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Sample records for assessing biomechanical exposures

  1. Systematic evaluation of observational methods assessing biomechanical exposures at work

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Esa-Pekka Takala; Irmeli Pehkonen; Mikael Forsman; Gert-Åke Hansson; Svend Erik Mathiassen; W Patrick Neumann; Gisela Sjøgaard; Kaj Bo Veiersted; Rolf H Westgaard; Jørgen Winkel

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This systematic review aimed to identify published observational methods assessing biomechanical exposures in occupational settings and evaluate them with reference to the needs of different users...

  2. Systematic evaluation of observational methods assessing biomechanical exposures at work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takala, Esa-Pekka; Pehkonen, Irmeli; Forsman, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    to September 2008. Methods were included if they were primarily based on the systematic observation of work, the observation target was the human body, and the method was clearly described in the literature. A systematic evaluation procedure was developed to assess concurrent and predictive validity...... difficult to observe correctly. Intra- and inter-observer repeatability were reported for 7 and 17 methods, respectively, and were judged mostly to be good or moderate. CONCLUSIONS: With training, observers can reach consistent results on clearly visible body postures and work activities. Many observational...

  3. Ulnar neuropathy and ulnar neuropathy-like symptoms in relation to biomechanical exposures assessed by a job exposure matrix: a triple case-referent study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Susanne Wulff; Johnsen, Birger; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders; Frost, Poul

    2012-11-01

    We aimed to evaluate relations between occupational biomechanical exposures and (1) ulnar neuropathy confirmed by electroneurography (ENG) and (2) ulnar neuropathy-like symptoms with normal ENG. In this triple case-referent study, we identified all patients aged 18-65 years, examined with ENG at a neurophysiological department on suspicion of ulnar neuropathy, 2001-2007. We mailed a questionnaire to 546 patients with ulnar neuropathy, 633 patients with ulnar neuropathy-like symptoms and two separate groups of community referents, matched on sex, age and primary care centre (risk set sampling). The two patient groups were also compared to each other directly. We constructed a Job Exposure Matrix to provide estimates of exposure to non-neutral postures, repetitive movements, hand-arm vibrations and forceful work. Conditional and unconditional logistic regressions were used. The proportion who responded was 59%. Ulnar neuropathy was related to forceful work with an exposure-response pattern reaching an OR of 3.85 (95% CI 2.04 to 7.24); non-neutral postures strengthened effects of forceful work. No relation was observed with repetitive movements. Ulnar neuropathy-like symptoms were related to repetitive movements with an OR of 1.89 (95% CI 1.01 to 3.52) in the highest-exposure category (≥2.5 h/day); forceful work was unrelated to the outcome. Ulnar neuropathy and ulnar neuropathy-like symptoms differed with respect to associations with occupational biomechanical exposures. Findings suggested specific effects of forceful work on the ulnar nerve. Thus, results corroborated the importance of an electrophysiological diagnosis when evaluating risk factors for ulnar neuropathy. Preventive effects may be achieved by reducing biomechanical exposures at work.

  4. Recent software developments for biomechanical assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, John O. B.

    1990-08-01

    While much of the software developed in research laboratories is narrow in focus and suited for a specific experiment, some of it is broad enough and of high enough quality to be useful to others in solving similar problems. Several biomechanical assessment packages are now beginning to emerge, including: * 3D research biomechanics (5- and 6-DOF) with kinematics, kinetics, 32-channel analog data subsystem, and project management. * 3D full-body gait analysis with kinematics, kinetics, EMG charts, and force plate charts. * 2D dynamic rear-foot assessment. * 2D occupational biomechanics lifting task and personnel assessments. * 2D dynamic gait analysis. * Multiple 2D dynamic spine assessments. * 2D sport and biomechanics assessments with kinematics and kinetics. * 2D and 3D equine gait assessments.

  5. How to Assess the Biomechanical Risk Levels in Beekeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, G; Rossi, F; Baracco, A

    2016-01-01

    Beekeepers are at particular risk of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders, but many of the studies lack detailed exposure assessment. To evaluate the biomechanical overload exposure in a specific farming activity, a multitasking model has been developed through the characterization of 37 basic operational tasks typical of the beekeeping activity. The Occupational Repetitive Actions (OCRA) Checklist and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Lifting Index methodologies have been applied to these elementary tasks to evaluate the exposure, and the resulting risk indices have been time-weighted averaged. Finally, an easy access, computer-assisted toolkit has been developed to help the beekeepers in the biomechanical risk assessment process. The risk of biomechanical overload for the upper limbs ranges from acceptable (maintenance and recovery of woody material and honey packaging with dosing machine tasks) to high (distribution of the top supers) risk level. The risk for back injury is always borderline in women and increases with exposure time, whereas it ranges from acceptable to borderline in men. The definition of the biomechanical risk levels allows for planning of corrective actions aimed at preventing and reducing the risk of musculoskeletal disorders through engineering, administrative, and behavioral interventions. The methodology can be used for risk assessment in other mainly manual agricultural activities.

  6. Ultrasonographic assessment of carpal tunnel biomechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doesburg, M.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, we searched for a way to assess flexor tendon and median nerve biomechanics, as well as subsynovial connective tissue thickness (SSCT) in the carpal tunnel with ultrasound, and tried to see if these patterns would give a clue towards understanding the etiology of carpal tunnel

  7. Biomechanical and psychosocial occupational exposures: joint predictors of post-retirement functional health in the French GAZEL cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbath, Erika L; Glymour, M Maria; Descatha, Alexis; Leclerc, Annette; Zins, Marie; Goldberg, Marcel; Berkman, Lisa F

    2013-12-01

    Biomechanical and psychosocial occupational exposures are seldom considered simultaneously and over extended follow-up in occupational epidemiologic studies, although there is some evidence that combined exposures have interactive effects on workers' health during working life. Given high prevalence of functional disability among retirees, research on earlier-life determinants of subsequent functional outcomes can help shape workplace policies and practices. This study investigates whether health effects of combined occupational exposures during working life are observed after individuals retire and are no longer exposed. Analyses were conducted among retirees in the French GAZEL occupational cohort (n=9168). Cumulative exposure during working life to eight biomechanical strains and to one or more reports of psychosocial job strain (high-demand, low-control work) were assessed as predictors of three outcomes: difficulty with physical functioning, role limitations due to physical difficulties, and bodily pain. Individuals were classified by joint exposure to both biomechanical and psychosocial constraints. We modeled risk ratios (RR) between exposure to biomechanical and psychosocial factors at work (separately and in combination) and disability after retirement, and we calculated the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) to test whether combined effects departed from additivity. Both psychosocial and biomechanical exposures during working life were independent predictors of the three functional health outcomes. Compared with individuals who had neither biomechanical nor psychosocial exposures, in fully adjusted log-binomial models of the combined effects of biomechanical and psychosocial exposure, among those with low biomechanical exposures, the RR for physical functioning difficulties associated with psychosocial exposures was 1.18 (95% CI 1.01, 1.37). Among those with the highest levels of biomechanical exposures, RR was 1.42 (95% CI 1.21, 1.65) among

  8. Importance of accurately assessing biomechanics of the cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Cynthia J

    2016-07-01

    This article summarizes the state-of-the-art in clinical corneal biomechanics, including procedures in which biomechanics play a role, and the clinical consequences in terms of error in estimating intraocular pressure (IOP). Corneal biomechanical response to refractive surgery can be categorized into either stable alteration of surface shape and thus visual outcome, or unstable biomechanical decompensation. The stable response is characterized by central flattening and peripheral steepening that is potentiated in a stiffer cornea. Two clinical devices for assessing corneal biomechanics do not yet measure classic biomechanical properties, but rather provide assessment of corneal deformation response. Biomechanical parameters are a function of IOP, and both the cornea and sclera become stiffer as IOP increases. Any assessment of biomechanical parameters must include IOP, and one value of stiffness does not adequately characterize a cornea. Corneal biomechanics plays a role in the outcomes of any procedure in which lamellae are transected. Once the corneal structure has been altered in a manner that includes central thinning, IOP measurements with applanation tonometry are likely not valid, and other technologies should be used.

  9. Assessment of human exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebret, E. [RIVM-National Inst. of Public Health and Environmental Protection (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    This article describes some of the features of the assessment of human exposure to environmental pollutants in epidemiological studies. Since exposure assessment in air pollution epidemiology studies typically involve professionals from various backgrounds, interpretation of a concepts like `exposure` may vary. A brief descriptions is therefore given by way of introduction

  10. [Work-related musculo-skeletal disorders in apiculture: a biomechanical approach to the risk assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, G; Sorasio, D; Rossi, F; Zito, D; Perrelli, E; Baracco, A

    2012-01-01

    The risk assessment in apiculture points out methodological problems due to discontinuities and variability of exposure. This study analyzes a comprehensive set of potential determinants influencing the biomechanical risks in apiarists using recognized technical standards to ensure the technical-scientific accuracy; it offers a simplified methodological toolkit to be used in the risk assessment process and provides a user-friendly computer application. The toolkit asks the beekeeper to specify, for each month, the total number of hours worked, specifying the distribution among different tasks. As a result, the application calculates the average index risk and the peak index risk. The evidence of the study indicates that there are activities in this occupational area with biomechanical risks that remain for some tasks, while reducing the exposure time.

  11. [Bus drivers' biomechanical risk assessment in two different contexts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baracco, A; Coggiola, M; Perrelli, F; Banchio, M; Martignone, S; Gullino, A; Romano, C

    2012-01-01

    The application of standardize methods for the biomechanical risk assessment in non-industrial cycled activity is not always possible. A typical case is the public transport sector, where workers complain of suffering for shoulder more than elbow and wrist pains. The Authors present the results of two studies involving two public transport companies and the risk of biomechanical overload of upper limbs for bus and tram drivers. The analysis has been made using three different approaches: focus groups; static analysis by using anthropometric manikins; work sampling technique by monitoring worker's activity and posture at each minute, for two hours and for each binomial vehicle-route, considering P5F e P95M drivers and assessing the perceived efforts thorough the Borg's CR10 Scale. The conclusive results show that the ergonomic analysis managed by multiple non-standardized techniques may reach consistent and repeatable results according to the epidemiological evidences.

  12. A Biomechanical Approach to Assessing Hip Fracture Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellman, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    Bone loss in microgravity is well documented, but it is difficult to quantify how declines in bone mineral density (BMD) contribute to an astronaut's overall risk of fracture upon return. This study uses a biomechanical approach to assessing hip fracture risk, or Factor of Risk (Phi), which is defined as the ratio of applied load to bone strength. All long-duration NASA astronauts from Expeditions 1-18 were included in this study (n=25), while crewmembers who flew twice (n=2) were treated as separate subjects. Bone strength was estimated based on an empirical relationship between areal BMD at the hip, as measured by DXA, and failure load, as determined by mechanical testing of cadaver femora. Fall load during a sideways fall was calculated from a previously developed biomechanical model, which takes into account body weight, height, gender, and soft tissue thickness overlying the lateral aspect of the hip that serves to attenuate the impact force. While no statistical analyses have been performed yet, preliminary results show that males in this population have a higher FOR than females, with a post- flight Phi of 0.87 and 0.36, respectively. FOR increases 5.1% from preflight to postflight, while only one subject crossed the fracture "threshold" of Phi = 1, for a total of 2 subjects with a postflight Phi > 1. These results suggest that men may be at greater risk for hip fracture due largely in part to their relatively thin soft tissue padding as compared to women, since soft tissue thickness has the highest correlation (R(exp 2)= .53) with FOR of all subject-specific parameters. Future work will investigate changes in FOR during recovery to see if baseline risk levels are restored upon return to 1-g activity. While dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the most commonly used clinical measure of bone health, it fails to provide compartment-specific information that is useful in assessing changes to bone quality as a result of microgravity exposure. Peripheral

  13. Exposure assessment of trichloroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C; Schaum, J

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews exposure information available for trichloroethylene (TCE) and assesses the magnitude of human exposure. The primary sources releasing TCE into the environment are metal cleaning and degreasing operations. Releases occur into all media but mostly into the air due to its volatility. It is also moderately soluble in water and can leach from soils into groundwater. TCE has commonly been found in ambient air, surface water, and groundwaters. The 1998 air levels in microg/m(3) across 115 monitors can be summarized as follows: range = 0.01-3.9, mean = 0.88. A California survey of large water utilities in 1984 found a median concentration of 3.0 microg/L. General population exposure to TCE occurs primarily by inhalation and water ingestion. Typical average daily intakes have been estimated as 11-33 microg/day for inhalation and 2-20 microg/day for ingestion. A small portion of the population is expected to have elevated exposures as a result of one or more of these pathways: inhalation exposures to workers involved in degreasing operations, ingestion and inhalation exposures occurring in homes with private wells located near disposal/contamination sites, and inhalation exposures to consumers using TCE products in areas of poor ventilation. More current and more extensive data on TCE levels in indoor air, water, and soil are needed to better characterize the distribution of background exposures in the general population and elevated exposures in special subpopulations. Images Figure 1 PMID:10807565

  14. Dermal exposure assessment techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, R A

    1993-12-01

    Exposure of the skin to chemical substances can contribute significantly to total dose in many workplace situations, and its relative importance will increase when airborne occupational exposure limits are reduced, unless steps to reduce skin exposure are undertaken simultaneously. Its assessment employs personal sampling techniques to measure skin loading rates, and combines these measurements with models of percutaneous absorption to estimate absorbed dose. Knowledge of dermal exposure pathways is in many cases fundamental to hazard evaluation and control. When the skin is the primary contributor to absorbed dose, dermal exposure measurements and biological monitoring play complementary roles in defining occupational exposures. Exposure normally occurs by one of three pathways: (i) immersion (direct contact with a liquid or solid chemical substance); (ii) deposition of aerosol or uptake of vapour through the skin; or (iii) surface contact (residue transfer from contaminated surfaces). Sampling methods fall into three categories: surrogate skin; chemical removal; and fluorescent tracers. Surface sampling represents a supplementary approach, providing an estimate of dermal exposure potential. Surrogate skin techniques involve placing a chemical collection medium on the skin. Whole-body garment samplers do not require assumptions relating to distribution, an inherent limitation of patch sampling. The validity of these techniques rests on the ability of the sampling medium to capture and retain chemicals in a manner similar to skin. Removal techniques include skin washing and wiping, but these measure only what can be removed from the skin, not exposure: laboratory removal efficiency studies are required for proper interpretation of data. Fluorescent tracer techniques exploit the visual properties of fluorescent compounds, and combined with video imaging make quantification of dermal exposure patterns possible, but the need to introduce a chemical substance (tracer

  15. Asbestos Exposure Assessment Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcot, Divya K.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to particular hazardous materials in a work environment is dangerous to the employees who work directly with or around the materials as well as those who come in contact with them indirectly. In order to maintain a national standard for safe working environments and protect worker health, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has set forth numerous precautionary regulations. NASA has been proactive in adhering to these regulations by implementing standards which are often stricter than regulation limits and administering frequent health risk assessments. The primary objective of this project is to create the infrastructure for an Asbestos Exposure Assessment Database specific to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) which will compile all of the exposure assessment data into a well-organized, navigable format. The data includes Sample Types, Samples Durations, Crafts of those from whom samples were collected, Job Performance Requirements (JPR) numbers, Phased Contrast Microscopy (PCM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) results and qualifiers, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), and names of industrial hygienists who performed the monitoring. This database will allow NASA to provide OSHA with specific information demonstrating that JSC s work procedures are protective enough to minimize the risk of future disease from the exposures. The data has been collected by the NASA contractors Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) and Wyle Laboratories. The personal exposure samples were collected from devices worn by laborers working at JSC and by building occupants located in asbestos-containing buildings.

  16. Work-related biomechanical exposure and job strain in midlife separately and jointly predict disability after 28 years: a Finnish longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, K C; Neupane, Subas; Leino-Arjas, Päivi; von Bonsdorff, Mikaela B; Rantanen, Taina; von Bonsdorff, Monika E; Seitsamo, Jorma; Ilmarinen, Juhani; Nygård, Clas-Håkan

    2017-09-01

    Objectives We investigated whether the extent of biomechanical exposures and job strain in midlife separately and jointly predict disability in old age. Methods Participants of the Finnish Longitudinal Study on Aging Municipal Employees (FLAME) in 1981 (aged 44-58 years) responded to disability questionnaires in 2009 (1850 women and 1082 men). Difficulties in performing five activities of daily living (ADL) and seven instrumental ADL (IADL) were used to assess severity of disability (score range: 0-12, 0=no disability). Information on biomechanical exposures and job strain was collected by questionnaire at baseline. Adjusted prevalence proportion ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were modelled using mixed negative binomial regression with robust variance. The joint effect of two exposures was quantified using the concept of relative excessive risk due to interaction (RERI). Results The overall prevalence of disability (score: 1-12) was 46.7% (women: 41%; men: 57%). Compared to low-level exposures in an adjusted model, the PR of high baseline biomechanical exposures for each one unit increase in the disability score was 1.31 (95% CI 1.10-1.55) and PR of high job strain was 1.71 (95% CI 1.26-2.32). Associations were rather similar in gender-stratified analyses. Furthermore, the joint effect (high strain/high biomechanical) was multiplicative (women: PR 1.32, 95% CI 1.21-1.45; men: PR 1.27, 95% CI 1.13-1.44), but no additive effect was observed when fully adjusted. Conclusion High biomechanical exposure and job strain in midlife were strongly associated with the severity of disability in later life. The workplace could serve as arena for preventive interventions regarding disability in old age.

  17. Assessment of knowledge transfer in the context of biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Randolph E.

    The dynamic act of knowledge transfer, or the connection of a student's prior knowledge to features of a new problem, could be considered one of the primary goals of education. Yet studies highlight more instances of failure than success. This dissertation focuses on how knowledge transfer takes place during individual problem solving, in classroom settings and during group work. Through the lens of dynamic transfer, or how students connect prior knowledge to problem features, this qualitative study focuses on a methodology to assess transfer in the context of biomechanics. The first phase of this work investigates how a pedagogical technique based on situated cognition theory affects students' ability to transfer knowledge gained in a biomechanics class to later experiences both in and out of the classroom. A post-class focus group examined events the students remembered from the class, what they learned from them, and how they connected them to later relevant experiences inside and outside the classroom. These results were triangulated with conceptual gains evaluated through concept inventories and pre- and post- content tests. Based on these results, the next two phases of the project take a more in-depth look at dynamic knowledge transfer during independent problem-solving and group project interactions, respectively. By categorizing prior knowledge (Source Tools), problem features (Target Tools) and the connections between them, results from the second phase of this study showed that within individual problem solving, source tools were almost exclusively derived from "propagated sources," i.e. those based on an authoritative source. This differs from findings in the third phase of the project, in which a mixture of "propagated" sources and "fabricated" sources, i.e. those based on student experiences, were identified within the group project work. This methodology is effective at assessing knowledge transfer in the context of biomechanics through evidence of

  18. Diagnostic Assessment of Preparedness of Level One Sports Science Students for Biomechanics Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Sharon J.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the use of a diagnostic test to assess the preparedness of level one students for a sports biomechanics module. During their first week at university, a cohort of 108 students completed a diagnostic test at the end of their first lecture in sports biomechanics, with no prior notice. Upon…

  19. Assessment of spring cranioplasty biomechanics in sagittal craniosynostosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Alessandro; Schievano, Silvia; Rodriguez Florez, Naiara; McNicholas, Roisin; Rodgers, Will; Ponniah, Allan; James, Greg; Hayward, Richard; Dunaway, David; Jeelani, N U Owase

    2017-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Scaphocephaly secondary to sagittal craniosynostosis has been treated in recent years with spring-assisted cranioplasty, an innovative approach that leverages the use of metallic spring distractors to reshape the patient skull. In this study, a population of patients who had undergone spring cranioplasty for the correction of scaphocephaly at the Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children was retrospectively analyzed to systematically assess spring biomechanical performance and kinematics in relation to spring model, patient age, and outcomes over time. METHODS Data from 60 patients (49 males, mean age at surgery 5.2 ± 0.9 months) who had received 2 springs for the treatment of isolated sagittal craniosynostosis were analyzed. The opening distance of the springs at the time of insertion and removal was retrieved from the surgical notes and, during the implantation period, from planar radiographs obtained at 1 day postoperatively and at the 3-week follow-up. The force exerted by the spring to the patient skull at each time point was derived after mechanical testing of each spring model-3 devices with the same geometry but different wire thicknesses. Changes in the cephalic index between preoperatively and the 3-week follow-up were recorded. RESULTS Stiffer springs were implanted in older patients (p springs were used (p spring models, however, the devices all plateaued. Indeed, regardless of patient age or spring model, after 10 days from insertion, all the devices were open. CONCLUSIONS Results in this study provide biomechanical insights into spring-assisted cranioplasty and could help to improve spring design and follow-up strategy in the future.

  20. Biomechanical assessment in models of glaucomatous optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thao D; Ethier, C Ross

    2015-12-01

    The biomechanical environment within the eye is of interest in both the regulation of intraocular pressure and the loss of retinal ganglion cell axons in glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Unfortunately, this environment is complex and difficult to determine. Here we provide a brief introduction to basic concepts of mechanics (stress, strain, constitutive relationships) as applied to the eye, and then describe a variety of experimental and computational approaches used to study ocular biomechanics. These include finite element modeling, direct experimental measurements of tissue displacements using optical and other techniques, direct experimental measurement of tissue microstructure, and combinations thereof. Thanks to notable technical and conceptual advances in all of these areas, we are slowly gaining a better understanding of how tissue biomechanical properties in both the anterior and posterior segments may influence the development of, and risk for, glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Although many challenging research questions remain unanswered, the potential of this body of work is exciting; projects underway include the coupling of clinical imaging with biomechanical modeling to create new diagnostic tools, development of IOP control strategies based on improved understanding the mechanobiology of the outflow tract, and attempts to develop novel biomechanically-based therapeutic strategies for preservation of vision in glaucoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Risk of surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome in relation to neck-shoulder complaints and occupational biomechanical exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Susanne Wulff; Dalbøge, Annett; Andersen, JH

    2013-01-01

    at the Danish Ramazzini Centre. We linked baseline questionnaire information from 1993-2004 on neck-shoulder complaints, job titles, psychosocial work factors, body mass index, and smoking with register information on first-time surgery for SIS from 1996-2008. Biomechanical exposure measures were obtained from...

  2. ECO Exposure Assessment Tools by Receptors and Exposure Factors - References

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eco-Box is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases

  3. ECO Exposure Assessment Tools by Exposure Pathways - References

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eco-Box is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases

  4. An observational model for biomechanical assessment of sprint kayaking technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Lisa K; Hume, Patria A; Nolte, Volker

    2012-11-01

    Sprint kayaking stroke phase descriptions for biomechanical analysis of technique vary among kayaking literature, with inconsistencies not conducive for the advancement of biomechanics applied service or research. We aimed to provide a consistent basis for the categorisation and analysis of sprint kayak technique by proposing a clear observational model. Electronic databases were searched using key words kayak, sprint, technique, and biomechanics, with 20 sources reviewed. Nine phase-defining positions were identified within the kayak literature and were divided into three distinct types based on how positions were defined: water-contact-defined positions, paddle-shaft-defined positions, and body-defined positions. Videos of elite paddlers from multiple camera views were reviewed to determine the visibility of positions used to define phases. The water-contact-defined positions of catch, immersion, extraction, and release were visible from multiple camera views, therefore were suitable for practical use by coaches and researchers. Using these positions, phases and sub-phases were created for a new observational model. We recommend that kayaking data should be reported using single strokes and described using two phases: water and aerial. For more detailed analysis without disrupting the basic two-phase model, a four-sub-phase model consisting of entry, pull, exit, and aerial sub-phases should be used.

  5. Impacts of hematite nanoparticle exposure on biomechanical, adhesive, and surface electrical properties of Escherichia coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Hughes, Joseph; Chen, Yongsheng

    2012-06-01

    Despite a wealth of studies examining the toxicity of engineered nanomaterials, current knowledge on their cytotoxic mechanisms (particularly from a physical perspective) remains limited. In this work, we imaged and quantitatively characterized the biomechanical (hardness and elasticity), adhesive, and surface electrical properties of Escherichia coli cells with and without exposure to hematite nanoparticles (NPs) in an effort to advance our understanding of the cytotoxic impacts of nanomaterials. Both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed that E. coli cells had noticeable deformation with hematite treatment for 45 min with a statistical significance. The hematite-treated cells became significantly harder or stiffer than untreated ones, as evidenced by indentation and spring constant measurements. The average indentation of the hematite-treated E. coli cells was 120 nm, which is significantly lower (P hematite-treated E. coli cells (0.28 ± 0.11 nN/nm) was about 20 times higher than that of untreated ones (0.01 ± 0.01 nN/nm). The zeta potential of E. coli cells, measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS), was shown to shift from -4 ± 2 mV to -27 ± 8 mV with progressive surface adsorption of hematite NPs, a finding which is consistent with the local surface potential measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Overall, the reported findings quantitatively revealed the adverse impacts of nanomaterial exposure on physical properties of bacterial cells and should provide insight into the toxicity mechanisms of nanomaterials.

  6. Head impacts during high school football: a biomechanical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broglio, Steven P; Sosnoff, Jacob J; Shin, SungHoon; He, Xuming; Alcaraz, Christopher; Zimmerman, Jerrad

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the impact biomechanics sustained by players during interscholastic football. To characterize the location and magnitude of impacts sustained by players during an interscholastic football season. Observational design. On the field. High school varsity football team (n = 35; age = 16.85 +/- 0.75 years, height = 183.49 +/- 5.31 cm, mass = 89.42 +/- 12.88 kg). Biomechanical variables (linear acceleration, rotational acceleration, jerk, force, impulse, and impact duration) related to head impacts were categorized by session type, player position, and helmet impact location. Differences in grouping variables were found for each impact descriptor. Impacts occurred more frequently and with greater intensity during games. Linear acceleration was greatest in defensive linemen and offensive skill players and when the impact occurred at the top of the helmet. The largest rotational acceleration occurred in defensive linemen and with impacts to the front of the helmet. Impacts with the highest-magnitude jerk, force, and impulse and shortest duration occurred in the offensive skill, defensive line, offensive line, and defensive skill players, respectively. Top-of-the-helmet impacts yielded the greatest magnitude for the same variables. We are the first to provide a biomechanical characterization of head impacts in an interscholastic football team across a season of play. The intensity of game play manifested with more frequent and intense impacts. The highest-magnitude variables were distributed across all player groups, but impacts to the top of the helmet yielded the highest values. These high school football athletes appeared to sustain greater accelerations after impact than their older counterparts did. How this finding relates to concussion occurrence has yet to be elucidated.

  7. In vitro method for assessing the biomechanics of the patellofemoral joint following total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, L G; Gheduzzi, S; Miles, A W

    2014-12-01

    The patellofemoral joint is a common site of pain and failure following total knee arthroplasty. A contributory factor may be adverse patellofemoral biomechanics. Cadaveric investigations are commonly used to assess the biomechanics of the joint, but are associated with high inter-specimen variability and often cannot be carried out at physiological levels of loading. This study aimed to evaluate the suitability of a novel knee simulator for investigating patellofemoral joint biomechanics. This simulator specifically facilitated the extended assessment of patellofemoral joint biomechanics under physiological levels of loading. The simulator allowed the knee to move in 6 degrees of freedom under quadriceps actuation and included a simulation of the action of the hamstrings. Prostheses were implanted on synthetic bones and key soft tissues were modelled with a synthetic analogue. In order to evaluate the physiological relevance and repeatability of the simulator, measurements were made of the quadriceps force and the force, contact area and pressure within the patellofemoral joint using load cells, pressure-sensitive film, and a flexible pressure sensor. The results were in agreement with those previously reported in the literature, confirming that the simulator is able to provide a realistic physiological loading situation. Under physiological loading, average standard deviations of force and area measurements were substantially lower and comparable to those reported in previous cadaveric studies, respectively. The simulator replicates the physiological environment and has been demonstrated to allow the initial investigation of factors affecting patellofemoral biomechanics following total knee arthroplasty. © IMechE 2014.

  8. Variability in endotoxin exposure levels and consequences for exposure assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaan, S.; Schinkel, J.; Wouters, I.M.; Preller, L.; Tielemans, E.; Nij, E.T.; Heederik, D.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Workers in many industries are exposed to endotoxins, which may cause adverse health effects. In exposure assessment, information about exposure variability is essential. However, variability in exposure has rarely been investigated for biological agents and more specifically for

  9. Quantitative Assessment of Dance Therapy Infulence on the Parkinson’s Disease Patients’ Lower Limb Biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatas Lukšys

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease – progressive neurologic disorder that damages a variety of motor function and reduces the quality of life. Patients with PD are subject to various physical therapy exercises, but recently is applied more often the dance – music therapy. This study aims assessing the therapeutic effect of the modified Lindy Hop dance therapy on lower extremity biomechanics. The experimental study was performed using inertial sensors that registered lower extremity biomechanical parameters during gait. Several spatio-temporal parameters of lower limb were calculated and were found statistically significant between groups, which allows quantifying the influence of dance therapy.

  10. Biomechanical and ergonomic assessment of urban transit operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Wayne J; Everson, Donald; Rae, Michelle; Callaghan, Jack P; Croll, Jim; Kuruganti, Usha

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of neck and low back musculoskeletal injuries in transit operators has been shown to be high; with work absences exceeding double the National average. There is a lack of biomechanical data generated from field researches to inform on musculoskeletal risk associated with transportation and driving occupations. Instead there has been a reliance on simulated driving and questionnaire-based research. This study was designed to examine the musculoskeletal and biomechanical stresses experienced by urban bus drivers. The main objective was to obtain a baseline understanding of sitting posture, muscle activiation and subjective ratings of stress during regular driving tasks. Fifteen urban city bus drivers were recruited for this study. Bus drivers drove the same 65-minute bus route once, at the same time of day, in the same preselected bus. Wireless surface electromyography monitored muscular activity of the drivers' neck, upper trapezius, and erector spinae and video analysis and seat pressure mapping was used to monitor changes in driving posture. A health and lifestyle questionnaire was administered to record specific neck and back pain experienced by drivers as well as to provide lifestyle habits. Drivers were found to exhibit non-neutral postures for less than 30% of the time while conducting routine tasks of turning and stopping for passenger loading and unloading. The neck posture was the greatest concern in terms of non-neutral posture and this was supported by the higher muscle activation to the neck musculature. There was significant posture adjustment made during the one-hour driving period with the adjustments increasing with driving time. Activities associated with bus driving appear to require the use of non-neutral postures an increase in muscle activation. Significant postural adjustments were needed over the one-hour observation period suggesting that the musculoskeletal demands may increase over a regular 12-hour shift.

  11. ECO Exposure Assessment Tools by Stressors - References

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eco-Box is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases

  12. ECO Exposure Assessment Tools by Effects - References

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eco-Box is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases

  13. Research and Teaching: Assessing the Effect of Problem-Based Learning on Undergraduate Student Learning in Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandeville, David; Stoner, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of using the problem-based learning (PBL) teaching strategy on student academic achievement and secondary learning outcomes when compared with the traditional lecture (TL) for an undergraduate Biomechanics course. Successive undergraduate Biomechanics courses--a TL cohort and a PBL cohort--were…

  14. Biomechanical Assessment of Patellar Advancement Procedures for Patella Alta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Adam; Baldini, Todd; Krughoff, Kevin; Shapiro, Joshua A; Lindeque, Bennie; Rhodes, Jason; Carollo, James

    2016-05-01

    Crouch gait deformity is common in children with cerebral palsy and often is associated with patella alta. Patellar tendon advancement typically is used to correct patella alta and restore normal knee mechanics. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanical strength of surgical constructs used for fixation during patellar advancement procedures. This study used a cadaveric model to determine which of 3 surgical techniques is biomechanically optimal for patellar tendon advancement in treating patella alta. Twenty-four human cadaveric knees (8 per group) were prepared using 1 of 3 different common surgical techniques: tibial tubercle osteotomy, patellar tendon partial resection and repair at the distal patella, and patellar tendon imbrication. The patella was loaded from 25 to 250 N at 1 Hz for 1000 cycles. A significant difference in patella displacement under cyclical loading was found between surgical techniques. Tibial tubercle osteotomy exhibited significantly less displacement under cyclical loading than distal patella excision and repair (Ppatella excision and repair (P=.0006). Tibial tubercle osteotomy survived longest. Based on failure criteria of 5 mm of displacement, tibial tubercle osteotomy lasted between 250 and 500 cycles. The other 2 techniques failed by 25 cycles. This study offers quantitative evidence regarding the relative mechanical strength of each construct and may influence choice of surgical technique. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e492-e497.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Systematic evaluation of observational methods assessing biomechanical exposures at work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takala, Esa-Pekka; Irmeli, Pehkonen; Forsman, Mikael

    2009-01-01

    is suitable for all purposes. The selection and use of methods has often been based on tradition rather than on a critical evaluation, because actors are generally not aware of methods outside of their own realm of experience.   Aims   The aim of this project was to systematically and critically evaluate.......ttl.fi/workloadexposuremethods The site also includes a tool to sort the methods according to the items used in the evaluation so that the user can select and compare methods for his/her purposes.   Acknowledgments. This study was financially supported by the Nordic Council of Ministers (Project 411040 - 70107)        ...... in the electronic databases and other sources identified 29 observational methods. The methods were evaluated for the aspects related to their reliability and usability for different purposes. The results of evaluation will be found in internet with a tool that helps the user to search for most suitable method...

  16. EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS IN EXPOSURE SCIENCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure is the contact between a stressor and a human or ecological receptor. Risk analysis step in which receptor interaction with the exposure stressor of concern is evaluated. To assess exposure to a particular stressor we need to know - Properties of the stressor; Sources, p...

  17. Non-invasive MRI Assessments of Tissue Microstructures and Macromolecules in the Eye upon Biomechanical or Biochemical Modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Leon C.; Sigal, Ian A.; Ning-Jiun Jan; Xiaoling Yang; Yolandi van der Merwe; Yu Yu; Ying Chau; Leung, Christopher K.; Conner, Ian P.; Tao Jin; Wu, Ed X.; Seong-Gi Kim; Gadi Wollstein; Schuman, Joel S.; Kevin C Chan

    2016-01-01

    The microstructural organization and composition of the corneoscleral shell (CSS) determine the biomechanical behavior of the eye, and are important in diseases such as glaucoma and myopia. However, limited techniques can assess these properties globally, non-invasively and quantitatively. In this study, we hypothesized that multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can reveal the effects of biomechanical or biochemical modulation on CSS. Upon intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation, CSS appe...

  18. The corneoscleral shell of the eye: potentials of assessing biomechanical parameters in normal and pathological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Iomdina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews modern methods of evaluating the biomechanical properties of the corneoscleral shell of the eye that can be used both in the studies of the pathogenesis of various ophthalmic pathologies and in clinical practice. The biomechanical parameters of the cornea and the sclera have been shown to be diagnostically significant in assessing the risk of complications and the effectiveness of keratorefractive interventions, in the diagnosis and the prognosis of keratoconus, progressive myopia, or glaucoma. In clinical practice, a special device, Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA, has been used on a large scale. The analyzer is used to assess two parameters that characterize viscoelastic properties of the cornea — corneal hysteresis (CH and corneal resistance factor (CRF. Reduced levels of CH and CRF have been noted after eximer laser surgery, especially that administered to patients who demonstrate a regression in the refraction effect or suffer from keratoconus. This fact justifies the use of these biomechanical parameters as additional diagnostic criteria in the evaluation of the state of the cornea. At the same time, ORA data are shown to reflect the biomechanical response to the impact of the air pulse not only from the cornea alone but also from the whole corneoscleral capsule. This is probably the cause of reduced CH in children with progressive myopia and a weakened supportive function of the sclera, as well as such reduction in glaucomatous adult patients. It is hypothesized that a low CH value is a result of remodeling of the connective tissue matrix of the corneoscleral shell of the eye and can be an independent factor testifying to a risk of glaucoma progression. Reduced CH in primary open-angle glaucoma occurs in parallel with the development of pathological structural changes of the optic disc, and deterioration of visual fields, which is an evidence of a specific character and sensitivity of this parameter. The

  19. Exposure Assessment Tools by Chemical Classes - Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA ExpoBox is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases

  20. Biomechanical Assessment of the Strength of Volleyball Players in Different Stages of the Training Macrocycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Śliwa Marcin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In order to help volleyball players achieve superior results, their coaches are constantly seeking new training methods. One of the methods used to improve the effectiveness of the training that is being implemented is conducting tests which make it possible to assess the player’s locomotor system in terms of its motor and biomechanical functions. The aim of the study was to determine the torque of the knee flexor and extensor muscles of volleyball players in three stages of the annual macrocycle.

  1. Assessment of Corneal Biomechanical Properties by CorVis ST in Patients with Dry Eye and in Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Long

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate corneal biomechanical properties in patients with dry eye and in healthy subjects using Corneal Visualization Scheimpflug Technology (CorVis ST. Methods. Biomechanical parameters were measured using CorVis ST in 28 eyes of 28 patients with dry eye (dry eye group and 26 normal subjects (control group. The Schirmer I test value, tear film break-up time (TBUT, and corneal staining score (CSS were recorded for each eye. Biomechanical properties were compared between the two groups and bivariate correlation analysis was used to assess the relationship between biomechanical parameters and dry eye signs. Results. Only one of the ten biomechanical parameters was significantly different between the two groups. Patients in the dry eye group had significantly lower highest concavity time (HC-time (P=0.02 than the control group. Correlation analysis showed a significant negative correlation between HC-time and CSS with marginal P value (ρ=-0.39, P=0.04 in the dry eye group. Conclusions. The corneal biomechanical parameter of HC-time is reduced in dry eyes compared to normal eyes. There was also a very weak but significant negative correlation between HC-time and CSS in the dry eye group, indicating that ocular surface damage can give rise to a more compliant cornea in dry eyes.

  2. Ultrasound Elasticity Imaging System with Chirp-Coded Excitation for Assessing Biomechanical Properties of Elasticity Phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-Chun Chun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The biomechanical properties of soft tissues vary with pathological phenomenon. Ultrasound elasticity imaging is a noninvasive method used to analyze the local biomechanical properties of soft tissues in clinical diagnosis. However, the echo signal-to-noise ratio (eSNR is diminished because of the attenuation of ultrasonic energy by soft tissues. Therefore, to improve the quality of elastography, the eSNR and depth of ultrasound penetration must be increased using chirp-coded excitation. Moreover, the low axial resolution of ultrasound images generated by a chirp-coded pulse must be increased using an appropriate compression filter. The main aim of this study is to develop an ultrasound elasticity imaging system with chirp-coded excitation using a Tukey window for assessing the biomechanical properties of soft tissues. In this study, we propose an ultrasound elasticity imaging system equipped with a 7.5-MHz single-element transducer and polymethylpentene compression plate to measure strains in soft tissues. Soft tissue strains were analyzed using cross correlation (CC and absolution difference (AD algorithms. The optimal parameters of CC and AD algorithms used for the ultrasound elasticity imaging system with chirp-coded excitation were determined by measuring the elastographic signal-to-noise ratio (SNRe of a homogeneous phantom. Moreover, chirp-coded excitation and short pulse excitation were used to measure the elasticity properties of the phantom. The elastographic qualities of the tissue-mimicking phantom were assessed in terms of Young’s modulus and elastographic contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRe. The results show that the developed ultrasound elasticity imaging system with chirp-coded excitation modulated by a Tukey window can acquire accurate, high-quality elastography images.

  3. Line-field low coherence holography for ultra-fast assessment of tissue biomechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Schill, Alexander; Singh, Manmohan; Wu, Chen; Larin, Kirill V.

    2017-02-01

    Changes in the biomechanical properties of tissues are often associated with disease etiology and can provide quantitative information for clinical diagnosis. Tissue elasticity is often assessed by analyzing the speed of an elastic wave, such as in supersonic shear wave imaging and magnetic resonance elastography techniques. However, insufficient spatial resolution and large stimulation forces limit their application in small samples (dimensions on the order of millimeters or micrometers). Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is an emerging technique that provides local biomechanical properties with micrometer scale resolution. However, conventional point-by-point scanning OCE methods require long acquisition times (tens of seconds) that are unfeasible for clinical use due to motion artifacts, and repeated external excitations. Here, we demonstrate a noncontact ultrafast line-field low coherent holography system (LF-LCH) integrated with spatial phase shifting algorithm for phase retrieval based on a single interferogram. The proposed method using the Hilbert transform outperforms the Fourier transform-based technique in LF-LCH. Spatio-temporal maps of elastic wave propagation were acquired using a single air-pulse excitation and the acquisition speed can be optimized to less than 10 ms. Results on homogenous, transversely heterogeneous agar phantoms and ex vivo chicken breast agreed well with mechanical testing, demonstrating that this method can accurately detect tissue stiffness with an ultrafast line imaging rate of 200 kHz using a robust phase retrieval algorithm, which is among the highest speed for lateral imaging of elastic wave propagation with optical elastography methods.

  4. A pilot study of biomechanical assessment before and after an integrative training program for adolescents with juvenile fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Susan T; Thomas, Staci; DiCesare, Christopher; Pfeiffer, Megan; Sil, Soumitri; Ting, Tracy V; Williams, Sara E; Myer, Gregory D; Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita

    2016-07-22

    Adolescents with juvenile fibromyalgia (JFM) tend to be very sedentary and avoid participation in physical activity. A prior study suggested that JFM patients show altered biomechanics compared to healthy adolescents which may make them more prone to pain/injury during exercise. A new intervention combining well established cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) techniques with specialized neuromuscular exercise -Fibromyalgia Integrative Training for Teens (FIT Teens) was developed and shown to be promising in improving functioning in adolescents with JFM. In contrast to traditional exercise programs such as aerobic or resistance training, neuromuscular training is a tailored approach which targets gait, posture, balance and movement mechanics which form the foundation for safe exercise participation with reduced risk for injury or pain (and hence more tolerable by JFM patients). The aim of this pilot feasibility study was to establish whether objective biomechanical assessment including sophisticated 3-D motion analysis would be useful in measuring improvements in strength, balance, gait, and functional performance after participation in the 8-week FIT Teens program. Eleven female participants with JFM (ages 12-18 years) completed pre- and post-treatment assessments of biomechanics, including walking gait analysis, lower extremity strength assessment, functional performance, and dynamic postural stability. Descriptive data indicated that mechanics of walking gait and functional performance appeared to improve after treatment. Hip abduction strength and dynamic postural control also demonstrated improvements bilaterally. Overall, the results of this pilot study offer initial evidence for the utility of biomechanical assessment to objectively demonstrate observable changes in biomechanical performance after an integrated training intervention for youth with JFM. If replicated in larger controlled studies, findings would suggest that through the FIT Teens intervention

  5. Biomechanical Assessment of Reaching Movements in Post-Stroke Patients During a Robot-Aided Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mazzoleni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to describe a method for the assessment of the motor performance in post-stroke subjects who have been undergone a robot-aided upper limb rehabilitation treatment. The motivation for adopting such methodology relies on the need of quantitative methods for the evaluation of the effects of robot-aided rehabilitation treatments, which assumes great importance from the clinical point of view. The method is based on the analysis of biomechanical parameters computed from force data recorded during the execution of planar reaching movements. Data from 17 chronic post-stroke patients and 5 healthy subjects were analysed. The results show the effectiveness of the proposed method, which can contribute to quantitatively evaluate the effects of a robot-mediated therapy on the upper limb of chronic post-stroke subjects.

  6. FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOMECHANICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duane Knudson

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION This book provides a broad and in-depth theoretical and practical description of the fundamental concepts in understanding biomechanics in the qualitative analysis of human movement. PURPOSE The aim is to bring together up-to-date biomechanical knowledge with expert application knowledge. Extensive referencing for students is also provided. FEATURES This textbook is divided into 12 chapters within four parts, including a lab activities section at the end. The division is as follows: Part 1 Introduction: 1.Introduction to biomechanics of human movement; 2.Fundamentals of biomechanics and qualitative analysis; Part 2 Biological/Structural Bases: 3.Anatomical description and its limitations; 4.Mechanics of the musculoskeletal system; Part 3 Mechanical Bases: 5.Linear and angular kinematics; 6.Linear kinetics; 7.Angular kinetics; 8.Fluid mechanics; Part 4 Application of Biomechanics in Qualitative Analysis :9.Applying biomechanics in physical education; 10.Applying biomechanics in coaching; 11.Applying biomechanics in strength and conditioning; 12.Applying biomechanics in sports medicine and rehabilitation. AUDIENCE This is an important reading for both student and educators in the medicine, sport and exercise-related fields. For the researcher and lecturer it would be a helpful guide to plan and prepare more detailed experimental designs or lecture and/or laboratory classes in exercise and sport biomechanics. ASSESSMENT The text provides a constructive fundamental resource for biomechanics, exercise and sport-related students, teachers and researchers as well as anyone interested in understanding motion. It is also very useful since being clearly written and presenting several ways of examples of the application of biomechanics to help teach and apply biomechanical variables and concepts, including sport-related ones

  7. Sulfur Oxides Risk and Exposure Assessment Planning ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    In conducting risk/exposure assessments for the Sulfur Oxides NAAQS review, EPA will first develop a draft Scope and Methods Plan which will describe the proposed scope of the quantitative and qualitative analyses to be performed and the tools/methods that may be employed Provide opportunity for CASAC feedback on EPA's plans for the risk and exposure assessment for the Sulfur Oxides NAAQS review

  8. Mycotoxins: occurrence, toxicology, and exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, S; Ramos, A J; Cano-Sancho, G; Sanchis, V

    2013-10-01

    Mycotoxins are abiotic hazards produced by certain fungi that can grow on a variety of crops. Consequently, their prevalence in plant raw materials may be relatively high. The concentration of mycotoxins in finished products is usually lower than in raw materials. In this review, occurrence and toxicology of the main mycotoxins are summarised. Furthermore, methodological approaches for exposure assessment are described. Existing exposure assessments, both through contamination and consumption data and biomarkers of exposure, for the main mycotoxins are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Integrating Exposure into Chemical Alternatives Assessment ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most alternatives assessments (AA) published to date are largely hazard-based rankings, and as such may not represent a fully informed consideration of the advantages and disadvantages of possible alternatives. With an assessment goal of identifying an alternative chemical that is more sustainable, other attributes beyond hazard are also important, including exposure, risk, life-cycle impacts, performance, cost, and social responsibility. Building on the 2014 recommendations by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences to improve AA decisions by including comparative exposure assessment, the HESISustainable Chemical Alternatives Technical Committee, which consists of scientists from academia, industry, government, and NGOs, has developed a qualitative comparative exposure approach. Conducting such a comparison can screen for alternatives that are expected to have a higher exposure potential, which could trigger a higher-tiered, more quantitative exposure assessment on the alternatives being considered. This talk will demonstrate an approach for including chemical- and product-related exposure information in a qualitative AA comparison. Starting from existing hazard AAs, a series of four chemical-product application scenarios were examined to test the concept, to understand the effort required, and to determine the value of exposure data in AA decision-making. The group has developed a classification approach for ingredient and product parameters to support compariso

  10. Exposure scenario libraries as a tool for exposure assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Jiménez, Araceli; Rashid, Shahzad; Brouwer, Derk; Fransman, Wouter; Fito, Carlos; Boulougouris, George; van Tongeren, Martie

    2015-05-01

    The development of nanotechnology has reached a point where it is being widely applied, and numerous nanomaterials and nano-enabled products are handled across a broad range of industrial sectors. Exposure extends beyond occupational settings as products containing nanomaterials are used by different consumer groups. Despite the knowledge on their toxic effects is growing there is still not OEL for most NMS and therefore the precautionary approach is still used where levels are kept as low as possible Therefore there is a need to assess workers and consumers exposure.

  11. Nonlinear Optical Macroscopic Assessment of 3-D Corneal Collagen Organization and Axial Biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Winkler, Moritz; Chai, Dongyul; Kriling, Shelsea; NIEN, CHYONG JY; Brown, Donald J.; Jester, Bryan; Juhasz, Tibor; Jester, James V.

    2011-01-01

    Collagen fibers in the anterior cornea are highly intertwined, unlike those in the posterior cornea. This axial gradient corresponds to a decrease in elastic modulus, suggesting that specific fiber organization controls corneal biomechanics and shape.

  12. Impaired physical function, loss of muscle mass and assessment of biomechanical properties in critical ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jesper Brøndum

    2012-01-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) admission is associated with muscle weakness and ICU survivors report sustained limitation of physical capacity for years after discharge. Limited information is available on the underlying biomechanical properties responsible for this muscle function impairment. A plaus......Intensive care unit (ICU) admission is associated with muscle weakness and ICU survivors report sustained limitation of physical capacity for years after discharge. Limited information is available on the underlying biomechanical properties responsible for this muscle function impairment...

  13. Corneal Biomechanical Assessment Using Corneal Visualization Scheimpflug Technology in Keratoconic and Normal Eyes

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Tian; Yi-Fei Huang; Li-Qiang Wang; Hua Bai; Qun Wang; Jing-Jing Jiang; Ying Wu; Min Gao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the corneal biomechanical properties of keratoconic patients and age-matched controls using corneal visualization Scheimpflug technology (Corvis ST). Methods. Sixty keratoconic eyes from 47 keratoconus patients and 60 normal eyes from 60 controls were enrolled in this prospective study. Tomography and biomechanical parameters of all eyes were obtained with the Pentacam and Corvis ST, respectively. Intraocular pressure was measured using a Goldmann applanation tonometer. ...

  14. Clinical and biomechanical assessment of patella resurfacing in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Lisa; Benedetti, Maria Grazia; Ensini, Andrea; Catani, Fabio; Giannini, Sandro

    2006-07-01

    Currently there is a limited understanding of the factors influencing range of motion by comparing patellar resurfacing vs non-resurfacing in total knee arthroplasty during activities of daily living. A recent meta-analysis of patellar replacement confirms better outcome with patella resurfacing; however, the result can be influenced by many other factors, such as: component design, surgeon experience, and technical aspects of the surgery. This study compares the biomechanics of the knee in patients after total knee arthroplasty with and without patellar resurfacing during stair climbing. Forty-seven patients with total knee arthroplasty were assessed at the mean follow-up of 24 months. In all of them a posterior stabilised fixed bearing prosthesis (Optetrak PS, Exactech) was implanted. Twenty-six patients were treated without patellar resurfacing and 21 with patellar resurfacing. Clinical evaluations were performed using the International Knee Society and the Hospital for Special Surgery scores. Ten patients with patellar resurfacing and 10 patients without patellar resurfacing were also studied with motion analysis during stair climbing; 10 healthy subjects were studied for statistical comparison. Clinical passive knee flexion, International Knee Society Function and Hospital for Special Surgery scores were significantly higher in the patellar resurfacing group. During stair climbing, active knee joint range of motion during the stance phase was greater in patients with patellar resurfacing. The maximum adduction moment was significantly higher in the group without patellar resurfacing. Patients with patellar resurfacing demonstrated better clinical scores, and kinematic and kinetic data while ascending stairs.

  15. ECO Exposure Assessment Tools by Phases of ERA - References

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eco-Box is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases

  16. Study of biomechanical overload in urban gardeners of Barcelona: application of analytical models for risk exposure evaluation in annual working cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Casado, Enrique; Hernandez-Soto, Aquiles; Tello, Sandoval; Gual, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Occupational musculoskeletal disorders in the upper limbs and its consequences on the impact and prevalence in the work force are subject of many investigations in almost all the production fields. However, the exposure to this kind of risk factor on urban gardeners has not been well studied so far. The kind of plant varieties used in the parks, the tools that they use, as much as the necessary actions for the maintenance of the park, have an impact on the biomechanical overload of the upper limbs. Additionally, the analysis of the exposure to the biomechanical overload on upper limbs in gardening work is a complex task, mainly because it is an activity highly variable and of annual cycle. For this reason an analytical model for risk exposure evaluation is necessary. During this research the work activity of 29 gardeners in 3 urban parks of Barcelona has been analyzed. Each park has a specific acting plan, in relation with the quantity and the typology of vegetal species, its classification and the season of the year. Work and observation and video recording sessions on-site were conducted. The video-graphic registration was done on workers without any prior musculoskeletal disorder and with a minimum labour experience of 5 years. Moreover, the analysis of saturation time, considered as the relation of the repetitive working hours in reference with the hours of effective work was done. Using the registered tasks on video, the biomechanical overload on upper limbs applying the OCRA Checklist method was analyzed. A methodological procedure to analyze the risk exposure in annual working cycle has been proposed. The results that we got allow us to get information that can help in the assignment of the tasks and in the training of staff, as well as in the recommendations of the urban landscape's design. All these aspects have the goal to decrease the risk to develop work-related musculoskeletal disorders.

  17. Assessment of dermal exposure to chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmen, J.J. van; Brouwer, D.H.

    1995-01-01

    The methods for the dermal exposure assessment vary in their complexity and are in some sense complementary to each other. The most easy-to-use methods involve a pseudo-skin-approach, such as gloves and removal by washing. In some cases generic modelling appears to be possible. The experimental

  18. Assessing the changes in the biomechanical properties of the crystalline lens induced by cold cataract with air-pulse OCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C.; Singh, M.; Liu, C.-H.; Han, Z.; Li, J.; Raghunathan, R.; Larin, K. V.

    2015-11-01

    A cataract is the increase in opacity of the crystalline lens that can pathologically degrade visual acuity. In this study, we utilized a phase-sensitive optical coherence elastography (OCE) system to study the effects of a cold cataract on the biomechanical properties of the porcine crystalline lens in vitro. The cold cataract was induced by placing the whole lens in a low temperature environment until the lens was obviously clouded. Air-pulse OCE measurements were conducted on 6 lenses before and after cold cataract induction. A low amplitude displacement (≤ 10 µm) was induced by a focused air-pulse and the temporal deformation profiles from the surface and within the lenses were analyzed. The results demonstrated that the stiffness of the porcine lens increased after induction of the cold cataract, and it demonstrated the feasibility of OCE to assess the biomechanical changes in the lens due to cataract.

  19. Assessment of the biomechanical properties of porcine cornea after UV cross-linking at different intraocular pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiasong; Singh, Manmohan; Vantipalli, Srilatha; Han, Zhaolong; Liu, Chih-Hao; Twa, Michael D.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-03-01

    In this study we demonstrate the use of phase-stabilized swept-source optical coherence elastography (PhS-SSOCE) to assess the biomechanical properties of porcine corneas before and after collagen cross-linking (CXL) at different intraocular pressures by measuring the velocity of an air-pulse induced elastic wave and recovery process rate of an air-pulse induced deformation. Young's moduli were estimated by two different methods: the shear wave equation and a newly developed elasticity reconstruction model. The results show that the corneas became stiffer after the CXL treatment, as evidenced by the increased elastic wave velocity and recovery process rate and greater Young's modulus. This non-contact and noninvasive measurement technique utilizes minimal force for excitation (deformation less than 10 μm in amplitude) of the tissue. Thus, it can be potentially used to study the biomechanical properties of ocular and other delicate tissues.

  20. ASSESSMENT OF HUMAN EXPOSURE TO TOLUENE DIISOCYANATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLIVIA ANCA RUSU

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of human exposure to toluene diisocyanate. Toluene diisocyanate (TDI, an aromatic compound, may be dangerous for human health. Diisocyanates have wide industrial use in the fabrication of flexible and rigid foams, fibers, elastomers, and coatings such as paints and varnishes. Isocyanates are known skin and respiratory sensitizers, and proper engineering controls should be in place to prevent exposure to isocyanate liquid and vapor; exposure to TDI vapors is well documented to increase asthma risk. The study focused on the exposure of workers and nearby populations to toluene diisocyanate in a Polyurethane Foam Factory located in Baia Mare, Romania. Workplace air measurements were performed in different departments of the plant, after sampling either in fixed points or as personal monitoring. Sampling in four different locations of Baia Mare town was carried out, - during and after the foaming process. TDI sampling was performed on silica cartridge followed by GC-MS analysis. TDI concentration at workplace was lower than 0,035 mg/m³, which represents the permissible exposure limit, while in the city the TDI concentration had shown values below 0,20 μg/m³. Health assessment of a group of 49 workers was based on questionnaire interview, determination of TDI antibodies and lung function tests. Data collected until this stage do not show any negative effects of TDI on the employees health. Since this plant had only recently begun operating, continuous workplace and ambient air TDI monitoring, along with workers health surveillance, is deemed necessary.

  1. Exposure Assessment of Chemicals from Packaging Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poças, Maria De Fátima; Hogg, Timothy

    A variety of chemicals may enter our food supply, by means of intentional or unintentional addition, at different stages of the food chain. These chemicals include food additives, pesticide residues, environmental contaminants, mycotox-ins, flavoring substances, and micronutrients. Packaging systems and other food-contact materials are also a source of chemicals contaminating food products and beverages. Monitoring exposure to these chemicals has become an integral part of ensuring the safety of the food supply. Within the context of the risk analysis approach and more specifically as an integral part of risk assessment procedures, the exercise known as exposure assessment is crucial in providing data to allow sound judgments concerning risks to human health. The exercise of obtaining this data is part of the process of revealing sources of contamination and assessing the effectiveness of strategies for minimizing the risk from chemical contamination in the food supply (Lambe, 2002).

  2. Study of biomechanical overload in urban gardeners of Barcelona: application of analytical models for risk exposure evaluation in annual working cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Álvarez Casado, Enrique; Tello Sandoval, Sonia; Hernández Soto, Aquiles Carlos; Gual, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Occupational musculoskeletal disorders in the upper limbs and its consequences on the impact and prevalence in the work force are subject of many investigations in almost all the production fields. However, the exposure to this kind of risk factor on urban gardeners has not been well studied so far. The kind of plant varieties used in the parks, the tools that they use, as much as the necessary actions for the maintenance of the park, have an impact on the biomechanical overload of t...

  3. Non-invasive MRI Assessments of Tissue Microstructures and Macromolecules in the Eye upon Biomechanical or Biochemical Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Leon C; Sigal, Ian A; Jan, Ning-Jiun; Yang, Xiaoling; van der Merwe, Yolandi; Yu, Yu; Chau, Ying; Leung, Christopher K; Conner, Ian P; Jin, Tao; Wu, Ed X; Kim, Seong-Gi; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S; Chan, Kevin C

    2016-08-26

    The microstructural organization and composition of the corneoscleral shell (CSS) determine the biomechanical behavior of the eye, and are important in diseases such as glaucoma and myopia. However, limited techniques can assess these properties globally, non-invasively and quantitatively. In this study, we hypothesized that multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can reveal the effects of biomechanical or biochemical modulation on CSS. Upon intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation, CSS appeared hyperintense in both freshly prepared ovine eyes and living rat eyes using T2-weighted MRI. Quantitatively, transverse relaxation time (T2) of CSS increased non-linearly with IOP at 0-40 mmHg and remained longer than unloaded tissues after being unpressurized. IOP loading also increased fractional anisotropy of CSS in diffusion tensor MRI without apparent change in magnetization transfer MRI, suggestive of straightening of microstructural fibers without modification of macromolecular contents. Lastly, treatments with increasing glyceraldehyde (mimicking crosslinking conditions) and chondroitinase-ABC concentrations (mimicking glycosaminoglycan depletion) decreased diffusivities and increased magnetization transfer in cornea, whereas glyceraldehyde also increased magnetization transfer in sclera. In summary, we demonstrated the changing profiles of MRI contrast mechanisms resulting from biomechanical or biochemical modulation of the eye non-invasively. Multi-modal MRI may help evaluate the pathophysiological mechanisms in CSS and the efficacy of corneoscleral treatments.

  4. Non-invasive MRI Assessments of Tissue Microstructures and Macromolecules in the Eye upon Biomechanical or Biochemical Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Leon C.; Sigal, Ian A.; Jan, Ning-Jiun; Yang, Xiaoling; van der Merwe, Yolandi; Yu, Yu; Chau, Ying; Leung, Christopher K.; Conner, Ian P.; Jin, Tao; Wu, Ed X.; Kim, Seong-Gi; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S.; Chan, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    The microstructural organization and composition of the corneoscleral shell (CSS) determine the biomechanical behavior of the eye, and are important in diseases such as glaucoma and myopia. However, limited techniques can assess these properties globally, non-invasively and quantitatively. In this study, we hypothesized that multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can reveal the effects of biomechanical or biochemical modulation on CSS. Upon intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation, CSS appeared hyperintense in both freshly prepared ovine eyes and living rat eyes using T2-weighted MRI. Quantitatively, transverse relaxation time (T2) of CSS increased non-linearly with IOP at 0–40 mmHg and remained longer than unloaded tissues after being unpressurized. IOP loading also increased fractional anisotropy of CSS in diffusion tensor MRI without apparent change in magnetization transfer MRI, suggestive of straightening of microstructural fibers without modification of macromolecular contents. Lastly, treatments with increasing glyceraldehyde (mimicking crosslinking conditions) and chondroitinase-ABC concentrations (mimicking glycosaminoglycan depletion) decreased diffusivities and increased magnetization transfer in cornea, whereas glyceraldehyde also increased magnetization transfer in sclera. In summary, we demonstrated the changing profiles of MRI contrast mechanisms resulting from biomechanical or biochemical modulation of the eye non-invasively. Multi-modal MRI may help evaluate the pathophysiological mechanisms in CSS and the efficacy of corneoscleral treatments. PMID:27561353

  5. Corneal Biomechanical Assessment Using Corneal Visualization Scheimpflug Technology in Keratoconic and Normal Eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Tian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare the corneal biomechanical properties of keratoconic patients and age-matched controls using corneal visualization Scheimpflug technology (Corvis ST. Methods. Sixty keratoconic eyes from 47 keratoconus patients and 60 normal eyes from 60 controls were enrolled in this prospective study. Tomography and biomechanical parameters of all eyes were obtained with the Pentacam and Corvis ST, respectively. Intraocular pressure was measured using a Goldmann applanation tonometer. Results. The tomography and biomechanical parameters of the keratoconic corneas were significantly different from those of the normal corneas except for the anterior chamber angle, first applanation length, the highest concavity time, and peak distance. The deformation amplitude was the best predictive parameter (area under the curve: 0.882, with a sensitivity of 81.7%, although there was a significant overlap between keratoconic and normal corneas that ranged from 1.0 to 1.4 mm. In both the keratoconus and control groups, the deformation amplitude was negatively correlated with intraocular pressure, central corneal thickness, and corneal volume at 3 and 5 mm. Conclusions. Corvis ST offers an alternative method for measuring corneal biomechanical properties. The possibility of classifying keratoconus based on deformation amplitude deserves clinical attention.

  6. Biomechanical and nonfunctional assessment of physical capacity in male ICU survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jesper Brøndum; Rose, Martin Høyer; Jensen, Bente Rona

    2013-01-01

    : ICU admission is associated with decreased physical function for years after discharge. The underlying mechanisms responsible for this muscle function impairment are undescribed. The aim of this study was to describe the biomechanical properties of the quadriceps muscle in ICU survivors 12 months...... after ICU discharge....

  7. MRI-based biomechanical parameters for carotid artery plaque vulnerability assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelman, Lambert; Teng, Zhongzhao; Nederveen, Aart J.; van der Lugt, Aad; Gillard, Jonathan H.

