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Sample records for assess mucosal angiogenesis

  1. Serological assessment of gastric mucosal atrophy in gastric cancer

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    Bornschein Jan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-invasive tools for gastric cancer screening and diagnosis are lacking. Serological testing with the detection of pepsinogen 1 (PG1, pepsinogen 2 (PG2 and gastrin 17 (G17 offers the possibility to detect preneoplastic gastric mucosal conditions. Aim of this study was to assess the performance of these serological tests in the presence of gastric neoplasia. Methods Histological and serological samples of 118 patients with gastric cancer have been assessed for tumor specific characteristics (Laurén type, localisation, degree of mucosal abnormalities (intestinal metaplasia, atrophy and serological parameters (PG1, PG2, PG1/2-ratio, G17, H. pylori IgG, CagA status. Association of the general factors to the different serological values have been statistically analyzed. Results Patients with intestinal type gastric cancer had lower PG1 levels and a lower PG1/2-ratio compared to those with diffuse type cancer (p = 0.003. The serum levels of PG2 itself and G17 were not significantly altered. H. pylori infection in general had no influence on the levels of PG1, PG2 and G17 in the serum of gastric cancer patients. There was a trend towards lower PG1 levels in case of positive CagA-status (p = 0.058. The degree of both intestinal metaplasia and atrophy correlated inversely with serum levels for PG1 and the PG1/2-ratio (p Conclusions Glandular atrophy and a positive CagA status are determinant factors for decreased pepsinogen 1 levels in the serum of patients with gastric cancer. The serological assessment of gastric atrophy by analysis of serum pepsinogen is only adequate for patients with intestinal type cancer.

  2. Imaging techniques used for the real-time assessment of angiogenesis in digestive cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Săftoiu, Adrian; Vilmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis has a critical role in primary tumor growth and the development of metastases. Several angiogenesis inhibitors were recently developed, being a very attractive target for digestive tumor therapy. However, individualized therapy should not only be based on the pre-treatment imaging...... of reviews was to analyze and enhance current knowledge and future perspectives about the real-time assessment of angiogenesis in digestive cancers, used for the longitudinal monitoring of the effects of chemo-radiotherapy (including anti-angiogenic therapies), as well as for the precise targeting of drugs...... through molecular-based drug-delivery systems....

  3. Imaging techniques used for the real-time assessment of angiogenesis in digestive cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saftoiu, Adrian; Vilmann, Peter; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis has a critical role in primary tumor growth and the development of metastases. Several angiogenesis inhibitors were recently developed, being a very attractive target for digestive tumor therapy. However, individualized therapy should not only be based on the pre-treatment imaging...... of reviews was to analyze and enhance current knowledge and future perspectives about the real-time assessment of angiogenesis in digestive cancers, used for the longitudinal monitoring of the effects of chemo-radiotherapy (including anti-angiogenic therapies), as well as for the precise targeting of drugs...

  4. Digital Microscopy Assessment of Angiogenesis in Different Breast Cancer Compartments

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    Anca Haisan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Tumour angiogenesis defined by microvessel density (MVD is generally accepted as a prognostic factor in breast cancer. However, due to variability of measurement systems and cutoffs, it is questionable to date whether it contributes to predictive outline. Our study aims to grade vascular heterogeneity by comparing clear-cut compartments: tumour associated stroma (TAS, tumour parenchyma, and tumour invasive front. Material and Methods. Computerized vessel area measurement was performed using a tissue cytometry system (TissueFAXS on slides originated from 50 patients with breast cancer. Vessels were marked using immunohistochemistry with CD34. Regions of interest were manually defined for each tumour compartment. Results. Tumour invasive front vascular endothelia area was 2.15 times higher than that in tumour parenchyma and 4.61 times higher than that in TAS (P<0.002. Worth to mention that the lymph node negative subgroup of patients show a slight but constant increase of vessel index in all examined compartments of breast tumour. Conclusion. Whole slide digital examination and region of interest (ROI analysis are a valuable tool in scoring angiogenesis markers and disclosing their prognostic capacity. Our study reveals compartments’ variability of vessel density inside the tumour and highlights the propensity of invasive front to associate an active process of angiogenesis with potential implications in adjuvant therapy.

  5. Thalidomide Improves the Intestinal Mucosal Injury and Suppresses Mesenteric Angiogenesis and Vasodilatation by Down-Regulating Inflammasomes-Related Cascades in Cirrhotic Rats.

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    Li, Tzu-Hao; Huang, Chia-Chang; Yang, Ying-Ying; Lee, Kuei-Chuan; Hsieh, Shie-Liang; Hsieh, Yun-Cheng; Alan, Lin; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Shou-Dong; Tsai, Chang-Youh

    2016-01-01

    By blocking TNFα-related effects, thalidomide not only inhibits hepatic fibrogenesis but improves peripheral vasodilatation and portal hypertension in cirrhotic rats. Nonetheless, the investigation of thalidomide's effects on splanchnic and collateral microcirculation has been limited. Our study explored the roles of intestinal and mesenteric TNFα along with inflammasome-related pathway in relation to cirrhosis and the splanchnic/collateral microcirculation. Using in vivo and in vitro approaches, mechanisms of the effects of thalidomide on intestinal and mesenteric inflammatory, vasodilatory and angiogenic cascades-related abnormalities were explored in cirrhotic rats that had received 1-month thalidomide (C-T) treatment. In cirrhotic rats, high tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and nitric oxide (NO)x levels were associated with the NOD-like receptors protein 3 (NLRP3), IL-1β and caspase-1 inflammasome over-expression in splenorenal shunt and mesenteric tissues. The thalidomide-related inhibition of mesenteric and splenorenal shunt inflammasome expression was accompanied by a significantly decreased intestinal mucosal injury and inflammasome immunohistochemical staining expression. Suppression of various angiogenic cascades, namely VEGF-NOS-NO, was paralleled by a decrease in mesenteric angiogenesis as detected by CD31 immunofluorescence staining and by reduced portosystemic shunting (PSS) in C-T rats. The down-regulation of the mesenteric and collateral vasodilatory VEGF-NOS-NO cascades resulted in a correction of vasoconstrictive hypo-responsiveness and in an attenuation of vasodilatory hyper-responsiveness when analyzed by in situ perfusion of the superior mesenteric arterial (SMA) and portosystemic collaterals. There was also a decrease in SMA blood flow and an increase in SMA resistance in the C-T rats. Additionally, acute incubation with thalidomide abolished TNFα-augmented VEGF-mediated migration of and tube

  6. Chemo-radiotherapy induced oral mucositis during IMRT for head and neck cancer - An assessment.

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    Nagarajan, Karthika

    2015-05-01

    This study is conducted mainly to evaluate the changes in quality and quantity of oral epithelial cells during the course of IMRT. 30 Patients undergoing chemo-radiotherapy were followed through course of treatment. They were compared with a group of age- and sex-matched healthy individuals. The procedure involved WHO clinical scoring, collection of oral washings and preparation of buccal smears from both study group and control group. The changes occurred were recorded as a way of assessing the severity of oral mucositis. revealed a significant occurrence of oral mucositis in almost all patients during weekly follow up. There was a significant increase in percentage of viable buccal epithelial cells in study group when compared to normal controls (P<0.005) during and at the end of chemo-radiotherapy. quantification of oral mucositis can be done at cellular level by determining the oral mucosal cell viability and their maturation during IMRT.

  7. Imaging angiogenesis.

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    Charnley, Natalie; Donaldson, Stephanie; Price, Pat

    2009-01-01

    There is a need for direct imaging of effects on tumor vasculature in assessment of response to antiangiogenic drugs and vascular disrupting agents. Imaging tumor vasculature depends on differences in permeability of vasculature of tumor and normal tissue, which cause changes in penetration of contrast agents. Angiogenesis imaging may be defined in terms of measurement of tumor perfusion and direct imaging of the molecules involved in angiogenesis. In addition, assessment of tumor hypoxia will give an indication of tumor vasculature. The range of imaging techniques available for these processes includes positron emission tomography (PET), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), perfusion computed tomography (CT), and ultrasound (US).

  8. Assessment of cancer therapy-induced oral mucositis using a patient-reported oral mucositis experience questionnaire.

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    Anne Margrete Gussgard

    Full Text Available Treatment of oral mucositis (OM is challenging. In order to develop and test useful treatment approaches, the development of reliable, reproducible and simpler methods than are currently available for assessment of OM is important. A Patient-Reported Oral Mucositis Symptom (PROMS scale was assessed in patients with head and neck cancer to determine if the patient-reported OM experience, as determined by using the PROMS scale, correlate with OM assessed by clinician-based scoring tools.Fifty patients with head and neck cancer and undergoing radiotherapy consented to participate. They were examined before cancer treatment and twice weekly during 6-7 weeks of therapy and once 4-6 weeks after therapy. Signs of OM were evaluated using the 3 clinician-based scoring tools; NCI-CTCAE v.3, the OMAS criteria and the Total VAS-OMAS. The participants' OM experiences were recorded using PROMS-questionnaires consisting of 10 questions on a visual analogue scale. Spearman rank correlation test were applied between the PROMS scale values and the clinician-determined scores. Repeated measures mixed linear models were applied to appraise the strengths of correlation at the different time points throughout the observation period.Thirty-three participants completed all stages of the study. The participant experience of OM using the PROMS scale demonstrates good correlations (Spearman's Rho 0.65-0.78, p<0.001 with the clinician-determined scores on the group level over all time points and poor to good correlations (Spearman's Rho -0.12-0.70, p<0.001 on the group level at different time points during and after therapy. When mouth opening was problematic, i.e. during the 6th and 7th week after commencing cancer treatment, the Spearman's Rho varied between 0.19 and 0.70 (p<0.001.Patient experience of OM, as reported by the PROMS scale may be a feasible substitute for clinical assessment in situations where patients cannot endure oral examinations.

  9. Assessment of Molecular Imaging of Angiogenesis with Three-Dimensional Ultrasonography

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    Jason E. Streeter

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging (MI with ultrasonography relies on microbubble contrast agents (MCAs adhering to a ligand-specific target for applications such as characterizing tumor angiogenesis. It is projected that ultrasonic (US MI can provide information about tumor therapeutic response before the detection of phenotypic changes. One of the limitations of preclinical US MI is that it lacks a comprehensive field of view. We attempted to improve targeted MCA visualization and quantification by performing three-dimensional (3D MI of tumors expressing αvβ3 integrin. Volumetric acquisitions were obtained with a Siemens Sequoia system in cadence pulse sequencing mode by mechanically stepping the transducer elevationally across the tumor in 800-micron increments. MI was performed on rat fibrosarcoma tumors (n = 8 of similar sizes using MCAs conjugated with a cyclic RGD peptide targeted to αvβ3 integrin. US MI and immunohistochemical analyses show high microbubble targeting variability, suggesting that individual two-dimensional (2D acquisitions risk misrepresenting more complex heterogeneous tissues. In 2D serial studies, where it may be challenging to image the same plane repeatedly, misalignments as small as 800 microns can introduce substantial error. 3D MI, including volumetric analysis of inter- and intra-animal targeting, provides a thorough way of characterizing angiogenesis and will be a more robust assessment technique for the future of MI.

  10. Assessment of molecular imaging of angiogenesis with three-dimensional ultrasonography.

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    Streeter, Jason E; Gessner, Ryan C; Tsuruta, James; Feingold, Steven; Dayton, Paul A

    2011-12-01

    Molecular imaging (MI) with ultrasonography relies on microbubble contrast agents (MCAs) adhering to a ligand-specific target for applications such as characterizing tumor angiogenesis. It is projected that ultrasonic (US) MI can provide information about tumor therapeutic response before the detection of phenotypic changes. One of the limitations of preclinical US MI is that it lacks a comprehensive field of view. We attempted to improve targeted MCA visualization and quantification by performing three-dimensional (3D) MI of tumors expressing αvβ3 integrin. Volumetric acquisitions were obtained with a Siemens Sequoia system in cadence pulse sequencing mode by mechanically stepping the transducer elevationally across the tumor in 800-micron increments. MI was performed on rat fibrosarcoma tumors (n  =  8) of similar sizes using MCAs conjugated with a cyclic RGD peptide targeted to αvβ3 integrin. US MI and immunohistochemical analyses show high microbubble targeting variability, suggesting that individual two-dimensional (2D) acquisitions risk misrepresenting more complex heterogeneous tissues. In 2D serial studies, where it may be challenging to image the same plane repeatedly, misalignments as small as 800 microns can introduce substantial error. 3D MI, including volumetric analysis of inter- and intra-animal targeting, provides a thorough way of characterizing angiogenesis and will be a more robust assessment technique for the future of MI.

  11. Tumor angiogenesis assessment using multi-fluorescent scans on murine slices by Markov random field framework

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    Laifa, Oumeima; Le Guillou-Buffello, Delphine; Racoceanu, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    The fundamental role of vascular supply in tumor growth makes the evaluation of the angiogenesis crucial in assessing effect of anti-angiogenic therapies. Since many years, such therapies are designed to inhibit the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). To contribute to the assessment of anti-angiogenic agent (Pazopanib) effect on vascular and cellular structures, we acquired data from tumors extracted from a murine tumor model using Multi- Fluorescence Scanning. In this paper, we implemented an unsupervised algorithm combining the Watershed segmentation and Markov Random Field model (MRF). This algorithm allowed us to quantify the proportion of apoptotic endothelial cells and to generate maps according to cell density. Stronger association between apoptosis and endothelial cells was revealed in the tumors receiving anti-angiogenic therapy (n = 4) as compared to those receiving placebo (n = 4). A high percentage of apoptotic cells in the tumor area are endothelial. Lower density cells were detected in tumor slices presenting higher apoptotic endothelial areas.

  12. Nerve growth factor injected into the gastric ulcer base incorporates into endothelial, neuronal, glial and epithelial cells: implications for angiogenesis, mucosal regeneration and ulcer healing.

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    Tanigawa, T; Ahluwalia, A; Watanabe, T; Arakawa, T; Tarnawski, A S

    2015-08-01

    A previous study has demonstrated that locally administered growth factors such as epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor can accelerate healing of experimental gastric ulcers in rats. That study indicates that locally administered growth factors can exert potent biological effects resulting in enhanced gastric ulcers healing. However, the fate of injected growth factors, their retention and localization to specific cellular compartments have not been examined. In our preliminary study, we demonstrated that local injection of nerve growth factor to the base of experimental gastric ulcers dramatically accelerates ulcer healing, increases angiogenesis - new blood vessel formation, and improves the quality of vascular and epithelial regeneration. Before embarking on larger, definitive and time sequence studies, we wished to determine whether locally injected nerve growth factor is retained in gastric ulcer's tissues and taken up by specific cells during gastric ulcer healing. Gastric ulcers were induced in anesthetized rats by local application of acetic acid using standard methods; and, 60 min later fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled nerve growth factor was injected locally to the ulcer base. Rats were euthanized 2, 5 and 10 days later. Gastric specimens were obtained and processed for histology. Unstained paraffin sections were examined under a fluorescence microscope, and the incorporation of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled nerve growth factor into various gastric tissue cells was determined and quantified. In addition, we performed immunostaining for S100β protein that is expressed in neural components. Five and ten days after ulcer induction labeled nerve growth factor (injected to the gastric ulcer base) was incorporated into endothelial cells of blood vessels, neuronal, glial and epithelial cells, myofibroblasts and muscle cells. This study demonstrates for the first time that during gastric ulcer healing

  13. Firefly luciferase-based dynamic bioluminescence imaging: a noninvasive technique to assess tumor angiogenesis.

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    Sun, Amy; Hou, Lewis; Prugpichailers, Tiffany; Dunkel, Jason; Kalani, Maziyar A; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Kalani, M Yashar S; Tse, Victor

    2010-04-01

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is emerging as a cost-effective, high-throughput, noninvasive, and sensitive imaging modality to monitor cell growth and trafficking. We describe the use of dynamic BLI as a noninvasive method of assessing vessel permeability during brain tumor growth. With the use of stereotactic technique, 10 firefly luciferase-transfected GL26 mouse glioblastoma multiforme cells were injected into the brains of C57BL/6 mice (n = 80). After intraperitoneal injection of D-luciferin (150 mg/kg), serial dynamic BLI was performed at 1-minute intervals (30 seconds exposure) every 2 to 3 days until death of the animals. The maximum intensity was used as an indirect measurement of tumor growth. The adjusted slope of initial intensity (I90/Im) was used as a proxy to monitor the flow rate of blood into the vascular tree. Using a modified Evans blue perfusion protocol, we calculated the relative permeability of the vascular tree at various time points. Daily maximum intensity correlated strongly with tumor volume. At postinjection day 23, histology and BLI demonstrated an exponential growth of the tumor mass. Slopes were calculated to reflect the flow in the vessels feeding the tumor (adjusted slope = I90/Im). The increase in BLI intensity was correlated with a decrease in adjusted slope, reflecting a decrease in the rate of blood flow as tumor volume increased (y = 93.8e-0.49, R2 = 0.63). Examination of calculated slopes revealed a peak in permeability around postinjection day 20 (n = 42, P maximum intensity observed; as angiogenesis progressed, tumor vessel caliber increased dramatically, resulting in sluggish but increased flow. This trend was correlated with Evans blue histology, revealing an increase in Evans blue dye uptake into the tumor, as slope calculated by BLI increases. Dynamic BLI is a practical, noninvasive technique that can semiquantitatively monitor changes in vascular permeability and therefore facilitate the study of tumor angiogenesis in

  14. Noninvasive and Quantitative Assessment of In Vivo Fetomaternal Interface Angiogenesis Using RGD-Based Fluorescence

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    M. Keramidas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is a key process for proper placental development and for the success of pregnancy. Although numerous in vitro methods have been developed for the assessment of this process, relatively few reliable in vivo methods are available to evaluate this activity throughout gestation. Here we report an in vivo technique that specifically measures placental neovascularization. The technique is based on the measurement of a fluorescent alpha v beta 3 (αvβ3 integrin-targeting molecule called Angiolone-Alexa-Fluor 700. The αvβ3 integrin is highly expressed by endothelial cells during the neovascularization and by trophoblast cells during their invasion of the maternal decidua. Angiolone was injected to gravid mice at 6.5 and 11.5 days post coitus (dpc. The fluorescence was analyzed one day later at 7.5 and 12.5 dpc, respectively. We demonstrated that (i Angiolone targets αvβ3 protein in the placenta with a strong specificity, (ii this technique is quantitative as the measurement was correlated to the increase of the placental size observed with increasing gestational age, and (iii information on the outcome is possible, as abnormal placentation could be detected early on during gestation. In conclusion, we report the validation of a new noninvasive and quantitative method to assess the placental angiogenic activity, in vivo.

  15. Firefly Luciferase–Based Dynamic Bioluminescence Imaging: A Noninvasive Technique to Assess Tumor Angiogenesis

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    Sun, Amy; Hou, Lewis; Prugpichailers, Tiffany; Dunkel, Jason; Kalani, Maziyar A.; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Tse, Victor

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is emerging as a cost-effective, high-throughput, noninvasive, and sensitive imaging modality to monitor cell growth and trafficking. We describe the use of dynamic BLI as a noninvasive method of assessing vessel permeability during brain tumor growth. METHODS With the use of stereotactic technique, 105 firefly luciferase–transfected GL26 mouse glioblastoma multiforme cells were injected into the brains of C57BL/6 mice (n = 80). After intraperitoneal injection of d-luciferin (150 mg/kg), serial dynamic BLI was performed at 1-minute intervals (30 seconds exposure) every 2 to 3 days until death of the animals. The maximum intensity was used as an indirect measurement of tumor growth. The adjusted slope of initial intensity (I90/Im) was used as a proxy to monitor the flow rate of blood into the vascular tree. Using a modified Evans blue perfusion protocol, we calculated the relative permeability of the vascular tree at various time points. RESULTS Daily maximum intensity correlated strongly with tumor volume. At postinjection day 23, histology and BLI demonstrated an exponential growth of the tumor mass. Slopes were calculated to reflect the flow in the vessels feeding the tumor (adjusted slope = I90/Im). The increase in BLI intensity was correlated with a decrease in adjusted slope, reflecting a decrease in the rate of blood flow as tumor volume increased (y = 93.8e−0.49, R2 = 0.63). Examination of calculated slopes revealed a peak in permeability around postinjection day 20 (n = 42, P maximum intensity observed; as angiogenesis progressed, tumor vessel caliber increased dramatically, resulting in sluggish but increased flow. This trend was correlated with Evans blue histology, revealing an increase in Evans blue dye uptake into the tumor, as slope calculated by BLI increases. CONCLUSION Dynamic BLI is a practical, noninvasive technique that can semiquantitatively monitor changes in vascular permeability and therefore

  16. Bowel cleansing for colonoscopy: prospective randomized assessment of efficacy and of induced mucosal abnormality with three preparation agents.

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    Lawrance, I C; Willert, R P; Murray, K

    2011-05-01

    Bowel-cleansing studies are frequently underpowered, poorly designed, and use subjective bowel cleansing assessments. Consensus on efficacy, tolerability, and preparation-induced mucosal abnormalities is lacking. This study aimed to clarify the differences in efficacy and preparation-induced mucosal inflammation of sodium phosphate (NaP), colonLYTLEY (PEG), and Picoprep (Pico). This was a prospective randomized single-blinded trial of ambulatory patients to assess the efficacy of bowel preparation and preparation-induced mucosal inflammation. Proceduralists who were blinded to the preparation taken, assessed both bowel cleansing by using the Ottawa bowel preparation assessment tool and preparation-induced mucosal inflammation. Of the 634 patients, 98 % ingested more than 75 % of the bowel preparation and data were complete for colonic preparation scoring in 99 %. The preparation used, time of procedure, and patient sex all independently impacted on bowel cleansing. NaP was less efficacious than PEG ( P morning procedures whereas all bowel preparations were equally efficacious for afternoon procedures. Preparation-induced mucosal inflammation was 10-fold greater with NaP ( P = 0.03) and Pico ( P = 0.03) compared with PEG. This is the largest published prospective randomized blinded study on this topic and the first to evaluate the three major classes of preparation with a validated tool. The bowel preparation used, time of procedure, and patient sex all independently impacted on bowel cleansing. NaP gave the worst preparation for morning procedures whereas all preparations were equally effective for afternoon procedures. NaP and Pico induced mucosal inflammation 10-fold more frequently than PEG, a finding that requires further investigation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. A thin layer angiogenesis assay: a modified basement matrix assay for assessment of endothelial cell differentiation.

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    Faulkner, Ashton; Purcell, Robert; Hibbert, Andrew; Latham, Sally; Thomson, Scott; Hall, Wendy L; Wheeler-Jones, Caroline; Bishop-Bailey, David

    2014-12-05

    Basement matrices such as Matrigel™ and Geltrex™ are used in a variety of cell culture assays of anchorage-dependent differentiation including endothelial cell tube formation assays. The volumes of matrix recommended for these assays (approximately 150 μl/cm(2)) are costly, limit working distances for microscopy, and require cell detachment for subsequent molecular analysis. Here we describe the development and validation of a thin-layer angiogenesis (TLA) assay for assessing the angiogenic potential of endothelial cells that overcomes these limitations. Geltrex™ basement matrix at 5 μl/cm(2) in 24-well (10 μl) or 96-well (2 μl) plates supports endothelial cell differentiation into tube-like structures in a comparable manner to the standard larger volumes of matrix. Since working distances are reduced, high-resolution single cell microscopy, including DIC and confocal imaging, can be used readily. Using MitoTracker dye we now demonstrate, for the first time, live mitochondrial dynamics and visualise the 3-dimensional network of mitochondria present in differentiated endothelial cells. Using a standard commercial total RNA extraction kit (Qiagen) we also show direct RNA extraction and RT-qPCR from differentiated endothelial cells without the need to initially detach cells from their supporting matrix. We present here a new thin-layer assay (TLA) for measuring the anchorage-dependent differentiation of endothelial cells into tube-like structures which retains all the characteristics of the traditional approach but with the added benefit of a greatly lowered cost and better compatibility with other techniques, including RT-qPCR and high-resolution microscopy.

  18. Biomarkers in the assessment of oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Normando, Ana Gabriela Costa; Rocha, Camila Lopes; de Toledo, Isabela Porto; de Souza Figueiredo, Paulo Tadeu; Dos Reis, Paula Elaine Diniz; De Luca Canto, Graziela; Guerra, Eliete Neves Silva

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the capability of biomarkers to predict the risk of oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients, as well as to assess the correlation between these biomarkers and the severity of mucositis. The search was performed at LILACS, PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus, and Web of Science. A search of the gray literature was performed on Google Scholar, OpenGrey, and ProQuest. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed using the Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument (MAStARI) tool, and the evidence quality was assessed by the Grading of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. After a two-step selection process, 26 studies met the eligibility criteria. In total, 27 biomarkers were evaluated, and the most frequent were the epidermal growth factor (EGF), C-reactive protein (CRP), genetic polymorphisms, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). The meta-analysis showed an expression of polymorphisms in XRCC1 (32.66%), XRCC3 (31.00%), and RAD51 (39.16%) genes, as well as an expression of protein biomarkers (39.57%), in patients with an increased risk of developing oral mucositis. Dosing biomarkers before starting radiation therapy may be a promising method to predict the risk of developing mucositis and allow radiosensitive patients to have a customized treatment. Although there is currently limited evidence to confirm the putative implementation of serum and salivary biomarkers to assess the correlation between them and the severity of mucositis, this current review provides new research directions.

  19. Mucosal vaccines

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    Nizard, Mevyn; Diniz, Mariana O; Roussel, Helene; Tran, Thi; Ferreira, Luis CS; Badoual, Cecile; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system displays several adaptations reflecting the exposure to the external environment. The efficient induction of mucosal immune responses also requires specific approaches, such as the use of appropriate administration routes and specific adjuvants and/or delivery systems. In contrast to vaccines delivered via parenteral routes, experimental, and clinical evidences demonstrated that mucosal vaccines can efficiently induce local immune responses to pathogens or tumors located at mucosal sites as well as systemic response. At least in part, such features can be explained by the compartmentalization of mucosal B and T cell populations that play important roles in the modulation of local immune responses. In the present review, we discuss molecular and cellular features of the mucosal immune system as well as novel immunization approaches that may lead to the development of innovative and efficient vaccines targeting pathogens and tumors at different mucosal sites. PMID:25424921

  20. Base-metal dental casting alloy biocompatibility assessment using a human-derived three-dimensional oral mucosal model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGinley, E L

    2012-01-01

    Nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloys used in fixed prosthodontics have been associated with type IV Ni-induced hypersensitivity. We hypothesised that the full-thickness human-derived oral mucosa model employed for biocompatibility testing of base-metal dental alloys would provide insights into the mechanisms of Ni-induced toxicity. Primary oral keratinocytes and gingival fibroblasts were seeded onto Alloderm™ and maintained until full thickness was achieved prior to Ni-Cr and cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy disc exposure (2-72 h). Biocompatibility assessment involved histological analyses with cell viability measurements, oxidative stress responses, inflammatory cytokine expression and cellular toxicity analyses. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis determined elemental ion release levels. We detected adverse morphology with significant reductions in cell viability, significant increases in oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokine expression and cellular toxicity for the Ni-Cr alloy-treated oral mucosal models compared with untreated oral mucosal models, and adverse effects were increased for the Ni-Cr alloy that leached the most Ni. Co-Cr demonstrated significantly enhanced biocompatibility compared with Ni-Cr alloy-treated oral mucosal models. The human-derived full-thickness oral mucosal model discriminated between dental alloys and provided insights into the mechanisms of Ni-induced toxicity, highlighting potential clinical relevance.

  1. Assessment of vascularity as an index of angiogenesis in periradicular granulomas. Comparison with oral carcinomas and normal tissue counterparts.

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    Davey, K J; Perrier, S; Ohe, G; Gilbert, A D; Bankfalvi, A; Saunders, W P; Schor, S L; Schor, A M

    2008-11-01

    To quantify vascularity in periradicular granulomas using different endothelial markers, and assess its value as an index of angiogenesis by comparing granulomas with healthy periodontal ligament (PDL). To use oral tumours, compared with adjacent normal mucosa, as positive controls. Paraffin-embedded sections were stained with antibodies to von Willebrand factor (vWF), a pan-endothelial marker, and CD105, a putative marker for angiogenic vessels. Vascularity was quantified by different methods reflecting vessel volume and density. Irrespective of the marker or method used, vascularity values were similar in periradicular granuloma and PDL. Both tissues were highly vascularized, with levels similar to those found in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Vascularity was significantly higher in the latter than in normal mucosa. Fewer vessels were positive for CD105 than for vWF in the normal mucosa, whereas similar numbers were found in the other tissues examined. A comparison of vascularity in oral tumours and normal oral mucosa provided evidence of angiogenesis in the former. Staining with CD105 added limited value to staining with vWF in these tissues. In contrast, a comparison of periradicular granuloma and PDL failed to demonstrate evidence of angiogenesis in the granuloma. As all vessels were similarly stained with vWF and CD105 in granuloma and PDL, a possible hypothesis is that all vessels are newly formed in these tissues. A more plausible alternative is that CD105 expression may reflect the metabolic activity or intrinsic characteristics of the tissues, rather than the presence of angiogenic vessels.

  2. Mucosal changes in laryngopharyngeal reflux--prevalence, sensitivity, specificity and assessment.

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    Powell, Jason; Cocks, Helen C

    2013-04-01

    A literature review regarding the use of laryngopharyngeal mucosal signs in diagnosing laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). Literature review. A search of MEDLINE in February 2012 using the terms laryngopharyngeal reflux, laryngitis, mucosa, appearances, and signs (English language only). One or more laryngopharyngeal mucosal signs associated with LPR were identified in 64% to 93% of healthy volunteers (3% >5 signs) and in 17% to 85% of gastroesophageal reflux disease sufferers (Reflux Finding Score [RFS] >7 in 24%). Reinke's edema, pseudosulcus, ventricular obliteration, vocal cord nodules, and granulomas have in some, but not all studies, been shown to be more prevalent in those with pH-proven pharyngeal reflux. Pseudosulcus, interarytenoid thickening, and Reinke's edema were more prevalent in those symptomatic of LPR than those not. The use of multiple mucosal signs may improve detection of reflux sufferers from asymptomatic controls. The RFS has a sensitivity and specificity of 87.8% and 37.5%, respectively, for picking up pH-proven pharyngeal reflux individuals. Inter- and intrarater reliability for identifying signs is fair to good in most studies. The limited evidence for each mucosal finding should be considered in making the diagnosis of LPR. Further quality research in to mucosal findings in LPR is needed. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  3. Angiogenesis Inhibitors

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    ... blood vessels “feed” growing tumors with oxygen and nutrients , allowing the cancer cells to invade nearby tissue , to move throughout ... any angiogenesis inhibitors currently being used to treat cancer in humans? Yes. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved bevacizumab to ...

  4. 3D discrete angiogenesis dynamic model and stochastic simulation for the assessment of blood perfusion coefficient and impact on heat transfer between nanoparticles and malignant tumors.

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    Yifat, Jonathan; Gannot, Israel

    2015-03-01

    Early detection of malignant tumors plays a crucial role in the survivability chances of the patient. Therefore, new and innovative tumor detection methods are constantly searched for. Tumor-specific magnetic-core nano-particles can be used with an alternating magnetic field to detect and treat tumors by hyperthermia. For the analysis of the method effectiveness, the bio-heat transfer between the nanoparticles and the tissue must be carefully studied. Heat diffusion in biological tissue is usually analyzed using the Pennes Bio-Heat Equation, where blood perfusion plays an important role. Malignant tumors are known to initiate an angiogenesis process, where endothelial cell migration from neighboring vasculature eventually leads to the formation of a thick blood capillary network around them. This process allows the tumor to receive its extensive nutrition demands and evolve into a more progressive and potentially fatal tumor. In order to assess the effect of angiogenesis on the bio-heat transfer problem, we have developed a discrete stochastic 3D model & simulation of tumor-induced angiogenesis. The model elaborates other angiogenesis models by providing high resolution 3D stochastic simulation, capturing of fine angiogenesis morphological features, effects of dynamic sprout thickness functions, and stochastic parent vessel generator. We show that the angiogenesis realizations produced are well suited for numerical bio-heat transfer analysis. Statistical study on the angiogenesis characteristics was derived using Monte Carlo simulations. According to the statistical analysis, we provide analytical expression for the blood perfusion coefficient in the Pennes equation, as a function of several parameters. This updated form of the Pennes equation could be used for numerical and analytical analyses of the proposed detection and treatment method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The assessment of angiogenesis and fibroblastic stromagenesis in hyperplastic and pre-invasive breast lesions

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    Louvrou Niki

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the changes of the neoplastic microenvironment during the different morphological alterations of hyperplastic and pre-invasive breast lesions. Methods 78 in situ ductal carcinomas of all degrees of differentiation, 22 atypical ductal hyperplasias, 25 in situ lobular carcinomas, 18 atypical lobular hyperplasias, 32 ductal epithelial hyperplasias of usual type and 8 flat atypias were immunohistochemically investigated for the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, smooth muscle actin (SMA and CD34, while microvessel density (MVD was counted using the anti-CD31 antibody. Results VEGF expression was strongly correlated with MVD in all hyperplastic and pre-invasive breast lesions (p Conclusion Angiogenesis is observed before any significant fibroblastic stromagenesis in pre-invasive breast lesions. A composite phenotype characterized by VEGF positive epithelial cells and SMA positive/CD34 negative stromal cells, is identified mostly in intermediate and high grade DCIS. These findings might imply for new therapeutic strategies using both anti-angiogenic factors and factors selectively targeting tumor stroma in order to prevent the progression of DCIS to invasive carcinoma.

  6. Oral mucositis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heals by itself when there is no infection. Healing usually takes 2 to 4 weeks. Mucositis caused ... March 20, 2016. Read More Bone marrow transplant HIV/AIDS Mastectomy Patient Instructions After chemotherapy - discharge Bleeding ...

  7. Assessment of indomethacin oral spray for the treatment of oropharyngeal mucositis-induced pain during anticancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momo, Kenji; Nagaoka, Hiroka; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Bukawa, Hiroki; Chiba, Shigeru; Kohda, Yukinao; Homma, Masato

    2017-07-15

    The efficacy and safety of indomethacin (IM) oral spray (OS) as a pain control therapy for oropharyngeal mucositis due to anticancer chemo- and radiotherapy were assessed in patients with head and neck carcinomas and haematological tumours. We observed 35 patients (male/female, 20/15; 53 ± 17 years) with oropharyngeal mucositis who were treated with IM-OS preparation for pain relief at University of Tsukuba Hospital, Japan. Analgesic effects were assessed using the six-grade face scale for pain in 28 patients at the start of IM oral spray treatment. Systemic exposure was assessed by determining urinary excretions of IM in seven patients. Pain relief was achieved in 26 (93%) patients at 25 (5-60) min after applying the IM-OS preparation (15.6 ± 3.4 μg/kg) and analgesic effects were maintained for 120 (10-360) min. The pain was significantly decreased after using the spray (3.6 ± 0.7 vs. 2.4 ± 0.9, p < 0.01). Moreover, urinary IM excretion rates after applying the IM spray preparation were 1.8 ± 0.8% of the IM oral spray dose (130.5 ± 77.7 μg/kg/day), which was markedly lower than that following oral administration of IM (60%). No adverse events were observed following application of the spray. The present IM spray is an effective and safe preparation for pain relief and can be used as an alternative therapeutic option for oropharyngeal mucositis in cancer patients.

  8. Assessing the carcinogenic potential of low-dose exposures to chemical mixtures in the environment: focus on the cancer hallmark of tumor angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhiwei; Brooks, Samira A.; Dormoy, Valérian; Hsu, Chia-Wen; Hsu, Hsue-Yin; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Massfelder, Thierry; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Xia, Menghang; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Brown, Dustin G.; Prudhomme, Kalan R.; Colacci, Annamaria; Hamid, Roslida A.; Mondello, Chiara; Raju, Jayadev; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Woodrick, Jordan; Scovassi, A. Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Roy, Rabindra; Forte, Stefano; Memeo, Lorenzo; Salem, Hosni K.; Lowe, Leroy; Jensen, Lasse; Bisson, William H.; Kleinstreuer, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    One of the important ‘hallmarks’ of cancer is angiogenesis, which is the process of formation of new blood vessels that are necessary for tumor expansion, invasion and metastasis. Under normal physiological conditions, angiogenesis is well balanced and controlled by endogenous proangiogenic factors and antiangiogenic factors. However, factors produced by cancer cells, cancer stem cells and other cell types in the tumor stroma can disrupt the balance so that the tumor microenvironment favors tumor angiogenesis. These factors include vascular endothelial growth factor, endothelial tissue factor and other membrane bound receptors that mediate multiple intracellular signaling pathways that contribute to tumor angiogenesis. Though environmental exposures to certain chemicals have been found to initiate and promote tumor development, the role of these exposures (particularly to low doses of multiple substances), is largely unknown in relation to tumor angiogenesis. This review summarizes the evidence of the role of environmental chemical bioactivity and exposure in tumor angiogenesis and carcinogenesis. We identify a number of ubiquitous (prototypical) chemicals with disruptive potential that may warrant further investigation given their selectivity for high-throughput screening assay targets associated with proangiogenic pathways. We also consider the cross-hallmark relationships of a number of important angiogenic pathway targets with other cancer hallmarks and we make recommendations for future research. Understanding of the role of low-dose exposure of chemicals with disruptive potential could help us refine our approach to cancer risk assessment, and may ultimately aid in preventing cancer by reducing or eliminating exposures to synergistic mixtures of chemicals with carcinogenic potential. PMID:26106137

  9. Assessment of VEGF and EGFR in the study of angiogenesis of eyelid carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bălăşoiu, Andrei Theodor; Ciurea, Raluca Niculina; Mănescu, Maria Rodica; Mocanu, Carmen LuminiŢa; Stepan, Alex Emilian; Bălăşoiu, Maria; Niculescu, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    A tumor represents an abnormal tissue growth that can arise from any ocular structure, such as eyelids, muscles or the optic nerve. At the eyelids, there are two main tumor types: basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Angiogenesis plays a crucial role in growth, invasion and metastasis processes of any tumor. It is well known the fact that without new vessels formation tumors cannot exceed 1-2 mm diameter. Immunohistochemical analysis has been performed on 43 cases of primary carcinomas of the eyelid, diagnosed between 2010 and 2014 in the Laboratory of Pathological Anatomy of the University Emergency County Hospital of Craiova, Romania. Biological material was represented by surgical resection samples, coming from the Clinic of Ophthalmology the anteriorly named Hospital. Within the immunohistochemical study, we have evaluated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in a group of 43 cutaneous carcinomas of the eyelid, depending on the type and differentiation grade of the tumor. Of the 43 samples, 23 came from patients with eyelid basal cell carcinoma and 20 came from patients with eyelid squamous cell carcinoma. In our study, EGFR and VEGF immunoexpression was superior for squamous cell carcinomas, compared to basal cell carcinomas, fact that was statistically significant. Regarding squamous cell carcinomas, the immunoexpression of these two markers was superior in moderate÷poor differentiated forms, compared to well differentiated forms, fact that was statistically significant. The markers used in this study were found to be associated with the acquisition of aggression and angiogenic phenotypes by analyzed carcinomas.

  10. Spectral computed tomography in advanced gastric cancer: Can iodine concentration non-invasively assess angiogenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Hua; Ren, Ke; Liang, Pan; Chai, Ya-Ru; Chen, Kui-Sheng; Gao, Jian-Bo

    2017-03-07

    To investigate the correlation of iodine concentration (IC) generated by spectral computed tomography (CT) with micro-vessel density (MVD) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in patients with advanced gastric carcinoma (GC). Thirty-four advanced GC patients underwent abdominal enhanced CT in the gemstone spectral imaging mode. The IC of the primary lesion in the arterial phase (AP) and venous phase (VP) were measured, and were then normalized against that in the aorta to provide the normalized IC (nIC). MVD and VEGF were detected by immunohistochemical assays, using CD34 and VEGF-A antibodies, respectively. Correlations of nIC with MVD, VEGF, and clinical-pathological features were analyzed. Both nICs correlated linearly with MVD and were higher in the primary lesion site than in the normal control site, but were not correlated with VEGF expression. After stratification by clinical-pathological subtypes, nIC-AP showed a statistically significant correlation with MVD, particularly in the group with tumors at stage T4, without nodular involvement, of a mixed Lauren type, where the tumor was located at the antrum site, and occurred in female individuals. nIC-VP showed a positive correlation with MVD in the group with the tumor at stage T4 and above, had nodular involvement, was poorly differentiated, was located at the pylorus site, of a mixed and diffused Lauren subtype, and occurred in male individuals. nIC-AP and nIC-VP showed significant differences in terms of histological differentiation and Lauren subtype. The IC detected by spectral CT correlated with the MVD. nIC-AP and nIC-VP can reflect angiogenesis in different pathological subgroups of advanced GC.

  11. Targeted microbubbles for imaging tumor angiogenesis: assessment of whole-body biodistribution with dynamic micro-PET in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willmann, Jürgen K; Cheng, Zhen; Davis, Corrine

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate in vivo whole-body biodistribution of microbubbles (MBs) targeted to tumor angiogenesis-related vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) by using dynamic micro-positron emission tomography (PET) in living mice....

  12. Oral mucositis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raber-Durlacher, J.E.; Elad, S.; Barasch, A.

    2010-01-01

    Mucosal damage is one of the most common adverse effects of radiotherapy and of cytotoxic therapy for cancer. With prevalence between 10% and 100%, depending of the cytotoxic regimen and patient-associated variables, this morbid condition represents a significant problem in oncology. In this paper

  13. Comprehensive Assessment of Host Responses to 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Oral Mucositis through Transcriptomic Analysis.

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    Chung-Ta Chang

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy plays an important role in current cancer therapy; however, several problems remain unsolved on the issue of host-therapeutics interaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the host responses after 5-flurouracil (5-FU administration and to find the target genes and their relationship with other cytokines in the 5-FU-induced oral mucositis (OM mouse model through transcriptomic analysis.Thirty-six 6 to 8 week-old male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into the control group and 5-FU-treated group. In the 5-FU group, mice received 5-FU (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally on day 1, day 8, day 15, day 22, and day 29, respectively. We evaluated the oral mucosal change under macroanalysis and histological examination at indicated periods, and then applied transcriptomic analysis of gene expression profile and Immunohistochemical stain to identify the target molecules related to 5-FU-induced OM.The most prominent histological change in this model was observed in the fifth week. The gene expression of Bone gamma-carboxyglutamate protein, related sequence 1 (Bglap-rs1 (-12.69-fold and Chitinase 3-like 4 (Chi3l4 (-6.35-fold were significantly down-regulated in this phase. The quantitative real-time PCR results also revealed the expression levels were 0.62-fold in Bglap-rs1 and 0.13-fold in Chi3l4 compared with the control group. Immunohistochemical stain showed significant expression of cluster of differentiation 11b (p<0.01, interleukin-1β (p<0.001 and tumor necrosis factor-α (p<0.05, and down-regulation of Bglap-rs1 (p<0.01 compared with the control group. By Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis, there were twenty-three pathways significantly participated in this study (p<0.05.Through comprehensively transcriptomic analysis and IHC stain, we discovered several valuable pathways, verified the main pro-inflammatory cytokines, and revealed two significantly down-regulated genes in the 5-FU-induced OM model. These

  14. Assessing the clinical effectiveness of an algorithmic approach for mucosal lichen planus (MLP): A retrospective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashack, Kurt A; Haley, Laura L; Luther, Chelsea A; Riemer, Christie A; Ashack, Richard J

    2016-06-01

    Mucosal lichen planus (MLP) is a therapeutic challenge in need of a new treatment approach because of its debilitating effect on patient's quality of life. We sought to evaluate a standardized treatment plan for patients with MLP. A second objective was to describe the effect of mycophenolate mofetil in this patient population. The study retrospectively analyzed 53 patients with MLP treated using a standardized algorithm. The number of MLP lesions, disease activity, and pain at the last visit were compared with baseline scores determined at the initial visit. Results were analyzed using the paired samples t test and confirmed with the Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank test. The average number of lesions was reduced from 3.77 to 1.67 (P < .001). The average disease activity was reduced from 2.73 to 0.90 (P < .001). Average pain reported decreased from 2.03 to 1.03 (P < .001). This study was a retrospective analysis of a small patient population. There was no universal symptom severity scale used at the time of treatment for some patients. The standardized treatment plan reduced symptoms for patients with MLP. Mycophenolate mofetil appears to be a reasonable treatment option for these patients. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Low Cost Implantation Model in the Rat That Allows a Spatial Assessment of Angiogenesis

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    Paul Slezak

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available There is continual demand for animal models that allow a quantitative assessment of angiogenic properties of biomaterials, therapies, and pharmaceuticals. In its simplest form, this is done by subcutaneous material implantation and subsequent vessel counting which usually omits spatial data. We have refined an implantation model and paired it with a computational analytic routine which outputs not only vessel count but also vessel density, distribution, and vessel penetration depth, that relies on a centric vessel as a reference point. We have successfully validated our model by characterizing the angiogenic potential of a fibrin matrix in conjunction with recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor (rhVEGF165. The inferior epigastric vascular pedicles of rats were sheathed with silicone tubes, which were subsequently filled with 0.2 ml of fibrin and different doses of rhVEGF165, centrically embedding the vessels. Over 4 weeks, tissue samples were harvested and subsequently immunohistologically stained and computationally analyzed. The model was able to detect variations over the angiogenic potentials of growth factor spiked fibrin matrices. Adding 20 ng of rhVEGF165 resulted in a significant increase in vasculature while 200 ng of rhVEGF165 did not improve vascular growth. Vascularized tissue volume increased during the first week and vascular density increased during the second week. Total vessel count increased significantly and exhibited a peak after 2 weeks which was followed by a resorption of vasculature by week 4. In summary, a simple implantation model to study in vivo vascularization with only a minimal workload attached was enhanced to include morphologic data of the emerging vascular tree.

  16. Assessment of Heparanase-Mediated Angiogenesis Using Microvascular Endothelial Cells: Identification of λ-Carrageenan Derivative as a Potent Anti Angiogenic Agent

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    Nicolas Poupard

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Heparanase is overexpressed by tumor cells and degrades the extracellular matrix proteoglycans through cleavage of heparan sulfates (HS, allowing pro-angiogenic factor release and thus playing a key role in tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. Here we propose new HS analogs as potent heparanase inhibitors: Heparin as a positive control, Dextran Sulfate, λ-Carrageenan, and modified forms of them obtained by depolymerization associated to glycol splitting (RD-GS. After heparanase activity assessment, 11 kDa RD-GS-λ-Carrageenan emerged as the most effective heparanase inhibitor with an IC50 of 7.32 ng/mL compared to 10.7 ng/mL for the 16 kDa unfractionated heparin. The fractionated polysaccharides were then tested in a heparanase-rich medium-based in vitro model, mimicking tumor microenvironment, to determine their effect on microvascular endothelial cells (HSkMEC angiogenesis. As a preliminary study, we identified that under hypoxic and nutrient poor conditions, MCF-7 cancer cells released much more mature heparanase in their supernatant than in normal conditions. Then a MatrigelTM assay using HSkMEC cultured under hypoxic conditions in the presence (or not of this heparanase-rich supernatant was realized. Adding heparanase-rich media strongly enhanced angiogenic network formation with a production of twice more pseudo-vessels than with the control. When sulfated polysaccharides were tested in this angiogenesis assay, RD-GS-λ-Carrageenan was identified as a promising anti-angiogenic agent.

  17. Change in Periapical Lesion and Adjacent Mucosal Thickening Dimensions One Year after Endodontic Treatment: Volumetric Cone-beam Computed Tomography Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamburoğlu, Kıvanç; Yılmaz, Funda; Gulsahi, Kamran; Gulen, Orhan; Gulsahi, Ayse

    2017-02-01

    Changes in periapical lesion dimensions along with mucosal thickening after endodontic treatment have not been studied yet. Therefore, the objectives of this study were (1) to obtain linear and volumetric measurements of lesion dimensions in maxillary first molars with periapical pathology and (2) to measure maxillary sinus mucosal thickening in the vicinity of periapical lesions before and 1 year after endodontic treatment by using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Twenty-one maxillary first molar teeth of 21 patients (14 female and 7 male) with periapical lesion that had local mucosal thickening in the vicinity of the periapical lesion were endodontically treated. A total of 21 maxillary first molar roots (8 mesiobuccal roots, 6 distobuccal roots, and 7 palatal roots), each one from different patients, was included. Pretreatment and 1-year post-treatment CBCT images of each tooth were obtained by using Kodak CS 9300 3D CBCT unit. Width, height, surface area, and volume measurements of periapical lesions and mucosal thickening of the maxillary sinus mucosa in the vicinity of the periapical lesion were measured before and 1 year after endodontic treatment. General linear model (analysis of variance) was used for the comparisons between measurements, and significance was set at P post-treatment measurements conducted by using CBCT images (width, P = .002; height, P  .05). There were 36%, 41%, 53%, 54%, 53%, 73%, and 75% mean reductions in lesion width, lesion height, maximum sinus mucosal thickness, medium sinus mucosal thickness, minimum sinus mucosal thickness, lesion surface area, and lesion volume, respectively, before and 1 year after endodontic treatment. Regression analysis of pretreatment lesion volume versus percentage of post-treatment lesion volume change revealed a low regression coefficient (R2 = 16.7%, P > .05), showing a weak linear relationship. CBCT assessment of changes in periapical lesion and mucosal thickening dimensions may

  18. A prospective comparison of common toxicity criteria adverse events Version 3 and 4 in assessing oral mucositis for oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hickman

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: Differences in grading of mucositis scored by V3 and V4 are frequent. Relationships between biologically effective dose and rates of grade 3 mucositis have historically been based on mucosal appearances. It is not known whether the same relationships apply when mucositis is graded based on symptomatic grading systems. Both V3 and V4 should be used in clinical trials to improve understanding of mucositis and its relationship to quality of life and late mucosal toxicity.

  19. Pathogenicity of Candida albicans isolates from bloodstream and mucosal candidiasis assessed in mice and Galleria mellonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, M; Mandelblat, M; Alastruey-Izquierdo, A; Mendlovic, S; Semis, R; Segal, E

    2016-03-01

    The working hypothesis of this study was to elucidate a possible association between the pathogenic potential of Candida albicans strains with a clinical entity, systemic versus superficial candidiasis. Specifically, we assessed the pathogenicity of two groups of clinical C. albicans isolates: isolates from bloodstream infection (S) versus isolates from vaginitis patients (M), in two experimental in vivo systems - mice and Galleria melonella, in comparison to a control strain (CBS 562). Mice and G. mellonella larvae were inoculated with CBS 562 and the different S and M isolates, and followed up for survival rate and survival time during 30 and 7 days, respectively. Candida kidney colonization of mice was assessed by histopathology and colony-forming units' enumeration. The results revealed: (1) S and M isolates had different behavior patterns in the two models and varied in different parameters; (2) no statistically significant difference in pathogenicity between S and M isolates as whole groups was noted; (3) S14 was the most virulent isolate and close to the standard strain CBS 562 in both models. This study is distinctive in its outline combining two different groups of C. albicans clinical isolates originating from two different clinical entities that were assessed in vivo concurrently in two models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Angiogenesis in gliomas.

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    Elzbieta Czykier

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Brain gliomas are characterized by invasive growth and neovascularisation potential. Angiogenesis plays a major role in the progression of gliomas and its determination has a great prognostic value. The aim of the study was to assess the vascularisation of chosen brain gliomas and to estimate how it is correlated with tumour histological type, malignancy grade, location and size, and with age and sex of patients. Tumour vascularisation analysis was based on the determination of microvascular proliferation (MVP and microvessel density (MVD. Microvascular proliferation was measured with immunohistochemical methods using mouse monoclonal antibodies to detect cell proliferation antigens. The following antibodies were used Ki-67 and PCNA (DAKO. Identification of vessels was performed by CD31 antibody and anti-human von Willebrand factor (DAKO. The highest microvascular proliferation and microvascular density were observed in multiform glioblastomas and the lowest in oligodendrogliomas. Significant correlation was observed between the vascularisation and malignancy grade.

  1. Angiogenesis in malignant lymphoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, A.; Raemaekers, J.M.M.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Angiogenesis plays an important role in the pathophysiology of both solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. Angiogenesis-associated parameters are important prognosticators, and tumor blood vessels are an emerging target for therapy. This review addresses the evidence of the

  2. Angiogenesis in liver fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adlia, Amirah

    2017-01-01

    Angiogenesis emerges in parallel with liver fibrosis, but it is still unclear whether angiogenesis is a defense mechanism of the body in response to fibrosis, or whether it aggravates the fibrotic condition. In this thesis, Amirah Adlia applied different approaches to elucidate the role of

  3. A role for angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.G. Stupack

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic debilitating disease characterized by distinct autoimmune, inflammatory and fibrovascular components which lead to synovial proliferation and joint destruction. However, existing treatments specifically target only autoimmune and inflammatory components despite the fact that neovascularization of the inflamed synovium is a hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis. Angiogenesis may contribute to synovial growth, leukocyte recruitment and tissue remodeling, thus potentiating disease progression. Although no therapies currently target angiogenesis, several existing therapies have anti-angiogenic activity. Recent advances in anti-angiogenic strategies in oncology, including the identification of integrin avß3 as a crucial effector of angiogenesis, suggest a means to assess the role of angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis. Synovial endothelial cells have been shown to express integrin avß3, suggesting that these cells may be targeted for angiogenesis inhibition. Prior studies in rat arthritis models have shown benefit after the addition of broad spectrum integrin antagonists. However, formal assessment of integrin-targeted anti-angiogenic activity is now underway. These controlled studies will be important in assessing the efficacy of therapies which target angiogenesis in RA.

  4. Chronological assessment of mast cell-mediated gut dysfunction and mucosal inflammation in a rat model of chronic psychosocial stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicario, María; Guilarte, Mar; Alonso, Carmen; Yang, Pinchang; Martínez, Cristina; Ramos, Laura; Lobo, Beatriz; González, Ana; Guilà, Meritxell; Pigrau, Marc; Saperas, Esteban; Azpiroz, Fernando; Santos, Javier

    2010-10-01

    Life stress and mucosal inflammation may influence symptom onset and severity in certain gastrointestinal disorders, particularly irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), in connection with dysregulated intestinal barrier. However, the mechanism responsible remains unknown. Crowding is a validated animal model reproducing naturalistic psychosocial stress, whose consequences on gut physiology remain unexplored. Our aims were to prove that crowding stress induces mucosal inflammation and intestinal dysfunction, to characterize dynamics in time, and to evaluate the implication of stress-induced mast cell activation on intestinal dysfunction. Wistar-Kyoto rats were submitted to 15 days of crowding stress (8 rats/cage) or sham-crowding (2 rats/cage). We measured spontaneous and corticotropin-releasing factor-mediated release of plasma corticosterone. Stress-induced intestinal chrono-pathobiology was determined by measuring intestinal inflammation, epithelial damage, mast cell activation and infiltration, and intestinal barrier function. Corticosterone release was higher in crowded rats throughout day 15. Stress-induced mild inflammation, manifested earlier in the ileum and the colon than in the jejunum. While mast cell counts remained mostly unchanged, piecemeal degranulation increased along time, as the mucosal content and luminal release of rat mast cell protease-II. Stress-induced mitochondrial injury and increased jejunal permeability, both events strongly correlated with mast cell activation at day 15. Taken together, we have provided evidences that long-term exposure to psychosocial stress promotes mucosal inflammation and mast cell-mediated barrier dysfunction in the rat bowel. The notable resemblance of these findings with those in some IBS patients, support the potential interest and translational validity of this experimental model for the research of stress-sensitive intestinal disorders, particularly IBS. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Angiogenesis and endometriose].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, C M; Bartley, J; Mechsner, S; Ebert, A D

    2004-08-01

    Endometriosis is considered a chronic disease of women during their reproductive phase, which resembles many signs of malignancy. So far, therapeutic options for endometriosis-associated pain and infertility are unsatisfactory and often lead to recurrence of disease after termination of treatment. Angiogenesis seems to play an important role in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. The use of angiogenesis inhibitors may add an important new tool to well-established treatment schedules. Therefore, it is very important to thoroughly investigate the role of angiogenesis in endometriosis with respect to the female reproductive system.

  6. Angiogenesis and Melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribatti, Domenico, E-mail: ribatti@anatomia.uniba.it; Annese, Tiziana; Longo, Vito [Department of Human Anatomy and Histology, University of Bari Medical School, Piazza G. Cesare, 11, Policlinico 70124, Bari (Italy)

    2010-02-25

    Angiogenesis occurs in pathological conditions, such as tumors, where a specific critical point in tumor progression is the transition from the avascular to the vascular phase. Tumor angiogenesis depends mainly on the release by neoplastic cells of growth factors specific for endothelial cells, which are able to stimulate the growth of the host’s blood vessels. This article summarizes the literature concerning the relationship between angiogenesis and human melanoma progression. The recent applications of antiangiogenic agents which interfere with melanoma progression are also described.

  7. Clinical implications of angiogenesis in cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta WC Pang

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Roberta WC Pang1, Ronnie TP Poon2 Departments of 1Medicine and 2Surgery, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, ChinaAbstract: Angiogenesis plays an important role in the growth and progression of cancer. The regulation of tumor angiogenesis depends on a net balance of angiogenic factors and antiangiogenic factors, which are secreted by both tumor cells and host-infiltrating cells. Numerous studies have indicated that assessment of angiogenic activity by either microvessel density or expression of angiogenic factors in cancer can provide prognostic information independent of conventional clinicopathological factors such as tumor staging. Some studies also suggested that assessment of tumor angiogenesis may predict cancer response to chemotherapy or radiotherapy. However, the most important clinical implication of tumor angiogenesis is the development of a novel strategy of anticancer therapy targeting tumor vessels instead of cancer cells. Antiangiogenic therapy aims to inhibit the growth of tumor, and current evidence suggests that it works best in combination with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy. Recently, a monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor, which is one of the most potent angiogenic factors, has been approved for clinical use in colorectal cancer patients after a clinical trial confirmed that combining the antibody with standard chemotherapy regimen could prolong patient survival. The clinical implications of angiogenesis in cancer are reviewed in this article.Keywords: angiogenesis, antiangiogenic therapy, cancer, prognosis

  8. Angiogenesis in vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Werther, Kim; Nalla, Amarnadh

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are potent mediators of tumor angiogenesis. It has been demonstrated that vestibular schwannoma VEGF expression correlates with tumor growth pattern, whereas knowledge on the expression of MMPs is lacking. This study...

  9. Assessment of dental caries experience, periodontal status, and oral mucosal lesions among human immunodeficiency virus seropositives with and without antiretroviral therapy: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya Hegde

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among people living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS, studies shows variations in the prevalence of oral manifestations which may be attributed to differences in prescribed medications, stages of disease, way of transmission, and inadequate diet. Aim: To assess the dental caries experience, periodontal status, and oral mucosal lesions among people living with HIV/AIDS. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted for a period of 2 months among 130 people above the age group of 15 years, having HIV/AIDS. Oral mucosal lesions were assessed according to the World Health Organization Oral Health Assessment Form 1997; dental caries was assessed using decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT index and periodontal status was assessed using community periodontal index of treatment needs index by a single calibrated examiner. Data on antiretroviral therapy (ART were obtained from medical records. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Majority of them were females (84.6%, and 86.2% were on ART. There was no significant difference in the DMFT score among subjects with and without ART (median = 3. Fisher's exact test did not show statistically significant difference in the periodontal status between people with or without ART. Hyperpigmentation was found in 12.5% of the study subjects with ART. Conclusions: Subjects with and without ART did not show any difference in the prevalence of dental caries or periodontal status. Hyperpigmentation was the common condition found among subjects with ART. However, further follow-up studies are required to gain insight to the long-term use of ART on oral tissues.

  10. Novel developments in endoscopic mucosal imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sommen, F; Curvers, W L; Nagengast, W B

    2018-01-01

    Endoscopic techniques such as High-definition and optical-chromoendoscopy have had enormous impact on endoscopy practice. Since these techniques allow assessment of most subtle morphological mucosal abnormalities, further improvements in endoscopic practice lay in increasing the detection efficacy

  11. Angiogenesis in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribatti, Domenico; Marimpietri, Danilo; Pastorino, Fabio; Brignole, Chiara; Nico, Beatrice; Vacca, Angelo; Ponzoni, Mirco

    2004-12-01

    Angiogenesis is a biological process by which new capillaries are formed from preexisting vessels. It occurs in physiological and pathological conditions, such as tumors, where a specific turning point is the transition from the avascular to the vascular phase. Tumor angiogenesis depends mainly on the release by neoplastic cells of growth factors specific for endothelial cells able to stimulate the growth of the host's blood vessels. In neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor of infancy and childhood, angiogenesis also appears to play an important role in determining tumor phenotype. The nature of the angiogenic balance in neuroblastoma is complex, and a spectrum of angiogenesis stimulators, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and inhibitors, such as tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), have been detected in neuroblastoma tumors. Moreover, an increased production of MMP-2 and -9 has been also observed in advanced stages of tumor, favoring degradation of extracellular matrix and enhancing tumor dissemination. High tumor vascularity is correlated with widely disseminated disease, MYCN amplification, unfavorable histology, and poor outcome. In contrast, low tumor vascularity is associated with prognostically favorable features, such as a localized disease and favorable histology. It is becoming increasingly evident that agents that interfere with blood vessel formation also block tumor progression. Preclinical studies suggest that antiangiogenic strategies may be effective in the treatment of neuroblastoma. A major goal is the determination of whether inhibition of angiogenesis is a realistic way of inhibiting tumor cell dissemination and formation of metastasis in neuroblastoma.

