk) for breast cancer. We searched Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (CRD) Health Technology Assessment Database, and National Health Service (NHS) Economic Evaluation Database, from January 2002 to January 2016, for evidence of effectiveness, harms, and diagnostic accuracy. Only studies evaluating the use of screening breast MRI as an adjunct to mammography in the specified populations were included. No studies in women at less than high risk for breast cancer met our inclusion criteria. It remains uncertain if the use of adjunct screening breast MRI in women at less than high risk (average or higher than average risk) for breast cancer will reduce breast cancer-related mortality without significant increases in unnecessary follow-up testing and treatment.

  6. Automated texture scoring for assessing breast cancer masking risk in full field digital mammography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallenberg, Michiel Gijsbertus J; Petersen, Peter Kersten; Lillholm, Martin

    2015-01-01

    of cancerous tissue, we took the contralateral mammograms. We developed a novel machine learning based method called convolutional sparse autoencoder (CSAE) to characterize mammographic texture. The CSAE was trained and tested on raw mammograms to separate interval cancers from controls in a five-fold cross......PURPOSE: The goal of this work is to develop a method to identify women at high risk for having breast cancer that is easily missed in regular mammography screening. Such a method will provide a rationale for selecting women for adjunctive screening. It goes beyond current risk assessment models...... that are not specifically adapted to reduce the number of interval cancers. METHOD AND MATERIALS: From the Dutch breast cancer screening program we collected 109 cancers that were screen negative and subsequently appeared as interval cancers, and 327 age matched healthy controls. To obtain mammograms without signs...

  7. Population prevalence of hereditary breast cancer phenotypes and implementation of a genetic cancer risk assessment program in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edenir I. Palmero

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2004, a population-based cohort (the Núcleo Mama Porto Alegre - NMPOA Cohort was started in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil and within that cohort, a hereditary breast cancer study was initiated, aiming to determine the prevalence of hereditary breast cancer phenotypes and evaluate acceptance of a genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA program. Women from that cohort who reported a positive family history of cancer were referred to GCRA. Of the 9218 women enrolled, 1286 (13.9% reported a family history of cancer. Of the 902 women who attended GCRA, 55 (8% had an estimated lifetime risk of breast cancer ³ 20% and 214 (23.7% had pedigrees suggestive of a breast cancer predisposition syndrome; an unexpectedly high number of these fulfilled criteria for Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome (122 families, 66.7%. The overall prevalence of a hereditary breast cancer phenotype was 6.2% (95%CI: 5.67-6.65. These findings identified a problem of significant magnitude in the region and indicate that genetic cancer risk evaluation should be undertaken in a considerable proportion of the women from this community. The large proportion of women who attended GCRA (72.3% indicates that the program was well-accepted by the community, regardless of the potential cultural, economic and social barriers.

  8. Population prevalence of hereditary breast cancer phenotypes and implementation of a genetic cancer risk assessment program in southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, a population-based cohort (the Núcleo Mama Porto Alegre - NMPOA Cohort) was started in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil and within that cohort, a hereditary breast cancer study was initiated, aiming to determine the prevalence of hereditary breast cancer phenotypes and evaluate acceptance of a genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA) program. Women from that cohort who reported a positive family history of cancer were referred to GCRA. Of the 9218 women enrolled, 1286 (13.9%) reported a family history of cancer. Of the 902 women who attended GCRA, 55 (8%) had an estimated lifetime risk of breast cancer ≥ 20% and 214 (23.7%) had pedigrees suggestive of a breast cancer predisposition syndrome; an unexpectedly high number of these fulfilled criteria for Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome (122 families, 66.7%). The overall prevalence of a hereditary breast cancer phenotype was 6.2% (95%CI: 5.67-6.65). These findings identified a problem of significant magnitude in the region and indicate that genetic cancer risk evaluation should be undertaken in a considerable proportion of the women from this community. The large proportion of women who attended GCRA (72.3%) indicates that the program was well-accepted by the community, regardless of the potential cultural, economic and social barriers. PMID:21637504

  9. An interobserver reproducibility analysis of Ki67 visual assessment in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Ruohong; Yu, Baohua; Bi, Rui; Yang, Fei; Yang, Wentao

    2015-01-01

    Ki67 labeling index (LI) is used as a predictive marker and is associated with prognosis in breast cancer. However, standardised methodologies for measurement are lacking which has limited its application in clinical practice. In this study, we evaluated the interobserver concordance of visual assessment of Ki67 LI in breast cancer. Ki67-immunostained slides of 160 cases of primary invasive breast cancer were visual assessed by five breast pathologists with two different methods to choose the scoring fields: (1) hot-spot score, (2) average score. Proportions of positive invasive tumor cells at 10 % intervals were scored. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess the interobserver reproducibility. (1) A perfect concordance of Ki67 LI was demonstrated according to both score methods (P30% Ki-67 LI). The concordance was relatively low in intermediate Ki67 LI group compared with low and high Ki67 LI groups. (3) All cases were classified into three groups by paired-difference (d) between means of hot-spot score and average score (dKi67 LI at 10 % intervals is a candidate for a standard method in breast cancer clinical practice. Average score and hot-spot score of visual assessment both demonstrated a perfect concordance, and an overall average assessment across the whole section including hot spots may be a better method. Interobserver concordance of intermediate Ki67 LI in which most cutoffs are located for making clinical decisions was relatively low.

  10. Breast Cancer Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  11. An automatic framework for assessing breast cancer risk due to various hormone replacement therapies (HRT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal; Brandt, Sami; Nielsen, Mads

    It is well known that menopausal hormone therapy increases mammographic density. Increase in breast density may relate to breast cancer risk. Several computer assisted automatic methods for assessing mammographic density have been suggested by J.W. Byng (1996), N. Karssemeijer (1998), J.M. Boone...... features describing the local elongatedness or stripiness, especially trained to see the effect of HRT (Hormone Replacement Therapy ) thereby providing a non-subjective and reproducible measure and compare it to the BIRADS and percentage density measure....

  12. An automatic framework for assessing breast cancer risk due to various hormone replacement therapies (HRT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal; Brandt, Sami; Nielsen, Mads

    It is well known that menopausal hormone therapy increases mammographic density. Increase in breast density may relate to breast cancer risk. Several computer assisted automatic methods for assessing mammographic density have been suggested by J.W. Byng (1996), N. Karssemeijer (1998), J.M. Boone(...... features describing the local elongatedness or stripiness, especially trained to see the effect of HRT (Hormone Replacement Therapy ) thereby providing a non-subjective and reproducible measure and compare it to the BIRADS and percentage density measure....

  13. Breast cancer in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in situ - male; Intraductal carcinoma - male; Inflammatory breast cancer - male; Paget disease of the nipple - male; Breast cancer - male ... The cause of breast cancer in men is not clear. But there are risk factors that make breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging as an Adjunct to Mammography for Breast Cancer Screening in Women at Less Than High Risk for Breast Cancer: A Health Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitovic-Jokic, Milica; Holubowich, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Background Screening with mammography can detect breast cancer early, before clinical symptoms appear. Some cancers, however, are not captured with mammography screening alone. Among women at high risk for breast cancer, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been suggested as a safe adjunct (supplemental) screening tool that can detect breast cancers missed on screening mammography, potentially reducing the number of deaths associated with the disease. However, the use of adjunct screening tests may also increase the number of false-positive test results, which may lead to unnecessary follow-up testing, as well as patient stress and anxiety. We investigated the benefits and harms of MRI as an adjunct to mammography compared with mammography alone for screening women at less than high risk (average or higher than average risk) for breast cancer. Methods We searched Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (CRD) Health Technology Assessment Database, and National Health Service (NHS) Economic Evaluation Database, from January 2002 to January 2016, for evidence of effectiveness, harms, and diagnostic accuracy. Only studies evaluating the use of screening breast MRI as an adjunct to mammography in the specified populations were included. Results No studies in women at less than high risk for breast cancer met our inclusion criteria. Conclusions It remains uncertain if the use of adjunct screening breast MRI in women at less than high risk (average or higher than average risk) for breast cancer will reduce breast cancer–related mortality without significant increases in unnecessary follow-up testing and treatment. PMID:27990198

  15. Nanoparticles in Sentinel Lymph Node Assessment in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Douek

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The modern management of the axilla in breast cancer relies on surgery for accurate staging of disease and identifying those patients at risk who would benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. The introduction of sentinel lymph node biopsy has revolutionized axillary surgery, but still involves a surgical procedure with associated morbidity in many patients with no axillary involvement. Nanotechnology encompasses a broad spectrum of scientific specialities, of which nanomedicine is one. The potential use of dual-purpose nanoprobes could enable imaging the axilla simultaneous identification and treatment of metastatic disease. Whilst most applications of nanomedicine are still largely in the laboratory phase, some potential applications are currently undergoing clinical evaluation for translation from the bench to the bedside. This is an exciting new area of research where scientific research may become a reality.

  16. Assessment of chemotherapy on various biochemical markers in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Márcia F C J; Gomes, Antonio L; Islam, Muhammad T; Tabrez, Shams; Jabir, Nasimudeen R; Alam, Mohammad Z; Machado, Kátia C; de Alencar, Marcus V O B; Machado, Keylla C; Ali, Eunus S; Mishra, Siddhartha K; Gomes, Leonardo F; Sobral, André Luiz Pinho; E Sousa, João M C; de Souza, Geane F; Melo-Cavalcante, Ana Amélia C; da Silva, Juliana

    2018-03-01

    Chemotherapy is a standard treatment method for the patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Lately, cyclophosphamide (CYP) and doxorubicin (DOX) are used as the major chemotherapeutic agents especially for the treatment of breast cancer. Till date, no serum biomarker has been able to provide an early diagnosis of breast cancer. This study aimed to assess inflammatory, cardiac, renal and hematological markers in 56 breast cancer patients (BCP) before, during and after termination of chemotherapy with CYP and DOX. Blood samples were collected from the patients at the each treatment stages mentioned above. These samples were assessed for interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 10 (IL-10), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase (CK), creatinine, hemoglobin (Hb), leukocyte, platelet and Na + /K + -ATPase levels either by ELISA or colorimetric methods. The results suggest a significant increase in IL-6 level at all the stages in BCP as compared to control group. On the other hand, IL-10, CK and Na + /K + -ATPase levels were found to be significantly declined during all the stages. Moreover, the majority of hematological parameters remained unchanged throughout the treatment period with the exception of creatinine and Hb which showed slight modulation in their level at different stages. Based on the results, we conclude that breast cancer and co-treatment with CYP and DOX, interfere arious biological markers, thereby, showing the physiological imbalance. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Assessment of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in breast cancer. Guideline note. Technological evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daurat, Veronique

    2015-10-01

    The medical questions of this assessment focus on intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT), in women undergoing lumpectomy (breast-conserving surgery) and adjuvant radiotherapy for early breast cancer, in order for it to be refunded by the National Health Insurance. IORT was compared to standard whole-breast irradiation. Medical assessment questions have been grouped within 3 themes: 1. evaluation of conditions for achieving an IORT process (environment, technical platform, multidisciplinary organisation, risk management [anaesthetic, infectious, radiation protection, logistics/ technical] experience and training of professionals); 2. clinical benefit/risk ratio of the IORT in comparison with standard external breast irradiation; 3. population eligible for IORT treatment, with the highest standards in terms of risk factors in the current state of knowledge. The assessment method used in this report is based on: - a critical analysis of data from the selected literature identified through a systematic search; - gathering the viewpoints of relevant stakeholders (National Professional Boards of the medical and health professional domains, as well as national instances and patient associations of the domain). In conclusion, the available data are not mature enough to demonstrate that IORT is useful in adjuvant conservative breast cancer treatment in comparison with standard external whole breast irradiation. As a consequence, at this stage, the elements are not gathered to support IORT payment by National Health Insurance. Long-term data from clinical and medico-economic studies are needed to prove clinical utility of the IORT in early breast cancer. HAS recommends eventually that IORT is performed exclusively in the context of clinical research in breast cancer

  18. Face Validity of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast Symptom Index (FACT- B into Formal Arabic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loulou Kobeissi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer affects over one million women annually and is the most common global malignancy among women. Extensive improvements have taken place in the management of breast cancer in recent years and a higher percentage of women are cured from this disease. A proper assessment of the quality of life of women with breast cancer is an essential component in disease management. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy- Breast Symptom Index has been commonly used and well-validated among English speaking populations as well as other populations. To date, no formal translation and evaluation of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast System Index exists in Arabic. Therefore, this study intends to translate, adapt and face-validate the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast System Index into Arabic, specifically in the context of the Lebanese culture. Methods: We conducted forward and backward translation in Arabic, combined with face validity by clinicians. This was followed by pre-testing to ensure the instrument’s adequacy and cultural sensitivity conducted by the administration of face-to-face interviews with individual breast cancer patients (n=33 and two focus groups (4 women/group to evaluate the relevance and appropriateness of each item and words used in the questionnaire. Results: Study results reinforced the value of the Arabic translated version of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast System Index in capturing the quality of life of women with breast cancer in Lebanon. Conclusion: The instrument was perceived to be adequate, appropriate for use, culturally sensitive, simple as well as exhaustive. Suggestions have been made to enrich the instruments’ ability to incorporate other quality of life dimensions not captured, as well to enhance the cultural specificity of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast System Index, when administered among Lebanese women diagnosed with

  19. A novel model for Ki67 assessment in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Quinci; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Fernö, Mårten; Grabau, Dorthe; Borgquist, Signe

    2014-06-16

    Ki67 is currently the proliferation biomarker of choice, with both prognostic and predictive value in breast cancer. A lack of consensus regarding Ki67 use in pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical practice may hinder its formal acceptance in the clinical setting. One hundred breast cancer samples were stained for Ki67. A standard estimation of Ki67 using fixed denominators of 200, 400 and 1 000 counted tumor cells was performed, and a cut-off at 20% was applied, Ki67static. A novel stepwise counting strategy for Ki67 estimation, Ki67scs, was developed based on rejection regions derived from exact two-sided binomial confidence intervals for proportions. Ki67scs was defined by the following parameters: the cut-off (20%), minimum (50) and maximum (400) number of tumor cells to count, increment (10) and overall significance level of the test procedure (0.05). Results from Ki67scs were compared to results from the Ki67static estimation with fixed denominators. For Ki67scs, the median number of tumor cells needed to determine Ki67 status was 100; the average, 175. Among 38 highly proliferative samples, the average Ki67scs fraction was 45%. For these samples, the fraction decreased from 39% to 37% to 35% with static counting of 200, 400 and 1 000 cells, respectively. The largest absolute difference between the estimation methods was 23% (42% (Ki67scs) vs. 19% (Ki67static)) and resulted in an altered sample classification. Among the 82 unequivocal samples, 74 samples received the same classification using both Ki67scs and Ki67static. Of the eight disparate samples, seven were classified highly proliferative by Ki67static when 200 cells were counted; whereas all eight cases were classified as low proliferative when 1 000 cells were counted. Ki67 estimation using fixed denominators may be inadequate, particularly for tumors demonstrating extensive heterogeneity. We propose a time saving stepwise counting strategy, which acknowledges small highly proliferative hot

  20. Breast cancer risk assessment by Gail Model in women of Baghdad ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To assess the high incidence of breast cancer (BC) and the effect of its early diagnosis on decreasing morbidity and mortality among Iraqi women. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted and data were collected from 250 women in Baghdad by a questionnaire consisted of demographic and ...

  1. Breast cancer risk assessment by Gail Model in women of Baghdad

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salam Hussein Ewaid

    2016-09-22

    Sep 22, 2016 ... Abstract Objectives: To assess the high incidence of breast cancer (BC) and the effect of its early diagnosis on decreasing morbidity and mortality among Iraqi women. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted and data were collected from 250 women in Baghdad by a questionnaire ...

  2. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  3. Olaparib In Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-17

    Metastatic Breast Cancer; Invasive Breast Cancer; Somatic Mutation Breast Cancer (BRCA1); Somatic Mutation Breast Cancer (BRCA2); CHEK2 Gene Mutation; ATM Gene Mutation; PALB2 Gene Mutation; RAD51 Gene Mutation; BRIP1 Gene Mutation; NBN Gene Mutation

  4. Awareness of Breast Cancer and Breast Self Examination Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Breast cancer is the commonest malignancy affecting women in Nigeria. Regular breast self examination reduces morbidity and mortality from this disease. Objective: To assess the knowledge of breast cancer, breast self examination and practice amongst secondary school teachers in Enugu , Nigeria.

  5. The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme: its role as an assessment and stratification tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, J. M. H.; van Doorne-Nagtegaal, H. J.; Zonderland, H. M.; van Tinteren, H.; Visser, O.; Verbeek, A. L. M.; den Heeten, G. J.; Broeders, M. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    To assess the suitability of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) as a quality assessment tool in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme. The data of 93,793 screened women in the Amsterdam screening region (November 2005-July 2006) were reviewed. BI-RADS categories, work-up,

  6. The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme: its role as an assessment and stratification tool.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, J.M.H.; Doorne-Nagtegaal, H.J. van; Zonderland, H.M.; Tinteren, H. van; Visser, O; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Heeten, G.J. den; Broeders, M.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the suitability of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) as a quality assessment tool in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme. METHODS: The data of 93,793 screened women in the Amsterdam screening region (November 2005-July 2006) were reviewed. BI-RADS

  7. Tamoxifen for Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Karn

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the common cancers. Hormonal therapy along with surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and targeted therapy are vital modalities for the management of breast cancer. Tamoxifen has been the most widely used hormonal therapy for more than two decades. In this article we review the benefits, dose, duration and timing of Tamoxifen therapy in patients with breast cancer. Keywords: breast cancer, hormonal therapy, tamoxifen.

  8. An interobserver reproducibility analysis of Ki67 visual assessment in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruohong Shui

    Full Text Available Ki67 labeling index (LI is used as a predictive marker and is associated with prognosis in breast cancer. However, standardised methodologies for measurement are lacking which has limited its application in clinical practice. In this study, we evaluated the interobserver concordance of visual assessment of Ki67 LI in breast cancer.Ki67-immunostained slides of 160 cases of primary invasive breast cancer were visual assessed by five breast pathologists with two different methods to choose the scoring fields: (1 hot-spot score, (2 average score. Proportions of positive invasive tumor cells at 10 % intervals were scored. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC was used to assess the interobserver reproducibility.(1 A perfect concordance of Ki67 LI was demonstrated according to both score methods (P30% Ki-67 LI. The concordance was relatively low in intermediate Ki67 LI group compared with low and high Ki67 LI groups. (3 All cases were classified into three groups by paired-difference (d between means of hot-spot score and average score (d<5, 5≤d<10, d≥10. The consistency was observed to decrease with increasing paired-difference according to both methods.Visual assessment of Ki67 LI at 10 % intervals is a candidate for a standard method in breast cancer clinical practice. Average score and hot-spot score of visual assessment both demonstrated a perfect concordance, and an overall average assessment across the whole section including hot spots may be a better method. Interobserver concordance of intermediate Ki67 LI in which most cutoffs are located for making clinical decisions was relatively low.

  9. Description of a computer program to assess cancer antigen 15.3, carcinoembryonic antigen, and tissue polypeptide antigen information during monitoring of metastatic breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sölétormos, G; Schiøler, V

    2000-01-01

    It is time-consuming to process and compare the clinical and marker information registered during monitoring of breast cancer patients. To facilitate the assessment, we developed a computer program for interpreting consecutive measurements. The intraindividual biological variation, the analytical...... of individual breast cancer patients with tumor marker measurements. It may also be implemented in trials investigating the utility of potential new markers in breast cancer as well as in other malignancies....

  10. Evaluating the self-assessed support needs of women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindop, E; Cannon, S

    2001-06-01

    The first aim of the study was to identify the self-assessed support needs of women with breast cancer at various points of illness and, secondly, to establish if these needs formed clusters which could provide the basis for developing a standardized scale of needs for use by breast care teams in the evaluation of care. It has been found that support given to women with breast cancer has a positive effect upon their reactions to the illness and may even prolong their survival. Given that breast cancer affects a large number of women it is obviously important that those affected receive, in addition to the best available medical treatment, the type of support that best meets their needs. This study aimed to provide information on the impact of breast cancer and the need for various types of support by examining women's own assessment of their needs at different stages of their illness. A purposive sample of 12 women with a diagnosis of breast cancer was selected in one health authority in England, United Kingdom (UK). Women selected represented a wide age range (between 26 and 58), were married or in long-term cohabiting relationships and were at different points on the illness trajectory. Women were invited to take part in a semi-structured interview about their experiences of breast cancer. The data from these interviews were analysed using the software package Qualitative Solutions and Research, Nonnumerical Data Indexing, Searching and Theorizing (QSR*NUDIST). Following this content analysis, a questionnaire was formulated which divided statements into seven categories: diagnosis, treatment, support, femininity and body image, family and friends, information and after care, to be rated on a Likert scale ranging from "of no importance" to "extremely important". Questionnaire data were analysed by means of a one-way analysis of variance (for three independent variables) or t-test for two independent variables. Results. The questionnaire was sent to 971 women and

  11. HEREDITARY BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Bit-Sava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary breast cancer occurs in 5–20 % of cases and it is associated with inherited mutations in particular genes, such as BRCA1 и BRCA2 in most cases. The CHEK2, PTEN, TP53, ATM, RAD51, BLM, PALB2, Nbs genes are associated with low and median risks ofdeveloping breast cancer. Molecular genetic studies identify germinal mutations underlying hereditary breast cancer. In most cases hereditary breast cancer refers to triple-negative phenotype, which is the most aggressive type of breast cancer, that does not express the genes for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2. The review presents the diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer. Clinical-morphological aspects allow the new diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer to be identified. Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors demonstrate the potential for effective treatment of BRCA-associated breast cancer.

  12. Breast cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  13. Breast Cancer and Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guluzar Arzu Turan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women and may accompany infertility. The relationship between infertility treatment and breast cancer has not yet been proven. However, estrogen exposure is well known to cause breast cancer. Recent advances in treatment options have provided young patients with breast cancer a chance of being mother [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(3.000: 317-323

  14. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Breast Cancer KidsHealth / For Kids / Breast Cancer What's in this ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  15. BILATERAL BREAST CANCER: DIAGNOSIS AND PROGNOSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursaru, Manuela; Jari, Irma; Gheorghe, Liliana; Naum, A G; Scripcariu, V; Negru, D

    2016-01-01

    To assess bilateral breast cancer patients, initially diagnosed with stage II unilateral breast cancer. 113 patients with stage 0-II breast cancer diagnosed between 1983 and 2011 were assessed. Of these, 8 patients had bilateral breast cancer: 7 patients with metachronous bilateral breast cancer and 1 patient with synchronous breast cancer. Breast ultrasound, mammography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were used to diagnose recurrence, loco regional and distant metastasis. Age at diagnosis ranged from 37 to 59 years, with a maximum age incidence in the 4th decade (age between: 31-40 years). The average time interval between the two breast cancers was 8.125 years. The most common histological type was invasive ductal carcinoma. All eight patients with bilateral breast cancer had at least one type of recurrence/metastasis, mostly in the liver, and statistically the pleuropulmonary and liver metastases were the most frequent causes of death. Patients in the 4th decade diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer are at risk of developing bilateral breast cancer. In metachronous breast cancer, the time interval between the detection of the second breast cancer and death is directly proportional to the time interval between the two breast cancers. TASTASES, DEATH.

  16. Radiation binary targeted therapy for HER-2 positive breast cancers: assumptions, theoretical assessment and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mundy, Daniel W [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47909 (United States); Harb, Wael [Horizon Oncology, The Care Group, Unity Medical Center, Lafayette, IN 47901 (United States); Jevremovic, Tatjana [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47909 (United States)

    2006-03-21

    A novel radiation targeted therapy is investigated for HER-2 positive breast cancers. The proposed concept combines two known approaches, but never used together for the treatment of advanced, relapsed or metastasized HER-2 positive breast cancers. The proposed radiation binary targeted concept is based on the anti HER-2 monoclonal antibodies (MABs) that would be used as vehicles to transport the nontoxic agent to cancer cells. The anti HER-2 MABs have been successful in targeting HER-2 positive breast cancers with high affinity. The proposed concept would utilize a neutral nontoxic boron-10 predicting that anti HER-2 MABs would assure its selective delivery to cancer cells. MABs against HER-2 have been a widely researched strategy in the clinical setting. The most promising antibody is Trastuzumab (Herceptin (registered) ). Targeting HER-2 with the MAB Trastuzumab has been proven to be a successful strategy in inducing tumour regression and improving patient survival. Unfortunately, these tumours become resistant and afflicted women succumb to breast cancer. In the proposed concept, when the tumour region is loaded with boron-10 it is irradiated with neutrons (treatment used for head and neck cancers, melanoma and glioblastoma for over 40 years in Japan and Europe). The irradiation process takes less than an hour producing minimal side effects. This paper summarizes our recent theoretical assessments of radiation binary targeted therapy for HER-2 positive breast cancers on: the effective drug delivery mechanism, the numerical model to evaluate the targeted radiation delivery and the survey study to find the neutron facility in the world that might be capable of producing the radiation effect as needed. A novel method of drug delivery utilizing Trastuzumab is described, followed by the description of a computational Monte Carlo based breast model used to determine radiation dose distributions. The total flux and neutron energy spectra of five currently available

  17. Breast asymmetry and predisposition to breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Scutt, Diane; Lancaster, Gillian A; Manning, John T

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: It has been shown in our previous work that breast asymmetry is related to several of the known risk factors for breast cancer, and that patients with diagnosed breast cancer have more breast volume asymmetry, as measured from mammograms, than age-matched healthy women. METHODS: In the present study, we compared the breast asymmetry of women who were free of breast disease at time of mammography, but who had subsequently developed breast cancer, with that of age-matched healthy ...

  18. Quality assessment of delineation and dose planning of early breast cancer patients included in the randomized Skagen Trial 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francolini, Giulio; Thomsen, Mette S; Yates, Esben S

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To report on a Quality assessment (QA) of Skagen Trial 1, exploring hypofractionation for breast cancer patients with indication for regional nodal radiotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Deviations from protocol regarding target volume delineations and dose parameters (Dmin...

  19. Quantitative assessment of effect of preanalytic cold ischemic time on protein expression in breast cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumeister, Veronique M; Anagnostou, Valsamo; Siddiqui, Summar; England, Allison Michal; Zarrella, Elizabeth R; Vassilakopoulou, Maria; Parisi, Fabio; Kluger, Yuval; Hicks, David G; Rimm, David L

    2012-12-05

    Companion diagnostic tests can depend on accurate measurement of protein expression in tissues. Preanalytic variables, especially cold ischemic time (time from tissue removal to fixation in formalin) can affect the measurement and may cause false-negative results. We examined 23 proteins, including four commonly used breast cancer biomarker proteins, to quantify their sensitivity to cold ischemia in breast cancer tissues. A series of 93 breast cancer specimens with known time-to-fixation represented in a tissue microarray and a second series of 25 matched pairs of core needle biopsies and breast cancer resections were used to evaluate changes in antigenicity as a function of cold ischemic time. Estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), HER2 or Ki67, and 19 other antigens were tested. Each antigen was measured using the AQUA method of quantitative immunofluorescence on at least one series. All statistical tests were two-sided. We found no evidence for loss of antigenicity with time-to-fixation for ER, PgR, HER2, or Ki67 in a 4-hour time window. However, with a bootstrapping analysis, we observed a trend toward loss for ER and PgR, a statistically significant loss of antigenicity for phosphorylated tyrosine (P = .0048), and trends toward loss for other proteins. There was evidence of increased antigenicity in acetylated lysine, AKAP13 (P = .009), and HIF1A (P = .046), which are proteins known to be expressed in conditions of hypoxia. The loss of antigenicity for phosphorylated tyrosine and increase in expression of AKAP13, and HIF1A were confirmed in the biopsy/resection series. Key breast cancer biomarkers show no evidence of loss of antigenicity, although this dataset assesses the relatively short time beyond the 1-hour limit in recent guidelines. Other proteins show changes in antigenicity in both directions. Future studies that extend the time range and normalize for heterogeneity will provide more comprehensive information on preanalytic variation due

  20. "Hippocrates-mst": a prototype for computer-aided microcalcification analysis and risk assessment for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyrou, George; Kapsimalakou, Smaragda; Frigas, Antonis; Koufopoulos, Konstantinos; Vassilaros, Stamatios; Ligomenides, Panos

    2006-11-01

    One of the most common cancer types among women is breast cancer. Regular mammographic examinations increase the possibility for early diagnosis and treatment and significantly improve the chance of survival for patients with breast cancer. Clustered microcalcifications have been considered as important indicators of the presence of breast cancer. We present "Hippocrates-mst", a prototype system for computer-aided risk assessment of breast cancer. Our research has been focused in developing software to locate microcalcifications on X-ray mammography images, quantify their critical features and classify them according to their probability of being cancerous. A total of 260 cases (187 benign and 73 malignant) have been examined and the performance of the prototype is presented through receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The system is showing high levels of sensitivity identifying correctly 98.63% of malignant cases.

  1. Psychometric assessment of the Chinese version of the brief illness perception questionnaire in breast cancer survivors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Zhang

    Full Text Available The eight-item Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ supposedly evaluates cognitive and emotional representations of illness. This study examined the validity and reliability of a traditional Chinese version of the B-IPQ in Hong Kong Chinese breast cancer survivors.358 Chinese breast cancer survivors who had recently ended their primary treatment completed this B-IPQ Chinese version. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA tested the factor structure. The internal consistency, construct, predictive and convergent validities of the scale were assessed.CFA revealed that the original three-factor (cognitive-emotional representations and illness comprehensibility structure of the B-IPQ poorly fitted our sample. After deleting one item measuring illness coherence, seven-item gave an optimal two-factor (cognitive-emotional representations structure for the B-IPQ (B-IPQ-7. Cronbach's alpha for the two subscales were 0.653 and 0.821, and for the overall seven-item scale of B-IPQ was 0.783. Correlations of illness perception and physical symptom distress, anxiety, depression and known-group comparison between different treatment status suggested acceptable construct validity. The association between baseline illness perception and psychological distress at 3-month follow up supported predictive validity.B-IPQ-7 appears to be a moderately valid measure of illness perception in cancer population, potentially useful for assessing illness representations in Chinese women with breast cancer.

  2. Comparing Visually Assessed BI-RADS Breast Density and Automated Volumetric Breast Density Software: A Cross-Sectional Study in a Breast Cancer Screening Setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniëlle van der Waal

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to compare different methods for measuring breast density, both visual assessments and automated volumetric density, in a breast cancer screening setting. These measures could potentially be implemented in future screening programmes, in the context of personalised screening or screening evaluation.Digital mammographic exams (N = 992 of women participating in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme (age 50-75y in 2013 were included. Breast density was measured in three different ways: BI-RADS density (5th edition and with two commercially available automated software programs (Quantra and Volpara volumetric density. BI-RADS density (ordinal scale was assessed by three radiologists. Quantra (v1.3 and Volpara (v1.5.0 provide continuous estimates. Different comparison methods were used, including Bland-Altman plots and correlation coefficients (e.g., intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC].Based on the BI-RADS classification, 40.8% of the women had 'heterogeneously or extremely dense' breasts. The median volumetric percent density was 12.1% (IQR: 9.6-16.5 for Quantra, which was higher than the Volpara estimate (median 6.6%, IQR: 4.4-10.9. The mean difference between Quantra and Volpara was 5.19% (95% CI: 5.04-5.34 (ICC: 0.64. There was a clear increase in volumetric percent dense volume as BI-RADS density increased. The highest accuracy for predicting the presence of BI-RADS c+d (heterogeneously or extremely dense was observed with a cut-off value of 8.0% for Volpara and 13.8% for Quantra.Although there was no perfect agreement, there appeared to be a strong association between all three measures. Both volumetric density measures seem to be usable in breast cancer screening programmes, provided that the required data flow can be realized.

  3. Comparing Visually Assessed BI-RADS Breast Density and Automated Volumetric Breast Density Software: A Cross-Sectional Study in a Breast Cancer Screening Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Waal, Daniëlle; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; Schuur, Klaas H.; Timmers, Johanna M. H.; Verbeek, André L. M.; Broeders, Mireille J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study is to compare different methods for measuring breast density, both visual assessments and automated volumetric density, in a breast cancer screening setting. These measures could potentially be implemented in future screening programmes, in the context of personalised screening or screening evaluation. Materials and Methods Digital mammographic exams (N = 992) of women participating in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme (age 50–75y) in 2013 were included. Breast density was measured in three different ways: BI-RADS density (5th edition) and with two commercially available automated software programs (Quantra and Volpara volumetric density). BI-RADS density (ordinal scale) was assessed by three radiologists. Quantra (v1.3) and Volpara (v1.5.0) provide continuous estimates. Different comparison methods were used, including Bland-Altman plots and correlation coefficients (e.g., intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]). Results Based on the BI-RADS classification, 40.8% of the women had ‘heterogeneously or extremely dense’ breasts. The median volumetric percent density was 12.1% (IQR: 9.6–16.5) for Quantra, which was higher than the Volpara estimate (median 6.6%, IQR: 4.4–10.9). The mean difference between Quantra and Volpara was 5.19% (95% CI: 5.04–5.34) (ICC: 0.64). There was a clear increase in volumetric percent dense volume as BI-RADS density increased. The highest accuracy for predicting the presence of BI-RADS c+d (heterogeneously or extremely dense) was observed with a cut-off value of 8.0% for Volpara and 13.8% for Quantra. Conclusion Although there was no perfect agreement, there appeared to be a strong association between all three measures. Both volumetric density measures seem to be usable in breast cancer screening programmes, provided that the required data flow can be realized. PMID:26335569

  4. Comparing Visually Assessed BI-RADS Breast Density and Automated Volumetric Breast Density Software: A Cross-Sectional Study in a Breast Cancer Screening Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Waal, Daniëlle; den Heeten, Gerard J; Pijnappel, Ruud M; Schuur, Klaas H; Timmers, Johanna M H; Verbeek, André L M; Broeders, Mireille J M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to compare different methods for measuring breast density, both visual assessments and automated volumetric density, in a breast cancer screening setting. These measures could potentially be implemented in future screening programmes, in the context of personalised screening or screening evaluation. Digital mammographic exams (N = 992) of women participating in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme (age 50-75y) in 2013 were included. Breast density was measured in three different ways: BI-RADS density (5th edition) and with two commercially available automated software programs (Quantra and Volpara volumetric density). BI-RADS density (ordinal scale) was assessed by three radiologists. Quantra (v1.3) and Volpara (v1.5.0) provide continuous estimates. Different comparison methods were used, including Bland-Altman plots and correlation coefficients (e.g., intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]). Based on the BI-RADS classification, 40.8% of the women had 'heterogeneously or extremely dense' breasts. The median volumetric percent density was 12.1% (IQR: 9.6-16.5) for Quantra, which was higher than the Volpara estimate (median 6.6%, IQR: 4.4-10.9). The mean difference between Quantra and Volpara was 5.19% (95% CI: 5.04-5.34) (ICC: 0.64). There was a clear increase in volumetric percent dense volume as BI-RADS density increased. The highest accuracy for predicting the presence of BI-RADS c+d (heterogeneously or extremely dense) was observed with a cut-off value of 8.0% for Volpara and 13.8% for Quantra. Although there was no perfect agreement, there appeared to be a strong association between all three measures. Both volumetric density measures seem to be usable in breast cancer screening programmes, provided that the required data flow can be realized.

  5. Quantitative breast MRI radiomics for cancer risk assessment and the monitoring of high-risk populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendel, Kayla R.; Li, Hui; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2016-03-01

    Breast density is routinely assessed qualitatively in screening mammography. However, it is challenging to quantitatively determine a 3D density from a 2D image such as a mammogram. Furthermore, dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is used more frequently in the screening of high-risk populations. The purpose of our study is to segment parenchyma and to quantitatively determine volumetric breast density on pre-contrast axial DCE-MRI images (i.e., non-contrast) using a semi-automated quantitative approach. In this study, we retroactively examined 3D DCE-MRI images taken for breast cancer screening of a high-risk population. We analyzed 66 cases with ages between 28 and 76 (mean 48.8, standard deviation 10.8). DCE-MRIs were obtained on a Philips 3.0 T scanner. Our semi-automated DCE-MRI algorithm includes: (a) segmentation of breast tissue from non-breast tissue using fuzzy cmeans clustering (b) separation of dense and fatty tissues using Otsu's method, and (c) calculation of volumetric density as the ratio of dense voxels to total breast voxels. We examined the relationship between pre-contrast DCE-MRI density and clinical BI-RADS density obtained from radiology reports, and obtained a statistically significant correlation [Spearman ρ-value of 0.66 (p < 0.0001)]. Our method within precision medicine may be useful for monitoring high-risk populations.

  6. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... incidence of breast cancer subtypes by race/ethnicity, poverty, and state. Journal of the National Cancer Institute ... PubMed Abstract] Tamoxifen for early breast cancer: an overview of the randomised trials. Early Breast Cancer Trialists’ ...

  7. Knowledge, awareness, and practices concerning breast cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Breast cancer is by far the most frequent cancer of women. However the preventive measures for such problem are probably less than expected. Objectives: The objectives of this study are to assess the breast cancer knowledge and awareness and factors associated with the practice of breast self examination ...

  8. Assessment of required resources for implementation of national breast cancer screening program in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majstorović Nemanja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. High values of standardized mortality and morbidity rates of standardized cancer mortality in Serbia, especially colorectal, cervical and breast cancer led to creation of national programs for their early detection and engagement of the international support for their implementation. Objective. Assessment of required resources (time, personnel, financial to implement the National program for screening of breast cancer in the Republic of Serbia. Methods. Three possible scenarios have been prepared (optimistic, realistic and pessimistic based on the expected coverage by screening of women aged 45 to 69 years, and time, personnel and financial feasibility estimates were made for a two-year screening cycle. Results. Time aspect of feasibility even under conditions of “relaxation” of the assumption on the number of working days during the year did not question feasibility of any of the scenarios. Personnel feasibility is only possible in the pessimistic scenario, while the financial feasibility only makes sense in optimistic scenario as the least unfavorable solution due to economies of scale. Conclusion. Establishment of the initial base of skilled radiologists and radiology technicians and the system for their continuous medical education as well as allocation of specific MoH budget line for screening program expenditures, along with donated mammographs and good organization and coordination, may provide unobstructed implementation of the National program for early detection of breast cancer in the Republic of Serbia.

  9. Contralateral breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patients with family history of breast cancer is associated with a 15.4% probability of simultaneous ... second breast is the history of having had cancer in the opposite breast. 5' 15 The important factors that point to ... contralateral mirror image biopsy at the time of definitive surgery as a means of detecting an occult second ...

  10. Fuzzy-probabilistic multi agent system for breast cancer risk assessment and insurance premium assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatari, Farzaneh; Akbarzadeh-T, Mohammad-R; Sabahi, Ahmad

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we present an agent-based system for distributed risk assessment of breast cancer development employing fuzzy and probabilistic computing. The proposed fuzzy multi agent system consists of multiple fuzzy agents that benefit from fuzzy set theory to demonstrate their soft information (linguistic information). Fuzzy risk assessment is quantified by two linguistic variables of high and low. Through fuzzy computations, the multi agent system computes the fuzzy probabilities of breast cancer development based on various risk factors. By such ranking of high risk and low risk fuzzy probabilities, the multi agent system (MAS) decides whether the risk of breast cancer development is high or low. This information is then fed into an insurance premium adjuster in order to provide preventive decision making as well as to make appropriate adjustment of insurance premium and risk. This final step of insurance analysis also provides a numeric measure to demonstrate the utility of the approach. Furthermore, actual data are gathered from two hospitals in Mashhad during 1 year. The results are then compared with a fuzzy distributed approach. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Can Biomarker Assessment on Circulating Tumor Cells Help Direct Therapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Natalie [Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Department, Prato Hospital, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Pestrin, Marta [Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Department, Prato Hospital, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Translational Research Laboratory, Prato Hospital, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Galardi, Francesca; De Luca, Francesca [Translational Research Laboratory, Prato Hospital, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Malorni, Luca [Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Department, Prato Hospital, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Translational Research Laboratory, Prato Hospital, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Di Leo, Angelo, E-mail: adileo@usl4.toscana.it [Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Department, Prato Hospital, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy)

    2014-03-25

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) count has prognostic significance in metastatic breast cancer, but the predictive utility of CTCs is uncertain. Molecular studies on CTCs have often been limited by a low number of CTCs isolated from a high background of leukocytes. Improved enrichment techniques are now allowing molecular characterisation of single CTCs, whereby molecular markers on single CTCs may provide a real-time assessment of tumor biomarker status from a blood test or “liquid biopsy”, potentially negating the need for a more invasive tissue biopsy. The predictive ability of CTC biomarker analysis has predominantly been assessed in relation to HER2, with variable and inconclusive results. Limited data exist for other biomarkers, such as the estrogen receptor. In addition to the need to define and validate the most accurate and reproducible method for CTC molecular analysis, the clinical relevance of biomarkers, including gain of HER2 on CTC after HER2 negative primary breast cancer, remains uncertain. This review summarises the currently available data relating to biomarker evaluation on CTCs and its role in directing management in metastatic breast cancer, discusses limitations, and outlines measures that may enable future development of this approach.

  12. A meta-analysis of clinical trials assessing the effect of radiofrequency ablation for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen J

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Jiayan Chen,1,* Chi Zhang,1,* Fei Li,1,* Liping Xu,1 Hongcheng Zhu,1 Shui Wang,2 Xiaoan Liu,2 Xiaoming Zha,2 Qiang Ding,2 Lijun Ling,2 Wenbin Zhou,2 Xinchen Sun1 1Department of Radiation Oncology, 2Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA is a minimally invasive thermal ablation technique. We conducted a meta-analysis based on eligible studies to assess the efficacy and safety of RFA for treating patients with breast cancer.Methods: A literature search was conducted in PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases. Eligible studies were clinical trials that assessed RFA in patients with breast cancer. The outcomes included complete ablation rate, recurrence rate, excellent or good cosmetic rates, and complication rate. A random-effects or fixed-effects model was used to pool the estimate, according to the heterogeneity among the included studies.Results: Fifteen studies, with a total of 404 patients, were included in this meta-analysis. Pooled results showed that 89% (95% confidence interval: 85%–93% of patients achieved a complete ablation after RFA treatment and 96% of patients reported a good-to-excellent cosmetic result. Although the pooled result for recurrence rate was 0, several cases of relapse were observed at different follow-up times. No RFA-related complications were recorded, except for skin burn with an incidence of 4% (95% confidence interval: 1%–6%.Conclusion: This meta-analysis showed that RFA can be a promising alternative option for treating breast cancer since it produces a higher complete ablation rate with a low complication rate. Further well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm the efficacy and safety of RFA for breast cancer. Keywords: radiofrequency ablation, breast cancer, meta-analysis

  13. A large-scale assessment of two-way SNP interactions in breast cancer susceptibility using 46,450 cases and 42,461 controls from the breast cancer association consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milne, Roger L.; Herranz, Jesús; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias-Perez, José Ignacio; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Wang, Qin; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Mikael; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Clarke, Christina A.; Hopper, John L.; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nicholas; Schoemaker, Minouk; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Purrington, Kristen; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Sanchez, Marie; Mulot, Claire; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Collée, J. Margriet; Jager, Agnes; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Soucy, Penny; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Hamann, Ute; Försti, Asta; Rüdiger, Thomas; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Fasching, Peter A.; Häberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Peto, Julian; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Mariani, Paolo; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federik; Burwinkel, Barbara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Lambrechts, Diether; Yesilyurt, Betul T.; Floris, Giuseppe; Leunen, Karin; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Couch, Fergus J.; Toland, Amanda E.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Hall, Per; Benítez, Javier; Malats, Núria; Easton, Douglas F.; Lo, Wing-Yee; Justenhoven, Christina; Baisch, Christian; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Pesch, Beate; Rabstein, Sylvia; Lotz, Anne; Harth, Volker; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Erkkilä, Irja; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; von Smitten, Karl; Antonenkova, Natalia; Hillemanns, Peter; Christiansen, Hans; Myöhänen, Eija; Kemiläinen, Helena; Thorne, Heather; Niedermayr, Eveline; Bowtell, D.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; deFazio, A.; Gertig, D.; Green, A.; Webb, P.; Parsons, P.; Hayward, N.; Whiteman, D.; Peuteman, Gilian; Smeets, Dominiek; van Brussel, Thomas; Corthouts, Kathleen; Slanger, Tracy; Mutschelknauss, Elke; Salazar, Ramona; Behrens, S.; Birr, R.; Busch, W.; Eilber, U.; Kaspereit, B.; Knese, N.; Smit, K.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Barile, Monica; Feroce, Irene; Bonanni, Bernardo; Goldberg, Mark; Tranchant, Martine; Valois, Marie-France; Turgeon, Annie; Heguy, Lea; Otsukka, Meeri; Mononen, Kari; Selander, Teresa; Weerasooriya, Nayana; Krol-Warmerdam, E.; Molenaar, J.; Blom, J.; Brinton, Louise; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Peplonska, Beata; Zatonski, Witold; Chao, Pei; Stagner, Michael; Bos, Petra; Blom, Jannet; Crepin, Ellen; Nieuwlaat, Anja; Heemskerk, Annette; Higham, Sue; Cross, Simon; Cramp, Helen; Connley, Dan; Pilarski, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Part of the substantial unexplained familial aggregation of breast cancer may be due to interactions between common variants, but few studies have had adequate statistical power to detect interactions of realistic magnitude. We aimed to assess all two-way interactions in breast cancer susceptibility

  14. A large-scale assessment of two-way SNP interactions in breast cancer susceptibility using 46,450 cases and 42,461 controls from the breast cancer association consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milne, Roger L; Herranz, Jesús; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2014-01-01

    Part of the substantial unexplained familial aggregation of breast cancer may be due to interactions between common variants, but few studies have had adequate statistical power to detect interactions of realistic magnitude. We aimed to assess all two-way interactions in breast cancer susceptibil...

  15. Breast Cancer - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Expand Section Breast Biopsy - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Breast Cancer - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual ...

  16. Mammography: interobserver variability in breast density assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, E. A.; Zonderland, H. M.; Eijkemans, M. J. C.; Kriege, M.; Mahdavian Delavary, B.; Burger, C. W.; Ansink, A. C.

    2007-01-01

    Our objective was to determine the interobserver variability of breast density assessment according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) and to examine potential associations between breast density and risk factors for breast cancer. Four experienced breast radiologists received

  17. The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme: its role as an assessment and stratification tool

    OpenAIRE

    Timmers, J. M. H.; van Doorne-Nagtegaal, H. J.; Zonderland, H. M.; van Tinteren, H.; Visser, O.; Verbeek, A. L. M.; den Heeten, G. J.; Broeders, M. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To assess the suitability of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) as a quality assessment tool in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme. Methods The data of 93,793 screened women in the Amsterdam screening region (November 2005–July 2006) were reviewed. BI-RADS categories, work-up, age, final diagnosis and final TNM classification were available from the screening registry. Interval cancers were obtained through linkage with the cancer registry. BI-RADS was ...

  18. Breast cancer in Kumasi, Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohene-Yeboah, M.; Adjei, E.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in Ghanaian women.To describes the characteristics of breast cancer patients attending the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Kumasi, Ghana.The study was conducted at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital. Between July 1st 2004 and June 30th 2009 patients presenting with breast lumps were assessed by clinical examination, imaging studies and pathological examination. Relevant clinical and pathological were recorded prospectively data on all patients with microscopically proven breast cancer. The cancers were graded according to the modified Bloom-Richardson system. Tissue immunoperoxidase stains for oestrogen, progesterone receptors and c-erb2 oncogene were performed with commercially prepared antigens and reagents.Nineteen thousand four hundred and twenty – three (19,423) patients were seen during the study period. There were 330 (1.7%) patients with histologically proven breast cancer. The mean age was 49.1 years. A palpable breast lump was detected in 248 patients (75.2%). Two hundred and eighty –one patients (85.2%) presented with Stages III and IV , 271 (82.1%) invasive and 230 ( 85.2%) high grade carcinomas. Oestrogen and progesterone receptors were positive in 32 and 9 cases respectively. Her2 protein was positive in 11 cases. In Kumasi, as in other parts of Ghana, breast cancer affects mostly young pre-menopausal who present with advanced disease. The cancers have unfavourable prognostic features and are unlikely to respond to hormonal therapy. (au)

  19. [Breast cancer surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, Georges; Berclaz, Gilles; Langer, Igor; Pittet-Cuenod, Brigitte; Delaloye, Jean-François

    2007-10-24

    Breast conserving surgery followed by radiation therapy is the treatment of choice for early breast cancer. For patients who choice or need a mastectomy, breast reconstruction provides an acceptable alternative. Breast cancer surgery has been evolving through minimally invasive approaches. Sentinel node biopsy has already remplaced axillary lymph node dissection in the evaluation of the axilla. Local ablation of the tumor may be a valuable alternative to surgery in the future.

  20. Breast Cancer Risk in American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Risk in American Women On This Page What ... risk of developing the disease. Personal history of breast cancer : Women who have had breast cancer are more ...

  1. Radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boljesikova, E.; Ligacova, A.

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of breast carcinoma, reduces local recurrences about 20% (after breast conserving surgery or mastectomy), reduces 15 y mortality for cancer about 5%. The irradiation volumes can cover whole breast ± boost, partial breast, chest wall and regional lymph nodes. In contribution are analysed indications of radiotherapy, radiation techniques with focus on new trends, altered fractionation, partial breast irradiation and toxicity. (author)

  2. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Breast cancer Breast cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Breast cancer is a disease in which certain cells in ...