    2016-01-01

    Carotid atherosclerotic plaques are a major cause of ischaemic stroke. The biomechanical environment to which the arterial wall and plaque is subjected to plays an important role in the initiation, progression and rupture of carotid plaques. MRI is frequently used to characterize the morphology of a

  8. Three Ways of Assessing the Inertial Biomechanics of a Cyclist's Leg

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rios Soltero, E.F.; Spitas, C.; Flipsen, S.F.J.; Savelberg, H.H.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the complexity of joints and the difficulty to get accurate position measurements, most biomechanical analyses regarding cycling are based on some basic assumptions. For instance, a fixed distance is often set between the hip joint and the seat. Sometimes, this joint is considered to be

  9. Exposure Assessment of Diesel Bus Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Hofmann

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to measure ultrafine particle concentrations with diameters less than 1 μm emitted by diesel buses and to assess resulting human exposure levels. The study was conducted at the Woolloongabba Busway station in Brisbane, Australia in the winter months of 2002 during which temperature inversions frequently occurred. Most buses that utilize the station are fuelled by diesel, the exhaust of which contains a significant quantity of particle matter. Passengers waiting at the station are exposed to these particles emitted from the buses. During the course of this study, passenger census was conducted, based on video surveillance, yielding person-by-person waiting time data. Furthermore, a bus census revealed accurate information about the total number of diesel versus Compressed Natural Gas (CNG powered buses. Background (outside of the bus station and platform measurements of ultrafine particulate number size distributions were made to determine ambient aerosol concentrations. Particle number exposure concentration ranges from 10 and 40 to 60% of bus related exhaust fumes. This changes dramatically when considering the particle mass exposure concentration, where most passengers are exposed to about 50 to 80% of exhaust fumes. The obtained data can be very significant for comparison with similar work of this type because it is shown in previous studies that exhaust emissions causes cancer in laboratory animals. It was assumed that significant differences between platform and background distributions were due to bus emissions which, combined with passenger waiting times, yielded an estimate of passenger exposure to ultrafine particles from diesel buses. From an exposure point of view, the Busway station analyzed resembles a street canyon. Although the detected exhaust particle concentration at the outbound platform is found to be in the picogram range, exposure increases with the time passengers spend on the platform

  10. 30 CFR 62.110 - Noise exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Noise exposure assessment. 62.110 Section 62... REGULATIONS OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE § 62.110 Noise exposure assessment. (a) The mine operator must establish a system of monitoring that evaluates each miner's noise exposure sufficiently to determine...

  11. Risk of surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome in relation to neck-shoulder complaints and occupational biomechanical exposures: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Susanne Wulff; Dalbøge, Annett; Andersen, Johan Hviid; Thomsen, Jane Frølund; Frost, Poul

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study was to evaluate the risk of surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) in relation to neck-shoulder complaints and occupational biomechanical shoulder exposures. The study was based on the Musculoskeletal Research Database at the Danish Ramazzini Centre. We linked baseline questionnaire information from 1993-2004 on neck-shoulder complaints, job titles, psychosocial work factors, body mass index, and smoking with register information on first-time surgery for SIS from 1996-2008. Biomechanical exposure measures were obtained from a job exposure matrix based on expert judgment. We applied multivariable Cox regression. During 280 125 person-years of follow-up among 37 402 persons, 557 first-time operations for SIS occurred. Crude surgery rates increased from 1.1 to 2.5 per 1000 person-years with increasing shoulder load. Using no neck-shoulder complaints and low shoulder load at baseline as a reference, no neck-shoulder complaints and high shoulder load showed an adjusted hazard ratio (HR(adj)) of 2.55 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.59-4.09], while neck-shoulder complaints in combination with high shoulder load showed an HR(adj) of 4.52 (95% CI 2.87-7.13). Subanalyses based on 18 856 persons showed an HR(adj) of 5.40 (95% CI 2.88-10.11) for complaints located specifically in the shoulder in combination with high shoulder load. Based on these findings, persons with neck-shoulder and especially shoulder complaints in combination with high shoulder load seem an obvious target group for interventions aimed at reducing exposures to prevent surgery for SIS.

  12. Biomechanical Assessment of Locked Plating for the Fixation of Patella Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurm, Simone; Augat, Peter; Bühren, Volker

    2015-09-01

    To analyze the mechanical stability of locked plating in comparison with tension-band wiring for the fixation of fractures of the patella. Biomechanical tests were performed on artificial foam patella specimens comparing an angular stable plate and monocortical screws with tension-band wiring. Tests were performed under combined tension and bending until failure simulating physiological loading of the tibia during walking. Tension-band wiring failed at 66% of the failure load of plating (1052 N, P = 0.002) and had 5 times larger fracture gap displacements (P = 0.002). Based on the biomechanical advantages, locked plating of the patella may constitute a reasonable alternative in the treatment of patella fractures.

  13. Technical Overview of Ecological Risk Assessment - Analysis Phase: Exposure Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure Characterization is the second major component of the analysis phase of a risk assessment. For a pesticide risk assessment, the exposure characterization describes the potential or actual contact of a pesticide with a plant, animal, or media.

  14. Assessment of corneal biomechanical parameters in myopes and emmetropes using the Corvis ST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Rachel; Chang, Robert T; Wong, Ian Y H; Lai, Jimmy S M; Lee, Jacky W Y; Singh, Kuldev

    2016-03-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated conflicting results regarding the relationship between corneal biomechanical properties and refractive error. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare the corneal biomechanical parameters of myopes and emmetropes. Ninety-four subjects with varying degrees of myopia (aged 29 to 74 years, spherical equivalent [SE] -0.5 to -17.5 D) and 25 emmetropes (aged 19 to 75 years, SE: -0.5 to +0.5 D) presenting at the Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong were recruited sequentially for this prospective study. All patients were phakic with no history of coexisting ocular disease. The corneal biomechanical parameters of the right eye of each subject were analysed using the Corvis ST non-contact tonometer. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured using both the Corvis ST and the Topcon Non-Contact Tonometer CT-80. Refractive error was measured by non-cycloplegic subjective and objective refractometry. High myopes (SE greater than -6.00 D) demonstrated greater mean outward applanation velocities (p corneal thickness. There were no statistically significant differences in age, IOP or central corneal thickness among emmetropes, low to moderate myopes or high myopes. Within this study of Chinese subjects, high myopes demonstrate greater corneal mean outward applanation velocity on Corvis ST testing, than emmetropes. In particular, those with high myopia (SE greater than -6.00 D) show a distinct corneal biomechanical profile relative to those with either emmetropia or low to moderate myopia using the Corvis ST. © 2016 Optometry Australia.

  15. Assessment of the ex vivo biomechanical properties of porcine cornea with inflation test for corneal xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, F; Jiang, L; Wang, X; Zhang, D; Wang, Q; Zeng, Y

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to obtain the biomechanical properties of porcine cornea so as to provide necessary biomechanical experimental basis for pig-to-human corneal xenotransplantation. Seventeen fresh porcine corneal specimens obtained from pigs aged 4-6 months were examined under inflation conditions to determine the constitutive relationships of the material through dynamic loading conditions (pressure range: 1.47-42.66 mmHg). The forward deflection of porcine anterior corneal apex was measured by the laser displacement sensor. The pressure deformation results were analysed on the basis of shell theory to estimate Young's modulus of the cornea and derive its relationship with intraocular pressure (IOP). The porcine corneas showed a nonlinear corneal forward displacement/IOP and stress/strain relationship with an initial low stiffness stage and a later high stiffness stage. In spite of the nonlinearity between the internal pressure and apex forward deflection, the relationship between the Young's modulus and the IOP was almost linear. Compared with human corneas, porcine corneas exhibited a similar nonlinear behaviour but lower stiffness values. The biomechanical parameters of porcine cornea obtained from this test could be applied to numerical simulations of refractive surgery procedures and lay a foundation for pig-to-human corneal xenotransplantation. Copyright © 2012 Informa UK, Ltd.

  16. Ocular response analyzer to assess corneal biomechanical properties in exfoliation syndrome and exfoliative glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cankaya, Ali Bulent; Anayol, Alpaslan; Özcelik, Dilek; Demirdogen, Elif; Yilmazbas, Pelin

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the differences in corneal biomechanical parameters between healthy and exfoliation syndrome (EXS) and exfoliative glaucoma (EXG) patients. Two hundred and forty-four eyes of 102 healthy, 64 EXS, and 78 EXG patients were included in the study. Corneal biomechanical parameters were measured using an ocular response analyzer (ORA). Central corneal thickness (CCT) was measured with an ultrasonic pachymeter. The differences in ORA parameters between study and control group participants were analyzed using Student's t test. In healthy subjects, EXS and EXG eyes mean corneal hysteresis (CH) values were 9.4 ± 1.4 mmHg, 8.5 ± 1.5 mmHg and 6.9 ± 2.1 mmHg, respectively. The difference in mean CH between the EXG and the other two groups were statistically significant (p glaucoma. In this study, CH was found to be significantly lower in eyes with exfoliation. Further studies are needed to establish the relationships between exfoliation, ocular biomechanics, and glaucoma.

  17. Protective Effect of Chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa L. Extract against Cadmium Impact on the Biomechanical Properties of the Femur: A Study in a Rat Model of Low and Moderate Lifetime Women Exposure to This Heavy Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata M. Brzóska

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis that the consumption of Aronia melanocarpa berries (chokeberries extract, recently reported by us to improve bone metabolism in female rats at low-level and moderate chronic exposure to cadmium (1 and 5 mg Cd/kg diet for up to 24 months, may increase the bone resistance to fracture was investigated. Biomechanical properties of the neck (bending test with vertical head loading and diaphysis (three-point bending test of the femur of rats administered 0.1% aqueous chokeberry extract (65.74% of polyphenols or/and Cd in the diet (1 and 5 mg Cd/kg for 3, 10, 17, and 24 months were evaluated. Moreover, procollagen I was assayed in the bone tissue. The low-level and moderate exposure to Cd decreased the procollagen I concentration in the bone tissue and weakened the biomechanical properties of the femoral neck and diaphysis. Chokeberry extract administration under the exposure to Cd improved the bone collagen biosynthesis and femur biomechanical properties. The results allow for the conclusion that the consumption of chokeberry products under exposure to Cd may improve the bone biomechanical properties and protect from fracture. This study provides support for Aronia melanocarpa berries being a promising natural agent for skeletal protection under low-level and moderate chronic exposure to Cd.

  18. Quantitative assessment of corneal biomechanical properties using optical coherence elastography and a modified Rayleigh Lamb-frequency model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhaolong; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Li, Jiasong; Singh, Manmohan; Wang, Shang; Vantipalli, Srilatha; Wu, Chen; Liu, Chih-hao; Twa, Michael D.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-03-01

    This study reports the application of a modified Rayleigh-Lamb frequency equation (RLFE) to a noncontact optical coherence elastography (OCE) method for quantitative assessment of the biomechanical properties of a porcine cornea. A focused air-pulse induced an elastic wave in the cornea, which was imaged by a phasestabilized optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. From the displacement data acquired by the OCT system, phase velocities of the mechanical wave were extracted by spectral analysis using a fast Fourier transform. Experiments were conducted on 2% agar phantom samples, and the Young's moduli were assessed by the Rayleigh-Lamb frequency equation, which was validated using uniaxial mechanical compression testing. The Rayleigh-Lamb frequency equation was then applied to OCE data from a normal porcine cornea, in which the fluid-solid effect was considered. The Young's modulus of the porcine cornea was measured to be ~60 kPa and the shear viscosity was ~0.33 Pa·s. The combination of OCE and RLFE is a promising noninvasive method for the estimation of the biomechanical properties of the cornea in vivo.

  19. Using exposure bands for rapid decision making in the RISK21 tiered exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellarco, M; Zaleski, R; Gaborek, B J; Qian, H; Bellin, C A; Egeghy, P; Heard, N; Jolliet, O; Lander, D R; Sunger, N; Stylianou, K S; Tanir, J Y

    2017-04-01

    The ILSI Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) Risk Assessment in the Twenty-first Century (RISK21) project was initiated to address and catalyze improvements in human health risk assessment. RISK21 is a problem formulation-based conceptual roadmap and risk matrix visualization tool, facilitating transparent evaluation of both hazard and exposure components. The RISK21 roadmap is exposure-driven, that is, exposure is used as the second step (after problem formulation) to define and focus the assessment. This paper describes the exposure tiers of the RISK21 matrix and the approaches to adapt readily available information to more quickly inform exposure at a screening level. In particular, exposure look-up tables were developed from available exposure tools (European Centre for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals (ECETOC) Targeted Risk Assessment (TRA) for worker exposure, ECETOC TRA, European Solvents Industry Group (ESIG) Generic Exposure Scenario (GES) Risk and Exposure Tool (EGRET) for consumer exposure, and USEtox(®) for indirect exposure to humans via the environment) and were tested in a hypothetical mosquito bed netting case study. A detailed WHO risk assessment for a similar mosquito net use served as a benchmark for the performance of the RISK21 approach. The case study demonstrated that the screening methodologies provided suitable conservative exposure estimates for risk assessment. The results of this effort showed that the RISK21 approach is useful for defining future assessment efforts, focusing assessment activities and visualizing results.

  20. Integration of Scheimpflug-Based Corneal Tomography and Biomechanical Assessments for Enhancing Ectasia Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrósio, Renato; Lopes, Bernardo T; Faria-Correia, Fernando; Salomão, Marcella Q; Bühren, Jens; Roberts, Cynthia J; Elsheikh, Ahmed; Vinciguerra, Riccardo; Vinciguerra, Paolo

    2017-07-01

    To present the Tomographic and Biomechanical Index (TBI), which combines Scheimpflugbased corneal tomography and biomechanics for enhancing ectasia detection. Patients from different continents were retrospectively studied. The normal group included 1 eye randomly selected from 480 patients with normal corneas and the keratoconus group included 1 eye randomly selected from 204 patients with keratoconus. There were two groups: 72 ectatic eyes with no surgery from 94 patients with very asymmetric ectasia (VAE-E group) and the fellow eyes of these patients with normal topography (VAE-NT group). Pentacam HR and Corvis ST (Oculus Optikgeräte GmbH, Wetzlar, Germany) parameters were analyzed and combined using different artificial intelligence methods. The accuracies for detecting ectasia of the Belin/Ambrósio Deviation (BAD-D) and Corvis Biomechanical Index (CBI) were compared to the TBI, considering the areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROCs). The random forest method with leave-one-out cross-validation (RF/LOOCV) provided the best artificial intelligence model. The AUROC for detecting ectasia (keratoconus, VAE-E, and VAE-NT groups) of the TBI was 0.996, which was statistically higher (DeLong et al., P ectasia (keratoconus and VAE-E groups) with 100% specificity. The AUROCs for the TBI, BAD-D, and CBI were 0.985, 0.839, and 0.822 in the VAE-NT group (DeLong et al., P ectasia than other techniques. The TBI was sensitive for detecting subclinical (fruste) ectasia among eyes with normal topography in very asymmetric patients. The TBI may also confirm unilateral ectasia, potentially characterizing the inherent ectasia susceptibility of the cornea, which should be the subject of future studies. [J Refract Surg. 2017;33(7):434-443.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. The Language Exposure Assessment Tool: Quantifying Language Exposure in Infants and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAnda, Stephanie; Bosch, Laura; Poulin-Dubois, Diane; Zesiger, Pascal; Friend, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop the Language Exposure Assessment Tool (LEAT) and to examine its cross-linguistic validity, reliability, and utility. The LEAT is a computerized interview-style assessment that requests parents to estimate language exposure. The LEAT yields an automatic calculation of relative language exposure and…

  2. Determinants of Dermal Exposure Relevant for Exposure Modelling in Regulatory Risk Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marquart, J.; Brouwer, D.H.; Gijsbers, J.H.J.; Links, I.H.M.; Warren, N.; Hemmen, J.J. van

    2003-01-01

    Risk assessment of chemicals requires assessment of the exposure levels of workers. In the absence of adequate specific measured data, models are often used to estimate exposure levels. For dermal exposure only a few models exist, which are not validated externally. In the scope of a large European

  3. [Biomechanic and biological activity assessment of concavity-convex amniotic membrane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yi; Yu, Yao; Tan, Gang; Peng, Juan; Zhou, Qiong; Pei, Chonggang; Dong, Wenjia; Gao, Guiping

    2012-12-01

    This paper conducted research on biomechanical characteristics and biological activity of concavity-convex amniotic membrane (CCAM) and discussed its superiority as ocular surface repair material. Folding and compression with vacuum of fresh amniotic membrane were used to prepare CCAM. After cutting the striga of CCAM, sixteen CCAM tissue section were chosen at random to test their tensile strength using electronic universal testing machine. The bilayer amniotic membrane (BAM), the double-deck amniotic membrane (DAM) and the monolayer amniotic membrane (MAM) were as controls. The test parameters included yield strength, tensile strength, elongation at break, elastic modulus and so on. The cytokines of fresh amniotic membrane (FAM), MAM and CCAM were analyzed by radioimmunoassay method. The CCAM was obviously thicker than MAM and DAM. After 15 min in PBS, the CCAM tissue can recover the normal shape. The tensile strength and the elongation at break of CCAM were higher than those of the MAM and the DAM (P biomechanical properties than the MAM and the DAM, showing the superiority as ocular surface repair material.

  4. [Biomechanical risk assessment of manual material handling in vegetables and fruit departments of supermarkets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draicchio, F; Silvetti, A; Badellino, E; Vinci, F

    2007-01-01

    There is little in the literature about the risks of manual handling of material in supermarkets and what there is refers solely to storehouse work. This contrasts with the substantial number of studies of the risk of repeated arm movements among supermarket cash-desk staff. The scarcity of information is partly due to the difficulties of applying widely employed, standardized evaluation methods in this sector. One of the conditions limiting the application of the NIOSH protocol in this retail sector is that lifting tasks are so often closely tied to transport. The biomechanical analysis method we used brought to light considerable risks in many of the steps investigated: unpacking the pallet, unloading the crates from the pallet to the ground, lifting them from the floor onto display stands, and filling the boxes on the stands with goods before the shop opens. Images acquired on site were analyzed in the laboratory. We selected the most indicative images, which were then studied as regards posture and biomechanics using Apalys 3.0 software (ILMCAD GmbH, Ilmenau, Germany). Biomechemical analysis was done on the following movements: unloading crates from the pallet, positioning them on fruit and vegetable department display stands, and filling the boxes on the stands. We obtained a prediction of 2720 to 5472 N for the load at the lumbosacral junction (L5-S1). Simulation of the NIOSH index gave a value of 2.69 in the only case where the Waters protocol could be applied.

  5. Dynamic ultra high speed Scheimpflug imaging for assessing corneal biomechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Ambrósio Jr

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe a novel technique for clinical characterization of corneal biomechanics using non-invasive dynamic imaging. METHODS: Corneal deformation response during non contact tonometry (NCT is monitored by ultra-high-speed (UHS photography. The Oculus Corvis ST (Scheimpflug Technology; Wetzlar, Germany has a UHS Scheimpflug camera, taking over 4,300 frames per second and of a single 8mm horizontal slit, for monitoring corneal deformation response to NCT. The metered collimated air pulse or puff has a symmetrical configuration and fixed maximal internal pump pressure of 25 kPa. The bidirectional movement of the cornea in response to the air puff is monitored. RESULTS: Measurement time is 30ms, with 140 frames acquired. Advanced algorithms for edge detection of the front and back corneal contours are applied for every frame. IOP is calculated based on the first applanation moment. Deformation amplitude (DA is determined as the highest displacement of the apex in the highest concavity (HC moment. Applanation length (AL and corneal velocity (CVel are recorded during ingoing and outgoing phases. CONCLUSION: Corneal deformation can be monitored during non contact tonometry. The parameters generated provide clinical in vivo characterization of corneal biomechanical properties in two dimensions, which is relevant for different applications in Ophthalmology.

  6. Exposure Assessment Tools by Lifestages and Populations - General Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA ExpoBox is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases

  7. Exposure Assessment Tools by Chemical Classes - Inorganics and Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA ExpoBox is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases

  8. THE CHALLENGE OF ASSESSING CHILDREN'S EXPOSURE TO PESTICIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    In implementing the Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA) the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has adopted a policy that the exposure factors and models used to assess and predict exposure to pesticides should generally be conservative. Some elements of exposure assess...

  9. Exposure Assessment Tools by Approaches - Indirect Estimation (Scenario Evaluation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA ExpoBox is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases, mode

  10. Invertebrate biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patek, S N; Summers, A P

    2017-05-22

    Invertebrate biomechanics focuses on mechanical analyses of non-vertebrate animals, which at root is no different in aim and technique from vertebrate biomechanics, or for that matter the biomechanics of plants and fungi. But invertebrates are special - they are fabulously diverse in form, habitat, and ecology and manage this without the use of hard, internal skeletons. They are also numerous and, in many cases, tractable in an experimental and field setting. In this Primer, we will probe three axes of invertebrate diversity: worms (Phylum Annelida), spiders (Class Arachnida) and insects (Class Insecta); three habitats: subterranean, terrestrial and airborne; and three integrations with other fields: ecology, engineering and evolution. Our goal is to capture the field of invertebrate biomechanics, which has blossomed from having a primary focus on discoveries at the interface of physics and biology to being inextricably linked with integrative challenges that span biology, physics, mathematics and engineering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Exploring Global Exposure Factors Resources for Use in Consumer Exposure Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, Rosemary T; Egeghy, Peter P; Hakkinen, Pertti J

    2016-07-22

    This publication serves as a global comprehensive resource for readers seeking exposure factor data and information relevant to consumer exposure assessment. It describes the types of information that may be found in various official surveys and online and published resources. The relevant exposure factors cover a broad range, including general exposure factor data found in published compendia and databases and resources about specific exposure factors, such as human activity patterns and housing information. Also included are resources on exposure factors related to specific types of consumer products and the associated patterns of use, such as for a type of personal care product or a type of children's toy. Further, a section on using exposure factors for designing representative exposure scenarios is included, along with a look into the future for databases and other exposure science developments relevant for consumer exposure assessment.

  12. Exploring Global Exposure Factors Resources for Use in Consumer Exposure Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary T. Zaleski

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This publication serves as a global comprehensive resource for readers seeking exposure factor data and information relevant to consumer exposure assessment. It describes the types of information that may be found in various official surveys and online and published resources. The relevant exposure factors cover a broad range, including general exposure factor data found in published compendia and databases and resources about specific exposure factors, such as human activity patterns and housing information. Also included are resources on exposure factors related to specific types of consumer products and the associated patterns of use, such as for a type of personal care product or a type of children’s toy. Further, a section on using exposure factors for designing representative exposure scenarios is included, along with a look into the future for databases and other exposure science developments relevant for consumer exposure assessment.

  13. Exploring Global Exposure Factors Resources for Use in Consumer Exposure Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, Rosemary T.; Egeghy, Peter P.; Hakkinen, Pertti J.

    2016-01-01

    This publication serves as a global comprehensive resource for readers seeking exposure factor data and information relevant to consumer exposure assessment. It describes the types of information that may be found in various official surveys and online and published resources. The relevant exposure factors cover a broad range, including general exposure factor data found in published compendia and databases and resources about specific exposure factors, such as human activity patterns and housing information. Also included are resources on exposure factors related to specific types of consumer products and the associated patterns of use, such as for a type of personal care product or a type of children’s toy. Further, a section on using exposure factors for designing representative exposure scenarios is included, along with a look into the future for databases and other exposure science developments relevant for consumer exposure assessment. PMID:27455300

  14. [Corneal biomechanics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, R M; Merayo-Lloves, J; Jaramillo, M A; Galvis, V

    2005-04-01

    To review the corneal biomechanic concepts and to analyse, clarify and understand their relevance in refractive surgery. A literature review has been done using different databases. Corneal biomechanic concepts are not new and are applied implicitly in numerous surgical procedures. Their origin is related to tonometry studies, but they gained in popularity when they were linked to the treatment of keratoconus, a pathology in which the mechanical properties of the cornea are altered. Factors determining corneal stability were thus defined. Corneal biomechanics have also been used following refractive surgery to study post-operative keratectasia and to improve ablation patterns, which ignores the corneal response. The new ablation systems need to include the biomechanical factors, which motivate research conducted in physical-mathematical models and in corneal wound healing, improving our knowledge about the corneal biomechanical response. The corneal biomechanic concepts have gained in popularity with the advent of refractive surgery, although they did exist previously. Their relevance is linked to improvements in the ablation systems used in an attempt to obtain more accurate and reliable results.

  15. INFLUENCE OF EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT METHOD IN AN EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDY OF TRIHALOMETHANE EXPOSURE AND SPONTANEOUS ABORTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trihalomethanes are common contaminants of chlorinated drinking water. Studies of their health effects have been hampered by exposure misclassification, due in part to limitations inherent in using utility sampling records. We used two exposure assessment methods, one based on ut...

  16. Inertial measures of motion for clinical biomechanics: comparative assessment of accuracy under controlled conditions - changes in accuracy over time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Lebel

    Full Text Available Interest in 3D inertial motion tracking devices (AHRS has been growing rapidly among the biomechanical community. Although the convenience of such tracking devices seems to open a whole new world of possibilities for evaluation in clinical biomechanics, its limitations haven't been extensively documented. The objectives of this study are: 1 to assess the change in absolute and relative accuracy of multiple units of 3 commercially available AHRS over time; and 2 to identify different sources of errors affecting AHRS accuracy and to document how they may affect the measurements over time.This study used an instrumented Gimbal table on which AHRS modules were carefully attached and put through a series of velocity-controlled sustained motions including 2 minutes motion trials (2MT and 12 minutes multiple dynamic phases motion trials (12MDP. Absolute accuracy was assessed by comparison of the AHRS orientation measurements to those of an optical gold standard. Relative accuracy was evaluated using the variation in relative orientation between modules during the trials.Both absolute and relative accuracy decreased over time during 2MT. 12MDP trials showed a significant decrease in accuracy over multiple phases, but accuracy could be enhanced significantly by resetting the reference point and/or compensating for initial Inertial frame estimation reference for each phase.The variation in AHRS accuracy observed between the different systems and with time can be attributed in part to the dynamic estimation error, but also and foremost, to the ability of AHRS units to locate the same Inertial frame.Mean accuracies obtained under the Gimbal table sustained conditions of motion suggest that AHRS are promising tools for clinical mobility assessment under constrained conditions of use. However, improvement in magnetic compensation and alignment between AHRS modules are desirable in order for AHRS to reach their full potential in capturing clinical outcomes.

  17. Assessment of Corneal Biomechanical Properties and Intraocular Pressure in Myopic Spanish Healthy Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María A. del Buey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To examine biomechanical parameters of the cornea in myopic eyes and their relationship with the degree of myopia in a western healthy population. Methods. Corneal hysteresis (CH, corneal resistance factor (CRF, Goldmann correlated intraocular pressure (IOP, and corneal compensated IOP (IOPcc were measured using the ocular response analyzer (ORA in 312 eyes of 177 Spanish subjects aged between 20 and 56 years. Refraction was expressed as spherical equivalent (SE, which ranged from 0 to −16.50 diopters (D (mean: −3.88±2.90 D. Subjects were divided into four groups according to their refractive status: group 1 or control group: emmetropia (-0.50≤SE0.05; nevertheless, IOPcc was significantly higher in the moderately myopic (15.47±2.47 mmHg and highly myopic (16.14±2.59 mmHg groups than in the emmetropia (15.15±2.06 mmHg and low myopia groups (14.53±2.37 mmHg. No correlation between age and the measured parameters was found. CH and IOPcc were weakly but significantly correlated with SE (r=0.171, P=0.002 and r=-0.131, P=0.021, resp.. Conclusions. Present study showed only a very weak, but significant, correlation between CH and refractive error, with CH being lower in both moderately and highly myopic eyes than that in the emmetropic and low myopic eyes. These changes in biomechanical properties of the cornea may have an impact on IOP measurement, increasing the risk of glaucoma.

  18. Inertial Measures of Motion for Clinical Biomechanics: Comparative Assessment of Accuracy under Controlled Conditions - Effect of Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebel, Karina; Boissy, Patrick; Hamel, Mathieu; Duval, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background Inertial measurement of motion with Attitude and Heading Reference Systems (AHRS) is emerging as an alternative to 3D motion capture systems in biomechanics. The objectives of this study are: 1) to describe the absolute and relative accuracy of multiple units of commercially available AHRS under various types of motion; and 2) to evaluate the effect of motion velocity on the accuracy of these measurements. Methods The criterion validity of accuracy was established under controlled conditions using an instrumented Gimbal table. AHRS modules were carefully attached to the center plate of the Gimbal table and put through experimental static and dynamic conditions. Static and absolute accuracy was assessed by comparing the AHRS orientation measurement to those obtained using an optical gold standard. Relative accuracy was assessed by measuring the variation in relative orientation between modules during trials. Findings Evaluated AHRS systems demonstrated good absolute static accuracy (mean error motions (mean error between 0.5o and 3.1o). In slow motions, relative accuracy varied from 2o to 7o depending on the type of AHRS and the type of rotation. Absolute and relative accuracy were significantly affected (pmotions. The extent of that effect varied across AHRS. Interpretation Absolute and relative accuracy of AHRS are affected by environmental magnetic perturbations and conditions of motions. Relative accuracy of AHRS is mostly affected by the ability of all modules to locate the same global reference coordinate system at all time. Conclusions Existing AHRS systems can be considered for use in clinical biomechanics under constrained conditions of use. While their individual capacity to track absolute motion is relatively consistent, the use of multiple AHRS modules to compute relative motion between rigid bodies needs to be optimized according to the conditions of operation. PMID:24260324

  19. Development and validation of an innovative tool for the assessment of biomechanical strategies: the Timed "Up and Go" - Assessment of Biomechanical Strategies (TUG-ABS) for individuals with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Christina D C M; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F; Nadeau, Sylvie

    2013-03-01

    To develop and validate a clinical tool based on the biomechanical strategies exhibited by people with hemiparesis due to stroke during the performance of the Timed "Up and Go" test. The Timed "Up and Go" Assessment of Biomechanical Strategies (TUG-ABS) was developed for subjects with stroke, based on the analyses of 3 sources of information: published evidence; opinions of rehabilitation professionals; and observations of TUG performances, followed by a multi-step approach, which involved the investigation of the reliability, content, and criterion-related validity of the preliminary version. Content validity was established by an expert panel, whereas intra- and inter-rater reliability was established by two independent examiners. Criterion-related validity was established by comparing the TUG-ABS scores at the item level obtained by independent analyses of video observations and the gold standard motion analysis system. The final tool included the items, which showed acceptable values for these psychometric properties. The preliminary version consisted of 24 items with 3 response categories. Twenty-one items showed acceptable content validity (0.72 ≤ κ ≤ 1.00; p ≤ 0.01), 19 acceptable intra- and inter-rater reliability (0.36 ≤ κ ≤1.00; p ≤ 0.04), and 15 acceptable criterion-related validity (0.29 ≤ κ ≤ 1.00; p ≤ 0.04). The final developed 15-item TUG-ABS version proved to be valid and reliable for individuals with hemiparesis due to stroke, but it should be clinically validated before being used for clinical applications and research purposes.

  20. Environmental exposure assessment in European birth cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gehring, Ulrike; Casas, Maribel; Brunekreef, Bert

    2013-01-01

    Environmental exposures during pregnancy and early life may have adverse health effects. Single birth cohort studies often lack statistical power to tease out such effects reliably. To improve the use of existing data and to facilitate collaboration among these studies, an inventory...... of the environmental exposure and health data in these studies was made as part of the ENRIECO (Environmental Health Risks in European Birth Cohorts) project. The focus with regard to exposure was on outdoor air pollution, water contamination, allergens and biological organisms, metals, pesticides, smoking and second...... hand tobacco smoke (SHS), persistent organic pollutants (POPs), noise, radiation, and occupational exposures. The review lists methods and data on environmental exposures in 37 European birth cohort studies. Most data is currently available for smoking and SHS (N=37 cohorts), occupational exposures (N...

  1. Assessing Marine Species Exposure to Ocean Acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, E.; Busch, S.; McElhany, P.; Gledhill, D. K.; Milke, L. M.; Wieczorek, D.

    2016-02-01

    Assessing the vulnerability of society to ocean acidification (OA) demands an understanding of both the sensitivity of economically important species together with an organism's exposure to potentially harmful carbonate chemistry conditions. However, research has revealed that sensitivity to OA is frequently life-stage dependent and the environmental conditions experienced by a marine organism often vary with life-stage. Enhancing the development of a National Ocean Acidification Observing Network (NOA-ON) and establishing appropriate treatment conditions for experimental studies requires careful consideration of where the vulnerable life-stages of an organism reside in space (e.g., estuary versus oceanic), depth (e.g., surface mixed layer versus benthos), and time (e.g., diel vertical migration, seasonality of the chemical environment within the context of an organism life cycle). Few studies have explicitly attempted to document carbonate chemistry dynamics specific to a given organism's life-cycle. Here we estimate carbonate dynamics in terms of aragonite saturation state range and variability within the U.S. Northeast and West Coast through the application of NOAA's NOA-ON assets mapped out with respect to the life stages of economically important species within those regions. Two economically important species will be considered for which the life-cycles are well known along with the sensitivities to OA for early life-stages: Atlantic Surf Clam in the northeast and Dungeness Crab of the northwest coast of the U.S. Other species may also be considered.

  2. Assessment of Bagging Operators Exposure to with PVC Airborne Particulates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Asilian, H; Nasseri Nejad, M; Mortazavi, S. B; Jafari, M. J; Khavanin, A; Dehdashti, A. R

    2008-01-01

    .... This field study wasconducted to evaluate the occupational exposure of packaging operators to airborne polyvinyl chloridedust in order to health risk assessment and recommend feasible controlling methods...

  3. Multiple pathway asbestos exposure assessment for a Superfund community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, Curtis W; Conway, Kathrene; Landguth, Erin L; McNew, Tracy; Linker, Laura; Pfau, Jean; Black, Brad; Szeinuk, Jaime; Flores, Raja

    2015-01-01

    Libby, MT, USA, was the home to workers at a historical vermiculite mining facility and served as the processing and distribution center for this industrial product that was contaminated with amphibole asbestos. Several pathways of environmental asbestos exposure to the general population have been identified. The local clinic and health screening program collects data from participants on past occupational and environmental exposures to vermiculite and asbestos. Health studies among this population have demonstrated associations between amphibole exposure and health outcomes, but critical questions regarding the nature and level of exposure associated with specific outcomes remain unanswered. The objective of this study was to develop a comprehensive exposure assessment approach that integrates information on individuals' contact frequency with multiple exposure pathways. For 3031 participants, we describe cumulative exposure metrics for environmental exposures, occupational exposures, and residents' contact with carry-home asbestos from household workers. As expected, cumulative exposures for all three occupational categories were higher among men compared with women, and cumulative exposures for household contact and environmental pathways were higher among women. The comprehensive exposure assessment strategies will advance health studies and risk assessment approaches in this population with a complex history of both occupational and environmental asbestos exposure.

  4. ASSESSING HUMAN EXPOSURE TO GRASS POLLEN IN DENMARK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peel, Robert George; Hertel, Ole; Herbert, Rob

    Objectives: Exposure to pollen is typically assessed using data collected at fixed roof-top monitoring stations, which give a general picture of airborne pollen concentrations over a wide region. Actual exposure levels can be obtained through personal exposure monitoring. This is typically done u...

  5. Retrospective exposure assessment in a chemical research and development facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Alexander, Bruce H; Mandel, Jeffrey H

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this exposure assessment was to reconstruct cumulative historical exposures for workers who have been exposed to multiple chemicals and chemical groups to better understand a cluster of brain cancers within a research and development lab. Chemicals of interest, including acrylates, bis-chloromethyl ether (BCME), chloromethyl methyl ether (CMME), isothiazolones and nitrosoamines, were selected on the basis of the plausibility of penetrating the blood-brain barrier and the uniqueness of the chemical's biological activity. In a complicated exposure setting such as a chemical R&D facility, multiple exposure estimation methods were needed. First, similarly exposure groups (SEGs) were created for these materials based on department group, time period of the department's existence and function associated with job titles. A probabilistic framework for assessing exposures was developed using Bayesian analysis of historical monitoring data, mathematical exposure modeling and professional judgments of current and former industrial hygienists at the facility were used to reconstruct the exposure history for acrylates, BCME and CMME for each SEG over the time period of interest. Since sufficient measurement data for isothiazolones and nitrosoamines were not available, the exposure histories for each SEG for these chemicals were estimated. This was done using objective formaldehyde levels and subjective employee interviews. The interviews assessed workplace determinants of exposure as distinct surrogates for estimating inhalation and dermal exposures. The exposure assessments by these methods were compared against each other to estimate the potential for exposure misclassification. A job exposure matrix (JEM) was constructed that contained the exposures obtained from above multiple approaches for each of these chemical groups for each SEG for each year of interest. The combination of methods used in this work is a unique and potentially helpful framework that

  6. Biomechanical assessment of a new adhesive bone cement for otologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werning, J W; Maniglia, A J; Anderson, J M

    1995-05-01

    The adhesion of metallic prostheses to bone is a major problem in otologic surgery. Conventional bone cements lack significant adhesive strength, which predisposes the cemented prosthesis to loosening. The advent of surgically implantable hearing devices is one example where an adhesive cement to secure metal to bone would be useful. The biomechanical properties of a new cement, 4-META/MMA-TBB opaque resin, were evaluated in an animal model. The cement is composed of 4-methacryloyloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META) and methyl methacrylate (MMA) as monomers and tri-n-butyl borane (TBB) as an initiator. Titanium disks were cemented to the tibias of rabbits, which were sacrificed at 0 and 90 days. Tensile and shear bond strengths between bone and metal were tested at both times. The mean baseline tensile and shear bond strengths were 8.92 MPa and 11.96 MPa, respectively. Adhesive failure occurred at the bone-cement interface. The decrease in bond strength at 90 days was minimal. Thus, 4-META/MMA-TBB cement is a promising new metal-to-bone adhesive that may be useful for the surgical fixation of metallic prostheses in otologic surgery.

  7. Obesity and Obesity Shape Markedly Influence Spine Biomechanics: A Subject-Specific Risk Assessment Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezelbash, Farshid; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl; Plamondon, André; Arjmand, Navid; Parnianpour, Mohamad

    2017-10-01

    Underlying mechanisms of obesity-related back pain remain unexplored. Thus, we aim to determine the effect of obesity and its shapes on the spinal loads and the associated risks of injury. Obesity shapes were initially constructed by principal component analysis based on datasets on 5852 obese individuals. Spinal loads, cycles to vertebral failure and trunk stability margin were estimated in a subject-specific trunk model taking account of personalized musculature, passive ligamentous spine, obesity shapes, segmental weights, spine kinematics and bone mineral density. Three obesity shapes (mean and extreme abdominal circumferences) at three body weights (BWs) of 86, 98 and 109 kg were analyzed. Additional BW (12 kg) increased spinal loads by ~11.8%. Higher waist circumferences at identical BW increased spinal forces to the tune of ~20 kg additional BW and the risk of vertebral fatigue compression fracture by 3-7 times when compared with smaller waist circumferences. Forward flexion, greater BW and load in hands increased the trunk stability margin. Spinal loads markedly increased with BW, especially at greater waist circumferences. The risk of vertebral fatigue fracture also substantially increased at greater waist circumferences though not at smaller ones. Obesity and its shape should be considered in spine biomechanics.

  8. Wall Paint Exposure Assessment Model (WPEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    WPEM uses mathematical models developed from small chamber data to estimate the emissions of chemicals from oil-based (alkyd) and latex wall paint which is then combined with detailed use, workload and occupancy data to estimate user exposure.

  9. Biomechanic modeling of sit-to-stand to upright posture for mobility assessment of persons with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzà, Claudia; Stanhope, Steven J; Taviani, Antonio; Cappozzo, Aurelio

    2006-05-01

    To test the suitability of using biomechanic measures associated with a minimum measured input model (MMIM) approach to assess mobility of people with chronic stroke during the execution of a sit-to-stand (STS) to upright posture motor task. Single group, observational. Institutional settings in the United States and Italy. Twenty-nine subjects with chronic unilateral lower-limb impairments and resultant mobility limitations secondary to stroke. Not applicable. Manual measurement of lower-limb strength; performance-based tests including repeated chair standing, walking speed, and standing balance; and ground reactions measured with a force platform during STS and upright posture. The ground reactions were fed to a telescopic inverted pendulum model of the musculoskeletal system. Parameters representing the model outputs were compared with performance-based and strength measures to assess, respectively, motor ability and impairment-related changes in subjects' motor strategies. The parameters derived from the model effectively differentiated between motor strategies associated with different performance-based scores, and allowed the identification of relevant difficulties encountered in STS execution. These difficulties could be associated with different strength scores. This was also true for subjects scoring the maximum in both performance-based and strength tests. The MMIM is a relatively inexpensive and noninvasive approach that enhances mobility assessment of hemiparetic subjects with different motor ability levels. It provides information that correlates well with performance-based and strength scores and, in addition, it allows for subject-specific motor strategy identification.

  10. DREAM: a method for semi-quantitative dermal exposure assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wendel de Joode, B. van; Brouwer, D.H.; Kromhout, H.; Hemmen, J.J. van

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a new method (DREAM) for structured, semi-quantitative dermal exposure assessment for chemical or biological agents that can be used in occupational hygiene or epidemiology. It is anticipated that DREAM could serve as an initial assessment of dermal exposure, amongst others,

  11. Integration of Probabilistic Exposure Assessment and Probabilistic Hazard Characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voet, van der H.; Slob, W.

    2007-01-01

    A method is proposed for integrated probabilistic risk assessment where exposure assessment and hazard characterization are both included in a probabilistic way. The aim is to specify the probability that a random individual from a defined (sub)population will have an exposure high enough to cause a

  12. Clinical testing of an innovative tool for the assessment of biomechanical strategies: the Timed “Up and Go” Assessment of Biomechanical Strategies (TUG-ABS) for individuals with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Christina D C M; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F; Nadeau, Sylvie

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the reliability and construct and criterion- related validities of the Timed “Up and Go” Assessment of Biomechanical Strategies (TUG-ABS), when used with subjects with hemiparesis due to stroke within clinical settings. Construct validity was investigated by the following methods: the known groups, convergence, discriminant analyses, and the opinions of clinical professionals, who used the TUG-ABS with subjects with stroke. The criterion-related validity was investigated by comparing the realtime and video observation scores. Inter-rater reliability was investigated by two independent examiners using both realtime and video observations. The TUG-ABS differentiated people with stroke from healthy controls (p ABS in their clinical settings, provided positive evaluations. Agreement was also observed between real-time and video observations (0.27 ≤ kappa ≤ 0.85; p ABS was reliable for both real-time (0.24 ≤ kappa ≤ 1.00; p ABS demonstrated good construct and criterion-related validities, as well as reliability, when applied in subjects with stroke within clinical settings, which supported the theoretical assumptions employed for its development.

  13. Probabilistic assessment of exposure to nail cosmetics in French consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficheux, A S; Morisset, T; Chevillotte, G; Postic, C; Roudot, A C

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess probabilistic exposure to nail cosmetics in French consumers. The exposure assessment was performed with base coat, polish, top coat and remover. This work was done for adult and child consumers. Dermal, inhalation and oral routes were taken into account for varnishes. Exposure evaluation was performed for the inhalation route with polish remover. The main route of exposure to varnishes was the ungual route. Inhalation was the secondary route of exposure, followed by dermal and oral routes. Polish contributed most to exposure, regardless of the route of exposure. For this nail product, P50 and P95 values by ungual route were respectively equal to 1.74 mg(kg bw week)(-1) and 8.55 mg(kg bw week)(-1) for women aged 18-34 years. Exposure to polish by inhalation route was equal to 0.70 mg(kg bw week)(-1) (P50) and 5.27 mg(kg bw week)(-1) (P95). P50 and P95 values by inhalation route were respectively equal to 0.08 mg(kg bw week)(-1) and 1.14 mg(kg bw week)(-1) for consumers aged 18-34 years exposed to polish remover. This work provided current exposure data for nail cosmetics, and a basis for future toxicological studies of the uptake of substances contained in nail cosmetics in order to assess systemic exposure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dermal exposure and risk assessment of tebuconazole applicators in vineyards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandic-Rajcevic, Stefan; Rubino, Federico Maria; Vianello, Giorgio; Fugnoli, Lorenzo; Polledri, Elisa; Mercadante, Rosa; Moretto, Angelo; Fustinoni, Silvia; Colosio, Claudio

    2015-07-08

    Models used in the pre-marketing evaluation do not cover all work scenarios and may over- or underestimate exposure. Uncertainties present in the extrapolation from pre-marketing to the post-marketing warrant exposure and risk assessment in real-life working conditions. Seven vineyard pesticide applicators were followed for a total of 12 work-days. A data collection sheet was developed specifically for this study. Workers' body exposure, hands, and head exposure were measured. Tebuconazole was analyzed using LC-MS/MS. Median potential and actual body exposures were 22.41 mg/kg and 0.49 mg/kg of active substance applied, respectively. The median protection factor provided by the coverall was 98% (range: 90-99%). Hand exposure was responsible for 61% of total actual exposure, and was reduced by more than 50% in workers using gloves. The German Model underestimated the exposure in one work-day, and grossly overestimated it in 3 work-days. High levels of potential body exposure were efficiently controlled by the cotton coverall. Use of personal protective devices, especially chemically-resistant gloves and head cover is the main determinant of skin protection. Field studies on pesticide exposure in real-life conditions and development of methods and tools for easier risk assessment are necessary to complement and confirm the risk assessment done in the authorization process.

  15. Exposure Data for Travel Risk Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, N O; Koornstra, Matthijs; Broughton, Jeremy

    1999-01-01

    This report illustrates why risk and exposure data are critical for policymaking at local, national and EU levels.Conclusions are drawn about the evaluation and use of risk information for different modes and estimates are presented for the fatality risk of various travel modes in the EU....

  16. Cellular Metabolomics for Exposure and Toxicity Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have developed NMR automation and cell quench methods for cell culture-based metabolomics to study chemical exposure and toxicity. Our flow automation method is robust and free of cross contamination. The direct cell quench method is rapid and effective. Cell culture-based met...

  17. Quantitative assessment of early biomechanical modifications in diabetic foot patients: the role of foot kinematics and step width

    OpenAIRE

    Lamola, Giuseppe; Venturi, Martina; Martelli, Dario; Iacopi, Elisabetta; Fanciullacci, Chiara; Coppelli, Alberto; Rossi, Bruno; Piaggesi, Alberto; Chisari, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Background Forefoot ulcers (FU) are one of the most disabling and relevant chronic complications of diabetes mellitus (DM). In recent years there is emerging awareness that a better understanding of the biomechanical factors underlying the diabetic ulcer could lead to improve the management of the disease, with significant socio-economic impacts. Our purpose was to try to detect early biomechanical factors associated with disease progression. Methods Thirty subjects (M/F: 22/8; mean age???SD:...

  18. Biomechanical properties of crystalline lens as a function of intraocular pressure assessed noninvasively by optical coherence elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chen; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Liu, Chih-Hao; Han, Zhaolong; Singh, Manmohan; Larin, Kirill V.

    2017-02-01

    Many ocular diseases such as glaucoma and uveitis can lead to the elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP). Previous research implies a link between elevated IOP and lens disease. However, the relationship between IOP elevation and biomechanical properties of the crystalline lens has not been directly studied yet. In this work, we investigated the biomechanical properties of porcine lens as a function of IOP by acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography.

  19. Verbal Instructions Acutely Affect Drop Vertical Jump Biomechanics--Implications for Athletic Performance and Injury Risk Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuu, Steven; Musalem, Lindsay L; Beach, Tyson A C

    2015-10-01

    Biomechanical quantities acquired during the drop vertical jump (DVJ) are used in the assessment of athletic performance and injury risk. The objective was to examine the impact of different verbal instructions on spatiotemporal, kinematic, and kinetic variables commonly included in such assessments. Ten men and 10 women from local varsity and club volleyball, basketball, figure skating, and track and field teams volunteered to participate. The athletes performed DVJs after given instructions to minimize ground contact time (CT), maximize jump height (HT), and synchronously extend the lower extremity joints (EX). Between the CT, HT, and EX conditions, body segment and joint angles were compared together with characteristics of vertical ground reaction force (GRF), whole-body power output, stiffness, and center-of-mass displacement time histories. Verbal instructions were found to influence nearly all of the spatiotemporal, body segment and joint kinematic, and kinetic variables that were statistically analyzed. Particularly noteworthy was the finding that athletic performance indices (e.g., jump height, power output, vertical stiffness, and reactive strength index) and lower extremity injury risk markers (e.g., peak vertical GRF and frontal plane knee angle) were significantly different (p ≤ 0.05) between the CT, HT, and EX conditions. The findings of this study suggest that verbal instructions should be controlled and/or clearly documented when using the DVJ to assess athletic performance potential and injury risk. Moreover, practitioners who devise performance enhancement and injury prevention strategies based on DVJ assessments are advised to consider that "coaching" or "cueing" during the task execution could impact conclusions drawn.

  20. Spine biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael A; Dolan, Patricia

    2005-10-01

    Current trends in spine research are reviewed in order to suggest future opportunities for biomechanics. Recent studies show that psychosocial factors influence back pain behaviour but are not important causes of pain itself. Severe back pain most often arises from intervertebral discs, apophyseal joints and sacroiliac joints, and physical disruption of these structures is strongly but variably linked to pain. Typical forms of structural disruption can be reproduced by severe mechanical loading in-vitro, with genetic and age-related weakening sometimes leading to injury under moderate loading. Biomechanics can be used to quantify spinal loading and movements, to analyse load distributions and injury mechanisms, and to develop therapeutic interventions. The authors suggest that techniques for quantifying spinal loading should be capable of measurement "in the field" so that they can be used in epidemiological surveys and ergonomic interventions. Great accuracy is not required for this task, because injury risk depends on tissue weakness as much as peak loading. Biomechanical tissue testing and finite-element modelling should complement each other, with experiments establishing proof of concept, and models supplying detail and optimising designs. Suggested priority areas for future research include: understanding interactions between intervertebral discs and adjacent vertebrae; developing prosthetic and tissue-engineered discs; and quantifying spinal function during rehabilitation. "Mechanobiology" has perhaps the greatest future potential, because spinal degeneration and healing are both mediated by the activity of cells which are acutely sensitive to their local mechanical environment. Precise characterisation and manipulation of this environment will be a major challenge for spine biomechanics.

  1. Biomechanical Assessment of Hip Capsular Repair and Reconstruction Procedures Using a 6 Degrees of Freedom Robotic System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippon, Marc J; Trindade, Christiano A C; Goldsmith, Mary T; Rasmussen, Matthew T; Saroki, Adriana J; Løken, Sverre; LaPrade, Robert F

    2017-07-01

    Although acetabular labral repair has been biomechanically validated to improve stability, capsular management of the hip remains a topic of growing interest and controversy. To biomechanically evaluate the effects of several arthroscopically relevant conditions of the capsule through a robotic, sequential sectioning study. Controlled laboratory study. Ten human cadaveric unilateral hip specimens (mean age, 51.3 years [range, 38-65 years]) from full pelvises were used to test range of motion (ROM) for the intact capsule and for multiple capsular conditions including portal incisions, interportal capsulotomy, interportal capsulotomy repair, T-capsulotomy, T-capsulotomy repair, a large capsular defect, and capsular reconstruction. Hips were biomechanically tested using a 6 degrees of freedom robotic system to assess ROM with applied 5-N·m internal, external, abduction, and adduction rotation torques throughout hip flexion and extension. All capsulotomy procedures (portals, interportal capsulotomy, and T-capsulotomy) created increases in external, internal, adduction, and abduction rotations compared with the intact state throughout the full tested ROM (-10° to 90° of flexion). Reconstruction significantly reduced rotation compared with the large capsular defect state for external rotation at 15° (difference, 1.4°) and 90° (difference, 1.3°) of flexion; internal rotation at -10° (difference, 0.4°), 60° (difference, 0.9°), and 90° (difference, 1.4°) of flexion; abduction rotation at -10° (difference, 0.5°), 15° (difference, 1.1°), 30° (difference, 1.2°), 60° (difference, 0.9°), and 90° (difference, 1.0°) of flexion; and adduction rotation at 0° (difference, 0.7°), 15° (difference, 0.8°), 30° (difference, 0.3°), and 90° (difference, 0.6°) of flexion. Repair of T-capsulotomy resulted in significant reductions in rotation compared with the T-capsulotomy condition for abduction rotation at -10° (difference, 0.3°), 15° (difference, 0.9

  2. Chemical Mixtures Health Risk Assessment: Overview of Exposure Assessment, Whole Mixtures Assessments; Basic Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    This problems-based, half-day, introductory workshop focuses on methods to assess health risks posed by exposures to chemical mixtures in the environment. Chemical mixtures health risk assessment methods continue to be developed and evolve to address concerns over health risks f...

  3. Bias in the estimation of exposure effects with individual- or group-based exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyang-Mi; Richardson, David; Loomis, Dana; Van Tongeren, Martie; Burstyn, Igor

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we develop models of bias in estimates of exposure-disease associations for epidemiological studies that use group- and individual-based exposure assessments. In a study that uses a group-based exposure assessment, individuals are grouped according to shared attributes, such as job title or work area, and assigned an exposure score, usually the mean of some concentration measurements made on samples drawn from the group. We considered bias in the estimation of exposure effects in the context of both linear and logistic regression disease models, and the classical measurement error in the exposure model. To understand group-based exposure assessment, we introduced a quasi-Berkson error structure that can be justified with a moderate number of exposure measurements from each group. In the quasi-Berkson error structure, the true value is equal to the observed one plus error, and the error is not independent of the observed value. The bias in estimates with individual-based assessment depends on all variance components in the exposure model and is smaller when the between-group and between-subject variances are large. In group-based exposure assessment, group means can be assumed to be either fixed or random effects. Regardless of this assumption, the behavior of estimates is similar: the estimates of regression coefficients were less attenuated with a large sample size used to estimate group means, when between-subject variability was small and the spread between group means was large. However, if groups are considered to be random effects, bias is present, even with large number of measurements from each group. This does not occur when group effects are treated as fixed. We illustrate these models in analyses of the associations between exposure to magnetic fields and cancer mortality among electric utility workers and respiratory symptoms due to carbon black.

  4. Noise Exposure Assessment in a Dental School

    OpenAIRE

    Thitiworn Choosong; Wandee Kaimook; Ratchada Tantisarasart; Puwanai Sooksamear; Satith Chayaphum; Chanon Kongkamol; Wisarut Srisintorn; Pitchaya Phakthongsuk

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This cross-sectional study was performed in the Dental School of Prince of Songkla University to ascertain noise exposure of dentists, dental assistants, and laboratory technicians. A noise spectral analysis was taken to illustrate the spectra of dental devices. Methods: A noise evaluation was performed to measure the noise level at dental clinics and one dental laboratory from May to December 2010. Noise spectral data of dental devices were taken during dental practices at the...

  5. Noise exposure assessment in a dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choosong, Thitiworn; Kaimook, Wandee; Tantisarasart, Ratchada; Sooksamear, Puwanai; Chayaphum, Satith; Kongkamol, Chanon; Srisintorn, Wisarut; Phakthongsuk, Pitchaya

    2011-12-01

    This cross-sectional study was performed in the Dental School of Prince of Songkla University to ascertain noise exposure of dentists, dental assistants, and laboratory technicians. A noise spectral analysis was taken to illustrate the spectra of dental devices. A noise evaluation was performed to measure the noise level at dental clinics and one dental laboratory from May to December 2010. Noise spectral data of dental devices were taken during dental practices at the dental services clinic and at the dental laboratory. A noise dosimeter was set following the Occupational Safety and Health Administration criteria and then attached to the subjects' collar to record personal noise dose exposure during working periods. The peaks of the noise spectrum of dental instruments were at 1,000, 4,000, and 8,000 Hz which depended on the type of instrument. The differences in working areas and job positions had an influence on the level of noise exposure (p personal hearing zone found that the laboratory technicians were exposed to the highest impulsive noise levels (137.1 dBC). The dentists and dental assistants who worked at a pedodontic clinic had the highest percent noise dose (4.60 ± 3.59%). In the working areas, the 8-hour time-weighted average of noise levels ranged between 49.7-58.1 dBA while the noisiest working area was the dental laboratory. Dental personnel are exposed to noise intensities lower than occupational exposure limits. Therefore, these dental personnel may not experience a noise-induced hearing loss.

  6. Wireless Phones Electromagnetic Field Radiation Exposure Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    A. D. Usman; W. F.W. Ahmad; M. Z.A.A. Kadir; M. Mokhtar

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: Inadequate knowledge of electromagnetic field emitted by mobile phones and increased usage at close proximity, created a lot of skepticism and speculations among end users on its safety or otherwise. Approach: In this study, near field electromagnetic field radiation measurements were conducted on different brand of mobile phones in active mode using a tri-axis isotropic probe and electric field meter. Results: The highest electromagnetic field exposure was recorded when th...

  7. Relationship between the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale and the Biomechanical Measure in Assessing Knee Extensor Muscle Spasticity in Patients with Post-Stroke Hemiparesia:A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Nakhostin Ansari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS is a clinical meas-ure that has been recently developed for the assessment of muscle spasticity. There is a dearth of research on the validity of the MMAS. The aim of the present study was to investi-gate the relationship between the MMAS and the biomechanical measure of work-velocity slope in assessing knee extensor muscle spasticity in patients with hemiparesia. Materials & Methods: Fourteen patients with post-stroke hemiparesia were included in this cross sectional study. Knee extensor spasticity was assessed with MMAS. An isokinetic dy-namometer was used to impose knee passive flexion with the angular velocity of 10, 30, 60, and 90 °/Sec to measure Torque-angle data. Work (Joule was calculated at each velocity to determine the slope of the work-velocity curves as the biomechanical measure of muscle spasticity. Results: The mean work decreased as the velocity increased but was not statistically signifi-cant (P = 0.07. The mean slope was – 0.35 [J /(°/Sec]. There was no significant correlation between the MMAS and the work-velocity slope (r =0.31, P = 0.28. Conclusion: There was no significant relationship between the MMAS and the biomechanical measure of work-velocity slope. Further studies with larger sample size are suggested. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2014; 21 (2: 131-136

  8. Synthetic Augmented Suture Anchor Reconstruction for a Complete Traumatic Distal Triceps Tendon Rupture in a Male Professional Bodybuilder with Postoperative Biomechanical Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Elissavet Nikolaidou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bodybuilding is a high-risk sport for distal triceps tendon ruptures. Management, especially in high-demanding athletes, is operative with suture anchor refixation technique being frequently used. However, the rate of rerupture is high due to underlying poor tendon quality. Thus, additional augmentation could be useful. This case report presents a reconstruction technique for a complete traumatic distal triceps tendon rupture in a bodybuilder with postoperative biomechanical assessment. A 28-year-old male professional bodybuilder was treated with a synthetic augmented suture anchor reconstruction for a complete triceps tendon rupture of his right dominant elbow. Postoperative biomechanical assessment included isokinetic elbow strength and endurance testing by using multiple angular velocities to simulate the “off-season” and “precompetition” phases of training. Eighteen months postoperatively and after full return to training, the biomechanical assessment indicated that the strength and endurance of the operated elbow joint was fully restored with even higher ratings compared to the contralateral healthy arm. The described reconstruction technique can be considered as an advisable option in high-performance athletes with underlying poor tendon quality due to high tensile strength and lack of donor site morbidity, thus enabling them to restore preinjury status and achieve safe return to sports.

  9. Synthetic Augmented Suture Anchor Reconstruction for a Complete Traumatic Distal Triceps Tendon Rupture in a Male Professional Bodybuilder with Postoperative Biomechanical Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidou, Maria-Elissavet; Banke, Ingo J.; Laios, Thomas; Petsogiannis, Konstantinos; Mourikis, Anastasios

    2014-01-01

    Bodybuilding is a high-risk sport for distal triceps tendon ruptures. Management, especially in high-demanding athletes, is operative with suture anchor refixation technique being frequently used. However, the rate of rerupture is high due to underlying poor tendon quality. Thus, additional augmentation could be useful. This case report presents a reconstruction technique for a complete traumatic distal triceps tendon rupture in a bodybuilder with postoperative biomechanical assessment. A 28-year-old male professional bodybuilder was treated with a synthetic augmented suture anchor reconstruction for a complete triceps tendon rupture of his right dominant elbow. Postoperative biomechanical assessment included isokinetic elbow strength and endurance testing by using multiple angular velocities to simulate the “off-season” and “precompetition” phases of training. Eighteen months postoperatively and after full return to training, the biomechanical assessment indicated that the strength and endurance of the operated elbow joint was fully restored with even higher ratings compared to the contralateral healthy arm. The described reconstruction technique can be considered as an advisable option in high-performance athletes with underlying poor tendon quality due to high tensile strength and lack of donor site morbidity, thus enabling them to restore preinjury status and achieve safe return to sports. PMID:24711944

  10. Linking Aquatic Exposure and Effects: Risk Assessment of Pesticides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brock, T.C.M.; Alix, A.; Brown, C.D.; Capri, E.; Gottesburen, E.

    2010-01-01

    Time-variable exposure profiles of pesticides are more often the rule than exception in the surface waters of agricultural landscapes. There is, therefore, a need to adequately address the uncertainties arising from time-variable exposure profiles in the aquatic risk assessment procedure for

  11. Air pollution exposure assessment methods utilized in epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Bin; Wilson, J Gaines; Zhan, F Benjamin; Zeng, Yongnian

    2009-03-01

    The assessment of personal exposure to air pollution is a critical component of epidemiological studies associating air pollution and health effects. This paper critically reviewed 157 studies over 29 years that utilized one of five categories of exposure methods (proximity, air dispersion, hybrid, human inhalation, and biomarkers). Proximity models were found to be a questionable technique as they assume that closer proximity equates to greater exposure. Inhalation models and biomarker estimates were the most effective in assessing personal exposure, but are often cost prohibitive for large study populations. This review suggests that: (i) factors such as uncertainty, validity, data availability, and transferability related to exposure assessment methods should be considered when selecting a model; and (ii) although an entirely discreet new class of approach is not necessary, significant progress could be made through the development of a 'hybrid' model utilizing the strengths of several existing methods. Future work should systematically evaluate the performance of hybrid models compared to other individual exposure assessment methods utilizing geospatial information technologies (e.g. geographic information systems (GIS) and remote sensing (RS)) to more robustly refine estimates of ambient exposure and quantify the linkages and differences between outdoor, indoor and personal exposure estimates.

  12. Relation between radiological assessment and biomechanical stability of lumbar interbody fusion in a large animal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroeze, R. J.; van der Veen, A. J.; van Royen, B. J.; Bank, R. A.; Helder, M. N.; Smit, T. H.