  12. In vivo monitoring of angiogenesis within Matrigel chambers using MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, David Alberg; Ley, Carsten Dan; Simonsen, Helle Juhl

    Angiogenesis is a critical process in tumour de- velopment and presents an important target for the development of a range of anti-cancer agents1,2. To assess the in vivo efficacy of these ‘angiotherapeutics’, a sim ple and reproducible in vivo model would be of significant value. Here we show.......of angiogenesis and arteriogene- sis....

  13. Radionuclide imaging of tumor angiogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, I.; Boerman, O.C.

    2009-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a multistep process regulated by pro- and antiangiogenic factors. In order to grow and metastasize, tumors need a constant supply of oxygen and nutrients. For growth beyond 1-2 mm in size, tumors are dependent on angiogenesis. Inhibition of angiogenesis is a new cancer treatment

  14. Mucosal vaccine design and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodrow, Kim A; Bennett, Kaila M; Lo, David D

    2012-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces are a major portal of entry for many human pathogens that are the cause of infectious diseases worldwide. Vaccines capable of eliciting mucosal immune responses can fortify defenses at mucosal front lines and protect against infection. However, most licensed vaccines are administered parenterally and fail to elicit protective mucosal immunity. Immunization by mucosal routes may be more effective at inducing protective immunity against mucosal pathogens at their sites of entry. Recent advances in our understanding of mucosal immunity and identification of correlates of protective immunity against specific mucosal pathogens have renewed interest in the development of mucosal vaccines. Efforts have focused on efficient delivery of vaccine antigens to mucosal sites that facilitate uptake by local antigen-presenting cells to generate protective mucosal immune responses. Discovery of safe and effective mucosal adjuvants are also being sought to enhance the magnitude and quality of the protective immune response.

  15. Isolated mucosal Leishmaniasis

    OpenAIRE

    Deepak Sundriyal; Naveen Kumar; Raj Kumar; Brijesh Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a term used to define a group of clinical syndrome caused by various species of parasite Leishmania. Three main clinical types of leishmaniasis are visceral leishmaniasis, cutaneous leishmaniasis and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis. However, isolated presentation as mucosal disease is rare. We report a case of primarily mucosal leishmaniasis.

  16. Vascular grading of angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S; Grabau, D A; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2000-01-01

    years and 4 months. The microvessels were immunohistochemically stained by antibodies against CD34. Angiogenesis was graded semiquantitatively by subjective scoring into three groups according to the expected number of microvessels in the most vascular tumour area. The vascular grading between observers...

  17. How phototherapy affects angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Mary

    2007-02-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for normal growth, tissue repair and regeneration. Its stimulation accelerates repair and regeneration including wound healing where these processes are delayed. Its inhibition can reduce the rate of growth of solid tumors. Phototherapy can accelerate the resolution of acute inflammation with the result that the proliferative phase of tissue repair, when angiogenesis occurs, begins earlier than in sham-irradiated controls. Evidence that angiogenesis is enhanced in dermal repair, tendon repair and bone regeneration in rodents is presented. The cellular mechanisms that control angiogenesis involve the interaction of endothelial cells, macrophages, pericytes and other cells in response, for example, to changes in the availability of oxygen in the local environment. Pericytes and macrophages modulate endothelial cell proliferation; pericytes guide endothelial cell migration. The stimulation of endothelial cell proliferation in vitro following exposure to red (660 nm) and infrared (820 nm) radiation, 15 mW, at 2-8 J/cm2 is presented. 1J/cm2 was ineffective. 820 nm irradiation, 15 mW, at 8 J/cm2 was observed to inhibit pericyte proliferation in vitro. Indirect effects on endothelial cell and pericyte proliferation followed stimulation of soluble mediator production by macrophages following exposure to red and infrared radiation. The potential clinical significance of the results obtained is discussed and the necessity of clinical trials emphasized.

  18. Radiation induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Satheesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene

  19. Assessment of the hamster cheek pouch as a model for radiation-induced oral mucositis, and evaluation of the protective effects of keratinocyte growth factor using this model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shinichi; Suemaru, Katsuya; Nakanishi, Miki; Nakajima, Noriko; Tanaka, Mamoru; Tanaka, Akihiro; Araki, Hiroaki

    2014-10-01

    Oral mucositis induced by radiotherapy impacts quality of life. Previous studies have reported on the use of the hamster as a model for radiation-induced oral mucositis; however, details regarding factors such as radiation dose response, effects on myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and related histopathological changes remain unclear. In the present study using the hamster, we evaluated the dose dependency of radiation-induced oral mucositis and the effects of keratinocyte growth factor (palifermin). Oral mucositis was induced in the cheek pouch by X-irradiation using single doses in the range 20-50 Gy. To evaluate the protective effect of palifermin, administration was carried out (5 mg/kg) on days 1, 2 and 3 or on days 9, 10 and 11 after single irradiation at a dose of 40 Gy. The oral mucositis score, MPO activity and histopathological findings of inflammation increased in a dose dependent manner. Palifermin treatment stimulated the proliferation of mucosal epithelial cells. Additionally, palifermin when administered on days 1, 2 and 3 after irradiation (40 Gy) reduced the severity of oral mucositis. The hamster was found to be a suitable model for radiation-induced oral mucositis, with excellent results regarding the evaluation of radiation dose response and drug reactivity.

  20. Molecular Imaging System for Monitoring Tumor Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytac, Esra; Burcin Unlu, Mehmet

    2012-02-01

    In cancer, non-invasive imaging techniques that monitor molecular processes associated with the tumor angiogenesis could have a central role in the evaluation of novel antiangiogenic and proangiogenic therapies as well as early detection of the disease. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) can serve as specific biological targets for imaging of angiogenesis since expression of MMPs is required for angiogenesis and has been found to be upregulated in every type of human cancer and correlates with stage, invasive, metastatic properties and poor prognosis. However, for most cancers it is still unknown when, where and how MMPs are involved in the tumor angiogenesis [1]. Development of high-resolution, high sensitivity imaging techniques in parallel with the tumor models could prove invaluable for assessing the physical location and the time frame of MMP enzymatic acitivity. The goal of this study is to understand where, when and how MMPs are involved in the tumor angiogenesis. We will accomplish this goal by following two objectives: to develop a high sensitivity, high resolution molecular imaging system, to develop a virtual tumor simulator that can predict the physical location and the time frame of the MMP activity. In order to achieve our objectives, we will first develop a PAM system and develop a mathematical tumor model in which the quantitative data obtained from the PAM can be integrated. So, this work will develop a virtual tumor simulator and a molecular imaging system for monitoring tumor angiogenesis. 1.Kessenbrock, K., V. Plaks, and Z. Werb, MMP:regulators of the tumor microenvironment. Cell, 2010. 141(1)

  1. Measurement of mucosal conductivity by MII is a potential marker of mucosal integrity restored in infants on acid-suppression therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loots, Clara M.; van Wijk, Michiel P.; Smits, Marije J.; Wenzl, Tobias G.; Benninga, Marc A.; Omari, Taher I.

    2011-01-01

    Esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) allows measurement of the conductivity of adjacent contents. During esophageal rest, raw impedance levels may represent mucosal integrity. We assessed the influence of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) on presumed mucosal integrity by reanalyzing raw

  2. Vascular grading of angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S; Grabau, D A; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2000-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of angiogenesis by vascular grading of primary breast tumours, and to evaluate the prognostic impact of adding the vascular grade to the Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI). The investigation included 836 patients. The median follow-up time was 11...... years and 4 months. The microvessels were immunohistochemically stained by antibodies against CD34. Angiogenesis was graded semiquantitatively by subjective scoring into three groups according to the expected number of microvessels in the most vascular tumour area. The vascular grading between observers...... was moderately reproduced (kappa = 0.59). Vascular grade was significantly associated with axillary node involvement, tumour size, malignancy grade, oestrogen receptor status and histological type. In univariate analyses vascular grade significantly predicted recurrence free survival and overall survival for all...

  3. Perlecan and tumor angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Xinnong; Couchman, John R

    2003-01-01

    Perlecan is a major heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) of basement membranes (BMs) and connective tissues. The core protein of perlecan is divided into five domains based on sequence homology to other known proteins. Commonly, the N-terminal domain I of mammalian perlecan is substituted with thr...... have unwanted promoting effects on tumor cell proliferation and tumor angiogenesis. Understanding of these attributes at the molecular level may offer opportunities for therapeutic intervention....

  4. Angiogenesis in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyo Nishida

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Naoyo Nishida1,2, Hirohisa Yano1, Takashi Nishida3, Toshiharu Kamura2, Masamichi Kojiro1Departments of 1Pathology and 2Obstetrics and Gynecology and Research Center of Innovative Cancer Therapy of the 21 Century COE Program for Medical Science, Kurume University School of Medicine, Fukuoka, Japan; 3Hita Saiseikai Hospital, Oita, JapanAbstract: New growth in the vascular network is important since the proliferation, as well as metastatic spread, of cancer cells depends on an adequate supply of oxygen and nutrients and the removal of waste products. New blood and lymphatic vessels form through processes called angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, respectively. Angiogenesis is regulated by both activator and inhibitor molecules. More than a dozen different proteins have been identified as angiogenic activators and inhibitors. Levels of expression of angiogenic factors reflect the aggressiveness of tumor cells. The discovery of angiogenic inhibitors should help to reduce both morbidity and mortality from carcinomas. Thousands of patients have received antiangiogenic therapy to date. Despite their theoretical efficacy, antiangiogeic treatments have not proved beneficial in terms of long-term survival. There is an urgent need for a new comprehensive treatment strategy combining antiangiogenic agents with onventional cytoreductive treatments in the control of cancer.Keywords: angiogenesis, immunohistochemistry, prognosis

  5. Nasal mucosal biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biopsy - nasal mucosa; Nose biopsy ... to fast for a few hours before the biopsy. ... Nasal mucosal biopsy is most often done when abnormal tissue is seen during examination of the nose. It may also be ...

  6. Mucosal Lactobacillus vectored vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qinghua; Zhu, Liqi; Kang, Haihong; Yang, Qian

    2013-04-01

    Traditional non-gastrointestinal vaccines can prevent effectively the invasion of pathogens; however, these vaccines are less effective against mucosal infections because there is not a sufficient immune response at the mucosa. Most pathogens invade via a mucosal pathway (oral, intranasal, or vaginal). It is widely accepted that Lactobacillus species play a critical role as commensals in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Their ability to survive in the digestive tract, their close association with the intestinal epithelium, their immunomodulatory properties and their safety even when consumed in large amounts make lactobacilli attractive candidates for live vehicles for the delivery of immunogens to the intestinal mucosa. The oral or intranasal administration of Lactobacillus-based vaccines is a promising method to control mucosal infection because these vaccines could induce strong humoral and cellular immune responses both in the blood and at mucosal sites.

  7. A method to assess target gene involvement in angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo using lentiviral vectors expressing shRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Blosser

    Full Text Available Current methods to study angiogenesis in cancer growth and development can be difficult and costly, requiring extensive use of in vivo methodologies. Here, we utilized an in vitro adipocyte derived stem cell and endothelial colony forming cell (ADSC/ECFC co-culture system to investigate the effect of lentiviral-driven shRNA knockdown of target genes compared to a non-targeting shRNA control on cord formation using High Content Imaging. Cord formation was significantly reduced following knockdown of the VEGF receptor VEGFR2 in VEGF-driven cord formation and the FGF receptor FGFR1 in basic FGF (bFGF-driven cord formation. In addition, cord formation was significantly reduced following knockdown of the transcription factor forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1, a protein with known positive effects on angiogenesis and blood vessel stabilization in VEGF- and bFGF-driven cord formation. Lentiviral shRNA also demonstrated utility for stable knockdown of VEGFR2 and FOXO1 in ECFCs, allowing for interrogation of protein knockdown effects on in vivo neoangiogenesis in a Matrigel plug assay. In addition to interrogating the effect of gene knockdown in endothelial cells, we utilized lentiviral shRNA to knockdown specificity protein 1 (SP1, a transcription factor involved in the expression of VEGF, in U-87 MG tumor cells to demonstrate the ability to analyze angiogenesis in vitro in a tumor-driven transwell cord formation system and in tumor angiogenesis in vivo. A significant reduction in tumor-driven cord formation, VEGF secretion, and in vivo tumor angiogenesis was observed upon SP1 knockdown. Therefore, evaluation of target gene knockdown effects in the in vitro co-culture cord formation assay in the ADSC/ECFC co-culture, ECFCs alone, and in tumor cells translated directly to in vivo results, indicating the in vitro method as a robust, cost-effective and efficient in vitro surrogate assay to investigate target gene involvement in endothelial or tumor cell

  8. [Tumoral angiogenesis: physiopathology, prognostic value and therapeutic perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, T; Chastre, E; Kotelevets, L; Vaillant, J C; Louvet, C; Balosso, J; Le Gall, E; Prévot, S; Gespach, C

    1998-12-01

    Angiogenesis activation plays a crucial role in tumoral growth and metastases dissemination. This review summarizes and analyzes current knowledge on molecular mechanisms related to angiogenesis and the prognostic value of its effectors. It also focuses on the therapeutical relevance of various drugs that might inhibit angiogenesic processes. Tumor angiogenesis involves complex interactions between tumoral, stromal, endothelial cells, fibroblasts and the extracellular matrix. Normal and malignant angiogenesis depends on the balance of proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors. Endothelial cells are activated by growth factors, such as Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), and proliferate; they release proteases able to induce degradation of the basement membrane and extracellular matrix, and undergo migration and tubulogenesis. Angiostatin and endostatin are two powerful inhibitors of angiogenesis in experimental models. Assessment of intratumoral microvessel density and quantification of angiogenic factors, including VEGF, are of prognostic value in most cancers, particularly in breast cancer. However, the use of these prognosis markers in clinical practice is still controversial due to the lack of prospective studies and to technical limits inherent to the scoring and standardization of immunohistochemical methods. Better understanding of the molecular basis of angiogenesis allows the development of new therapeutical strategies. Biochemical targets of antiangiogenic therapy are: the interaction between angiogenic factors and their receptors; the interaction of endothelial cells with the extracellular matrix; and intracellular signaling pathways. Angiogenesis inhibitors may not cause tumor regression, but inhibit cellular growth and produce "disease dormancy". Extensive phase I to III clinical trials involving antiangiogenesis therapy are in progress.

  9. Advances in mucosal vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeusen, Els N T; Scheerlinck, Jean-Pierre Y; Wattegedera, Sean; Entrican, Gary

    2004-12-01

    Pathogens that enter the body via mucosal surfaces face unique defense mechanisms that combine the innate barrier provided by the mucus layer with an adaptive response typified by the production and transepithelial secretion of pathogen-specific IgA. Both the measurement and induction of mucosal responses pose significant challenges for experimental and practical application and may need to be adapted to the species under study. In particular, for livestock, immunization procedures developed in small rodent models are not always effective in large animals or compatible with management practices. This paper reviews the latest advances in our understanding of the processes that lead to secretory IgA responses and how this relates to the development of mucosal immunization procedures and adjuvants for veterinary vaccines. In addition, it highlights the complex interactions that can take place between the pathogen and the host's immune response, with specific reference to Chlamydia/Chlamydophila infections in sheep.

  10. Targeting Angiogenesis in Childhood Sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant K. Bid

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis and vasculogenesis constitute two processes in the formation of new blood vessels and are essential for progression of solid tumors. Consequently, targeting angiogenesis, and to a lesser extent vasculogenesis, has become a major focus in cancer drug development. Angiogenesis inhibitors are now being tested in pediatric populations whereas inhibitors of vasculogenesis are in an earlier stage of development. Despite the initial enthusiasm for targeting angiogenesis for treatment of cancer, clinical trials have shown only incremental increases in survival, and agents have been largely cytostatic rather than inducing tumor regressions. Consequently, the role of such therapeutic approaches in the context of curative intent for childhood sarcomas is less clear. Here we review the literature on blood vessel formation in sarcomas with a focus on pediatric sarcomas and developments in targeting angiogenesis for treatment of these rare cancers.

  11. Oral mucositis prevention and management by therapeutic laser in head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekrazad, Reza; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2014-01-01

    Oral mucositis is considered a severe complication in cancer patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy for head and neck cancer. The aim of this review study was to assess the effect of low level laser therapy for prevention and management of oral mucositis in cancer patients. The electronic databases searched included Pubmed, ISI Web of Knowledge and Google scholar with keywords as "oral mucositis", "low level laser therapy" from 2000 to 2013. The results of most studies showed that photobiomodulation (PBM) reduced the severity of mucositis. Also, it can delay the appearance of severe mucositis. Low level laser therapy is a safe approach for management and prevention of oral mucositis.

  12. Vaccines against mucosal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, Jan; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2012-06-01

    There remains a great need to develop vaccines against many of the pathogens that infect mucosal tissues or have a mucosal port of entry. Parenteral vaccination may protect in some instances, but usually a mucosal vaccination route is necessary. Mucosal vaccines also have logistic advantages over injectable vaccines by being easier to administer, having less risk of transmitting infections and potentially being easier to manufacture. Still, however, only relatively few vaccines for human use are available: oral vaccines against cholera, typhoid, polio, and rotavirus, and a nasal vaccine against influenza. For polio, typhoid and influenza, in which the pathogens reach the blood stream, there is also an injectable vaccine alternative. A problem with available oral live vaccines is their reduced immunogenicity when used in developing countries; for instance, the efficacy of rotavirus vaccines correlates closely with the national per capita income. Research is needed to define the impact of factors such as malnutrition, aberrant intestinal microflora, concomitant infections, and preexisting immunity as well as of host genetic factors on the immunogenicity of these vaccines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mucosal vaccination of fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rombout, J.H.W.M.; Kiron, V.

    2014-01-01

    Among the novel vaccination methods, mucosal vaccination seems to possess all the desired criteria. The chapter reviews the state-of-the-art knowledge regarding this type of vaccination with a focus on their uptake, immune stimulation, and where possible, discusses their potential as future

  14. Diabetes and Wound Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzoagu A. Okonkwo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes Mellitus Type II (DM2 is a growing international health concern with no end in sight. Complications of DM2 involve a myriad of comorbidities including the serious complications of poor wound healing, chronic ulceration, and resultant limb amputation. In skin wound healing, which has definite, orderly phases, diabetes leads to improper function at all stages. While the etiology of chronic, non-healing diabetic wounds is multi-faceted, the progression to a non-healing phenotype is closely linked to poor vascular networks. This review focuses on diabetic wound healing, paying special attention to the aberrations that have been described in the proliferative, remodeling, and maturation phases of wound angiogenesis. Additionally, this review considers therapeutics that may offer promise to better wound healing outcomes.

  15. Angiogenesis and Endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza L. Rocha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive review was performed to survey the role of angiogenesis in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. This is a multifactorial disease in which the development and maintenance of endometriotic implants depend on their invasive capacity and angiogenic potential. The peritoneal fluid of patients with endometriosis is a complex suspension carrying inflammatory cytokines, growth factors, steroid hormones, proangiogenic factors, macrophages, and endometrial and red blood cells. These cells and their signaling products concur to promote the spreading of new blood vessels at the endometriotic lesions and surroundings, which contributes to the endometriotic implant survival. Experimental studies of several antiangiogenic agents demonstrated the regression of endometriotic lesions by reducing their blood supply. Further studies are necessary before these novel agents can be introduced into clinical practice, in particular the establishment of the safety of anti-angiogenic medications in women who are seeking to become pregnant.

  16. Angiogenesis Inhibitors in NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Manzo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is a complex biological process that plays a relevant role in sustaining the microenvironment, growth, and metastatic potential of several tumors, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Bevacizumab was the first angiogenesis inhibitor approved for the treatment of patients with advanced NSCLC in combination with chemotherapy; however, it was limited to patients with non-squamous histology and first-line setting. Approval was based on the results of two phase III trials (ECOG4599 and AVAIL that demonstrated an improvement of about two months in progression-free survival (PFS in both trials, and in the ECOG4599 trial, an improvement in overall survival (OS also. Afterwards, other antiangiogenic agents, including sunitinib, sorafenib, and vandetanib have been unsuccessfully tested in first and successive lines. Recently, two new antiangiogenic agents (ramucirumab and nintedanib produced a significant survival benefit in second-line setting. In the REVEL study, ramucirumab plus docetaxel prolonged the median OS of patients with any histology NSCLC when compared with docetaxel alone (10.4 versus 9.1 months, hazard ratio (HR 0.857, p = 0.0235. In the LUME-Lung 1 study, nintedanib plus docetaxel prolonged the median PFS of patients with any tumor histology (p = 0.0019, and improved OS (12.6 versus 10.3 months in patients with adenocarcinoma. As a result, it became a new option for the second-line treatment of patients with advanced NSCLC and adenocarcinoma histology. Identifying predictive biomarkers to optimize the benefit of antiangiogenic drugs remains an ongoing challenge.

  17. Perspectives on mucosal vaccines: is mucosal tolerance a barrier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestecky, Jiri; Russell, Michael W; Elson, Charles O

    2007-11-01

    Mucosal administration of Ags induces specific Abs in external secretions and systemic unresponsiveness termed oral or mucosal tolerance. The dominant response depends on the species studied, the nature, dose, frequency, route of Ag application, and the use of adjuvants. The temporal sequence of Ag exposure determines the quality of the ensuing immune response; although initial mucosal Ag exposure results in systemic T cell hyporesponsiveness, pre-existing systemic responses are refractory to the tolerizing effects of mucosal Ag encounter. Mucosal and systemic humoral responses may be induced concomitantly with diminished systemic T cell responses, thereby permitting Ab-mediated containment of mucosal Ags without stimulation of the systemic immune compartment. B cell Ig isotype switching and differentiation toward IgA production share common regulatory mechanisms with the suppression of T cells. Optimization of mucosal vaccination strategies has the potential for enhancing protective immune responses and suppressing systemic responses to autoantigens desirable for the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  18. Dobesilate is an angiogenesis inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Pedro; Sanchez, I; Lozano, R M; Gimenez-Gallego, G

    2005-09-12

    Aberrant angiogenesis is essential for the progression of solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Antiangiogenic therapy is one of the most promising approaches to treat such diseases. Dobesilate is an oral agent for treatment of vascular complications of diabetic retinopathy. We have examined the possibility that this compound could interfere with the process of angiogenesis in a mouse gelatine sponge assay using acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) as an inducer of neovascularization. According to the results reported here, dobesilate remarkably reduced vessel ingrowth in aFGF-containing subcutaneous sponges in mice. These findings suggest that dobesilate could be an effective agent in the treatment of angiogenesis-dependent diseases involving FGFs.

  19. Anti-angiogenesis in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2013-06-01

    The nature of the angiogenic balance in neuroblastoma is complex, and a spectrum of angiogenesis stimulators and inhibitors have been detected in neuroblastoma tumours. The complex relationships between angiogenic cascade and anti-angiogenic agents in the tumour vascular phase have indicated that anti-angiogenesis can be considered as a strategy for the adjuvant therapy of neuroblastoma. The major goal is to establish if inhibition of angiogenesis is a realistic therapeutic strategy for inhibiting tumour cell dissemination and the formation of metastasis in neuroblastoma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Voice disorders in mucosal leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Nunes Ruas

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Leishmaniasis is considered as one of the six most important infectious diseases because of its high detection coefficient and ability to produce deformities. In most cases, mucosal leishmaniasis (ML occurs as a consequence of cutaneous leishmaniasis. If left untreated, mucosal lesions can leave sequelae, interfering in the swallowing, breathing, voice and speech processes and requiring rehabilitation. OBJECTIVE: To describe the anatomical characteristics and voice quality of ML patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A descriptive transversal study was conducted in a cohort of ML patients treated at the Laboratory for Leishmaniasis Surveillance of the Evandro Chagas National Institute of Infectious Diseases-Fiocruz, between 2010 and 2013. The patients were submitted to otorhinolaryngologic clinical examination by endoscopy of the upper airways and digestive tract and to speech-language assessment through directed anamnesis, auditory perception, phonation times and vocal acoustic analysis. The variables of interest were epidemiologic (sex and age and clinic (lesion location, associated symptoms and voice quality. RESULTS: 26 patients under ML treatment and monitored by speech therapists were studied. 21 (81% were male and five (19% female, with ages ranging from 15 to 78 years (54.5+15.0 years. The lesions were distributed in the following structures 88.5% nasal, 38.5% oral, 34.6% pharyngeal and 19.2% laryngeal, with some patients presenting lesions in more than one anatomic site. The main complaint was nasal obstruction (73.1%, followed by dysphonia (38.5%, odynophagia (30.8% and dysphagia (26.9%. 23 patients (84.6% presented voice quality perturbations. Dysphonia was significantly associated to lesions in the larynx, pharynx and oral cavity. CONCLUSION: We observed that vocal quality perturbations are frequent in patients with mucosal leishmaniasis, even without laryngeal lesions; they are probably associated to disorders of some

  1. Angiogenesis and Its Therapeutic Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Yoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis plays critical roles in human physiology that range from reproduction and fetal growth to wound healing and tissue repair. The sophisticated multistep process is tightly regulated in a spatial and temporal manner by “on-off switch signals” between angiogenic factors, extracellular matrix components, and endothelial cells. Uncontrolled angiogenesis may lead to several angiogenic disorders, including vascular insufficiency (myocardial or critical limb ischemia and vascular overgrowth (hemangiomas, vascularized tumors, and retinopathies. Thus, numerous therapeutic opportunities can be envisaged through the successful understanding and subsequent manipulation of angiogenesis. Here, we review the clinical implications of angiogenesis and discuss pro- and antiangiogenic agents that offer potential therapy for cancer and other angiogenic diseases.

  2. Natural products against cancer angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, El Bairi; Ayman, El-Meghawry El-Kenawy; Rahman, Heshu; Abdelkarim, Guaadaoui; Najda, Agnieszka

    2016-11-01

    The process of angiogenesis is quite well-known nowadays. Some medicines and extracts affecting this process are already used routinely in supporting the conventional treatment of many diseases that are considered angiogenic such as cancer. However, we must be aware that the area of currently used drugs of this type is much narrower than the theoretical possibilities existing in therapeutic angiogenesis. Plant substances are a large and diverse group of compounds that are found naturally in fruits, vegetables, spices, and medicinal plants. They also have different anticancer properties. The aim of this literature review article is to present the current state of knowledge concerning the molecular targets of tumor angiogenesis and the active substances (polyphenols, alkaloids, phytohormones, carbohydrates, and terpenes) derived from natural sources, whose activity against cancer angiogenesis has been confirmed.

  3. Angiogenesis, Cancer, and Vascular Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Junji Moriya; Tohru Minamino

    2017-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have revealed that the angiogenic response to ischemic injury declines with age, which might account for the increased morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular disease (CVD) among the elderly. While impairment of angiogenesis with aging leads to delayed wound healing or exacerbation of atherosclerotic ischemic diseases, it also inhibits the progression of cancer. Age-related changes of angiogenesis have been considered to at least partly result from vascular aging o...

  4. Dobesilate is an angiogenesis inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Cuevas, P.; Sánchez, I.; Lozano, R.M.; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo

    2005-01-01

    Aberrant angiogenesis is essential for the progression of solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Antiangiogenic therapy is one of the most promising approaches to treat such diseases. Dobesilate is an oral agent for treatment of vascular complications of diabetic retinopathy. We have examined the possibility that this compound could interfere with the process of angiogenesis in a mouse gelatine sponge assay using acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) as an inducer of neovascularization...

  5. Mucosal immunology and probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongarrà, Maria Luisa; Rizzello, Valeria; Muccio, Letizia; Fries, Walter; Cascio, Antonio; Bonaccorsi, Irene; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2013-02-01

    The cross-talk between the mucosa-associated immune system and microbiota is critical in mucosal tissue homeostasis as well as in protection against infectious and inflammatory diseases occurring at mucosal sites. This recent evidence has paved the way to therapeutic approaches aimed at modulating the mucosa-associated immune system using probiotics. Different strains of probiotics possess the ability to finely regulate dendritic cell (DC) activation, polarizing the subsequent T cell activity toward Th1 (e.g. Lactobacillus (Lb) acidophilus), Th2 (Lb.reuteri and Bifidobacterium bifidum) or, as more recently demonstrated, Th17 responses induced by specific strains such as Lb.rhamnosus GG and Lac23a, the latter isolated in our laboratory. Here, we review some recent advances in our understanding of probiotics effects on mucosal immunology, particularly on cells of the innate immunity such as DCs. We also highlight our own experiences in modulating DC functions by commensal bacteria and discuss the relevance of probiotics administration in the treatment of human immunopathologies.

  6. Upregulation of angiogenesis in oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hassiny, A; Friedlander, L T; Parachuru, V Pb; Seo, B; M Hussaini, H; Rich, A M

    2017-11-24

    Since angiogenesis is fundamental to the pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory disorders this study investigated the expression of various vascular markers in oral lichen planus and non-specific oral mucosal inflammatory tissues. Archival specimens of oral lichen planus (n=15) and inflamed tissues (n=13) were stained using immunohistochemistry with antibodies to CD34, vascular endothelial growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and vasohibin. Nine representative sites at the epithelial-connective tissue junction and through the fibrous connective tissue were selected and automated analysis techniques were used to determine the extent of positivity expressed as the percentage of positive cells. Significance was denoted when plichen planus samples compared with inflamed controls. A higher level of CD34 was observed in the deeper parts of the connective tissue of OLP (p=0.04), whereas VEGF and VEGFR2 expression was higher all through the tissues (respectively plichen planus in all sites evaluated (plichen planus compared with inflamed controls, with increased expression of pro-angiogenic factors and decreased anti-angiogenic expression. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Gastric angiogenesis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Pousa

    Full Text Available The formation of new blood vessels seen in conditions commonly associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection, including gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma, prompts consideration of a potential relationship between mucosal colonization by this organism and the angiogenic process. H. pylori directly or indirectly damages endothelial cells, which induces a number of changes in the microvasculature of the gastric mucosa. In H. pylori-associated conditions, that is, in gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma, there is an increased concentration of angiogenic factors, and subsequently a formation of new blood vessels. However, this early angiogenesis -which is activated to repair the gastric mucosa- is subsequently inhibited in patients with peptic ulcer, and ulcer healing is thus delayed. This may be due to the antiproliferative action of this organism on endothelial cells. While the angiogenic process becomes inhibited in infected patients with peptic ulcer, it remains seemingly active in those with gastritis or gastric cancer. This fact is in support of the notion suggested by various studies that peptic ulcer and gastric cancer are mutually excluding conditions. In the case of gastric cancer, neoangiogenesis would enhance nutrient and oxygen supply to cancer cells, and thus tumor growth and metastatic spread.

  8. Image-enhanced bronchoscopic evaluation of bronchial mucosal microvasculature in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathy, Eman Mahmoud; Shafiek, Hanaa; Morsi, Tamer S; El Sabaa, Bassma; Elnekidy, Abdelaziz; Elhoffy, Mohamed; Atta, Mohamed Samy

    2016-01-01

    Bronchial vascular remodeling is an underresearched component of airway remodeling in COPD. Image-enhanced bronchoscopy may offer a less invasive method for studying bronchial microvasculature in COPD. To evaluate endobronchial mucosal vasculature and changes in COPD by image-enhanced i-scan3 bronchoscopy and correlate them pathologically by analyzing bronchial mucosal biopsies. This case-control study analyzed 29 COPD patients (41.4% Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease B [GOLD B] and 58.6% GOLD D) and ten healthy controls admitted at Alexandria Main University Hospital, Egypt. Combined high-definition white light bronchoscopy (HD WLB) with i-scan3 was used to evaluate endobronchial mucosal microvasculature. The vascularity was graded according to the level of mucosal red discoloration (ie, endobronchial erythema) from decreased discoloration to normal, mild, moderate, and severe increased red discoloration (G-1, G0, G+1, G+2, and G+3, respectively) and scored by three bronchoscopists independently. Bronchial mucosal biopsies were taken for microvascular density counting using anti-CD34 antibody as angiogenesis marker. Different grades of endobronchial erythema were observed across/within COPD patients using combined HD WLB + i-scan3, with significant agreement among scorers (P=0.031; median score of G+1 [G-1-G+2]) being higher in GOLD D (P=0.001). Endobronchial erythema significantly correlated with COPD duration, exacerbation frequency, and body mass index (Pmicrovasculature and surface changes in COPD, which may represent vasodilatation rather than angiogenesis.

  9. Mucosal immunology and virology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tyring, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    .... A third chapter focuses on the proximal end of the gastrointestinal tract (i.e. the oral cavity). The mucosal immunology and virology of the distal end of the gastrointestinal tract is covered in the chapter on the anogenital mucosa. Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) plays a role in protection against all viral (and other) infections except those that enter the body via a bite (e.g. yellow fever or dengue from a mosquito or rabies from a dog) or an injection or transfusion (e.g. HIV, Hepatitis B). ...

  10. Advances in anatomic, functional, and molecular imaging of angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Andrew R; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2008-04-01

    Angiogenesis is a fundamental process in various physiologic and pathologic processes. The ability to visualize and quantify angiogenesis will allow early diagnosis and monitoring for clinical determination of angiogenesis states before, during, and after adjuvant antiangiogenic and therapeutic angiogenesis treatments.

  11. Image-enhanced bronchoscopic evaluation of bronchial mucosal microvasculature in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathy EM

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Eman Mahmoud Fathy,1 Hanaa Shafiek,1 Tamer S Morsi,1,† Bassma El Sabaa,2 Abdelaziz Elnekidy,3 Mohamed Elhoffy,1 Mohamed Samy Atta1 1Chest Diseases Department, 2Pathology Department, 3Radiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt †Doctor Tamer Morsi passed away on August 15, 2014 Background: Bronchial vascular remodeling is an underresearched component of airway remodeling in COPD. Image-enhanced bronchoscopy may offer a less invasive method for studying bronchial microvasculature in COPD. Objectives: To evaluate endobronchial mucosal vasculature and changes in COPD by image-enhanced i-scan3 bronchoscopy and correlate them pathologically by analyzing bronchial mucosal biopsies. Methods: This case–control study analyzed 29 COPD patients (41.4% Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease B [GOLD B] and 58.6% GOLD D and ten healthy controls admitted at Alexandria Main University Hospital, Egypt. Combined high-definition white light bronchoscopy (HD WLB with i-scan3 was used to evaluate endobronchial mucosal microvasculature. The vascularity was graded according to the level of mucosal red discoloration (ie, endobronchial erythema from decreased discoloration to normal, mild, moderate, and severe increased red discoloration (G-1, G0, G+1, G+2, and G+3, respectively and scored by three bronchoscopists independently. Bronchial mucosal biopsies were taken for microvascular density counting using anti-CD34 antibody as angiogenesis marker. Results: Different grades of endobronchial erythema were observed across/within COPD patients using combined HD WLB + i-scan3, with significant agreement among scorers (P=0.031; median score of G+1 [G-1–G+2] being higher in GOLD D (P=0.001. Endobronchial erythema significantly correlated with COPD duration, exacerbation frequency, and body mass index (P<0.05. Angiogenesis was significantly decreased among COPD patients versus controls (10.6 [8–13.3] vs 14 [11

  12. Are tumours angiogenesis-dependent?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheul, H. M. W.; Voest, E. E.; Schlingemann, R. O.

    2004-01-01

    The final proof of principle that cancer patients can be effectively treated with angiogenesis inhibitors is eagerly awaited. Various preclinical in vivo experiments have proven that most tumours need new vessel formation in order to grow and to form metastases. First of all, tumours do not grow in

  13. [Radiation-induced mucositis of the aerodigestive tract: prevention and treatment. MASCC/ISOO mucositis group's recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensadoun, René-Jean; Le Page, Fabien; Darcourt, Vincent; Bensadoun, Francis; Ciais, Gaston; Rostom, Yousri A; Poissonnet, Gilles; Dassonville, Olivier; Demard, François

    2006-02-01

    Acute mucositis is the main intensity-limiting toxicity in the management of head and neck (H&N) and digestive track carcinomas with radiotherapy. New radiation modalities (hyperfractionation and/or acceleration) as well as combined modality regimens in this situation induce higher rates of acute toxicity. Hyperfractionation for example allows higher control rates, with few late toxicities, but it slightly increases acute mucositis. The addition of chemotherapy introduces systemic toxicity and can exacerbate local tissue reactions when used concurrently with radiation. Mucositis is recognized as the principal limiting factor to further treatment intensification. As local-regional control and overall survival are related to dose-intensity in this case, further research into the assessment, analysis, prevention and treatment of mucosal toxicity is not only crucial to the improvement in quality of life, but certainly to improved rates of disease control as well. Several topical and systemic treatments are directed to the decrease and the acceptance of this acute toxicity, but few have shown significant preventive effect. Improvement of technical aspects of H&N radiotherapy (3D conformal radiation, intensity-modulated radiotherapy) should have a major impact in the prevention of mucositis. The efficacy of low level laser therapy in the management of such a toxicity could hence yield important development of this method in the field of oncology. MASCC/ISOO mucositis group's recommendations for the management of acute radiation-induced mucositis are here summarized.

  14. New advances in mucosal vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Charani

    2014-10-01

    The ICI 2013 Mucosal Vaccine Workshop presentations covered a wide range of topics, these mainly fell into three categories: (i) Understanding the interactions of host and microbes, specifically commensal pathogens and improving the antigen uptake via the (microfold cells) M cells to induce effective IgA antibody immunity at the gut mucosa; (ii) effective plant-based vaccines and (iii) development of prophylactic and therapeutic mucosal-based vaccine strategies for virus infections such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), influenza and human papillomavirus (HPV) associated head and neck cancers. How to improve the efficacy of oral vaccines, novel intranasal mucosal adjuvants and a unique intra-cheek delivery method were also discussed. Presenters emphasized the differences associated with systemic and mucosal vaccination, specifically, how mucosal vaccines unlike systemic delivery can induce effective immunity at the first line of defence. Collectively, the workshop provided insights into recent developments in the mucosal vaccine research field, highlighting the complexities associated with designing safe and effective mucosal vaccines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. In vivo monitoring of angiogenesis within Matrigel chambers using MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, David; Ley, Carsten Dan; Søgaard, Lise Vejby

    2006-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a critical process in tumour development and presents an important target for the development of a range of anti-cancer agents . To assess the in vivo efficacy of these ‘angiotherapeutics', a simple and reproducible in vivo model would be of significant value. Here we show...

  16. Mucosal healing in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob Benedict; Coskun, Mehmet; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2013-01-01

    . With the introduction of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors for the treatment of UC, it has become increasingly evident that the disease course is influenced by whether or not the patient achieves mucosal healing. Thus, patients with mucosal healing have fewer flare-ups, a decreased risk of colectomy......, and a lower probability of developing colorectal cancer. Understanding the mechanisms of mucosal wound formation and wound healing in UC, and how they are affected therapeutically is therefore of importance for obtaining efficient treatment strategies holding the potential of changing the disease course of UC....... This review is focused on the pathophysiological mechanism of mucosal wound formation in UC as well as the known mechanisms of intestinal wound healing. Regarding the latter topic, pathways of both wound healing intrinsic to epithelial cells and the wound-healing mechanisms involving interaction between...

  17. Mucositis Grades and Yeast Species

    OpenAIRE

    Ognjenović, Marina; Milatić, Katja; Parat, Katica; KOVAČIĆ, IVAN; Ježina Bušelić, Marina A.; Božić, Joško

    2013-01-01

    Surgically treated patients with oral, head and neck cancer commonly develop mucositis during additional irradiation therapy. Oral mucosa inflammation other than irradiation is mostly caused by Candida albicans, yeast of Candida genus. This study evaluated possible connection between grades of oral mucositis and oral yeast profile in irradiated patients before, during and after irradiation. In 25 examined patients mucosits grades »0« to »2« before irradiation with 20% positive smears and o...

  18. Cutaneous and mucosal pain syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddappa K

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The cutaneous and mucosal pain syndromes are characterized by pain, burning sensation, numbness or paraesthesia of a particular part of the skin or mucosal surface without any visible signs. They are usually sensory disorders, sometimes with a great deal of psychologic overlay. In this article various conditions have been listed and are described. The possible causative mechanisms are discussed when they are applicable and the outline of their management is described.

  19. Mucosal vaccines for biodefense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantis, N J; Morici, L A; Roy, C J

    2012-01-01

    Bioterrorism is the deliberate release of biological toxins, pathogenic viruses, bacteria, parasites, or other infectious agents into the public sphere with the objective of causing panic, illness, and/or death on a local, regional, or possibly national scale. The list of potential biological agents compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is long and diverse. However, a trait common to virtually all the potential bioterrorism agents is the fact that they are likely to be disseminated by either aerosol or in food/water supplies with the intention of targeting the mucosal surfaces of the respiratory or gastrointestinal tracts, respectively. In some instances, inhalation or ingestion would mimic the natural route by which humans are exposed to these agents. In other instances, (e.g., the inhalation of a toxin is normally associated with food borne illness), it would represent an unnatural route of exposure. For most potential bioterrorism agents, the respiratory or gastrointestinal mucosa may simply serve as a route of entry by which they gain access to the systemic compartment where intoxication/replication occurs. For others, however, the respiratory or gastrointestinal mucosa is the primary tissue associated with pathogenesis, and therefore, the tissue for which countermeasures must be developed.

  20. Stimulating angiogenesis by hyperbaric oxygen in an isolated tissue construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Valerie; Herron, Margo S; Bueno, Reuben A; Chambers, Christopher B; Neumeister, Michael W

    2011-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) treatment has been shown to stimulate angiogenesis in prefabricated myocutaneous flaps. We conducted the current study to determine optimal HBO2 treatment intervals for peak angiogenesis. Lewis rats were implanted subcutaneously with silicone molds in the inguinal region. Molds contained inguinal fat, a vascular pedicle and Matrigel plug. Thirty-two animals were randomized into four groups: HBO2 Treatment (2.5 atm of 100% oxygen, 90 minutes, 2x/day)--Group 1 (seven days) or--Group 2 (14 days); and Control Treatment (room air at atmospheric pressure)--Group 1 (seven days) or--Group 2(14 days). Implants were harvested, processed for H&E staining, and imaged digitally; angiogenesis was assessed by grade of vascularization at the Matrigel/fat boundary. Intergroup grading differences were assessed statistically. Vascularization in seven-day HBO2-treated implants was significantly increased compared to seven-day controls (p = 0.008). Vascularization in 14-day HBO2-treated implants was significantly decreased compared to 14-day controls (p = 0.012). There was no significant difference between seven-day HBO-treated implants and 14-day controls (p > 0.05). Short-term HBO2 exposure appears to increase angiogenesis in isolated tissue constructs. Prolonged HBO2 exposure may lead to vascular pruning. Short-term HBO2 exposure appears to expedite the natural vascularization process, resulting in equivalent vascularization in a shorter time.

  1. Oral mucositis in children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pels, Elżbieta

    2012-01-01

    Oral mucositis is the most commonly reported side effect observed in neoplastic patients treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy of the head and neck region as well as in patients who have received a haematopoietic stem cell transplant. The aim of the study was to assess the oral mucosa status in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) during antineoplastic therapy. The clinical examination included 78 children aged 2-18 with ALL. The clinical examination was conducted using the dental preset tray. The condition of the oral mucosa was determined using the WHO scale for oral mucositis. In the first period of antineoplastic therapy the pathological lesions of the oral mucosa of the mucositis type were observed among the examined patients. The lesions had various levels of intensity. Pain was found to be the primary symptom of oral mucositis. In this study the following were observed: local erythema of the oral mucosa in 35%, white pseudomembranous lesions in 18%, erosions in 40% and oral ulcerative lesions in 4% of patients who underwent the antineoplastic therapy. Oral mucositis was observed in 3.17% of children after 6 months of chemotherapy. Local treatment of oral mucositis with polyantibiotic-antifungal mixture, supporting antifungal systemic treatment, and improving the overall peripheral blood conditions in children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia improve the condition of the oral mucosa.

  2. Angiogenesis and Anti-Angiogenic Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Demirer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Blood vessels in our body is developed by vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. There have been new advances in molecular pathology and tumor biology areas in recent years. Angiogenesis is modulated by the balance between angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors. Angiogenesis plays a key role in tumor growth. Drugs inhibiting angiogenesis have been in use in various malign or non-malign diseases. Inhibition of angiogenesis in malign diseases is a very attractive subject in medicine and studies are going on about long term affects and toxicities. Inhibition of angiogenesis is not an only treatment choice alone. It is a supplemental treatment option applied with conventional chemotherapy, radiotherapy, surgery, immunotherapy and hormonal therapy. It has been used in colorectal carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, non-small cell lung cancer, glioblastoma, heoatocellular carcinoma, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, tyroid medullary cancer.

  3. Angiogenesis in cutaneous disease: part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Amy; Hoang, Van; Laquer, Vivian; Kelly, Kristen M

    2009-12-01

    Angiogenesis is an important process in normal physiology and disease pathogenesis. Angiogenesis is controlled in a healthy body by a system of angiogenic growth factors and angiogenesis inhibitors. When angiogenic growth factors are predominantly expressed, blood vessel growth occurs and disease may result. Successful therapies have been developed that target growth factors, their receptors, or the cascade pathways that are activated by growth factor/receptor interactions. There is good evidence that angiogenesis plays an important role in a wide range of cutaneous maladies, and angiogenesis-targeting therapies are playing an increasing role in the management of dermatologic disease. Cutaneous angiogenesis offers an exciting new arena for targeted dermatologic therapeutics. After completing this learning activity, participants should be able to distinguish angiogenic growth factors and inhibitors, recognize angiogenic mediating agents and compare their mechanisms of action, and apply the use of angiogenic mediating agents in clinical and research situations.

  4. Role of angiogenesis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letilovic, Tomislav; Vrhovac, Radovan; Verstovsek, Srdan; Jaksic, Branimir; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2006-09-01

    Angiogenesis is a physiologic process of new blood vessels formation mediated by various cytokines called angiogenic and angiostatic factors. Although its potential pathophysiologic role in solid tumors has been extensively studied for more than 3 decades, enhancement of angiogenesis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and other malignant hematological disorders has been recognized more recently. An increased level of angiogenesis has been documented by various experimental methods both in bone marrow and lymph nodes of patients with CLL. Although the role of angiogenesis in the pathophysiology of this disease remains to be fully elucidated, experimental data suggest that several angiogenic factors play a role in the disease progression. Biologic markers of angiogenesis were also shown to be of prognostic relevance in CLL. The current findings provide the rationale for investigating antiangiogenic agents in CLL. In the current review angiogenesis in CLL is discussed and its potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  5. Risk analysis, diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal mucositis in pediatric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiken, Nicoline S S; Rings, Edmond H H M; Tissing, Wim J E

    2015-04-01

    Mucositis is a complex inflammatory reaction of the mucous membranes of the alimentary tract upon chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatment in oncology patients. Mucositis can be subdivided in oral and gastrointestinal mucositis (GI mucositis). The damage to the gastrointestinal tract compromises the intestinal function and thereby the nutritional status and the quality of life, and eventually affects survival. The literature on GI mucositis focuses mainly on adults. This review focuses on data available on GI mucositis in pediatric cancer patients. An evaluation of the clinical presentation and consequences of GI mucositis in children is outlined. The review summarizes key issues for clinicians with respect to risk analysis for developing mucositis and the diagnosis of this condition in children. Information on these issues is obtained from clinical trials in children and adults, and from animal models. Diagnostic tools and assessment of severity of GI mucositis in children is elaborated on. Furthermore, the clinical management of the symptoms and consequences of GI mucositis in children, with specific focus on nutritional support, are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Angiogenesis in cutaneous disease: Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Laquer, V; Hoang, V.; Nguyen, A; Kelly, KM

    2009-01-01

    This review will discuss the role of angiogenesis in specific cutaneous diseases. Scientific evidence now points to the role of angiogenesis in tumor development and many other cutaneous disorders. Angiogenesis is a complex process that involves angiogenic growth factors and inhibitors, many of which could be a potential target for pharmacologic intervention. Antiangiogenic agents have recently been applied to dermatologic diseases with promising efficacy. Learning objectives: After completin...

  7. Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in bronchial asthma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Detoraki, A; Granata, F; Staibano, S; Rossi, F. W; Marone, G; Genovese, A

    2010-01-01

    ... A. Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in bronchial asthma. Allergy 2010; 65: 946-958. Neovascularization plays a prominent role in inflammation and tissue remodeling in several chronic inflammatory disorders...

  8. A Critical Analysis of the Available In Vitro and Ex Vivo Methods to Study Retinal Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Moleiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is a biological process with a central role in retinal diseases. The choice of the ideal method to study angiogenesis, particularly in the retina, remains a problem. Angiogenesis can be assessed through in vitro and in vivo studies. In spite of inherent limitations, in vitro studies are faster, easier to perform and quantify, and typically less expensive and allow the study of isolated angiogenesis steps. We performed a systematic review of PubMed searching for original articles that applied in vitro or ex vivo angiogenic retinal assays until May 2017, presenting the available assays and discussing their applicability, advantages, and disadvantages. Most of the studies evaluated migration, proliferation, and tube formation of endothelial cells in response to inhibitory or stimulatory compounds. Other aspects of angiogenesis were studied by assessing cell permeability, adhesion, or apoptosis, as well as by implementing organotypic models of the retina. Emphasis is placed on how the methods are applied and how they can contribute to retinal angiogenesis comprehension. We also discuss how to choose the best cell culture to implement these methods. When applied together, in vitro and ex vivo studies constitute a powerful tool to improve retinal angiogenesis knowledge. This review provides support for researchers to better select the most suitable protocols in this field.

  9. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions among chewing tobacco users: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha S Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square and Fisher′s exact tests were used to assess the statistical significance. Results: Of the 901 subjects with CT habits, 55.8% revealed no clinically detectable oral mucosal changes and 44.1% showed mucosal changes of which 63.8% were males and 36.1% were females. The most common finding was chewers mucositis (59.5% followed by submucous fibrosis (22.8%, leukoplakia (8%, lichenoid reaction (6.5%, oral cancer (2.7%, and lichen planus (0.5%. Conclusion: This study provides information about different CT habits and associated mucosal lesions among this population.

  10. Proinflammatory mediators stimulate neutrophil-directed angiogenesis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCourt, M

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF; vascular permeability factor) is one of the most potent proangiogenic cytokines, and it plays a central role in mediating the process of angiogenesis or new blood vessel formation. Neutrophils (PMNs) recently have been shown to produce VEGF. HYPOTHESIS: The acute inflammatory response is a potent stimulus for PMN-directed angiogenesis. METHODS: Neutrophils were isolated from healthy volunteers and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and anti-human Fas monoclonal antibody. Culture supernatants were assayed for VEGF using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Culture supernatants from LPS- and TNF-alpha-stimulated PMNs were then added to human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human microvessel endothelial cells and assessed for endothelial cell proliferation using 5-bromodeoxyuridine labeling. Tubule formation was also assessed on MATRIGEL basement membrane matrix. Neutrophils were lysed to measure total VEGF release, and VEGF expression was detected using Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Lipopolysaccharide and TNF-alpha stimulation resulted in significantly increased release of PMN VEGF (532+\\/-49 and 484+\\/-80 pg\\/mL, respectively; for all, presented as mean +\\/- SEM) compared with control experiments (32+\\/-4 pg\\/mL). Interleukin 6 and Fas had no effect. Culture supernatants from LPS- and TNF-alpha-stimulated PMNs also resulted in significant increases (P<.005) in macrovascular and microvascular endothelial cell proliferation and tubule formation. Adding anti-human VEGF-neutralizing polyclonal antibody to stimulated PMN supernatant inhibited these effects. Total VEGF release following cell lysis and Western blot analysis suggests that the VEGF is released from an intracellular store. CONCLUSION: Activated human PMNs are directly angiogenic by releasing VEGF, and this has important implications for inflammation, capillary leak syndrome

  11. Endothelial progenitor cells physiology and metabolic plasticity in brain angiogenesis and blood-brain barrier modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Malinovskaya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is a considerable interest to the assessment of blood-brain barrier (BBB development as a part of cerebral angiogenesis developmental program. Embryonic and adult angiogenesis in the brain is governed by the coordinated activity of endothelial progenitor cells, brain microvascular endothelial cells, and non-endothelial cells contributing to the establishment of the BBB (pericytes, astrocytes, neurons. Metabolic and functional plasticity of endothelial progenitor cells controls their timely recruitment, precise homing to the brain microvessels, and efficient support of brain angiogenesis. Deciphering endothelial progenitor cells physiology would provide novel engineering approaches to establish adequate microfluidically-supported BBB models and brain microphysiological systems for translational studies.

  12. A randomized trial to assess anti-HIV activity in female genital tract secretions and soluble mucosal immunity following application of 1% tenofovir gel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marla J Keller

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical and early phase clinical microbicide studies have not consistently predicted the outcome of efficacy trials. To address this gap, candidate biomarkers of microbicide pharmacodynamics and safety were evaluated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of tenofovir gel, the first microbicide to demonstrate significant protection against HIV acquisition.30 women were randomized to apply a single daily dose of tenofovir or placebo gel for 14 consecutive days. Anti-HIV activity was measured in cervicovaginal lavage (CVL on Days 0, 3, 7, 14 and 21 by luciferase assay as a surrogate marker of pharmacodynamics. Endogenous activity against E. coli and HSV-2 and concentrations of immune mediators were quantified in CVL as candidate biomarkers of safety. Tenofovir levels were measured in CVL and blood.A significant increase in anti-HIV activity was detected in CVL from women who applied tenofovir gel compared to their endogenous anti-HIV activity in genital tract secretions on Day 0 and compared to activity in CVL from women in the placebo group. The activity correlated significantly with CVL concentration of tenofovir (r = 0.6, p<0.001 and fit a sigmoid E(max pharmacodynamic model. Anti-HIV activity in CVL from women who applied tenofovir persisted when virus was introduced in semen, whereas endogenous anti-HIV activity decreased. Tenofovir did not trigger an inflammatory response or induce sustained loss in endogenous antimicrobial activity or immune mediators.Tenofovir gel had no deleterious impact on soluble mucosal immunity. The increased anti-HIV activity in CVL, which persisted in the presence of semen and correlated with tenofovir concentration, is consistent with the efficacy observed in a recent clinical trial. These results promote quantified CVL anti-HIV activity as a surrogate of tissue pharmacodynamics and as a potential biomarker of adherence to product. This simple, feasible and inexpensive bioassay may promote the development

  13. Narrow band (light) imaging of oral mucosa in routine dental patients. Part I: Assessment of value in detection of mucosal changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truelove, Edmond L; Dean, David; Maltby, Samuel; Griffith, Matthew; Huggins, Kimberly; Griffith, Mickealla; Taylor, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the value of adding narrow band (light) imaging (NBI) to the standard oral soft tissue examination process used to detect mucosal change. A total of 620 dental patients who came to the clinic for regular dental evaluation or for treatment of acute dental problems were given a standard oral soft tissue examination by dental students under faculty supervision. The results of the white light examination were recorded after the tissues were examined with NBI, at which point areas with a loss of fluorescence (LOF) were recorded. The nature of the tissue change was classified clinically as normal variation, inflammatory, traumatic, dysplastic, or other, and patients were categorized depending on their clinical findings: normal, need follow-up visit, or immediate biopsy. Risk factors related to oral dysplasia also were recorded. The addition of NBI added between one and two minutes to the examination process. Of the 620 examinations, an area with an LOF suggestive of pathology was detected in 69 subjects (11.1%). After a second immediate evaluation, 28 of the 69 subjects were scheduled for follow-up or biopsy. None of the lesions discovered in these 28 subjects had been detected using standard (white light) examination. Adding NBI to the routine clinical examination resulted in detection of changes not seen with white light examination in 11.1% of patients; of these, a small but important number were found to have otherwise undetected persistent changes representing inflammatory lesions or potentially dangerous oral dysplasia. Adding NBI as an adjunctive diagnostic procedure improved the quality and outcome of the examination process.

  14. Islet organogenesis, angiogenesis and innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, Marlon E

    2011-11-01

    The pancreas is characterized by a major component, an exocrine and ductal system involved in digestion, and a minor component, the endocrine islets represented by islet micro-organs that tightly regulate glucose homoeostasis. Pancreatic organogenesis is strictly co-ordinated by transcription factors that are expressed sequentially to yield functional islets capable of maintaining glucose homoeostasis. Angiogenesis and innervation complete islet development, equipping islets to respond to metabolic demands. Proper regulation of this triad of processes during development is critical for establishing functional islets.

  15. Mucosal Immunization with Liposome-Nucleic Acid Adjuvants Generates Effective Humoral and Cellular Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Angela; Propst, Katie; Kedl, Ross; Dow, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Development of effective new mucosal vaccine adjuvants has become a priority with the increase in emerging viral and bacterial pathogens. We previously reported that cationic liposomes complexed with non-coding plasmid DNA (CLDC) were effective parenteral vaccine adjuvants. However, little is known regarding the ability of liposome-nucleic acid complexes to function as mucosal vaccine adjuvants, or the nature of the mucosal immune responses elicited by mucosal liposome-nucleic acid adjuvants. To address these questions, antibody and T cell responses were assessed in mice following intranasal immunization with CLDC-adjuvanted vaccines. The effects of CLDC adjuvant on antigen uptake, trafficking, and cytokine responses in the airways and draining lymph nodes were also assessed. We found that mucosal immunization with CLDC-adjuvanted vaccines effectively generated potent mucosal IgA antibody responses, as well as systemic IgG responses. Notably, mucosal immunization with CLDC adjuvant was very effective in generating strong and sustained antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in the airways of mice. Mucosal administration of CLDC vaccines also induced efficient uptake of antigen by DCs within the mediastinal lymph nodes. Finally, a killed bacterial vaccine adjuvanted with CLDC induced significant protection from lethal pulmonary challenge with Burkholderia pseudomallei. These findings suggest that liposome-nucleic acid adjuvants represent a promising new class of mucosal adjuvants for non-replicating vaccines, with notable efficiency at eliciting both humoral and cellular immune responses following intranasal administration. PMID:21600950

  16. Intra-laboratory validation of a human cell based in vitro angiogenesis assay for testing angiogenesis modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jertta-Riina Sarkanen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The developed standardized human cell based in vitro angiogenesis assay was intra-laboratory validated to verify that the method is reliable and relevant for routine testing of modulators of angiogenesis e.g. pharmaceuticals and industrial chemicals. This assay is based on the earlier published method but it was improved and shown to be more sensitive and rapid than the previous assay. The performance of the assay was assessed by using 6 reference chemicals, which are widely used pharmaceuticals that inhibit angiogenesis: acetyl salicylic acid, erlotinib, 2-methoxyestradiol, levamisole, thalidomide, and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor. In the intra-laboratory validation, the sensitivity of the assay (upper and lower limits of detection and linearity of response in tubule formation, batch to batch variation in tubule formation between different Master cell bank batches, and precision as well as the reliability of the assay (reproducibility and repeatability were tested. The pre-set acceptance criteria for the intra-laboratory validation study were met. The relevance of the assay in man was investigated by comparing the effects of reference chemicals and their concentrations to the published human data. The comparison showed a good concordance, which indicates that this human cell based angiogenesis model predicts well the effects in man and has the potential to be used to supplement and/or replace of animal tests.

  17. Mycoplasma pneumonia-associated mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Cyril; Sharain, Korosh; Skalski, Joseph; Ramar, Kannan

    2014-03-13

    We present a case of a young man with severe mucositis following an upper respiratory tract infection limited to the ophthalmic and oral mucosa while sparing the rest of the skin, genitalia and perianal regions. Investigations revealed that the mucositis was a rare extrapulmonary manifestation of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. He had progressive vision-threatening symptoms despite antibiotics and best supportive care and thus was treated with intravenous corticosteroids, immunoglobulins, temporary ocular amniotic membrane grafts and tarsorrhaphy. The patient made an almost complete recovery over 6 weeks.