  3. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menopause Map Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July 2010 Download PDFs English ... G. Komen Foundation What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  4. Multiple imputation as a means to assess Mammographic vs. Ultrasound technology in Determine Breast Cancer Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helenowski, Irene B.; Demirtas, Hakan; Khan, Seema; Eladoumikdachi, Firas; Shidfar, Ali

    2014-03-01

    Tumor size based on mammographic and ultrasound data are two methods used in predicting recurrence in breast cancer patients. Which technology offers better determination of diagnosis is an ongoing debate among radiologists, biophysicists, and other clinicians, however. Further complications in assessing the performance of each technology arise from missing data. One approach to remedy this problem may involve multiple imputation. Here, we therefore examine how imputation affects our assessment of the relationship between recurrence and tumor size determined either by mammography of ultrasound technology. We specifically employ the semi-parametric approach for imputing mixed continuous and binary data as presented in Helenowski and Demirtas (2013).

  5. Breast Cancer Screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altaf, Fadwa J.

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer is a very common health problem in Saudi females that can be reduced by early detection through introducing breast cancer screening. Literature review reveals significant reduction in breast cancer incidence and outcome after the beginning of breast cancer screening. The objectives of this article are to highlight the significance of breast cancer screening in different international societies and to write the major guidelines of breast cancer screening in relation to other departments involved with more emphasis on the Pathology Department guidelines in tissue handling, diagnostic criteria and significance of the diagnosis. This article summaries and acknowledges major work carried out before, and recommends similar modified work in order to meet the requirement for the Saudi society. (author)

  6. Breast cancer predisposition syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemel, Deborah; Domchek, Susan M

    2010-10-01

    A small, but important, percentage of breast cancer cases is caused by the inheritance of a single copy of a mutated gene. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the genes most commonly associated with inherited breast cancer; however, mutations in TP53 and PTEN cause Li-Fraumeni syndrome and Cowden syndrome, respectively, both of which are associated with high lifetime risks of breast cancer. Advances in the field of breast cancer genetics have led to an improved understanding of detection and prevention strategies. More recently, strategies to target the underlying genetic defects in BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated breast and ovarian cancers are emerging and may have implications for certain types of sporadic breast cancer. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The impact of breast cancer biological subtyping on tumor size assessment by ultrasound and mammography - a retrospective multicenter cohort study of 6543 primary breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, Roland Gregor; Wollschläger, Daniel; Kreienberg, Rolf; Janni, Wolfgang; Wischnewsky, Manfred; Diessner, Joachim; Stüber, Tanja; Bartmann, Catharina; Krockenberger, Mathias; Wischhusen, Jörg; Wöckel, Achim; Blettner, Maria; Schwentner, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Mammography and ultrasound are the gold standard imaging techniques for preoperative assessment and for monitoring the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer. Maximum accuracy in predicting pathological tumor size non-invasively is critical for individualized therapy and surgical planning. We therefore aimed to assess the accuracy of tumor size measurement by ultrasound and mammography in a multicentered health services research study. We retrospectively analyzed data from 6543 patients with unifocal, unilateral primary breast cancer. The maximum tumor diameter was measured by ultrasound and/or mammographic imaging. All measurements were compared to final tumor diameter determined by postoperative histopathological examination. We compared the precision of each imaging method across different patient subgroups as well as the method-specific accuracy in each patient subgroup. Overall, the correlation with histology was 0.61 for mammography and 0.60 for ultrasound. Both correlations were higher in pT2 cancers than in pT1 and pT3. Ultrasound as well as mammography revealed a significantly higher correlation with histology in invasive ductal compared to lobular cancers (p < 0.01). For invasive lobular cancers, the mammography showed better correlation with histology than ultrasound (p = 0.01), whereas there was no such advantage for invasive ductal cancers. Ultrasound was significantly superior for HR negative cancers (p < 0.001). HER2/neu positive cancers were also more precisely assessed by ultrasound (p < 0.001). The size of HER2/neu negative cancers could be more accurately predicted by mammography (p < 0.001). This multicentered health services research approach demonstrates that predicting tumor size by mammography and ultrasound provides accurate results. Biological tumor features do, however, affect the diagnostic precision

  8. Development and Psychometric Assessment of the Measure of Globalization Influence on Health Risk (MGIHR) Among Mexican Women with Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodora, Jesse N; Carvajal, Scott C; Robles-Garcia, Rebeca; Agraz, Francisco Páez; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian; Meza-Montenegro, Maria Mercedes; Gutierrez-Millan, Luis Enrique; Martinez, Maria Elena

    2015-08-01

    Lacking in the literature are data addressing the extent to which changes in reproductive and lifestyle factors predispose women in developing nations to higher breast cancer rates, and the degree to which these are due to globalization influences. This article describes the development and psychometric assessment of an instrument intended to measure global, predominantly U.S., influences on breast cancer risk profile among women residing in Mexico. Using investigator consensus and a focus group methodology, the Measure of Globalization Influence on Health Risk (MGIHR) was developed and completed by 341 women. Psychometric analysis support the use of an 11-item Consumerism and Modernity scale and 7-item Reproductive Control and Gender Role scale. The MGIHR is a valid and reliable instrument for understanding changing lifestyle and reproductive factors for breast cancer risk and may provide a more complete understanding of breast cancer development and needed interventions.

  9. Assessing the Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Breast Cancer Mortality in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedjou, Clement G.; Tchounwou, Paul B.; Payton, Marinelle; Miele, Lucio; Fonseca, Duber D.; Lowe, Leroy; Alo, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths among women aged 40–55 in the United States and currently affects more than one in ten women worldwide. It is also one of the most diagnosed cancers in women both in wealthy and poor countries. Fortunately, the mortality rate from breast cancer has decreased in recent years due to increased emphasis on early detection and more effective treatments in White population. Although the mortality rates have declined in some ethnic populations, the overall cancer incidence among African American and Hispanic populations has continued to grow. The goal of the present review article was to highlight similarities and differences in breast cancer morbidity and mortality rates primarily among African American women compared to White women in the United States. To reach our goal, we conducted a search of articles in journals with a primary focus on minority health, and authors who had published articles on racial/ethnic disparity related to breast cancer patients. A systematic search of original research was conducted using MEDLINE, PUBMED and Google Scholar databases. We found that racial/ethnic disparities in breast cancer may be attributed to a large number of clinical and non-clinical risk factors including lack of medical coverage, barriers to early detection and screening, more advanced stage of disease at diagnosis among minorities, and unequal access to improvements in cancer treatment. Many African American women have frequent unknown or unstaged breast cancers than White women. These risk factors may explain the differences in breast cancer treatment and survival rate between African American women and White women. New strategies and approaches are needed to promote breast cancer prevention, improve survival rate, reduce breast cancer mortality, and ultimately improve the health outcomes of racial/ethnic minorities. PMID:28475137

  10. Breast cancer screening among women younger than age 50: a current assessment of the issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R A

    2000-01-01

    In the hope of resolving underlying policy questions related to the value of breast cancer screening with mammography for women younger than 50 years of age, the National Institutes of Health and the National Cancer Institute in 1997 jointly sponsored a consensus conference on the subject. While the panel concluded that the data were insufficient to endorse mammography for this age group apart from individual choice, the conclusion was not the "consensus" sought by many of those with strong opinions on both sides of this issue, and the debate raged on. Prior to the 1997 conference, and since, meta-analyses of trial data and assessments of service screening programs have indicated that breast cancer screening with mammography for women between 40 and 49 meets recommended levels of performance compared with performance in women 50 years and older, especially if programs achieve high quality and screen at 12-to-18 month intervals. Because the detectable preclinical phase is shorter in younger women who develop breast cancer compared with that in women 50 years of age or older, a key component of any screening program for those younger than 50 is an appropriate screening interval. Many of the screening programs that had historically been developed for women in their forties--and whose disappointing results contributed to the confusion and controversy about the efficacy of mammography in younger women--had a 24-month screening interval, which was not found to be of significant benefit for early detection of breast cancer in this age group. While a new emphasis of this controversy has focused on the balance of benefits and harms in women ages 40 to 49, women of all ages need to be fully informed about the benefits and limitations of breast cancer screening--more specifically, what to expect at the time of screening, and what to expect from screening. There are differences in the performance and effectiveness of mammography in different age groups of women aged 40 and

  11. Neuroendocrine breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça, Susana; Esteves, Joana; Costa, Sílvia; Vale, Sílvio; Maciel, Jorge

    2012-08-13

    Neuroendocrine breast cancer is thought to account for about 1% of all breast cancers. This rare type of breast malignancy is more common in older women and presents as a low-grade, slow-growing cancer. The most definitive markers that indicate neuroendocrine carcinoma are the presence of chromogranin, synaptophysin or neuron-specific enolase, in at least 50% of malignant tumour cells. The authors present a case report of an 83-year-old woman, admitted to their institution with right breast lump. Physical examination, mammography and ultrasonography showed a 2.4 cm nodule, probably a benign lesion (BI-RADS 3). A fine needle aspiration biopsy was performed and revealed proliferative epithelial papillary lesion. She was submitted to excisional biopsy and histology showed endocrine breast cancer well differentiated (G1). Immunohistochemically, tumour cells were positive for synaptophysin. These breast cancers are characterised for their excellent prognosis and conservative treatment is almost always enough to obtain patient cure.

  12. Breast cancer statistics, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSantis, Carol; Siegel, Rebecca; Bandi, Priti; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the American Cancer Society provides an overview of female breast cancer statistics in the United States, including trends in incidence, mortality, survival, and screening. Approximately 230,480 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 39,520 breast cancer deaths are expected to occur among US women in 2011. Breast cancer incidence rates were stable among all racial/ethnic groups from 2004 to 2008. Breast cancer death rates have been declining since the early 1990s for all women except American Indians/Alaska Natives, among whom rates have remained stable. Disparities in breast cancer death rates are evident by state, socioeconomic status, and race/ethnicity. While significant declines in mortality rates were observed for 36 states and the District of Columbia over the past 10 years, rates for 14 states remained level. Analyses by county-level poverty rates showed that the decrease in mortality rates began later and was slower among women residing in poor areas. As a result, the highest breast cancer death rates shifted from the affluent areas to the poor areas in the early 1990s. Screening rates continue to be lower in poor women compared with non-poor women, despite much progress in increasing mammography utilization. In 2008, 51.4% of poor women had undergone a screening mammogram in the past 2 years compared with 72.8% of non-poor women. Encouraging patients aged 40 years and older to have annual mammography and a clinical breast examination is the single most important step that clinicians can take to reduce suffering and death from breast cancer. Clinicians should also ensure that patients at high risk of breast cancer are identified and offered appropriate screening and follow-up. Continued progress in the control of breast cancer will require sustained and increased efforts to provide high-quality screening, diagnosis, and treatment to all segments of the population. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society, Inc.

  13. Systematic Identification and Assessment of Therapeutic Targets for Breast Cancer Based on Genome-Wide RNA Interference Transcriptomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available With accumulating public omics data, great efforts have been made to characterize the genetic heterogeneity of breast cancer. However, identifying novel targets and selecting the best from the sizeable lists of candidate targets is still a key challenge for targeted therapy, largely owing to the lack of economical, efficient and systematic discovery and assessment to prioritize potential therapeutic targets. Here, we describe an approach that combines the computational evaluation and objective, multifaceted assessment to systematically identify and prioritize targets for biological validation and therapeutic exploration. We first establish the reference gene expression profiles from breast cancer cell line MCF7 upon genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi of a total of 3689 genes, and the breast cancer query signatures using RNA-seq data generated from tissue samples of clinical breast cancer patients in the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA. Based on gene set enrichment analysis, we identified a set of 510 genes that when knocked down could significantly reverse the transcriptome of breast cancer state. We then perform multifaceted assessment to analyze the gene set to prioritize potential targets for gene therapy. We also propose drug repurposing opportunities and identify potentially druggable proteins that have been poorly explored with regard to the discovery of small-molecule modulators. Finally, we obtained a small list of candidate therapeutic targets for four major breast cancer subtypes, i.e., luminal A, luminal B, HER2+ and triple negative breast cancer. This RNAi transcriptome-based approach can be a helpful paradigm for relevant researches to identify and prioritize candidate targets for experimental validation.

  14. Assessing risk of breast cancer in an ethnically South-East Asia population (results of a multiple ethnic groups study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Machin, David; Chow, Khuan-Yew; Sim, Yu-Fan; Duffy, Stephen W; Matchar, David B; Goh, Chien-Hui; Chia, Kee-Seng

    2012-11-19

    Gail and others developed a model (GAIL) using age-at-menarche, age-at-birth of first live child, number of previous benign breast biopsy examinations, and number of first-degree-relatives with breast cancer as well as baseline age-specific breast cancer risks for predicting the 5-year risk of invasive breast cancer for Caucasian women. However, the validity of the model for projecting risk in South-East Asian women is uncertain. We evaluated GAIL and attempted to improve its performance for Singapore women of Chinese, Malay and Indian origins. Data from the Singapore Breast Screening Programme (SBSP) are used. Motivated by lower breast cancer incidence in many Asian countries, we utilised race-specific invasive breast cancer and other cause mortality rates for Singapore women to produce GAIL-SBSP. By using risk factor information from a nested case-control study within SBSP, alternative models incorporating fewer then additional risk factors were determined. Their accuracy was assessed by comparing the expected cases (E) with the observed (O) by the ratio (E/O) and 95% confidence interval (CI) and the respective concordance statistics estimated. From 28,883 women, GAIL-SBSP predicted 241.83 cases during the 5-year follow-up while 241 were reported (E/O=1.00, CI=0.88 to 1.14). Except for women who had two or more first-degree-relatives with breast cancer, satisfactory prediction was present in almost all risk categories. This agreement was reflected in Chinese and Malay, but not in Indian women. We also found that a simplified model (S-GAIL-SBSP) including only age-at-menarche, age-at-birth of first live child and number of first-degree-relatives performed similarly with associated concordance statistics of 0.5997. Taking account of body mass index and parity did not improve the calibration of S-GAIL-SBSP. GAIL can be refined by using national race-specific invasive breast cancer rates and mortality rates for causes other than breast cancer. A revised model

  15. Assessing risk of breast cancer in an ethnically South-East Asia population (results of a multiple ethnic groups study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Fei

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gail and others developed a model (GAIL using age-at-menarche, age-at-birth of first live child, number of previous benign breast biopsy examinations, and number of first-degree-relatives with breast cancer as well as baseline age-specific breast cancer risks for predicting the 5-year risk of invasive breast cancer for Caucasian women. However, the validity of the model for projecting risk in South-East Asian women is uncertain. We evaluated GAIL and attempted to improve its performance for Singapore women of Chinese, Malay and Indian origins. Methods Data from the Singapore Breast Screening Programme (SBSP are used. Motivated by lower breast cancer incidence in many Asian countries, we utilised race-specific invasive breast cancer and other cause mortality rates for Singapore women to produce GAIL-SBSP. By using risk factor information from a nested case-control study within SBSP, alternative models incorporating fewer then additional risk factors were determined. Their accuracy was assessed by comparing the expected cases (E with the observed (O by the ratio (E/O and 95% confidence interval (CI and the respective concordance statistics estimated. Results From 28,883 women, GAIL-SBSP predicted 241.83 cases during the 5-year follow-up while 241 were reported (E/O=1.00, CI=0.88 to 1.14. Except for women who had two or more first-degree-relatives with breast cancer, satisfactory prediction was present in almost all risk categories. This agreement was reflected in Chinese and Malay, but not in Indian women. We also found that a simplified model (S-GAIL-SBSP including only age-at-menarche, age-at-birth of first live child and number of first-degree-relatives performed similarly with associated concordance statistics of 0.5997. Taking account of body mass index and parity did not improve the calibration of S-GAIL-SBSP. Conclusions GAIL can be refined by using national race-specific invasive breast cancer rates and mortality rates

  16. Assessment of cosmetic outcome of oncoplastic breast conservation surgery in women with early breast cancer: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adimulam, G; Challa, V R; Dhar, A; Chumber, S; Seenu, V; Srivastava, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the cosmetic outcome of patients undergoing oncoplastic breast conserving surgery in Indian population. A prospective cohort of 35 patients who were eligible for breast conservation surgery was included in the study from year 2007 to 2009. Patients with central quadrant tumors were excluded from the study. A double - blind cosmetic assessment was done by a plastic surgeon and a senior nurse not involved in the management of patients. Moreover, self-assessment was carried out by the patient regarding the satisfaction of surgery, comfort with brasserie, social and sexual life after oncoplastic surgery. In this study, 35 patients underwent oncoplastic breast conservation surgery by various techniques. The cosmetic outcome scores of the surgeon and nurse were analyzed for inter rater agreement using inter-class Correlation Coefficients. There was a good association between them. The risk factors for poor cosmetic outcome was studied by univariate analysis and significant correlation was obtained with age, volume of breast tissue excised and estimated percentage of breast volume excised (P surgery. Patients were offered an option for cosmetic correction of contralateral breast by mastopexy or reduction mammoplasty however, none of them agreed for another procedure. Oncoplastic breast surgery helps to resect larger volume of tissue with wider margins around the tumor. It helps to achieve better cosmesis and extends the indications for breast conservation. Most of the patients were satisfied with mere preservation of the breast mound rather than a symmetrical contralateral breast.

  17. Assessment of Ki67 expression for breast cancer subtype classification and prognosis in the Nurses' Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Megan A; Hirko, Kelly A; Beck, Andrew H; Collins, Laura C; Schnitt, Stuart J; Eliassen, A Heather; Holmes, Michelle D; Tamimi, Rulla M; Hazra, Aditi

    2017-11-01

    Ki67 is a proliferation marker commonly assessed by immunohistochemistry in breast cancer, and it has been proposed as a clinical marker for subtype classification, prognosis, and prediction of therapeutic response. However, the clinical utility of Ki67 is limited by the lack of consensus on the optimal cut point for each application. We assessed Ki67 by immunohistochemistry using Definiens digital image analysis (DIA) in 2653 cases of incident invasive breast cancer diagnosed in the Nurses' Health Study from 1976 to 2006. Ki67 was scored as continuous percentage of positive tumor cells, and dichotomized at various cut points. Multivariable hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using Cox regression models for distant recurrence, breast cancer-specific mortality and overall mortality in relation to luminal subtypes defined with various Ki67 cut points, adjusting for breast cancer prognostic factors, clinico-pathologic features and treatment. DIA was highly correlated with manual scoring of Ki67 (Spearman correlation ρ = 0.86). Mean Ki67 score was higher in grade-defined luminal B (12.6%), HER2-enriched (17.9%) and basal-like (20.6%) subtypes compared to luminal A (8.9%). In multivariable-adjusted models, luminal B tumors had higher breast cancer-specific mortality compared to luminal A cancer classified using various cut points for Ki67 positivity including the 14% cut point routinely reported in the literature (HR 1.38, 95% CI 1.11-1.72, p = 0.004). There was no significant difference in clinical outcomes for ER- tumors according to Ki67 positivity defined at various cut points. Assessment of Ki67 in breast tumors by DIA was a robust and quantitative method. Results from this large prospective cohort study provide support for the clinical relevance of using Ki67 at the 14% cut point for luminal subtype classification and breast cancer prognosis.

  18. PET scan for breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radioactive substance (called a tracer) to look for breast cancer. This tracer can help identify areas of cancer ... only after a woman has been diagnosed with breast cancer. It is done to see if the cancer ...

  19. Contralateral breast cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unnithan, Jaya; Macklis, Roger M.

    2001-01-01

    The use of breast-conserving treatment approaches for breast cancer has now become a standard option for early stage disease. Numerous randomized studies have shown medical equivalence when mastectomy is compared to lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy for the local management of this common problem. With an increased emphasis on patient involvement in the therapeutic decision making process, it is important to identify and quantify any unforeseen risks of the conservation approach. One concern that has been raised is the question of radiation- related contralateral breast cancer after breast radiotherapy. Although most studies do not show statistically significant evidence that patients treated with breast radiotherapy are at increased risk of developing contralateral breast cancer when compared to control groups treated with mastectomy alone, there are clear data showing the amount of scattered radiation absorbed by the contralateral breast during a routine course of breast radiotherapy is considerable (several Gy) and is therefore within the range where one might be concerned about radiogenic contralateral tumors. While radiation related risks of contralateral breast cancer appear to be small enough to be statistically insignificant for the majority of patients, there may exist a smaller subset which, for genetic or environmental reasons, is at special risk for scatter related second tumors. If such a group could be predicted, it would seem appropriate to offer either special counselling or special prevention procedures aimed at mitigating this second tumor risk. The use of genetic testing, detailed analysis of breast cancer family history, and the identification of patients who acquired their first breast cancer at a very early age may all be candidate screening procedures useful in identifying such at- risk groups. Since some risk mitigation strategies are convenient and easy to utilize, it makes sense to follow the classic 'ALARA' (as low as reasonably

  20. Male breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lautrup, Marianne D; Thorup, Signe S; Jensen, Vibeke

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Describe prognostic parameters of Danish male breast cancer patients (MBCP) diagnosed from 1980–2009. Determine all-cause mortality compared to the general male population and analyze survival/mortality compared with Danish female breast cancer patients (FBCP) in the same period...

  1. Breast cancer and HIV

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intuition might dictate that the outcome of both surgical and adjuvant treatment of breast cancer in these patients would be poor because of the effect on immunity. We recently published a prospective cohort study which compared the treatment outcomes of breast cancer in HIV- infected and -uninfected patients.3 This was ...

  2. Barriers and Facilitators for Utilization of Genetic Counseling and Risk Assessment Services in Young Female Breast Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Anderson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Women diagnosed with breast cancer at a young age are more likely to carry a cancer predisposing genetic mutation. Per the current NCCN recommendations, women diagnosed under age 50 should be referred to cancer genetic counseling for further risk evaluation. This study seeks to assess patient-reported barriers and facilitators to receiving genetic counseling and risk assessment among a community-based population of young breast cancer survivors (YBCS. Methods. Through the Michigan Cancer Surveillance Program, a state-based cancer registry, 488 women diagnosed with breast cancer before age 50 in 2006-2007 were identified. They received a mail survey regarding family history and facilitators and barriers to receiving genetic counseling and risk assessment. Results. Responses were received from 289 women (59.2%. One hundred twenty-two (42.2% reported having received cancer genetic counseling. The most frequent reason identified for receiving services was to benefit their family's future. The top reasons for not attending were “no one recommended it” and “medical insurance coverage issues.” Discussion. This study is the first published report using a state cancer registry to determine facilitators and barriers to receiving genetic counseling and risk assessment among YBCS. These findings demonstrate the need for additional awareness and education about appropriate indications for genetic services.

  3. Barriers and Facilitators for Utilization of Genetic Counseling and Risk Assessment Services in Young Female Breast Cancer Survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, B.; McLosky, J.; Wasilevich, E.; Callo, S. L.; Duquette, D.; Copeland, G.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Women diagnosed with breast cancer at a young age are more likely to carry a cancer predisposing genetic mutation. Per the current NCCN recommendations, women diagnosed under age 50 should be referred to cancer genetic counseling for further risk evaluation. This study seeks to assess patient-reported barriers and facilitators to receiving genetic counseling and risk assessment among a community-based population of young breast cancer survivors (YBCS). Methods. Through the Michigan Cancer Surveillance Program, a state-based cancer registry, 488 women diagnosed with breast cancer before age 50 in 2006-2007 were identified. They received a mail survey regarding family history and facilitators and barriers to receiving genetic counseling and risk assessment. Results. Responses were received from 289 women (59.2%). One hundred twenty-two (42.2%) reported having received cancer genetic counseling. The most frequent reason identified for receiving services was to benefit their family's future. The top reasons for not attending were “no one recommended it” and “medical insurance coverage issues.” Discussion. This study is the first published report using a state cancer registry to determine facilitators and barriers to receiving genetic counseling and risk assessment among YBCS. These findings demonstrate the need for additional awareness and education about appropriate indications for genetic services.

  4. CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  5. Human papilloma viruses (HPV and breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Sutherland Lawson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Human papillomaviruses (HPV may have a role in some breast cancers. The purpose of this study is to fill important gaps in the evidence. These gaps are: (i confirmation of the presence of high risk for cancer HPVs in breast cancers, (ii evidence of HPV infections in benign breast tissues prior to the development of HPV positive breast cancer in the same patients, (iii evidence that HPVs are biologically active and not harmless passengers in breast cancer.Methods: RNA-seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA was used to identify HPV RNA sequences in breast cancers. We also conducted a retrospective cohort study based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR analyses to identify HPVs in archival specimens from Australian women with benign breast biopsies who later developed breast cancer. To assess whether HPVs in breast cancer were biologically active, the expression of the oncogenic protein HPV E7 was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC.Results: Thirty (3.5% low risk and 20 (2.3% high risk HPV types were identified in 855 breast cancers from the TCGA data base. The high risk types were HPV 18 (48%, HPV 113 (24%, HPV 16 (10%, HPV 52 (10%. Data from the PCR cohort study, indicated that HPV type 18 was the most common type identified in breast cancer specimens (55% of 40 breast cancer specimens followed by HPV 16 (13%. The same HPV type was identified in both the benign and subsequent breast cancer in 15 patients. HPV E7 proteins were identified in 72% of benign breast specimens and 59% of invasive breast cancer specimens.Conclusions: There were 4 observations of particular interest: (i confirmation by both NGS and PCR of the presence of high risk HPV gene sequences in breast cancers, (ii a correlation between high risk HPV in benign breast specimens and subsequent HPV positive breast cancer in the same patient, (iii HPVs in breast cancer are likely to be biologically active (as shown by transcription of HPV DNA to RNA plus the expression of

  6. Human Papilloma Viruses and Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, James S; Glenn, Wendy K; Salyakina, Daria; Delprado, Warick; Clay, Rosemary; Antonsson, Annika; Heng, Benjamin; Miyauchi, Shingo; Tran, Dinh D; Ngan, Christopher C; Lutze-Mann, Louise; Whitaker, Noel J

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) may have a role in some breast cancers. The purpose of this study is to fill important gaps in the evidence. These gaps are: (i) confirmation of the presence of high risk for cancer HPVs in breast cancers, (ii) evidence of HPV infections in benign breast tissues prior to the development of HPV-positive breast cancer in the same patients, (iii) evidence that HPVs are biologically active and not harmless passengers in breast cancer. RNA-seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) was used to identify HPV RNA sequences in breast cancers. We also conducted a retrospective cohort study based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses to identify HPVs in archival specimens from Australian women with benign breast biopsies who later developed breast cancer. To assess whether HPVs in breast cancer were biologically active, the expression of the oncogenic protein HPV E7 was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Thirty (3.5%) low-risk and 20 (2.3%) high-risk HPV types were identified in 855 breast cancers from the TCGA database. The high risk types were HPV 18 (48%), HPV 113 (24%), HPV 16 (10%), HPV 52 (10%). Data from the PCR cohort study indicated that HPV type 18 was the most common type identified in breast cancer specimens (55% of 40 breast cancer specimens) followed by HPV 16 (13%). The same HPV type was identified in both the benign and subsequent breast cancer in 15 patients. HPV E7 proteins were identified in 72% of benign breast specimens and 59% of invasive breast cancer specimens. There were four observations of particular interest: (i) confirmation by both NGS and PCR of the presence of high-risk HPV gene sequences in breast cancers, (ii) a correlation between high-risk HPV in benign breast specimens and subsequent HPV-positive breast cancer in the same patient, (iii) HPVs in breast cancer are likely to be biologically active (as shown by transcription of HPV DNA to RNA plus the expression of HPV E7 proteins), (iv) HPV

  7. St Gallen 2015 subtyping of luminal breast cancers : impact of different Ki67-based proliferation assessment methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Focke, Cornelia M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413647927; van Diest, Paul J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075281775; Decker, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Ki67 has been proposed as prognostic proliferation marker in luminal breast cancer (BC), but little is known on the influence of Ki67 assessment methods on subtyping into luminal A- and B-like tumors. Our aim was to study the influence of different Ki67-labeling index (Ki67-LI) assessment methods on

  8. Ovarian reserve in breast cancer: assessment with anti-Müllerian hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamy, Anne-Sophie; Porcher, Raphaël; Cuvier, Caroline; Giacchetti, Sylvie; Schlageter, Marie-Hélène; Coussieu, Christiane; Gronier, Héloise; Feugeas, Jean-Paul; Adoui, Nadir; Lacorte, Jean-Marc; Poirot, Catherine; Habdous, Mohamed; Espié, Marc

    2014-11-01

    Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels fall during chemotherapy. Treatment-induced amenorrhoea is a reversible phenomenon, but few data are available on long-term AMH changes in breast cancer. The aim of the study was to describe serum AMH levels before, during and in the long term after chemotherapy, and to show a potential AMH recovery. Between May 2010 and June 2011, we selected 134 women aged 18-43 years at the time of breast cancer diagnosis who received chemotherapy between 2005 and 2011, and had not undergone an oophorectomy or had previous cytotoxic treatment. The AMH levels were assessed before, during and 4 months to 5.5 years after the end of chemotherapy. During chemotherapy, AMH was undetectable in 69% of women. After chemotherapy, a significant increase in AMH was found, with an average magnitude of +1.2% per month (95% credibility interval: 0.7 to 1.6). Older age and 12 months of amenorrhoea were found to be associated with a lower AMH recovery rate, whereas baseline AMH and number of chemotherapy cycles were not. The process of AMH changes during and after chemotherapy is dynamic, and shows recovery after ovarian injury. Caution should be exercised in interpreting individual AMH assessment in this context. Copyright © 2014 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessing disruptions in adherence to antidepressant treatments after breast cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yi-Ting; Winn, Aaron N; Rosenstein, Donald L; Dusetzina, Stacie B

    2017-06-01

    Long-term treatment with antidepressants can lessen the symptoms of depression, but health-related crises-such as a cancer diagnosis-may disrupt ongoing depression care. The study aims to estimate the effect of receiving a breast cancer diagnosis on antidepressant adherence among women with depression. Using SEER-Medicare administrative claims, we identified women aged 65+ with newly diagnosed breast cancer between 2008 and 2011, who were diagnosed with depression and used antidepressants during the year before pre-diagnosis year. We compared antidepressant adherence among women with breast cancer to similar women without cancer using generalized estimation equations. Antidepressant adherence was estimated using the proportion of days covered 1 year before and after the index date. We included 1142 women with breast cancer and pre-existing depression and 1142 matched non-cancer patients with pre-existing depression. Mean antidepressant adherence was similar for both groups in the year before and after the index date (all around 0.71); adherence decreased by approximately 0.01 following breast cancer diagnosis in cancer group, with similar reductions among non-cancer group (p = 0.19). However, substantial proportion of patients had inadequate adherence to antidepressants in the post-diagnosis period, and almost 40% of patients in each group discontinued antidepressants over the study period. Antidepressant adherence was not associated with receiving a breast cancer diagnosis beyond what would have been expected in a similar cohort of women without cancer; however, adherence was poor among both groups. Ensuring adequate ongoing depression care is important to improve cancer care and patient quality of life in the long term. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Objective assessment of the aesthetic outcomes of breast cancer treatment: toward automatic localization of fiducial points on digital photographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udpa, Nitin; Sampat, Mehul P.; Kim, Min Soon; Reece, Gregory P.; Markey, Mia K.

    2007-03-01

    The contemporary goals of breast cancer treatment are not limited to cure but include maximizing quality of life. All breast cancer treatment can adversely affect breast appearance. Developing objective, quantifiable methods to assess breast appearance is important to understand the impact of deformity on patient quality of life, guide selection of current treatments, and make rational treatment advances. A few measures of aesthetic properties such as symmetry have been developed. They are computed from the distances between manually identified fiducial points on digital photographs. However, this is time-consuming and subject to intra- and inter-observer variability. The purpose of this study is to investigate methods for automatic localization of fiducial points on anterior-posterior digital photographs taken to document the outcomes of breast reconstruction. Particular emphasis is placed on automatic localization of the nipple complex since the most widely used aesthetic measure, the Breast Retraction Assessment, quantifies the symmetry of nipple locations. The nipple complexes are automatically localized using normalized cross-correlation with a template bank of variants of Gaussian and Laplacian of Gaussian filters. A probability map of likely nipple locations determined from the image database is used to reduce the number of false positive detections from the matched filter operation. The accuracy of the nipple detection was evaluated relative to markings made by three human observers. The impact of using the fiducial point locations as identified by the automatic method, as opposed to the manual method, on the calculation of the Breast Retraction Assessment was also evaluated.

  11. Breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Owens

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumours are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs. Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to the pathology of breast cancer will greatly aid the pursuit of novel therapies targeted at eliminating these cells. This review will summarise what is currently known about the origins of breast CSCs, their role in disease progression and ways in which they may be targeted therapeutically.

  12. A cross-sectional assessment of quality of life of breast cancer patients in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almutairi, K M; Mansour, E A; Vinluan, J M

    2016-07-01

    This aim of this study was to assess the quality of life of Saudi female breast cancer patients and determine the effects of the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics on the quality of life of those patients. This study was designed as a cross-sectional study. The data were collected from 145 female cancer patients who were recruited from outpatient units in different clinical settings in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from September 2014 to February 2015. Questionnaires were distributed to the patients during their visits to the outpatient clinics after obtaining informed consent. Quality of life was assessed using a validated Arabic version of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) quality of life. Among functional scales, emotional functioning scored the highest (83.25 [95% CI 79.53-86.98]). The most distressing symptom on the symptom scale was insomnia (mean 84.14 [95% CI 79.95-88.32]), followed by appetite loss (mean 80.92 [95% CI 76.51-85.33]) and dyspnoea (mean 80.00 [95% CI 75.51-84.49]). Poor functioning was found in sexual enjoyment (mean 22.52 [95% CI 17.97-27.08]) while future perspective scored the highest (mean 76.32 [95% CI 70.52-82.12]). This study shows breast cancer survivors in Saudi had a low overall global quality of life. Saudi women showed average scores on all the functional scales but the emotional ones scored the highest. Insomnia, appetite loss, and dyspnoea were the distressing symptoms on symptom scales while future perspective domain scored the highest in item of QLQ-BR23. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessment of quality of life in breast cancer patients at a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Damodar

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: These findings have shown that there exists a strong correlation between the length of treatment and the QoL among breast cancer patients. Future interventions should target each specific aspect of QoL.

  14. (Very) Early technology assessment and translation of predictive biomarkers in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miquel-Cases, Anna; Schouten, Philip C; Steuten, Lotte M G; Retèl, Valesca P; Linn, Sabine C; van Harten, Wim H

    Predictive biomarkers can guide treatment decisions in breast cancer. Many studies are undertaken to discover and translate these biomarkers, yet few biomarkers make it to practice. Before use in clinical decision making, predictive biomarkers need to demonstrate analytical validity, clinical

  15. (Very) Early technology assessment and translation of predictive biomarkers in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miquel-Cases, Anna; Schouten, Philip C.; Steuten, Lotte M.G.; Retèl, Valesca P.; Linn, Sabine C.; van Harten, Wim H.

    2017-01-01

    Predictive biomarkers can guide treatment decisions in breast cancer. Many studies are undertaken to discover and translate these biomarkers, yet few biomarkers make it to practice. Before use in clinical decision making, predictive biomarkers need to demonstrate analytical validity, clinical

  16. Assessment on zoledronic acid use in patients with bone metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soriano Garcia, Jorge L; Batista Albuerne, Noyde; Lima Perez, Mayte

    2010-01-01

    The biphosphonates are the cornerstone in the bone metastases treatment. In present paper the effectiveness and safety of the zoledronic acid (ZA) use in patients with bone metastatic breast cancer (MBC)

  17. South African Breast Cancer and HIV Outcomes Study: Methods and Baseline Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Cubasch

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In low- and middle-income, HIV-endemic regions of sub-Saharan Africa, morbidity and mortality from the common epithelial cancers of the developed world are rising. Even among HIV-infected individuals, access to antiretroviral therapy has enhanced life expectancy, shifting the distribution of cancer diagnoses toward non–AIDS-defining malignancies, including breast cancer. Building on our prior research, we recently initiated the South African Breast Cancer and HIV Outcomes study. Methods: We will recruit a cohort of 3,000 women newly diagnosed with breast cancer at hospitals in high (average, 20% HIV prevalence areas, in Johannesburg, Durban, Pietermaritzburg, and Empangeni. At baseline, we will collect information on demographic, behavioral, clinical, and other factors related to access to health care. Every 3 months in year 1 and every 6 months thereafter, we will collect interview and chart data on treatment, symptoms, cancer progression, comorbidities, and other factors. We will compare survival rates of HIV-infected and uninfected women with newly diagnosed breast cancer and their likelihood of receiving suboptimal anticancer therapy. We will identify determinants of suboptimal therapy and context-specific modifiable factors that future interventions can target to improve outcomes. We will explore molecular mechanisms underlying potentially aggressive breast cancer in both HIV-infected and uninfected patients, as well as the roles of pathogens, states of immune activation, and inflammation in disease progression. Conclusion: Our goals are to contribute to development of evidence-based guidelines for the management of breast cancer in HIV-positive women and to improve outcomes for all patients with breast cancer in resource-constrained settings.

  18. Oxalate induces breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellaro, Andrés M; Tonda, Alfredo; Cejas, Hugo H; Ferreyra, Héctor; Caputto, Beatriz L; Pucci, Oscar A; Gil, German A

    2015-10-22

    Microcalcifications can be the early and only presenting sign of breast cancer. One shared characteristic of breast cancer is the appearance of mammographic mammary microcalcifications that can routinely be used to detect breast cancer in its initial stages, which is of key importance due to the possibility that early detection allows the application of more conservative therapies for a better patient outcome. The mechanism by which mammary microcalcifications are formed is still largely unknown but breast cancers presenting microcalcifications are more often associated with a poorer prognosis. We combined Capillary Electrochromatography, histology, and gene expression (qRT-PCR) to analyze patient-matched normal breast tissue vs. breast tumor. Potential carcinogenicity of oxalate was tested by its inoculation into mice. All data were subjected to statistical analysis. To study the biological significance of oxalates within the breast tumor microenvironment, we measured oxalate concentration in both human breast tumor tissues and adjoining non-pathological breast tissues. We found that all tested breast tumor tissues contain a higher concentration of oxalates than their counterpart non-pathological breast tissue. Moreover, it was established that oxalate induces proliferation of breast cells and stimulates the expression of a pro-tumorigenic gene c-fos. Furthermore, oxalate generates highly malignant and undifferentiated tumors when it was injected into the mammary fatpad in female mice, but not when injected into their back, indicating that oxalate does not induce cancer formation in all types of tissues. Moreover, neither human kidney-epithelial cells nor mouse fibroblast cells proliferate when are treated with oxalate. We found that the chronic exposure of breast epithelial cells to oxalate promotes the transformation of breast cells from normal to tumor cells, inducing the expression of a proto-oncogen as c-fos and proliferation in breast cancer cells

  19. Oxalate induces breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellaro, Andrés M.; Tonda, Alfredo; Cejas, Hugo H.; Ferreyra, Héctor; Caputto, Beatriz L.; Pucci, Oscar A.; Gil, German A.

    2015-01-01

    Microcalcifications can be the early and only presenting sign of breast cancer. One shared characteristic of breast cancer is the appearance of mammographic mammary microcalcifications that can routinely be used to detect breast cancer in its initial stages, which is of key importance due to the possibility that early detection allows the application of more conservative therapies for a better patient outcome. The mechanism by which mammary microcalcifications are formed is still largely unknown but breast cancers presenting microcalcifications are more often associated with a poorer prognosis. We combined Capillary Electrochromatography, histology, and gene expression (qRT-PCR) to analyze patient-matched normal breast tissue vs. breast tumor. Potential carcinogenicity of oxalate was tested by its inoculation into mice. All data were subjected to statistical analysis. To study the biological significance of oxalates within the breast tumor microenvironment, we measured oxalate concentration in both human breast tumor tissues and adjoining non-pathological breast tissues. We found that all tested breast tumor tissues contain a higher concentration of oxalates than their counterpart non-pathological breast tissue. Moreover, it was established that oxalate induces proliferation of breast cells and stimulates the expression of a pro-tumorigenic gene c-fos. Furthermore, oxalate generates highly malignant and undifferentiated tumors when it was injected into the mammary fatpad in female mice, but not when injected into their back, indicating that oxalate does not induce cancer formation in all types of tissues. Moreover, neither human kidney-epithelial cells nor mouse fibroblast cells proliferate when are treated with oxalate. We found that the chronic exposure of breast epithelial cells to oxalate promotes the transformation of breast cells from normal to tumor cells, inducing the expression of a proto-oncogen as c-fos and proliferation in breast cancer cells

  20. Shear-wave elastography contributes to accurate tumour size estimation when assessing small breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, R; Thompson, J M; Moussa, O; Vinnicombe, S; Evans, A

    2014-12-01

    To assess whether the size of peritumoural stiffness (PTS) on shear-wave elastography (SWE) for small primary breast cancers (≤15 mm) was associated with size discrepancies between grey-scale ultrasound (GSUS) and final histological size and whether the addition of PTS size to GSUS size might result in more accurate tumour size estimation when compared to final histological size. A retrospective analysis of 86 consecutive patients between August 2011 and February 2013 who underwent breast-conserving surgery for tumours of size ≤15 mm at ultrasound was carried out. The size of PTS stiffness was compared to mean GSUS size, mean histological size, and the extent of size discrepancy between GSUS and histology. PTS size and GSUS were combined and compared to the final histological size. PTS of >3 mm was associated with a larger mean final histological size (16 versus 11.3 mm, p size of >3 mm was associated with a higher frequency of underestimation of final histological size by GSUS of >5 mm (63% versus 18%, p size led to accurate estimation of the final histological size (p = 0.03). The size of PTS was not associated with margin involvement (p = 0.27). PTS extending beyond 3 mm from the grey-scale abnormality is significantly associated with underestimation of tumour size of >5 mm for small invasive breast cancers. Taking into account the size of PTS also led to accurate estimation of the final histological size. Further studies are required to assess the relationship of the extent of SWE stiffness and margin status. Copyright © 2014 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Health technology assessment and screening in The Netherlands: case studies of mammography in breast cancer, PSA screening in prostate cancer, and ultrasound in normal pregnancy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banta, H.D.; Oortwijn, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the assessment and implementation of three screening methods: mammography for breast cancer, screening for prostate cancer, and routine use of ultrasound in pregnancy. METHODS: To review policy documents and published papers dealing with prevention and screening in the

  2. ["Screening" in special situations. Assessing predictive genetic screening for hereditary breast and colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Susanna; Wild, Claudia; Schamberger, Chantal

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this health technology assessment was to analyse the current scientific and genetic counselling on predictive genetic testing for hereditary breast and colorectal cancer. Predictive genetic testing will be available for several common diseases in the future and questions related to financial issues and quality standards will be raised. This report is based on a systematic/nonsystematic literature search in several databases (e.g. EmBase, Medline, Cochrane Library) and on a specific health technology assessment report (CCOHTA) and review (American Gastroenterological Ass.), respectively. Laboratory test methods, early detection methods and the benefit from prophylactic interventions were analysed and social consequences interpreted. Breast and colorectal cancer are counted among the most frequently cancer diseases. Most of them are based on random accumulation of risk factors, 5-10% show a familial determination. A hereditary modified gene is responsible for the increased cancer risk. In these families, high tumour frequency, young age at diagnosis and multiple primary tumours are remarkable. GENETIC DIAGNOSIS: Sequence analysis is the gold standard. Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography is a quick alternative method. The identification of the responsible gene defect in an affected family member is important. If the test result is positive there is an uncertainty whether the disease will develop or not, when and in which degree, which is founded in the geno-/phenotype correlation. The individual risk estimation is based upon empirical evidence. The test results affect the whole family. Currently, primary prevention is possible for familial adenomatous polyposis (celecoxib, prophylactic colectomy) and for hereditary mamma carcinoma (prophylactic mastectomy). The so-called preventive medical check-ups are early detection examinations. The evidence about early detection methods for colorectal cancer is better than for breast cancer. Prophylactic

  3. Breast cancer receptor status assessment and clinicopathological association in Nigerian women: A retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makanjuola SBL

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer markers are becoming increasingly important in breast cancer research due to their impact on prognosis, treatment and survival. The present retrospective study was carried out to quantify the proportion of estrogen (ER, progesterone (PR, and human epithelial receptor 2 (HER2 expressions and their association with tumour grade, age, and tumour size in breast cancer patients in Nigeria. Materials and methods: The paraffin embedded tissue sections were analysed for breast cancer markers using monoclonal antibody SP1 for ER and SP2 for PR and polyclonal antibody ErbB2 for HER2. Results: A total of 286 breast cancer paraffin wax tissue sections were analysed for ER, PR and HER2 expression. Of all the tissue samples examined, 20 (7% were ER-positive, 6 (2.1% were PR-positive, 11 (3.8% were HER2-positive whereas 248 (87% were triple-negative breast carcinoma. ER- and PR-positivity was associated with early grade I and II tumours (P 50mm (P < 0.0001. Conclusion: A small proportion of Nigerian women with breast cancer are ER/PR-positive which are associated with less aggressive, better prognosis and benefit from endocrine therapy. An even smaller proportion of patients with aggressive tumors were HER2-posivite but responsive to Herceptin treatment. Unfortunately, a very high proportion of cases were triple-negative which is associated with very aggressive tumours and no targeted treatment, which may explain the high mortality rates from breast cancer in Nigeria.

  4. Ecological momentary assessment of sleep, symptoms, and mood during chemotherapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, Chelsea G; Lam, Cho Y; Arun, Banu; Valero, Vincente; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2014-11-01

    This study examined the association of sleep before and during a chemotherapy (CT) cycle for breast cancer with symptoms and mood during a CT cycle. Twenty women undergoing CT for breast cancer completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) 1 h prior to a CT infusion. For 3 weeks following infusion, participants estimated sleep efficiency, minutes to sleep (sleep latency), number of nocturnal awakenings (sleep fragmentation (SF)), and sleep quality (SQ) each morning and rated symptoms (nausea, fatigue, numbness, and difficulty thinking) and mood three times daily (morning, afternoon, and evening) via ecological momentary assessments using automated handheld computers. The results showed that disturbed sleep (PSQI score > 5) prior to CT infusion was associated with greater fatigue, and more negative and anxious mood throughout the 3-week CT cycle, and good pre-CT infusion sleep (PSQI score cycle. Reducing sleep disturbance may be an important way to improve quality of life during CT. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. A qualitative analysis of staff-client interactions within a breast cancer assessment clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nightingale, J.M.; Murphy, F.; Eaton, C.; Borgen, R.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Breast screening clients recalled to an assessment clinic experience high levels of anxiety. The culture of the assessment clinic may impact upon client experience, which may influence their future re-engagement in screening. This study aimed to explore the culture of staff-client interactions within a breast cancer assessment clinic. Materials and methods: Following an ethnographic approach, twenty-three client journeys were observed, followed by semi-structured interviews with the clients. The observation and interview data were analysed to produce research themes, which were then explored within two focus groups to add a practitioner perspective. Results: Multiple staff-client interaction events were observed over a period of several weeks. Client interview feedback was overwhelmingly positive. Three recurrent and sequential themes emerged: breaking down barriers, preparing the ground and sign-posting. These themes outline the changing focus of staff-client interactions during the client's clinic journey, encompassing how anxieties were expressed by clients, and responded to by practitioners. Conclusion: This study was the first to explore in depth the staff-client interaction culture within a breast assessment clinic using an ethnographic approach. A new perspective on professional values and behaviours has been demonstrated via a model of staff-client interaction. The model documents the process of guiding the client from initial confusion and distress to an enhanced clarity of understanding. A recommendation most likely to have a positive impact on the client experience is the introduction of a client navigator role to guide the clients through what is often a lengthy, stressful and confusing process. - Highlights: • This study was the first to explore staff-client interaction within breast assessment clinics. • Assessment clinic culture may affect client perceptions and future re-engagement in screening. • An ethnographic approach

  6. Exploratory outcome assessment of Qigong/Tai Chi Easy on breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkey, Linda K; Roe, Denise J; Smith, Lisa; Millstine, Denise

    2016-12-01

    Breast cancer survivors (BCSs) experience symptoms affecting overall quality of life (QOL), often for a prolonged period post-treatment. Meditative Movement (MM), including Qigong and Tai Chi Easy (QG/TCE), has demonstrated benefit for improving QOL issues such as fatigue and sleep, but there is limited evidence of its impact on cognitive function, overall physical activity, and body weight for BCSs. This double-blind, randomized controlled pilot study with 87 female BCSs explored effects of QG/TCE on mental and physical QOL (Medical Outcomes Survey, Short Form), cognitive function (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Cognitive Function and two cognitive performance tests from the WAIS III), overall levels of physical activity (PA)(Brief Physical Activity Questionnaire) and body mass index (BMI). Twelve weekly sessions of QG/TCE were compared to sham Qigong (SQG), a gentle movement control intervention similar to QG/TCE but without the focus on breathing and meditative state. Both groups demonstrated pre-to-post-intervention improvements in physical and mental health, level of PA, self-reported cognitive function, and cognitive performance tests, though without significant differences between QG/TCE and SQG. For a subset of women enrolled later in the study, a significant reduction in BMI [-0.66 (p=0.048)] was found for QG/TCE compared to SQG. Practices that include gentle movement (such as QG/TCE or our sham protocol) among women with a history of breast cancer may improve many facets of the cancer experience, including QOL, cognitive function, and PA patterns. Practicing QG/TCE may show some advantage for BMI reduction compared to non-meditative gentle exercise. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Contribution of germline TP53 variants and assessment of HER-2 status among young breast cancer patients in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao Yan Lau

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS is caused by a mutation in the TP53 tumour suppressor gene. This rare hereditary condition predisposes individuals to an increased risk of cancers including breast cancer in women at a relatively young age, which accounts for nearly 25%–30% of all LFS‑associated cancers. Studies have shown that breast tumours in women with a germline TP53 deleterious variants are associated with a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2-positive phenotype. Taken together, this study aimed to investigate the contribution of germline TP53 variants and its association with tumour HER-2 status in a cohort of young women with breast cancer. Methods: From 2002 to 2017, 4048 women with breast cancer treated at University Malaya Medical Centre or Sime Darby Medical Centre participated in the Malaysian Breast Cancer Genetics Study. Of which, 87 patients were diagnosed before 30 years of age. All patients were analysed for germline TP53 single nucleotide variants, small insertions or deletions by amplicon‑based targeted sequencing and validated by Sanger sequencing. DNA from patients who tested negative for sequencing were subsequently evaluated for the presence of TP53 exon deletions or duplications by multiplex ligation‑dependent probe amplification. HER-2 status of breast tumours was defined by immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridisation and/or silver in situ hybridisation. Results: 5 distinct TP53 variants were detected in 5 individuals. 3 out of 5 TP53 variants were classified as frameshift mutations, one nonsense mutation and one in-frame duplication. Variants in other genes were detected in 17 individuals. No large genomic rearrangements were detected in the remaining 65 sequencing-negative patients. The assessment of HER-2 status will be presented. Conclusions: Our results suggest that alterations in TP53 gene were identified in approximately 5.7% (5/87 of this cohort of young women with breast

  8. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... are not listed here. Drugs Approved to Prevent Breast Cancer Evista (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Keoxifene (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Nolvadex (Tamoxifen ...