    2013-01-01

    To relate the progress of vertebral segmental stability after interbody fusion surgery with radiological assessment of spinal fusion. Twenty goats received double-level interbody fusion and were followed for a period of 3, 6 and 12 months. After killing, interbody fusion was assessed

  13. Existing Default Values and Recommendations for Exposure Assessment - A Nordic Exposure Group Project 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höglund, Lena; Räisänen, Jouni; Hämäläinen, Anne-Maija

    Default values are often used in exposure assessments e.g. in modelling because of lack of actually measured data. The quality of the exposure assessment outcome is therefore heavily dependent on the validity and representativeness this input data. Today the used default factors consist of a wide...... and dust ingestion, drinking water, food intake, non-dietary ingestion factors, lifetime expectancy, activity factors and consumer products......'s exposure assessments. The exposure default values were collected from the relevant European sources (ECHA, Consexpo, EUSES, Biocide TNsG, ECETOC, ExpoFacts) as well as from WHO and US-EPA. The following key default factors selected to the evaluation: body weight, body surface area, inhalation rate, soil...

  14. Integrating exposure into chemical alternatives assessment using a qualitative approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greggs, Bill; Arnold, Scott; Burns, T. E.

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable Chemical Alternatives Technical Committee, which consists of scientists from academia, industry, government, and NGOs, has developed a qualitative comparative exposure approach. Conducting such a comparison can screen for alternatives that are expected to have a higher human or environmental......Most alternatives assessments (AA) published to date are largely hazard-based rankings, and as such may not represent a fully informed consideration of the advantages and disadvantages of possible alternatives. With an assessment goal of identifying an alternative chemical that is more sustainable...... exposure potential, which could trigger a higher-tiered, more quantitative exposure assessment on the alternatives being considered, minimizing the likelihood of regrettable substitution. This talk will demonstrate an approach for including chemical- and product-related exposure information...

  15. Integrating exposure into chemical alternatives assessment using a qualitative approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greggs, Bill; Arnold, Scott; Burns, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable Chemical Alternatives Technical Committee, which consists of scientists from academia, industry, government, and NGOs, has developed a qualitative comparative exposure approach. Conducting such a comparison can screen for alternatives that are expected to have a higher exposure potential, which......Most alternatives assessments (AA) published to date are largely hazard-based rankings, and as such may not represent a fully informed consideration of the advantages and disadvantages of possible alternatives. With an assessment goal of identifying an alternative chemical that is more sustainable...... could trigger a higher-tiered, more quantitative exposure assessment on the alternatives being considered. This talk will demonstrate an approach for including chemical- and product-related exposure information in a qualitative AA comparison. Starting from existing hazard AAs, a series of four chemical...

  16. Shoulder biomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugo, Roberto; Kung, Peter; Ma, C. Benjamin [Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, University of California, San Francisco, 500 Parnassus Avenue, MU 320W-0728 San Francisco, CA 914143 (United States)], E-mail: maben@orthosurg.ucsf.edu

    2008-10-15

    The biomechanics of the glenohumeral joint depend on the interaction of both static and dynamic-stabilizing structures. Static stabilizers include the bony anatomy, negative intra-articular pressure, the glenoid labrum, and the glenohumeral ligaments along with the joint capsule. The dynamic-stabilizing structures include the rotator cuff muscles and the other muscular structures surrounding the shoulder joint. The combined effect of these stabilizers is to support the multiple degrees of motion within the glenohumeral joint. The goal of this article is to review how these structures interact to provide optimal stability and how failure of some of these mechanisms can lead to shoulder joint pathology.

  17. Defining the "Correct Form": Using Biomechanics to Develop Reliable and Valid Assessment Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satern, Miriam N.

    2011-01-01

    Physical educators should be able to define the "correct form" they expect to see each student performing in their classes. Moreover, they should be able to go beyond assessing students' skill levels by measuring the outcomes (products) of movements (i.e., how far they throw the ball or how many successful attempts are completed) or counting the…

  18. A preliminary biomechanical assessment of a polymer composite hip implant using an infrared thermography technique validated by strain gage measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougherara, Habiba; Rahim, Ehsan; Shah, Suraj; Dubov, Anton; Schemitsch, Emil H; Zdero, Rad

    2011-07-01

    With the resurgence of composite materials in orthopaedic applications, a rigorous assessment of stress is needed to predict any failure of bone-implant systems. For current biomechanics research, strain gage measurements are employed to experimentally validate finite element models, which then characterize stress in the bone and implant. Our preliminary study experimentally validates a relatively new nondestructive testing technique for orthopaedic implants. Lock-in infrared (IR) thermography validated with strain gage measurements was used to investigate the stress and strain patterns in a novel composite hip implant made of carbon fiber reinforced polyamide 12 (CF/PA12). The hip implant was instrumented with strain gages and mechanically tested using average axial cyclic forces of 840 N, 1500 N, and 2100 N with the implant at an adduction angle of 15 deg to simulate the single-legged stance phase of walking gait. Three-dimensional surface stress maps were also obtained using an IR thermography camera. Results showed almost perfect agreement of IR thermography versus strain gage data with a Pearson correlation of R(2) = 0.96 and a slope = 1.01 for the line of best fit. IR thermography detected hip implant peak stresses on the inferior-medial side just distal to the neck region of 31.14 MPa (at 840 N), 72.16 MPa (at 1500 N), and 119.86 MPa (at 2100 N). There was strong correlation between IR thermography-measured stresses and force application level at key locations on the implant along the medial (R(2) = 0.99) and lateral (R(2) = 0.83 to 0.99) surface, as well as at the peak stress point (R(2) = 0.81 to 0.97). This is the first study to experimentally validate and demonstrate the use of lock-in IR thermography to obtain three-dimensional stress fields of an orthopaedic device manufactured from a composite material.

  19. Biomechanical assessment of composite versus metallic intramedullary nailing system in femoral shaft fractures: A finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiezadeh, Saeid; Tavakkoli Avval, Pouria; Fawaz, Zouheir; Bougherara, Habiba

    2014-08-01

    Intramedullary nails are the primary choice for treating long bone fractures. However, complications following nail surgery including non-union, delayed union, and fracture of the bone or the implant still exist. Reducing nail stiffness while still maintaining sufficient stability seems to be the ideal solution to overcome the abovementioned complications. In this study, a new hybrid concept for nails made of carbon fibers/flax/epoxy was developed in order to reduce stress shielding. The mechanical performance of this new implant in terms of fracture stability and load sharing was assessed using a comprehensive non-linear FE model. This model considers several mechanical factors in nine fracture configurations at immediately post-operative, and in the healed bone stages. Post-operative results showed that the hybrid composite nail increases the average normal force at the fracture site by 319.23N (P<0.05), and the mean stress in the vicinity of fracture by 2.11MPa (P<0.05) at 45% gait cycle, while only 0.33mm and 0.39mm (P<0.05) increases in the fracture opening and the fragments' shear movement were observed. The healed bone results revealed that implantation of the titanium nail caused 20.2% reduction in bone stiffness, while the composite nail lowered the stiffness by 11.8% as compared to an intact femur. Our results suggest that the composite nail can provide a preferred mechanical environment for healing, particularly in transverse shaft fractures. This may help bioengineers better understand the biomechanics of fracture healing, and aid in the design of effective implants. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. In-vivo corneal pulsation in relation to in-vivo intraocular pressure and corneal biomechanics assessed in-vitro. An animal pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogala, Maja M; Danielewska, Monika E; Antończyk, Agnieszka; Kiełbowicz, Zdzisław; Rogowska, Marta E; Kozuń, Marta; Detyna, Jerzy; Iskander, D Robert

    2017-09-01

    The aim was to ascertain whether the characteristics of the corneal pulse (CP) measured in-vivo in a rabbit eye change after short-term artificial increase of intraocular pressure (IOP) and whether they correlate with corneal biomechanics assessed in-vitro. Eight New Zealand white rabbits were included in this study and were anesthetized. In-vivo experiments included simultaneous measurements of the CP signal, registered with a non-contact method, IOP, intra-arterial blood pressure, and blood pulse (BPL), at the baseline and short-term elevated IOP. Afterwards, thickness of post-mortem corneas was determined and then uniaxial tensile tests were conducted leading to estimates of their Young's modulus (E). At the baseline IOP, backward stepwise regression analyses were performed in which successively the ocular biomechanical, biometric and cardiovascular predictors were separately taken into account. Results of the analysis revealed that the 3rd CP harmonic can be statistically significantly predicted by E and central corneal thickness (Models: R2 = 0.662, p biomechanics in-vitro was confirmed. In particular, spectral analysis revealed that higher amplitude and power of the 3rd CP harmonic indicates higher corneal stiffness, while the 1st CP harmonic correlates positively with the corresponding harmonic of the BPL signal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Environmental exposure assessment framework for nanoparticles in solid waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldrin, Alessio; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Baun, Anders

    2014-01-01

    releases, eventually leading to a final assessment of potential ENM exposure. The proposed framework was applied to three selected nanoproducts: nanosilver polyester textile, nanoTiO2 sunscreen lotion and carbon nanotube tennis racquets. We found that the potential global environmental exposure of ENMs......Information related to the potential environmental exposure of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in the solid waste management phase is extremely scarce. In this paper, we define nanowaste as separately collected or collectable waste materials which are or contain ENMs, and we present a five......-step framework for the systematic assessment of ENM exposure during nanowaste management. The framework includes deriving EOL nanoproducts and evaluating the physicochemical properties of the nanostructure, matrix properties and nanowaste treatment processes as well as transformation processes and environment...

  2. Data collection costs in industrial environments for three occupational posture exposure assessment methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Documentation of posture measurement costs is rare and cost models that do exist are generally naïve. This paper provides a comprehensive cost model for biomechanical exposure assessment in occupational studies, documents the monetary costs of three exposure assessment methods for different stakeholders in data collection, and uses simulations to evaluate the relative importance of cost components. Methods Trunk and shoulder posture variables were assessed for 27 aircraft baggage handlers for 3 full shifts each using three methods typical to ergonomic studies: self-report via questionnaire, observation via video film, and full-shift inclinometer registration. The cost model accounted for expenses related to meetings to plan the study, administration, recruitment, equipment, training of data collectors, travel, and onsite data collection. Sensitivity analyses were conducted using simulated study parameters and cost components to investigate the impact on total study cost. Results Inclinometry was the most expensive method (with a total study cost of € 66,657), followed by observation (€ 55,369) and then self report (€ 36,865). The majority of costs (90%) were borne by researchers. Study design parameters such as sample size, measurement scheduling and spacing, concurrent measurements, location and travel, and equipment acquisition were shown to have wide-ranging impacts on costs. Conclusions This study provided a general cost modeling approach that can facilitate decision making and planning of data collection in future studies, as well as investigation into cost efficiency and cost efficient study design. Empirical cost data from a large field study demonstrated the usefulness of the proposed models. PMID:22738341

  3. Assessment of exposure dose to workers in virtual decommissioning environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, KwanSeong; Moon, JeiKwon; Choi, ByungSeon; Hyun, Dongjun; Lee, Jonghwan; Kim, Ikjune; Kim, GeunHo; Seo, JaeSeok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    This paper is intended to suggest the method analyze and assess the exposure dose to workers in virtual decommissioning environments. To simulate a lot of decommissioning scenarios, decommissioning environments were designed in virtual reality. To simulate and assess the exposure dose to workers, human model also was designed in virtual environments. These virtual decommissioning environments made it possible to real-time simulate and assess the exposure dose to workers. This work was to be able to simulate scenarios of decommissioning so that exposure dose to workers could be measured and assessed. To establish the plan of exposure dose to workers during decommissioning of nuclear facilities before decommissioning activities are accomplished, the method of simulation assessment was developed in virtual radiological environments. But this work was developed as a tool of simulation for single subject mode. Afterwards, the simulation environment for multi-subjects mode will be upgraded by simultaneous modules with networking environments. Then the much more practical method will be developed by changing number of workers and duration of time under any circumstances of decommissioning.

  4. Fungi, MVOCs and dust exposure assessment in poultry production

    OpenAIRE

    Viegas, Susana; Sabino, Raquel; Veríssimo, Cristina; Monteiro, Ana; Viegas, Carla

    2012-01-01

    Moulds are considered central elements in daily exposure of poultry workers and can be the cause of an increased risk of occupational respiratory diseases, like allergic and non-allergic rhinitis and asthma. The objective is to evaluate the exposure to different species of moulds in poultries and relate them with respiratory symptoms in poultry workers. Seven Portuguese poultries were analyzed in order to assess air fungal contamination, as well as to evaluate the existence of clinical sympto...

  5. Biomechanics of the Median Nerve During Stretching as Assessed by Ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Payá, Jacinto Javier; Ríos-Díaz, José; Del Baño-Aledo, María Elena; García-Martínez, David; de Groot-Ferrando, Ana; Meroño-Gallut, Javier

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this observational cross-sectional study was to investigate the normal motion of the median nerve when stretched during a neurodynamic exercise. In recent years, ultrasonography has been increasingly accepted as an imaging technique for examining peripheral nerves in vivo, offering a reliable and noninvasive method for a precise evaluation of nerve movement. Transverse motion of the median nerve in the arm during a neurodynamic test was measured. A volunteer sample of 22 healthy subjects (11 women) participated in the study. Nerve displacement and deformation were assessed by dynamic ultrasonography. Excellent interobserver agreement was obtained, with kappa coefficient of .7-.8. Ultrasonography showed no lateral motion during wrist extension in 68% of nerves, while 73% moved dorsally, with statistically significant differences between sexes (ORlat = 6.3; 95% CI = 1.4-27.7 and ORdor = 8.3; 95% CI = 1.6-44.6). The cross-sectional area was significantly greater in men (3.6 mm2). Quantitative analysis revealed no other statistically significant differences. Our results provide evidence of substantial individual differences in median nerve transverse displacement in response to a neurodynamic exercise.

  6. A Biomechanical Assessment of Kyphoplasty as a Stand-Alone Treatment in a Human Cadaveric Burst Fracture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Edwin King Yat; Whyne, Cari Marisa; Singh, Devin; Ford, Michael

    2015-07-15

    In vitro biomechanics study. To determine whether kyphoplasty is an adequate stand-alone treatment for restoring biomechanical stability in the spine after experiencing high-energy vertebral burst fractures. Kyphoplasty in the treatment of high-energy vertebral burst fractures has been shown by previous studies to significantly improve stiffness when used in conjunction with pedicle screw instrumentation. However, it is not known whether kyphoplasty as a stand-alone treatment may be an acceptable method for restoring biomechanical stability of a spinal motion segment post-burst fracture while allowing flexibility of the motion segment through the intervertebral discs. Young cadaveric spines (15-50 yr old; 3 males and 1 female; bone mineral density 0.27-0.31 gHA/cm) were divided into motion segments consisting of 3 intact vertebrae separated by 2 intervertebral discs (T11-L1 and L2-L4). Mechanical testing in axial, flexion/extension, lateral bending, and torsion was performed on each specimen in an intact state, after an experimentally simulated burst fracture and postkyphoplasty. Computed tomography was used to confirm the burst fractures and quantify cement placement. Between the intact and burst-fractured states significant decreases in stiffness were seen in all loading modes (63%-69%). Burst fracture increased the average angulation of the vertebral endplates 147% and decreased vertebral body height by an average of 40%. Postkyphoplasty, only small recoveries in stiffness were seen in axial, flexion/extension, and lateral bending (4%-12%), with no improvement in torsional stiffness. Large angular deformations (85%) and height loss (31%) remained postkyphoplasty as compared with the intact state. Lack of overall improvement in biomechanical stiffness indicates failure of kyphoplasty to sufficiently restore stability as a stand-alone treatment after high-energy burst fracture. The lack of stability can be explained by an inability to biomechanically repair the

  7. Lateral trochanteric pain following total hip arthroplasty: radiographic assessment of altered biomechanics as a potential aetiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkarim, Ali; Keegan, Cathy; Bajwa, Raazi; Sheehan, Eoin

    2018-01-15

    Lateral trochanteric pain (LTP) complicates up to 17% of cases of total hip arthroplasty (THA). Studies have refuted underlying trochanteric bursitis. Restoration of the femoral offset and reproduction of the natural femoral centre of rotation are important in successful arthroplasty. LTP is believed to be associated with their alteration. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of femoral offset and centre of rotation on the incidence of LTP post-THA. A retrospective case control study was developed from 158 patients who underwent a THA over a two-year period to form two patient cohorts. Twenty-nine patients diagnosed with LTP were matched with 110 control subjects. The direct lateral approach was used in all cases. Anterior-posterior pelvic radiographs before and after surgery were compared to assess the femoral, cup and global offsets and limb length discrepancies between the two groups. Statistical analyses were performed using the Mann-Whitney U test and independent samples t test. Twenty-nine diagnosed with post-operative LTP. Sixty-two percent of symptomatic patients were female (p = 0.13). The median ages were 74.33 (symptomatic) and 70.71 (control) (p = 0.11). The differences (pre-post) of the femoral (p = 0.17), cup (p = 0.5) and global offsets (p = 0.99) and mean of limb length discrepancy (LLD) (p = 0.83) were not significant between the two groups. No relationship was found between LTP and femoral offset or femoral centre of rotation. Disruption of the soft tissues during a lateral approach with resultant abductor tear, tendon defects and tendinitis might play a role in LTP and explain the apparent efficacy of corticosteroid injections.

  8. Biomechanical considerations for assessing interactions of children and small occupants with inflatable seat belts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhana, Stephen W; Sundararajan, Srinivasan; Board, Derek; Prasad, Priya; Rupp, Jonathan D; Miller, Carl S; Jeffreys, Thomas A; Schneider, Lawrence W

    2013-11-01

    NHTSA estimates that more than half of the lives saved (168,524) in car crashes between 1960 and 2002 were due to the use of seat belts. Nevertheless, while seat belts are vital to occupant crash protection, safety researchers continue efforts to further enhance the capability of seat belts in reducing injury and fatality risk in automotive crashes. Examples of seat belt design concepts that have been investigated by researchers include inflatable, 4-point, and reverse geometry seat belts. In 2011, Ford Motor Company introduced the first rear seat inflatable seat belts into production vehicles. A series of tests with child and small female-sized Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATD) and small, elderly female Post Mortem Human Subjects (PMHS) was performed to evaluate interactions of prototype inflatable seat belts with the chest, upper torso, head and neck of children and small occupants, from infants to young adolescents. Tests simulating a 6-year-old child asleep in a booster seat, with its head lying directly on its shoulder on top of the inflatable seat belt, were considered by engineering judgment, to represent a worst case scenario for interaction of an inflating seat belt with the head and neck of a child and/or small occupant. All evaluations resulted in ATD responses below Injury Assessment Reference Values reported by Mertz et al. (2003). In addition, the tests of the PMHS subjects resulted in no injuries from interaction of the inflating seat belt with the heads, necks, and chests of the subjects. Given the results from the ATD and PMHS tests, it was concluded that the injury risk to children and small occupants from deployment of inflatable seat belt systems is low.

  9. Biomechanical assessment of balance and posture in subjects with ankylosing spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawacha Zimi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ankylosing spondylitis is a major chronic rheumatic disease that predominantly affects axial joints, determining a rigid spine from the occiput to the sacrum. The dorsal hyperkyphosis may induce the patients to stand in a stooped position with consequent restriction in patients’ daily living activities. The aim of this study was to develop a method for quantitatively and objectively assessing both balance and posture and their mutual relationship in ankylosing spondylitis subjects. Methods The data of 12 healthy and 12 ankylosing spondylitis subjects (treated with anti-TNF-α stabilized, with a mean age of 51.42 and 49.42 years; mean BMI of 23.08 and 25.44 kg/m2 were collected. Subjects underwent a morphological examination of the spinal mobility by means of a pocket compass needle goniometer, together with an evaluation of both spinal and hip mobility (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index, and disease activity (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index. Quantitative evaluation of kinematics and balance were performed through a six cameras stereophotogrammetric system and a force plate. Kinematic models together with a test for evaluating balance in different eye level conditions were developed. Head protrusion, trunk flexion-extension, pelvic tilt, hip-knee-ankle flexion-extension were evaluated during Romberg Test, together with centre of pressure parameters. Results Each subject was able to accomplish the required task. Subjects’ were comparable for demographic parameters. A significant increment was observed in ankylosing spondylitis subjects for knee joint angle with the target placed at each eye level on both sides (p  Conclusions Our findings confirm the need to investigate both balance and posture in ankylosing spondylitis subjects. This methodology could help clinicians to plan rehabilitation treatments.

  10. A BIOMECHANICAL ASSESSMENT OF ERGOMETER TASK SPECIFICITY IN ELITE FLATWATER KAYAKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Fleming

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The current study compared EMG, stroke force and 2D kinematics during on-ergometer and on-water kayaking. Male elite flatwater kayakers (n = 10 performed matched exercise protocols consisting of 3 min bouts at heart and stroke rates equivalent to 85% of VO2peak (assessed by prior graded incremental test. EMG data were recorded from Anterior Deltoid (AD, Triceps Brachii (TB, Latissimus Dorsi (LD and Vastus Lateralis (VL via wireless telemetry. Video data recorded at 50 Hz with audio triggers pre- and post-exercise facilitated synchronisation of EMG and kinematic variables. Force data were recorded via strain gauge arrays on paddle and ergometer shafts. EMG data were root mean squared (20ms window, temporally and amplitude normalised, and averaged over 10 consecutive cycles. In addition, overall muscle activity was quantified via iEMG and discrete stroke force and kinematic variables computed. Significantly greater TB and LD mean iEMG activity were recorded on-water (239 ± 15 vs. 179 ± 10 µV. s, p < 0.01 and 158 ± 12 vs. 137 ± 14 µV.s, p < 0.05, respectively, while significantly greater AD activity was recorded on-ergometer (494 ± 66 vs. 340 ± 35 µV.s, p < 0.01. Time to vertical shaft position occurred significantly earlier on-ergometer (p < 0.05. Analysis of stroke force data and EMG revealed that increased AD activity was concurrent with increased external forces applied to the paddle shaft at discrete phases of the on-ergometer stroke cycle. These external forces were associated with the ergometer loading mechanism and were not observed on- water. The current results contradict a previous published hypothesis on shoulder muscle recruitment during on-water kayaking.

  11. Biomechanical Assessment of Motor Abilities in Male Handball Players During the Annual Training Macrocycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacewicz Tomasz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of the study was to determine the torque of the knee extensors and flexors of the lead lower limb, the torque of the shoulder extensors and flexors of the dominant upper limb, and the torque generated by the muscles of the kinematic chain going from the trail lower limb to the hand of the dominant limb in male handball players during the annual training macrocycle. Changes in jump height and throwing velocity were also investigated. Material and methods. The study involved 13 handball players from a Polish second-league team. The measurements were performed four times: at the beginning of the preparation period, at the beginning of the season, at the end of the first part of the season, and at the end of the second part of the season. Torque was measured in isokinetic and isometric conditions. Jumping ability was tested using a piezoelectric platform, and throwing velocity was measured with a speed radar gun. Results. The study found statistically significant differences between the relative torque values of the knee extensors (p < 0.002 and flexors (p < 0.003 of the lead leg measured in isokinetic conditions between the first three measurements and the final one. Isokinetic measurement of the torque of the muscles of the kinematic chain going from the trail leg to the hand of the dominant arm decreased in a statistically significant way at the end of the season. As for the results of the measurement of the torque of the shoulder extensors and flexors in static conditions, no statistically significant differences were observed between the four measurements. However, statistically significant differences were noted in jumping ability and throwing velocity in the annual training macrocycle. Conclusions. The results of the study indicate that there is a need to perform regular assessments of players’ strength and jumping ability during the competition period. There is a need to modify the training methods used during the

  12. Biomechanical assessment and monitoring of thermal ablation using Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Gary Yi

    Cancer remains, one of the major public health problems in the United States as well as many other countries worldwide. According to According to the World Health Organization, cancer is currently the leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for 7.6 million deaths annually, and 25% of the annual death was due to Cancer during the year of 2011. In the long history of the cancer treatment field, many treatment options have been established up to date. Traditional procedures include surgical procedures as well as systemic therapies such as biologic therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and radiation therapy. Nevertheless, side-effects are often associated with such procedures due to the systemic delivery across the entire body. Recently technologies have been focused on localized therapy under minimally or noninvasive procedure with imaging-guidance, such as cryoablation, laser ablation, radio-frequency (RF) ablation, and High Intensity F-ocused Ultrasound (HIFU). HIFU is a non-invasive procedure aims to coagulate tissue thermally at a localized focal zone created with noninvasively emitting a set of focused ultrasound beams while the surrounding healthy tissues remain relatively untreated. Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a dynamic, radiation-force-based imaging technique, which utilizes a single HIFU transducer by emitting an Amplitude-modulated (AM) beam to both thermally ablate the tumor while inducing a stable oscillatory tissue displacement at its focal zone. The oscillatory response is then estimated by a cross-correlation based motion tracking technique on the signal collected by a confocally-aligned diagnostic transducer. HMIFU addresses the most critical aspect and one of the major unmet needs of HIFU treatment, which is the ability to perform real-time monitoring and mapping of tissue property change during the HIFU treatment. In this dissertation, both the assessment and monitoring aspects of HMIFU have been investigated

  13. Stakeholder attitudes towards cumulative and aggregate exposure assessment of pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeke, Wim; Van Loo, Ellen J; Vanhonacker, Filiep; Delcour, Ilse; Spanoghe, Pieter; van Klaveren, Jacob D

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluates the attitudes and perspectives of different stakeholder groups (agricultural producers, pesticide manufacturers, trading companies, retailers, regulators, food safety authorities, scientists and NGOs) towards the concepts of cumulative and aggregate exposure assessment of pesticides by means of qualitative in-depth interviews (n = 15) and a quantitative stakeholder survey (n = 65). The stakeholders involved generally agreed that the use of chemical pesticides is needed, primarily for meeting the need of feeding the growing world population, while clearly acknowledging the problematic nature of human exposure to pesticide residues. Current monitoring was generally perceived to be adequate, but the timeliness and consistency of monitoring practices across countries were questioned. The concept of cumulative exposure assessment was better understood by stakeholders than the concept of aggregate exposure assessment. Identified pitfalls were data availability, data limitations, sources and ways of dealing with uncertainties, as well as information and training needs. Regulators and food safety authorities were perceived as the stakeholder groups for whom cumulative and aggregate pesticide exposure assessment methods and tools would be most useful and acceptable. Insights obtained from this exploratory study have been integrated in the development of targeted and stakeholder-tailored dissemination and training programmes that were implemented within the EU-FP7 project ACROPOLIS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Human biological monitoring of mercury for exposure assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romilda Z. Boerleider

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mercury (Hg is a naturally occurring element that has metallic, inorganic and organic forms, each with their own implications for human health. Exposure to mercury primarily occurs by inhalation of metallic mercury vapors and by dietary intake of organic mercury. Early health effects are often not well detected. Therefore, determination of the internal dose is a valuable approach in primary prevention. With this review, we aim to give an overview of the different human biological monitoring (HBM approaches for short- and long-term exposure to different chemical forms of mercury. We performed a literature search in PubMed using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH terms as well as free text words. From 417 reviews found, we selected 8 reviews. In addition, online information from national and international health authorities was used. The format of the biological application datasheets from the BIOMONECS project was used to provide an overview of the different biological media for HBM of mercury and methyl mercury. Recent exposure to metallic mercury can be assessed by blood sampling within 24 h after exposure. If children are involved, breath sampling can be considered as a less invasive alternative. Urinary mercury levels mainly reflect long-term inhalation exposure to elemental mercury vapors and divalent mercury. Mercury in blood and hair reflects mid- and long-term exposure to methyl mercury, whereas analysis of a hair segment close to the scalp indicates recent exposure. A flow chart was developed to support the selection of the most suitable HBM approach. For each of the different biological matrices, we provided an overview of advantages and limitations. Depending on the source and duration of exposure, blood, exhaled air, urine or hair can be used for mercury exposure assessment.

  15. Helmet-Cam: tool for assessing miners' respirable dust exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecala, A B; Reed, W R; Joy, G J; Westmoreland, S C; O'Brien, A D

    2013-09-01

    Video technology coupled with datalogging exposure monitors have been used to evaluate worker exposure to different types of contaminants. However, previous application of this technology used a stationary video camera to record the worker's activity while the worker wore some type of contaminant monitor. These techniques are not applicable to mobile workers in the mining industry because of their need to move around the operation while performing their duties. The Helmet-Cam is a recently developed exposure assessment tool that integrates a person-wearable video recorder with a datalogging dust monitor. These are worn by the miner in a backpack, safety belt or safety vest to identify areas or job tasks of elevated exposure. After a miner performs his or her job while wearing the unit, the video and dust exposure data files are downloaded to a computer and then merged together through a NIOSH-developed computer software program called Enhanced Video Analysis of Dust Exposure (EVADE). By providing synchronized playback of the merged video footage and dust exposure data, the EVADE software allows for the assessment and identification of key work areas and processes, as well as work tasks that significantly impact a worker's personal respirable dust exposure. The Helmet-Cam technology has been tested at a number of metal/nonmetal mining operations and has proven to be a valuable assessment tool. Mining companies wishing to use this technique can purchase a commercially available video camera and an instantaneous dust monitor to obtain the necessary data, and the NIOSH-developed EVADE software will be available for download at no cost on the NIOSH website.

  16. 75 FR 28804 - An Exposure Assessment of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-24

    ... exposure media concentrations, and an exposure assessment including background exposures and exposures to... higher for children compared with those for adults. In December 2008, the draft report was released for...

  17. Task-based exposure assessment of nanoparticles in the workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Seunghon; Yoon, Chungsik; Lee, Euiseung; Lee, Kiyoung; Park, Donguk; Chung, Eunkyo; Kim, Pilje; Lee, Byoungcheun

    2012-09-01

    Although task-based sampling is, theoretically, a plausible approach to the assessment of nanoparticle exposure, few studies using this type of sampling have been published. This study characterized and compared task-based nanoparticle exposure profiles for engineered nanoparticle manufacturing workplaces (ENMW) and workplaces that generated welding fumes containing incidental nanoparticles. Two ENMW and two welding workplaces were selected for exposure assessments. Real-time devices were utilized to characterize the concentration profiles and size distributions of airborne nanoparticles. Filter-based sampling was performed to measure time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations, and off-line analysis was performed using an electron microscope. Workplace tasks were recorded by researchers to determine the concentration profiles associated with particular tasks/events. This study demonstrated that exposure profiles differ greatly in terms of concentrations and size distributions according to the task performed. The size distributions recorded during tasks were different from both those recorded during periods with no activity and from the background. The airborne concentration profiles of the nanoparticles varied according to not only the type of workplace but also the concentration metrics. The concentrations measured by surface area and the number concentrations measured by condensation particle counter, particulate matter 1.0, and TWA mass concentrations all showed a similar pattern, whereas the number concentrations measured by scanning mobility particle sizer indicated that the welding fume concentrations at one of the welding workplaces were unexpectedly higher than were those at workplaces that were engineering nanoparticles. This study suggests that a task-based exposure assessment can provide useful information regarding the exposure profiles of nanoparticles and can therefore be used as an exposure assessment tool.

  18. In Vitro Exposure Systems and Dosimetry Assessment Tools ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2009, the passing of The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act facilitated the establishment of the FDA Center for Tobacco Products (CTP) and gave it regulatory authority over the marketing, manufacture and distribution of tobacco products, including those termed “modified risk”. On 4-6 April 2016, the Institute for In Vitro Sciences, Inc. (IIVS) convened a workshop conference titled “In Vitro Exposure Systems and Dosimetry Assessment Tools for Inhaled Tobacco Products” to bring together stakeholders representing regulatory agencies, academia, and industry to address the research priorities articulated by the FDA CTP. Specific topics were covered to assess the status of current in vitro smoke and aerosol/vapor exposure systems, as well as the various approaches and challenges to quantifying the complex exposures, in in vitro pulmonary models developed for evaluating adverse pulmonary events resulting from tobacco product exposures. The four core topics covered were, 1) Tobacco Smoke And E-Cigarette Aerosols, 2) Air-Liquid Interface-In Vitro Exposure Systems, 3) Dosimetry Approaches For Particles And Vapors; In Vitro Dosimetry Determinations and 4) Exposure Microenvironment/Physiology Of Cells. The two and a half day workshop included presentations from 20 expert speakers, poster sessions, networking discussions, and breakout sessions which identified key findings and provided recommendations to advance these technologies. Here, we will re

  19. Occupational exposure assessment in a radioactive facility: a preliminary evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Alice dos Santos; Gerulis, Eduardo; Sanches, Matias P.; Carneiro, Janete C.G.G., E-mail: alicesante@hotmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The risk that a worker has found on the job is a function of the hazards present and his exposure level to those hazards. Exposure and risk assessment is therefore the heart of all occupational health and industrial hygiene programs involving a continuous process of information gathering. The use of a systematic method to characterize workplace exposures to chemical, physical and biological risks is a fundamental part of this process. This study aims to carry out a preliminary evaluation in a radioactive facility, identifying potential exposures and consequently the existing occupational hazards (risk/agent) in the workplace which the employee is subject. The study is based on proposal to carry out a basic characterization of the facility, which could be the first step in the investigation of occupational exposure. For this study was essential to know the workplace, potential risks and agents; workforce profile including assignment of tasks, sources of exposure processes, and control measures. The main tool used in this study was based on references, records, standards, procedures, interviews with the workers and with management. Since the basic characterization of the facility has been carried out, consequently the potential exposure to the agents of risks to workers has been identified. The study provided an overview of the perception of risk founded at facility studied. It is expected to contribute with the occupational health program resources for welfare of the worker. (author)

  20. Cumulative risk assessment of chemical exposures in urban environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragas, Ad M J; Oldenkamp, R; Preeker, N L; Wernicke, J; Schlink, U

    2011-07-01

    We performed a cumulative risk assessment for people living in a hypothetical urban environment, called Urbania. The main aims of the study were to demonstrate how a cumulative risk assessment for a middle-sized European city can be performed and to identify the bottlenecks in terms of data availability and knowledge gaps. The assessment focused on five air pollutants (i.e., PM₁₀, benzene, toluene, nonane and naphthalene) and six food pesticides (i.e., acetamiprid, carbendazim, chlorpyrifos, diazinon, imidacloprid and permethrin). Exposure predictions showed that PM₁₀, benzene and naphthalene exposure frequently exceeded the standards, and that the indoor environment contributed more than the outdoor environment. Effect predictions showed that mixture and interaction effects were generally limited. However, model calculations indicated potential synergistic effects between naphthalene and benzene and between chlorpyrifos, diazinon and toluene. PM₁₀ dominated the health impact expressed in Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs). We conclude that measures to reduce the health impact of environmental pollution should focus on the improvement of indoor air quality and the reduction of PM₁₀ emissions. Cumulative risk assessment can be improved by (1) the development of person-oriented exposure models that can simulate the cumulative exposure history of individuals, (2) a better mechanistic understanding of the effects of cumulative stressors, and (3) the development of instruments to prioritize stressors for inclusion in cumulative risk assessments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Drone based measurement system for radiofrequency exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Wout; Aerts, Sam; Vandenbossche, Matthias; Thielens, Arno; Martens, Luc

    2016-03-10

    For the first time, a method to assess radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure of the general public in real environments with a true free-space antenna system is presented. Using lightweight electronics and multiple antennas placed on a drone, it is possible to perform exposure measurements. This technique will enable researchers to measure three-dimensional RF-EMF exposure patterns accurately in the future and at locations currently difficult to access. A measurement procedure and appropriate measurement settings have been developed. As an application, outdoor measurements are performed as a function of height up to 60 m for Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) 900 MHz base station exposure. Bioelectromagnetics. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Skin exposure: Assessing the hazard in the workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Kevin

    1994-01-01

    An outline of the Occupational Safety and Health Agency's concerns of skin exposure to hazardous chemicals is presented, followed by the corresponding slide narrations. Specifically, dermatitis and skin absorption as compared to lung absorption are addressed. Lung versus skin exposure is examined for glycol ethers and acrylamide. Examples of skin exposure include PBC's in transformers, toluene and xylene from autobody work, polynuclear aromatics (PNA's) among Coke oven workers, toluene diisocyanate (TDI), and occupational chemical exposures in an academic medical center. Permeation through gloves in the semiconductor industry is addressed as evidence for the need to assess the effectiveness of PPE (Personal Protective Equipment). This leads to the revisions of the PPE standard and the Safety and Health Program standard.

  3. Biomechanical changes after repeated collagen cross-linking on human corneas assessed in vitro using scanning acoustic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshtawi, Ithar M; Akhtar, Riaz; Hillarby, M Chantal; O'Donnell, Clare; Zhao, Xuegen; Brahma, Arun; Carley, Fiona; Derby, Brian; Radhakrishnan, Hema

    2014-03-13

    To explore the biomechanical changes induced by repeated cross-linking using scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM). Thirty human corneas were divided into three groups. In group A, five corneas were cross-linked once. In group B, five corneas were cross-linked twice, 24 hours apart. In group C, five corneas were cross-linked three times, 24 hours apart. The contralateral controls in all groups had similar treatment but without UV-A. The speed of sound, which is directly proportional to the square root of the tissue's elastic modulus, was assessed using SAM. In group A, the speed of sound of the treated corneas was 1677.38 ± 10.70 ms(-1) anteriorly and 1603.90 ± 9.82 ms(-1) posteriorly, while it was 1595.23 ± 9.66 ms(-1) anteriorly and 1577.13 ± 8.16 ms(-1) posteriorly in the controls. In group B, the speed of sound of the treated corneas was 1746.33 ± 23.37 ms(-1) anteriorly and 1631.60 ± 18.92 ms(-1) posteriorly, while it was 1637.57 ± 22.15 ms(-1) anteriorly and 1612.30 ± 22.23 ms(-1) posteriorly in the controls. In group C, the speed of sound of the treated corneas was 1717.97 ± 18.92 ms(-1) anteriorly and 1616.62 ± 17.58 ms(-1) posteriorly, while it was 1628.69 ± 9.37 ms(-1) anteriorly and 1597.68 ± 11.97 ms(-1) posteriorly in the controls. The speed of sound in the anterior (200 × 200 μm) region between the cross-linked and control corneas in groups A, B, and C was increased by a factor of 1.051 (P = 0.005), 1.066 (P = 0.010), and 1.055 (P = 0.005) respectively. However, there was no significant difference among the cross-linked corneas in all groups (P = 0.067). A significant increase in speed of sound was found in all treated groups compared with the control group; however, the difference among the treated groups is not significant, suggesting no further cross-links are induced when collagen cross-linking treatment is repeated.

  4. Exposure assessment in studies on health effects of traffic exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setaelae, S. [Association for the Pulmonary Disabled, Helsinki (Finland); Jaakkola, J.J.K. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Public Health

    1995-12-31

    A main source of outdoor air pollution is road traffic, which produces a complex mixture of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, volatile hydrocarbons, airborne particles and some other compounds. Traffic exhaust affects also the concentrations of ozone and other photo chemical oxidants. In earlier studies those components have had remarkable health effects. Several studies on occupational exposure to automobile exhaust have been published and several studies have been observed an association between both outdoor and indoor pollutant levels and health outcomes. However, there are only a few epidemiological studies in which traffic exhaust, a complex mixture, has been studied in its entirety. During recent years, interesting epidemiological studies of the health effects of this complex mixture have been published. Human exposure assessment for traffic exhaust can be categorized according to the environment of exposure (indoors, outdoors, in-traffic) or to the method of exposure assessment (direct or indirect methods). In this presentation the methods are further categorized into (1) traffic activity, (2) air concentration measurements, and (3) dispersion models, in order to better understand the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches. The objective of this presentation is to make a critical review of exposure assessments in the epidemiological studies on health effects of traffic exhaust. (author)

  5. Occupational Exposure Assessment of Nanomaterials using Control Banding Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liguori, Biase

    Nanotechnology can be termed as the “new industrial revolution”. A broad range of potential benefits in various applications for the environment and everyday life of humans can be related to the use of nanotechnology. Nanomaterials are used in a large variety of products already in the market......, and because of their novel physical and chemical characteristics, the application of nanomaterials is projected to increase further. This will inevitably increase the production of nanomaterials with potential increase of exposure for the workers which are the first in line expected to become exposed...... to potentially hazardous nanomaterials. Exposure assessment of nanomaterials is more difficult to define and conduct than that of traditional chemicals. This thesis provides an analysis of the field of occupational exposure assessment and a number of challenges are identified. The analysis showed...

  6. Opportunities for using spatial property assessment data in air pollution exposure assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keller C Peter

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many epidemiological studies examining the relationships between adverse health outcomes and exposure to air pollutants use ambient air pollution measurements as a proxy for personal exposure levels. When pollution levels vary at neighbourhood levels, using ambient pollution data from sparsely located fixed monitors may inadequately capture the spatial variation in ambient pollution. A major constraint to moving toward exposure assessments and epidemiological studies of air pollution at a neighbourhood level is the lack of readily available data at appropriate spatial resolutions. Spatial property assessment data are widely available in North America and may provide an opportunity for developing neighbourhood level air pollution exposure assessments. Results This paper provides a detailed description of spatial property assessment data available in the Pacific Northwest of Canada and the United States, and provides examples of potential applications of spatial property assessment data for improving air pollution exposure assessment at the neighbourhood scale, including: (1 creating variables for use in land use regression modelling of neighbourhood levels of ambient air pollution; (2 enhancing wood smoke exposure estimates by mapping fireplace locations; and (3 using data available on individual building characteristics to produce a regional air pollution infiltration model. Conclusion Spatial property assessment data are an extremely detailed data source at a fine spatial resolution, and therefore a source of information that could improve the quality and spatial resolution of current air pollution exposure assessments.

  7. Stoffenmanager exposure model: company-specific exposure assessments using a Bayesian methodology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, P. van de; Fransman, W.; Schinkel, J.; Rubingh, C.; Warren, N.; Tielemans, E.

    2010-01-01

    The web-based tool "Stoffenmanager" was initially developed to assist small- and medium-sized enterprises in the Netherlands to make qualitative risk assessments and to provide advice on control at the workplace. The tool uses a mechanistic model to arrive at a "Stoffenmanager score" for exposure.

  8. EPa`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Exposure issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callahan, M.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    Three major issues to be dealt with over the next ten years in the exposure assessment field are: consistency in terminology, the impact of computer technology on the choice of data and modeling, and conceptual issues such as the use of time-weighted averages.

  9. How to assess exposure of aquatic organisms to manufactured nanoparticles?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quik, Joris T.K.; Vonk, Jan Arie; Hansen, Steffen Foss

    2011-01-01

    Ecological risk of chemicals is measured by the quotient of predicted no-effect concentrations and predicted exposure concentrations, which are hard to assess for manufactured nanomaterials (NMs). This paper proposes modifications to currently used models, in order to make them suitable for estim...

  10. Task-based dermal exposure models for regulatory risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warren, N.D.; Marquart, H.; Christopher, Y.; Laitinen, J.; Hemmen, J.J. van

    2006-01-01

    The regulatory risk assessment of chemicals requires the estimation of occupational dermal exposure. Until recently, the models used were either based on limited data or were specific to a particular class of chemical or application. The EU project RISKOFDERM has gathered a considerable number of

  11. Elderly Exposure to Air Pollutants : Measuring, assessing and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almeida-Silva, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    This Thesis focuses on the estimation of the human exposure to air pollutants, and gives special attention to one of the most susceptible groups in the general population - elders. To fulfil the goal the work was conducted following the risk assessment paradigm and, consequently, was divided into 5

  12. Ergonomic and health assessment of farmers' multi-pesticide exposure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. This was a cross-sectional study conducted among 534 farmers in the largest vegetable –producing area in the northern part of the Philippines. This study assessed the ergonomic risk factors, and occupational health and safety conditions of farmers' multi-pesticide exposures.Methods. Methods consisted of ...

  13. Human exposure assessment for airborne pollutants: advances and opportunities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    National Research Council Staff

    1991-01-01

    ... in Assessing Human Exposure to Airborne Pollutants Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES WASHINGTON, D.C. 1991 i Copyrightthe cannot be not from book, paper however, version for formatting, original authoritative the typesetting-speci...

  14. American Society of Biomechanics Clinical Biomechanics Award 2015: MRI assessments of cartilage mechanics, morphology and composition following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Jarred; Vignos, Michael F; Liu, Fang; Kijowski, Richard; Thelen, Darryl G

    2016-05-01

    The pathogenesis of osteoarthritis following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is currently unknown. The study purpose was to leverage recent advances in quantitative and dynamic MRI to test the hypothesis that abnormal joint mechanics within four years of reconstruction is accompanied by evidence of early compositional changes in cartilage. Static MR imaging was performed bilaterally on eleven subjects with an ACL reconstruction (1-4years post-surgery) and on twelve healthy subjects to obtain tibial cartilage thickness maps. Quantitative imaging (mcDESPOT) was performed unilaterally on all subjects to assess the fraction of bound water in the tibial plateau cartilage. Finally, volumetric dynamic imaging was performed to assess cartilage contact patterns during an active knee flexion-extension task. A repeated-measures ANOVA was used to test for the effects of surgical reconstruction and location on cartilage thickness, bound water fractions, and contact across the medial and lateral tibia plateaus. No significant differences in cartilage thickness were found between groups. However, there was a significant reduction in the fraction of water bound by proteoglycan in the ACL reconstructed knees, most notably along the anterior portion of the medial plateau and the weight-bearing lateral plateau. During movement, reconstructed knees exhibited greater contact along the medial spine in the medial plateau and along the posterior aspect of the lateral plateau, when compared with their healthy contralateral knees and healthy controls. This study provides evidence that abnormal mechanics in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knees are present coincidently with early biomarkers of cartilage degeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Exposure assessment of MWCNTs in their life cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono-Ogasawara, M.; Takaya, M.; Yamada, M.

    2015-05-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are used as a filler in composites to obtain electrical conductivity, and improve mechanical strength and other properties. However, exposure to MWCNTs may pose health risks because of their size, shape, and insolubility. A quantitative exposure assessment method for CNTs is therefore needed. We have developed a promising carbon analysis method that considers the size distribution of elemental carbon. We conducted exposure assessment according to the lifecycle of CNTs. At the first stage, large quantity of CNTs are handled and exposure to neat CNTs is likely to occur. When large quantity of CNTs are handled, enclosure and automated process are strongly recommended. By applying appropriate measures, CNT concentration can be well controlled. Local exhaust ventilation and less-restrictive enclosures were found to work well during the second stage, which involves handling smaller CNT quantities. At measured sites, MWCNT concentrations were below an occupational exposure level proposed by Nakanishi (i.e., 0.030 mg/m3). This analysis method can also be applied to particles containing MWCNTs. At downstream stages of the lifecycle, neat MWCNTs were not observed and concentrations of embedded MWCNTs were lower than 0.015 mg/m3.

  16. Assessing the reproductive health of men with occupational exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Steven M; Marlow, Katherine L

    2014-01-01

    The earliest report linking environmental (occupational) exposure to adverse human male reproductive effects dates back to1775 when an English physician, Percival Pott, reported a high incidence of scrotal cancer in chimney sweeps. This observation led to safety regulations in the form of bathing requirements for these workers. The fact that male-mediated reproductive harm in humans may be a result of toxicant exposures did not become firmly established until relatively recently, when Lancranjan studied lead-exposed workers in Romania in 1975, and later in 1977, when Whorton examined the effects of dibromochloropropane (DBCP) on male workers in California. Since these discoveries, several additional human reproductive toxicants have been identified through the convergence of laboratory and observational findings. Many research gaps remain, as the pool of potential human exposures with undetermined effects on male reproduction is vast. This review provides an overview of methods used to study the effects of exposures on male reproduction and their reproductive health, with a primary emphasis on the implementation and interpretation of human studies. Emphasis will be on occupational exposures, although much of the information is also useful in assessing environmental studies, occupational exposures are usually much higher and better defined.

  17. [Risk assessment of renal dysfunction caused by occupational lead exposure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Li-ting; Lei, Li-jian; Chang, Xiu-li; Jin, Tai-yi; Zheng, Guang; Guo, Wei-jun; Li, Hui-qi; Pan, Xiao-hai

    2010-03-01

    To assess the risk of renal dysfunction caused by occupational lead exposure through epidemiological investigation. The workers in a battery factory were selected as the subjects for the exposure and effect assessment. The occupational environmental monitoring data was collected and used to calculate the total external dose of lead. The relationship between external dose and internal dose of lead was analyzed. The external dose, blood lead (BPb) and urinary lead (UPb) were used as exposure biomarkers while the urinary N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase (UNAG), and urinary albumin (UALB) were used as the effect biomarkers for the renal dysfunction caused by lead. Software of BMDS (BMDS 11311) was used to calculate BMD. The external and internal does of lead was positively correlated (BPb: r = 0.466, P < 0.01; UPb: r = 0.383, P < 0.01). The levels of BPb, UPb in exposure group (654.03 microg/L, 143.45 microg/g Cr) were significantly higher than those in the control group (57.12 microg/L, 7.20 microg/g Cr), so were UALB, UNAG; in addition, all of them presented significant dose-response relationship. The BPb BMD of UALB, UNAG were 607.76, 362.56 microg/L respectively and the UPb BMD of UALB, UNAG were 117.79, 78.79 microg/gCr respectively. Occupational lead exposure can cause renal dysfunction, which presents dose-response relationship; the risk assessment of renal dysfunction caused by occupational lead exposure is performed by BMD calculation of BPb and UPb.

  18. [Hygiene and legal aspects of occupational exposure assessment to cytostatics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupczewska-Dobecka, Małgorzata; Pałaszewska-Tkacz, Anna; Czerczak, Sławomir; Konieczko, Katarzyna

    2018-01-01

    The employers responsibilities for the assessment of occupational exposure to cytostatics in the workplace were analyzed in the light of existing legal regulations. Cytostatics may pose a threat to health and life of workers taking care of patients treated oncologically, i.e., pharmacists, physicians, nurses and other personnel. The significant scale of occupational exposure to cytostatics in Poland is confirmed by the data collected in the Central Register of Data on Exposure to Carcinogenic or Mutagenic Substances, Mixtures, Agents or Technological Processes, maintained by the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Łódź, Poland. The issue of occupational risk assessment of exposure to cytostatics gives raise to numerous concerns. Polish regulations concerning health protection of employees occupationally exposed to cytostatics are not unequivocal, as they are derived from different areas of the law, especially those applying to hazard classification, labeling and preparation of safety data sheets for cytostatics. There are neither binding occupational exposure limits legally set for active compounds of antineoplastic drugs nor methods for monitoring of these substances concentrations in a worker's breathing zone and biological material. This prevents the employer to carry out the correct assessment of occupational exposure, the results of which are the basis for preparing the proper preventive strategy. In this article the consequences of amendments to the European chemical legislation for employers responsible for adequate protection of health and life of employees exposed to cytostatics, were discussed, as well as some legal changes aimed at a better health and life protection of workers exposed to cytostatics in a workplace were proposed. Med Pr 2018;69(1):77-92. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  19. A new assessment method of outdoor tobacco smoke (OTS) exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyeri; Lee, Kiyoung

    2014-04-01

    Outdoor tobacco smoke (OTS) is concerned due to potential health effects. An assessment method of OTS exposure is needed to determine effects of OTS and validate outdoor smoking policies. The objective of this study was to develop a new method to assess OTS exposure. This study was conducted at 100 bus stops including 50 centerline bus stops and 50 roadside bus stops in Seoul, Korea. Using real-time aerosol monitor, PM2.5 was measured for 30 min at each bus stop in two seasons. ‘Peak analysis' method was developed to assess short term PM2.5 exposure by OTS. The 30-min average PM2.5 exposure at each bus stop was associated with season and bus stop location but not smoking activity. The PM2.5 peak occurrence rate by the peak analysis method was significantly associated with season, bus stop location, observed smoking occurrence, and the number of buses servicing a route. The PM2.5 peak concentration was significantly associated with season, smoking occurrence, and the number of buses servicing a route. When a smoker was standing still at the bus stop, magnitude of peak concentrations were significantly higher than when the smoker walking-through the bus stop. People were exposed to high short-term PM2.5 peak levels at bus stops, and the magnitude of peak concentrations were highest when a smoker was located close to the monitor. The magnitude of peak concentration was a good indicator helped distinguish nearby OTS exposure. Further research using ‘peak analysis' is needed to measure smoking-related exposure to PM2.5 in other outdoor locations.

  20. ASSESSMENT OF POPULATION AND TERRITORY REHABILITATION EFFICIENCY REGARDING RADIATION EXPOSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Volobuev

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The suggested assessment of rehabilitation measure efficiency is distinguished by the fact that integral risk interpretation is considered, which takes total radiation exposure and reduction of life standards caused by it into account. A rehabilitation measure structure in the context of radiation emergency is given. Classification of direct and mediated consequences of an emergency is given. Optimization of rehabilitation measures is carried out from the position of quality and security of life balancing. Corresponding expenses are compared to the cost of radiation exposure and its social equivalent damage. The role of an efficiency criterion is given to an integral damage minimum.

  1. Occupational exposure assessment: Practices in Malaysian nuclear agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarowi, S. Muhd, E-mail: suzie@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Ramli, S. A.; Kontol, K. Mohamad [Radiation Safety & Health Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Rahman, N. A. H. Abd. [Faculty of Science & Mathematics, Sultan Idris of Education Universit, 35900, Tanjong Malim, Perak Darul Ridzuan (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) is the leading agency in introducing and promoting the application of nuclear science technology in Malaysia. The agency provides major nuclear facilities purposely for research and commercialisation such as reactor, irradiation plants and radioisotope production laboratory. When dealing with ionizing radiation, there is an obligatory requirement to monitor and assess the radiation exposure to the workers. The personal dose of radiation workers were monitored monthly by assessing their Thermoluminescence Dosimeter (TLD) dose reading. This paper will discuss the current practice in managing, assessing, record keeping and reporting of the occupational exposure in Nuclear Malaysia including the Health Physic Group roles and challenges. The statistics on occupational radiation exposure of monitored workers working in different fields in Nuclear Malaysia from 2011 - 2013 will also be presented. The results show that the null hypothesis (H{sub 0}) was accepted which the means of every populations are all equal or not differ significantly. This hypothesis states that the dose exposure received by the radiation workers in Nuclear Malaysia is similar and there were no significant changes from 2011 to 2013. The radiation monitoring programme correlate with the requirement of our national law, the Atomic Energy Licensing Act 1984 (Act 304)

  2. Occupational exposure assessment: Practices in Malaysian nuclear agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarowi, S. Muhd; Ramli, S. A.; Kontol, K. Mohamad; Rahman, N. A. H. Abd.

    2016-01-01

    Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) is the leading agency in introducing and promoting the application of nuclear science technology in Malaysia. The agency provides major nuclear facilities purposely for research and commercialisation such as reactor, irradiation plants and radioisotope production laboratory. When dealing with ionizing radiation, there is an obligatory requirement to monitor and assess the radiation exposure to the workers. The personal dose of radiation workers were monitored monthly by assessing their Thermoluminescence Dosimeter (TLD) dose reading. This paper will discuss the current practice in managing, assessing, record keeping and reporting of the occupational exposure in Nuclear Malaysia including the Health Physic Group roles and challenges. The statistics on occupational radiation exposure of monitored workers working in different fields in Nuclear Malaysia from 2011 - 2013 will also be presented. The results show that the null hypothesis (H₀) was accepted which the means of every populations are all equal or not differ significantly. This hypothesis states that the dose exposure received by the radiation workers in Nuclear Malaysia is similar and there were no significant changes from 2011 to 2013. The radiation monitoring programme correlate with the requirement of our national law, the Atomic Energy Licensing Act 1984 (Act 304).

  3. Health effects assessment of chemical exposures: ARIES methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra, L; Montero, M.; Rabago, I.; Vidania, R.

    1995-07-01

    In this work, we present ARIES* update: a system designed in order to facilitate the human health effects assessment produced by accidental release of toxic chemicals. The first version of ARIES was developed in relation to 82/501/EEC Directive about mayor accidents in the chemical industry. So, the first aim was the support of the effects assessment derived for the chemicals included into this directive. From this establishment, it was considered acute exposures for high concentrations. In this report, we present the actual methodology for considering other type of exposures, such as environmental and occupational. Likewise other versions, the methodology comprises two approaches: quantitative and qualitative assessments. Quantitative assessment incorporates the mathematical algorithms useful to evaluate the effects produced by the most important routes of exposure: inhalation, ingestion, eye contact and skin absorption, in a short, medium and long term. It has been included models that realizes an accurate quantification of doses, effects,... and so on, such as simple approaches when the available information is not enough. Qualitative assessment, designed in order to complement or replace the previous one, is incorporated into an informatics system, developed in Clipper. It executes and displays outstanding and important toxicological information of about 100 chemicals. This information comes from ECDIN (Environmental Chemicals Data and Information Network) database through a collaboration with JRC-ISPRA working group. (Author) 24 refs.

  4. Biomechanics in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, J. F. V.

    1980-01-01

    Examines current usage of the term "biomechanics" and emphasizes the importance of differentiating between structure and material. Describes current prolects in biomechanics and lists four points about the educational significance of the field. (GS)

  5. Comparison of occupational exposure assessment tools and concepts for nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liguori, Biase; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Baun, Anders

    The development, production and application of engineered nanomaterials have been growing in different fields. This leads to a consequent increased potential of exposure to nanomaterials in the working environment. However to determine the potential exposure risk is a challenging task for risk...... assessors, due to limited availability of data on nanomaterial exposure level. To face this challenge a number of methods have been developed including the “Control Banding Nanotool”, the “Swiss precautionary matrix”; “Stoffenmanager Nano version 1.0; “ANSES - Development of a specific Control Banding Tool...... for Nanomaterials”; “NanoSafer vs. 1.1 – A web-based precautionary risk assessment tool for manufactured nanomaterials using first order modeling” Based on the literature information we have analyzed these tools and discussed elements regarding: the domain of application and whether it accounts for the nanospecific...

  6. Pollution exposure on marine protected areas: A global assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partelow, Stefan; von Wehrden, Henrik; Horn, Olga

    2015-11-15

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) face many challenges in their aim to effectively conserve marine ecosystems. In this study we analyze the extent of pollution exposure on the global fleet of MPAs. This includes indicators for current and future pollution and the implications for regionally clustered groups of MPAs with similar biophysical characteristics. To cluster MPAs into characteristic signature groups, their bathymetry, baseline biodiversity, distance from shore, mean sea surface temperature and mean sea surface salinity were used. We assess the extent at which each signature group is facing exposure from multiple pollution types. MPA groups experience similar pollution exposure on a regional level. We highlight how the challenges that MPAs face can be addressed through governance at the appropriate scale and design considerations for integrated terrestrial and marine management approaches within regional level networks. Furthermore, we present diagnostic social-ecological indicators for addressing the challenges facing unsuccessful MPAs with practical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Historical Exposures to Chemicals at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant: A Pilot Retrospective Exposure Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Janeen Denise [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1999-02-01

    In a mortality study of white males who had worked at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant between 1952 and 1979, an increased number of deaths from benign and unspecified intracranial neoplasms was found. A case-control study nested within this cohort investigated the hypothesis that an association existed between brain tumor death and exposure to either internally deposited plutonium or external ionizing radiation. There was no statistically significant association found between estimated radiation exposure from internally deposited plutonium and the development of brain tumors. Exposure by job or work area showed no significant difference between the cohort and the control groups. An update of the study found elevated risk estimates for (1) all lymphopoietic neoplasms, and (2) all causes of death in employees with body burdens greater than or equal to two nanocuries of plutonium. There was an excess of brain tumors for the entire cohort. Similar cohort studies conducted on worker populations from other plutonium handling facilities have not yet shown any elevated risks for brain tumors. Historically, the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant used large quantities of chemicals in their production operations. The use of solvents, particularly carbon tetrachloride, was unique to Rocky Flats. No investigation of the possible confounding effects of chemical exposures was done in the initial studies. The objectives of the present study are to (1) investigate the history of chemical use at the Rocky Flats facility; (2) locate and analyze chemical monitoring information in order to assess employee exposure to the chemicals that were used in the highest volume; and (3) determine the feasibility of establishing a chemical exposure assessment model that could be used in future epidemiology studies.