  18. Role of angiogenesis in endodontics: contributions of stem cells and proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors to dental pulp regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Asatourian, Armen; Sorenson, Christine M; Sheibani, Nader

    2015-06-01

    Dental pulp regeneration is a part of regenerative endodontics, which includes isolation, propagation, and re-transplantation of stem cells inside the prepared root canal space. The formation of new blood vessels through angiogenesis is mandatory to increase the survival rate of re-transplanted tissues. Angiogenesis is defined as the formation of new blood vessels from preexisting capillaries, which has great importance in pulp regeneration and homeostasis. Here the contribution of human dental pulp stem cells and proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors to angiogenesis process and regeneration of dental pulp is reviewed. A search was performed on the role of angiogenesis in dental pulp regeneration from January 2005 through April 2014. The recent aspects of the relationship between angiogenesis, human dental pulp stem cells, and proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors in regeneration of dental pulp were assessed. Many studies have indicated an intimate relationship between angiogenesis and dental pulp regeneration. The contribution of stem cells and mechanical and chemical factors to dental pulp regeneration has been previously discussed. Angiogenesis is an indispensable process during dental pulp regeneration. The survival of inflamed vital pulp and engineered transplanted pulp tissue are closely linked to the process of angiogenesis at sites of application. However, the detailed regulatory mechanisms involved in initiation and progression of angiogenesis in pulp tissue require investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, David Alberg

    2008-01-01

    and the involved signaling molecules. Subsequently, a short review of contrast agents and perfusion measurements is given. Finally, methods for monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance imaging are reviewed. A method for monitoring early stages of angiogenesis as well as the effect of anti...

  20. Mucosal vaccines: where do we stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraehenbuhl, Jean-Pierre; Neutra, Marian R

    2013-01-01

    Mucosal vaccinology is a relatively young but rapidly expanding discipline. At present the vast majority of vaccines are administered by injection, including vaccines that protect against mucosally acquired pathogens such as influenza virus and human papilloma virus. However, mucosal immune responses are most efficiently induced by the administration of vaccines onto mucosal surfaces. The small number of currently licensed mucosal vaccines have reduced the burden of disease and mortality caused by enteric pathogens including rotavirus, V. cholerae and S. typhi, or those that spread to affect distal organs such as poliovirus. Expanding knowledge about the special features of the mucosal immune system promises to accelerate development of mucosal vaccines that could contribute significantly to protection against pathogens that colonize or invade via mucosal surfaces including HIV, Shigella, ETEC, Campylobacter jejuni, Helicobacter pylori and many others.

  1. Oral Mucositis Prevention and Management by Therapeutic Laser in Head and Neck Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Fekrazad, Reza; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Oral mucositis is considered a severe complication in cancer patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy for head and neck cancer. The aim of this review study was to assess the effect of low level laser therapy for prevention and management of oral mucositis in cancer patients.

  2. Mucosal delivery of vaccines in domestic animals

    OpenAIRE

    Gerdts, Volker; Mutwiri, George; Tikoo, Suresh; Babiuk, Lorne

    2006-01-01

    International audience; Mucosal vaccination is proving to be one of the greatest challenges in modern vaccine development. Although highly beneficial for achieving protective immunity, the induction of mucosal immunity, especially in the gastro-intestinal tract, still remains a difficult task. As a result, only very few mucosal vaccines are commercially available for domestic animals. Here, we critically review various strategies for mucosal delivery of vaccines in domestic animals. This incl...

  3. Immunology of Gut Mucosal Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasetti, Marcela F.; Simon, Jakub K.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Levine, Myron M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Understanding the mechanisms underlying the induction of immunity in the gastrointestinal mucosa following oral immunization and the cross-talk between mucosal and systemic immunity should expedite the development of vaccines to diminish the global burden caused by enteric pathogens. Identifying an immunological correlate of protection in the course of field trials of efficacy, animal models (when available), or human challenge studies is also invaluable. In industrialized country populations, live attenuated vaccines (e.g. polio, typhoid, and rotavirus) mimic natural infection and generate robust protective immune responses. In contrast, a major challenge is to understand and overcome the barriers responsible for the diminished immunogenicity and efficacy of the same enteric vaccines in underprivileged populations in developing countries. Success in developing vaccines against some enteric pathogens has heretofore been elusive (e.g. Shigella). Different types of oral vaccines can selectively or inclusively elicit mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A and serum immunoglobulin G antibodies and a variety of cell-mediated immune responses. Areas of research that require acceleration include interaction between the gut innate immune system and the stimulation of adaptive immunity, development of safe yet effective mucosal adjuvants, better understanding of homing to the mucosa of immunologically relevant cells, and elicitation of mucosal immunologic memory. This review dissects the immune responses elicited in humans by enteric vaccines. PMID:21198669

  4. Immunology of gut mucosal vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasetti, Marcela F; Simon, Jakub K; Sztein, Marcelo B; Levine, Myron M

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying the induction of immunity in the gastrointestinal mucosa following oral immunization and the cross-talk between mucosal and systemic immunity should expedite the development of vaccines to diminish the global burden caused by enteric pathogens. Identifying an immunological correlate of protection in the course of field trials of efficacy, animal models (when available), or human challenge studies is also invaluable. In industrialized country populations, live attenuated vaccines (e.g. polio, typhoid, and rotavirus) mimic natural infection and generate robust protective immune responses. In contrast, a major challenge is to understand and overcome the barriers responsible for the diminished immunogenicity and efficacy of the same enteric vaccines in underprivileged populations in developing countries. Success in developing vaccines against some enteric pathogens has heretofore been elusive (e.g. Shigella). Different types of oral vaccines can selectively or inclusively elicit mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A and serum immunoglobulin G antibodies and a variety of cell-mediated immune responses. Areas of research that require acceleration include interaction between the gut innate immune system and the stimulation of adaptive immunity, development of safe yet effective mucosal adjuvants, better understanding of homing to the mucosa of immunologically relevant cells, and elicitation of mucosal immunologic memory. This review dissects the immune responses elicited in humans by enteric vaccines. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Dendritic cell-targeting DNA-based mucosal adjuvants for the development of mucosal vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Kataoka, Kosuke; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2009-01-01

    In order to establish effective mucosal immunity against various mucosal pathogens, vaccines must be delivered via the mucosal route and contain effective adjuvant(s). Since mucosal adjuvants can simply mix with the antigen, it is relatively easy to adapt them for different types of vaccine development. Even in simple admixture vaccines, the adjuvant itself must be prepared without any complications. Thus, CpG oligodeoxynucleotides or plasmids encoding certain cDNA(s) would be potent mucosal ...

  6. Angiogenesis in the atherosclerotic plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Camaré

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a multifocal alteration of the vascular wall of medium and large arteries characterized by a local accumulation of cholesterol and non-resolving inflammation. Atherothrombotic complications are the leading cause of disability and mortality in western countries. Neovascularization in atherosclerotic lesions plays a major role in plaque growth and instability. The angiogenic process is mediated by classical angiogenic factors and by additional factors specific to atherosclerotic angiogenesis. In addition to its role in plaque progression, neovascularization may take part in plaque destabilization and thromboembolic events. Anti-angiogenic agents are effective to reduce atherosclerosis progression in various animal models. However, clinical trials with anti-angiogenic drugs, mainly anti-VEGF/VEGFR, used in anti-cancer therapy show cardiovascular adverse effects, and require additional investigations.

  7. Oral cryotherapy reduced oral mucositis in patients having cancer treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivakovsky, Sylvia

    2016-09-01

    Data sourcesCochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, CANCERLIT, CINAHL, the US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry and the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform.Study selectionRandomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of oral cryotherapy in patients with cancer receiving treatment compared to usual care, no treatment or other interventions to prevent mucositis. The primary outcome was incidence of mucositis and its severity.Data extraction and synthesisTwo reviewers carried out study assessment and data extraction independently. Treatment effect for continuous data was calculated using mean values and standard deviations and expressed as mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence interval. Risk ratio (RR) was calculated for dichotomous data. Meta-analysis was performed.ResultsFourteen studies with 1280 participants were included. Subgroup analysis was undertaken according to the main cancer treatment type. Cryotherapy reduced the risk of developing mucositis by 39% (RR = 0.61; 95%CI, 0.52 to 0.72) on patients treated with fluorouracil (5FU). For melphalan-based treatment the risk of developing mucositis was reduced by 41% (RR =0.59; 95%CI, 0.35 to 1.01). Oral cryotherapy was shown to be safe, with very low rates of minor adverse effects, such as headaches, chills, numbness/taste disturbance and tooth pain. This appears to contribute to the high rates of compliance seen in the included studies.ConclusionsThere is confidence that oral cryotherapy leads to a large reduction in oral mucositis in adults treated with 5FU. Although there is less certainty on the size of the reduction on patients treated with melphalan, it is certain there is reduction of severe mucositis.

  8. The Mucosal Immune System of Teleost Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Irene

    2015-08-12

    Teleost fish possess an adaptive immune system associated with each of their mucosal body surfaces. Evidence obtained from mucosal vaccination and mucosal infection studies reveal that adaptive immune responses take place at the different mucosal surfaces of teleost. The main mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT) of teleosts are the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), the gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT) and the recently discovered nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). Teleost MALT includes diffuse B cells and T cells with specific phenotypes different from their systemic counterparts that have co-evolved to defend the microbe-rich mucosal environment. Both B and T cells respond to mucosal infection or vaccination. Specific antibody responses can be measured in the gills, gut and skin mucosal secretions of teleost fish following mucosal infection or vaccination. Rainbow trout studies have shown that IgT antibodies and IgT(+) B cells are the predominant B cell subset in all MALT and respond in a compartmentalized manner to mucosal infection. Our current knowledge on adaptive immunity in teleosts is limited compared to the mammalian literature. New research tools and in vivo models are currently being developed in order to help reveal the great intricacy of teleost mucosal adaptive immunity and help improve mucosal vaccination protocols for use in aquaculture.

  9. Mechanical and Chemical Signaling in Angiogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This volume of Studies in Mechanobiology, Tissue Engineering and Biomaterials describes the most recent advances in angiogenesis research at all biological length scales: molecular, cellular and tissue, in both in vivo and in vitro settings.  Angiogenesis experts from diverse fields including engineering, cell and developmental biology, and chemistry have contributed chapters which focus on the mechanical and chemical signals which affect and promote blood vessel growth. Specific emphasis is given to novel methodologies and biomaterials that have been developed and applied to angiogenesis research. 

  10. Mucosal delivery of vaccines in domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdts, Volker; Mutwiri, George K; Tikoo, Suresh K; Babiuk, Lorne A

    2006-01-01

    Mucosal vaccination is proving to be one of the greatest challenges in modern vaccine development. Although highly beneficial for achieving protective immunity, the induction of mucosal immunity, especially in the gastro-intestinal tract, still remains a difficult task. As a result, only very few mucosal vaccines are commercially available for domestic animals. Here, we critically review various strategies for mucosal delivery of vaccines in domestic animals. This includes live bacterial and viral vectors, particulate delivery-systems such as polymers, alginate, polyphosphazenes, immune stimulating complex and liposomes, and receptor mediated-targeting strategies to the mucosal tissues. The most commonly used routes of immunization, strategies for delivering the antigen to the mucosal surfaces, and future prospects in the development of mucosal vaccines are discussed.

  11. New horizon of mucosal immunity and vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ichiro; Nochi, Tomonori; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2009-06-01

    Progress in the past quarter-century on understanding the molecular, cellular, and in vivo components of the mucosal immune system have allowed us to develop a practical strategy for a novel mucosal vaccine. The mucosal immune system can induce secretory IgA (SIgA) and serum IgG responses to provide two layers of defense against mucosal pathogens. For SIgA-mediated immunity in the gastrointestinal tract, the gut-associated lymphoid tissue contains both the tissue-dependent and tissue-independent IgA components. Harnessing the mucosal immune system for vaccine development may help prevent the global health problems caused by enteric infectious diseases. We have therefore combined mucosal immunology and plant biology to create a rice-based mucosal vaccine that requires neither needles and syringes nor refrigeration.

  12. Dendritic cell-targeting DNA-based mucosal adjuvants for the development of mucosal vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Kosuke; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2009-01-01

    In order to establish effective mucosal immunity against various mucosal pathogens, vaccines must be delivered via the mucosal route and contain effective adjuvant(s). Since mucosal adjuvants can simply mix with the antigen, it is relatively easy to adapt them for different types of vaccine development. Even in simple admixture vaccines, the adjuvant itself must be prepared without any complications. Thus, CpG oligodeoxynucleotides or plasmids encoding certain cDNA(s) would be potent mucosal adjuvant candidates when compared with other substances that can be used as mucosal adjuvants. The strategy of a DNA-based mucosal adjuvant facilitates the targeting of mucosal dendritic cells, and thus is an effective and safe approach. It would also provide great flexibility for the development of effective vaccines for various mucosal pathogens. PMID:19722892

  13. The Impact of Low-Level Laser Therapy on Oral Mucositis and Quality of Life in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Using the Oral Health Impact Profile and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Bone Marrow Transplantation Questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lorrany Candido; Sacono, Nancy Tomoko; Freire, Maria do Carmo Matias; Costa, Luciane Rezende; Batista, Aline Carvalho; Silva, Geisa Badauy Lauria

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on oral mucositis (OM) and quality of life (QoL) of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) patients. OM related to high-dose chemotherapy is often associated with increased risk of mortality and impaired QoL in HSCT patients. LLLT has shown promising effects in the prevention and treatment of chemotherapy-induced OM. There is a dearth of literature focused on subjective aspects involving OM and QoL in patients receiving LLLT. Thirty-nine patients were randomly assigned to two groups: control (n=19) and laser (n=20). LLLT was performed from the 1st day of the conditioning regimen until day 7 post-HSCT (D+7). OM severity was evaluated in all patients [World Health Organization (WHO) scale]. A blinded observer collected subjective outcomes from patients on admission (AD), D+7 and at discharge (DC). QoL was assessed using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Bone Marrow Transplantation (FACT-BMT) questionnaires. Statistical analyses included descriptive, bivariate and multivariate (generalized estimating equation) tests. The overall FACT-BMT (p=0.074) and OHIP-14 (p=0.749) scores were not associated with the use of laser therapy. Both instruments showed a deterioration in QoL for the whole sample on D+7. The laser group presented less severe OM than the control group (p<0.001). LLLT did not influence the oral and general health-related QoL of patients undergoing HSCT, although it was clinically effective in reducing the severity of chemotherapy-induced OM.

  14. Pregnancy stimulates tumor angiogenesis in breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genin, Anne-Sophie; Antoine, Martine; Aractingi, Selim; Rouzier, Roman

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the poor prognosis of pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) remain not well-understood. We studied angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis as they are known prognostic factors in breast cancer. We conducted a case control study of breast cancer comparing women with and without PABC matched for age and histological parameters. Surgical specimen sections were immunostained with anti-CD31 for angiogenesis and anti-D2-40 for lymphangiogenesis, then analyzed using vessel density, ratio of the vascular area and the Chalkley count. Seventeen patients with PABC and 22 controls were included. Angiogenesis was significantly increased in tumor tissues, and tended to be higher in healthy breast tissues from the PABC group compared to controls. In contrast, no difference between the two groups was found concerning lymphangiogenesis both in tumor and healthy breast tissues. Pregnancy enhances angiogenesis in breast cancer. This phenomenon appears to explain the poor prognosis of PABC.

  15. Angiogenesis in cutaneous disease: part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laquer, Vivian; Hoang, Van; Nguyen, Amy; Kelly, Kristen M

    2009-12-01

    This review will discuss the role of angiogenesis in specific cutaneous diseases. Scientific evidence now points to the role of angiogenesis in tumor development and many other cutaneous disorders. Angiogenesis is a complex process that involves angiogenic growth factors and inhibitors, many of which could be a potential target for pharmacologic intervention. Antiangiogenic agents have recently been applied to dermatologic diseases with promising efficacy. After completing this learning activity, participants should be able to recognize cutaneous diseases where angiogenesis is likely to be an important factor, recognize scenarios where angiogenic therapy may be useful in conjunction with traditional therapies, and be able to use angiogenic-mediating agents in the treatment of dermatologic disease.

  16. Notch in Pathological Angiogenesis and Lymphangiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Branching of Dopaminergic Axons. Journal of Neuroscience, 29(38): 11973-11981. BOOK CHAPTERS 1. Uh, M.K., Kandel , J., Kitajewski, J. Evaluating Tumor Angiogenesis. 2nd ed. 980. New York: Springer, 2013. 341-51. Print.

  17. The regulation of angiogenesis in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlenski, Alexandre; Liu, Shuqing; Cohn, Susan L

    2003-07-18

    Angiogenesis is required for the growth and metastasis of malignant tumors, and high vascular density has been correlated with aggressive tumor growth in many types of cancer. This process is regulated by the local balance of stimulatory and inhibitory molecules produced by tumor cells, stromal cells, and the organ-specific environment. In neuroblastoma, a pediatric malignancy that is characterized by a broad spectrum of clinical behavior, angiogenesis also appears to play an important role in determining tumor phenotype. The nature of the angiogenic balance in neuroblastoma is complex, and a spectrum of angiogenesis stimulators and inhibitors has been detected in neuroblastoma tumors. This review summarizes our current understanding of the regulation of angiogenesis in neuroblastoma.

  18. Cryopreservation of Human Mucosal Leukocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M Hughes

    Full Text Available Understanding how leukocytes in the cervicovaginal and colorectal mucosae respond to pathogens, and how medical interventions affect these responses, is important for developing better tools to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. An effective cryopreservation protocol for these cells following their isolation will make studying them more feasible.To find an optimal cryopreservation protocol for mucosal mononuclear leukocytes, we compared cryopreservation media and procedures using human vaginal leukocytes and confirmed our results with endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Specifically, we measured the recovery of viable vaginal T cells and macrophages after cryopreservation with different cryopreservation media and handling procedures. We found several cryopreservation media that led to recoveries above 75%. Limiting the number and volume of washes increased the fraction of cells recovered by 10-15%, possibly due to the small cell numbers in mucosal samples. We confirmed that our cryopreservation protocol also works well for both endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Cryopreserved leukocytes had slightly increased cytokine responses to antigenic stimulation relative to the same cells tested fresh. Additionally, we tested whether it is better to cryopreserve endocervical cells on the cytobrush or in suspension.Leukocytes from cervicovaginal and colorectal tissues can be cryopreserved with good recovery of functional, viable cells using several different cryopreservation media. The number and volume of washes has an experimentally meaningful effect on the percentage of cells recovered. We provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol with best practices for cryopreservation of mucosal leukocytes.

  19. Cryopreservation of Human Mucosal Leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Sean M; Shu, Zhiquan; Levy, Claire N; Ferre, April L; Hartig, Heather; Fang, Cifeng; Lentz, Gretchen; Fialkow, Michael; Kirby, Anna C; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M; Veazey, Ronald S; Germann, Anja; von Briesen, Hagen; McElrath, M Juliana; Dezzutti, Charlene S; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Baker, Chris A R; Shacklett, Barbara L; Gao, Dayong; Hladik, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how leukocytes in the cervicovaginal and colorectal mucosae respond to pathogens, and how medical interventions affect these responses, is important for developing better tools to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. An effective cryopreservation protocol for these cells following their isolation will make studying them more feasible. To find an optimal cryopreservation protocol for mucosal mononuclear leukocytes, we compared cryopreservation media and procedures using human vaginal leukocytes and confirmed our results with endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Specifically, we measured the recovery of viable vaginal T cells and macrophages after cryopreservation with different cryopreservation media and handling procedures. We found several cryopreservation media that led to recoveries above 75%. Limiting the number and volume of washes increased the fraction of cells recovered by 10-15%, possibly due to the small cell numbers in mucosal samples. We confirmed that our cryopreservation protocol also works well for both endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Cryopreserved leukocytes had slightly increased cytokine responses to antigenic stimulation relative to the same cells tested fresh. Additionally, we tested whether it is better to cryopreserve endocervical cells on the cytobrush or in suspension. Leukocytes from cervicovaginal and colorectal tissues can be cryopreserved with good recovery of functional, viable cells using several different cryopreservation media. The number and volume of washes has an experimentally meaningful effect on the percentage of cells recovered. We provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol with best practices for cryopreservation of mucosal leukocytes.

  20. Cannabidiol inhibits angiogenesis by multiple mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solinas, M; Massi, P; Cantelmo, AR; Cattaneo, MG; Cammarota, R; Bartolini, D; Cinquina, V; Valenti, M; Vicentini, LM; Noonan, DM; Albini, A; Parolaro, D

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Several studies have demonstrated anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic actions of cannabinoids on various tumours, together with their anti-angiogenic properties. The non-psychoactive cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) effectively inhibits the growth of different types of tumours in vitro and in vivo and down-regulates some pro-angiogenic signals produced by glioma cells. As its anti-angiogenic properties have not been thoroughly investigated to date, and given its very favourable pharmacological and toxicological profile, here, we evaluated the ability of CBD to modulate tumour angiogenesis. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Firstly, we evaluated the effect of CBD on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation and viability – through [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay and FACS analysis – and in vitro motility – both in a classical Boyden chamber test and in a wound-healing assay. We next investigated CBD effects on different angiogenesis-related proteins released by HUVECs, using an angiogenesis array kit and an ELISA directed at MMP2. Then we evaluated its effects on in vitro angiogenesis in treated HUVECs invading a Matrigel layer and in HUVEC spheroids embedded into collagen gels, and further characterized its effects in vivo using a Matrigel sponge model of angiogenesis in C57/BL6 mice. KEY RESULTS CBD induced HUVEC cytostasis without inducing apoptosis, inhibited HUVEC migration, invasion and sprouting in vitro, and angiogenesis in vivo in Matrigel sponges. These effects were associated with the down-modulation of several angiogenesis-related molecules. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This study reveals that CBD inhibits angiogenesis by multiple mechanisms. Its dual effect on both tumour and endothelial cells supports the hypothesis that CBD has potential as an effective agent in cancer therapy. PMID:22624859

  1. Piperine, a dietary phytochemical, inhibits angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Doucette, Carolyn D.; Hilchie, Ashley L.; Liwski, Robert; Hoskin, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in tumor progression. Piperine, a major alkaloid constituent of black pepper, has diverse physiological actions including killing of cancer cells; however, the effect of piperine on angiogenesis is not known. Here we show that piperine inhibited the proliferation and G1/S transition of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) without causing cell death. Piperine also inhibited HUVEC migration and tubule formation in vitro, as well as collagen-induce...

  2. Mucosal biofilm communities in the human intestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Sandra; Bahrami, Bahram; Macfarlane, George T

    2011-01-01

    Complex and highly variable site-dependent bacterial ecosystems exist throughout the length of the human gastrointestinal tract. Until relatively recently, the majority of our information on intestinal microbiotas has come from studies on feces, or from aspirates taken from the upper gut. However, there is evidence showing that mucosal bacteria growing in biofilms on surfaces lining the gut differ from luminal populations, and that due to their proximity to the epithelial surface, these organisms may be important in modulating the host's immune system and contributing to some chronic inflammatory diseases. Over the past decade, increasing interest in mucosal bacteria, coupled with advances in molecular approaches for assessing microbial diversity, has begun to provide some insight into the complexity of these mucosa-associated communities. In gastrointestinal conditions such as inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease), it has been shown that a dysbiosis exists in microbial community structure, and that there is a reduction in putatively protective mucosal organisms such as bifidobacteria. Therefore, manipulation of mucosal communities may be beneficial in restoring normal functionality in the gut, thereby improving the immune status and general health of the host. Biofilm structure and function has been studied intensively in the oral cavity, and as a consequence, mucosal communities in the mouth will not be covered in this chapter. This review addresses our current knowledge of mucosal populations in the gastrointestinal tract, changes that can occur in community structure in disease, and therapeutic modulation of biofilm composition by antibiotics, prebiotics, and probiotics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Low level laser therapy may reduce risk of oral mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivakovsky, Silvia

    2015-06-01

    Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), CINHAL, Web of Science, Scopus, LILACS, Conference proceedings of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology, American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society of Hematology, American Society of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, and Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer and the reference lists of identified studies. Two reviewers independently selected studies for inclusion with randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs being considered. Data were extracted using a specifically developed form and study quality was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Dichotomous outcomes data were synthesised using the risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Continuous outcomes measured using different scales were synthesised using the standardised mean difference (SMD) while those using the same scale were synthesised using the weighted mean difference (WMD). Eighteen RCTs involving 1144 patients were included. Four trials were considered to be at low risk of bias across all domains. Prophylactic LLLT reduced the overall risk of severe mucositis (risk ratio (RR) 0.37, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.20 to 0.67; P = 0.001). Compared to placebo/no therapy LLLT also reduced the following outcomes; severe mucositis at the time of anticipated maximal mucositis RR = 0.34, (95% CI; 0.20 to 0.59); overall mean grade of mucositis SMD -1.49, (95% CI; -2.02 to -0.95); duration of severe mucositis WMD -5.32, 95% (CI; -9.45 to -1.19) and incidence of severe pain (RR 0.26, 95% CI; 0.18 to 0.37). Prophylactic LLLT reduced severe mucositis and pain in patients with cancer and HSCT recipients. Future research should identify the optimal characteristics of LLLT and determine feasibility in the clinical setting.

  4. [The development of mucosal vaccine using bacterial function for targeting mucosal tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hidehiko; Kondoh, Masuo; Yagi, Kiyohito; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Kunisawa, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Most pathogens invade body through the mucosal epithelium, which is a primary target to prevent the infectious diseases. Mucosal vaccine has been considered to be an effective strategy to establish immunosurveillance against pathogens by the induction of antigen-specific immune responses at both mucosal and systemic immune compartments. The development of antigen delivery system and mucosal adjuvants are required for the sufficient induction of protective immunity in the development of mucosal vaccine. In this review, we shed light on the recent advances in the development of antigen delivery system using microbial functions for mucosal vaccines.

  5. Piperine, a dietary phytochemical, inhibits angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucette, Carolyn D.; Hilchie, Ashley L.; Liwski, Robert; Hoskin, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in tumor progression. Piperine, a major alkaloid constituent of black pepper, has diverse physiological actions including killing of cancer cells; however, the effect of piperine on angiogenesis is not known. Here we show that piperine inhibited the proliferation and G1/S transition of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) without causing cell death. Piperine also inhibited HUVEC migration and tubule formation in vitro, as well as collagen-induced angiogenic activity by rat aorta explants and breast cancer cell-induced angiogenesis in chick embryos. Although piperine binds to and activates the cation channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), its effects on endothelial cells did not involve TRPV1 since the antiproliferative effect of piperine was not affected by TRPV1-selective antagonists, nor did HUVECs express detectable TRPV1 mRNA. Importantly, piperine inhibited phosphorylation of Ser 473 and Thr 308 residues of Akt (protein kinase B), which is a key regulator of endothelial cell function and angiogenesis. Consistent with Akt inhibition as the basis of piperine’s action on HUVECs, inhibition of the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway with LY-294002 also inhibited HUVEC proliferation and collagen-induced angiogenesis. Taken together, these data support the further investigation of piperine as an angiogenesis inhibitor for use in cancer treatment. PMID:22902327

  6. Therapeutic angiogenesis: a fantastic new adventure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harjai, Kishore J; Chowdhury, Pertha; Grines, Cindy L

    2002-06-01

    A significant proportion of patients with coronary artery disease have symptoms refractory to medical treatment, yet are unsuitable for conventional revascularization techniques, like percutaneous coronary intervention and coronary artery bypass surgery. Such patients are potential candidates for alternative forms of coronary revascularization, like therapeutic angiogenesis. This strategy is designed to promote the development of supplemental collateral blood vessels that will act as endogenous bypass conduits. Two major avenues for achieving therapeutic angiogenesis are currently under intense investigation: gene therapy (the introduction of new genetic material into somatic cells to synthesize proteins that are missing, defective, or desired for specific therapeutic purposes) and protein-based therapy (administration of the growth factors, instead of the genes encoding for the growth factors responsible for angiogenesis). This article provides a concise review of the "components" of gene and protein-based therapy, namely, the growth factors, the vector (for gene therapy), the route of delivery, the therapeutic target, the desired therapeutic effect, and quantifiable clinical end points for trials of angiogenesis. Based on preliminary studies, the authors believe that therapeutic angiogenesis represents a promising novel therapy for treatment of the ischemic heart. In the future, angiogenesis will likely be offered as an adjunct to conventional revascularization strategies in subsets of patients who are only "suboptimally" revascularized with conventional techniques, and might evolve into a stand-alone treatment for some patients with nonrevascularizable disease.

  7. Angiostatin anti-angiogenesis requires IL-12: The innate immune system as a key target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morini Monica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiostatin, an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor, is a fragment of plasminogen. Its anti-angiogenic activity was discovered with functional assays in vivo, however, its direct action on endothelial cells is moderate and identification of definitive mechanisms of action has been elusive to date. We had previously demonstrated that innate immune cells are key targets of angiostatin, however the pathway involved in this immune-related angiogenesis inhibition was not known. Here we present evidence that IL-12, a principal TH1 cytokine with potent anti-angiogenic activity, is the mediator of angiostatin's activity. Methods Function blocking antibodies and gene-targeted animals were employed or in vivo studies using the subcutaneous matrigel model of angiogenesis. Quantitative real-time PCR were used to assess modulation of cytokine production in vitro. Results Angiostatin inhibts angiogenesis induced by VEGF-TNFα or supernatants of Kaposi's Sarcoma cells (a highly angiogenic and inflammation-associated tumor. We found that function-blocking antibodies to IL-12 reverted angiostatin induced angiogenesis inhibition. The use of KO animal models revealed that angiostatin is unable to exert angiogenesis inhibition in mice with gene-targeted deletions of either the IL-12 specific receptor subunit IL-12Rβ2 or the IL-12 p40 subunit. Angiostatin induces IL-12 mRNA synthesis by human macrophages in vitro, suggesting that these innate immunity cells produce IL-12 upon angiostatin stimulation and could be a major cellular mediator. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor such as angiostatin act on innate immune cells as key targets in inflammatory angiogenesis. Angiostatin proves to be anti-angiogenic as an immune modulator rather than a direct anti-vascular agent. This article is dedicated to the memory of Prof Judah Folkman for his leadership and for encouragement of these studies.

  8. Chlamydia pneumoniae infection promotes vascular endothelial cell angiogenesis through an IQGAP1-related signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Beibei; Zhang, Lijun; Liu, Jingya; Ma, Lu; Wang, Haiwei; Zheng, Ningbo; Chen, Xiaoyu; Shen, Bingling; Xu, Zhelong; Zhang, Lijun

    2017-06-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae) infection plays a potential role in angiogenesis. However, it is still an enigma how C. pneumoniae is involved in this process. Therefore, we investigated the effect of C. pneumoniae infection on angiogenesis, and then explored the roles of IQGAP1-related signaling in C. pneumoniae infection-induced angiogenesis. C. pneumoniae infection significantly enhanced angiogenesis as assessed by the tube formation assay possibly by inducing vascular endothelial cell (VEC) migration in the wound healing and Transwell migration assays. Subsequently, immunoprecipitation, Western blot and tube formation assay results showed that the phosphorylation of both IQGAP1 and N-WASP was required for the angiogenesis induced by C. pneumoniae infection. Our co-immunoprecipitation study revealed that IQGAP1 physically associated with N-WASP after C. pneumoniae infection of VECs. Actin polymerization assay further showed that in C. pneumoniae-infected VECs, both IQGAP1 and N-WASP were recruited to filamentous actin, and shared some common compartments localized at the leading edge of lamellipodia, which was impaired after the depletion of IQGAP1 by using the small interference RNA. Moreover, the knockdown of IQGAP1 also significantly decreased N-WASP phosphorylation at Tyr256 induced by C. pneumoniae infection. We conclude that C. pneumoniae infection promotes VEC migration and angiogenesis presumably through the IQGAP1-related signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Postreceptor signal transduction mechanisms involved in octreotide-induced inhibition of angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, P C; Barrie, R; Hill, N; Landeck, S; Kurozawa, D; Woltering, E A

    1994-12-01

    Somatostatin analogues inhibit peptide release and cell growth through multiple postreceptor signal transduction mechanisms (PRSTM), including G proteins (GP), cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), calcium, protein kinase C (PKC), and tyrosine phosphatase (TP). Octreotide acetate (OA), a somatostatin analogue, has been shown to inhibit angiogenesis; however, the PRSTM involved are unknown. Fertilized chicken eggs were obtained and incubated. On day 3, embryos were removed and placed in plastic wrap hammocks. On day 7, disks containing OA, test substances that interfere with PRSTM, or combinations of OA plus a test substance were placed on the developing chorioallantoic membrane. Blood vessel growth under each disk was assessed at 24 hours. Data were evaluated by chi-squared analysis. OA's ability to inhibit angiogenesis is significantly diminished when combined with calcium, bradykinin (increases calcium), pertussis toxin (inhibits GP), or 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (increases cAMP). In contrast, no significant decrease is noted in OA's ability to inhibit angiogenesis when combined with phorbol ester (activates PKC) or vanadate (inhibits TP). OA-induced inhibition of angiogenesis is GP, calcium, and cAMP dependent and is PKC and TP independent. Better understanding of the PRSTM involved with OA-induced inhibition of angiogenesis may lead to enhancement of OA's effect on angiogenesis.

  10. Advances and challenges in mucosal adjuvant technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsted, Daniel; Fallahi, Firouzeh; Golshani, Ashkan; Azizi, Ali

    2015-05-15

    Adjuvants play attractive roles in enhancement of immune response during vaccination; however, due to several challenges, only a limited number of adjuvants are licensed by health authorities. The lack of an effective mucosal adjuvant is even more significant as none of the licensed adjuvants revealed a strong enhancement in immune system after mucosal administration. Over the past two decades, several mucosal adjuvants have been developed to deliver antigens to the target cells in the mucosal immune system and increase specific immune responses. However, the safety and efficacy of these adjuvants for testing in human trials is still an important issue, requiring further study. In this article, we briefly review the challenges associated with most common mucosal adjuvants and discuss potential strategies for targeting the mucosal immune system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Functional role of inorganic trace elements in angiogenesis-Part II: Cr, Si, Zn, Cu, and S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Asatourian, Armen; Orangi, Jafar; Sorenson, Christine M; Sheibani, Nader

    2015-10-01

    Trace elements play critical roles in angiogenesis events. The effects of nitrogen, iron, selenium, phosphorus, gold, and calcium were discussed in part I. In part II, we evaluated the effect of chromium, silicon, zinc, copper, and sulfur on different aspects of angiogenesis, with critical roles in healing and regeneration processes, and undeniable roles in tumor growth and cancer therapy. This review is the second of series that serves as an overview of the role of inorganic elements in regulation of angiogenesis and vascular function. The methods of exposure, structure, mechanism, and potential activity of these trace elements are briefly discussed. An electronic search was performed on the role of these trace elements in angiogenesis from January 2005 to April 2014. The recent aspects of the relationship between five different trace elements and their role in regulation of angiogenesis, and homeostasis of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors were assessed. Many studies have investigated the effects and importance of these elements in angiogenesis events. Both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on angiogenesis are observed for the evaluated elements. Chromium can promote angiogenesis in pathological manners. Silicon as silica nanoparticles is anti-angiogenic, while in calcium silicate extracts and bioactive silicate glasses promote angiogenesis. Zinc is an anti-angiogenic agent acting on important genes and growth factors. Copper and sulfur compositions have pro-angiogenic functions by activating pro-angiogenic growth factors and promoting endothelial cells migration, growth, and tube formation. Thus, utilization of these elements may provide a unique opportunity to modulate angiogenesis under various setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Development of an AIDS Mucosal Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Tang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that mucosal tissues contain the largest surface area of the human body and are the front line of natural host defense against various pathogens. In fact, more than 80% of infectious disease pathogens probably gain entry into the susceptible human hosts through open mucosal surfaces. Human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1, a mainly sexually transmitted virus, also primarily targets the vaginal and gastrointestinal mucosa as entry sites for viral transmission, seeding, replication and amplification. Since HIV-1 establishes its early replication in vaginal or rectal mucosal tissues, the induction of sufficient mucosal immunity at the initial site of HIV-1 transmission becomes essential for a protective vaccine. However, despite the fact that current conventional vaccine strategies have remained unsuccessful in preventing HIV-1 infection, sufficient financial support and resources have yet to be given to develop a vaccine able to elicit protective mucosal immunity against sexual transmissions. Interestingly, Chinese ancestors invented variolation through intranasal administration about one thousand years ago, which led to the discovery of a successful smallpox vaccine and the final eradication of the disease. It is the hope for all mankind that the development of a mucosal AIDS vaccine will ultimately help control the AIDS pandemic. In order to discover an effective mucosal AIDS vaccine, it is necessary to have a deep understanding of mucosal immunology and to test various mucosal vaccination strategies.

  13. Interleukin 32 promotes angiogenesis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nold-Petry, Claudia A.; Rudloff, Ina; Baumer, Yvonne; Ruvo, Menotti; Marasco, Daniela; Botti, Paolo; Farkas, Laszlo; Cho, Steven X.; Zepp, Jarod A.; Azam, Tania; Dinkel, Hannah; Palmer, Brent E.; Boisvert, William A.; Cool, Carlyne D.; Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laima; Heinhuis, Bas; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Dinarello, Charles A.; Voelkel, Norbert F.; Nold, Marcel F.

    2013-01-01

    IL-32 is a multi-faceted cytokine with a role in infections, autoimmune diseases, and cancer, and it exerts diverse functions, including aggravation of inflammation and inhibition of virus propagation. We previously identified IL-32 as a critical regulator of endothelial cell (EC) functions, and now reveal that IL-32 also possesses angiogenic properties. The hyperproliferative EC of human pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and glioblastoma multiforme exhibited a markedly increased abundance of IL-32, and, significantly, the cytokine colocalized with integrin αVβ3. VEGF receptor blockade, which resulted in EC hyperproliferation, increased IL-32 threefold. siRNA-mediated silencing of IL-32 negated the 58% proliferation of EC that occurred within 24h in scrambled-transfected controls. Reduction of IL-32 neither affected apoptosis (insignificant changes in Bak-1, Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, LDH, annexin V, and propidium iodide) nor VEGF or TGF-β levels, but siIL-32-transfected adult and neonatal EC produced up to 61% less NO, IL-8, and MMP-9, and up to 3-fold more activin A and endostatin. In co-culture-based angiogenesis assays, IL-32γ dose-dependently increased tube formation up to 3-fold; an αVβ3 inhibitor prevented this activity, and reduced IL-32γ-induced IL-8 by 85%. In matrigel plugs loaded with IL-32γ, VEGF, or vehicle, and injected into live mice, we observed the anticipated VEGF-induced increase in neocapillarization (8-fold vs vehicle), but unexpectedly, IL-32γ was equally angiogenic. A second signal such as IFNγ was required to render cells responsive to exogenous IL-32γ; importantly, this was confirmed using a completely synthetic preparation of IL-32γ. In summary, we add angiogenic properties that are mediated by integrin αVβ3 but VEGF-independent, to the portfolio of IL-32, implicating a role for this versatile cytokine in PAH and neoplastic diseases. PMID:24337385

  14. Clopidogrel inhibits angiogenesis of gastric ulcer healing via downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiing-Chyuan; Peng, Yen-Ling; Chen, Tseng-Shing; Huo, Teh-Ia; Hou, Ming-Chih; Huang, Hui-Chun; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Fa-Yauh

    2016-09-01

    Although clopidogrel does not cause gastric mucosal injury, it does not prevent peptic ulcer recurrence in high-risk patients. We explored whether clopidogrel delays gastric ulcer healing via inhibiting angiogenesis and to elucidate the possible mechanisms. Gastric ulcers were induced in Sprague Dawley rats, and ulcer healing and angiogenesis of ulcer margin were compared between clopidogrel-treated rats and controls. The expressions of the proangiogenic growth factors and their receptors including basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), bFGF receptor (FGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGFR1, VEGFR2, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)A, PDGFB, PDGFR A, PDGFR B, and phosphorylated form of mitogenic activated protein kinase pathways over the ulcer margin were compared via western blot and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In vitro, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to elucidate how clopidogrel inhibited growth factors-stimulated HUVEC proliferation. The ulcer sizes were significantly larger and the angiogenesis of ulcer margin was significantly diminished in the clopidogrel (2 and 10 mg/kg/d) treated groups. Ulcer induction markedly increased the expression of phosphorylated form of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK), FGFR2, VEGF, VEGFR2, and PDGFRA when compared with those of normal mucosa. Clopidogrel treatment significantly decreased pERK, FGFR2, VEGF, VEGFR2, and PDGFRA expression at the ulcer margin when compared with those of the respective control group. In vitro, clopidogrel (10(-6)M) inhibited VEGF-stimulated (20 ng/mL) HUVEC proliferation, at least, via downregulation of VEGFR2 and pERK. Clopidogrel inhibits the angiogenesis of gastric ulcer healing at least partially by the inhibition of the VEGF-VEGFR2-ERK signal transduction pathway. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Angiogenesis, fibrinogenesis and presence of synechiae after exeresis of a swine vocal fold mucosal microflap and use of topical mitomycin-C Estudo da angiogênese, fibrogênese e presença de sinéquias após exérese de fragmento de mucosa de pregas vocais de suínos utilizando instrumental frio e mitomicina-C tópica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Ribas de Carvalho Duarte Fonseca

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate swine vocal fold healing in a period of 30 days after topical mitomycin-C application. METHODS: Twelve swine underwent exeresis of mucosal flaps from the free edge of the anterior third of both vocal folds with a cold instrument (laryngeal scissors. The animals were divided into two groups: EG (Experimental Group, consisting of 6 animals undergoing topical MMC application (4 mg/dL on the operated area for 4 minutes; CG (Control Group, 6 animals undergoing topical saline solution application on the operated area for 4 minutes. After 30 days, the animals were sacrificed and the larynges were collected and examined for the presence of synechiae as well as a histological immunohistochemical assessment of immature and mature collagen deposition, number of blood vessels and myofibroblasts. RESULTS: Mature collagen deposition in the EG was 452.12 μm² and 1332.31μm² in the CG; immature collagen deposition was 1511.73μm² in the EG and 1020.61μm² in the CG. The number of myofibroblasts was 1.556 in the EG and 3.583 in the CG. The number of blood vessels was 2.565 in EG and 6.917 in the CG. There were no synechiae in the two studied groups. CONCLUSIONS: There was an increase in immature collagen deposition in the experimental group when compared with the control group. There was a decrease in mature collagen deposition in the experimental group when compared with the control group. There was a decrease in the number of myofibroblasts in the experimental group when compared with the control group. A decrease in blood vessels was observed in the experimental group when compared with the control group. There was no synechia formation in either studied group.OBJETIVO: Avaliar a cicatrização de pregas vocais de suínos utilizando mitomicina-C tópica, em 30 dias. MÉTODOS: Doze suínos foram submetidos à exérese de mucosa do bordo livre do terço anterior de ambas as pregas vocais com instrumental frio (tesoura curva e divididos

  16. Angiogenesis is inhibitory for mammalian digit regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ling; Yan, Mingquan; Simkin, Jennifer; Ketcham, Paulina D.; Leininger, Eric; Han, Manjong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The regenerating mouse digit tip is a unique model for investigating blastema formation and epimorphic regeneration in mammals. The blastema is characteristically avascular and we previously reported that blastema expression of a known anti‐angiogenic factor gene, Pedf, correlated with a successful regenerative response (Yu, L., Han, M., Yan, M., Lee, E. C., Lee, J. & Muneoka, K. (2010). BMP signaling induces digit regeneration in neonatal mice. Development, 137, 551–559). Here we show that during regeneration Vegfa transcripts are not detected in the blastema but are expressed at the onset of differentiation. Treating the amputation wound with vascular endothelial growth factor enhances angiogenesis but inhibits regeneration. We next tested bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP9), another known mediator of angiogenesis, and found that BMP9 is also a potent inhibitor of digit tip regeneration. BMP9 induces Vegfa expression in the digit stump suggesting that regenerative failure is mediated by enhanced angiogenesis. Finally, we show that BMP9 inhibition of regeneration is completely rescued by treatment with pigment epithelium‐derived factor. These studies show that precocious angiogenesis is inhibitory for regeneration, and provide compelling evidence that the regulation of angiogenesis is a critical factor in designing therapies aimed at stimulating mammalian regeneration. PMID:27499862

  17. Erythropoietin blockade inhibits the induction of tumor angiogenesis and progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew E Hardee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The induction of tumor angiogenesis, a pathologic process critical for tumor progression, is mediated by multiple regulatory factors released by tumor and host cells. We investigated the role of the hematopoietic cytokine erythropoietin as an angiogenic factor that modulates tumor progression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fluorescently-labeled rodent mammary carcinoma cells were injected into dorsal skin-fold window chambers in mice, an angiogenesis model that allows direct, non-invasive, serial visualization and real-time assessment of tumor cells and neovascularization simultaneously using intravital microscopy and computerized image analysis during the initial stages of tumorigenesis. Erythropoietin or its antagonist proteins were co-injected with tumor cells into window chambers. In vivo growth of cells engineered to stably express a constitutively active erythropoietin receptor EPOR-R129C or the erythropoietin antagonist R103A-EPO were analyzed in window chambers and in the mammary fat pads of athymic nude mice. Co-injection of erythropoietin with tumor cells or expression of EPOR-R129C in tumor cells significantly stimulated tumor neovascularization and growth in window chambers. Co-injection of erythropoietin antagonist proteins (soluble EPOR or anti-EPO antibody with tumor cells or stable expression of antagonist R103A-EPO protein secreted from tumor cells inhibited angiogenesis and impaired tumor growth. In orthotopic tumor xenograft studies, EPOR-R129C expression significantly promoted tumor growth associated with increased expression of Ki67 proliferation antigen, enhanced microvessel density, decreased tumor hypoxia, and increased phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinases ERK1/2. R103A-EPO antagonist expression in mammary carcinoma cells was associated with near-complete disruption of primary tumor formation in the mammary fat pad. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that erythropoietin is an

  18. COX-2, VEGF and tumour angiogenesis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Toomey, D P

    2009-06-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests a protective effective of regular NSAID use against developing cancer. Cyclooxygenase-2, a target of NSAIDs, is upregulated in many cancers and has been associated with increased VEGF production and angiogenesis. Angiogenesis is the formation of new vessels from existing vasculature and as an essential process for tumour development represents an important therapeutic target. Following an extensive review of the literature this article details the current knowledge on the role of COX-2 in tumorigenesis focusing on its relationship to angiogenesis and VEGF production by tumour cells. While COX-2 is clearly detrimental to prognosis and NSAIDs have a beneficial effect, the possibility of COX-2 independent effects being partly or wholly responsible for this benefit cannot be excluded.

  19. Mesoscopic and continuum modelling of angiogenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Spill, F.

    2014-03-11

    Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones in response to chemical signals secreted by, for example, a wound or a tumour. In this paper, we propose a mesoscopic lattice-based model of angiogenesis, in which processes that include proliferation and cell movement are considered as stochastic events. By studying the dependence of the model on the lattice spacing and the number of cells involved, we are able to derive the deterministic continuum limit of our equations and compare it to similar existing models of angiogenesis. We further identify conditions under which the use of continuum models is justified, and others for which stochastic or discrete effects dominate. We also compare different stochastic models for the movement of endothelial tip cells which have the same macroscopic, deterministic behaviour, but lead to markedly different behaviour in terms of production of new vessel cells. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  20. Mucosal Immunosenescence In The Gastrointestinal Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shintaro; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that pathogen-specific secretory IgA (SIgA) antibody (Ab) is the major player at mucosal surfaces for host defense. However, alterations in the mucosal immune system occur in advanced aging which results in a failure of induction of SIgA Abs for protection from infectious diseases. Signs of mucosal senescence first appear in the gut immune system. Further, changes in the intestinal microbiota most likely influence mucosal immunity. To overcome the immunological aging decline in mucosal immunity, several adjuvant systems including mucosal dendritic cell (DC) targeting have been shown to be attractive and effective immunological strategies. Similarly, antigen (Ag) uptake-M cells are ideal targets for facilitating Ag-specific mucosal immune responses. However, the numbers of M cells are reduced in aged mice. In this regard, Spi-B, an essential transcription factor for the functional and structural differentiation of M cells could be a potent strategy for the induction of effective mucosal immunity in aging. PMID:25531743

  1. Bioadhesive delivery systems for mucosal vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudner, Barbara C; O'Hagan, Derek T

    2010-12-01

    Mucosal vaccine delivery potentially induces mucosal as well as systemic immune responses and may have advantages particularly for optimal protection against pathogens that infect the host through mucosal surfaces. However, the delivery of antigens through mucosal membranes remains a major challenge due to unfavorable physiological conditions (pH and enzymes) and significant biological barriers, which restrict the uptake of antigens. To improve mucosal vaccine delivery, the use of bioadhesive delivery systems offers numerous advantages, including protection from degradation, increasing concentration of antigen in the vicinity of mucosal tissue for better absorption, extending their residence time, and/or targeting them to sites of antigen uptake. Although some bioadhesives have direct immune stimulating properties, it appears most likely that successful mucosal vaccination will require the addition of vaccine adjuvants for optimal immune responses, particularly if they are to be used in an unprimed population. Thus, complex vaccine formulations and delivery strategies have to be carefully designed to appropriately stimulate immune response for the target pathogen. In addition, careful consideration is needed to define the "best" route for mucosal immunization for each individual pathogen.

  2. Nutrition and Gut Mucositis in Pediatric Oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Peter Erik Lotko

    . Unfortunately, effective treatment strategies against mucositis are not in general available. The overall aim of the present PhD was to study interactions between mucositis, inflammation and nutrition. We hypothesized that toxic reactions in the alimentary tract, induced by chemotherapy, followed by release...

  3. Head and neck radiation and mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garden, Adam S; Chambers, Mark S

    2007-04-01

    We will review the recent literature that has provided new insights into the pathogenesis, metrics and therapeutics of mucositis. Radiation techniques include conformal therapy and intensity modulated therapy that attempt to minimize dose to normal tissues while still delivering high doses to tumor targets. Drugs used to prevent or treat mucositis typically fall into three classes: antimicrobials, growth factors and radioprotectors. To date, drugs in all three categories have had little success in preventing radiation-induced mucositis, but palifermin, a keratinocyte growth factor, and RK-0202, a topical radioprotector, hold promise and are under investigation. Treatment of patients with head and neck cancers often requires multimodality therapy, and radiotherapy is often a critical component of this approach. Unfortunately, the dose intense regimens required to treat patients often results in mucositis. While this treatment sequela has long been recognized, only recently have researchers clearly identified its incidence and developed metrics to quantify mucositis and its resultant symptoms. Efforts to minimize mucositis have involved both advances in radiation physics, and the development of pharmacologic agents to prevent or treat mucositis. While no drug to date has shown significant efficacy in reducing the incidence of radiation-induced mucositis for head and neck cancer patients, several agents are currently being tested and hold promise.

  4. Mucosal vaccines: a paradigm shift in the development of mucosal adjuvants and delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Atul; Gowda, Devegowda Vishakante; Madhunapantula, SubbaRao V; Shinde, Chetan G; Iyer, Meenakshi

    2015-04-01

    Mucosal immune responses are the first-line defensive mechanisms against a variety of infections. Therefore, immunizations of mucosal surfaces from which majority of infectious agents make their entry, helps to protect the body against infections. Hence, vaccinization of mucosal surfaces by using mucosal vaccines provides the basis for generating protective immunity both in the mucosal and systemic immune compartments. Mucosal vaccines offer several advantages over parenteral immunization. For example, (i) ease of administration; (ii) non-invasiveness; (iii) high-patient compliance; and (iv) suitability for mass vaccination. Despite these benefits, to date, only very few mucosal vaccines have been developed using whole microorganisms and approved for use in humans. This is due to various challenges associated with the development of an effective mucosal vaccine that can work against a variety of infections, and various problems concerned with the safe delivery of developed vaccine. For instance, protein antigen alone is not just sufficient enough for the optimal delivery of antigen(s) mucosally. Hence, efforts have been made to develop better prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines for improved mucosal Th1 and Th2 immune responses using an efficient and safe immunostimulatory molecule and novel delivery carriers. Therefore, in this review, we have made an attempt to cover the recent advancements in the development of adjuvants and delivery carriers for safe and effective mucosal vaccine production. © 2015 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. KSHV-Mediated Angiogenesis in Tumor Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravinkumar Purushothaman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8, also known as Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, is a malignant human oncovirus belonging to the gamma herpesvirus family. HHV-8 is closely linked to the pathogenesis of Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS and two other B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases: primary effusion lymphoma (PEL and a plasmablastic variant of multicentric Castleman’s disease (MCD. KS is an invasive tumor of endothelial cells most commonly found in untreated HIV-AIDS or immuno-compromised individuals. KS tumors are highly vascularized and have abnormal, excessive neo-angiogenesis, inflammation, and proliferation of infected endothelial cells. KSHV directly induces angiogenesis in an autocrine and paracrine fashion through a complex interplay of various viral and cellular pro-angiogenic and inflammatory factors. KS is believed to originate due to a combination of KSHV’s efficient strategies for evading host immune systems and several pro-angiogenic and pro-inflammatory stimuli. In addition, KSHV infection of endothelial cells produces a wide array of viral oncoproteins with transforming capabilities that regulate multiple host-signaling pathways involved in the activation of angiogenesis. It is likely that the cellular-signaling pathways of angiogenesis and lymph-angiogenesis modulate the rate of tumorigenesis induction by KSHV. This review summarizes the current knowledge on regulating KSHV-mediated angiogenesis by integrating the findings reported thus far on the roles of host and viral genes in oncogenesis, recent developments in cell-culture/animal-model systems, and various anti-angiogenic therapies for treating KSHV-related lymphoproliferative disorders.

  6. Mucosal vaccines: novel strategies and applications for the control of pathogens and tumors at mucosal sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizard, Mevyn; Diniz, Mariana O; Roussel, Helene; Tran, Thi; Ferreira, Luis Cs; Badoual, Cecile; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system displays several adaptations reflecting the exposure to the external environment. The efficient induction of mucosal immune responses also requires specific approaches, such as the use of appropriate administration routes and specific adjuvants and/or delivery systems. In contrast to vaccines delivered via parenteral routes, experimental, and clinical evidences demonstrated that mucosal vaccines can efficiently induce local immune responses to pathogens or tumors located at mucosal sites as well as systemic response. At least in part, such features can be explained by the compartmentalization of mucosal B and T cell populations that play important roles in the modulation of local immune responses. In the present review, we discuss molecular and cellular features of the mucosal immune system as well as novel immunization approaches that may lead to the development of innovative and efficient vaccines targeting pathogens and tumors at different mucosal sites.

  7. BISPHOSPHONATE - RELATED MUCOSITIS (BRM: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Stanimirov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Bisphosphonates (BPs are the most widely used and effective antiresorptive agents for the treatment of diseases in which there is an increase in osteoclastic resorption, including post-menopausal osteoporosis, Paget’s disease, and tumor-associated osteolysis. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are well aware of the side effects of bisphosphonates and mainly with bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (BRONJ. Less known are the mucosal lesions associated with the use of these agents. In the scientific literature, there are only few reports of mucosal lesions due to the direct contact of the oral form of BPs with the mucosa (bisphosphonate-related mucositis. They are mostly related to improper use of bisphosphonate tablets that are chewed, sucked or allowed to melt in the mouth before swallowing. Lesions are atypical and need to be differentiated from other mucosal erosions. We present a case of bisphosphonate-related mucositis due to the improper use of alendronate.

  8. Advances and challenges in skeletal muscle angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olfert, I Mark; Baum, Oliver; Hellsten, Ylva

    2016-01-01

    during health, but poorly controlled in disease - resulting in either excessive capillary growth (pathological angiogenesis) or losses in capillarity (rarefaction). Given that skeletal muscle comprises nearly 40% of body mass in humans, skeletal muscle capillary density has a significant impact...... on metabolism, endocrine function, and locomotion, and is tightly regulated at many different levels. Skeletal muscle is also high adaptable, and thus one of the few organ systems which can be experimentally manipulated (e.g. by exercise) to study physiologic regulation of angiogenesis. This review will focus...

  9. Eph Receptors and Ephrin Ligands: Important Players in Angiogenesis and Tumor Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Mosch

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Eph receptors and their ephrin ligands were identified in the late 1980's. Subsequently, they were linked to different physiological and pathophysiological processes like embryonic development, angiogenesis, and tumorigenesis. In this regard, recent work focused on the distribution and effects of Eph receptors and ephrins on tumor cells and tumor microenvironment. The purpose of this review is to outline the role of these molecules in physiological angiogenesis and pathophysiological tumor angiogenesis. Furthermore, novel therapeutical approaches are discussed as Eph receptors and ephrins represent attractive targets for antiangiogenic therapy.

  10. Oral mucositis in children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Pels, El?bieta

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study Oral mucositis is the most commonly reported side effect observed in neoplastic patients treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy of the head and neck region as well as in patients who have received a haematopoietic stem cell transplant. The aim of the study was to assess the oral mucosa status in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) during antineoplastic therapy. Material and methods The clinical examination included 78 children aged 2-18 with ALL. The clinica...

  11. Mucosal versus muscle pain sensitivity in provoked vestibulodynia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witzeman K

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn Witzeman,1 Ruby HN Nguyen,2 Alisa Eanes,3 Sawsan As-Sanie,4 Denniz Zolnoun51Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, CO, 2Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 3Pelvic Pain Research Unit, Division of Advanced Laparoscopy and Pelvic Pain, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 5Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USABackground: An estimated 8.3%–16% of women experience vulvovaginal discomfort during their lifetime. Frequently these patients report provoked pain on contact or with attempted intercourse, commonly referred to as provoked vestibulodynia (PVD. Despite the burden of this condition, little is known about its potential etiologies including pelvic floor muscular dysfunction and mucosal components. This knowledge would be beneficial in developing targeted therapies including physical therapy.Objective: To explore the relative contribution of mucosal versus muscle pain sensitivity on pain report from intercourse among women with PVD.Design: In this proof of concept study, 54 women with PVD underwent a structured examination assessing mucosal and pelvic muscle sensitivity.Methods: We examined three mucosal sites in the upper and lower vestibule. Patients were asked to rate their pain on cotton swab palpation of the mucosa using a 10-point visual analog scale. Muscle pain was assessed using transvaginal application of pressure on right and left puborectalis, and the perineal muscle complex. The Gracely pain scale (0–100 was used to assess the severity of pain with intercourse, with women rating the lowest, average, and highest pain levels; a 100 rating the

  12. Colorectal endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Pujan; Wallace, Michael B

    2017-08-01

    Colonoscopy has the benefit of detecting and treating precancerous adenomatous polyps and thus reduces mortality associated with CRC. Screening colonoscopy is the keystone for prevention of colorectal cancer. Over the last 20 years there has been increased in the management of large colorectal polyps from surgery to endoscopic removal techniques which is less invasive. Traditionally surgical resection was the treatment of choice for many years for larger polyps but colectomy poses significant morbidity of 14-46% and mortality of up to 7%. There are several advantages of endoscopic resection technique over surgery; it is less invasive, less expensive, has rapid recovery, and preserves the normal gut functions. In addition patient satisfaction and efficacy of EMR is higher with minor complications. Thus, this has facilitated the development of advanced resection technique for the treatment of large colorectal polyps called as endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Muhammad Maria

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced oral mucositis (RIOM is a major dose-limiting toxicity in head and neck cancer patients. It is a normal tissue injury caused by radiation/radiotherapy (RT, which has marked adverse effects on patient quality of life and cancer therapy continuity. It is a challenge for radiation oncologists since it leads to cancer therapy interruption, poor local tumor control, and changes in dose fractionation. RIOM occurs in 100% of altered fractionation radiotherapy head and neck cancer patients. In the United Sates, its economic cost was estimated to reach 17,000.00 USD per patient with head and neck cancers. This review will discuss RIOM definition, epidemiology, impact and side effects, pathogenesis, scoring scales, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

  14. Advances in the understanding and management of mucositis during stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Joanne M; Wardill, Hannah R

    2017-12-01

    Mucositis is a severe and common side effect of anticancer treatments, with an incidence of between 40 and 80% depending on the cytotoxic regimen used. The most profound mucositis burden is experienced during conditioning regimens for hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), where the use of highly mucotoxic agents with or without total body irradiation leads to serious damage throughout the alimentary tract. Currently, the assessment and management of both oral and gastrointestinal mucositis lack authoritative guideline, with recommendations only achieved in narrow clinical scenarios. This review provides a brief overview of current management guidelines for mucositis in both adult and pediatric patients receiving HSCT, highlights recent advances in mucositis prevention and discusses future research avenues. The Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer and International Society for Oral Oncology (MASCC/ISOO) guidelines for the prevention of mucositis in HSCT are scarce, with low level laser therapy (photobiomodulation) and palifermin only recommended for oral mucositis. Loperamide and octreotide remain gold-standard for the treatment of diarrhea, despite poor efficacy. Although several interventions have been trialled in pediatric cohorts, no recommendations currently exist for children receiving high-dose chemotherapy or total body irradiation for HSCT. HSCT continues to be associated with mucositis, which impacts on patients' ability and willingness to receive engraftment, and worsens clinical outcome. Research into the prevention and treatment of mucositis in this setting remains limited, with an overwhelming amount of small, single-center studies that fail to achieve a sufficient level of evidence that warrant recommendation(s). As such, our ability to manage mucotoxic side effects of high-dose chemotherapy and irradiation is limited, particularly in children.