  9. Breast Cancer in Young Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Campaign Initiatives Participation in Cancer Moonshot Stay Informed Breast Cancer in Young Women Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Syndicate this page Marleah’s family history of breast cancer was her motivation for pursuing a career where ...

  10. Docosahexaenoic Acid in Preventing Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-20

    Benign Breast Neoplasm; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Paget Disease of the Breast; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  11. Assessment of the added value of the Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope in breast cancer diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilgerink MP

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Marjolein P Hilgerink1, Marjan JM Hummel2, Srirang Manohar3, Simon R Vaartjes1, Maarten J IJzerman21Department of Medical Physics, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands; 2Health Technology and Services Research, 3Biomedical Photonic Imaging, MIRA Institute, University of Twente, Enschede, The NetherlandsPurpose: Photoacoustic (PA imaging is a recently developed breast cancer imaging technique. In order to enhance successful clinical implementation, we quantified the potential clinical value of different scenarios incorporating PA imaging by means of multi-criteria analysis. From this analysis, the most promising area of application for PA imaging in breast cancer diagnosis is determined, and recommendations are provided to optimize the design of PA imaging.Methods: The added value of PA imaging was assessed in two areas of application in the diagnostic track. These areas include PA imaging as an alternative to x-ray mammography and ultrasonography in early stage diagnosis, and PA imaging as an alternative to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI in later stage diagnosis. The added value of PA imaging was assessed with respect to four main criteria (costs, diagnostic performance, patient comfort and risks. An expert panel composed of medical, technical and management experts was asked to assess the relative importance of the criteria in comparing the alternative diagnostic devices. The judgments of the experts were quantified based on the validated pairwise comparison technique of the Analytic Hierarchy Process, a technique for multi-criteria analysis. Sensitivity analysis was applied to account for the uncertainty of the outcomes.Results: Among the considered alternatives, PA imaging is the preferred technique due to its non-invasiveness, low cost and low risks. However, the experts do not expect large differences in diagnostic performance. The outcomes suggest that design changes to improve the diagnostic performance of PA imaging should

  12. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography versus MRI: Initial results in the detection of breast cancer and assessment of tumour size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallenberg, E.M.; Renz, D.M. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Clinic of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Dromain, C. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiology, Villejuif cedex (France); Diekmann, F. [St. Joseph-Stift Bremen, Department of Medical Imaging, Bremen (Germany); Engelken, F.; Krohn, M.; Singh, J.M.; Bick, U. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Ingold-Heppner, B. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Institute of Pathology, Berlin (Germany); Winzer, K.J. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Breast Center, Department of Gynecology, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    To compare mammography (MG), contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection and size estimation of histologically proven breast cancers using postoperative histology as the gold standard. After ethical approval, 80 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent MG, CESM, and MRI examinations. CESM was reviewed by an independent experienced radiologist, and the maximum dimension of suspicious lesions was measured. For MG and MRI, routine clinical reports of breast specialists, with judgment based on the BI-RADS lexicon, were used. Results of each imaging technique were correlated to define the index cancer. Fifty-nine cases could be compared to postoperative histology for size estimation. Breast cancer was visible in 66/80 MG, 80/80 CESM, and 77/79 MRI examinations. Average lesion largest dimension was 27.31 mm (SD 22.18) in MG, 31.62 mm (SD 24.41) in CESM, and 27.72 mm (SD 21.51) in MRI versus 32.51 mm (SD 29.03) in postoperative histology. No significant difference was found between lesion size measurement on MRI and CESM compared with histopathology. Our initial results show a better sensitivity of CESM and MRI in breast cancer detection than MG and a good correlation with postoperative histology in size assessment. (orig.)

  13. Assessment of ionizing radiation as a risk factor for breast cancer incidence in Goiania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lage, Leonardo Bastos

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to evaluate whether exposure to ionizing radiation to which women are subjected can be associated with the incidence of breast cancer in Goiania. The defined study area is the central region of Goiania, or the Sanitary Districts of Campinas-Centro and Sul, in which are the seven major accident sources of contamination with Cesium 137, and also, as shown by previous study, the majority of new cases of breast cancer (60,43 %). We used the geographical division of the city in census tracts and health districts. The data collection was divided in two stages: the first, for the survey of radiometric measurements, and the second, for identifying the addresses of women diagnosed with breast cancer. The radiometric survey occurred between 2010 and 2014, in which was used an environmental gamma radiation mobile measuring system. This system was composed by a high-sensitivity detector coupled to a Global Positioning System (GPS) and a microcomputer. The assembly was installed on a motor vehicle so that the height of the detector is found at one meter from the ground, and programmed to obtain a measurement of the doses absorbed in the air rate each second. The data collected were: doses absorbed in the air rate, geographical coordinates, altitude, date and time of acquisition. From Mobisys software, files were generated and from ArcGIS 10.0 platform, geospatial assessment survey through the elaboration of thematic maps and geospatial analysis statistics. The annual averages of effective doses and collective effective doses were estimated from the rate of doses absorbed in air collected by the system and the resident population in the census tracts. The second stage begun from the data collection at the Registry of Goiania's Population Based Cancer (RCBPGO), in which were identified addresses of women diagnosed with breast cancer between 2001 and 2010. Part of the data was geographically referenced and using census data were estimated and compared the

  14. Broccoli Sprout Extract in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-30

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Postmenopausal; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  15. THERAPEUTIC OPTIONS FOR BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Georgescu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer remains a major public health problem, being the second cause of cancer death in women. There is a marked tendency to restrict the extension of surgical gesture, which directly leads to two different attitudes: radical surgery and conservative surgery, to which, at least in our country, there are still some delays. Prospective and retrospective studies have shown that, in 20 years, conservative and radical therapy had about the same rate of survival and disease-free interval, at least for stage I and II breast cancer, the only real counterargument against conservative surgery being that, in principle, the higher rate of recurrence local constraint can be solved by postoperative radiotherapy. Finally, the survival rate is the main parameter of evaluation, assessing the effectiveness of the treatment in breast cancer, and in all its other forms.

  16. Breast Cancer Screening in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Kalager, Mette

    2017-01-01

    Background: Effective breast cancer screening should detect early-stage cancer and prevent advanced disease. Objective: To assess the association between screening and the size of detected tumors and to estimate overdiagnosis (detection of tumors that would not become clinically relevant). Design......) and nonadvanced (≤20 mm) breast cancer tumors in screened and nonscreened women were measured. Two approaches were used to estimate the amount of overdiagnosis: comparing the incidence of advanced and nonadvanced tumors among women aged 50 to 84 years in screening and nonscreening areas; and comparing...... for regional differences in women younger than the screening age, found that 711 invasive tumors and 180 cases of DCIS were overdiagnosed in 2010 (overdiagnosis rate of 48.3% [including DCIS] and 38.6% [excluding DCIS]). Limitation: Regional differences complicate interpretation. Conclusion: Breast cancer...

  17. Treatment Options for Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  18. General Information about Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  19. Coping with a Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACTS FOR LIFE Coping With a Breast Cancer Diagnosis Coping with breast cancer A breast cancer diagnosis can cause a wide range of ... as normal a routine as possible. Be patient. Coping with breast cancer requires time, acceptance, a fighting ...

  20. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Assessment of Inflammatory Breast Cancer Prior to and After Neoadjuvant Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uden, D.J.P. van; Wilt, J.H.W. de; Meeuwis, C.; Blanken-Peeters, C.; Mann, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to describe the dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) features of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) and to assess the value of DCE-MRI for the prediction of pathological complete response (pCR). METHODS: Image analysis was performed in 15

  1. Assessment of validation of health-economics decision models in intervention studies of seasonal influenza and breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, P.T.; Frederix, G.W.; Al, M.J.; Feenstra, T.F.; Vemer, P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to review recently published health-economic (HE) decision models to assess the reporting of validation efforts. An infectious disease (seasonal influenza, SI) and a chronic disease (breast cancer, BC) were used as examples, giving a preliminary insight in the reporting of

  2. Self-assessed health, perceived stress and non-participation in breast cancer screening: A Danish cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Line Flytkjær; Pedersen, Anette Fischer; Andersen, Berit

    2015-01-01

    and subsequent non-participation in breast cancer screening. Methods This population-based cohort study included 4512 women who had participated in a Health Survey in 2006 and who were also the target group (aged 50–69 years) for the first organised breast cancer screening programme -3 years later in the Central......Objective Population-based cancer screening is offered in many countries to detect early stages of cancer and reduce mortality. Screening efficiency and equality is susceptible due to a group of non-participants. We investigated associations between self-assessed health, perceived stress...... health scores in the middle range. Women with low mental health assessment were more likely not to participate than women with mental health scores in the middle range (PR = 1.44, 95% CI: 1.22–1.69). Higher non-participation propensity was also observed for women with the highest perceived stress scores...

  3. Learning about Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Learning About Breast Cancer Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research News Features Funding Divisions Funding ...

  4. Preeclampsia and breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pacheco, Nadja Livia Pekkola; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In parous women preeclampsia has been associated with reduced risk of developing breast cancer. Characteristics of births following preeclamptic pregnancies may help understand mechanisms involved in the breast cancer risk reduction inferred by preeclampsia. METHODS: We conducted...... a register-based cohort study of all Danish women giving birth during 1978-2010 (n = 778,701). The association between preeclampsia and breast cancer was evaluated overall and according to birth characteristics by means of incidence rate ratios (IRR) estimated in Poisson regression models. RESULTS: Compared...... with women with non-preeclamptic pregnancies only, women with one or more preeclamptic pregnancies were 19% significantly less likely to develop breast cancer (IRR = 0.81 [95% CI 0.72-0.93]). We found some indication of greater risk reduction in women with term births, one or more previous births...

  5. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peer Review and Funding Outcomes Step 4: Award Negotiation & Issuance Manage Your Award Grants Management Contacts Monitoring ... with inflammatory breast cancer, but, due to the importance of radiation therapy in treating this disease, experts ...

  6. Should women at increased risk for breast and ovarian cancer be randomized to prophylactic surgery? An ethical and empirical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambor, E S; Bernhardt, B A; Geller, G; Helzlsouer, K J; Doksum, T; Holtzman, N A

    2000-04-01

    More information is needed about the relative effectiveness of prophylactic surgery, chemoprevention, and surveillance in reducing breast and ovarian cancer risk in women with an inherited susceptibility mutation. We assessed practical and ethical barriers to conducting randomized clinical trials (RCTs) to compare preventive interventions for breast and ovarian cancer. Eighty-seven at-risk women who attended an education and counseling session about BRCA1/2 testing were asked about their willingness to participate in hypothetical research studies for breast and ovarian cancer risk reduction. In addition, 247 Maryland physicians from five specialties completed a mail survey including a question about their likelihood of recommending RCT participation to an at-risk woman. Nineteen percent of at-risk women reported willingness to participate in a hypothetical RCT for breast cancer risk reduction and 17% for ovarian cancer risk reduction. Women with children and women likely to have a prophylactic mastectomy if found to have a susceptibility mutation were significantly more willing to participate in an RCT. A majority of women would be willing to participate in nonrandomized trials or registries. Fifty-two percent of physicians responded that they would be likely to recommend RCT participation to a woman carrying a breast cancer susceptibility mutation. Oncologists were the most likely to recommend an RCT. Although the results of nonrandomized trials may be difficult to interpret because of such issues as selection bias. Greater feasibility combined with fewer ethical concerns make nonrandomized trials a more viable alternative to randomized trials for evaluation of preventive interventions for breast and ovarian cancer when prophylactic surgery is one of the treatments being evaluated.

  7. Assessment of Volume Measurement of Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema by Three Methods: Circumference Measurement, Water Displacement, and Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørup, Caroline; Zerahn, B.; Hendel, Helle Westergren

    2010-01-01

    Background: Following treatment for breast cancer 12%-60% develop breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). There are several ways of assessing BCRL. Circumference measurement (CM) and water displacement (WD) for volume measurements (VM) are frequently used methods in practice and research...

  8. CYP17 genetic polymorphism, breast cancer, and breast cancer risk factors: Australian Breast Cancer Family Study

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Jiun-Horng; Gertig, Dorota M; Chen, Xiaoqing; Dite, Gillian S; Jenkins, Mark A; Milne, Roger L; Southey, Melissa C; McCredie, Margaret RE; Giles, Graham G; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hopper, John L; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Because CYP17 can influence the degree of exposure of breast tissues to oestrogen, the interaction between polymorphisms in this gene and hormonal risk factors is of particular interest. We attempted to replicate the findings of studies assessing such interactions with the -34T?C polymorphism. Methods Risk factor and CYP17 genotyping data were derived from a large Australian population-based case-control-family study of 1,284 breast cancer cases and 679 controls. Crude and adjust...

  9. Ultrasound as an Adjunct to Mammography for Breast Cancer Screening: A Health Technology Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Screening with mammography can detect breast cancer early, before clinical symptoms appear. Some cancers, however, are not captured with mammography screening alone. Ultrasound has been suggested as a safe adjunct screening tool that can detect breast cancers missed on mammography. We investigated the benefits, harms, cost-effectiveness, and cost burden of ultrasound as an adjunct to mammography compared with mammography alone for screening women at average risk and at high risk for breast cancer. We searched Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, EBM Reviews, and the NHS Economic Evaluation Database, from January 1998 to June 2015, for evidence of effectiveness, harms, diagnostic accuracy, and cost-effectiveness. Only studies evaluating the use of ultrasound as an adjunct to mammography in the specified populations were included. We also conducted a cost analysis to estimate the costs in Ontario over the next 5 years to fund ultrasound as an adjunct to mammography in breast cancer screening for high-risk women who are contraindicated for MRI, the current standard of care to supplement mammography. No studies in average-risk women met the inclusion criteria of the clinical review. We included 5 prospective, paired cohort studies in high-risk women, 4 of which were relevant to the Ontario context. Adjunct ultrasound identified between 2.3 and 5.9 additional breast cancers per 1,000 screens. The average pooled sensitivity of mammography and ultrasound was 53%, a statistically significant increase relative to mammography alone (absolute increase 13%; P mammography screening alone. The GRADE for this body of evidence was low. Additional annual costs of using breast ultrasound as an adjunct to mammography for high-risk women in Ontario contraindicated for MRI would range from $15,500 to $30,250 in the next 5 years. We found no evidence that evaluated the comparative effectiveness or diagnostic accuracy of screening breast ultrasound as an adjunct to mammography among average

  10. The role of ultrasound and lymphoscintigraphy in the assessment of axillary lymph nodes in patients with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Nieciecki

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy and the leading cause of death due to cancer in European women. Mammography screening programs aimed to increase the detection of early cancer stages were implemented in numerous European countries. Recent data show a decrease in mortality due to breast cancer in many countries, particularly among young women. At the same time, the number of sentinel node biopsy procedures and breast-conserving surgeries has increased. Intraoperative sentinel lymph node biopsy preceded by lymphoscintigraphy is used in breast cancer patients with no clinical signs of lymph node metastasis. Due to the limited sensitivity and specificity of physical examination in detecting metastatic lesions, developing an appropriate diagnostic algorithm for the preoperative assessment of axillary lymph nodes seems to be a challenge. The importance of ultrasound in patient qualification for sentinel lymph-node biopsy has been discussed in a number of works. Furthermore, different lymphoscintigraphy protocols have been compared in the literature. The usefulness of novel radiopharmaceuticals as well as the methods of image acquisition in sentinel lymph node diagnostics have also been assessed. The aim of this article is to present, basing on current guidelines, literature data as well as our own experience, the diagnostic possibilities of axillary lymph node ultrasound in patient qualification for an appropriate treatment as well as the role of lymphoscintigraphy in sentinel lymph node biopsy.

  11. [Pregnancy and breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Torres, Nicolás; Asbun-Bojalil, Juan; Hernández-Valencia, Marcelino

    2013-01-01

    association of breast cancer and pregnancy is not common. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the pregnancy, young age, stage, treatment, prognosis and mortality of women with breast cancer during pregnancy. retrospective analysis from March 1992 to February 2009, 16 patients were included with breast cancer and pregnancy. They were analized: histological characteristic of tumor, therapeutic response of the oncological treatment, evolution of the pregnancy. From of baby born: Apgar and weight. The woman's mortality with breast cancer during pregnancy was evaluated for age group and for interval of time between late pregnancy and diagnosis posterior of breast cancer and pregnancy. characteristic predominant clinicohistological: stage III (81.2%), T3-T4 (75%), N+ 93.7%, invasive ductal carcinoma (87.5%), histological grade 2-3 (93.7%), receptor estrogeno positive (43.7%); RPpositive (25%); HER-2/neu positive (31.2%). 27 chemotherapy cycles were applied with 5-fluorouracil, epirubicin and cyclophosphamide during the second or third trimester of the pregnancy, there were not severe adverse effects for the mothers and the baby born exposed to chemotherapy. The mean time to disease recurrence was 18.8 months (range, 6-62 months). The rate of mortality for specific age (breast cancer and pregnancy.

  12. The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme: its role as an assessment and stratification tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmers, J.M.H.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Broeders, M.J.M. [National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and HTA, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Doorne-Nagtegaal, H.J. van; Tinteren, H. van; Visser, O. [Comprehensive Cancer Centre The Netherlands (IKNL), location Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Zonderland, H.M. [Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heeten, G.J. den [National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-08-15

    To assess the suitability of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) as a quality assessment tool in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme. The data of 93,793 screened women in the Amsterdam screening region (November 2005-July 2006) were reviewed. BI-RADS categories, work-up, age, final diagnosis and final TNM classification were available from the screening registry. Interval cancers were obtained through linkage with the cancer registry. BI-RADS was introduced as a pilot in the Amsterdam region before the nationwide introduction of digital mammography (2009-2010). A total of 1,559 women were referred to hospital (referral rate 1.7 %). Breast cancer was diagnosed in 485 women (detection rate 0.52 %); 253 interval cancers were reported, yielding a programme sensitivity of 66 % and specificity of 99 %. BI-RADS 0 had a lower positive predictive value (PPV, 14.1 %) than BI-RADS 4 (39.1 %) and BI-RADS 5 (92.9 %; P < 0.0001). The number of invasive procedures and tumour size also differed significantly between BI-RADS categories (P < 0.0001). The significant differences in PPV, invasive procedures and tumour size match with stratification into BI-RADS categories. It revealed inter-observer variability between screening radiologists and can thus be used as a quality assessment tool in screening and as a stratification tool in diagnostic work-up. (orig.)

  13. The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme: its role as an assessment and stratification tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmers, J M H; van Doorne-Nagtegaal, H J; Zonderland, H M; van Tinteren, H; Visser, O; Verbeek, A L M; den Heeten, G J; Broeders, M J M

    2012-08-01

    To assess the suitability of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) as a quality assessment tool in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme. The data of 93,793 screened women in the Amsterdam screening region (November 2005-July 2006) were reviewed. BI-RADS categories, work-up, age, final diagnosis and final TNM classification were available from the screening registry. Interval cancers were obtained through linkage with the cancer registry. BI-RADS was introduced as a pilot in the Amsterdam region before the nationwide introduction of digital mammography (2009-2010). A total of 1,559 women were referred to hospital (referral rate 1.7 %). Breast cancer was diagnosed in 485 women (detection rate 0.52 %); 253 interval cancers were reported, yielding a programme sensitivity of 66 % and specificity of 99 %. BI-RADS 0 had a lower positive predictive value (PPV, 14.1 %) than BI-RADS 4 (39.1 %) and BI-RADS 5 (92.9 %; P BI-RADS categories (P BI-RADS categories. It revealed inter-observer variability between screening radiologists and can thus be used as a quality assessment tool in screening and as a stratification tool in diagnostic work-up. • The BI-RADS atlas is widely used in breast cancer screening programmes. • There were significant differences in results amongst different BI-RADS categories. • Those differences represented the radiologists' degree of suspicion for malignancy, thus enabling stratification of referrals. • BI-RADS can be used as a quality assessment tool in screening. • Training should create more uniformity in applying the BI-RADS lexicon.

  14. The knowledge value-chain of genetic counseling for breast cancer: an empirical assessment of prediction and communication processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amara, Nabil; Blouin-Bougie, Jolyane; Jbilou, Jalila; Halilem, Norrin; Simard, Jacques; Landry, Réjean

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: to analyze the genetic counseling process for breast cancer with a theoretical knowledge transfer lens and to compare generalists, medical specialists, and genetic counselors with regards to their genetic counseling practices. This paper presents the genetic counseling process occurring within a chain of value-adding activities of four main stages describing health professionals' clinical practices: (1) evaluation, (2) investigation, (3) information, and (4) decision. It also presents the results of a cross-sectional study based on a Canadian medical doctors and genetic counselors survey (n = 176) realized between July 2012 and March 2013. The statistical exercise included descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA and post-hoc tests. The results indicate that even though all types of health professionals are involved in the entire process of genetic counseling for breast cancer, genetic counselors are more involved in the evaluation of breast cancer risk, while medical doctors are more active in the decision toward breast cancer risk management strategies. The results secondly demonstrate the relevance and the key role of genetic counselors in the care provided to women at-risk of familial breast cancer. This paper presents an integrative framework to understand the current process of genetic counseling for breast cancer in Canada, and to shed light on how and where health professionals contribute to the process. It also offers a starting point for assessing clinical practices in genetic counseling in order to establish more clearly where and to what extent efforts should be undertaken to implement future genetic services.

  15. Immunotherapy of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criscitiello, Carmen; Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Cancer immunoediting is the process by which the immune system protects the host from tumor development and guides the somatic evolution of tumors by eliminating highly immunogenic tumor cells. A fundamental dogma of tumor immunology and of cancer immunosurveillance in particular is that cancer cells express antigens that differentiate them from their nontransformed counterparts. Molecular studies clearly show that these antigens were often products of mutated cellular genes, aberrantly expressed normal genes, or genes encoding viral proteins. There is a strict correlation between genetic instability and the immune landscape of a breast cancer. Mutational heterogeneity in breast cancer is associated with new cancer-associated genes and new cancer antigens. Frequencies of somatic mutations or mutational burden can be related to the immunogenicity of breast cancer. We believe that molecular subtypes of breast cancer that are triple negative, luminal B-like or HER2-positive have a high mutational burden and can be considered immunogenic. The increasing knowledge of the immune system's capacity to not only recognize and destroy cancer, but also to shape cancer immunogenicity will develop more informed attempts to control cancer via immunological approaches. To be effective in breast cancer, immunotherapies will have to increase the quality or quantity of immune effector cells, reveal additional protective tumor antigens, and/or eliminate cancer-induced immunosuppressive mechanisms. Multiple immunotherapy approaches are under investigation in patients with breast cancer. These include vaccine approaches to elicit strong specific immune responses to tumor antigens such as WT-1, HER2 and NY-ESO-1, approaches involving adoptive transfer of in vitro-expanded, naturally arising or genetically engineered tumor-specific lymphocytes, therapeutic administration of monoclonal antibodies to target and eliminate tumor cells, and approaches that inhibit or destroy the molecular or

  16. Breast cancer education for schoolgirls: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nicola; Smith, Jenny; Brasher, Amanda; Omrani, Atefeh; Wakefield-Scurr, Joanna

    2017-03-30

    Adolescent girls are an important target group for breast cancer education and promoting breast awareness. However, research has not established schoolgirls' perceived importance of breast cancer education or explored factors that may impact engagement. This study aimed to identify schoolgirls' concerns about breast cancer, desire to know more and perceived importance of breast cancer education, and explored associations with demographic factors. Of 2089 schoolgirls (11-18 years) surveyed, 1958 completed all relevant breast cancer questions and demographic factors (ethnicity, school type, breast size, physical activity level and age). χ-Tests assessed associations between demographics, desire to know more and perceived importance of breast cancer. Overall, 44% of schoolgirls reported concerns about breast cancer, 72% wanted to know more and 77% rated the topic as extremely important. Breast size was not associated with wanting to know more about breast cancer. Schoolgirls who wanted to know more about breast cancer were White, from single-sex schools with boys at sixth form, more physically active and older. However, among other ethnic groups, school types and physical activity levels, the proportion of girls who wanted to know more about breast cancer was still high (≥61%). This study provides evidence of the need for breast cancer education for schoolgirls across all school types, irrespective of breast size or physical activity levels. The results highlight the need to be inclusive and engage schoolgirls from all ethnic groups and to promote breast awareness at a young age to ensure effective breast cancer education.

  17. Contraception and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhothisuwan, Kris

    2004-10-01

    Oral contraceptive use is weakly associated with breast cancer risk in the general population, but the association among women with a familial predisposition to breast cancer is less clear. Recent studies indicating that oral contraception may increase the risk of breast cancer more in subjects who are BRCA 1 or BRCA 2 mutation carriers. Features of hormonal contraceptive use, such as duration of use, age at first use, and the dose and type of hormone within the contraceptives, have little effect on breast cancer risk. Women who begin use before age 20 have higher relative risks of having breast cancer diagnosed while they are using combined oral contraceptives and in the 5 years after stopping than do women who begin use at older ages. Given that on influence of oral contraceptives on the breast has been hypothesized to be greatest before the cellular differentiation that occurs with a first pregnancy. A significant trend of increasing risk with first use before age 20 years was observed. Among women diagnosed at ages 30 to 34 years the relative risk associated with recent oral contraceptive use was 1.54 if use began before age 20 years and 1.13 it use began at older ages.

  18. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in Breast Cancer Patients with Different Tumor size: In vitro and In vivo Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Habit, O.H.

    2003-01-01

    Chromosomal radiosensitivity of normal tissues from breast cancer patients has been used for detection of cancer prone individuals. Interindividual variation among breast cancer patients and cancer-prone individuals is, however, not satisfactorily explained. In this study the type of tumor and its degree of progression is addressed to find out its effect on the variability produced. Three groups of breast cancer patients with different tumor sizes; I, II and III were used in this investigation. The first group of 12 patients with tumor grade I, the second group comprised 15 patients of tumor grade II and a third group of 13 patients of tumor grade III. A fourth control group of 14 normal healthy individuals of the same age group were also used. Blood samples were withdrawn before starting radiotherapy treatment. In vitro irradiation of blood with 2.0, 4.0 or 6.0 Gy, and blood culture was set up at 37 0C for 54 hr. Different types of chromosomal aberrations (dicentrics, rings, breaks, fragments and gaps) were scored. Another set of irradiated cultures were set up for assay of micronucleated binucleate lymphocytes treated with cytochalasin B. Blood samples were also obtained from breast cancer patients 24 hr

  19. Considerations for comprehensive assessment of genetic predisposition in familial breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Henry; Synder, Carrie; Wang, San Ming

    2015-01-01

    About 10-15% of breast cancer cases are family related, classified as familial breast cancer. The disease was first reported in 1866 and determined to be an autosomal dominant genetic disease in 1971. Germline mutations in BRCA1 were discovered and deemed as the first genetic predisposition for the disease in 1994. By now, genetic predispositions for about 40% of familial breast cancer families have been identified. New molecular genetic approaches currently under development should accelerate the process to identify the full spectrum of genetic predispositions for the disease, thereby enabling a better understanding of the genetic basis of the disease and therein providing benefit to high-risk patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Risk assessment, disease prevention and personalised treatments in breast cancer: is clinically qualified integrative approach in the horizon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a multifactorial disease. A spectrum of internal and external factors contributes to the disease promotion such as a genetic predisposition, chronic inflammatory processes, exposure to toxic compounds, abundant stress factors, a shift-worker job, etc. The cumulative effects lead to high incidence of breast cancer in populations worldwide. Breast cancer in the USA is currently registered with the highest incidence rates amongst all cancer related patient cohorts. Currently applied diagnostic approaches are frequently unable to recognise early stages in tumour development that impairs individual outcomes. Early diagnosis has been demonstrated to be highly beneficial for significantly enhanced therapy efficacy and possibly full recovery. Actual paper shows that the elaboration of an integrative diagnostic approach combining several levels of examinations creates a robust platform for the reliable risk assessment, targeted preventive measures and more effective treatments tailored to the person in the overall task of breast cancer management. The levels of examinations are proposed, and innovative technological approaches are described in the paper. The absolute necessity to create individual patient profiles and extended medical records is justified for the utilising by routine medical services. Expert recommendations are provided to promote further developments in the field. PMID:23418957

  1. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, James S., E-mail: james.lawson@unsw.edu.au; Heng, Benjamin [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia)

    2010-04-30

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix.

  2. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, James S.; Heng, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix

  3. Who's talking about breast cancer? Analysis of daily breast cancer posts on the internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Edel M; Corrigan, Mark A; McHugh, Seamus M; Murphy, David; O'Mullane, John; Hill, Arnold D; Redmond, Henry Paul

    2013-02-01

    Breast cancer is the cancer most commonly searched for on the internet. Our aim was to assess daily new breast cancer related posting on the internet. We analyzed numbers of new daily posts for common cancers for one month and subsequently analyzed content of 1426 breast cancer related posts. We also assessed use of online discussion forums for breast cancer related dialogue. Breast related topics had significantly more posts per day compared to others (mean 66.7, p Anonymous posts were common (55%) and less likely to be accurate (p internet has become a primary forum within which health information, particularly relating to breast cancer, is both sought and shared. Increasingly information is provided by patients themselves. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Breast Cancer Knowledge among College Students: Influencing Factors and Resultant Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Mary F.; King, Keith A.; Vidourek, Rebecca A.; Merianos, Ashley L.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Many misconceptions about breast cancer exist. College students have the opportunity to perform breast cancer risk-reducing behaviors. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess breast cancer knowledge among university students and examine the influence of breast cancer knowledge on health behaviors for breast cancer prevention.…

  5. Breast cancer and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knabben, Laura; Mueller, Michel D

    2017-08-29

    Background In the past decades the incidence of pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) increased. Possible explanations are the trend to postpone childbearing and the general increase in the incidence of breast cancer. Materials and methods A sytematic review of the literature was performed with the aim to report on incidence, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of breast cancer during pregnancy. We also cover the issue of pregnancy following a diagnosis of breast cancer including fertility preservation and prognosis. Results Ultrasound is the imaging method of choice in pregnancy, but mammography can also be performed as the fetal irradiation dose is low. To avoid a delay in diagnosis every sonographic mass in pregnant women which does not clearly correspond to a cyst needs further investigation by biopsy. Treatment should follow as close as possible the guidelines for non-pregnant patients. Administration of chemotherapy is possible after the first trimester. There is a large body of evidence for the use of anthracyclines. In contrast radiotherapy, trastuzumab and antihormonal treatment by tamoxifen are contraindicated during pregnancy. Pregnancy does not seem to influence prognosis. Most adverse obstetric outcomes are related to preterm delivery, which should therefore, whenever possible, be avoided. Young patients with breast cancer and incomplete family planning should be referred for counseling about fertility preservation options before the initiation of adjuvant treatment. A pregnancy following breast cancer does not have a negative impact on prognosis. Conclusion Multidisciplinary management of women with breast cancer in pregnancy is mandatory and data should be collected to allow further improvement in management.

  6. Breast Cancer Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The BioScan System was developed by OmniCorder Technologies, Inc. at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The system is able to locate cancerous lesions by detecting the cancer's ability to recruit a new blood supply. A digital sensor detects infrared energy emitted from the body and identifies the minute differences accompanying the blood flow changes associated with cancerous cells. It also has potential use as a monitoring device during cancer treatment. This technology will reduce the time taken to detect cancerous cells and allow for earlier intervention, therefore increasing the overall survival rates of breast cancer patients.

  7. Expression of the breast cancer resistance protein in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faneyte, Ian F.; Kristel, Petra M. P.; Maliepaard, Marc; Scheffer, George L.; Scheper, Rik J.; Schellens, Jan H. M.; van de Vijver, Marc J.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is involved in in vitro multidrug resistance and was first identified in the breast cancer cell line MCF7/AdrVp. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of BCRP in resistance of breast cancer to anthracycline treatment. EXPERIMENTAL

  8. Breast cancer in Accra, Ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    -Richardson's .... breast cancer cases followed by lobular carcinomas ... lobular carcinoma. Malignant breast tumours of all kinds are most common in the age group 40-49 years (Table 2). Almost all (94.4%) cancers occur after age 29 years.

  9. Vitamin D and Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Janowsky, Esther

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of our current work is to determine whether there are differences in blood levels of 1,25-dihydroxy- vitamin D between women with breast cancer and two control groups of women without breast cancer...

  10. Gravidomimetic Prevention of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andersen, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that a novel synthetic peptide can prevent breast cancer, we utilized a standard model to induce breast cancer in rats and initiated a dose-finding study in which four log doses...

  11. Life After Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACTS FOR LIFE Life After Breast Cancer Treatment Once breast cancer treatment ends, you may face a new set of issues and concerns. ... fear. If fear starts to disrupt your daily life, talk with your doctor. Getting the support and ...

  12. Bisphosphonates in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Aju; Brufsky, Adam

    2015-08-15

    Bisphosphonates are osteoclast inhibitors, currently being used in oncology to prevent or delay bone morbidity in cancer. Oral and intravenous formulations of bisphosphonates have been found to be efficacious in preventing skeletal-related events such as bone pain, pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression and hypercalcemia of malignancy, in patients with bone metastatic breast cancer. Bisphosphonates are also used to prevent bone loss associated with anti-estrogen therapy using aromatase inhibitors. In addition to its role in preventing bone resorption, several pre-clinical studies have noted an anti-tumor role as well. Recent research effort has particularly focused on investigating an adjuvant role for bisphosphonates in early breast cancer. Recently, few randomized trials have found a beneficial effect for adjuvant use of the aminobisphosphonate, zoledronate, in older patients who are post-menopausal. This review article will summarize the various clinical studies investigating the role of bisphosphonates in breast cancer. © 2014 UICC.

  13. Breast cancer chemoprevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Sestak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Trials with tamoxifen have clearly shown that the risk of developing oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer can be reduced by at least 50% with prophylactic agents. The current challenge is to find new agents which achieve this or better efficacy, but with fewer side effects. Recent results indicate that the SERM raloxifene has similar efficacy to tamoxifen, but leads to fewer endometrial cancers, gynecological symptoms, and thromboembolic events. Results for contralateral tumors in adjuvant trials suggest that aromatase inhibitors may be able to prevent up to 70%–80% of ER-positive breast cancers, and this is currently being investigated in two large prevention trials, one using anastrozole (IBIS-II and the other exemestane (MAP.3. New agents are needed for receptor negative breast cancer and several possibilities are currently under investigation.

  14. Attachment, emotion regulation, and adaptation to breast cancer: assessment of a mediational hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, Marisa; Brandão, Tânia; Teixeira, Joana; Coimbra, Joaquim Luis; Matos, Paula Mena

    2015-11-01

    This study examines the links between attachment, adaptation to breast cancer, and the mediating role played by emotional regulation processes. Participants were 127 women with breast cancer recruited in two public hospitals of Porto and at the Portuguese Cancer League. Women completed measures of attachment, quality of life, and emotion regulation. Path models were used to examine the associations between the constructs and to test the mediational hypotheses. Significant associations were found between attachment and adaptation. Dimensions of emotion regulation totally or partially mediated the associations between attachment and adaptation outcomes. Attachment security effects on interpersonal relations were totally mediated by communicating emotions. Also, attachment anxiety effect on physical well-being was totally mediated by rumination. Attachment avoidance effects on psychological outcomes were totally mediated by emotional control and partially mediated by communicating emotions for the case of interpersonal relations. This study highlights the importance of addressing emotional regulation jointly with attachment to deepen the comprehension of the relational processes implicated in adaptation to breast cancer. Results supported a mediational hypothesis, presenting emotional regulation processes as relevant dimensions for the understanding of attachment associations with adaptation to breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Self-assessed health, perceived stress and non-participation in breast cancer screening: A Danish cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Line Flytkjær; Pedersen, Anette Fischer; Andersen, Berit; Vedsted, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Population-based cancer screening is offered in many countries to detect early stages of cancer and reduce mortality. Screening efficiency and equality is susceptible due to a group of non-participants. We investigated associations between self-assessed health, perceived stress and subsequent non-participation in breast cancer screening. This population-based cohort study included 4512 women who had participated in a Health Survey in 2006 and who were also the target group (aged 50-69 years) for the first organised breast cancer screening programme -3 years later in the Central Denmark Region in 2008-2009. A U-shaped association was observed for physical health assessment as women with the highest (PR=1.28, 95% CI: 1.06-1.55), and the lowest (PR=1.41, 95% CI: 1.18-1.68) physical health scores were less likely to participate in the programme than women with physical health scores in the middle range. Women with low mental health assessment were more likely not to participate than women with mental health scores in the middle range (PR=1.44, 95% CI: 1.22-1.69). Higher non-participation propensity was also observed for women with the highest perceived stress scores (PR=1.27, 95% CI: 1.07-1.51) compared with women scoring in the middle range. Women with highest and lowest self-assessed physical health, with lowest mental health or highest perceived stress were significantly more likely not to participate in breast cancer screening 2-3 years later than women who reported average health. Interventions targeting these groups may promote equal participation in future breast cancer screening programmes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of Visual and automated assessment of Ki-67 proliferative activity and their impact on outcome in primary operable invasive ductal breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed, Z M A; McMillan, D C; Elsberger, B; Going, J J; Orange, C; Mallon, E; Doughty, J C; Edwards, J

    2012-01-01

    Background: Immunohistochemistry of Ki-67 protein is widely used to assess tumour proliferation, and is an established prognostic factor in breast cancer. There is interest in automating the assessment of Ki-67 labelling index (LI) with possible benefits in handling increased workload, with improved accuracy and precision. Patients and methods: Visual and automated assessment of Ki-67 LI and survival were examined in patients with primary operable invasive ductal breast cancer. Tissue microar...

  17. Immunophenotyping of hereditary breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Groep, P.

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary breast cancer runs in families where several family members in different generations are affected. Most of these breast cancers are caused by mutations in the high penetrance genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 which account for about 5% of all breast cancers. However, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 may

  18. Breast Cancer Basics and You

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Screening For Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Basics and You Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... more than 232,670 new cases of female breast cancer in the United States in 2014. More than ...

  19. The Health Deviation of Post-Breast Cancer Lymphedema: Symptom Assessment and Impact on Self-Care Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armer, Jane M; Henggeler, Mary H; Brooks, Constance W; Zagar, Eris A; Homan, Sherri; Stewart, Bob R

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cancer among women world-wide, affecting 1 of 8 women during their lifetimes. In the US alone, some 2 million breast cancer survivors comprise 20% of all cancer survivors. Conservatively, it is estimated that some 20-40% of all breast cancer survivors will develop the health deviation of lymphedema or treatment-related limb swelling over their lifetimes. This chronic accumulation of protein-rich fluid predisposes to infection, leads to difficulties in fitting clothing and carrying out activities of daily living, and impacts self-esteem, self-concept, and quality of life. Lymphedema is associated with self-care deficits (SCD) and negatively impacts self-care agency (SCA) and physiological and psychosocial well-being. Objectives of this report are two-fold: (1) to explore four approaches of assessing and diagnosing breast cancer lymphedema, including self-report of symptoms and the impact of health deviations on SCA; and (2) to propose the development of a clinical research program for lymphedema based on the concepts of Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory (SCDNT). Anthropometric and symptom data from a National-Institutes-of-Health-funded prospective longitudinal study were examined using survival analysis to compare four definitions of lymphedema over 24 months post-breast cancer surgery among 140 of 300 participants (all who had passed the 24-month measurement). The four definitions included differences of 200 ml, 10% volume, and 2 cm circumference between pre-op baseline and/or contralateral limbs, and symptom self-report of limb heaviness and swelling. Symptoms, SCA, and SCD were assessed by interviews using a validated tool. Estimates of lymphedema occurrence varied by definition and time since surgery. The 2 cm girth change provided the highest estimation of lymphedema (82% at 24 months), followed by 200 ml volume change (57% at 24 months). The 10% limb volume change converged with symptom report of heaviness and swelling at 24 months

  20. Pregnancy associated breast cancer and pregnancy after breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğer, Emek; Çalışkan, Eray; Mallmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and its frequency is increasing as more women postpone their pregnancies to their thirties and forties. Breast cancer diagnosis during pregnancy and lactation is difficult and complex both for the patient and doctors. Delay in diagnosis is frequent and treatment modalities are difficult to accept for the pregnant women. The common treatment approach is surgery after diagnosis, chemotherapy after the first trimester and radiotherapy after delivery. Even though early stage breast cancers have similar prognosis, advanced stage breast cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and lactation have poorer prognosis than similar stage breast cancers diagnosed in non-pregnant women. Women who desire to become pregnant after treatment of breast cancer will have many conflicts. Although the most common concern is recurrence of breast cancer due to pregnancy, the studies conducted showed that pregnancy has no negative effect on breast cancer prognosis. In this review we search for the frequency of breast cancer during pregnancy, the histopathological findings, risk factor, diagnostic and treatment modalities. We reviewed the literature for evidence based findings to help consult the patients on the outcome of breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy and lactation, and also inform the patients who desire to become pregnant after breast cancer according to current evidences. PMID:24592003

  1. National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene trial: advancing the science of recruitment and breast cancer risk assessment in minority communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Wilson, John W; Cook, Elise D; Edwards, Cora L; Gibson, Regina V; McElwain, Diane L; Figueroa-Moseley, Colmar D; Paskett, Electra D; Roberson, Noma L; Wickerham, D Lawrence; Wolmark, Norman

    2013-04-01

    One of the first chemoprevention trials conducted in the western hemisphere, the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project's (NSABP) Breast Cancer Prevention Trial (BCPT), demonstrated the need to evaluate all aspects of recruitment in real time and to implement strategies to enroll racial and ethnic minority women. The purpose of this report is to review various patient recruitment efforts the NSABP developed to enhance the participation of racial and ethnic minority women in the Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) trial and to describe the role that the recruitment process played in the implementation and understanding of breast cancer risk assessment in minority communities. The NSABP STAR trial was a randomized, double-blinded study comparing the use of tamoxifen 20 mg/day to raloxifene 60 mg/day, for a 5-year period, to reduce the risk of developing invasive breast cancer. Eligible postmenopausal women were required to have a 5-year predicted breast cancer risk of 1.66% based on the modified Gail Model. For the current report, eligibility and enrollment data were tabulated by race/ethnicity for women who submitted STAR risk assessment forms (RAFs). A total of 184,460 RAFs were received, 145,550 (78.9%) from white women and 38,910 (21.1%) from minority women. Of the latter group, 21,444 (11.6%) were from African Americans/blacks, 7913 (4.5%) from Hispanics/Latinas, and 9553 (5.2%) from other racial or ethnic groups. The percentages of risk-eligible women among African Americans, Hispanics/Latinas, others, and whites were 14.2%, 23.3%, 13.7%, and 57.4%, respectively. Programs targeting minority enrollment submitted large numbers of RAFs, but the eligibility rates of the women referred from those groups tended to be lower than the rates among women referred outside of those programs. The average number of completed risk assessments increased among minority women over the course of the recruitment period compared to those from whites. We have not

  2. Application of Cox and Parametric Survival Models to Assess Social Determinants of Health Affecting Three-Year Survival of Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseny, Maryam; Amanpour, Farzaneh; Mosavi-Jarrahi, Alireza; Jafari, Hossein; Moradi-Joo, Mohammad; Davoudi Monfared, Esmat

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer mortality in Iran. Social determinants of health are among the key factors affecting the pathogenesis of diseases. This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the social determinants of breast cancer survival time with parametric and semi-parametric regression models. It was conducted on male and female patients diagnosed with breast cancer presenting to the Cancer Research Center of Shohada-E-Tajrish Hospital from 2006 to 2010. The Cox proportional hazard model and parametric models including the Weibull, log normal and log-logistic models were applied to determine the social determinants of survival time of breast cancer patients. The Akaike information criterion (AIC) was used to assess the best fit. Statistical analysis was performed with STATA (version 11) software. This study was performed on 797 breast cancer patients, aged 25-93 years with a mean age of 54.7 (±11.9) years. In both semi-parametric and parametric models, the three-year survival was related to level of education and municipal district of residence (P<0.05). The AIC suggested that log normal distribution was the best fit for the three-year survival time of breast cancer patients. Social determinants of health such as level of education and municipal district of residence affect the survival of breast cancer cases. Future studies must focus on the effect of childhood social class on the survival times of cancers, which have hitherto only been paid limited attention.

  3. Lymphatic vessel assessment by podoplanin (D2-40 immunohistochemistry in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailja Puri Wahal

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Taking into account our small sample size, we conclude that a further large-sized study should be carried out to further prove the role of lymphatics in tumor dissemination. New therapeutic options can be developed targeting the lymphatic channels to arrest the lymphatic spread of the breast cancer.

  4. Benefit risk assessment and update on the use of docetaxel in the management of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alken S

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Scheryll Alken, Catherine M KellyDepartment of Medical Oncology, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, IrelandAbstract: The objective of this paper is to review the data supporting the use of docetaxel in the treatment of breast cancer, focusing on pharmacokinetics, efficacy in adjuvant and metastatic trials alone and in combination with chemotherapeutic and targeted agents, and the toxicity of docetaxel in comparison to paclitaxel. Docetaxel is a semisynthetic product derived from the European yew tree Taxus baccata L. It promotes the assembly of microtubules, stabilizes them, and thereby prevents their depolymerization. Docetaxel has been incorporated into neo-adjuvant chemotherapy regimens, both with and without anthracyclines. The inclusion of taxanes such as docetaxel in polychemotherapy regimens in early breast cancer is associated with a statistically significant reduction in mortality. As a single agent, docetaxel is highly active in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. In first-line treatment of metastatic breast cancer, the combination of docetaxel and capecitabine was associated with an improvement in overall survival; however, toxicity was higher. The toxicity profile of docetaxel has been well documented and is predictable; the most frequent adverse effects are neutropenia and febrile neutropenia. Taxane-specific adverse effects, such as peripheral neuropathy, are also expected but are manageable with appropriate dosing and scheduling.Keywords: taxanes, docetaxel, clinical trial, adverse effects, peripheral neuropathy, neutropenia

  5. Intraoperative Cerenkov Imaging for Guiding Breast Cancer Surgery and Assessing Tumor Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    study as wall as for a murine breast cancer xenograft model. 6. References [1] Cherenkov, Pavel A. (1934). "Visible emission of clean liquids by...cells were seeded sparsely on 5 mm65 mm6 0.1 mm plates made of CdWO4, a non- hygroscopic inorganic scintillator, with both sides polished (Figure 1A

  6. Assessment of the added value of the Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope in breast cancer diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgerink, Marjolein P.; Hummel, J. Marjan; Manohar, Srirang; Vaartjes, Simon R.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a recently developed breast cancer imaging technique. In order to enhance successful clinical implementation, we quantified the potential clinical value of different scenarios incorporating PA imaging by means of multi-criteria analysis. From this analysis, the

  7. Differences and similarities in breast cancer risk assessment models in clinical practice : which model to choose?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobi, Catharina E.; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Siegerink, Bob; van Asperen, Christi J.

    To show differences and similarities between risk estimation models for breast cancer in healthy women from BRCA1/2-negative or untested families. After a systematic literature search seven models were selected: Gail-2, Claus Model, Claus Tables, BOADICEA, Jonker Model, Claus-Extended Formula, and

  8. A study of breast cancer in korle bu teaching hospital: assessing the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There were 42 metastatic events affecting 35 patients during follow-up, including pleura (11), brain (10) and lungs (9). Conclusions: Breast cancer continues to affect a young population and patients still present late with advanced disease. Education needs to be intensified, but research into the reasons for late presentation ...

  9. Assessment of in vitro drug resistance of human breast cancer cells subcultured from biopsy specimens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krásná, Luboslava; Netíková, I.; Chaloupková, Alena; Taišlová, Eva; Zimovjanová, M.; Veselý, Pavel; Daneš, J.; Petruželka, L.; Matoušková, Eva

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 23, 3B (2003), s. 2593-2600 ISSN 0250-7005 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC6734 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : Breast cancer * 3T3 feeder-layer culture technique * MTT test Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.347, year: 2003

  10. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage 0-IIB Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-05

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  11. Breast Cancer Rates by State

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Campaign Buttons and Badges Stay Informed Rates by State for Other Kinds of Cancer All Cancers Combined ... Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by State Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ...