  8. Research Techniques in Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Terry

    Biomechanics involves the biological human beings interacting with his/her mechanical environment. Biomechanics research is being done in connection with sport, physical education, and general motor behavior, and concerns mechanics independent of implements. Biomechanics research falls in the following two general categories: (1) that specific…

  9. Progressive Commercial Cigarette Yield Reduction: Biochemical Exposure and Behavioral Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benowitz, Neal L.; Dains, Katherine M.; Hall, Sharon M.; Stewart, Susan; Wilson, Margaret; Dempsey, Delia; Jacob, Peyton

    2009-01-01

    Background Mandated reduction of exposure to nicotine and other cigarette toxins has been proposed as a possible national regulatory strategy. However, tapering using lower yield commercial cigarettes may not be effective in reducing nicotine or tar exposure due to compensatory smoking behavior. We examined the effects of gradual reduction of nicotine yield in commercial cigarettes on smoking behavior, with an assessment of nicotine intake and exposure to tobacco smoke toxins. Methods This 10-week longitudinal study of 20 smokers involved smoking the usual brand followed by different brands with progressively lower machine-determined yields, ranging from 0.9 to 0.1 mg nicotine, each smoked for 1 week. Subjects were followed for 4 weeks after returning to smoking the usual brand (or quitting). Smoking behaviors, biomarkers of tobacco smoke exposure, and cardiovascular effects were measured. Findings Cotinine and other biomarkers of smoke exposure remained unchanged comparing the usual brand with the 0.4 mg nicotine brands. A 30% to 40% decrease in nicotine, carbon monoxide, and carcinogen exposure comparing 0.1 mg nicotine cigarettes with baseline was observed. Self-efficacy was significantly increased and dependence decreased after tapering. Implications We confirm prior cross-sectional population and experimental studies showing complete compensation for cigarettes down to the 0.4 mg nicotine range. Nicotine and tobacco toxin exposure were substantially reduced while smoking 0.1 mg nicotine cigarettes. Our data suggest that the degree of nicotine dependence of smokers may be lowered with progressive yield tapering. Gradual tapering of smokers from regular to ultralow nicotine yield commercial cigarettes might facilitate smoking cessation and warrants future research. PMID:19258480

  10. Risk assessment of fluoride exposure in drinking water of Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guissouma, Wiem; Hakami, Othman; Al-Rajab, Abdul Jabbar; Tarhouni, Jamila

    2017-06-01

    The presence of fluoride in drinking water is known to reduce dental cavities among consumers, but an excessive intake of this anion might leads to dental and skeletal fluorosis. This study reports a complete survey of the fluoridated tap water taken from 100 water consumption points in Tunisia. The fluoride concentrations in tap water were between 0 and 2.4 mg L(-1). Risk assessment of Fluoride exposure was assessed depending on the age of consumers using a four-step method: hazard identification, toxicity reference values selection (TRVs), daily exposure assessment, and risk characterization. Our findings suggest that approximately 75% of the Tunisian population is at risk for dental decay, 25% have a potential dental fluorosis risk, and 20% might have a skeletal fluorosis risk according to the limits of fluoride in drinking water recommended by WHO. More investigations are recommended to assess the exposure risk of fluoride in other sources of drinking water such as bottled water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Exposure assessment of microwave ovens and impact on total exposure in WLANs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plets, David; Verloock, Leen; Van Den Bossche, Matthias; Tanghe, Emmeric; Joseph, Wout; Martens, Luc

    2016-02-01

    In situ exposure of electric fields of 11 microwave ovens is assessed in an occupational environment and in an office. Measurements as a function of distance without load and with a load of 275 ml of tap water were performed at distances of oven (without load), which is 2.5 and 1.1 times below the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection reference level for occupational exposure and general public exposure, respectively. For exposure at distances of >1 m, a model of the electric field in a realistic environment is proposed. In an office scenario, switching on a microwave oven increases the median field strength from 91 to 145 mV m(-1) (+91 %) in a traditional Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN) deployment and from 44 to 92 mV m(-1) (+109 %) in an exposure-optimised WLAN deployment. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Assessment of global flood exposures - developing an appropriate approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millinship, Ian; Booth, Naomi

    2015-04-01

    Increasingly complex probabilistic catastrophe models have become the standard for quantitative flood risk assessments by re/insurance companies. On the one hand, probabilistic modelling of this nature is extremely useful; a large range of risk metrics can be output. However, they can be time consuming and computationally expensive to develop and run. Levels of uncertainty are persistently high despite, or perhaps because of, attempts to increase resolution and complexity. A cycle of dependency between modelling companies and re/insurers has developed whereby available models are purchased, models run, and both portfolio and model data 'improved' every year. This can lead to potential exposures in perils and territories that are not currently modelled being largely overlooked by companies, who may then face substantial and unexpected losses when large events occur in these areas. We present here an approach to assessing global flood exposures which reduces the scale and complexity of approach used and begins with the identification of hotspots where there is a significant exposure to flood risk. The method comprises four stages: i) compile consistent exposure information, ii) to apply reinsurance terms and conditions to calculate values exposed, iii) to assess the potential hazard using a global set of flood hazard maps, and iv) to identify potential risk 'hotspots' which include considerations of spatially and/or temporally clustered historical events, and local flood defences. This global exposure assessment is designed as a scoping exercise, and reveals areas or cities where the potential for accumulated loss is of significant interest to a reinsurance company, and for which there is no existing catastrophe model. These regions are then candidates for the development of deterministic scenarios, or probabilistic models. The key advantages of this approach will be discussed. These include simplicity and ability of business leaders to understand results, as well as

  13. Use-Exposure Relationships of Pesticides for Aquatic Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuzhou; Spurlock, Frank; Deng, Xin; Gill, Sheryl; Goh, Kean

    2011-01-01

    Field-scale environmental models have been widely used in aquatic exposure assessments of pesticides. Those models usually require a large set of input parameters and separate simulations for each pesticide in evaluation. In this study, a simple use-exposure relationship is developed based on regression analysis of stochastic simulation results generated from the Pesticide Root-Zone Model (PRZM). The developed mathematical relationship estimates edge-of-field peak concentrations of pesticides from aerobic soil metabolism half-life (AERO), organic carbon-normalized soil sorption coefficient (KOC), and application rate (RATE). In a case study of California crop scenarios, the relationships explained 90–95% of the variances in the peak concentrations of dissolved pesticides as predicted by PRZM simulations for a 30-year period. KOC was identified as the governing parameter in determining the relative magnitudes of pesticide exposures in a given crop scenario. The results of model application also indicated that the effects of chemical fate processes such as partitioning and degradation on pesticide exposure were similar among crop scenarios, while the cross-scenario variations were mainly associated with the landscape characteristics, such as organic carbon contents and curve numbers. With a minimum set of input data, the use-exposure relationships proposed in this study could be used in screening procedures for potential water quality impacts from the off-site movement of pesticides. PMID:21483772

  14. Biomechanical assessment and 3D finite element analysis of the treatment of tibial fractures using minimally invasive percutaneous plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xin-Jia; Wang, Hua

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the biomechanical effects of varying the length of a limited contact-dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP) and the number and position of screws on middle tibial fractures, and to provide biomechanical evidence regarding minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO). For biomechanical testing, 60 tibias from cadavers (age at mortality, 20–40 years) were used to create middle and diagonal fracture models without defects. Tibias were randomly grouped and analyzed by biomechanic and three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis. The differences among LC-DCPs of different lengths (6-, 10- and 14-hole) with 6 screws, 14-hole LC-DCPs with different numbers of screws (6, 10 and 14), and 14-hole LC-DCPs with 6 screws at different positions with regard to mechanical characteristics, including compressing, torsion and bending, were examined. The 6-hole LC-DCP had greater vertical compression strain compared with the 10- and 14-hole LC-DCPs (P0.05). However, plates with 14 screws had greater vertical strain compared with those fixed with 6 or 10 screws (P<0.01). For 4-hole LC-DCPs with screws at different positions, vertical compression strain values were lowest for plates with screws at positions 1, 4, 7, 8, 11 and 14 (P<0.01). The lateral strain values and vertical strain values for plates with screws at positions 1, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 14 were significantly lower compared with those at the other positions (P<0.01), and torque values were also low. Thus, the 14-hole LC-DCP was the most stable against vertical compression, torsion and bending, and the 6-hole LC-DCP was the least stable. However, the use of 14 screws with a 14-hole LC-DCP provided less stability against bending than did 6 or 10 screws. Furthermore, fixation with distributed screws, in which some screws were close to the fracture line, provided good stability against compression and torsion, while fixation with screws at the ends of the LC-DCP provided poor

  15. Exposure factors for cleaning, automotive care, and surface protection products for exposure assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Young; Lim, Miyoung; Yang, Wonho; Lee, Kiyoung

    2017-01-01

    Accurately measuring the usage patterns of consumer products (CPs) is important to conduct realistic exposure assessments. We determined the exposure factors for 18 consumer products: household bleach, mold stain remover, all-purpose cleaner, washing machine cleaner, air conditioner cleaner, glass cleaner, drain cleaner, adhesive remover, liquid snow chain, tire shine spray, wheel cleaner, rain repellent, car wax spray, leather polish, furniture polish, anti-fog product, fabric waterproofing spray, and rust inhibitor. Field survey staff visited homes and collected product use information via face-to-face interviews. In total, 10,000 participants (5010 men and 4990 women) aged 15 years and older completed the questionnaire. Household bleach had the highest use rate of 47.4% and use rates for the other products ranged from 0.8 to 21.7%. The use rates of many CPs differed by age group and gender. Many household cleaning products were used regularly, but some products, such as air conditioner cleaner and liquid snow chain, were used in specific seasons or for specific purposes; therefore, they were used less frequently compared to cleaning products. These exposure factor data will be useful as input data for exposure and risk assessments and setting safety guidelines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Microbial risk assessment framework for exposure to amended sludge projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Joseph N S; Moore, Kelly; Soller, Jeffery A; Eisenberg, Don; Colford, John M

    2008-06-01

    Although the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has a long history of using risk-based approaches for regulatory purposes, pollutant limits for pathogens in biosolids are not currently based on quantitative risk assessments. We developed and demonstrated a risk-based methodology for assessing the risk to human health from exposure to pathogens via biosolids. Four models were developed, incorporating direct ingestion, groundwater, and aerosol exposure pathways. Three sources of environmental data were used to estimate risk: pathogen monitoring of sludge, efficacy of sludge treatment, and pathogen monitoring of biosolids. Risk estimates were obtainable even for Class A biosolids, where posttreatment monitoring data are below detectable levels, demonstrating that risk assessments for biosolids exposure are practical. Model analyses suggest that: a) a two-digester design decreases the probability of risks >10(-4) compared with one-digester designs, b) risks associated with exposures to groundwater and aerosol pathways were, in general, lower than exposures to the direct ingestion pathway, and c) secondary transmission can be an important factor in risk estimation. The risk-based approach presented here provides a tool to a) help biosolids producers interpret the results of biosolids monitoring data in terms of its health implications, b) help treatment plant engineers evaluate the risk-based benefits of operational changes to existing or projected treatment processes, and c) help environmental managers evaluate potential capital improvements and/or land application site placement issues. Regulation of pathogens can now be based on human health risk in a manner parallel to other water-related risks.

  17. Investigating an approach to identifying the biomechanical differences between intercostal cartilage in subjects with pectus excavatum and normals in vivo: preliminary assessment of normal subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechowicz, Krzysztof; McKenzie, Frederic; Yan, Zhenzhen; Bawab, Sebastian; Ringleb, Stacie

    2009-02-01

    The cause of pectus excavatum (PE) is unknown and little research has been done to assess the material properties of the PE costal cartilage. One source reported, after studying ex vivo various properties of the costal cartilage in cases of PE that the biomechanical stability of PE cartilage is decreased when compared to that of normals. Building on this idea, it would be beneficial to measure the biomechanical properties of the costal cartilages in vivo to further determine the differences between PE subjects and normals. An approach to doing this would be to use a modified FARO arm, which can read applied loads and resulting deflections. These values can be used to establish a finite element model of the chest area of a person with PE. So far, a validated technique for the registration between a CT based 3D model of the ribcage and a skin surface scan in case of PE has been addressed. On the basis of the data gathered from 10 subjects with normal chests using a robot arm, stylus and 3D laser scanner, we tried to evaluate the influence of inter-measurement respiration of a subject on results accuracy and the possibility of using the stylus for deflection measurement. In addition, we established the best strategy for taking measurements.

  18. Assessment of xenoestrogenic exposure by a biomarker approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Høj; Nielsen, Flemming; Andersen, Helle Raun

    2003-01-01

    : To determine the applicability of this approach, we assessed the estrogenicity of serum samples from 30 pregnant and 60 non-pregnant Danish women thought to be exposed only to low levels of endocrine disruptors. We also studied 211 serum samples from pregnant Faroese women, whose marine diet included whale...... with the lipid-based concentrations of individual suspected endocrine disruptors in the Faroese samples. When added along with the estradiol standard, an indication of an enhanced estrogenic response was found in most cases. Thus, the in vitro estrogenicity response offers a promising and feasible approach......BACKGROUND: Epidemiological documentation of endocrine disruption is complicated by imprecise exposure assessment, especially when exposures are mixed. Even if the estrogenic activity of all compounds were known, the combined effect of possible additive and/or inhibiting interaction...

  19. An Assessment of Air Pollution Exposure Information for Health Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick W. Lipfert

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Most studies of air pollution health effects are based on outdoor ambient exposures, mainly because of the availability of population-based data and the need to support emission control programs. However, there is also a large body of literature on indoor air quality that is more relevant to personal exposures. This assessment attempts to merge these two aspects of pollution-related health effects, emphasizing fine particles. However, the basic concepts are applicable to any pollutant. The objectives are to examine sensitivities of epidemiological studies to the inclusion of personal exposure information and to assess the resulting data requirements. Indoor air pollution results from penetration of polluted outdoor air and from various indoor sources, among which environmental tobacco smoke (ETS is probably the most toxic and pervasive. Adequate data exist on infiltration of outdoor air but less so for indoor sources and effects, all of which have been based on surveys of small samples of individual buildings. Since epidemiology is based on populations, these data must be aggregated using probabilistic methods. Estimates of spatial variation and precision of ambient air quality are also needed. Hypothetical personal exposures in this paper are based on ranges in outdoor air quality, variable infiltration rates, and ranges of indoor source strength. These uncertainties are examined with respect to two types of mortality studies: time series analysis of daily deaths in a given location, and cross-sectional analysis of annual mortality rates among locations. Regressions of simulated mortality on personal exposures, as affected by all of these uncertainties, are used to examine effects on dose-response functions using quasi-Monte Carlo methods. The working hypothesis is that indoor sources are reasonably steady over time and thus applicable only to long-term cross-sectional studies. Uncertainties in exposure attenuate the simulated mortality

  20. New approach for assessing human perfluoroalkyl exposure via hair

    OpenAIRE

    Alves,Andreia; Jacobs, Griet; VANERMEN Guido; Covaci, Adrian; Voorspoels, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: In the recent years hair has been increasingly used as alternative matrix in human biomonitoring (HBM) of environmental pollutants. Sampling advantages and time integration of exposure assessment seems the most attractive features of hair matrix. In the current study, a novel miniaturized method was developed and validated for measuring 15 perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), including perfluoro n-butanoic acid (PFBA), perfluoro n-pentanoic acid (PFPeA), perfluoro n-hexanoic acid (PFHx...

  1. Biomechanical patterns of text-message distraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Peter; Hwang, Jaejin; Grawe, Sarah; Li, Jing; Snyder, Alison; Lee, Christina; Marras, William S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify biomechanical measures that can distinguish texting distraction in a laboratory-simulated driving environment. The goal would be to use this information to provide an intervention for risky driving behaviour. Sixteen subjects participated in this study. Three independent variables were tested: task (texting, visual targeting, weighted and non-weighted movements), task direction (front and side) and task distance (close and far). Dependent variables consisted of biomechanical moments, head displacement and the length of time to complete each task. Results revealed that the time to complete each task was higher for texting compared to other tasks. Peak moments during texting were only distinguishable from visual targeting. Peak head displacement and cumulative biomechanical exposure measures indicated that texting can be distinguished from other tasks. Therefore, it may be useful to take into account both temporal and biomechanical measures when considering warning systems to detect texting distraction.

  2. Modeling Exposure to Persistent Chemicals in Hazard and Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan-Ellsberry, Christina E.; McLachlan, Michael S.; Arnot, Jon A.; MacLeod, Matthew; McKone, Thomas E.; Wania, Frank

    2008-11-01

    Fate and exposure modeling has not thus far been explicitly used in the risk profile documents prepared to evaluate significant adverse effect of candidate chemicals for either the Stockholm Convention or the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution. However, we believe models have considerable potential to improve the risk profiles. Fate and exposure models are already used routinely in other similar regulatory applications to inform decisions, and they have been instrumental in building our current understanding of the fate of POP and PBT chemicals in the environment. The goal of this paper is to motivate the use of fate and exposure models in preparing risk profiles in the POP assessment procedure by providing strategies for incorporating and using models. The ways that fate and exposure models can be used to improve and inform the development of risk profiles include: (1) Benchmarking the ratio of exposure and emissions of candidate chemicals to the same ratio for known POPs, thereby opening the possibility of combining this ratio with the relative emissions and relative toxicity to arrive at a measure of relative risk. (2) Directly estimating the exposure of the environment, biota and humans to provide information to complement measurements, or where measurements are not available or are limited. (3) To identify the key processes and chemical and/or environmental parameters that determine the exposure; thereby allowing the effective prioritization of research or measurements to improve the risk profile. (4) Predicting future time trends including how quickly exposure levels in remote areas would respond to reductions in emissions. Currently there is no standardized consensus model for use in the risk profile context. Therefore, to choose the appropriate model the risk profile developer must evaluate how appropriate an existing model is for a specific setting and whether the assumptions and input data are relevant in the context of the application

  3. Exposure assessment and risk of gastrointestinal illness among surfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, David L; Harding, Anna K; Hope, Bruce K; Slaughter-Mason, Samantha

    2008-01-01

    Surfing is a unique recreational activity with the possibility of elevated risk for contracting gastrointestinal (GI) illness through ingestion of contaminated water. No prior studies have assessed exposure from ingestion among surfing populations. This study estimated the magnitude and frequency of incidental water ingestion using a Web-based survey and integrated exposure distributions with enterococci distributions to predict the probability of GI illness at six Oregon beaches. The mean exposure magnitude and frequency were 170 ml of water ingested per day and 77 days spent surfing per year, respectively. The mean number of enterococci ingested ranged from approximately 11 to 86 colony-forming units (CFU) per day. Exposure-response analyses were conducted using an ingested dose model and two epidemiological models. Risk was characterized using joint probability curves (JPC). At the most contaminated beach, the annualized ingested dose model estimated a mean 9% probability of a 50% probability of GI illness, similar to the results of the first epidemiological model (mean 6% probability of a 50% probability of GI illness). The second epidemiological model predicted a 23% probability of exceeding an exposure equivalent to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum acceptable GI illness rate (19 cases/1000 swimmers). While the annual risk of GI illness for Oregon surfers is not high, data showed that surfers ingest more water compared to swimmers and divers and need to be considered in regulatory and public health efforts, especially in more contaminated waters. Our approach to characterize risk among surfers is novel and informative to officials responsible for advisory programs. It also highlights the need for further research on microbial dose-response relationships to meet the needs of quantitative microbial risk assessments (QMRA).

  4. Exposure assessment issues in epidemiology studies of phthalates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Lauren E; Cooper, Glinda S; Galizia, Audrey; Meeker, John D

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review exposure assessment issues that need to be addressed in designing and interpreting epidemiology studies of phthalates, a class of chemicals commonly used in consumer and personal care products. Specific issues include population trends in exposure, temporal reliability of a urinary metabolite measurement, and how well a single urine sample may represent longer-term exposure. The focus of this review is on seven specific phthalates: diethyl phthalate (DEP); di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP); diisobutyl phthalate (DiBP); butyl benzyl phthalate (BBzP); di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP); diisononyl phthalate (DiNP); and diisodecyl phthalate (DiDP). Comprehensive literature search using multiple search strategies. Since 2001, declines in population exposure to DEP, BBzP, DBP, and DEHP have been reported in the United States and Germany, but DEHP exposure has increased in China. Although the half-lives of various phthalate metabolites are relatively short (3 to 18h), the intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for phthalate metabolites, based on spot and first morning urine samples collected over a week to several months, range from weak to moderate, with a tendency toward higher ICCs (greater temporal stability) for metabolites of the shorter-chained (DEP, DBP, DiBP and BBzP, ICCs generally 0.3 to 0.6) compared with those of the longer-chained (DEHP, DiNP, DiDP, ICCs generally 0.1 to 0.3) phthalates. Additional research on optimal approaches to addressing the issue of urine dilution in studies of associations between biomarkers and different type of health effects is needed. In conclusion, the measurement of urinary metabolite concentrations in urine could serve as a valuable approach to estimating exposure to phthalates in environmental epidemiology studies. Careful consideration of the strengths and limitations of this approach when interpreting study results is required. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pesticide Exposure, Safety Issues, and Risk Assessment Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damalas, Christos A.; Eleftherohorinos, Ilias G.

    2011-01-01

    Pesticides are widely used in agricultural production to prevent or control pests, diseases, weeds, and other plant pathogens in an effort to reduce or eliminate yield losses and maintain high product quality. Although pesticides are developed through very strict regulation processes to function with reasonable certainty and minimal impact on human health and the environment, serious concerns have been raised about health risks resulting from occupational exposure and from residues in food and drinking water. Occupational exposure to pesticides often occurs in the case of agricultural workers in open fields and greenhouses, workers in the pesticide industry, and exterminators of house pests. Exposure of the general population to pesticides occurs primarily through eating food and drinking water contaminated with pesticide residues, whereas substantial exposure can also occur in or around the home. Regarding the adverse effects on the environment (water, soil and air contamination from leaching, runoff, and spray drift, as well as the detrimental effects on wildlife, fish, plants, and other non-target organisms), many of these effects depend on the toxicity of the pesticide, the measures taken during its application, the dosage applied, the adsorption on soil colloids, the weather conditions prevailing after application, and how long the pesticide persists in the environment. Therefore, the risk assessment of the impact of pesticides either on human health or on the environment is not an easy and particularly accurate process because of differences in the periods and levels of exposure, the types of pesticides used (regarding toxicity and persistence), and the environmental characteristics of the areas where pesticides are usually applied. Also, the number of the criteria used and the method of their implementation to assess the adverse effects of pesticides on human health could affect risk assessment and would possibly affect the characterization of the already

  6. Pesticide Exposure, Safety Issues, and Risk Assessment Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos A. Damalas

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides are widely used in agricultural production to prevent or control pests, diseases, weeds, and other plant pathogens in an effort to reduce or eliminate yield losses and maintain high product quality. Although pesticides are developed through very strict regulation processes to function with reasonable certainty and minimal impact on human health and the environment, serious concerns have been raised about health risks resulting from occupational exposure and from residues in food and drinking water. Occupational exposure to pesticides often occurs in the case of agricultural workers in open fields and greenhouses, workers in the pesticide industry, and exterminators of house pests. Exposure of the general population to pesticides occurs primarily through eating food and drinking water contaminated with pesticide residues, whereas substantial exposure can also occur in or around the home. Regarding the adverse effects on the environment (water, soil and air contamination from leaching, runoff, and spray drift, as well as the detrimental effects on wildlife, fish, plants, and other non-target organisms, many of these effects depend on the toxicity of the pesticide, the measures taken during its application, the dosage applied, the adsorption on soil colloids, the weather conditions prevailing after application, and how long the pesticide persists in the environment. Therefore, the risk assessment of the impact of pesticides either on human health or on the environment is not an easy and particularly accurate process because of differences in the periods and levels of exposure, the types of pesticides used (regarding toxicity and persistence, and the environmental characteristics of the areas where pesticides are usually applied. Also, the number of the criteria used and the method of their implementation to assess the adverse effects of pesticides on human health could affect risk assessment and would possibly affect the characterization

  7. Assessment of predictive dermal exposure to chemicals in the work environment

    OpenAIRE

    Agnieszka Jankowska; Sławomir Czerczak; Małgorzata Kupczewska-Dobecka

    2017-01-01

    Assessment of dermal exposure to chemicals in the work environment is problematic, mainly as a result of the lack of measurement data on occupational exposure to chemicals. Due to common prevalence of occupational skin exposure and its health consequences it is necessary to look for efficient solutions allowing for reliable exposure assessment. The aim of the study is to present predictive models used to assess non-measured dermal exposure, as well as to acquaint Polish users with the princip...

  8. Framework for Multi-Pathway Cumulative Exposure for Comparative Assessments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKone, Tom; Fantke, Peter

    2016-01-01

    to global) environment with information about larger scale populations rather than specific individuals or vulnerable subgroups. Although there can be large uncertainties in this approach, it provides insight on how chemical properties and use patterns map onto population-scale metrics of exposure......-cycle impacts and chemical alternatives. We present a regional case study for pesticide alternatives in an agricultural valley of California to assess the opportunities and future prospects for the multi-pathway cumulative framework in LCA and CAA. This case reveals that the relative contributions to cumulative...... pollutant intake via different exposure pathways depend on (a) persistence of chemicals at different levels of integration (regional, urban-scale, food-web, indoors), (b) basic chemical properties, (c) the retention of chemicals in food webs, and (d) the retention of chemicals by indoor surfaces....

  9. Risk assessment of mercury exposure from dental amalgams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, J.W.

    Much attention is being focused upon the issue of mercury exposure from dental amalgam restorations and the potential for adverse health effects. This controversy has grown beyond the confines of the dental profession itself and is becoming an emotional public health issue. In hope of regaining good health, many dental patients with chronic systemic diseases are considering replacement of their amalgams. Dentists are increasingly being challenged to prove the safety of amalgams. Recently, systematic methods have been established for quantitative evaluation of environmental risks. This study brings together the quantitative methodologies of risk assessment and the knowledge of mercury exposure from dental amalgams to estimate the safety of dental amalgam restorative therapy. Analysis concludes that the margin of safety for mercury toxicity in humans from dental amalgams is approximately 8- to 30-fold. There are many uncertainties involved in this estimate, and further studies are warranted to improve its precision. 48 references.

  10. Quantitative assessment of early biomechanical modifications in diabetic foot patients: the role of foot kinematics and step width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamola, Giuseppe; Venturi, Martina; Martelli, Dario; Iacopi, Elisabetta; Fanciullacci, Chiara; Coppelli, Alberto; Rossi, Bruno; Piaggesi, Alberto; Chisari, Carmelo

    2015-11-09

    Forefoot ulcers (FU) are one of the most disabling and relevant chronic complications of diabetes mellitus (DM). In recent years there is emerging awareness that a better understanding of the biomechanical factors underlying the diabetic ulcer could lead to improve the management of the disease, with significant socio-economic impacts. Our purpose was to try to detect early biomechanical factors associated with disease progression. Thirty subjects (M/F: 22/8; mean age ± SD: 61,84 ± 10 years) with diagnosis of type II DM were included. The participants were divided into 3 groups (10 subjects per group) according to the stage of evolution of the disease: Group 1, subjects with newly diagnosed type II DM, without clinical or instrumental diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) nor FU (group called "DM"); Group 2, with DPN but without FU (group called "DPN"); Group 3, with DPN and FU (group called "DNU"). All subjects underwent 3-D Gait Analysis during walking at self-selected speed, measuring spatio-temporal, kinematic and kinetic parameters and focusing on ankle and foot joints. The comparative analysis of values between groups was performed using 1-way ANOVA. We also investigated group to group differences with Tukey HSD test. The results taken into consideration were those with a significance of P step width (P = 0.0265) with the advance of the disease was evident, with a statistically significant difference comparing subjects with recently diagnosed diabetes mellitus and subjects with diabetic neuropathy and foot ulcer (P = 0.0048 for ROM and P = 0.0248 for step width at Tukey's test). The results provide evidence that foot segmental kinematics, along with step width, can be proposed as simple and clear indicators of disease progression. This can be the starting point for planning more targeted strategies to prevent the occurrence and the recurrence of a FU in diabetic subjects.

  11. Risk assessment of exposure to radon decay products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monchaux, G

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this project was to assess the risk due to inhalation of radon and its decay products using an horizontal approach across a large scale research programme. The central objective was the assessment of human risk which requires combination of several topics involving a multidisciplinary approach. In the Aerosol Studies Group, progress was achieved in improvement, calibration and automation of experimental techniques for continuous and integrated measurements of the unattached fraction f{sub p}- and equilibrium factor F- values. Measurements were performed to determine the variation of size distributions of unattached and aerosol-associated radon decay products under typical living conditions. All aerosol groups performed controlled chamber studies to understand the basic behaviour of airborne activity concentrations. Measurements were performed to determine neutralisation rates of {sup 218}Po, to understand the cluster growth with residence time and to understand the hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles. In the Modelling Group, the programme RADEP has been developed to calculate the weighted committed equivalent lung dose per unit exposure of radon progeny (H{sub w}/P{sub p}) which implements the ICRP Publication 66 Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM). The stochastic deposition model (IDEAL) has been compared with the deposition model used by the HRTM, and the agreement between the two deposition models was excellent. A deterministic radon progeny dosimetry model (RADOS) has been developed. This model includes all bronchial airway generations compared with the HRTM that groups the 16 airway generations into three regions. Initial calculations with RADOS show that the basal and secretory cell doses are slightly smaller compared with that of the HRTM. A sensitivity analysis has been performed that has identified those HRTM model parameters that most affect the Hw/Pp. A stochastic rat deposition model (RALMO) and a clearance model for the rat based on the

  12. Effect of dexamethasone on mandibular bone biomechanics in rats during the growth phase as assessed by bending test and peripheral quantitative computerized tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzini, Clarisa; Champin, Graciela; Alippi, Rosa M; Bozzini, Carlos E

    2015-04-01

    Long-term glucocorticoid administration to growing rats induces osteopenia and alterations in the biomechanical behavior of the bone. This study was performed to estimate the effects of dexamethasone (DTX), a synthetic steroid with predominant glucocorticoid activity, on the biomechanical properties of the mandible of rats during the growth phase, as assessed by bending test and peripheral quantitative computed tomographic (pQCT) analysis. The data obtained by the two methods will provide more precise information when analyzed together than separately. Female rats aged 23 d (n=7) received 500μg.kg-1 per day of DXT for 4 weeks. At the end of the treatment period, their body weight and body length were 51.3% and 20.6% lower, respectively, than controls. Hemimandible weight and area (an index of mandibular size) were 27.3% and 9.7% lower, respectively. The right hemimandible of each animal was subjected to a mechanical 3-point bending test. Significant weakening of the bone, as shown by a correlative impairment of strength and stiffness, was observed in experimental rats. Bone density and cross-sectional area were measured by pQCT. Cross-sectional, cortical and trabecular areas were reduced by 20% to 30% in the DTX group, as were other cortical parameters, including the bone density, mineral content and cross-sectional moment of inertia. The "bone strength index" (BSI, the product of the pQCT-assessed xCSMI and vCtBMD) was 56% lower in treated rats, which compares well with the 54% and 52% reduction observed in mandibular strength and stiffness determined through the bending test. Data suggest that the corticosteroid exerts a combined, negative action on bone geometry (mass and architecture) and volumetric bone mineral density of cortical bone, which would express independent effects on both cellular (material quality) and tissue (cross-sectional design) levels of biological organization of the skeleton in the species.

  13. Assessment of exposure to mixture pollutants in Mexican indigenous children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Ramírez, R; Pérez-Vázquez, F J; Cilia-López, V G; Zuki-Orozco, B A; Carrizales, L; Batres-Esquivel, L E; Palacios-Ramírez, A; Díaz-Barriga, F

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present work was to complete an exposure assessment in three Mexican indigenous communities using the community-based health risk assessment, which is the first step in the CHILD framework. We used 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) as an exposure biomarker to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and trans, trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) as an exposure biomarker to benzene, persistent organic pollutants (POPs), lead, manganese, arsenic, and fluoride. Anthropometric measurements were also taken. In these communities, high percentages of children with chronic malnutrition were found (28 to 49 %) based on their weight and age. All communities showed a high percentage of children with detectable levels of four or more compounds (70 to 82 %). Additionally, our results showed that in indigenous communities, children are exposed to elevated levels of certain environmental pollutants, including manganese with 17.6, 16.8, and 7.3 μg/L from SMP, TOC, and CUA, respectively. Lead and HCB levels were similar in the indigenous communities (2.5, 3.1, and 4.2 μg/dL and 2.5, 3.1, and 3.7 ng/mL, respectively). 1-OHP and t,t-MA levels were higher in TOC (0.8 μmol/mol of creatinine, 476 μg/g of creatinine, respectively) when compared with SMP (0.1 μmol/mol of creatinine, 215.5 μg/g of creatinine, respectively) and CUA (0.1 μmol/mol of creatinine, 185.2 μg/g of creatinine, respectively). DDE levels were 30.7, 26.9, and 9.6 ng/mL in CUA, SMP, and TOC, respectively. The strength of this study is that it assesses exposure to pollutants with indications for the resultant risk before an intervention is made by the CHILD program to manage this risk in the indigenous communities. Considering the large number of people, especially children, exposed to multiple pollutants, it is important to design effective intervention programs that reduce exposure and the resultant risk in the numerous indigenous communities in Mexico.

  14. Biomechanics of corneal ectasia and biomechanical treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Cynthia J.; Dupps, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Many algorithms exist for the topographic/tomographic detection of corneas at risk for post-refractive surgery ectasia. It is proposed that the reason for the difficulty to find a universal screening tool based on corneal morphologic features is that curvature, elevation, and pachymetric changes are all secondary signs of keratoconus and post-refractive surgery ectasia and that the primary abnormality is in the biomechanical properties. It is further proposed that the biomechanical modificati...

  15. Biomechanics in Paralympics: Implications for Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morriën, Floor; Taylor, Matthew J D; Hettinga, Florentina J

    2017-05-01

    To provide an overview of biomechanical studies in Paralympic research and their relevance for performance in Paralympic sports. The search terms paralympic biomechanics, paralympic sport performance, paralympic athlete performance, and paralympic athlete were entered into the electronic database PubMed. Thirty-four studies were found. Biomechanical studies in Paralympics mainly contributed to performance enhancement by technical optimization (n = 32) and/or injury prevention (n = 6). In addition, biomechanics was found to be important in understanding activity limitation caused by various impairments, which is relevant for evidence-based classification in Paralympic sports (n = 6). Distinctions were made between biomechanical studies in sitting (41%), standing (38%), and swimming athletes (21%). In sitting athletes, mostly kinematics and kinetics in wheelchair propulsion were studied, mainly in athletes with spinal-cord injuries. In addition, kinetics and/or kinematics in wheelchair basketball, seated discus throwing, stationary shot-putting, hand-cycling, sit-skiing, and ice sledge hockey received attention. In standing sports, primarily kinematics of athletes with amputations performing jump sports and running and the optimization of prosthetic devices were investigated. No studies were reported on other standing sports. In swimming, mainly kick rate and resistance training were studied. Biomechanical research is important for performance by gaining insight into technical optimization, injury prevention, and evidence-based classification in Paralympic sports. In future studies it is advised to also include physiological and biomechanical measures, allowing the assessment of the capability of the human body, as well as the resulting movement.

  16. Probabilistic mercury multimedia exposure assessment in small children and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisset, Typhaine; Ramirez-Martinez, Alejandra; Wesolek, Nathalie; Roudot, Alain-Claude

    2013-09-01

    Emissions of mercury in the environment have been decreasing for several years. However, mercury species are still found in different media (food, water, air and breast-milk). Due to mercury toxicity and typical behaviour in children, we have conducted a mercury exposure assessment in French babies, and small children aged 0 to 36months. Consumption and mercury concentration data were chosen for the exposure assessment. The Monte Carlo technique has been used to calculate the weekly exposure dose in order to integrate inter-individual variability and parameter uncertainty. Exposure values have been compared to toxicological reference values for health risk assessment. Inorganic mercury median exposure levels ranged from 0.160 to 1.649μg/kg of body weight per week (95th percentile (P95): 0.298-2.027µg/kg bw/week); elemental mercury median exposure level in children was 0.11ng/kg bw/week (P95: 28ng/kg bw/week); and methylmercury median exposure level ranged from 0.247 to 0.273µg/kg bw/week (P95: 0.425-0.463µg/kg bw/week). Only elemental mercury by inhalation route (indoor air) and methylmercury by ingestion (fish and breast-milk) seem to lead to a health risk in small children. These results confirm the importance of assessing total mercury concentration in media like breast-milk, indoor air and dust and methylmercury level in food, other than fish and seafood. In this way, informed monitoring plan and risk assessment in an at-risk sub-population can be set. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Major national human biomonitoring programs in chemical exposure assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Choi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Human biomonitoring (HBM programs have been established in several countries around the world in order to monitor the levels of chemical exposures in the general population and qualify health risk assessment of national and international interest. Study design, population, sample collection, and chemical analysis must be considered when comparing and interpreting the results. In this review, the objectives and brief descriptions of the major national HBM programs in North America, Europe, and Asia are provided. Similarities and differences observed from a comparative analysis among these programs, including the stratification of data according to age, sex, socioeconomic background, etc. as well as the identification of chemical exposure associated with food intake, are discussed. Overall, although there are some discrepancies in the study designs among the reviewed national HBM programs, results from the programs can provide useful information such as chemical levels found within the general population of a country that can be compared. Furthermore, the results can be used by regulatory authorities or the government to enforce legislations in order to reduce the exposure of chemicals into the human body.

  18. Exposure assessment of workers in printed electronics workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Sohn, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Jin Soo; Ahn, Kangho; Kim, Keun Soo; Lee, Jong Hwan; Lee, Taik Min; Yu, Il Je

    2013-07-01

    Printed electronics uses converging technologies, such as printing, fine mechanics, nanotechnology, electronics and other new technologies. Consequently, printed electronics raises additional health and safety concerns to those experienced in the traditional printing industry. This study investigated two printed electronics workplaces based on a walk-through survey and personal and area sampling. All the printed electronics operations were conducted in a cleanroom. No indication of exposure to excess silver nanoparticles or carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was found. While the organic solvents were lower than current occupational exposure limits, there was a lack of engineering controls, such as local exhaust ventilation, correct enclosure and duct connections. There was also an insufficient quantity of personal protective equipment, and some organic solvents not described in the safety data sheets (SDSs) were detected in the air samples. Plus, the cleaning work, a major emissions operation, was not conducted within a hood, and the cleaning waste was not properly disposed of. Therefore, the present exposure assessment results from two printed electronics workplaces suggest that the printed electronics industry needs to take note of the occupational safety and health risks and hazards already established by the traditional printing industry, along with new risks and hazards originating from converging technologies such as nanotechnology.

  19. Mercury contamination and exposure assessment of fishery products in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hye-Ran; Kim, Na-Young; Hwang, Lae-Hong; Park, Ju-Sung; Kim, Jung-Hun

    2015-01-01

    In this study, total (T-Hg) and methyl mercury (Me-Hg) contamination was investigated in fishery products including canned fish, fish sauces, dried bonito and frozen tuna sashimi, collected from retail markets in Korea, to assess dietary exposure. Direct mercury analyser and gas chromatography-electron captured detector were employed to measure T-Hg and Me-Hg, respectively. The highest T-Hg and Me-Hg contamination was present in tuna sashimi, followed by dried bonito, respectively. Canned tuna showed more frequent detection and higher content than other canned fishery products. The weekly exposure estimate indicates that exposure to mercury from fishery products is safe, showing 2.59% provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) for T-Hg, 1.82% PTWI for Me-Hg and 4.16% reference dose for Me-Hg. However, it should be addressed to monitor the mercury contamination in fish and fishery products regularly, to safeguard vulnerable population such as children, to limit intake of these food products.

  20. Assessment of noise exposures in a pediatric dentistry residency clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadid, Khaled; Klein, Ulrich; Meinke, Deanna

    2011-01-01

    In addition to sounds from dental equipment, pediatric dentists are exposed to noise produced by precooperative and/or noncooperative children. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the daily personal noise exposure of a pediatric dentistry resident while treating children in a teaching clinic to determine both comprehensive noise doses and peak noise occurrences as well as to assess the risk for noise-induced hearing loss. A noise dosimeter (Noise-Pro DLX) was used to measure the total personal noise exposure dose using the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Hearing Conservation Amendment criteria and the US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) occupational noise exposure revised criteria. Comprehensive noise doses for 31 days were obtained for a single resident. OSHA and NIOSH-allowable limits were not exceeded during any one day in the study period. Noise levels during crying episodes, however, were higher than the reported noise levels of dental instruments and reached maximum levels of 112.9 dBA. Noise levels to which the pediatric dental resident was exposed fell below the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health's damage-risk thresholds for noise-induced hearing loss.

  1. Assessing protection against radiation exposure after prostate (125)I brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Takashi; Yorozu, Atsunori; Kikumura, Riki; Ohashi, Toshio; Shigematsu, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    To expand the radiation dose rate measurement data set by measuring radiation under various prostate (125)I brachytherapy situations. Measurements were obtained from 63 consecutive unselected patients at Tokyo Medical Center, Japan. Differences in factors during measurements, such as body postures, distances from the skin surface, and measurement directions were considered. Furthermore, shielding effects of lead-lined underwear, consisting mainly of 0.1-mm thickness of lead, were also assessed. Radiation exposure varies according to the patient's body posture, with results differing as much as approximately 40.0% in measured radiation dose rates at 30cm from the anterior skin surface. Weight, body mass index, and tissue thickness showed good correlations with measured radiation dose rates. The magnitude of radiation exposure attenuation by shielding was approximately 95.8%, similar to the attenuation ratio based on tissue measurements made in the lateral direction. The respective mean times required to reach 1mSv were 1.2, 7.6, and 65.4 days in the standing position and 0.6, 4.6, and 40.4 days in the supine position at the site of contact, and at 30 and 100cm from the anterior skin surface. This study obtained supplemental information pertaining to radiological protection and confirmed that shielding can be an effective tool for reducing exposures. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Biomechanics principles and practices

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, Donald R

    2014-01-01

    Presents Current Principles and ApplicationsBiomedical engineering is considered to be the most expansive of all the engineering sciences. Its function involves the direct combination of core engineering sciences as well as knowledge of nonengineering disciplines such as biology and medicine. Drawing on material from the biomechanics section of The Biomedical Engineering Handbook, Fourth Edition and utilizing the expert knowledge of respected published scientists in the application and research of biomechanics, Biomechanics: Principles and Practices discusses the latest principles and applicat

  3. Patellofemoral anatomy and biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Seth L; Plackis, Andreas C; Nuelle, Clayton W

    2014-07-01

    Patellofemoral disorders are common. There is a broad spectrum of disease, ranging from patellofemoral pain and instability to focal cartilage disease and arthritis. Regardless of the specific condition, abnormal anatomy and biomechanics are often the root cause of patellofemoral dysfunction. A thorough understanding of normal patellofemoral anatomy and biomechanics is critical for the treating physician. Recognizing and addressing abnormal anatomy will optimize patellofemoral biomechanics and may ultimately translate into clinical success. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Corneal biomechanics: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Piñero Llorens, David Pablo; Alcón, Natividad

    2014-01-01

    Biomechanics is often defined as ‘mechanics applied to biology’. Due to the variety and complexity of the behaviour of biological structures and materials, biomechanics is better defined as the development, extension and application of mechanics for a better understanding of physiology and physiopathology and consequently for a better diagnosis and treatment of disease and injury. Different methods for the characterisation of corneal biomechanics are reviewed in detail, including those that a...

  5. Assessing the Health and Performance Risks of Carbon Dioxide Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.; Meyers, V. E.; Alexander, D.

    2010-01-01

    provide no more than partial answers to the questions of environmental interactions, interindividual variability, and optimal control levels. Future prospective studies should involve assessment of astronaut well being using sophisticated measures during exposures to levels of CO2 in the range from 2 to 8 mmHg.

  6. Assessing Mammal Exposure to Climate Change in the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Bruno R; Sales, Lilian P; De Marco, Paulo; Loyola, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Human-induced climate change is considered a conspicuous threat to biodiversity in the 21st century. Species' response to climate change depends on their exposition, sensitivity and ability to adapt to novel climates. Exposure to climate change is however uneven within species' range, so that some populations may be more at risk than others. Identifying the regions most exposed to climate change is therefore a first and pivotal step on determining species' vulnerability across their geographic ranges. Here, we aimed at quantifying mammal local exposure to climate change across species' ranges. We identified areas in the Brazilian Amazon where mammals will be critically exposed to non-analogue climates in the future with different variables predicted by 15 global circulation climate forecasts. We also built a null model to assess the effectiveness of the Amazon protected areas in buffering the effects of climate change on mammals, using an innovative and more realistic approach. We found that 85% of species are likely to be exposed to non-analogue climatic conditions in more than 80% of their ranges by 2070. That percentage is even higher for endemic mammals; almost all endemic species are predicted to be exposed in more than 80% of their range. Exposure patterns also varied with different climatic variables and seem to be geographically structured. Western and northern Amazon species are more likely to experience temperature anomalies while northeastern species will be more affected by rainfall abnormality. We also observed an increase in the number of critically-exposed species from 2050 to 2070. Overall, our results indicate that mammals might face high exposure to climate change and that protected areas will probably not be efficient enough to avert those impacts.

  7. Assessing Mammal Exposure to Climate Change in the Brazilian Amazon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno R Ribeiro

    Full Text Available Human-induced climate change is considered a conspicuous threat to biodiversity in the 21st century. Species' response to climate change depends on their exposition, sensitivity and ability to adapt to novel climates. Exposure to climate change is however uneven within species' range, so that some populations may be more at risk than others. Identifying the regions most exposed to climate change is therefore a first and pivotal step on determining species' vulnerability across their geographic ranges. Here, we aimed at quantifying mammal local exposure to climate change across species' ranges. We identified areas in the Brazilian Amazon where mammals will be critically exposed to non-analogue climates in the future with different variables predicted by 15 global circulation climate forecasts. We also built a null model to assess the effectiveness of the Amazon protected areas in buffering the effects of climate change on mammals, using an innovative and more realistic approach. We found that 85% of species are likely to be exposed to non-analogue climatic conditions in more than 80% of their ranges by 2070. That percentage is even higher for endemic mammals; almost all endemic species are predicted to be exposed in more than 80% of their range. Exposure patterns also varied with different climatic variables and seem to be geographically structured. Western and northern Amazon species are more likely to experience temperature anomalies while northeastern species will be more affected by rainfall abnormality. We also observed an increase in the number of critically-exposed species from 2050 to 2070. Overall, our results indicate that mammals might face high exposure to climate change and that protected areas will probably not be efficient enough to avert those impacts.

  8. Quantifying human exposure to air pollution - moving from static monitoring to spatio-temporally resolved personal exposure assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinle, Susanne; Reis, Stefan; Sabel, Clive E

    2013-01-01

    distributions. New developments in sensor technology now enable us to monitor personal exposure to air pollutants directly while people are moving through their activity spaces and varying concentration fields. The literature review on which this paper is based on reflects recent developments in the assessment...... for the integrated assessment of human exposure to air pollutants taking into account latest technological capabilities and contextual information. Highlights ? We review and discuss recent developments and advances of research into personal exposure to air pollution. ? We emphasise the importance of personal...... exposure studies to accurately assess human health risks. ? We discuss potential and shortcomings of methods and tools with a focus on how their development influences study design. ? We propose a novel conceptual model for integrated health impact assessment of human exposure to air pollutants. ? We...

  9. Gingival Recessions and Biomechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Morten Godtfredsen

    Gingival recessions and biomechanics “Tissue is the issue, but bone sets the tone.“ A tooth outside the cortical plate can result in loss of bone and development of a gingival recession. The presentation aims to show biomechanical considerations in relation to movement of teeth with gingival...... by moving the root back in the alveolus. The tooth movement is accompanied by bone gain and thus increase the success rate for soft tissue augmentation. The choice of biomechanical system influences the treatment outcome. If a standard straight wire appliance is used, a biomechanical dilemma can arise...

  10. Biomechanical properties of the mid-shaft femur in middle-aged hypophysectomized rats as assessed by bending test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzini, Clarisa; Picasso, Emilio O; Champin, Graciela M; Alippi, Rosa María; Bozzini, Carlos E

    2012-10-01

    Both stiffness and strength of bones are thought to be controlled by the "bone mechanostat". Its natural stimuli would be the strains of bone tissue (sensed by osteocytes) that are induced by both gravitational forces (body weight) and contraction of regional muscles. Body weight and muscle mass increase with age. Biomechanical performance of load-bearing bones must adapt to these growth-induced changes. Hypophysectomy in the rat slows the rate of body growth. With time, a great difference in body size is established between a hypophysectomized rat and its age-matched control, which makes it difficult to establish the real effect of pituitary ablation on bone biomechanics. The purpose of the present investigation was to compare mid-shaft femoral mechanical properties between hypophysectomized and weight-matched normal rats, which will show similar sizes and thus will be exposed to similar habitual loads. Two groups of 10 female rats each (H and C) were established. H rats were 12-month-old that had been hypophysectomized 11 months before. C rats were 2.5-month-old normals. Right femur mechanical properties were tested in 3-point bending. Structural (load-bearing capacity and stiffness), geometric (cross-sectional area, cortical sectional area, and moment of inertia), and material (modulus of elasticity and maximum elastic stress) properties were evaluated. The left femur was ashed for calcium content. Comparisons between parameters were performed by the Student's t test. Average body weight, body length, femur weight, femur length, and gastrocnemius weight were not significantly different between H and C rats. Calcium content in ashes was significantly higher in H than in C rats. Cross-sectional area, medullary area, and cross-sectional moment of inertia were higher in C rats, whereas cortical area did not differ between groups. Structural properties (diaphyseal stiffness, elastic limit, and load at fracture) were about four times higher in hypophysectomized rats

  11. The private life of echidnas: using accelerometry and GPS to examine field biomechanics and assess the ecological impact of a widespread, semi-fossorial monotreme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Christofer J; Cooper, Christine E; Withers, Philip C; Freakley, Craig; Singh, Surya; Terrill, Philip

    2016-10-15

    The short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) is a monotreme and therefore provides a unique combination of phylogenetic history, morphological differentiation and ecological specialisation for a mammal. The echidna has a unique appendicular skeleton, a highly specialised myrmecophagous lifestyle and a mode of locomotion that is neither typically mammalian nor reptilian, but has aspects of both lineages. We therefore were interested in the interactions of locomotor biomechanics, ecology and movements for wild, free-living short-beaked echidnas. To assess locomotion in its complex natural environment, we attached both GPS and accelerometer loggers to the back of echidnas in both spring and summer. We found that the locomotor biomechanics of echidnas is unique, with lower stride length and stride frequency than reported for similar-sized mammals. Speed modulation is primarily accomplished through changes in stride frequency, with a mean of 1.39 Hz and a maximum of 2.31 Hz. Daily activity period was linked to ambient air temperature, which restricted daytime activity during the hotter summer months. Echidnas had longer activity periods and longer digging bouts in spring compared with summer. In summer, echidnas had higher walking speeds than in spring, perhaps because of the shorter time suitable for activity. Echidnas spent, on average, 12% of their time digging, which indicates their potential to excavate up to 204 m(3) of soil a year. This information highlights the important contribution towards ecosystem health, via bioturbation, of this widespread Australian monotreme. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Air pollution in moderately polluted urban areas: How does the definition of "neighborhood" impact exposure assessment?

    OpenAIRE

    TENAILLEAU, Quentin; Mauny, Frédéric; Joly, Daniel; François, Stéphane; Bernard, Nadine

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Environmental health studies commonly quantify subjects' pollution exposure in their neighborhood. How this neighborhood is defined can vary, however, leading to different approaches to quantification whose impacts on exposure levels remain unclear. We explore the relationship between neighborhood definition and exposure assessment. NO 2 , benzene, PM 10 and PM 2.5 exposure estimates were computed in the vicinity of 10,825 buildings using twelve exposure assessment tec...

  13. Assessing Climate Change Impacts on Wildfire Exposure in Mediterranean Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Olga M; Salis, Michele; Ager, Alan A; Arca, Bachisio; Alcasena, Fermin J; Monteiro, Antonio T; Finney, Mark A; Del Giudice, Liliana; Scoccimarro, Enrico; Spano, Donatella

    2017-10-01

    We used simulation modeling to assess potential climate change impacts on wildfire exposure in Italy and Corsica (France). Weather data were obtained from a regional climate model for the period 1981-2070 using the IPCC A1B emissions scenario. Wildfire simulations were performed with the minimum travel time fire spread algorithm using predicted fuel moisture, wind speed, and wind direction to simulate expected changes in weather for three climatic periods (1981-2010, 2011-2040, and 2041-2070). Overall, the wildfire simulations showed very slight changes in flame length, while other outputs such as burn probability and fire size increased significantly in the second future period (2041-2070), especially in the southern portion of the study area. The projected changes fuel moisture could result in a lengthening of the fire season for the entire study area. This work represents the first application in Europe of a methodology based on high resolution (250 m) landscape wildfire modeling to assess potential impacts of climate changes on wildfire exposure at a national scale. The findings can provide information and support in wildfire management planning and fire risk mitigation activities. © 2016 Society for Risk Analysis.

  14. ASSESSMENT OF BAGGING OPERATORS EXPOSURE TO WITH PVC AIRBORNE PARTICULATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Asilian, M. Nasseri Nejad, S. B. Mortazavi, M. J. Jafari, A. Khavanin, A. R. Dehdashti

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Dust consists of tiny solid particles carried by air currents. These particles are formed by many different processes. One of these processes is polymerization of inert plastic such as Polyvinyl Chloride production plant. According to the Occupational Health and Safety Assessment Series requirements, section 4.4.6, occupational health and safety risks must be defined and controlled where needed. This field study was conducted to evaluate the occupational exposure of packaging operators to airborne polyvinyl chloride dust in order to health risk assessment and recommend feasible controlling methods. The mass concentration of polyvinyl chloride particulate was measured in two fractions according to the particle size that expressed as total and respirable particulates. The Air Sampling Methods, Methods for the Determination of Hazardous Substances 14/3, of Health and Safety Executive were used as a standard sampling protocol. The average mass concentrations for respirable and total particulates were measured 3.54±0.3 mg/m3 and 11.89±0.8 mg/m3 respectively. Also health risks of studied condition were estimated as significant level, category one, therefore the risk must be reduced below the standard level. According to the work requirements to reduce the emission rate and mitigate the health risk exposure, a local exhaust ventilation system design was recommended for bag-filters of hopper tank.

  15. Risk assessment and management of occupational exposure to pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroni, M; Fait, A; Colosio, C

    1999-06-30

    Occupational exposure to pesticides in agriculture and public health applications may cause acute and long-term health effects. Prevention of adverse effects in the users requires actions to be undertaken in the pre-marketing and post-marketing phase of these products. The pre-marketing preventive actions are primary responsibility of industry and the public administration. Admission of pesticide use (registration) is carried out by considering the toxicological properties of each pesticide (hazard identification), determining the dose-response relationship (NOEL identification), assessing or predicting the exposure level in the various scenarios of their use, and characterising the risk. The decision about admission takes into consideration the balance between risks and benefits. The post-marketing preventive activities consist of the promotion of a proper risk management at the workplace. Such a management includes the risk assessment of the specific conditions of use, the adoption of proper work practices, and the health surveillance of the workers. Each country should develop an adequate National Plan for Prevention of Pesticide Risk which allocates different roles and tasks at the central, regional and local level.

  16. A biomechanical model to assess the contribution of pelvic musculature weakness to the development of stress urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Clare; Kwok, Ezra; Sassani, Farrokh; Jackson, Roy; Cundiff, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    A biomechanical model of the female pelvic support system was developed to explore the contribution of pelvic floor muscle defect to the development of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). From a pool of 135 patients, clinical data of 26 patients with pelvic muscular defect were used in modelling. The model was employed to estimate the parameters that describe the stiffness properties of the vaginal wall and ligament tissues for individual patients. The parameters were then implemented into the model to evaluate for each patient the impact of pelvic muscular defect on the vaginal apex support and the bladder neck support, a factor that relates to the onset of SUI. For the modelling analysis, the compromise of pelvic muscular support was demonstrated to contribute to vaginal apex prolapse and bladder neck prolapse, a condition commonly seen in SUI patients, while simulated conditions of restored muscular support were shown to help re-establish both vaginal apex and bladder neck supports. The findings illustrate the significance of pelvic muscle strength to vaginal support and urinary continence; therefore, the clinical recommendation of pelvic muscle strengthening, such as Kegel exercises, has been shown to be an effective treatment for patients with SUI symptoms.

  17. A structured observational method to assess dermal exposure to manufactured nanoparticles: DREAM as an initial assessment tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duuren-Stuurman, B. van; Pelzer, J.; Moehlmann, C.; Berges, M.; Bard, D.; Wake, D.; Mark, D.; Jankowska, E.; Brouwer, D.

    2010-01-01

    Preliminary results of inventories of exposure scenarios for nanomaterials have indicated possible dermal exposure. Within the NANOSH project focused on occupational safety and health aspects of nanotechnology a shortened version of the observational DeRmal Exposure AssessMent (DREAM) method was

  18. [Exposure risk assessment of plasticizer in dietary food in Xiamen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Qunying; Yang, Yue; Su, Yanhua; Lyu, Chanwen; Wang, Sumei; Yu, Huan; Qin, Mengting; Li, Yanni; Zhao, Benhua

    2014-07-01

    To understand the dietary consumption of residents in Xiamen and the content of phthalic acid esters (PAEs) in food, and to assess the plasticizer exposure risk of diet in Xiamen. The survey was conducted by stratified cluster random sampling method in Xiamen from September to October in 2010. According to the Xiamen administrative division, six neighborhood communities were selected as sampling units, then 25 families were randomly chosen from each sampling units.From the above 150 families, the permanent residents over the age of six were permitted to our study. The survey included 495 residents totally. These participants' information, such as basic personal information, physical activity levels, meal frequency and the average consumption of 33 kinds of food in 13 categories were collected using questionnaires. Thirteen categories included cereal and tubers, beans, vegetables, fungi and algae, fruits, dairy products, meat, seafood, eggs, snacks, beverages, cooking oil and spices. The height and weight of residents were measured and the average daily dietary intake was calculated. Thirty-three kinds of food in 13 categories were collected in supermarkets in Xiamen. According to the annual sales ranking, the top three-five brands of each kinds of food were selected and numbered, then two or three brands were chosen by random number table method from them; three completely individual packed samples in the same batch of each brand were detected; 243 samples were included in our study.100-500 g solid samples or 100-500 ml liquid samples were collected. The content of diethyl phthalate (DEP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) in food were detected by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, which expressed by median (minimum-maximum). The exposure dose, contribution rate and risk index of PAEs were calculated by point estimation method. According to the average daily dietary intake of residents in Xiamen, the top three ones in 13 categories

  19. Developing and evaluating distributions for probabilistic human exposure assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddalena, Randy L.; McKone, Thomas E.

    2002-08-01

    This report describes research carried out at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to assist the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in developing a consistent yet flexible approach for evaluating the inputs to probabilistic risk assessments. The U.S. EPA Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (OERR) recently released Volume 3 Part A of Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund (RAGS), as an update to the existing two-volume set of RAGS. The update provides policy and technical guidance on performing probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). Consequently, EPA risk managers and decision-makers need to review and evaluate the adequacy of PRAs for supporting regulatory decisions. A critical part of evaluating a PRA is the problem of evaluating or judging the adequacy of input distributions PRA. Although the overarching theme of this report is the need to improve the ease and consistency of the regulatory review process, the specific objectives are presented in two parts. The objective of Part 1 is to develop a consistent yet flexible process for evaluating distributions in a PRA by identifying the critical attributes of an exposure factor distribution and discussing how these attributes relate to the task-specific adequacy of the input. This objective is carried out with emphasis on the perspective of a risk manager or decision-maker. The proposed evaluation procedure provides consistency to the review process without a loss of flexibility. As a result, the approach described in Part 1 provides an opportunity to apply a single review framework for all EPA regions and yet provide the regional risk manager with the flexibility to deal with site- and case-specific issues in the PRA process. However, as the number of inputs to a PRA increases, so does the complexity of the process for calculating, communicating and managing risk. As a result, there is increasing effort required of both the risk professionals performing the analysis and the risk manager

  20. Assessment of multiple frequency ELF electric and magnetic field exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitgeb, N.

    2008-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields both in daily life and at workplaces exhibit increasingly complex frequency spectra. Present spectral assessment rules proved to be too conservative for health risk assessment. This is because they are based on the assumption that cells would react like linear systems in terms of responding to a sum of frequencies by a sum of independent responses to each individual frequency. Based on numerical investigations with the Hodgkin-Huxley and the Frankenhaeuser-Huxley nerve cell models, it could be shown that accounting for the nonlinear behaviour of cellular excitation processes avoids considerable overestimation of simultaneous exposures to multiple frequency ELF electric and magnetic fields. Besides this, it could be shown that the role of phase relationships is less important than that assumed so far. The present assessment rules lead to non-compliances of marketed electric appliances. For general application, a nonlinear biology-based assessment (NBBA) rule has been proposed, validated and proven advantageous compared with ICNIRP's rule. While staying conservative it avoids unnecessary overestimation and demonstrates compliance even in cases of suspected non-conformities. It is up to responsible bodies to decide upon the adoption of this proposal and the potential need for implementing additional or reducing the already incorporated safety factors.

  1. Biomechanics of corneal ectasia and biomechanical treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Cynthia J; Dupps, William J

    2014-06-01

    Many algorithms exist for the topographic/tomographic detection of corneas at risk for post-refractive surgery ectasia. It is proposed that the reason for the difficulty in finding a universal screening tool based on corneal morphologic features is that curvature, elevation, and pachymetric changes are all secondary signs of keratoconus and post-refractive surgery ectasia and that the primary abnormality is in the biomechanical properties. It is further proposed that the biomechanical modification is focal in nature, rather than a uniform generalized weakening, and that the focal reduction in elastic modulus precipitates a cycle of biomechanical decompensation that is driven by asymmetry in the biomechanical properties. This initiates a repeating cycle of increased strain, stress redistribution, and subsequent focal steepening and thinning. Various interventions are described in terms of how this cycle of biomechanical decompensation is interrupted, such as intrastromal corneal ring segments, which redistribute the corneal stress, and collagen crosslinking, which modifies the basic structural properties. Proprietary or commercial disclosures are listed after the references. Copyright © 2014 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessing reasonable worst-case full-shift exposure levels from data of variable quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marquart, H.; Drooge, H. van; Groenewold, M.; Hemmen, J. van

    2001-01-01

    Exposure assessors involved in regulatory risk assessments often need to estimate a reasonable worst-case full-shift exposure level from very limited exposure information. Full-shift exposure data of very high quality are rare. A full-shift value can also be calculated from (short term) task-based

  3. Bisphenol A exposure assessment from olive oil consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Omar, Tarek F; Sukhn, Carol; Fares, Souha A; Abiad, Mohamad G; Habib, Rima R; Dhaini, Hassan R

    2017-07-01

    The use of bisphenol A (BPA) in packaging has grown over the past 50 years despite concerns of its migration into packaged food and beverages, resulting in human exposure. Many studies have reported tumorigenic effects and endocrine alterations associated with BPA in animal models. This study aims at assessing human exposure to BPA from olive oil. A total of 27 olive oil samples were collected from mills and local villagers in the Hasbaya District, a major olive oil harvesting region in Lebanon. Information on storage conditions was also collected. BPA was extracted and quantified by HPLC. Results showed significantly higher BPA levels in olive oil samples stored in plastic vs. non-plastic packaging (mean = 333 vs. 150 μg/kg, p value = 0.006), samples with a plastic storage duration of >1 year compared to those with a storage duration of <1 year (mean = 452 vs. 288 μg/kg, p value = 0.008), and oil samples sourced from locals compared to oil mills (mean = 376 vs. 228 μg/kg, p value = 0.022). Statistically significant higher BPA levels remained for samples stored in plastic vs. non-plastic packaging in the bootstrap multivariable linear regression (B = 121.56, 95% CI 53.44-194.39, p value = 0.009). This is the first report on BPA levels in Mediterranean olive oil. The estimated exposure was 1.38% of the EFSA tolerable daily intake, hence there are no concerns about potential health risks from olive oil consumption.

  4. Biomechanical Assessment of the Dorsal Spanning Bridge Plate in Distal Radius Fracture Fixation: Implications for Immediate Weight-Bearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jerry I; Peterson, Bret; Bellevue, Kate; Lee, Nicolas; Smith, Sean; Herfat, Safa

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the biomechanical stability of a 2.4-mm dorsal spanning bridge plate with a volar locking plate (VLP) in a distal radius fracture model, during simulated crutch weight-bearing. Five paired cadaveric forearms were tested. A 1-cm dorsal wedge osteotomy was created to simulate an unstable distal radius fracture with dorsal comminution. Fractures were fixed with a VLP or a dorsal bridge plate (DBP). Specimens were mounted to a crutch handle, and optical motion-tracking sensors were attached to the proximal and distal segments. Specimens were loaded in compression at 1 mm/s on a servohydraulic test frame until failure, defined as 2 mm of gap site displacement. The VLP construct was significantly more stable to axial load in a crutch weight-bearing model compared with the DBP plate (VLP: 493 N vs DBP: 332 N). Stiffness was higher in the VLP constructs, but this was not statistically significant (VLP: 51.4 N/mm vs DBP: 32.4 N/mm). With the crutch weight-bearing model, DBP failed consistently with wrist flexion and plate bending, whereas VLP failed with axial compression at the fracture site and dorsal collapse. Dorsal spanning bridge plating is effective as an internal spanning fixator in treating highly comminuted intra-articular distal radius fracture and prevents axial collapse at the radiocarpal joint. However, bridge plating may not offer advantages in early weight-bearing or transfer in polytrauma patients, with less axial stability in our crutch weight-bearing model compared with volar plating. A stiffer 3.5-mm DBP or use of a DBP construct without the central holes may be considered for distal radius fractures if the goal is early crutch weight-bearing through the injured extremity.

  5. Experimental identification of the lateral human-structure interaction mechanism and assessment of the inverted-pendulum biomechanical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, S. P.; Owen, J. S.; Hussein, M. F. M.

    2014-10-01

    simplicity of this biomechanical model, remarkable agreement was observed.