  15. Melanoma Angiogenesis and Metastasis Modulated by Ribozyme Targeting of the Secreted Growth Factor Pleiotrophin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czubayko, Frank; Schulte, Anke M.; Berchem, Guy J.; Wellstein, Anton

    1996-12-01

    Clinical and experimental evidence suggests that spreading of malignant cells from a localized tumor (metastasis) is directly related to the number of microvessels in the primary tumor. This tumor angiogenesis is thought to be mediated by tumor-cell-derived growth factors. However, most tumor cells express a multitude of candidate angiogenesis factors and it is difficult to decipher which of these are rate-limiting factors in vivo. Herein we use ribozyme targeting of pleiotrophin (PTN) in metastatic human melanoma cells to assess the significance of this secreted growth factor for angiogenesis and metastasis. As a model we used human melanoma cells (1205LU) that express high levels of PTN and metastasize from subcutaneous tumors to the lungs of experimental animals. In these melanoma cells, we reduced PTN mRNA and growth factor activity by transfection with PTN-targeted ribozymes and generated cell lines expressing different levels of PTN. We found that the reduction of PTN does not affect growth of the melanoma cells in vitro. In nude mice, however, tumor growth and angiogenesis were decreased in parallel with the reduced PTN levels and apoptosis in the tumors was increased. Concomitantly, the metastatic spread of the tumors from the subcutaneous site to the lungs was prevented. These studies support a direct link between tumor angiogenesis and metastasis through a secreted growth factor and identify PTN as a candidate factor that may be rate-limiting for human melanoma metastasis.

  16. Camel milk inhibits inflammatory angiogenesis via downregulation of proangiogenic and proinflammatory cytokines in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhaider, Abdulqader A; Abdel Gader, Abdel Galil M; Almeshaal, Nawaf; Saraswati, Sarita

    2014-07-01

    Camel milk has traditionally been used to treat cancer, but this practice awaits scientific scrutiny, in particular its role in tumor angiogenesis, the key step involved in tumor growth and metastasis. We aimed to investigate the effects of camel milk on key components of inflammatory angiogenesis in sponge implant angiogenesis model. Polyester-polyurethane sponges, used as a framework for fibrovascular tissue growth, were implanted in Swiss albino mice and camel milk (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg/day) was administered for 14 days through installed cannula. The implants collected at day 14 post-implantation were processed for the assessment of hemoglobin (Hb), myeloperoxidase (MPO), N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG), and collagen, which were used as indices for angiogenesis, neutrophil, and macrophage accumulation and extracellular matrix deposition, respectively. Relevant inflammatory, angiogenic, and fibrogenic cytokines were also determined. Camel milk treatment attenuated the main components of the fibrovascular tissue, wet weight, vascularization (Hb content), macrophage recruitment (NAG activity), collagen deposition and the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor-α, and transforming growth factor-β. A regulatory function of camel milk on multiple parameters of the main components of inflammatory angiogenesis has been revealed, giving insight into the potential therapeutic benefit underlying the anti-cancer actions of camel milk. © 2013 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Evaluation of Angiogenesis Using Micro-Computed Tomography in a Xenograft Mouse Model of Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar Savai

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative evaluation of lung tumor angiogenesis using immunohistochemical techniques has been limited by difficulties in generating reproducible data. To analyze intrapulmonary tumor angiogenesis, we used high-resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT of lung tumors of mice inoculated with mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC1 or human adenocarcinoma (A549 cell lines. The lung vasculature was filled with the radiopaque silicone rubber, Microfil, through the jugular vein (in vivo application or pulmonary artery (ex vivo application. In addition, human adenocarcinoma lung tumor-bearing mice treated site-specifically with humanized monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab against vascular endothelial growth factor. Quantitative analysis of lung tumor microvessels imaged with micro-CT showed that more vessels (mainly small, <0.02 mm2 were filled using the in vivo (5.4% compared with the ex vivo (2.1% method. Furthermore, bevacizumab-treated lung tumor-bearing mice showed significantly reduced lung tumor volume and lung tumor angiogenesis compared with untreated mice as assessed by micro-CT. Interestingly, microvascularization of mainly the smaller vessels (<0.02 mm2 was reduced after bevacizumab treatment. This observation with micro-CT was nicely correlated with immunohistochemical measurement of microvessels. Therefore, micro-CT is a novel method for investigating lung tumor angiogenesis, and this might be considered as an additional complementary tool for precise quantification of angiogenesis.

  18. Fibromodulin Enhances Angiogenesis during Cutaneous Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Zheng, PhD

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Altogether, we demonstrated that in addition to reducing scar formation, FMOD also promotes angiogenesis. As blood vessels organize and regulate wound healing, its potent angiogenic properties will further expand the clinical application of FMOD for cutaneous healing of poorly vascularized wounds.

  19. Automatic extraction of angiogenesis bioprocess from text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinglong; McKendrick, Iain; Barrett, Ian; Dix, Ian; French, Tim; Tsujii, Jun'ichi; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Understanding key biological processes (bioprocesses) and their relationships with constituent biological entities and pharmaceutical agents is crucial for drug design and discovery. One way to harvest such information is searching the literature. However, bioprocesses are difficult to capture because they may occur in text in a variety of textual expressions. Moreover, a bioprocess is often composed of a series of bioevents, where a bioevent denotes changes to one or a group of cells involved in the bioprocess. Such bioevents are often used to refer to bioprocesses in text, which current techniques, relying solely on specialized lexicons, struggle to find. Results: This article presents a range of methods for finding bioprocess terms and events. To facilitate the study, we built a gold standard corpus in which terms and events related to angiogenesis, a key biological process of the growth of new blood vessels, were annotated. Statistics of the annotated corpus revealed that over 36% of the text expressions that referred to angiogenesis appeared as events. The proposed methods respectively employed domain-specific vocabularies, a manually annotated corpus and unstructured domain-specific documents. Evaluation results showed that, while a supervised machine-learning model yielded the best precision, recall and F1 scores, the other methods achieved reasonable performance and less cost to develop. Availability: The angiogenesis vocabularies, gold standard corpus, annotation guidelines and software described in this article are available at http://text0.mib.man.ac.uk/~mbassxw2/angiogenesis/ Contact: xinglong.wang@gmail.com PMID:21821664

  20. Monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, David Alberg

    2008-01-01

    When a tumor reaches a certain size it can no longer rely on passive perfusion for nutrition. The tumor therefore emits signaling molecules which stimulating surrounding vessels to divide and grow towards the tumor, a process known as angiogenesis. Very little angiogenesis is present in healthy a...... in a transgenic mouse model. The last manuscript presents a new method for in vivo cell labeling. This method could find use in studying the metastatic spread of cancer cells throughout the body.......-angiogenic treatment is presented in the first manuscript. In the second and third manuscript, two separate methods of quantifying perfusion, blood volume and vessel permeability are presented. The methods are used to show that drug delivery to a xenografted tumor is plausible and to show possible vascular maturation...... and the involved signaling molecules. Subsequently, a short review of contrast agents and perfusion measurements is given. Finally, methods for monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance imaging are reviewed. A method for monitoring early stages of angiogenesis as well as the effect of anti...

  1. Angiogenesis in wound healing and tumor metastasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, D. J.; Schlingemann, R. O.; Westphal, J. R.; Denijn, M.; Rietveld, F. J.; de Waal, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    Formation of new blood vessels is essential for several physiological and pathological events, e.g. embryogenesis, wound healing and tumor growth and metastasis. In order to increase the insight into the mechanisms of angiogenesis we have visualized the different components of the microvasculature

  2. Proliferation, angiogenesis and differentiation related markers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The upregulation of these proliferation- and angiogenesis-related factors in endothelial cells and/or fibroblasts and not in follicular cells of compact carcinoma compared to healthy glands supports the relevance of stromal cells in cancer progression. Keywords: Canine, Histology, Immunohistochemistry, Thyroid carcinoma.

  3. PPAR Gamma and Angiogenesis: Endothelial Cells Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Kotlinowski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We summarize the current knowledge concerning PPARγ function in angiogenesis. We discuss the mechanisms of action for PPARγ and its role in vasculature development and homeostasis, focusing on endothelial cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and bone marrow-derived proangiogenic cells.

  4. Angiogenesis and the inception of pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapiteijn, Kitty

    2006-01-01

    Vascular maladaptation prior and during implantation may lead to serious complications during pregnancy, perinatally, but also later in life (Barker hypothesis). The consequences later in life often appear to be related to endothelial dysfunction. Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels

  5. Mucosal Vaccine Development Based on Liposome Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi, Valentina; Norling, Karin; Bally, Marta; Höök, Fredrik; Lycke, Nils Y

    2016-01-01

    Immune protection against infectious diseases is most effective if located at the portal of entry of the pathogen. Hence, there is an increasing demand for vaccine formulations that can induce strong protective immunity following oral, respiratory, or genital tract administration. At present, only few mucosal vaccines are found on the market, but recent technological advancements and a better understanding of the principles that govern priming of mucosal immune responses have contributed to a more optimistic view on the future of mucosal vaccines. Compared to live attenuated vaccines, subcomponent vaccines, most often protein-based, are considered safer, more stable, and less complicated to manufacture, but they require the addition of nontoxic and clinically safe adjuvants to be effective. In addition, another limiting factor is the large antigen dose that usually is required for mucosal vaccines. Therefore, the combination of mucosal adjuvants with the recent progress in nanoparticle technology provides an attractive solution to these problems. In particular, the liposome technology is ideal for combining protein antigen and adjuvant into an effective mucosal vaccine. Here, we describe and discuss recent progress in nanoparticle formulations using various types of liposomes that convey strong promise for the successful development of the next generation of mucosal vaccines.

  6. Modern mucosal vaccines, adjuvants and microbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranage, Martin P; Manoussaka, Maria

    2009-02-01

    Preventing infection at the pathogen portal of entry through induction of mucosal immunity and the use of microbicides has always been an exciting prospect. Moreover, the promise of needle-free prophylaxis is attractive for many reasons. This meeting report highlights some of the critical issues that were discussed concerning recent advances in the field. New routes of vaccination and modalities of delivery are still being discovered, and important advances are occurring in the development of safe mucosal adjuvants. Protection of mucosal surfaces is likely to be particularly crucial to prevent infections with pathogens, such as HIV, that can be sequestered rapidly.

  7. Therapeutic angiogenesis for the critical limb ischemia decreases platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudý, Peter; Chudá, Daniela; Hudeček, Jan; Fedorová, Jana; Sinák, Igor; Hlinka, Luboš; Talapková, Renáta; Laca, Ludovít; Kubisz, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Platelets are required for the recruitment of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMMNC) into ischemia-induced vasculature, which underlines their key role in angiogenesis. The difference in platelet immunophenotype between healthy controls and patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI) treated with therapeutic angiogenesis (TA) using BMMNC was assessed. The impact of TA on the expression of platelet membrane markers was studied as well. CLI patients (N = 26) and blood donors as controls (N = 21) were enrolled. Bone marrow (600 ± 50 ml) was centrifuged (3200 g, 20 min, 22 °C). BMMNC (100-120 ml) were separated by Optipress I and implanted to the ischemic limb using deep intramuscular injections. Flow cytometry was employed for the peripheral blood platelets immunophenotyping. CD41FITC, CD62PE, CD36FITC, CD29FITC antibodies were used. Patients were followed up prior to the procedure and at months 1, 3 and 6. The expression of CD41 was lower in CLI patients than in the controls. P-selectin (CD62P) was higher in CLI patients than in controls at the baseline and at month 6. It was significantly down-regulated at month 3, however not at months 1 and 6 compared to baseline. Platelet GPIV (CD36) was higher at the baseline, but not during the follow-up compared to the controls. β1-integrin (CD29) progressively decreased during the follow-up as compared to the baseline value. Platelets in CLI express P-selectin, GPIV and β1-integrin more abundantly than platelets of healthy subjects. TA down-regulates the expression of the respective markers. Possible mechanism could be higher clearance of the activated platelets in the ischemic tissues during angiogenesis.

  8. Healing acceleration in hamsters of oral mucositis induced by 5-fluorouracil with topical Calendula officinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanideh, Nader; Tavakoli, Parisa; Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Amanat, Dariush; Tadbir, Azadeh Andisheh; Samani, Soleiman Mohammadi; Tamadon, Amin

    2013-03-01

    This study assessed the potential of topical Calendula officinalis extract on the healing of oral mucositis induced by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in hamsters. Oral mucositis was induced in 60 male hamsters by 5-FU (60 mg/kg) on days 0, 5, and 10 of the study. The cheek pouch was scratched with a sterile needle on days 1 and 2. On days 12-17, 5% and 10% C. officinalis gel and gel base groups were treated and then compared with a control group. Macroscopic and microscopic scores and weights were evaluated. Microscopic and macroscopic scores of mucositis were lower in the 5% and 10% C. officinalis gel groups than in the gel base and control groups (P Calendula officinalis extract accelerated the healing of oral mucositis in hamsters. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Microneedle and mucosal delivery of influenza vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang-Moo; Song, Jae-Min; Kim, Yeu-Chun

    2017-01-01

    In recent years with the threat of pandemic influenza and other public health needs, alternative vaccination methods other than intramuscular immunization have received great attention. The skin and mucosal surfaces are attractive sites probably because of both non-invasive access to the vaccine delivery and unique immunological responses. Intradermal vaccines using a microinjection system (BD Soluvia) and intranasal vaccines (FluMist) are licensed. As a new vaccination method, solid microneedles have been developed using a simple device that may be suitable for self-administration. Because coated micorneedle influenza vaccines are administered in the solid state, developing formulations maintaining the stability of influenza vaccines is an important issue to be considered. Marketable microneedle devices and clinical trials remain to be developed. Other alternative mucosal routes such as oral and intranasal delivery systems are also attractive for inducing cross protective mucosal immunity but effective non-live mucosal vaccines remain to be developed. PMID:22697052

  10. Microbiota and Mucosal Immunity in Amphibians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Bruno M.; Scalvenzi, Thibault; Benlamara, Sarah; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last 20 years, we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacteria, archeas, and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet, the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: (i) the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and (ii) the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small-animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota. PMID:25821449

  11. Microbiota and mucosal immunity in amphibians

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Colombo, Bruno M; Scalvenzi, Thibault; Benlamara, Sarah; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    ...) the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small-animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota.

  12. Microbiota and mucosal immunity in amphibians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno M Colombo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last twenty years we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacterias, archeas and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: i the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and ii the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota.

  13. Microbiota and mucosal immunity in amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Bruno M; Scalvenzi, Thibault; Benlamara, Sarah; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last 20 years, we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacteria, archeas, and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet, the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: (i) the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and (ii) the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small-animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota.

  14. Transgenic Killer Commensal Bacteria as Mucosal Protectants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Polonelli

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available As first line of defense against the majority of infections and primary site for their transmission, mucosal surfaces of the oral cavity and genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and respiratory tracts represent the most suitable sites to deliver protective agents for the prevention of infectious diseases. Mucosal protection is important not only for life threatening diseases but also for opportunistic infections which currently represent a serious burden in terms of morbidity, mortality, and cost of cures. Candida albicans is among the most prevalent causes of mucosal infections not only in immuno- compromised patients, such as HIV-infected subjects who are frequently affected by oral and esophageal candidiasis, but also in otherwise healthy individuals, as in the case of acute vaginitis. Unfortunately, current strategies for mucosal protection against candidiasis are severely limited by the lack of effective vaccines and the relative paucity and toxicity of commercially available antifungal drugs. An additional option has been reported in a recent

  15. Cellular proliferation and angiogenesis in nasal polyps of young adult and geriatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae Min; Byun, Jang Yul; Baek, Byoung Joon; Lee, Jae Yong

    2015-06-01

    Cellular proliferation and angiogenesis are associated with pathophysiology of nasal polyposis (NP). In a previous report, we showed that patient age is a predictive factor of surgical outcomes among patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and NP, and that geriatric patients exhibit better outcomes than pediatric and adult patients. We postulated that better outcomes in the geriatric population may be secondary to decreased proliferation and angiogenesis within polyps. Therefore, we evaluated the cellular proliferation and angiogenesis in young adult and geriatric patients with NP. This was a prospective case-control study. Twenty patients were divided into 2 groups according to age (20 to 30 years vs ≥65 years of age). NP tissues were sampled during endoscopic sinus surgery and processed for immunohistochemistry. Cellular proliferation was evaluated with proliferating cell nuclear antigen and Ki67, and angiogenesis was assessed with vascular endothelial growth factor. We also compared objective surgical outcomes using endoscopy scores. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed significantly higher expression and positive reactivity of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and Ki67 in the polyps of young adults than in those of geriatric patients, whereas the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor was similar between the 2 groups. Endoscopy scores were better in the geriatric group. Geriatric patients have a lower cellular proliferative ability than young adults, and angiogenesis does not significantly differ between the 2 age groups. Cellular proliferation seems to be the cause of the different surgical outcomes between the 2 age groups, whereas angiogenesis has no significant influence on the postoperative course. © 2015 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  16. Ferrite Nanoparticles in Pharmacological Modulation of Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Aparna; Radha, S.; Khan, Y.; Tilak, Priya

    2011-07-01

    Nanoparticles are being explored in the targeted drug delivery of pharmacological agents : angiogenesis being one such novel application which involves formation of new blood vessels or branching of existing ones. The present study involves the use of ferrite nanoparticles for precise therapeutic modulation of angiogenesis. The ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation of ferrous and ferric salts by a suitable base, were found to be 10-20 nm from X-ray diffraction and TEM measurements. The magnetization measurements showed superparamagnetic behavior of the uncoated nanoparticles. These ferrite nanoparticles were found to be bio-compatible with lymphocytes and neural cell lines from the biochemical assays. The chick chorioallantoic membrane(CAM) from the shell of fertile white Leghorn eggs was chosen as a model to study angiogenic activity. An enhancement in the angiogenic activity in the CAM due to addition of uncoated ferrite nanoparticles was observed.

  17. Cytokines and Angiogenesis in the Corpus Luteum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António M. Galvão

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In adults, physiological angiogenesis is a rare event, with few exceptions as the vasculogenesis needed for tissue growth and function in female reproductive organs. Particularly in the corpus luteum (CL, regulation of angiogenic process seems to be tightly controlled by opposite actions resultant from the balance between pro- and antiangiogenic factors. It is the extremely rapid sequence of events that determines the dramatic changes on vascular and nonvascular structures, qualifying the CL as a great model for angiogenesis studies. Using the mare CL as a model, reports on locally produced cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNF, interferon gamma (IFNG, or Fas ligand (FASL, pointed out their role on angiogenic activity modulation throughout the luteal phase. Thus, the main purpose of this review is to highlight the interaction between immune, endothelial, and luteal steroidogenic cells, regarding vascular dynamics/changes during establishment and regression of the equine CL.

  18. Vaccination against Salmonella Infection: the Mucosal Way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayet, Rémi; Bioley, Gilles; Rochereau, Nicolas; Paul, Stéphane; Corthésy, Blaise

    2017-09-01

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica includes several serovars infecting both humans and other animals and leading to typhoid fever or gastroenteritis. The high prevalence of associated morbidity and mortality, together with an increased emergence of multidrug-resistant strains, is a current global health issue that has prompted the development of vaccination strategies that confer protection against most serovars. Currently available systemic vaccine approaches have major limitations, including a reduced effectiveness in young children and a lack of cross-protection among different strains. Having studied host-pathogen interactions, microbiologists and immunologists argue in favor of topical gastrointestinal administration for improvement in vaccine efficacy. Here, recent advances in this field are summarized, including mechanisms of bacterial uptake at the intestinal epithelium, the assessment of protective host immunity, and improved animal models that closely mimic infection in humans. The pros and cons of existing vaccines are presented, along with recent progress made with novel formulations. Finally, new candidate antigens and their relevance in the refined design of anti-Salmonella vaccines are discussed, along with antigen vectorization strategies such as nanoparticles or secretory immunoglobulins, with a focus on potentiating mucosal vaccine efficacy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Toll-Like Receptors in Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Grote

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs are known as pattern-recognition receptors related to the Toll protein of Drosophila. After recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns of microbial origin, the TLRs alert the immune system, and initiate innate and adaptive immune responses. The TLR system, though, is not confined solely to the leukocyte-mediated immune defense against exogenous pathogens. Besides myeloid cells, TLR expression has been reported in multiple tissues and cell types, including epithelial and endothelial cells. Moreover, despite the microbial patterns that are commonly accepted as TLR ligands, there is increasing evidence that TLRs also recognize host-derived molecules. In this regard, recent studies point to an involvement of TLRs in various chronic inflammatory disorders and cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and even cancer. A common feature of these disorders is an enhanced so-called inflammation-induced angiogenesis. However, inflammation-induced angiogenesis is not solely a key component of pathogen defense during acute infection or chronic inflammatory disorders, but also plays a critical role in repair mechanisms, e.g., wound healing and subsequent tissue regeneration. Interestingly, the latest research could coincidentally demonstrate that TLR activation promotes angiogenesis in various inflammatory settings in response to both exogenous and endogenous ligands, although the precise mode of action of TLRs in this context still remains ambiguous. The objective of this review is to present evidence for the implication of TLRs in angiogenesis during physiological and pathophysiological processes, and the potential clinical relevance for new treatment regimes involving TLR modulation.

  20. Molecular MRI of neurovascular inflammation and angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Deddens, L.H.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes the use of different MR contrast agent platforms for the direct detection of pathology-induced upregulation of intraluminally-expressed vascular entities by molecular MRI. We particularly focused on the in vivo target specificity and MR sensitivity of the agents. The biological targets of our molecular MRI approaches were associated with two types of vascular events that are critically involved in many pathologies; i.e., angiogenesis and neurovascular inflammation. In Ch...

  1. Highly Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Exposed Seronegative Men Have Lower Mucosal Innate Immune Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Jennifer A; Romas, Laura; Hoffman, Jennifer C; Elliott, Julie; Saunders, Terry; Burgener, Adam D; Anton, Peter A; Yang, Otto O

    2017-08-01

    Risk of HIV acquisition varies, and some individuals are highly HIV-1-exposed, yet, persistently seronegative (HESN). The immunologic mechanisms contributing to this phenomenon are an area of intense interest. As immune activation and inflammation facilitate disease progression in HIV-1-infected persons and gastrointestinal-associated lymphoid tissue is a highly susceptible site for transmission, we hypothesized that reduced gut mucosal immune reactivity may contribute to reduced HIV-1 susceptibility in HESN men with a history of numerous rectal sexual exposures. To test this, we used ex vivo mucosal explants from freshly acquired colorectal biopsies from healthy control and HESN subjects who were stimulated with specific innate immune ligands and inactivated whole pathogens. Immune reactivity was then assessed via cytokine arrays and proteomic analysis. Mucosal immune cell compositions were quantified via immunohistochemistry. We found that explants from HESN subjects produced less proinflammatory cytokines compared with controls following innate immune stimulation; while noninflammatory cytokines were similar between groups. Proteomic analysis identified several immune response proteins to be differentially expressed between HIV-1-stimulated HESN and control explants. Immunohistochemical examination of colorectal mucosa showed similar amounts of T cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells between groups. The results of this pilot study suggest that mucosal innate immune reactivity is dampened in HESN versus control groups, despite presence of similar densities of immune cells in the colorectal mucosa. This observed modulation of the rectal mucosal immune response may contribute to lower risk of mucosal HIV-1 transmission in these individuals.

  2. Effects of Streptococcus thermophilus TH-4 in a rat model of doxorubicin-induced mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanru; Brook, Caitlin L; Whittaker, Alexandra L; Lawrence, Andrew; Yazbeck, Roger; Howarth, Gordon S

    2013-08-01

    Mucositis is a debilitating intestinal side effect of chemotherapeutic regimens. Probiotics have been considered a possible preventative treatment for mucositis. Streptococcus thermophilus TH-4 (TH-4), a newly identified probiotic, has been shown to partially alleviate mucositis induced by administration of the antimetabolite chemotherapy drug, methotrexate in rats; likely mediated through a mechanism of folate production. However, its effects against other classes of chemotherapy drug have yet to be determined. The authors investigated the effects of TH-4 in a rat model of mucositis induced by the anthracycline chemotherapy drug, doxorubicin. Gastrointestinal damage was induced in female Dark Agouti rats (148.3 ± 1.5 g) by intraperitoneal injection of doxorubicin (20 mg/kg). Animals recieved a daily oral gavage of TH-4 at 10(9) cfu/ml or skim milk (vehicle) from days 0 to 8. At day 6, rats were injected with either saline or doxorubicin. At kill, small intestinal tissues were collected for determination of sucrase and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities and histological assessment. Body weight was significantly decreased by doxorubicin compared with normal controls (p loss of body weight induced by doxorubicin (2.3% compared with 4%), but provided no further therapeutic benefit. The minimal amelioration of doxorubicin-induced mucositis by TH-4 further supports folate production as a likely mechanism of TH-4 action against methotrexate-induced mucositis. Further studies into TH-4 are required to confirm its applicability to other conventional chemotherapy regimens.

  3. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor increases vascular endothelial growth factor expression and enhances angiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Yang; Hung, Shih-Ya; Chen, Hsien-Te; Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Fong, Yi-Chin; Wang, Shih-Wei; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2014-10-15

    Chondrosarcomas are a type of primary malignant bone cancer, with a potent capacity for local invasion and distant metastasis. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is commonly upregulated during neurogenesis. The aim of the present study was to examine the mechanism involved in BDNF-mediated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and angiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma cells. Here, we knocked down BDNF expression in chondrosarcoma cells and assessed their capacity to control VEGF expression and angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. We found knockdown of BDNF decreased VEGF expression and abolished chondrosarcoma conditional medium-mediated angiogenesis in vitro as well as angiogenesis effects in vivo in the chick chorioallantoic membrane and Matrigel plug nude mouse models. In addition, in the xenograft tumor angiogenesis model, the knockdown of BDNF significantly reduced tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis. BDNF increased VEGF expression and angiogenesis through the TrkB receptor, PLCγ, PKCα, and the HIF-1α signaling pathway. Finally, we analyzed samples from chondrosarcoma patients by immunohistochemical staining. The expression of BDNF and VEGF protein in 56 chondrosarcoma patients was significantly higher than in normal cartilage. In addition, the high level of BDNF expression correlated strongly with VEGF expression and tumor stage. Taken together, our results indicate that BDNF increases VEGF expression and enhances angiogenesis through a signal transduction pathway that involves the TrkB receptor, PLCγ, PKCα, and the HIF-1α. Therefore, BDNF may represent a novel target for anti-angiogenic therapy for human chondrosarcoma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Statins and angiogenesis: Is it about connections?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaidakov, Magomed, E-mail: mkhaidakov@uams.edu [Division of Cardiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and VA Medical Center, Little Rock, AR (United States); Wang, Wenze [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Khan, Junaid A.; Kang, Bum-Yong; Hermonat, Paul L. [Division of Cardiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and VA Medical Center, Little Rock, AR (United States); Mehta, Jawahar L., E-mail: Mehtajl@uams.edu [Division of Cardiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and VA Medical Center, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2009-09-25

    Statins, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, have been shown to induce both angiogenic and angiostatic responses. We attempted to resolve this controversy by studying the effects of two different statins, rosuvastatin and simvastatin, in two different assay systems. In the matrigel angiogenesis assay, both statins enhanced tube formation by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs, p < 0.01 vs. control). In the ex vivo mouse aortic ring sprouting assay, both statins virtually abolished new vessel formation (p < 0.01). As a basic difference between the two models of angiogenesis is dispersed state of endothelial cells vs. compact monolayer, we analyzed influence of statins on endothelial junction proteins. RT-PCR analysis and cytoimmunostaining of HUVECs treated with simvastatin revealed increased expression of VE-cadherin (p < 0.05). The blockade of VE-cadherin with a specific antibody reversed simvastatin-induced tube formation (p < 0.002). These data suggest that statins through VE-cadherin stimulation modulate cell-cell adhesion and diminish the ability of cells to proliferate and migrate. The observations of reduced angiogenesis in the intact vessel may relate to anti-atherosclerotic and anti-cancer effects of statins, and provide a feasible explanation for conflicting data under different experimental conditions.

  5. Molecular Therapeutic Targets for Glioma Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Takano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the prominent angiogenesis that occurs in malignant glioma, antiangiogenic therapy has been attempted. There have been several molecular targets that are specific to malignant gliomas, as well as more broadly in systemic cancers. In this review, I will focus on some topics related to molecular therapeutic targets for glioma angiogenesis. First, important angiogenic factors that could be considered molecular targets are VEGF, VEGF-induced proteins on endothelial cells, tissue factor, osteopontin, v3 integrin, and thymidine phosphorylase as well as endogenous inhibitors, soluble Flt1, and thrombospondin 1. Second, hypoxic areas are also decreased by metronomic CPT11 treatment as well as temozolomide. Third, glioma-derived endothelial cells that are genetically and functionally distinct from normal endothelial cells should be targeted, for example, with SDF-1 and CXCR7 chemokine. Fourth, endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs likely contribute towards glioma angiogenesis in the brain and could be useful as a drug delivery tool. Finally, blockade of delta-like 4 (Dll4 results in a nonfunctioning vasculature and could be another important target distinct from VEGF.

  6. Soy and Breast Cancer: Focus on Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Varinska

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have revealed that high consumption of soy products is associated with low incidences of hormone-dependent cancers, including breast and prostate cancer. Soybeans contain large amounts of isoflavones, such as the genistein and daidzain. Previously, it has been demonstrated that genistein, one of the predominant soy isoflavones, can inhibit several steps involved in carcinogenesis. It is suggested that genistein possesses pleiotropic molecular mechanisms of action including inhibition of tyrosine kinases, DNA topoisomerase II, 5α-reductase, galectin-induced G2/M arrest, protein histidine kinase, and cyclin-dependent kinases, modulation of different signaling pathways associated with the growth of cancer cells (e.g., NF-κB, Akt, MAPK, etc. Moreover, genistein is also a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis. Uncontrolled angiogenesis is considered as a key step in cancer growth, invasion, and metastasis. Genistein was found to inhibit angiogenesis through regulation of multiple pathways, such as regulation of VEGF, MMPs, EGFR expressions and NF-κB, PI3-K/Akt, ERK1/2 signaling pathways, thereby causing strong antiangiogenic effects. This review focuses on the antiangiogenic properties of soy isoflavonoids and examines their possible underlying mechanisms.

  7. Intrauterine growth restriction and placental angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harma Muge

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, basic-fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS are factors that take part in placental angiogenesis. They are highly expressed during embryonic and fetal development, especially in the first trimester. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of placental angiogenesis in the development of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR by comparing the levels of expression of VEGF-A, b-FGF, and eNOS in normal-term pregnancy and IUGR placentas. Methods The expression of VEGF-A, b-FGF, and eNOS was studied using the avidin-biotin-peroxidase method in placental tissues diagnosed as normal (n = 55 and IUGR (n = 55. Results were evaluated in a semi-quantitative manner. Results The expression of all the markers was significantly higher (p Conclusion Increased expression of VEGF-A, b-FGF, and eNOS may be the result of inadequate uteroplacental perfusion, supporting the proposal that abnormal angiogenesis plays a role in the pathophysiology of IUGR.

  8. Inside the mucosal immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry R McGhee

    Full Text Available An intricate network of innate and immune cells and their derived mediators function in unison to protect us from toxic elements and infectious microbial diseases that are encountered in our environment. This vast network operates efficiently by use of a single cell epithelium in, for example, the gastrointestinal (GI and upper respiratory (UR tracts, fortified by adjoining cells and lymphoid tissues that protect its integrity. Perturbations certainly occur, sometimes resulting in inflammatory diseases or infections that can be debilitating and life threatening. For example, allergies in the eyes, skin, nose, and the UR or digestive tracts are common. Likewise, genetic background and environmental microbial encounters can lead to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs. This mucosal immune system (MIS in both health and disease is currently under intense investigation worldwide by scientists with diverse expertise and interests. Despite this activity, there are numerous questions remaining that will require detailed answers in order to use the MIS to our advantage. In this issue of PLOS Biology, a research article describes a multi-scale in vivo systems approach to determine precisely how the gut epithelium responds to an inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, given by the intravenous route. This article reveals a previously unknown pathway in which several cell types and their secreted mediators work in unison to prevent epithelial cell death in the mouse small intestine. The results of this interesting study illustrate how in vivo systems biology approaches can be used to unravel the complex mechanisms used to protect the host from its environment.

  9. Transoral Mucosal Excision Sutured Gastroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legner, Andras; Altorjay, Aron; Juhasz, Arpad; Stadlhuber, Rudolph; Reich, Viktor; Hunt, Brandon; Rothstein, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. An outpatient transoral endoscopic procedure for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and obesity would be appealing if safe, effective, and durable. We present the first in human experience with a new system. Methods. Eight patients with GERD (3) and obesity (5) were selected according to a preapproved study protocol. All GERD patients had preprocedure manometry and pH monitoring to document GERD as well as quality of life and symptom questionnaires. Obese patients (body mass index >35) underwent a psychological evaluation and tests for comorbidities. Under general anesthesia, a procedure was performed at the gastroesophageal junction including mucosal excision, suturing of the excision beds for apposition, and suture knotting. Results. One patient with micrognathia could not undergo the required preprocedural passage of a 60 F dilator and was excluded. The first 2 GERD patients had incomplete procedures due to instrument malfunction. The subsequent 5 subjects had a successfully completed procedure. Four patients were treated for obesity and had an average excess weight loss of 30.3% at 2-year follow-up. Of these patients, one had an 8-mm outlet at the end of the procedure recognized on video review—a correctable error—and another vomited multiple times postoperatively and loosened the gastroplasty sutures. The treated GERD patient had resolution of reflux-related symptoms and is off all antisecretory medications at 2-year follow-up. Her DeMeester score was 8.9 at 24 months. Conclusion. The initial human clinical experience showed promising results for effective and safe GERD and obesity therapy. PMID:24623807

  10. LIHNCS - Lugol's iodine in head and neck cancer surgery: a multicentre, randomised controlled trial assessing the effectiveness of Lugol's iodine to assist excision of moderate dysplasia, severe dysplasia and carcinoma in situ at mucosal resection margins of oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaul, James A; Cymerman, James A; Hislop, Stuart; McConkey, Chris; McMahon, Jeremy; Mehanna, Hisham; Shaw, Richard; Sutton, David N; Dunn, Janet

    2013-09-24

    Oral cavity and oropharynx cancer are increasing in incidence worldwide but survival outcomes have not significantly improved over the last three decades. The presence of dysplasia or carcinoma in situ at surgical margins following resection of squamous carcinoma of the mucosal surfaces of the head and neck has been shown to be associated with a higher incidence of local recurrence and reduced survival. While invasive carcinoma in mucosal surfaces can usually be distinguished from adjacent normal mucous membrane, pre-malignant disease is much less readily distinguished at operation. We describe a protocol for a randomised, controlled trial in which we will assess the effectiveness of Lugol's iodine staining in allowing visualisation and excision of cancer margin dysplasia at time of primary surgery. We will recruit 300 patients diagnosed with oral cavity or oropharynx squamous cell carcinoma. All participants will be planned for primary surgery with curative intent. After completion of baseline assessment participants will be randomised into either a standard surgical treatment arm or surgical treatment including Lugol's iodine staining. This paper describes the rationale and design of a unique trial in head and neck surgical oncology. If margin dysplasia visualisation with Lugol's iodine allows complete excision of high-risk, pre-cancer mucosa at time of primary surgery, this may lead to a reduction in local recurrence and improved survival. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN03712770.

  11. Anti-inflammatory and healing action of oral gel containing borneol monoterpene in chemotherapy-induced mucositis in rats ( Rattus norvegicus

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    Braz José do Nascimento-Júnior

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of gels containing the monoterpene borneol in induced oral mucositis using an animal model. Gels were prepared with borneol at 1.2% and 2.4% (w/w. Oral mucositis was induced by administration of three doses of 5-fluorouracil (30 mg/kg, i.p. and injury with acetic acid (50%, v/v soaked in filter paper applied to right cheek mucosa for 60s. Four subgroups comprising 12 animals each were formed. Six animals from each group were sacrificed at days seven and fourteen after oral mucositis induction. Mucous samples were processed and stained with hematoxylin-eosin and Masson’s Trichrome. The semiquantitative evaluation involved observation of inflammatory parameters. ImageJ® software was used in the quantitative evaluation. For statistical analyses, Two-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey’s post-test (p <0.05, were employed. Borneol 2.4% gel proved effective in the treatment of oral mucositis with statistically significant differences between groups for angiogenesis control, inflammatory cell count reduction and percentage neoformed collagen increase. The confirmation of anti-inflammatory and healing action of borneol in oral mucositis in rats renders it a good marker for predicting this activity for plant extracts rich in this substance.

  12. Modification of radiation-induced acute oral mucositis in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, M; Ross, G A

    2004-02-01

    A new non-toxic drug (compound A) consisting of curcumin, alpha-tocopherol and sunflower oil was developed and its efficacy tested in the treatment of radiation-induced oral mucositis in the rat. Mature (12 weeks old, 200-225 g) female Sprague-Dawley rats were used. While under general anaesthesia, the tongues of the animals were slightly extended outside and a region of the underside of the tongue was irradiated in-situ with single doses of 2.27 MeV beta-rays from a 5-mm diameter 90Sr/90Y plaque. The dose-rate of the source was about 10 Gy min(-1) at the surface of the mucus membrane. Irradiations and subsequent assessment of the lesion were carried out under general anaesthesia maintained by a 1.5% halothane/oxygen mixture. Six groups of animals were irradiated with single doses of 13.5, 15.0, 16.5 or 18Gy. One subgroup (radiation only) received no further treatment, while the other five groups received 0.5 ml day(-1) of either compound A, sunflower oil, alpha-tocopherol, curcumin or water containing 10% ethanol by oral gavage until the end of experiments. Mucosal ulceration (erosion of mucosal epithelium) was considered as an end-point. From the day after irradiation until any acute radiation-induced oral mucosal lesion had healed, the tongues of the animals were assessed daily for the presence of radiation-induced mucositis (mucosal ulceration). Quantal data for the incidence of radiation-induced mucositis were analysed using logit analysis and a dose-modification factor was obtained. There was a modest increase in ED50, the dose expected to cause mucositis in 50% of the animals after both alpha-tocopherol and sunflower oil were administered. This resulted in dose-modification factors of 1.05. While curcumin treatment resulted in a dose-modification factor of 1.09. Compound A significantly reduced the incidence of radiation-induced mucositis with a statistically significant dose-modification factor of 1.2 +/- 0.1. Curcumin and other components of compound A

  13. An evaluation of Vitamin E and Pycnogenol in children suffering from oral mucositis during cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, H; Pandey, R K; Saksena, A K; Kumar, A

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of Vitamin E (E) and Pycnogenol (P) in treatment of Chemotherapy-Related Oral Mucositis (ChROM) in children. A total of 72 children, aged between 6 and 15 years, with ChROM were selected and randomly divided into three groups after assessment of oral mucositis (OM) by WHO grading system. Glycerine (control), E, and P were topically applied in group I, II, and III, respectively, and the prognosis of OM was assessed by functional, objective, and subjective parameters. Patients of group II and III showed significant improvement when ChROM was analyzed through scoring systems - WHO grading, Oral Mucositis Assessment Scale (OMAS), and Children's International Mucositis Evaluation Scale (ChIMES) as compared to group I (P < 0.001); however, there was no significant difference between groups II and III. Both the drugs E and P per se are effective for treatment of OM with P being not effective for the treatment of severe mucositis (grade 4). Combination of E and P and additional agents may be tried for better results. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Recent progress in mucosal vaccine development: potential and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lycke, Nils

    2012-07-25

    Most pathogens access the body through the mucosal membranes. Therefore, effective vaccines that protect at these sites are much needed. However, despite early success with the live attenuated oral polio vaccine over 50 years ago, only a few new mucosal vaccines have been subsequently launched. This is partly due to problems with developing safe and effective mucosal adjuvants. In the past decade, however, the successful development of live attenuated mucosal vaccines against influenza virus and rotavirus infections has boosted interest in this field, and great expectations for new mucosal vaccines lie ahead. Here, I discuss the expanding knowledge and strategies used in the development of mucosal vaccines.

  15. Mucosal vaccines against respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kejian; Varga, Steven M

    2014-06-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of severe respiratory disease in infants, young children, immune-compromised and elderly populations worldwide. Natural RSV infection in young children does not elicit long-lasting immunity and individuals remain susceptible to repeated RSV infections throughout life. Because RSV infection is restricted to the respiratory tract, an RSV vaccine should elicit mucosal immunity at upper and lower respiratory tracts in order to most effectively prevent RSV reinfection. Although there is no safe and effective RSV vaccine available, significant progress has been recently made in basic RSV research and vaccine development. This review will discuss recent advances in the identification of a new neutralizing antigenic site within the RSV fusion (F) protein, understanding the importance of mucosal immune responses against RSV infection, and the development of novel mucosal vaccination strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mucosal Immunity and Candida albicans Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Moyes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between mucosal surfaces and microbial microbiota are key to host defense, health, and disease. These surfaces are exposed to high numbers of microbes and must be capable of distinguishing between those that are beneficial or avirulent and those that will invade and cause disease. Our understanding of the mechanisms involved in these discriminatory processes has recently begun to expand as new studies bring to light the importance of epithelial cells and novel immune cell subsets such as Th17 T cells in these processes. Elucidating how these mechanisms function will improve our understanding of many diverse diseases and improve our ability to treat patients suffering from these conditions. In our voyage to discover these mechanisms, mucosal interactions with opportunistic commensal organisms such as the fungus Candida albicans provide insights that are invaluable. Here, we review current knowledge of the interactions between C. albicans and epithelial surfaces and how this may shape our understanding of microbial-mucosal interactions.

  17. miR-218 inhibited tumor angiogenesis by targeting ROBO1 in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangyuan; Dong, Jiaqiang; He, Yan; Zhao, Ming; Liu, Zhen; Wang, Na; Jiang, Mingzuo; Zhang, Zhe; Liu, Gang; Liu, Haiming; Nie, Yongzhan; Fan, Daiming; Tie, Jun

    2017-06-05

    Aberrant expression of miRNAs is involved in several carcinogenic processes, including tumor growth, metastasis and angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine the role of miR-218 in gastric cancer angiogenesis. In situ hybridization was performed on a set of tissue microarray samples to assess the difference in miR-218 expression in vessels between tumor tissues and normal gastric mucosa. In vitro, ectopic expression of miR-218 disturbed the tubular structure and inhibited the migration of endothelial cells. Motility and tube formation were rescued when miR-218 was downregulated. Moreover, miR-218 suppressed endothelial cell sprouting in a fibrin bead sprouting assay. Subsequently, we identified ROBO1 as a target of miR-218 in endothelial cells and determined it was responsible for the effect of miR-218 on tumor angiogenesis. In vivo, local injection of mature miR-218 in xenografted tumors disrupted the vessel plexus and thus inhibited tumor growth. Taken together, our study demonstrated an anti-angiogenic role of miR-218 in gastric cancer and indicated that delivery of miR-218 may be a potential therapeutic strategy to inhibit tumor angiogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Increased angiogenesis and FGFR protein expression indicate a favourable prognosis in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertz, Simone; Abeé, Christine; Schwarz-Furlan, Stephan; Alfer, Joachim; Hofstädter, Ferdinand; Stoehr, Robert; Hartmann, Arndt; Gaumann, Andreas K A

    2014-12-01

    Compared to other members of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) family, only few studies investigate FGFR3 in tumour angiogenesis. We investigated the connection between angiogenesis and FGF/FGFR expression including FGFR3 mutation status in urothelial carcinomas. Immunohistochemistry was performed in invasive and non-invasive urothelial cancers of 61 patients. Protein expression of CD31, factor VIII (FVIII), FGF-1/2, FGFR1, FGFR3 and FGFR4 and FGFR3 mutation status were evaluated. Morphometric assessment of angiogenesis including microvessel count (MVC) and vascular surface area (VSA) was analysed. Correlation and survival analyses (overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS)) with univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. CD31 values (MVC and VSA) significantly correlated with OS and DFS. OS and DFS were significantly better in patients with FGFR3 overexpression. Multivariate analysis revealed FGFR3 protein expression and tumour grading (WHO classification 2004) as independent prognostic factors of OS and VSA of CD31 and FGFR3 protein expression of DFS. FGFR3 mutation status was correlated with VSA measured by FVIII. FGFR3 may be able to induce a pro-angiogenic phenotype in urothelial carcinomas and significantly influence prognosis. Consequently, FGFR3 is a potential therapeutic target also from the angiogenesis perspective.

  19. Novel vaccine development strategies for inducing mucosal immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujkuyama, Yoshiko; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Kataoka, Kosuke; Gilbert, Rebekah S; McGhee, Jerry R; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2012-01-01

    To develop protective immune responses against mucosal pathogens, the delivery route and adjuvants for vaccination are important. The host, however, strives to maintain mucosal homeostasis by responding to mucosal antigens with tolerance, instead of immune activation. Thus, induction of mucosal immunity through vaccination is a rather difficult task, and potent mucosal adjuvants, vectors or other special delivery systems are often used, especially in the elderly. By taking advantage of the common mucosal immune system, the targeting of mucosal dendritic cells and microfold epithelial cells may facilitate the induction of effective mucosal immunity. Thus, novel routes of immunization and antigen delivery systems also show great potential for the development of effective and safe mucosal vaccines against various pathogens. The purpose of this review is to introduce several recent approaches to induce mucosal immunity to vaccines, with an emphasis on mucosal tissue targeting, new immunization routes and delivery systems. Defining the mechanisms of mucosal vaccines is as important as their efficacy and safety, and in this article, examples of recent approaches, which will likely accelerate progress in mucosal vaccine development, are discussed. PMID:22380827

  20. Exosomes expressing carbonic anhydrase 9 promote angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, Kengo; Kawakami, Kyojiro; Fujita, Yasunori; Sugaya, Maki; Kameyama, Koji; Mizutani, Kosuke; Deguchi, Takashi; Ito, Masafumi

    2017-10-21

    Exosomes or microvesicles that are secreted from cells are considered to play important roles in tumor microenvironment. Carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9), which is induced by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) in response to hypoxia, is overexpressed in many types of cancer including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We examined the expression level of CA9 in several RCC cell lines and found that the basal level of CA9 was much higher in OSRC-2 cells than in Caki-1, KMRC-1 and 786-O cells. Consistent with the intracellular expression levels, CA9 was abundantly detected in exosomes isolated by ultracentrifugation from OSRC-2 cells. Density gradient centrifugation of OSRC-2 and 786-O exosomes confirmed the co-presence of CA9 with exosomal markers. Upon hypoxia and treatment with CoCl2, a hypoxia mimic agent, the CA9 level in exosomes was increased for all cell lines. In order to examine the effects of CA9 exosomes on angiogenesis, we generated stably transfected HEK293 cells expressing CA9. Immunocytochemical staining demonstrated the uptake of CA9 exosomes by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). In vitro angiogenesis assays using HUVEC revealed that CA9 exosomes promoted migration and tube formation. Lastly, MMP2 expression was increased by treatment with CA9 exosomes in HUVEC. Taken together, our results suggest the possibility that CA9 exosomes released from hypoxic RCC may enhance angiogenesis in microenvironment, thereby contributing to cancer progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Angiogenesis and anti-angiogenesis: Perspectives for the treatment of solid tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinsbergh, V.W.M. van; Collen, A.; Koolwijk, P.

    1999-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels from preexisting ones. Many solid tumors depend on an extensive newly formed vascular network to become nourished and to expand. Tumor cells induce the formation of an extensive but aberrant vascular network by the secretion of angiogenic factors. A

  2. Electrochemotherapy of mucosal head and neck tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plaschke, Christina Caroline; Gothelf, Anita; Gehl, Julie

    2016-01-01

    with head and neck cancer treated across the mucosal surface with electrochemotherapy. The search resulted in 11 studies with a total of 72 patients. RESULTS: Overall complete response was reported as good, especially in primary small tumors. Side effects were minor in primary tumors whereas large......, recurrent tumors displayed more frequent side effects and some serious adverse events. Design and structure of the studies differed considerably, making general comparisons difficult. CONCLUSION: Few studies concerning electrochemotherapy on mucosal head and neck tumors are available and they are not easily...

  3. Signaling and molecular basis of bone marrow niche angiogenesis in leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shirzad, R.; Shahrabi, S.; Ahmadzadeh, A.; Kampen, K. R.; Shahjahani, M.; Saki, N.

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the process of blood vessel formation, is necessary for tissue survival in normal and pathologic conditions. Increased angiogenesis in BM niche is correlated with leukemia progression and resistance to treatment. Angiogenesis can interfere with disease progression and several

  4. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions among chewing tobacco users: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sujatha S; Prashanth, Radha; Yashodha Devi, B K; Chugh, Nidhi; Kaur, Aninditya; Thomas, Nithin

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of chewing tobacco (CT) in the last 10-12 years has led to an increased incidence of potentially malignant oral disorders and frank oral malignancies. To determine the frequency of oral mucosal lesions and to correlate the dose-response relationship among CT users of Bengaluru North province. This population-based cross-sectional study was conducted among a randomized cluster sample of adults in low-income group (slums), of Bengaluru North, Karnataka state, India. Nine hundred and one subjects, all CT users were surveyed in this cross-sectional study. A prestructured questionnaire which included information on type and amount of CT used, duration and frequency of use, and location of placement of tobacco in the oral cavity was used for assessment, which was followed by oral examination for the presence of lesions. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used to assess the statistical significance. Of the 901 subjects with CT habits, 55.8% revealed no clinically detectable oral mucosal changes and 44.1% showed mucosal changes of which 63.8% were males and 36.1% were females. The most common finding was chewers mucositis (59.5%) followed by submucous fibrosis (22.8%), leukoplakia (8%), lichenoid reaction (6.5%), oral cancer (2.7%), and lichen planus (0.5%). This study provides information about different CT habits and associated mucosal lesions among this population.

  5. The Role of Angiogenesis in Coronary Artery Disease: A Double-Edged Sword: Intraplaque Angiogenesis in Physiopathology and Therapeutic Angiogenesis for Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen; Li, Xiaobo; Zuo, Guangfeng; Pu, Jiangqin; Wu, Xinlei; Chen, Shaoliang

    2017-12-27

    Angiogenesis is described as a sprouting and growth process of new blood vessels from pre-existing vasculature. The relationship between angiogenesis and coronary artery disease (CAD) is double-sided. On one hand, angiogenesis within plaques is responsible for facilitating the growth and vulnerability of plaques by causing intraplaque hemorrhage and inflammatory cell influx, and overabundance of erythrocytes and inflammatory cells within a plaque probably causes plaque rupture, further leading to acute coronary syndrome. Therefore, inhibiting intraplaque angiogenesis has been considered as a potential therapeutic target for CAD. On the other hand, aiming at improving reperfusion to the ischemic myocardium in patients with CAD, angiogenesis promoting has been utilized as a therapeutic approach to expand myocardial microvascular network. Current strategies include direct administration of angiogenic growth factors (protein therapy), promoting angiogenic genes expression in vivo (gene therapy), and delivering stem cells (cell therapy) or exosomes (cell free therapy). This article will start by clarifying the basic concept of angiogenesis, interpret the mechanism of excessive intraplaque angiogenesis in atherosclerosis, and discuss its role in the growth and vulnerability of plaques. Then we will focus on the four distinct strategies of therapeutic angiogenesis. Despite promising animal studies and small-scale clinical trials of therapeutic angiogenesis in patients with ischemic heart disease, investigations have far not shown definite evidence of clinical efficacy. Hence, while acknowledging future work that remains to be done to validate the clinical results, we reviewed the critical challenges in this arena and highlighted the exciting progress that has occurred recently. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Mucosal vaccines: recent progress in understanding the natural barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Olga; Lebre, Filipa; Bento, Dulce; Borchard, Gerrit; Junginger, Hans E

    2010-02-01

    It has long been known that protection against pathogens invading the organism via mucosal surfaces correlates better with the presence of specific antibodies in local secretions than with serum antibodies. The most effective way to induce mucosal immunity is to administer antigens directly to the mucosal surface. The development of vaccines for mucosal application requires antigen delivery systems and immunopotentiators that efficiently facilitate the presentation of the antigen to the mucosal immune system. This review provides an overview of the events within mucosal tissues that lead to protective mucosal immune responses. The understanding of those biological mechanisms, together with knowledge of the technology of vaccines and adjuvants, provides guidance on important technical aspects of mucosal vaccine design. Not being exhaustive, this review also provides information related to modern adjuvants, including polymeric delivery systems and immunopotentiators.

  7. Chemotherapy Induces Oral Mucositis in Mice Without Additional Noxious Stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bertolini

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Oral mucositis (OM is a serious side effect of cancer chemotherapy. The pathobiology of oral mucositis remains incompletely understood due to lack of appropriate models which recapitulate the human condition. Existing rodent models are intraperitoneal and require radiation, chemical or mechanical injury to the chemotherapy protocol to induce oral lesions. We aimed to develop an OM mouse model that is induced solely by chemotherapy and reproduces macroscopic, histopathologic and inflammatory characteristics of the human condition. Female C57BL/6 mice were given intravenous 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU injections every 48 hours, for 2 weeks. A high daily dose of intraperitoneal administration was tested for comparison. Mice were monitored daily for weight loss. Epithelial histomorphometric analyses in tongue, esophageal and intestinal tissues were conducted coupled with assessment of apoptosis, cell proliferation, neutrophilic infiltration and the integrity of adherens junctions by immunohistochemistry. Neutropenia was assessed in peripheral blood and bone marrow. Tissues were analyzed for pro-inflammatory cytokines at the protein and mRNA levels. Daily intraperitoneal administration of 5-FU led to rapid weight loss and intestinal mucositis, but no oral inflammatory changes. Intravenous administration triggered atrophy of the oral and esophageal epithelium accompanied by reduction in cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Coincidental with these changes were up-regulation of NF-κB, TNFα, IL-1β, GM-CSF, IL-6 and KC. Despite neutropenia, increased oral neutrophilic infiltration and reduced E-cadherin was observed in oroesophageal mucosae. We developed a novel experimental tool for future mechanistic studies on the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced OM.

  8. The etiological structure, biological properties of causative agents of peri-implant mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Faustova

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose was to examine the peri-implant mucositis microflora and sensitivity of dominant pathogens to antibiotics and antiseptics. Materials and methods. The study involved 43 patients with peri-implant mucositis. During the study 162 clinical strains of microorganisms were isolated and identified. Cultivation of clinical isolates was performed by the standard method, final identification was carried out with using bacteriological automatic analyzer Vitec – 2compact bioMérieux (France. Determination of sensitivity to antibiotics of pathogens was carried with disc-diffusion method; the study of sensitivity to antiseptics was carried by means of double serial dilutions method by the standard procedure approved by the Order № 167 of the Ministry of Public Health of Ukraine on “On Approval of Training Guidance “Assessment of the sensitivity of microorganisms to antibiotics”, dated by April, 5, 2007. Results. It is The microflora of peri-implant area of patients with mucositis was revealed to consist of opportunistic species. Representatives of Streptococcus spp. and Staphylococcus spp. were dominating among them, although Kocuria spp., Enterobacter spp. and yeast-like fungi Candida spp. were detected quite common. Investigated clinical strains of microorganisms had different sensitivity to antibiotics. All cultures were sensitive to fluoroquinolones, but very significant number of them showed resistance to penicillins, macrolides and lincosamides. In turn, horosten, dekasan and chlorhexidine had powerful antimicrobial effect on dominant pathogens of periimplant mucositis in patients. Moreover, the effect of decametoxine-based antiseptics on some of them significantly exceeded the activity of chlorhexidine. Conclusions. Microflora from peri-implant area of patients with peri-implant mucositis consists mainly of aerobic and facultative anaerobic microorganisms, belonging to normal oral microflora. Most of pathogens of mucositis obtaine

  9. New generation of oral mucosal vaccines targeting dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Owen, Jennifer L.; Sahay, Bikash; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2013-01-01

    As most infectious organisms gain entry at mucosal surfaces, there is a great deal of interest in developing vaccines that elicit effective mucosal immune responses against pathogen challenge. Targeted vaccination is one of the most effective methods available to prevent and control infectious diseases. Mucosal vaccines can offer lower costs, better accessibility, needle free delivery, and a higher capacity for mass immunizations during pandemics. Both local mucosal immunity and robust system...

  10. CCL5 promotes VEGF-dependent angiogenesis by down-regulating miR-200b through PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in human chondrosarcoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guan-Ting; Chen, Hsien-Te; Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Tan, Tzu-Wei; Fong, Yi-Chin; Chen, Po-Chen; Yang, Wei-Hung; Wang, Shih-Wei; Chen, Jui-Chieh; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most common primary malignant bone cancer, with potential for local invasion and distant metastasis. Chemokine CCL5 (formerly RANTES) of the CC-chemokine family plays a crucial role in metastasis. Angiogenesis is essential for the cancer metastasis. However, correlation of CCL5 with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and angiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma is still unknown. CCL5-mediated VEGF expression was assessed by qPCR, ELISA, and Western blotting. CCL5-induced angiogenesis was examined by migration and tube formation in endothelial progenitor cells in vitro. CCL5 increased VEGF expression and also promoted chondrosarcoma conditional medium-mediated angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Stimulation of chondrosarcoma with CCL5 augmented PI3K and Akt phosphorylation, while PI3K and Akt inhibitor or siRNA abolished CCL5-induced VEGF expression and angiogenesis. We also demonstrated CCL5 inhibiting miR-200b expression and miR-200b mimic reversing the CCL5-enhanced VEGF expression and angiogenesis. Moreover, in chondrosarcoma patients showed the positive correlation between CCL5 and VEGF; negative correlation between CCL5 and miR-200b. Taken together, results demonstrate CCL5 promoting VEGF-dependent angiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma cells by down-regulating miR-200b through PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. PMID:25301739

  11. Evidence that tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) inhibits angiogenesis by inducing vascular endothelial cell apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Pei-Lin, E-mail: pchen@dal.ca [Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Easton, Alexander S., E-mail: alexander.easton@dal.ca [Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and its related ligands TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) and Fas ligand (FasL) play roles in the regulation of vascular responses, but their effect on the formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) is unclear. Therefore, we have examined the effects of these ligands on angiogenesis modeled with primary cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). To examine angiogenesis in the context of the central nervous system, we have also modeled cerebral angiogenesis with the human brain endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. Parameters studied were bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and cell number (MTT) assay (to assess endothelial proliferation), scratch assay (migration) and networks on Matrigel (tube formation). In our hands, neither TRAIL nor FasL (1, 10, and 100 ng/ml) had an effect on parameters of angiogenesis in the HUVEC model. In hCMEC/D3 cells by contrast, TRAIL inhibited all parameters (10-100 ng/ml, 24 h). This was due to apoptosis, since its action was blocked by the pan-caspase inhibitor zVADfmk (5 x 10{sup -5} mol/l) and TRAIL increased caspase-3 activity 1 h after application. However FasL (100 ng/ml) increased BrdU uptake without other effects. We conclude that TRAIL has different effects on in vitro angiogenesis depending on which model is used, but that FasL is generally ineffective when applied in vitro. The data suggest that TRAIL primarily influences angiogenesis by the induction of vascular endothelial apoptosis, leading to vessel regression.

  12. Human embryo-conditioned medium stimulates in vitro endometrial angiogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapiteijn, K.; Koolwijk, P.; Weiden, R.M.F. van der; Nieuw Amerongen, G. van; Plaisier, M.; Hinsbergh, V.W.M. van; Helmerhorst, F.M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Successful implantation and placentation depend on the interaction between the endometrium and the embryo. Angiogenesis is crucial at this time. In this article we investigate the direct influence of the human embryo on in vitro endometrial angiogenesis. Design: In vitro study. Setting:

  13. Modulating angiogenesis with integrin-targeted nanomedicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duro-Castano, Aroa; Gallon, Elena; Decker, Caitlin; Vicent, María J

    2017-09-15

    Targeting angiogenesis-related pathologies, which include tumorigenesis and metastatic processes, has become an attractive strategy for the development of efficient guided nanomedicines. In this respect, integrins are cell-adhesion molecules involved in angiogenesis signaling pathways and are overexpressed in many angiogenic processes. Therefore, they represent specific biomarkers not only to monitor disease progression but also to rationally design targeted nanomedicines. Arginine-glycine-aspartic (RGD) containing peptides that bind to specific integrins have been widely utilized to provide ligand-mediated targeting capabilities to small molecules, peptides, proteins, and antibodies, as well as to drug/imaging agent-containing nanomedicines, with the final aim of maximizing their therapeutic index. Within this review, we aim to cover recent and relevant examples of different integrin-assisted nanosystems including polymeric nanoconstructs, liposomes, and inorganic nanoparticles applied in drug/gene therapy as well as imaging and theranostics. We will also critically address the overall benefits of integrin-targeting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Multiscale Modeling of Angiogenesis and Predictive Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Samara; Byrne, Helen; Maini, Philip

    Tumors induce the growth of new blood vessels from existing vasculature through angiogenesis. Using an agent-based approach, we model the behavior of individual endothelial cells during angiogenesis. We incorporate crowding effects through volume exclusion, motility of cells through biased random walks, and include birth and death-like processes. We use the transition probabilities associated with the discrete model and a discrete conservation equation for cell occupancy to determine collective cell behavior, in terms of partial differential equations (PDEs). We derive three PDE models incorporating single, multi-species and no volume exclusion. By fitting the parameters in our PDE models and other well-established continuum models to agent-based simulations during a specific time period, and then comparing the outputs from the PDE models and agent-based model at later times, we aim to determine how well the PDE models predict the future behavior of the agent-based model. We also determine whether predictions differ across PDE models and the significance of those differences. This may impact drug development strategies based on PDE models.