  12. Hereditary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin J; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are only detected in 25% of families with a strong history of breast cancer, though hereditary factors are expected to be involved in the remaining families with no recognized mutation. Molecular characterization is expected to provide new insight...... into the tumor biology to guide the search of new high-risk alleles and provide better classification of the growing number of BRCA1/2 variants of unknown significance (VUS). In this review, we provide an overview of hereditary breast cancer, its genetic background, and clinical implications, before focusing...... on the pathologically and molecular features associated with the disease. Recent transcriptome and genome profiling studies of tumor series from BRCA1/2 mutation carriers as well as familial non-BRCA1/2 will be discussed. Special attention is paid to its association with molecular breast cancer subtypes as well...

  13. Inheritance of proliferative breast disease in breast cancer kindreds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skolnick, M.H.; Cannon-Albright, L.A.; Goldgar, D.E.; Ward, J.H.; Marshall, C.J.; Schumann, G.B.; Hogle, H.; McWhorter, W.P.; Wright, E.C.; Tran, T.D.; Bishop, D.T.; Kushner, J.P.; Eyre, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies have emphasized that genetic susceptibility to breast cancer is rare and is expressed primarily as premenopausal breast cancer, bilateral breast cancer, or both. Proliferative breast disease (PBD) is a significant risk factor for the development of breast cancer and appears to be a precursor lesion. PBD and breast cancer were studied in 103 women from 20 kindreds that were selected for the presence of two first degree relatives with breast cancer and in 31 control women. Physical examination, screening mammography, and four-quadrant fine-needle breast aspirates were performed. Cytologic analysis of breast aspirates revealed PBD in 35% of clinically normal female first degree relatives of breast cancer cases and in 13% of controls. Genetic analysis suggests that genetic susceptibility causes both PBD and breast cancer in these kindreds. This study supports the hypothesis that this susceptibility is responsible for a considerable portion of breast cancer, including unilateral and postmenopausal breast cancer

  14. Breast self examination and breast cancer: Knowledge and practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    knowledge and practice of BSE and knowledge on breast cancer. Responses on awareness on breast cancer were weighed using a 3-point. Likert's scale. ... have shown no significant effect of regular BSE on breast cancer ... Table 1: Characteristics of women surveyed concerning breast self-examination and breast cancer.

  15. Assessment of breast cancer response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy with time-intensity curve parameters in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Chunxue; Wang Xiaoying; Qin Naishan; Jiang Xuexiang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of the type and the steepest slope of tumor's time-intensity curve (TIC) in assessing the pathologic response of locally advanced breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Methods: Thirty-six patients with pathologically confirmed locally advanced breast cancer who finished four courses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy underwent preoperative breast MRI three times during the NAC. Pathologic response was assessed according Miller-Payne grading system, grade 4 and 5 were defined as major histological response (MHR, n=16) group, and grade 1 to 3 as non- major histological response(NMHR, n=20)group. The type and the steepest slope of tumor's TIC were compared between two groups before NAC, after the second cycle and after the fourth cycle of NAC. ROC analysis was carded out to assess the clinical value of the TIC parameters. Results: After the second cycle of NAC, the steepest slope of TIC and its first change rate were different between the MHR group [(1.93± 0.88)%/s, median 35.6%] and NMHR group [(2.73±1.22)%/s, median -11.4%] (P= 0.045 and 0.01, t=1.09, Z=-3.64). After the fourth cycle, the proportion of type I in MHR group (62.5%, 10/16) was significantly higher than that in NMHR group (10.0%, 2/20, P=0.01, Z=-2.02), and the proportion of type III in MHR group (6.2%, 1/16) was significantly lower than that in NMH1R group (60.0%, 12/20, P=0.01, Z=-1.48). The steepest slope and its second change rate were different between the MHR group [(1.33±0.52)%/s, median 56.8%] and NMHR group [(2.33± 0.94)%/s, median 15.8%] (P<0.01, t=1.82, Z=-3.58). After the second cycle, the area under curve of the steepest slope of TIC and its first change rate were 0.70 (P=0.04), 0.80 (P=0.01), respectively. After the fourth cycle, the area under curve of the type I , the type I + II, the steepest slope and its second change were 0.78 (P=0.03), 0.69 (P=0.06), 0.82 (P=0.01), 0.92 (P=0.01), respectively. Conclusion: The steepest

  16. A Risk Assessment Comparison of Breast Cancer and Factors Affected to Risk Perception of Women in Turkey: A Cross-sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    YÜKSEL, Serpil; ALTUN UĞRAŞ, Gülay; ÇAVDAR, İkbal; BOZDOĞAN, Atilla; ÖZKAN GÜRDAL, Sibel; AKYOLCU, Neriman; ESENCAN, Ecem; VAROL SARAÇOĞLU, Gamze; ÖZMEN, Vahit

    2017-01-01

    Background: The increase in breast cancer incidence has enhanced attention towards breast cancer risk. The aim of this study was to determine the risk of breast cancer and risk perception of women, factors that affect risk perception, and to determine differences between absolute risk and the perception of risk. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out among 346 women whose score in the Gail Risk Model (GRM) was ≥ 1.67% and/or had a 1st degree relative with breast cancer in Bahçeşehir town in Istanbul, Turkey between Jul 2012 and Dec 2012. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews. The level of risk for breast cancer has been calculated using GRM and the Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Form (BCRAF). Breast cancer risk perception (BCRP), has been evaluated by visual analogue 100-cm-long scale. Results: Even though 39.6% of the women considered themselves as high-risk carriers, according to the GRM and the BCRAF, only 11.6% and 9.8% of women were in the “high risk” category, respectively. There was a positive significant correlation between the GRM and the BCRAF scores (Prisk perception were age (40–59 yr), post-menopausal phase, high-very high economic income level, existence of breast cancer in the family, having regular breast self-examination and clinical breast examination (Prisk of breast, cancer there is a significant difference between the women’s risk perception and their absolute risk level. PMID:28435816

  17. Pregnancy-associated Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Ashley S

    2016-12-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting pregnancy. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer refers to breast cancer that is diagnosed during pregnancy or within the first postpartum year. The incidence is increasing as more women delay childbearing. Breast cancer can be safely diagnosed, staged, and treated during pregnancy while protecting the fetus and mother with excellent outcomes for both. Avoiding diagnostic delays is vital to prognosis. This article provides an overview of the diagnosis, staging, management, and prognosis of pregnancy-associated breast cancer. Relevant current literature is reviewed.

  18. Automated adipose study for assessing cancerous human breast tissue using optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Yu; Yao, Xinwen; Chang, Ernest W.; Bin Amir, Syed A.; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Feldman, Sheldon; Hendon, Christine P.

    2017-02-01

    Breast cancer is the third leading cause of death in women in the United States. In human breast tissue, adipose cells are infiltrated or replaced by cancer cells during the development of breast tumor. Therefore, an adipose map can be an indicator of identifying cancerous region. We developed an automated classification method to generate adipose map within human breast. To facilitate the automated classification, we first mask the B-scans from OCT volumes by comparing the signal noise ratio with a threshold. Then, the image was divided into multiple blocks with a size of 30 pixels by 30 pixels. In each block, we extracted texture features such as local standard deviation, entropy, homogeneity, and coarseness. The features of each block were input to a probabilistic model, relevance vector machine (RVM), which was trained prior to the experiment, to classify tissue types. For each block within the B-scan, RVM identified the region with adipose tissue. We calculated the adipose ratio as the number of blocks identified as adipose over the total number of blocks within the B-scan. We obtained OCT images from patients (n = 19) in Columbia medical center. We automatically generated the adipose maps from 24 B-scans including normal samples (n = 16) and cancerous samples (n = 8). We found the adipose regions show an isolated pattern that in cancerous tissue while a clustered pattern in normal tissue. Moreover, the adipose ratio (52.30 ± 29.42%) in normal tissue was higher than the that in cancerous tissue (12.41 ± 10.07%).

  19. The Pink Underside: The Commercialization of Medical Risk Assessment and Decision-Making Tools for Hereditary Breast Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse-Biber, Sharlene; Flynn, Bailey; Farrelly, Keeva

    2018-04-01

    The growth of the Internet since the millennium has opened up a myriad of opportunities for education, particularly in medicine. Although those looking for health care information used to have to turn to a face-to-face doctor's visit, an immense library of medical advice is now available at their fingertips. The BRCA genetic predispositions (mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancer genes) which expose men and women to greater risk of breast, ovarian, and other cancers can be researched extensively online. Several nonprofit organizations now offer online risk assessment and decision-making tools meant to supplement conversation with medical professionals, which in actuality are quickly replacing it. We argue here through a critical qualitative template analysis of several such tools that the discursive frameworks utilized are prone to fearmongering, commercialization, and questionable validity. Left unchecked, these assessment tools could do more harm than good in driving young women especially to take unnecessary extreme surgical action.

  20. New Advances in Nanotechnology-Based Diagnosis and Therapeutics for Breast Cancer: An Assessment of Active-Targeting Inorganic Nanoplatforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falagan-Lotsch, Priscila; Grzincic, Elissa M; Murphy, Catherine J

    2017-01-18

    Breast cancer is a major cause of suffering and mortality among women. Limitations in the current diagnostic methods and treatment approaches have led to new strategies to positively impact the survival rates and quality of life of breast cancer patients. Nanotechnology offers a real possibility of mitigating breast cancer mortality by early-stage cancer detection and more precise diagnosis as well as more effective treatments with minimal side effects. The current nanoplatforms approved for breast cancer therapeutics are based on passive tumor targeting using organic nanoparticles and have not provided the expected significant improvements in the clinic. In this review, we present the emerging approaches in breast cancer nanomedicine based on active targeting using versatile inorganic nanoplatforms with biomedical relevance, such as gold, silica, and iron oxide nanoparticles, as well as their efficacy in breast cancer imaging, drug and gene delivery, thermal therapy, combinational therapy, and theranostics in preclinical studies. The main challenges for clinical translation and perspectives are discussed.

  1. Accelerated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  2. Chromogenic in situ hybridisation for the assessment of HER2 status in breast cancer: an international validation ring study

    OpenAIRE

    van de Vijver, Marc; Bilous, Michael; Hanna, Wedad; Hofmann, Manfred; Kristel, Petra; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Rüschoff, Josef

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Before any new methodology can be introduced into the routine diagnostic setting it must be technically validated against the established standards. To this end, a ring study involving five international pathology laboratories was initiated to validate chromogenic in situ hybridisation (CISH) against fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) as a test for assessing human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status in breast cancer. Methods Each...

  3. Clinicians' use of breast cancer risk assessment tools according to their perceived importance of breast cancer risk factors: an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brédart, Anne; Kop, Jean-Luc; Antoniou, Antonis C; Cunningham, Alex P; De Pauw, Antoine; Tischkowitz, Marc; Ehrencrona, Hans; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Dolbeault, Sylvie; Rhiem, Kerstin; Easton, Douglas F; Devilee, Peter; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Schmutlzer, Rita

    2018-03-05

    The BOADICEA breast cancer (BC) risk assessment model and its associated Web Application v3 (BWA) tool are being extended to incorporate additional genetic and non-genetic BC risk factors. From an online survey through the BOADICEA website and UK, Dutch, French and Swedish national genetic societies, we explored the relationships between the usage frequencies of the BWA and six other common BC risk assessment tools and respondents' perceived importance of BC risk factors. Respondents (N = 443) varied in age, country and clinical seniority but comprised mainly genetics health professionals (82%) and BWA users (93%). Oncology professionals perceived reproductive, hormonal (exogenous) and lifestyle BC risk factors as more important in BC risk assessment compared to genetics professionals (p values personal BC history as BC risk factors. BWA use was positively related to the weight given to hormonal BC risk factors. The importance attributed to lifestyle and BMI BC risk factors was not associated with the use of BWA or any of the other tools. Next version of the BWA encompassing additional BC risk factors will facilitate more comprehensive BC risk assessment in genetics and oncology practice.

  4. Effects of Breast Cancer and Mastectomy on Fibrinolytic Activity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is good to know if this is also the case in Africans with breast cancer. Africans are known to possess enhanced fibrinolysis. This study was designed to assess the effect of breast cancer on fibrinolytic activity and the effect of mastectomy on fibrinolysis in African women. Sixty histo-patholically proven breast cancer patients ...

  5. How reassuring is a normal breast ultrasound in assessment of a screen-detected mammographic abnormality? A review of interval cancers after assessment that included ultrasound evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, M.L.; Welman, C.J.; Celliers, L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To review factors resulting in a false-negative outcome or delayed cancer diagnosis in women recalled for further evaluation, including ultrasound, after an abnormal screening mammogram. Materials and methods: Of 646,692 screening mammograms performed between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2004, 34,533 women were recalled for further assessment. Nine hundred and sixty-four interval cancers were reported in this period. Forty-six of these women had been recalled for further assessment, which specifically included ultrasound evaluation in the preceding 24 months, and therefore, met the inclusion criteria for this study. Screening mammograms, further mammographic views, ultrasound scans, clinical findings, and histopathology results were retrospectively reviewed by two consultant breast radiologists. Results: The interval cancer developed in the contralateral breast (n = 9), ipsilateral breast, but different site (n = 6), and ipsilateral breast at the same site (n = 31) as the abnormality for which they had recently been recalled. In the latter group, 10 were retrospectively classified as a false-negative outcome, nine had a delay in obtaining a biopsy, and 12 had a delay due to a non-diagnostic initial biopsy. Various factors relating to these outcomes are discussed. Conclusion: Out of 34,533 women who attended for an assessment visit and the 46 women who subsequently developed an interval breast cancer, 15 were true interval cancers, 10 had a false-negative assessment outcome, and 21 had a delay to cancer diagnosis on the basis of a number of factors. When there is discrepancy between the imaging and histopathology results, a repeat biopsy rather than early follow-up would have avoided a delay in some cases. A normal ultrasound examination should not deter the radiologist from proceeding to stereotactic biopsy, if the index mammographic lesion is suspicious of malignancy.

  6. Depression and Resilience in Breast Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ristevska-Dimitrovska, Gordana; Stefanovski, Petar; Smichkoska, Snezhana; Raleva, Marija; Dejanova, Beti

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A significant number of breast cancer patients, during their life with the diagnosis, experience emotional distress in the form of depression and anxiety. Psychological resilience is the ability of a person to protect his/her mental health when faced with adverse circumstances such as the cancer diagnosis. This study aims to assess the resilience in breast cancer patients and to explore whether depression affects the resilience. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Two hundred eighteen (218) ...

  7. GLUT 5 is not over-expressed in breast cancer cells and patient breast cancer tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayatri Gowrishankar

    Full Text Available F18 2-Fluoro 2-deoxyglucose (FDG has been the gold standard in positron emission tomography (PET oncologic imaging since its introduction into the clinics several years ago. Seeking to complement FDG in the diagnosis of breast cancer using radio labeled fructose based analogs, we investigated the expression of the chief fructose transporter-GLUT 5 in breast cancer cells and human tissues. Our results indicate that GLUT 5 is not over-expressed in breast cancer tissues as assessed by an extensive immunohistochemistry study. RT-PCR studies showed that the GLUT 5 mRNA was present at minimal amounts in breast cancer cell lines. Further knocking down the expression of GLUT 5 in breast cancer cells using RNA interference did not affect the fructose uptake in these cell lines. Taken together these results are consistent with GLUT 5 not being essential for fructose uptake in breast cancer cells and tissues.

  8. Assessing local capacity to expand rural breast cancer screening and patient navigation: An iterative mixed-method tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inrig, Stephen J; Higashi, Robin T; Tiro, Jasmin A; Argenbright, Keith E; Lee, Simon J Craddock

    2017-04-01

    Despite federal funding for breast cancer screening, fragmented infrastructure and limited organizational capacity hinder access to the full continuum of breast cancer screening and clinical follow-up procedures among rural-residing women. We proposed a regional hub-and-spoke model, partnering with local providers to expand access across North Texas. We describe development and application of an iterative, mixed-method tool to assess county capacity to conduct community outreach and/or patient navigation in a partnership model. Our tool combined publicly-available quantitative data with qualitative assessments during site visits and semi-structured interviews. Application of our tool resulted in shifts in capacity designation in 10 of 17 county partners: 8 implemented local outreach with hub navigation; 9 relied on the hub for both outreach and navigation. Key factors influencing capacity: (1) formal linkages between partner organizations; (2) inter-organizational relationships; (3) existing clinical service protocols; (4) underserved populations. Qualitative data elucidate how our tool captured these capacity changes. Our capacity assessment tool enabled the hub to establish partnerships with county organizations by tailoring support to local capacity and needs. Absent a vertically integrated provider network for preventive services in these rural counties, our tool facilitated a virtually integrated regional network to extend access to breast cancer screening to underserved women. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Imaging Management of Breast Density, a Controversial Risk Factor for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcon, Shannon; Williams, Angela; Weinfurtner, Jared; Drukteinis, Jennifer S

    2017-04-01

    Breast density is well recognized as an independent risk factor for the development of breast cancer. However, the magnitude of risk is controversial. As the public becomes increasingly aware of breast density as a risk factor, legislation and notification laws in relation to breast density have become common throughout the United States. Awareness of breast density as a risk factor for breast cancer presents new challenges for the clinician in the approach to the management and screening of women with dense breasts. The evidence and controversy surrounding breast density as a risk factor for the development of breast cancer are discussed. Common supplemental screening modalities for breast cancer are also discussed, including tomosynthesis, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging. A management strategy for screening women with dense breasts is also presented. The American College of Radiology recognizes breast density as a controversial risk factor for breast cancer, whereas the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recognizes breast density as a modest risk factor. Neither organization recommends the routine use of supplemental screening in women with dense breasts without considering additional patient-related risk factors. Breast density is a poorly understood and controversial risk factor for the development of breast cancer. Mammography is a screening modality proven to reduce breast cancer-related mortality rates and is the single most appropriate tool for population-based screening. Use of supplemental screening modalities should be tailored to individual risk assessment.

  10. Breast cancer imaging devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moadel, Renee M

    2011-05-01

    Conventional mammography is a screening procedure constrained by low specificity in the detection of breast cancer. Approximately 40% of women undergoing mammography screening have dense breast tissue, and conventional mammographic imaging has a sensitivity range of only 50%-85% for malignant lesions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now recommended for breast cancer screening in high-risk patients. However, approximately 15% of patients cannot tolerate MRI. These are the clinical situations in which positron emission mammography (PEM) and breast-specific gamma (BSG) camera systems fulfill a need for primary breast cancer imaging. Because breast cancer is the most common malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death among women, many nuclear medicine imaging techniques are essential in the evaluation and therapy of patients with this disease. Nuclear medicine surgical techniques consist of sentinel lymph node localization and the use of radiolabeled seeds for intraoperative localization of nonpalpable breast cancers. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the PEM Flex Solo II scanner, which has the capability for stereotactic biopsy, with an array of pixelated lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO) crystals, position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMT), and a spatial resolution of 2.4 mm. Clear PEM is a scanner in development with cerium-doped LYSO (LYSO:Ce) crystals, multipixel avalanche photodiodes, depth of interaction measurement with a resolution of 1.3 mm. The Dilon 6800 Gamma Camera is a BSG device approved by the FDA with stereotactic biopsy guidance capability, a pixelated array of sodium iodide crystals, PS-PMTs, and an extrinsic spatial resolution of 6 mm at 3 cm from the camera. GE has just received clearance from the FDA for a molecular breast imaging camera, the Discovery NM 750 b, with pixelated cadmium zinc telluride crystals, semiconductor photoelements and an extrinsic resolution of 3.5 mm at 3 cm. The Society of

  11. Preservation of nipple-areola complex in breast cancer--a clinicopathological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Ambar; Gupta, Sandipan; Bhattacharya, Nirjhar

    2008-10-01

    Skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) with immediate breast reconstruction (IBR), which traditionally includes the nipple-areola complex (NAC), is the modern way of improving the cosmetic and aesthetic outcome of advanced breast cancer surgery. However, with nipple and areola lacking, it fails to simulate the original breast. This study is directed at exploring the possibility of NAC preservation in selected mastectomy patients. A retrospective analysis of the breast specimens of 219 consecutive mastectomy patients was performed after categorising the tumour characteristics on the basis of their TNM staging. The relationship of malignant involvement of the NAC with positive regional lymph nodes (pN), tumour size (T), site, stage and skin involvement by the breast tumour was noted and analysed. Chi-square analysis was performed for different characteristics vis-à-vis NAC involvement. Two-sided lists, wherever possible, had been performed at the 5% level of significance and P values were evaluated. The total frequency of malignant involvement of NAC was 44 (20%) out of 219. The frequency of NAC involvement in stage I and II tumours was found to be 9.38% compared to stage III tumours where it was 30%. The NAC was involved in 4 (2.5%) of 160 patients with peripheral tumours compared with 40 (68%) of 59 patients with tumours located centrally. Only 2 (1.5%) of 130 peripheral tumours bigger than 5 cm had malignant NAC involvement while the number in their central counterparts was much bigger (59%). Not a single breast cancer patient with skin involvement in the peripheral quadrants had any nipple-areola involvement. NAC can be preserved in patients having stage I, II and III diseases with peripheral tumours less than 5 cm in size, irrespective of the nodal status and skin involvement.

  12. Assessment of leakage dose in vivo in patients undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peta Lonski

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Accurate quantification of the relatively small radiation doses delivered to untargeted regions during breast irradiation in patients with breast cancer is of increasing clinical interest for the purpose of estimating long-term radiation-related risks. Out-of-field dose calculations from commercial planning systems however may be inaccurate which can impact estimates for long-term risks associated with treatment. This work compares calculated and measured dose out-of-field and explores the application of a correction for leakage radiation. Materials and methods: Dose calculations of a Boltzmann transport equation solver, pencil beam-type, and superposition-type algorithms from a commercial treatment planning system (TPS were compared with in vivo thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD measurements conducted out-of-field on the contralateral chest at points corresponding to the thyroid, axilla and contralateral breast of eleven patients undergoing tangential beam radiotherapy for breast cancer. Results: Overall, the TPS was found to under-estimate doses at points distal to the radiation field edge with a modern linear Boltzmann transport equation solver providing the best estimates. Application of an additive correction for leakage (0.04% of central axis dose improved correlation between the measured and calculated doses at points greater than 15 cm from the field edge. Conclusions: Application of a correction for leakage doses within peripheral regions is feasible and could improve accuracy of TPS in estimating out-of-field doses in breast radiotherapy. Keywords: Breast radiotherapy, TLD, Leakage dose, Dose calculation algorithm

  13. Breast Cancer - Early Diagnosis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-28

    This podcast answers a listener's question about how to tell if she has breast cancer.  Created: 4/28/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/28/2011.

  14. Quality Assessments of Long-Term Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Breast Cancer Xenograft Tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jian-Ying; Chen, Lijun; Zhang, Bai; Tian, Yuan; Liu, Tao; Thomas, Stefani N.; Chen, Li; Schnaubelt, Michael; Boja, Emily; Hiltket, Tara; Kinsinger, Christopher; Rodriguez, Henry; Davies, Sherri; Li, Shunqiang; Snider, Jacqueline E.; Erdmann-Gilmore, Petra; Tabb, David L.; Townsend, Reid; Ellis, Matthew; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.; Carr, Steven A.; Zhang, Zhen; Chan, Daniel W.; Zhang, Hui

    2017-09-21

    The identification of protein biomarkers requires large-scale analysis of human specimens to achieve statistical significance. In this study, we evaluated the long-term reproducibility of an iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification) based quantitative proteomics strategy using one channel for universal normalization across all samples. A total of 307 liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) analyses were completed, generating 107 one-dimensional (1D) LC-MS/MS datasets and 8 offline two-dimensional (2D) LC-MS/MS datasets (25 fractions for each set) for human-in-mouse breast cancer xenograft tissues representative of basal and luminal subtypes. Such large-scale studies require the implementation of robust metrics to assess the contributions of technical and biological variability in the qualitative and quantitative data. Accordingly, we developed a quantification confidence score based on the quality of each peptide-spectrum match (PSM) to remove quantification outliers from each analysis. After combining confidence score filtering and statistical analysis, reproducible protein identification and quantitative results were achieved from LC-MS/MS datasets collected over a 16 month period.

  15. Performance assessment of diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging instruments in a 2-year multicenter breast cancer trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leproux, Anaïs; O'Sullivan, Thomas D.; Cerussi, Albert; Durkin, Amanda; Hill, Brian; Hylton, Nola; Yodh, Arjun G.; Carp, Stefan A.; Boas, David; Jiang, Shudong; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian; Roblyer, Darren; Yang, Wei; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2017-12-01

    We present a framework for characterizing the performance of an experimental imaging technology, diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI), in a 2-year multicenter American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) breast cancer study (ACRIN-6691). DOSI instruments combine broadband frequency-domain photon migration with time-independent near-infrared (650 to 1000 nm) spectroscopy to measure tissue absorption and reduced scattering spectra and tissue hemoglobin, water, and lipid composition. The goal of ACRIN-6691 was to test the effectiveness of optically derived imaging endpoints in predicting the final pathologic response of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Sixty patients were enrolled over a 2-year period at participating sites and received multiple DOSI scans prior to and during 3- to 6-month NAC. The impact of three sources of error on accuracy and precision, including different operators, instruments, and calibration standards, was evaluated using a broadband reflectance standard and two different solid tissue-simulating optical phantoms. Instruments showed <0.0010 mm-1 (10.3%) and 0.06 mm-1 (4.7%) deviation in broadband absorption and reduced scattering, respectively, over the 2-year duration of ACRIN-6691. These variations establish a useful performance criterion for assessing instrument stability. The proposed procedures and tests are not limited to DOSI; rather, they are intended to provide methods to characterize performance of any instrument used in translational optical imaging.

  16. Early diagnosis of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semiglazov, V.F.

    1989-01-01

    Modern data are presentd on epidemology etiopathogensis and statistics of breast cancer. Home and international clinical and histological classifications is given. Much attention is paid to the methods for early diagnosis of pretumor diseases and breast cancer: clinical roentgenomammography, thrmography and computerized tomomammography. The role of self-examination in cancer early detection has been analyzed. Special attention is paid to system of detection of minimal and unpalpable form of breast cancer, screening of these tumors. 113 refs.; 60 figs.; 6 tabs

  17. Impact of intratumoural heterogeneity on the assessment of Ki67 expression in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleskandarany, M A; Green, A R; Ashankyty, I; Elmouna, A; Diez-Rodriguez, M; Nolan, C C; Ellis, I O; Rakha, E A

    2016-07-01

    In breast cancer (BC), the prognostic value of Ki67 expression is well-documented. Intratumoural heterogeneity (ITH) of Ki67 expression is amongst the several technical issues behind the lag of its inclusion into BC prognostic work-up. The immunohistochemical (IHC) expression of anti-Ki67 antibody (MIB1 clone) was assessed in four full-face (FF) sections from different primary tumour blocks and their matched axillary nodal (LN) metastases in a series of 55 BC. Assessment was made using the highest expression hot spots (HS), lowest expression (LS), and overall/average expression scores (AS) in each section. Heterogeneity score (Hes), co-efficient of variation, and correlation co-efficient were used to assess the levels of Ki67 ITH. Ki67 HS, LS, and AS scores were highly variable within the same section and between different sections of the primary tumour, with maximal variation observed in the LS (P Ki67 and clinicopathological and molecular variables were similar when using HS or AS, the best correlation between AS and HS was observed in tumours with high Ki67 expression only. Ki67 expression in LN deposits was less heterogeneous than in the primary tumours and was perfectly correlated with the HS Ki67 expression in the primary tumour sections (r = 0.98, P Ki67 expression using HS scoring method on a full-face BC tissue section can represent the primary tumour growth fraction that is likely to metastasise. The association between Ki67 expression pattern in the LN metastasis and the HS in the primary tumour may reflect the temporal heterogeneity through clonal expansion.

  18. Hormone Use in Food Animal Production: Assessing Potential Dietary Exposures and Breast Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachman, Keeve E; Smith, Tyler J S

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the role of hormones in breast cancer etiology, following reports that heightened levels of endogenous hormones and exposure to exogenous hormones and other endocrine-disrupting chemicals through food and the environment are associated with increased breast cancer risk. Seven hormone drugs (testosterone propionate, trenbolone acetate, estradiol, zeranol, progesterone, melengestrol acetate, and bovine somatotropin) are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in food animals. There is concern that these drugs or their biologically active metabolites may accumulate in edible tissues, potentially increasing the risk of exposure for consumers. To date, the potential for human exposure to residues of these compounds in animal products, as well as the risks that may result from this exposure, is poorly understood. In this paper, we discuss the existing scientific evidence examining the toxicological significance of exposure to hormones used in food animal production in relation to breast cancer risk. Through a discussion of U.S. federal regulatory programs and the primary literature, we interpret the state of surveillance for residues of hormone drugs in animal products and discuss trends in meat consumption in relation to the potential for hormone exposure. Given the lack of chronic bioassays of oral toxicity of the seven hormone compounds in the public literature and the limitations of existing residue surveillance programs, it is not currently possible to provide a quantitative characterization of risks that result from the use of hormonal drugs in food animal production, complicating our understanding of the role of dietary hormone exposure in the population burden of breast cancer.

  19. Assessment of response to endocrine therapy using FDG PET/CT in metastatic breast cancer: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortazavi-Jehanno, Nina; Giraudet, Anne-Laure; Champion, Laurence; Edeline, Veronique; Madar, Olivier; Pecking, Alain Paul [Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Lerebours, Florence [Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Service d' Oncologie Medicale, Saint-Cloud (France); Stanc, Elise Le [Hopital Foch, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Suresnes (France); Bellet, Dominique [Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Pharmacologie Chimique et Genetique and Imagerie, Inserm U1022 CNRS UMR 8151, Faculte des sciences pharmaceutiques et biologiques, Paris (France); Alberini, Jean-Louis [Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Universite Versailles Saint-Quentin, Faculte de Medecine, Versailles (France)

    2012-03-15

    The purpose of this pilot study was to assess whether outcome in metastatic or recurrent breast cancer patients is related to metabolic response to endocrine therapy determined by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. The study group comprised 22 patients with breast cancer (age 58 {+-} 11 years, mean {+-} SD) who were scheduled to receive endocrine therapy. They were systematically assessed by PET/CT at baseline and after a mean of 10 {+-} 4 weeks for evaluation of response after induction. All patients demonstrated FDG-avid lesions on the baseline PET/CT scan. The metabolic response was assessed according to EORTC criteria and based on the mean difference in SUV{sub max} between the two PET/CT scans, and the patients were classified into four groups: complete or partial metabolic response, or stable or progressive metabolic disease (CMR, PMR, SMD and PMD, respectively). All patients were followed in our institution. Metastatic sites were localized in bone (n = 15), lymph nodes (n = 11), chest wall (n = 3), breast (n = 5), lung (n = 3), soft tissue (n = 1) and liver (n = 1). PMR was observed in 11 patients (50%), SMD in 5 (23%) and PMD in 6 (27%). The median progression-free survival (PFS) times were 20, 27 and 6 months in the PMR, SMD and PMD groups, respectively. PFS in the SMD group differed from that in the PMR and SMD groups (p < 0.0001). Metabolic response assessed by FDG PET/CT imaging in patients with metastatic breast cancer treated with endocrine therapy is predictive of the patients' PFS. (orig.)

  20. Assessment of response to endocrine therapy using FDG PET/CT in metastatic breast cancer: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortazavi-Jehanno, Nina; Giraudet, Anne-Laure; Champion, Laurence; Edeline, Veronique; Madar, Olivier; Pecking, Alain Paul; Lerebours, Florence; Stanc, Elise Le; Bellet, Dominique; Alberini, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to assess whether outcome in metastatic or recurrent breast cancer patients is related to metabolic response to endocrine therapy determined by 18 F-FDG PET/CT. The study group comprised 22 patients with breast cancer (age 58 ± 11 years, mean ± SD) who were scheduled to receive endocrine therapy. They were systematically assessed by PET/CT at baseline and after a mean of 10 ± 4 weeks for evaluation of response after induction. All patients demonstrated FDG-avid lesions on the baseline PET/CT scan. The metabolic response was assessed according to EORTC criteria and based on the mean difference in SUV max between the two PET/CT scans, and the patients were classified into four groups: complete or partial metabolic response, or stable or progressive metabolic disease (CMR, PMR, SMD and PMD, respectively). All patients were followed in our institution. Metastatic sites were localized in bone (n = 15), lymph nodes (n = 11), chest wall (n = 3), breast (n = 5), lung (n = 3), soft tissue (n = 1) and liver (n = 1). PMR was observed in 11 patients (50%), SMD in 5 (23%) and PMD in 6 (27%). The median progression-free survival (PFS) times were 20, 27 and 6 months in the PMR, SMD and PMD groups, respectively. PFS in the SMD group differed from that in the PMR and SMD groups (p < 0.0001). Metabolic response assessed by FDG PET/CT imaging in patients with metastatic breast cancer treated with endocrine therapy is predictive of the patients' PFS. (orig.)

  1. Assessment of two mammographic density related features in predicting near-term breast cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bin; Sumkin, Jules H.; Zuley, Margarita L.; Wang, Xingwei; Klym, Amy H.; Gur, David

    2012-02-01

    In order to establish a personalized breast cancer screening program, it is important to develop risk models that have high discriminatory power in predicting the likelihood of a woman developing an imaging detectable breast cancer in near-term (e.g., BIRADS), and computed mammographic density related features we compared classification performance in estimating the likelihood of detecting cancer during the subsequent examination using areas under the ROC curves (AUC). The AUCs were 0.63+/-0.03, 0.54+/-0.04, 0.57+/-0.03, 0.68+/-0.03 when using woman's age, BIRADS rating, computed mean density and difference in computed bilateral mammographic density, respectively. Performance increased to 0.62+/-0.03 and 0.72+/-0.03 when we fused mean and difference in density with woman's age. The results suggest that, in this study, bilateral mammographic tissue density is a significantly stronger (p<0.01) risk indicator than both woman's age and mean breast density.

  2. Use of the international classification of functioning, disability and health as a functional assessment tool for breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Eun Joo; Kim, Bo-Ram; Shin, Hyung Ik; Lim, Jae-Young

    2012-03-01

    To develop a patient self-completed questionnaire from the items of the Brief Core Set Questionnaire for Breast Cancer (BCSQ-BC) and to investigate the prevalence of specific dysfunctions throughout the course of cancer and treatments. From January 2010 to February 2011, 96 breast cancer patients were evaluated with BCSQ-BC developed for clinical application of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Quality of life and upper limb dysfunction using disabilities of arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) were assessed. Content validity was evaluated using correlations between BCSQ-BC and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ and DASH scores. Construct validity was computed using exploratory factor analysis. Kappa statistics were computed for agreement between test-retest ICF data. The level of significance and odds ratios were reported for individuals with early post-acute and long-term context and with total mastectomy and breast conservative surgery. There was consistently good test-retest agreement in patient-completed questionnaires (kappa value, 0.76). Body function, activity and participation subscales are significantly related with EORTC QLQ and DASH. Problems with activity and participation were strongly associated with physical functional domains of EORTC QLQ (r=-0.708, pcancer. Immobility of joint (15% vs. 7%) and lymphatic dysfunction (17% vs. 3%) were indexed more frequently in extensive surgery cases than in conservative surgery. Muscle power (16% vs. 8%), exercise tolerance functions (12% vs. 4%) and looking after one's health (10% vs. 2%) were impaired within 1 year after surgery, while sleep dysfunction (8% vs. 14%) was a major problem over 1 year after surgery. The BCSQ-BC identifies the problems comprehensively in functioning of patients with breast cancer. We revealed the interaction with the ICF framework adopting a multifactor understanding of function and disability.

  3. Association between breast cancer, breast density, and body adiposity evaluated by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Wenlian; Huang, Peng; Macura, Katarzyna J.; Artemov, Dmitri

    2016-01-01

    Despite the lack of reliable methods with which to measure breast density from 2D mammograms, numerous studies have demonstrated a positive association between breast cancer and breast density. The goal of this study was to study the association between breast cancer and body adiposity, as well as breast density quantitatively assessed from 3D MRI breast images. Breast density was calculated from 3D T1-weighted MRI images. The thickness of the upper abdominal adipose layer was used as a surrogate marker for body adiposity. We evaluated the correlation between breast density, age, body adiposity, and breast cancer. Breast density was calculated for 410 patients with unilateral invasive breast cancer, 73 patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and 361 controls without breast cancer. Breast density was inversely related to age and the thickness of the upper abdominal adipose layer. Breast cancer was only positively associated with body adiposity and age. Age and body adiposity are predictive of breast density. Breast cancer was not associated with breast density; however, it was associated with the thickness of the upper abdominal adipose layer, a surrogate marker for body adiposity. Our results based on a limited number of patients warrant further investigations. (orig.)

  4. Opioids and breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe; Ahern, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioids may alter immune function, thereby potentially affecting cancer recurrence. The authors investigated the association between postdiagnosis opioid use and breast cancer recurrence. METHODS: Patients with incident, early stage breast cancer who were diagnosed during 1996 through...... 2008 in Denmark were identified from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group Registry. Opioid prescriptions were ascertained from the Danish National Prescription Registry. Follow-up began on the date of primary surgery for breast cancer and continued until breast cancer recurrence, death......, emigration, 10 years, or July 31, 2013, whichever occurred first. Cox regression models were used to compute hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals associating breast cancer recurrence with opioid prescription use overall and by opioid type and strength, immunosuppressive effect, chronic use (≥6 months...

  5. Mindfulness Meditation or Survivorship Education in Improving Behavioral Symptoms in Younger Stage 0-III Breast Cancer Survivors (Pathways to Wellness)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-15

    Cancer Survivor; Early-Stage Breast Carcinoma; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  6. Standardization for Ki-67 assessment in moderately differentiated breast cancer. A retrospective analysis of the SAKK 28/12 study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna Varga

    Full Text Available Proliferative activity (Ki-67 Labelling Index in breast cancer increasingly serves as an additional tool in the decision for or against adjuvant chemotherapy in midrange hormone receptor positive breast cancer. Ki-67 Index has been previously shown to suffer from high inter-observer variability especially in midrange (G2 breast carcinomas. In this study we conducted a systematic approach using different Ki-67 assessments on large tissue sections in order to identify the method with the highest reliability and the lowest variability.Five breast pathologists retrospectively analyzed proliferative activity of 50 G2 invasive breast carcinomas using large tissue sections by assessing Ki-67 immunohistochemistry. Ki-67-assessments were done on light microscopy and on digital images following these methods: 1 assessing five regions, 2 assessing only darkly stained nuclei and 3 considering only condensed proliferative areas ('hotspots'. An individual review (the first described assessment from 2008 was also performed. The assessments on light microscopy were done by estimating. All measurements were performed three times. Inter-observer and intra-observer reliabilities were calculated using the approach proposed by Eliasziw et al. Clinical cutoffs (14% and 20% were tested using Fleiss' Kappa.There was a good intra-observer reliability in 5 of 7 methods (ICC: 0.76-0.89. The two highest inter-observer reliability was fair to moderate (ICC: 0.71 and 0.74 in 2 methods (region-analysis and individual-review on light microscopy. Fleiss'-kappa-values (14% cut-off were the highest (moderate using the original recommendation on light-microscope (Kappa 0.58. Fleiss' kappa values (20% cut-off were the highest (Kappa 0.48 each in analyzing hotspots on light-microscopy and digital-analysis. No methodologies using digital-analysis were superior to the methods on light microscope.Our results show that all methods on light-microscopy for Ki-67 assessment in large tissue

  7. Mobile Phone Apps for Quality of Life and Well-Being Assessment in Breast and Prostate Cancer Patients: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Esther; Monteiro-Guerra, Francisco; Rivera-Romero, Octavio; Dorronzoro-Zubiete, Enrique; Sanchez-Bocanegra, Carlos Luis; Gabarron, Elia

    2017-12-04

    Mobile phone health apps are increasingly gaining attention in oncological care as potential tools for supporting cancer patients. Although the number of publications and health apps focusing on cancer is increasing, there are still few specifically designed for the most prevalent cancers diagnosed: breast and prostate cancers. There is a need to review the effect of these apps on breast and prostate cancer patients' quality of life (QoL) and well-being. The purposes of this study were to review the scientific literature on mobile phone apps targeting breast or prostate cancer patients and involving QoL and well-being (anxiety and depression symptoms) and analyze the clinical and technological characteristics, strengths, and weaknesses of these apps, as well as patients' user experience with them. We conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed literature from The Cochrane Library, Excerpta Medica Database, PsycINFO, PubMed, Scopus, and MEDLINE to identify studies involving apps focused on breast and/or prostate cancer patients and QoL and/or well-being published between January 1, 2000, and July 12, 2017. Only trial studies which met the inclusion criteria were selected. The systematic review was completed with a critical analysis of the apps previously identified in the health literature research that were available from the official app stores. The systematic review of the literature yielded 3862 articles. After removal of duplicates, 3229 remained and were evaluated on the basis of title and abstract. Of these, 3211 were discarded as not meeting the inclusion criteria, and 18 records were selected for full text screening. Finally, 5 citations were included in this review, with a total of 644 patients, mean age 52.16 years. Four studies targeted breast cancer patients and 1 focused on prostate cancer patients. Four studies referred to apps that assessed QoL. Only 1 among the 5 analyzed apps was available from the official app store. In 3 studies, an app

  8. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  9. Screening for breast cancer post reduction mammoplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muir, T.M.; Tresham, J.; Fritschi, L.; Wylie, E.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether remodelling of the breast after breast reduction surgery has an effect on mammographic cancer detection. Methods and materials: For women who attended population-based screening between January 1998 to December 2007, data were extracted on their age, history of previous breast reduction, and the result of screening (recall for further assessment, cancer, or no cancer). The number of cancers detected, recalls per 1000 screens and the characteristics of the cancers detected in the two groups was compared. Results: In total 244,147 women with 736,219 screening episodes were reviewed. In the 4743 women who had a breast reduction, 51 breast cancers were detected [age standardized rate (ASR) of 4.28 per 1000 screening episodes; 95% CI 3.11-5.46], compared with 4342 breast cancers in 239 404 women screened in the non-reduction group (ASR of 5.99 per 1000 screening episodes; 95% CI 5.81-6.16). There were fewer cancers in the breast reduction group with a relative risk of 0.71. There was no significant difference in the rate of recall between the two groups, with a crude recall rate of 46.1 per 1000 screening episodes post-breast reduction compared with 50.7 per 1000 screening episodes for women without breast reduction. There was no significant difference in the pathological type or location of the cancer between the two groups of women. Conclusion: Postoperative breast changes following reduction mammoplasty do not significantly hinder analysis of the screening mammogram.

  10. Cardiac Function After Multimodal Breast Cancer Therapy Assessed With Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Echocardiography Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heggemann, Felix, E-mail: felix.heggemann@umm.de [First Medical Department, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); German Center for Cardiovascular Research, Mannheim (Germany); Grotz, Hanna; Welzel, Grit [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Dösch, Christina [First Medical Department, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); German Center for Cardiovascular Research, Mannheim (Germany); Hansmann, Jan [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Attenberger, Ulrike; Schönberg, Stephan Oswald [German Center for Cardiovascular Research, Mannheim (Germany); Institute of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Borggrefe, Martin [First Medical Department, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); German Center for Cardiovascular Research, Mannheim (Germany); Wenz, Frederik [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Papavassiliu, Theano [First Medical Department, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); German Center for Cardiovascular Research, Mannheim (Germany); Lohr, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Breast intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) reduces high-dose heart volumes but increases low-dose volumes. We prospectively assessed heart changes after 3D conformal RT (3DCRT) and IMRT for left-sided breast cancer. Heart dose was analyzed individually, 3DCRT patients were moderately exposed, and IMRT was performed only in patients with unacceptably high heart doses upon 3DCRT planning. Methods and Materials: In 49 patients (38 patients received 3DCRT; 11 patients received IMRT; and 20 patients received neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and echocardiography were performed before and at 6, 12, and 24 months after treatment. Results: Mean heart dose for IMRT was 12.9 ± 3.9 Gy versus 4.5 ± 2.4 Gy for 3DCRT. Heart volumes receiving >40 Gy were 2.6% (3DCRT) versus 1.3% (IMRT); doses were >50 Gy only with 3DCRT. Temporary ejection fraction (EF) decrease was observed on MRI after 6 months (63%-59%, P=.005) resolving at 24 months. Only 3 patients had pronounced largely transient changes of EF and left ventricular enddiastolic diameter (LVEDD). Mitral (M) and tricuspid (T) annular plane systolic excursion (MAPSE and TAPSE) were reduced over the whole cohort (still within normal range). After 24 months left ventricular remodeling index decreased in patients receiving chemotherapy (0.80 vs 0.70, P=.028). Neither wall motion abnormalities nor late enhancements were found. On echocardiography, in addition to EF findings that were similar to those on MRI, global strain was unchanged over the whole cohort at 24 months after a transient decrease at 6 and 12 months. Longitudinal strain decreased in the whole cohort after 24 months in some segments, whereas it increased in others. Conclusions: Until 24 months after risk-adapted modern multimodal adjuvant therapy, only subclinical cardiac changes were observed in both 3DCRT patients with inclusion of small to moderate amounts of heart volume in RT tangents and

  11. Breast Cancer Risk and Mammographic Density Assessed with Semiautomated and Fully Automated Methods and BI-RADS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffers, Abra M; Sieh, Weiva; Lipson, Jafi A; Rothstein, Joseph H; McGuire, Valerie; Whittemore, Alice S; Rubin, Daniel L

    2017-02-01

    Purpose To compare three metrics of breast density on full-field digital mammographic (FFDM) images as predictors of future breast cancer risk. Materials and Methods This institutional review board-approved study included 125 women with invasive breast cancer and 274 age- and race-matched control subjects who underwent screening FFDM during 2004-2013 and provided informed consent. The percentage of density and dense area were assessed semiautomatically with software (Cumulus 4.0; University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada), and volumetric percentage of density and dense volume were assessed automatically with software (Volpara; Volpara Solutions, Wellington, New Zealand). Clinical Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) classifications of breast density were extracted from mammography reports. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by using conditional logistic regression stratified according to age and race and adjusted for body mass index, parity, and menopausal status, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was computed. Results The adjusted odds ratios and 95% CIs for each standard deviation increment of the percentage of density, dense area, volumetric percentage of density, and dense volume were 1.61 (95% CI: 1.19, 2.19), 1.49 (95% CI: 1.15, 1.92), 1.54 (95% CI: 1.12, 2.10), and 1.41 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.80), respectively. Odds ratios for women with extremely dense breasts compared with those with scattered areas of fibroglandular density were 2.06 (95% CI: 0.85, 4.97) and 2.05 (95% CI: 0.90, 4.64) for BI-RADS and Volpara density classifications, respectively. Clinical BI-RADS was more accurate (AUC, 0.68; 95% CI: 0.63, 0.74) than Volpara (AUC, 0.64; 95% CI: 0.58, 0.70) and continuous measures of percentage of density (AUC, 0.66; 95% CI: 0.60, 0.72), dense area (AUC, 0.66; 95% CI: 0.60, 0.72), volumetric percentage of density (AUC, 0.64; 95% CI: 0.58, 0.70), and density volume (AUC, 0.65; 95% CI: 0.59, 0

  12. Getting free of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halttunen, Arja; Hietanen, P; Jallinoja, P

    1992-01-01

    who had less thoughts of recurrence belonged to a group that had gone through an eight-week group psychotherapy intervention, were less depressed and had more other illnesses. Women who felt 'cured' had less limitations and restrictions due to cancer and belonged more often to higher social classes......Twenty-two breast cancer patients who were relapse-free and had no need for cancer-related treatment were interviewed 8 years after mastectomy in order to evaluate their feelings of getting free of breast cancer and the meaning of breast cancer in their lives. The study is a part of an intervention...... and follow-up study of 57 breast cancer patients. Half of the 22 patients still had frequent or occasional thoughts of recurrence and over two-thirds still thought they had not been 'cured' of cancer. More than half of the patients admitted that going through breast cancer had made them more mature. Women...

  13. Reproduction and Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanf, Volker; Hanf, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    Summary Reproduction is doubtlessly one of the main biological meanings of life. It is therefore not surprising that various aspects of reproduction impact on breast cancer risk. Various developmental levels may become targets of breast tumorigenesis. This review follows the chronologic sequence of events in the life of a female at risk, starting with the intrauterine development. Furthermore, the influence of both contraceptive measures and fertility treatment on breast cancer development is dealt with, as well as various pregnancy-associated factors, events, and perinatal outcomes. Finally, the contribution of breast feeding to a reduced breast cancer risk is discussed. PMID:25759622

  14. Breast cancer: patterns of care, second cancers and genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Schaapveld, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent female cancer in Europe and North America and poses an important health care problem. Over the last decades extensive literature has been compiled on the effectiveness of various diagnostic and treatment strategies, which has resulted in broad consensus on the most appropriate diagnostic and treatment strategies, laid down in clinical guidelines. The first chapters of this thesis assess breast cancer treatment in the North- Netherlands. Zie: Summary

  15. BREAST CANCER IN KUMASI, GHANA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    David Ofori-Adjei

    2012-03-01

    Mar 1, 2012 ... SUMMARY. Background: Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in Ghanaian women. Objective: To describes the characteristics of breast cancer patients attending the Komfo Anokye Teaching. Hospital in Kumasi, Ghana. Method: The study was conducted at the Komfo. Anokye Teaching ...