  6. Assessing exposure to cosmic radiation during long-haul flights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottollier-Depois, J.F.; Chau, Q.; Bouisset, P.; Kerlau, G.; Plawinski, L.; Lebaron-Jacobs, L. [Inst. for Protection and Nuclear Safety, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2000-05-01

    The assessment of exposure to cosmic radiation on board air craft is one of the preoccupations of organizations responsible for radiation protection. Cosmic particle flux increases with altitude and latitude and depends on the solar activity. The exposure has been estimated on several airlines using transatlantic, Siberian and transequatorial routes on board subsonic and supersonic air crafts, to illustrate the effect of these parameters. Measurements have been realized with a tissue equivalent proportional counter using the microdosimetric technique. Such a system provides the absorbed dose, the ambient dose equivalent, the mean quality factor and the dose distribution as a function of lineal energy. Data have been collected at maximum solar activity in 1991-92 and at minimum in 1996-98. The lowest mean dose rate measured was 3 {mu}Sv.h{sup -1} during a Paris-Buenos Aires flight in 1991; the highest was 6.6 {mu}Sv.h{sup -1} during Paris-Tokyo flight using Siberian route and 9.7 {mu}Sv.h{sup -1} on Concorde in 1996-97. The mean quality factor is around 1.8. The corresponding annual effective dose, based on 700 hours of flight for subsonic aircraft and 300 hours for Concorde, can be estimated between 2 mSv for least-exposed routes and 5 mSv for more exposed routes. (author)

  7. Assessing exposure to cosmic radiation during long-haul flights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottollier-Depois, J F; Chau, Q; Bouisset, P; Kerlau, G; Plawinski, L; Lebaron-Jacobs, L

    2000-05-01

    The assessment of exposure to cosmic radiation on board aircraft is one of the concerns of organizations responsible for radiation protection. Cosmic-particle flux increases with altitude and latitude and depends on solar activity. To illustrate the effect of these parameters, exposure has been estimated on several airlines operating subsonic and supersonic aircraft on transatlantic, Siberian and transequatorial routes. Measurements have been made with a tissue-equivalent proportional counter using the microdosimetric technique. This type of system provides the absorbed dose, the ambient dose equivalent, the mean quality factor, and the dose distribution as a function of lineal energy. Data were collected at maximum solar activity in 1991-1992 and at minimum activity in 1996-1998. The lowest mean dose rate measured was 3 microSv h(-1) during a Paris-Buenos Aires flight in 1991. The highest rates were 6.6 microSv h(-1) during a Paris-Tokyo flight on a Siberian route and 9.7 microSv h(-1) on Concorde in 1996-1997. The mean quality factor is around 1.8. The corresponding annual effective dose, based on 700 h of flight for subsonic aircraft and 300 h for Concorde, can be estimated at between 2 mSv for the least-exposed routes and 5 mSv for the more-exposed routes.

  8. Assessing exposure to cosmic radiation on board aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottollier-Depois, J. F.; Chau, Q.; Bouisset, P.; Kerlau, G.; Plawinski, L.; Lebaron-Jacobs, L.

    The assessment of exposure to cosmic radiation on board aircraft is one of the preoccupations of organizations responsible for radiation protection. The cosmic radiation particle flux increases with altitude and latitude and depends on the solar activity. The radiation exposure has been estimated on several airlines using transatlantic, Siberian and transequatorial routes on board subsonic and supersonic aircraft, to illustrate the effect of these parameters: Measurements have been obtained with a tissue equivalent proportional counter using the microdosimetric technique. Data have been collected at maximum solar activity in 1991-1992 and at minimum in 1996-1998. The lowest mean dose rate measured was 3 μSv/h during a Paris-Buenos Aires flight in 1991; the highest was 6.6 μSv/h during a Paris-Tokyo flight using a Siberian route and 9.7 μ Sv/h on Concorde in 1996-1997. The mean quality factor is around 1.8. The corresponding annual effective dose, based on 700 hours of flight for subsonic aircraft and 300 hours for Concorde, can be-estimated between 2 rnSv for least-exposed routes and 5 mSv for more exposed routes.

  9. Assessment of predictive dermal exposure to chemicals in the work environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Jankowska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of dermal exposure to chemicals in the work environment is problematic, mainly as a result of the lack of measurement data on occupational exposure to chemicals. Due to common prevalence of occupational skin exposure and its health consequences it is necessary to look for efficient solutions allowing for reliable exposure assessment. The aim of the study is to present predictive models used to assess non-measured dermal exposure, as well as to acquaint Polish users with the principles of the selected model functioning. This paper presents examples of models to assist the employer in the the assessment of occupational exposure associated with the skin contact with chemicals, developed in European Union (EU countries, as well as in countries outside the EU. Based on the literature data dermal exposure models EASE (Estimation and Assessment of Substance Exposure, COSHH Essentials (Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations, DREAM (Dermal Exposure Assessment Method, Stoffenmanager , ECETOC TRA (European Centre for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals Targeted Risk Assessment, MEASE (Metal’s EASE, PHED (Pesticide Handlers Exposure Database, DERM (Dermal Exposure Ranking Method and RISKOFDERM (Risk Assessment of Occupational Dermal Exposure to Chemicals were briefly described. Moreover the characteristics of RISKOFDERM, guidelines for its use, information on input and output data were further detailed. Problem of full work shift dermal exposure assessment is described. An example of exposure assessment using RISKOFDERM and effectiveness evaluation to date were also presented. When no measurements are available, RISKOFDERM allows dermal exposure assessment and thus can improve the risk assessment quality and effectiveness of dermal risk management. Med Pr 2017;68(4:557–569

  10. [Assessment of predictive dermal exposure to chemicals in the work environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, Agnieszka; Czerczak, Sławomir; Kupczewska-Dobecka, Małgorzata

    2017-06-27

    Assessment of dermal exposure to chemicals in the work environment is problematic, mainly as a result of the lack of measurement data on occupational exposure to chemicals. Due to common prevalence of occupational skin exposure and its health consequences it is necessary to look for efficient solutions allowing for reliable exposure assessment. The aim of the study is to present predictive models used to assess non-measured dermal exposure, as well as to acquaint Polish users with the principles of the selected model functioning. This paper presents examples of models to assist the employer in the the assessment of occupational exposure associated with the skin contact with chemicals, developed in European Union (EU) countries, as well as in countries outside the EU. Based on the literature data dermal exposure models EASE (Estimation and Assessment of Substance Exposure), COSHH Essentials (Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations), DREAM (Dermal Exposure Assessment Method), Stoffenmanager , ECETOC TRA (European Centre for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals Targeted Risk Assessment), MEASE (Metal's EASE), PHED (Pesticide Handlers Exposure Database), DERM (Dermal Exposure Ranking Method) and RISKOFDERM (Risk Assessment of Occupational Dermal Exposure to Chemicals) were briefly described. Moreover the characteristics of RISKOFDERM, guidelines for its use, information on input and output data were further detailed. Problem of full work shift dermal exposure assessment is described. An example of exposure assessment using RISKOFDERM and effectiveness evaluation to date were also presented. When no measurements are available, RISKOFDERM allows dermal exposure assessment and thus can improve the risk assessment quality and effectiveness of dermal risk management. Med Pr 2017;68(4):557-569. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  11. Quality control for exposure assessment in epidemiological studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornkessel, C; Blettner, M; Breckenkamp, J

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of an epidemiological study, dosemeters were used for the assessment of radio frequency electromagnetic field exposure. To check the correct dosemeter's performance in terms of consistency of recorded field values over the entire study period, a quality control strategy...... was developed. In this paper, the concept of quality control and its results is described. From the 20 dosemeters used, 19 were very stable and reproducible, with deviations of a maximum of +/-1 dB compared with their initial state. One device was found to be faulty and its measurement data had to be excluded...... from the analysis. As a result of continuous quality control procedures, the confidence in the measurements obtained during the field work was strengthened significantly....

  12. Accurate assessment of exposure using tracer gas measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kierat, Wojciech; Bivolarova, Mariya; Zavrl, Eva

    2018-01-01

    Room airflow interaction, particularly in the breathing zone, is important to assess exposure to indoor air pollution. A breathing thermal manikin was used to simulate a room occupant with the convective boundary layer (CBL) generated around the body and the respiratory flow. Local airflow against...... the face of the manikin was applied to increase the complexity of the airflow interaction. CO2 was released at the armpits and N2O at the groin to simulate the respective bio-effluents generated at these two body sites. The tracer gas concentration at the mouth/nose of the manikin was measured with gas...... with a decrease in the response time of the gas analyzer. When only CBL was present, shorter measurement time was needed for the accurate concentration measurement of the tracer gas released close to the breathing zone. For more complex flow, as a result of CBL interaction with the exhalation flow, the needed...

  13. Quantitative self-assessment of exposure to solvents among shoe repair men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertsenberg, S.; Brouwer, D.; Lurvink, M.; Rubingh, C.; Rijnders, E.; Tielemans, E.

    2007-01-01

    Self-assessment of exposure (SAE) refers to any exposure assessment methodology wherein the worker takes an active role in establishing his or her exposure status. The objective of this study was to investigate the reliability and feasibility of SAE approaches among shoe repair workers collecting

  14. Mutagenic potential assessment associated with human exposure to natural radioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Alexandre Endres; Navoni, Julio Alejandro; de Oliveira Galvão, Marcos Felipe; Garcia, Anuska Conde Fagundes Soares; do Amaral, Viviane Souza; Petta, Reinaldo Antônio; Campos, Thomas Ferreira da Costa; Panosso, Renata; Quinelato, Antônio Luiz; de Medeiros, Sílvia Regina Batistuzzo

    2017-01-01

    Lucrécia city, known to harbor a high cancer rate, is located in a semiarid region characterized by the presence of mineral reservoirs, facing a high exposure to metal and natural radioactivity. The present study aimed to assess the environmental scenario at a semiarid region located in Northeastern Brazil. Metal concentration, alpha and beta radiation, and cyanobacteria content in tap water along with indoor radon and gamma emitters (U, K and Th) concentrations were measured. In addition, mutagenic and nuclear instability effects were assessed using buccal micronucleus cytome assay. The study included five samplings corresponding to a period between 2007 and 2009. Drinking water from Lucrécia city presented levels of Mn, Ni and Cr along with cyanobacteria in concentrations one to four times higher than regulatory guidelines considered. Furthermore, high levels of all the tested radionuclides were found. A high percentage of the houses included in this study presented indoor radon concentrations over 100 Bq m-3. The mean annual effective dose from Lucrécia houses was six times higher than observed in a control region. The levels of exposure in most of the Lucrécia houses were classified as middle to high. A significant mutagenic effect, represented as an increase of micronuclei (MN) frequency and nuclear abnormalities as nuclear buds (NB), binucleated cells (BN), and pyknotic cells (PYC) were found. The results obtained highlight the role of high background radioactivity on the observed mutagenic effect and could help to explain the exacerbated cancer rate reported in this locality. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. New approach for assessing human perfluoroalkyl exposure via hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Andreia; Jacobs, Griet; Vanermen, Guido; Covaci, Adrian; Voorspoels, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    In the recent years hair has been increasingly used as alternative matrix in human biomonitoring (HBM) of environmental pollutants. Sampling advantages and time integration of exposure assessment seems the most attractive features of hair matrix. In the current study, a novel miniaturized method was developed and validated for measuring 15 perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), including perfluoro n-butanoic acid (PFBA), perfluoro n-pentanoic acid (PFPeA), perfluoro n-hexanoic acid (PFHxA), perfluoro n-heptanoic acid (PFHpA), perfluor n-octanoic acid (PFOA), perfluoro n-nonanoic acid (PFNA), perfluoro tetradecanoic acid (PFTeDA), perfluorobutane sulfonic acid (PFBS), perfluoro pentane sulfonic acid (PFPeS), perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), perfluoroheptane sulfonic acid (PFHpS), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorononane sulfonic acid (PFNS), perfluorodecane sulfonic acid (PFDS) and perfluorododecane sulfonic acid (PFDoS) in human hair by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). After extraction using ethyl acetate, dispersive ENVI-Carb was used for clean-up. Good intra- and inter-day precision for low (LQ 5 ng/g hair) and high spike (HQ 15n g/g) levels were achieved (in general RSD hair and 3-13 pg/g hair, respectively. The method limit of quantification (LOQm) ranged between 6 and 301 pg/g hair. The PFAS levels were measured in 30 human hair samples indicating that the levels are low (14-1534 pg/g hair). Some PFAS were not present in any hair sample (e.g. PFHpA, PFTeDA, PFNA, PFPeS, PFHpS, PFOS and PFNS), while other PFAS were frequently detected (PFBA, PFPeA, PFHxA, PFOA, PFBS, PFHxS, PFOS, PFDS and PFDoS) in human hair. Although levels in general were low, there is evidence of higher human exposure to some analytes, such as PFBA, PFPeA, PFHxA, PFOA, PFBS, PFHxS, and PFDoS. The current study shows that hair is a suitable alternative non-invasive matrix for exposure assessment of PFAS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  16. Next generation of microbiological risk assessment: Potential of omics data for exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Besten, Heidy M W; Amézquita, Alejandro; Bover-Cid, Sara; Dagnas, Stéphane; Ellouze, Mariem; Guillou, Sandrine; Nychas, George; O'Mahony, Cian; Pérez-Rodriguez, Fernando; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2017-10-04

    In food safety and public health risk evaluations, microbiological exposure assessment plays a central role as it provides an estimation of both the likelihood and the level of the microbial hazard in a specified consumer portion of food and takes microbial behaviour into account. While until now mostly phenotypic data have been used in exposure assessment, mechanistic cellular information, obtained using omics techniques, will enable the fine tuning of exposure assessments to move towards the next generation of microbiological risk assessment. In particular, metagenomics can help in characterizing the food and factory environment microbiota (endogenous microbiota and potentially pathogens) and the changes over time under the environmental conditions associated with processing, preservation and storage. The difficulty lies in moving up to a quantitative exposure assessment, because the development of models that enable the prediction of dynamics of pathogens in a complex food ecosystem is still in its infancy in the food safety domain. In addition, collecting and storing the environmental data (metadata) required to inform the models has not yet been organised at a large scale. In contrast, progress in biomarker identification and characterization has already opened the possibility of making qualitative or even quantitative connection between process and formulation conditions and microbial responses at the strain level. In term of modelling approaches, without changing radically the usual model structure, changes in model inputs are expected: instead of (or as well as) building models upon phenotypic characteristics such as for example minimal temperature where growth is expected, exposure assessment models could use biomarker response intensity as inputs. These new generations of strain-level models will bring an added value in predicting the variability in pathogen behaviour. Altogether, these insights based upon omics techniques will increase our (quantitative

  17. From eyeballing to statistical modelling : methods for assessment of occupational exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromhout, H.

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis methods for assessment of occupational exposure are evaluated and developed. These methods range from subjective methods (qualitative and semiquantitative) to more objective quantitative methods based on actual measurement of personal exposure to chemical and physical

  18. The utility of proximity-based herbicide exposure assessment in epidemiologic studies of Vietnam veterans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Making Best Use of the Agent Orange Exposure Reconstruction Model

    2008-01-01

    ... of information about the veterans' level of exposure to these herbicides. To address that problem, researchers developed a model to assess the opportunity for herbicide exposure among these veterans...

  19. Validation of a job-exposure matrix for assessment of utility worker exposure to magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Christoffer; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Skotte, Jørgen; Thomsen, Birthe L; Olsen, Jørgen H

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a 50-Hz electromagnetic field job-exposure matrix used in epidemiological studies of a nationwide cohort of utility workers in Denmark. We compared a job-exposure matrix that distinguished four categories of exposure to 50-Hz time-weighted average (TWA) magnetic fields: low ( 1.0 microT) of utility company employees with 196 measurements of 8-h exposure for 129 workers in this industry. The 129 workers were selected from the following five main work environments: generation facilities, transmission lines, distribution lines, substations, and other electrically and non-electrically relates jobs. This study shows that the job-exposure matrix can be expected to introduce misclassification mainly between adjacent categories of exposure. Thus, the distribution of measurements of exposure to 50-Hz magnetic fields was similar for workers in the medium and the high exposure matrix categories. But the two extreme categories satisfactorily separate low and very highly exposed workers. The study shows that epidemiological use of this job-exposure matrix might combine the two intermediate categories of exposure. If the sample size in extreme categories provides enough power, a study in which this job-exposure matrix is used should allow detection of a true association between exposure to 50-Hz magnetic field and disease.

  20. Assessing human exposure to power-frequency electric and magnetic fields.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaune, W. T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews published literature and current problems relating to the assessment of occupational and residential human exposures to power-frequency electric and magnetic fields. Available occupational exposure data suggest that the class of job titles known as electrical workers may be an effective surrogate for time-weighted-average (TWA) magnetic-field (but not electric-field) exposure. Current research in occupational-exposure assessment is directed to the construction of job-exposu...

  1. Time and frequency weightings and the assessment of sound exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ordoñez, Rodrigo Pizarro; de Toro, Miguel Angel Aranda; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2010-01-01

    of the exposure. This information is being used to investigate metrics that can differentiate temporal characteristics (impulsive, fluctuating) as well as frequency characteristics (narrow-band or tonal dominance) of sound exposures. This presentation gives an overview of the existing sound measurement...... and analysis methods, that can provide a better representation of the effects of sound exposures on the hearing system...

  2. Assessment of residual exposure to PCBs in metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fostinelli, Jacopo; Catalani, Simona; Gaia, Alice; De Palma, Giuseppe; Apostoli, Pietro

    2017-06-28

    To evaluate the occupational exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in 56 workers employed in 6 electric arc furnace steelmaking plants and 2 secondary aluminum smelting plants located in the highly industrialized area of Brescia, Northern Italy. Thirty-four PCB congeners were found in both environmental and biological samples from workers engaged in scrap yards, electric arc furnaces, casting and maintenance departments. The highest airborne PCB levels were found in the aluminum plant, even 100 times those detected in the steelwork plants. Dioxin-like PCB congeners (DL-PCBs) were poorly represented in all biological samples, whereas non Dioxin-Like PCB congeners (noDL-PCBs), in particular environmentally widespread congeners (PCB 153, 138, 180), could be detected in almost all samples. The mean total PCB serum level was 3.9 ng/ml, with a range of 1.3-10.3 ng/ml, while the geometric mean for airborne PCBs levels was 9305 pg/m3, with a range of 1138-217806 pg/m3. Despite the higher PCB values recorded in some metallurgical plant workplaces, we failed to find any significant difference between serum concentrations in workers from steel or aluminum production, even in consideration of different tasks or different job seniority, while positive association was found only according to the age of the workers. A possible explanation may be identified in the effectiveness of the individual and collective preventive measures adopted in the workplace. Assessment of the occupational exposure to such compounds, in consideration of the recent classifications as carcinogenic to humans, should be encouraged.

  3. Assessing the radiological impact of radiation exposure devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofani, Alessandro

    2011-04-01

    Radiation exposure devices (REDs) are radiological weapons obtained by concealing a strong gamma-emitting source in a place frequented by public to cause radiation injuries following the absorption of elevated radiation doses. The present work aims to assess the radiological impact of an RED by simulating its effects in both dynamical and static conditions of the covertly exposed population, with individual position and motion obtained through a Monte Carlo approach. The results indicate that in small enclosures the motion of people amplify the effects of radiation exposure with respect to the static case because it turns out in a larger number of individuals receiving doses above the threshold for the onset of deterministic effects. This behavior is mitigated in medium and large enclosures due to dose spreading over trajectories moving far away from the critical region close to the RED. The scaling laws obtained with a simple circular geometry were successfully applied to a more complex geometry like that of a stadium. The potentially large number of victims and the possibility to reiterate the attack raise the question of early detection. This can be achieved either by radiation survey or by indirectly inferring the presence of a strong radioactive source following the triage of patients with radiation sickness symptoms collected by the same hospital. In the former case careful design and operation of aerial or in situ monitoring is needed, while in the latter specific training should be given to healthcare personnel aimed to improve their discrimination and cooperation capabilities. © 2010 Society for Risk Analysis.

  4. A rapid test for soy aeroallergens exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Simon, Daniel; Cruz, María-Jesús; Untoria, María-Dolores; Muñoz, Xavier; Villalbí, Joan R; Morell, Ferran; Gómez-Ollés, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Determining soy aeroallergens levels is extremely important in the assessment of health risks due to these airborne substances. Currently, soy aeroallergens exposure in the environment is monitored using enzyme immunoassays (EIA) which must be evaluated in a specialized laboratory by skilled personnel. To describe the development and performance of a rapid immunochromatography assay for the detection of soy aeroallergens in environmental samples. A test strip using gold labeled anti-soy hull low molecular weight extract (SHLMWE) antibody for the rapid detection of soy aeroallergens in environmental samples was developed. One hundred nineteen airborne samples were analysed in parallel by the strip assay and the anti-SHLMWE sandwich EIA. The assay results were visually analysed by three independent observers who ranked samples as: -, + or ++. Strips were also scanned and analysed by densitometry. The rapid test detected a range of concentrations from 6.25 to 25 ng/mL. Agreement in strip assay interpretations between evaluators was substantial (Kappa = 0.63; CI 0.544-0.715). Visual interpretation also gave a good concordance with EIA results, with sensitivity ranging from 77.3 to 100 and specificity from 65 to 83.5 depending on the observer. Furthermore, a strong correlation was observed between densitometry results of strip assay and EIA determinations. The strip assay developed is rapid, simple, and sensitive and does not require expensive equipment or specific skills. It has considerable potential in the environmental monitoring field for screening soy aeroallergens levels in port cities where allergen measurements are not currently performed. Due to its simplicity, the test will improve the management of soy allergic patients by controlling environmental allergen exposure without the need for apparatus or skilled personnel.

  5. Assessment of dietary exposure of nitrate and nitrite in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, C; Heraud, F; Volatier, J-L; Leblanc, J-C

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the dietary exposure of nitrate and nitrite in France. A total of 13, 657 concentration levels of nitrate and nitrite measured in food, representing 138 and 109 food items, respectively, and coming from French monitoring programmes between 2000 and 2006, were used. Depending on the non-detected and non-quantified analysis treatment, lower and upper concentration mean estimates were calculated for each food item. These were combined with consumption data derived from 1474 adults and 1018 children from the French national individual consumption survey (INCA1), conducted in 1999 and based on a 7-day food record diary. A total of 18% of spinaches, 6% of salads, 10% of cheeses, 8% of meat products and 6% of industrial meat products exceeded the European nitrate maximum level or maximum residual level. A total of 0.4% of industrial meat products and 0.2% of meat products exceeded their European nitrite maximum level or maximum residual level. Nitrate dietary exposure averaged 40% of the acceptable daily intake (ADI; 3.7 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1)) for adults and 51 - 54% of the ADI for children with the major contributors being, for adults and children, respectively, vegetables (24 and 27% of ADI), potatoes (5 and 11% of ADI), and water (5 and 5% of ADI). The individual nitrate dietary intake of 1.4% (confidence interval (CI(95th)) [0.8; 2.0]) to 1.5% (CI(95th) [0.9; 2.1]) of adults and 7.9% (CI(95th) [6.2; 9.6]) to 8.4% (CI(95th) [6.7; 10.1]) of children were higher than the ADI. Nitrite dietary exposure averaged 33-67% of the ADI (0.06 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1)) for adults and 67-133% of the ADI for children, with contributions of additive food vectors at 33% of ADI for adults and 50-67% of ADI for children. The individual nitrite dietary intake of 0.7% (CI(95th) [0.3; 1.1]) to 16.4% (CI(95th) [14.5; 18.3]) of adults and 10.5% (CI(95th) [8.6; 12.4]) to 66.2% (CI(95th) [63.3; 69.1]) of children were higher than the ADI.

  6. A novel approach for exposure assessment in air pollution epidemiological studies using neuro-fuzzy inference systems: Comparison of exposure estimates and exposure-health associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanes-Vidal, Victoria; Cantuaria, Manuella Lech; Nadimi, Esmaeil S

    2017-04-01

    Many epidemiological studies have used proximity to sources as air pollution exposure assessment method. However, proximity measures are not generally good surrogates because of their complex non-linear relationship with exposures. Neuro-fuzzy inference systems (NFIS) can be used to map complex non-linear systems, but its usefulness in exposure assessment has not been extensively explored. We present a novel approach for exposure assessment using NFIS, where the inputs of the model were easily-obtainable proximity measures, and the output was residential exposure to an air pollutant. We applied it to a case-study on NH3 pollution, and compared health effects and exposures estimated from NFIS, with those obtained from emission-dispersion models, and linear and non-linear regression proximity models, using 10-fold cross validation. The agreement between emission-dispersion and NFIS exposures was high (Root-mean-square error (RMSE) =0.275, correlation coefficient (r)=0.91) and resulted in similar health effect estimates. Linear models showed poor performance (RMSE=0.527, r=0.59), while non-linear regression models resulted in heterocedasticity, non-normality and clustered data. NFIS could be a useful tool for estimating individual air pollution exposures in epidemiological studies on large populations, when emission-dispersion data are not available. The tradeoff between simplicity and accuracy needs to be considered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Population-Based Assessment of Exposure to Risk Behaviors in Motion Pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, James D.; Worth, Keilah A.; Beach, Michael; Gerrard, Meg; Heatherton, Todd F.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of most population-based studies of media is to relate a specific exposure to an outcome of interest. A research program has been developed that evaluates exposure to different components of movies in an attempt of assess the association of such exposure with the adoption of substance use during adolescence. To assess exposure to movie substance use, one must measure both viewing time and content. In developing the exposure measure, the study team was interested in circumventing a common problem in exposure measurement, where measures often conflate exposure to media with attention to media. Our aim in this paper is to present a validated measure of exposure to entertainment media, the Beach method, which combines recognition of a movie title with content analysis of the movie for substance use, to generate population based measures of exposure to substance use in this form of entertainment. PMID:19122801

  8. Retrospective exposure assessment and quality control in an international multi-centre case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tinnerberg, H; Heikkilä, P; Huici-Montagud, A

    2003-01-01

    of the assessors, as Cohen's kappa and as overall proportion of the agreements. The reassessment of the exposures changed the exposure statuses significantly, when compared with the original cohort. Harmonization of the exposure criteria increased the conformity of the assessments. The prevalence of exposure......The paper presents the exposure assessment method and quality control procedure used in an international, multi-centre case-control study within a joint Nordic and Italian cohort. This study was conducted to evaluate whether occupational exposure to carcinogens influenced the predictivity of high...... frequency of chromosomal aberrations (CA) in peripheral lymphocytes for increased cancer risk. Occupational hygienists assessed exposures in each participating country: Denmark, Finland, Italy, Norway and Sweden. The exposure status to a carcinogen or a clastogen was coded in the cohort according...

  9. Biomechanical factors associated with the risk of knee injury when ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To systematically assess the literature investigating biomechanical knee injury risk factors when an individual lands from a jump. Data sources. Four electronic databases were searched for peer-reviewed English journals containing landing biomechanical studies published over 14 years (1990 - 2003).

  10. Aeronautical Inspirations in Biomechanics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ryszard Maroński

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. The goal of the paper is to show that some problems formulated in the dynamics of atmospheric flight are very similar to the problems formulated in the biomechanics of motion and medicine...

  11. Computational modeling in biomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Mofrad, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a glimpse of the diverse and important roles that modern computational technology is playing in various areas of biomechanics. It includes unique chapters on ab initio quantum mechanical, molecular dynamic and scale coupling methods..

  12. Biomechanics of the brain

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Karol

    2011-01-01

    With contributions from scientists at major institutions, this book presents an introduction to brain anatomy for engineers and scientists. It provides, for the first time, a comprehensive resource in the field of brain biomechanics.

  13. Biomechanics of oral mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of prosthodontic treatment has been well recognized, and the need is continuously increasing with the ageing population. While the oral mucosa plays a critical role in the treatment outcome, the associated biomechanics is not yet fully understood. Using the literature available, this paper provides a critical review on four aspects of mucosal biomechanics, including static, dynamic, volumetric and interactive responses, which are interpreted by its elasticity, viscosity/permeability, apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient, respectively. Both empirical studies and numerical models are analysed and compared to gain anatomical and physiological insights. Furthermore, the clinical applications of such biomechanical knowledge on the mucosa are explored to address some critical concerns, including stimuli for tissue remodelling (interstitial hydrostatic pressure), pressure–pain thresholds, tissue displaceability and residual bone resorption. Through this review, the state of the art in mucosal biomechanics and their clinical implications are discussed for future research interests, including clinical applications, computational modelling, design optimization and prosthetic fabrication. PMID:26224566

  14. Biomechanically Engineered Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Tekla S.

    1991-01-01

    The real-world meeting of electronics, computer monitoring, control systems, and mathematics, introduced in the context of sports, is described. Recent advances in the field of biomechanics and its use in improving athletic performance are discussed. (KR)

  15. Corneal biomechanics - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Sabine; Hafezi, Farhad

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, the interest in corneal biomechanics has strongly increased. The material properties of the cornea determine its shape and therefore play an important role in corneal ectasia and related pathologies. This review addresses the molecular origin of biomechanical properties, models for their description, methods for their characterisation, techniques for their modification, and computational simulation approaches. Recent research has focused on developing non-contact techniques to measure the biomechanical properties in vivo, on determining structural and molecular abnormalities in pathological corneas, on developing and optimising techniques to reinforce the corneal tissue and on the computational simulation of surgical interventions. A better understanding of corneal biomechanics will help to improve current refractive surgeries, allow an earlier diagnosis of ectatic disorders and a better quantification of treatments aiming at reinforcing the corneal tissue. © 2017 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2017 The College of Optometrists.

  16. Assessing host extinction risk following exposure to Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louca, Stilianos; Lampo, Margarita; Doebeli, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Wildlife diseases are increasingly recognized as a major threat to biodiversity. Chytridiomycosis is an emerging infectious disease of amphibians caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Using a mathematical model and simulations, we study its effects on a generic riparian host population with a tadpole and adult life stage. An analytical expression for the basic reproduction quotient, Qo, of the pathogen is derived. By sampling the entire relevant parameter space, we perform a statistical assessment of the importance of all considered parameters in determining the risk of host extinction, upon exposure to Bd. We find that Qo not only gives a condition for the initial invasion of the fungus, but is in fact the best predictor for host extinction. We also show that the role of tadpoles, which in some species tolerate infections, is ambivalent. While tolerant tadpoles may provide a reservoir for the fungus, thus facilitating its persistence or even amplifying its outbreaks, they can also act as a rescue buffer for a stressed host population. Our results have important implications for amphibian conservation efforts. PMID:24807247

  17. Risk Assessment to Dust Exposure in Room Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiku Rokhim

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available As one of the particulate chemicals, dust could occur in most of the production process and can create interference for workers health and safety. As one of the air pollution sources, dust could became a potential hazard which exist in room maintenances. Protection to workers is a must in order to reduce the risk of respiratory tract syndrome that often could be found in this cases. The aim of this study is to conduct a risk assessment to dust exposure in room maintenance, which held by contractors in PT. X (Persero building in Surabaya. This is an cross sectional study with obsevation approach. The object of this research is the repairing  works. The results indicate that the activities which could produce dust, such as: walls sanding using sandpaper, the tiles dismantle, sawmilling, the wood fiber refining, grinding, mixing and stirring cast  materials, and room cleaning. Dust produced from a variety of works including sanddust, cement, lime, wood and dust mixed with paint. The results show that three types of works considere as high-risk activity (value > 12-25, 3 types of work consider as midle risk activities (value > 5-12, and one activity considered as a low-risk work (grades 1-5. The dusk factors controlling should be held regularly, in order to minimize the risk leveln againts the workers.

  18. Efficient assessment of exposure to manual lifting using company data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Beek, Allard J; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Burdorf, Alex

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study, based on an extensive dataset on manual materials handling during scaffolding, was to explore whether routinely collected company data can be used to estimate exposure to manual lifting. The number of manual lifts of scaffold parts while constructing/dismantling scaffolds was well predicted by the number of scaffolders in the team and the type of worksite, in combination with company data of either the number of scaffold parts or the scaffold volume. The proportion of explained variance in the number of lifts ranged from 77% to 92%, depending on the variables in the model. Data on scaffold parts and scaffold volume can easily be obtained from the company's administration, since this is its usual paperwork supporting logistics and customer invoicing, respectively. We conclude that company data can be a promising source of information for ergonomic practitioners and researchers, to support assessment of manual lifting in scaffolding. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Exposure assessment of mycotoxins in cow's milk in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorini, M L; Gaggiotti, M; Molineri, A; Chiericatti, C A; Zapata de Basílico, M L; Basílico, J C; Pisani, M

    2012-02-01

    A stochastic simulation model was developed to carry out the first quantitative risk exposure assessment of the mycotoxin level in cow's milk produced in Argentina. The prevalence and concentration of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1), deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZEA) were modeled at various stages through milk processes complying with Argentinean practices. Concentration of AFM1 (0.059ppb), DON (0.338ppb) and ZEA (0.125ppb) in dairy milk were estimated. The proportion of feed samples that exceeded the maximum level accepted by European regulations for AFB1, DON and ZEA were estimated at 25.07%, 0.0% and 8.9%, respectively. The percentage of milk samples that exceeded the maximum level accepted for AFB1 by the MERCOSUR (0.5ppb) and the European Union regulations (0.05ppb) were 0.81 and 32.65, respectively. The probability distribution of AFM1 concentration in milk was affected by the carry-over rate equations applied in the model. Mycotoxin levels in corn silage and concentrated feeds were the factors most correlated with mycotoxin concentrations in milk. Therefore, agricultural practices, crop management and feed production require prompt attention regarding mycotoxin issues. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [ASSESSMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE TO RADIO FREQUENCY ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniołczyk, Halina; Mariańska, Magda; Mamrot, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    European Union Directive 2013/35/UE provides for the implementation of EU regulations into national legislation. Our aim is to assess actual health hazards from radiofrequency eldctromagnetic field (RF EMF) (range: 100 kHz - 300 GHz) and indicate workplaces with the highest risk to employee health. Data from measurements of RF EMF performed by the Laboratory of Electromagnetic Hazards in Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine (Łódź, Poland) were analyzed. The analysis covered the results of electric field intensity (E) for over 450 selected items. The ranges of protection zones and the extent to which maximum admissible intensity (MAI) values were also analyzed. The determinations and'measurements of EMF in the work environment met the requirements of Polish Standard, while Polish regulations on the MAI values were used as the criterion for the assessment of the exposure. The highest values of E field intensity at workplaces were measured for: electrosurgery, to 400 V/m, and short-wave diathermy units, to 220 V/m, dielectric welders to 240 V/m, within the FM radio antenna systems, to 180 V/m. The widest protection zones were noted for prototype research instruments, short-wave diathermy units, and dielectric welders. The most excessive (up to 12-fold MAI) values were recorded for dielectric welders, short-wave diathermy units (up to 11-fold) and microwave diathermy units (up to 8-fold). Our results have confirmed the high RF EMF values for physiotherapists, operators of dielectric welders, and mast maintenance workers in radio com munication facilities (especially radio and TV broadcasting stations).

  1. Biomechanics and tennis

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, B.

    2006-01-01

    Success in tennis requires a mix of player talent, good coaching, appropriate equipment, and an understanding of those aspects of sport science pertinent to the game. This paper outlines the role that biomechanics plays in player development from sport science and sport medicine perspectives. Biomechanics is a key area in player development because all strokes have a fundamental mechanical structure and sports injuries primarily have a mechanical cause.

  2. Non-destructive pollution exposure assessment in the European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus): IV hair versus soil analysis in exposure and risk assessment of organochlorine compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havé, D' H.; Scheirs, J.; Covaci, A.; Brink, van den N.W.; Verhagen, R.; Coen, De W.

    2007-01-01

    Few ecotoxicological studies on mammals use non-destructive methodologies, despite the growing ethical concern over the use of destructive sampling methods. In the present study we assessed exposure of hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs),

  3. Pro Et Con Analysis Of Occupational Exposure Assessement Tools And Concepts For nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liguori, Biase; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Alstrup Jensen, Keld

    of the tools (input data requirements, exposure evaluation and handling to reduce exposure) as well as specific pros and cons. Most of the tools provide a transparent and comprehensible approach to assess occupational exposure, but the majority of them are based on purely qualitative considerations about...

  4. Health risk assessment for chemical exposures of military interest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langenberg, J.P.; Polhuijs, M.; Sijbranda, T.

    2016-01-01

    Participation in military operations is accompanied by health hazards resulting from exposure to chemical substances from natural and anthropogenic sources. Historically, focus on toxicological risks has been on the health effects of exposure to chemical warfare agents (CW A). In recent years the

  5. Assessing Sources of Human Methylmercury Exposure Using Stable Mercury Isotopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Miling; Sherman, Laura S; Blum, Joel D

    2014-01-01

    Seafood consumption is the primary route of methylmercury (MeHg) exposure for most populations. Inherent uncertainties in dietary survey data point to the need for an empirical tool to confirm exposure sources. We therefore explore the utility of Hg stable isotope ratios in human hair as a new me...

  6. Problems of Sport Biomechanics and Robotics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Erdmann, Wlodzimierz S

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents many common areas of interest of different specialists. There are problems described from sport, biomechanics, sport biomechanics, sport engineering, robotics, biomechanics and robotics, sport biomechanics and robotics...

  7. #2 - An Empirical Assessment of Exposure Measurement Error ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background• Differing degrees of exposure error acrosspollutants• Previous focus on quantifying and accounting forexposure error in single-pollutant models• Examine exposure errors for multiple pollutantsand provide insights on the potential for bias andattenuation of effect estimates in single and bipollutantepidemiological models The National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) Human Exposure and Atmospheric Sciences Division (HEASD) conducts research in support of EPA mission to protect human health and the environment. HEASD research program supports Goal 1 (Clean Air) and Goal 4 (Healthy People) of EPA strategic plan. More specifically, our division conducts research to characterize the movement of pollutants from the source to contact with humans. Our multidisciplinary research program produces Methods, Measurements, and Models to identify relationships between and characterize processes that link source emissions, environmental concentrations, human exposures, and target-tissue dose. The impact of these tools is improved regulatory programs and policies for EPA.

  8. Assessment on personal exposure to particulate compounds using an empirical exposure model in an elderly community in Tianjin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia; Zhang, Nan; Han, Bin; You, Yan; Zhou, Jian; Zhang, Jiefeng; Niu, Can; Liu, Yating; He, Fei; Ding, Xiao; Bai, Zhipeng

    2016-12-01

    Using central site measurement data to predict personal exposure to particulate matter (PM) is challenging, because people spend most of their time indoors and ambient contribution to personal exposure is subject to infiltration conditions affected by many factors. Efforts in assessing and predicting exposure on the basis of associated indoor/outdoor and central site monitoring were limited in China. This study collected daily personal exposure, residential indoor/outdoor and community central site PM filter samples in an elderly community during the non-heating and heating periods in 2009 in Tianjin, China. Based on the chemical analysis results of particulate species, mass concentrations of the particulate compounds were estimated and used to reconstruct the PM mass for mass balance analysis. The infiltration factors (Finf) of particulate compounds were estimated using both robust regression and mixed effect regression methods, and further estimated the exposure factor (Fpex) according to participants' time-activity patterns. Then an empirical exposure model was developed to predict personal exposure to PM and particulate compounds as the sum of ambient and non-ambient contributions. Results showed that PM mass observed during the heating period could be well represented through chemical mass reconstruction, because unidentified mass was minimal. Excluding the high observations (>300μg/m(3)), this empirical exposure model performed well for PM and elemental carbon (EC) that had few indoor sources. These results support the use of Fpex as an indicator for ambient contribution predictions, and the use of empirical non-ambient contribution to assess exposure to particulate compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Exposure and health risk assessment of applicators to DDT during indoor residual spraying in malaria vector control program

    OpenAIRE

    Spanoghe, Pieter; Tessema, Dejene A; Steurbaut, Walter

    2012-01-01

    We assessed exposure of applicators, health risk of DDT to the applicators and evaluated the applicability of existing pesticide exposure models for indoor residual spraying (IRS). Patch sampling for dermal and personal air sampler for inhalation exposure were used in monitoring 57 applicators on the exposure assessment to DDT. The exposure of the applicators was also estimated using three exposure models. The mean actual dermal exposure was 449 mg total DDT per applicator per one house treat...

  10. Evaluation of methodologies for exposure assessment to atmospheric pollutants from a landfill site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Richard; Leonardi, Giovanni S; Robins, Alan; Jefferis, Stephan; Coy, Joanne; Wight, Jeremy; Murray, Virginia

    2009-04-01

    Epidemiological studies around landfill sites are limited by several factors, particularly a lack of accurate exposure assessment. Traditionally, exposure estimates are based on distance between place of residence and the landfill site. However, this measure of exposure ignores the effects that environmental factors may have upon exposure. A previous epidemiological study at a landfill site in the United Kingdom provided the basis for a case study to investigate exposure assessment methodologies that could support ongoing and future epidemiological work. Estimation of relative exposure to atmospheric pollutants near the site was refined using the Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling System (ADMS) 3.1. Annual average concentrations were calculated around the landfill site, which was modeled as an area source with a steady release rate over its entire active surface. Local meteorological and terrain data were used in the assessment. A geographical information system (GIS) was then used to link the results of the modeling to population and other data. Sensitivity studies were included to examine the variation of predicted exposure with several modeling assumptions and hence set other uncertainties in context. No simple relationship existed between the relative individual exposure measured by distance from the site and by dispersion modeling. A reassessment of exposure assessment in epidemiological studies around landfill sites was then undertaken with the refined estimates of exposure. This concluded that use of distance from the site as a proxy for exposure could lead to significant exposure misclassification in comparison with exposure assessment using atmospheric dispersion modeling and GIS. The study also indicated that assessment of peak exposure rates (i.e., extreme concentration levels) might be necessary in some epidemiological work. Optimum strategies for increasing the probability of observing effects in the more highly exposed population can be derived by

  11. Assessment of occupational exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Aniołczyk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: European Union Directive 2013/35/UE provides for the implementation of EU regulations into national legislation. Our aim is to assess actual health hazards from radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF EMF (range: 100 kHz – 300 GHz and indicate workplaces with the highest risk to employee health. Material and Methods: Data from measurements of RF EMF performed by the Laboratory of Electromagnetic Hazards in Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine (Łódź, Poland were analyzed. The analysis covered the results of electric field intensity (E for over 450 selected items. The ranges of protection zones and the extent to which maximum admissible intensity (MAI values were also analyzed. The determinations and measurements of EMF in the work environment met the requirements of Polish Standard, while Polish regulations on the MAI values were used as the criterion for the assessment of the exposure. Results: The highest values of E field intensity at workplaces were measured for: electrosurgery, to 400 V/m, and short-wave diathermy units, to 220 V/m, dielectric welders to 240 V/m, within the FM radio antenna systems, to 180 V/m. The widest protection zones were noted for prototype research instruments, short-wave diathermy units, and dielectric welders. The most excessive (up to 12-fold MAI values were recorded for dielectric welders, short-wave diathermy units (up to 11-fold and microwave diathermy units (up to 8-fold. Conclusions: Our results have confirmed the high RF EMF values for physiotherapists, operators of dielectric welders, and mast maintenance workers in radio communication facilities (especially radio and TV broadcasting stations. Med Pr 2015;66(2:199–212

  12. A novel endpoint for the assessment of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy in rodents: biomechanical properties of peripheral nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-Ning; Berryman, Edwin; Zakur, David; Shoieb, Ahmed M; Pardo, Ingrid D; Boucher, Magalie; Somps, Chris J; Bagi, Chedo M; Cook, Jon C

    2018-02-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CiPN) is a frequent adverse effect in patients and a leading safety consideration in oncology drug development. Although behavioral assessment and microscopic examination of the nerves and dorsal root ganglia can be incorporated into toxicity studies to assess CiPN risk, more sensitive and less labor-intensive endpoints are often lacking. In this study, rats and mice administered vincristine (75 μg kg-1  day-1 , i.p., for 10 days in rats and 100 μg kg-1  day-1 , i.p., for 11 days in mice, respectively) were employed as the CiPN models. Behavioral changes were assessed during the dosing phase. At necropsy, the sural or sciatic nerve was harvested from the rats and mice, respectively, and assessed for mechanical and histopathological endpoints. It was found that the maximal load and the load/extension ratio were significantly decreased in the nerves collected from the animals dosed with vincristine compared with the vehicle-treated animals (P < 0.05). Additionally, the gait analysis revealed that the paw print areas were significantly increased in mice (P < 0.01), but not in rats following vincristine administration. Light microscopic histopathology of the nerves and dorsal root ganglia were unaffected by vincristine administration. We concluded that ex vivo mechanical properties of the nerves is a sensitive endpoint, providing a new method to predict CiPN in rodent. Gait analysis may also be a useful tool in these pre-clinical animal models. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. An investigation of risk factors for fracture in patients with osteoporosis and osteopaenia using biomechanical, biochemical and radiological assessments

    OpenAIRE

    Browne, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Osteoporosis is defined as a skeletal disorder characterised by compromised bone strength resulting in an increased risk for fracture. Hip fractures are the most common osteoporotic fracture in older adults and occur due to reduced bone strength and a propensity to falling. Dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the standard test to assess for osteoporosis in fracture patients, although there is a significant overlap between patients diagnosed with nornial and osteoporotic bones who subsequently ...

  14. Exposure assessment to glyphosate of two species of annelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Torres, Tristán; Giuffré, Lidia; Romaniuk, Romina; Ríos, Ruth P; Pagano, Eduardo A

    2014-08-01

    Adult mortality, biomass, fecundity and viability of cocoons were studied in Eisenia fetida and Octolasion tyrtaeum, in response to glyphosate exposure in soil. Exposure tests were carried out following USEPA procedure, with five concentrations of glyphosate in soil and a control. O. tyrtaeum was more sensitive to the highest concentration of glyphosate (50,000 mg kg(-1)), with 100 % mortality by day 7 of exposure, compared with 71 % for E. fetida. Although biomass of O. tyrtaeum was significantly different between the control and 5,000 mg kg(-1) dose at day 14, E. fetida was not affected at that concentration, and only showed a significant weight loss after 7 days of exposure to 50,000 mg kg(-1). Adverse effects upon adult fecundity and cocoon viability were observed at glyphosate concentrations of 5,000 mg kg(-1) and above. Adverse effects were observed at concentrations that greatly exceeded the recommended field application rates of glyphosate.

  15. Dermal exposure assessment to benzene and toluene using charcoal cloth pads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joode, De B.V.; Tielemans, E.; Vermeulen, R.; Wegh, H.C.P.; Kromhout, H.

    2005-01-01

    Charcoal cloth pads have been used to assess volatile chemicals on the skin in a laboratory setting; however, they have not yet been applied to measure dermal exposure in occupational settings. This study aimed at evaluating whether charcoal pads can be used to assess dermal exposure to benzene and

  16. European consumer exposure to cosmetic products, a framework for conducting population exposure assessments Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, B; Steiling, W; Safford, B; Coroama, M; Tozer, S; Firmani, C; McNamara, C; Gibney, M

    2011-02-01

    Access to reliable exposure data is essential for the evaluation of the toxicological safety of ingredients in cosmetic products. This study complements the data set obtained previously (Part 1) and published in 2007 by the European cosmetic industry acting within COLIPA. It provides, in distribution form, exposure data on daily quantities of five cosmetic product types: hair styling, hand cream, liquid foundation, mouthwash and shower gel. In total 80,000 households and 14,413 individual consumers in five European countries provided information using their own products. The raw data were analysed using Monte Carlo simulation and a European Statistical Population Model of exposure was constructed. A significant finding was an inverse correlation between the frequency of product use and the quantity used per application recorded for mouthwash and shower gel. The combined results of Part 1 (7 product types) and Part 2 (5 products) reported here, bring up to date and largely confirm the current exposure parameters concerning some 95% of the estimated daily exposure to cosmetics use in the EU. The design of this study, with its relation to demographic and individual diversity, could serve as a model for studies of populations' exposure to other consumer products. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessment of corneal biomechanical properties in normal tension glaucoma and comparison with open-angle glaucoma, ocular hypertension, and normal eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grise-Dulac, Alice; Saad, Alain; Abitbol, Olivia; Febbraro, Jean-Luc; Azan, Elodie; Moulin-Tyrode, Christine; Gatinel, Damien

    2012-09-01

    To assess the biomechanical properties of corneas in patients with normal tension glaucoma (NTG) and to compare them with those of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), ocular hypertension (OHT), and normal controls (N). Corneal hysteresis (CH), corneal resistance factor (CRF), Goldmann intraocular pressure (IOPg), and corneal compensated IOP (IOPcc) were obtained using an ocular response analyzer for 28 eyes in 14 patients with NTG, 75 eyes in 38 patients with chronic POAG, 53 eyes of 27 patients with OHT, and 44 eyes of 22 N controls. IOP using Goldmann applanation tonometry (IOPGA) and ultrasonic central corneal thickness (CCT) were also measured for each eye. Analysis of variance test was used for statistical analysis. CH was significantly lower in the NTG group (9.88±2.02 mm Hg) compared with the N group (11.05±1.53 mm Hg; P<0.01). CRF was significantly lower in the NTG group (9.5±1.89 mm Hg) compared with the POAG group (11.15±2.35 mm Hg; P<0.01) and to the N group (11.00±1.75 mm Hg; P<0.01). CCT was not considered significantly different between the 4 groups. However, IOPcc was found to be significantly lower in NTG group compared with the POAG group and OHT group (P<0.001). NTG was associated with significantly lower CRF than chronic POAG and N patients. CH and CRF could be a useful tool in early diagnosis of NTG.

  18. SPORT AND EXERCISE BIOMECHANICS (BIOS INSTANT NOTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Grimshaw

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION Instant Notes on Sport and Exercise Biomechanics provides a broad overview of the fundamental concepts in exercise and sport biomechanics. PURPOSE The book aims to provide instant notes on essential information about biomechanics, and is designed to help undergraduate students to grasp the corresponding subjects in physical effort rapidly and easily. AUDIENCE The book provides a useful resource for undergraduate and graduate students as a fundamental reference book. For the researcher and lecturer it would be a starting point to plan and prepare more detailed experimental designs or lecture and/or laboratory classes in the field of exercise and sport biomechanics. It would also be interest to anyone who wonders the concepts like momentum possessed, whole body angular momentum, opposite parallel forces, superman position, parabolic flight path, joint/normal reaction force, etc. FEATURES This textbook is divided into following sections from A to F: kinematics of motion, kinetics of linear motion, kinetics of angular motion, special topics, applications and measurement techniques, respectively. In sub-sections the kinematics of motion are reviewed in detail, outlining the physics of motion. Furthermore, the discussions of mechanical characteristics of motion, the mechanisms of injury, and the analysis of the sport technique provide a source of valuable information for both students and lecturers in appropriate fields. ASSESSMENT This book is an important reading for biomechanics students, teachers and even researchers as well as anyone interested in understanding motion.

  19. Biomechanics and mechanobiology in functional tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilak, Farshid; Butler, David L.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Baaijens, Frank P.T.

    2014-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering continues to expand and mature, and several products are now in clinical use, with numerous other preclinical and clinical studies underway. However, specific challenges still remain in the repair or regeneration of tissues that serve a predominantly biomechanical function. Furthermore, it is now clear that mechanobiological interactions between cells and scaffolds can critically influence cell behavior, even in tissues and organs that do not serve an overt biomechanical role. Over the past decade, the field of “functional tissue engineering” has grown as a subfield of tissue engineering to address the challenges and questions on the role of biomechanics and mechanobiology in tissue engineering. Originally posed as a set of principles and guidelines for engineering of load-bearing tissues, functional tissue engineering has grown to encompass several related areas that have proven to have important implications for tissue repair and regeneration. These topics include measurement and modeling of the in vivo biomechanical environment; quantitative analysis of the mechanical properties of native tissues, scaffolds, and repair tissues; development of rationale criteria for the design and assessment of engineered tissues; investigation of the effects biomechanical factors on native and repair tissues, in vivo and in vitro; and development and application of computational models of tissue growth and remodeling. Here we further expand this paradigm and provide examples of the numerous advances in the field over the past decade. Consideration of these principles in the design process will hopefully improve the safety, efficacy, and overall success of engineered tissue replacements. PMID:24818797

  20. Corneal biomechanics: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñero, David P; Alcón, Natividad

    2015-03-01

    Biomechanics is often defined as 'mechanics applied to biology'. Due to the variety and complexity of the behaviour of biological structures and materials, biomechanics is better defined as the development, extension and application of mechanics for a better understanding of physiology and physiopathology and consequently for a better diagnosis and treatment of disease and injury. Different methods for the characterisation of corneal biomechanics are reviewed in detail, including those that are currently commercially available (Ocular Response Analyzer and CorVis ST). The clinical applicability of the parameters provided by these devices are discussed, especially in the fields of glaucoma, detection of ectatic disorders and orthokeratology. Likewise, other methods are also reviewed, such as Brillouin microscopy or dynamic optical coherence tomography and others with potential application to clinical practice but not validated for in vivo measurements, such as ultrasonic elastography. Advantages and disadvantages of all these techniques are described. Finally, the concept of biomechanical modelling is revised as well as the requirements for developing biomechanical models, with special emphasis on finite element modelling. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2014 Optometry Australia.

  1. Cerebellar TMS in treatment of a patient with cerebellar ataxia: evidence from clinical, biomechanics and neurophysiological assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzan, Faranak; Wu, Yunfen; Manor, Brad; Anastasio, Elana M; Lough, Matthew; Novak, Vera; Greenstein, Patricia E; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2013-10-01

    We describe a patient with a probable diagnosis of idiopathic late-onset cerebellar atrophy who shows improvement of limb coordination, speech, and gait following 21 days of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applied to scalp regions presumably corresponding to the cerebellum. This case study provides, for the first time, a quantitative assessment of gait improvement in response to TMS therapy in ataxia, as well as neurophysiological evidence in support of modification of cerebellar-cortical interaction that may underlie some of the improvements.

  2. Assessment of prenatal exposure to arsenic in Tenerife Island.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriol Vall

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Increasing awareness of the potential chronic health effects of arsenic (As at low exposure levels has motivated efforts to better understand impaired child development during pregnancy by biomarkers of exposure. The aims of this study were to evaluate the prenatal exposure to As by analysis of an alternative matrix (meconium, to examine its effects on neonatal outcomes and investigate the association with maternal lifestyle and dietary habits during pregnancy. METHODS: A transversal descriptive study was conducted in Tenerife (Spain. A total of 96 mother-child pairs participated in the study. A questionnaire on sociodemographic, lifestyle and dietary habits during pregnancy was administered the day after the delivery. Analysis of total As in meconium was performed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer. RESULTS: Total As was detected in 37 (38.5% meconium samples. The univariate logistic regression model indicates that prenatal exposure to As was associated with a low intake of eggs per week (OR 0.56; CI (95%: 0.34-0.94 during pregnancy. Conversely, frequent intake of vegetables was associated with prenatal As exposure (OR: 1.19; CI (95%: 1.01-1.41 and frequent intake of processed meat (as bacon, Frankfurt's sausage, and hamburger shows a trend to As prenatal exposure (OR: 8.54; CI (95%: 0.80-90.89. The adjusted multivariate logistic regression model indicates that only frequent intake of vegetables maintains the association (OR: 1.31; CI (95%: 1.02-1.68. CONCLUSION: The studied population presented a low As exposure and was not associated with neonatal effects. Maternal consumption of vegetables during pregnancy was associated with detectable meconium As levels; however the concentration detected in meconium was too low to be considered a major public health concern in this geographical area.

  3. Exposure assessment of process-related contaminants in food by biomarker monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Dussort, P; Günther, Helmut; Hanlon, Paul; Honda, Hiroshi; Mally, Angela; O'Hagan, Sue; Scholz, Gabriele; Seidel, Albrecht; Swenberg, James; Teeguarden, Justin; Eisenbrand, Gerhard

    2018-01-04

    Exposure assessment is a fundamental part of the risk assessment paradigm, but can often present a number of challenges and uncertainties. This is especially the case for process contaminants formed during the processing, e.g. heating of food, since they are in part highly reactive and/or volatile, thus making exposure assessment by analysing contents in food unreliable. New approaches are therefore required to accurately assess consumer exposure and thus better inform the risk assessment. Such novel approaches may include the use of biomarkers, physiologically based kinetic (PBK) modelling-facilitated reverse dosimetry, and/or duplicate diet studies. This review focuses on the state of the art with respect to the use of biomarkers of exposure for the process contaminants acrylamide, 3-MCPD esters, glycidyl esters, furan and acrolein. From the overview presented, it becomes clear that the field of assessing human exposure to process-related contaminants in food by biomarker monitoring is promising and strongly developing. The current state of the art as well as the existing data gaps and challenges for the future were defined. They include (1) using PBK modelling and duplicate diet studies to establish, preferably in humans, correlations between external exposure and biomarkers; (2) elucidation of the possible endogenous formation of the process-related contaminants and the resulting biomarker levels; (3) the influence of inter-individual variations and how to include that in the biomarker-based exposure predictions; (4) the correction for confounding factors; (5) the value of the different biomarkers in relation to exposure scenario's and risk assessment, and (6) the possibilities of novel methodologies. In spite of these challenges it can be concluded that biomarker-based exposure assessment provides a unique opportunity to more accurately assess consumer exposure to process-related contaminants in food and thus to better inform risk assessment.

  4. A case report of lung cancer in a horse trainer caused by exposure to respirable crystalline silica: an exposure assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yoon, Jin-Ha; Kim, Boowook; Choi, Byung-Soon; Park, So Young; Kwag, Hyun-Suk; Kim, In-Ah; Jeong, Ji Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present a case of lung cancer in a 48-year-old male horse trainer. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such case report to include an exposure assessment of respirable crystalline silica (RCS) as a quartz...

  5. Probabilistic assessment of exposure to cosmetic products by French children aged 0-3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficheux, A S; Dornic, N; Bernard, A; Chevillotte, G; Roudot, A C

    2016-08-01

    Very few exposure data are available for children in Europe and worldwide. The aim of this study was to assess the exposure to cosmetic products used on children aged 0-3 years using recent consumption data generated for the French population. Exposure was assessed using a probabilistic method for 24 products including cleanser, skin care, fragrance, solar and bottom products. The exposure data obtained in this study for children aged 0-3 years were higher than the values fixed by the SCCS for all common products: liquid shampoo, face moisturizer cream, toothpaste, shower gel and body moisturizer cream. Exposure was assessed for the first time for many products such as sunscreens, Eau de toilette and massage products. These new French exposure values will be useful for safety assessors and for safety agencies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of expert and job-exposure matrix-based retrospective exposure assessment of occupational carcinogens in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offermans, N.S.M.; Vermeulen, R.; Burdorf, A.; Peters, S.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Koeman, T.; Tongeren, M. van; Kauppinen, T.; Kant, I.; Kromhout, H.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Reliable retrospective exposure assessment continues to be a challenge in most population-based studies. Several methodologies exist for estimating exposures retrospectively, of which case-by-case expert assessment and job-exposure matrices (JEMs) are commonly used. This study evaluated

  7. Biomechanical factors associated with the development of tibiofemoral knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Tunen, Joyce A C; Dell'Isola, Andrea; Juhl, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Altered biomechanics, increased joint loading and tissue damage, might be related in a vicious cycle within the development of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). We have defined biomechanical factors as joint-related factors that interact with the forces, moments and kinematics in and around...... a synovial joint. Although a number of studies and systematic reviews have been performed to assess the association of various factors with the development of KOA, a comprehensive overview focusing on biomechanical factors that are associated with the development of KOA is not available. The aim...... of this review is (1) to identify biomechanical factors that are associated with (the development of) KOA and (2) to identify the impact of other relevant risk factors on this association. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Cohort, cross-sectional and case-control studies investigating the association of a biomechanical...

  8. The role of imaging and in situ biomechanical testing in assessing pedicle screw pull-out strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, B S; Belmont, P J; Richardson, W J; Yu, J R; Harper, K D; Nightingale, R W

    1996-09-01

    This study determined the predictive ability of quantitative computed tomography, dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, pedicular geometry, and mechanical testing in assessing the strength of pedicle screw fixation in an in vitro mechanical test of intra-pedicular screw fixation in the human cadaveric lumbar spine. To test several hypotheses regarding the relative predictive value of densitometry, pedicular geometry, and mechanical testing in describing pedicle screw pull-out. Previous investigations have suggested that mechanical testing, geometry, and densitometry, determined by quantitative computed tomography or dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, predict the strength of the screw-bone system. However, no study has compared the relative predictive value of these techniques. Forty-nine pedicle screw cyclic-combined flexion-extension moment-axial pull-out tests were performed on human cadaveric lumbar vertebrae. The predictive ability of quantitative computed tomography, dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, insertional torque, in situ stiffness, and pedicular geometry was assessed using multiple regression. Several variables correlated to force at failure. However, multiple regression analysis showed that bone mineral density of the pedicle determined by quantitative computed tomography, insertional torque, and in situ stiffness when used in combination resulted in the strongest prediction of pull-out force. No other measures provided additional predictive ability in the presence of these measures. Pedicle density determined by quantitative computed tomography when used with insertional torque and in situ stiffness provides the strongest predictive ability of screw pull-out. Geometric measures of the pedicle and density determined by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry do not provide additional predictive ability in the presence of these measures.

  9. Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS{reg_sign}): Exposure pathway and human health impact assessment models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strenge, D.L.; Chamberlain, P.J.

    1995-05-01

    The Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) provides physics-based models for human health risk assessment for radioactive and hazardous pollutants. MEPAS analyzes pollutant behavior in various media (air, soil, groundwater and surface water) and estimates transport through and between media and exposure and impacts to the environment, to the maximum individual, and to populations. MEPAS includes 25 exposure pathway models, a database with information on more than 650 contaminants, and a sensitivity module that allows for uncertainty analysis. Four major transport pathways are considered in MEPAS: groundwater, overland, surface water, and atmospheric. This report describes the exposure pathway and health impact assessment component of MEPAS, which provides an estimate of health impacts to selected individuals and populations from exposure to pollutants. The exposure pathway analysis starts with pollutant concentration in a transport medium and estimates the average daily dose to exposed individuals from contact with the transport medium or a secondary medium contaminated by the transport medium. The average daily dose is then used to estimate a measure of health impact appropriate to the type of pollutant considered. Discussions of the exposure pathway models include the assumptions and equations used to convert the transport medium concentrations to exposure medium concentrations. The discussion for a given exposure pathway defines the transport pathways leading to the exposure, the special processes considered in determining the pollutant concentration in the exposure medium, and the exposure model used to estimate the average daily dose. Models for the exposure pathway and health impact assessments require definition of several parameters. A summary of the notation used for these parameters is provided.

  10. Survival risk assessment for primary blast exposures to the head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafaels, Karin; Bass, Cameron R Dale; Salzar, Robert S; Panzer, Matthew B; Woods, William; Feldman, Sanford; Cummings, Thomas; Capehart, Bruce

    2011-11-01

    Many soldiers returning from the current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have had at least one exposure to an explosive event and a significant number have symptoms consistent with traumatic brain injury. Although blast injury risk functions have been determined and validated for pulmonary injury, there is little information on the blast levels necessary to cause blast brain injury. Anesthetized male New Zealand White rabbits were exposed to varying levels of shock tube blast exposure focused on the head, while their thoraces were protected. The specimens were euthanized and evaluated when the blast resulted in respiratory arrest that was non-responsive to resuscitation or at 4?h post-exposure. Injury was evaluated by gross examination and histological evaluation. The fatality data from brain injury were then analyzed using Fisher's exact test to determine a brain fatality risk function. Greater blast intensity was associated with post-blast apnea and the need for mechanical ventilation. Gross examination revealed multifocal subdural hemorrhages, most often near the brainstem, at more intense levels of exposure. Histological evaluation revealed subdural and subarachnoid hemorrhages in the non-responsive respiratory-arrested specimens. A fatality risk function from blast exposure to the head was determined for the rabbit specimens with an LD(50) at a peak overpressure of 750?kPa. Scaling techniques were used to predict injury risk at other blast overpressure/duration combinations. The fatality risk function showed that the blast level needed to cause fatality from an overpressure wave exposure to the head was greater than the peak overpressure needed to cause fatality from pulmonary injury. This risk function can be used to guide future research for blast brain injury by providing a realistic fatality risk to guide the design of protection or to evaluate injury.