  15. Chemotherapy-induced mucositis pursuant to different phase of chemotherapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlette Suzy Puspa Pertiwi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia is the most common Leukemia seen in children. This disease has a manifestation in the oral mucosa, which is caused by either the disease itself or its treatment by chemotherapy, such as mucositis. Oral mucositis is one of a common, debilitating complication of cancer chemotherapy. Mucosal toxicity depends on Several factors; one of them is the duration of the therapy. The aim of this study is to evaluate chemotherapy-induced mucositis pursuant to a different phase of chemotherapy in children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. Twenty children diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia who received induction, consolidation, and maintenance chemotherapy of Hasan Sadikin Hospital were included in this study. The criteria used for assessing mucositis was based on general mucositis scale from WHO. Data were collected and presented in the form of tables and percentages. The results showed that every child had developed mucositis during the course of chemotherapy in the induction and consolidation phase, except one child in the maintenance group did not the. at the induction phase 14,3% had developed mucositis at scale 2 and 86,7 at scale 3, consolidation phase 50% at scale 2 and 50% at scale 1, and in maintenance phase 14,3% in scale 28,6% in scale 1, and 57,1 in scale 2. Generally, it was concluded that mucositis develops in every phase of chemotherapy but the scale is slighter as the course of chemotherapy enters the advanced phases.

  16. Ghrelin did not change coronary angiogenesis in diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaei, M; Tahergorabi, Z

    2017-02-28

    Ghrelin is a 28 amino acids peptide that initially was recognized as an endogenous ligand for growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR). Recently, a number of studies demonstrated that ghrelin is a cardiovascular hormone with a series cardiovascular effect. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of systemic ghrelin administration on angiogenesis in the heart and its correlation with serum leptin levels in normal and diet-induced obese mice. 24 male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into four groups: normal diet (ND) or control, ND+ghrelin, high-fat-diet (HFD) or obese and HFD+ghrelin (n=6/group). Obese and control groups received HFD or ND, respectively, for 14 weeks. Then, the ghrelin was injected subcutaneously 100µg/kg twice daily. After 10 days, the animals were sacrificed, blood samples were taken and the hearts were removed. The angiogenic response in the heart was assessed by immunohisochemical staining. HFD significantly increased angiogenesis in the heart expressed as the number of CD31 positive cells than standard diet. Ghrelin did not alter angiogenesis in the heart in both obese and control groups, however, it reduced serum nitric oxide (NO) and leptin levels in obese mice. There was a strong positive correlation between the number of CD31 positive cells and serum leptin concentration (r=0.74). Leptin as an angiogenic factor has a positive correlation with angiogenesis in the heart. Although systemic administration of ghrelin reduced serum leptin and NO levels in obese mice, however, it could not alter coronary angiogenesis.

  17. Mucosal Vaccination and Therapy with Genetically Modified Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, J.

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have proved to be effective mucosal delivery vehicles that overcome the problem of delivering functional proteins to the mucosal tissues. By the intranasal route, both live and killed LAB vaccine strains have been shown to elicit mucosal and systemic immune responses that

  18. Adaptive immune responses at mucosal surfaces of teleost fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rombout, J.H.W.M.; Yang, G.; Kiron, V.

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the extant knowledge on the teleostean mucosal adaptive immune mechanisms, which is relevant for the development of oral or mucosal vaccines. In the last decade, a number of studies have shed light on the presence of new key components of mucosal immunity: a distinct

  19. Concomitant early mucosal and cutaneous leishmaniasis in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaventura, Viviane S; Cafe, Virginia; Costa, Jackson; Oliveira, Fabiano; Bafica, Andre; Rosato, Andrea; de Freitas, Luiz A R; Brodskyn, Claudia; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Barral, Aldina

    2006-08-01

    Mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) is often clinically silent until reaching a highly advanced state. In this prospective study, 6 of 220 patients with early cutaneous leishmaniasis were diagnosed with mucosal involvement by otorhinolaryngological examination (a rate similar to the reported rate of late ML). Detection of early ML may represent an important strategy in preventing severe mucosal destruction in human leishmaniasis.

  20. Oral Mucositis: understanding the pathology and management

    OpenAIRE

    Georgiou, M; Patapatiou, G; Domoxoudis, S.; Pistevou-Gompaki, K; Papanikolaou, A

    2012-01-01

    Oral Mucositis is a common complication of cancer therapy which may limit the completion of treatment and affect the quality of life of the patient. As we have come to understand its pathogenesis new developments in its management and prevention have allowed us minimize this side effect.

  1. Mucosal melanoma of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascierto, Paolo Antonio; Accorona, Remo; Botti, Gerardo; Farina, Davide; Fossati, Piero; Gatta, Gemma; Gogas, Helen; Lombardi, Davide; Maroldi, Roberto; Nicolai, Piero; Ravanelli, Marco; Vanella, Vito

    2017-04-01

    Mucosal melanoma of the head and neck is a very rare and aggressive malignancy with a very poor prognosis. The nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, and oral cavity are the most common locations. One-, 3- and 5-year survival rates between 2000 and 2007 were 63%, 30% and 20%, respectively. Cigarette smoking seems to be a risk factor even though the evidence for this is very low. Clinical signs and symptoms are usually nonspecific. While surgery is considered the mainstay of treatment for most mucosal melanomas of the head and neck region, radiotherapy has a role in local control of the disease after surgery. Many new treatment options in the last years, in particular targeted therapies (i.e. inhibitors of c-KIT, NRAS/MEK or BRAF) and immunotherapies (anti CTLA-4 and anti PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies), have changed the history of cutaneous melanoma. Despite the different biology, mucosal melanoma is currently treated in the same way as cutaneous melanoma; however, patients with mucosal melanoma were excluded from the majority of recent clinical trials. Recent molecular findings offer new hope for the development of more effective systemic therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Plant-derived antigens as mucosal vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, H S; Herbst-Kralovetz, M M

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, researchers have developed robust systems for recombinant subunit vaccine production in plants. Stably and transiently transformed plants have particular advantages that enable immunization of humans and animals via mucosal delivery. The initial goal to immunize orally by ingestion of plant-derived antigens has proven difficult to attain, although many studies have demonstrated antibody production in both humans and animals, and in a few cases, protection against pathogen challenge. Substantial hurdles for this strategy are low-antigen content in crudely processed plant material and limited antigen stability in the gut. An alternative is intranasal delivery of purified plant-derived antigens expressed with robust viral vectors, especially virus-like particles. The use of pattern recognition receptor agonists as adjuvants for mucosal delivery of plant-derived antigens can substantially enhance serum and mucosal antibody responses. In this chapter, we briefly review the methods for recombinant protein expression in plants, and describe progress with human and animal vaccines that use mucosal delivery routes. We do not attempt to compile a comprehensive list, but focus on studies that progressed to clinical trials or those that showed strong indications of efficacy in animals. Finally, we discuss some regulatory concerns regarding plant-based vaccines.

  3. Topical morphine for oral mucositis in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bettina Nygaard; Aagaard, Gitte; Henneberg, Steen W

    2012-01-01

    Systemic opioids for painful chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in children often result in unsatisfactory pain relief and a high frequency of side effects. Opioids applied topically can produce analgesia by binding to opioid receptors on peripheral terminals of sensory neurons. These receptors...

  4. Interventions for preventing oral mucositis in patients with cancer receiving treatment: oral cryotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Philip; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Worthington, Helen V; Littlewood, Anne; Clarkson, Jan E; McCabe, Martin G

    2015-12-23

    Oral mucositis is a side effect of chemotherapy, head and neck radiotherapy, and targeted therapy, affecting over 75% of high risk patients. Ulceration can lead to severe pain and difficulty eating and drinking, which may necessitate opioid analgesics, hospitalisation and nasogastric or intravenous nutrition. These complications may lead to interruptions or alterations to cancer therapy, which may reduce survival. There is also a risk of death from sepsis if pathogens enter the ulcers of immunocompromised patients. Ulcerative oral mucositis can be costly to healthcare systems, yet there are few preventive interventions proven to be beneficial. Oral cryotherapy is a low-cost, simple intervention which is unlikely to cause side-effects. It has shown promise in clinical trials and warrants an up-to-date Cochrane review to assess and summarise the international evidence. To assess the effects of oral cryotherapy for preventing oral mucositis in patients with cancer who are receiving treatment. We searched the following databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 17 June 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 5), MEDLINE via Ovid (1946 to 17 June 2015), EMBASE via Ovid (1980 to 17 June 2015), CANCERLIT via PubMed (1950 to 17 June 2015) and CINAHL via EBSCO (1937 to 17 June 2015). We searched the US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry, and the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching databases. We included parallel-design randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of oral cryotherapy in patients with cancer receiving treatment. We used outcomes from a published core outcome set registered on the COMET website. Two review authors independently screened the results of electronic searches, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We contacted study authors for information

  5. Regulation of gastrointestinal mucosal growth during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, A P N

    2003-12-01

    The increase in the aging population has led to a growing interest in achieving a better understanding of the aging process and of diseases that are predominantly expressed during advancing age. Since the structural and, in turn, the functional integrity of the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract (GI) are maintained by constant renewal of cells, a detailed knowledge of the events that initiate and regulate mucosal proliferative processes is essential for a better understanding of the normal aging process as well as age-associated dysfunctions, including malignancy that represent disorders of tissue growth. In Fischer-344 rats, aging is associated with increased mucosal proliferative activity in much of the GI tract. On the other hand, the functional properties are either decreased or remain unchanged during advancing age. Basal gastric acid and pepsin output decline during aging, as is gastrin secretion. In contrast, antral gastrin levels increase during this period, as is mucosal histidine decarboxylase activity. The age-related decline in gastrin secretion could partly be attributed to a higher ratio of somatostatin (D) to gastrin (G) cells in the antral mucosa. The age-related rise in GI mucosal proliferative activity could not be attributed to the trophic action of either gastrin or bombesin, since they caused no significant change in mucosal proliferation in aged rats. On the other hand, EGF and TGF-alpha appear to be involved in regulating mucosal proliferation during aging. Aging is associated with increased activation of EGF-receptor (EGFR), the common receptor for EGF and TGF-alpha. This could be due to (a) increased levels of membrane-bound precursor form(s) of TGF-alpha resulting in increased activation EGFR signaling processes through an autocrine/paracrine mechanism, (b) heightened sensitivity of mucosal EGFR to EGF and TGF-alpha such that comparatively lower levels of these peptides are required to activate EGFR in aged than in young animals and

  6. An open-label, multicenter, phase 2a study to assess the feasibility of imaging metastases in late-stage cancer patients with the alpha{sub v}beta{sub 3}-selective angiogenesis imaging agent 99mTc-NC100692

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axelsson, Rimma (Division of Radiology, Dept. of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Inst., Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)), e-mail: rimma.axelsson@ki.se; Bach-Gansmo, Tore (The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway)); Castell-Conesa, Juan (Hospital Universitari Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain)); McParland, Brian J. (Research and Development, Medical Diagnostics, GE Healthcare Ltd., Amersham (United Kingdom))

    2010-01-15

    Background: The alpha{sub v}beta{sub 3} integrin is one of the angiogenesis-related membrane proteins highly expressed on the neovasculature of breast cancer and lung carcinomas. Labeling of the alpha{sub v}beta{sub 3} integrin with 99mTc-NC100692 provides a potential tool for imaging angiogenesis and hence the presence of malignant lesions. Purpose: To determine the feasibility of detecting metastatic lesions in liver, lung, bone, and brain with scintigraphy using the alpha{sub v}beta{sub 3}-avid imaging agent 99mTc-NC100692 in patients with breast or lung cancer, and to assess its safety profile. Material and Methods: Twenty-five patients, 15 with lung cancer and 10 with breast cancer, were recruited at 10 centers. Metastases were newly diagnosed by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or bone scintigraphy, i.e., the reference standard. Patients underwent whole-body scans of approximately 10-15 min duration beginning at 45 min post-injection and a SPECT acquisition of approximately 30 min beginning at 75 min after injection of up to 1100 MBq 99mTc-NC100692. In case of liver metastases, dynamic acquisitions of 15 min were performed starting immediately post-injection. Safety measurements were performed up to 2.5 hours after injection and included hematology, serum biochemistry, coagulation, urine analysis, vital signs, oximetry, 12-lead ECG assessments, and a physical examination. Results: In patients with breast cancer, 99mTc-NC100692 scintigraphy detected 1 of 7 liver, 4 of 5 lung, 8 of 17 bone, and 1 of 1 brain metastases. The corresponding numbers for lung cancer patients were 0 of 2, 17 of 18, 2 of 2, and 7 of 9. There was overall stability through the follow-up period for all investigated safety parameters. Conclusion: Scintigraphy with 99mTc-NC100692 is feasible for detection of lung and brain metastases from breast and lung cancer, while the detection of liver and bone lesions is poor. The use of 99mTc-NC100692 is safe and well tolerated

  7. An open-label, multicenter, phase 2a study to assess the feasibility of imaging metastases in late-stage cancer patients with the {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-selective angiogenesis imaging agent {sup 99m}Tc-NC100692

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axelsson, Rimma [Division of Radiology, Dept. of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Inst., Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)], e-mail: rimma.axelsson@ki.se; Bach-Gansmo, Tore [The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Castell-Conesa, Juan [Hospital Universitari Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); McParland, Brian J. [Research and Development, Medical Diagnostics, GE Healthcare Ltd., Amersham (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    Background: The {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin is one of the angiogenesis-related membrane proteins highly expressed on the neovasculature of breast cancer and lung carcinomas. Labeling of the {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin with {sup 99m}Tc-NC100692 provides a potential tool for imaging angiogenesis and hence the presence of malignant lesions. Purpose: To determine the feasibility of detecting metastatic lesions in liver, lung, bone, and brain with scintigraphy using the {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-avid imaging agent {sup 99m}Tc-NC100692 in patients with breast or lung cancer, and to assess its safety profile. Material and Methods: Twenty-five patients, 15 with lung cancer and 10 with breast cancer, were recruited at 10 centers. Metastases were newly diagnosed by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or bone scintigraphy, i.e., the reference standard. Patients underwent whole-body scans of approximately 10-15 min duration beginning at 45 min post-injection and a SPECT acquisition of approximately 30 min beginning at 75 min after injection of up to 1100 MBq {sup 99m}Tc-NC100692. In case of liver metastases, dynamic acquisitions of 15 min were performed starting immediately post-injection. Safety measurements were performed up to 2.5 hours after injection and included hematology, serum biochemistry, coagulation, urine analysis, vital signs, oximetry, 12-lead ECG assessments, and a physical examination. Results: In patients with breast cancer, {sup 99m}Tc-NC100692 scintigraphy detected 1 of 7 liver, 4 of 5 lung, 8 of 17 bone, and 1 of 1 brain metastases. The corresponding numbers for lung cancer patients were 0 of 2, 17 of 18, 2 of 2, and 7 of 9. There was overall stability through the follow-up period for all investigated safety parameters. Conclusion: Scintigraphy with {sup 99m}Tc-NC100692 is feasible for detection of lung and brain metastases from breast and lung cancer, while the detection of liver and bone lesions is poor. The use of {sup

  8. Modulation of miR29a improves impaired post-ischemic angiogenesis in hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lingdan; Okeke, Emmanuel; Ayalew, Dawit; Wang, Danny; Shahid, Lyeba; Dokun, Ayotunde O

    2017-08-01

    Individuals with diabetes mellitus suffer from impaired angiogenesis and this contributes to poorer peripheral arterial disease outcomes. In experimental peripheral arterial disease, angiogenesis and perfusion recovery are impaired in mice with diabetes. We recently showed that a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 12 (ADAM12) is upregulated in ischemic endothelial cells and plays a key role in post-ischemic angiogenesis and perfusion recovery following experimental peripheral arterial disease. Here we investigated the role of miR29a in the regulation of endothelial cell ADAM12 expression in ischemia and how hyperglycemia negatively affects this regulation. We also explored whether modulating miR29a can improve impaired post-ischemic angiogenesis associated with hyperglycemia. Additionally, we tested whether miR29a modulation could improve post ischemic angiogenesis in the setting of impaired vascular endothelial growth factor signaling. We forced miR29a expression in ischemic endothelial cells and assessed ADAM12 expression. We also evaluated whether hyperglycemia in vivo and in vitro impair ischemia-induced ADAM12 upregulation and miR29a downregulation. Lastly, we determined whether modulating endothelial cell miR29a expression in ischemia and hyperglycemia could improve impaired endothelial cell functions. We found under ischemic conditions where ADAM12 is upregulated in endothelial cells, miR29a is downregulated. Forced expression of miR29a in ischemic endothelial cell prevented ADAM12 upregulation . In ischemic hind limbs of mice with type 1 diabetes and in endothelial cells exposed to simulated ischemia plus hyperglycemia, ADAM12 upregulation and miR29a downregulation were blunted while angiogenesis was impaired. Knocking down miR29a with an miR29a inhibitor was sufficient to improve ADAM12 upregulation and angiogenesis in simulated ischemia plus hyperglycemia. It was also sufficient to improve perfusion recovery in type 1 diabetes

  9. Mucosal immunity and HIV-1 infection: applications for mucosal AIDS vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyakov, Igor M; Ahlers, Jeffrey D

    2012-01-01

    Natural transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) occurs through gastrointestinal and vaginal mucosa. These mucosal tissues are major reservoirs for initial HIV replication and amplification, and the sites of rapid CD4(+) T cell depletion. In both HIV-infected humans and SIV-infected macaques, massive loss of CD4(+) CCR5(+) memory T cells occurs in the gut and vaginal mucosa within the first 10-14 days of infection. Induction of local HIV-specific immune responses by vaccines may facilitate effective control of HIV or SIV replication at these sites. Vaccines that induce mucosal responses, in particular CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), have controlled viral replication at mucosal sites and curtailed systemic dissemination. Thus, there is strong justification for development of next generation vaccines that induce mucosal immune effectors against HIV-1 including CD8(+) CTL, CD4(+) T helper cells and secretory IgA. In addition, further understanding of local innate mechanisms that impact early viral replication will greatly inform future vaccine development. In this review, we examine the current knowledge concerning mucosal AIDS vaccine development. Moreover, we propose immunization strategies that may be able to elicit an effective immune response that can protect against AIDS as well as other mucosal infections.

  10. Mouse Models for the Study of Mucosal Vaccination Against Otitis Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabirov, Albert; Metzger, Dennis W.

    2008-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is one of the most common infectious diseases in humans. The pathogenesis of OM involves nasopharyngeal colonization (NP) and retrograde ascension of the pathogen up the Eustachian tube into the middle ear (ME). Due to increasing rates of antibiotic resistance, there is an urgent need for vaccines to prevent infections caused by the most common causes of bacterial OM, including nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Moraxella catarrhalis. Current vaccine strategies aim to diminish bacterial NP carriage, thereby reducing the likelihood of developing acute OM. To be effective, vaccination should induce local mucosal mmunity both in the ME and in the NP. Studies in animal models have demonstrated that the intranasal route of vaccination is particularly effective at inducing immune responses in the nasal passage and ME for protection against OM. The mouse is increasingly used in these models, because of the availability of murine reagents and the existence of technology to manipulate murine models of disease immunologically and genetically. Previous studies confirmed the suitability of the mouse as a model for inflammatory processes in acute OM. Here, we discuss various murine models of OM and review the applicability of these models to assess the efficacy of mucosal vaccination and the mechanisms responsible for protection. In addition, we discuss various mucosal vaccine antigens, mucosal adjuvants and mucosal delivery systems. PMID:18295938

  11. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions among Pre-University students of Kodava population in Coorg District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandeepa, N C; Jaishankar, H P; Sharath, Chandra B; Abhinetra, M S; Darshan, D D; Deepika, Nappalli

    2013-06-01

    To know the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions among Pre-University students of Kodava population in Coorg District. This survey also aims to find out tobacco or other habits among students and related changes in the oral environment. 900 PU students of Kodava population were included. 300 students from each taluk were randomly selected, after the consent. Questions were asked to reveal the systemic diseases, abnormal oral habits, use of tobacco &alcohol. Each student was examined for oral mucosal lesions and recording was based on WHO oral health assessment form. Oral mucosal lesions were similar to studies done in other population but with a slightly higher frequency of few lesions. Incidence of substance use was noted, but with no signs of significant changes in the oral mucosa. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions varies among each population indicating the need for study in each population to format health policy. Substance use was noted among 16-17 yr age group indicates the need for early preventive measures among adolescents to avoid future serious health problems. How to cite this article: Sandeepa N C, Jaishankar H P, Sharath C B, Abhinetra M S, Darshan D D, Nappalli D. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions among Pre-University students of Kodava population in Coorg District. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(3):35-41.

  12. Direct effect of infliximab on intestinal mucosa sustains mucosal healing: exploring new mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petito, Valentina; Lopetuso, Loris Riccardo; Arena, Vincenzo; Stigliano, Egidio; Boninsegna, Alma; Bibbò, Stefano; Poscia, Andrea; Alfieri, Sergio; Rosa, Fausto; Amato, Arianna; Cammarota, Giovanni; Papa, Alfredo; Sgambato, Alessandro; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Scaldaferri, Franco

    2016-04-01

    Infliximab is effective in inflammatory bowel disease through several mechanisms, possibly acting at the mucosal level. To assess the role of infliximab on intestinal mucosa and whether it contributes to mucosal healing. Human colonic mucosal biopsies were incubated with or without infliximab. Cultured biopsies were evaluated for histological staining, CD68, CD3, E-cadherin and phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) expression, and apoptosis. A scratch assay and MTT assay were performed with Caco2 cells in the presence of infliximab and/or tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α or treated with supernatants obtained from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells or human intestinal fibroblasts treated with TNF-α and infliximab alone or in association. Infliximab-treated biopsies displayed a better histological appearance, reduced inflammation with an increase of E-cadherin, phospho-ERK and apoptosis. Supernatants showed lower TNF-α, IL-17, IL-6 and IL-8 concentration, with an increase in fibroblast-growth-factor. Motility at scratch assay and proliferation at MTT assay of Caco2 cells displayed differential modulation by TNF-α and infliximab, directly or through supernatants of human intestinal fibroblasts and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to them. Infliximab contributes to the mucosal healing process by acting directly at an intestinal mucosal level; infliximab indirectly affects epithelial cell migration and proliferation by acting on both fibroblasts and leukocytes. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Imaging of Mucosal Inflammation: Current Technological Developments, Clinical Implications, and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian J. Waldner

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, various technological developments markedly improved imaging of mucosal inflammation in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. Although technological developments such as high-definition-, chromo-, and autofluorescence-endoscopy led to a more precise and detailed assessment of mucosal inflammation during wide-field endoscopy, probe-based and stationary confocal laser microscopy enabled in vivo real-time microscopic imaging of mucosal surfaces within the gastrointestinal tract. Through the use of fluorochromes with specificity against a defined molecular target combined with endoscopic techniques that allow ultrastructural resolution, molecular imaging enables in vivo visualization of single molecules or receptors during endoscopy. Molecular imaging has therefore greatly expanded the clinical utility and applications of modern innovative endoscopy, which include the diagnosis, surveillance, and treatment of disease as well as the prediction of the therapeutic response of individual patients. Furthermore, non-invasive imaging techniques such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, scintigraphy, and ultrasound provide helpful information as supplement to invasive endoscopic procedures. In this review, we provide an overview on the current status of advanced imaging technologies for the clinical non-invasive and endoscopic evaluation of mucosal inflammation. Furthermore, the value of novel methods such as multiphoton microscopy, optoacoustics, and optical coherence tomography and their possible future implementation into clinical diagnosis and evaluation of mucosal inflammation will be discussed.

  14. Trefoil factor family peptides are increased in the saliva of children with mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verey, Fran; Nexo, Ebba; Greenwood, Rosemary; Berry, Monica; Corfield, Anthony P

    2011-12-01

    Mucositis is a painful ulcerative condition of the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract, occurring in association with chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimes. Trefoil factor family peptides (TFF, trefoil peptides), present in saliva, contribute to epithelial restitution and repair and are therefore potentially important in the healing phase of mucositis. This study aimed to assess any changes in the levels of trefoil peptides in oncology patients with and without mucositis. Saliva was collected from healthy children, pretreatment oncology patients, neutropenic patients on treatment with no oral disease and mucositic patients. TFF1, 2 and 3 were quantified using ELISA. In healthy children TFF2 and 3 were positively correlated with age (r = 0.454, p = 0.01 for TFF2; r = 0.410, p = 0.05 for TFF3 Spearman rank correlation). TFF3 was higher in mucositis compared to all other groups. A linear regression prediction model indicated that TFF3, but not TFF1 and TFF2, was significantly different in mucositic and healthy controls, suggesting an altered pattern of trefoil peptide secretion (p = 0.021). This study is the first to focus on trefoil peptides in paediatric saliva. It shows the correlation between TFF2, TFF3 and age in healthy children. Paediatric mucositis disease occurs in the presence of increased concentrations and an altered pattern of trefoil peptides.

  15. Prevalence of Oral Mucosal Disorders in Diabetes Mellitus Patients Compared with a Control Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José González-Serrano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hyperglycemia is associated with impaired wound healing and higher susceptibility to infections. It is unclear whether patients with diabetes mellitus (DM present more oral mucosal disorders compared to control groups. The objectives were to compare (a the prevalence rates of oral mucosal disorders in the DM and non-DM population and (b the prevalence rates of specific disorders in the DM and non-DM population. Full-text articles were included if they met the following inclusion criteria: (a they must be original articles from scientific journals, (b they must be only cross-sectional studies in English, (c the prevalence of oral mucosal disorders in DM patients must be evaluated, (d results must be compared with a healthy control group, and (e oral mucosal disorders must be specified in DM and non-DM group. All studies showed higher prevalence of oral mucosal disorders in DM patients in relation to non-DM population: 45–88% in type 2 DM patients compared to 38.3–45% in non-DM groups and 44.7% in type 1 DM patients compared to 25% in non-DM population. Tongue alterations and denture stomatitis were the most frequent significant disorders observed. The quality assessment following the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI Prevalence Critical Appraisal Tool showed the low quality of the existing studies.

  16. Variability of high-dose melphalan exposure on oral mucositis in patients undergoing prophylactic low-level laser therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Gustavo Henrique; Jaguar, Graziella Chagas; Alves, Fabio Abreu; Guollo, Andre; Camandoni, Vanessa Oliveira; Damascena, Aline Santos; Lima, Vladmir Claudio Cordeiro

    2017-07-01

    The present study outlines the clinical impact and risk factors of oral mucositis in 79 patients with multiple myeloma following high-dose melphalan for autologous transplant. All patients underwent daily prophylactic low-level indium gallium aluminum phosphate diode laser therapy (660 nm, 15 mW, 3.75 J/cm2, 10 s per point) from the beginning of the conditioning regimen up to day +2. Oral mucositis assessments were made daily until hospital discharge. For analysis, oral mucositis was divided into two groups according to severity: group 1, patients with oral mucositis grade mucositis grade ≥III (n = 8). Univariate logistic models were used to determine the risk factors. Patients in group 1 were found to have statistically fewer days of oral pain than those in group 2 (3.94 and 6.25 days, respectively, p = 0.014). Morphine was required in 75% of patients in group 2, versus 42.25% in group 1 (p = 0.06). Risk of severe oral mucositis was associated with higher serum creatinine levels (OR = 6.10; 95% CI 1.25-31.60; p = 0.02) and older age (OR = 1.21; 95% CI 1.05-1.47; p = 0.027). Severe oral mucositis was associated with worse clinical outcomes. Older patients and those with renal dysfunction previous autologous transplant had the greatest risk for severe oral mucositis despite prophylactic laser treatment. Our results highlight the importance of further research to define the dose, application time, and number of prophylactic laser sessions in those patients with the greatest risk for severe oral mucositis.

  17. Low level laser therapy in oral mucositis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauwels, R G E C; Martens, L C

    2011-04-01

    The goal of this pilot study was to investigate the capacity of pain relief and wound healing of low level laser therapy (LLLT) in chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis (OM) in a paediatric oncology population group. 16 children (mean age 9.4 years) from the Gent University Hospital - Department Paediatric Oncology/haematology, suffering from chemotherapy-induced OM were selected. During clinical investigations, the OM grade was assessed using the WHO classification. All children were treated using a GaAlAs diode laser with 830 nm wavelength and a potency of 150 mW. The energy released was adapted according to the severity of the OM lesions. The same protocol was repeated every 48 hrs until healing of each lesion occurred. Subjective pain was monitored before and immediately after treatment by an appropriate pain scale and functional impairment was recorded. At each visit, related blood cell counts were recorded. After 12 mths, records were evaluated and information about treatment sequence, treatment sessions and frequencies related to the pain sensation and comfort were registered. Immediately after beaming the OM, pain relief was noticed. Depending on the severity of OM, on average, 2.5 treatments per lesion in a period of 1 week were sufficient to heal a mucositis lesion. LLLT, one of the most recent and promising treatment therapies, has been shown to reduce the severity and duration of mucositis and to relieve pain significantly. In the present study similar effects were obtained with the GaAlAs 830nm diode laser. It became clear that using the latter diode device, new guidelines could be developed as a function of the WHO-OM grades i.e. the lower the grade, the less energy needed. Immediate pain relief and improved wound healing resolved functional impairment that was obtained in all cases.

  18. Characterization of pain originating from oral mucosal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla-Aslan, Ragda; Benoliel, Rafael; Sharav, Yair; Czerninski, Rakefet

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize pain associated with oral mucosal lesions. A cross-sectional study was performed in patients diagnosed with localized mucosal pain originating from acute ulcers (AUs), herpes infections (HIs), and immune-mediated chronic diseases (IMCDs). Pain-related features, including intensity (VAS-I), perceived unpleasantness (VAS-U), functional impairment (VAS-F), and effect on quality of life (VAS-Q), were recorded using a 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS). Waking from sleep, provoking, and alleviating factors were assessed by questionnaires. Sixty-three patients aged 19 to 82 years (47.22 ± 17.20 years) were examined over the study period. These included 18 patients with AUs, 21 with HIs, and 24 with IMCDs. At rest, VAS-U was significantly higher than VAS-I for all groups, and VAS-F was higher for lesions located on the tongue or lips. Up to 80% of patients described the pain as "burning." Differences between groups were not observed for all other parameters measured. Pain woke the patients from sleep in almost half of cases. VAS-I and VAS-U were not related to size or number of lesions. Mucosal pain is generally burning in quality, with a higher level of pain-related unpleasantness than pain intensity. In about half of the cases, pain awakens the person from sleep, a feature that correlated to female gender and pain intensity. Pain intensity or unpleasantness was not related to the size or number of lesions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cardiac atrial appendage stem cells promote angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Fanton, Yanick; Houbrechts, Cynthia; Willems, Leen; Daniëls, Annick; Linsen, Loes; Ratajczak, Jessica; Bronckaers, Annelies; Lambrichts, Ivo; Declercq, Jeroen; Rummens, Jean-Luc; Hendrikx, Marc; Hensen, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac atrial appendage stem cells (CASCs) show extraordinary myocardial differentiation properties, making them ideal candidates for myocardial regeneration. However, since the myocardium is a highly vascularized tissue, revascularization of the ischemic infarct area is essential for functional repair. Therefore, this study assessed if CASCs contribute to cardiac angiogenesis via paracrine mechanisms. First, it was demonstrated that CASCs produce and secrete high levels of numerous angiogen...

  20. Expression of Molecular Markers of Angiogenesis, Lymphangiogenesis, and Proliferation Depending on the Stage of Skin Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bgatova, N P; Lomakin, A I; Fursov, S A; Kachesov, I V; Chepko, S A; Isakova, N B; Borodin, Yu I; Voytsitsky, V E; Konenkov, V I

    2016-08-01

    The expression of molecular markers characterizing activity of the tumor process and metastases (proliferation marker Ki-67, angiogenesis marker CD34, and lymphangiogenesis markers podoplanin and LYVE-1) was assessed by immunohictochemical method in the primary tumor specimens collected during surgery for cutaneous melanoma (40 patients). Proliferative activity of the tumor tissue and volume density of peritumoral blood and lymph vessels increased with increasing tumor malignancy, which could indicate the risk of metastases.

  1. Intragastric inulin as a measure of mucosal damage caused by aspirin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittmers, L.E. Jr.; Anderson, L.A.; Fall, M.M.; Alich, A.A. (Univ. of Minnesota-Duluth School of Medicine (USA))

    1990-11-01

    In an attempt to find a method of gastric mucosal damage assessment that yields consistent results, the experiments presented here employed the measurement of the movement of inulin out of the gastric contents into the stomach wall and vascular compartment as an estimate of mucosal damage. Anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats were functionally nephrectomized and were administered a control or test solution containing 3H-inulin. The test solutions contained one of three doses of aspirin. Blood samples were taken at 15-min intervals over a 90-min exposure period. The stomach was removed from the animal and full-thickness tissue samples taken for measurement of 3H-inulin content. When the gastric mucosa was exposed to the test agents, there was a significantly greater accumulation of inulin in the body and antrum as well as in the plasma when compared to controls. We conclude that intragastric inulin can be employed to estimate gastric mucosal damage.

  2. Effect of chlorhexidine and benzydamine mouthwashes on mucositis induced by therapeutic irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samaranayake, L.P.; MacFarlane, T.W.; Hunter, I.P.; Robertson, A.G.; MacFarlane, G.; Soutar, D.S.; Ferguson, M.M.

    1988-05-01

    The efficacy of Benzydamine as a mouthwash was compared with chlorhexidine in two groups of patients receiving radiotherapy for oral carcinoma. Mucositis and pain were recorded over a 6 week period and oral carriage of Candida species, coliforms and Staphylococcus aureus was assessed using an oral rinse technique. There was no significant difference in the mucositis scores, overall pain scores or the yeast and bacterial species isolated between the two treatment groups. However, 58% (7 out of 12) and 92% (12 out of 13) patients reported oral discomfort when rinsing the mouth with chlorhexidine and benzydamine, respectively. In both groups, the most common coliform isolated was Klebsiella pneumoniae and the carriage of yeasts was significantly greater than that of coliforms. These results indicate that, although the individual patient acceptance of chlorhexidine is better than benzydamine, there is little difference between the two mouthwashes both in controlling pain and mucositis or in the oral carriage of the micro-organisms studied.

  3. Targeting angiogenesis with integrative cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yance, Donald R; Sagar, Stephen M

    2006-03-01

    An integrative approach for managing a patient with cancer should target the multiple biochemical and physiological pathways that support tumor development while minimizing normal tissue toxicity. Angiogenesis is a key process in the promotion of cancer. Many natural health products that inhibit angiogenesis also manifest other anticancer activities. The authors will focus on natural health products (NHPs) that have a high degree of antiangiogenic activity but also describe some of their many other interactions that can inhibit tumor progression and reduce the risk of metastasis. NHPs target various molecular pathways besides angiogenesis, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the HER-2/neu gene, the cyclooxygenase-2 enzyme, the NF-kB transcription factor, the protein kinases, Bcl-2 protein, and coagulation pathways. The herbalist has access to hundreds of years of observational data on the anticancer activity of many herbs. Laboratory studies are confirming the knowledge that is already documented in traditional texts. The following herbs are traditionally used for anticancer treatment and are antiangiogenic through multiple interdependent processes that include effects on gene expression, signal processing, and enzyme activities: Artemisia annua (Chinese wormwood), Viscum album (European mistletoe), Curcuma longa (turmeric), Scutellaria baicalensis (Chinese skullcap), resveratrol and proanthocyanidin (grape seed extract), Magnolia officinalis (Chinese magnolia tree), Camellia sinensis (green tea), Ginkgo biloba, quercetin, Poria cocos, Zingiber officinale (ginger), Panax ginseng, Rabdosia rubescens (rabdosia), and Chinese destagnation herbs. Quality assurance of appropriate extracts is essential prior to embarking on clinical trials. More data are required on dose response, appropriate combinations, and potential toxicities. Given the multiple effects of these agents, their future use for cancer therapy probably lies in synergistic combinations

  4. Acute effects of high-dose intragastric nicotine on mucosal defense mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindell, G; Bukhave, Klaus; Lilja, I

    1997-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is overrepresented among smokers; they also heal slowly and relapse frequently. Data are accumulating that smoking is detrimental to gastroduodenal mucosal cytoprotection. This study was designed to assess acute effects of high-dose intragastric nicotine, as it has been shown...

  5. Primary prevention of peri-implantitis: managing peri-implant mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepsen, Søren; Berglundh, Tord; Genco, Robert; Aass, Anne Merete; Demirel, Korkud; Derks, Jan; Figuero, Elena; Giovannoli, Jean Louis; Goldstein, Moshe; Lambert, France; Ortiz-Vigon, Alberto; Polyzois, Ioannis; Salvi, Giovanni E; Schwarz, Frank; Serino, Giovanni; Tomasi, Cristiano; Zitzmann, Nicola U

    2015-04-01

    Over the past decades, the placement of dental implants has become a routine procedure in the oral rehabilitation of fully and partially edentulous patients. However, the number of patients/implants affected by peri-implant diseases is increasing. As there are--in contrast to periodontitis--at present no established and predictable concepts for the treatment of peri-implantitis, primary prevention is of key importance. The management of peri-implant mucositis is considered as a preventive measure for the onset of peri-implantitis. Therefore, the remit of this working group was to assess the prevalence of peri-implant diseases, as well as risks for peri-implant mucositis and to evaluate measures for the management of peri-implant mucositis. Discussions were informed by four systematic reviews on the current epidemiology of peri-implant diseases, on potential risks contributing to the development of peri-implant mucositis, and on the effect of patient and of professionally administered measures to manage peri-implant mucositis. This consensus report is based on the outcomes of these systematic reviews and on the expert opinion of the participants. Key findings included: (i) meta-analysis estimated a weighted mean prevalence for peri-implant mucositis of 43% (CI: 32-54%) and for peri-implantitis of 22% (CI: 14-30%); (ii) bleeding on probing is considered as key clinical measure to distinguish between peri-implant health and disease; (iii) lack of regular supportive therapy in patients with peri-implant mucositis was associated with increased risk for onset of peri-implantitis; (iv) whereas plaque accumulation has been established as aetiological factor, smoking was identified as modifiable patient-related and excess cement as local risk indicator for the development of peri-implant mucositis; (v) patient-administered mechanical plaque control (with manual or powered toothbrushes) has been shown to be an effective preventive measure; (vi) professional intervention

  6. Could the biological robustness of low level laser therapy (Photobiomodulation) impact its use in the management of mucositis in head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonis, Stephen T; Hashemi, Sepehr; Epstein, Joel B; Nair, Raj G; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E

    2016-03-01

    Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been noted to be effective in mitigating the development of oral mucositis among patients being treated with chemoradiation for cancers of the head and neck. To explain the biological basis for this observation we performed a comprehensive literature search. Our investigation identified a substantial number of LLLT-activated pathways that have been strongly associated with negative tumor outcomes including proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, metastases and cancer-treatment resistance. In light of these findings, we suggest an investigational strategy to assure that LLLT's anti-mucositis efficacy is independent of its possible potential to enhance threatening tumor behaviors. Included are appropriate pre-clinical modeling, short- and long-term follow-up of LLLT-treated patients, and the requirement for consistency of LLLT parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Amelioration of Chemotherapy-Induced Intestinal Mucositis by Orally Administered Probiotics in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chun-Bin; Cheng, Mei-Lien; Liu, Chia-Yuan; Chang, Szu-Wen; Chiang Chiau, Jen-Shiu; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Intestinal mucositis is a frequently encountered side effect in oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy. No well-established or up to date therapeutic strategies are available. To study a novel way to alleviate mucositis, we investigate the effects and safety of probiotic supplementation in ameliorating 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. Methods Seventy-two mice were injected saline or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) intraperitoneally daily. Mice were either orally administrated daily saline, probiotic suspension of Lactobacillus casei variety rhamnosus (Lcr35) or Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum (LaBi). Diarrhea score, pro-inflammatory cytokines serum levels, intestinal villus height and crypt depth and total RNA from tissue were assessed. Samples of blood, liver and spleen tissues were assessed for translocation. Results Marked diarrhea developed in the 5-FU groups but was attenuated after oral Lcr35 and LaBi administrations. Diarrhea scores decreased significantly from 2.64 to 1.45 and 0.80, respectively (Pprobiotics administration. We also found TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA expressions were up-regulated in intestinal mucositis tissues following 5-FU treatment (TNF-α: 4.35 vs. 1.18, IL-1β: 2.29 vs. 1.07, IL-6: 1.49 vs. 1.02) and that probiotics treatment suppressed this up-regulation (Pprobiotics Lcr35 and LaBi can ameliorate chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. This suggests probiotics may serve as an alternative therapeutic strategy for the prevention or management of chemotherapy-induced mucositis in the future. PMID:26406888

  8. Influence of Levamisole and Other Angiogenesis Inhibitors on Angiogenesis and Endothelial Cell Morphology in Vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friis, Tina; Engel, Anne-Marie; Bendiksen, Christine D.; Larsen, Line S.; Houen, Gunnar, E-mail: gh@ssi.dk [Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Immunology and Genetics, Statens Serum Institut, Artillerivej 5, DK-2300 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-06-24

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from existing vessels is required for many physiological processes and for growth of solid tumors. Initiated by hypoxia, angiogenesis involves binding of angiogenic factors to endothelial cell (EC) receptors and activation of cellular signaling, differentiation, migration, proliferation, interconnection and canalization of ECs, remodeling of the extracellular matrix and stabilization of newly formed vessels. Experimentally, these processes can be studied by several in vitro and in vivo assays focusing on different steps in the process. In vitro, ECs form networks of capillary-like tubes when propagated for three days in coculture with fibroblasts. The tube formation is dependent on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and omission of VEGF from the culture medium results in the formation of clusters of undifferentiated ECs. Addition of angiogenesis inhibitors to the coculture system disrupts endothelial network formation and influences EC morphology in two distinct ways. Treatment with antibodies to VEGF, soluble VEGF receptor, the VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor SU5614, protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor (PTPI) IV or levamisole results in the formation of EC clusters of variable size. This cluster morphology is a result of inhibited EC differentiation and levamisole can be inferred to influence and block VEGF signaling. Treatment with platelet factor 4, thrombospondin, rapamycin, suramin, TNP-470, salubrinal, PTPI I, PTPI II, clodronate, NSC87877 or non-steriodal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) results in the formation of short cords of ECs, which suggests that these inhibitors have an influence on later steps in the angiogenic process, such as EC proliferation and migration. A humanized antibody to VEGF is one of a few angiogenesis inhibitors used clinically for treatment of cancer. Levamisole is approved for clinical treatment of cancer and is interesting with respect to anti-angiogenic activity

  9. New generation of oral mucosal vaccines targeting dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jennifer L; Sahay, Bikash; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2013-12-01

    As most infectious organisms gain entry at mucosal surfaces, there is a great deal of interest in developing vaccines that elicit effective mucosal immune responses against pathogen challenge. Targeted vaccination is one of the most effective methods available to prevent and control infectious diseases. Mucosal vaccines can offer lower costs, better accessibility, needle free delivery, and a higher capacity for mass immunizations during pandemics. Both local mucosal immunity and robust systemic responses can be achieved through mucosal vaccination. Recent progress in understanding the molecular and cellular components of the mucosal immune system have allowed for the development of a novel mucosal vaccine platform utilizing specific dendritic cell-targeting peptides and orally administered lactobacilli to elicit efficient antigen specific immune responses against infections, including Bacillus anthracis in experimental models of disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Tumor angiogenesis in mice and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alani, Rhoda M; Silverthorn, Courtney F; Orosz, Kate

    2004-06-01

    Over the past decade much research has focused on understanding the molecular pathways that regulate the development of a tumor-associated vasculature. In 1999, Lyden and colleagues showed that mice deficient in one to three Id1 or Id3 alleles could not support the growth of tumor xenografts due to defects in tumor-associated angiogenesis. Three recently published manuscripts have now re-examined the role of Id genes in the development of a tumor-associated vasculature using more clinically relevant tumor model systems. Remarkably, all three studies have found strikingly different results compared to the original xenograft data published in 1999. Below we review the current understanding of the role of Id genes in the development of a tumor-associated vasculature given the most recent data and suggest ways in which animal tumor model systems might be put to better use to provide more clinically relevant information.

  11. Chemotherapy-Induced and/or Radiation Therapy-Induced Oral Mucositis-Complicating the Treatment of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddireddy Umameshwar Rao Naidu

    2004-09-01

    condition, but none of them can completely prevent or treat mucositis. More and more pathological methods are being developed to understand this condition so that better therapeutic regimens can be selected. Emphasis also should be made in assessing the patient's psychologic condition, particular depressive disorders. This is important because treatment with antidepressants will not only contribute in lifting depression but also reduces pain somatization. Although mucositis is rarely life-threatening, it will interfere with treatment of cancer to a great extent.

  12. Tympanomastoid cholesterol granulomas: Immunohistochemical evaluation of angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannella, Giannicola; Di Gioia, Cira; Carletti, Raffaella; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2017-08-01

    This study investigates the immunohistochemical expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and CD34 in patients treated for middle ear and mastoid cholesterol granulomas to evaluate the angiogenesis and vascularization of this type of lesion. A correlation between the immunohistochemical data and the radiological and intraoperative evidence of temporal bone marrow invasion and blood source connection was performed to validate this hypothesis. Retrospective study. Immunohistochemical expression of VEGF and CD34 in a group of 16 patients surgically treated for cholesterol granuloma was examined. Middle ear cholesteatomas with normal middle ear mucosa and external auditory canal skin were used as the control groups. The radiological and intraoperative features of cholesterol granulomas were also examined. In endothelial cells, there was an increased expression of angiogenetic growth factor receptors in all the cholesterol granulomas in this study. The quantitative analysis of VEGF showed a mean value of 37.5, whereas the CD34 quantitative analysis gave a mean value of 6.8. Seven patients presented radiological or intraoperative evidence of bone marrow invasion, hematopoietic potentialities, or blood source connections that might support the bleeding theory. In all of these cases there was computed tomography or intraoperative evidence of bone erosion of the middle ear and/or temporal bone structures. The mean values of VEGF and CD34 were 41.1 and 7.7, respectively. High values of VEGF and CD34 are present in patients with cholesterol granulomas. Upregulation of VEGF and CD34 is indicative of a remarkable angiogenesis and a widespread vascular concentration in cholesterol granulomas. 3b. Laryngoscope, 127:E283-E290, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  13. Sage tea-thyme-peppermint hydrosol oral rinse reduces chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis: A randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutluay Yayla, Ezgi; Izgu, Nur; Ozdemir, Leyla; Aslan Erdem, Sinem; Kartal, Murat

    2016-08-01

    This pilot study aimed to investigate the preventive effect of sage tea-thyme-peppermint hydrosol oral rinse used in conjunction with basic oral care on chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis. An open-label randomized controlled study. Two oncology hospitals in Ankara, Turkey. Patients receiving 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy regimens were divided into the intervention group (N=30) and control group (N=30). Basic oral care was prescribed to the control group, while the intervention group was prescribed sage tea-thyme-peppermint hydrosol in addition to basic oral care. All patients were called to assess their compliance with the study instructions on day 5 and 14. Oral mucositis was evaluated using an inspection method or by assessing oral cavity photos based on the World Health Organization oral toxicity scale on day 5 and 14. Most of the patients in the intervention group did not develop oral mucositis on day 5. In addition, the incidence of grade 1 oral mucositis was statistically lower in the intervention group (10%) than the control group (53.3%) on day 5. By day 14, the majority of patients in both the groups had grade 0 oral mucositis. Sage tea-thyme-peppermint hydrosol oral rinse has promising results in alleviating oral mucositis. This hydrosol can be recommended for clinical use as it is well tolerated and cost-effective. However, further randomized controlled trials are needed to support the study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. M cell-targeted mucosal vaccine strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, M; Pascual, D W; Kiyono, H

    2012-01-01

    Immune responses in the aerodigestive tract are characterized by production and transport of specific IgA antibodies across the epithelium to act as a first line of defense against pathogens in the external environment. To sample antigens on mucosal surfaces in the intestine and upper respiratory tract, the immune system relies on a close collaboration between specialized antigen-sampling epithelial M cells and lymphoid cells. Depending on various factors, local antigen presentation in the mucosal tissue leads to tolerance or initiation of an active immune response. Recently, molecules that could be used to target vaccine antigens to apical M cell surfaces have been identified. Here we review the M cell-targeted vaccine strategy, an approach that could be used to enhance uptake and efficacy of vaccines delivered in the nasal cavity or intestine.

  15. Mucosal lichen planus: an evidence-based treatment update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davari, Parastoo; Hsiao, Hui-Hua; Fazel, Nasim

    2014-07-01

    Mucosal lichen planus (MLP) is a chronic mucosal disorder that often poses a therapeutic challenge to dermatologists, dentists, and gynecologists. To relieve patients' pain and discomfort, improve their quality of life, and achieve clinical improvement, various therapeutic approaches can be considered for this disease. Based on the current literature it is difficult to define any particular treatment as the main therapeutic modality. We aimed to systematically review the current literature for the effectiveness of available treatment modalities for MLP. All of the randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews of MLP were collected by searching Pubmed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Health Technology Assessment Database, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure. Meta-analysis was performed, if possible. Topical betamethasone valerate, clobetasol-17-propionate, and fluocinonide are effective in the treatment of oral lichen planus (OLP) when compared with placebo. Calcineurin inhibitors and topical retinoids are also beneficial treatment options. The review does not include therapies with a lower level of evidence. Topical corticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy for OLP. High-quality evidence is lacking for the treatment of lichen planus.

  16. Oral Mucosal Disorders in Pregnant versus Non-Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Rezazadeh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of pregnancy on the Oral Mucosa Disorder (OMD have been sporadically documented in some developed countries. Less known is the status of OMD during pregnancy in less developed/developing countries. Iran is no exception. This study assesses the prevalence of OMD in 200 pregnant women and compares the findings with the findings from a 200 non-pregnant woman of similar age distribution in Iran. The participants had been referred to a clinic to receive reproductive age-related services. Participants suffering from systemic chronic diseases, those on medications/drugs, smokers, needing biopsies, and those with urgent Oral Mucosal Lesion (OML treatments were excluded from the study. Oral mucosal of all 400 participants were examined. The participants’ age ranges were from 17 to 47; with the average age of 33.14 for one group; and 30.23 for the other group. Both groups had the same level of formal education. Out of 400 examined women; 62 had lesions, including 47 pregnant (23.5%; and 15 non-pregnant (7.5% women. This result shows that the OMD rate of occurrence was significantly higher among the pregnant women. Higher OML prevalence in pregnant women, as compared to the non-pregnant women, indicates the importance of timely oral examination of pregnant women and subsequent treatment plans for them.

  17. Mucositis in irradiated cancer patients: effects of an antiseptic mouthrinse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzós, Isabel; Herrera, David; Santos, Sagrario; O'Connor, Ana; Peña, Carmen; Lanzós, Eduardo; Sanz, Mariano

    2010-09-01

    To assess the effects of an antiseptic, non-alcohol based mouth-rinse containing chlorhexidine and cetylpyridinium chloride, in preventing the oral complications associated to radiation therapy in head-and-neck cancer patients. This was a parallel, double blind, prospective, randomized clinical trial. Cancer patients were randomly assigned to one of the two treatments (test mouth-rinse or a placebo). Three visits were scheduled (baseline, 14 and 28 days). Different outcome variables were evaluated: mucositis, plaque and gingival indices, stimulated saliva and salivary pH. 70 patients were screened and 36 were included. The presence and the degree of mucositis significantly increased in both groups and no significant differences were detected between groups, although the median increase in the placebo group (1.81) at 2 weeks was higher than in the test group (1.20). Within the limitations of the small sample size, this study suggests that the use of the tested mouth-rinse may lead to some improvements in clinical parameters in patients irradiated for head-and-neck cancer.

  18. Neonatal human dermal fibroblasts immobilized in RGD-alginate induce angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Susana G; Oliveira, Maria J; Barbosa, Mário A; Soares, Raquel; Granja, Pedro L

    2014-01-01

    Promoting angiogenesis in a damaged tissue is a major challenge for tissue regeneration. Recent findings in tissue engineering suggest that fibroblasts (FBs) play an important role in orchestrating the angiogenic process. Fibroblasts maintain the structural integrity of connective tissue by continuously secreting growth factors and extracellular matrix precursors, which are essential for endothelial cell (EC) adhesion and spreading, thus playing a crucial role in angiogenesis. We hypothesized that FBs immobilized in alginate gels grafted with the RGD peptidic sequence could influence the recruitment of ECs to improve vascularization. In this work, the modulation of immobilized human FBs within the 3D synthetic extracellular matrix was assessed. Experiments using cocultures of ECs and FBs in indirect contact as well as angiogenic assays were performed to assess the influence of FBs immobilized in RGD-alginate in ECs' viability, stabilization, sprouting, and assembly into capillary-like structures. This study demonstrates the ability of FBs immobilized within RGD-alginate microspheres to modulate and support capillary-like structures' assembly. These findings indicate that the microenvironment created by these stromal cells in the scaffold modulates capillary morphogenesis, thus stimulating angiogenesis in situ and can potentially be used in regenerative medicine in clinical scenarios where vascularization is essential.

  19. Brain-gut axis and mucosal immunity: a perspective on mucosal psychoneuroimmunology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, F

    2012-02-03

    The role of the brain-gut axis has traditionally been investigated in relation to intestinal motility, secretion, and vascularity. More recently, the concept of brain-gut dialogue has extended to the relationship between the nervous system and mucosal immune function. There is compelling evidence for a reciprocal or bi-directional communication between the immune system and the neuroendocrine system. This is mediated, in part, by shared ligands (chemical messengers) and receptors that are common to the immune and nervous systems. Although the concept of psychoneuroimmunology and neuroimmune cross-talk has been studied primarily in the context of the systemic immune system, it is likely to have special significance in the gut. The mucosal immune system is anatomically, functionally, and operationally distinct from the systemic immune system and is subject to independent regulatory signals. Furthermore, the intestinal mucosal immune system operates in a local milieu that depends on a dense innervation for its integrity, with juxtaposition of neuroendocrine cells and mucosal immune cells. An overview of evidence for the biologic plausibility of a brain-gut-immune axis is presented and its potential relevance to mucosal inflammatory disorders is discussed.

  20. Mucosal immune responses induced by transcutaneous vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, L B; Clements, J D; Freytag, L C

    2012-01-01

    The skin has been investigated as a site for vaccine delivery only since the late 1990s. However, much has been discovered about the cell populations that reside in the skin, their active role in immune responses, and the fate of trans- cutaneously applied antigens. Transcutaneous immunization (TCI) is a safe, effective means of inducing immune responses against a number of pathogens. One of the most notable benefits of TCI is the induction of immune responses in both systemic and mucosal compartments. This chapter focuses on the transport of antigen into and beyond intact skin, the cutaneous sentinel cell populations that play a role in TCI, and the types of mucosal immune responses that have been generated. A number of in vivo studies in murine models have provided information about the broad responses induced by TCI. Cellular and humoral responses and protection against challenge have been noted in the gastrointestinal, reproductive, and respiratory tracts. Clinical trials have demonstrated the benefits of this vaccine delivery route in humans. As with other routes of immunization, the type of vaccine formulation and choice of adjuvant may be critical for achieving appropriate responses and can be tailored to activate specific immune-responsive cells in the skin to increase the efficacy of TCI against mucosal pathogens.

  1. Checkpoint inhibition for advanced mucosal melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierauf, Julia; Veit, Johannes A; Hess, Jochen; Treiber, Nicolai; Lisson, Catharina; Weissinger, Stephanie E; Bommer, Martin; Hoffmann, Thomas K

    2017-04-01

    Whereas anti-PD-1 therapy has demonstrated a significant and durable response against advanced cutaneous melanoma, conventional chemotherapies have shown only minor benefit against advanced mucosal melanoma. To investigate the efficacy of anti-PD-1 therapy in a small cohort of patients with mucosal melanoma of the head and neck. We analysed five patients with mucosal melanoma of the head and neck who received nivolumab or pembrolizumab, at an advanced stage. Expression of PD-L1 and PD-1 in all tumour samples was evaluated immunohistochemically. All patients received at least two cycles of nivolumab or pembrolizumab. The most severe adverse events were categorised as CTCAE (common terminology criteria for adverse events) Grade 2. All patients showed progressive disease after restaging at three and six months, and no partial or complete response was observed. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated PD-L1 expression in less than 5% of tumour cells. Systemic therapy with either nivolumab or pembrolizumab showed no clinical response, however, tumour progression was identified in all patients using Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) v1.1 and immune-related response criteria (irRC) to evaluate tumour response.

  2. Oral mucosal manifestations of autoimmune skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Mayson B; Porter, Stephen R; Smoller, Bruce R; Sitaru, Cassian

    2015-10-01

    A group of autoimmune diseases is characterised by autoantibodies against epithelial adhesion structures and/or tissue-tropic lymphocytes driving inflammatory processes resulting in specific pathology at the mucosal surfaces and the skin. The most frequent site of mucosal involvement in autoimmune diseases is the oral cavity. Broadly, these diseases include conditions affecting the cell-cell adhesion causing intra-epithelial blistering and those where autoantibodies or infiltration lymphocytes cause a loss of cell-matrix adhesion or interface inflammation. Clinically, patients present with blistering, erosions and ulcers that may affect the skin as well as further mucosal surfaces of the eyes, nose and genitalia. While the autoimmune disease may be suspected based on clinical manifestations, demonstration of tissue-bound and circulating autoantibodies, or lymphocytic infiltrates, by various methods including histological examination, direct and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblotting and quantitative immunoassay is a prerequisite for definitive diagnosis. Given the frequency of oral involvement and the fact that oral mucosa is the initially affected site in many cases, the informed practitioner should be well acquainted with diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of autoimmune dermatosis with oral involvement. This paper reviews the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of these conditions in the oral cavity with a specific emphasis on their differential diagnosis and current management approaches. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Hitting the mucosal road in tolerance induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedermann, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    Within the last decades a dramatic increase in allergic diseases has been recognized in the Westernized societies, leading to the fact that meanwhile 25-30% of the population is afflicted by allergic disorders. Besides a hereditary disposition, other factors, including a reduced microbial contact early in life or changes in nutrition, might also have influenced this epidemiological development. So far the only causative treatment against type-I allergies is specific immunotherapy. In young and monosensitized patients this treatment is highly efficacious, while there are clear limitations in older or multisensitized patients. Allergy research therefore aims at establishing new and more efficacious treatment strategies in prophylactic as well as therapeutic settings. Our research programs focus on the development of novel allergy vaccines based on the induction of mucosal tolerance. In different mouse models of respiratory allergy mucosal treatment with genetically engineered allergen constructs proved to prevent the development of allergic mono- and multisensitivities. The additional use of mucosal adjuvants seems particularly important to improve therapeutic treatment approaches. Recent studies on the inverse relation of certain parasite infections and the development of allergy prompted us to search for selected parasitic molecules with immunosuppressive properties as potential adjuvant systems for novel allergy vaccines. An overview of our recent studies will be given. Copyright 2009 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. A characterization of anaerobic colonization and associated mucosal adaptations in the undiseased ileal pouch.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smith, F M

    2012-02-03

    INTRODUCTION: The resolution of pouchitis with metronidazole points to an anaerobic aetiology. Pouchitis is mainly seen in patients with ulcerative colitis pouches (UCP). We have recently found that sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB), a species of strict anaerobe, colonize UCP exclusively. Herein, we aimed to correlate levels of different bacterial species (including SRB) with mucosal inflammation and morphology. METHODS: Following ethical approval, fresh faecal samples and mucosal biopsies were taken from 9 patients with UCP and 5 patients with familial adenomatous polyposis pouches (FAPP). For the purposes of comparison, faecal samples and mucosal biopsies were also taken from the stomas of 7 of the 9 patients with UC (UCS). Colonization by four types of strict anaerobes (SRB, Clostridium perfringens, Bifidobacteria and Bacteroides) as well as by three types of facultative anaerobes (Enterococci, Coliforms and Lactobacilli) was evaluated. Inflammatory scores and mucosal morphology were assessed histologically in a blinded fashion by a pathologist. RESULTS: In general, strict anaerobes predominated over facultative in the UCP (P = 0.041). SRB were present in UCP exclusively. Even after exclusion of SRB from total bacterial counts, strict anaerobes still predominated. In the UCS, facultative anaerobes predominated. Strict and facultative anaerobes were present at similar levels in the FAPP. Enterococci were present at significantly reduced levels in the UCP when compared with the UCS (P = 0.031). When levels of SRB and other anaerobic species were individually correlated with mucosal inflammation and morphology, no trends were observed. CONCLUSION: We have previously identified that SRB exclusively colonize UCP. In addition we have now identified a novel increase in the strict\\/facultative anaerobic ratio within the UCP compared to UCS. These stark differences in bacterial colonization, however, appear to have limited impact on mucosal inflammation or morphology.