  16. Breast MR imaging for the assessment of residual disease following initial surgery for breast cancer with positive margins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krammer, Julia [University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Mannheim (Germany); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast Imaging Section, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Price, Elissa R. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Division of Women' s Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Jochelson, Maxine S.; Watson, Elizabeth; Morris, Elizabeth A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast Imaging Section, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Murray, Melissa P. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Pathology, New York, NY (United States); Schoenberg, Stefan O. [University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Mannheim (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    To determine the accuracy of post-operative MR in predicting residual disease in women with positive margins, emphasizing the size thresholds at which residual disease can be confidently identified. This IRB-approved HIPAA-compliant retrospective study included 175 patients with MR after positive margins following initial surgery for breast cancer. Two expert readers independently re-evaluated MR images for evidence of residual disease at the surgical cavity and multifocal/multicentric disease. All patients underwent definitive surgery and MR findings were correlated to histopathology. 139/175 (79.4%) patients had residual disease at surgery. Average overall sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for residual disease at the surgical cavity were 73%, 72%, 91% and 45%, respectively. The readers identified 42/45 (93%, reader 1) and 43/45 (95%, reader 2) patients with residual invasive disease at the cavity of ≥5 mm and 22/22 (100%, both readers) patients with disease ≥10 mm. Average sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for unknown multifocal/multicentric disease were 90%, 96%, 93% and 86%, respectively. Post-operative breast MR can accurately depict ≥5-mm residual disease at the surgical cavity and unsuspected multifocal/multicentric disease. These findings have the potential to lead to more appropriate selection of second surgical procedures in women with positive margins. (orig.)

  17. The potential of ki67 and p53 assessment in development of individualized targeted therapy in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormenisan, C; Kubik, M; Legrand, S; Kraemer, D; Smotherman, C; Masood, S

    2015-01-01

    Despite the improvement of diagnostic methods and chemotherapeutic regimens in breast cancer, overall 5-year survival significantly depends on the stage of the disease. Over expression of tumor suppressor gene p53 and the marker for cellular proliferation Ki67 in breast cancer may have prognostic significance. We evaluated 675 patients diagnosed with breast cancer at UF Health Jacksonville between January 2000 and June 2007 with up to 5-year follow up. The aim of the study was to determine whether immunohistochemical (IHC) assessment of Ki67 and p53 may predict outcome, the 'hazard' of dying. Cox's proportional hazards models were used to control for age (ki67 was considered in the model, the hazard of dying was significantly higher for ki67 positive compared to ki67 negative (Hazard ratio = 1.64, 95% CI 1.08, 2.49, p = 0.021). Neither of the two markers, nor their interaction was significant when all variables were considered in the model. This study confirms the expression of p53 and Ki67 as strong individual indicators of patient outcome. However, when controlling for the other variables, the two markers are not independent predictors. Future studies that will include these markers might help design targeted therapy.

  18. Assessment of Breast Cancer Risk in an Iranian Female Population Using Bayesian Networks with Varying Node Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Sepandi, Mojtaba; Rahimikazerooni, Salar

    2016-11-01

    Objective: As a source of information, medical data can feature hidden relationships. However, the high volume of datasets and complexity of decision-making in medicine introduce difficulties for analysis and interpretation and processing steps may be needed before the data can be used by clinicians in their work. This study focused on the use of Bayesian models with different numbers of nodes to aid clinicians in breast cancer risk estimation. Methods: Bayesian networks (BNs) with a retrospectively collected dataset including mammographic details, risk factor exposure, and clinical findings was assessed for prediction of the probability of breast cancer in individual patients. Area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC), accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were used to evaluate discriminative performance. Result: A network incorporating selected features performed better (AUC = 0.94) than that incorporating all the features (AUC = 0.93). The results revealed no significant difference among 3 models regarding performance indices at the 5% significance level. Conclusion: BNs could effectively discriminate malignant from benign abnormalities and accurately predict the risk of breast cancer in individuals. Moreover, the overall performance of the 9-node BN was better, and due to the lower number of nodes it might be more readily be applied in clinical settings. Creative Commons Attribution License

  19. The Quality of Romanian Breast Cancer Websites: a Five-Year Longitudinal Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nădăşan, Valentin; Roşca, Anca Noela; Tarcea, Monica; Ábrám, Zoltán; Măruşteri, Marius

    2016-11-25

    The Internet has become an important source of overall health information and seems to be the second common source of information used by patients in the process of decision-making before breast surgery. The goal of this study was to monitor Romanian breast cancer websites and their quality over a period of 5 years. We evaluated a sample of 20 websites selected from Google's first search results pages using specific rating scores for e-health quality, completeness, accuracy, and potential risk, in 2011 and 2016, respectively. Only 15 (75%) of the websites in the 2011 sample were accessible in 2016 and only two (10%) retained real-life visibility (Google PageRank < 20). The mean quality scores at baseline (2011) and follow-up (2016), respectively, were as follows: e-health quality 3.80 vs. 4.05; completeness 4.23 vs. 5.43; accuracy 5.74 vs. 6.35; and potential risk score 7.60 vs. 7.30. All quality scores were low or, at best, modest and did not improve significantly over the 5-year period. The results of the study draw attention to the need for programs aiming to improve the ability of breast cancer patients to screen the online health resources and to better regulate the medical Internet to safeguard the best interest of health information seekers.

  20. Evaluating wait times from screening to breast cancer diagnosis among women undergoing organised assessment vs usual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarelli, Anna M; Muradali, Derek; Blackmore, Kristina M; Smith, Courtney R; Mirea, Lucia; Majpruz, Vicky; O'Malley, Frances P; Quan, May Lynn; Holloway, Claire Mb

    2017-05-09

    Timely coordinated diagnostic assessment following an abnormal screening mammogram reduces patient anxiety and may optimise breast cancer prognosis. Since 1998, the Ontario Breast Screening Program (OBSP) has offered organised assessment through Breast Assessment Centres (BACs). For OBSP women seen at a BAC, an abnormal mammogram is followed by coordinated referrals through the use of navigators for further imaging, biopsy, and surgical consultation as indicated. For OBSP women seen through usual care (UC), further diagnostic imaging is arranged directly from the screening centre and/or through their physician; results must be communicated to the physician who is then responsible for arranging any necessary biopsy and/or surgical consultation. This study aims to evaluate factors associated with diagnostic wait times for women undergoing assessment through BAC and UC. Of the 2 147 257 women aged 50-69 years screened in the OBSP between 1 January 2002 and 31 December 2009, 155 866 (7.3%) had an abnormal mammogram. A retrospective design identified two concurrent cohorts of women diagnosed with screen-detected breast cancer at a BAC (n=4217; 47%) and UC (n=4827; 53%). Multivariable logistic regression analyses examined associations between wait times and assessment and prognostic characteristics by pathway. A two-sided 5% significance level was used. Screened women with breast cancer were two times more likely to be diagnosed within 7 weeks when assessed through a BAC vs UC (OR=1.91, 95% CI=1.73-2.10). In addition, compared with UC, women assessed through a BAC were significantly more likely to have their first assessment procedure within 3 weeks of their abnormal mammogram (OR=1.25, 95% CI=1.12-1.39), ⩽3 assessment procedures (OR=1.54, 95% CI=1.41-1.69), ⩽2 assessment visits (OR=1.86, 95% CI=1.70-2.05), and ⩾2 procedures per visit (OR=1.41, 95% CI=1.28-1.55). Women diagnosed through a BAC were also more likely than those in UC to have imaging (OR=1.99, 95

  1. Epigenetic Subtypes of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    breast cancer phenotypes and their inheritance pattern, the Polyak lab has generated somatic cell fusions and performed...Determine the contribution of genetic heterogeneity to metastasis in breast cancer ; 2) Develop strategies to assess genomic heterogeneity in human tumors...Dissecting the heterogeneity of triple-negative breast cancer . J Clin Oncol 30, 1879-1887, (2012). 5 Su, Y. et al. Somatic Cell Fusions Reveal Extensive Heterogeneity in Basal-like Breast

  2. Estrogens and breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HANKINSON SUSAN E

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we summarize the epidemiologic evidence for the associations of oral contraceptives and postmenopausal hormones with risk of breast cancer. We also describe the biologic plausibility of these relationships. Overall, there appears to be little, if any, increase in risk with oral contraceptive use in general, even among users for 10 or more years. However, compared to never users, current oral contraceptive users appear to have a modest elevation in risk that subsides within about 10 years after cessation of use. For postmenopausal hormones, the weight of the evidence suggests little or no increase in risk among users of short duration, or for use in the past. However, current longer term use is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer that increases with duration. This increase in risk is large enough, and well enough supported, to be considered along with the other risks and benefits of postmenopausal hormone therapy.

  3. Are Qualitative Assessments of Background Parenchymal Enhancement, Amount of Fibroglandular Tissue on MR Images, and Mammographic Density Associated with Breast Cancer Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dontchos, Brian N.; Partridge, Savannah C.; Korde, Larissa A.; Lam, Diana L.; Scheel, John R.; Peacock, Sue; Lehman, Constance D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether qualitative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging assessments of background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT), and mammographic density are associated with risk of developing breast cancer in women who are at high risk. Materials and Methods In this institutional review board–approved HIPAA-compliant retrospective study, all screening breast MR images obtained from January 2006 to December 2011 in women aged 18 years or older and at high risk for but without a history of breast cancer were identified. Women in whom breast cancer was diagnosed after index MR imaging comprised the cancer cohort, and one-to-one matching (age and BRCA status) of each woman with breast cancer to a control subject was performed by using MR images obtained in women who did not develop breast cancer with follow-up time maximized. Amount of BPE, BPE pattern (peripheral vs central), amount of FGT at MR imaging, and mammographic density were assessed on index images. Imaging features were compared between cancer and control cohorts by using conditional logistic regression. Results Twenty-three women at high risk (mean age, 47 years ± 10 [standard deviation]; six women had BRCA mutations) with no history of breast cancer underwent screening breast MR imaging; in these women, a diagnosis of breast cancer (invasive, n = 12; in situ, n = 11) was made during the follow-up interval. Women with mild, moderate, or marked BPE were nine times more likely to receive a diagnosis of breast cancer during the follow-up interval than were those with minimal BPE (P = .007; odds ratio = 9.0; 95% confidence interval: 1.1, 71.0). BPE pattern, MR imaging amount of FGT, and mammographic density were not significantly different between the cohorts (P = .5, P = .5, and P = .4, respectively). Conclusion Greater BPE was associated with a higher probability of developing breast cancer in women at high risk for cancer and warrants further study. © RSNA

  4. Readability assessment of internet-based patient education materials related to mammography for breast cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlKhalili, Rend; Shukla, Pratik A; Patel, Ronak H; Sanghvi, Saurin; Hubbi, Basil

    2015-03-01

    The US Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS) recommends that Internet-based patient education materials (IPEMs) be written below the sixth-grade reading level to target the average American adult. This study was designed to determine the readability of IPEMs regarding mammography for breast cancer screening. Three-hundred mammography-related Web sites were reviewed for IPEMs. Forty-two IPEMs that met the Health on the Net Foundation Code of Conduct were assessed for readability level with four readability indices that use existing algorithms based on word and sentence length to quantitatively analyze Internet sources for language intricacy including the following: Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (FKGL), Flesch Reading Ease Score (FRES), Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG), and Gunning Frequency of Gobbledygook (Gunning FOG; GFOG). Results were compared to national recommendations, and intergroup analysis was performed. No IPEMs (0%) regarding mammography were written at or below the sixth-grade reading level, based on FKGL. The mean readability scores were as follows: FRES, 49.04 ± 10.62; FKGL, 10.71 ± 2.01; SMOG, 13.33 ± 1.67; and Gunning FOG, 14.32 ± 2.18. These scores indicate that the readability of mammography IPEMs is written at a "difficult" level, significantly above the recommended sixth-grade reading level (P related to mammography are written well above the recommended sixth-grade level and likely reflect other IPEMs in diagnostic radiology. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. (Very) Early technology assessment and translation of predictive biomarkers in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquel-Cases, Anna; Schouten, Philip C; Steuten, Lotte M G; Retèl, Valesca P; Linn, Sabine C; van Harten, Wim H

    2017-01-01

    Predictive biomarkers can guide treatment decisions in breast cancer. Many studies are undertaken to discover and translate these biomarkers, yet few biomarkers make it to practice. Before use in clinical decision making, predictive biomarkers need to demonstrate analytical validity, clinical validity and clinical utility. While attaining analytical and clinical validity is relatively straightforward, by following methodological recommendations, the achievement of clinical utility is extremely challenging. It requires demonstrating three associations: the biomarker with the outcome (prognostic association), the effect of treatment independent of the biomarker, and the differential treatment effect between the prognostic and the predictive biomarker (predictive association). In addition, economical, ethical, regulatory, organizational and patient/doctor-related aspects are hampering the translational process. Traditionally, these aspects do not receive much attention until formal approval or reimbursement of a biomarker test (informed by Health Technology Assessment (HTA)) is at stake, at which point the clinical utility and sometimes price of the test can hardly be influenced anymore. When HTA analyses are performed earlier, during biomarker research and development, they may prevent further development of those biomarkers unlikely to ever provide sufficient added value to society, and rather facilitate translation of the promising ones. Early HTA is particularly relevant for the predictive biomarker field, as expensive medicines are under pressure and the need for biomarkers to guide their appropriate use is huge. Closer interaction between clinical researchers and HTA experts throughout the translational research process will ensure that available data and methodologies will be used most efficiently to facilitate biomarker translation. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Inflammatory breast cancer in accessory abdominal breast tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy C. Miles, MD, MPH

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Accessory breast tissue results from failure of the embryologic mammary ridge, also known as the milk line, to involute. As a result, ectopic breast tissue can develop anywhere along this ridge, which extends from the axilla—the most common location—to the groin. Primary breast cancer in accessory breast tissue is uncommon but has been reported in multiple prior studies. We present a rare case of inflammatory breast cancer presenting in upper abdominal accessory breast tissue in women with a personal history of ipsilateral breast cancer, and highlight the challenges of both diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer in accessory breast tissue.

  7. Clinical assessment of human breast cancer margins with wide-field optical coherence micro-elastography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Wes M.; Chin, Lixin; Wijesinghe, Philip; Kirk, Rodney W.; Latham, Bruce; Sampson, David D.; Saunders, Christobel M.; Kennedy, Brendan F.

    2017-02-01

    Breast cancer has the second highest mortality rate of all cancers in females. Surgical excision of malignant tissue forms a central component of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) procedures. Incomplete excision of malignant tissue is a major issue in BCS with typically 20 - 30% cases requiring a second surgical procedure due to postoperative detection of tumor in the margin. A major challenge for surgeons during BCS is the lack of effective tools to assess the surgical margin intraoperatively. Such tools would enable the surgeon to more effectively remove all tumor during the initial surgery, hence reducing re-excision rates. We report advances in the development of a new tool, optical coherence micro-elastography, which forms images, known as elastograms, based on mechanical contrast within the tissue. We demonstrate the potential of this technique to increase contrast between malignant tumor and healthy stroma in elastograms over OCT images. We demonstrate a key advance toward clinical translation by conducting wide-field imaging in intraoperative time frames with a wide-field scanning system, acquiring mosaicked elastograms with overall dimensions of 50 × 50 mm, large enough to image an entire face of most lumpectomy specimens. We describe this wide-field imaging system, and demonstrate its operation by presenting wide-field optical coherence tomography images and elastograms of a tissue mimicking silicone phantom and a number of representative freshly excised human breast specimens. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of scanning large areas of lumpectomies, which is an important step towards practical intraoperative margin assessment.

  8. Optimized NSAIDS for Breast Cancer Prevention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carson, Dennis A

    2005-01-01

    ...) develop breast cancer less frequently. However, these drugs have side effects toward the stomach, liver and kidneys, particularly at the high doses potentially required to prevent breast cancer...

  9. Proteomic classification of breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kamel, Dalia

    2012-11-01

    Being a significant health problem that affects patients in various age groups, breast cancer has been extensively studied to date. Recently, molecular breast cancer classification has advanced significantly with the availability of genomic profiling technologies. Proteomic technologies have also advanced from traditional protein assays including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry to more comprehensive approaches including mass spectrometry and reverse phase protein lysate arrays (RPPA). The purpose of this manuscript is to review the current protein markers that influence breast cancer prediction and prognosis and to focus on novel advances in proteomic classification of breast cancer.

  10. Unemployment among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Kathrine; Ewertz, Marianne; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Badsberg, Jens Henrik; Osler, Merete

    2014-05-01

    Though about 20% of working age breast cancer survivors do not return to work after treatment, few studies have addressed risk factors for unemployment. The majority of studies on occupational consequences of breast cancer focus on non-employment, which is a mixture of sickness absence, unemployment, retirement pensions and other reasons for not working. Unemployment in combination with breast cancer may represent a particular challenge for these women. The aim of the present study is therefore to analyze the risk for unemployment in the years following diagnosis and treatment for breast cancer. This study included 14,750 women diagnosed with breast cancer in Denmark 2001-2009 identified through a population-based clinical database and linked with information from Danish administrative population based registers for information on labour market affiliation, socio-demography and co-morbid conditions. Multivariable analyses were performed by Cox's proportional hazard models. Two years after treatment, 81% of patients were still part of the work force, 10% of which were unemployed. Increasing duration of unemployment before breast cancer was associated with an adjusted HR = 4.37 (95% CI: 3.90-4.90) for unemployment after breast cancer. Other risk factors for unemployment included low socioeconomic status and demography, while adjuvant therapy did not increase the risk of unemployment. Duration of unemployment before breast cancer was the most important determinant of unemployment after breast cancer treatment. This allows identification of a particularly vulnerable group of patients in need of rehabilitation.

  11. St Gallen 2015 subtyping of luminal breast cancers: impact of different Ki67-based proliferation assessment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focke, Cornelia M; van Diest, Paul J; Decker, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Ki67 has been proposed as prognostic proliferation marker in luminal breast cancer (BC), but little is known on the influence of Ki67 assessment methods on subtyping into luminal A- and B-like tumors. Our aim was to study the influence of different Ki67-labeling index (Ki67-LI) assessment methods on the proportion of BCs classified as luminal A-like. 280 early BCs were subtyped according to the St Gallen 2015 definitions into 71 % luminal (HER2 negative), 6 % luminal B-like (HER2 positive), 13 % triple negative, 1 % HER2 positive (nonluminal), and 9 % special type. Digitized whole slides were counted manually on the screen. We used nine defined counting methods to assess the Ki67-LI (including the International Ki67 in Breast Cancer Working Group recommendations), and compared the resulting medians and the proportions of cancers classified as luminal A-like according to the formerly used cut-off Ki67-LI medians than those measuring an average proliferation (27.45 % vs 16.96 %, p Ki67-LI were found when assessing 1020 compared to counting 100, 200, 300 cells (17.65 vs 33 %, vs 28 %, vs 24.33 %, respectively; p Ki67-LI cut-off cancers varied between 13 and 44 %. The proportion of BCs classified as luminal A-like is highly influenced by the Ki67-LI assessment method. As a consequence, the selection of a specific Ki67-LI assessment method may have a direct effect on the proportion of patients considered having low-risk disease and thus influence therapeutic decision making. This calls for a standardized assessment method.

  12. [Validation of BR23 questionnaire for the assessment of quality of life of breast cancer patients in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irarrázaval, M Elisa; Rodríguez, Pía F; Fasce, Gerardo; Silva, Fernando W; Waintrub, Herman; Torres, Camilo; Barriga, Carolina; Fritis, Marcela; Marín, Luis

    2013-06-01

    Quality of Life assessment in oncologic patients evaluates the impact and sequels of the disease ana the adverse effects of available treatments. To validate in Chile the breast cancer specific-questionnaire (BR23) developed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC). After performing a linguistic validation of the BR23 according to EORTC instructions, its psychometric properties were tested in 103 patients with breast cancer whose ages ranged from 34 to 83 years. Internal consistency of the scales was assessed using the Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The test-retest correlations of each scale (n = 83) were evaluated. The correlation of BR23 scales with SF36 version 2 and C30 version 3.0 scales was also assessed. The sensitivity and specificity of the instrument were analyzed using receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC). Alpha values showed acceptable levels of internal consistency, ranging between 0.702 and 0.917 in all scales of BR23. The statistical analysis revealed significant test-retest correlations in most scales of BR23. The correlations between BR23 and similar domains of C30 and SF36 questionnaires were also significant. The BR23 questionnaire demonstrated satisfactory levels of sensitivity and specificity when compared with the SF-36 scale. The BR23 questionnaire adapted for use in Chile is linguistically appropriate and psychometrically valid.

  13. Differential expression of cancer-related proteins in paired breast milk samples from women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcaro, Kathleen F; Browne, Eva P; Qin, Wenyi; Zhang, Ke; Anderton, Douglas L; Sauter, Edward R

    2012-11-01

    Breast cancer risk increases during pregnancy and remains elevated for a number of years thereafter. Cancer-associated proteins that are secreted into breast milk may provide a means to detect cancer in the lactating breast or to assess future breast cancer risk. To determine whether proteins linked to breast cancer would be differentially expressed in matched (both breasts from each participant) human milk samples collected from women with unilateral breast cancer. Five cancer-associated proteins (basic fibroblast growth factor [bFGF], YKL-40, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, and transforming growth factor β1 and β2) were analyzed in milk provided by 5 lactating women, 4 of whom were known to have cancer in 1 breast (and the opposite breast clinically disease free) at the time of milk collection and 1 who developed breast cancer 2 years after milk collection. Expression was significantly higher for TGFβ2 (P = .03) and bFGF (P =.03) in the breasts with cancer. These proteins may play a role in assessing a woman's risk of pregnancy-associated breast cancer. Because of variable protein concentration among patients and the limited sample size, the results are considered preliminary.

  14. In situ breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, Luis

    2004-01-01

    In situ breast cancer, particularly the ductal type, is increasing in frequency in the developed countries as well as in Ecuador, most probably. These lesions carry a higher risk of developing a subsequent invasive cancer. Treatment has changed recently due to results of randomized studies, from classical mastectomy to conservative surgery associated to radiotherapy. The Van Nuys Prognostic Index is currently the most usual instrument to guide diagnosis and treatment. Tamoxifen seems to decrease significantly the risk of tumor recurrence after initial treatment. (The author)

  15. Interleukin-19 in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Yin Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory cytokines within the tumor microenvironment are linked to progression in breast cancer. Interleukin- (IL- 19, part of the IL-10 family, contributes to a range of diseases and disorders, such as asthma, endotoxic shock, uremia, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. IL-19 is expressed in several types of tumor cells, especially in squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, tongue, esophagus, and lung and invasive duct carcinoma of the breast. In breast cancer, IL-19 expression is correlated with increased mitotic figures, advanced tumor stage, higher metastasis, and poor survival. The mechanisms of IL-19 in breast cancer have recently been explored both in vitro and in vivo. IL-19 has an autocrine effect in breast cancer cells. It directly promotes proliferation and migration and indirectly provides a microenvironment for tumor progression, which suggests that IL-19 is a prognostic marker in breast cancer and that antagonizing IL-19 may have therapeutic potential.

  16. Breast-feeding after breast cancer in childbearing women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camune, Barbara; Gabzdyl, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    According to the American Cancer Society in 2007, about 178,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer each year in the United States. Of these, 25% have tumors in their childbearing years and may desire future opportunities for pregnancy and lactation. Although there is a multitude of options related to preserving fertility, little is known about the residual effects of breast cancer treatment and the ability to breast-feed afterward. This article describes the epidemiological relationship between breast cancer and pregnancy and lactation. Basic types of treatment for breast cancer including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation are reviewed. Practical information on how to support breast-feeding after breast cancer is included.

  17. An assessment of reliability and validity of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 among breast cancer patients in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulbari Bener

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Breast cancer has been the most common cancer type that affects women worldwide and subsequent treatment is often associated with considerable psychological and quality of life (QoL. Aim: This study aimed to assess psychometric properties of the Arabic version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC general QoL questionnaire (QLQ-C30 for breast cancer patients in Qatar. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional hospital-based study conducted on 678 breast cancer patients using Arabic version of the EORTC QLQ-C30 tool. Results: The mean age of women was 47.7 ± 10.2 years and 33.4% of women had consanguineous parents. Six subscales out of the nine met the standards of reliability with coefficients ranging from 0.55 to 0.89. The mean score of all functioning scales was high >55. Advanced breast cancer stages of III–IV had higher symptomatic scores significantly than those in early stages for the physical function, cognitive, fatigue, insomnia, appetite loss, constipation, and financial difficulties. Correlation coefficients between each item ranged from –0.113 to 0.960, and item 21 (tense and item 23 (irritable had strongest negative correlations with their corresponding emotional functioning subscale, whereas items 29 (physical condition and 30 (overall QoL had the strongest positive correlation with Global Health/QoL subscale. Item 6 (limited work showed a higher correlation with fatigue (r = 0.749. Likewise, item 19 (pain interfered with daily activities of the pain subscale had higher correlations with physical functioning, role functioning, and fatigue subscales. Conclusion: Qatari Arabic version of the EORTC QLQ-C30 showed acceptable psychometric properties, which is a reliable and valid instrument, that can be used by oncologists.

  18. Awareness and current knowledge of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Akram, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mehwish; Daniyal, Muhammad; Khan, Asmat Ullah

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer remains a worldwide public health dilemma and is currently the most common tumour in the globe. Awareness of breast cancer, public attentiveness, and advancement in breast imaging has made a positive impact on recognition and screening of breast cancer. Breast cancer is life-threatening disease in females and the leading cause of mortality among women population. For the previous two decades, studies related to the breast cancer has guided to astonishing advancement in our under...

  19. Awareness and current knowledge of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Akram; Mehwish Iqbal; Muhammad Daniyal; Asmat Ullah Khan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer remains a worldwide public health dilemma and is currently the most common tumour in the globe. Awareness of breast cancer, public attentiveness, and advancement in breast imaging has made a positive impact on recognition and screening of breast cancer. Breast cancer is life-threatening disease in females and the leading cause of mortality among women population. For the previous two decades, studies related to the breast cancer has guided to astonishing advancement in ...

  20. Low-cost surface reconstruction for aesthetic results assessment and prediction in breast cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacher, Rene M; Hipwell, John H; Williams, Norman R; Keshtgar, Mohammed R S; Hawkes, David J; Stoyanov, Danail

    2015-08-01

    The high incidence and low mortality of breast cancer surgery has led to an increasing emphasis on the cosmetic outcome of surgical treatment. Advances in aesthetic evaluation, as well as surgical planning and outcome prediction, have been investigated by using geometrically precise 3D modelling of the breast surface prior to surgery and after the procedure. However, existing solutions are based on expensive site specific setups and remain weakly validated. In this paper, we explore the possibility of using low-cost RGBD cameras as an affordable and mobile system for breast surface reconstruction. The methodology relies on sensor calibration, uncertainty-driven point filtering, dense reconstruction and subsequent multi-view joint optimization to diffuse residual pose errors. Results from a phantom study, with ground truth obtained through commercially available scanners, indicate that the approach is promising with RMS errors in order of 2 mm. A clinical study shows the practical applicability of our method and compares favourably to high-end scanning solutions.

  1. Longitudinal assessment of the impact of adapted physical activity on upper limb disability and quality of life in breast cancer survivors from an Italian cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirandola, Daniela; Miccinesi, Guido; Muraca, Maria Grazia; Belardi, Stefania; Giuggioli, Roberta; Sgambati, Eleonora; Manetti, Mirko; Monaci, Marco; Marini, Mirca

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a specific adapted physical activity (APA) protocol on upper limb disability and quality of life in breast cancer survivors and to assess longitudinally the possible role of APA on long-term benefits. Breast cancer survivors from an Italian cohort were assessed by fitness tests (shoulder-arm mobility, range of motion, and back flexibility) before and after 8-week APA. Quality of life and back and surgical shoulder pain intensity were evaluated by Short Form-12 and numerical rating scale questionnaires, respectively. At 1.5-year post-APA follow-up, survivors were evaluated as at baseline/post-APA to assess long-term effects. A statistically significant improvement in shoulder-arm mobility, pain perception, and quality of life was observed in breast cancer survivors after APA intervention. Longitudinal analyses indicated an overall decrease in the achieved benefits at 1.5-year post-APA. The survivorship phase of breast cancer requires a multidisciplinary collaboration involving either the cancer-care medical team or APA professionals to manage psychophysical outcomes. A specific APA protocol may represent an effective countermeasure to reduce post-treatment upper limb disability and improve the quality of life in breast cancer survivors. Participation in structured APA protocols should be maintained over time to preserve the achieved benefits.

  2. An integrated breast cancer risk assessment and management model based on fuzzy cognitive maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Jayashree; Karmegam, Akila; Papageorgiou, Elpiniki; Papandrianos, Nikolaos; Vasukie, A

    2015-03-01

    There is a growing demand for women to be classified into different risk groups of developing breast cancer (BC). The focus of the reported work is on the development of an integrated risk prediction model using a two-level fuzzy cognitive map (FCM) model. The proposed model combines the results of the initial screening mammogram of the given woman with her demographic risk factors to predict the post-screening risk of developing BC. The level-1 FCM models the demographic risk profile. A nonlinear Hebbian learning algorithm is used to train this model and thus to help on predicting the BC risk grade based on demographic risk factors identified by domain experts. The risk grades estimated by the proposed model are validated using two standard BC risk assessment models viz. Gail and Tyrer-Cuzick. The level-2 FCM models the features of the screening mammogram concerning normal, benign and malignant cases. The data driven Hebbian learning algorithm (DDNHL) is used to train this model in order to predict the BC risk grade based on these mammographic image features. An overall risk grade is calculated by combining the outcomes of these two FCMs. The main limitation of the Gail model of underestimating the risk level of women with strong family history is overcome by the proposed model. IBIS is a hard computing tool based on the Tyrer-Cuzick model that is comprehensive enough in covering a wide range of demographic risk factors including family history, but it generates results in terms of numeric risk score based on predefined formulae. Thus the outcome is difficult to interpret by naive users. Besides these models are based only on the demographic details and do not take into account the findings of the screening mammogram. The proposed integrated model overcomes the above described limitations of the existing models and predicts the risk level in terms of qualitative grades. The predictions of the proposed NHL-FCM model comply with the Tyrer-Cuzick model for 36 out of

  3. Targeting breast cancer outcomes-what about the primary relatives?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Johnston, Alison

    2017-07-01

    Up to 65% of newly diagnosed breast cancer patients had not been screened correctly before diagnosis resulting in increased stage of cancer at presentation. This study assessed whether their primary relatives are, in turn, assessed appropriately.

  4. European Breast Cancer Service Screening Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paci, Eugenio; Broeders, Mireille; Hofvind, Solveig

    2014-01-01

    A recent comprehensive review has been carried out to quantify the benefits and harms of the European population-based mammographic screening programs. Five literature reviews were conducted on the basis of the observational published studies evaluating breast cancer mortality reduction, breast...... seven to nine breast cancer deaths are avoided, four cases are overdiagnosed, 170 women have at least one recall followed by noninvasive assessment with a negative result, and 30 women have at least one recall followed by invasive procedures yielding a negative result. The chance of a breast cancer...... cancer overdiagnosis, and false-positive results. On the basis of the studies reviewed, the authors present a first estimate of the benefit and harm balance sheet. For every 1,000 women screened biennially from ages 50 to 51 years until ages 68 to 69 years and followed up until age 79 years, an estimated...

  5. A large-scale assessment of two-way SNP interactions in breast cancer susceptibility using 46,450 cases and 42,461 controls from the breast cancer association consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Roger L; Herranz, Jesús; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Zamora, M Pilar; Arias-Perez, José Ignacio; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Wang, Qin; Bolla, Manjeet K; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Mikael; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ziogas, Argyrios; Clarke, Christina A; Hopper, John L; Dite, Gillian S; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nicholas; Schoemaker, Minouk; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E; Vachon, Celine; Purrington, Kristen; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Sanchez, Marie; Mulot, Claire; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Collée, J Margriet; Jager, Agnes; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W; Reed, Malcolm W R; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Soucy, Penny; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Hamann, Ute; Försti, Asta; Rüdiger, Thomas; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Fasching, Peter A; Häberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Peto, Julian; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Mariani, Paolo; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federik; Burwinkel, Barbara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Lambrechts, Diether; Yesilyurt, Betul T; Floris, Giuseppe; Leunen, Karin; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Rutgers, Emiel J; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Couch, Fergus J; Toland, Amanda E; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Pharoah, Paul D P; Hall, Per; Benítez, Javier; Malats, Núria; Easton, Douglas F

    2014-04-01

    Part of the substantial unexplained familial aggregation of breast cancer may be due to interactions between common variants, but few studies have had adequate statistical power to detect interactions of realistic magnitude. We aimed to assess all two-way interactions in breast cancer susceptibility between 70,917 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected primarily based on prior evidence of a marginal effect. Thirty-eight international studies contributed data for 46,450 breast cancer cases and 42,461 controls of European origin as part of a multi-consortium project (COGS). First, SNPs were preselected based on evidence (P 10(-10)). In summary, we observed little evidence of two-way SNP interactions in breast cancer susceptibility, despite the large number of SNPs with potential marginal effects considered and the very large sample size. This finding may have important implications for risk prediction, simplifying the modelling required. Further comprehensive, large-scale genome-wide interaction studies may identify novel interacting loci if the inherent logistic and computational challenges can be overcome.

  6. Numerical assessment of radiation binary targeted therapy for HER-2 positive breast cancers: advanced calculations and radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves-Carralves, Manuel L Sztejnberg; Jevremovic, Tatjana [Purdue University, School of Nuclear Engineering, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2017 (United States)

    2007-07-21

    In our previous publication (Mundy et al 2006 Phys. Med. Biol. 51 1377) we have described the theoretical assessment of our novel approach in radiation binary targeted therapy for HER-2 positive breast cancers and summarized the future directions in this area of research. In this paper we advanced the numerical analysis to show the detailed radiation dose distribution for various neutron sources in combination with the required boron concentration and allowed radiation skin doses. We once again proved the feasibility of the concept and will use these data and conclusions to start with the experimental verifications.

  7. Nodal Status Assessment in Breast Cancer: Strategies of Clinical Grounds and Quality of Life Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Orsaria

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Even in the era of gene-expression profiling, the nodal status still remains the primary prognostic discriminant in breast cancer patients. The exclusion of node involvement using noninvasive methods could reduce the rate of axillary surgery, thereby preventing from suffering complications. However, lymphatic mapping with sentinel node biopsy (SNB is one of the most interesting recent developments in surgical oncology. Optimization of procedure could be implemented by dual mapping injection site skills, resection of all hot or blue nodes through tracer combination, and improvement in atypical drainage patterns mapping. This anatomical analysis suggests safety measures in patients with high probability of node metastasis through a renewed interest in surgical management. The perspective of a guided axillary sampling (GAS could represent a potential development of recent anatomical and functional acquisitions, offering a dynamic technique shared according to clinical and anatomical disease parameters. Furthermore, the surgical staging procedures may adopt a conservative approach through the evaluation of upper arm lymphatics, thus defining a functional model aimed at the reduction of short- and long-term adverse events. Quality results in breast cancer surgery need to generate oncological safety devoid of complications through renewed clinical experience.

  8. Rising incidence of breast cancer among female cancer survivors: implications for surveillance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Soerjomataram (Isabelle); W.J. Louwman; L.E.M. Duijm (Lucien); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe number of female cancer survivors has been rising rapidly. We assessed the occurrence of breast cancer in these survivors over time. We computed incidence of primary breast cancer in two cohorts of female cancer survivors with a first diagnosis of cancer at ages 30+ in the periods

  9. Breast cancer screening in Korean woman with dense breast tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hee Jung [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Eun Sook [Dept. of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Ann [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Asian women, including Korean, have a relatively higher incidence of dense breast tissue, compared with western women. Dense breast tissue has a lower sensitivity for the detection of breast cancer and a higher relative risk for breast cancer, compared with fatty breast tissue. Thus, there were limitations in the mammographic screening for women with dense breast tissue, and many studies for the supplemental screening methods. This review included appropriate screening methods for Korean women with dense breasts. We also reviewed the application and limitation of supplemental screening methods, including breast ultrasound, digital breast tomosynthesis, and breast magnetic resonance imaging; and furthermore investigated the guidelines, as well as the study results.

  10. Breast cancer screening in Korean woman with dense breast tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hee Jung; Ko, Eun Sook; Yi, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Asian women, including Korean, have a relatively higher incidence of dense breast tissue, compared with western women. Dense breast tissue has a lower sensitivity for the detection of breast cancer and a higher relative risk for breast cancer, compared with fatty breast tissue. Thus, there were limitations in the mammographic screening for women with dense breast tissue, and many studies for the supplemental screening methods. This review included appropriate screening methods for Korean women with dense breasts. We also reviewed the application and limitation of supplemental screening methods, including breast ultrasound, digital breast tomosynthesis, and breast magnetic resonance imaging; and furthermore investigated the guidelines, as well as the study results

  11. Cancer Recognition and Screening for Common Breast Disorders and Malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohon, Constance

    2017-06-01

    Breast cancer is predicted to be the most common newly diagnosed cancer in women in 2016. Screening mammography is the most commonly used method for the detection of breast cancer in women of average risk. A genetic risk assessment is recommended for women with a greater than 20% to 25% chance of having a predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer. Evaluation of a breast mass begins with a detailed history, assessment for cancer risk, and physical examination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Overdiagnosis in breast cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Beau, Anna-Belle; Christiansen, Peer

    2017-01-01

    Overdiagnosis in breast cancer screening is an important issue. A recent study from Denmark concluded that one in three breast cancers diagnosed in screening areas in women aged 50-69 years were overdiagnosed. The purpose of this short communication was to disentangle the study's methodology...

  13. Breast cancer in the elderly

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    breast cancer at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Of these, 27. (25.2%) ... age groups wit11 less emphasis 011 the elderly. Breast cancer has, however, been found to be a serious disease in terms of incidence and mor- tality in older women.GJ .... a disease of the relatively young in our environ- men t.

  14. Breast cancer in the elderly

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JhfBK: A I'ccr-mvicw Journal of liiomeclical Scicnccs. July 2002, Vol. 1 No. 1 pp 33-42. Breast cancer in the elderly. ABSTRACT. Between Janua~y 1997 and December 2001,107 patients were admitted and treated for breast cancer at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Of these, 27. (25.2%) were aged 60 ...

  15. Conventional surgery in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapia Herrera, Andres

    2013-01-01

    General aspects of breast cancer were described from the epidemiological point of view, clinical and pathological, as well as its impact at global and national levels. Parenchyma conservative surgery and/or breast skin was analyzed exhaustively as a cancer treatment analyzed exhaustively, to your specifications, requirements, technical aspects, risks, benefits, degree of oncological safety and benefits for patients [es

  16. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-06

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  17. Statins and breast cancer prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahern, T. P.; Lash, T. L.; Damkier, P.

    2014-01-01

    Much preclinical and epidemiological evidence supports the anticancer effects of statins. Epidemiological evidence does not suggest an association between statin use and reduced incidence of breast cancer, but does support a protective effect of statins-especially simvastatin-on breast cancer...... recurrence. Here, we argue that the existing evidence base is sufficient to justify a clinical trial of breast cancer adjuvant therapy with statins and we advocate for such a trial to be initiated without delay. If a protective effect of statins on breast cancer recurrence is supported by trial evidence......, then the indications for a safe, well tolerated, and inexpensive treatment can be expanded to improve outcomes for breast cancer survivors. We discuss several trial design opportunities-including candidate predictive biomarkers of statin safety and efficacy-and off er solutions to the key challenges involved...

  18. Unemployment among breast cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Kathrine; Ewertz, Marianne; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Though about 20% of working age breast cancer survivors do not return to work after treatment, few studies have addressed risk factors for unemployment. The majority of studies on occupational consequences of breast cancer focus on non-employment, which is a mixture of sickness absence......, unemployment, retirement pensions and other reasons for not working. Unemployment in combination with breast cancer may represent a particular challenge for these women. The aim of the present study is therefore to analyze the risk for unemployment in the years following diagnosis and treatment for breast...... cancer. METHOD: This study included 14,750 women diagnosed with breast cancer in Denmark 2001-2009 identified through a population-based clinical database and linked with information from Danish administrative population based registers for information on labour market affiliation, socio...

  19. Green Tea and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Anna H; Butler, Lesley M

    2014-01-01

    The identification of modifiable lifestyle factors that could reduce the risk of breast cancer is a research priority. Despite the enormous chemo preventive potential of green tea and compelling evidence from animal studies, its role in breast cancer development in humans is still unclear. Part of the uncertainty is related to the relatively small number of epidemiological studies on green tea and breast cancer and that the overall results from case-control studies and prospective cohort studies are discordant. In addition, the mechanisms by which green tea intake may influence risk of breast cancer in humans remains not well studied. We review the human studies that have evaluated the relationship between green tea intake and four biomarkers (sex steroid hormones, mammographic density, insulin-like growth factor, adiponectin) that are believed to be important in breast cancer development. Results from these biomarker studies are also inconclusive. Limitations of human studies and areas of further investigations are discussed. PMID:21538855

  20. Radiation-induced breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finnerty, N.A.; Buzdar, A.U.; Blumenschein, G.R.

    1984-01-01

    Between 1975 and 1983, sixteen patients with a history of irradiation at an early age to the head, neck, or chest areas for a variety of conditions in whom breast cancer subsequently developed were seen at out institute. The median latent period between the irradiation and the development of breast cancer was 420 months. The distribution of patients by stage of the disease and the median age at diagnosis of this subgroup was similar to the breast cancer observed in the general population. The subsequent course of this disease was also similar to the breast cancer observed in the general population. A substantial number of women have been exposed to irradiation at a young age, and these women are at a higher risk of having breast cancer develop. These women should be closely observed to discover the disease in an early curable stage

  1. A Comparison of Visual Assessment and Automated Digital Image Analysis of Ki67 Labeling Index in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Fangfang; Bi, Rui; Yu, Baohua; Yang, Fei; Yang, Wentao; Shui, Ruohong

    2016-01-01

    Ki67 labeling index (LI) is critical for treatment options and prognosis evaluation in breast cancer. Visual assessment (VA) is widely used to assess Ki67 LI, but has some limitations. In this study, we compared the consistency between VA and automated digital image analysis (DIA) of Ki67 LI in breast cancer, and to evaluate the application value of DIA in Ki67 LI assessment. Ki67 immunostained slides of 155 cases of primary invasive breast cancer were eyeballing assessed by five breast pathologists and automated digital image analyzed by one breast pathologist respectively. Two score methods, hot-spot score and average score, were used to choose score areas. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to analyze the consistency between VA and DIA, and Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare the median of paired-difference between VA and DIA values. (1) A perfect agreement was demonstrated between VA and DIA of Ki67 LI by ICC analysis (PKi67 LI was also showed in G2-G3, ER positive/HER2 negative cases. Average score and hot-spot score methods both demonstrated a perfect concordance between VA and DIA of Ki67 LI. (2) All cases were classified into three groups by VA values (≤10%, 11%-30% and >30% Ki67 LI). The concordance was relatively lower in intermediate Ki67 LI group (11%-30%) compared with high (>30%) Ki67 LI groups according to both methods. (3) All cases were classified into three groups by paired-difference (d) between VA values of hot-spot score and average score (dKi67 staining distribution (heterogeneous or homogenous) and reproducibility of assessment. A perfect agreement was all demonstrated in three groups, and a slightly better Ki67 LI agreement between VA and DIA was indicated in homogenous staining slides than in heterogeneous staining ones. (4) VA values were relatively smaller than DIA values (average score: median of paired-difference -3.72; hot-spot score: median of paired-difference -9.12). An excellent agreement between VA

  2. Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first full-term baby, and certain breast conditions. Obesity is also a risk factor for breast cancer ... with BRCA-1 and BRCA-2 mutations? Does gender of offspring have an ... differences in breast cancer risk. Develop surrogate markers to ...

  3. Optical Imaging in Breast Cancer Diagnosis: The Next Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Herranz, Michel; Ruibal, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers among the population of the Western world. Diagnostic methods include mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance; meanwhile, nuclear medicine techniques have a secondary role, being useful in regional assessment and therapy followup. Optical imaging is a very promising imaging technique that uses near-infrared light to assess optical properties of tissues and is expected to play an important role in breast cancer detection. Optical breast i...

  4. Eating Disorders and Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Katie M; Whelan, Denis R; Sandler, Dale P; Weinberg, Clarice R

    2017-02-01

    Eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa affect overall and reproductive health and may also affect breast cancer risk. We studied the association between self-reported eating disorders and breast cancer risk in a prospective cohort study. In 2003-2009, the Sister Study enrolled women ages 35-74 years who had a sister with breast cancer but had never had it themselves. Using data from 47,813 women, we estimated adjusted HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between eating disorders and invasive breast cancer over a median of 5.4 years of follow-up. Three percent (n = 1,569) of participants reported a history of an eating disorder. Compared with women who never had an eating disorder, women who reported eating disorders in the past had reduced breast cancer risk (HR = 0.62; 95% CI, 0.42-0.92). In this large prospective, observational cohort study, we observed an inverse association between having a history of an eating disorder and invasive breast cancer. Historical eating disorders may be associated with a long-term reduction in breast cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(2); 206-11. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Pregnancy associated breast cancer and pregnancy after breast cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Doğer, Emek; Çalışkan, Eray; Mallmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and its frequency is increasing as more women postpone their pregnancies to their thirties and forties. Breast cancer diagnosis during pregnancy and lactation is difficult and complex both for the patient and doctors. Delay in diagnosis is frequent and treatment modalities are difficult to accept for the pregnant women. The common treatment approach is surgery after diagnosis, chemotherapy after the first trimester and...

  6. Screening for Breast Cancer: Detection and Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Screening For Breast Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents Screening ... Breast Cancer" Articles #BeBrave: A life-saving test / Breast Cancer Basics ... and Diagnosis / Staging and Treatment / Selected National Cancer Institute Breast ...

  7. Breast cancer in men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, C.M. de; Villas-Boas, C.L.P.; Koch, H.A.; Nogueira, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    After a study of all cases of masculine breast cancer registered at the INCa from 1983 to 1989, the author present the most usual clinical, radiological and histopathological findings. The ductal infiltrating type of carcinoma was predominant; there were also six cases of secondary implant and two patients who died. The value of this article lies on the opportunity of presenting 11 cases of this pathology, which represent only 0,2% of malignant tumors in men, and to describe its manifestations and call the attention of radiologists for this entity. (author)

  8. Breast Cancer Survivorship Care: Targeting a Colorectal Cancer Education Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherri G. Homan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer survivors are at risk of developing a second primary cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the leading second primary cancers, and it is often preventable. We developed a multi-component educational tool to inform and encourage women breast cancer survivors to engage in CRC screening. To assess the strengths and weakness of the tool and to improve the relevancy to the target audience, we convened four focus groups of women breast cancer survivors in Missouri. We also assessed the potential impact of the tool on the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding CRC and collected information on the barriers to CRC screening through pre- and post-focus groups’ questionnaires. A total of 43 women breast cancer survivors participated and provided very valuable suggestions on design and content to update the tool. Through the process and comparing pre- and post-focus group assessments, a significantly higher proportion of breast cancer survivors strongly agreed or agreed that CRC is preventable (78.6% vs. 96.9%, p = 0.02 and became aware that they were at a slightly increased risk for CRC (18.6% vs. 51.7%, p = 0.003. The most cited barrier was the complexity of preparation for colonoscopy.

  9. Exercise in Targeting Metabolic Dysregulation in Stage I-III Breast or Prostate Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-12

    Cancer Survivor; No Evidence of Disease; Obesity; Overweight; Prostate Carcinoma; Sedentary Lifestyle; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  10. Signal enhancement ratio (SER) quantified from breast DCE-MRI and breast cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shandong; Kurland, Brenda F.; Berg, Wendie A.; Zuley, Margarita L.; Jankowitz, Rachel C.; Sumkin, Jules; Gur, David

    2015-03-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recommended as an adjunct to mammography for women who are considered at elevated risk of developing breast cancer. As a key component of breast MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) uses a contrast agent to provide high intensity contrast between breast tissues, making it sensitive to tissue composition and vascularity. Breast DCE-MRI characterizes certain physiologic properties of breast tissue that are potentially related to breast cancer risk. Studies have shown that increased background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), which is the contrast enhancement occurring in normal cancer-unaffected breast tissues in post-contrast sequences, predicts increased breast cancer risk. Signal enhancement ratio (SER) computed from pre-contrast and post-contrast sequences in DCE-MRI measures change in signal intensity due to contrast uptake over time and is a measure of contrast enhancement kinetics. SER quantified in breast tumor has been shown potential as a biomarker for characterizing tumor response to treatments. In this work we investigated the relationship between quantitative measures of SER and breast cancer risk. A pilot retrospective case-control study was performed using a cohort of 102 women, consisting of 51 women who had diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer and 51 matched controls (by age and MRI date) with a unilateral biopsy-proven benign lesion. SER was quantified using fully-automated computerized algorithms and three SER-derived quantitative volume measures were compared between the cancer cases and controls using logistic regression analysis. Our preliminary results showed that SER is associated with breast cancer risk, after adjustment for the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS)-based mammographic breast density measures. This pilot study indicated that SER has potential for use as a risk factor for breast cancer risk assessment in women at elevated risk of developing breast cancer.

  11. Insulin and Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    hypothesis. Int J Cancer i1995; 62:403-6. 45) Kim YI. Diet, lifestyle and colonrectal cancer : Is hyperinsulinemia the missing link? Nutrition Reviews 1999...with colonrectal cancer , another type of cancer whose etiology has been related to impaired fasting glucose and * hyperinsulinemic insulin resistance...and colonrectal cancer : Is hyperinsulinemia the missing link? Nutrition Reviews 1999; 56:275-9. 46) Kaaks R. Nutrition, hormones, and breast cancer : Is

  12. Breast Cancer Suspicion in a Transgender Male-to-Female Patient on Hormone Replacement Therapy Presenting with Right Breast Mass: Breast Cancer Risk Assessment and Presentation of a Rare Lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystina Tongson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been an increasing use of hormonal therapy among male-to-female (MtF transgender individuals. This long-term hormone replacement therapy (HRT renders MtF individuals a unique patient subgroup in terms of breast cancer risk. This case describes a MtF transgender who presented with a breast lesion concerning for malignancy following hormonal replacement therapy. The patient additionally had a strong family history of breast cancer. Final pathology revealed lobular hyperplasia in the setting of gynecomastia and pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH. Both pathology findings are rare in biological females, let alone in the setting of hormone replacement therapy in a MtF individual. While the number of reported cases of suspicious breast lesions in this population remains scarce, it presents both a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge due to the nature of the treatment course and the lack of research in this recently growing subgroup of patients.