  11. Assessing Smoking Behaviour and Tobacco Smoke Exposure: Definitions and Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregg E

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the increased availability of tobacco products other than conventional cigarettes, the use of puffing topography devices for smoking behaviour studies and the use of biomarkers to study smoke constituents exposure have generated the need for a more comprehensive set of definitions concerning smoking behaviour and exposure to smoke. The definitions offered in this paper are based on many years of practical experience and on consensus within a broad group of scientists working in these areas. It is intended that, with wider and more consistent usage, these definitions should reduce any misunderstandings and facilitate interpretation of future studies.

  12. ASB clinical biomechanics award winner 2016: Assessment of gaze stability within 24-48hours post-concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Nicholas G; D'Amico, Nathan R; Powell, Douglas; Mormile, Megan E; Grimes, Katelyn E; Munkasy, Barry A; Gore, Russell K; Reed-Jones, Rebecca J

    2017-05-01

    Approximately 90% of athletes with concussion experience a certain degree of visual system dysfunction immediately post-concussion. Of these abnormalities, gaze stability deficits are denoted as among the most common. Little research quantitatively explores these variables post-concussion. As such, the purpose of this study was to investigate and compare gaze stability between a control group of healthy non-injured athletes and a group of athletes with concussions 24-48hours post-injury. Ten collegiate NCAA Division I athletes with concussions and ten healthy control collegiate athletes completed two trials of a sport-like antisaccade postural control task, the Wii Fit Soccer Heading Game. During play all participants were instructed to minimize gaze deviations away from a central fixed area. Athletes with concussions were assessed within 24-48 post-concussion while healthy control data were collected during pre-season athletic screening. Raw ocular point of gaze coordinates were tracked with a monocular eye tracking device (240Hz) and motion capture during the postural task to determine the instantaneous gaze coordinates. This data was exported and analyzed using a custom algorithm. Independent t-tests analyzed gaze resultant distance, prosaccade errors, mean vertical velocity, and mean horizontal velocity. Athletes with concussions had significantly greater gaze resultant distance (p=0.006), prosaccade errors (pconcussions had less control of gaze during play of the Wii Fit Soccer Heading Game. This could indicate a gaze stability deficit via potentially reduced cortical inhibition that is present within 24-48hours post-concussion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Asbestos exposure assessment in the first case of intrasplenic mesothelioma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miscetti, Giorgio; Bodo, Patrizia; Lumare, A; Abbritti, E P; Garofani, Patrizia; Burani, V

    2016-01-20

    In 2013 the International Journal of Surgical Pathology published a case report of intrasplenic malignant mesothelioma (MM) in a 48-year-old man: it was the first report in literature describing a case of primitive intra-splenic MM, described without  a history of asbestos exposure. To verify the possible past exposure to asbestos, ignored by the patient himself, by studying in depth his environmental and occupational history. Information about the occupational and non-occupational history of the subject was collected by Experts of the Operational Unit of Occupational Health and Safety Control (UOC PSAL) of the Local Health Unit Umbria 1 - Perugia, using the Italian National Mesothelioma Register (ReNaM) questionnaire and guide lines; an inspection was  carried out at the past canning industry where the patient worked in the period 1982-1990 and material was taken to be analysed by MOCF and SEM. Samples showed the presence of asbestos  fibres belonging to the amphibole class (amosite and crocidolite) and to the serpentine class (chrysotile). The survey described the past occupational exposure to asbestos in a canning industry, where  the subject worked in the period 1982-1990,  unknown to the patient himself. The authors strongly confirm the  usefulness of standardized methods, such as the ReNaM Questionnaire, and the importance of technical expertise of the investigator to find and analyse the suspect materials and to demonstrate  possible past occupational exposure to asbestos.

  14. Assessment of Nicotine Exposure From Active Human Cigarette Smoking Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahours Xavier

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The burning of a cigarette is a series of consecutive sequences of both passive and active burnings when a smoking cycle is applied to the cigarette. A previous study, using a smoking machine, showed that cigarette nicotine yields are dependent linearly on the difference between the time of smouldering (passive burning and the time of smoking (active burning. It is predicted that the smoker’s nicotine yield increases when the intensity of smoking increases, i.e., when the time to smoke a cigarette (smoking time decreases. Note that observations made on machines might not be comparable to human behaviours. The aim of this study was to determine whether nicotine mouth-level exposure could be predicted through measurement of human smoking time. A smoking behaviour study was conducted to compare human smoking nicotine yields obtained from both filter tip analysis and the cigarette burning time model. Results showed that smokers’ exposure to the smoke depends essentially on the speed at which the cigarette is smoked. An increase in human smoking intensity, resulting in a decrease in smoking time, generates an increase in smoke exposure, whatever the puff number, puff duration, puff volume and filter ventilation (open or blocked. The association of a machine smoking yield with a corresponding smoking time, and the time taken by a consumer to smoke the cigarette would provide information on the exposure to smoke constituents in a simple and effective manner.

  15. original article assessment of hiv post-exposure prophylaxis use ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Background: Infection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus is a serious public health problem costing the lives of many people including health workers. Hence, Ethiopia has developed guideline on the prevention of infection in health institutions in July 2004 and also employed the use of post exposure prophylaxis since ...

  16. Assessing elemental mercury vapor exposure from cultural and religious practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, D M; Newby, C A; Leal-Almeraz, T O; Thomas, V M

    2001-08-01

    Use of elemental mercury in certain cultural and religious practices can cause high exposures to mercury vapor. Uses include sprinkling mercury on the floor of a home or car, burning it in a candle, and mixing it with perfume. Some uses can produce indoor air mercury concentrations one or two orders of magnitude above occupational exposure limits. Exposures resulting from other uses, such as infrequent use of a small bead of mercury, could be well below currently recognized risk levels. Metallic mercury is available at almost all of the 15 botanicas visited in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, but botanica personnel often deny having mercury for sale when approached by outsiders to these religious and cultural traditions. Actions by public health authorities have driven the mercury trade underground in some locations. Interviews indicate that mercury users are aware that mercury is hazardous, but are not aware of the inhalation exposure risk. We argue against a crackdown by health authorities because it could drive the practices further underground, because high-risk practices may be rare, and because uninformed government intervention could have unfortunate political and civic side effects for some Caribbean and Latin American immigrant groups. We recommend an outreach and education program involving religious and community leaders, botanica personnel, and other mercury users.

  17. Lead Concentrations and Risk Exposure Assessment in Surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Lead is included in the formulation of several motor oils. Leaded gasoline has been phased out, but is still used in ... Human exposure to motor garage chemicals has been suggested to induce genotoxic effects (Oktem et al., ... by adding hydrogen peroxide and sodium hexametaphosphate and the resulting soil analysed by.

  18. Assessment of potential asbestos exposures from jet engine overhaul work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynarek, S P; Van Orden, D R

    2012-06-01

    Asbestos fibers have been used in a wide variety of products and numerous studies have shown that exposures from the use or manipulation of these products can vary widely. Jet engines contained various components (gaskets, clamps, o-rings and insulation) that contained asbestos that potentially could release airborne fibers during routine maintenance or during an engine overhaul. To evaluate the potential exposures to aircraft mechanics, a Pratt & Whitney JT3D jet engine was obtained and overhauled by experienced mechanics using tools and work practices similar to those used since the time this engine was manufactured. This study has demonstrated that the disturbance of asbestos-containing gaskets, o-rings, and other types of asbestos-containing components, while performing overhaul work to a jet engine produces very few airborne fibers, and that virtually none of these aerosolized fibers is asbestos. The overhaul work was observed to be dirty and oily. The exposures to the mechanics and bystanders were several orders of magnitude below OSHA exposure regulations, both current and historic. The data presented underscore the lack of risk to the health of persons conducting this work and to other persons in proximity to it from airborne asbestos. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessing sources of human methylmercury exposure using stable mercury isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Miling; Sherman, Laura S; Blum, Joel D; Grandjean, Philippe; Mikkelsen, Bjarni; Weihe, Pál; Sunderland, Elsie M; Shine, James P

    2014-01-01

    Seafood consumption is the primary route of methylmercury (MeHg) exposure for most populations. Inherent uncertainties in dietary survey data point to the need for an empirical tool to confirm exposure sources. We therefore explore the utility of Hg stable isotope ratios in human hair as a new method for discerning MeHg exposure sources. We characterized Hg isotope fractionation between humans and their diets using hair samples from Faroese whalers exposed to MeHg predominantly from pilot whales. We observed an increase of 1.75‰ in δ(202)Hg values between pilot whale muscle tissue and Faroese whalers' hair but no mass-independent fractionation. We found a similar offset in δ(202)Hg between consumed seafood and hair samples from Gulf of Mexico recreational anglers who are exposed to lower levels of MeHg from a variety of seafood sources. An isotope mixing model was used to estimate individual MeHg exposure sources and confirmed that both Δ(199)Hg and δ(202)Hg values in human hair can help identify dietary MeHg sources. Variability in isotopic signatures among coastal fish consumers in the Gulf of Mexico likely reflects both differences in environmental sources of MeHg to coastal fish and uncertainty in dietary recall data. Additional data are needed to fully refine this approach for individuals with complex seafood consumption patterns.

  20. Quantitative exposure assessment in community-based studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Occupational epidemiology focuses on the associations between exposures at the workplace and disease outcomes, essentially concerned with the prevention of disease. Basically two types of studies can be distinguished in occupational epidemiology: industry-based studies which study a population at

  1. Teaching undergraduate biomechanics with Just-in-Time Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riskowski, Jody L

    2015-06-01

    Biomechanics education is a vital component of kinesiology, sports medicine, and physical education, as well as for many biomedical engineering and bioengineering undergraduate programmes. Little research exists regarding effective teaching strategies for biomechanics. However, prior work suggests that student learning in undergraduate physics courses has been aided by using the Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT). As physics understanding plays a role in biomechanics understanding, the purpose of study was to evaluate the use of a JiTT framework in an undergraduate biomechanics course. This two-year action-based research study evaluated three JiTT frameworks: (1) no JiTT; (2) mathematics-based JiTT; and (3) concept-based JiTT. A pre- and post-course assessment of student learning used the biomechanics concept inventory and a biomechanics concept map. A general linear model assessed differences between the course assessments by JiTT framework in order to evaluate learning and teaching effectiveness. The results indicated significantly higher learning gains and better conceptual understanding in a concept-based JiTT course, relative to a mathematics-based JiTT or no JiTT course structure. These results suggest that a course structure involving concept-based questions using a JiTT strategy may be an effective method for engaging undergraduate students and promoting learning in biomechanics courses.

  2. HESI pilot project: Testing a qualitative approach for incorporating exposure into alternatives assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greggs, Bill; Arnold, Scott; Burns, Thomas J.

    important, including exposure, risk, life-cycle thinking, performance, cost, and social responsibility. Building on the 2014 recommendations by the US National Academy of Sciences to improve AA decisions by including comparative xposure assessment, the HESI Sustainable Chemical Alternatives Technical...... Committee, which consists of scientists from academia, industry, government, and NGOs, has developed a qualitative comparative exposure approach. Conducting such a comparison can screen for alternatives that are expected to have a higher exposure potential, which could trigger a higher-tiered, more......-quantitative exposure assessment on the alternatives being considered. This talk will demonstrate an approach for including chemical and product exposure information in a qualitative AA comparison. Starting from existing hazard AAs, a series of four exposure examples were examined to test the concept, to understand...

  3. A probabilistic assessment of health risks associated with short-term exposure to tropospheric ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitfield, R.G; Biller, W.F.; Jusko, M.J.; Keisler, J.M.

    1996-06-01

    The work described in this report is part of a larger risk assessment sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Earlier efforts developed exposure-response relationships for acute health effects among populations engaged in heavy exertion. Those efforts also developed a probabilistic national ambient air quality standards exposure model and a general methodology for integrating probabilistic exposure-response relation- ships and exposure estimates to calculate overall risk results. Recently published data make it possible to model additional health endpoints (for exposure at moderate exertion), including hospital admissions. New air quality and exposure estimates for alternative national ambient air quality standards for ozone are combined with exposure-response models to produce the risk results for hospital admissions and acute health effects. Sample results explain the methodology and introduce risk output formats.

  4. Harmonisation of food categorisation systems for dietary exposure assessments among European children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Neve, Melissa; Sioen, Isabelle; Boon, Polly

    2010-01-01

    Within the European project called EXPOCHI (Individual Food Consumption Data and Exposure Assessment Studies for Children), 14 different European individual food consumption databases of children were used to conduct harmonised dietary exposure assessments for lead, chromium, selenium and food co...... coded and in level of detail provided about the consumed foods. The work done and the problems encountered in this project can be of interest for future projects in which food consumption data will be collected on a pan-European level and used for common exposure assessments....

  5. Does intraarticular inflammation predict biomechanical cartilage properties?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldstein, Wenzel; Perino, Giorgio; Jawetz, Shari T; Gilbert, Susannah L; Boettner, Friedrich

    2014-07-01

    Intact cartilage in the lateral compartment is an important requirement for medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). Progression of cartilage degeneration in the lateral compartment is a common failure mode of medial UKA. Little is known about factors that influence the mechanical properties of lateral compartment cartilage. The purposes of this study were to answer the following questions: (1) Does the synovial fluid white blood cell count predict the biomechanical properties of macroscopically intact cartilage of the distal lateral femur? (2) Is there a correlation between MRI grading of synovitis and the biomechanical properties of macroscopically intact cartilage? (3) Is there a correlation between the histopathologic assessment of the synovium and the biomechanical properties of macroscopically intact cartilage? The study included 84 patients (100 knees) undergoing primary TKA for varus osteoarthritis between May 2010 and January 2012. All patients underwent preoperative MRI to assess the degree of synovitis. During surgery, the cartilage of the distal lateral femur was assessed macroscopically using the Outerbridge grading scale. In knees with an Outerbridge grade of 0 or 1, osteochondral plugs were harvested from the distal lateral femur for biomechanical and histologic assessment. The synovial fluid was collected to determine the white blood cell count. Synovial tissue was taken for histologic evaluation of the degree of synovitis. The mean aggregate modulus and the mean dynamic modulus were significantly greater in knees with 150 or less white blood cells/mL synovial fluid compared with knees with greater than 150 white blood cells/mL synovial fluid. There was no correlation among MRI synovitis grades, histopathologic synovitis grades, and biomechanical cartilage properties. The study suggests that lateral compartment cartilage in patients with elevated synovial fluid white blood cell counts has a reduced ability to withstand compressive loads

  6. Sensitivity Analysis of Personal Exposure Assessment Using a Computer Simulated Person

    OpenAIRE

    Brohus, Henrik; Jensen, H. K.

    2009-01-01

    The paper considers uncertainties related to personal exposure assessment using a computer simulated person. CFD is used to simulate a uniform flow field around a human being to determine the personal exposure to a contaminant source. For various vertical locations of a point contaminant source three additional factors are varied, namely the velocity, details of the computer simulated person, and the CFD model of the wind channel. The personal exposure is found to be highly dependent on the r...

  7. Mathematical foundations of biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederer, Peter F

    2010-01-01

    The aim of biomechanics is the analysis of the structure and function of humans, animals, and plants by means of the methods of mechanics. Its foundations are in particular embedded in mathematics, physics, and informatics. Due to the inherent multidisciplinary character deriving from its aim, biomechanics has numerous connections and overlapping areas with biology, biochemistry, physiology, and pathophysiology, along with clinical medicine, so its range is enormously wide. This treatise is mainly meant to serve as an introduction and overview for readers and students who intend to acquire a basic understanding of the mathematical principles and mechanics that constitute the foundation of biomechanics; accordingly, its contents are limited to basic theoretical principles of general validity and long-range significance. Selected examples are included that are representative for the problems treated in biomechanics. Although ultimate mathematical generality is not in the foreground, an attempt is made to derive the theory from basic principles. A concise and systematic formulation is thereby intended with the aim that the reader is provided with a working knowledge. It is assumed that he or she is familiar with the principles of calculus, vector analysis, and linear algebra.

  8. Biomechanical pulping of kenaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz Ahmed; Masood Akhtar; Gary C. Myers; Gary M. Scott

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of fungal pretreatment of whole kenaf prior to refining on refiner electrical energy consumption, paper strength, and optical properties. We also explored the suitability of whole kenaf biomechanical pulp for making newsprint in terms of ISO brightness and strength properties. Kenaf was sterilized by autoclaving...

  9. Lead concentrations and risk exposure assessment in surface soils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated lead concentrations in < 250 μm and < 75 μm of deposited dust and< 2000 μm, < 250 μm, and < 75 μm of surface soils at undeveloped residential lands leased to auto-mechanic artisans for a minimum of ten years and estimated exposure risk for children that will reside on the polluted lands after the ...

  10. Exposure Assessment Methods in Studies on Waste Management and Health Effects: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Spinazzè

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Concerns and uncertainties persist about potential environmental and health effects associated with exposure to emissions from widely adopted waste management facilities: despite a limited amount of evidence having been found for some exposure-effect associations, most of the available studies were characterized by limitations related to poor exposure assessment, which could introduce biases and weaknesses in the interpretation of results. This communication provides a brief overview of the exposure assessment methods used in studies on waste management and health effects: problems, key issues, priorities and challenges are briefly presented and discussed. The main conclusions refer to the need of newly developed and harmonized exposure assessment strategies and techniques, which represent an essential step in the study of waste-disposal facilities’ health impacts.

  11. Using transportation demand models to assess regional noise exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliski, Kenneth

    2005-09-01

    In the United States, most metropolitan areas run some type of transportation demand model to estimate regional travel patterns, and, to some extent, air pollution. The more advanced of these models accurately represent the geographic contours of the roadways (in contrast to the older straight-line node and link models). This allows an almost seamless integration of these new transportation demand models into noise prediction models. Combined with the locations of individual homes from a separate E911 database, we can readily make estimates of the noise exposure of populations over large areas. In this paper, the regional traffic noise exposure of residences of Chittenden County, VT is estimated and mapped. It was found that 30% of the residences are exposed to noise levels exceeding the WHO sleep disturbance level of 45 dB LAeq(8) and 20% of residences are exposed to levels exceeding the WHO ``serious annoyance'' level of 55 dB LAeq(16). Maps show noise contours as well as individual homes color coded based on relative day and night noise exposure levels. Measured sound level data are given for particular locations to validate the predictions.

  12. Health effects assessment of exposure to particles from wood smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Elsa; Dybdahl, M. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, National Food Institute, Dept. of Toxicology and Risk Assessment, Soeborg (Denmark)); Larsen, Poul Bo (Danish Environmental Protection Agency, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    2008-07-01

    The number of residential wood burning devices has increased in Denmark during the latest years and it has been estimated that there in 2005 were about 551,000 wood stoves and about 48,000 wood boilers in Denmark. This has resulted in an increased exposure of the general Danish population to pollutants associated with residential wood smoke. New Danish monitoring results on particulate matter (PM) in ambient air have shown elevated PM levels in areas with many wood stoves, particularly during wintertime when wood burning is common. Due to the size distribution of wood smoke particles essentially all will be contained in the PM{sub 2.5} fraction. It has been estimated that about 17,665 tonnes PM{sub 2.5} per year (2005) in Denmark come from residential wood combustion. Therefore, there is an increasing concern that adverse human health effects might be associated with the increased exposure to residential wood smoke. This project has been set up in order to review the scientific literature concerning adverse health effects of pollutants associated with residential wood smoke with the main focus on particulate matter and to quantify and evaluate, if possible, the impact on human health of the increased exposure to particles in residential wood smoke. (au)

  13. Indoor transformer stations and ELF magnetic field exposure: use of transformer structural characteristics to improve exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okokon, Enembe Oku; Roivainen, Päivi; Kheifets, Leeka; Mezei, Gabor; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that populations of multiapartment buildings with indoor transformer stations may serve as a basis for improved epidemiological studies on the relationship between childhood leukaemia and extremely-low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields (MFs). This study investigated whether classification based on structural characteristics of the transformer stations would improve ELF MF exposure assessment. The data included MF measurements in apartments directly above transformer stations ("exposed" apartments) in 30 buildings in Finland, and reference apartments in the same buildings. Transformer structural characteristics (type and location of low-voltage conductors) were used to classify exposed apartments into high-exposure (HE) and intermediate-exposure (IE) categories. An exposure gradient was observed: both the time-average MF and time above a threshold (0.4 μT) were highest in the HE apartments and lowest in the reference apartments, showing a statistically significant trend. The differences between HE and IE apartments, however, were not statistically significant. A simulation exercise showed that the three-category classification did not perform better than a two-category classification (exposed and reference apartments) in detecting the existence of an increased risk. However, data on the structural characteristics of transformers is potentially useful for evaluating exposure-response relationship.

  14. Assessment of long-term exposures to toxic substances in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, S M

    1991-02-01

    Because airborne exposure varies greatly over time and between individual workers, occupational hygienists should adopt sampling strategies which recognize the inherent statistical nature of assessing exposure. This analysis indicates that the traditional practice of testing 'compliance' with occupational exposure limits (OELs) should be discarded. Rather, it is argued that acceptable exposure should be defined with reference to the exposure distribution. Regarding the many statistical issues which come into play, it is concluded that hygienists should continue to apply the log-normal model for summarizing and testing data. However, sampling designs should move away from methods which are biased (e.g. sampling only the worst case) and which rely upon job title and observation as the primary means of assigning workers into groups. Since exposure data often lack independence (e.g. owing to the autocorrelation of serial measurements) and there exist large differences in exposure between workers in the same job group, random sampling designs should be adopted. It is also shown that the relationship between the mean of a log-normal distribution and exposures in the right tail allows one to evaluate simultaneously the mean exposure and the maximum frequency with which exposures exceed the OEL. Investigation of the biological concepts relies heavily upon a conceptual model which depicts the exposure-response continuum as a sequence of time series related to exposure, burden, damage and risk. Analysis of the linkages between these processes identifies two kinetic conditions which are necessary if variability of exposure is to affect appreciably the individual's risk of chronic disease. First, the variation of exposure from interval to interval must be efficiently translated into burden and damage (no damping), and second, during periods of intense exposure the relationship between burden and damage must be non-linear (curving upwards). On the basis of current knowledge it

  15. Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellweg, Stefanie; Demou, Evangelia; Bruzzi, Raffaella; Meijer, Arjen; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; McKone, Thomas E.

    2008-12-21

    Neglecting health effects from indoor pollutant emissions and exposure, as currently done in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result in product or process optimizations at the expense of workers? or consumers? health. To close this gap, methods for considering indoor exposure to chemicals are needed to complement the methods for outdoor human exposure assessment already in use. This paper summarizes the work of an international expert group on the integration of human indoor and outdoor exposure in LCA, within the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative. A new methodological framework is proposed for a general procedure to include human-health effects from indoor exposure in LCA. Exposure models from occupational hygiene and household indoor air quality studies and practices are critically reviewed and recommendations are provided on the appropriateness of various model alternatives in the context of LCA. A single-compartment box model is recommended for use as a default in LCA, enabling one to screen occupational and household exposures consistent with the existing models to assess outdoor emission in a multimedia environment. An initial set of model parameter values was collected. The comparison between indoor and outdoor human exposure per unit of emission shows that for many pollutants, intake per unit of indoor emission may be several orders of magnitude higher than for outdoor emissions. It is concluded that indoor exposure should be routinely addressed within LCA.

  16. Assessment of carbon nanoparticle exposure on murine macrophage function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suro-Maldonado, Raquel M.

    There is growing concern about the potential cytotoxicity of nanoparticles. Exposure to respirable ultrafine particles (2.5uM) can adversely affect human health and have been implicated with episodes of increased respiratory diseases such as asthma and allergies. Nanoparticles are of particular interest because of their ability to penetrate into the lung and potentially elicit health effects triggering immune responses. Nanoparticles are structures and devises with length scales in the 1 to 100-nanometer range. Black carbon (BC) nanoparticles have been observed to be products of combustion, especially flame combustion and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) have been shown to be found in both indoor and outdoor air. Furthermore, asbestos, which have been known to cause mesothelioma as well as lung cancer, have been shown to be structurally identical to MWCNTs. The aims of these studies were to examine the effects of carbon nanoparticles on murine macrophage function and clearance mechanisms. Macrophages are immune cells that function as the first line of defense against invading pathogens and are likely to be amongst the first cells affected by nanoparticles. Our research focused on two manufactured nanoparticles, MWCNT and BC. The two were tested against murine-derived macrophages in a chronic contact model. We hypothesized that long-term chronic exposure to carbon nanoparticles would decrease macrophages ability to effectively respond to immunological challenge. Production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), cell surface macrophage; activation markers, reactive oxygen species formation (ROS), and antigen processing and presentation were examined in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) following a 144hr exposure to the particulates. Data demonstrated an increase in TNF-alpha, and NO production; a decrease in phagocytosis and antigen processing and presentation; and a decrease in the expression levels of cell surface macrophage

  17. Biomechanics of Pediatric Manual Wheelchair Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavens, Brooke A.; Schnorenberg, Alyssa J.; Aurit, Christine M.; Tarima, Sergey; Vogel, Lawrence C.; Harris, Gerald F.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is limited research of the biomechanics of pediatric manual wheelchair mobility. Specifically, the biomechanics of functional tasks and their relationship to joint pain and health is not well understood. To contribute to this knowledge gap, a quantitative rehabilitation approach was applied for characterizing upper extremity biomechanics of manual wheelchair mobility in children and adolescents during propulsion, starting, and stopping tasks. A Vicon motion analysis system captured movement, while a SmartWheel simultaneously collected three-dimensional forces and moments occurring at the handrim. A custom pediatric inverse dynamics model was used to evaluate three-dimensional upper extremity joint motions, forces, and moments of 14 children with spinal cord injury (SCI) during the functional tasks. Additionally, pain and health-related quality of life outcomes were assessed. This research found that joint demands are significantly different amongst functional tasks, with greatest demands placed on the shoulder during the starting task. Propulsion was significantly different from starting and stopping at all joints. We identified multiple stroke patterns used by the children, some of which are not standard in adults. One subject reported average daily pain, which was minimal. Lower than normal physical health and higher than normal mental health was found in this population. It can be concluded that functional tasks should be considered in addition to propulsion for rehabilitation and SCI treatment planning. This research provides wheelchair users and clinicians with a comprehensive, biomechanical, mobility assessment approach for wheelchair prescription, training, and long-term care of children with SCI. PMID:26442251

  18. Biomechanics of Pediatric Manual Wheelchair Mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavens, Brooke A; Schnorenberg, Alyssa J; Aurit, Christine M; Tarima, Sergey; Vogel, Lawrence C; Harris, Gerald F

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is limited research of the biomechanics of pediatric manual wheelchair mobility. Specifically, the biomechanics of functional tasks and their relationship to joint pain and health is not well understood. To contribute to this knowledge gap, a quantitative rehabilitation approach was applied for characterizing upper extremity biomechanics of manual wheelchair mobility in children and adolescents during propulsion, starting, and stopping tasks. A Vicon motion analysis system captured movement, while a SmartWheel simultaneously collected three-dimensional forces and moments occurring at the handrim. A custom pediatric inverse dynamics model was used to evaluate three-dimensional upper extremity joint motions, forces, and moments of 14 children with spinal cord injury (SCI) during the functional tasks. Additionally, pain and health-related quality of life outcomes were assessed. This research found that joint demands are significantly different amongst functional tasks, with greatest demands placed on the shoulder during the starting task. Propulsion was significantly different from starting and stopping at all joints. We identified multiple stroke patterns used by the children, some of which are not standard in adults. One subject reported average daily pain, which was minimal. Lower than normal physical health and higher than normal mental health was found in this population. It can be concluded that functional tasks should be considered in addition to propulsion for rehabilitation and SCI treatment planning. This research provides wheelchair users and clinicians with a comprehensive, biomechanical, mobility assessment approach for wheelchair prescription, training, and long-term care of children with SCI.

  19. A probabilistic assessment of the impact of interventions on oncology nurses' exposure to antineoplastic agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijster, T.; Fransman, W.; Hemmen, J. van; Kromhout, H.; Heederik, D.; Tielemans, E.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The main goal was to investigate the potential of a probabilistic approach for exposure assessment and use this information to evaluate the impact of a complex of policy actions/interventions on dermal exposure to antineoplastic agents among oncology nurses. The central theme of this

  20. The diesel exhaust in miners study: I. Overview of the exposure assessment process.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stewart, P.A.; Coble, J.B.; Vermeulen, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/216532620; Schleiff, P.; Blair, A.; Lubin, J.; Attfield, M.; Silverman, D.T.

    2010-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the exposure assessment process for an epidemiologic study that investigated mortality, with a special focus on lung cancer, associated with diesel exhaust (DE) exposure among miners. Details of several components are provided in four other reports. A major

  1. Sensitivity Analysis of Personal Exposure Assessment Using a Computer Simulated Person

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik; Jensen, H. K.

    2009-01-01

    The paper considers uncertainties related to personal exposure assessment using a computer simulated person. CFD is used to simulate a uniform flow field around a human being to determine the personal exposure to a contaminant source. For various vertical locations of a point contaminant source t...

  2. Exposure data and risk indicators for safety performance assessment in Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papadimitriou, E. Yannis, G. Bijleveld, F.D. & Cardoso, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is the analysis of the state-of-the-art in risk indicators and exposure data for safety performance assessment in Europe, in terms of data availability, collection methodologies and use. More specifically, the concepts of exposure and risk are explored, as well as the

  3. Exposure data and risk indicators for safety performance assessment in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papadimitriou, G.; Yannis, G.; Bijleveld, F.D.; Cardoso, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is the analysis of the state-of-the-art in risk indicators and exposure data for safety performance assessment in Europe, in terms of data availability, collection methodologies and use. More specifically, the concepts of exposure and risk are explored, as well as the

  4. Assessment of dust sampling methods for the study of cultivable-microorganism exposure in stables.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Normand, A.C.; Vacheyrou, M.; Sudre, B.; Heederik, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072910542; Piarroux, R.

    2009-01-01

    Studies have shown a link between living on a farm, exposure to microbial components (e.g., endotoxins or beta-d-glucans), and a lower risk for allergic diseases and asthma. Due to the lack of validated sampling methods, studies of asthma and atopy have not relied on exposure assessment based on

  5. Assessment of mould spore exposure and relations to symptoms in wood trimmers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eduard, W.

    1993-01-01

    Relationships between exposure to mould spores, IgG antibodies against moulds and respiratory and febrile symptoms were studied among wood trimmers. A new method for quantitative assessment of mould spore exposure by scanning electron microscopy was developed. This method was validated by

  6. Exposure assessment for a nested case-control study of lung cancer among European asphalt workers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agostini, M.; Ferro, G.; Olsson, A.; Burstyn, I.; de Vocht, F.; Hansen, J.; Funch Lassen, C.; Johansen, C.; Kjaerheim, K.; Langard, S.; Stucker, I.; Ahrens, W.; Behrens, T.; Lindbohm, M-J.; Heikkila, P.; Heederik, D.; Portengen, L.; Shaham, J.; Boffetta, P.; Kromhout, H.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Development of a method for retrospective assessment of exposure to bitumen fume, bitumen condensate, organic vapour, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and co-exposures to known or suspected lung carcinogens for a nested case-control study of lung cancer mortality among European asphalt

  7. An Exploratory Study: Assessment of Modeled Dioxin Exposure in Ceramic Art Studios (Final Report, 2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, An Exploratory Study: Assessment of Modeled Dioxin Exposure in Ceramic Art Studios. This report investigates the potential dioxin exposure to artists/hobbyists who use ball clay to make pottery and related products. Derm...

  8. Refinement of the Nanoparticle Emission Assessment Technique into the Nanomaterial Exposure Assessment Technique (NEAT 2.0).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastlake, Adrienne C; Beaucham, Catherine; Martinez, Kenneth F; Dahm, Matthew M; Sparks, Christopher; Hodson, Laura L; Geraci, Charles L

    2016-09-01

    Engineered nanomaterial emission and exposure characterization studies have been completed at more than 60 different facilities by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). These experiences have provided NIOSH the opportunity to refine an earlier published technique, the Nanoparticle Emission Assessment Technique (NEAT 1.0), into a more comprehensive technique for assessing worker and workplace exposures to engineered nanomaterials. This change is reflected in the new name Nanomaterial Exposure Assessment Technique (NEAT 2.0) which distinguishes it from NEAT 1.0. NEAT 2.0 places a stronger emphasis on time-integrated, filter-based sampling (i.e., elemental mass analysis and particle morphology) in the worker's breathing zone (full shift and task specific) and area samples to develop job exposure matrices. NEAT 2.0 includes a comprehensive assessment of emissions at processes and job tasks, using direct-reading instruments (i.e., particle counters) in data-logging mode to better understand peak emission periods. Evaluation of worker practices, ventilation efficacy, and other engineering exposure control systems and risk management strategies serve to allow for a comprehensive exposure assessment.

  9. Exposure assessment of adult intake of bisphenol A (BPA) with emphasis on canned food dietary exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorber, Matthew; Schecter, Arnold; Paepke, Olaf; Shropshire, William; Christensen, Krista; Birnbaum, Linda

    2015-04-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high-volume, synthetic compound found in epoxy resins and plastics used in food packaging. Food is believed to be a major source of BPA intake. In this study, we measured the concentration of BPA in convenience samplings of foodstuffs purchased in Dallas, Texas. Sampling entailed collection of 204 samples of fresh, frozen, and canned foods in two rounds in 2010. BPA was positive in 73% of the canned food samples, while it was found in only 7% of non-canned foods at low concentrations. The results of this food sampling program were used to calculate adult dietary intakes of BPA. A pathway approach combined food intakes, a "canned fraction" parameter which described what portion of total intake of that food came from canned products, and measured food concentrations. Dietary intakes were calculated as 12.6 ng/kg-day, of which 12.4 ng/kg-day was from canned foods. Canned vegetable intakes alone were 11.9 ng/kg-day. This dietary intake was compared to total intakes of BPA estimated from urine measurements of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Total adult central tendency intakes ranged from 30 to 70 ng/kg-day for NHANES cycles between 2005 and 2010. Three possibilities were explored to explain the difference between these two approaches for intake estimation. Not all foods which may have been canned, particularly canned beverages such as soft drinks, were sampled in our food sampling program. Second, non-food pathways of exposure may be important for adults, including thermal paper exposures, and dust and air exposures. Finally, our canned food concentrations may not be adequately representative of canned foods in the United States; they were found to be generally lower compared to canned food concentrations measured in six other worldwide food surveys including three in North America. Our finding that canned food concentrations greatly exceeded non-canned concentrations was consistent with other studies, and

  10. Assessment of lifetime exposure to trihalomethanes through different routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, C M; Cantor, K P; Grimalt, J O; Castaño‐Vinyals, G; Malats, N; Silverman, D; Tardon, A; Garcia‐Closas, R; Serra, C; Carrato, A; Rothman, N; Real, F X; Dosemeci, M; Kogevinas, M

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate lifetime exposure to trihalomethanes (THM) through ingestion, inhalation, and dermal absorption in a hospital based case‐control study of bladder cancer conducted between 1998 and 2001 in five areas of Spain. The study base was comprised of subjects living in the catchment areas of the participating hospitals. Methods Individual information on water related habits was obtained from personal interviews of 1219 cases and 1271 controls: residential and occupational history, drinking water source at each residence and job, amount of water consumption, frequency and duration of showering, bathing, and swimming pool attendance. THM levels, water source history, and year when chlorination started in study areas were ascertained through measurements in drinking water samples and questionnaires to water companies and local authorities. Estimates of THM levels covered 79% of the subjects' person‐years of exposure. Results Current and historical average THM levels in water were correlated. Control subjects reported that drinking water source in the last residence was municipal for 63%, bottled for 22%, private well for 2%, and other sources for 13%. For the time window between age 15 and the time of interview, average residential THM level was 32.2 μg/l. THM exposure through ingestion was 23.7 μg/day on average, and was correlated with the ingestion THM level in the workplace. Overall, 79% usually took showers, 16% usually took baths, and 13% had ever attended a swimming pool. Between 21% and 45% of controls unexposed to THM through ingestion were evaluated as moderately or highly exposed through showering or bathing, and 5–10% were exposed through swimming in pools. Conclusion The importance of evaluating different routes is underscored by findings from experimental studies showing substantial differences in THM uptake and internal distribution by route. PMID:16556748

  11. Health effects assessment of exposure to particles from wood smoke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Elsa

    2007-01-01

    distribution of wood smoke particles, essentially all will be contained in the PM2.5 fraction. In Denmark, recent results indicate that about 10,000 tonnes PM2.5 per year, about half of the total particle emission in Denmark, come from residential wood combustion. Based on a few measurement campaigns conducted...... in Denmark in selected residential areas with different kinds of heating, the annual average PM2.5 exposure from wood smoke can be estimated at 0.4–2 mg/m3 as a preliminary estimate for the whole Danish population. Epidemiological studies evaluating adverse health effects from ambient air pollution...

  12. Ochratoxin A in Portugal: A Review to Assess Human Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia C. Duarte

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In Portugal, the climate, dietary habits, and food contamination levels present the characteristics for higher population susceptibility to ochratoxin A (OTA, one of the known mycotoxins with the greatest public health and agro-economic importance. In this review, following a brief historical insight on OTA research, a summary of the available data on OTA occurrence in food (cereals, bread, wine, meat and biological fluids (blood, urine is made. With this data, an estimation of intake is made to ascertain and update the risk exposure estimation of the Portuguese population, in comparison to previous studies and other populations.

  13. Scientific Opinion on outline proposals for assessment of exposure of organisms to substances in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Annette

    2010-01-01

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel to prepare a revision of the Guidance Document on persistence in soil (SANCO/9188VI/1997 of 12 July 2000) as scientific knowledge in this field has evolved in recent years. Therefore the Panel started the development of a revised methodology...... for the assessment of exposure of soil organisms. Based on a previous opinion of the Panel, the methodology is developed both for the concentration in total soil and the concentration in the soil pore water. The aim of the exposure assessment is the spatial 90th percentile of the exposure concentration (maximum...... in time) in the intended area of use in each of the three regulatory zones. The assessment of this percentile will include the uncertainty of substance and soil properties. The exposure assessment methodology is a function of (i) the type of crop (annual, pasture, permanent or rice), (ii) the tillage...

  14. Self-Reported and FEMA Flood Exposure Assessment after Hurricane Sandy: Association with Mental Health Outcomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lieberman-Cribbin, Wil; Liu, Bian; Schneider, Samantha; Schwartz, Rebecca; Taioli, Emanuela

    2017-01-01

    .... Here we assess the concordance in self-reported and Federal Emergency Management (FEMA) flood exposure after Hurricane Sandy and determine the associations between flooding and anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder...

  15. Webinar Presentation: Epidemiologic Studies of the Effects of Toxic Exposures on Brain and Behavior: Neuropsychological Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation, Epidemiologic Studies of the Effects of Toxic Exposures on Brain and Behavior: Neuropsychological Assessment, was given at the NIEHS/EPA Children's Centers 2015 Webinar Series: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Neurodevelopment.

  16. Chemical concentrations, exposures, health risks by census tract from National Scale Air Toxics Assessment (NATA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Chemical concentrations, exposures, health risks by census tract for the United States from National Scale Air Toxics Assessment (NATA). This dataset is associated...

  17. Importance of environmental and biomass dynamics in predicting chemical exposure in ecological risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morselli, M.; Semplice, M.; Leander, de F.; Brink, van den P.J.; Guardo, Di A.

    2015-01-01

    In ecological risk assessment, exposure is generally modelled assuming static conditions, herewith neglecting the potential role of emission, environmental and biomass dynamics in affecting bioavailable concentrations. In order to investigate the influence of such dynamics on predicted bioavailable

  18. Integrating Exposure into Chemical Alternatives Assessment Using a Qualitative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most alternatives assessments (AA) published to date are largely hazard-based rankings, and as such may not represent a fully informed consideration of the advantages and disadvantages of possible alternatives. With an assessment goal of identifying an alternative chemical that i...

  19. Facial exposure dose assessment during intraoral radiography by radiological technologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hwan; Yang, Han Joon [Dept. of International Radiological Science, Hallym University of Graduate Studies, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    The study examined the changes in the decreased facial exposure dose for radiological technologists depending on increased distance between the workers and the X-ray tube head during intraoral radiography. First, the facial phantom similar to the human tissues was manufactured. The shooting examination was configured to the maxillary molars for adults (60 kVp, 10 mA, 50 msec) and for children (60 kVp, 10 mA, 20 msec), and the chamber was fixed where the facial part of the radiation worker would be placed using the intraoral radiography equipment. The distances between the X-ray tube head and the phantom were set to 10 cm, 15 cm, 20 cm, 25 cm, 30 cm, 35 cm, and 40 cm. The phantom was radiated 20 times with each examination condition and the average scattered doses were examined. The rate at the distance of 40 cm decreased by about 92.6% to 7.43% based on the scattered rays radiated at the distance of 10 cm under the adult conditions. The rate at the distance of 40 cm decreased by about 97.6% to 2.58% based on the scattered rays radiated at the distance of 10 cm under the children conditions. Protection from the radiation exposure was required during the dental radiographic examination.

  20. Combining a Job-Exposure Matrix with Exposure Measurements to Assess Occupational Exposure to Benzene in a Population Cohort in Shanghai, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Melissa C.; Coble, Joseph B.; Lu, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Ji, Bu-Tian; Xue, Shouzheng; Portengen, Lutzen; Chow, Wong-Ho; Gao, Yu-Tang; Yang, Gong; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel

    2012-01-01

    Background: Generic job-exposure matrices (JEMs) are often used in population-based epidemiologic studies to assess occupational risk factors when only the job and industry information of each subject is available. JEM ratings are often based on professional judgment, are usually ordinal or semi-quantitative, and often do not account for changes in exposure over time. We present an empirical Bayesian framework that combines ordinal subjective JEM ratings with benzene measurements. Our aim was to better discriminate between job, industry, and time differences in exposure levels compared to using a JEM alone. Methods: We combined 63 221 short-term area air measurements of benzene exposure (1954–2000) collected during routine health and safety inspections in Shanghai, China, with independently developed JEM intensity ratings for each job and industry using a mixed-effects model. The fixed-effects terms included the JEM intensity ratings for job and industry (both ordinal, 0–3) and a time trend that we incorporated as a b-spline. The random-effects terms included job (n = 33) and industry nested within job (n = 399). We predicted the benzene concentration in two ways: (i) a calibrated JEM estimate was calculated using the fixed-effects model parameters for calendar year and JEM intensity ratings; (ii) a job-/industry-specific estimate was calculated using the fixed-effects model parameters and the best linear unbiased predictors from the random effects for job and industry using an empirical Bayes estimation procedure. Finally, we applied the predicted benzene exposures to a prospective population-based cohort of women in Shanghai, China (n = 74 942). Results: Exposure levels were 13 times higher in 1965 than in 2000 and declined at a rate that varied from 4 to 15% per year from 1965 to 1985, followed by a small peak in the mid-1990s. The job-/industry-specific estimates had greater differences between exposure levels than the calibrated JEM estimates (97.5th

  1. Impact of a smoking ban in hospitality venues on second hand smoke exposure: a comparison of exposure assessment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Sarah; Huynh, Cong Khanh; Bauer, Georg F; Hoffmann, Susanne; Röösli, Martin

    2013-06-04

    In May 2010, Switzerland introduced a heterogeneous smoking ban in the hospitality sector. While the law leaves room for exceptions in some cantons, it is comprehensive in others. This longitudinal study uses different measurement methods to examine airborne nicotine levels in hospitality venues and the level of personal exposure of non-smoking hospitality workers before and after implementation of the law. Personal exposure to second hand smoke (SHS) was measured by three different methods. We compared a passive sampler called MoNIC (Monitor of NICotine) badge, to salivary cotinine and nicotine concentration as well as questionnaire data. Badges allowed the number of passively smoked cigarettes to be estimated. They were placed at the venues as well as distributed to the participants for personal measurements. To assess personal exposure at work, a time-weighted average of the workplace badge measurements was calculated. Prior to the ban, smoke-exposed hospitality venues yielded a mean badge value of 4.48 (95%-CI: 3.7 to 5.25; n = 214) cigarette equivalents/day. At follow-up, measurements in venues that had implemented a smoking ban significantly declined to an average of 0.31 (0.17 to 0.45; n = 37) (p = 0.001). Personal badge measurements also significantly decreased from an average of 2.18 (1.31-3.05 n = 53) to 0.25 (0.13-0.36; n = 41) (p = 0.001). Spearman rank correlations between badge exposure measures and salivary measures were small to moderate (0.3 at maximum). Nicotine levels significantly decreased in all types of hospitality venues after implementation of the smoking ban. In-depth analyses demonstrated that a time-weighted average of the workplace badge measurements represented typical personal SHS exposure at work more reliably than personal exposure measures such as salivary cotinine and nicotine.

  2. Indirect validation of a retrospective method of exposure assessment used in a nested case-control study of lung cancer and silica exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosemeci, M; McLaughlin, J K; Chen, J Q; Hearl, F; McCawley, M; Wu, Z; Chen, R G; Peng, K L; Chen, A L; Rexing, S H

    1994-02-01

    Validations of retrospective methods of assessment used in occupational epidemiological studies have rarely been published. This study is an indirect validation of a quantitative retrospective assessment of exposure to silica used in a nested case-control study of lung cancer among workers at 29 metal mines and pottery factories in China. Indices of cumulative total dust and cumulative respirable dust were calculated by merging work histories with the historical exposure profile for each subject. To validate indirectly the methods of exposure assessment used in the study of lung cancer, trends for exposure response relation between the two indices of exposure to silica and risk of silicosis were evaluated with 376 patients with silicosis from the study population as the cases, and 1262 controls without silicosis for comparison. Age adjusted odds ratios (ORs) as a measure of risk of silicosis showed striking trends with both indices of exposure to silica. For cumulative respirable dust, the OR (95% confidence interval) rose from 7.6 (5.1-11.4) for low exposure to 20.0 (13.2-30.6) for medium exposure, and to 51.7 (31.0-86.8) for high exposure. The strength of the association between exposure to silica and risk of silicosis suggests that the retrospective assessment of exposure used in the case-control study of lung cancer would accurately reflect an exposure response relation between silica and lung cancer, if it existed.

  3. Pesticide flow analysis to assess human exposure in greenhouse flower production in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesmes-Fabian, Camilo; Binder, Claudia R

    2013-03-25

    Human exposure assessment tools represent a means for understanding human exposure to pesticides in agricultural activities and managing possible health risks. This paper presents a pesticide flow analysis modeling approach developed to assess human exposure to pesticide use in greenhouse flower crops in Colombia, focusing on dermal and inhalation exposure. This approach is based on the material flow analysis methodology. The transfer coefficients were obtained using the whole body dosimetry method for dermal exposure and the button personal inhalable aerosol sampler for inhalation exposure, using the tracer uranine as a pesticide surrogate. The case study was a greenhouse rose farm in the Bogota Plateau in Colombia. The approach was applied to estimate the exposure to pesticides such as mancozeb, carbendazim, propamocarb hydrochloride, fosetyl, carboxin, thiram, dimethomorph and mandipropamide. We found dermal absorption estimations close to the AOEL reference values for the pesticides carbendazim, mancozeb, thiram and mandipropamide during the study period. In addition, high values of dermal exposure were found on the forearms, hands, chest and legs of study participants, indicating weaknesses in the overlapping areas of the personal protective equipment parts. These results show how the material flow analysis methodology can be applied in the field of human exposure for early recognition of the dispersion of pesticides and support the development of measures to improve operational safety during pesticide management. Furthermore, the model makes it possible to identify the status quo of the health risk faced by workers in the study area.

  4. Pesticide Flow Analysis to Assess Human Exposure in Greenhouse Flower Production in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia R. Binder

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Human exposure assessment tools represent a means for understanding human exposure to pesticides in agricultural activities and managing possible health risks. This paper presents a pesticide flow analysis modeling approach developed to assess human exposure to pesticide use in greenhouse flower crops in Colombia, focusing on dermal and inhalation exposure. This approach is based on the material flow analysis methodology. The transfer coefficients were obtained using the whole body dosimetry method for dermal exposure and the button personal inhalable aerosol sampler for inhalation exposure, using the tracer uranine as a pesticide surrogate. The case study was a greenhouse rose farm in the Bogota Plateau in Colombia. The approach was applied to estimate the exposure to pesticides such as mancozeb, carbendazim, propamocarb hydrochloride, fosetyl, carboxin, thiram, dimethomorph and mandipropamide. We found dermal absorption estimations close to the AOEL reference values for the pesticides carbendazim, mancozeb, thiram and mandipropamide during the study period. In addition, high values of dermal exposure were found on the forearms, hands, chest and legs of study participants, indicating weaknesses in the overlapping areas of the personal protective equipment parts. These results show how the material flow analysis methodology can be applied in the field of human exposure for early recognition of the dispersion of pesticides and support the development of measures to improve operational safety during pesticide management. Furthermore, the model makes it possible to identify the status quo of the health risk faced by workers in the study area.

  5. Air pollution in moderately polluted urban areas: How does the definition of "neighborhood" impact exposure assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenailleau, Quentin M; Mauny, Frédéric; Joly, Daniel; François, Stéphane; Bernard, Nadine

    2015-11-01

    Environmental health studies commonly quantify subjects' pollution exposure in their neighborhood. How this neighborhood is defined can vary, however, leading to different approaches to quantification whose impacts on exposure levels remain unclear. We explore the relationship between neighborhood definition and exposure assessment. NO2, benzene, PM10 and PM2.5 exposure estimates were computed in the vicinity of 10,825 buildings using twelve exposure assessment techniques reflecting different definitions of "neighborhood". At the city scale, its definition does not significantly influence exposure estimates. It does impact levels at the building scale, however: at least a quarter of the buildings' exposure estimates for a 400 m buffer differ from the estimated 50 m buffer value (±1.0 μg/m(3) for NO2, PM10 and PM2.5; and ±0.05 μg/m(3) for benzene). This variation is significantly related to the definition of neighborhood. It is vitally important for investigators to understand the impact of chosen assessment techniques on exposure estimates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Retrospective Assessment of Occupational Exposures for the GENEVA Study of ALS among Military Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Anila; Woskie, Susan R; Gore, Rebecca; Sandler, Dale P; Schmidt, Silke; Kamel, Freya

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes the retrospective exposure assessment conducted to assess occupational exposures for the Genes and Environmental Exposures in Veterans (GENEVA) study, a case-control study investigating the joint contribution of genetics and environmental exposures to the risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) among military veterans. Occupational histories for 1597 study participants collected as part of the GENEVA study were the basis for this retrospective exposure assessment. The data set included 15528 jobs held from 1924 to 2010, representing 4539 unique industry and occupation (I&O) combinations. Three industrial hygiene experts were recruited to independently rate occupational exposures to specific agents previously associated with an increased risk of ALS. Utilizing information on industry, job title, tasks performed, and materials used for each job held, raters assigned exposures associated with each I&O for the 'current time' defined as the period after 1995 (post-1995). The exposure assessment targeted agents identified as potential occupational risk factors for ALS. Experts rated semi-quantitatively exposure intensity in five exposure categories (0-4) for Group A agents (lead, formaldehyde, hydrocarbon solvents, and chlorinated solvents) and qualitatively as yes/no (1/0) exposed for Group B agents (mercury, selenium, arsenic, polychlorinated biphenyls, electromagnetic field, pesticides, and viral agents). Confidence scores (0-3) were reported for every I&O rated based on raters' experience with that industry and/or job. Each I&O was assigned an average exposure score of the raters and an alternative exposure rating was developed for each I&O by excluding low confidence (<2) scores before averaging. Exposure reconstruction for jobs held pre-1995 was done by comparing exposure data extracted from the OSHA Chemical Exposure and Health Database (CEHD) during pre-1995 and post-1995. For agents with limited exposure data in the CEHD, pre-1995

  7. Exposure assessment of family cosmetic products dedicated to babies, children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Berrada, M P; Ficheux, A S; Dahmoul, Z; Roudot, A C; Ferret, P J

    2017-05-01

    Very few consumption and exposure data is available for family cosmetic products. The aim of the present study was to assess the consumption and the exposure to family cosmetic products used by babies, children and adults. 10 categories of products were studied: shampoo, shower gel, solid soap, cleansing lotion, emollient foam, emollient bath, cream, milk, balm and lip balm. Consumption data were obtained from 2994 participants (789 babies aged 0-3 years, 837 children aged 4-12 years and 1368 adults aged more than 18 years) included in 87 clinical safety studies. Exposure was performed using a probabilistic method. The implementation of consumption and exposure assessment by age has strengthened this work, as consumption and mainly exposure differences were shown. In fact, babies were always the most exposed to family products, followed by children and adults. These original data will be useful for safety assessors and safety agencies in order to protect consumers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessment of general public exposure to LTE and RF sources present in an urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Wout; Verloock, Leen; Goeminne, Francis; Vermeeren, Günter; Martens, Luc

    2010-10-01

    For the first time, in situ electromagnetic field exposure of the general public to fields from long term evolution (LTE) cellular base stations is assessed. Exposure contributions due to different radiofrequency (RF) sources are compared with LTE exposure at 30 locations in Stockholm, Sweden. Total exposures (0.2-2.6 V/m) satisfy the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) reference levels (from 28 V/m for frequency modulation (FM), up to 61 V/m for LTE) at all locations. LTE exposure levels up to 0.8 V/m were measured, and the average contribution of the LTE signal to the total RF exposure equals 4%.

  9. Exposure assessment of workplace manufacturing titanium dioxide particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huadong; Zhao, Lin; Chen, Zhangjian; Zhou, Jingwen; Tang, Shichuan; Kong, Fanling; Li, Xinwei; Yan, Ling; Zhang, Ji; Jia, Guang

    2016-10-01

    With the widespread use of titanium dioxide (TiO2) human exposure is inevitable, but the exposure data on TiO2 are still limited. This study adopted off-line filter-based sampling combined with real-time activity-based monitoring to measure the concentrations in a workplace manufacturing TiO2 (primary diameter: 194 ± 108 nm). Mass concentrations (MCs) of aerosol particles in the packaging workshop (total dust: 3.17 mg/m3, nano dust: 1.22 mg/m3) were much higher than those in the milling workshop (total dust: 0.79 mg/m3, nano dust: 0.31 mg/m3) and executive office (total dust: 0.44 mg/m3, nano dust: 0.19 mg/m3). However, the MCs of TiO2 were at a relatively low level in the packaging workshop (total TiO2: 46.4 μg/m3, nano TiO2: 16.7 μg/m3) and milling workshop (total TiO2: 39.4 μg/m3, nano TiO2: 19.4 μg/m3) by ICP-MS. The number concentration (NC), surface area concentration (SAC) of aerosol particles potentially deposited in alveolar (SACA), and tracheobronchial (SACTB) regions of lungs in the packaging workshop were (1.04 ± 0.89) × 105 particles/cm3, 414.49 ± 395.07, and 86.01 ± 83.18 μm2/cm3, respectively, which were all significantly higher than those of the milling workshop [(0.12 ± 0.40) × 105 particles/cm3, 75.38 ± 45.23, and 17.60 ± 9.22 μm2/cm3, respectively] as well as executive office and outdoor background ( p important data of TiO2 particles exposure in the workplace.

  10. Cancer risk assessment for arsenic exposure through oyster consumption.

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, How-Ran

    2002-01-01

    Risk is assessed on the basis of assumptions, but this practice might not be well received by the general public. To avoid miscommunication, the assumptions should be stated clearly in reporting the results. Recently, a report on an assessment of the cancer risk associated with consumption of oysters caused a panic among consumers in Taiwan and produced significant effects on related industries. A group of researchers measured the arsenic content in oysters in the Taiwan area and conducted a ...

  11. Environmental exposure assessment in European birth cohorts: results from the ENRIECO project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehring Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Environmental exposures during pregnancy and early life may have adverse health effects. Single birth cohort studies often lack statistical power to tease out such effects reliably. To improve the use of existing data and to facilitate collaboration among these studies, an inventory of the environmental exposure and health data in these studies was made as part of the ENRIECO (Environmental Health Risks in European Birth Cohorts project. The focus with regard to exposure was on outdoor air pollution, water contamination, allergens and biological organisms, metals, pesticides, smoking and second hand tobacco smoke (SHS, persistent organic pollutants (POPs, noise, radiation, and occupational exposures. The review lists methods and data on environmental exposures in 37 European birth cohort studies. Most data is currently available for smoking and SHS (N=37 cohorts, occupational exposures (N=33, outdoor air pollution, and allergens and microbial agents (N=27. Exposure modeling is increasingly used for long-term air pollution exposure assessment; biomonitoring is used for assessment of exposure to metals, POPs and other chemicals; and environmental monitoring for house dust mite exposure assessment. Collaborative analyses with data from several birth cohorts have already been performed successfully for outdoor air pollution, water contamination, allergens, biological contaminants, molds, POPs and SHS. Key success factors for collaborative analyses are common definitions of main exposure and health variables. Our review emphasizes that such common definitions need ideally be arrived at in the study design phase. However, careful comparison of methods used in existing studies also offers excellent opportunities for collaborative analyses. Investigators can use this review to evaluate the potential for future collaborative analyses with respect to data availability and methods used in the different cohorts and to identify potential partners

  12. Probabilistic disaggregation of a spatial portfolio of exposure for natural hazard risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Custer, Rocco; Nishijima, Kazuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    of a portfolio of buildings in two communes in Switzerland and the results are compared to sample observations. The relevance of probabilistic disaggregation uncertainty in natural hazard risk assessment is illustrated with the example of a simple flood risk assessment.......In natural hazard risk assessment situations are encountered where information on the portfolio of exposure is only available in a spatially aggregated form, hindering a precise risk assessment. Recourse might be found in the spatial disaggregation of the portfolio of exposure to the resolution...

  13. A Review of the Field on Children's Exposure to Environmental Contaminants: A Risk Assessment Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Alesia; Penney, Rosalind; Solo-Gabriele, Helena

    2017-03-04

    Background: Children must be recognized as a sensitive population based on having biological systems and organs in various stages of development. The processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination of environmental contaminants within a child's body are considered less advanced than those of adults, making them more susceptible to disease outcomes following even small doses. Children's unique activities of crawling and practicing increased hand-to-mouth ingestion also make them vulnerable to greater exposures by certain contaminants within specific environments. Approach: There is a need to review the field of children's environmental exposures in order to understand trends and identify gaps in research, which may lead to better protection of this vulnerable and sensitive population. Therefore, explored here are previously published contemporary works in the broad area of children's environmental exposures and potential impact on health from around the world. A discussion of children's exposure to environmental contaminants is best organized under the last four steps of a risk assessment approach: hazard identification, dose-response assessment, exposure assessment (including children's activity patterns) and risk characterization. We first consider the many exposure hazards that exist in the indoor and outdoor environments, and emerging contaminants of concern that may help guide the risk assessment process in identifying focus areas for children. A section on special diseases of concern is also included. Conclusions: The field of children's exposures to environmental contaminants is broad. Although there are some well-studied areas offering much insight into children exposures, research is still needed to further our understanding of exposures to newer compounds, growing disease trends and the role of gene-environment interactions that modify adverse health outcomes. It is clear that behaviors of adults and children play a role in reducing or

  14. Dose assessment of an accidental exposure at the IPNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos Torres, M.M.

    1995-02-01

    Seven different methods were used to estimate the dose rate to a female worker who was accidentally exposed in the neutron PHOENIX beamline at the IPNS. Theoretical and measured entrance dose ranged from 550 mrem/min to 2850 mrem/min. Theoretical estimates were based on a Monte Carlo simulation of a spectrum provided by IPNS (Crawford Spectrum). Dose measurements were made with TLDs on phantoms and with ionization chambers in a water phantom. Estimates of the whole body total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) rate ranged from 5.2 mrem/min to 840 mrem/min. Assumed and measured quality factors ranged from 2.6 to 11.8. Cytogenetic analyses of blood samples detected no positive exposure. The recommended TEDE rate was 158 mrem/min. The TEDE was 750 mrem.

  15. A task-based assessment of parental occupational exposure to pesticides and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunier, Robert B; Kang, Alice; Hammond, S Katharine; Reinier, Kyndaron; Lea, C Suzanne; Chang, Jeffrey S; Does, Monique; Scelo, Ghislaine; Kirsch, Janice; Crouse, Vonda; Cooper, Robert; Quinlan, Patricia; Metayer, Catherine

    2017-07-01

    Associations between parental occupational pesticide exposure and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) vary across studies, likely due to different exposure assessment methodologies. We assessed parental occupational pesticide exposure from the year before pregnancy to the child's third year of life for 669 children diagnosed with ALL and 1021 controls. We conducted expert rating using task-based job modules (JM) to estimate exposure to pesticides among farmer workers, gardeners, agricultural packers, and pesticide applicators. We compared this method to (1) partial JM using job titles and a brief description, but without completing the task-based questionnaire, and (2) job exposure matrix (JEM) linking job titles to the International Standard Classifications of Occupation Codes. We used unconditional logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for ALL cancer risk and pesticide exposure adjusting for child's sex, age, race/ethnicity and household income. Compared to complete JMs, partial JMs and JEM led to 3.1% and 9.4% of parents with pesticide exposure misclassified, respectively. Misclassification was similar in cases and controls. Using complete JMs, we observed an increased risk of ALL for paternal occupational exposure to any pesticides (OR=1.7; 95% CI=1.2, 2.5), with higher risks reported for pesticides to treat nut crops (OR=4.5; 95% CI=0.9, 23.0), and for children diagnosed before five years of age (OR=2.3; 95% CI: 1.3, 4.1). Exposure misclassification from JEM attenuated these associations by about 57%. Maternal occupational pesticide exposure before and after birth was not associated with ALL. The risk of ALL was elevated in young children with paternal occupational pesticide exposure during the perinatal period, using more detailed occupational information for exposure classification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Biomechanical factors and physical examination findings in osteoarthritis of the knee: associations with tissue abnormalities assessed by conventional radiography and high-resolution 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to explore the associations between knee osteoarthritis (OA)-related tissue abnormalities assessed by conventional radiography (CR) and by high-resolution 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as biomechanical factors and findings from physical examination in patients with knee OA. Methods This was an explorative cross-sectional study of 105 patients with knee OA. Index knees were imaged using CR and MRI. Multiple features from CR and MRI (cartilage, osteophytes, bone marrow lesions, effusion and synovitis) were related to biomechanical factors (quadriceps and hamstrings muscle strength, proprioceptive accuracy and varus-valgus laxity) and physical examination findings (bony tenderness, crepitus, bony enlargement and palpable warmth), using multivariable regression analyses. Results Quadriceps weakness was associated with cartilage integrity, effusion, synovitis (all detected by MRI) and CR-detected joint space narrowing. Knee joint laxity was associated with MRI-detected cartilage integrity, CR-detected joint space narrowing and osteophyte formation. Multiple tissue abnormalities including cartilage integrity, osteophytes and effusion, but only those detected by MRI, were found to be associated with physical examination findings such as crepitus. Conclusion We observed clinically relevant findings, including a significant association between quadriceps weakness and both effusion and synovitis, detected by MRI. Inflammation was detected in over one-third of the participants, emphasizing the inflammatory component of OA and a possible important role for anti-inflammatory therapies in knee OA. In general, OA-related tissue abnormalities of the knee, even those detected by MRI, were found to be discordant with biomechanical and physical examination features. PMID:23039323

  17. Biomechanics of Rowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hase, Kazunori; Kaya, Motoshi; Yamazaki, Nobutoshi; Andrews, Brian J.; Zavatsky, Amy B.; Halliday, Suzanne E.