  5. Centchroman regulates breast cancer angiogenesis via inhibition of HIF-1α/VEGFR2 signalling axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewangan, Jayant; Kaushik, Shweta; Rath, Srikanta Kumar; Balapure, Anil K

    2018-01-15

    Angiogenesis is a recognized hallmark of cancer which promotes cancer cell progression and metastasis. Inhibition of angiogenesis to attenuate cancer growth is becoming desirable strategy for breast cancer management. The present study is aimed to investigate the antiangiogenic efficacy of a novel selective estrogen receptor modulator Centchroman (CC) on human breast cancer cells. Effect of CC on cell viability was evaluated using Sulforhodamine B assay. Endothelial cell proliferation, wound healing, Boyden chamber cell invasion, tube formation and chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays were performed to assess the effect of CC on migration, invasion and angiogenesis. Apoptosis, reactive oxygen species generation, caspase-3/7 and intracellular calcium ion level were measured through flow cytometry. Expression levels of HIF-1α, VEGF, VEGFR2, AKT and ERK were assessed by western blot analysis. CC selectively induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cells without affecting non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cells MCF-10A. Moreover, it inhibits migratory, invasive and mammosphere forming potential of breast cancer. Furthermore, CC also inhibited VEGF-induced migration, invasion and tube formation of HUVECs in vitro. CC effectively inhibited neovasculature formation in chicken CAM. Western blot analysis demonstrated that CC inhibited expression of HIF-1α and its downstream target VEGF. Interestingly, CC also suppressed VEGFR2 phosphorylation and consequently attenuated AKT and ERK phosphorylation. Our findings suggest that CC downregulates VEGF-induced angiogenesis by modulating HIF-1α/VEGFR2 pathway and recommend it (CC) as a potential therapeutic drug for breast cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The immune responses to bacterial antigens encountered in vivo at mucosal surfaces.

    OpenAIRE

    Dougan, G; Ghaem-Maghami, M; Pickard, D; Frankel, G; Douce, G; Clare, S; Dunstan, S; Simmons, C

    2000-01-01

    Mammals have evolved a sophisticated immune system for handling antigens encountered at their mucosal surfaces. The way in which mucosally delivered antigens are handled influences our ability to design effective mucosal vaccines. Live attenuated derivatives of pathogens are one route towards the development of mucosal vaccines. However, some molecules, described as mucosal immunogens, are inherently immunogenic at mucosal surfaces. Studies on mucosal immunogens may facilitate the identificat...

  7. Mucosal delivery of vaccines: role of mucoadhesive/biodegradable polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Neeraj K; Mangal, Sharad; Khambete, Hemant; Sharma, Pradeep K; Tyagi, Rajeev K

    2010-06-01

    Majority of infectious microorganism make their gateway to the host through mucosal surfaces, such as gastrointestinal tract, nasal and vaginal tract. Mucosal immune response structured as sIgA can effectively prevent the attachment and invasion of the microorganism from mucosal surface and thereby serves as an efficient tool against infectious disease. There has been an increased demand for the development of novel vaccine that leads to the induction of immune response in systemic circulation as well as at mucosal surfaces against infectious disease. Mucosal delivery of vaccine provides basis for induction of both mucosal as well as systemic immune responses against the infectious organisms. However, a variety of factors such as mucociliary clearance, presence of deteriorating enzymes, pH extremes (GIT), low permeation and metabolic degradation limit the mucosal delivery of vaccine. Numerous strategies have been explored in the meadow of mucosal vaccination for the purpose of efficient antigen delivery through mucosal route(s). Polymeric carrier(s) such as nanoparticles and microparticles loaded with the antigen can serve as the basis for creation of important formulations for improved vaccine. Biodegradable and mucoadhesive polymeric carrier(s) seems to be most promising candidate for mucosal vaccine delivery. Several polymers from natural and synthetic origin, such as polylactide-co-glycolide, chitosan, alginate, carbopol, gelatin etc., have been explored for the efficient mucosal vaccine delivery and significant results have been obtained. This review outlines the polymers used in mucosal vaccine delivery with special reference to mucoadhesive/biodegradable polymers. This article also covers the recent patent granted in the field on polymeric carrier mediated mucosal vaccination.

  8. Longitudinal Studies of Angiogenesis in Hormone-Dependent Shionogi Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor P. Wade

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Vessel size imaging was used to assess changes in the average vessel size of Shionogi tumors throughout the tumor growth cycle. Changes in R2 and R2* relaxivities caused by the injection of a superparamagnetic contrast agent (ferumoxtran-10 were measured using a 2.35-T animal magnetic resonance imaging system, and average vessel size index (VSI was calculated for each stage of tumor progression: growth, regression, and relapse. Statistical analysis using Spearman rank correlation test showed no dependence between vessel size and tumor volume at any stage of the tumor growth cycle. Paired Student's t test was used to assess the statistical significance of the differences in average vessel size for the three stages of the tumor growth cycle. The average VSI for regressing tumors (15.1 ± 6.6 wm was significantly lower than that for growing tumors (35.2 ± 25.5 μm; P < .01. Relapsing tumors also had an average VSI (45.4 ± 41.8 μm higher than that of regressing tumors, although the difference was not statistically significant (P = .067. This study shows that VSI imaging is a viable method for the noninvasive monitoring of angiogenesis during the progression of a Shionogi tumor from androgen dependence to androgen independence.

  9. Comparative Efficacy of Aloe vera and Benzydamine Mouthwashes on Radiation-induced Oral Mucositis: A Triple-blind, Randomised, Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebjamee, Mahnaz; Mansourian, Arash; Hajimirzamohammad, Mohammad; Mohammad, Haji Mirza Mohammad; Zadeh, Mohsen Taghi; Bekhradi, Reza; Kazemian, Ali; Manifar, Soheila; Ashnagar, Sajjad; Doroudgar, Kiavash

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of an Aloe vera mouthwash with a benzydamine mouthwash in the alleviation of radiation- induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients using a triple-blind, randomised controlled trial. Twenty-six eligible head and neck cancer patients who were to receive conventional radiation therapy at the radiation oncology department were randomised to receive an Aloe vera mouthwash or a benzydamine mouthwash. Mucositis severity was assessed during the course of radiation therapy using the WHO grading system. At baseline, there was no difference in the distribution of mucositis severity between the two groups. The mean interval between radiation therapy and onset of mucositis was similar for both groups (Aloe vera 15.69±7.77 days, benzydamine 15.85±12.96 days). The mean interval between the start of radiation therapy and the maximum severity of mucositis were was also similar in both the Aloe vera and benzydamine groups (Aloe vera 23.38±10.75 days, benzydamine 23.54±15.45 days). Mean changes of mucositis severity over time in both groups were statistically similar and the effect of both treatments did not change signficantly with time (p=0.09). Aloe vera mouthwash was as beneficial as benzydamine mouthwash in alleviating the severity of radiation-induced mucositis and showed no side effects. The Aloe vera mouthwash could be an alternative agent in the treatment of radiation-induced mucositis in patients with head and neck cancers.

  10. Thyroidal angiogenesis in zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to high ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-04-20

    Mukhi and Patino, 2003;. Mukhi et al., 2005). Angiogenesis has been recognized as a complex process contributing to the pathophysiology of many benign and malignant diseases of thyroid (Mitchell and. Parangi, 2005).

  11. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound for molecular imaging of angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbrey, J R; Forsberg, F

    2010-08-01

    Molecular imaging of angiogenesis using contrast-enhanced ultrasound allows for functional, real-time, inexpensive imaging of angiogenesis. The addition of stabilized microbubbles as contrast agents greatly improves ultrasound signal to noise ratio/signal strength/image quality (up to 25 dB) and allows for imaging of angiogenic vasculature. In this article recent advances in the usage of contrast-enhanced ultrasound for molecular imaging of angiogenesis are reviewed. The usage of commercially available agents and correlations between their imaging parameters and molecular markers of angiogenesis are reviewed. Recent developments in ultrasound contrast agents targeted to angiogenic markers for both diagnosis and monitoring are discussed. Finally, a brief overview of the emerging field of chemotherapeutic-loaded agents, which can be used with ultrasound-triggered drug delivery, is provided.

  12. Surgical revascularization induces angiogenesis in orthotopic bone allograft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, Wouter F.; Kremer, Thomas; Friedrich, Patricia; Bishop, Allen T.

    2012-01-01

    Remodeling of structural bone allografts relies on adequate revascularization, which can theoretically be induced by surgical revascularization. We developed a new orthotopic animal model to determine the technical feasibility of axial arteriovenous bundle implantation and resultant angiogenesis. We

  13. Selective inhibition of retinal angiogenesis by targeting PI3 kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Alvarez

    Full Text Available Ocular neovascularisation is a pathological hallmark of some forms of debilitating blindness including diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration and retinopathy of prematurity. Current therapies for delaying unwanted ocular angiogenesis include laser surgery or molecular inhibition of the pro-angiogenic factor VEGF. However, targeting of angiogenic pathways other than, or in combination to VEGF, may lead to more effective and safer inhibitors of intraocular angiogenesis. In a small chemical screen using zebrafish, we identify LY294002 as an effective and selective inhibitor of both developmental and ectopic hyaloid angiogenesis in the eye. LY294002, a PI3 kinase inhibitor, exerts its anti-angiogenic effect in a dose-dependent manner, without perturbing existing vessels. Significantly, LY294002 delivered by intraocular injection, significantly inhibits ocular angiogenesis without systemic side-effects and without diminishing visual function. Thus, targeting of PI3 kinase pathways has the potential to effectively and safely treat neovascularisation in eye disease.

  14. Tumor-induced remote ECM network orientation steers angiogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balcioglu, H.E.; Water, van de B.; Danen, E.H.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis promotes tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we use automated sequential microprinting of tumor and endothelial cells in extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds to study its mechanical aspects. Quantitative reflection microscopy shows that tumor spheroids induce radial orientation of

  15. Starter Feeding Supplementation Alters Colonic Mucosal Bacterial Communities and Modulates Mucosal Immune Homeostasis in Newborn Lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junhua; Bian, Gaorui; Sun, Daming; Zhu, Weiyun; Mao, Shengyong

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of starter feeding supplementation on colonic mucosal bacterial communities and on mucosal immune homeostasis in pre-weaned lambs. We selected eight pairs of 10-day-old lamb twins. One twin was fed breast milk (M, n = 8), while the other was fed breast milk plus starter (M+S, n = 8). The lambs were sacrificed at 56 days age. Colonic content was collected to determine the pH and the concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFA) and lactate. The colonic mucosa was harvested to characterize the bacterial communities using Illumina MiSeq sequencing and to determine mRNA expression levels of cytokines and toll-like receptors (TLR) using quantitative real-time PCR. The results show that starter feeding decreased luminal pH and increased the concentrations of acetate, propionate, butyrate, total VFA, and lactate in the colon. The principal coordinate analysis (PCA) and analysis of molecular variance show that starter feeding supplementation significantly affected the colonic mucosal bacterial communities with a higher relative abundance of the dominant taxa unclassified S24-7, Oscillibacter, Prevotella, Parabacteroides, Bifidobacterium, Ruminobacter, and Succinivibrio, and a lower proportion of unclassified Ruminococcaceae, RC9_gut_group, Blautia, Phocaeicola, Phascolarctobacterium, unclassified BS11_gut_group, unclassified family_XIII, and Campylobacter in lambs. Meanwhile, starter feeding decreased mRNA expression of TLR4 and cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ in colonic tissue. Furthermore, the changes in the colonic mucosal mRNA expression of TLR and cytokines were associated with changes in mucosal bacterial composition. These findings may provide new insights into colonic mucosal bacteria and immune homeostasis in developing lambs.

  16. Utility of abdominal skin plus subcutaneous fat and rectal mucosal biopsy in the diagnosis of AL amyloidosis with renal involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Huang, Xianghua; Cheng, Shuiqin; Zhao, Liang; Ren, Guisheng; Chen, Wencui; Wang, Qingwen; Zeng, Caihong; Liu, Zhihong

    2017-01-01

    Skin fat biopsy of the abdominal wall is a simple and safe method for detecting amyloidosis, and rectal mucosal biopsy is also frequently used for screening for the disease; however, the sensitivity of these approaches has not been fully studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of skin fat biopsy combined with rectal mucosal biopsy as a screening procedure for the diagnosis of systemic immunoglobulin light-chain (AL) amyloidosis. We retrospectively analyzed 224 AL amyloidosis patients confirmed by renal biopsy, including a test group of 165 patients and validation group of 59 patients. Surgical skin fat biopsy from the abdominal wall and rectal mucosal biopsy under endoscopy was performed to obtain specimens. Congo red staining and immunofluorescence staining with antibodies against light chains were performed to type the disease. Pathology reports were reviewed to assess the diagnostic sensitivity of skin fat biopsy and rectal mucosal biopsy. Diagnostic specificity was not examined in the present study, because no healthy volunteers and only few patients with other diseases had performed immunofluorescence staining on skin fat and rectal specimens. Of the 165 patients in the test group, Congo red staining of skin fat and rectal mucosal specimens was associated with a sensitivity of 89.3% and 94.8%, respectively. The sensitivity increased to 98.9% by combining both biopsy methods. Immunofluorescence stains were positive in 81.1% of patients undergoing skin fat biopsy and 84.7% of patients undergoing rectal mucosal biopsy. Immunofluorescence stains yielded positive results in 86.7% of cases combining skin fat biopsy with rectal mucosal biopsy. The diagnostic results also performed well in the validation group. Surgical skin biopsy including the subcutaneous fat pad can be performed safely at the bedside and is useful for diagnosing AL amyloidosis. Combining skin fat biopsy with rectal mucosal biopsy may identify amyloid deposits in almost all

  17. Salivary Cytokine Levels and Oral Mucositis in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Treated With Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossi, Paolo, E-mail: Paolo.bossi@istitutotumori.mi.it [Department of Head and Neck Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Bergamini, Cristiana [Department of Head and Neck Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Miceli, Rosalba [Clinical Epidemiology and Trial Organization Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Cova, Agata [Unity of Immunotherapy, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Orlandi, Ester [Radiotherapy 2 Unity, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Resteghini, Carlo; Locati, Laura; Alfieri, Salvatore; Imbimbo, Martina; Granata, Roberta [Department of Head and Neck Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Mariani, Luigi [Clinical Epidemiology and Trial Organization Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Iacovelli, Nicola Alessandro [Radiotherapy 2 Unity, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Huber, Veronica [Unity of Immunotherapy, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Cavallo, Anna [Department of Physics and Radiation Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Licitra, Lisa [Department of Head and Neck Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Rivoltini, Licia [Unity of Immunotherapy, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: We assessed the presence of salivary cytokines, their modulation during chemoradiation therapy (CTRT), and their association with oral mucositis severity in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: The present prospective observational study enrolled 55 patients with locally advanced HNC requiring CTRT. We also studied 10 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with other cancers. The salivary levels of 13 cytokines were analyzed. We constructed a cytokine predictive score of oral mucositis severity. Results: The baseline salivary cytokine levels were not associated with the severity of treatment-induced oral mucositis. The cytokine levels overall increased during treatment, especially in patients with worse mucositis. In particular, on univariable analysis, an increase of interleukin (IL)-1β (area under the curve [AUC] 0.733; P=.009), IL-6 (AUC 0.746; P=.005), and tumor necrosis factor-α (AUC 0.710; P=.005) at the third week of treatment was significantly associated with the development of severe oral mucositis. On multivariable analysis, the predictive score based on the IL-1β and IL-6 changes from baseline to week 3 was an early strong predictor of higher grade oral mucositis. Conclusions: The treatment of HNC patients with concurrent CTRT induces a significant increase in the salivary levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α, all positively associated with the severity of mucosal toxicity. A greater increase of IL-1β and IL-6 3 weeks after treatment initiation is predictive of worse oral mucositis, representing a potential tool for the early identification of patients at risk.

  18. Utility of abdominal skin plus subcutaneous fat and rectal mucosal biopsy in the diagnosis of AL amyloidosis with renal involvement.

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    Ting Li

    Full Text Available Skin fat biopsy of the abdominal wall is a simple and safe method for detecting amyloidosis, and rectal mucosal biopsy is also frequently used for screening for the disease; however, the sensitivity of these approaches has not been fully studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of skin fat biopsy combined with rectal mucosal biopsy as a screening procedure for the diagnosis of systemic immunoglobulin light-chain (AL amyloidosis.We retrospectively analyzed 224 AL amyloidosis patients confirmed by renal biopsy, including a test group of 165 patients and validation group of 59 patients. Surgical skin fat biopsy from the abdominal wall and rectal mucosal biopsy under endoscopy was performed to obtain specimens. Congo red staining and immunofluorescence staining with antibodies against light chains were performed to type the disease. Pathology reports were reviewed to assess the diagnostic sensitivity of skin fat biopsy and rectal mucosal biopsy. Diagnostic specificity was not examined in the present study, because no healthy volunteers and only few patients with other diseases had performed immunofluorescence staining on skin fat and rectal specimens.Of the 165 patients in the test group, Congo red staining of skin fat and rectal mucosal specimens was associated with a sensitivity of 89.3% and 94.8%, respectively. The sensitivity increased to 98.9% by combining both biopsy methods. Immunofluorescence stains were positive in 81.1% of patients undergoing skin fat biopsy and 84.7% of patients undergoing rectal mucosal biopsy. Immunofluorescence stains yielded positive results in 86.7% of cases combining skin fat biopsy with rectal mucosal biopsy. The diagnostic results also performed well in the validation group.Surgical skin biopsy including the subcutaneous fat pad can be performed safely at the bedside and is useful for diagnosing AL amyloidosis. Combining skin fat biopsy with rectal mucosal biopsy may identify amyloid deposits in

  19. The effect of thalidomide on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage in mice: involvement of inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirshahrokhi, Keyvan; Khalili, Ali-Reza

    2015-01-05

    Excessive ethanol ingestion causes gastric mucosal damage through the inflammatory and oxidative processes. The present study was aimed to evaluate the protective effect of thalidomide on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage in mice. The animals were pretreated with vehicle or thalidomide (30 or 60 mg/kg, orally), and one hour later, the gastric mucosal injury was induced by oral administration of acidified ethanol. The animals were euthanized one hour after ethanol ingestion, and gastric tissues were collected to biochemical analyzes. The gastric mucosal lesions were assessed by macroscopic and histopathological examinations. The results showed that treatment of mice with thalidomide prior to the administration of ethanol dose-dependently reduced the gastric ulcer index. Thalidomide pretreatment significantly reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6], malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. In addition, thalidomide significantly inhibited ethanol-induced nitric oxide (NO) overproduction in gastric tissue. Histological observations showed that ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage was attenuated by thalidomide pretreatment. It seems that thalidomide as an anti-inflammatory agent may have a protective effect against alcohol-induced mucosal damage by inhibition of neutrophil infiltration and reducing the production of nitric oxide and inflammatory cytokines in gastric tissue. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Perceiving nasal patency through mucosal cooling rather than air temperature or nasal resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kai; Blacker, Kara; Luo, Yuehao; Bryant, Bruce; Jiang, Jianbo

    2011-01-01

    Adequate perception of nasal airflow (i.e., nasal patency) is an important consideration for patients with nasal sinus diseases. The perception of a lack of nasal patency becomes the primary symptom that drives these patients to seek medical treatment. However, clinical assessment of nasal patency remains a challenge because we lack objective measurements that correlate well with what patients perceive. The current study examined factors that may influence perceived patency, including air temperature, humidity, mucosal cooling, nasal resistance, and trigeminal sensitivity. Forty-four healthy subjects rated nasal patency while sampling air from three facial exposure boxes that were ventilated with untreated room air, cold air, and dry air, respectively. In all conditions, air temperature and relative humidity inside each box were recorded with sensors connected to a computer. Nasal resistance and minimum airway cross-sectional area (MCA) were measured using rhinomanometry and acoustic rhinometry, respectively. General trigeminal sensitivity was assessed through lateralization thresholds to butanol. No significant correlation was found between perceived patency and nasal resistance or MCA. In contrast, air temperature, humidity, and butanol threshold combined significantly contributed to the ratings of patency, with mucosal cooling (heat loss) being the most heavily weighted predictor. Air humidity significantly influences perceived patency, suggesting that mucosal cooling rather than air temperature alone provides the trigeminal sensation that results in perception of patency. The dynamic cooling between the airstream and the mucosal wall may be quantified experimentally or computationally and could potentially lead to a new clinical evaluation tool.

  1. Differential Effects of EGFL6 on Tumor versus Wound Angiogenesis

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    Kyunghee Noh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Angiogenesis inhibitors are important for cancer therapy, but clinically approved anti-angiogenic agents have shown only modest efficacy and can compromise wound healing. This necessitates the development of novel anti-angiogenesis therapies. Here, we show significantly increased EGFL6 expression in tumor versus wound or normal endothelial cells. Using a series of in vitro and in vivo studies with orthotopic and genetically engineered mouse models, we demonstrate the mechanisms by which EGFL6 stimulates tumor angiogenesis. In contrast to its antagonistic effects on tumor angiogenesis, EGFL6 blockage did not affect normal wound healing. These findings have significant implications for development of anti-angiogenesis therapies. : Noh et al. identify EGFL6 as an angiogenic target that is selectively present in tumor endothelial cells in a hypoxic tumor microenvironment. EGFL6 blockade exerts robust anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor effects without affecting wound healing. These findings suggest an important approach for effectively targeting tumor angiogenesis. Keywords: tumor endothelial cells, ovarian cancer, chitosan nanoparticles, tumor vasculature, wound healing

  2. Melatonin as an angiogenesis inhibitor to combat cancer: Mechanistic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goradel, Nasser Hashemi; Asghari, Mohammad Hossein; Moloudizargari, Milad; Negahdari, Babak; Haghi-Aminjan, Hamed; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2017-11-15

    Melatonin, a pineal indolamine, participates in different body functions and is shown to possess diverse biological activities such as anti-tumor action. Angiogenesis inhibition is one of the mechanisms by which melatonin exerts its oncostatic effects. Increased angiogenesis is a major feature of tumor progression, thus angiogenesis inhibition is a critical step in cancer therapy. Melatonin employs a variety of mechanisms to target nutrients and oxygen supply to cancer cells. At the transcriptional level, hypoxia induced factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the genes under its control, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are the main targets of melatonin for inhibition of angiogenesis. Melatonin prevents translocation of HIF-1α into the nucleus thereby hindering VEGF expression and also prevents the formation of HIF-1α, phospho-STAT3 and CBP/p300 complex which is involved in the expression of angiogenesis-related genes. Angiostatic properties of melatonin could be also due to its ability to inhibit VEGFR2's activation and expression. Other angiostatic mechanisms of melatonin include the inhibition of endothelial cell migration, invasion, and tube formation. In the present study, we have reviewed the molecular anti-angiogenesis pathways mediated by melatonin and the responsible mechanisms in various types of cancers both in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Accelerated coronary angiogenesis by vegfr1-knockout endocardial cells.

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    Zheng Zhang

    Full Text Available During mouse heart development, ventricular endocardial cells give rise to the coronary arteries by angiogenesis. Myocardially-derived vascular endothelial growth factor-a (Vegfa regulates embryonic coronary angiogenesis through vascular endothelial growth factor-receptor 2 (Vegfr2 expressed in the endocardium. In this study, we investigated the role of endocardially-produced soluble Vegfr1 (sVegfr1 in the coronary angiogenesis. We deleted sVegfr1 in the endocardium of the developing mouse heart and found that this deletion resulted in a precocious formation of coronary plexuses. Using an ex vivo coronary angiogenesis assay, we showed that the Vegfr1-null ventricular endocardial cells underwent excessive angiogenesis and generated extensive endothelial tubular networks. We also revealed by qPCR analysis that expression of genes involved in the Vegf-Notch pathway was augmented in the Vegfr1-null hearts. We further showed that inhibition of Notch signaling blocked the formation of coronary plexuses by the ventricular endocardial cells. These results establish that Vegfr1 produced in the endocardium negatively regulates embryonic coronary angiogenesis, possibly by limiting the Vegf-Notch signaling.

  4. Role of ROBO4 Signalling in Developmental and Pathological Angiogenesis

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    Suresh Singh Yadav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transmembrane roundabout receptor family members (ROBO1–ROBO4 principally orchestrate the neuronal guidance mechanism of the nervous system. Secreted glycoprotein SLITs are the most appreciated ligands for ROBOs. Recently identified ROBO4 is the key mediator of SLIT-ROBO mediated developmental and pathological angiogenesis. Although SLIT2 has been shown to interact with ROBO4 as ligand, it remains an open question whether this protein is the physiologic partner of ROBO4. The purpose of this review is to summarise how reliable SLIT2 as ligand for ROBO4 is, if not what the other possible mechanisms demonstrated till date for ROBO4 mediated developmental and pathological angiogenesis are. We conclude that ROBO4 is expressed specially in vascular endothelial cells and maintains the vascular integrity via either SLIT2 dependent or SLIT2 independent manner. On the contrary, it promotes the pathological angiogenesis by involving different signalling arm(s/unknown ligand(s. This review explores the interactions SLIT2/ROBO1, SLIT2/ROBO1–ROBO4, ROBO1/ROBO4, and ROBO4/UNC5B which can be promising and potential therapeutic targets for developmental angiogenesis defects and pathological angiogenesis. Finally we have reviewed the ROBO4 signalling pathways and made an effort to elaborate the insight of this signalling as therapeutic target of pathological angiogenesis.

  5. Cerebral insulin, insulin signaling pathway, and brain angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yi; Zhang, Le; Hu, Zhiping

    2016-01-01

    Insulin performs unique non-metabolic functions within the brain. Broadly speaking, two major areas of these functions are those related to brain endothelial cells and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) function, and those related to behavioral effects, like cognition in disease states (Alzheimer's disease, AD) and in health. Recent studies showed that both these functions are associated with brain angiogenesis. These findings raise interesting questions such as how they are linked to each other and whether modifying brain angiogenesis by targeting certain insulin signaling pathways could be an effective strategy to treat dementia as in AD, or even to help secure healthy longevity. The two canonical downstream pathways involved in mediating the insulin signaling pathway, the phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K), and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, in the brain are supposed to be similar to those in the periphery. PI3K and MAPK pathways play important roles in angiogenesis. Both are involved in stimulating hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) in angiogenesis and could be activated by the insulin signaling pathway. This suggests that PI3K and MAPK pathways might act as cross-talk between the insulin signaling pathway and the angiogenesis pathway in brain. But the cerebral insulin, insulin signaling pathway, and the detailed mechanism in the connection of insulin signaling pathway, brain angiogenesis pathway, and healthy aging or dementias are still mostly not clear and need further studies.

  6. Angiogenesis in the degeneration of the lumbar intervertebral disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Gh; Iencean, SM; Mohan, A

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the study is to show the histological and biochemical changes that indicate the angiogenesis of the intervertebral disc in lumbar intervertebral disc hernia and the existence of epidemiological correlations between these changes and the risk factors of lumbar intervertebral disc hernia, as well as the patient's quality of life (QOL). We have studied 50 patients aged between 18 and 73 years old, who have undergone lumbar intervertebral disc hernia surgery, making fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor level measurements, as elements in the process of appreciating the disc angiogenesis. Also, pre–surgery and post–surgery QOL has been measured, as well as the intensity of the pain syndrome. We have identified factors capable of stimulating vascular endothelial growth (VEGF, FGF–2) for the examined disc material, but histological examination did not show angiogenesis. The process of angiogenesis at the degenerated intervertebral disc level affects the patient's quality of life both pre and postoperatively, and may be a predictive factor for the post–operative results. Patients can prevent the appearance of angiogenesis type degenerative processes of the intervertebral disc by avoiding angiogenesis correlated factors (weight control, physical effort, and smoking). PMID:20968201

  7. Roles of M cells in infection and mucosal vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Miao; Gao, Zeqian; Zhang, Zhongwang; Pan, Li; Zhang, Yongguang

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system plays a crucial part in the control of infection. Exposure of humans and animals to potential pathogens generally occurs through mucosal surfaces, thus, strategies that target the mucosa seem rational and efficient vaccination measures. Vaccination through the mucosal immune system can induce effective systemic immune responses simultaneously with mucosal immunity compared with parenteral vaccination. M cells are capable of transporting luminal antigens to the underlying lymphoid tissues and can be exploited by pathogens as an entry portal to invade the host. Therefore, targeting M-cell-specific molecules might enhance antigen entry, initiate the immune response, and induce protection against mucosal pathogens. Here, we outline our understanding of the distribution and function of M cells, and summarize the advances in mucosal vaccine strategies that target M cells.

  8. Use of nonhuman primate models to develop mucosal AIDS vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genescà, Meritxell; Miller, Christopher J

    2010-02-01

    The HIV vaccines tested in the halted Step efficacy trial and the modestly successful phase 3 RV144 trial were designed to elicit strong systemic immune responses; therefore, strategies to direct immune responses into mucosal sites should be tested in an effort to improve AIDS vaccine efficacy. However, as increased CD4(+) T-cell activation and recruitment to mucosal sites have the potential to enhance HIV transmission, mucosal immune responses to HIV vaccines should primarily consist of effector CD8(+) T cells and plasma cells. Controlling the level of mucosal T-cell activation may be a critical factor in developing an effective mucosal AIDS vaccine. Immunization routes and adjuvants that can boost antiviral immunity in mucosal surfaces offer a reasonable opportunity to improve AIDS vaccine efficacy. Nonhuman primate models offer the best system for preclinical evaluation of these approaches.

  9. [Current progress in the development of mucosal vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeyama, Natsumi; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2011-09-01

    Mucosal vaccination has several advantages compared with that of injection-type vaccination. Secretory IgA(SIgA) produced at mucosal surface plays a key role for inactivation of toxins and inhibition of pathogen invasion. Although oral or nasal vaccination with attenuated live microorganisms have been shown to be effective in the induction of protective immunity, these types of vaccine have the ability to infect transiently to the host. For the development of safe and effective mucosal vaccine, an obvious strategy is the preparation of inactivated subunit-type mucosal vaccine. Here we introduce our frontier technology for the development of rice-based oral vaccines, as a new generation of mucosal vaccine. Further, we also discuss recent progress in the development of other types of mucosal vaccine and adjuvant.

  10. Antibodies and their receptors: different potential roles in mucosal defence

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    Rachel eHorton

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Over recent years it has become increasingly apparent that mucosal antibodies are not only restricted to the IgM and IgA isotypes, but that also other isotypes and particularly IgG can be found in significant quantities at some mucosal surfaces, such as in the genital tract. Their role is more complex than traditionally believed with, among other things, the discovery of novel function of mucosal immunoglobulin receptors. A thorough knowledge in the source and function and mucosal immunoglobulins is particularly important in development of vaccines providing mucosal immunity, and also in the current climate of microbicide development, to combat major world health issues such as HIV. We present here a comprehensive review of human antibody mediated mucosal immunity.

  11. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition reduces angiogenesis via hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and Notch1 in head neck squamous cell carcinoma.

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    Wei-Ming Wang

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis, a marker of cancer development, affects response to radiotherapy sensibility. This preclinical study aims to understand the receptor tyrosine kinase-mediated angiogenesis in head neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. The receptor tyrosine kinase activity in a transgenic mouse model of HNSCC was assessed. The anti-tumorigenetic and anti-angiogenetic effects of cetuximab-induced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibition were investigated in xenograft and transgenic mouse models of HNSCC. The signaling transduction of Notch1 and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α was also analyzed. EGFR was overexpressed and activated in the Tgfbr1/Pten deletion (2cKO mouse model of HNSCC. Cetuximab significantly delayed tumor onset by reducing tumor angiogenesis. This drug exerted similar effects on heterotopic xenograft tumors. In the human HNSCC tissue array, increased EGFR expression correlated with increased HIF-1α and micro vessel density. Cetuximab inhibited tumor-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo by significantly downregulating HIF-1α and Notch1. EGFR is involved in the tumor angiogenesis of HNSCC via the HIF-1α and Notch1 pathways. Therefore, targeting EGFR by suppressing hypoxia- and Notch-induced angiogenesis may benefit HNSCC therapy.

  12. Differential modulation of angiogenesis by erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in a mouse model of ischaemic retinopathy.

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    Carmel M McVicar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs are widely used to treat anaemia but concerns exist about their potential to promote pathological angiogenesis in some clinical scenarios. In the current study we have assessed the angiogenic potential of three ESAs; epoetin delta, darbepoetin alfa and epoetin beta using in vitro and in vivo models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The epoetins induced angiogenesis in human microvascular endothelial cells at high doses, although darbepoetin alfa was pro-angiogenic at low-doses (1-20 IU/ml. ESA-induced angiogenesis was VEGF-mediated. In a mouse model of ischaemia-induced retinopathy, all ESAs induced generation of reticulocytes but only epoetin beta exacerbated pathological (pre-retinal neovascularisation in comparison to controls (p<0.05. Only epoetin delta induced a significant revascularisation response which enhanced normality of the vasculature (p<0.05. This was associated with mobilisation of haematopoietic stem cells and their localisation to the retinal vasculature. Darbepoetin alfa also increased the number of active microglia in the ischaemic retina relative to other ESAs (p<0.05. Darbepoetin alfa induced retinal TNFalpha and VEGF mRNA expression which were up to 4 fold higher than with epoetin delta (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: This study has implications for treatment of patients as there are clear differences in the angiogenic potential of the different ESAs.

  13. Evaluation of tumor angiogenesis in patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma

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    Suciu B.A.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate tumor angiogenesis in patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma. A total of 20 patients with pulmonary adenocarinoma have been included in the study. In order to evaluate tumor angiogenesis we studied the importance of CD34 expression. Evaluation of vascular density was performed with a semiautomated method using the dedicated software called ImageJ. We introduced in our study 20 patients with lung adenocarcinoma. We were able to identify tumor angiogenesis in 19 cases (95%. Immunolabeling of CD34 positive endothelial cells provided a good overview of tumor vascularization. Immunohistochemical staining of CD34 positive endothelium cells provided a good basis for tumor vascularity assessment, and also an excellent contrast for computer assisted morphometric measurements. Also we studied the intensity of the immunohistochemical staining of CD34 in the tumoral cells. We obtained the following results: a minor expression in 4 cases (20%, a moderate expression in 9 cases (45% and an intense expression in 6 cases (30%. The histological type of adenocarcinomas influences the architecture and branching of the vessels. The density of newly developed vessels is higher in patients with papillary pulmonary adenocarcinomas, which may indicate a possible relationship between the histological type and development of vascular supply.

  14. Grating-based phase-contrast imaging of tumor angiogenesis in lung metastases.

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    Huimin Lin

    Full Text Available To assess the feasibility of the grating-based phase-contrast imaging (GPI technique for studying tumor angiogenesis in nude BALB/c mice, without contrast agents.We established lung metastatic models of human gastric cancer by injecting the moderately differentiated SGC-7901 gastric cancer cell line into the tail vein of nude mice. Samples were embedded in a 10% formalin suspension and dried before imaging. Grating-based X-ray phase-contrast images were obtained at the BL13W beamline of the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF and compared with histological sections.Without contrast agents, grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging still differentiated angiogenesis within metastatic tumors with high spatial resolution. Vessels, down to tens of microns, showed gray values that were distinctive from those of the surrounding tumors, which made them easily identifiable. The vessels depicted in the imaging study were similar to those identified on histopathology, both in size and shape.Our preliminary study demonstrates that grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging has the potential to depict angiogenesis in lung metastases.

  15. Concurrent Mucosal Melanoma and Angiofibroma of the Nose

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Jae Hyung; Ha, Jin Bu; Lee, Junguee; Lee, Joohyung

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma rarely develops in the paranasal sinuses, and generally has a poor prognosis. However, mucosal melanoma can masquerade both clinically and histopathologically as a benign lesion, rendering accurate early diagnosis difficult. On the other hand, angiofibroma, a benign tumor, is more easily diagnosed than a mucosal melanoma, because the former exhibits specific histopathological features. No cases of concurrent angiofibroma and mucosal melanoma have been reported to date. We d...

  16. Low-Level Laser Therapy for Treatment of Oral Mucositis

    OpenAIRE

    Ravina Naomi Tarigan; Yuniardini Septorini Wimardhani

    2012-01-01

    Radiation and chemotherapy are the treatment options for head and neck cancer. Several side effects related to those treat-ment have been shown. Oral mucositis is a common side effect in patients undergoing those treatment. The presence of oral mucositis in these patients would influencing quality of life therefore compromising treatment outcome. The spec-trum of oral mucositis can be clinically seen as thinning of oral mucosa, oral discomfort to painful oral lesion causing mastication impair...

  17. Chitosan-Based Nanoparticles for Mucosal Delivery of RNAi Therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martirosyan, Alina; Olesen, Morten Jarlstad; Howard, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    of the polysaccharide chitosan have been used to facilitate delivery of siRNA across mucosal surfaces following local administration. This chapter describes the mucosal barriers that need to be addressed in order to design an effective mucosal delivery strategy and the utilization of the mucoadhesive properties...... of chitosan. Focus is given to preparation methods and the preclinical application of chitosan nanoparticles for respiratory and oral delivery of siRNA....

  18. Probiotic supplements and debridement of peri-implant mucositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallström, Hadar; Lindgren, Susann; Widén, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial was to evaluate the effects of probiotic supplements in adjunct to conventional management of peri-implant mucositis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-nine adult patients with peri-implant mucositis were consecutively recruited...... debridement and oral hygiene reinforcement resulted in clinical improvement of peri-implant mucositis and a reduction in cytokine levels. Probiotic supplements did not provide added benefit to placebo....

  19. VASCULAR REMODELING IN HYPERTENSION: ANGIOGENESIS FEATURES

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    L. A. Haisheva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim — cross-sectional study of changes in various segments of the vascular bed in arterial hypertension (AH, defining the role of inducers and inhibitors of angiogenesis in these processes.Materials and methods. The study included 99 patients with arterial hypertension of I–II degree, average age of 63.2 ± 2.6 years, diseaseduration 9.2 ± 7.2 years.Results. It was found that patients with arterial hypertension have disorders in all segments of vascular bed: endothelial dysfunction (highvWF, microcirculatory disorders, and increased pulse wave velocity (PWV of elastic-type vessels. The level of angioginesis factors doesnot depend on such parameters as gender, age, body mass index. Smoking and duration of hypertension influence on vascular endothelialgrowth factor raise and endostatin levels are higher in patients with family history of cardiovascular diseases. Duration of disease is directlycorrelated with microcirculatory disorders and the PWV, correlation between microcirculatory disorders and pulse wave velocity indicatetheir common processes.

  20. The effects of radiation on angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabham, Peter; Sharma, Preety

    2013-10-26

    The average human body contains tens of thousands of miles of vessels that permeate every tissue down to the microscopic level. This makes the human vasculature a prime target for an agent like radiation that originates from a source and passes through the body. Exposure to radiation released during nuclear accidents and explosions, or during cancer radiotherapy, is well known to cause vascular pathologies because of the ionizing effects of electromagnetic radiations (photons) such as gamma rays. There is however, another type of less well-known radiation - charged ion particles, and these atoms stripped of electrons, have different physical properties to the photons of electromagnetic radiation. They are either found in space or created on earth by particle collider facilities, and are of significant recent interest due to their enhanced effectiveness and increasing use in cancer radiotherapy, as well as a health risk to the growing number of people spending time in the space environment. Although there is to date, relatively few studies on the effects of charged particles on the vascular system, a very different picture of the biological effects of these particles compared to photons is beginning to emerge. These under researched biological effects of ion particles have a large impact on the health consequences of exposure. In this short review, we will discuss the effects of charged particles on an important biological process of the vascular system, angiogenesis, which creates and maintains the vasculature and is highly important in tumor vasculogenesis.

  1. Hypoxia and Angiogenesis in Endometrioid Endometrial Carcinogenesis

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    Nicole Horrée

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α plays an essential role in the adaptive response of cells to hypoxia, triggering biologic events associated with aggressive tumor behavior. Methods: Expression of HIF-1α and proteins in the HIF-1α pathway (Glut-1, CAIX, VEGF in paraffin-embedded specimens of normal (n = 17, premalignant (n = 17 and endometrioid endometrial carcinoma (n = 39 was explored by immunohistochemistry, in relation to microvessel density (MVD. Results: HIF-1α overexpression was absent in inactive endometrium but present in hyperplasia (61% and carcinoma (87%, with increasing expression in a perinecrotic fashion pointing to underlying hypoxia. No membranous expression of Glut-1 and CAIX was noticed in inactive endometrium, in contrast with expression in hyperplasia (Glut-1 0%, CAIX 61%, only focal and diffuse and carcinoma (Glut-1 94.6%, CAIX 92%, both mostly perinecrotically. Diffuse HIF-1α was accompanied by activation of downstream targets. VEGF was significantly higher expressed in hyperplasias and carcinomas compared to inactive endometrium. MVD was higher in hyperplasias and carcinomas than in normal endometrium (p < 0.001. Conclusion: HIF-1α and its downstream genes are increasingly expressed from normal through premalignant to endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the endometrium, paralleled by activation of its downstream genes and increased angiogenesis. This underlines the potential importance of hypoxia and its key regulator HIF-1α in endometrial carcinogenesis.

  2. Fibroblast growth factor signaling pathway in endothelial cells is activated by BMPER to promote angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Jennifer S; Rahner, Susanne; Deckler, Meike; Bode, Christoph; Patterson, Cam; Moser, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Previously, we have identified bone morphogenetic protein endothelial cell precursor-derived regulator (BMPER) to increase the angiogenic activity of endothelial cells in a concentration-dependent manner. In this project, we now investigate how BMPER acts in concert with key molecules of angiogenesis to promote blood vessel formation. To assess the effect of BMPER on angiogenesis-related signaling pathways, we performed an angiogenesis antibody array with BMPER-stimulated endothelial cells. We detected increased basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF/FGF-2) expression after BMPER stimulation and decreased expression of thrombospondin-1. Additionally, FGF receptor-1 expression, phosphorylation, FGF signaling pathway activity, and cell survival were increased. Consistently, silencing of BMPER by small interfering RNA decreased bFGF and FGF receptor-1 expression and increased thrombospondin-1 expression and cell apoptosis. Next, we investigated the interaction of BMPER and the FGF signaling pathway in endothelial cell function. BMPER stimulation increased endothelial cell angiogenic activity in migration, Matrigel, and spheroid assays. To block FGF signaling, an anti-bFGF antibody was used, which effectively inhibited the proangiogenic BMPER effect. Accordingly, BMPER-silenced endothelial cells under bFGF stimulation showed decreased angiogenic activity compared with bFGF control. We confirmed these findings in vivo by subcutaneous Matrigel injections with and without bFGF in C57BL/6_Bmper(+/-) mice. Aortic ring assays of C57BL/6_Bmper(+/-) mice confirmed a specific effect for bFGF but not for vascular endothelial growth factor. Taken together, the proangiogenic BMPER effect in endothelial cells is mediated by inhibition of antiangiogenic thrombospondin-1 and enhanced expression and activation of the FGF signaling pathway that is crucial in the promotion of angiogenesis. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Lentivirus-Mediated Nox4 shRNA Invasion and Angiogenesis and Enhances Radiosensitivity in Human Glioblastoma

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    Yongsheng Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radioresistance remains a significant therapeutic obstacle in glioblastoma. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are associated with multiple cellular functions such as cell proliferation and apoptosis. Nox4 NADPH oxidase is abundantly expressed and has proven to be a major source of ROS production in glioblastoma. Here we investigated the effects of Nox4 on GBM tumor cell invasion, angiogenesis, and radiosensitivity. A lentiviral shRNA vector was utilized to stably knockdown Nox4 in U87MG and U251 glioblastoma cells. ROS production was measured by flow cytometry using the fluorescent probe DCFH-DA. Radiosensitivity was evaluated by clonogenic assay and survival curve was generated. Cell proliferation activity was assessed by a cell counting proliferation assay and invasion/migration potential by Matrigel invasion assay. Tube-like structure formation assay was used to evaluate angiogenesis ability in vitro and VEGF expression was assessed by MTT assay. Nox4 knockdown reduced ROS production significantly and suppressed glioblastoma cells proliferation and invasion and tumor associated angiogenesis and increased their radiosensitivity in vitro. Our results indicate that Nox4 may play a crucial role in tumor invasion, angiogenesis, and radioresistance in glioblastoma. Inhibition of Nox4 by lentivirus-mediated shRNA could be a strategy to overcome radioresistance and then improve its therapeutic efficacy for glioblastoma.

  4. Calycosin promotes angiogenesis involving estrogen receptor and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway in zebrafish and HUVEC.

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    Jing Yan Tang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Angiogenesis plays an important role in a wide range of physiological processes, and many diseases are associated with the dysregulation of angiogenesis. Radix Astragali is a Chinese medicinal herb commonly used for treating cardiovascular disorders and has been shown to possess angiogenic effect in previous studies but its active constituent and underlying mechanism remain unclear. The present study investigates the angiogenic effects of calycosin, a major isoflavonoid isolated from Radix Astragali, in vitro and in vivo. METHODOLOGY: Tg(fli1:EGFP and Tg(fli1:nEGFP transgenic zebrafish embryos were treated with different concentrations of calycosin (10, 30, 100 microM from 72 hpf to 96 hpf prior morphological observation and angiogenesis phenotypes assessment. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to calycosin (10, 100 microM from 72 hpf to 78 hpf before gene-expression analysis. The effects of VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor on calycosin-induced angiogenesis were studied using 72 hpf Tg(fli1:EGFP and Tg(fli1:nEGFP zebrafish embryos. The pro-angiogenic effects of calycosin were compared with raloxifene and tamoxifen in 72 hpf Tg(fli1:EGFP zebrafish embryos. The binding affinities of calycosin to estrogen receptors (ERs were evaluated by cell-free and cell-based estrogen receptor binding assays. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell cultures (HUVEC were pretreated with different concentrations of calycosin (3, 10, 30, 100 microM for 48 h then tested for cell viability and tube formation. The role of MAPK signaling in calycosin-induced angiogenesis was evaluated using western blotting. CONCLUSION: Calycosin was shown to induce angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cell cultures (HUVEC in vitro and zebrafish embryos in vivo via the up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 mRNA expression. It was demonstrated that calycosin acted similar to other selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs, such

  5. Engineering immunity in the mucosal niche against sexually transmitted infections.

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    Ramanathan, Renuka; Woodrow, Kim

    2016-01-01

    The mucosal surfaces of the genital tract are the site of entry to over 30 different bacterial, parasitic, and viral pathogens that are the cause of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV. Women and adolescent girls are more severely impacted by STIs than men due in part to a greater biological susceptibility for acquiring infections and differences in disease sequelae. While it is widely accepted that preventative vaccines against the most commonly transmitted STIs would have a major impact on decreasing the global health burden of STIs for women worldwide, several challenges preclude their development. The female genital tract is a complex niche of microflora, hormonal influences, and immune tissues and cells that result in a mucosal immune system that is distinct from other mucosal sites and from our systemic immune system. An appreciation of these differences and their effect on shaping mucosal immunity to sexually transmitted pathogens is an important determinant for the design of effective STI vaccines. Here we describe the anatomy and mucosal immune system of the female reproductive tract, and discuss bioengineering strategies to design mucosal vaccines that overcome delivery challenges and coordinate the presentation kinetics and compartmentalization of antigens and adjuvants to relevant mucosal immune cell subsets. In particular, we describe recent progress in understanding the role of specific mucosal dendritic cell subsets in facilitating immune responses to pathogenic microbes in the genital mucosa. We also discuss the development of pathogen-mimicking materials that may be useful for engineering protective immunity in this mucosal niche. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Mucosal Vaccine for Prevention of Viral Disease in Animal

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    Sudarisman

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The major obstacle in combating infectious viral diseases in animals is the lack of effective vaccines . A large number of viral pathogens are mucosaly transmitted and must cross mucosal barriers to infect the host . The mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts represent the principal portals of entry for most animal viral pathogens . Current inactivated viral vaccines administered by intramuscular injection elicit primarily circulating antibodies . The best defense against these predominantly mucosal viral pathogens would be vaccines capable inducing both systemic and mucosal immunity which is a cost effective disease prevention tool . For most viral pathogens, induction of mucosal immunity appears most appropriate based on the routes of infection . The effectiveness of vaccine delivery to mucosal surfaces including respiratory tract may be most useful for prevention of the upper ways where secretory antibody is most important for protection against viral infection . Most external mucosal surfaces are replete with organized follicles and scattered antigen-reactive or sensitized lymphoid elements, including B cells, T lymphocytes, T cell subsets . plasma cells and a variety of other cellular elements involved in the induction and maintenance of immune response . Thus, a better understanding of the mucosal immune system is needed before effiective mucosal vaccines can be developed.

  7. Scoring irradiation mucositis in head and neck cancer patients

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    Spijkervet, F.K.L.; Panders, A.K. (Departments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Groningen (Netherlands)); Saene, H.K.F. van (Medical Microbiology, University of Liverpool (UK)); Vermey, A. (Department of Surgery Oncology Division, University Hospital Groningen (Netherlands)); Mehta, D.M. (Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Groningen (Netherlands))

    1989-01-01

    Irradiation mucositis is defined as an inflammatory-like process of the oropharyngeal mucosa following therapeutic irradiation of patients who have head and neck cancer. Clinically, it is a serious side effect because severe mucositis can cause generalized problems (weight loss, nasogastic tube feedings) and interferes with the well-being of the patient seriously. Grading mucositis is important for the evaluation of preventive and therapeutic measures. The object of this study was to develop a scoring method based on local mucositis signs only. Four clinical local signs of mucositis were used in this score: white discoloration, erythema, pseudomembranes and ulceration. Mucositis of the oral cavity was calcualted during conventional irradiation protocol for 8 distinguishable areas using the 4 signs and their extent. A prospective evaluation of this method in 15 irradiated head and neck cancer patients displayed an S-curve reflecting a symptomless first irradiation week, followed by a rapid and steady increase of white discoloration, erythema and pseudomembranes during the second and third week. Oral candidiasis, generalized symptoms such as weight loss and the highest mucositis scores were seen after 3 weeks irradiation. The novel mucositis scoring method may be of value in studying the effect of hygiene programs, topical application of disinfectans or antibiotics on oral mucositis. (author).

  8. Multiscale modeling of mucosal immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling techniques are playing increasingly important roles in advancing a systems-level mechanistic understanding of biological processes. Computer simulations guide and underpin experimental and clinical efforts. This study presents ENteric Immune Simulator (ENISI), a multiscale modeling tool for modeling the mucosal immune responses. ENISI's modeling environment can simulate in silico experiments from molecular signaling pathways to tissue level events such as tissue lesion formation. ENISI's architecture integrates multiple modeling technologies including ABM (agent-based modeling), ODE (ordinary differential equations), SDE (stochastic modeling equations), and PDE (partial differential equations). This paper focuses on the implementation and developmental challenges of ENISI. A multiscale model of mucosal immune responses during colonic inflammation, including CD4+ T cell differentiation and tissue level cell-cell interactions was developed to illustrate the capabilities, power and scope of ENISI MSM. Background Computational techniques are becoming increasingly powerful and modeling tools for biological systems are of greater needs. Biological systems are inherently multiscale, from molecules to tissues and from nano-seconds to a lifespan of several years or decades. ENISI MSM integrates multiple modeling technologies to understand immunological processes from signaling pathways within cells to lesion formation at the tissue level. This paper examines and summarizes the technical details of ENISI, from its initial version to its latest cutting-edge implementation. Implementation Object-oriented programming approach is adopted to develop a suite of tools based on ENISI. Multiple modeling technologies are integrated to visualize tissues, cells as well as proteins; furthermore, performance matching between the scales is addressed. Conclusion We used ENISI MSM for developing predictive multiscale models of the mucosal immune system during gut

  9. Proteoglycans in cancer biology, tumour microenvironment and angiogenesis

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    Iozzo, Renato V; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2011-01-01

    Proteoglycans, key molecular effectors of cell surface and pericellular microenvironments, perform multiple functions in cancer and angiogenesis by virtue of their polyhedric nature and their ability to interact with both ligands and receptors that regulate neoplastic growth and neovascularization. Some proteoglycans such as perlecan, have pro- and anti-angiogenic activities, whereas other proteoglycans, such as syndecans and glypicans, can also directly affect cancer growth by modulating key signalling pathways. The bioactivity of these proteoglycans is further modulated by several classes of enzymes within the tumour microenvironment: (i) sheddases that cleave transmembrane or cell-associated syndecans and glypicans, (ii) various proteinases that cleave the protein core of pericellular proteoglycans and (iii) heparanases and endosulfatases which modify the structure and bioactivity of various heparan sulphate proteoglycans and their bound growth factors. In contrast, some of the small leucine-rich proteoglycans, such as decorin and lumican, act as tumour repressors by physically antagonizing receptor tyrosine kinases including the epidermal growth factor and the Met receptors or integrin receptors thereby evoking anti-survival and pro-apoptotic pathways. In this review we will critically assess the expanding repertoire of molecular interactions attributed to various proteoglycans and will discuss novel proteoglycan functions modulating cancer progression, invasion and metastasis and how these factors regulate the tumour microenvironment. PMID:21155971

  10. Lonidamine Causes Inhibition of Angiogenesis-Related Endothelial Cell Functions

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    Donatella Del Bufalo

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess whether lonidamine (LND interferes with some steps in angiogenesis progression. We report here, for the first time, that LND inhibited angiogenic-related endothelial cell functions in a dose-dependent manner (1-50 μg/ml. In particular, LND decreased proliferation, migration, invasion, and morphogenesis on matrigel of different endothelial cell lines. Zymographic and Western blot analysis assays showed that LND treatment produced a reduction in the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and metalloproteinase-9 by endothelial cells. Vessel formation in a matrigel plug was also reduced by LND. The viability, migration, invasion, and matrix metalloproteinase production of different tumor cell lines were not affected by low doses of LND (1-10 μg/ml, whereas 50 μg/ml LND, which corresponds to the dose used in clinical management of tumors, triggered apoptosis both in endothelial and tumor cells. Together, these data demonstrate that LND is a compound that interferes with endothelial cell functions, both at low and high doses. Thus, the effect of LND on endothelial cell functions, previously undescribed, may be a significant contributor to the antitumor effect of LND observed for clinical management of solid tumors.

  11. Therapeutic options targeting angiogenesis in nonsmall cell lung cancer

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    Lucio Crinò

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a major unmet medical need for effective and well-tolerated treatment options for patients with advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC, in both first-line and relapsed/refractory settings. Experimental evidence has validated signalling pathways that regulate tumour angiogenesis, including the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF and fibroblast growth factor (FGF pathways, as valid anti-cancer drug targets. However, to date, bevacizumab (an anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody is the only antiangiogenic agent to be approved for the treatment of NSCLC. Many other agents, including antibodies, small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors and vascular disrupting agents, have been assessed in phase III trials but have generally failed to demonstrate clinically meaningful benefits. This lack of success probably reflects the redundancy of proangiogenic pathways and the molecular and clinical heterogeneity of NSCLC. In this review we summarise recently completed and ongoing randomised clinical trials of emerging antiangiogenic agents in patients with NSCLC. We highlight recent promising data with agents that simultaneously inhibit multiple proangiogenic pathways, including the PDGF and FGF pathways, as well as the VEGF pathway. Finally, we discuss the outlook for antiangiogenic agents in NSCLC, emphasising the need for clinically validated prognostic and predictive biomarkers to identify patients most likely to respond to therapy.

  12. Gastric mucosal status in patients with reflux esophagitis

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    Riyadh Mohamad Hasan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Reflux esophagitis and atrophic gastritis has increased in its frequency in patients with dyspepsia, heartburn and regurgitation. Aims To determine the association of reflux esophagitis, endoscopic gastric mucosal atrophy and histolopathologic atrophy of the gastric mucosa in patients living in Iraq. Methods A group of 130 consecutive patients who were referred to Gastrointestinal Tract Center at Al-Kindy Teaching Hospital (Baghdad-Iraq from January 2015 to January 2016. The presence or absence of reflux esophagitis, hiatal hernia and atrophic gastritis were determined by endoscopist. Collected gastric biopsy specimens from those patients were examined by for assessment gastric mucosal status and the presence of atrophic gastritis. Results A total of 130 patients were included: 91 men and 39 women, and with mean age of 42.5±6.7 years. According to patients profile, endoscope and histopathological examination of gastric biopsies; there was a significant increase (P=0.0001 in number of patients with diffuse antral gastritis (84(70 per cent compared to environmental metaplastic atrophic gastritis (36(30 per cent. There was a significant increase (P=0.041 in the frequency of reflux esophagitis in patients with diffuse antral gastritis (76.19 per cent than environmental metaplastic atrophic gastritis (55.55 per cent. There was no significant difference (P=0.479 in the assessment of gastric atrophy between endoscopy or histopathology in patients with reflux esophagitis. Conclusion The endoscopic investigation of atrophic gastritis was inversely associated with reflux esophagitis. Endoscopy investigates patients with symptoms of reflux esophagitis because it can confirm or exclude this disease with or without gastric atrophy with certainty.

  13. Oral lichen planus and lichenoid mucositis.

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    De Rossi, Scott S; Ciarrocca, Katharine

    2014-04-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is commonly found in middle-aged women. Although the cause is unknown, research points to several complex immunologic events and cells that are responsible for the inflammatory destruction and chronicity of these lesions. Biopsy for histologic diagnosis is recommended. The mainstay of treatment remains topical corticosteroids; however, newer therapies such as immunomodulating agents are available for recalcitrant lesions. In cases of lichenoid mucositis or reactions, treatment should be directed at identifying and removing the presumed cause. Given the apparent risk of squamous cell carcinoma in these patients, frequent follow-up and repeat biopsy are vital. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Peri-implantitis y mucositis periimplantaria

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    Ikeda Artacho, María Cristina; Docente del Departamento Académico de Clínica Estomatológica. Facultad de Estomatología. Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima,; Ceccarelli Calle, José Francisco; Alumno del Programa de Diplomado en Periodoncia. Facultad de Estomatología. Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima,; Proaño de Casalino, Doris; Docente del Departamento Académico de Clínica Estomatológica. Facultad de Estomatología. Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima,

    2014-01-01

    La implantología oral es una rama de la estomatología que ha evolucionado de una manera muy rápida en los últimos 40 años, desde que Branemark en los años 60 sentara las bases de esta especialidad. No obstante, existen una serie de complicaciones que se pueden desarrollar alrededor del implante, entre las cuales figuran la mucositis periimplantaria y la periimplantitis, patologías que afectan del 2 al 10% de los implantes colocados. Este artículo presenta una revisión de la documentación cien...

  15. Lack of correlation between fecal blood loss and drug-induced gastric mucosal lesions

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    Hedenbro, J.L.; Wetterberg, P.; Vallgren, S.; Bergqvist, L.

    1988-05-01

    Increased fecal blood loss was produced in healthy volunteers by the administration of two nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), naproxen or fenflumizole. Basal as well as drug-induced gastrointestinal blood loss was measured using /sup 51/Cr erythrocyte labeling. Median rise in daily fecal blood loss was 432%. All subjects were endoscoped at the initiation and at the completion of the study. Endoscopic findings were assessed quantitatively by two observers in two different ways. All subjects but three had gastric mucosal lesions at follow-up endoscopy. There was a good correlation between the endoscopic assessments but no statistical correlation between the endoscopic assessment and the increase in fecal blood loss. The data suggest that factors other than gastric mucosal lesions have to be taken into account when investigating NSAID-induced gastrointestinal bleeding.

  16. Protective effect of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge on 5-fluorouracil-induced oral mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Rim; Kim, Jinsung; Oh, Ja Young; Kim, Ha Young; Kim, Young Joo; Chang, Mun Seog

    2017-07-01

    Oral mucositis is a common side-effect caused by chemotherapy or radiotherapy occurring in the majority of cancer patients and is characterized by inflammation and ulcers in the oral mucosa. In the present study, we examined the protective effects of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (SM) on oral mucositis induced by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in human pharyngeal cells and golden Syrian hamsters. We investigated the proliferation and antioxidant abilities of SM using MTT, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays in vitro. Additionally, TUNEL assay was performed, and the expression levels of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), caspase-3 and proinflammatory cytokines were assessed by immunoblotting. The results showed that SM increased the cell proliferation rate in human pharyngeal cells up to 128.97±9.7% compared with this rate in the untreated cells and exerted protective effects on mucosal injury caused by 5-FU treatment. In addition, all concentrations of SM increased DPPH scavenging ability and blocked ROS generation in the treated cells. Taken together, following SM treatment, expression of NF-κB and cleaved caspase-3 were significantly decreased followed by inhibition of cell death. These data suggest that SM could be used for the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis caused by cancer therapies.