  13. Novel Targeted Therapies for Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0461 TITLE: Novel Targeted Therapies for Inflammatory Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jose Silva CONTRACTING...CONTRACT NUMBER Novel Targeted Therapies for Inflammatory Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0461 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) l 5d...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC, ~5% of all breast cancers ) is the most lethal form of breast cancer , presenting a 5- year

  14. Epigenetics and Breast Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An T. Vo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several of the active compounds in foods, poisons, drugs, and industrial chemicals may, by epigenetic mechanisms, increase or decrease the risk of breast cancers. Enzymes that are involved in DNA methylation and histone modifications have been shown to be altered in several types of breast and other cancers resulting in abnormal patterns of methylation and/or acetylation. Hypermethylation at the CpG islands found in estrogen response element (ERE promoters occurs in conjunction with ligand-bonded alpha subunit estrogen receptor (Erα dimers wherein the ligand ERα dimer complex acts as a transcription factor and binds to the ERE promoter. Ligands could be 17-β-estradiol (E2, phytoestrogens, heterocyclic amines, and many other identified food additives and heavy metals. The dimer recruits DNA methyltransferases which catalyze the transfer of methyl groups from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM to 5′-cytosine on CpG islands. Other enzymes are recruited to the region by ligand-ERα dimers which activate DNA demethylases to act simultaneously to increase gene expression of protooncogenes and growth-promoting genes. Ligand-ERα dimers also recruit histone acetyltransferase to the ERE promoter region. Histone demethylases such as JMJD2B and histone methyltransferases are enzymes which demethylate lysine residues on histones H3 and/or H4. This makes the chromatin accessible for transcription factors and enzymes.

  15. Diet and breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Romieu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Both diet and nutrition have been studied in relationship with breast cancer risk, as the great variation among different countries in breast cancer incidence could possibly be explained through the inflammatory and immune response, as well as antioxidant intake, among others.To date, no clear association with diet beyond overweight and weight gain has been found, except for alcohol consumption. Nonetheless, the small number of studies done in middle to low income countries where variability of food intake is wider,is beginning to show interesting results.Tanto la dieta como la nutrición han sido estudiadas en relación con el riesgo de cáncer de mama, dada la gran variación de incidencia de cáncer entre países, y la posibilidad de explicarla a través de la respuesta inflamatoria o inmune, así como ingesta de antioxidantes,entre otros.Hasta la fecha, ninguna asociación clara con la dieta ha sido encontrada, excepto para el consumo de alcohol, más allá del sobrepeso y del incremento de peso. Sin embargo, los estudios que se están realizando en países de mediano a bajo nivel de ingresos, con mayor variabilidad de ingesta de alimentos, comienzan a mostrar resultados interesantes.

  16. Estrogens in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terzieff, V.; Vázquez, A.

    2004-01-01

    The prolonged exposure to estrogen increases the risk of cancer breast, the precise role of estrogen in the carcinogenesis process is unclear. They are capable of inducing cell proliferation through different channels receptor Estrogen (ER) known, for example through MAPkinasa sensitivity the promoter of proliferation effect depends on the level of RE, or type to â, integrity (mutations may alter its function) and ligand. The different types of estrogens and related compounds have different profile of affinity for RE and effect end. The modulatory role of progestogens proliferation is very complex, and the interaction between the effector pathways of progestin’s, estrogens, EGF and IGF family - maybe others - determines the final effect .. Estrogens are mutagenic per se weak, but is now known for its hepatic metabolism occur highly reactive species such as quinones, and catechol, powerful mutagens in vitro. Direct or indirect genotoxicity probably explains Part of the effects of estrogen on tumor cells. The use of hormone replacement (HTR) increases the risk of CM, as proportional to the time of use. The combination with progestin seems to be increased risk (R R 2). It is unclear the role of phyto estrogens in the prevention the CM. In the male breast is known that the proliferative response to parenchymal different hormonal maneuvers is different. The effect is minimal castration are and maximum with the combination of estrogen and progesterone. It is unclear, however, the risk of the population exposed to hormone therapy for cancer prostate or otherwise

  17. Family History of Cancer in Relation to Breast Cancer Subtypes in African American Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethea, Traci N; Rosenberg, Lynn; Castro-Webb, Nelsy; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E; Ruiz-Narváez, Edward A; Charlot, Marjory; Park, Song-Yi; Bandera, Elisa V; Troester, Melissa A; Ambrosone, Christine B; Palmer, Julie R

    2016-02-01

    The evidence on the relation of family history of cancers other than breast cancer to breast cancer risk is conflicting, and most studies have not assessed specific breast cancer subtypes. We assessed the relation of first-degree family history of breast, prostate, lung, colorectal, ovarian, and cervical cancer and lymphoma or leukemia, to the risk of estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)), ER(-), and triple-negative breast cancer in data from the African American Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk Consortium. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to calculate ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CI). There were 3,023 ER(+) and 1,497 ER(-) breast cancer cases (including 696 triple-negative cases) and 17,420 controls. First-degree family history of breast cancer was associated with increased risk of each subtype: OR = 1.76 (95% CI, 1.57-1.97) for ER(+), 1.67 (1.42-1.95) for ER(-), and 1.72 (1.38-2.13) for triple-negative breast cancer. Family history of cervical cancer was associated with increased risk of ER(-) (OR = 2.39; 95% CI, 1.36-4.20), but not ER(+) cancer. Family history of both breast and prostate cancer was associated with increased risk of ER(+) (3.40; 2.42-4.79) and ER(-) (2.09; 1.21-3.63) cancer, but family history of both breast and lung cancer was associated only with ER(-) cancer (2.11; 1.29-3.46). A family history of cancers other than breast may influence the risk of breast cancer, and associations may differ by subtype. Greater surveillance and counseling for additional screening may be warranted for women with a family history of cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Towards Prevention of Breast Cancer: What Are the Clinical Challenges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgquist, Signe; Hall, Per; Lipkus, Isaac; Garber, Judy E

    2018-04-16

    The dramatic increase in breast cancer incidence compels a paradigm shift in our preventive efforts. There are several barriers to overcome before prevention becomes an established part of breast cancer management. The objective of this review is to identify the clinical challenges for improved breast cancer prevention and discuss current knowledge on breast cancer risk assessment methods, risk communication, ethics, and interventional efforts with the aim of covering the aspects relevant for a breast cancer prevention trial. Herein, the following five areas are discussed: (i) Adequate tools for identification of women at high risk of breast cancer suggestively entitled Prevent! Online. (ii) Consensus on the definition of high risk, which is regarded as mandatory for all risk communication and potential prophylactic interventions. (iii) Risk perception and communication regarding risk information. (iv) Potential ethical concerns relevant for future breast cancer prevention programs. (v) Risk-reducing programs involving multileveled prevention depending on identified risk. Taken together, devoted efforts from both policy makers and health care providers are warranted to improve risk assessment and risk counseling in women at risk for breast cancer to optimize the prevention of breast cancer. Cancer Prev Res; 11(5); 1-10. ©2018 AACR. ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. The Effect of Simvastatin on Breast Cancer Cell Growth in Women With Stage I-II Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-02

    Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage I Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IA Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IB Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIA Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIB Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  20. Axillary Lymph Nodes and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... white blood cells that help fight illness. If breast cancer spreads, the lymph nodes in the underarm (called ... if they contain cancer cells. This helps determine breast cancer stage and guide treatment. Sentinel node biopsy and ...

  1. Summer Student Breast Cancer Research Training Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zaloga, Gary P

    2005-01-01

    ... projects addressed the effects of omega-3 lipids upon breast cancer cells. 0mega-3 lipids were found to decrease breast cancer-induced muscle cell proteolysis and to induce apoptosis in cancer cells...

  2. The psychometric properties of the Korean version of the functional assessment of cancer therapy-cognitive (FACT-Cog) in Korean patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Hee; Bae, Sun Hyoung; Jung, Yong Sik; Jung, Young-Mi

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Korean version of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Cognitive scale (FACT-Cog) in patients with breast cancer in Korea. The FACT-Cog was translated into Korean using forward and back translation. Patients with breast cancer who had undergone chemotherapy were enrolled from the university hospital and assessed using the Korean version of the FACT-Cog, the cognitive functioning scale of the EORTC-QLQ-C30 (EORTC-CF), and the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II). Analyses of internal consistency, construct validity, concurrent validity, and convergent validity were performed to evaluate the psychometric characteristics. A total of 250 patients completed the questionnaire. There were no missing data and patients completed the scale within 10 min. The Korean version of the FACT-Cog had acceptable internal consistency, with Cronbach's alpha coefficients of 0.94 for the total scores and 0.87-0.95 for the four subscales. The item-total correlation coefficients ranged from 0.36 to 0.95. Moderate correlations were found (r = 0.33 to 0.53) between the Korean version of the FACT-Cog and the EORTC-CF. There was acceptable convergent validity, with weak and moderately significant correlations (r = -0.41 to -0.22) between the Korean version of the FACT-Cog and the BDI-II. Confirmatory factory analysis supported a four-factor structure of the Korean version of the FACT-Cog with a good model fit. The Korean version of the FACT-Cog is a valid and reliable scale to measure self-reporting of cognitive impairment in patients with breast cancer who are undergoing chemotherapy.

  3. Breast cancer incidence in Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altantsetseg, Dalkhjav; Davaasambuu, Ganmaa; Rich-Edwards, Janet; Davaalkham, Dambadarjaa; Tretli, Steinar; Hoover, Robert N.; Frazier, A. Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Data on international variation in breast cancer incidence may help to identify additional risk factors. Substantially lower breast cancer rates in Asia than in North America and Western Europe are established, but differences within Asia have been largely ignored despite heterogeneity in lifestyles and environments. Mongolia’s breast cancer experience is of interest because of its shared genetics but vastly different diet compared with other parts of Asia. Methods Age-standardized breast cancer incidence and mortality rates obtained from the International Association of Cancer Registries are presented for several Asian countries. Mongolian incidence rates obtained from its cancer registry describe incidence within the country. Results Breast cancer incidence in Mongolia (age standardized 8.0/100,000) is almost a third of rates in China (21.6/100,000), and over five times that of Japan (42.7/100,000) and Russia (43.2/100,000). Rates within Mongolia appear to have increased slightly over the last decade and are higher in urban than rural areas (annual percentage increase of age-standardized rates from 1998 to 2005 was 3.60 and 2.57%, respectively). The increase in breast cancer incidence with age plateaus at menopause, as in other Asian populations. Conclusions Mongolia’s low breast cancer incidence is of particular interest because of their unusual diet (primarily red meat and dairy) compared with other Asian countries. More intensive study of potential dietary, reproductive and lifestyle factors in Mongolia with comparison to other Asian populations may provide more clarity in what drives the international breast cancer rate differences. PMID:22543542

  4. Risk of endometrial cancer after tamoxifen treatment of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.E. van Leeuwen (Flora); J. Benraadt (J.); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); C.H.F. Gimbrère (Charles); R. Otter (Renée); L.J. Scheuten (Leo); R.A. Damhuis (Ronald); M. Bontenbal (Marijke); A.I. Diepenhorst; A.W. van den Belt-Dusebout (Alexandra); H. van Tinteren (Harm)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractSince large trials have been set up to assess whether tamoxifen decreases the risk of breast cancer in healthy women, it has become important to investigate the drug's potential adverse effects, including occurrence of endometrial cancer. We undertook a case-control study in the

  5. The Adjunctive Digital Breast Tomosynthesis in Diagnosis of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Lung Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare the diagnostic performance of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT and digital mammography (DM for breast cancers. Materials and Methods. Fifty-seven female patients with pathologically proved breast cancer were enrolled. Three readers gave a subjective assessment superiority of the index lesions (mass, focal asymmetry, architectural distortion, or calcifications and a forced BIRADS score, based on DM reading alone and with additional DBT information. The relevance between BIRADS category and index lesions of breast cancer was compared by chi-square test. Result. A total of 59 breast cancers were reviewed, including 17 (28.8% mass lesions, 12 (20.3% focal asymmetry/density, 6 (10.2% architecture distortion, 23 (39.0% calcifications, and 1 (1.7% intracystic tumor. Combo DBT was perceived to be more informative in 58.8% mass lesions, 83.3% density, 94.4% architecture distortion, and only 11.6% calcifications. As to the forced BIRADS score, 84.4% BIRADS 0 on DM was upgraded to BIRADS 4 or 5 on DBT, whereas only 27.3% BIRADS 4A on DM was upgraded on DBT, as BIRADS 4A lesions were mostly calcifications. A significant P value (<0.001 between the BIRADS category and index lesions was noted. Conclusion. Adjunctive DBT gives exquisite information for mass lesion, focal asymmetry, and/or architecture distortion to improve the diagnostic performance in mammography.

  6. The adjunctive digital breast tomosynthesis in diagnosis of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tsung-Lung; Liang, Huei-Lung; Chou, Chen-Pin; Huang, Jer-Shyung; Pan, Huay-Ben

    2013-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and digital mammography (DM) for breast cancers. Fifty-seven female patients with pathologically proved breast cancer were enrolled. Three readers gave a subjective assessment superiority of the index lesions (mass, focal asymmetry, architectural distortion, or calcifications) and a forced BIRADS score, based on DM reading alone and with additional DBT information. The relevance between BIRADS category and index lesions of breast cancer was compared by chi-square test. A total of 59 breast cancers were reviewed, including 17 (28.8%) mass lesions, 12 (20.3%) focal asymmetry/density, 6 (10.2%) architecture distortion, 23 (39.0%) calcifications, and 1 (1.7%) intracystic tumor. Combo DBT was perceived to be more informative in 58.8% mass lesions, 83.3% density, 94.4% architecture distortion, and only 11.6% calcifications. As to the forced BIRADS score, 84.4% BIRADS 0 on DM was upgraded to BIRADS 4 or 5 on DBT, whereas only 27.3% BIRADS 4A on DM was upgraded on DBT, as BIRADS 4A lesions were mostly calcifications. A significant P value (BIRADS category and index lesions was noted. Adjunctive DBT gives exquisite information for mass lesion, focal asymmetry, and/or architecture distortion to improve the diagnostic performance in mammography.

  7. Miscellaneous syndromes and their management: occult breast cancer, breast cancer in pregnancy, male breast cancer, surgery in stage IV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colfry, Alfred John

    2013-04-01

    Surgical therapy for occult breast cancer has traditionally centered on mastectomy; however, breast conservation with whole breast radiotherapy followed by axillary lymph node dissection has shown equivalent results. Patients with breast cancer in pregnancy can be safely and effectively treated; given a patient's pregnancy trimester and stage of breast cancer, a clinician must be able to guide therapy accordingly. Male breast cancer risk factors show strong association with BRCA2 mutations, as well as Klinefelter syndrome. Several retrospective trials of surgical therapy in stage IV breast cancer have associated a survival advantage with primary site tumor extirpation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A critical assessment of geographic clusters of breast and lung cancer incidences among residents living near the Tittabawassee and Saginaw Rivers, Michigan, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guajardo, Olga A; Oyana, Tonny J

    2009-01-01

    To assess previously determined geographic clusters of breast and lung cancer incidences among residents living near the Tittabawassee and Saginaw Rivers, Michigan, using a new set of environmental factors. Breast and lung cancer data were acquired from the Michigan Department of Community Health, along with point source pollution data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The datasets were used to determine whether there is a spatial association between disease risk and environmental contamination. GIS and spatial techniques were combined with statistical analysis to investigate local risk of breast and lung cancer. The study suggests that neighborhoods in close proximity to the river were associated with a high risk of breast cancer, while increased risk of lung cancer was detected among neighborhoods in close proximity to point source pollution and major highways. Statistically significant (P cancer incidences were observed among residents living near the rivers. These findings are useful to researchers and governmental agencies for risk assessment, regulation, and control of environmental contamination in the floodplains.

  9. A Critical Assessment of Geographic Clusters of Breast and Lung Cancer Incidences among Residents Living near the Tittabawassee and Saginaw Rivers, Michigan, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guajardo, O.A.; Oyana, T.J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. To assess previously determined geographic clusters of breast and lung cancer incidences among residents living near the Tittabawassee and Saginaw Rivers, Michigan, using a new set of environmental factors. Materials and Methods. Breast and lung cancer data were acquired from the Michigan Department of Community Health, along with point source pollution data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The datasets were used to determine whether there is a spatial association between disease risk and environmental contamination. GIS and spatial techniques were combined with statistical analysis to investigate local risk of breast and lung cancer. Results and Conclusion. The study suggests that neighborhoods in close proximity to the river were associated with a high risk of breast cancer, while increased risk of lung cancer was detected among neighborhoods in close proximity to point source pollution and major highways. Statistically significant (P=.001) clusters of cancer incidences were observed among residents living near the rivers. These findings are useful to researchers and governmental agencies for risk assessment, regulation, and control of environmental contamination in the flood plains.

  10. A Critical Assessment of Geographic Clusters of Breast and Lung Cancer Incidences among Residents Living near the Tittabawassee and Saginaw Rivers, Michigan, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A. Guajardo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To assess previously determined geographic clusters of breast and lung cancer incidences among residents living near the Tittabawassee and Saginaw Rivers, Michigan, using a new set of environmental factors. Materials and Methods. Breast and lung cancer data were acquired from the Michigan Department of Community Health, along with point source pollution data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The datasets were used to determine whether there is a spatial association between disease risk and environmental contamination. GIS and spatial techniques were combined with statistical analysis to investigate local risk of breast and lung cancer. Results and Conclusion. The study suggests that neighborhoods in close proximity to the river were associated with a high risk of breast cancer, while increased risk of lung cancer was detected among neighborhoods in close proximity to point source pollution and major highways. Statistically significant (P≤.001 clusters of cancer incidences were observed among residents living near the rivers. These findings are useful to researchers and governmental agencies for risk assessment, regulation, and control of environmental contamination in the floodplains.

  11. Mammographic detection of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homer, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    Mammography, whether film or xerography, is a complementary examination to breast palpation in the detection of breast cancer. According to the guidelines of the American Cancer Society, mammography should be performed on every asymptomatic woman, at least once, over the age of 35. Annual mammography after 50 is also advised. The radiation dose to the breast from current equipment is so low as to not be considered a factor in denying a woman this screening examination. Mammography has a role in evaluating the woman with solitary and multiple breast masses. It is the only proved reliable modality able to detect nonpalpable breast cancers and small tumors less than 2 cm in size. All nonpalpable lesions should be excised by directed biopsy, using a preoperative localization technique

  12. The Distress Thermometer assessed in women at risk of developing hereditary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dooren, S; Duivenvoorden, H J; Passchier, J; Bannink, M; Tan, M B M; Oldenmenger, W H; Seynaeve, C; van der Rijt, C C D

    2009-10-01

    The Distress Thermometer (DT) is a promising instrument to get insight into distress experienced by cancer patients. At our Family Cancer Clinic the DT, including an adapted problem list, was completed by 100 women at increased risk of developing hereditary breast cancer (mean age 45.2 years; SD: 10.5). Additionally, the women filled in either the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale as psychological component (n=48) or the somatic subscale of the Symptom Checklist-90 as somatic component (n=50) to identify associations with the DT-score. Further, the women filled in an evaluation form. The median score on the DT was 2 (range: 0-9). With regression analysis adjusted for age, the contribution of mood and somatic complaints, respectively, was investigated. The standardized regression coefficient for anxiety was 0.32 (ns), for depression 0.14 (ns) and for the somatic subscale 0.49 (pdepression was 16%, and for somatic complaints 24%. The differences between the coefficients were not significant. Evaluation forms were returned by 73 women. In 50% of the cases, the physician had discussed the DT/problem list, which was appreciated by the majority of these women (80%). Sixty-two percent of the women would recommend the use of the DT for other patients. The use of the DT/problem list seems promising for the current population, and was appreciated by the majority of the women. As mood and somatic complaints did not differ significantly in explaining the experienced distress, other candidate factors need to be examined.

  13. CONTINUING EDUCATION 111 Breast Cancer In Pregnancy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The reported overall survival rate for breast cancer in pregnancy is poor,. reflecting the more advanced stage of the disease at diagnosis. An approach to the management of breast cancer in pregnancy is presented by a case illustration and a review of literature. KEY WORDS: Breast Cancer, Pregnancy, Management breast ...

  14. Breast cancer cell lines: friend or foe?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdall, Sarah E; Hanby, Andrew M; Lansdown, Mark RJ; Speirs, Valerie

    2003-01-01

    The majority of breast cancer research is conducted using established breast cancer cell lines as in vitro models. An alternative is to use cultures established from primary breast tumours. Here, we discuss the pros and cons of using both of these models in translational breast cancer research

  15. Increased risk for depression after breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suppli, Nis P; Johansen, Christoffer; Christensen, Jane

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the risk for first depression, assessed as incident hospital contacts for depression and incident use of antidepressants, among women with breast cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Danish national registries were used to identify 1,997,669 women with no diagnosis of cancer...... or a major psychiatric disorder. This cohort was followed from 1998 to 2011 for a diagnosis of breast cancer and for the two outcomes, hospital contact for depression and redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants. Rate ratios for incident hospital contacts for depression and incident use of antidepressants...... associated with use of antidepressants. CONCLUSION: Women with breast cancer are at long-term increased risk for first depression, including both severe episodes leading to hospital contact and use of antidepressants. Clinicians should be aware that the risk is highest in women with comorbid conditions, node...

  16. Simulation of reduced breast cancer mortality in breast cancer screening programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamora, L. I.; Forastero, C.; Guirado, D.; Lallena, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    The breast cancer screening programs are an essential tool in the fight against breast cancer. Currently, many questions concerning the setup of these programs are open, namely: age range of women who undergo the same, frequency of mammography, ... The effectiveness of a program should be evaluated in terms of mortality reduction is its systematic implementation in the population. In this sense, we performed Monte Carlo simulations to assess that these reductions.

  17. Awareness of Breast Cancer and Practice of Breast Self ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Objective: Breast cancer is the commonest cancer among women in globally and in Nigeria. In Nigeria, cases of breast cancer cases have been prevalent for three decades and more than 90% of cases can be detected by women themselves through breast self – examination. The objective of this study ...

  18. Energy expenditure in women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuconi, Carolina Pereira; Ceolin Alves, Ana Lígia; Toulson Davisson Correia, Maria Isabel

    2015-04-01

    To assess the energy expenditure of women with breast cancer and the effectiveness of available predictive equations (PEs) for the estimation of energy requirements in these subjects. Women with breast cancer and healthy women controls underwent indirect calorimetry and nutritional assessment. The estimation of energy requirements included PEs (Harris-Benedict [HB], corrected by injury and activity factors), the Mifflin St. Jeor, and the quick formula of 25 kcal/kg of body weight (BW). Statistical analyses, including Student's t test, a paired t test, Bland-Altman analysis, and backward multivariate linear regression, were performed using the SPSS 17.0 software. Statistical significance was set at P breast cancer and 19 healthy women were evaluated. Analysis of nutritional status revealed 64.7% of the patients were overweight/obese, and 88.2% had an excess of body fat mass. The resting energy expenditure (REE) of the breast cancer patients was similar to that of the healthy women, even after adjustment for fat free mass (FFM) (P breast cancer was similar to that of healthy women. The energy requirements of these patients may be calculated based on the quick formula of 25 kcal/kg of BW. Nonetheless, this estimation should be used cautiously as it results in wide variations when used alone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Frozen section is superior to imprint cytology for the intra-operative assessment of sentinel lymph node metastasis in Stage I Breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makita Masujiro

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A standard intra-operative procedure for assessing sentinel lymph node metastasis in breast cancer patients has not yet been established. Patients and methods One hundred and thirty-eight patients with stage I breast cancer who underwent sentinel node biopsy using both imprint cytology and frozen section were analyzed. Results Seventeen of the 138 patients had sentinel node involvement. Results of imprint cytology included nine false negative cases (sensitivity, 47.1%. In contrast, only two cases of false negatives were found on frozen section (sensitivity, 88.2%. There were two false positive cases identified by imprint cytology (specificity, 98.3%. On the other hand, frozen section had 100% specificity. Conclusion These findings suggest that frozen section is superior to imprint cytology for the intra-operative determination of sentinel lymph node metastasis in stage I breast cancer patients.

  20. Hormones, Women and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... women who • Are older • Have no children • Delayed pregnancy until after age 30 • Have used combination hormone therapy (estrogen plus progestin) for more than five years • Have a mother, sister, or daughter who has had breast cancer Did you know? Breast pain alone is not ...

  1. Environmental chemical exposures and breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Stanley

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available As a hormone-sensitive condition with no single identifiable cause, breast cancer is a major health problem. It is characterized by a wide range of contributing factors and exposures occurring in different combinations and strengths across a lifetime that may be amplified during periods of enhanced developmental susceptibility and impacted by reproductive patterns and behaviours. The vast majority of cases are oestrogen-receptor positive and occur in women with no family history of the disease suggesting that modifiable risk factors are involved. A substantial body of evidence now links oestrogen-positive breast cancer with environmental exposures. Synthetic chemicals capable of oestrogen mimicry are characteristic of industrial development and have been individually and extensively assessed as risk factors for oestrogen-sensitive cancers. Existing breast cancer risk assessment tools do not take such factors into account. In the absence of consensus on causation and in order to better understand the problem of escalating incidence globally, an expanded, integrated approach broadening the inquiry into individual susceptibility breast cancer is proposed. Applying systems thinking to existing data on oestrogen-modulating environmental exposures and other oestrogenic factors characteristic of Westernisation and their interactions in the exposure, encompassing social, behavioural, environmental, hormonal and genetic factors, can assist in understanding cancer risks and the pursuit of prevention strategies. A new conceptual framework based on a broader understanding of the “system” that underlies the development of breast cancer over a period of many years, incorporating the factors known to contribute to breast cancer risk, could provide a new platform from which government and regulators can promulgate enhanced and more effective prevention strategies.

  2. Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves ... a link to this page included, e.g., “Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves ...

  3. The value of surveillance mammography of the contralateral breast in patients with a history of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, W.L.; Schaapveld, M.; Jansen, L.; Bagherzadegan, E.; Sahinovic, M.M.; Baas, P.C.; Hanssen, L.M.H.C.; van der Mijle, H.C.J.; Brandenburg, J.D.; Wiggers, T.; de Bock, G.H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the contribution of surveillance mammography to the early detection of metachronous contralateral. breast cancer (MCBC) and to assess its impact on the survival of breast cancer patients with relation to compliance. Method: Breast cancer patients (5589) were identified using

  4. Soy Isoflavones Supplementation in Treating Women at High Risk For or With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-08

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  5. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents ... the time a woman is taking the pills, notes Leslie Ford, M.D., associate director for NCI's ...

  6. Melatonin, Aging and Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hill, Steven

    2001-01-01

    ... conditions for tumor induction, promotion and progression. The pineal gland, via its hormone melatonin, has been shown by numerous laboratories to inhibit the proliferation of both human and animal models of breast cancer...

  7. Height and Breast Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ben; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Delahanty, Ryan J

    2015-01-01

    -analysis to investigate associations between height and breast cancer risk using data from 159 prospective cohorts totaling 5216302 women, including 113178 events. In a consortium with individual-level data from 46325 case patients and 42482 control patients, we conducted a Mendelian randomization analysis using...... a genetic score that comprised 168 height-associated variants as an instrument. This association was further evaluated in a second consortium using summary statistics data from 16003 case patients and 41335 control patients. RESULTS: The pooled relative risk of breast cancer was 1.17 (95% confidence......BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have linked adult height with breast cancer risk in women. However, the magnitude of the association, particularly by subtypes of breast cancer, has not been established. Furthermore, the mechanisms of the association remain unclear. METHODS: We performed a meta...

  8. MHC Genes and Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pillai, Shiv

    2000-01-01

    Tumors are believed to emerge only when immune surveillance fails. We wished to ascertain whether the failure to inherit putative protective alleles of HLA class II genes is linked to the development of breast cancer...

  9. Molecular genetics of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radice, P.; Pierotti, M. A. [Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy). Division of Experimental Oncology

    1997-09-01

    In the last two decades, molecular studies have enlightened the complexity of the genetic alterations that occur in breast cancer cells. To date, more than 40 different genes or loci have been found to be altered in breast carcinomas. Although some of these genes, as for example ERBB2, appear to be mutated in a high proportion of cases, their mechanism of action and their role in the different stages of cancer development are still poorly understood. More recently, two major determinants of the inherited predisposition to breast cancer, BRCA1 and BRCA2, have been isolated. As a consequence, it is now possible to screen families with a positive history of breast carcinomas for the identification of mutations carriers, in order to address these individuals into adequate programs of cancer surveillance and prevention.

  10. Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peer; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jensen, Maj-Britt

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG), with an associated database, was introduced as a nationwide multidisciplinary group in 1977 with the ultimate aim to improve the prognosis in breast cancer. Since then, the database has registered women diagnosed with primary invasive...... nonmetastatic breast cancer. The data reported from the departments to the database included details of the characteristics of the primary tumor, of surgery, radiotherapy, and systemic therapies, and of follow-up reported on specific forms from the departments in question. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: From 1977 through...... 2014, ~110,000 patients are registered in the nationwide, clinical database. The completeness has gradually improved to more than 95%. DBCG has continuously prepared evidence-based guidelines on diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer and conducted quality control studies to ascertain the degree...

  11. Palbociclib for Advanced Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    An interim analysis of the PALOMA3 trial shows that women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer who received palbociclib plus fulvestrant had longer progression-free survival rates than women who received a placebo plus fulvestrant.

  12. Decline in breast cancer mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njor, Sisse Helle; Schwartz, Walter; Blichert-Toft, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    Funen/rest of Denmark. As multidisciplinary teams were introduced gradually in the rest of Denmark from 1994, the screening effect was slightly underestimated. RESULTS: Over 14 years, women targeted by screening in Funen experienced a 22% (95% confidence interval 11%-32%) reduction in breast cancer......OBJECTIVES: When estimating the decline in breast cancer mortality attributable to screening, the challenge is to provide valid comparison groups and to distinguish the screening effect from other effects. In Funen, Denmark, multidisciplinary breast cancer management teams started before screening...... was introduced; both activities came later in the rest of Denmark. Because Denmark had national protocols for breast cancer treatment, but hardly any opportunistic screening, Funen formed a "natural experiment", providing valid comparison groups and enabling the separation of the effect of screening from other...

  13. Cadherin-11 and Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Byers, Stephen W

    2005-01-01

    .... In year one of this grant we showed that the presence of the cadherin-11 splice variant promotes invasion of cadherin-11 positive breast cancer cells, perhaps by promoting cell-ECM interactions...

  14. Molecular genetics of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radice, P.; Pierotti, M. A.

    1997-01-01

    In the last two decades, molecular studies have enlightened the complexity of the genetic alterations that occur in breast cancer cells. To date, more than 40 different genes or loci have been found to be altered in breast carcinomas. Although some of these genes, as for example ERBB2, appear to be mutated in a high proportion of cases, their mechanism of action and their role in the different stages of cancer development are still poorly understood. More recently, two major determinants of the inherited predisposition to breast cancer, BRCA1 and BRCA2, have been isolated. As a consequence, it is now possible to screen families with a positive history of breast carcinomas for the identification of mutations carriers, in order to address these individuals into adequate programs of cancer surveillance and prevention

  15. Understanding your breast cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... provider about the risks and benefits before taking hormone therapy . You may want to avoid taking estrogen combined with progesterone or progestin. If you have a family history of breast cancer, ask your provider about genetic ...

  16. Does Aluminium Trigger Breast Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jennrich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Breast cancer is by far the most common cancer in women in the western world. In 90% of breast cancers, environmental factors are among the causes. The frequency with which the tumour occurs in the outer upper part of the breast has risen with above average rates in recent decades. Aluminium salts as ingredients in deodorants and antiperspirants are being absorbed by the body to a greater extent than hitherto assumed. Their toxicity for healthy and diseased breast tissue cells includes various well-documented pathomechanisms. In the sense of primary and secondary prevention, the cancer-triggering potential of aluminium and its use in anti-perspirant deodorants must be re-evaluated. For the same reason the access to a targeted diagnosis and treatment of aluminium loading must be facilitated.

  17. Radiofrequency Tagged Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-19

    Positive Axillary Lymph Node; Stage 0 Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage I Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IA Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IB Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIA Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIB Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer AJCC v7

  18. Assessing Associations between the AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 Functional Module and Breast Cancer Risk in BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanco, Ignacio; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Cuadras, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    While interplay between BRCA1 and AURKA-RHAMM-TPX2-TUBG1 regulates mammary epithelial polarization, common genetic variation in HMMR (gene product RHAMM) may be associated with risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers. Following on these observations, we further assessed the link between ...

  19. Assessing associations between the AURKAHMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 functional module and breast cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Blanco (Ignacio); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); D. Cuadras (Daniel); X. Wang (Xing); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); De Garibay, G.R. (Gorka Ruiz); Librado, P. (Pablo); Sánchez-Gracia, A. (Alejandro); Rozas, J. (Julio); N. Bonifaci (Núria); L. McGuffog (Lesley); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); A.B.M.M.K. Islam (Abul); Mateo, F. (Francesca); A. Berenguer (Antonio); A. Petit (Anna); I. Català (Isabel); J. Brunet (Joan); L. Feliubadaló (L.); Tornero, E. (Eva); J. Benítez (Javier); A. Osorio (Ana); Teresa, R. (Ramón); Teresa, C. (Cajal); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); B.K. Arun (Banu); A.E. Toland (Amanda); B. Karlan; C.S. Walsh (Christine); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); Nussbaum, R.L. (Robert L.); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Claes (Kathleen); Van Maerken, T. (Tom); O. Díez (Orland); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); L. Jønson (Lars); Gerdes, A.-M. (Anne-Marie); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); T. Caldes (Trinidad); A.M. Dunning (Alison); C.T. Oliver (Clare); E. Fineberg (Elena); Cook, M. (Margaret); S. Peock (Susan); E. McCann (Emma); A. Murray (Alexandra); C. Jacobs (Chris); Pichert, G. (Gabriella); F. Lalloo (Fiona); Chu, C. (Carol); H. Dorkins (Huw); J. Paterson (Joan); Ong, K.-R. (Kai-Ren); Teixeira, M.R. (Manuel R.); Teixeira, T. (T.); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); Van Der Luijt, R.B. (Rob B.); M.J. Ligtenberg (Marjolijn); P. Devilee (Peter); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); M.A. Rookus (Matti); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); M.J. Blok (Marinus); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); Rodriguez, G.C. (Gustavo C.); K.-A. Phillips (Kelly-Anne); M. Piedmonte (Marion); S. Nerenstone (Stacy); V.L. Bae-Jump (Victoria L.); O'Malley, D.M. (David M.); Ratner, E.S. (Elena S.); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); C.W. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Ditsch (Nina); Arnold, N. (Norbert); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); D. Niederacher (Dieter); C. Sutter (Christian); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); D. Steinemann (Doris); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); K. Kast (Karin); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); Bojesen, A. (Anders); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); L. Sunde (Lone); U.B. Jensen; M. Thomassen (Mads); T.A. Kruse (Torben); L. Foretova (Lenka); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); L. Bernard (Loris); B. Peissel (Bernard); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); P. Radice (Paolo); L. Ottini (Laura); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Agata (Simona); C. Maugard; J. Simard (Jacques); P. Soucy (Penny); A. Berger (Annemarie); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D. Geschwantler Kaulich (Daphne); M.-K. Tea; G. Pfeiler (Georg); E.M. John (Esther); A. Miron (Alexander); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Terry, M.B. (Mary Beth); Chung, W.K. (Wendy K.); M.B. Daly (Mary); D. Goldgar (David); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); F. Fostira (Florentia); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); J. Garber; A.K. Godwin (Andrew); E. Olah; Narod, S.A. (Steven A.); G. Rennert (Gad); S.S. Paluch (Shani); Y. Laitman (Yael); E. Friedman (Eitan); A. Liljegren (Annelie); J. Rantala (Johanna); Stenmark-Askmalm, M. (Marie); N. Loman (Niklas); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); U. Hamann (Ute); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); S. Healey (Sue); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); J. Herzog (Josef); Margileth, D. (David); Gorrini, C. (Chiara); M. Esteller (Manel); Gómez, A. (Antonio); Sayols, S. (Sergi); Vidal, E. (Enrique); Heyn, H. (Holger); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); M. Léone (Mélanie); L. Barjhoux (Laure); M. Fassy-Colcombet (Marion); A. de Pauw (Antoine); C. Lasset (Christine); S.F. Ferrer; L. Castera (Laurent); P. Berthet (Pascaline); F. Cornelis (Franco̧is); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); F. Damiola (Francesca); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); C.A. Maxwell (Christopher); J. Vijai (Joseph); Robson, M. (Mark); N. Kauff (Noah); Corines, M.J. (Marina J.); Villano, D. (Danylko); J.M. Cunningham (Julie); Lee, A. (Adam); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); C. Lazaro (Conxi); D.F. Easton (Douglas); Offit, K. (Kenneth); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); F.J. Couch (Fergus); Antoniou, A.C. (Antonis C.); M.A. Pujana (Miguel)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWhile interplay between BRCA1 and AURKA-RHAMM-TPX2-TUBG1 regulates mammary epithelial polarization, common genetic variation in HMMR (gene product RHAMM) may be associated with risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers. Following on these observations, we further assessed the link

  20. Assessing associations between the AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 functional module and breast cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanco, Ignacio; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Cuadras, Daniel; Wang, Xianshu; Barrowdale, Daniel; de Garibay, Gorka Ruiz; Librado, Pablo; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Rozas, Julio; Bonifaci, Núria; McGuffog, Lesley; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Islam, Abul; Mateo, Francesca; Berenguer, Antoni; Petit, Anna; Català, Isabel; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadaló, Lidia; Tornero, Eva; Benítez, Javier; Osorio, Ana; Ramón Y Cajal, Teresa; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Arun, Banu K.; Toland, Amanda E.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Claes, Kathleen; van Maerken, Tom; Díez, Orland; Hansen, Thomas V.; Jønson, Lars; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldés, Trinidad; Dunning, Alison M.; Oliver, Clare; Fineberg, Elena; Cook, Margaret; Peock, Susan; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Jacobs, Chris; Pichert, Gabriella; Lalloo, Fiona; Chu, Carol; Dorkins, Huw; Paterson, Joan; Ong, Kai-Ren; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Seynaeve, Caroline; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Devilee, Peter; Wijnen, Juul T.; Rookus, Matti A.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Blok, Marinus J.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Phillips, Kelly-Anne A.; Piedmonte, Marion; Nerenstone, Stacy R.; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; O'Malley, David M.; Ratner, Elena S.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Rhiem, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hansjoerg J.; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Steinemann, Doris; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Gehrig, Andrea; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Sunde, Lone; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Foretova, Lenka; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bernard, Loris; Peissel, Bernard; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Radice, Paolo; Ottini, Laura; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Maugard, Christine; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Geschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alex; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; Daly, Mary B.; Goldgar, David E.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elisabeth J.; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Godwin, Andrew K.; Olah, Edith; Narod, Steven A.; Rennert, Gad; Paluch, Shani Shimon; Laitman, Yael; Friedman, Eitan; Liljegren, Annelie; Rantala, Johanna; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Hamann, Ute; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Healey, Sue; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Herzog, Josef; Margileth, David; Gorrini, Chiara; Esteller, Manel; Gómez, Antonio; Sayols, Sergi; Vidal, Enrique; Heyn, Holger; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Léoné, Melanie; Barjhoux, Laure; Fassy-Colcombet, Marion; de Pauw, Antoine; Lasset, Christine; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Castera, Laurent; Berthet, Pascaline; Cornelis, François; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Damiola, Francesca; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Maxwell, Christopher A.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Corines, Marina J.; Villano, Danylko; Cunningham, Julie; Lee, Adam; Lindor, Noralane; Lázaro, Conxi; Easton, Douglas F.; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Pujana, Miguel Angel; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Calender, Alain; Giraud, Sophie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Buecher, Bruno; Houdayer, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Golmard, Lisa; Collet, Agnès; Moncoutier, Virginie; Lefol, Cédrick; Belotti, Muriel; Elan, Camille; Nogues, Catherine; Fourme, Emmanuelle; Birot, Anne-Marie; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Caron, Olivier; Guillaud-Bataille, Marine; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bonadona, Valérie; Handallou, Sandrine; Hardouin, Agnès; Vaur, Dominique; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Remenieras, Audrey; Eisinger, François; Coupier, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Françoise; Bubien, Virginie; Sevenet, Nicolas; Longy, Michel; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Peysselon, Magalie; Coron, Fanny; Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Warcoin, Mathilde; Sokolowska, Johanna; Bronner, Myriam; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Damette, Alexandre; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Aghmesheh, Morteza; Amor, David; Andrews, Lesley; Antill, Yoland; Armitage, Shane; Arnold, Leanne; Balleine, Rosemary; Bankier, Agnes; Bastick, Patti; Beesley, Jonathan; Beilby, John; Bennett, Barbara; Bennett, Ian; Berry, Geoffrey; Blackburn, Anneke; Bogwitz, Michael; Brennan, Meagan; Brown, Melissa; Buckley, Michael; Burgess, Matthew; Burke, Jo; Butow, Phyllis; Byron, Keith; Callen, David; Campbell, Ian; Chauhan, Deepa; Chauhan, Manisha; Christian, Alice; Clarke, Christine; Colley, Alison; Cotton, Dick; Crook, Ashley; Cui, James; Culling, Bronwyn; Cummings, Margaret; Dawson, Sarah-Jane; Defazio, Anna; Delatycki, Martin; Dickson, Rebecca; Dixon, Joanne; Dobrovic, Alexander; Dudding, Tracy; Edkins, Ted; Edwards, Stacey; Eisenbruch, Maurice; Farshid, Gelareh; Fawcett, Susan; Fellows, Andrew; Fenton, Georgina; Field, Michael; Firgaira, Frank; Flanagan, James; Fleming, Jean; Fong, Peter; Forbes, John; Fox, Stephen; French, Juliet; Friedlander, Michael; Gaff, Clara; Gardner, Mac; Gattas, Mike; George, Peter; Giles, Graham; Gill, Grantley; Goldblatt, Jack; Greening, Sian; Grist, Scott; Haan, Eric; Hardie, Kate; Harris, Marion; Hart, Stewart; Hayward, Nick; Heiniger, Louise; Hopper, John; Humphrey, Evelyn; Hunt, Clare; James, Paul; Jenkins, Mark; Jones, Alison; Kefford, Rick; Kidd, Alexa; Kiely, Belinda; Kirk, Judy; Koehler, Jessica; Kollias, James; Kovalenko, Serguei; Lakhani, Sunil; Leaming, Amanda; Leary, Jennifer; Lim, Jacqueline; Lindeman, Geoff; Lipton, Lara; Lobb, Liz; Mann, Graham; Marsh, Deborah; McLachlan, Sue Anne; Meiser, Bettina; Meldrum, Cliff; Milne, Roger; Mitchell, Gillian; Newman, Beth; Niedermayr, Eveline; Nightingale, Sophie; O'Connell, Shona; O'Loughlin, Imelda; Osborne, Richard; Pachter, Nick; Patterson, Briony; Peters, Lester; Phillips, Kelly; Price, Melanie; Purser, Lynne; Reeve, Tony; Reeve, Jeanne; Richards, Robert; Rickard, Edwina; Robinson, Bridget; Rudzki, Barney; Saleh, Mona; Salisbury, Elizabeth; Sambrook, Joe; Saunders, Christobel; Saunus, Jodi; Sayer, Robyn; Scott, Elizabeth; Scott, Rodney; Scott, Clare; Seshadri, Ram; Sexton, Adrienne; Sharma, Raghwa; Shelling, Andrew; Simpson, Peter; Southey, Melissa; Spurdle, Amanda; Suthers, Graeme; Sykes, Pamela; Tassell, Margaret; Taylor, Donna; Taylor, Jessica; Thierry, Benjamin; Thomas, Susan; Thompson, Ella; Thorne, Heather; Townshend, Sharron; Trainer, Alison; Tran, Lan; Tucker, Kathy; Tyler, Janet; Visvader, Jane; Walker, Logan; Walpole, Ian; Ward, Robin; Waring, Paul; Warner, Bev; Warren, Graham; Williams, Rachael; Wilson, Judy; Winship, Ingrid; Wu, Kathy; Young, Mary Ann; Olsson, Håkan; Jernström, Helena; Henriksson, Karin; Harbst, Katja; Soller, Maria; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Öfverholm, Anna; Nordling, Margareta; Karlsson, Per; Einbeigi, Zakaria; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Bustinza, Gisela Barbany; Melin, Beatrice; Ardnor, Christina Edwinsdotter; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Pigg, Maritta Hellström; Rosenquist, Richard; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Åke

    2015-01-01

    While interplay between BRCA1 and AURKA-RHAMM-TPX2-TUBG1 regulates mammary epithelial polarization, common genetic variation in HMMR (gene product RHAMM) may be associated with risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers. Following on these observations, we further assessed the link between the

  1. Antidepressant medication use and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernli, Karen J; Hampton, John M; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly A

    2009-04-01

    Most epidemiologic studies have detected no association between prior use of antidepressant medications and breast cancer risk. Despite the uniform conclusion, there is a continuous rise in the proportion of women using antidepressants, lending support to further monitoring of disease effects. We conducted a population-based case-control study among 2908 incident breast cancer cases diagnosed from 2003 to 2006, and 2927 control women from Wisconsin. Associations between antidepressant use and breast cancer risk were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression. The association between use of antidepressant medications and breast cancer risk was null (OR = 0.89, 95%CI 0.78-1.01). When stratified by type of antidepressant, use of selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) resulted in a similar risk overall (OR = 0.85, 95%CI 0.72-1.00) and among former and currents users. There were no associations between other types of antidepressant classes and breast cancer risk. In assessing risks among the five most commonly used antidepressants, we detected no association with fluoxetine, sertraline, venlafaxine, or buproprion hydrochloride. There was a reduction in breast cancer risk of 36% (OR = 0.64, 95%CI 0.45-0.92) among users of paroxetine hydrochloride. When stratified by body mass index, there was a reduction in risk associated with antidepressant users who were not overweight (OR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.60-0.90), but this association was null in overweight women (p-interaction = 0.04). Surveillance of health risks associated with antidepressant medications continues to be of public health importance, though these medications are not likely to be associated with breast cancer risk.

  2. Relationship Between Mammographic Density and Breast Cancer Death in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Women with elevated mammographic density have an increased risk of developing breast cancer. However, among women diagnosed with breast cancer, it is unclear whether higher density portends reduced survival, independent of other factors. Methods We evaluated relationships between mammographic density and risk of death from breast cancer and all causes within the US Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium. We studied 9232 women diagnosed with primary invasive breast carcinoma during 1996–2005, with a mean follow-up of 6.6 years. Mammographic density was assessed using the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) density classification. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by Cox proportional hazards regression; women with scattered fibroglandular densities (BI-RADS 2) were the referent group. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results A total of 1795 women died, of whom 889 died of breast cancer. In multivariable analyses (adjusted for site, age at and year of diagnosis, American Joint Committee on Cancer stage, body mass index, mode of detection, treatment, and income), high density (BI-RADS 4) was not related to risk of death from breast cancer (HR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.71 to 1.19) or death from all causes (HR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.68 to 1.02). Analyses stratified by stage and other prognostic factors yielded similar results, except for an increased risk of breast cancer death among women with low density (BI-RADS 1) who were either obese (HR = 2.02, 95% CI = 1.37 to 2.97) or had tumors of at least 2.0cm (HR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.14 to 2.09). Conclusions High mammographic breast density was not associated with risk of death from breast cancer or death from any cause after accounting for other patient and tumor characteristics. Thus, risk factors for the development of breast cancer may not necessarily be the same as factors influencing the risk of death after breast cancer has developed. PMID:22911616

  3. The Breast Cancer DNA Interactome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    RG . Demonstration of receptors for insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 on Hs578T human breast cancer cells. J Biol Chem. 1993;268:26045-8...Interaction Profiles in Breast Cancer Reveal Altered Chromatin Architecture Michael J. Zeitz1*, Ferhat Ay2, Julia D. Heidmann1, Paula L. Lerner1...Illumina sequencing data have been submitted to the GEO database accession number: GSE49521. Mapping and Filtering of 4C Reads We first de -multiplexed the

  4. Breast cancer and spaceflight: risk and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Yael R; Bacal, Kira; Jones, Jeffrey A; Hamilton, Douglas R

    2007-04-01

    Spaceflight exposes astronauts to a host of environmental factors which could increase their risk for cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown an increased incidence of breast cancer in female commercial flight attendants, with occupational risk factors as one of the proposed mechanisms for the higher incidence in this cohort. Since female astronauts are exposed to similar occupational conditions as flight attendants, they too may be at an increased risk for breast cancer. With the planning of exploration class missions to the Moon and to Mars it is important to assess and minimize the risk for breast malignancy, and to have a well-defined protocol for the diagnosis and treatment of a breast mass discovered during a mission. Risk factors for development of breast cancer in the female astronaut include ionizing radiation, disrupted melatonin homeostasis secondary to circadian shifting, chemical exposure, and changes in immune function. Preflight, in-flight, and postflight screening and management modalities include imaging and fine needle aspiration (FNA). Employing such a strategy may provide a viable management approach in the case of a newly diagnosed breast mass inflight.