    Compared with the other exercise, such as walking and cycling, rowing was expected to have some fitness advantage, while there were some misgivings about the risk of injury. The objectives of this study were to quantify biomechanical characteristics of rowing for fitness and rehabilitation and to offer normative data for the prevention of injury and for determining effective exercise. An experiment was performed to collect the kinematic and kinetic data during rowing by experienced and non-experienced subjects. A three-dimensional whole-body musculo-skeletal model was used to calculate the biomechanical loads, such as the joint moments, the muscular tensions, the joint contact forces and the energy consumption. The results of this study indicate that rowing is an effective exercise for rehabilitation and fitness. However, the non-experienced rower should acquire considerable skill to obtain sufficient exercise. The rowing cadence should be decided according to the purpose of the exercise.

  18. Biomechanics of Rowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hase, Kazunori; Andrews, Brian J.; Zavatsky, Amy B.; Halliday, Suzanne E.

    A new control model for the study of biomechanical simulation of human movement was investigated using rowing as an example. The objectives were to explore biological and mechanical alternatives to optimal control methods. The simulation methods included simple control mechanisms based on proportional and derivative (PD) control, consideration of a simple neural model, introduction of an inverse dynamics system for feedback, and computational adjustment of control parameters by using an evaluative criterion and optimization method. By using simulation, appropriate rowing motions were synthesized. The generated rowing motion was periodic, continuous, and adaptable so that the pattern was stable against the mechanical force and independent of the initial condition. We believe that the simulation model is not only practical as a computational research tool from a biomechanical-engineering viewpoint but also significant from the point of view of fundamental biological theories of movement.

  19. Biomechanics in Molar Control

    OpenAIRE

    Rendón Giraldo, Juan Esteban; Castaño, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Inadequate molar control is one of the difficulties that arise during mechanical treatment. When molar control is handled efficiently, it facilitates precise control of forces and moments, which increases the effectiveness of biomechanics. Knowledge of 4 x 2, 6 x 2 partial systems and the transpalatal bar with its different forms of activation offer a number of advantages that make it possible to optimize orthodontic results. The aim of this article is to clarify concepts, specify possible tr...

  20. Changes in Post-Stroke Gait Biomechanics Induced by One Session of Gait Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesar, T M; Reisman, D S; Higginson, J S; Awad, L N; Binder-Macleod, S A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether one session of targeted locomotor training can induce measurable improvements in the post-stroke gait impairments. Thirteen individuals with chronic post-stroke hemiparesis participated in one locomotor training session combining fast treadmill training and functional electrical stimulation (FES) of ankle dorsi- and plantar-flexor muscles. Three dimensional gait analysis was performed to assess within-session changes (after versus before training) in gait biomechanics at the subject's self-selected speed without FES. Our results showed that one session of locomotor training resulted in significant improvements in peak anterior ground reaction force (AGRF) and AGRF integral for the paretic leg. Additionally, individual subject data showed that a majority of study participants demonstrated improvements in the primary outcome variables following the training session. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that a single session of intense, targeted post-stroke locomotor retraining can induce significant improvements in post-stroke gait biomechanics. We posit that the within-session changes induced by a single exposure to gait training can be used to predict whether an individual is responsive to a particular gait intervention, and aid with the development of individualized gait retraining strategies. Future studies are needed to determine whether these single-session improvements in biomechanics are accompanied by short-term changes in corticospinal excitability, and whether single-session responses can serve as predictors for the longer-term effects of the intervention with other targeted gait interventions.

  1. Exposure assessment of workplace manufacturing titanium dioxide particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Huadong; Zhao, Lin; Chen, Zhangjian [Peking University, Department of Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health (China); Zhou, Jingwen [Jinan Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China); Tang, Shichuan [Beijing Municipal Institute of Labor Protection, Beijing Key Laboratory of Occupational Safety and Health (China); Kong, Fanling [Shandong Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China); Li, Xinwei; Yan, Ling; Zhang, Ji, E-mail: zhangji1967@163.com [Jinan Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China); Jia, Guang, E-mail: jiaguangjia@bjmu.edu.cn [Peking University, Department of Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health (China)

    2016-10-15

    With the widespread use of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) human exposure is inevitable, but the exposure data on TiO{sub 2} are still limited. This study adopted off-line filter-based sampling combined with real-time activity-based monitoring to measure the concentrations in a workplace manufacturing TiO{sub 2} (primary diameter: 194 ± 108 nm). Mass concentrations (MCs) of aerosol particles in the packaging workshop (total dust: 3.17 mg/m{sup 3}, nano dust: 1.22 mg/m{sup 3}) were much higher than those in the milling workshop (total dust: 0.79 mg/m{sup 3}, nano dust: 0.31 mg/m{sup 3}) and executive office (total dust: 0.44 mg/m{sup 3}, nano dust: 0.19 mg/m{sup 3}). However, the MCs of TiO{sub 2} were at a relatively low level in the packaging workshop (total TiO{sub 2}: 46.4 μg/m{sup 3}, nano TiO{sub 2}: 16.7 μg/m{sup 3}) and milling workshop (total TiO{sub 2}: 39.4 μg/m{sup 3}, nano TiO{sub 2}: 19.4 μg/m{sup 3}) by ICP-MS. The number concentration (NC), surface area concentration (SAC) of aerosol particles potentially deposited in alveolar (SAC{sub A}), and tracheobronchial (SAC{sub TB}) regions of lungs in the packaging workshop were (1.04 ± 0.89) × 10{sup 5} particles/cm{sup 3}, 414.49 ± 395.07, and 86.01 ± 83.18 μm{sup 2}/cm{sup 3}, respectively, which were all significantly higher than those of the milling workshop [(0.12 ± 0.40) × 10{sup 5} particles/cm{sup 3}, 75.38 ± 45.23, and 17.60 ± 9.22 μm{sup 2}/cm{sup 3}, respectively] as well as executive office and outdoor background (p < 0.05). Activity-related characteristics were found in both workshops, and the time-variant characteristics showed very similar trends for 3 days in the packaging workshop. Our study provides important data of TiO{sub 2} particles exposure in the workplace.

  2. Assessing landslide exposure in areas with limited landslide information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellicani, R.; van Westen, C.J.; Spilotro, G.

    2014-01-01

    Landslide risk assessment is often a difficult task due to the lack of temporal data on landslides and triggering events (frequency), run-out distance, landslide magnitude and vulnerability. The probability of occurrence of landslides is often very difficult to predict, as well as the expected

  3. Assessment of exposure to ionizing radiation at selected mining ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigated the levels of ionizing radiation at selected mining sites in Nasarawa State, Nigeria. Inspector alert nuclear radiation meter (S.E. International, USA SN: 35440) was used for these assessments. The meter was held at the abdominal level (about 1 m above ground level) and readings were taken in ...

  4. Assessment of exposure for baby cosmetic care products in a Korean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunyoung; Yun, Jongbok; Ha, Jaehyoun; Park, Byung Cheol; Park, Gyeong Hun; Kim, Hak Rim; Hong, Seung Phil; Kim, Kyu Bong; Kim, Myung Hwa

    2017-08-01

    Assessment of exposure to cosmetic products via the skin is important for evaluating the risks associated with the use of these products. However, few exposure studies have been conducted with babies, particularly in Asia. The aim of our study was to assess the exposure to selected cosmetic products in babies under the age of 36 months, over both winter and summer months. We evaluated exposure for seven cosmetic baby care products identified in a previous web-based survey as being commonly used by Korean parents. Parents were instructed to use their baby's products as per their usual habit, recording usage for each product on a daily basis over a 14-day period. Products were weighed at the start and completion of the study, with the change in weight used to determine the total amount of product used. Descriptive statistics for daily exposure were calculated. In this study, daily exposure for different products was influenced by sex, age groups and seasons. Of specific note, 3.51% of the lotion in a wet wipe was transferred to the skin. In conclusion, we provide baseline exposure data for baby products, with exposure being based on parents' usual use of the products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of Occupational Exposure to Bisphenol A in Five Different Production Companies in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinälä, Milla; Ylinen, Katriina; Tuomi, Tapani; Santonen, Tiina; Porras, Simo P

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess occupational exposure to bisphenol A in Finland. Five companies took part in the research project: two paint factories (liquid and powder paints), a composite product factory, a thermal paper factory, and a tractor factory. Exposure was assessed by measuring total bisphenol A excretion (free and conjugated) from urine samples, and its concentrations in the air. The results revealed the specific work tasks in two of five companies in which significant occupational exposure to bisphenol A may occur. In the manufacturing of liquid paint hardener, urine samples collected after the working day showed bisphenol A levels of up to 100-170 µg l-1. Workers in thermal paper manufacturing were also exposed to bisphenol A, especially those working in the manufacture of coating material and operating coating machines. Median concentrations of the post-shift urine samples of coating machine workers were in the range of 130-250 µg l-1. The highest bisphenol A concentrations were in the range of 1000-1500 µg l-1. Recommendations for more effective personal protection resulted in decreased exposure, particularly among coating machine operators. In the rest of the companies, urinary bisphenol A levels were typically in the range of those of the general population. Bisphenol A concentrations in air samples were typically low (bisphenol A (maximum 17.6 mg m-3). Low air levels, even in the companies with high urinary levels, suggest exposure via dermal contact. According to the results, exposure to bisphenol A may occur particularly in work tasks that involve the use of pure bisphenol A. In these tasks, special attention should be paid to the prevention of skin exposure. Inhalation exposure may become relevant in dusty work tasks. Since skin exposure is of potential concern in these tasks, biomonitoring is recommended as the method for assessing occupational exposure to bisphenol A. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf

  6. [Assessment of telephone operators' exposure to sound through headphones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanami, Shoko; Inoue, Jinro; Takahashi, Koko; Horie, Seichi

    2011-09-01

    We estimated the level of noise that telephone operators were exposed to through headphones by a two-step method using an artificial ear technique and a manikin technique. In the artificial ear technique, the sound pressure level (Leq) of the total work hours was 81.5 dB, whereas the Leq of the total duration of phone calls was 89.3 dB. Therefore, we conducted a more accurate measurement by the manikin technique (ISO11904-2). By this method, we could simulate the headphone-wearing condition of the workers and convert the measurements to a diffuse-field related L(Aeq). By this manikin technique, the corrected L(Aeq) of the total work hours was 68.3 dB, whereas the corrected L(Aeq) of the total duration of call was 76.6 dB, which was below the standard of the Occupational Exposure Limits of the Japan Society of Occupational Health. We confirmed that in a workplace where the background noise is low (51.3 dBA), a good signal-noise ratio is maintained so that operators don't have to listen to loud sounds through headphones. Neither the gender nor the type of the telephone equipment of the callers affected the sound pressure levels.

  7. Assessment of Turkish junior male physicians’ exposure to mobbing behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Bayram; Cetin, Mehmet; Cimen, Mesut; Yildiran, Nuri

    2012-01-01

    Aim To determine the extent of Turkish junior male physicians’ exposure to mobbing behavior and its correlation with physicians' characteristics. Methods The study included physicians recruited for compulsory military service in April 2009. No sampling method was used, questionnaires were delivered to all physicians, and 278 of 292 (95%) questionnaires were returned. We used Leymann Inventory of Psychological Terror including 45 items for data collection and structural equation model for data analysis. Results A total of 87.7% of physicians experienced mobbing behavior. Physicians who worked more than 40 hours a week, single physicians, physicians working in university hospitals and private hospitals, and physicians who did not have occupational commitment were more exposed to mobbing (P Mobbing was not associated with specialty status, service period, age, and personality variables (P > 0.05). All goodness-of- fit indices of the model were acceptable (χ2 = 1.449, normed fit index = 0.955, Tucker Lewis index = 0.980, comparative fit index = 0.985, and root mean square error of approximation = 0.040). Conclusions Workplace mobbing is a critical problem for junior male physicians in Turkey. We suggest an introduction of a reporting system and education activities for physicians in high-risk groups. PMID:22911529

  8. Assessment of Turkish junior male physicians' exposure to mobbing behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Bayram; Cetin, Mehmet; Cimen, Mesut; Yildiran, Nuri

    2012-08-01

    To determine the extent of Turkish junior male physicians' exposure to mobbing behavior and its correlation with physicians' characteristics. The study included physicians recruited for compulsory military service in April 2009. No sampling method was used, questionnaires were delivered to all physicians, and 278 of 292 (95%) questionnaires were returned. We used Leymann Inventory of Psychological Terror including 45 items for data collection and structural equation model for data analysis. A total of 87.7% of physicians experienced mobbing behavior. Physicians who worked more than 40 hours a week, single physicians, physicians working in university hospitals and private hospitals, and physicians who did not have occupational commitment were more exposed to mobbing (PMobbing was not associated with specialty status, service period, age, and personality variables (P>0.05). All goodness-of- fit indices of the model were acceptable (χ(2)=1.449, normed fit index=0.955, Tucker Lewis index=0.980, comparative fit index=0.985, and root mean square error of approximation=0.040). Workplace mobbing is a critical problem for junior male physicians in Turkey. We suggest an introduction of a reporting system and education activities for physicians in high-risk groups.

  9. [Determination of total phthalates in perfume and their exposure assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sihan; Wang, Zhengmeng; Deng, Hongxia; Duan, Jiahui; Wang, Jinyi; Liu, Shuhui

    2017-12-08

    A novel method for rapid screening of phthalates (PAEs) in perfumes was developed. The PAEs were hydrolyzed to phthalic acid (PA), and the PA in the acidified solution was extracted with tributyl phosphate (TBP) which was detected by high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). Meanwhile exposure dose to PAEs was estimated by the percentage of a topically applied dose that permeates the skin. The parameters such as the concentration and volume of KOH, the volume of ethanol, hydrolysis time and temperature were employed to evaluate the hydrolysis efficiency of PAEs. The optimized hydrolysis conditions were 10 mL of 4 mol/L KOH, and 1 mL of ethanol at 80℃ for 20 min. The linear range of phthalic acid was 3-240 μmol/L with a good correlation coefficient ( R 2 =0.9991). The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were 4.6 μmol/kg and 5.9 μmol/kg, respectively. The recoveries varied from 83.4% to 92.7% with relative standard deviations equal to or lower than 6.8%( n =5). A total of 35 perfume samples were determined, and the contents of total PAEs were found in the range of perfumes. The method is simple and reliable, and has a wide range of applicability. It can be used as a new choice for the detection of PAEs in perfume.

  10. Aflatoxins in hazelnuts and dried figs: Occurrence and exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabak, Bulent

    2016-11-15

    A total of 300 samples of hazelnuts and dried fig were analysed for the incidence of any aflatoxins (AFs). High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD) method was used to quantify the amounts of AFs. The limit of quantification varied from 0.21 to 0.30μgkg(-1). No AFs were detected in shells of the hazelnuts, while six raw hazelnut kernel samples (12%) and five roasted hazelnut kernel samples (8.3%) contained AFs ranging from 0.09 to 11.3μgkg(-1) and from 0.17 to 11.2μgkg(-1), respectively. Sixteen dried fig samples (12.3%) contained AFs ranging from 0.1 to 28.2μgkg(-1) and a mean value of 3.8μgkg(-1). Three hazelnuts and six dried fig samples exceeded the European maximum limits (MLs) of 5 and 2μgkg(-1) for aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), respectively. The contribution of hazelnuts to AFs exposure is higher than that of dried figs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Saturation-based quality assessment for colorful multi-exposure image fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenwei Deng

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Multi-exposure image fusion is becoming increasingly influential in enhancing the quality of experience of consumer electronics. However, until now few works have been conducted on the performance evaluation of multi-exposure image fusion, especially colorful multi-exposure image fusion. Conventional quality assessment methods for multi-exposure image fusion mainly focus on grayscale information, while ignoring the color components, which also convey vital visual information. We propose an objective method for the quality assessment of colored multi-exposure image fusion based on image saturation, together with texture and structure similarities, which are able to measure the perceived color, texture, and structure information of fused images. The final image quality is predicted using an extreme learning machine with texture, structure, and saturation similarities as image features. Experimental results for a public multi-exposure image fusion database show that the proposed model can accurately predict colored multi-exposure image fusion image quality and correlates well with human perception. Compared with state-of-the-art image quality assessment models for image fusion, the proposed metric has better evaluation performance.

  12. Probabilistic exposure assessment to face and oral care cosmetic products by the French population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, A; Dornic, N; Roudot, Ac; Ficheux, As

    2017-12-01

    Cosmetic exposure data for face and mouth are limited in Europe. The aim of the study was to assess the exposure to face cosmetics using recent French consumption data (Ficheux et al., 2016b, 2015). Exposure was assessed using a probabilistic method for thirty one face products from four lines of products: cleanser, care, make-up and make-up remover products and two oral care products. Probabilistic exposure was assessed for different subpopulation according to sex and age in adults and children. Pregnant women were also studied. The levels of exposure to moisturizing cream, lip balm, mascara, eyeliner, cream foundation, toothpaste and mouthwash were higher than the values currently used by the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (SCCS). Exposure values found for eye shadow, lipstick, lotion and milk (make-up remover) were lower than SCCS values. These new French exposure values will be useful for safety assessors and for safety agencies in order to protect the general population and the at risk populations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. The Health Impacts of Energy Policy Pathways in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia: A Total Exposure Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, L. A.; Damdinsuren, Y.; Olkhanud, P. B.; Smith, K. R.; Turner, J. R.; Edwards, R.; Odsuren, M.; Ochir, C.

    2015-12-01

    Ulaanbaatar is home to nearly half of Mongolia's 2.8 million residents. The city's rapid growth, frigid winters, valley topography, and reliance on coal-fired stoves have led to some of the worst winter pollution levels in the world. To better understand this issue, we modeled integrated PM2.5exposures and related health impacts for various city-wide heating policies through 2024. This assessment is one of the first to employ a total exposure approach and results of the 2014 Comparative Risk Assessments of the Global Burden of Disease Project (CRA/GBD) in a policy-relevant energy study. Emissions related to heating, traffic, and power generation were considered under Business as Usual, Moderate Improvement, and Max Improvement scenarios. Calibrated outdoor models were combined with indoor models, local infiltration and time activity estimates, and demographic projections to estimate PM2.5exposures in 2014 and 2024. Indoor exposures were assigned by heating type, home type, and smoking status; outdoor exposures were assigned through geocoding. Population average annual exposures were calculated and applied to local disease rates and integrated exposure-response curves (2014 CRA/GBD) to arrive at annual projections of premature deaths and DALYs. We estimate 2014 annual average exposures at 68 μg/m3, dictated almost exclusively by indoor winter exposures. Under current trends, annual exposures increase 10% to 75 μg/m3 in 2024. This is in stark contrast to the moderate and max improvement scenarios, which lead to 2024 annual exposures that are 31%, and 68% lower, respectively. Under the Moderate scenario, 2024 per capita annual DALY and death burdens drop 26% and 22%, respectively, from 2014 levels. Under the Max scenario, 2024 per capita annual DALY and death burdens drop 71% and 66%, respectively, from 2014. SHS becomes a major contributor as emissions from other sectors decrease. Reductions are dominated by cardiovascular and lower respiratory diseases in children.

  14. Assessing and reporting uncertainties in dietary exposure analysis - Part II: Application of the uncertainty template to a practical example of exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, David; Bánáti, Diána; Kennedy, Marc; König, Jürgen; O'Mahony, Cian; Kettler, Susanne

    2017-11-01

    A previous publication described methods for assessing and reporting uncertainty in dietary exposure assessments. This follow-up publication uses a case study to develop proposals for representing and communicating uncertainty to risk managers. The food ingredient aspartame is used as the case study in a simple deterministic model (the EFSA FAIM template) and with more sophisticated probabilistic exposure assessment software (FACET). Parameter and model uncertainties are identified for each modelling approach and tabulated. The relative importance of each source of uncertainty is then evaluated using a semi-quantitative scale and the results expressed using two different forms of graphical summary. The value of this approach in expressing uncertainties in a manner that is relevant to the exposure assessment and useful to risk managers is then discussed. It was observed that the majority of uncertainties are often associated with data sources rather than the model itself. However, differences in modelling methods can have the greatest impact on uncertainties overall, particularly when the underlying data are the same. It was concluded that improved methods for communicating uncertainties for risk management is the research area where the greatest amount of effort is suggested to be placed in future. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Elaboration of a concept for the cumulative environmental exposure assessment of biocides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, Rita; Bunke, Dirk; Moch, Katja [Oeko-Institut e.V. - Institut fuer Angewandte Oekologie e.V., Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Gartiser, Stefan [Hydrotox GmbH, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Article 10(1) of the EU Biocidal Products Directive 98/8/EC (BPD) requires that for the inclusion of an active substance in Annex I, Annex IA or IB, cumulation effects from the use of biocidal products containing the same active substance shall be taken into account, where relevant. The study proves the feasibility of a technical realisation of Article 10(1) of the BPD and elaborates a first concept for the cumulative environmental exposure assessment of biocides. Existing requirements concerning cumulative assessments in other regulatory frameworks have been evaluated and their applicability for biocides has been examined. Technical terms and definitions used in this context were documented with the aim to harmonise terminology with other frameworks and to set up a precise definition within the BPD. Furthermore, application conditions of biocidal products have been analysed to find out for which cumulative exposure assessments may be relevant. Different parameters were identified which might serve as indicators for the relevance of cumulative exposure assessments. These indicators were then integrated in a flow chart by means of which the relevance of cumulative exposure assessments can be checked. Finally, proposals for the technical performance of cumulative exposure assessments within the Review Programme have been elaborated with the aim to bring the results of the project into the upcoming development and harmonization processes on EU level. (orig.)

  16. Assessing human exposure to phthalates, alternative plasticizers and organophosphate esters

    OpenAIRE

    Bui, Tuong Thuy

    2017-01-01

    Phthalate esters (PEs) and organophosphate esters (OPEs) are common indoor pollutants frequently detected in environmental (dust, air), personal (hand wipes, diet) and human matrices (urine, serum etc.). In this thesis, mathematical models were used to establish links between intake and body burden for a comprehensive dataset based on a Norwegian study population. Also, the relative importance of different PE uptake pathways was assessed and discussed. Furthermore, the suitability of human na...

  17. A model for probabilistic health impact assessment of exposure to food chemicals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Voet, H.; van der Heijden, G.W.; Bos, P.M.J.; Bosgra, S.; Boon, P.E.; Muri, S.D.; Bruschweiler, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    A statistical model is presented extending the integrated probabilistic risk assessment (IPRA) model of van der Voet and Slob [van der Voet, H., Slob, W., 2007. Integration of probabilistic exposure assessment and probabilistic hazard characterisation. Risk Analysis, 27, 351-371]. The aim is to

  18. A model for probabilistic health impact assessment of exposure to food chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voet, van der H.; Heijden, van der G.W.A.M.; Bos, P.M.J.; Bosgra, S.; Boon, P.E.; Muri, S.D.; Brüschweiler, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    A statistical model is presented extending the integrated probabilistic risk assessment (IPRA) model of van der Voet and Slob [van der Voet, H., Slob, W., 2007. Integration of probabilistic exposure assessment and probabilistic hazard characterisation. Risk Analysis, 27, 351–371]. The aim is to

  19. Expert assessment of exposure to carcinogens in Norway's offshore petroleum industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinsvåg, Kjersti; Bråtveit, Magne; Moen, Bente; Austgulen, Li V-Torill; Hollund, Bjørg Eli; Haaland, Inger Margrethe; Naerheim, Jakob; Svendsen, Kristin; Kromhout, Hans

    2008-03-01

    This study presents and evaluates an expert group's assessment of exposure to carcinogens for defined job categories in Norway's offshore petroleum industry, 1970-2005, to provide exposure information for a planned cohort study on cancer. Three university and five industry experts in occupational hygiene individually assessed the likelihood of exposure to 1836 combinations of carcinogens (n=17), job categories (n=27) and time periods (n=4). In subsequent plenary discussions, the experts agreed on exposed combinations. Agreement between the individual and the panel assessments was calculated by Cohen's kappa index. Using the panel assessment as reference, sensitivity and specificity were estimated. The eight experts assessed 63% of the 1836 combinations in plenary, resulting in 265 (14%) convened exposed combinations. Chlorinated hydrocarbons, benzene and inhalation of mineral oils had the highest number of exposed job categories (n=14, 9 and 10, respectively). The job categories classified as exposed to the highest numbers of carcinogens were the mechanics (n=10), derrick workers (n=6) and process technicians (n=5). The agreement between the experts' individual assessments and the panel assessment was kappa=0.53-0.74. The sensitivity was 0.55-0.86 and specificity 0.91-0.97. For these parameters, there were no apparent differences between the university experts and the industry experts. The resulting 265 of 1836 possible exposure combinations convened as "exposed" by expert assessment is presented in this study. The experts' individual ratings highly agreed with the succeeding panel assessment. Correlation was found between years of experience of the raters and agreement with the panel. The university experts and the industry experts' assessments had no apparent differences. Further validation of the exposure assessment is suggested, such as by new sampling data or observational studies.

  20. Corneal biomechanical properties in thyroid eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabulut, Gamze Ozturk; Kaynak, Pelin; Altan, Cıgdem; Ozturker, Can; Aksoy, Ebru Funda; Demirok, Ahmet; Yılmaz, Omer Faruk

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of thyroid eye disease (TED) on the measurement of corneal biomechanical properties and the relationship between these parameters and disease manifestations. A total of 54 eyes of 27 individuals with TED and 52 eyes of 30 healthy control participants were enrolled. Thyroid ophthalmopathy activity was defined using the VISA (vision, inflammation, strabismus, and appearance/exposure) classification for TED. The intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement with Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT), axial length (AL), keratometry, and central corneal thickness (CCT) measurements were taken from each patient. Corneal biomechanical properties, including corneal hysteresis (CH) and corneal resistance factor (CRF) and noncontact IOP measurements, Goldmann-correlated IOP (IOPg) and corneal-compensated IOP (IOPcc) were measured with the Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA) using the standard technique. Parameters such as best corrected visual acuity, axial length, central corneal thickness, and corneal curvature were not statistically significant between the two groups (p > 0.05). IOP measured with GAT was higher in participants with TED (p corneal resistance factor between groups. However, IOPg and IOPcc were significantly higher in TED patients. CH and VISA grading of TED patients showed a negative correlation (p = 0.007). In conclusion, TED affects the corneal biomechanical properties by decreasing CH. IOP with GAT and IOPg is found to be increased in these patients. As the severity of TED increases, CH decreases in these patients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. An ignored risk factor in toxicology: The total imprecision of exposure assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, Philippe; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben

    2010-01-01

    Quality assurance of exposure biomarkers usually focuses on laboratory performance only. Using data from a prospective birth cohort study in the Faroe Islands, we have assessed the total imprecision of exposure biomarkers. As biomarkers of prenatal methylmercury exposure, mercury concentrations...... were determined in cord blood, cord tissue, and maternal hair. We determined their mutual correlations and their associations with the child's neurobehavioral effect variables at age 7 years. The exposure biomarkers correlated well with one another, but the cord blood mercury concentration showed...... the best associations with neurobehavioral deficits. Because at least three exposure parameters were available, factor analysis and structural equation modeling could be applied to determine the total imprecision of each biomarker. For the cord-blood parameter, the total imprecision was 25-30%, and almost...

  2. Residential traffic noise exposure assessment: application and evaluation of European Environmental Noise Directive maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Charlotta; Nilsson, Mats E; Stenkvist, Dag; Bellander, Tom; Pershagen, Göran

    2013-01-01

    Digital noise maps produced according to the European Environmental Noise Directive (END) could provide valuable exposure information in noise and health research. However, their usefulness in epidemiological studies has not been evaluated. The objective of this study was to apply and evaluate Swedish END maps for assessments of residential traffic noise exposure. END maps from three Swedish cities were used to assess residential traffic noise exposure for a population sample of 2496 men and women included in a national Environmental Health Survey. For each subject, we assessed noise levels manually and automatically at three geographical points, using survey data to locate dwellings within buildings. Cohen's kappa coefficient (κ) was used to assess agreement between the noise estimates. To evaluate the maps, we compared the observed and predicted proportions of annoyed residents as a function of noise exposure using survey data and already established exposure-response relationships. The root mean square deviation (r.m.s.) was used to assess the precision of observed estimates. The agreement between the noise estimates ranged from κ=0.4 to 0.8. Generally, there was a high correspondence between observed and predicted exposure-response relationships for noise annoyance, regardless of method and if data on dwelling location within building were used. The best precision was, however, found when we manually corrected the noise level according to the location of the dwelling within buildings (r.m.s.=0.029). Noise maps based on the END appear useful for assessing residential traffic noise exposure, particularly if combined with survey data on dwelling location.

  3. Consumption and exposure assessment to cosmetic products for children under 2 years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Berrada, Marie-Pierre; Ficheux, Anne-Sophie; Guillou, Sonia; Berge, Carole; de Javel, Dominique; Roudot, Alain-Claude; Ferret, Pierre-Jacques

    2017-07-01

    Today, the use of personal care products is an integral part of daily life. Little information about children's consumption and exposure to cosmetic products is available. The aim of the study was to assess the consumption and the exposure of French babies aged 0-23 months old to seven common baby care products: shampoo, shower gel, cleansing water, cleansing milk, moisturizing cream, bottom cream and wipes. Consumption and exposure were assessed using small age intervals in order to identify any differences. Exposure was calculated using a probabilistic method. These original data will be useful for safety assessors and safety agencies in order to protect consumers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Integrated indoor and outdoor exposure assessment framework for fine particulate matter pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKone, Thomas E; Hodas, Natasha; Apte, Joshua S.

    2016-01-01

    The 2010 Global Burden of Disease report demonstrates that fine particulate matter (PM2.5) pollution is the major environmental contributor to mortality. Exposures outdoors (ambient) and indoors (household) contribute almost qually to this burden. Unfortunately, the health impacts from exposure...... to PM2.5 are often excluded from life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) used for characterizing environmental performance of products and services. This is in large part because of the lack of well-vetted harmonized guidance about how to consistently assess the exposures and impacts of indoor and outdoor...... emissions of PM2.5 and its precursors. We present a modeling framework for calculating exposure factors for indoor and outdoor emissions of primary PM2.5 and secondary PM2.5 precursors, and a roadmap for further refining this modelling framework for operational use in LCIA. The framework was developed over...

  5. Health effects from indoor and outdoor exposure to fine particulate matter in life cycle impact assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fantke, Peter; McKone, T.E.; Jolliet, Olivier

    Exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) pollution is a major contributor to human disease burden as continuously shown in the Global Burden of Disease study series. Exposures to PM2.5 concentration outdoors and indoors contribute almost equally to this burden. Despite the importance, health...... impacts from exposure to PM2.5 are often excluded from life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) characterization profiles. This is in large part because of the lack of well-vetted harmonized guidance about how to consistently assess the exposures and impacts of indoor and outdoor emissions of PM2.5 and its...... precursors. We present a framework for calculating characterization factors for indoor and outdoor emissions of primary PM2.5 and secondary PM2.5 precursors, and a roadmap for further refining this modelling framework for operational use in LCIA. The framework was developed over the last three years...

  6. Inter-rater agreement in the assessment of exposure to carcinogens in the offshore petroleum industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinsvåg, Kjersti; Bråtveit, Magne; Moen, Bente E; Kromhout, Hans

    2007-09-01

    To evaluate the reliability of an expert team assessing exposure to carcinogens in the offshore petroleum industry and to study how the information provided influenced the agreement among raters. Eight experts individually assessed the likelihood of exposure for combinations of 17 carcinogens, 27 job categories and four time periods (1970-1979, 1980-1989, 1990-1999 and 2000-2005). Each rater assessed 1836 combinations based on summary documents on carcinogenic agents, which included descriptions of sources of exposure and products, descriptions of work processes carried out within the different job categories, and monitoring data. Inter-rater agreement was calculated using Cohen's kappa index and single and average score intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) (ICC(2,1) and ICC(2,8), respectively). Differences in inter-rater agreement for time periods, raters, International Agency for Research on Cancer groups and the amount of information provided were consequently studied. Overall, 18% of the combinations were denoted as possible exposure, and 14% scored probable exposure. Stratified by the 17 carcinogenic agents, the probable exposure prevalence ranged from 3.8% for refractory ceramic fibres to 30% for crude oil. Overall mean kappa was 0.42 (ICC(2,1) = 0.62 and ICC(2,8) = 0.93). Providing limited quantitative measurement data was associated with less agreement than for equally well described carcinogens without sampling data. The overall kappa and single-score ICC indicate that the raters agree on exposure estimates well above the chance level. The levels of inter-rater agreement were higher than in other comparable studies. The average score ICC indicates reliable mean estimates and implies that sufficient raters were involved. The raters seemed to have enough documentation on which to base their estimates, but provision of limited monitoring data leads to more incongruence among raters. Having real exposure data, with the inherent variability of such data

  7. [Objective assessment of total noise exposure over 24 hours: a cross-sectional study in Bavaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinmann, T; Sárközi, E; Praml, G; von Kries, R; Ehrenstein, V; Nowak, D; Radon, K

    2012-11-01

    Noise can affect well-being and performance of individuals and might be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. To date most epidemiological studies considered exposure from a single source of noise. The EU Environmental Noise Directive (2002/49/EC) requires a summative measurement of ambient noise. This study aimed to capture the participants' exposure to environmental noise by means of personal noise dosimetry. Children (n=628, participation=61%, age 8-12 years), adolescents (n=632, participation=58%, age 13-17 years) and adults (n=482, participation=40%, age 18-65 years) were selected randomly from the population registry of 4 Bavarian towns and were invited to participate in a 24-h measurement using noise dosimetry. Noise exposures during day and night were analyzed separately. In addition, predictors of noise exposure were assessed. For daytime noise exposure mean±standard deviation were in children 80.0±5.8 dB(A), in adolescents 76.0±6.2 dB(A), in adults 72.1±6.1 dB(A) (p(ANOVA)noise exposure was statistically significantly higher for participants from smaller towns than for those living in Munich, while nighttime noise exposure was highest for participants from Munich [44.1±7.2 dB(A)]. The summative noise exposure in urban Bavaria is high, in particular among children at daytime. Increased exposure levels in children might be caused by themselves while, e.g., playing. Whether the higher daytime exposure in towns is due to high noise levels commuting between home and work has to be assessed in future studies. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Comparison of exposure assessment methods for occupational carcinogens in a multi-centre lung cancer case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Susan; Vermeulen, Roel; Cassidy, Adrian; 't Mannetje, Andrea; van Tongeren, Martie; Boffetta, Paolo; Straif, Kurt; Kromhout, Hans

    Objectives Retrospective exposure assessment remains a problematic aspect of population-based case-control studies. Different methods have been developed, including case-by-case expert assessment and job-exposure matrices (JEM). The present analyses compare exposure prevalence and risk estimates

  9. A Case Report of Lung Cancer in a Horse Trainer Caused by Exposure to Respirable Crystalline Silica: An Exposure Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Ha Yoon

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present a case of lung cancer in a 48-year-old male horse trainer. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such case report to include an exposure assessment of respirable crystalline silica (RCS as a quartz. The trainer had no family history of lung cancer. Although he had a 15 pack/year cigarette-smoking history, he had stopped smoking 12 years prior to his diagnosis. For the past 23 years, he had performed longeing, and trained 7-12 horses per day on longeing arena surfaces covered by recycled sands, the same surfaces used in race tracks. We investigated his workplace RCS exposure, and found it to be the likely cause of his lung cancer. The 8-hour time weight average range of RCS was 0.020 to 0.086 mg/m3 in the longeing arena. Horse trainers are exposed to RCS from the sand in longeing arenas, and the exposure level is high enough to have epidemiological ramifications for the occupational risk of lung cancer.

  10. The Penobscot River and environmental contaminants: Assessment of tribal exposure through sustenance lifeways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Valerie; Kusnierz, Daniel; Hillger, Robert; Ferrario, Joseph; Hughes, Thomas; Diliberto, Janet; Orazio, Carl E.; Dudley, Robert W.; Byrne, Christian; Sugatt, Richard; Warren, Sarah; DeMarini, David; Elskus, Adria; Stodola, Steve; Mierzykowski, Steve; Pugh, Katie; Culbertson, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    EPA in collaboration with the Penobscot Indian Nation, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USF&WS) collectively embarked on a four year research study to evaluate the environmental health of the riverine system by targeting specific cultural practices and using traditional science to conduct a preliminary contaminant screening of the flora and fauna of the Penobscot River ecosystem. This study was designed as a preliminary screening to determine if contaminant concentrations in fish, eel, snapping turtle, wood ducks, and plants in Regions of the Penobscot River relevant to where PIN tribal members hunt, fish and gather plants were high enough to be a health concern. This study was not designed to be a statistically validated assessment of contaminant differences among study sites or among species. The traditional methodology for health risk assessment used by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is based on the use of exposure assumptions (e.g. exposure duration, food ingestion rate, body weight, etc.) that represent the entire American population, either as a central tendency exposure (e.g. average, median) or as a reasonable maximum exposure (e.g. 95% upper confidence limit). Unfortunately, EPA lacked exposure information for assessing health risks for New England regional tribes sustaining a tribal subsistence way of life. As a riverine tribe, the Penobscot culture and traditions are inextricably tied to the Penobscot River watershed. It is through hunting, fishing, trapping, gathering and making baskets, pottery, moccasins, birch-bark canoes and other traditional practices that the Penobscot culture and people are sustained. The Penobscot River receives a variety of pollutant discharges leaving the Penobscot Indian Nation (PIN) questioning the ecological health and water quality of the river and how this may affect the practices that sustain their way of life

  11. The assessment of electromagnetic field radiation exposure for mobile phone users

    OpenAIRE

    Buckus Raimondas; Strukcinskiene Birute; Raistenskis Juozas

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim. During recent years, the widespread use of mobile phones has resulted in increased human exposure to electromagnetic field radiation and to health risks. Increased usage of mobile phones at the close proximity raises questions and doubts in safety of mobile phone users. The aim of the study was to assess an electromagnetic field radiation exposure for mobile phone users by measuring electromagnetic field strength in different settings at the...

  12. Assessment of radiation exposure of nuclear medicine staff using personal TLD dosimeters and charcoal detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, F.; Garcia-Talavera, M.; Pardo, R.; Deban, L. [Valladolid Univ., Dept. de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias (Spain); Garcia-Talavera, P.; Singi, G.M.; Martin, E. [Hospital Clinico Univ., Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Salamanca (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    Although the main concern regarding exposure to ionizing radiation for nuclear medicine workers is external radiation, inhalation of radionuclides can significantly contribute to the imparted doses. We propose a new approach to assess exposure to inhalation of {sup 131}I based on passive monitoring using activated charcoal detectors. We compared the inhalation doses to the staff of a nuclear medicine department, based on the measurements derived from charcoal detectors placed at various locations, and the external doses monitored using personal TLD dosimeters. (authors)

  13. MobRISK: a model for assessing the exposure of road users to flash flood events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabou, Saif; Ruin, Isabelle; Lutoff, Céline; Debionne, Samuel; Anquetin, Sandrine; Creutin, Jean-Dominique; Beaufils, Xavier

    2017-09-01

    Recent flash flood impact studies highlight that road networks are often disrupted due to adverse weather and flash flood events. Road users are thus particularly exposed to road flooding during their daily mobility. Previous exposure studies, however, do not take into consideration population mobility. Recent advances in transportation research provide an appropriate framework for simulating individual travel-activity patterns using an activity-based approach. These activity-based mobility models enable the prediction of the sequence of activities performed by individuals and locating them with a high spatial-temporal resolution. This paper describes the development of the MobRISK microsimulation system: a model for assessing the exposure of road users to extreme hydrometeorological events. MobRISK aims at providing an accurate spatiotemporal exposure assessment by integrating travel-activity behaviors and mobility adaptation with respect to weather disruptions. The model is applied in a flash-flood-prone area in southern France to assess motorists' exposure to the September 2002 flash flood event. The results show that risk of flooding mainly occurs in principal road links with considerable traffic load. However, a lag time between the timing of the road submersion and persons crossing these roads contributes to reducing the potential vehicle-related fatal accidents. It is also found that sociodemographic variables have a significant effect on individual exposure. Thus, the proposed model demonstrates the benefits of considering spatiotemporal dynamics of population exposure to flash floods and presents an important improvement in exposure assessment methods. Such improved characterization of road user exposures can present valuable information for flood risk management services.

  14. Examining Exposure Assessment in Shift Work Research: A Study on Depression Among Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Amy L; Franche, Renée-Louise; Koehoorn, Mieke

    2018-01-11

    Coarse exposure assessment and assignment is a common issue facing epidemiological studies of shift work. Such measures ignore a number of exposure characteristics that may impact on health, increasing the likelihood of biased effect estimates and masked exposure-response relationships. To demonstrate the impacts of exposure assessment precision in shift work research, this study investigated relationships between work schedule and depression in a large survey of Canadian nurses. The Canadian 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses provided the analytic sample (n = 11450). Relationships between work schedule and depression were assessed using logistic regression models with high, moderate, and low-precision exposure groupings. The high-precision grouping described shift timing and rotation frequency, the moderate-precision grouping described shift timing, and the low-precision grouping described the presence/absence of shift work. Final model estimates were adjusted for the potential confounding effects of demographic and work variables, and bootstrap weights were used to generate sampling variances that accounted for the survey sample design. The high-precision exposure grouping model showed the strongest relationships between work schedule and depression, with increased odds ratios [ORs] for rapidly rotating (OR = 1.51, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.91-2.51) and undefined rotating (OR = 1.67, 95% CI = 0.92-3.02) shift workers, and a decreased OR for depression in slow rotating (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.57-1.08) shift workers. For the low- and moderate-precision exposure grouping models, weak relationships were observed for all work schedule categories (OR range 0.95 to 0.99). Findings from this study support the need to consider and collect the data required for precise and conceptually driven exposure assessment and assignment in future studies of shift work and health. Further research into the effects of shift rotation frequency on depression is

  15. Magnetic field exposure assessment in a case-control study of childhood leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinerman, R A; Linet, M S; Hatch, E E; Wacholder, S; Tarone, R E; Severson, R K; Kaune, W T; Friedman, D R; Haines, C M; Muirhead, C R; Boice, J D; Robison, L L

    1997-09-01

    Epidemiologic evaluation of the relation between magnetic field exposures and cancer depends critically on study design, particularly the methods used for exposure assessment. We incorporated a complex magnetic field exposure assessment protocol into a large incident case-control study of childhood leukemia. We measured residential magnetic fields using a standard protocol in current and former homes of 638 cases and 620 controls and determined wire codes for 414 case-control pairs. We chose a time-weighted average of magnetic field measurements in each eligible home, weighted by the time the subject lived in each home as the main exposure metric for each subject. We found that 24-hour bedroom magnetic field measurements adequately characterize children's residential exposure and that measuring other rooms contributes only slightly to the estimate of average residential exposure to magnetic fields. Front door measured fields provide useful exposure information when interior measurements are missing. If feasible, measuring multiple homes in which the subject has resided is preferable to measuring a single home. A similar distribution of wire codes for controls agreeing or refusing to participate in our study implies that risk estimates derived from wire code data will not be influenced by response bias.

  16. Using city-wide mobile noise assessments to estimate bicycle trip annual exposure to Black Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekoninck, Luc; Botteldooren, Dick; Int Panis, Luc

    2015-10-01

    Several studies have shown that a significant amount of daily air pollution exposure, in particular Black Carbon (BC), is inhaled during bicycle trips. Previously, the instantaneous BC exposure of cyclists was modeled as the sum of a background concentration and a local traffic related component based on a local assessment of traffic noise. We present a fast and low cost methodology to achieve a city-wide assessment of yearly average BC exposure of cyclists along their trips, based on a city-wide mobile noise sensing campaign. The methodology requires participatory sensing measurements of noise, partially combined with BC and/or other air pollutants sensitive to local traffic variations. The combined measurements cover the spatial and meteorological variability and provide the data for an instantaneous exposure model. The mobile noise-only measurements map the full city; and yearly meteorology statistics are used to extrapolate the instantaneous exposure model to a yearly average map of in-traffic air pollution exposure. Less than four passages at each segment along the network with mobile noise equipment are necessary to reach a standard error of 500 ng/m(3) for the yearly average BC exposure. A strong seasonal effect due to the BC background concentration is detected. The background contributes only 25% to the total trip exposure during spring and summer. During winter the background component increases to 50-60%. Engine related traffic noise along the bicyclist's route is a valid indicator of the BC exposure along the route, independent of the seasonal background. Low exposure route selection results in an exposure reduction of 35% in winter and 60% in summer, sensitive to the weather conditions, specific trip attributes and the available alternatives. The methodology is relevant for further research into the local effects of air pollution on health. Mobile noise mapping adds local traffic data including traffic dynamics into the air pollution exposure

  17. A Formaldehyde Exposure Assessment Tool for Occupants of FEMA Temporary Housing Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Spears, Michael; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L; Apte, Michael G.

    2010-10-01

    The report outlines the methodology used to develop a web-based tool to assess the formaldehyde exposure of the occupants of Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) temporary housing units (THUs) after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005. Linear regression models were built using available data to retrospectively estimate the indoor temperature and relative humidity, formaldehyde emission factors and concentration, and hence the formaldehyde exposures. The interactive web-tool allows the user to define the inputs to the model to evaluate formaldehyde exposures for different scenarios.

  18. Exposure assessment of the cumulative intake of pesticides with dissimilar mode of action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bodil Hamborg; Petersen, Annette; Christiansen, Sofie

    Risk assessment of pesticides is currently based on the no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELs) for effects of single compounds. However, humans might be exposed to a mixture of pesticides at the same time and the exposure could occur from more pesticides with endocrine disrupting effects....... In this study the effects of combined exposure from four endocrine disrupting pesticides have been investigated (procymidone, mancozeb, tebuconazole, and prochloraz). The four pesticides have dissimilar mode of actions. On the background of the potency for each pesticide to a given effect, a relative potency...... factor and the cumulative acute exposure of the pesticides have been estimated....

  19. Influence of exposure assessment and parameterization on exposure response. Aspects of epidemiologic cohort analysis using the Libby Amphibole asbestos worker cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateson, Thomas F; Kopylev, Leonid

    2015-01-01

    Recent meta-analyses of occupational epidemiology studies identified two important exposure data quality factors in predicting summary effect measures for asbestos-associated lung cancer mortality risk: sufficiency of job history data and percent coverage of work history by measured exposures. The objective was to evaluate different exposure parameterizations suggested in the asbestos literature using the Libby, MT asbestos worker cohort and to evaluate influences of exposure measurement error caused by historically estimated exposure data on lung cancer risks. Focusing on workers hired after 1959, when job histories were well-known and occupational exposures were predominantly based on measured exposures (85% coverage), we found that cumulative exposure alone, and with allowance of exponential decay, fit lung cancer mortality data similarly. Residence-time-weighted metrics did not fit well. Compared with previous analyses based on the whole cohort of Libby workers hired after 1935, when job histories were less well-known and exposures less frequently measured (47% coverage), our analyses based on higher quality exposure data yielded an effect size as much as 3.6 times higher. Future occupational cohort studies should continue to refine retrospective exposure assessment methods, consider multiple exposure metrics, and explore new methods of maintaining statistical power while minimizing exposure measurement error.

  20. Non-destructive pollution exposure assessment in the European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus): IV. Hair versus soil analysis in exposure and risk assessment of organochlorine compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Have, Helga [Department of Biology, Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology Group, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)]. E-mail: helga.dhave@ua.ac.be; Scheirs, Jan [Department of Biology, Evolutionary Biology Group, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Covaci, Adrian [Toxicological Centre, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Brink, Nico W. van den [Alterra, Wageningen UR, Box 47, NL-6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Verhagen, Ron [Department of Biology, Evolutionary Biology Group, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Coen, Wim de [Department of Biology, Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology Group, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2007-02-15

    Few ecotoxicological studies on mammals use non-destructive methodologies, despite the growing ethical concern over the use of destructive sampling methods. In the present study we assessed exposure of hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethanes (DDTs), hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB), by investigating concentrations of these compounds in soils and hedgehog hair from seven study sites around the urban area of Antwerp, Belgium. No relationships were observed between organochlorine compound concentrations in soils and hair from the different study areas. Furthermore, the individual variation of contamination levels in hair within study sites was high, especially for HCHs and HCB, and hair and soil had different relative profiles for PCBs, DDTs and HCHs. Our results show that concentrations of organochlorine compounds in soils alone are not predictive of the risk of these pollutants to hedgehogs and that tissue analyses are preferred to soil analyses in exposure and risk assessment studies. - Hair is better than soil for exposure and risk assessment of PCBs and organochlorine pesticides in hedgehogs.

  1. A quantitative screening-level approach to incorporate chemical exposure and risk into alternative assessment evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Scott M; Greggs, Bill; Goyak, Katy O; Landenberger, Bryce D; Mason, Ann M; Howard, Brett; Zaleski, Rosemary T

    2017-11-01

    As the general public and retailers ask for disclosure of chemical ingredients in the marketplace, a number of hazard screening tools were developed to evaluate the so-called "greenness" of individual chemical ingredients and/or formulations. The majority of these tools focus only on hazard, often using chemical lists, ignoring the other part of the risk equation: exposure. Using a hazard-only focus can result in regrettable substitutions, changing 1 chemical ingredient for another that turns out to be more hazardous or shifts the toxicity burden to others. To minimize the incidents of regrettable substitutions, BizNGO describes "Common Principles" to frame a process for informed substitution. Two of these 6 principles are: "reduce hazard" and "minimize exposure." A number of frameworks have emerged to evaluate and assess alternatives. One framework developed by leading experts under the auspices of the US National Academy of Sciences recommended that hazard and exposure be specifically addressed in the same step when assessing candidate alternatives. For the alternative assessment community, this article serves as an informational resource for considering exposure in an alternatives assessment using elements of problem formulation; product identity, use, and composition; hazard analysis; exposure analysis; and risk characterization. These conceptual elements build on practices from government, academia, and industry and are exemplified through 2 hypothetical case studies demonstrating the questions asked and decisions faced in new product development. These 2 case studies-inhalation exposure to a generic paint product and environmental exposure to a shampoo rinsed down the drain-demonstrate the criteria, considerations, and methods required to combine exposure models addressing human health and environmental impacts to provide a screening level hazard and exposure (risk) analysis. This article informs practices for these elements within a comparative risk context

  2. NASA Space Radiation Protection Strategies: Risk Assessment and Permissible Exposure Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, J. L.; Patel, Z. S.; Simonsen, L. C.

    2017-01-01

    Permissible exposure limits (PELs) for short-term and career astronaut exposures to space radiation have been set and approved by NASA with the goal of protecting astronauts against health risks associated with ionizing radiation exposure. Short term PELs are intended to prevent clinically significant deterministic health effects, including performance decrements, which could threaten astronaut health and jeopardize mission success. Career PELs are implemented to control late occurring health effects, including a 3% risk of exposure induced death (REID) from cancer, and dose limits are used to prevent cardiovascular and central nervous system diseases. For radiation protection, meeting the cancer PEL is currently the design driver for galactic cosmic ray and solar particle event shielding, mission duration, and crew certification (e.g., 1-year ISS missions). The risk of cancer development is the largest known long-term health consequence following radiation exposure, and current estimates for long-term health risks due to cardiovascular diseases are approximately 30% to 40% of the cancer risk for exposures above an estimated threshold (Deep Space one-year and Mars missions). Large uncertainties currently exist in estimating the health risks of space radiation exposure. Improved understanding through radiobiology and physics research allows increased accuracy in risk estimation and is essential for ensuring astronaut health as well as for controlling mission costs, optimization of mission operations, vehicle design, and countermeasure assessment. We will review the Space Radiation Program Element's research strategies to increase accuracy in risk models and to inform development and validation of the permissible exposure limits.

  3. Ecological risk assessment of multimedia hazardous air pollutants: estimating exposure and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efroymson, R A; Murphy, D L

    2001-07-02

    Hazardous air pollutants, some of which have the potential for multimedia distribution, raise several hurdles for ecological risk assessment including: (1) the development of an adequate transport, fate and exposure model; and (2) the selection of exposure-response models that can accommodate multiple exposure routes for ecological receptors. To address the first issue, the EPA Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards has developed TRIM.FaTE, a mass-balance, fate, transport, and ecological exposure model that is a component of the Total Risk Integrated Methodology (TRIM) for air pollutants. In addition to abiotic transfers and transformations, TRIM.FaTE estimates the uptake of a chemical by terrestrial and aquatic organisms with time. Measures of exposure that TRIM.FaTE can provide include: (1) body burdens or tissue concentrations; (2) doses averaged over any time period; or (3) concentrations of chemicals in abiotic media. The model provides the user with the flexibility to choose the exposure-response thresholds or dose-response relationships that are best suited to data availability, routes of exposure, and the mechanism of toxicity of the chemical to an ecological receptor. One of the challenges of incorporating TRIM.FaTE into a risk assessment methodology lies in defining a streamlined model simulation scenario for initial screening-level risk assessments. These assessments may encompass multiple facilities that emit a variety of pollutants near diverse ecosystems. The information on ecological risk assessment methodology that is described is applicable to the EPA Residual Risk Program with emphasis on multimedia pollutants and the role of TRIM.FaTE.

  4. A conceptual framework to support exposure science research and complete the source-to-outcome continuum for risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    While knowledge of exposure is fundamental to assessing and mitigating risks, exposure information has been costly and difficult to generate. Driven by major scientific advances in analytical methods, biomonitoring, computational tools, and a newly articulated vision for a great...

  5. Biomechanics of concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaney, David F; Smith, Douglas H

    2011-01-01

    The rising awareness of the long-term health problems associated with concussions re-emphasizes the need for understanding the mechanical etiology of concussions. This article reviews past studies defining the common mechanisms for mild traumatic brain injury and summarizes efforts to convert the external input to the head (force, acceleration, and velocity) into estimates of motions and deformations of the brain that occur during mild traumatic brain injury. Studies of how these mechanical conditions contribute to the cellular mechanisms of damage in mild traumatic brain injury are reviewed. Finally, future directions for improving understanding concussion biomechanics are discussed. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Quantitative assessment of human and pet exposure to Salmonella associated with dry pet foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertini, Elisabetta; Buchanan, Robert L; Narrod, Clare; Ford, Randall M; Baker, Robert C; Pradhan, Abani K

    2016-01-04

    Recent Salmonella outbreaks associated with dry pet foods and treats highlight the importance of these foods as previously overlooked exposure vehicles for both pets and humans. In the last decade efforts have been made to raise the safety of this class of products, for instance by upgrading production equipment, cleaning protocols, and finished product testing. However, no comprehensive or quantitative risk profile is available for pet foods, thus limiting the ability to establish safety standards and assess the effectiveness of current and proposed Salmonella control measures. This study sought to develop an ingredients-to-consumer quantitative microbial exposure assessment model to: 1) estimate pet and human exposure to Salmonella via dry pet food, and 2) assess the impact of industry and household-level mitigation strategies on exposure. Data on prevalence and concentration of Salmonella in pet food ingredients, production process parameters, bacterial ecology, and contact transfer in the household were obtained through literature review, industry data, and targeted research. A probabilistic Monte Carlo modeling framework was developed to simulate the production process and basic household exposure routes. Under the range of assumptions adopted in this model, human exposure due to handling pet food is null to minimal if contamination occurs exclusively before extrusion. Exposure increases considerably if recontamination occurs post-extrusion during coating with fat, although mean ingested doses remain modest even at high fat contamination levels, due to the low percent of fat in the finished product. Exposure is highly variable, with the distribution of doses ingested by adult pet owners spanning 3Log CFU per exposure event. Child exposure due to ingestion of 1g of pet food leads to significantly higher doses than adult doses associated with handling the food. Recontamination after extrusion and coating, e.g., via dust or equipment surfaces, may also lead to

  7. Assessment of Relationship between Spontaneous Abortion and Occupational Exposure to Organic Solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mohammadi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Nowadays, some studies indicate the adverse effects of exposure to chemicals, especially organic solvents on the reproductive system of females. This study aimed to assess the relationship between spontaneous abortion with occupational exposure to organic solvents in pharmaceutical industry. Materials & Methods: This is a cross-sectional and descriptive-analytical study which was carried out in 2010 in one of the pharmaceutical factories located in the suburbs of Tehran. During the study, married women who were working in the factory laboratory units and were exposed to mixed organic solvents were compared with married women who were working in the packing units of the factory without occupational exposure to organic solvents. Frequency of spontaneous abortion and duration of pregnancy were assessed in both two groups. Collected data were analyzed with the SPSS software using t-test, logistic regression, and chi-square test. Results: In the present study, the frequency of spontaneous abortion in employees with exposure to organic solvents mixture was 10.7%. This study showed that even after adjustment for confounding factors, there was a significant correlation between spontaneous abortion and occupational exposure to organic solvents mixture and this correlation increased with increasing levels of exposure to organic solvents. Moreover, a significant correlation was observed between occupational exposure to mixed organic solvents and waiting time to become pregnant (TTP. Furthermore, this study showed that even after adjustment for confounding variables, shift workers were significantly more affected by spontaneous abortion compared to daytime workers (P < 0.001. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, since there is probability of spontaneous abortion resulting from occupational exposure to various chemicals including organic solvents, review of the status of occupational exposure of workers can be helpful

  8. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles: occupational exposure assessment in the photocatalytic paving production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinazzè, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.spinazze@uninsubria.it; Cattaneo, Andrea; Limonta, Marina [Università degli studi dell’Insubria, Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia (Italy); Bollati, Valentina; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto [Università degli Studi di Milano, EPIGET-Epidemiology, Epigenetics and Toxicology Lab, Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche e di Comunità (Italy); Cavallo, Domenico M. [Università degli studi dell’Insubria, Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    Limited data are available regarding occupational exposure assessment to nano-sized titanium dioxide (nano-TiO{sub 2}). The objective of this study is to assess the occupational exposure of workers engaged in the application of nano-TiO{sub 2} onto concrete building materials, by means of a multi-metric approach (mean diameter, number, mass and surface area concentrations). The measurement design consists of the combined use of (i) direct-reading instruments to evaluate the total particle number concentrations relative to the background concentration and the mean size-dependent characteristics of particles (mean diameter and surface area concentration) and to estimate the 8-h time-weighted average (8-h TWA) exposure to nano-TiO{sub 2} for workers involved in different working tasks; and (ii) filter-based air sampling, used for the determination of size-resolved particle mass concentrations. A further estimation was performed to obtain the mean 8-h TWA exposure values expressed as mass concentrations (µg nano-TiO{sub 2}/m{sup 3}). The multi-metric characterization of occupational exposure to nano-TiO{sub 2} was significantly different both for different work environments and for each work task. Generally, workers were exposed to engineered nanoparticles (ENPs; <100 nm) mean levels lower than the recommended reference values and proposed occupational exposure limits (40,000 particle/cm{sup 3}; 300 µg/m{sup 3}) and relevant exposures to peak concentration were not likely to be expected. The estimated 8-h TWA exposure showed differences between the unexposed and exposed subjects. For these last, further differences were defined between operators involved in different work tasks. This study provides information on nano-TiO{sub 2} number and mass concentration, size distribution, particles diameter and surface area concentrations, which were used to obtain work shift-averaged exposures.

  9. The Diesel Exhaust in Miners Study: I. Overview of the Exposure Assessment Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Patricia A.; Coble, Joseph B.; Vermeulen, Roel; Schleiff, Patricia; Blair, Aaron; Lubin, Jay; Attfield, Michael; Silverman, Debra T.

    2010-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the exposure assessment process for an epidemiologic study that investigated mortality, with a special focus on lung cancer, associated with diesel exhaust (DE) exposure among miners. Details of several components are provided in four other reports. A major challenge for this study was the development of quantitative estimates of historical exposures to DE. There is no single standard method for assessing the totality of DE, so respirable elemental carbon (REC), a component of DE, was selected as the primary surrogate in this study. Air monitoring surveys at seven of the eight study mining facilities were conducted between 1998 and 2001 and provided reference personal REC exposure levels and measurements for other agents and DE components in the mining environment. (The eighth facility had closed permanently prior to the surveys.) Exposure estimates were developed for mining facility/department/job/year combinations. A hierarchical grouping strategy was developed for assigning exposure levels to underground jobs [based on job titles, on the amount of time spent in various areas of the underground mine, and on similar carbon monoxide (CO, another DE component) concentrations] and to surface jobs (based on the use of, or proximity to, diesel-powered equipment). Time trends in air concentrations for underground jobs were estimated from mining facility-specific prediction models using diesel equipment horsepower, total air flow rates exhausted from the underground mines, and, because there were no historical REC measurements, historical measurements of CO. Exposures to potentially confounding agents, i.e. respirable dust, silica, radon, asbestos, and non-diesel sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, also were assessed. Accuracy and reliability of the estimated REC exposures levels were evaluated by comparison with several smaller datasets and by development of alternative time trend models. During 1998–2001, the average

  10. The diesel exhaust in miners study: I. Overview of the exposure assessment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Patricia A; Coble, Joseph B; Vermeulen, Roel; Schleiff, Patricia; Blair, Aaron; Lubin, Jay; Attfield, Michael; Silverman, Debra T

    2010-10-01

    This report provides an overview of the exposure assessment process for an epidemiologic study that investigated mortality, with a special focus on lung cancer, associated with diesel exhaust (DE) exposure among miners. Details of several components are provided in four other reports. A major challenge for this study was the development of quantitative estimates of historical exposures to DE. There is no single standard method for assessing the totality of DE, so respirable elemental carbon (REC), a component of DE, was selected as the primary surrogate in this study. Air monitoring surveys at seven of the eight study mining facilities were conducted between 1998 and 2001 and provided reference personal REC exposure levels and measurements for other agents and DE components in the mining environment. (The eighth facility had closed permanently prior to the surveys.) Exposure estimates were developed for mining facility/department/job/year combinations. A hierarchical grouping strategy was developed for assigning exposure levels to underground jobs [based on job titles, on the amount of time spent in various areas of the underground mine, and on similar carbon monoxide (CO, another DE component) concentrations] and to surface jobs (based on the use of, or proximity to, diesel-powered equipment). Time trends in air concentrations for underground jobs were estimated from mining facility-specific prediction models using diesel equipment horsepower, total air flow rates exhausted from the underground mines, and, because there were no historical REC measurements, historical measurements of CO. Exposures to potentially confounding agents, i.e. respirable dust, silica, radon, asbestos, and non-diesel sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, also were assessed. Accuracy and reliability of the estimated REC exposures levels were evaluated by comparison with several smaller datasets and by development of alternative time trend models. During 1998-2001, the average

  11. Comparison of exposure assessment methods for occupational carcinogens in a multi-centre lung cancer case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Susan; Vermeulen, Roel; Cassidy, Adrian; Mannetje, Andrea 't; van Tongeren, Martie; Boffetta, Paolo; Straif, Kurt; Kromhout, Hans

    2011-02-01

    Retrospective exposure assessment remains a problematic aspect of population-based case-control studies. Different methods have been developed, including case-by-case expert assessment and job-exposure matrices (JEM). The present analyses compare exposure prevalence and risk estimates derived by different exposure assessment methods. In the context of a case-control study conducted in seven European countries, exposure was estimated for asbestos, diesel motor emissions (DME) and crystalline silica, using three different assessment methods. First, experts assigned exposures to all reported jobs on a case-by-case basis. Second, a population-specific JEM (PSJEM) was developed using the expert assessments of controls only, and re-applied to all study subjects. Third, an independent general population JEM (GPJEM) was created by occupational exposure experts not involved in the original study, and applied to study subjects. Results from these methods were compared. There was poor to fair agreement in assigned exposure between expert assessment and the GPJEM (kappas: asbestos 0.17; DME 0.48; silica 0.38). Exposure prevalence was significantly heterogeneous (psilica diminished. It has been previously advocated that the expert assessment approach to assign exposures based on detailed questionnaire responses provides more accurate exposure estimates than JEM-based results. However, current results demonstrated little, if any, advantage of case-by-case assessment when compared to a JEM approach.