  17. Artemisia supplementation differentially affects the mucosal and luminal ileal microbiota of diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, Shawna; Taylor, Christopher M; Luo, Meng; Blanchard, Eugene; Ribnicky, David M; Cefalu, William T; Mynatt, Randall L; Welsh, David A

    2014-01-01

    The gut microbiome has been implicated in obesity and metabolic syndrome; however, most studies have focused on fecal or colonic samples. Several species of Artemisia have been reported to ameliorate insulin signaling both in vitro and in vivo. The aim of this study was to characterize the mucosal and luminal bacterial populations in the terminal ileum with or without supplementation with Artemisia extracts. Following 4 wk of supplementation with different Artemisia extracts (PMI 5011, Santa or Scopa), diet-induced obese mice were sacrificed and luminal and mucosal samples of terminal ileum were used to evaluate microbial community composition by pyrosequencing of 16 S rDNA hypervariable regions. Significant differences in community structure and membership were observed between luminal and mucosal samples, irrespective of diet group. All Artemisia extracts increased the Bacteroidetes to Firmicutes ratio in mucosal samples. This effect was not observed in the luminal compartment. There was high interindividual variability in the phylogenetic assessments of the ileal microbiota, limiting the statistical power of this pilot investigation. Marked differences in bacterial communities exist depending on the biogeographic compartment in the terminal ileum. Future studies testing the effects of Artemisia or other botanical supplements require larger sample sizes for adequate statistical power. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Maintenance of superior mesenteric arterial perfusion prevents increased intestinal mucosal permeability in endotoxic pigs

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    Fink, M.P.; Kaups, K.L.; Wang, H.L.; Rothschild, H.R. (Department of Surgery, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester (USA))

    1991-08-01

    Lipopolysaccharide increases intestinal mucosal permeability to hydrophilic compounds such as chromium 51-labeled edetate (51Cr-EDTA). The authors sought to determine whether this phenomenon is partly mediated by lipopolysaccharide-induced mesenteric hypoperfusion. They assessed permeability in an isolated segment of ileum by measuring plasma-to-lumen clearances (C) for two probes, 51Cr-EDTA and urea, and expressing the results as a ratio (CEDTA/CUREA). In control pigs (n = 6) resuscitated with Ringer's lactate (RL), mucosal permeability was unchanged during the 210-minute period of observation. In pigs (n = 7) infused with lipopolysaccharide (50 micrograms/kg) and similarly resuscitated with RL, mesenteric perfusion (Qsma) decreased significantly and permeability increased progressively and significantly. When endotoxic pigs (n = 6) were resuscitated with a regimen (RL plus hetastarch plus dobutamine) that preserved normal Qsma, lipopolysaccharide-induced mucosal hyperpermeability was prevented. Resuscitation of endotoxic pigs (n = 6) with RL plus hetastarch provided intermediate protection against both mesenteric hypoperfusion and increased permeability. These data suggest that diminished Qsma contributes to impaired ileal mucosal barrier function in experimental endotoxicosis.

  19. Low-level laser for prevention and therapy of oral mucositis induced by chemotherapy or radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genot, Marie-Thérèse; Klastersky, Jean

    2005-05-01

    Oral mucositis is a common morbid condition associated with chemotherapy or radiotherapy for which there is no standard prophylaxis or treatment. There is increasing evidence that the use of low-level laser can reduced the severity of mucositis associated with chemotherapy or radiation therapy. The purpose of this review is to examine the available evidence for it. For most approaches commonly used to prevent or treat chemotherapy-associated or radiotherapy-associated oral mucositis, a recent panel of experts could not find sufficient levels of evidence to recommend or suggest their use. As for low-level laser therapy, the results are difficult to assess and compare because of interoperator variability and because clinical trials are difficult to conduct in that field. Nevertheless, there is accumulating evidence in support of low-level laser therapy. On the basis of literature data, it is reasonable to conclude that the evidence that low-level laser therapy may be useful in decreasing the severity of chemotherapy-associated or radiotherapy-associated mucositis is substantial, even though there have been few controlled studies in the field of prevention.

  20. Initiation of ART during early acute HIV infection preserves mucosal Th17 function and reverses HIV-related immune activation.

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    Alexandra Schuetz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal Th17 cells play an important role in maintaining gut epithelium integrity and thus prevent microbial translocation. Chronic HIV infection is characterized by mucosal Th17 cell depletion, microbial translocation and subsequent immune-activation, which remain elevated despite antiretroviral therapy (ART correlating with increased mortality. However, when Th17 depletion occurs following HIV infection is unknown. We analyzed mucosal Th17 cells in 42 acute HIV infection (AHI subjects (Fiebig (F stage I-V with a median duration of infection of 16 days and the short-term impact of early initiation of ART. Th17 cells were defined as IL-17+ CD4+ T cells and their function was assessed by the co-expression of IL-22, IL-2 and IFNγ. While intact during FI/II, depletion of mucosal Th17 cell numbers and function was observed during FIII correlating with local and systemic markers of immune-activation. ART initiated at FI/II prevented loss of Th17 cell numbers and function, while initiation at FIII restored Th17 cell numbers but not their polyfunctionality. Furthermore, early initiation of ART in FI/II fully reversed the initially observed mucosal and systemic immune-activation. In contrast, patients treated later during AHI maintained elevated mucosal and systemic CD8+ T-cell activation post initiation of ART. These data support a loss of Th17 cells at early stages of acute HIV infection, and highlight that studies of ART initiation during early AHI should be further explored to assess the underlying mechanism of mucosal Th17 function preservation.

  1. Clostridium difficile flagellin FliC: Evaluation as adjuvant and use in a mucosal vaccine against Clostridium difficile.

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    Jean-François Bruxelle

    Full Text Available The immunogenicity of bacterial flagellin has been reported in different studies. By its close interaction with the immune system, the flagellin represents an interesting adjuvant and vaccine candidate. Salmonella Typhimurium flagellin has already been tested as adjuvant to stimulate mucosal immunity. Here, we assessed the ability of Clostridium difficile flagellin FliC to act as a mucosal adjuvant, first combined with ovalbumin as antigen and second with a C. difficile surface protein, the precursor of the S-layer proteins SlpA. Using ovalbumin as antigen, we compared the gut mucosal adjuvanticity of FliC to Salmonella Typhimurium flagellin and cholera toxin. Two routes of immunization were tested in a mouse model: intra-rectal and intra-peritoneal, following which, gut mucosal and systemic antibody responses against ovalbumin (Immunoglobulins G and Immunoglobulins A were analyzed by Enzyme-Linked Immuno Assay in intestinal contents and in sera. In addition, ovalbumin-specific immunoglobulin producing cells were detected in the intestinal lamina propria by Enzyme-Linked Immunospot. Results showed that FliC as adjuvant for immunization targeting ovalbumin was able to stimulate a gut mucosal and systemic antibody response independently of the immunization route. In order to develop a mucosal vaccine to prevent C. difficile intestinal colonization, we assessed in a mouse model the efficacy of FliC as adjuvant compared with cholera toxin co-administrated with the C. difficile S-layer precursor SlpA as antigen. After challenge, a significant decrease of C. difficile intestinal colonization was observed in immunized groups compared to the control group. Our results showed that C. difficile FliC could be used as adjuvant in mucosal vaccination strategy against C. difficile infections.

  2. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates tumor angiogenesis of human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunamura, Makoto; Duda, Dan G; Ghattas, Maivel H; Lozonschi, Lucian; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Yamauchi, Jun-Ichiro; Matsuno, Seiki; Shibahara, Shigeki; Abraham, Nader G

    2003-01-01

    Angiogenesis is necessary for the continued growth of solid tumors, invasion and metastasis. Several studies clearly showed that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in angiogenesis. In this study, we used the vital microscope system, transparent skinfold model, lung colonization model and transduced pancreatic cancer cell line (Panc-1)/human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) cells, to precisely analyze, for the first time, the effect of hHO-1 gene on tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Our results revealed that HO-1 stimulates angiogenesis of pancreatic carcinoma in severe combined immune deficient mice. Overexpression of human hHO-1 after its retroviral transfer into Panc-1 cells did not interfere with tumor growth in vitro. While in vivo the development of tumors was accelerated upon transfection with hHO-1. On the other hand, inhibition of heme oxygenase (HO) activity by stannous mesoporphyrin was able transiently to delay tumor growth in a dose dependent manner. Tumor angiogenesis was markedly increased in Panc-1/hHO-1 compared to mock transfected and wild type. Lectin staining and Ki-67 proliferation index confirmed these results. In addition hHO-1 stimulated in vitro tumor angiogenesis and increased endothelial cell survival. In a lung colonization model, overexpression of hHO-1 increased the occurrence of metastasis, while inhibition of HO activity by stannous mesoporphyrin completely inhibited the occurrence of metastasis. In conclusion, overexpression of HO-1 genes potentiates pancreatic cancer aggressiveness, by increasing tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis and that the inhibition of the HO system may be of useful benefit for the future treatment of the disease.

  3. The postnatal development of the mucosal immune system and mucosal tolerance in domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Mick; Haverson, Karin

    2006-01-01

    The mucosal immune system is exposed to a range of antigens associated with pathogens, to which it must mount active immune responses. However, it is also exposed to a large number of harmless antigens associated with food and with commensal microbial flora, to which expression of active, inflammatory immune responses to these antigens is undesirable. The mucosal immune system must contain machinery capable of evaluating the antigens to which it is exposed and mounting appropriate effector or regulatory responses. Since the immune system is likely to have evolved initially in mucosal tissues, the requirement to prevent damaging allergic responses must be at least as old as the adaptive immune system, and studies of the mechanisms should include a range of non-mammalian species. Despite the importance for rational design of vaccines and for control of allergic reactions, the mechanisms involved are still largely unclear. It is not clear that the classical experimental protocol of "oral tolerance" is, in fact, measuring a biologically important phenomenon, nor is it clear whether tolerance is regulated in the evolutionarily recent organised lymphoid tissue (the lymph nodes) or the more ancient, diffuse architecture in the intestine. The capacity of the immune system to discriminate between "dangerous" and "harmless" antigens appears to develop with age and exposure to microbial flora. Thus, the ability of an individual or a group of animals to correctly regulate mucosal immune responses will depend on age, genetics and on their microbial environment and history. Attempts to manipulate the mucosal immune system towards active immune responses by oral vaccines, or towards oral tolerance, are likely to be confounded by environmentally-induced variability between individuals and between groups of animals.

  4. Angiogenesis in adenosquamous cancer of pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestris, Nicola; Danza, Katia; Longo, Vito; Brunetti, Oronzo; Fucci, Livia; Argentiero, Antonella; Calabrese, Angela; Cataldo, Ivana; Tamma, Roberto; Ribatti, Domenico; Tommasi, Stefania

    2017-11-10

    Adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas (ASCP) is an uncommon variant of exocrine pancreatic malignancies, characterized by a histological admixture of adenomatous and squamous cell elements. This cancer is characterized by a poorly differentiated histology and a poorer clinical outcome compared to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Unlike PDAC, that is characterized by a low microvascular density (MVD) and collapsed vasculature, no data are available about angiogenesis in ASPC. Immunohistochemical evaluation of MVD and trypatse-positive mast cells (MCs) were performed on a single case of ASCP compared to PDAC. Moreover, the levels of angiopoietin-1 and -2 (Ang-1, Ang-2), receptor tyrosine kinase with immunoglobulin and epidermal growth factor homology domain-2 (Tie-2), vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1A), miR-21-5p, miR-181a-5p, miR-122-5p, and miR-27a-3p were evaluated by real-time PCR. Higher number of tryptase-positive MCs and MVD are observed in the ASCP case compared to PDAC one. Lower levels of miR-122-5p and higher expression of VEGFA, HIF1A and Ang-2 genes were observed in ASCP. Furthermore, lower Ang-1 and Tie-2 transcript levels and higher increases of miR-21-5p, miR27a-3p and miR-181a-5p levels were found in the rarest form of pancreatic carcinoma. Our data demonstrate an important angiogenic activity in ASCP with a putative role of miR-21-5p, miR-181a-5p, miR-122-5p and miR-27a-3p in the regulation of this process.

  5. Anatomical and microstructural imaging of angiogenesis

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    Kiessling, Fabian [University of Aachen (RWTH), Experimental Molecular Imaging, Aachen (Germany); Razansky, Daniel [Technical University of Munich and Helmholtz Center Munich, Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging, Munich (Germany); Alves, Frauke [University Medical Center, Department of Haematology and Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Max-Planck-Institute for Experimental Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology of Neuronal Signals, Goettingen (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    This article reviews and discusses different options for visualizing the microarchitecture of vessels ex vivo and in vivo with respect to reliability, practicability and availability. The investigation of angiogenesis by standard histological methods, like microvessel density counts, is limited since the three-dimensional (3-D) architecture and the functionality of vessels cannot be considered properly. Coregistration of immunostained images of vessels may be performed but is time consuming and often not sufficiently accurate. Confocal fluorescence microscopy is an alternative, but only enables 3-D stacks of less than 500 nm in thickness. Multiphoton microscopy and other advanced technologies, such as optical coherence tomography and optical frequency domain imaging, provide a deeper view into tissues and allow for in vivo imaging of microvessels, which is a precondition for longitudinal studies. Besides these microscopic techniques, the vascularization in larger tissue samples can be investigated using corrosion casts in combination with scanning electron microscopy, or microcomputed tomography ({mu}CT). Furthermore, recent improvements in {mu}CT technology open up new perspectives for in vivo scans with high resolution and tolerable X-ray doses. Also 3-D contrast-enhanced high-frequency ultrasound has been shown to be sensitive for angiogenic vessels and even distinguishing between mature and immature vessels appears feasible. Microvessel architecture can also be visualized by MRI. Here, T1-weighted angiography techniques after injection of blood pool contrast agents appear preferable. Optoacoustic tomographic imaging has more recently shown promise for high-resolution in vivo mapping of the microvasculature in rodents using intrinsic haemoglobin-based contrast and exogenous contrast agents. (orig.)

  6. The oral mucosal surface and blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumova, Ella A; Dierkes, Tobias; Sprang, Jürgen; Arnold, Wolfgang H

    2013-03-12

    Detailed information about the size of the oral mucosa is scarce in the literature, and those studies that do exist do not take into account the size of the tongue or the enlargement of the surface by the papillae. Because of the various functions of the oral mucosa in the maintenance of oral health, knowledge of its true size may provide a better understanding of the physiology of the oral cavity and some oral diseases and direct future therapeutic strategies. The aim of this study was to determine the total size of the oral mucosa. Five human adult cadaver heads were cut in the median sagittal plane, and the total area of the oral surface was determined using silicon casts. The surface of the tongue was measured with quantitative profilometry. Photographs of oral blood vessels were taken in different areas of the oral mucosa of adult test subjects using intravital microscopy, and the pictures were compared with vessel casts of the oral mucosal capillaries of a maccaca fasciculrais monkey, which was studied using a scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the dorsal side of the tongue comprises a large proportion of the total oral mucosal surface. The surface area of the epithelium increases moving from anterior to posterior on the tongue, and the number of underlying blood vessels increases proportionally. It can be concluded that the back of the tongue plays an important role in the oral resorption of drugs. The results may be of relevance for the delivery and development of oral drug application.

  7. Probiotics as Antifungals in Mucosal Candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Victor H; Bandara, H M H N; Mayer, Marcia P A; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-05-01

    Candidais an opportunistic pathogen that causes mucosal and deep systemic candidiasis. The emergence of drug resistance and the side effects of currently available antifungals have restricted their use as long-term prophylactic agents for candidal infections. Given this scenario, probiotics have been suggested as a useful alternative for the management of candidiasis. We analyzed the available data on the efficacy of probiotics in candidal colonization of host surfaces. A number of well-controlled studies indicate that probiotics, particularly lactobacilli, suppressCandidagrowth and biofilm development in vitro.A few clinical trials have also shown the beneficial effects of probiotics in reducing oral, vaginal, and enteric colonization byCandida; alleviation of clinical signs and symptoms; and, in some cases, reducing the incidence of invasive fungal infection in critically ill patients. Probiotics may serve in the future as a worthy ally in the battle against chronic mucosal candidal infections. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Hacking macrophage-associated immunosuppression for regulating glioblastoma angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xin; Morales, Renee-Tyler Tan; Qian, Weiyi; Wang, Haoyu; Gagner, Jean-Pierre; Dolgalev, Igor; Placantonakis, Dimitris; Zagzag, David; Cimmino, Luisa; Snuderl, Matija; Lam, Raymond H W; Chen, Weiqiang

    2018-02-02

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most lethal primary adult brain tumor and its pathology is hallmarked by distorted neovascularization, diffuse tumor-associated macrophage infiltration, and potent immunosuppression. Reconstituting organotypic tumor angiogenesis models with biomimetic cell heterogeneity and interactions, pro-/anti-inflammatory milieu and extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanics is critical for preclinical anti-angiogenic therapeutic screening. However, current in vitro systems do not accurately mirror in vivo human brain tumor microenvironment. Here, we engineered a three-dimensional (3D), microfluidic angiogenesis model with controllable and biomimetic immunosuppressive conditions, immune-vascular and cell-matrix interactions. We demonstrate in vitro, GL261 and CT-2A GBM-like tumors steer macrophage polarization towards a M2-like phenotype for fostering an immunosuppressive and proangiogenic niche, which is consistent with human brain tumors. We distinguished that GBM and M2-like immunosuppressive macrophages promote angiogenesis, while M1-like pro-inflammatory macrophages suppress angiogenesis, which we coin "inflammation-driven angiogenesis." We observed soluble immunosuppressive cytokines, predominantly TGF-β1, and surface integrin (α v β 3 ) endothelial-macrophage interactions are required in inflammation-driven angiogenesis. We demonstrated tuning cell-adhesion receptors using an integrin (α v β 3 )-specific collagen hydrogel regulated inflammation-driven angiogenesis through Src-PI3K-YAP signaling, highlighting the importance of altered cell-ECM interactions in inflammation. To validate the preclinical applications of our 3D organoid model and mechanistic findings of inflammation-driven angiogenesis, we screened a novel dual integrin (α v β 3 ) and cytokine receptor (TGFβ-R1) blockade that suppresses GBM tumor neovascularization by simultaneously targeting macrophage-associated immunosuppression, endothelial-macrophage interactions, and

  9. Module-based multiscale simulation of angiogenesis in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mac Gabhann Feilim

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mathematical modeling of angiogenesis has been gaining momentum as a means to shed new light on the biological complexity underlying blood vessel growth. A variety of computational models have been developed, each focusing on different aspects of the angiogenesis process and occurring at different biological scales, ranging from the molecular to the tissue levels. Integration of models at different scales is a challenging and currently unsolved problem. Results We present an object-oriented module-based computational integration strategy to build a multiscale model of angiogenesis that links currently available models. As an example case, we use this approach to integrate modules representing microvascular blood flow, oxygen transport, vascular endothelial growth factor transport and endothelial cell behavior (sensing, migration and proliferation. Modeling methodologies in these modules include algebraic equations, partial differential equations and agent-based models with complex logical rules. We apply this integrated model to simulate exercise-induced angiogenesis in skeletal muscle. The simulation results compare capillary growth patterns between different exercise conditions for a single bout of exercise. Results demonstrate how the computational infrastructure can effectively integrate multiple modules by coordinating their connectivity and data exchange. Model parameterization offers simulation flexibility and a platform for performing sensitivity analysis. Conclusions This systems biology strategy can be applied to larger scale integration of computational models of angiogenesis in skeletal muscle, or other complex processes in other tissues under physiological and pathological conditions.

  10. Module-based multiscale simulation of angiogenesis in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Qutub, Amina A; Vempati, Prakash; Mac Gabhann, Feilim; Popel, Aleksander S

    2011-04-04

    Mathematical modeling of angiogenesis has been gaining momentum as a means to shed new light on the biological complexity underlying blood vessel growth. A variety of computational models have been developed, each focusing on different aspects of the angiogenesis process and occurring at different biological scales, ranging from the molecular to the tissue levels. Integration of models at different scales is a challenging and currently unsolved problem. We present an object-oriented module-based computational integration strategy to build a multiscale model of angiogenesis that links currently available models. As an example case, we use this approach to integrate modules representing microvascular blood flow, oxygen transport, vascular endothelial growth factor transport and endothelial cell behavior (sensing, migration and proliferation). Modeling methodologies in these modules include algebraic equations, partial differential equations and agent-based models with complex logical rules. We apply this integrated model to simulate exercise-induced angiogenesis in skeletal muscle. The simulation results compare capillary growth patterns between different exercise conditions for a single bout of exercise. Results demonstrate how the computational infrastructure can effectively integrate multiple modules by coordinating their connectivity and data exchange. Model parameterization offers simulation flexibility and a platform for performing sensitivity analysis. This systems biology strategy can be applied to larger scale integration of computational models of angiogenesis in skeletal muscle, or other complex processes in other tissues under physiological and pathological conditions.

  11. Friends Turned Foes: Angiogenic Growth Factors beyond Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratiek N. Matkar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones is a biological process that ensures an adequate blood flow is maintained to provide the cells with a sufficient supply of nutrients and oxygen within the body. Numerous soluble growth factors and inhibitors, cytokines, proteases as well as extracellular matrix proteins and adhesion molecules stringently regulate the multi-factorial process of angiogenesis. The properties and interactions of key angiogenic molecules such as vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs, fibroblast growth factors (FGFs and angiopoietins have been investigated in great detail with respect to their molecular impact on angiogenesis. Since the discovery of angiogenic growth factors, much research has been focused on their biological actions and their potential use as therapeutic targets for angiogenic or anti-angiogenic strategies in a context-dependent manner depending on the pathologies. It is generally accepted that these factors play an indispensable role in angiogenesis. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that this is not their only role and it is likely that the angiogenic factors have important functions in a wider range of biological and pathological processes. The additional roles played by these molecules in numerous pathologies and biological processes beyond angiogenesis are discussed in this review.

  12. Chemotherapy induced intestinal mucositis; from bench to bed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.A.E. Koning, de (Barbara)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPart 1 focuses primarily on the pathophysiology of mucositis, in order to gain more insight different experimental mouse models were used. Chapter 2 describes mucositis induced by high dose doxorubicin (DOX)- treatment. DOX is a frequently used cytostatic drug in childhood cancer,

  13. Antibodies and their receptors: different potential roles in mucosal defense

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horton, Rachel E.; Vidarsson, Gestur

    2013-01-01

    Over recent years it has become increasingly apparent that mucosal antibodies are not only restricted to the IgM and IgA isotypes, but that also other isotypes and particularly IgG can be found in significant quantities at some mucosal surfaces, such as in the genital tract. Their role is more

  14. Mucosal malignant melanoma - a clinical, oncological, pathological and genetic survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lauge H; Larsen, Ann-Cathrine; von Buchwald, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal melanomas constitute 1.3% of all melanomas and they may develop in any mucosal membrane. Conjunctival melanomas (0.5/million/year) and melanomas in the sinonasal cavity (0.5/million/year) are the most common, followed by anorectal melanomas (0.4/million/year) and melanomas in the oral cav...

  15. Mucosal Immune Regulation in Early Infancy: Monitoring and Intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Hol (Jeroen)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe mucosal immune system of infants is dependent on the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. Homeostasis results from the interaction between the mucosa and exogenous factors such as dietar and microbial agents. Induction and maintenance of homeostasis is a highly regluated system that

  16. Analysis of Non-infective Oral Mucosal Lesions with Possible ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study suggests a rarity of autoimmune disease of oral mucosal. The lesions consist predominantly of RAU and an emerging trend of allergic stomatitis due to herbal toothpaste was observed. This study emphasizes the need for routine immunological tests in the diagnosis of suspected autoimmune oral mucosal lesions.

  17. Mucosal melanoma: correlation of clinicopathologic, prognostic, and molecular features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gru, Alejandro A; Becker, Nils; Dehner, Louis P; Pfeifer, John D

    2014-08-01

    Although the presence of the t(12;22)(q13;q12) translocation (the defining molecular feature of malignant melanoma of soft parts/clear cell sarcoma) in cutaneous melanoma has been investigated, no large-scale studies have been performed among mucosal melanoma (MucM). In this study we assessed the prevalence of the EWSR1 rearrangement in primary MucM, and analyzed gross and microscopic features with their potential impact on diagnosis and prognosis. Overall, 132 specimens from 84 patients were included. A total of 55 cases had an intramucosal component. Survival of MucMs of the head and neck was associated with two independent factors: size and histology. Tumors more than 3 cm in greatest dimension had an average survival of 12.75 months; those 3 cm or less had an average survival of 38.3 months (P=0.035). Purely epithelioid tumors had an average worse survival of 16.8 months (P=0.028). A cut-off value of 1 mm for Breslow depth provided a statistically significant difference in survival at both 3 and 5 years (P=-0.02) by multivariate analysis in the gynecologic tract. At the molecular level three cases had a EWSR1 rearrangement by fluorescent in-situ hybridization, but only one with an intramucosal component. None of the 58 cases tested by PCR showed the presence of the EWSR1 rearrangement. With the exception of vulvar melanomas, the prognosis of mucosal-associated melanomas was poor and there was a suggestion that spindle morphology may be more favorable. Our study also showed that the EWSR1 rearrangement was very uncommon among MucM. Though 'clear cell sarcoma' is embedded in the sarcoma literature, the synonym 'melanoma of soft parts' has considerable justification in light of our evolving understanding of the molecular genetics in the family of malignant melanomas.

  18. Oral mucosal health in liver transplant recipients and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helenius-Hietala, Jaana; Ruokonen, Hellevi; Grönroos, Lisa; Rissanen, Harri; Vehkalahti, Miira M; Suominen, Liisa; Isoniemi, Helena; Meurman, Jukka H

    2014-01-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs and other medications may predispose patients to oral diseases. Data on oral mucosal health in recipients of liver transplantation (LT) are limited. We, therefore, recruited 84 LT recipients (64 with chronic liver disease and 20 with acute liver failure) for clinical oral examinations in a cross-sectional, case-control study. Their oral health had been clinically examined before transplantation. The prevalence of oral mucosal lesions (OMLs) was assessed in groups with different etiologies of liver disease and in groups with different immunosuppressive medications, and these groups were compared to controls selected from a nationwide survey in Finland (n = 252). Risk factors for OMLs were evaluated with logistic regression. OMLs were more frequent in LT recipients versus controls (43% versus 15%, P lesion, and its prevalence was significantly higher for patients using cyclosporine A (CSA; 29%) versus patients using tacrolimus (TAC; 5%, P = 0.007); the prevalence was even higher with the simultaneous use of calcium channel blockers and CSA (47%) or TAC (8%, P = 0.002). Lesions with malignant potential such as drug-induced lichenoid reactions, oral lichen planus-like lesions, leukoplakias, and ulcers occurred in 13% of the patients with chronic liver disease and in 6% of the controls. Every third patient with chronic liver disease had reduced salivary flow, and more than half of all patients were positive for Candida; this risk was higher with steroids. In conclusion, the high frequency of OMLs among LT recipients can be explained not only by immunosuppressive drugs but also by other medications. Because dry mouth affects oral health and OMLs may have the potential for malignant transformation, annual oral examinations are indicated. © 2013 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  19. Chemokine receptor CXCR7 regulates the invasion, angiogenesis and tumor growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Fan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of recent advances in diagnostic and therapeutic measures, the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC patients remains poor. Therefore, it is crucial to understand what factors are involved in promoting development of HCC. Evidence is accumulating that members of the chemokine receptor family are viewed as promising therapeutic targets in the fight against cancer. More recent studies have revealed that chemokine receptor CXCR7 plays an important role in cancer development. However, little is known about the effect of CXCR7 on the process of HCC cell invasion and angiogenesis. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression of CXCR7 in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues and cell lines and to evaluate the role of CXCR7 in tumor growth, angiogenesis and invasion of HCC cells. Methods We constructed CXCR7 expressing shRNA, and CXCR7shRNA was subsequently stably transfected into human HCC cells. We evaluated the effect of CXCR7 inhibition on cell invasion, adhesion, VEGF secretion, tube formation and tumor growth. Immunohistochemistry was done to assess the expression of CXCR7 in human hepatocellular carcinoma tissues and CD31 in tumor of mice. We also evaluated the effect of VEGF stimulation on expression of CXCR7. Results CXCR7 was overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues. We showed that high invasive potential HCC cell lines express high levels of CXCR7. In vitro, CXCL12 was found to induce invasion, adhesion, tube formation, and VEGF secretion in SMMC-7721 cells. These biological effects were inhibited by silencing of CXCR7 in SMMC-7721 cells. In addition, we also found that VEGF stimulation can up-regulate CXCR7 expression in SMMC-7721 cells and HUVECs. More importantly, enhanced expression of CXCR7 by VEGF was founctional. In vivo, tumor growth and angiogenesis were suppressed by knockdown of CXCR7 in SMMC-7721 cells. However, silencing of CXCR7 did not affect metastasis of tumor in vivo

  20. Angiogenesis and blood vessel stability in inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennedy, Aisling

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess blood vessel stability in inflammatory synovial tissue (ST) and to examine neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), oxidative DNA damage, and hypoxia in vivo. METHODS: Macroscopic vascularity and ST oxygen levels were determined in vivo in patients with inflammatory arthritis who were undergoing arthroscopy. Vessel maturity\\/stability was quantified in matched ST samples by dual immunofluorescence staining for factor VIII (FVIII)\\/alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA). NCAM and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2\\'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) were examined by immunohistochemistry. Angiogenesis was assessed in vitro, using human dermal endothelial cells (HDECs) in a Matrigel tube formation assay. RESULTS: A significant number of immature vessels (showing no pericyte recruitment) was observed in tissue from patients with inflammatory arthritis (P < 0.001), in contrast to osteoarthritic and normal tissue, which showed complete recruitment of pericytes. Low in vivo PO(2) levels in the inflamed joint (median [range] 22.8 [3.2-54.1] mm Hg) were inversely related to increased macroscopic vascularity (P < 0.04) and increased microscopic expression of FVIII and alpha-SMA (P < 0.04 and P < 0.03, respectively). A significant proportion of vessels showed focal expression of NCAM and strong nuclear 8-oxodG expression, implicating a loss of EC-pericyte contact and increased DNA damage, levels of which were inversely associated with low in vivo PO(2) (P = 0.04 for each comparison). Circulating cells were completely negative for 8-oxodG. Exposure of HDEC to 3% O(2) (reflecting mean ST in vivo measurements) significantly increased EC tube formation (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate the presence of unstable vessels in inflamed joints associated with hypoxia, incomplete EC-pericyte interactions, and increased DNA damage. These changes may further contribute to persistent hypoxia in the inflamed joint to further drive this unstable microenvironment.

  1. A Novel Peptide to Treat Oral Mucositis Blocks Endothelial and Epithelial Cell Apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Xiaoyan; Chen Peili [Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Sonis, Stephen T. [Division of Oral Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Biomodels, Watertown, Massachusetts (United States); Lingen, Mark W. [Department of Pathology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Berger, Ann [NephRx Corporation, Kalamazoo, Michigan (United States); Toback, F. Gary, E-mail: gtoback@medicine.bsd.uchicago.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: No effective agents currently exist to treat oral mucositis (OM) in patients receiving chemoradiation for the treatment of head-and-neck cancer. We identified a novel 21-amino acid peptide derived from antrum mucosal protein-18 that is cytoprotective, mitogenic, and motogenic in tissue culture and animal models of gastrointestinal epithelial cell injury. We examined whether administration of antrum mucosal protein peptide (AMP-p) could protect against and/or speed recovery from OM. Methods and Materials: OM was induced in established hamster models by a single dose of radiation, fractionated radiation, or fractionated radiation together with cisplatin to simulate conventional treatments of head-and-neck cancer. Results: Daily subcutaneous administration of AMP-p reduced the occurrence of ulceration and accelerated mucosal recovery in all three models. A delay in the onset of erythema after irradiation was observed, suggesting that a protective effect exists even before injury to mucosal epithelial cells occurs. To test this hypothesis, the effects of AMP-p on tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}-induced apoptosis were studied in an endothelial cell line (human dermal microvascular endothelial cells) as well as an epithelial cell line (human adult low-calcium, high-temperature keratinocytes; HaCaT) used to model the oral mucosa. AMP-p treatment, either before or after cell monolayers were exposed to tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, protected against development of apoptosis in both cell types when assessed by annexin V and propidium iodide staining followed by flow cytometry or ligase-mediated polymerase chain reaction. Conclusions: These observations suggest that the ability of AMP-p to attenuate radiation-induced OM could be attributable, at least in part, to its antiapoptotic activity.

  2. Inter-rater agreement in the diagnosis of mucositis and peri-implantitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merli, Mauro; Bernardelli, Francesco; Giulianelli, Erica; Toselli, Ivano; Moscatelli, Marco; Pagliaro, Umberto; Nieri, Michele

    2014-09-01

    The objective was to assess the inter-rater agreement in the diagnosis of mucositis and peri-implantitis. Adult patients with ≥ 1 dental implant were eligible. Three operators examined the patients. One examiner allocated the patients to three groups of nine as follows: nine implants with peri-implantitis, nine implants with mucositis, and 9 implants with healthy mucosa. Each examiner recorded on all 27 patients (one implant per patient) recessions, probing depth, bleeding on probing, suppuration, keratinized tissue depth and bone loss, leading to a final diagnosis of mucositis, peri-implantitis or healthy mucosa. Examiners were independent and blinded to each other. Fleiss k-statistic with quadratic weight in the diagnosis of peri-implantitis and mucositis was 0.66 [CI95%: 0.45-0.87]. A complete agreement was obtained only in 14 cases (52%). Fleiss k-statistics in bleeding on probing and bone loss were respectively 0.31 [CI95%: 0.20-0.41] and 0.70 [CI95%: 0.45-0.94]. Intra-class correlation coefficients for recession, probing depth and keratinized tissue depth were respectively 0.69 [CI95%: 0.62-0.75], 0.54 [CI95%: 0.44-0.63] and 0.56 [CI95%: 0.27-0.77]. The inter-rater agreement in the diagnosis of peri-implant disease was qualified as merely good. This could also be due in part to the unclear definition of peri-implantitis and mucositis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A Murine Model of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Peri-Implant Mucositis and Peri-Implantitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirih, Flavia Q; Hiyari, Sarah; Leung, Ho-Yin; Barroso, Ana D V; Jorge, Adrian C A; Perussolo, Jeniffer; Atti, Elisa; Lin, Yi-Ling; Tetradis, Sotirios; Camargo, Paulo M

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants are a widely used treatment option for tooth replacement. However, they are susceptible to inflammatory diseases such as peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis, which are highly prevalent and may lead to implant loss. Unfortunately, the understanding of the pathogenesis of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis is fragmented and incomplete. Therefore, the availability of a reproducible animal model to study these inflammatory diseases would facilitate the dissection of their pathogenic mechanisms. The objective of this study is to propose a murine model of experimental peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. Screw-shaped titanium implants were placed in the upper healed edentulous alveolar ridges of C57BL/6J mice 8 weeks after tooth extraction. Following 4 weeks of osseointegration, Porphyromonas gingivalis -lipolysaccharide (LPS) injections were delivered to the peri-implant soft tissues for 6 weeks. No-injections and vehicle injections were utilized as controls. Peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis were assessed clinically, radiographically (microcomputerized tomograph [CT]), and histologically following LPS-treatment. LPS-injections resulted in a significant increase in soft tissue edema around the head of the implants as compared to the control groups. Micro-CT analysis revealed significantly greater bone loss in the LPS-treated implants. Histological analysis of the specimens demonstrated that the LPS-group had increased soft tissue vascularity, which harbored a dense mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate, and the bone exhibited noticeable osteoclast activity. The induction of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis in mice via localized delivery of bacterial LPS has been demonstrated. We anticipate that this model will contribute to the development of more effective preventive and therapeutic approaches for these 2 conditions.

  4. Murine Vaginal Colonization Model for Investigating Asymptomatic Mucosal Carriage of Streptococcus pyogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael E.; Nielsen, Hailyn V.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2013-01-01

    While many virulence factors promoting Streptococcus pyogenes invasive disease have been described, specific streptococcal factors and host properties influencing asymptomatic mucosal carriage remain uncertain. To address the need for a refined model of prolonged S. pyogenes asymptomatic mucosal colonization, we have adapted a preestrogenized murine vaginal colonization model for S. pyogenes. In this model, derivatives of strains HSC5, SF370, JRS4, NZ131, and MEW123 established a reproducible, asymptomatic colonization of the vaginal mucosa over a period of typically 3 to 4 weeks' duration at a relatively high colonization efficiency. Prior treatment with estradiol prolonged streptococcal colonization and was associated with reduced inflammation in the colonized vaginal epithelium as well as a decreased leukocyte presence in vaginal fluid compared to the levels of inflammation and leukocyte presence in non-estradiol-treated control mice. The utility of our model for investigating S. pyogenes factors contributing to mucosal carriage was verified, as a mutant with a mutation in the transcriptional regulator catabolite control protein A (CcpA) demonstrated significant impairment in vaginal colonization. An assessment of in vivo transcriptional activity in the CcpA− strain for several known CcpA-regulated genes identified significantly elevated transcription of lactate oxidase (lctO) correlating with excessive generation of hydrogen peroxide to self-lethal levels. Deletion of lctO did not impair colonization, but deletion of lctO in a CcpA− strain prolonged carriage, exceeding even that of the wild-type strain. Thus, while LctO is not essential for vaginal colonization, its dysregulation is deleterious, highlighting the critical role of CcpA in promoting mucosal colonization. The vaginal colonization model should prove effective for future analyses of S. pyogenes mucosal colonization. PMID:23460515

  5. Efficient mucosal vaccination mediated by the neonatal Fc receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lilin; Zeng, Rongyu; Bai, Yu; Roopenian, Derry C; Zhu, Xiaoping

    2011-02-01

    Almost all infectious diseases are initiated at mucosal surfaces, yet intramuscular or subcutaneous vaccination usually provides only minimal protection at sites of infection owing to suboptimal activation of the mucosal immune system. The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) mediates the transport of IgG across polarized epithelial cells lining mucosal surfaces. We mimicked this process by fusing a model antigen, herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein gD, to an IgG Fc fragment. Intranasal immunization, together with the adjuvant CpG, completely protected wild-type, but not FcRn knockout, mice after intravaginal challenge with virulent HSV-2 186. This immunization strategy induced efficient mucosal and systemic antibody, B- and T-cell immune responses, with stable protection for at least 6 months after vaccination in most of the immunized animals. The FcRn-IgG transcellular transport pathway may provide a general delivery route for subunit vaccines against many mucosal pathogens.

  6. Nanocarriers: a versatile approach for mucosal vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Nishi; Sharma, Rajeev; Agrawal, Udita; Vyas, Suresh P

    2015-02-01

    Infectious agents generally use mucosal surfaces as entry port to the body thereby necessitating the need of development of mucosal vaccine as vaccination is important for disease avoidance and suppression. Vaccination through mucosal route is a promising strategy to elicit efficient immune response as parentally administered vaccines induce poor mucosal immunity in general. Safety, economy and stability are highly desired with vaccines and this can be achieved with use of delivery cargos. This review focuses on challenges related with mucosal vaccines and use of nanocarriers as suitable cargos to cater the antigen effectively to the desired site. The review also includes different factors which are to be considered regarding the performance of the nanocarriers and clinical status of these systems.

  7. Mucosal surface nodularity on upper gastrointestinal series (UGIS) : prospective analysis of its primary cause and prevalence of gastric malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soo Youn; Kim, Sun Mi; Kim, Ah Young; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Ha, Hyun Kwon [Univ. of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-10-01

    Mucosal surface nodularity was defined as present at UGIS when multiple nodular defects larger than 5 mm were scattered in the gastric mucosa in an area greater than 5 x 5 cm. The purpose of this study was to determine the primary causes of this radiographic finding and to assess the incidence of gastric malignancy in these patients. During a one-year period were prospectively collected among patients who underwent UGIS, data for 51 [aged 30-78 (mean, 51) years] above who met the criteria of mucosal surface nodularity. Whether or not this was present was decided by two radiologists who in reaching a consensus excluded the possibility of erosive gastritis, indicated by central barium collection in the nodular defects. The primary causes of mucosal nodularity and associated gastric pathologies were determined by the histopathological results obtained from the specimens after surgery (n=18) or endoscopic biopsy (n=33). Pathological examinations revealed that the primary causes of the mucosal nodularity in these 51 patients were intestinal metaplasia in 28 (54.9%), MALT lymphoma in seven (13.7%), early gastric cancer in six (11.8%), chronic gastritis in five (9.8%), low grade dysplasia in four (7.8%), and gastritis cystica profunda in one (2%). Gastric malignancy was present either in or outside the area of mucosal nodularity in 34 (66/7%) of the 51 (27 carcinomas and 7 MALT lymphomas). No different patterns of mucosal surface nodularity were noted between the groups of each disease entity. Mucosal surface nodularity is observed at UGIS in various gastric pathologies. Because of the high incidence of gastric malignancy in these patients, close follow-up or gastrofiberscopic biopsy is mandatory.

  8. Low-Level Laser Therapy Promoted Aggressive Proliferation and Angiogenesis Through Decreasing of Transforming Growth Factor-β1 and Increasing of Akt/Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Yun-Hee; Moon, Jeong-Hwan; Choi, Sun-Hyang; Ahn, Jin-Chul

    2016-06-01

    We assessed the cause of increased tumor after low-level laser therapy (LLLT) by histological analysis. LLLT is a nonthermal phototherapy used in several medical applications, including wound healing, reduction of pain, and amelioration of oral mucositis. We discovered by accident that LLLT increased tumor size while testing a photodynamic therapy (PDT) model for the treatment of thyroid cancer. Although therapeutic effects of LLLT on cancer or dysplastic cells have been studied, LLLT has been recently reported to stimulate the aggressiveness of the tumor. The anaplastic thyroid cancer cell line FRO was injected into thyroid glands of nude mice orthotopically and then laser irradiation was performed with 0, 15, and 30 J/cm(2) (100 mW/cm(2)) on the thyroid after 10 days. The tumor volume was measured for 4 weeks and the thyroid tissues underwent histological analysis. We observed that proliferation of FRO cells and macrophage infiltration was increased with energy delivery to the thyroid glands. We also assessed overproliferated FRO cells using an immunohistochemical staining with hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), p-Akt, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1). HIF-1α and p-Akt were elevated after LLLT, which suggested that the phosphorylation of Akt by LLLT led to the activation of HIF-1α. Moreover, TGF-β1 expression was decreased after LLLT, which led to loss of cell cycle regulation. In conclusion, LLLT led to a decrease in TGF-β1 and increase of p-Akt/HIF-1α which resulted to overproliferation and angiogenesis of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC). Therefore, we suggest that LLLT can influence cancer aggressiveness associated with TGF-β1 and Akt/HIF-1α cascades in some poorly differentiated head and neck cancers.

  9. Microfluidic traction force microscopy to study mechanotransduction in angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldock, Luke; Wittkowske, Claudia; Perrault, Cecile M

    2017-07-01

    The formation of new blood vessels from existing vasculature, angiogenesis, is driven by coordinated endothelial cell migration and matrix remodeling in response to local signals. Recently, a growing body of evidence has shown that mechanotransduction, along with chemotransduction, is a major regulator of angiogenesis. Mechanical signals, such as fluid shear stress and substrate mechanics, influence sprouting and network formation, but the mechanisms behind this relationship are still unclear. Here, we present cellular traction forces as possible effectors activated by mechanosensing to mediate matrix remodeling, and encourage the use of TFM to study mechanotransduction in angiogenesis. We also suggest that deciphering the response of EC to mechanical signals could reveal an optimal angiogenic mechanical environment, and provide insight into development, wound healing, the initiation and growth of tumors, and new strategies for tissue engineering. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Morphine Promotes Tumor Angiogenesis and Increases Breast Cancer Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Bimonte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphine is considered a highly potent analgesic agent used to relieve suffering of patients with cancer. Several in vitro and in vivo studies showed that morphine also modulates angiogenesis and regulates tumour cell growth. Unfortunately, the results obtained by these studies are still contradictory. In order to better dissect the role of morphine in cancer cell growth and angiogenesis we performed in vitro studies on ER-negative human breast carcinoma cells, MDA.MB231 and in vivo studies on heterotopic mouse model of human triple negative breast cancer, TNBC. We demonstrated that morphine in vitro enhanced the proliferation and inhibited the apoptosis of MDA.MB231 cells. In vivo studies performed on xenograft mouse model of TNBC revealed that tumours of mice treated with morphine were larger than those observed in other groups. Moreover, morphine was able to enhance the neoangiogenesis. Our data showed that morphine at clinical relevant doses promotes angiogenesis and increases breast cancer progression.

  11. Angiogenesis in Dermatology - Insights of Molecular Mechanisms and Latest Developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richarz, N A; Boada, A; Carrascosa, J M

    Angiogenesis is the growth of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels. It is a biological process essential in physiological wound healing or pathological inflammation and tumor growth, which underlies a complex interplay of stimulating and inhibiting signals. Extracellular matrix, cells of innate and adaptive immunity and endothelial cells itself are a major source of angiogenic factors that activate or inhibit specific receptors and consequently influence intracellular signaling pathways. Most inflammatory and neoplastic diseases in dermatology are characterized by excessive angiogenesis, such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, as well as melanoma, non-melanoma skin cancer, but also benign vascular neoplasia. In this article we describe current knowledge of angiogenesis and its most relevant mechanisms in different dermatological disorders with particular emphasis on the angiogenic factors (vascular endothelial growth factor) and angiopoietins as a target of current and future directions of anti-angiogenic therapy. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Systematic review of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saunders, D.P.; Epstein, J.B.; Elad, S.; Allemano, J.; Bossi, P.; Wetering, M.D. van de; Rao, N.G.; Potting, C.M.J.; Cheng, K.K.; Freidank, A.; Brennan, M.T.; Bowen, J.; Dennis, K.; Lalla, R.V.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this project was to develop clinical practice guidelines on the use of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the prevention and management of oral mucositis (OM) in cancer patients. METHODS: A systematic review of the available literature was

  13. Systematic review of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saunders, Deborah P.; Epstein, Joel B.; Elad, Sharon; Allemano, Justin; Bossi, Paolo; van de Wetering, Marianne D.; Rao, Nikhil G.; Potting, Carin; Cheng, Karis K.; Freidank, Annette; Brennan, Michael T.; Bowen, Joanne; Dennis, Kristopher; Lalla, Rajesh V.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this project was to develop clinical practice guidelines on the use of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the prevention and management of oral mucositis (OM) in cancer patients. A systematic review of the available literature was conducted. The body

  14. Syndecan-4 shedding impairs macrovascular angiogenesis in diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ran; Xie, Jun; Wu, Han; Li, Guannan; Chen, Jianzhou; Chen, Qinhua; Wang, Lian; Xu, Biao, E-mail: xubiao@medmail.com.cn

    2016-05-20

    Purpose: Syndecan-4 (synd4) is a ubiquitous heparan sulfate proteoglycan cell surface receptor that modulates cell proliferation, migration, mechanotransduction, and endocytosis. The extracellular domain of synd4 sheds heavily in acute inflammation, but the shedding of synd4 in chronic inflammation, such as diabetes mellitus (DM), is still undefined. We investigated the alterations of synd4 endothelial expression in DM and the influence of impaired synd4 signaling on angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), diabetic rats, synd4 null mice, and db/db mice. Material and methods: HUVECs were incubated with advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Western blot analysis was used to determine synd4 protein expression and ELISA was used to detect soluble synd4 fragments. The concentration of synd4 in the aortic endothelia of diabetic rats was detected by immunohistochemical staining. Aortic ring assays were performed to study the process of angiogenesis in the diabetic rats and in synd4 null and db/db mice. Recombinant adenoviruses containing the synd4 gene or null were constructed to enhance synd4 aortic expression in db/db mice. Results: Western blot analysis showed decreased expression of the synd4 extracellular domain in HUVECs, and ELISA detected increased soluble fragments of synd4 in the media. Synd4 endothelial expression in the aortas of diabetic rats was decreased. Aortic ring assay indicated impaired angiogenesis in synd4 null and db/db mice, which was partially reversed by synd4 overexpression in db/db mice. Conclusion: Synd4 shedding from vascular endothelial cells played an important role in the diabetes-related impairment of angiogenesis. -- Highlights: •Synd4 shedding from endothelial cells is accelerated under the stimulation of AGEs. •Extracellular domain of synd4 is diminished in the endothelium of DM rats. •Aortic rings of synd4 null mice showed impaired angiogenesis. •Overexpression of synd4 partly rescues macrovascular

  15. Type VIII collagen is elevated in diseases associated with angiogenesis and vascular remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, N. U. B.; Willumsen, N.; Bülow Sand, Jannie Marie

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Type VIII collagen is involved in angiogenesis and remodeling of arteries. We hypothesized that type VIII collagen was upregulated in diseases associated with vascular remodeling, e.g. pulmonary fibrosis and cancer. In this paper we present the development and validation of a competitive...... performance, and in relevant disease cohorts. The developed ELISA was applied for the assessment of type VIII collagen in serum from patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and various cancers. Results The C8-C ELISA was technically stable...

  16. Interventions for treating oral mucositis for patients with cancer receiving treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Jan E; Worthington, Helen V; Furness, Susan; McCabe, Martin; Khalid, Tasneem; Meyer, Stefan

    2010-08-04

    Treatment of cancer is increasingly effective but associated with short and long term side effects. Oral side effects, including oral mucositis (mouth ulceration), remain a major source of illness despite the use of a variety of agents to treat them. To assess the effectiveness of interventions for treating oral mucositis or its associated pain in patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy or radiotherapy or both. Electronic searches of Cochrane Oral Health Group and PaPaS Trials Registers (to 1 June 2010), CENTRAL via The Cochrane Library (to Issue 2, 2010), MEDLINE via OVID (1950 to 1 June 2010), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 1 June 2010), CINAHL via EBSCO (1980 to 1 June 2010), CANCERLIT via PubMed (1950 to 1 June 2010), OpenSIGLE (1980 to 1 June 2010) and LILACS via the Virtual Health Library (1980 to 1 June 2010) were undertaken. Reference lists from relevant articles were searched and the authors of eligible trials were contacted to identify trials and obtain additional information. All randomised controlled trials comparing agents prescribed to treat oral mucositis in people receiving chemotherapy or radiotherapy or both. Outcomes were oral mucositis, time to heal mucositis, oral pain, duration of pain control, dysphagia, systemic infection, amount of analgesia, length of hospitalisation, cost and quality of life. Data were independently extracted, in duplicate, by two review authors. Authors were contacted for details of randomisation, blindness and withdrawals. Risk of bias assessment was carried out on six domains. The Cochrane Collaboration statistical guidelines were followed and risk ratio (RR) values calculated using fixed-effect models (less than 3 trials in each meta-analysis). Thirty-two trials involving 1505 patients satisfied the inclusion criteria. Three comparisons for mucositis treatment including two or more trials were: benzydamine HCl versus placebo, sucralfate versus placebo and low level laser versus sham procedure. Only the low level laser

  17. Animal Models of Chemotherapy-induced Mucositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sangild, Per T; Shen, René Liang; Pontoppidan, Peter Erik Lotko

    2018-01-01

    mangement and treatments. The results obtained from specific animal models can be difficult to translate to the diverse range of CIM manifestations in patients that vary according to the antineoplastic drugs, dose, underlying (cancer) disease and patient characteristics (e.g. age, genetics, body......Chemotherapy for cancer patients induces damaging tissue reactions along the epithelium of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). This chemotherapy-induced mucositis (CIM) is a serious side effect of cytotoxic drugs and several animal models of CIM have been developed to help understand the progression...... of CIM, and how to prevent it. Animal models allow highly controlled experimental conditions, detailed organ (e.g. GIT) insights, standardized, clinically-relevant treatment regimens and discovery of new biomarkers. Still, surprisingly few results from animal models have been translated into clinical CIM...

  18. Neutrophils as Components of Mucosal Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Caroline H T; Campbell, Eric L; Colgan, Sean P

    2017-11-01

    Inflammatory responses in the intestinal mucosa inevitably result in the recruitment of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes [PMNs]). Epithelial cells that line the mucosa play an integral role in the recruitment, maintenance, and clearance of PMNs at sites of inflammation. The consequences of such PMN-epithelial interactions often determine tissue responses and, ultimately, organ function. For this reason, there is significant interest in understanding how PMNs function in the mucosa during inflammation. Recent studies have shown that PMNs play a more significant role in molding of the immune response than previously thought. Here, we review the recent literature regarding the contribution of PMNs to the development and resolution of inflammation, with an emphasis on the role of the tissue microenvironment and pathways for promoting epithelial restitution. These studies highlight the complex nature of inflammatory pathways and provide important insight into the difficulties of treating mucosal inflammation.

  19. Mucosal biofilm detection in chronic otitis media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessman, Marcus; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Eickhardt-Sørensen, Steffen Robert

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine middle ear biopsies from Greenlandic patients with chronic otitis media (COM) for the presence of mucosal biofilms and the bacteria within the biofilms. Thirty-five middle ear biopsies were obtained from 32 Greenlandic COM patients admitted to ear...... surgery. All biopsies were examined by means of peptide nucleic acid-fluorescent in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH), and if possible culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the 16s rDNA and sequencing. Light microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used. Skin biopsies from 23...... of 20 (35 %) usable middle ear biopsies, and in two out of ten (20 %) usable control samples. There was no association between biofilm findings and PCR and 16s sequencing. Staphylococci were the most common bacteria in bacterial culture. We found evidence of bacterial biofilms in 43 % of middle ear...

  20. Celecoxib treatment reduces peritoneal fibrosis and angiogenesis and prevents ultrafiltration failure in experimental peritoneal dialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fabbrini, Paolo; Schilte, Margot N.; Zareie, Mammad; ter Wee, Piet M.; Keuning, Eelco D.; Beelen, Robert H. J.; van den Born, Jaap

    2009-01-01

    Background. Daily peritoneal exposure to peritoneal dialysis fluid (PDF) induces severe morphological alterations including fibrosis and angiogenesis that lead to a loss of peritoneal ultrafiltration (UF) capacity. Since cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 is involved in fibrosis and angiogenesis, we

  1. Effect of Curcumin on Angiogenesis in Aortic Ring Model of the Wistar Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Baharara

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: The results proposed that the Curcumin had dose-dependent inhibitory effects on angiogenesis in rat aortic ring Therefore, it can be introduced as an appropriate candidate in order to study angiogenesis and related diseases.

  2. miR-21 Is Linked to Glioma Angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Simon Kjær; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is the most consistently over-expressed microRNA (miRNA) in malignant gliomas. We have previously reported that miR-21 is upregulated in glioma vessels and subsets of glioma cells. To better understand the role of miR-21 in glioma angiogenesis and to characterize miR-21-posit...... with the six markers. These findings suggest that miR-21 is linked to glioma angiogenesis, that miR-21 is unlikely to regulate PTEN, and that miR-21-positive tumor cells do not possess stem cell characteristics....

  3. An interesting case of angiogenesis in cavernous hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipankar Das

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cavernous hemangioma is the most common orbital tumor in adult. There is lot of literatures for clinicopathological features of this tumor. These tumors had been studied for the model of angiogenesis in many of the experimental setups. We present a case of 34-year-old male with this tumor in the left eye with computerized tomography evidence. Postsurgical laboratory findings gave interesting evidence of tumor angiogenesis with tumor endothelial cells and sprouting of the small vessels endothelial cells. Podosome rosette could be conceptualized from the characteristic patterns seen in the tumor.

  4. Circular mucosal anopexy: Experience and technical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo Grau, Luis Antonio; Ruiz Edo, Neus; Llorca Cardeñosa, Sara; Heredia Budó, Adolfo; Estrada Ferrer, Óscar; Del Bas Rubia, Marta; García Torralbo, Eva María; Suñol Sala, Xavier

    2016-05-01

    Circular mucosal anopexy (CMA) achieves a more comfortable postoperative period than resective techniques. But complications and recurrences are not infrequent. This study aims to evaluate of the efficacy of CMA in the treatment of hemorrhoids and rectal mucosal prolapse (RMP). From 1999 to 2011, 613 patients underwent surgery for either hemorrhoids or RMP in our hospital. CMA was performed in 327 patients. Gender distribution was 196 male and 131 female. Hemorrhoidal grades were distributed as follows: 28 patients had RMP, 46 2nd grade, 146 3rd grade and 107 4th grade. Major ambulatory surgery (MAS) was performed in 79.9%. Recurrence of hemorrhoids was studied and groups of recurrence and no-recurrence were compared. Postoperative pain was evaluated by Visual Analogical Scale (VAS) as well as early complications. A total of 31 patients needed reoperation (5 RMP, 2 with 2nd grade, 17 with 3rd grade,/with 4th grade). No statistically significant differences were found between the non-recurrent group and the recurrent group with regards to gender, surgical time or hemorrhoidal grade, but there were differences related to age. In the VAS, 81.3% of patients expressed a postoperative pain ≤ 2 at the first week. Five patients needed reoperation for early postoperative bleeding. Six patients needed admission for postoperative pain. Recurrence rate is higher in CMA than in resective techniques. CMA is a useful technique for the treatment of hemorrhoids in MAS. Pain and the rate of complications are both low. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Mucosal Healing Did Not Predict Sustained Clinical Remission in Patients with IBD after Discontinuation of One-Year Infliximab Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Cong; Liu, Wei-Xin; Jiang, Min; Sun, Ming-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Aim To assess the endoscopic activity and Clinical activity after a one-year period of infliximab therapy and to evaluate the association between mucosal healing and need for retreatment after stopping infliximab in patients with Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods The data from 109 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) and 107 patients with Ulcerative colitis (UC) received one-year infliximab were assessed. The primary endpoint of the study was the proportion of clinical remission, mucosal healing and full remission in IBD after the one-year period of maintenance infliximab therapy. The secondary endpoint was the frequency of relapses in the next year. Results A total of 84.4% (92/109) CD patients and 81.3% (87/107) UC patients achieved clinical remission, 71.56% (78/109) of CD patients and 69.16% (74/107) of UC patients achieved mucosal healing, 56.88% (62/109) of CD patients and 54.21% (58/107) of UC patients achieved full remission at the end of the year of infliximab therapy. Infliximab therapy was restarted in the 10.19% (22/216) patients (13 CD, 9 UC) who achieved mucosal healing, and 13.89% (30/216) patients (18 CD, 12 UC) who achieved clinical remission and 6.48% (14/216) patients (8 CD, 6 UC) who achieved full remission had to be retreated within the next year. Neither clinical remission nor mucosal healing was associated with the time to restarting Infliximab therapy in IBD. Conclusion Mucosal healing did not predict sustained clinical remission in patients with IBD in whom the infliximab therapies had been stopped. And stopping or continuing infliximab therapy may be determined by assessing the IBD patient’s general condition and the clinical activity. PMID:25330148

  6. CXCL12 enhances angiogenesis through CXCR7 activation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG Min; Qiu, Lisha; Zhang, Yanyan; Xu, Dongsheng; Zheng, Jialin C.; Jiang, Li

    2017-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the process by which new vessels form from existing vascular networks. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) may contribute to the study of vascular repair and angiogenesis. The chemokine CXCL12 regulates multiple cell functions, including angiogenesis, mainly through its receptor CXCR4. In contrast to CXCL12/CXCR4, few studies have described roles for CXCR7 in vascular biology, and the downstream mechanism of CXCR7 in angiogenesis remains unclear. The results of the...

  7. Raised plasma endostatin levels correlate inversely with breast cancer angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Swee H; Hill, Arnold D K; Lee, Adriana W S; Foley, Deirdre; Kennedy, Susan; Young, Leonie; McDermott, Enda; O'Higgins, Niall

    2004-01-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for solid tumors, such as breast cancer, to grow. The effect of surgical removal of breast tumors on plasma endostatin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels was evaluated. Tumor tissues were analyzed for expression of Intratumoral microvessel density (IMVD) and endostatin. The effect of VEGF and endostatin in inducing apoptosis on human liver microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVEC) was investigated. Plasma from healthy volunteers, patients with fibroadenomas and breast cancer patients were assayed for endostatin and VEGF via immunoassay, pre-operatively and four weeks post-operatively. Expression of endostatin in tumor tissue was determined by Western blotting. IMVD was assessed following immunohistochemical staining with anti-CD34 antibody. Plasma endostatin levels, in breast cancer patients, were significantly elevated (P = 0.015) in the post-operative (60.59 +/- 7.70 etag/ml) compared with the pre-operative group (30.62 +/- 4.54 etag/ml) and with normal age-matched controls (34.97 +/- 3.76 etag/ml). In patients with high pre-operative plasma endostatin value, IMVD was decreased to 20.1 +/- 3.2 counts compared with 41.9 +/- 5.4 counts in those with low pre-operative endostatin value (P = 0.006). Neither plasma endostatin nor VEGF levels correlated with routine clinico-pathological parameters. Endostatin induced endothelial cell apoptosis and modulated the cytoprotective effect of VEGF in HLMVEC survival. Plasma endostatin levels are increased in patients following surgical removal of the primary tumor. The decreased IMVD seen in patients with higher endostatin levels may be due to the apoptosis-inducing effect of endostatin on microvascular endothelial cells.