  5. An Automatic Framework for Assessing Breast Cancer Risk Due to Various Hormone Replacement Therapies (HRT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal Raghunath; Brandt, Sami; Nielsen, Mads

    features describing the local elongatedness or stripiness, especially trained to see the effect of HRT thereby providing a non-subjective and reproducible measure and compare it to the BIRADS and percentage density measure. Objective: 1) To provide a framework for obtaining more accurate and sensitive...... of 2x135 completers of a two year, randomised, trial formed the base of the present analysis. Active treatments were transdermal estradiol releasing 0.014mg E2/week and orally administered raloxifene hydrochloride, 60mg/day respectively. Influence of the therapies on breast density was assessed....... No treatment induced significant density changes measured by BI-RADS. Both treatments made the area percentage density increase and the estradiol significantly. Both treatments induced significant changes in E2-specific heterogeneity scoring (E2-HER) and the raloxifene treatment a significantly higher change...

  6. Assessment of algorithms for mitosis detection in breast cancer histopathology images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veta, Mitko; van Diest, Paul J; Willems, Stefan M; Wang, Haibo; Madabhushi, Anant; Cruz-Roa, Angel; Gonzalez, Fabio; Larsen, Anders B L; Vestergaard, Jacob S; Dahl, Anders B; Cireşan, Dan C; Schmidhuber, Jürgen; Giusti, Alessandro; Gambardella, Luca M; Tek, F Boray; Walter, Thomas; Wang, Ching-Wei; Kondo, Satoshi; Matuszewski, Bogdan J; Precioso, Frederic; Snell, Violet; Kittler, Josef; de Campos, Teofilo E; Khan, Adnan M; Rajpoot, Nasir M; Arkoumani, Evdokia; Lacle, Miangela M; Viergever, Max A; Pluim, Josien P W

    2015-02-01

    The proliferative activity of breast tumors, which is routinely estimated by counting of mitotic figures in hematoxylin and eosin stained histology sections, is considered to be one of the most important prognostic markers. However, mitosis counting is laborious, subjective and may suffer from low inter-observer agreement. With the wider acceptance of whole slide images in pathology labs, automatic image analysis has been proposed as a potential solution for these issues. In this paper, the results from the Assessment of Mitosis Detection Algorithms 2013 (AMIDA13) challenge are described. The challenge was based on a data set consisting of 12 training and 11 testing subjects, with more than one thousand annotated mitotic figures by multiple observers. Short descriptions and results from the evaluation of eleven methods are presented. The top performing method has an error rate that is comparable to the inter-observer agreement among pathologists. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment of letrozole and tamoxifen alone and in sequence for postmenopausal women with steroid hormone receptor-positive breast cancer: the BIG 1-98 randomised clinical trial at 8·1 years median follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regan, Meredith M; Neven, Patrick; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive early breast cancer have persistent, long-term risk of breast-cancer recurrence and death. Therefore, trials assessing endocrine therapies for this patient population need extended follow-up. We present an update of efficacy outcomes in the Brea...

  8. Radiotherapy for breast cancer and pacemaker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menard, J.; Campana, F.; Bollet, M.A.; Dendale, R.; Fournier-Bidoz, N.; Marchand, V.; Mazal, A.; Fourquet, A.; Kirova, Y.M.; Kirov, K.M.; Esteve, M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. - Patients with permanent cardiac pacemakers occasionally require radiotherapy. Therapeutic Irradiation may cause pacemakers to malfunction due to the effects of ionizing radiation or electromagnetic interference. We studied the breast cancer patients who needed breast and/or chest wall and lymph node irradiation to assess the feasibility and tolerance in this population of patients. Patients and methods. - From November 2008 to December 2009, more than 900 patients received radiotherapy for their breast cancer in our department using megavoltage linear accelerator (X 4-6 MV and electrons). Among them, seven patients were with permanent pacemaker. All patients have been treated to the breast and chest wall and/or lymph nodes. Total dose to breast and/or chest wall was 50 Gy/25 fractions and 46 Gy/23 fractions to lymph nodes. Patients who underwent conserving surgery followed by breast irradiation were boosted when indicated to tumour bed with 16 Gy/8 fractions. All patients were monitored everyday in presence of radiation oncologist to follow the function of their pacemaker. All pacemakers were controlled before and after radiotherapy by the patients' cardiologist. Results. - Seven patients were referred in our department for postoperative breast cancer radiotherapy. Among them, only one patient was declined for radiotherapy and underwent mastectomy without radiotherapy. In four cases the pacemaker was repositioned before the beginning of radiotherapy. Six patients, aged between 48 and 84 years underwent irradiation for their breast cancer. Four patients were treated with conserving surgery followed by breast radiotherapy and two with mastectomy followed by chest wall and internal mammary chain, supra- and infra-clavicular lymph node irradiation. The dose to the pacemaker generator was kept below 2 Gy. There was no pacemaker dysfunction observed during the radiotherapy. Conclusion. - The multidisciplinary work with position change of the pacemaker before

  9. Iodide transport and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Vikki L; McCabe, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide and the leading cause of cancer death in women, with incidence rates that continue to rise. The heterogeneity of the disease makes breast cancer exceptionally difficult to treat, particularly for those patients with triple-negative disease. To address the therapeutic complexity of these tumours, new strategies for diagnosis and treatment are urgently required. The ability of lactating and malignant breast cells to uptake and transport iodide has led to the hypothesis that radioiodide therapy could be a potentially viable treatment for many breast cancer patients. Understanding how iodide is transported, and the factors regulating the expression and function of the proteins responsible for iodide transport, is critical for translating this hypothesis into reality. This review covers the three known iodide transporters - the sodium iodide symporter, pendrin and the sodium-coupled monocarboxylate transporter - and their role in iodide transport in breast cells, along with efforts to manipulate them to increase the potential for radioiodide therapy as a treatment for breast cancer. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  10. Cationic Albumin Nanoparticles for Enhanced Drug Delivery to Treat Breast Cancer: Preparation and In Vitro Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Abbasi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most anticancer drugs are greatly limited by the serious side effects that they cause. Doxorubicin (DOX is an antineoplastic agent, commonly used against breast cancer. However, it may lead to irreversible cardiotoxicity, which could even result in congestive heart failure. In order to avoid these harmful side effects to the patients and to improve the therapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin, we developed DOX-loaded polyethylenimine- (PEI- enhanced human serum albumin (HSA nanoparticles. The formed nanoparticles were ~137 nm in size with a surface zeta potential of ~+15 mV, prepared using 20 μg of PEI added per mg of HSA. Cytotoxicity was not observed with empty PEI-enhanced HSA nanoparticles, formed with low-molecular weight (25 kDa PEI, indicating biocompatibility and safety of the nanoparticle formulation. Under optimized transfection conditions, approximately 80% of cells were transfected with HSA nanoparticles containing tetramethylrhodamine-conjugated bovine serum albumin. Conclusively, PEI-enhanced HSA nanoparticles show potential for developing into an effective carrier for anticancer drugs.

  11. Prognosis of pregnancy-associated breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guek Eng; Mayer, Erica L; Partridge, Ann

    2017-06-01

    Conventionally, breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy and within the years following have been referred to collectively as pregnancy-associated breast cancer. However, increasing evidence suggests that breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy is a different entity from that diagnosed postpartum, both in terms of prognosis and biology. Given the increasing number of women who find themselves diagnosed with breast cancer during or following a pregnancy, future research and discussion should separate these two into distinct groups: breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy and breast cancer diagnosed postpartum in an effort to enhance our understanding to inform and improve clinical management and counseling.

  12. Radioisotope techniques used in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auyong Tingkun

    2001-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the commonest cancer in women. Treatment and prognosis of breast cancer depend very much on accurate diagnosis, staging and follow-up of patients. Recently, there are several radioisotope techniques developed and have great impact on management of breast cancer. These include scintimammography, sentinel lymph node detection and positron emission tomography. This article is to review these important techniques

  13. Health-related quality-of-life assessment in CLEOPATRA, a phase III study combining pertuzumab with trastuzumab and docetaxel in metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, J; Baselga, J; Im, Y-H; Im, S-A; Pivot, X; Ross, G; Clark, E; Knott, A; Swain, S M

    2013-10-01

    The phase III CLEOPATRA study demonstrated that combining pertuzumab with trastuzumab plus docetaxel significantly improves progression-free and overall survival in previously untreated HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. Here, we report health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) results from CLEOPATRA. Participants were randomly assigned to pertuzumab or placebo, each given with trastuzumab plus docetaxel every 3 weeks. Pertuzumab and trastuzumab were administered until progression and six or more docetaxel cycles were recommended. Time from randomization to a ≥ 5-point decrease in Trial Outcome Index-Physical/Functional/Breast (TOI-PFB) of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast (FACT-B) questionnaire was analyzed as a prespecified secondary end point. A post hoc exploratory analysis investigated time to ≥ 2-point deterioration in Breast Cancer Subscale (BCS) score. Time to ≥ 5-point decline in TOI-PFB did not differ significantly between the pertuzumab and placebo arms [hazard ratio (HR), 0.97; P = 0.7161]. The median times to TOI-PFB deterioration were 18.4 and 18.3 weeks, respectively (approximately six cycles). The mean TOI-PFB declined slightly until week 18 and recovered thereafter. Pertuzumab increased time until BCS deterioration versus placebo (median 26.7 versus 18.3 weeks; HR, 0.77; P = 0.0061). Combining pertuzumab with trastuzumab and docetaxel had no adverse impact on HRQoL and may prolong time to worsening of breast cancer-specific symptoms.

  14. Depression and Resilience in Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristevska-Dimitrovska, Gordana; Stefanovski, Petar; Smichkoska, Snezhana; Raleva, Marija; Dejanova, Beti

    2015-12-15

    A significant number of breast cancer patients, during their life with the diagnosis, experience emotional distress in the form of depression and anxiety. Psychological resilience is the ability of a person to protect his/her mental health when faced with adverse circumstances such as the cancer diagnosis. This study aims to assess the resilience in breast cancer patients and to explore whether depression affects the resilience. Two hundred eighteen (218) women, treated for early breast cancer responded to Connor - Davidson Resilience Scale and Hospital Depression and Anxiety Scale, in order to assess the level of psychological resilience and the level of depression. There is a significant negative correlation between depression and resilience in our sample (r = - 0.562, p resilience. There is no statistically significant correlation between the ages of the participants; time passed since diagnosis, cancer stage and resilience levels. This study shows that patients who are less depressed have higher levels of resilience and that psychological resilience may independently contribute to lower levels of depression among breast cancer patients. The level of psychological resilience may be a protective factor for depression and psychological distress.

  15. Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiansen P

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Peer Christiansen,1 Bent Ejlertsen,2,3 Maj-Britt Jensen,3 Henning Mouridsen3 1Department of Surgery P, Breast Surgery Unit, Aarhus University Hospital/Randers Regional Hospital, Aarhus C, 2Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, 3DBCG-secretariat, Department 2501, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark Aim of database: Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG, with an associated database, was introduced as a nationwide multidisciplinary group in 1977 with the ultimate aim to improve the prognosis in breast cancer. Since then, the database has registered women diagnosed with primary invasive nonmetastatic breast cancer. The data reported from the departments to the database included details of the characteristics of the primary tumor, of surgery, radiotherapy, and systemic therapies, and of follow-up reported on specific forms from the departments in question. Descriptive data: From 1977 through 2014, ~110,000 patients are registered in the nationwide, clinical database. The completeness has gradually improved to more than 95%. DBCG has continuously prepared evidence-based guidelines on diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer and conducted quality control studies to ascertain the degree of adherence to the guidelines in the different departments. Conclusion: Utilizing data from the DBCG database, a long array of high-quality DBCG studies of various designs and scope, nationwide or in international collaboration, have contributed to the current updating of the guidelines, and have been an instrumental resource in the improvement of management and prognosis of breast cancer in Denmark. Thus, since the establishment of DBCG, the prognosis in breast cancer has continuously improved with a decrease in 5-year mortality from ~37% to 15%. Keywords: breast cancer, database, guidelines, quality control, research

  16. MRI evaluation of the contralateral breast in patients with recently diagnosed breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taneja, Sangeeta; Jena, Amarnath; Zaidi, Syed Mohd. Shuaib; Khurana, Anuj

    2012-01-01

    Contralateral breast cancer can be synchronous and/or metachronous in patients with cancer of one breast. Detection of a synchronous breast cancer may affect patient management. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of the breast (DCE-MRI) is a sensitive technique for detecting contralateral lesions occult on the other imaging modalities in women already diagnosed with cancer of one breast. The aim was to assess the incidence of mammographically occult synchronous contralateral breast cancer in patients undergoing MRI mammography for the evaluation of a malignant breast lesion. A total of 294 patients with recently diagnosed breast cancer who underwent MRI of the breast were evaluated for lesions in the opposite breast. The incidence of synchronous contralateral malignancy detected by preoperative MRI mammography done for evaluation of extent of disease was 4.1%. Preoperative breast MRI may detect clinically and mammographically occult synchronous contralateral cancer, and can help the patient avoid an additional second surgery or a second course of chemotherapy later; also, as theoretically these lesions are smaller, there may be a survival benefit as well

  17. Assessing interactions between the associations of common genetic susceptibility variants, reproductive history and body mass index with breast cancer risk in the breast cancer association consortium: a combined case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milne, Roger L; Gaudet, Mia M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2010-01-01

    Several common breast cancer genetic susceptibility variants have recently been identified. We aimed to determine how these variants combine with a subset of other known risk factors to influence breast cancer risk in white women of European ancestry using case-control studies participating...

  18. Assessing interactions between the associations of common genetic susceptibility variants, reproductive history and body mass index with breast cancer risk in the breast cancer association consortium: a combined case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milne, Roger L; Gaudet, Mia M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2010-01-01

    Several common breast cancer genetic susceptibility variants have recently been identified. We aimed to determine how these variants combine with a subset of other known risk factors to influence breast cancer risk in white women of European ancestry using case-control studies participating in th...

  19. Diet and breast cancer: understanding risks and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Cynthia A

    2012-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women in the United States. Extensive research has been completed to evaluate the relationship between dietary factors and breast cancer risk and survival after breast cancer; however, a summary report with clinical inference is needed. Materials and This review summarizes the current epidemiological and clinical trial evidence relating diet to breast cancer incidence, recurrence, survival, and mortality. The review includes emerging epidemiological studies that assess risk within breast cancer subtypes as well as a summary of previous and ongoing dietary intervention trials designed to modify breast cancer risk. The available literature suggests that both low-fat and high-fiber diets may be weakly protective against breast cancer, whereas total energy intake and alcohol appear to be positively associated. Fiber may be weakly protective possibly through modulation of estrogen, whereas fruit and vegetable intake is not clearly associated with risk. Obesity is a risk factor for postmenopausal disease, and adult weight gain should be avoided to reduce risk. In survivors, diet has the greatest potential influence on overall mortality rather than breast cancer-specific events. Diet is modestly associated with breast cancer risk; associations appear more pronounced for postmenopausal disease, and healthy choices after diagnosis and treatment likely support longevity more so than reduced risk for recurrent disease.

  20. Awareness and current knowledge of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mehwish; Daniyal, Muhammad; Khan, Asmat Ullah

    2017-10-02

    Breast cancer remains a worldwide public health dilemma and is currently the most common tumour in the globe. Awareness of breast cancer, public attentiveness, and advancement in breast imaging has made a positive impact on recognition and screening of breast cancer. Breast cancer is life-threatening disease in females and the leading cause of mortality among women population. For the previous two decades, studies related to the breast cancer has guided to astonishing advancement in our understanding of the breast cancer, resulting in further proficient treatments. Amongst all the malignant diseases, breast cancer is considered as one of the leading cause of death in post menopausal women accounting for 23% of all cancer deaths. It is a global issue now, but still it is diagnosed in their advanced stages due to the negligence of women regarding the self inspection and clinical examination of the breast. This review addresses anatomy of the breast, risk factors, epidemiology of breast cancer, pathogenesis of breast cancer, stages of breast cancer, diagnostic investigations and treatment including chemotherapy, surgery, targeted therapies, hormone replacement therapy, radiation therapy, complementary therapies, gene therapy and stem-cell therapy etc for breast cancer.

  1. Awareness and current knowledge of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Akram

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Breast cancer remains a worldwide public health dilemma and is currently the most common tumour in the globe. Awareness of breast cancer, public attentiveness, and advancement in breast imaging has made a positive impact on recognition and screening of breast cancer. Breast cancer is life-threatening disease in females and the leading cause of mortality among women population. For the previous two decades, studies related to the breast cancer has guided to astonishing advancement in our understanding of the breast cancer, resulting in further proficient treatments. Amongst all the malignant diseases, breast cancer is considered as one of the leading cause of death in post menopausal women accounting for 23% of all cancer deaths. It is a global issue now, but still it is diagnosed in their advanced stages due to the negligence of women regarding the self inspection and clinical examination of the breast. This review addresses anatomy of the breast, risk factors, epidemiology of breast cancer, pathogenesis of breast cancer, stages of breast cancer, diagnostic investigations and treatment including chemotherapy, surgery, targeted therapies, hormone replacement therapy, radiation therapy, complementary therapies, gene therapy and stem-cell therapy etc for breast cancer.

  2. The Effect of Telephone Counseling and Education on Breast Cancer Screening in Family Caregivers of Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiriani, Khadijeh; Motevasselian, Monireh; Farnia, Farahnaz; Shiryazdi, Seyed Mostafa; Khodayarian, Mahsa

    2017-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most common form of malignancy among females. Family history is a key risk factor for breast cancer. Breast cancer screening practices are vital in patients with family history of breast cancer. Telephone counseling and education may be appropriate for improved breast cancer screening. This study was done to determine family caregiver patients' knowledge of risk factors for breast cancer and practice of breast cancer screening and also to assess the effect of telephone counseling and education on mammography screening. This study was a community-based trial. The participants of the study were 90 caregivers who were randomly divided into an experimental group, telephone counseling and education, and a control group. The intervention group received counseling and education phone calls. A three-section questionnaire was responded and filled out through telephone interviews with the participants. The collected data were analyzed with SPSS18, using descriptive and inferential statistics. The results showed that 88.9% of the participants did not know when to do breast self-exam (BSE). Mammography was performed by the participants before and after the telephone counseling in intervention group (Ppatients was low. Telephone counseling and educating may provide a suitable technique for earlier detection of breast cancer in family caregivers of breast cancer patients and it can influence the decision making regarding mammography screening among 40-year-old or older women. Trial Registration Number: 2017052316870N3.

  3. Factors affecting breast cancer screening behavior in Japan--assessment using the health belief model and conjoint analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunematsu, Miwako; Kawasaki, Hiromi; Masuoka, Yuko; Kakehashi, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    Japanese women in their 40s or older have been encouraged to attend breast cancer screening. However, the breast cancer screening rate in Japan is not as high as in Europe and the United States. The aim of this study was to identify psychological and personal characteristics of women concerning their participation in breast cancer screening using the Health Belief Model (HBM). In addition, the attributes of screening more easily accepted by participants were analyzed by conjoint analysis. In this cross sectional study of 3,200 age 20-69 women, data were collected by an anonymous questionnaire. Questions were based on HBM and personal characteristics, and included attitudes on hypothetical screening attributes. Data of women aged 40-69 were analyzed by logistic regression and conjoint analysis to clarify the factors affecting their participation in breast cancer screening. Among responses collected from 1,280 women of age 20-69, the replies of 993 women of age 40-69 were used in the analysis. Regarding the psychological characteristics based on HBM, the odds ratios were significantly higher in "importance of cancer screening" (95%CI: 1.21-2.47) and "benefits of cancer screening" (95%CI: 1.09-2.49), whereas the odds ratio was significantly lower in "barriers to participation before cancer screening" (95%CI: 0.27-0.51). Conjoint analysis revealed that the respondents, overall, preferred screening to be low cost and by female staff members. Furthermore, it was also clarified that attributes of screening dominant in decision-making were influenced by the employment status and the type of medical insurance of the women. In order to increase participation in breast cancer screening, it is necessary to disseminate accurate knowledge on cancer screening and to reduce barriers to participation. In addition, the attributes of screening more easily accepted were inexpensive, provided by female staff, executed in a hospital and finished in a short time.

  4. Finasteride treatment and male breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meijer, Mathias; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Green, Anders

    2018-01-01

    A potential link has been suggested between dispensed finasteride and increased risk of male breast cancer (MBC). Due to the rare occurrence of MBC, it remains to be established if such a relationship exists. The purpose of this study was to combine nationwide registers in four countries to assess...... the potential association between dispensed finasteride and MBC. A cohort of all males with dispensed finasteride in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden (1,365,088 person years) was followed up for up to 15 years for breast cancer, and compared to a cohort of males unexposed to finasteride. Individual...

  5. Clinical diagnosis of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leis, H P

    1975-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant neoplasm in women, and 6% will develop it during their normal life expectancy. There is a group who have a high risk of developing breast cancer. The recent improvement in cure rates seems to be jue chiefly to earlier diagnosis rather than to improved methods of therapy. The physician, by careful periodic breast examinations and by the judicious use of diagnostic aids such as mammography and thermography, especially in the high risk group, has a golden opportunity to pick up cancer in a localized stage where the prognosis for cure with appropriate therapy is excellent. A tentative diagnosis of breast cancer (Table XI) can be made with a fair degree of accuracy by taking a careful history, utilizing and combining available statistics about the frequency, median age, characteristic symptom complexes of the common breast lesions and factors related to a high mammary carcinoma risk, and by a systematic and thorough breast examination supplemented with diagnostic aids when appropriate. However, biopsy and histologic examination is mandatory in all patients with a) true, three dimentional, dominant lumps even if diagnostic aids are negative except for cysts which can be safely aspirated under controlled conditions; b) suspicious lesions found by diagnostic aids even though there are no clinical findings; c) serous, serosanguineous, bloody, or watery nipple discharge; and d) other signs of cancer, i.e. eczema of the nipple, axillary adenopathy, etc., in order to determine with absolute accuracy whether the lesion is benign or malignant.

  6. [Lobular neoplasms and invasive lobular breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinn, H-P; Helmchen, B; Heil, J; Aulmann, S

    2014-02-01

    The term lobular neoplasia (LN) comprises both atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH), and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) and thus a spectrum of morphologically heterogeneous but clinically and biologically related lesions. LN is regarded as a nonobligatory precursor lesion of invasive breast cancer and at the same time as an indicator lesion for ipsilateral and contralateral breast cancer risk of the patient. Rare pleomorphic or florid variants of LCIS must be differentiated from classical LCIS. The classical type of invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) can be distinguished from the non-special type of invasive breast cancer (NST) by E-cadherin inactivation, loss of E-cadherin related cell adhesion and the subsequent discohesive growth pattern. Variant forms of ILC may show different molecular features, and solid and pleomorphic differentiation patterns in cases of high grade variants. Important parameters for the prognostic assessment of ILC are tumor grading and the recognition of morphological variants.

  7. Assessment of breast cancer risk factors in asymptomatic hospital staff women aged 32-59: a descriptive report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdi, K.; Yahyazadeh, S.H.; Bahoor, F.; Ziaee, F.; Arefi, S.H.; Jafarnia, N.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Iranian breast cancer patients are relatively younger than their Western counterparts. The objective of the present study was to investigate risk factors for breast cancer in Iranian women and compare it with other data driven from other studies. Methods: A study was conducted in April 2008 in Tehran, Iran. Demographical data and risk factor related information, including data from their mammograms were collected using a questionnaire. Results: In all, 109 participants were interviewed. The mean age of participants was 40.48 +- 0.56 years. 1.8% of women were unmarried, while 78% were married and 20.2% were divorced/widowed. The mean age for menarche was 13.34 +-1.47 years and 46.89+-4.98 for the menopause, respectively. The mean parity time was 2.36+-1.13 and breast feeding in women was 23.27+-14.16 months. About 5.5% of the participants used oral contraceptive as a method for contraception. 8.3% of women experienced menopause, at the mean age of 46.89+-4.98. 33.3% of Mendip's women, used Hormone Replace Therapy (HRT).Moreover, 8.3% of women had a positive history of breast cancer in their family. Of those women on whom mammography was done, 10.1% had breast mass in radiological findings, mostly in favour of fibrocystic change. In 20.2% of participants, further investigation was advised. Conclusion: The findings of the present study were in accordance with other studies done in Iran and in some aspects in tune with other studies about breast cancer in other countries. However, more multi centric larger scale studies should be conducted in Iran to determine a pattern for breast cancer in Iranian women. (author)

  8. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the other breast may consider a bilateral mastectomy, meaning both breasts are removed. This includes women with ... Fluorouracil (5-FU, Adrucil) Gemcitabine (Gemzar) Methotrexate (multiple brand names) Paclitaxel (Taxol) Protein-bound paclitaxel (Abraxane) Vinorelbine ( ...

  9. 7q21-rs6964587 and breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milne, Roger L; Lorenzo-Bermejo, Justo; Burwinkel, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Using the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, the authors previously reported that the single nucleotide polymorphism 7q21-rs6964587 (AKAP9-M463I) is associated with breast cancer risk. The authors have now assessed this association more comprehensively using 16 independent case-control studies....

  10. Hypercalcaemia in patients with breast cancer: Patterns and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To assess the patterns of use of bisphosphonate therapies for hypercalcaemia in breast cancer patients, and their outcomes. Methods: A retrospective chart review study of breast cancer patients hospitalised between 2009 and 2014 at Penang Hospital, a public tertiary hospital in Malaysia was conducted. Patients ...

  11. Vitamin A Status of Patients with Breast Cancer Attending University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study was conducted to determine the vitamin A status of newly diagnosed patients with breast cancer at the University College Hospital, Ibadan. Subjects/Methods: The vitamin A status of thirty newly diagnosed female patients with breast cancer was assessed through the use of food frequency questionnaire ...

  12. Breast cancer and self-examination knowledge among Tanzanian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to assess knowledge related to breast cancer and breast self-examination (BSE) among Tanzanian women. This hospital-based study was conducted at the Ocean Road Cancer Institute in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 130 women aged 20-69 years ...

  13. Sexual dysfunction in young women with breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kedde, H.; van de Wiel, H. B. M.; Schultz, W. C. M. Weijmar; Wijsen, C.

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of sexual dysfunction in young women with breast cancer in the Netherlands, and to assess the relationship between sexual dysfunction, treatment methods and treatment-related complaints. Also, the interest among women with breast cancer in

  14. Delays in presentation and treatment of breast cancer in Enugu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To assess the delays and define the causes of delay in presentation and treatment of breast cancer patients inEnugu,Nigeria. Across-sectional survey of breast cancer patients using a semi structured questionnaire. SurgicalOncology unit,University ofNigeriaTeachingHospitalEnugu, (UNTH-E),Nigeria. 164 consecutively ...

  15. Menarche menopause breast cancer risk individual

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast Cancer; Bausch-Goldbohm, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Menarche and menopause mark the onset and cessation, respectively, of ovarian activity associated with reproduction, and affect breast cancer risk. Our aim was to assess the strengths of their effects and determine whether they depend on characteristics of the tumours or the affected

  16. Mammographic Breast Density in Malaysian Women with Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriah Jamal; Humairah Samad Cheung

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the mammographic breast density of women with breast cancer detected on voluntary mammographic screening at two selected screening centers in Malaysia. This was a retrospective study of Full-Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) images of 150 Malaysian women with biopsy-proven breast cancer. The study population comprised 73 Malays (37.7 %), 59 Chinese (39.3 %) and 18 Indians (12.0 %). The Tabar breast density Patterns (I - V) were used to evaluate mammographic breast density. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The results were compared with findings from a similar study on a group of 668 women who did not have breast cancer. The results showed that 44.7 % of the study population had dense breasts (Patterns IV and V), 14.7 % had predominantly fatty breasts (Patterns II and III) while 40.7 % had Pattern I. The proportion of study population with dense breasts decreased with age. In conclusion, the proportion of women with dense breasts decreased with age. Majority of the women with cancer (44.7 %) had dense breasts of Tabar Patterns IV and V, which has been associated with increased risk of breast cancer detected by voluntary mammographic screening. The results support the notion that increased breast density is a risk factor of breast cancer. (author)

  17. On ionising radiation and breast cancer risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattson, Anders

    1999-05-01

    A cohort of 3,090 women with clinical diagnosis of benign breast disease (BBD) was studied. Of these, 1,216 were treated with radiation therapy during 1925-54 (median age 40 years). The mean dose to the breasts was 5.8 Gy (range 0-50 Gy). Among other organs the lung received the highest scattered dose (0.75 Gy; range 0.004-8.98 Gy) and the rectum the lowest (0.008 Gy; range 0-0.06 Gy). A pooled analysis of eight breast cancer incidence cohorts was done, including: tumour registry data on breast cancer incidence among women in the Life Span Study cohort of atomic bomb survivors; women in Massachusetts who received repeated chest fluoroscopic during lung collapse treatment for tuberculosis; women who received x-ray therapy for acute post-partum mastitis; women who were irradiated in infancy for enlarged thymus glands ; two Swedish cohorts of women who received radiation treatments during infancy for skin hemangioma; and the BBD cohort. Together the cohorts included almost 78,000 women (-35,000 were exposed), around 1.8 million woman-years and 1500 cases. The breast cancer incidence rate as a function of breast dose was analysed using linear-quadratic Poisson regression models. Cell-killing effects and other modifying effects were incorporated through additional log-linear terms. Additive (EAR) and multiplicative (ERR) models were compared in estimating the age-at-exposure patterns and time related excess. The carcinogenic risks associated with radiation in mammographic mass screening is evaluated. Assessment was made in terms of breast cancer mortality and years of life. Effects were related to rates not influenced by a mammographic mass screening program and based on a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 40-year old women with no history of breast cancer being followed to 100 years of age. Two radiation risk assumptions were compared. The dose-response relationship is linear with little support in data for an upward curvature at low to medium doses. The competing effect

  18. Endocrine determinants of breast density and breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheus, M.

    2007-01-01

    Worldwide, breast cancer is the most common malignancy among females. The total breast area on a mammogram can be dived in a radiologicaly dense area (glandular and stromal tissue) and a non-dense area (mainly fat tissue). Women with a high proportion of dense breast tissue (percent breast density)

  19. AR Signaling in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Rahim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor (AR, a member of the steroid hormone receptor family status has become increasingly important as both a prognostic marker and potential therapeutic target in breast cancer. AR is expressed in up to 90% of estrogen receptor (ER positive breast cancer, and to a lesser degree, human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2 amplified tumors. In the former, AR signaling has been correlated with a better prognosis given its inhibitory activity in estrogen dependent disease, though conversely has also been shown to increase resistance to anti-estrogen therapies such as tamoxifen. AR blockade can mitigate this resistance, and thus serves as a potential target in ER-positive breast cancer. In HER2 amplified breast cancer, studies are somewhat conflicting, though most show either no effect or are associated with poorer survival. Much of the available data on AR signaling is in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC, which is an aggressive disease with inferior outcomes comparative to other breast cancer subtypes. At present, there are no approved targeted therapies in TNBC, making study of the AR signaling pathway compelling. Gene expression profiling studies have also identified a luminal androgen receptor (LAR subtype that is dependent on AR signaling in TNBC. Regardless, there seems to be an association between AR expression and improved outcomes in TNBC. Despite lower pathologic complete response (pCR rates with neoadjuvant therapy, patients with AR-expressing TNBC have been shown to have a better prognosis than those that are AR-negative. Clinical studies targeting AR have shown somewhat promising results. In this paper we review the literature on the biology of AR in breast cancer and its prognostic and predictive roles. We also present our thoughts on therapeutic strategies.

  20. Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing breast cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  1. Propranolol and survival from breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardwell, Chris R; Pottegård, Anton; Vaes, Evelien

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preclinical studies have demonstrated that propranolol inhibits several pathways involved in breast cancer progression and metastasis. We investigated whether breast cancer patients who used propranolol, or other non-selective beta-blockers, had reduced breast cancer-specific or all......-cause mortality in eight European cohorts. METHODS: Incident breast cancer patients were identified from eight cancer registries and compiled through the European Cancer Pharmacoepidemiology Network. Propranolol and non-selective beta-blocker use was ascertained for each patient. Breast cancer-specific and all......-analysis techniques. Dose-response analyses by number of prescriptions were also performed. Analyses were repeated investigating propranolol use before cancer diagnosis. RESULTS: The combined study population included 55,252 and 133,251 breast cancer patients in the analysis of breast cancer-specific and all...

  2. Realizing the promise of breast cancer vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Erica Jackson, Hatem SolimanUniversity of South Florida/Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USAAbstract: Breast cancer vaccines are being developed to stimulate adaptive antitumor immune responses in patients. These vaccines have the potential to treat breast cancer with minimal side effects and toxicity. However, many obstacles still need to be overcome to fully realize the vaccines' clinical benefit. A review of the literature was conducted to assess the use of vaccines in targeting transformed cells. Four vaccines currently under study were discussed, each summarizing the different vaccine platforms used to introduce target antigen to the patient's immune system. The advantages and disadvantages of each method were discussed, although no one method was found to be superior. Additional issues addressed included overcoming tumor-induced immunosuppression, immune evasion of transformed cells, the use of vaccines in combination therapy, and the challenges of using these vaccines in various clinical settings. Vaccines may be most effective in patients with minimal residual disease, as opposed to using them in the metastatic setting. Also, specific clinical trial design considerations for the use of vaccines in cancer patients, such as time-to-failure end points, were discussed. Understanding these various elements will be important to the translation of breast cancer vaccine therapy into routine clinical practice.Keywords: breast cancer, vaccine, immunotherapy, immune tolerance, peptide vaccine, dendritic cell vaccine

  3. Fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis of mammographic patterns in assessing breast cancer risk related to HRT treated population: a longitudinal and cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karemore, Gopal; Nielsen, Mads

    2009-02-01

    Structural texture measures are used to address the aspect of breast cancer risk assessment in screening mammograms. The current study investigates whether texture properties characterized by local Fractal Dimension (FD) and Lacunarity contribute to asses breast cancer risk. FD represents the complexity while the Lacunarity characterize the gappiness of a fractal. Our cross-sectional case-control study includes mammograms of 50 patients diagnosed with breast cancer in the subsequent 2-4 years and 50 matched controls. The longitudinal double blind placebo controlled HRT study includes 39 placebo and 36 HRT treated volunteers for two years. ROIs with same dimension (250*150 pixels) were created behind the nipple region on these radiographs. Box counting method was used to calculate the fractal dimension (FD) and the Lacunarity. Paired t-test and Pearson correlation coefficient were calculated. It was found that there were no differences between cancer and control group for FD (P=0.8) and Lacunarity (P=0.8) in crosssectional study whereas earlier published heterogeneity examination of radiographs (BC-HER) breast cancer risk score separated groups (p=0.002). In the longitudinal study, FD decreased significantly (PBIRADS (-0.34, P<0.001) and Percentage Density (-0.41, P<0.001). FD is invariant to the mammographic texture change from control to cancer population but marginally varying in HRT treated population. This study yields no evidence that lacunarity or FD are suitable surrogate markers of mammographic heterogeneity as they neither pick up breast cancer risk, nor show good sensitivity to HRT.

  4. Awareness of breast cancer and breast self-examination among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Awareness of breast cancer and breast self-examination among female undergraduate students in a higher teachers training college in Cameroon. ... Conclusion: Though most students are aware of the existence of breast cancer, their overall knowledge on its risk factors and clinical presentation is insufficient with a ...

  5. Glypican-3 Expression in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Hua Tsai

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: Immunohistochemical staining with TMA was convenient and feasible for analyzing Glypican-3 expression status in breast cancer. However, our preliminary results show that Glypican-3 expression had no significant prognostic value in breast cancer.

  6. Optimized NSAIDS for Breast Cancer Prevention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carson, Dennis A

    2005-01-01

    .... Also, how these agents prevent breast cancer is not understood. This project will develop an optimized NSAID for breast cancer prevention that can be taken safely at high doses, and will determine its mechanisms of action...

  7. DNA Methylation Alterations in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yamamoto, Fumiichiro

    2002-01-01

    We have performed the NotI-MseI MS-AFLP experiments using normal and tumor DNA from breast cancer patients and determined the identity of bands exhibiting consistent changes in breast cancer DNA fingerprint...

  8. HER2 Genetic Link to Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    When researchers discovered the HER2 gene's importance to breast cancer growth, this led to the development of trastuzumab and other treatments that have improved survival for women with HER2-positive breast cancer.

  9. Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Research News From NIH Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... hormone therapy does not increase the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women, according to an updated analysis ...

  10. Breast Cancer Epidemiology in Puerto Rico

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nazario, Cruz M; Freudenheim, Jo

    2008-01-01

    This project has two mayor goals: to design and conduct a pilot case-control breast cancer study among Puerto Rican women, and to train and develop researchers in breast cancer at the University of Puerto Rico...

  11. Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Us Information For… Media Policy Makers CDC Employees and Reasonable Accommodations (RA) Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Finding Breast Cancer Early Can ...

  12. Vectors for Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deisseroth, Albert B

    2005-01-01

    The objective is to design, build and study vectors which would be able to break tolerance to breast cancer associated TAA and be used to suppress the recurrence of metastatic breast cancer following surgical resection...

  13. Vectors for Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deisseroth, Albert

    2004-01-01

    The objective is to design, build and study vectors which would be able to break tolerance to breast cancer associated TAA and be used to suppress the recurrence of metastatic breast cancer following surgical resection...

  14. PET imaging in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombardieri, E.; Crippa, F.

    2001-01-01

    The basis of tumour imaging with PET is a specific uptake mechanism of positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals. Among the potential tracers for breast cancer (fluorodeoxyglucose, methionine, tyrosine, fluoro-estradiol, nor-progesterone), 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose labelled with fluorine (FDG) is the most widely used radiopharmaceutical because breast cancer is particularly avid of FDG and 18 F has the advantages of the a relatively long physical half-life. Mammography is the first choice examination in studying breast masses, due to its very good performances, an excellent compliance and the best value regarding the cost/effectiveness aspects. The FDG uptake in tissue correlates with the histological grade and potential aggressiveness of breast cancer and this may have prognostic consequences. Besides the evaluation of breast lesions, FDG-PET shows a great efficacy in staging lymph node involvement prior surgery and this could have a great value in loco-regional staging. Whole body PET provides also information with regard to metastasis localizations both in soft tissue and bone, and plays an important clinical role mainly in detecting recurrent metastatic disease. In fact for its metabolic characteristics PET visualizes regions of enhanced metabolic activity and can complete other imaging modalities based on structural anatomic changes. Even though CT and MRI show superior resolution characteristics, it has been demonstrated that PET provides more accurate information in discriminating between viable tumour, fibrotic scar or necrosis. These statements are coming from the examination of more than 2000 breast cancer detection

  15. N-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids of Marine Origin and Multifocality in Human Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouldamer, Lobna; Goupille, Caroline; Vildé, Anne; Arbion, Flavie; Body, Gilles; Chevalier, Stephan; Cottier, Jean Philippe; Bougnoux, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The microenvironment of breast epithelial tissue may contribute to the clinical expression of breast cancer. Breast epithelial tissue, whether healthy or tumoral, is directly in contact with fat cells, which in turn could influence tumor multifocality. In this pilot study we investigated whether the fatty acid composition of breast adipose tissue differed according to breast cancer focality. Twenty-three consecutive women presenting with non-metastatic breast cancer underwent breast-imaging procedures including Magnetic Resonance Imaging prior to treatment. Breast adipose tissue specimens were collected during breast surgery. We established a biochemical profile of adipose tissue fatty acids by gas chromatography. We assessed whether there were differences according to breast cancer focality. We found that decreased levels in breast adipose tissue of docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids, the two main polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acids of marine origin, were associated with multifocality. These differences in lipid content may contribute to mechanisms through which peritumoral adipose tissue fuels breast cancer multifocality.

  16. Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-07

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  17. Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-14

    Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  18. Serum FAS and the Early Detection of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Newschaffer, Craig

    2002-01-01

    ...) as a means of breast cancer early detection. Fatty acid synthase (FAS) is associated with poor breast cancer prognosis and is elevated in both breast cancer and in situ disease compared to normal breast tissue...

  19. Assessing associations between the AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 functional module and breast cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Blanco

    Full Text Available While interplay between BRCA1 and AURKA-RHAMM-TPX2-TUBG1 regulates mammary epithelial polarization, common genetic variation in HMMR (gene product RHAMM may be associated with risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers. Following on these observations, we further assessed the link between the AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 functional module and risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Forty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers and subsequently analyzed using a retrospective likelihood approach. The association of HMMR rs299290 with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers was confirmed: per-allele hazard ratio (HR = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.04-1.15, p = 1.9 x 10(-4 (false discovery rate (FDR-adjusted p = 0.043. Variation in CSTF1, located next to AURKA, was also found to be associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers: rs2426618 per-allele HR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.03-1.16, p = 0.005 (FDR-adjusted p = 0.045. Assessment of pairwise interactions provided suggestions (FDR-adjusted pinteraction values > 0.05 for deviations from the multiplicative model for rs299290 and CSTF1 rs6064391, and rs299290 and TUBG1 rs11649877 in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following these suggestions, the expression of HMMR and AURKA or TUBG1 in sporadic breast tumors was found to potentially interact, influencing patients' survival. Together, the results of this study support the hypothesis of a causative link between altered function of AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 and breast carcinogenesis in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

  20. [Breast cancer at the 1st Surgical Department, University Hospital Olomouc assessing the number and age of patients and benefit of breast screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bébarová, L; Zlámalová, N; Švach, I; Neoral, Č

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. It affects mostly women between the ages of 60 and 70; however, in the past years, the number of younger female patients has been increasing. The incidence of breast cancer has been rising worldwide, especially in the United States and Western Europe. Breast carcinoma mortality, on the other hand, has shown a slight decrease due to early screening programmes and advanced treatment methods. We included patients who had undergone surgery for breast carcinoma in the 1st Department of Surgery at Teaching Hospital in Olomouc between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2012. In each patient, her age at the time of diagnosis/surgery was calculated. All patients were divided into 10-year age groups. At the same time, a sub-group of breast cancer patients younger than 45 years was created. We compared the numbers of patients in the respective groups and sub-groups in every year. The mean age and the median of age were also calculated. To evaluate the benefit of mammary screening, we compared the staging of operated tumours in the different years studied. The results were statistically processed and evaluated. The total number of 980 patients underwent surgery for breast carcinoma at our department between 2008 and 2012 with age ranging from 20 to 88 years. 101 of them were younger than 45 years. The mean age of the patients was 59 years, the median was 60 years. The total number of patients increased from 153 in 2008 to 240 in 2012. There was no significant increase in the number of patients younger than 45 years. There were more patients diagnosed with stage II carcinoma and fewer patients with stage III carcinoma in 2012 than in 2010. The analysis of our group of patients confirmed the increasing tendencies of breast cancer incidence in total. We did not prove a statistically significant increase in the number of patients in pre-screening age (i.e., younger than 45 years). More frequent diagnosis of early-stage disease was

  1. Diet and risk of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kotepui, Manas

    2016-01-01

    Diet may play a role in both promoting and inhibiting human breast cancer development. In this review, nutritional risk factors such as consumption of dietary fat, meat, fiber, and alcohol, and intake of phytoestrogen, vitamin D, iron, and folate associated with breast cancer are reviewed. These nutritional factors have a variety of associations with breast cancer risk. Type of fat consumed has different effects on risk of breast cancer: consumption of meat is associated with heterocyclic ami...

  2. Computerized Prediction of Risk for Developing Breast Cancer Based on Bilateral Mammographic Breast Tissue Asymmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xingwei; Lederman, Dror; Tan, Jun; Wang, Xiao Hui; Zheng, Bin

    2011-01-01

    This study developed and assessed a computerized scheme to detect breast abnormalities and predict the risk of developing cancer based on bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry. A digital mammography database of 100 randomly selected negative cases and 100 positive cases for having high-risk of developing breast cancer was established. Each case includes four images of craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateral oblique (MLO) views of the left and right breast. To detect bilateral mammographic tissue...

  3. The Immunohistochemical Assessment of ALDH1 Activity in Breast Cancer and it’s Correlation With Pathologic Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molanae S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1 is a marker of normal and malignant human mammary stem cells that has been reported to be associated with poor prognosis. Studies on the detection of ALDH1+ cells can help the treatment of patients with breast cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the activity of ALDH1 in breast cancer and its relationship with the pathological features of the tumors.Methods: ALDH1 activity was studied by immunohistochemistry in 121 paraffin-embedded histological samples of breast cancer patients from Department of Pathology of Milad Hospital, Tehran, Iran during 2006-2007. The relationship of ALDH1 with the pathological features of the tumors (size, grade, lymph node metastasis and vascular invasion was also investigated.Results: Eighty-five percent of breast cancer samples expressed ALDH1 in their cytoplasm with a wide range of intensity (weak, moderate and strong, while 18 samples (14.9% were completely negative. The majority of cases (97.1% showed ALDH1 positivity in the stroma of tumors which varied from weak (2.9% to strong (73.5%. ALDH1 H-score (ALDH1% × intensity of tumor cells varied from 0 to 240 (mean= 80. ALDH1 H-score was ≤80 in 62 (51.2% and >80 in 59 (48.8% samples. There was no statistically significant relationship between ALDH1 H-score and age (P=0.358, tumor size (P=0.375, tumor grade (P=0.207, lymph node metastasis (P=0.125 or vascular invasion (P=0.190.Conclusion: ALDH1 activity was demonstrated in 85.1% of breast cancer samples although its level of expression was not correlated with the pathologic features of breast tumors.

  4. Tumor-suppressor activity of RRIG1 in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Guihong; Brewster, Abenaa; Guan, Baoxiang; Fan, Zhen; Brown, Powel H; Xu, Xiao-Chun

    2011-01-01

    Retinoid receptor-induced gene-1 (RRIG1) is a novel gene that has been lost in several types of human cancers. The aim of this study was to determine whether RRIG1 plays a role in breast cancer, such as in the suppression of breast cancer cell growth and invasion. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect RRIG1 expression in breast tissue specimens. Gene transfection was used to restore or knock down RRIG1 expression in breast cancer cell lines for analysis of cell viability, colony formation, and migration/invasion potential. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot assays were used to detect the changes in gene expression. The RhoA activation assay was used to assess RRIG1-induced inhibition of RhoA activity. The immunohistochemical data showed that RRIG1 expression was reduced in breast cancer tissues compared with normal and atypical hyperplastic breast tissues. RRIG1 expression was inversely correlated with lymph node metastasis of breast cancer but was not associated with the status of hormone receptors, such as estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, or HER2. Furthermore, restoration of RRIG1 expression inhibited proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion of breast cancer cells. Expression of RRIG1 also reduced phosphorylated Erk1/2 and Akt levels; c-Jun, MMP9, and Akt expressions; and RhoA activity. In contrast, knockdown of RRIG1 expression promoted breast cancer cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion potential. The data from the current study indicated that RRIG1 expression was reduced or lost in breast cancer and that restoration of RRIG1 expression suppressed breast cancer cell growth and invasion capacity. Future studies will determine the underlying molecular mechanisms and define RRIG1 as a tumor-suppressor gene in breast cancer

  5. Environmental Estrogens and Breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    llmiawati llmiawati

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent studies revealed that various man-made chemicals disrupting properties with endocrine- contribute in the development of breast cancer.objective: To review the state of the science of the endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC and their role in the development of breast cancer.Methods: Key papers on experimental and epidemiologic studies examining the associations between EDC and breast cancer were searched throJgh the Google Sch-olar and pubMedusing Results: EDC effects depend on the level and timing of exposure, with critical window on developmentalstages. Diethylstilbestrol(DES and bispIenolA(BpA aretwo thoroughlystudied environmental estrogenic compounds. Epidemiological studies showed increased breast cancer incident in women exposed to DES during gestation. ExperimentalstuQies revealed that BPA induces architectural and gene expression froRte changes ir i"J"rt r;;;"ry gtand, with the stroma of fetal mammary gland as the primary target. ihe effects of these environmental estrogens are mostly mediated through the estrogen ieceptors a and B. Their exposure may further sensitize the mammary tissuelo the hit or otner carcinogens. Epigenome alteration in the mammary gland has also been implicated in its neoplastic dLvelopre"nt.Conclusions: Fetal and perinatal stages are the critical exposure windows to environmental estrogens and multiple mechanism is irnplicated in the development of breast cancer resulted from this exposure.