  12. Quantitative crystalline silica exposure assessment for a historical cohort epidemiologic study in the German porcelain industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birk, Thomas; Guldner, Karlheinz; Mundt, Kenneth A; Dahmann, Dirk; Adams, Robert C; Parsons, William

    2010-09-01

    A time-dependent quantitative exposure assessment of silica exposure among nearly 18,000 German porcelain workers was conducted. Results will be used to evaluate exposure-response disease risks. Over 8000 historical industrial hygiene (IH) measurements with original sampling and analysis protocols from 1954-2006 were obtained from the German Berufs- genossenschaft der keramischen-und Glas-Industrie (BGGK) and used to construct a job exposure matrix (JEM). Early measurements from different devices were converted to modern gravimetric equivalent values. Conversion factors were derived from parallel historical measurements and new side-by-side measurements using historical and modern devices in laboratory dust tunnels and active workplace locations. Exposure values were summarized and smoothed using LOESS regression; estimates for early years were derived using backward extrapolation techniques. Employee work histories were merged with JEM values to determine cumulative crystalline silica exposures for cohort members. Average silica concentrations were derived for six primary similar exposure groups (SEGs) for 1938-2006. Over 40% of the cohort accumulated 1 mg/m(3)-years. Nearly 5000 workers had cumulative crystalline silica estimates >1.5 mg/m(3)-years. Similar numbers of men and women fell into each cumulative exposure category, except for 1113 women and 1567 men in the highest category. Over half of those hired before 1960 accumulated >3 mg/m(3)-years crystalline silica compared with 4.9% of those hired after 1960. Among those ever working in the materials preparation area, half accumulated >3 mg/m(3)-year compared with 12% of those never working in this area. Quantitative respirable silica exposures were estimated for each member of this cohort, including employment periods for which sampling used now obsolete technologies. Although individual cumulative exposure estimates ranged from background to about 40 mg/m(3)-years, many of these estimates reflect long

  13. Bilateral posterior cervical cages provide biomechanical stability: assessment of stand-alone and supplemental fixation for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voronov LI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Leonard I Voronov,1,2 Krzysztof B Siemionow,3 Robert M Havey,1,2 Gerard Carandang,1,2 Frank M Phillips,4 Avinash G Patwardhan1,2 1Musculoskeletal Biomechanics Laboratory, Department of Research, Edward Hines Jr VA Hospital, Hines, IL, USA; 2Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL, USA; 3College of Medicine at Chicago, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL, USA; 4Midwest Orthopedics at Rush, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA Introduction: Supplemental posterior instrumentation has been widely used to enhance stability and improve fusion rates in higher risk patients undergoing anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF. These typically involve posterior lateral mass or pedicle screw fixation with significant inherent risks and morbidities. More recently, cervical cages placed bilaterally between the facet joints (posterior cervical cages have been used as a less disruptive alternative for posterior fixation. The purpose of this study was to compare the stability achieved by both posterior cages and ACDF at a single motion segment and determine the stability achieved with posterior cervical cages used as an adjunct to single- and multilevel ACDF.Methods: Seven cadaveric cervical spine (C2–T1 specimens were tested in the following sequence: intact, C5–C6 bilateral posterior cages, C6–C7 plated ACDF with and without posterior cages, and C3–C5 plated ACDF with and without posterior cages. Range of motion in flexion–extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation was measured for each condition under moment loading up to ±1.5 Nm.Results: All fusion constructs significantly reduced the range of motion compared to intact in flexion–extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation (P<0.05. Similar stability was achieved with bilateral posterior cages and plated ACDF at a single level. Posterior cages, when placed as an adjunct to ACDF, further reduced range of motion in both

  14. Exposure Assessment and Biomonitoring of Workers in Magnetic Resonance Environment: An Exploratory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sannino

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has evolved rapidly over the past few decades as one of the most flexible tools in medical research and diagnostic imaging. MRI facilities are important sources of multiple exposure to electromagnetic fields for both patients and health-care staff, due to the presence of electromagnetic fields of multiple frequency ranges, different temporal variations, and field strengths. Due to the increasing use and technological advancements of MRI systems, clearer insights into exposure assessment and a better understanding of possible harmful effects due to long-term exposures are highly needed. In the present exploratory study, exposure assessment and biomonitoring of MRI workers at the Radio-diagnostics Unit of the National Cancer Institute of Naples “Pascale Foundation” (Naples, Italy have been carried out. In particular, exposure to the MRI static magnetic field (SMF has been evaluated by means of personal monitoring, while an application tool has been developed to provide an estimate of motion-induced, time-varying electric fields. Measurement results have highlighted a high day-to-day and worker-to-worker variability of the exposure to the SMF, which strongly depends on the characteristics of the environment and on personal behaviors, and the developed application tool can be adopted as an easy-to-use tool for rapid and qualitative evaluation of motion-induced, time-varying electric field exposure. Regarding biomonitoring, the 24 workers of the Radio-diagnostics Unit were enrolled to evaluate both spontaneous and mitomycin C-induced chromosomal fragility in human peripheral blood lymphocytes, by means of the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. The study subjects were 12 MRI workers, representative of different professional categories, as the exposed group, and 12 workers with no MRI exposure history, as the reference group. The results show a high worker-to-worker variability for both field exposure assessment

  15. Assessment of management policies and practices for occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens in dialysis facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaeyi, Chukwuma; Panlilio, Adelisa L; Hobbs, Cynthia; Patel, Priti R; Kuhar, David T

    2012-10-01

    Occupational exposure management is an important element in preventing the transmission of bloodborne pathogens in health care settings. In 2008, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted a survey to assess procedures for managing occupational bloodborne pathogen exposures in outpatient dialysis facilities in the United States. A cross-sectional survey of randomly selected outpatient dialysis facilities. 339 outpatient dialysis facilities drawn from the 2006 US end-stage renal disease database. Hospital affiliation (free-standing vs hospital-based facilities), profit status (for-profit vs not-for-profit facilities), and number of health care personnel (≥100 vs facilities reporting occupational bloodborne pathogen exposures and offering occupational exposure management services. We analyzed bloodborne pathogen exposures and provision of postexposure prophylaxis by facility type. Nearly all respondents (99.7%) had written policies and 95% provided occupational exposure management services to health care personnel during the daytime on weekdays, but services were provided infrequently during other periods of the week. Approximately 10%-15% of facilities reported having HIV, HBV, or HCV exposures in health care personnel in the 12 months prior to the survey, but inconsistencies were noted in procedures for managing such exposures. Despite 86% of facilities providing HIV prophylaxis for exposed health care personnel, only 37% designated a primary HIV postexposure prophylaxis regimen. For-profit and free-standing facilities reported fewer exposures, but did not as reliably offer HBV prophylaxis or have a primary HIV postexposure prophylaxis regimen relative to not-for-profit and hospital-based facilities. The survey response rate was low (37%) and familiarity of individuals completing the survey with facility policies or national guidelines could not be ascertained. Significant improvements are required in the implementation of guidelines for managing

  16. Assessment of Population and Microenvironmental Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Wan

    A positive relationship exists between fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) exposure and adverse health effects. PM2.5 concentration-response functions used in the quantitative risk assessment were based on findings from human epidemiological studies that relied on areawide ambient concentrations as surrogate for actual ambient exposure, which cannot capture the spatial and temporal variability in human exposures. The goal of the study is to assess inter-individual, geographic and seasonal variability in population exposures to inform the interpretation of available epidemiological studies, and to improve the understanding of how exposure-related factors in important exposure microenvironments contribute to the variability in individual PM2.5 exposure. Typically, the largest percentage of time in which an individual is exposed to PM2.5 of ambient origin occurs in indoor residence, and the highest ambient PM2.5 concentrations occur in transportation microenvironments because of the proximity to on-road traffic emissions. Therefore, indoor residence and traffic-related transportation microenvironments were selected for further assessment in the study. Population distributions of individual daily PM2.5 exposures were estimated for the selected regions and seasons using the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model for Particulate Matter (SHEDS-PM). For the indoor residence, the current practice by assuming the entire residence to be one large single zone for calculating the indoor residential PM 2.5 concentration was evaluated by applying an indoor air quality model, RISK, to compare indoor PM2.5 concentrations between single-zone and multi-zone scenarios. For the transportation microenvironments, one field data collection focused on in-vehicle microenvironment and was conducted to quantify the variability in the in-vehicle PM2.5 concentration with respect to the outside vehicle concentration for a wide range of conditions that affect intra-vehicle variability

  17. The Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) birth cohort study: assessment of environmental exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaro, Tim K; Scott, James A; Allen, Ryan W; Anand, Sonia S; Becker, Allan B; Befus, A Dean; Brauer, Michael; Duncan, Joanne; Lefebvre, Diana L; Lou, Wendy; Mandhane, Piush J; McLean, Kathleen E; Miller, Gregory; Sbihi, Hind; Shu, Huan; Subbarao, Padmaja; Turvey, Stuart E; Wheeler, Amanda J; Zeng, Leilei; Sears, Malcolm R; Brook, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development birth cohort was designed to elucidate interactions between environment and genetics underlying development of asthma and allergy. Over 3600 pregnant mothers were recruited from the general population in four provinces with diverse environments. The child is followed to age 5 years, with prospective characterization of diverse exposures during this critical period. Key exposure domains include indoor and outdoor air pollutants, inhalation, ingestion and dermal uptake of chemicals, mold, dampness, biological allergens, pets and pests, housing structure, and living behavior, together with infections, nutrition, psychosocial environment, and medications. Assessments of early life exposures are focused on those linked to inflammatory responses driven by the acquired and innate immune systems. Mothers complete extensive environmental questionnaires including time-activity behavior at recruitment and when the child is 3, 6, 12, 24, 30, 36, 48, and 60 months old. House dust collected during a thorough home assessment at 3-4 months, and biological specimens obtained for multiple exposure-related measurements, are archived for analyses. Geo-locations of homes and daycares and land-use regression for estimating traffic-related air pollution complement time-activity-behavior data to provide comprehensive individual exposure profiles. Several analytical frameworks are proposed to address the many interacting exposure variables and potential issues of co-linearity in this complex data set.

  18. Assessment of exposure to voices and noise via earphones in manufacturing industry workers in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Tomo; Kakei, Masazumi; Araki, Ikuno; Tsutsui, Takao; Satoh, Noriaki; Inoue, Jinro; Horie, Seichi

    2014-01-01

    There is concern that sound via earphones and headphones attached to headsets used in workplaces may be a risk factor for noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Although there are some previous studies investigating exposure to noise from headphones, almost none have assessed the risks to workers who use earphones. We assessed exposure to noise among workers who regularly wear earphones in noisy workplaces. The subjects of this study were 21 workers who regularly wear earphones in three manufacturing companies in Japan. The sound pressure output from earphones and personal exposure to occupational noise was measured for each worker. A noise-dosimeter was used to measure individual exposure to occupational noise. The sound pressure output from the earphones was measured by recording the electric signal with a data recorder attached to the earphones, and the recording was analyzed by playing it back in the laboratory through a sound analyzer via an ear simulator. The mean scores for personal exposure and earphone output LAeq were 87.9 dB and 87.6 dB, respectively. Earphone output LAeq exceeded 85 dB for two-thirds of the subjects. Nearly all the subjects lacked hearing protection devices (HPDs) on their earphones. The results suggest that workers who use earphones in noisy workplaces are exposed to the following NIHL risk factors: (1) they are deprived of the opportunity to fit appropriate HPDs, and (2) the sound pressure output from the earphones themselves exceeds the occupational exposure limit.

  19. Assessing Adult Exposure to Community Violence: A Review of Definitions and Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCou, Christopher R; Lynch, Shannon M

    2017-01-01

    Although experiences of community violence are linked with negative outcomes for adults and children, few standardized measures assessing community violence exist, and available measures lack consistency concerning the definition of community violence. Further, most measures currently utilized to assess adult exposure to community violence were designed for use with children and adolescents. To address these identified concerns and make recommendations for future research, this article reviews contemporary definitions of community violence, identifies the outcomes of exposure to community violence for adults, and evaluates measures of exposure to community violence with published psychometric data employing adult samples. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to identify studies that (1) included a self-report of community violence exposure, (2) included primarily adult respondents, and (3) reported psychometric data. Seventeen studies met the inclusion criteria. Measures employed in these studies were reviewed and basic psychometric properties discussed. Notably, the Survey of Exposure to Community Violence was the most commonly used measure among these studies. Although multiple measures demonstrated limited but acceptable psychometric performance in select studies, few in-depth psychometric analyses exist for measures of adult exposure to community violence. Also, it is difficult to compare studies due to variations in definitions of community violence and multiple versions of each measure. Recommendations for future research include provision of explicit definitions of community violence and reporting psychometric data for measures. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Alcohol Advertising Exposure Among Middle School–Age Youth: An Assessment Across All Media and Venues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Rebecca L.; Martino, Steven C.; Kovalchik, Stephanie A.; Becker, Kirsten M.; Shadel, William G.; D’Amico, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to quantify middle school youth’s exposure to alcohol advertisements across media and venues, determine venues of greatest exposure, and identify characteristics of youth who are most exposed. Method: Over a 10-month period in 2013, 589 Los Angeles–area youth ages 11–14 from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds completed a short paper-and-pencil survey assessing background characteristics and then participated in a 14-day ecological momentary assessment, logging all exposures to alcohol advertisements on handheld computers as they occurred. Results: African American and Hispanic youth were exposed to an average of 4.1 and 3.4 advertisements per day, respectively, nearly two times as many as non-Hispanic White youth, who were exposed to 2.0 advertisements per day. Girls were exposed to 30% more advertisements than boys. Most exposures were to outdoor advertisements, with television advertisements a close second. Conclusions: Exposure to alcohol advertising is frequent among middle school–age youth and may put them at risk for earlier or more frequent underage drinking. Greater restrictions on alcohol advertising outdoors and on television should be considered by regulators and by the alcohol industry and should focus particularly on reducing exposure among minority youth. PMID:27172570

  1. Alcohol Advertising Exposure Among Middle School-Age Youth: An Assessment Across All Media and Venues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Rebecca L; Martino, Steven C; Kovalchik, Stephanie A; Becker, Kirsten M; Shadel, William G; D'Amico, Elizabeth J

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify middle school youth's exposure to alcohol advertisements across media and venues, determine venues of greatest exposure, and identify characteristics of youth who are most exposed. Over a 10-month period in 2013, 589 Los Angeles-area youth ages 11-14 from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds completed a short paper-and-pencil survey assessing background characteristics and then participated in a 14-day ecological momentary assessment, logging all exposures to alcohol advertisements on handheld computers as they occurred. African American and Hispanic youth were exposed to an average of 4.1 and 3.4 advertisements per day, respectively, nearly two times as many as non-Hispanic White youth, who were exposed to 2.0 advertisements per day. Girls were exposed to 30% more advertisements than boys. Most exposures were to outdoor advertisements, with television advertisements a close second. Exposure to alcohol advertising is frequent among middle school-age youth and may put them at risk for earlier or more frequent underage drinking. Greater restrictions on alcohol advertising outdoors and on television should be considered by regulators and by the alcohol industry and should focus particularly on reducing exposure among minority youth.

  2. Computational Exposure Science: An Emerging Discipline to Support 21st-Century Risk Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeghy, Peter P; Sheldon, Linda S; Isaacs, Kristin K; Özkaynak, Halûk; Goldsmith, Michael-Rock; Wambaugh, John F; Judson, Richard S; Buckley, Timothy J

    2016-06-01

    Computational exposure science represents a frontier of environmental science that is emerging and quickly evolving. In this commentary, we define this burgeoning discipline, describe a framework for implementation, and review some key ongoing research elements that are advancing the science with respect to exposure to chemicals in consumer products. The fundamental elements of computational exposure science include the development of reliable, computationally efficient predictive exposure models; the identification, acquisition, and application of data to support and evaluate these models; and generation of improved methods for extrapolating across chemicals. We describe our efforts in each of these areas and provide examples that demonstrate both progress and potential. Computational exposure science, linked with comparable efforts in toxicology, is ushering in a new era of risk assessment that greatly expands our ability to evaluate chemical safety and sustainability and to protect public health. Egeghy PP, Sheldon LS, Isaacs KK, Özkaynak H, Goldsmith M-R, Wambaugh JF, Judson RS, Buckley TJ. 2016. Computational exposure science: an emerging discipline to support 21st-century risk assessment. Environ Health Perspect 124:697-702; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1509748.

  3. Exposure and dose assessment to particle components among an elderly population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Silva, M.; Almeida, S. M.; Pegas, P. N.; Nunes, T.; Alves, C. A.; Wolterbeek, H. T.

    2015-02-01

    People spend the majority of their time indoors and the composition and toxicity of indoor particles is very complex and present significant differences comparing with outdoor aerosols. Consequently, ambient particles cannot represent a real exposure. The aim of this work was to determine the daily exposure and the daily inhaled dose to particle components of elders living in Elderly Care Centers. A questionnaire was applied to 193 institutionalized elders in order to achieve their daily time pattern and to define the micro-environments where PM10 and its components (carbonaceous components and trace elements) were assessed. Daily exposure was calculated by integrating the elder's time spend in each micro-environment and the concentration of the pollutants for the period of interest. This parameter, together with the inhalation rate and the standard body weight, were used to calculate the daily inhaled dose. PM10 daily exposure and daily inhaled dose ranged between 11 - 16 μg m-3 and 20 × 10-3 - 28 × 10-3 μg kg-1, respectively. This work not only allowed a fully quantification of the magnitude of the elders exposure, but also showed that the assessment of the integrated exposure to PM components is determinant to accomplish the dose inhaled by elders living in ECCs.

  4. Long-term dietary exposure to lead in young European children: Comparing a pan-European approach with a national exposure assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boon, P.E.; Te Biesebeek, J.D.; van Klaveren, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Long-term dietary exposures to lead in young children were calculated by combining food consumption data of 11 European countries categorised using harmonised broad food categories with occurrence data on lead from different Member States (pan-European approach). The results of the assessment...... in children living in the Netherlands were compared with a long-term lead intake assessment in the same group using Dutch lead concentration data and linking the consumption and concentration data at the highest possible level of detail. Exposures obtained with the pan-European approach were higher than...... the national exposure calculations. For both assessments cereals contributed most to the exposure. The lower dietary exposure in the national study was due to the use of lower lead concentrations and a more optimal linkage of food consumption and concentration data. When a pan-European approach, using...

  5. Quantitative tremor assessment in workers with current low exposure to mercury vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wastensson, Gunilla; Lamoureux, Daniel; Sällsten, Gerd; Beuter, Anne; Barregård, Lars

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of tremor has been used in several occupational studies of workers with long-term exposure to mercury vapor (Hg(0)). Recent studies indicate an adverse effect even at relatively low exposure levels. In the present study, we used sensitive quantitative methods to assess tremor in chloralkali workers with current low exposure to Hg(0). Neurological examinations and recordings of tremor using both an accelerometer and a laser-based system were conducted in 43 mercury-exposed workers and 22 age-matched referents. The median urinary mercury concentration in exposed workers was 5.9 (1.3-25) microg/g creatinine (microg/gC), while it was 0.7 (0.2-4.1) microg/gC in referents. The mean exposure time was 15 years, and the median cumulative mercury index was 161 years x microg/gC in exposed workers. There were no differences between the exposed workers and the referents in the clinical evaluation of tremor. In the quantitative tremor tests, no associations were found with current or cumulative mercury exposure for the majority of tremor measures. There were indications that exposure to Hg(0) was associated with a lowering of tremor frequency in the non-dominant hand, and a possible interaction with smoking. The differences were small, however, and overall, this study indicates no significant adverse effects on tremor at these exposure levels.

  6. Separating sensitivity from exposure in assessing extinction risk from climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Maria G; Orme, C David L; Suttle, K Blake; Mace, Georgina M

    2014-11-04

    Predictive frameworks of climate change extinction risk generally focus on the magnitude of climate change a species is expected to experience and the potential for that species to track suitable climate. A species' risk of extinction from climate change will depend, in part, on the magnitude of climate change the species experiences, its exposure. However, exposure is only one component of risk. A species' risk of extinction will also depend on its intrinsic ability to tolerate changing climate, its sensitivity. We examine exposure and sensitivity individually for two example taxa, terrestrial amphibians and mammals. We examine how these factors are related among species and across regions and how explicit consideration of each component of risk may affect predictions of climate change impacts. We find that species' sensitivities to climate change are not congruent with their exposures. Many highly sensitive species face low exposure to climate change and many highly exposed species are relatively insensitive. Separating sensitivity from exposure reveals patterns in the causes and drivers of species' extinction risk that may not be evident solely from predictions of climate change. Our findings emphasise the importance of explicitly including sensitivity and exposure to climate change in assessments of species' extinction risk.

  7. Assessing Metal Exposures in a Community near a Cement Plant in the Northeast U.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement production is a major source of metals and metalloids in the environment, while exposures to metals and metalloids may impact human health in the surrounding communities. We recruited 185 participants living in the vicinity of a cement plant in the northeast U.S., and measured the levels of aluminum (Al, arsenic (As, cadmium (Cd, lead (Pb, mercury (Hg, and selenium (Se in blood and Hg in hair samples from them. A questionnaire was used to assess potential sources of Hg exposure. Multivariate regressions and spatial analyses were performed to evaluate the relative importance of different routes of exposures. The metal concentrations in blood or hair samples of our study participants were comparable to the U.S. general or regional population. Smoking contributed significantly to Cd and Pb exposures, and seafood consumption contributed significantly to Hg and As exposures, while variables related to the cement plant were not significantly associated with metal concentrations. Our results suggest that our study population was not at elevated health risk due to metal exposures, and that the contribution of the cement plant to metal exposures in the surrounding community was minimal.

  8. Evaluation of exposure concentrations used in assessing manufactured nanomaterial environmental hazards: are they relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Patricia A; Klaessig, Frederick; Turco, Ronald F; Priester, John H; Rico, Cyren M; Avila-Arias, Helena; Mortimer, Monika; Pacpaco, Kathleen; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2014-09-16

    Manufactured nanomaterials (MNMs) are increasingly produced and used in consumer goods, yet our knowledge regarding their environmental risks is limited. Environmental risks are assessed by characterizing exposure levels and biological receptor effects. As MNMs have rarely been quantified in environmental samples, our understanding of exposure level is limited. Absent direct measurements, environmental MNM concentrations are estimated from exposure modeling. Hazard, the potential for effects on biological receptors, is measured in the laboratory using a range of administered MNM concentrations. Yet concerns have been raised regarding the "relevancy" of hazard assessments, particularly when the administered MNM concentrations exceed those predicted to occur in the environment. What MNM concentrations are administered in hazard assessments and which are "environmentally relevant"? This review regards MNM concentrations in hazard assessments, from over 600 peer-reviewed articles published between 2008 and 2013. Some administered MNM concentrations overlap with, but many diverge from, predicted environmental concentrations. Other uncertainties influence the environmental relevance of current hazard assessments and exposure models, including test conditions, bioavailable concentrations, mode of action, MNM production volumes, and model validation. Therefore, it may be premature for MNM risk research to sanction information on the basis of concentration "environmental relevance".

  9. A tiered asthma hazard characterization and exposure assessment approach for evaluation of consumer product ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Andrew; Vincent, Melissa J; Parker, Ann; Gadagbui, Bernard K; Jayjock, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Asthma is a complex syndrome with significant consequences for those affected. The number of individuals affected is growing, although the reasons for the increase are uncertain. Ensuring the effective management of potential exposures follows from substantial evidence that exposure to some chemicals can increase the likelihood of asthma responses. We have developed a safety assessment approach tailored to the screening of asthma risks from residential consumer product ingredients as a proactive risk management tool. Several key features of the proposed approach advance the assessment resources often used for asthma issues. First, a quantitative health benchmark for asthma or related endpoints (irritation and sensitization) is provided that extends qualitative hazard classification methods. Second, a parallel structure is employed to include dose-response methods for asthma endpoints and methods for scenario specific exposure estimation. The two parallel tracks are integrated in a risk characterization step. Third, a tiered assessment structure is provided to accommodate different amounts of data for both the dose-response assessment (i.e., use of existing benchmarks, hazard banding, or the threshold of toxicological concern) and exposure estimation (i.e., use of empirical data, model estimates, or exposure categories). Tools building from traditional methods and resources have been adapted to address specific issues pertinent to asthma toxicology (e.g., mode-of-action and dose-response features) and the nature of residential consumer product use scenarios (e.g., product use patterns and exposure durations). A case study for acetic acid as used in various sentinel products and residential cleaning scenarios was developed to test the safety assessment methodology. In particular, the results were used to refine and verify relationships among tiered approaches such that each lower data tier in the approach provides a similar or greater margin of safety for a given

  10. Influence of instruments performance and material properties on exposure assessment of airborne engineered nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Marcus

    Over the last decades, materials engineered of nanosized structures have increased tremendously, in terms of both produced tonnage and economic market share. This, together with the fact that some of these engineered nanomaterials have shown an increased toxicological effect in humans as compared...... to their bulk counterpart, has expanded the scientific field of exposure measurements to airborne nanoparticles. As the greatest potential for human exposure to engineered nanomaterials resides within the production, packaging and downstream powdermaterial handling, as well as at reworking/waste treatment...... facilities, exposure risk for workers has received great focus. The studies described in this thesis come to four main conclusions: 1) Mass-balance modeling of airborne engineered nanomaterials using dustiness index as a primary source term can be useful for assessment of material-specific exposure scenarios...

  11. An assessment of air pollutant exposure methods in Mexico City, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-González, Luis O; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Sánchez, Brisa N; Zhang, Kai; Brown, Daniel G; Rojas-Bracho, Leonora; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro; Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe; O'Neill, Marie S

    2015-05-01

    Geostatistical interpolation methods to estimate individual exposure to outdoor air pollutants can be used in pregnancy cohorts where personal exposure data are not collected. Our objectives were to a) develop four assessment methods (citywide average (CWA); nearest monitor (NM); inverse distance weighting (IDW); and ordinary Kriging (OK)), and b) compare daily metrics and cross-validations of interpolation models. We obtained 2008 hourly data from Mexico City's outdoor air monitoring network for PM10, PM2.5, O3, CO, NO2, and SO2 and constructed daily exposure metrics for 1,000 simulated individual locations across five populated geographic zones. Descriptive statistics from all methods were calculated for dry and wet seasons, and by zone. We also evaluated IDW and OK methods' ability to predict measured concentrations at monitors using cross validation and a coefficient of variation (COV). All methods were performed using SAS 9.3, except ordinary Kriging which was modeled using R's gstat package. Overall, mean concentrations and standard deviations were similar among the different methods for each pollutant. Correlations between methods were generally high (r=0.77 to 0.99). However, ranges of estimated concentrations determined by NM, IDW, and OK were wider than the ranges for CWA. Root mean square errors for OK were consistently equal to or lower than for the IDW method. OK standard errors varied considerably between pollutants and the computed COVs ranged from 0.46 (least error) for SO2 and PM10 to 3.91 (most error) for PM2.5. OK predicted concentrations measured at the monitors better than IDW and NM. Given the similarity in results for the exposure methods, OK is preferred because this method alone provides predicted standard errors which can be incorporated in statistical models. The daily estimated exposures calculated using these different exposure methods provide flexibility to evaluate multiple windows of exposure during pregnancy, not just trimester or

  12. Biomechanics of pediatric manual wheelchair mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke A. Slavens

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is limited research of the biomechanics of pediatric manual wheelchair mobility. Specifically, the biomechanics of functional tasks and their relationship to joint pain and health is not well understood. To contribute to this knowledge gap, a quantitative rehabilitation approach was applied for characterizing upper extremity biomechanics of manual wheelchair mobility in children and adolescents during propulsion, starting and stopping tasks. A Vicon motion analysis system captured movement, while a SmartWheel simultaneously collected three-dimensional forces and moments occurring at the hand-rim. A custom pediatric inverse dynamics model was used to evaluate three-dimensional upper extremity joint motions, forces and moments of 14 children with spinal cord injury (SCI during the functional tasks. Additionally, pain and health-related quality of life outcomes were assessed. This research found that joint demands are significantly different amongst functional tasks, with greatest demands placed on the shoulder during the starting task. Propulsion was significantly different from starting and stopping at all joints. We identified multiple stroke patterns used by the children, some of which are not standard in adults. One subject reported average daily pain, which was minimal. Lower than normal physical health and higher than normal mental health was found in this population. It can be concluded that functional tasks should be considered in addition to propulsion for rehabilitation and SCI treatment planning. This research provides wheelchair users and clinicians with a comprehensive, biomechanical, mobility assessment approach for wheelchair prescription, training, and long-term care of children with SCI.

  13. Comparative Exposure Assessment of ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli through Meat Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Eric G; Pielaat, Annemarie; Smid, Joost H; van Duijkeren, Engeline; Vennemann, Francy B C; Wijnands, Lucas M; Chardon, Jurgen E

    2017-01-01

    The presence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) and plasmidic AmpC (pAmpC) producing Escherichia coli (EEC) in food animals, especially broilers, has become a major public health concern. The aim of the present study was to quantify the EEC exposure of humans in The Netherlands through the consumption of meat from different food animals. Calculations were done with a simplified Quantitative Microbiological Risk Assessment (QMRA) model. The model took the effect of pre-retail processing, storage at the consumers home and preparation in the kitchen (cross-contamination and heating) on EEC numbers on/in the raw meat products into account. The contribution of beef products (78%) to the total EEC exposure of the Dutch population through the consumption of meat was much higher than for chicken (18%), pork (4.5%), veal (0.1%) and lamb (0%). After slaughter, chicken meat accounted for 97% of total EEC load on meat, but chicken meat experienced a relatively large effect of heating during food preparation. Exposure via consumption of filet americain (a minced beef product consumed raw) was predicted to be highest (61% of total EEC exposure), followed by chicken fillet (13%). It was estimated that only 18% of EEC exposure occurred via cross-contamination during preparation in the kitchen, which was the only route by which EEC survived for surface-contaminated products. Sensitivity analysis showed that model output is not sensitive for most parameters. However, EEC concentration on meat other than chicken meat was an important data gap. In conclusion, the model assessed that consumption of beef products led to a higher exposure to EEC than chicken products, although the prevalence of EEC on raw chicken meat was much higher than on beef. The (relative) risk of this exposure for public health is yet unknown given the lack of a modelling framework and of exposure studies for other potential transmission routes.

  14. Assessment of Exposure to VOCs among Pregnant Women in the National Children’s Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Barksdale Boyle

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiologic studies can measure exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs using environmental samples, biomarkers, questionnaires, or observations. These different exposure assessment approaches each have advantages and disadvantages; thus, evaluating relationships is an important consideration. In the National Children’s Vanguard Study from 2009 to 2010, participants completed questionnaires and data collectors observed VOC exposure sources and collected urine samples from 488 third trimester pregnant women at in-person study visits. From urine, we simultaneously quantified 28 VOC metabolites of exposure to acrolein, acrylamide, acrylonitrile, benzene, 1-bromopropane, 1,3-butadiene, carbon disulfide, crotonaldehyde, cyanide, N,N-dimethylformamide, ethylbenzene, ethylene oxide, propylene oxide, styrene, tetrachloroethylene, toluene, trichloroethylene, vinyl chloride, and xylene exposures using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with an electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI/MSMS method. Urinary thiocyanate was measured using an ion chromatography coupled with an electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry method (IC-ESI/MSMS. We modeled the relationship between urinary VOC metabolite concentrations and sources of VOC exposure. Sources of exposure were assessed by participant report via questionnaire (use of air fresheners, aerosols, paint or varnish, organic solvents, and passive/active smoking and by observations by a trained data collector (presence of scented products in homes. We found several significant (p < 0.01 relationships between the urinary metabolites of VOCs and sources of VOC exposure. Smoking was positively associated with metabolites of the tobacco constituents acrolein, acrylamide, acrylonitrile, 1,3-butadiene, crotonaldehyde, cyanide, ethylene oxide, N,N-dimethylformamide, propylene oxide, styrene, and xylene. Study location was negatively associated with the toluene metabolite

  15. Assessment of Exposure to VOCs among Pregnant Women in the National Children’s Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Elizabeth Barksdale; Viet, Susan M.; Wright, David J.; Merrill, Lori S.; Alwis, K. Udeni; Blount, Benjamin C.; Mortensen, Mary E.; Moye, John; Dellarco, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies can measure exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using environmental samples, biomarkers, questionnaires, or observations. These different exposure assessment approaches each have advantages and disadvantages; thus, evaluating relationships is an important consideration. In the National Children’s Vanguard Study from 2009 to 2010, participants completed questionnaires and data collectors observed VOC exposure sources and collected urine samples from 488 third trimester pregnant women at in-person study visits. From urine, we simultaneously quantified 28 VOC metabolites of exposure to acrolein, acrylamide, acrylonitrile, benzene, 1-bromopropane, 1,3-butadiene, carbon disulfide, crotonaldehyde, cyanide, N,N-dimethylformamide, ethylbenzene, ethylene oxide, propylene oxide, styrene, tetrachloroethylene, toluene, trichloroethylene, vinyl chloride, and xylene exposures using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with an electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI/MSMS) method. Urinary thiocyanate was measured using an ion chromatography coupled with an electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry method (IC-ESI/MSMS). We modeled the relationship between urinary VOC metabolite concentrations and sources of VOC exposure. Sources of exposure were assessed by participant report via questionnaire (use of air fresheners, aerosols, paint or varnish, organic solvents, and passive/active smoking) and by observations by a trained data collector (presence of scented products in homes). We found several significant (p < 0.01) relationships between the urinary metabolites of VOCs and sources of VOC exposure. Smoking was positively associated with metabolites of the tobacco constituents acrolein, acrylamide, acrylonitrile, 1,3-butadiene, crotonaldehyde, cyanide, ethylene oxide, N,N-dimethylformamide, propylene oxide, styrene, and xylene. Study location was negatively associated with the toluene metabolite N

  16. The Validity and Applicability of Using a Generic Exposure Assessment Model for Occupational Exposure to Nano-Objects and Their Aggregates and Agglomerates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, Cindy; Voogd, Eef; Fransman, Wouter; Vermeulen, Roel

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Control banding can be used as a first-tier assessment to control worker exposure to nano-objects and their aggregates and agglomerates (NOAA). In a second tier, more advanced modelling approaches are needed to produce quantitative exposure estimates. As currently no general quantitative

  17. The validity and applicability of using a generic exposure assessment model for occupational exposure to nano-objects and their aggregates and agglomerates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, C.; Voogd, E.; Fransman, W.; Vermeulen, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Control banding can be used as a first-tier assessment to control worker exposure to nano-objects and their aggregates and agglomerates (NOAA). In a second tier, more advanced modelling approaches are needed to produce quantitative exposure estimates. As currently no general quantitative

  18. What are the elements required to improve exposure estimates in life cycle assessments?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernstoff, Alexi; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Margni, Manuele

    2016-01-01

    In this study we aim to identify and discuss priority elements required to improve exposure estimates in Life cycle assessment (LCA). LCA aims at guiding decision-support to minimize damages on resources, humans, and ecosystems which incur via providing society with products and services. Potential...... human toxicity and ecosystem toxicity of chemicals posed by different product life cycle stages are characterized in the life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) phase. Exposure and effect quantification as part of LCIA toxicity characterization faces numerous challenges related to inventory analysis (e......). There are many relevant areas for improving exposure quantification in LCIA. We explore prioritising future work based on investigating existing mitigation efforts, observed damages, and potential for (irreversible) harm to ensure LCIA covers at least the most relevant concerns faced by societies today regarding...

  19. Implementation guide for use with DOE Order 440.1: Occupational exposure assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-30

    DOE O 440.1, Worker Protection Management for DOE Federal and Contractor Employees, establishes the framework for an effective worker protection program that will reduce or prevent accidental injuries and illnesses. One element of the worker protection program in DOE O 440.1 is Exposure Assessment (EA). This Guide provides acceptable methodologies for conducting EA for workers. Exposure assessment should be included in the DOE and contractor written worker protection program, as required by DOE O 440.1. EA documentation should describe the methods and rationale a site uses to characterize and monitor workers` potential and actual exposures to hazardous agents. DOE O 440.1 applies to all activities (including design, construction, operation, maintenance, decontamination and decommissioning, research and development, and environmental restoration activities) performed by DOE and its contractors (and their subcontractors).

  20. Harmonizing exposure metrics and methods for sustainability assessments of food contact materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernstoff, Alexi; Jolliet, Olivier; Niero, Monia

    2016-01-01

    We aim to develop harmonized and operational methods for quantifying exposure to chemicals in food packaging specifically for sustainability assessments. Thousands of chemicals are approved for food packaging and numerous contaminates occur, e.g. through recycling. Chemical migration into food......, like LCA, finally facilitates including exposure to chemicals as a sustainable packaging design issue. Results were demonstrated in context of the pilot-scale Product Environmental Footprint regulatory method in the European Union. Increasing recycled content, decreasing greenhouse gas emissions...... by selecting plastics over glass, and adding chemicals with a design function were identified as risk management issues. We conclude developing an exposure framework, suitable for sustainability assessments commonly used for food packaging, is feasible to help guide packaging design to consider both...

  1. Between-User Reliability of Tier 1 Exposure Assessment Tools Used Under REACH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Judith; Galea, Karen S; Miller, Brian G; Hesse, Susanne; Van Tongeren, Martie

    2017-10-01

    When applying simple screening (Tier 1) tools to estimate exposure to chemicals in a given exposure situation under the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and restriction of CHemicals Regulation 2006 (REACH), users must select from several possible input parameters. Previous studies have suggested that results from exposure assessments using expert judgement and from the use of modelling tools can vary considerably between assessors. This study aimed to investigate the between-user reliability of Tier 1 tools. A remote-completion exercise and in person workshop were used to identify and evaluate tool parameters and factors such as user demographics that may be potentially associated with between-user variability. Participants (N = 146) generated dermal and inhalation exposure estimates (N = 4066) from specified workplace descriptions ('exposure situations') and Tier 1 tool combinations (N = 20). Interactions between users, tools, and situations were investigated and described. Systematic variation associated with individual users was minor compared with random between-user variation. Although variation was observed between choices made for the majority of input parameters, differing choices of Process Category ('PROC') code/activity descriptor and dustiness level impacted most on the resultant exposure estimates. Exposure estimates ranging over several orders of magnitude were generated for the same exposure situation by different tool users. Such unpredictable between-user variation will reduce consistency within REACH processes and could result in under-estimation or overestimation of exposure, risking worker ill-health or the implementation of unnecessary risk controls, respectively. Implementation of additional support and quality control systems for all tool users is needed to reduce between-assessor variation and so ensure both the protection of worker health and avoidance of unnecessary business risk management expenditure. © The Author 2017. Published

  2. Ethylene oxide sterilization in the medical-supply manufacturing industry: assessment and control of worker exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yeh-Chung; Liu, Hung-Hsin; Lin, Yi-Chang; Su, Po-Chi; Li, Lien-Hsiung; Chang, Cheng-Ping; Tang, Da-Toung; Chen, Chang-Yuh

    2007-11-01

    In 2005, the Taiwan Institute of Occupational Safety and Health started an on-site consulting program for the medical supplies manufacturing industry, which use ethylene oxide (EO) as a sterilant, with the goal of enhancing occupational hygiene practices and controlling EO-related risks. This study presents EO exposure assessment results and examines the effectiveness of control measures. Detailed surveys, including exposure monitoring, were conducted at 10 factories. Airborne EO was collected using an HBr-coated charcoal tube and analyzed using GC/MS. Sterilizer operators had an average short-term EO exposure level of 27.61 ppm during unloading; mean time-weighted average workshift exposure was 7.35 ppm. High EO concentrations were also present throughout the facilities. Specifically, mean EO concentrations in the aeration area, near the sterilizer and in the warehouse were 10.19, 5.75, and 8.78 ppm, respectively. These findings indicate that immediate controls are needed, and that EO emissions from sterilized products during storage cannot be overlooked. Worker short-term exposures during unloading was inversely correlated (p < 0.05) with the numbers of poststerilization purge cycle applied. The specific controls implemented and their usefulness is discussed. Increasing the number of poststerilization purge cycles is a simple approach to eliminating extremely high exposure during unloading. Improvements to ventilation, particularly in the aeration area and warehouse, were also effective in minimizing worker exposures. Use of effective respirator is recommended until the EO exposure levels, averaging 3.41 ppm after the controls, fall below the permissible exposure limit.

  3. Assessing the impacts of dimethoate on rotifers' reproduction through the pre-exposure history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ruixin; Chen, Jianqiu

    2015-01-01

    Organism usually undergoes an exposure of environmental pollution after a maternal exposure before birth. Traditional toxicological studies often initiated with rotifer neonates derived from the unexposed mothers while ignoring the pre-exposure (maternal exposure). The present study assessed the effect of dimethoate on the reproduction of the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus, considering how the pre-exposure occurred in the parental generation influenced the subsequent impact. The F0 generation rotifers were exposed to the pesticide at five concentrations until the first F1 generation rotifers were reproduced. The neonates (F1 generation) were then exposed to the pesticide at the corresponding concentrations. The offspring reproduction, the time begins to reproduce, the duration of the reproductive period and the lifespan of the F1 generation rotifers were evaluated. Our results indicated that dimethoate influenced the maturation and reproduction of the rotifers. The highest concentration (1.8 mg L(-1)) of dimethoate caused an inhibition in the offspring reproduction, shortened the life span and reduced the duration of the reproductive period. In addition, of particular interest in our study was that reproduction is also accelerated by the lowest concentration (0.2 mg L(-1)). However, the pre-exposure had a significant effect on the subsequent impact. The dimethoate pre-exposure increased the impacts when the F1 generation rotifers were exposed to the substance, even at the same concentrations as in pre-exposure. It suggests that the maternal exposure history before birth is also important and has the long-lasting consequence from one generation to another. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Wheelchair Propulsion Biomechanics in Junior Basketball Players: A Method for the Evaluation of the Efficacy of a Specific Training Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bergamini, Elena; Morelli, Francesca; Marchetti, Flavia; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Polidori, Lorenzo; Paradisi, Francesco; Traballesi, Marco; Cappozzo, Aurelio; Delussu, Anna Sofia

    2015-01-01

      As participation in wheelchair sports increases, the need of quantitative assessment of biomechanical performance indicators and of sports- and population-specific training protocols has become central...

  5. Exposure Assessment Suggests Exposure to Lung Cancer Carcinogens in a Painter Working in an Automobile Bumper Shop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Boowook; Yoon, Jin-Ha; Choi, Byung-Soon; Shin, Yong Chul

    2013-01-01

    A 46-year-old man who had worked as a bumper spray painter in an automobile body shop for 15 years developed lung cancer. The patient was a nonsmoker with no family history of lung cancer. To determine whether the cancer was related to his work environment, we assessed the level of exposure to carcinogens during spray painting, sanding, and heat treatment. The results showed that spray painting with yellow paint increased the concentration of hexavalent chromium in the air to as much as 118.33 μg/m3. Analysis of the paint bulk materials showed that hexavalent chromium was mostly found in the form of lead chromate. Interestingly, strontium chromate was also detected, and the concentration of strontium chromate increased in line with the brightness of the yellow color. Some paints contained about 1% crystalline silica in the form of quartz. PMID:24422178

  6. Exposure Assessment Suggests Exposure to Lung Cancer Carcinogens in a Painter Working in an Automobile Bumper Shop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boowook Kim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A 46-year-old man who had worked as a bumper spray painter in an automobile body shop for 15 years developed lung cancer. The patient was a nonsmoker with no family history of lung cancer. To determine whether the cancer was related to his work environment, we assessed the level of exposure to carcinogens during spray painting, sanding, and heat treatment. The results showed that spray painting with yellow paint increased the concentration of hexavalent chromium in the air to as much as 118.33 μg/m3. Analysis of the paint bulk materials showed that hexavalent chromium was mostly found in the form of lead chromate. Interestingly, strontium chromate was also detected, and the concentration of strontium chromate increased in line with the brightness of the yellow color. Some paints contained about 1% crystalline silica in the form of quartz.

  7. Exposure Assessment for Carbon Dioxide Gas: Full Shift Average and Short-Term Measurement Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, R Jedd; Smith, Philip A

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) makes up a relatively small percentage of atmospheric gases, yet when used or produced in large quantities as a gas, a liquid, or a solid (dry ice), substantial airborne exposures may occur. Exposure to elevated CO2 concentrations may elicit toxicity, even with oxygen concentrations that are not considered dangerous per se. Full-shift sampling approaches to measure 8-hr time weighted average (TWA) CO2 exposures are used in many facilities where CO2 gas may be present. The need to assess rapidly fluctuating CO2 levels that may approach immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH) conditions should also be a concern, and several methods for doing so using fast responding measurement tools are discussed in this paper. Colorimetric detector tubes, a non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) detector, and a portable Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy instrument were evaluated in a laboratory environment using a flow-through standard generation system and were found to provide suitable accuracy and precision for assessing rapid fluctuations in CO2 concentration, with a possible effect related to humidity noted only for the detector tubes. These tools were used in the field to select locations and times for grab sampling and personal full-shift sampling, which provided laboratory analysis data to confirm IDLH conditions and 8-hr TWA exposure information. Fluctuating CO2 exposures are exemplified through field work results from several workplaces. In a brewery, brief CO2 exposures above the IDLH value occurred when large volumes of CO2-containing liquid were released for disposal, but 8-hr TWA exposures were not found to exceed the permissible level. In a frozen food production facility nearly constant exposure to CO2 concentrations above the permissible 8-hr TWA value were seen, as well as brief exposures above the IDLH concentration which were associated with specific tasks where liquid CO2 was used. In a poultry processing facility the use of dry

  8. Assessment of dermal exposure during airless spray painting using a quantitative visualisation technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, D.H.; Lansink, C.M.; Cherrie, J.W.; Hemmen, J.J. van

    2000-01-01

    The range of dermal exposure to non-volatile compounds during spray painting was studied in a semi-experimental study involving three enterprises and 12 painters. A fluorescent tracer was added to the paint and deposition of the tracer on clothing and uncovered parts of the skin was assessed using

  9. Release of nanomaterials from solid nanocomposites and consumer exposure assessment - a forward-looking review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackevica, Aiga; Hansen, Steffen Foss

    2016-01-01

    identify and discuss the key data needs and provide recommendations for consumer exposure assessment of nanomaterials. In total, we identified 76 studies of relevance. Most studies have analyzed the release of Ag and TiO2 from textiles and paints, and CNT and SiO2 from nanocomposites. Less than half...

  10. Usage patterns of personal care products: Important factors for exposure assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesterbos, J.W.H.; Dudzina, T.; Delmaar, C.J.; Bakker, Mireille; Russel, F.G.M.; Goetz, N. von; Scheepers, P.T.J.; Roeleveld, N.

    2013-01-01

    Complete information regarding the use of personal care products (PCPs) by consumers is limited, but such information is crucial for realistic consumer exposure assessment. To fill this gap, a database was created with person-oriented information regarding usage patterns and circumstances of use for

  11. Assessment of field re-entry exposure to pesticides: A dislodgeable foliar residue study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasiotis, K.M.; Tsakirakis, A.N.; Richard Glass, C.; Charistou, A.N.; Anastassiadou, P.; Gerritsen-Ebben, R.; Machera, K.

    2017-01-01

    A dislodgeable foliar residue study was conducted in greenhouse pepper and tomato on the island of Crete, Greece, following the spray application of an SC insecticide (with active substance (a.s.) tebufenozide) and an EC fungicide (a.s. bupirimate). Furthermore, for the assessment of worker exposure

  12. The Combat Exposure Scale: A Systematic Assessment of Trauma in the Vietnam War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Mary; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes the development of the Combat Exposure Scale, which assessed the combat experiences of 43 help-seeking Vietnam veterans. Scale scores related significantly to current diagnosis of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and symptom intensity. The Guttman scaling technique resulted in an ordering of events that provided clinically relevant…

  13. Towards participatory air pollution exposure assessment in a goods movement community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelle C. Kondo; Chris Mizes; John Lee; Jacqueline McGady-Saier; Lisa O' Malley; Ariel Diliberto; Igor. Burstyn

    2014-01-01

    Air pollution from diesel truck traffic travelling to and from port facilities is a major environmental health concern in areas of Philadelphia such as the Port Richmond neighborhood. Ambient monitoring has limited capability to assess neighborhood- or personal-level exposures to this pollution. We sought to conduct a pilot study using a community-based participatory...

  14. Assessing the reliability and validity of television and game violence exposure measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fikkers, K.M.; Taylor Piotrowski, J.; Valkenburg, P.M.

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated whether common self-report measures of television and game violence exposure represent reliable and valid measurement tools. Three self-report measures—direct estimates, user-rated favorites, and agency-rated favorites—were assessed in terms of test-retest reliability, criterion

  15. Animal abuse and exposure to interparental violence in Italy: assessing the cycle of violence in youngsters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldry, A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Abuse against animals is an indicator of children’s maladjustment associated with domestic violence. This study empirically assesses the effects of exposure to interparental violence on animal abuse in 1,392 Italian youth aged 9 to 17. Results indicate that half of all youth ever abused animals,

  16. Animal abuse and exposure to interparental violence in Italy: assessing the cycle of Violence in youngsters.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldry, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    Abuse against animals is an indicator of children’s maladjustment associated with domestic violence. This study empirically assesses the effects of exposure to interparental violence on animal abuse in 1,392 Italian youth aged 9 to 17. Results indicate that half of all youth ever abused animals,

  17. Assessment of tobacco-exposure during pregnancy; behavioural and biochemical changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PH Kurver; EA Pley; MD E.J.M. Wouters; de Jong; SB Stolte; FJ Voorhorst

    1991-01-01

    Smoking-behavior during pregnancy and the reliability of an interview were prospectively investigated. The tobacco-exposure was assessed a) by an intake interview b) by a smoking diary and c) by maternal thiocyanate and carboxy-hemoglobin concentrations. Of the 115 nulliparous women, 66 smoked

  18. Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure for Life Cycle Assessment: Regional Health Impact Factors for Households

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Meijer, Arjen; Demou, Evangelia

    2015-01-01

    Human exposure to indoor pollutant concentrations is receiving increasing interest in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). We address this issue by incorporating an indoor compartment into the USEtox model, as well as by providing recommended parameter values for households in four different regions of t...

  19. Animal abuse and exposure to interparental violence in Italy: assessing the cycle of violence in youngsters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldry, A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Abuse against animals is an indicator of children's maladjustment associated with domestic violence. This study empirically assesses the effects of exposure to interparental violence on animal abuse in 1,392 Italian youth aged 9 to 17. Results indicate that half of all youth ever abused animals,

  20. Animal abuse and exposure to interparental violence in Italy: assessing the cycle of Violence in youngsters.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldry, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    Abuse against animals is an indicator of children's maladjustment associated with domestic violence. This study empirically assesses the effects of exposure to interparental violence on animal abuse in 1,392 Italian youth aged 9 to 17. Results indicate that half of all youth ever abused animals,

  1. Wastewater-based epidemiology to assess pan-European pesticide exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rousis, N.I.; Gracia-Lor, E.; Zuccato, E.; Bade, R.; Baz-Lomba, J.A.; Castrignanò, E.; Causanilles, A.; Covaci, A.; de Voogt, P.; Hernàndez, F.; Kasprzyk-Hordern, B.; Kinyua, J.; McCall, A.-K.; Plósz, B.G.; Ramin, P.; Ryu, Y.; Thomas, K.V.; van Nuijs, A.; Yang, Z.; Castiglioni, S.

    2017-01-01

    Human biomonitoring, i.e. the determination of chemicals and/or their metabolites in human specimens, is the most common and potent tool for assessing human exposure to pesticides, but it suffers from limitations such as high costs and biases in sampling. Wastewater-based epidemiology (WBE) is an

  2. Assessing the effectiveness of ramp-up during sonar operations using exposure models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benda-Beckmann, A.M. von; Wensveen, P.J.; Kvadsheim, P.H.; Lam, F.P.A.; Miller, P.J.O.; Tyack, P.L.; Ainslie, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Ramp-up procedures are used to mitigate the impact of sound on marine mammals. Sound exposure models combined with observations of marine mammals responding to sound can be used to assess the effectiveness of ramp-up procedures. We found that ramp-up procedures before full-level sonar operations can

  3. Assessment of exposure to wheat flour and the shape of its relationship with specific sensitization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peretz, C; de Pater, N; de Monchy, J; Oostenbrink, J; Heederik, D

    Objectives Dust and wheat-allergen exposure were assessed among bakers, flour millers, and bakery-ingredient producers, and the risk for sensitization was studied. Methods About 520 inhalable dust and wheat-allergen measurements were made among 270 Dutch workers. Data on sensitization to wheat and

  4. Assessment of exposure to wheat flour and the shape of its relationship with specific sensitization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peretz, C.; Pater, N. de; Monchy, J. de; Oostenbrink, J.; Heederik, D.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Dust and wheat-allergen exposure were assessed among bakers, flour millers, and bakery-ingredient producers, and the risk for sensitization was studied. Methods: About 520 inhalable dust and wheat- allergen measurements were made among 270 Dutch workers. Data on sensitization to wheat

  5. An Exploratory Study: Assessment of Modeled Dioxin Exposure in Ceramic Art Studios (External Review Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has released an external review draft entitled, An Exploratory Study: Assessment of Modeled Dioxin Exposure in Ceramic Art Studios(External Review Draft). The public comment period and the external peer-review workshop are separate processes that provide opportunities ...

  6. Assessment of diesel particulate matter exposure in the workplace: freight terminals†

    OpenAIRE

    Sheesley, Rebecca J.; James J. Schauer; Smith, Thomas J.; Garshick, Eric; Laden, Francine; Marr, Linsey C.; Molina, Luisa T.

    2008-01-01

    A large study has been undertaken to assess the exposure to diesel exhaust within diesel trucking terminals. A critical component of this assessment is an analysis of the variation in carbonaceous particulate matter (PM) across trucking terminal locations; consistency in the primary sources can be effectively tracked by analyzing trends in elemental carbon (EC) and organic molecular marker concentrations. Ambient samples were collected at yard, dock and repair shop work stations in 7 terminal...

  7. Assessment of occupational exposure to the respirable fraction of cement dust and crystalline silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Exposure to respirable fraction of cement dust and its crystalline silica content is the most important occupational risk factor in cement industries requiring more evaluation and monitoring. This study aimed to assess exposure to crystalline silica and cement dust among workers of a cement industry in Saveh city, Iran. . Material and Method: In this cross-sectional study, 62 samples of respirable dust were collected from breathing zone of the workers in different sections of factory. Determination of respirable fraction of cement dust concentrations carried out using gravimetric method according to the NIOSH method no. 0600. Visible absorption spectrophotometry was used according to the NIOSH method no. 7601 to determine crystalline silica content of respirable dust samples. . Result: The highest exposure concentrations to respirable fraction of cement dust was observed in the Raw Mill and Cement Mill, and the lowest exposure in Administrative Department and Kiln the range of workers exposure in the production sites were 1.77 to 18.89 mg/m3. The range of workers exposure to the crystalline silica in the production sites was 0.011 to 0.104 mg/m3. The highest and lowest mean of exposures was observed in the raw Mill and cement mill respectively. Occupational exposure to the crystalline silica in 57% of site samples exceeded adjusted TLV recommended by NIOSH and Iranian of Occupational Health Technical Committee (0.05 mg/m3. The average of free SiO2 fraction in whole site samples was 1.17% varying from 0.49% in the cement Mill to 1.53% and 1.7% in crusher and Kiln sections, respectively .Conclusion: Levels of exposure to cement respirable dust in all productive sections were significantly higher than the adjusted TLV. However, in administrative and control departments it was lower than the TLV level. Regarding crystalline silica, levels of exposure only in “Raw mill” and “kiln” were significantly higher than the adjusted TLV

  8. Biomechanics of lower limb haemophilic arthropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephensen, David; Drechsler, Wendy I; Scott, Oona M

    2012-09-01

    Intermittent joint bleeding and potential arthropathy remain a concern for patients and those responsible for haemophilic care. Monitoring the status of haemophilic joints is a current challenge. Evaluation of bone and soft tissue with radiological imaging together with clinical joint scoring is often used to monitor haemophilic arthropathy and may not be sufficiently sensitive to early changes in joint morphology. Recently an interest in the biomechanical status of haemophilic joints has emerged. Biomechanics is defined as the interdiscipline that describes, analyses and assesses movement in relation to biological and physical principles. This review considers the biomechanical evaluation of haemophilic joint status of the lower limb with particular reference to the evaluation of muscle atrophy, muscle strength, range of motion and gait as well as the relationship to haemophilic arthropathy. In raising the need for increased clinical awareness, this review highlights the need to establish test-retest and inter-rater reliability and ensuring that comparative studies are undertaken with age-matched unaffected peer groups. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Automation and apps for clinical dental biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bruce W

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this research summary is to introduce the current and ongoing work using smartphone video, tracking markers to measure musculoskeletal disorders of cranial and mandibular origin, and the potential significance of the technology to doctors and therapists. The MPA™ biomechanical measuring apps are in beta trials with various doctors and therapists. The technique requires substantial image processing and statistical analysis, best suited to server-side processing. A smartphone environment has enabled a virtual laboratory, which provides automated generation of graphics and in some cases automated interpretation. The system enables highly accurate real-time biomechanics studies using only a smartphone and tracking markers. Despite the technical challenges in setting up and testing of the virtual environment and with interpretation of clinical relevance, the trials have enabled a demonstration of real-time biomechanics studies. The technology has prompted a lot of discussion about the relevance of rapid assessment tools in clinical practice. It seems that a prior bias against motion tracking and its relevance is very strong with occlusion related use cases, yet there has been a general agreement about the use case for cranial movement tracking in managing complex issues related to the head, neck, and TMJ. Measurement of cranial and mandibular functions using a smartphone video as the input have been investigated. Ongoing research will depend upon doctors and therapists to provide feedback as to which uses are considered clinically relevant.

  10. Migration of silver from commercial plastic food containers and implications for consumer exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Goetz, Natalie; Fabricius, Lars; Glaus, Reto; Weitbrecht, Volker; Günther, Detlef; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2013-01-01

    Food storage containers with embedded silver as an antibacterial agent promise longer durability of food. For risk assessment the release of this silver into the stored food and resulting human exposure need to be known. For the purpose of exposure assessment, silver migration from commercial plastic containers with declared content of 'nano-' or 'micro-silver' into different food simulants (water, 10% ethanol, 3% acetic acid, olive oil) was quantitatively determined by ICP-MS and the form of the released silver was investigated. The highest migration of silver was observed for the acidic food simulant with 30 ng silver cm(-2) contact surface within 10 days at 20°C. In a second and third use cycle, migration dropped by a factor of up to 10, so that the maximum cumulated release over three use cycles was 34 ng cm(-2). The silver release over time was described using a power function and a numerical model that simulates Fickian diffusion through the plastic material. The released silver was found to be in ionic form, but also in the form of silver nanoparticles (around 12%). Consumer exposure to the total amount of silver released from the food containers is low in comparison with the background silver exposure of the general population, but since natural background concentrations are only known for ionic silver, the exposure to silver nanoparticles is not directly comparable with a safe background level.

  11. Assessing infant exposure to persistent organic pollutants via dietary intake in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toms, Leisa-Maree Leontjew; Hearn, Laurence; Mueller, Jochen F; Harden, Fiona A

    2016-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs); organochlorine pesticides (OCPs); and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) persist in the environment, bioaccumulate, and pose a risk of causing adverse human health effects. Typically, exposure assessments undertaken by modeling existing intake data underestimate the concentrations of these chemicals in infants. This study aimed to determine concentrations of POPs in infant foods, assess exposure via dietary intake and compare this to historical exposure. Fruit purees, meat and vegetables, dairy desserts, cereals and jelly foods (n = 33) purchased in 2013 in Brisbane, Australia were analyzed. For OCPs and PCBs, concentrations ranged up to 95 pg/g fw and for PBDEs up to 32 pg/g fw with most analytes below the limit of detection. Daily intake is dependent on type and quantity of foods consumed. Consumption of a 140 g meal would result in intake ranging from 0 to 4.2 ng/day, 4.4 ng/day and 13.3 ng/day, for OCPs, PBDEs and PCBs, respectively. PBDEs were detected in 3/33 samples, OCPs in 9/33 samples and PCBs in 13/33 samples. Results from this study indicate exposure for infants via dietary (in contrast to dust and breast milk) intake in Australia contribute only a minor component to total exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Health risk assessment of occupational exposure to a magnetic field from magnetic resonance imaging devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpowicz, Jolanta; Gryz, Krzysztof

    2006-01-01

    Health care staff who operate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices are exposed to a static magnetic field of significant spatial heterogenity always produced by MRI magnets during the whole shift. They can also be exposed to pulses of a time-varying magnetic field (gradient field) present only during patients' examinations. The level of the workers' exposure depends both on the type of the magnet and on the ergonomic design of each MRI device. The paper presents methods used for measuring and assessing workers' exposure. It also discusses the results of inspection measurements carried out next to approximately 20 MRI devices of approximately 0.2-2.0 T. The presented characteristic and overview of the variability of workers' exposure to a variety of MRI devices supports the need for data on monitoring occupational exposure to MRI. International exposure assessment standards and guidelines (International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection [ICNIRP], Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers [IEEE], American Conference of Governmental and Industrial Hygienists [ACGIH], European Commission directive), and those established in Poland are also compared.

  13. Assessment of Occupational Noise Exposure among Groundskeepers in North Carolina Public Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balanay, Jo Anne G; Kearney, Gregory D; Mannarino, Adam J

    2016-01-01

    Groundskeepers may have increased risk to noise-induced hearing loss due to the performance of excessively noisy tasks. This study assessed the exposure