  6. Breast Cancer EDGE Task Force Outcomes: Clinical Measures of Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Shana; Gilchrist, Laura; Sander, Antoinette

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain is one of the most commonly reported impairments after breast cancer treatment affecting anywhere from 16-73% of breast cancer survivors Despite the high reported incidence of pain from cancer and its treatments, the ability to evaluate cancer pain continues to be difficult due to the complexity of the disease and the subjective experience of pain. The Oncology Section Breast Cancer EDGE Task Force was created to evaluate the evidence behind clinical outcome measures of pain in women diagnosed with breast cancer. Methods The authors systematically reviewed the literature for pain outcome measures published in the research involving women diagnosed with breast cancer. The goal was to examine the reported psychometric properties that are reported in the literature in order to determine clinical utility. Results Visual Analog Scale, Numeric Rating Scale, Pressure Pain Threshold, McGill Pain Questionnaire, McGill Pain Questionnaire – Short Form, Brief Pain Inventory and Brief Pain Inventory – Short Form were highly recommended by the Task Force. The Task Force was unable to recommend two measures for use in the breast cancer population at the present time. Conclusions A variety of outcome measures were used to measure pain in women diagnosed with breast cancer. When assessing pain in women with breast cancer, researchers and clinicians need to determine whether a unidimensional or multidimensional tool is most appropriate as well as whether the tool has strong psychometric properties. PMID:25346950

  7. A fully-automated software pipeline for integrating breast density and parenchymal texture analysis for digital mammograms: parameter optimization in a case-control breast cancer risk assessment study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuanjie; Wang, Yan; Keller, Brad M.; Conant, Emily; Gee, James C.; Kontos, Despina

    2013-02-01

    Estimating a woman's risk of breast cancer is becoming increasingly important in clinical practice. Mammographic density, estimated as the percent of dense (PD) tissue area within the breast, has been shown to be a strong risk factor. Studies also support a relationship between mammographic texture and breast cancer risk. We have developed a fullyautomated software pipeline for computerized analysis of digital mammography parenchymal patterns by quantitatively measuring both breast density and texture properties. Our pipeline combines advanced computer algorithms of pattern recognition, computer vision, and machine learning and offers a standardized tool for breast cancer risk assessment studies. Different from many existing methods performing parenchymal texture analysis within specific breast subregions, our pipeline extracts texture descriptors for points on a spatial regular lattice and from a surrounding window of each lattice point, to characterize the local mammographic appearance throughout the whole breast. To demonstrate the utility of our pipeline, and optimize its parameters, we perform a case-control study by retrospectively analyzing a total of 472 digital mammography studies. Specifically, we investigate the window size, which is a lattice related parameter, and compare the performance of texture features to that of breast PD in classifying case-control status. Our results suggest that different window sizes may be optimal for raw (12.7mm2) versus vendor post-processed images (6.3mm2). We also show that the combination of PD and texture features outperforms PD alone. The improvement is significant (p=0.03) when raw images and window size of 12.7mm2 are used, having an ROC AUC of 0.66. The combination of PD and our texture features computed from post-processed images with a window size of 6.3 mm2 achieves an ROC AUC of 0.75.

  8. Model for individualized prediction of breast cancer risk after a benign breast biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratz, V Shane; Degnim, Amy C; Frank, Ryan D; Frost, Marlene H; Visscher, Daniel W; Vierkant, Robert A; Hieken, Tina J; Ghosh, Karthik; Tarabishy, Yaman; Vachon, Celine M; Radisky, Derek C; Hartmann, Lynn C

    2015-03-10

    Optimal early detection and prevention for breast cancer depend on accurate identification of women at increased risk. We present a risk prediction model that incorporates histologic features of biopsy tissues from women with benign breast disease (BBD) and compare its performance to the Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (BCRAT). We estimated the age-specific incidence of breast cancer and death from the Mayo BBD cohort and then combined these estimates with a relative risk model derived from 377 patient cases with breast cancer and 734 matched controls sampled from the Mayo BBD cohort to develop the BBD-to-breast cancer (BBD-BC) risk assessment tool. We validated the model using an independent set of 378 patient cases with breast cancer and 728 matched controls from the Mayo BBD cohort and compared the risk predictions from our model with those from the BCRAT. The BBD-BC model predicts the probability of breast cancer in women with BBD using tissue-based and other risk factors. The concordance statistic from the BBD-BC model was 0.665 in the model development series and 0.629 in the validation series; these values were higher than those from the BCRAT (0.567 and 0.472, respectively). The BCRAT significantly underpredicted breast cancer risk after benign biopsy (P = .004), whereas the BBD-BC predictions were appropriately calibrated to observed cancers (P = .247). We developed a model using both demographic and histologic features to predict breast cancer risk in women with BBD. Our model more accurately classifies a woman's breast cancer risk after a benign biopsy than the BCRAT. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  9. Model for Individualized Prediction of Breast Cancer Risk After a Benign Breast Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratz, V. Shane; Degnim, Amy C.; Frank, Ryan D.; Frost, Marlene H.; Visscher, Daniel W.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Hieken, Tina J.; Ghosh, Karthik; Tarabishy, Yaman; Vachon, Celine M.; Radisky, Derek C.; Hartmann, Lynn C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Optimal early detection and prevention for breast cancer depend on accurate identification of women at increased risk. We present a risk prediction model that incorporates histologic features of biopsy tissues from women with benign breast disease (BBD) and compare its performance to the Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (BCRAT). Methods We estimated the age-specific incidence of breast cancer and death from the Mayo BBD cohort and then combined these estimates with a relative risk model derived from 377 patient cases with breast cancer and 734 matched controls sampled from the Mayo BBD cohort to develop the BBD–to–breast cancer (BBD-BC) risk assessment tool. We validated the model using an independent set of 378 patient cases with breast cancer and 728 matched controls from the Mayo BBD cohort and compared the risk predictions from our model with those from the BCRAT. Results The BBD-BC model predicts the probability of breast cancer in women with BBD using tissue-based and other risk factors. The concordance statistic from the BBD-BC model was 0.665 in the model development series and 0.629 in the validation series; these values were higher than those from the BCRAT (0.567 and 0.472, respectively). The BCRAT significantly underpredicted breast cancer risk after benign biopsy (P = .004), whereas the BBD-BC predictions were appropriately calibrated to observed cancers (P = .247). Conclusion We developed a model using both demographic and histologic features to predict breast cancer risk in women with BBD. Our model more accurately classifies a woman's breast cancer risk after a benign biopsy than the BCRAT. PMID:25624442

  10. Internet Use and Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamad, Mazanah; Afshari, Mojgan; Mohamed, Nor Aini

    2011-01-01

    A survey was administered to 400 breast cancer survivors at hospitals and support group meetings in Peninsular Malaysia to explore their level of Internet use and factors related to the Internet use by breast cancer survivors. Findings of this study indicated that about 22.5% of breast cancer survivors used Internet to get information about breast…

  11. Pregnancy and abortion in breast cancer patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breast cancer in pregnancy is by itself not an indication for abortion. We document the case histories of 2 patients with breast cancer (recurrent or advanced) who elected to carry pregnancies to term. Pregnancy concurrent with or subsequent to breast cancer is not associated with a worse prognosis than would be observed ...

  12. Search for new breast cancer susceptibility genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenburg, Rogier Abel

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the search for new high-risk breast cancer susceptibility genes by linkage analysis. To date 20-25% of familial breast cancer is explained by mutations in the high-risk BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancer susceptibility genes. For the remaining families the genetic etiology is

  13. Contemporary Hormonal Contraception and the Risk of Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina S; Skovlund, Charlotte W; Hannaford, Philip C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about whether contemporary hormonal contraception is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. METHODS: We assessed associations between the use of hormonal contraception and the risk of invasive breast cancer in a nationwide prospective cohort study involving...... all women in Denmark between 15 and 49 years of age who had not had cancer or venous thromboembolism and who had not received treatment for infertility. Nationwide registries provided individually updated information about the use of hormonal contraception, breast-cancer diagnoses, and potential...... confounders. RESULTS: Among 1.8 million women who were followed on average for 10.9 years (a total of 19.6 million person-years), 11,517 cases of breast cancer occurred. As compared with women who had never used hormonal contraception, the relative risk of breast cancer among all current and recent users...

  14. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy After Mastectomy in Preventing Recurrence in Patients With Stage IIa-IIIa Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-06

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Medullary Breast Carcinoma; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  15. Computerized detection of breast cancer on automated breast ultrasound imaging of women with dense breasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drukker, Karen, E-mail: kdrukker@uchicago.edu; Sennett, Charlene A.; Giger, Maryellen L. [Department of Radiology, MC2026, The University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Develop a computer-aided detection method and investigate its feasibility for detection of breast cancer in automated 3D ultrasound images of women with dense breasts. Methods: The HIPAA compliant study involved a dataset of volumetric ultrasound image data, “views,” acquired with an automated U-Systems Somo•V{sup ®} ABUS system for 185 asymptomatic women with dense breasts (BI-RADS Composition/Density 3 or 4). For each patient, three whole-breast views (3D image volumes) per breast were acquired. A total of 52 patients had breast cancer (61 cancers), diagnosed through any follow-up at most 365 days after the original screening mammogram. Thirty-one of these patients (32 cancers) had a screening-mammogram with a clinically assigned BI-RADS Assessment Category 1 or 2, i.e., were mammographically negative. All software used for analysis was developed in-house and involved 3 steps: (1) detection of initial tumor candidates, (2) characterization of candidates, and (3) elimination of false-positive candidates. Performance was assessed by calculating the cancer detection sensitivity as a function of the number of “marks” (detections) per view. Results: At a single mark per view, i.e., six marks per patient, the median detection sensitivity by cancer was 50.0% (16/32) ± 6% for patients with a screening mammogram-assigned BI-RADS category 1 or 2—similar to radiologists’ performance sensitivity (49.9%) for this dataset from a prior reader study—and 45.9% (28/61) ± 4% for all patients. Conclusions: Promising detection sensitivity was obtained for the computer on a 3D ultrasound dataset of women with dense breasts at a rate of false-positive detections that may be acceptable for clinical implementation.

  16. Angiogenesis in male breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanthan Rani

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male breast cancer is a rare but aggressive and devastating disease. This disease presents at a later stage and in a more advanced fashion than its female counterpart. The immunophenotype also appears to be distinct when compared to female breast cancer. Angiogenesis plays a permissive role in the development of a solid tumor and provides an avenue for nutrient exchange and waste removal. Recent scrutiny of angiogenesis in female breast cancer has shown it to be of significant prognostic value. It was hypothesized that this holds true in invasive ductal carcinoma of the male breast. In the context of male breast cancer, we investigated the relationship of survival and other clinico-pathological variables to the microvascular density of the tumor tissue. Methods Seventy-five cases of primary male breast cancer were identified using the records of the Saskatchewan Cancer Agency over a period of 26 years. Forty-seven cases of invasive ductal carcinoma of the male breast had formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks that were suitable for this study. All cases were reviewed. Immunohistochemical staining was performed for the angiogenic markers (cluster designations 31 (CD31, 34 (CD34 and 105 (CD105, von Willebrand factor (VWF, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Microvascular density (MVD was determined using average, centre, and highest microvessel counts (AMC, CMC, and HMC, respectively. Statistical analyses compared differences in the distribution of survival times and times to relapse between levels of MVD, tumor size, node status and age at diagnosis. In addition, MVD values were compared within each marker, between each marker, and were also compared to clinico-pathological data. Results Advanced age and tumor size were related to shorter survival times. There were no statistically significant differences in distributions of survival times and times to relapse between levels of MVD variables. There was no

  17. Screening for breast cancer with mammography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C; Nielsen, Margrethe

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A variety of estimates of the benefits and harms of mammographic screening for breast cancer have been published and national policies vary. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effect of screening for breast cancer with mammography on mortality and morbidity. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched Pub...... excluded a biased trial and included 600,000 women in the analyses. Three trials with adequate randomisation did not show a significant reduction in breast cancer mortality at 13 years (relative risk (RR) 0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79 to 1.02); four trials with suboptimal randomisation showed...... misclassification of cause of death. The trials with adequate randomisation did not find an effect of screening on cancer mortality, including breast cancer, after 10 years (RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.10) or on all-cause mortality after 13 years (RR 0.99, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.03).Numbers of lumpectomies and mastectomies...

  18. Assessing the real-world cost-effectiveness of adjuvant trastuzumab in HER-2/neu positive breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hedden, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    Among women with surgically removed, high-risk HER-2\\/neu-positive breast cancer, trastuzumab has demonstrated significant improvements in disease-free and overall survival. The objective of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the currently recommended 12-month adjuvant protocol of trastuzumab using a Markov modeling approach and real-world cost data.

  19. Impact of intermediate mammography assessment on the likelihood of false-positive results in breast cancer screening programmes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ascunce, Nieves [Public Health Institute, CIBERESP, Navarra Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Pamplona (Spain); Instituto de Salud Publica, Navarra Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Pamplona (Spain); Ederra, Maria; Delfrade, Josu; Erdozain, Nieves [Public Health Institute, CIBERESP, Navarra Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Pamplona (Spain); Baroja, Araceli [Fundacion Rioja Salud, Logrono (Spain); Zubizarreta, Raquel [Public Health and Planning Directorate, Health Office, Galician Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Galicia (Spain); Salas, Dolores [General Directorate Public Health and Centre for Public Health Research (CSISP), Valencia (Spain); Castells, Xavier [Mar Teaching Hospital, CIBERESP, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-02-15

    Breast cancer screening is offered to 100% of the target population in Spain and intermediate mammograms (IMs) are sometimes indicated. This study was aimed at analysing the frequency of IMs, the factors determining their recommendation, and their impact on the risk of false-positive results and the detection rate. Data from 3,471,307 mammograms from Spanish breast cancer screening programmes were included. 3.36% of the mammograms were IMs. The factors associated with the use of IMs were age, initial screening, previous invasive tests, a familial history of breast cancer and use of hormone replacement therapy. In screening episodes with an IM, the probability of a false-positive result was 13.74% (95% CI: 13.43-14.05), almost double that in episodes without IMs (6.02%, 95% CI 5.99-6.05). In young women with previous invasive procedures, a familial history of breast cancer or hormone replacement therapy use who were undergoing their initial screen, this probability was lower when IMs were performed. IMs always increased the detection rate. The factors prompting IMs should be characterised so that radiologists can systematise their recommendations according to the presence of the factors maximising the benefits and minimising the adverse effects of this procedure. (orig.)

  20. Checkpoint inhibitors in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polk, Anne; Svane, Inge-Marie; Andersson, Michael

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: An increasing number of compounds directed against immune checkpoints are currently under clinical development. In this review we summarize current research in breast cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A computer-based literature search was carried out using PubMed and EMBASE; data...... reported at international meetings and clinicaltrials.gov were included as well. RESULTS: The obtained overall response rate of PD-1/PD-L1 monotherapy varied from 5 to 30% in heavily pretreated triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). The median duration of progression free survival and overall survival were...... and induce long standing anti-tumor immunity in a subgroup of breast cancer patients. However, the identification of predictive biomarkers is crucial for further development of this treatment modality....

  1. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues. Here, two High-Aspect Ratio Vessels turn at about 12 rmp to keep breast tissue constructs suspended inside the culture media. Syringes allow scientists to pull for analysis during growth sequences. The tube in the center is a water bubbler that dehumidifies the air to prevent evaporation of the media and thus the appearance of destructive bubbles in the bioreactor.

  2. Assessment of CA 15.3, CEA and TPA concentrations during monitoring of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sölétormos, G; Petersen, P H; Dombernowsky, P

    2000-01-01

    The variability of the tumor markers cancer antigen (CA) 15.3, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA) during steady state concentrations and the rate of increase during progression is described. One hundred and ninety-two patients were monitored during first...... with above cutoff level values. Clinical and marker progression was registered for 75 (CA 15.3), 62 (CEA), and 57 (TPA) patients. The coefficients of total variation of steady state concentrations (comprising the intra- and interassay analytical imprecision and the within subject biological variation) were...... for TPA (0.0346). Our data indicate that criteria for assessment of sequential tumor marker concentrations should consider the marker in question, the steady state variability, the cutoff value, and the rate of increase during disease progression....

  3. Job Authority and Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudrovska, Tetyana

    2013-01-01

    Using the 1957-2011 data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, I integrate the gender relations theory, a life course perspective, and a biosocial stress perspective to explore the effect of women's job authority in 1975 (at age 36) and 1993 (at age 54) on breast cancer incidence up to 2011. Findings indicate that women with the authority to hire, fire, and influence others' pay had a significantly higher risk of a breast cancer diagnosis over the next 30 years compared to housewives and employed women with no job authority. Because job authority conferred the highest risk of breast cancer for women who also spent more hours dealing with people at work in 1975, I suggest that the assertion of job authority by women in the 1970s involved stressful interpersonal experiences, such as social isolation and negative social interactions, that may have increased the risk of breast cancer via prolonged dysregulation of the glucocorticoid system and exposure of breast tissue to the adverse effects of chronically elevated cortisol. This study contributes to sociology by emphasizing gendered biosocial pathways through which women's occupational experiences become embodied and drive forward physiological repercussions.

  4. Genetic heterogeneity in breast cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, T I

    1996-01-01

    Approximately 20% of breast cancer patients have a family history of the disease, and in one-fourth of these cases breast cancer appears to be inherited as an autosomally dominant trait. Five genes and gene regions involved in breast cancer susceptibility have been uncovered. Germ-line mutations in the recently cloned BRCA1 gene at 17q21 is considered to be responsible for the disease in a majority of the breast-ovarian cancer families and in 40-45% of the site-specific breast cancer families, but appears not to be involved in families with both male and female breast cancer cases. The BRCA2 locus at 13q12-q13 appears to be involved in 40-45% of the site-specific breast cancer families, and in most of the families with affected males. The gene located in this region, however, does not seem to confer susceptibility to ovarian cancer. The TP53 gene is involved in breast cancer development in the Li-Fraumeni syndrome and Li-Fraumeni syndrom-like families, whereas germ-line mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene is present in a subset of male breast cancers. Furthermore, females who are obligate carriers of ataxia telangiectasia (AT) have a 4-12 times relative risk of developing breast cancer as compared with the general female population, indicating that germ-line mutations in AT also confer susceptibility to breast cancer.

  5. breast cancer screening in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Participants underwent Clinical Breast Examination (CBE), breast transillumination ... with low 5-year survival (of 39%). In the past, resource allocation for health was skewed towards infectious dis- eases such as HIV/AIDS and malaria. Currently however, a rapidly ... tality by up to 25-30 % in women over 50 years old (2-. 4).

  6. Antiangiogenic therapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, D.L.; Andersson, M.; Andersen, Jon Alexander Lykkegaard

    2010-01-01

    and optimal use of these agents for the treatment of breast cancer. Currently, the most promising approach has been the use of bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the most potent pro-angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Small molecular inhibitors of VEGF...... tyrosine kinase activity, such as sorafenib, appear promising. While, the role of sunitinib and inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in breast cancer has to be defined. Several unanswered questions remain, such as choice of drug(s), optimal duration of therapy and patient selection criteria...

  7. Breast Cancer Stem Cells in Antiestrogen Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Schafer JIM ,O’Regan RM, Jordan VC. Antitumor action of physiological estradiol on tamox- ifen stimulated breast tumors grown in athymic mice. Clin. Cancer...JS, Crowe DL (2009) Tumor initiating cancer stem cells from human breast cancer cell lines. Int J Oncol 34:1449–1453. 10. Woodward WA, Chen MS... Crowe DL (2009) Tumor initiating cancer stem cells from human breast cancer cell lines. Int J Oncol 34: 1449–1453. 49. Woodward WA, Chen MS, Behbod F

  8. Tamoxifen therapy in breast cancer control worldwide.

    OpenAIRE

    Love, R. R.; Koroltchouk, V.

    1993-01-01

    In most developed and many developing countries, breast cancer is the most frequent cancer and the leading cause of cancer death among women. At least 50% of all breast cancer patients worldwide would survive longer, however, if public awareness about and early detection of the condition were increased and greater use were made of efficient treatment of proven value. With early-stage, localized breast cancer, local treatment combined with adjuvant hormonal therapy with tamoxifen, a synthetic ...

  9. Adverse effects of breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odle, Teresa G

    2014-01-01

    As breast cancer outcomes improve and more people with breast cancer survive longer following diagnosis, many survivors must deal with the effects of treatment. Some adverse effects last a short time and have little influence on breast cancer patients' quality of life, yet others can cause long-term complications and add to increased morbidity and mortality among survivors. This article reviews the adverse effects of breast cancer treatments and how they affect the health and quality of life of those receiving treatment. The article also explains how adverse effects can interrupt treatment and how physicians and survivors can manage adverse effects of breast cancer treatment.

  10. An update on inflammatory breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Thapaliya

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory breast cancer is one of the most aggressive forms of breast cancer. Once considered to be a uniformly fatal disease, treatment of this entity has evolved significantly over the last two decades. In this article, we review the epidemiology, pathology, biologic underpinnings, radiologic advances, and treatment modalities for inflammatory breast cancer. Updates in surgical therapy, medical oncologic therapy and radiation therapy are reviewed. Emphasis is on cutting edge information regarding inflammatory breast cancer. The management of inflammatory breast cancer is best served by a multidisciplinary team. Continued research into molecular pathways and potential targets is imperative. Future clinical trials should include evaluation of conventional therapy with targeted therapies.

  11. Breast Tissue Composition and Its Dependence on Demographic Risk Factors for Breast Cancer: Non-Invasive Assessment by Time Domain Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taroni, Paola; Quarto, Giovanna; Pifferi, Antonio; Abbate, Francesca; Balestreri, Nicola; Menna, Simona; Cassano, Enrico; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast tissue composition is recognized as a strong and independent risk factor for breast cancer. It is a heritable feature, but is also significantly affected by several other elements (e.g., age, menopause). Nowadays it is quantified by mammographic density, thus requiring the use of ionizing radiation. Optical techniques are absolutely non-invasive and have already proved effective in the investigation of biological tissues, as they are sensitive to tissue composition and structure. Methods Time domain diffuse optical spectroscopy was performed at 7 wavelengths (635-1060 nm) on 200 subjects to derive their breast tissue composition (in terms of water, lipid and collagen content), blood parameters (total hemoglobin content and oxygen saturation level), and information on the microscopic structure (scattering amplitude and power). The dependence of all optically-derived parameters on age, menopausal status, body mass index, and use of oral contraceptives, and the correlation with mammographic density were investigated. Results Younger age, premenopausal status, lower body mass index values, and use of oral contraceptives all correspond to significantly higher water, collagen and total hemoglobin content, and lower lipid content (always p < 0.05 and often p < 10-4), while oxygen saturation level and scattering parameters show significant dependence only on some conditions. Even when age-adjusted groups of subjects are compared, several optically derived parameters (and in particular always collagen and total hemoglobin content) remain significantly different. Conclusions Time domain diffuse optical spectroscopy can probe non-invasively breast tissue composition and physiologic blood parameters, and provide information on tissue structure. The measurement is suitable for in vivo studies and monitoring of changes in breast tissue (e.g., with age, lifestyle, chemotherapy, etc.) and to gain insight into related processes, like the origin of cancer risk

  12. Breast cancer epidemiology and risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broeders, M. J. M.; Verbeek, A. L. M.

    1997-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in the Western society. Over the past decades it has become apparent that breast cancer incidence rates are increasing steadily, whereas the mortality rates for breast cancer have remained relatively constant. Information through the media on this rising number of cases has increased breast health awareness but has also introduced anxiety in the female population. This combination of factors has made the need for prevention of breast cancer an urgent matter. Breast cancer does not seem to be a single disease entity. A specific etiologic factor may therefore have more influence on one form may therefore have more influence on one form of breast cancer than another. So far though, as shown in their summary of current knowledge on established and dubious risk factors, no risk factors have been identified that can explain a major part of the incidence. Efforts to identify other ways for primary prevention have also been discouraging, even though breast cancer is one of the most investigated tumours world-wide. Thus, at this point i time, the most important strategy to reduce breast cancer mortality is early detection through individual counselling and organised breast screening programs. The recent isolation of breast cancer susceptibility genes may introduce new ways to reduce the risk of breast cancer in a small subset of women

  13. Aberrantly methylated DNA as a biomarker in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Lars Mønster; Guldberg, Per

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant DNA hypermethylation at gene promoters is a frequent event in human breast cancer. Recent genome-wide studies have identified hundreds of genes that exhibit differential methylation between breast cancer cells and normal breast tissue. Due to the tumor-specific nature of DNA hypermethyla...... as a versatile biomarker tool for screening, diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of breast cancer. Standardization of methods and biomarker panels will be required to fully exploit this clinical potential.......Aberrant DNA hypermethylation at gene promoters is a frequent event in human breast cancer. Recent genome-wide studies have identified hundreds of genes that exhibit differential methylation between breast cancer cells and normal breast tissue. Due to the tumor-specific nature of DNA...... hypermethylation events, their use as tumor biomarkers is usually not hampered by analytical signals from normal cells, which is a general problem for existing protein tumor markers used for clinical assessment of breast cancer. There is accumulating evidence that DNA-methylation changes in breast cancer patients...

  14. Assessing SNP-SNP interactions among DNA repair, modification and metabolism related pathway genes in breast cancer susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Sapkota

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWASs have identified low-penetrance common variants (i.e., single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs associated with breast cancer susceptibility. Although GWASs are primarily focused on single-locus effects, gene-gene interactions (i.e., epistasis are also assumed to contribute to the genetic risks for complex diseases including breast cancer. While it has been hypothesized that moderately ranked (P value based weak single-locus effects in GWASs could potentially harbor valuable information for evaluating epistasis, we lack systematic efforts to investigate SNPs showing consistent associations with weak statistical significance across independent discovery and replication stages. The objectives of this study were i to select SNPs showing single-locus effects with weak statistical significance for breast cancer in a GWAS and/or candidate-gene studies; ii to replicate these SNPs in an independent set of breast cancer cases and controls; and iii to explore their potential SNP-SNP interactions contributing to breast cancer susceptibility. A total of 17 SNPs related to DNA repair, modification and metabolism pathway genes were selected since these pathways offer a priori knowledge for potential epistatic interactions and an overall role in breast carcinogenesis. The study design included predominantly Caucasian women (2,795 cases and 4,505 controls from Alberta, Canada. We observed two two-way SNP-SNP interactions (APEX1-rs1130409 and RPAP1-rs2297381; MLH1-rs1799977 and MDM2-rs769412 in logistic regression that conferred elevated risks for breast cancer (P(interaction<7.3 × 10(-3. Logic regression identified an interaction involving four SNPs (MBD2-rs4041245, MLH1-rs1799977, MDM2-rs769412, BRCA2-rs1799943 (P(permutation = 2.4 × 10(-3. SNPs involved in SNP-SNP interactions also showed single-locus effects with weak statistical significance, while BRCA2-rs1799943 showed stronger statistical significance (P

  15. NUCKS overexpression in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kittas Christos

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NUCKS (Nuclear, Casein Kinase and Cyclin-dependent Kinase Substrate is a nuclear, DNA-binding and highly phosphorylated protein. A number of reports show that NUCKS is highly expressed on the level of mRNA in several human cancers, including breast cancer. In this work, NUCKS expression on both RNA and protein levels was studied in breast tissue biopsies consisted of invasive carcinomas, intraductal proliferative lesions, benign epithelial proliferations and fibroadenomas, as well as in primary cultures derived from the above biopsies. Specifically, in order to evaluate the level of NUCKS protein in correlation with the histopathological features of breast disease, immunohistochemistry was employed on paraffin sections of breast biopsies of the above types. In addition, NUCKS expression was studied by means of Reverse Transcription PCR (RT-PCR, real-time PCR (qRT-PCR and Western immunoblot analyses in the primary cell cultures developed from the same biopsies. Results The immunohistochemical Results showed intense NUCKS staining mostly in grade I and II breast carcinomas compared to normal tissues. Furthermore, NUCKS was moderate expressed in benign epithelial proliferations, such as adenosis and sclerosing adenosis, and highly expressed in intraductal lesions, specifically in ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS. It is worth noting that all the fibroadenoma tissues examined were negative for NUCKS staining. RT-PCR and qRT-PCR showed an increase of NUCKS expression in cells derived from primary cultures of proliferative lesions and cancerous tissues compared to the ones derived from normal breast tissues and fibroadenomas. This increase was also confirmed by Western immunoblot analysis. Although NUCKS is a cell cycle related protein, its expression does not correlate with Ki67 expression, neither in tissue sections nor in primary cell cultures. Conclusion The results show overexpression of the NUCKS protein in a number of non

  16. Ultrasound screening of contralateral breast after surgery for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Ja [Department of Radiology, Seoul Metropolitan Government Seoul National University, Boramae Medical Center (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Se-Yeong; Chang, Jung Min; Cho, Nariya [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Han, Wonshik [Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Woo Kyung, E-mail: moonwk@snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The addition of supplemental US to mammography depicted additional 5.0 cancers per 1000 postoperative women. • Positive biopsy rate of mammography-detected lesions was 66.7% (4 of 6) and that of US-detected lesions was 40.0% (6 of 15). • US can be helpful to detect mammographically occult breast cancer in the contralateral breast in women with previous history of cancer and dense breast. - Abstract: Objective: To determine whether supplemental screening ultrasound (US) to mammography could improve cancer detection rate of the contralateral breast in patients with a personal history of breast cancer and dense breasts. Materials and methods: During a one-year study period, 1314 screening patients with a personal history of breast cancer and dense breasts simultaneously underwent mammography and breast US. BI-RADS categories were given for mammography or US-detected lesions in the contralateral breast. The reference standard was histology and/or 1-year imaging follow-up, and the cancer rate according to BI-RADS categories and cancer detection rate and positive biopsy rate according to detection modality were analyzed. Results: Of 1314 patients, 84 patients (6.4%) were categorized as category 3 with one interval cancer and one cancer which was upgraded to category 4A after 6-month follow-up US (2.5% cancer rate, 95% CIs 1.5–9.1%). Fifteen patients (1.1%) had category 4A or 4B lesions in the contralateral breast. Four lesions were detected on mammography (two lesions were also visible on US) and 11 lesions were detected on US and 5 cancers were confirmed (33.3%, 95% CIs 15.0–58.5%). Six patients (0.5%) had category 4C lesions, 2 detected on mammography and 4 on US and 4 cancers were confirmed (66.7%, 95% CIs 29.6–90.8%). No lesions were categorized as category 5 in the contralateral breast. Cancer detection rate by mammography was 3.3 per 1000 patients and that by US was 5.0 per 1000 patients, therefore overall cancer detection rate by

  17. Ultrasound screening of contralateral breast after surgery for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Ja; Chung, Se-Yeong; Chang, Jung Min; Cho, Nariya; Han, Wonshik; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The addition of supplemental US to mammography depicted additional 5.0 cancers per 1000 postoperative women. • Positive biopsy rate of mammography-detected lesions was 66.7% (4 of 6) and that of US-detected lesions was 40.0% (6 of 15). • US can be helpful to detect mammographically occult breast cancer in the contralateral breast in women with previous history of cancer and dense breast. - Abstract: Objective: To determine whether supplemental screening ultrasound (US) to mammography could improve cancer detection rate of the contralateral breast in patients with a personal history of breast cancer and dense breasts. Materials and methods: During a one-year study period, 1314 screening patients with a personal history of breast cancer and dense breasts simultaneously underwent mammography and breast US. BI-RADS categories were given for mammography or US-detected lesions in the contralateral breast. The reference standard was histology and/or 1-year imaging follow-up, and the cancer rate according to BI-RADS categories and cancer detection rate and positive biopsy rate according to detection modality were analyzed. Results: Of 1314 patients, 84 patients (6.4%) were categorized as category 3 with one interval cancer and one cancer which was upgraded to category 4A after 6-month follow-up US (2.5% cancer rate, 95% CIs 1.5–9.1%). Fifteen patients (1.1%) had category 4A or 4B lesions in the contralateral breast. Four lesions were detected on mammography (two lesions were also visible on US) and 11 lesions were detected on US and 5 cancers were confirmed (33.3%, 95% CIs 15.0–58.5%). Six patients (0.5%) had category 4C lesions, 2 detected on mammography and 4 on US and 4 cancers were confirmed (66.7%, 95% CIs 29.6–90.8%). No lesions were categorized as category 5 in the contralateral breast. Cancer detection rate by mammography was 3.3 per 1000 patients and that by US was 5.0 per 1000 patients, therefore overall cancer detection rate by

  18. Radiation treatment for breast cancer. Recent advances.

    OpenAIRE

    Chow, Edward

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review recent advances in radiation therapy in treatment of breast cancer. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE and CANCERLIT were searched using the MeSH words breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in situ, sentinel lymph node biopsy, and postmastectomy radiation. Randomized studies have shown the efficacy of radiation treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and for invasive breast cancer. MAIN MESSAGE: Lumpectomy followed by radiation is effective treatment for DCIS. In early breast c...

  19. Chromogenic in situ hybridisation for the assessment of HER2 status in breast cancer: an international validation ring study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Vijver, Marc; Bilous, Michael; Hanna, Wedad; Hofmann, Manfred; Kristel, Petra; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Rüschoff, Josef

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Before any new methodology can be introduced into the routine diagnostic setting it must be technically validated against the established standards. To this end, a ring study involving five international pathology laboratories was initiated to validate chromogenic in situ hybridisation (CISH) against fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) as a test for assessing human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status in breast cancer. Methods Each laboratory performed CISH, FISH and IHC on its own samples. Unstained sections from each case were also sent to another participating laboratory for blinded retesting by CISH ('outside CISH'). Results A total of 211 invasive breast carcinoma cases were tested. In 76 cases with high amplification (HER2/CEP17 ratio >4.0) by FISH, 73 cases (96%) scored positive (scores ≥ 6) by 'outside CISH'. For FISH-negative cases (HER2/CEP17 ratio CISH scores indicating no amplification (score ≤ 5), and only three cases were positive by CISH; in the three remaining cases, no CISH result could be obtained. For cases with low-level amplification using FISH (HER2/CEP17 ratio 2.0–4.0), 20 of 35 had CISH scores indicating gene amplification. Inter-laboratory concordance was also very high: 95% for normal HER2 copy number (1–5 copies); and 92% for cases with HER2 copy numbers ≥ 6. CISH intra-laboratory concordance with IHC was 92% for IHC-negative cases (IHC 0/1+) and 91% for IHC 3+ cases. Among IHC 2+ cases, CISH was 100% concordant with samples showing high amplification by FISH, and 94% concordant with FISH-negative samples. Conclusion These results show that CISH inter- and intra-laboratory concordance to FISH and IHC is very high, even in equivocal IHC 2+ cases. Therefore, we conclude that CISH is a methodology that is a viable alternative to FISH in the HER2 testing algorithm. PMID:17922920

  20. Diabetes and Breast Cancer Subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heleen K Bronsveld

    Full Text Available Women with diabetes have a worse survival after breast cancer diagnosis compared to women without diabetes. This may be due to a different etiological profile, leading to the development of more aggressive breast cancer subtypes. Our aim was to investigate whether insulin and non-insulin treated women with diabetes develop specific clinicopathological breast cancer subtypes compared to women without diabetes.This cross-sectional study included randomly selected patients with invasive breast cancer diagnosed in 2000-2010. Stratified by age at breast cancer diagnosis (≤50 and >50 years, women with diabetes were 2:1 frequency-matched on year of birth and age at breast cancer diagnosis (both in 10-year categories to women without diabetes, to select ~300 patients with tumor tissue available. Tumor MicroArrays were stained by immunohistochemistry for estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER, PR, HER2, Ki67, CK5/6, CK14, and p63. A pathologist scored all stains and revised morphology and grade. Associations between diabetes/insulin treatment and clinicopathological subtypes were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. Morphology and grade were not significantly different between women with diabetes (n = 211 and women without diabetes (n = 101, irrespective of menopausal status. Premenopausal women with diabetes tended to have more often PR-negative (OR = 2.44(95%CI:1.07-5.55, HER2-negative (OR = 2.84(95%CI:1.11-7.22, and basal-like (OR = 3.14(95%CI:1.03-9.60 tumors than the women without diabetes, with non-significantly increased frequencies of ER-negative (OR = 2.48(95%CI:0.95-6.45 and triple negative (OR = 2.60(95%CI:0.88-7.67 tumors. After adjustment for age and BMI, the associations remained similar in size but less significant. We observed no evidence for associations of clinicopathological subtypes with diabetes in postmenopausal women, or with insulin treatment in general.We found no compelling evidence that women with diabetes

  1. Diabetes and Breast Cancer Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronsveld, Heleen K; Jensen, Vibeke; Vahl, Pernille; De Bruin, Marie L; Cornelissen, Sten; Sanders, Joyce; Auvinen, Anssi; Haukka, Jari; Andersen, Morten; Vestergaard, Peter; Schmidt, Marjanka K

    2017-01-01

    Women with diabetes have a worse survival after breast cancer diagnosis compared to women without diabetes. This may be due to a different etiological profile, leading to the development of more aggressive breast cancer subtypes. Our aim was to investigate whether insulin and non-insulin treated women with diabetes develop specific clinicopathological breast cancer subtypes compared to women without diabetes. This cross-sectional study included randomly selected patients with invasive breast cancer diagnosed in 2000-2010. Stratified by age at breast cancer diagnosis (≤50 and >50 years), women with diabetes were 2:1 frequency-matched on year of birth and age at breast cancer diagnosis (both in 10-year categories) to women without diabetes, to select ~300 patients with tumor tissue available. Tumor MicroArrays were stained by immunohistochemistry for estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER, PR), HER2, Ki67, CK5/6, CK14, and p63. A pathologist scored all stains and revised morphology and grade. Associations between diabetes/insulin treatment and clinicopathological subtypes were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. Morphology and grade were not significantly different between women with diabetes (n = 211) and women without diabetes (n = 101), irrespective of menopausal status. Premenopausal women with diabetes tended to have more often PR-negative (OR = 2.44(95%CI:1.07-5.55)), HER2-negative (OR = 2.84(95%CI:1.11-7.22)), and basal-like (OR = 3.14(95%CI:1.03-9.60) tumors than the women without diabetes, with non-significantly increased frequencies of ER-negative (OR = 2.48(95%CI:0.95-6.45)) and triple negative (OR = 2.60(95%CI:0.88-7.67) tumors. After adjustment for age and BMI, the associations remained similar in size but less significant. We observed no evidence for associations of clinicopathological subtypes with diabetes in postmenopausal women, or with insulin treatment in general. We found no compelling evidence that women with diabetes, treated

  2. Assessment of algorithms for mitosis detection in breast cancer histopathology images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veta, Mitko; van Diest, Paul J.; Willems, Stefan M.

    2014-01-01

    The proliferative activity of breast tumors, which is routinely estimated by counting of mitotic figures in hematoxylin and eosin stained histology sections, is considered to be one of the most important prognostic markers. However, mitosis counting is laborious, subjective and may suffer from low...

  3. Assessment of algorithms for mitosis detection in breast cancer histopathology images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veta, Mitko; van Diest, Paul J.; Willems, Stefan M.; Madabhushi, Anant; Cruz-Roa, Angel; Gonzalez, Fabio; Larsen, Anders B L; Vestergaard, Jacob S.; Dahl, Anders B.; Cireşan, Dan C.; Schmidhuber, Jürgen; Giusti, Alessandro; Gambardella, Luca M.; Tek, F. Boray; Walter, Thomas; Wang, Ching Wei; Kondo, Satoshi; Matuszewski, Bogdan J.; Precioso, Frederic; Snell, Violet; Kittler, Josef; de Campos, Teofilo E.; Khan, Adnan M.; Rajpoot, Nasir M.; Arkoumani, Evdokia; Lacle, Miangela M.; Viergever, Max A.; Pluim, JPW

    2015-01-01

    The proliferative activity of breast tumors, which is routinely estimated by counting of mitotic figures in hematoxylin and eosin stained histology sections, is considered to be one of the most important prognostic markers. However, mitosis counting is laborious, subjective and may suffer from low

  4. The Laboratory for Individualized Breast Radiodensity Assessment (LIBRA) | Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIBRA is a fully-automatic breast density estimation software solution based on a published algorithm that works on either raw (i.e., “FOR PROCESSING”) or vendor post-processed (i.e., “FOR PRESENTATION”) digital mammography images. LIBRA has been applied to over 30,000 screening exams and is being increasingly utilized in larger studies.

  5. Alcohol and breast cancer: the mechanisms explained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sader, Hassen; Abdul-Jabar, Hani; Allawi, Zahra; Haba, Yasser

    2009-08-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of death amongst women, several studies have shown significant association between alcohol consumption and breast cancer. The aim of this overview is to highlight some of the mechanisms by which alcohol consumption could increase the risk of developing breast cancer. Using online Medline search engine, article containing details about mechanisms which explain the link between alcohol and breast cancer were examined. A number of mechanisms were found by which alcohol could increase the risk of breast cancer, alcohol's interaction and effect on oestrogen secretion; number of oestrogen receptors; the generation of acetaldehyde and hydroxyl free radicals; cells migration and metastasis; secretion of IGF1 and interaction with HRT and folate metabolism. In conclusion, it is essential for clinicians to understand these mechanisms and inform patients of the link between alcohol and breast cancer. Breast cancer; Alcohol; Mechanisms.

  6. Quantitative in Situ Assessment of the Somatostatin Receptor in Breast Cancer to Assess Response to Targeted Therapy with 111-in-Pentetreotide. Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Met in breast cancer as a model. Lab Invest 2007;87:251-260. 17 21. Battifora H. The multitumor ( sausage ) tissue block: novel method for...intensity, size and shape Yes CMYK color model (Ontario Cancer Institute) Chromagen-based system, digital image acquisition, image analysis and

  7. Breast cancer knowledge and awareness among university students in Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambanje, Martha Nyanungo; Mafuvadze, Benford

    2012-01-01

    The high breast cancer mortality rate in Sub-Saharan Africa has been attributed to a lack of public awareness of the disease which often leads to late diagnosis of the disease. Little is known about the level of knowledge and awareness of breast cancer in Angola. Previous studies have shown that breast cancer awareness is higher among well-educated people. The goal of this study was to assess breast cancer knowledge and awareness among university students in Angola. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of university students using a self-administered questionnaire to investigate participants' awareness and knowledge of breast cancer. A total of 595 university students in medical and non-medical programs successfully completed the survey. Our results showed insufficient knowledge of breast cancer among university students in Angola irrespective of whether they were in medical or non-medical programs. The majority of the participants were not aware of some of the early signs of breast cancer such as change in color or shape of the nipple, even though they appreciated the need for monthly breast self-examination. Overall most of the participants indicated the need for increased breast cancer awareness among university students. The study points to the insufficient knowledge of university students in Angola about breast cancer. We expect that our results may provide useful data that may be used by the department of health in Angola and other African countries to formulate health education programs aimed at increasing awareness and promote screening and early detection of breast cancer in the continent.

  8. Environment and breast cancer - the role of xenooestrogens in breast cancer carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plesnicar, A.; Kralj, B.; Druzina, B.; Kovac, V.

    2002-01-01

    Background. The survival rate of breast cancer patients has not changed much in the last few decades in developed countries. In order to improve the efficacy of breast cancer prevention and treatment, the role of xenooestrogens in the mechanisms of its development has been evaluated. These industrial chemicals bear little structural resemblance to each other and bind to the oestrogen receptors of exposed cells and/or trigger oestrogenic responses in laboratory test systems. Exposure to xenooestrogens has been regarded as a risk factor for carcinogenesis and a preventable cause of breast carcinoma. Several epidemiological and experimental studies in in vivo and in in vitro conditions of the influence of xenooestrogens on the occurrence of breast cancer have been conducted in the last decades and have shown ambiguous results. Conclusions. No increase in breast carcinoma incidence could be found in women who were exposed to relatively high concentrations of xenooestrogens for extended periods and small quantities of these compounds that are present in the environment probably cannot act as etiological agents for the occurrence of this disease. A multi step approach is suggested regarding the sequence of studies and measures that should be taken to further assess the importance of xenooestrogens on breast cancer carcinogenesis. (author)

  9. Antiangiogenic therapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, D.L.; Andersson, M.; Andersen, Jon Alexander Lykkegaard

    2010-01-01

    and optimal use of these agents for the treatment of breast cancer. Currently, the most promising approach has been the use of bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the most potent pro-angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Small molecular inhibitors of VEGF...... tyrosine kinase activity, such as sorafenib, appear promising. While, the role of sunitinib and inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in breast cancer has to be defined. Several unanswered questions remain, such as choice of drug(s), optimal duration of therapy and patient selection criteria......ABSTRACT: Angiogenesis is an important component of cancer growth, invasion and metastasis. Therefore, inhibition of angiogenesis is an attractive strategy for treatment of cancer. We describe existing clinical trials of antiangiogenic agents and the challenges facing the clinical development...

  10. Risk of breast cancer following exposure to tetrachloroethylene-contaminated drinking water in Cape Cod, Massachusetts: reanalysis of a case-control study using a modified exposure assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webster Thomas F

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tetrachloroethylene (PCE is an important occupational chemical used in metal degreasing and drycleaning and a prevalent drinking water contaminant. Exposure often occurs with other chemicals but it occurred alone in a pattern that reduced the likelihood of confounding in a unique scenario on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. We previously found a small to moderate increased risk of breast cancer among women with the highest exposures using a simple exposure model. We have taken advantage of technical improvements in publically available software to incorporate a more sophisticated determination of water flow and direction to see if previous results were robust to more accurate exposure assessment. Methods The current analysis used PCE exposure estimates generated with the addition of water distribution modeling software (EPANET 2.0 to test model assumptions, compare exposure distributions to prior methods, and re-examine the risk of breast cancer. In addition, we applied data smoothing to examine nonlinear relationships between breast cancer and exposure. We also compared a set of measured PCE concentrations in water samples collected in 1980 to modeled estimates. Results Thirty-nine percent of individuals considered unexposed in prior epidemiological analyses were considered exposed using the current method, but mostly at low exposure levels. As a result, the exposure distribution was shifted downward resulting in a lower value for the 90th percentile, the definition of "high exposure" in prior analyses. The current analyses confirmed a modest increase in the risk of breast cancer for women with high PCE exposure levels defined by either the 90th percentile (adjusted ORs 1.0-1.5 for 0-19 year latency assumptions or smoothing analysis cut point (adjusted ORs 1.3-2.0 for 0-15 year latency assumptions. Current exposure estimates had a higher correlation with PCE concentrations in water samples (Spearman correlation coefficient = 0.65, p

  11. Genomic Changes in Normal Breast Tissue in Women at Normal Risk or at High Risk for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danforth, David N

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic breast cancer develops through the accumulation of molecular abnormalities in normal breast tissue, resulting from exposure to estrogens and other carcinogens beginning at adolescence and continuing throughout life. These molecular changes may take a variety of forms, including numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities, epigenetic changes, and gene expression alterations. To characterize these abnormalities, a review of the literature has been conducted to define the molecular changes in each of the above major genomic categories in normal breast tissue considered to be either at normal risk or at high risk for sporadic breast cancer. This review indicates that normal risk breast tissues (such as reduction mammoplasty) contain evidence of early breast carcinogenesis including loss of heterozygosity, DNA methylation of tumor suppressor and other genes, and telomere shortening. In normal tissues at high risk for breast cancer (such as normal breast tissue adjacent to breast cancer or the contralateral breast), these changes persist, and are increased and accompanied by aneuploidy, increased genomic instability, a wide range of gene expression differences, development of large cancerized fields, and increased proliferation. These changes are consistent with early and long-standing exposure to carcinogens, especially estrogens. A model for the breast carcinogenic pathway in normal risk and high-risk breast tissues is proposed. These findings should clarify our understanding of breast carcinogenesis in normal breast tissue and promote development of improved methods for risk assessment and breast cancer prevention in women.

  12. Nanotechnology for breast cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takemi; Decuzzi, Paolo; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Sakamoto, Jason H; Tasciotti, Ennio; Robertson, Fredika M; Ferrari, Mauro

    2009-02-01

    Breast cancer is the field of medicine with the greatest presence of nanotechnological therapeutic agents in the clinic. A pegylated form of liposomally encapsulated doxorubicin is routinely used for treatment against metastatic cancer, and albumin nanoparticulate chaperones of paclitaxel were approved for locally recurrent and metastatic disease in 2005. These drugs have yielded substantial clinical benefit, and are steadily gathering greater beneficial impact. Clinical trials currently employing these drugs in combination with chemo and biological therapeutics exceed 150 worldwide. Despite these advancements, breast cancer morbidity and mortality is unacceptably high. Nanotechnology offers potential solutions to the historical challenge that has rendered breast cancer so difficult to contain and eradicate: the extreme biological diversity of the disease presentation in the patient population and in the evolutionary changes of any individual disease, the multiple pathways that drive disease progression, the onset of 'resistance' to established therapeutic cocktails, and the gravity of the side effects to treatment, which result from generally very poor distribution of the injected therapeutic agents in the body. A fundamental requirement for success in the development of new therapeutic strategies is that breast cancer specialists-in the clinic, the pharmaceutical and the basic biological laboratory-and nanotechnologists-engineers, physicists, chemists and mathematicians-optimize their ability to work in close collaboration. This further requires a mutual openness across cultural and language barriers, academic reward systems, and many other 'environmental' divides. This paper is respectfully submitted to the community to help foster the mutual interactions of the breast cancer world with micro- and nano-technology, and in particular to encourage the latter community to direct ever increasing attention to breast cancer, where an extraordinary beneficial impact may

  13. Caloric Restriction in Treating Patients With Stage 0-I Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-25

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer

  14. Breast Cancer in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tessier Cloutier, B; Clarke, A E; Ramsey-Goldman, R

    2013-01-01

    Evidence points to a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We analyzed data from a large multisite SLE cohort, linked to cancer registries.......Evidence points to a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We analyzed data from a large multisite SLE cohort, linked to cancer registries....

  15. Breast Cancer Tissue Repository

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Iglehart, J

    1997-01-01

    The Breast Tissue Repository at Duke enters its fourth year of finding. The purpose of the Repository at Duke is to provide substantial quantities of frozen tissue for explorative molecular studies...

  16. Understanding and potentially reducing second breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, D.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Long term survival after breast cancer diagnosis has increased markedly in the last decade: 15-year relative survival after breast cancer diagnosis is now 75% in the US. Associated with these excellent survival prospects, however, long term studies suggest that contralateral second breast cancer rates are in the range from 10 to 15% at 15 years post treatment, and are still higher for BRCA1/2 carriers, as well as for still longer term survivors. These second cancer risks are much higher than those for a comparable healthy woman to develop a first breast cancer. It follows that women with breast cancer are highly prone to develop a second breast cancer. We propose here a new option for reducing the disturbingly high risk of a contralateral second breast cancer. in patients with both estrogen positive and negative primary breast cancer: pr