  8. Polymer-peptide conjugates for angiogenesis targeted tumor radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitra, Amitava [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Center for Nanomedicine and Cellular Delivery, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Nan, Anjan [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Center for Nanomedicine and Cellular Delivery, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Papadimitriou, John C. [Department of Pathology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Ghandehari, Hamidreza [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States) and Center for Nanomedicine and Cellular Delivery, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States) and Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)]. E-mail: hghandeh@rx.umaryland.edus; Line, Bruce R. [Center for Nanomedicine and Cellular Delivery, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States) and Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States) and Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)]. E-mail: bline@umm.edu

    2006-01-15

    Introduction: New methods of delivering radiotherapy to sites of occult or disseminated cancer are needed to control the disease and address the failure of conventional therapy. Because tumor cells rely on angiogenesis for survival, we assessed the effectiveness of {beta}-emitter radiotherapy delivered by polymer-peptide conjugates that target tumor neovasculature. This molecularly targeted radiation is intended to damage both the endothelial bed and surrounding neoplastic cells. Methods: N-(2-Hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA), a biocompatible and water-soluble copolymer, was derivatized to incorporate side chains for {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 9}Y chelation and was further conjugated to a {alpha}{sub V}{beta}{sub 3} integrin-targeting peptide (RGD4C). The HPMA copolymer-RGD4C conjugate was characterized by its side-chain contents, in vitro endothelial cell adhesion assay and its biodistribution and antitumor effectiveness in a SCID mouse xenograft model of human prostate carcinoma. Results: The conjugate contained about 16 RGD4C moieties per polymer backbone. Tumor accumulation significantly increased (P<.01) over time from 1.05{+-}0.03 % injected dose (%ID)/g tissue at 1 h to 4.32{+-}0.32% at 72 h. The activity in major normal tissues significantly decreased (P<.05) during that period. At 21 days, the control tumors increased 442% in volume from baseline. In contrast, a 7% and a 63% decrease of tumor volume were observed for the 100- and 250-{mu}Ci {sup 9}Y treatment groups, respectively. Histopathological examination revealed increased apoptosis in the treated tumors with no acute signs of radiation-induced toxicity to other organs. Conclusion: This copolymer-peptide conjugate targets tumor angiogenic vessels and delivers sufficient radiotherapy to arrest tumor growth.

  9. The mucosal immune system: From dentistry to vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyono, Hiroshi; Azegami, Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity is the beginning of the aero-digestive tract, which is covered by mucosal epithelium continuously under the threat of invasion of pathogens, it is thus protected by the mucosal immune system. In the early phase of our scientific efforts for the demonstration of mucosal immune system, dental science was one of major driving forces due to their foreseeability to use oral immunity for the control of oral diseases. The mucosal immune system is divided functionally into, but interconnected inductive and effector sites. Intestinal Peyer's patches (PPs) are an inductive site containing antigen-sampling M cells and immunocompetent cells required to initiate antigen-specific immune responses. At effector sites, PP-originated antigen-specific IgA B cells become plasma cells to produce polymeric IgA and form secretory IgA by binding to poly-Ig receptor expressed on epithelial cells for protective immunity. The development of new-generation mucosal vaccines, including the rice-based oral vaccine MucoRice, on the basis of the coordinated mucosal immune system is a promising strategy for the control of mucosal infectious diseases.

  10. Roles of Mucosal Immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB, is one of the world's leading infectious causes of morbidity and mortality. As a mucosal-transmitted pathogen, Mtb infects humans and animals mainly through the mucosal tissue of the respiratory tract. Apart from providing a physical barrier against the invasion of pathogen, the major function of the respiratory mucosa may be to serve as the inductive sites to initiate mucosal immune responses and sequentially provide the first line of defense for the host to defend against this pathogen. A large body of studies in the animals and humans have demonstrated that the mucosal immune system, rather than the systemic immune system, plays fundamental roles in the host’s defense against Mtb infection. Therefore, the development of new vaccines and novel delivery routes capable of directly inducing respiratory mucosal immunity is emphasized for achieving enhanced protection from Mtb infection. In this paper, we outline the current state of knowledge regarding the mucosal immunity against Mtb infection, including the development of TB vaccines, and respiratory delivery routes to enhance mucosal immunity are discussed.

  11. Extracellular nonmitogenic angiogenesis factor and method of isolation thereof from wound fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banda, M.J.; Werb, Z.; Knighton, D.R.; Hunt, T.K.

    1985-03-05

    A nonmitogenic angiogenesis factor is isolated from wound fluid by dialysis to include materials in the molecular size range of 2,000 to 14,000, lyophilization, and chromatography. The nonmitogenic angiogenesis factor is identified by activity by corneal implant assay and by cell migration assay. The angiogenesis factor is also characterized by inactivity by mitogenesis assay. 3 figs.

  12. Gastrin induction of protein synthesis in isolated gastric mucosal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumdar, A.N.; Edgerton, E.

    1987-09-01

    Exposure of isolated rat gastric mucosal cells to 10/sup -10/ and 10/sup -9/ M gastrin for 2 hr significantly stimulated (/sup 3/H) leucine incorporation into protein by 100 and 212%, respectively, when compared with the basal levels. Doses beyond 10/sup -9/ M lowered the maximal stimulatory effect of the hormone. Gastrin (10/sup -9/ M) specifically stimulated the synthesis of five proteins in isolated gastric mucosal cells with apparent molecular weights of 105, 76, 71, 63, and 54 kDa. Actinomycin-D completely abolished the gastrin-mediated stimulation of protein synthesis in isolated gastric mucosal cells.

  13. Tumor angiogenesis--a new therapeutic target in gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, E L; Spang-Thomsen, M; Skovgaard-Poulsen, H

    1998-01-01

    Tumor growth is critically dependent on angiogenesis, which is sprouting of new vessels from pre-existing vasculature. This process is regulated by inducers and inhibitors released from tumor cells, endothelial cells, and macrophages. Brain tumors, especially glioblastoma multiforme, have signifi...

  14. Asymmetric total synthesis of (-)-azaspirene, a novel angiogenesis inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yujiro; Shoji, Mitsuru; Yamaguchi, Junichiro; Sato, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Shinpei; Mukaiyama, Takasuke; Sakai, Ken; Asami, Yukihiro; Kakeya, Hideaki; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2002-10-16

    The asymmetric total synthesis of (-)-azaspirene, an angiogenesis inhibitor, has been accomplished, establishing its absolute stereochemistry. The key steps are a MgBr2.OEt2-mediated, diastereoselective Mukaiyama aldol reaction, a NaH-promoted, intramolecular cyclization of an alkynylamide, and the aldol reaction of a ketone containing functionalized gamma-lactam moiety without protection of tert-alcohol and amide functionalities.

  15. Visualising and quantifying angiogenesis in metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben Frøstrup; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Jakobsen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in tumour growth and dissemination. We have recently shown that blood vessel density, determined by image analysis based on microRNA-126 (miRNA-126) in situ hybridization (ISH) in the primary tumours of metastatic colorectal cancers (mCRC), is predictive...

  16. Macrophages: An Inflammatory Link between Angiogenesis and Lymphangiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corliss, Bruce A.; Azimi, Mohammad S.; Munson, Jenny; Peirce, Shayn M.; Murfee, Walter Lee

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis often occur in response to tissue injury or in the presence of pathology (e.g. cancer), and it is these types of environments in which macrophages are activated and increased in number. Moreover, the blood vascular microcirculation and the lymphatic circulation serve as the conduits for entry and exit for monocyte-derived macrophages in nearly every tissue and organ. Macrophages both affect and are affected by the vessels through which they travel. Therefore, it is not surprising that examination of macrophage behaviors in both angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis has yielded interesting observations that suggest macrophages may be key regulators of these complex growth and remodeling processes. In this review, we will take a closer look at macrophages through the lens of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, examining how their dynamic behaviors may regulate vessel sprouting and function. We present macrophages as a cellular link that spatially and temporally connects angiogenesis with lymphangiogenesis, in both physiological growth and in pathological adaptations, such as tumorigenesis. As such, attempts to therapeutically target macrophages in order to affect these processes may be particularly effective, and studying macrophages in both settings will accelerate the field’s understanding of this important cell type in health and disease. PMID:26614117

  17. Mechanisms of Angiogenesis and Lymphangiogenesis in TSC Skin Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-16

    factor (HIF-1α) 24 xiv     • Role of hypoxia in angiogenesis 26 LYMPHANGIOGENESIS 27 Lymphatic vascular system 27 Embryology of the lymphatic...functions leads to 29 a number of disease processes such as cancer metastasis, lymphedema and various inflammatory disorders131. Embryology of the

  18. Imbalance of angiogenesis in diabetic complications: The mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoya Tahergorabi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex disease and a chronic health-care problem. Nowadays, because of alteration of lifestyle such as lack of exercise, intake of high fat diet subsequently obesity and aging population, the prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing quickly in around the world. The international diabetes federation estimated in 2008, that 246 million adults in worldwide suffered from diabetes mellitus and the prevalence of disease is expected to reach to 380 million by 2025. Although, mainly in management of diabetes focused on hyperglycemia, however, it is documented that abnormalities of angiogenesis may contribute in the pathogenesis of diabetes complications. Angiogenesis is the generation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones. Normal angiogenesis depends on the intricate balance between angiogenic factors (such as VEGF, FGF 2 , TGF-β, angiopoietins and angiostatic factors (angiostatin, endostatin, thrombospondins. Vascular abnormalities in different tissues including retina and kidney can play a role in pathogenesis of micro-vascular complications of diabetes; also vascular impairment contributes in macrovascular complications e.g., diabetic neuropathy and impaired formation of coronary collaterals. Therefore, identifying of different mechanisms of the diabetic complications can give us an opportunity to prevent and/or treat the following complications and improves quality of life for patients and society. In this review, we studied the mechanisms of angiogenesis in micro-vascular and macro-vascular complications of diabetes mellitus.

  19. Pericyte-expressed Tie2 controls angiogenesis and vessel maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, Martin; Milde, Laura; Holm, Annegret; Stanicek, Laura; Gengenbacher, Nicolas; Savant, Soniya; Ruckdeschel, Tina; Hasanov, Zulfiyya; Srivastava, Kshitij; Hu, Junhao; Hertel, Stella; Bartol, Arne; Schlereth, Katharina; Augustin, Hellmut G

    2017-07-18

    The Tie receptors with their Angiopoietin ligands act as regulators of angiogenesis and vessel maturation. Tie2 exerts its functions through its supposed endothelial-specific expression. Yet, Tie2 is also expressed at lower levels by pericytes and it has not been unravelled through which mechanisms pericyte Angiopoietin/Tie signalling affects angiogenesis. Here we show that human and murine pericytes express functional Tie2 receptor. Silencing of Tie2 in pericytes results in a pro-migratory phenotype. Pericyte Tie2 controls sprouting angiogenesis in in vitro sprouting and in vivo spheroid assays. Tie2 downstream signalling in pericytes involves Calpain, Akt and FOXO3A. Ng2-Cre-driven deletion of pericyte-expressed Tie2 in mice transiently delays postnatal retinal angiogenesis. Yet, Tie2 deletion in pericytes results in a pronounced pro-angiogenic effect leading to enhanced tumour growth. Together, the data expand and revise the current concepts on vascular Angiopoietin/Tie signalling and propose a bidirectional, reciprocal EC-pericyte model of Tie2 signalling.

  20. The multitasking neutrophils and their involvement in angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seignez, Cédric; Phillipson, Mia

    2017-01-01

    This review describes the mechanisms by which neutrophils contribute to angiogenesis in hypoxic tissues during different conditions and diseases (e.g., menstrual cycle, wound healing, ischemic diseases, cancers), with particular focus on the recently described proangiogenic neutrophil subpopulation. The importance of neutrophils in initiation of angiogenesis has been described during the past decade, and is believed to occur through release of the well-known proangiogenic factors Bv8, vascular endothelial growth factor A, and matrix metalloproteinase 9. However, additional proangiogenic actions of neutrophils have been outlined this year, mediated through for example pyruvate kinase M2, 14,15-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps, although their distinct mechanisms of action remain partly unknown. Neutrophils can also limit angiogenesis by secreting for example neutrophil elastase and α-defensins, which generate angiostatic molecules and proteolytically inactivate proangiogenic factors, respectively. These opposing neutrophil actions can be the consequence of on-site education or recruitment of distinct subpopulations from circulation. Indeed, a circulating proangiogenic neutrophil subpopulation was recently described in mice and men, which was rapidly recruited to hypoxic tissues by vascular endothelial growth factor A. These recent findings have highlighted the diversity of actions performed by neutrophils in the angiogenic process and identified new opportunities to regulate angiogenesis.

  1. Protein Structure in Context: The Molecular Landscape of Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Span, Elise A.; Goodsell, David S.; Ramchandran, Ramani; Franzen, Margaret A.; Herman, Tim; Sem, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    A team of students, educators, and researchers has developed new materials to teach cell signaling within its cellular context. Two nontraditional modalities are employed: physical models, to explore the atomic details of several of the proteins in the angiogenesis signaling cascade, and illustrations of the proteins in their cellular environment,…

  2. Targeting Angiogenesis in Biliary Tract Cancers: An Open Option

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Simone

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Biliary tract cancers (BTCs are characterized by a bad prognosis and the armamentarium of drugs for their treatment is very poor. Although the inflammatory status of biliary tract represents the first step in the cancerogenesis, the microenvironment also plays a key role in the pathogenesis of BTCs, promoting tumor angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Several molecules, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and fibroblast growth factor (FGF, are involved in the angiogenesis process and their expression on tumor samples has been explored as prognostic marker in both cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer. Recent studies evaluated the genomic landscape of BTCs and evidenced that aberrations in several genes enrolled in the pro-angiogenic signaling, such as FGF receptor-2 (FGFR-2, are characteristic of BTCs. New drugs targeting the signaling pathways involved in angiogenesis have been tested in preclinical studies both in vitro and in vivo with promising results. Moreover, several clinical studies tested monoclonal antibodies against VEGF and tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the VEGF and the MEK/ERK pathways. Herein, we evaluate both the pathogenic mechanisms of BTCs focused on angiogenesis and the preclinical and clinical data available regarding the use of new anti-angiogenic drugs in these malignancies.

  3. Targeting Angiogenesis in Biliary Tract Cancers: An Open Option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simone, Valeria; Brunetti, Oronzo; Lupo, Luigi; Testini, Mario; Maiorano, Eugenio; Simone, Michele; Longo, Vito; Rolfo, Christian; Peeters, Marc; Scarpa, Aldo; Azzariti, Amalia; Russo, Antonio; Ribatti, Domenico; Silvestris, Nicola

    2017-02-15

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are characterized by a bad prognosis and the armamentarium of drugs for their treatment is very poor. Although the inflammatory status of biliary tract represents the first step in the cancerogenesis, the microenvironment also plays a key role in the pathogenesis of BTCs, promoting tumor angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Several molecules, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF), are involved in the angiogenesis process and their expression on tumor samples has been explored as prognostic marker in both cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer. Recent studies evaluated the genomic landscape of BTCs and evidenced that aberrations in several genes enrolled in the pro-angiogenic signaling, such as FGF receptor-2 (FGFR-2), are characteristic of BTCs. New drugs targeting the signaling pathways involved in angiogenesis have been tested in preclinical studies both in vitro and in vivo with promising results. Moreover, several clinical studies tested monoclonal antibodies against VEGF and tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the VEGF and the MEK/ERK pathways. Herein, we evaluate both the pathogenic mechanisms of BTCs focused on angiogenesis and the preclinical and clinical data available regarding the use of new anti-angiogenic drugs in these malignancies.

  4. Thyroidal angiogenesis in zebrafish ( Danio rerio ) exposed to high ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As a well known environmental contaminant, perchlorate inhibits thyroidal iodide uptake and reduces thyroid hormone levels. In zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to high concentrations of sodium perchlorate (200, 350 and 500 mg/L) for 10 days, remarkable angiogenesis was identified, not only histopathologically but also ...

  5. Validation and Optimization of an Ex Vivo Assay of Intestinal Mucosal Biopsies in Crohn's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadstrup, Kasper; Galsgaard, Elisabeth Douglas; Gerwien, Jens

    2016-01-01

    are non-responders. This study demonstrates this version of an ex vivo culture as a valid and robust assay to assess inflammation in mucosal biopsies and test of the efficacy of novel drug candidates and current treatments on individual patients-potentially for a personalized medicine approach....... human explant method to test drug candidates and pathophysiological conditions in CD intestinal biopsies. Mucosal biopsies from 27 CD patients and 6 healthy individuals were collected to validate an explant assay test where the polarized tissue was cultured on a novel metal mesh disk, slightly immersed......Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic illness demanding better therapeutics. The marketed biologics only benefit some patients or elicit diminishing effect over time. To complement the known methods in drug development and to obtain patient specific drug responses, we optimized and validated a known...

  6. Macroscopic extent of gastric mucosal atrophy: increased risk factor for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Noritoshi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to estimate whether the macroscopic extent of gastric mucosal atrophy is associated with a risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma using a case-control study in Japanese subjects, a population known to have a high prevalence of CagA-positive H. pylori infection. Methods Two hundred and fifty-three patients who were diagnosed as having esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and 253 sex- and age-matched controls were enrolled in the present study. The macroscopic extent of gastric mucosal atrophy was evaluated based on the Kimura and Takemoto Classification. A conditional logistic regression model with adjustment for potential confounding factors was used to assess the associations. Results Body gastritis, defined endoscopically, was independently associated with an increased risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusion Our findings suggest that macroscopic body gastritis may be a risk factor for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in Japan. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  7. Oral administration of the probiotic Lactobacillus fermentum VRI-003 and mucosal immunity in endurance athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, A J; Pyne, D B; Saunders, P U; Fricker, P A

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the ability of a probiotic Lactobacillus fermentum VRI-003 (PCC) to enhance the mucosal immune system of elite athletes. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial was conducted over a 4-month period of winter training. PARTICIPANTS; 20 healthy elite male distance runners. PCC was given at a daily dose of 1.26 x 10(10) as a freeze-dried powder in gelatin capsules. Placebo capsules contained an inert excipient. Treadmill performance (monthly), mucosal and systemic immunity (monthly), training (daily) and illness (daily) were assessed. Serum cytokine levels, salivary IgA levels and incidence, duration and severity of respiratory tract infections were measured. Subjects reported less than half the number of days of respiratory symptoms during PCC treatment (30 days) compared with placebo (72 days, ptrained distance runners. Maintenance of IFNgamma levels may be one mechanism underpinning the positive clinical outcomes.

  8. The effect of three mouthwashes on radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck malignancies: A randomized control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madan Kumar P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The present study was done to assess the effect of three alcohol-free mouthwashes on radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck malignancies. Materials and Methods: Eighty patients with head and neck malignancies, scheduled to undergo curative radiotherapy, were randomly assigned to receive one of the three alcohol-free test mouthwashes (0.12% chlorhexidine, 1% povidone-iodine, or salt/soda or a control. The patients were instructed to rinse with 10 ml of the mouthwash, twice a day, for a period of 6 weeks. Mucositis was assessed at baseline and at weekly intervals during radiation therapy, using the World Health Organization criteria for grading of mucositis. The baseline demography of the four groups was matched for age, sex, stage of cancer, and whether the patient had cancer of oral or extraoral regions. A post hoc test for repeated measures was used to find the difference of mean mucositis scores between the groups at various week intervals. Results: Among the 76 patients who completed the study, patients in the povidone-iodine group had significantly lower mucositis scores when compared to the control group from the first week of radiotherapy. Their scores were also significantly lower when compared to the salt/soda and chlorhexidine groups from the fourth and fifth week, respectively, after radiotherapy. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that use of alcohol-free povidone-iodine mouthwash can reduce the severity and delay the onset of oral mucositis due to antineoplastic radiotherapy.

  9. Measurement of Mucosal Thickness in Denture-bearing Area of Edentulous Mandible

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    Jian Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The thickness of the alveolar mucosa influences the probability of the occurrence of denture-induced irritations. Thick denture-supporting tissues offer relief from mucosal tenderness and ulcers; however, the uniformity of the thickness across the entire mandibular alveolar mucosa cannot be accurately determined in edentulous patients. This study aimed to assess the mucosal thickness of the denture-bearing area in the edentulous mandible. Methods: Twenty-seven edentulous patients underwent cone-beam computed tomography scanning, wherein the patients wore a record base to retract soft tissues away from the alveolar mucosa. The measured regions were the central incisor (IC, lateral incisor (IL, canine (Ca, first premolar (P1, second premolar (P2, first molar (M1, and second molar (M2 regions. The thickness was measured in the alveolar ridge crest (T, buccal (B1-B4, and lingual (L1-L4 alveolar ridge mucosa. The average thickness of the mucosa at buccal sides (B and lingual sides (L were also assessed. Results: The differences in the mucosal thickness between the left and right sides were not significant. In the Ca-M2 regions, T was the thickest, and L3 was the thinnest of all the measured points in the same regions. L was significantly less than B in posterior regions (P < 0.01. On the other hand, M2 at L4 was thinnest of all the measured regions from Ca to M2 (P < 0.01, and was thicker than IC, IL, P1, and P2 at B2. Conclusions: Since the mucosal thickness of denture-bearing area in the edentulous mandible is not uniform; the tissue surface of the denture base or custom tray should be selectively relieved, which may reduce the risk of denture-induced irritations.

  10. Helicobacter pylori coinfection is a confounder, modulating mucosal inflammation in oral submucous fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendran R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The oral cavity has been considered a potential reservoir for Helicobacter pylori (H pylori , from where the organism causes recurrent gastric infections. Aim: With this case-control study we tried to evaluate the role of H pylori in the etiology of mucosal inflammation, a condition that compounds the morbid state associated with oral submucous fibrosis (OSF. Materials and Methods : Subjects ( n = 150 were selected following institutional regulations on sample collection and grouped into test cases and positive and negative controls based on the presence of mucosal fibrosis and inflammation. The negative controls had none of the clinical signs. All patients underwent an oral examination as well as tests to assess oral hygiene/periodontal disease status; a rapid urease test (RUT of plaque samples was also done to estimate the H pylori bacterial load. We used univariate and mutivariate logistic regression for statistical analysis of the data and calculated the odds ratios to assess the risk posed by the different variables. Results : The RUT results differed significantly between the groups, reflecting the variations in the bacterial loads in each category. The test was positive in 52% in the positive controls (where nonspecific inflammation of oral mucosa was seen unassociated with fibrosis, in 46% of the test cases, and in 18% of the negative controls (healthy volunteers (χ2 = 13.887; P < 0.01. A positive correlation was seen between the oral hygiene/periodontal disease indices and RUT reactivity in all the three groups. Conclusions: The contribution of the H pylori in dental plaque to mucosal inflammation and periodontal disease was significant. Logistic regression analysis showed gastrointestinal disease and poor oral hygiene as being the greatest risk factors for bacterial colonization, irrespective of the subject groups. A positive correlation exists between RUT reactivity and the frequency of mucosal inflammation.

  11. Effect of α-asarone on angiogenesis and matrix metalloproteinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Jung; Lee, Soo-Jin; Kim, Moon-Moo

    2015-05-01

    α-Asarone is a main component of Acorus gramineus widely known as an oriental traditional medicinal stuff. A. gramineus has been known to have a variety of medicinal efficacies such as anti-gastric ulcer and anti-allergic activities, inhibition of histamine release and antioxidant effect. However, its effect on angiogenesis remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of α-asarone on induction of angiogenesis through modulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP). First of all, MTT assay was performed to evaluate the effect of α-asarone on cell viability using MTT assay, and then tube formation assay with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in vitro and rat aorta ring assay ex vivo were carried out to elucidate its effect on angiogenesis. Treatment with α-asarone below 6μM showed no cytotoxicity in human fibrosarcoma cells (HT1080) and HUVEC. It was observed that α-asarone not only promotes tube formation of HUVEC but also induces angiogenesis of rat aorta. In addition, the effects of α-asarone on the expressions of protein and gene were evaluated using western blot analysis and RT-PCR assay. α-Asarone increased the expression levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 stimulated by phenazine methosulfate (PMS) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) in HT1080. Especially, the expression level of antioxidant enzyme such as glutathione reductase was increased in the presence of α-asarone. Therefore, above findings suggest that α-asarone may play an important role in pathological diseases related to MMP and angiogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Angiogenesis dysregulation in term asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia.

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    Henna Shaikh

    Full Text Available Neonatal encephalopathy following birth asphyxia is a major predictor of long-term neurological impairment. Therapeutic hypothermia is currently the standard of care to prevent brain injury in asphyxiated newborns but is not protective in all cases. More robust and versatile treatment options are needed. Angiogenesis is a demonstrated therapeutic target in adult stroke. However, no systematic study examines the expression of angiogenesis-related markers following birth asphyxia in human newborns.This study aimed to evaluate the expression of angiogenesis-related protein markers in asphyxiated newborns developing and not developing brain injury compared to healthy control newborns.Twelve asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia were prospectively enrolled; six developed eventual brain injury and six did not. Four healthy control newborns were also included. We used Rules-Based Medicine multi-analyte profiling and protein array technologies to study the plasma concentration of 49 angiogenesis-related proteins. Mean protein concentrations were compared between each group of newborns.Compared to healthy newborns, asphyxiated newborns not developing brain injury showed up-regulation of pro-angiogenic proteins, including fatty acid binding protein-4, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, neuropilin-1, and receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-3; this up-regulation was not evident in asphyxiated newborns eventually developing brain injury. Also, asphyxiated newborns developing brain injury showed a decreased expression of anti-angiogenic proteins, including insulin-growth factor binding proteins -1, -4, and -6, compared to healthy newborns.These findings suggest that angiogenesis pathways are dysregulated following birth asphyxia and are putatively involved in brain injury pathology and recovery.

  13. SNP-SNP interaction network in angiogenesis genes associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Yi; Amankwah, Ernest K; Tseng, Tung-Sung; Qu, Xiaotao; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Park, Jong Y

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis has been shown to be associated with prostate cancer development. The majority of prostate cancer studies focused on individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) while SNP-SNP interactions are suggested having a great impact on unveiling the underlying mechanism of complex disease. Using 1,151 prostate cancer patients in the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) dataset, 2,651 SNPs in the angiogenesis genes associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness were evaluated. SNP-SNP interactions were primarily assessed using the two-stage Random Forests plus Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (TRM) approach in the CGEMS group, and were then re-evaluated in the Moffitt group with 1,040 patients. For the identified gene pairs, cross-evaluation was applied to evaluate SNP interactions in both study groups. Five SNP-SNP interactions in three gene pairs (MMP16+ ROBO1, MMP16+ CSF1, and MMP16+ EGFR) were identified to be associated with aggressive prostate cancer in both groups. Three pairs of SNPs (rs1477908+ rs1387665, rs1467251+ rs7625555, and rs1824717+ rs7625555) were in MMP16 and ROBO1, one pair (rs2176771+ rs333970) in MMP16 and CSF1, and one pair (rs1401862+ rs6964705) in MMP16 and EGFR. The results suggest that MMP16 may play an important role in prostate cancer aggressiveness. By integrating our novel findings and available biomedical literature, a hypothetical gene interaction network was proposed. This network demonstrates that our identified SNP-SNP interactions are biologically relevant and shows that EGFR may be the hub for the interactions. The findings provide valuable information to identify genotype combinations at risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer and improve understanding on the genetic etiology of angiogenesis associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness.

  14. Angiogenic factor AGGF1 promotes therapeutic angiogenesis in a mouse limb ischemia model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiulun Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD is a common disease accounting for about 12% of the adult population, and causes significant morbidity and mortality. Therapeutic angiogenesis using angiogenic factors has been considered to be a potential treatment option for PAD patients. In this study, we assessed the potential of a new angiogenic factor AGGF1 for therapeutic angiogenesis in a critical limb ischemia model in mice for PAD. METHODS AND RESULTS: We generated a unilateral hindlimb ischemia model in mice by ligation of the right common iliac artery and femoral artery. Ischemic mice with intrasmuscular administration of DNA for an expression plasmid for human AGGF1 (AGGF1 group resulted in increased expression of both AGGF1 mRNA and protein after the administration compared with control mice with injection of the empty vector (control group. Color PW Doppler echocardiography showed that the blood flow in ischemic hindlimbs was significantly increased in the AGGF1 group compared to control mice at time points of 7, 14, and 28 days after DNA administration (n = 9/group, P = 0.049, 0.001, and 0.001, respectively. Increased blood flow in the AGGF1 group was correlated to increased density of CD31-positive vessels and decreased necrosis in muscle tissues injected with AGGF1 DNA compared with the control tissue injected with the empty vector. Ambulatory impairment was significantly reduced in the AGGF1 group compared to the control group (P = 0.004. The effect of AGGF1 was dose-dependent. At day 28 after gene transfer, AGGF1 was significantly better in increasing blood flow than FGF-2 (P = 0.034, although no difference was found for tissue necrosis and ambulatory impairment. CONCLUSIONS: These data establish AGGF1 as a candidate therapeutic agent for therapeutic angiogenesis to treat PAD.

  15. Poly-ADP-ribose polymerase inhibition enhances ischemic and diabetic wound healing by promoting angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Patel, Darshan; Sen, Sabyasachi; Shanmugam, Victoria; Sidawy, Anton; Mishra, Lopa; Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc

    2017-04-01

    Chronic nonhealing wounds are a major health problem for patients in the United States and worldwide. Diabetes and ischemia are two major risk factors behind impaired healing of chronic lower extremity wounds. Poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) is found to be overactivated with both ischemic and diabetic conditions. This study seeks a better understanding of the role of PARP in ischemic and diabetic wound healing, with a specific focus on angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. Ischemic and diabetic wounds were created in FVB/NJ mice and an in vitro scratch wound model. PARP inhibitor PJ34 was delivered to the animals at 10 mg/kg/d through implanted osmotic pumps or added to the culture medium, respectively. Animal wound healing was assessed by daily digital photographs. Animal wound tissues, peripheral blood, and bone marrow cells were collected at different time points for further analysis with Western blot and flow cytometry. Scratch wound migration and invasion angiogenesis assays were performed using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Measurements were reported as mean ± standard deviation. Continuous measurements were compared by t-test. P healing and slower HUVEC migration. The beneficial effect of PARP inhibition with PJ34 on ischemic and diabetic wound healing was observed in both animal and in vitro models. In the animal model, the percentage of wound healing was significantly enhanced from 43% ± 6% to 71% ± 9% (P healing in ischemic and diabetic wounds is caused by PARP hyperactivity, and PARP inhibition significantly enhanced ischemic and diabetic wound healing by promoting angiogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. SNP-SNP interaction network in angiogenesis genes associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Yi Lin

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis has been shown to be associated with prostate cancer development. The majority of prostate cancer studies focused on individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs while SNP-SNP interactions are suggested having a great impact on unveiling the underlying mechanism of complex disease. Using 1,151 prostate cancer patients in the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS dataset, 2,651 SNPs in the angiogenesis genes associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness were evaluated. SNP-SNP interactions were primarily assessed using the two-stage Random Forests plus Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (TRM approach in the CGEMS group, and were then re-evaluated in the Moffitt group with 1,040 patients. For the identified gene pairs, cross-evaluation was applied to evaluate SNP interactions in both study groups. Five SNP-SNP interactions in three gene pairs (MMP16+ ROBO1, MMP16+ CSF1, and MMP16+ EGFR were identified to be associated with aggressive prostate cancer in both groups. Three pairs of SNPs (rs1477908+ rs1387665, rs1467251+ rs7625555, and rs1824717+ rs7625555 were in MMP16 and ROBO1, one pair (rs2176771+ rs333970 in MMP16 and CSF1, and one pair (rs1401862+ rs6964705 in MMP16 and EGFR. The results suggest that MMP16 may play an important role in prostate cancer aggressiveness. By integrating our novel findings and available biomedical literature, a hypothetical gene interaction network was proposed. This network demonstrates that our identified SNP-SNP interactions are biologically relevant and shows that EGFR may be the hub for the interactions. The findings provide valuable information to identify genotype combinations at risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer and improve understanding on the genetic etiology of angiogenesis associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness.

  17. Tumor angiogenesis in colorectal cancer, correlation with tumor extension and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javadi P

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor angiogenesis shown by Microvessel Count (MVC or Microvessel Density (MVD, is assessed by several studies as prognostic factor in some types of tumors, and also in colorectal carcinoma. This article is payed to correlation between clincopathologic factors and tumor angiogenesis. In this study, immunohistochemical techniques are used for vascular evaluation in specimens from twenty-nine colorectal carcinoma, and stained for Factor VIII-Related Antigen (F8RA by using monoclonal antibody. Uni and multivariate analysis disclosed that total MVC was higher in tumor [76.3±33 (×100=2.5 mm²/field and 29.8±11 (×200=0.785 mm²/field] than in normal tissue [37.7±15.8 (×100 and 17.6±7.8 (×200], (P=0.022, P=0.000009. Microvessel quantification was significantly higher in stage D (115±36.6, ×100 and 26.7±6.4, ×200, P=0.002 and P=0.04. In this study MVD has correlation with vascular invasion (P=0.024, ×100 and P=0.007, ×200, the mean tumor vessel count although was increased with clinicophatologic findings such as age<60 years, male, right colon involvement, infiltrating type, mucinous carcinoma, transmural penetration, grade III, lymphatic and perineural invasion, but was not statistically significant. Lymph node and hematogenous metastasis and size of tumor also, was not important. As a conclusion, MVD was increased in tumor and has shown correlation with metastasis, and vascular invasion. Resulting angiogenesis increase risk of metastasis.

  18. FASN expression, angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in central and peripheral giant cell lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo Gabriel Moreira FALCI

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Central giant cell lesion (CGCL and peripheral giant cell lesion (PGCL are non-neoplastic proliferative processes of the jaws. PGCL is a reactive process induced by irritant local factors and CGCL is an intra-osseous lesion of unknown etiology. Both lesions exhibit similar histologic features showing abundant mononuclear cells, admixed with a large number of multinucleated giant cells and a rich vascularized stroma with extravasated erythrocytes, hemosiderin deposition, and blood-filled pools. Recent studies have linked fatty acid synthase (FASN with angiogenesis. Objective: To evaluate angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis and their relationship with FASN expression in CGCL and PGCL. Material and Methods: Thirteen CGCL and 14 PGCL of the jaws were selected for immunoexpression of FASN; CD34 and CD105 (to assess blood microvessel density [MVD] and microvessel area [MVA]; and D2-40 (to assess lymphatic MVD and MVA. Results: Within PGCL and CGCL, MVD-CD34 was signifcantly higher than MVD-CD10S, followed by MVD-D2-40. Moreover, a signifcantly higher number of FASN-positive multinucleated giant cells than mononuclear cells were observed. Between PGCL and CGCL, only MVD-CD34 and all MVA were signifcantly higher in PGCL. Positive correlation between MVA-CD10S with FASNpositive mononuclear cells in both lesions was observed. Conclusions: Our results show both lesions exhibiting similar levels of FASN expression and neoangiogenesis, suggesting constitutive processes that regulate tissue maintenance.

  19. Chamomile Mouth Rinse Effects on Mucositis Reduction After Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talaipour AR

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years many patients have been received radiotherapy for head and neck tumors and"na large number of them have been survived for some years."nThe side effects of radiotherapy in oral region are mucositis, ulcers, fungal and viral infections and"nsalivary glands dysfunction. Among these, mucositis is the most important one."nA randomized double blind clinical trial was performed in radiotherapy department of Tehran Imam"nKhomeini Hospital to determine chamomile mouth rinse effects on mucositis after radiotherapy."nThe patients are selected randomly from those with oral oropharyngeal or nasopharyngeal cancers."nData showed that chamomile administration could decrease mucositis rate significantly,

  20. Recent developments in nanocarrier-aided mucosal vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammona, Olga; Bourganis, Vassilis; Karamanidou, Theodora; Kiparissides, Costas

    2017-05-01

    To date, most of the licensed vaccines for mucosal delivery are based on live-attenuated viruses which carry the risk of regaining their pathogenicity. Therefore, the development of efficient nonviral vectors allowing the induction of potent humoral and cell-mediated immunity is regarded as an imperative scientific challenge as well as a commercial breakthrough for the pharma industries. For a successful translation to the clinic, such nanocarriers should protect the antigens from mucosal enzymes, facilitate antigen uptake by microfold cells and allow the copresentation of robust, safe for human use, mucosal adjuvants to antigen-presenting cells. Finally, the developed formulations should exhibit accuracy regarding the administered dose, a major drawback of mucosal vaccines in comparison with parenteral ones.

  1. Recent advances in mucosal immunization using virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacher, Gaëlle; Kaeser, Matthias D; Moser, Christian; Gurny, Robert; Borchard, Gerrit

    2013-05-06

    Mucosal immunization offers the promises of eliciting a systemic and mucosal immune response, as well as enhanced patient compliance. Mucosal vaccination using defined antigens such as proteins and peptides requires delivery systems that combine good safety profiles with strong immunogenicity, which may be provided by virus-like particles (VLP). VLP are assembled from viral structural proteins and thus are devoid of any genetic material. They excel by mimicking natural pathogens, therefore providing antigen-protecting particulate nature, inherent immune-cell stimulatory mechanisms, and tissue-specific targeting depending on their parental virus. Nevertheless, despite of promising preclinical results, VLP remain rarely investigated in clinical studies. This review is intended to give an overview of obstacles and promises of VLP-based mucosal immunization as well as to identify strategies to further improve VLP while maintaining a good safety and tolerability profile.

  2. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions among tobacco users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Poornima; Govindraju, Poornima

    2012-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions associated with tobacco among patients visiting the dental hospital. A selection of 1525 patients visiting the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology were interviewed regarding tobacco habits. Examination of the oral cavity was performed by trained examiners under good illumination using diagnostic instruments. Oral mucosal lesions were diagnosed based on the clinical features. The patients were divided into groups based on their tobacco habits. Out of 1525 patients, 359 patients (23.5%) had the habit and 265 (73.8%) of them had oral mucosal lesions. Leukoedema was the most prevalent lesion. Leukoplakia was found in 3.5% of the patients. Malignancy was found only among chewers. Nearly three-quarters of the patients with the tobacco habit had oral mucosal lesions. This emphasises that routine examination of oral mucosa is important and that the patients must be motivated to quit this harmful habit.

  3. Physiology and immunology of mucosal barriers in catfish (Ictalurus spp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mucosal barriers of catfish (Ictalurus spp.) constitute the first line of defense against pathogen invasion while simultaneously carrying out a diverse array of other critical physiological processes, including nutrient adsorption, osmoregulation, waste excretion, and environmental sensing. Catf...

  4. Is Dental Implantation Indicated in Patients with Oral Mucosal Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Kalogirou Eleni-Marina; Sklavounou Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aim: Dental implants are a reliable treatment choice for rehabilitation of healthy patients as well as subjects with several systemic conditions. Patients with oral mucosal diseases often exhibit oral mucosal fragility and dryness, erosions, blisters, ulcers or microstomia that complicate the use of removable dentures and emphasize the need for dental implants. The aim of the current study is to review the pertinent literature regarding the dental implantation prospects for patient...

  5. Mucosal immunity of the respiratory tract in chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Kurtyak B.M.; Maslyanko R.P.; Levkivsky D.M.; Pundyak T.O.; Sobko G.V.

    2014-01-01

    This review article presents fundamental mechanisms of the local mucosal immunity m selected regions of the respiratory tract in healthy birds and in some pathological conditions. The respiratory system whose mucosa come into direct contact with microorganisms contaminating inhaled an, has some associated structures, such as Harderian gland (HG), conjunctive-associated lymphoid tissue (CALT) and paranasal glands (PG), whose participation in local mechanisms of the mucosal immunity has been co...

  6. Cystic fibrosis: a mucosal immunodeficiency syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Taylor Sitarik; Prince, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) functions as a channel that regulates the transport of ions and the movement of water across the epithelial barrier. Mutations in CFTR, which form the basis for the clinical manifestations of cystic fibrosis, affect the epithelial innate immune function in the lung, resulting in exaggerated and ineffective airway inflammation that fails to eradicate pulmonary pathogens. Compounding the effects of excessive neutrophil recruitment, the mutant CFTR channel does not transport antioxidants to counteract neutrophil-associated oxidative stress. Whereas mutant CFTR expression in leukocytes outside of the lung does not markedly impair their function, the expected regulation of inflammation in the airways is clearly deficient in cystic fibrosis. The resulting bacterial infections, which are caused by organisms that have substantial genetic and metabolic flexibility, can resist multiple classes of antibiotics and evade phagocytic clearance. The development of animal models that approximate the human pulmonary phenotypes—airway inflammation and spontaneous infection—may provide the much-needed tools to establish how CFTR regulates mucosal immunity and to test directly the effect of pharmacologic potentiation and correction of mutant CFTR function on bacterial clearance. PMID:22481418

  7. Mucosal disease series. Number IV. Erythema multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farthing, P; Bagan, J-V; Scully, C

    2005-09-01

    Erythema multiforme (EM) is an acute mucocutaneous hypersensitivity reaction characterised by a skin eruption, with or without oral or other mucous membrane lesions. Occasionally EM may involve the mouth alone. EM has been classified into a number of different variants based on the degree of mucosal involvement and the nature and distribution of the skin lesions. EM minor typically affects no more than one mucosa, is the most common form and may be associated with symmetrical target lesions on the extremities. EM major is more severe, typically involving two or more mucous membranes with more variable skin involvement - which is used to distinguish it from Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), where there is extensive skin involvement and significant morbidity and a mortality rate of 5-15%. Both EM major and SJS can involve internal organs and typically are associated with systemic symptoms. Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) may be a severe manifestation of EM, but some experts regard it as a discrete disease. EM can be triggered by a number of factors, but the best documented is preceding infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV), the lesions resulting from a cell mediated immune reaction triggered by HSV-DNA. SJS and TEN are usually initiated by drugs, and the tissue damage is mediated by soluble factors including Fas and FasL.

  8. Cannabidiol: an alternative therapeutic agent for oral mucositis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuba, L F; Salum, F G; Cherubini, K; Figueiredo, M A Z

    2017-06-01

    Chemo- and radiotherapy are therapeutic modalities often used in patients with malignant neoplasms. They kill tumour cells but act on healthy tissues as well, resulting in adverse effects. Oral mucositis is especially of concern, due to the morbidity that it causes. We reviewed the literature on the etiopathogenesis of oral mucositis and the activity of cannabidiol, to consider the possibility of its use for the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis. We searched the PubMed database and selected complete articles published in English that met the inclusion criteria for the period 1998-2016. The search terms 'cannabinoids', 'cannabidiol', 'oxidative stress', 'antioxidants' and 'oral mucositis' were used. The control of oxidative stress may prevent and alleviate oral mucositis. Studies have demonstrated that cannabidiol is safe to use and possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. The literature on the use of cannabidiol in dentistry is still scarce. Studies investigating the use of cannabidiol in oral mucositis and other oxidative stress-mediated side effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy on the oral mucosa should be encouraged. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Mucosal vaccination--an old but still vital strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Długońska, Henryka; Grzybowski, Marcin

    2012-01-01

    The basic premise of vaccinology is to achieve strong protective immunity against defined infectious agents by a vaccine mimicking the effects of natural primary exposure to a pathogen. Because an exposure of humans and animals to microbes occurs mostly through mucosal surfaces, targeting the mucosa seems a rational and efficient vaccination strategy. Many experimental and clinical data confirmed that mucosal immunization offers many advantages over widely used in human and veterinary medicine subcutaneous or intramuscular immunization. In the present article selected aspects regarding mucosal vaccination are discussed. The structure and function of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT), comprised of four main mucosal compartments forming a structural and functional unity as well as pivotal cellular MALT components (dendritic and M cells) were briefly characterized. Particular attention was focused on the mode of simple but efficacious delivery of vaccine antigens to mucosal surfaces. A few trials to generate potential mucosal vaccines against toxoplasmosis introduced by nasal or oral routes to experimental animals are also presented.

  10. Mucosal Vaccination for Prevention of HIV Infection and AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldovini, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Most of HIV infections occur via the genital tract or the rectum and HIV replicates at high levels in lymphoid organs and intestinal mucosa, likely requiring a more diversified immunity than pathogens restricted to a single mucosal site, such as the gastrointestinal tract for Vibrio cholera, or the respiratory airways for the influenza virus. Numerous AIDS vaccine candidates are under development and a general observation obtained from preclinical trials in non-human primates that failed to provide sterilizing immunity is that some infection protection or delayed onset of disease is observed in the presence of anti-SIV immunity. Recent clinical trials support difficulties to reproduce in humans the results observed in simian models, but at least one of them indicated that some protection of infection can be achieved. However, given the limited efficacy observed in the RV144 trial and concerns voiced in its statistical interpretation, preclinical trials should explore more effective immunogens, whether new or as combinations of existing ones, and mucosal routes of vaccinations in addition to the systemic routes, with the goal to maximize vaccination-mediated protection. The rationale for generating both strong mucosal and systemic immunity comes from animal experiments, recent clinical trials, and other successful vaccines currently in use. Mucosal responses against SIV have been induced with a variety of SIV antigens and via different mucosal routes with a spectrum of effects on protection. This review covers the rational and the experimental data that support the validity to explore mucosal immunization for HIV infection and AIDS prevention.

  11. Inside the brachycephalic nose: intranasal mucosal contact points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuenemann, Riccarda; Oechtering, Gerhard U

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of intranasal mucosal contact points in brachycephalic and normocephalic dogs. In total, 82 brachycephalic dogs (42 pugs and 40 French bulldogs) were evaluated by rhinoscopy for their intranasal mucosal contact and 25 normocephalic dogs were evaluated as a control group. Of those, 162 brachycephalic nasal cavities were evaluable and 140 had contact between intranasal structures (87%). Intraconchal and septoconchal mucosal contact points were the most commonly detected sites of contact. French bulldogs had a significantly higher prevalence of mucosal contact and had 3 mean contact points compared with 1.7 mean contact points per nasal cavity in pugs. Septal deviations were present in 62% of brachycephalic dogs. In the control group, mucosal contact points were present in only 7 of 50 nasal cavities (14%), and septal deviations occurred in 16% of those cases. Contact point average was 0.1 in large and 0.3 in small normocephalic dogs. Intranasal mucosal contact was identified as a common and previously unreported problem in brachycephalic dogs. Numerous contact points reduce the lumen of the intranasal passageways and indicate potential intranasal obstruction. Affected dogs might benefit from removal of obstructing conchae, potentially using laser-assisted turbinectomy.

  12. Differential Apoptosis in Mucosal and Dermal Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ariel; Francis, Marybeth; DiPietro, Luisa Ann

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Dermal and mucosal healing are mechanistically similar. However, scarring and closure rates are dramatically improved in mucosal healing, possibly due to differences in apoptosis. Apoptosis, nature's preprogrammed form of cell death, occurs via two major pathways, extrinsic and intrinsic, which intersect at caspase3 (Casp3) cleavage and activation. The purpose of this experiment was to identify the predominant pathways of apoptosis in mucosal and dermal wound healing. Approach: Wounds (1 mm biopsy punch) were made in the dorsal skin (n=3) or tongue (n=3) of female Balb/C mice aged 6 weeks. Wounds were harvested at 6 h, 24 h, day 3 (D3), D5, D7, and D10. RNA was isolated and analyzed using real time reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. Expression levels for genes in the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways were compared in dermal and mucosal wounds. Results: Compared to mucosal healing, dermal wounds exhibited significantly higher expression of Casp3 (at D5; phealing compared to skin. Conclusion: Expression patterns of key regulators of apoptosis in wound healing indicate that apoptosis occurs predominantly through the intrinsic pathway in the healing mucosa, but predominantly through the extrinsic pathway in the healing skin. The identification of differences in the apoptotic pathways in skin and mucosal wounds may allow the development of therapeutics to improve skin healing. PMID:25493209

  13. Differential Apoptosis in Mucosal and Dermal Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ariel; Francis, Marybeth; DiPietro, Luisa Ann

    2014-12-01

    Objectives: Dermal and mucosal healing are mechanistically similar. However, scarring and closure rates are dramatically improved in mucosal healing, possibly due to differences in apoptosis. Apoptosis, nature's preprogrammed form of cell death, occurs via two major pathways, extrinsic and intrinsic, which intersect at caspase3 (Casp3) cleavage and activation. The purpose of this experiment was to identify the predominant pathways of apoptosis in mucosal and dermal wound healing. Approach: Wounds (1 mm biopsy punch) were made in the dorsal skin (n=3) or tongue (n=3) of female Balb/C mice aged 6 weeks. Wounds were harvested at 6 h, 24 h, day 3 (D3), D5, D7, and D10. RNA was isolated and analyzed using real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Expression levels for genes in the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways were compared in dermal and mucosal wounds. Results: Compared to mucosal healing, dermal wounds exhibited significantly higher expression of Casp3 (at D5; pInnovation: Our observations indicate differential execution of apoptosis in oral wound healing compared to skin. Conclusion: Expression patterns of key regulators of apoptosis in wound healing indicate that apoptosis occurs predominantly through the intrinsic pathway in the healing mucosa, but predominantly through the extrinsic pathway in the healing skin. The identification of differences in the apoptotic pathways in skin and mucosal wounds may allow the development of therapeutics to improve skin healing.

  14. Low-Level Laser Therapy for Treatment of Oral Mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravina Naomi Tarigan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiation and chemotherapy are the treatment options for head and neck cancer. Several side effects related to those treat-ment have been shown. Oral mucositis is a common side effect in patients undergoing those treatment. The presence of oral mucositis in these patients would influencing quality of life therefore compromising treatment outcome. The spec-trum of oral mucositis can be clinically seen as thinning of oral mucosa, oral discomfort to painful oral lesion causing mastication impairment with increasing risk of infection. The Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC/International Society for Oral Oncology (ISOO has recommended some means that have important role in the management oral mucositis. The low-level laser therapy (LLLT is a relatively new way of reducing the severity of oral mucositis, although the true mechanism of action is still under study. This review aimed in exploring update about the usage of LLLT for oral mucositis treatment.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v17i3.42

  15. [New routes of administration: epidermal, transcutaneous mucosal ways of vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, François; Alain, Sophie; Ploy, Marie-Cécile

    2007-04-01

    A successful vaccine triggers the interaction of various cells of the immune system as does a regular immune response. It is thus necessary to introduce the vaccine antigens into an anatomic site where they will contact immune cells. The route of administration is thus critical for the outcome of vaccination. Intramuscular or subcutaneous injections are the most popular. Antigens injected intramuscularly can form persistent precipitates that are dissolved and re-absorbed relatively slowly. If injecting antigens is a quick, easy and reproducible way to vaccination, it requires trained personnel. Alternatives exist, through non-invasive formulations which allow administration by the patient or a third party with no particular expertise. The skin, especially its epidermal layer, is an accessible and competent immune environment and an attractive target for vaccine delivery, through transcutaneous delivery or immunostimulant patches. Mucosal immunization is another strategy: its major rationale is that organisms invade the body via mucosal surfaces. Therefore, local protection at mucosal surface as well as systemic defense is beneficial. Various formulations of mucosal vaccines have been developed, such as the Sabin oral polio vaccine (OPV), rotavirus vaccines, cold-adapted influenza vaccines or vaccine against typhoid fever. Thus we are entering in an era where mucosal and transcutaneous immunisation will play an important role in disease management. However, it has not been so easy to obtain regulatory approval for mucosal or transcutaneous formulations and needle-based vaccines continue to dominate the market.

  16. Evaluation of TLR agonists as potential mucosal adjuvants for HIV gp140 and tetanus toxoid in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Buffa

    Full Text Available In the present study we investigate the impact of a range of TLR ligands and chitosan as potential adjuvants for different routes of mucosal immunisation (sublingual (SL, intranasal (IN, intravaginal (IVag and a parenteral route (subcutaneous (SC in the murine model. We assess their ability to enhance antibody responses to HIV-1 CN54gp140 (gp140 and Tetanus toxoid (TT in systemic and vaginal compartments. A number of trends were observed by route of administration. For non-adjuvanted antigen, SC>SL>IN immunisation with respect to systemic IgG responses, where endpoint titres were greater for TT than for gp140. In general, co-administration with adjuvants increased specific IgG responses where IN = SC>SL, while in the vaginal compartment IN>SL>SC for specific IgA. In contrast, for systemic and mucosal IgA responses to antigen alone SL>IN = SC. A number of adjuvants increased specific systemic IgA responses where in general IN>SL>SC immunisation, while for mucosal responses IN = SL>SC. In contrast, direct intravaginal immunisation failed to induce any detectable systemic or mucosal responses to gp140 even in the presence of adjuvant. However, significant systemic IgG responses to TT were induced by intravaginal immunisation with or without adjuvant, and detectable mucosal responses IgG and IgA were observed when TT was administered with FSL-1 or Poly I∶C. Interestingly some TLRs displayed differential activity dependent upon the route of administration. MPLA (TLR4 suppressed systemic responses to SL immunisation while enhancing responses to IN or SC immunisation. CpG B enhanced SL and IN responses, while having little or no impact on SC immunisation. These data demonstrate important route, antigen and adjuvant effects that need to be considered in the design of mucosal vaccine strategies.

  17. Low-level laser therapy in the prevention and treatment of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in young patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramoff, Meire Maman Fracher; Lopes, Nilza Nelly Fontana; Lopes, Luciana Almeida; Dib, Luciano Lauria; Guilherme, Arnaldo; Caran, Eliana Monteiro; Barreto, Adriana Delboni; Lee, Maria Lucia Martinho; Petrilli, Antônio Sérgio

    2008-08-01

    A pilot clinical study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the prevention and treatment of chemotherapy (CT)-induced oral mucositis (OM) in young patients. Besides compromising the patient's nutrition and well-being, oral mucositis represents a portal of entry into the body for microorganisms present in the mouth, which may lead to sepsis if there is hematological involvement. Oncologic treatment tolerance decreases and systemic complications may arise that interfere with the success of cancer treatment. LLLT appears to be an interesting alternative to other approaches to treating OM, due to its trophic, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic properties. Patients undergoing chemotherapy (22 cycles) without mucositis were randomized into a group receiving prophylactic laser-irradiation (group 1), and a group receiving placebo light treatment (group 2). Patients who had already presented with mucositis were placed in a group receiving irradiation for therapeutic purposes (group 3, with 10 cycles of CT). Serum granulocyte levels were taken and compared to the progression of mucositis. In group 1, most patients (73%) presented with mucositis of grade 0 (p = 0.03 when compared with the placebo group), and 18% presented with grade 1. In group 2, 27% had no OM and did not require therapy. In group 3, the patients had marked pain relief (as assessed by a visual analogue scale), and a decrease in the severity of OM, even when they had severe granulocytopenia. The ease of use of LLLT, high patient acceptance, and the positive results achieved, make this therapy feasible for the prevention and treatment of OM in young patients.

  18. Betel nut chewing behaviour and its association with oral mucosal lesions and conditions in Ghaziabad, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sumanth; Anand, Richa; Dhingra, Chandan

    2014-01-01

    To assess the practices and behaviour among Betel nut users in Ghaziabad and to detect the clinically associated oral mucosal lesions and conditions. A community-based survey was conducted in Ghaziabad among 332 betel nut users. Data on betel nut use was obtained through a self-administered questionnaire. Oral mucosal lesions and conditions were recorded using WHO criteria. Out of 332 betel nut users, 32.8% consumed Gutkha. 62.3% users used betel nut with tobacco. Most of the study population started chewing betel nut because of peer pressure and the habit started at the workplace or school. A majority found that there was no physical discomfort due to the habit. The significant oral diseases detected were oral leukoplakia in 11.7% and oral submucous fibrosis in 6.1% of individuals. The findings of the present study revealed that 74.7% of the participants were current chewers. 30.4% of all participants had oral mucosal lesions and conditions.

  19. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in institutionalized elderly people in Mashhad, Northeast Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozafari, Pegah M; Dalirsani, Zohreh; Delavarian, Zahra; Amirchaghmaghi, Maryam; Shakeri, Mohammad T; Esfandyari, Abdollah; Falaki, Farnaz

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in institutionalized elderly people in Mashhad, northeast of Iran. This study was conducted to assess the prevalence of oral lesions in the institutionalized elderly. In this survey, we studied all of the nursing homes in Mashhad; a total of five encompassing 237 residents. The subjects were examined and lesions recorded in a designed checklist. T-test, chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used for the analysis. The mean age of the patients was 79.59 ± 8.88. Ninety-eight per cent of cases had at least one oral mucosal lesion. The most common lesions were fissured tongue (66.5%), atrophic glossitis (48.8%), sublingual varicosity (42%) and xerostomia (38%). There was no significant difference in the prevalence of denture-related lesions (DRLs) between men and women (p > 0.05). Xerostomia was more prevalent in 70-79-year-old than in 60-69-year-old subjects. No case of oral malignant lesion was detected. These findings revealed a higher prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in Mashhad city compared with other studies conducted in other major cities in Iran and abroad. The results emphasise the necessity of national programmes towards oral health promotion. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Transcriptomics of Post-Stroke Angiogenesis in the Aged Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buga, Ana Maria; Margaritescu, Claudiu; Scholz, Claus Juergen; Radu, Eugen; Zelenak, Christine; Popa-Wagner, Aurel

    2014-01-01

    Despite the obvious clinical significance of post-stroke angiogenesis in aged subjects, a detailed transcriptomic analysis of post-stroke angiogenesis has not yet been undertaken in an aged experimental model. In this study, by combining stroke transcriptomics with immunohistochemistry in aged rats and post-stroke patients, we sought to identify an age-specific gene expression pattern that may characterize the angiogenic process after stroke. We found that both young and old infarcted rats initiated vigorous angiogenesis. However, the young rats had a higher vascular density by day 14 post-stroke. “New-for-stroke” genes that were linked to the increased vasculature density in young animals included Angpt2, Angptl2, Angptl4, Cib1, Ccr2, Col4a2, Cxcl1, Lef1, Hhex, Lamc1, Nid2, Pcam1, Plod2, Runx3, Scpep1, S100a4, Tgfbi, and Wnt4, which are required for sprouting angiogenesis, reconstruction of the basal lamina (BL), and the resolution phase. The vast majority of genes involved in sprouting angiogenesis (Angpt2, Angptl4, Cib1, Col8a1, Nrp1, Pcam1, Pttg1ip, Rac2, Runx1, Tnp4, Wnt4); reconstruction of a new BL (Col4a2, Lamc1, Plod2); or tube formation and maturation (Angpt1, Gpc3, Igfbp7, Sparc, Tie2, Tnfsf10), had however, a delayed upregulation in the aged rats. The angiogenic response in aged rats was further diminished by the persistent upregulation of “inflammatory” genes (Cxcl12, Mmp8, Mmp12, Mmp14, Mpeg1, Tnfrsf1a, Tnfrsf1b) and vigorous expression of genes required for the buildup of the fibrotic scar (Cthrc1, Il6ra, Il13ar1, Il18, Mmp2, Rassf4, Tgfb1, Tgfbr2, Timp1). Beyond this barrier, angiogenesis in the aged brains was similar to that in young brains. We also found that the aged human brain is capable of mounting a vigorous angiogenic response after stroke, which most likely reflects the remaining brain plasticity of the aged brain. PMID:24672479

  1. Chamomile infusion cryotherapy to prevent oral mucositis induced by chemotherapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Reis, Paula Elaine Diniz; Ciol, Marcia A; de Melo, Nilce Santos; Figueiredo, Paulo Tadeu de Souza; Leite, André Ferreira; Manzi, Natália de Melo

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to compare cryotherapy made only with water and cryotherapy made with chamomile infusion for prevention and reduction of intensity of oral mucositis in patients with cancer receiving 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin. This is a randomized pilot study with two groups: cryotherapy made only with water (control group, n = 18) and cryotherapy made with chamomile infusion (chamomile group, n = 20). Both groups were instructed to swish the ice around in their oral cavity for at least 30 min during chemotherapy. Assessment of oral mucosa occurred on days 8, 15, and 22 after the first day of chemotherapy. Fifty percent of the patients in the control and 30 % in the chamomile group developed oral mucositis. Mouth pain score was higher in patients in the control group on all evaluations (p = 0.02 for day 8, p = 0.09 for day 15, and p = 0.14 for day 22). Patients in the chamomile group never developed mucositis with grade 2 or higher. Presence of ulceration was statistically significant on day 8 (16 % in the control vs. 0 % in the chamomile group, p = 0.10), but not in days 15 and 22, although 11 % still had ulcerations in the control group and none in the chamomile group. The occurrence of oral mucositis was lower in patients in the chamomile group than in the control group. When compared to the controls, the chamomile group presented less mouth pain and had no ulcerations. Cryotherapy was well tolerated by both groups, and no toxicity related to chamomile was identified.

  2. Aspirin-induced gastric mucosal damage: prevention by enteric-coating and relation to prostaglandin synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Hawthorne, A B; Mahida, Y R; Cole, A T; Hawkey, C J

    1991-01-01

    1. Gastric damage induced by low-dose aspirin and the protective effect of enteric-coating was assessed in healthy volunteers in a double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over trial using Latin square design. Each was administered placebo, plain aspirin 300 mg daily, plain aspirin 600 mg four times daily, enteric-coated aspirin 300 mg daily, or enteric-coated aspirin 600 mg four times daily for 5 days. Gastric damage was assessed endoscopically, and gastric mucosal bleeding measured. 2. Aspirin...

  3. Comparison of systemic and mucosal immunization with helper-dependent adenoviruses for vaccination against mucosal challenge with SHIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Eric A; Nehete, Pramod N; Nehete, Bharti P; Yang, Guojun; Buchl, Stephanie J; Hanley, Patrick W; Palmer, Donna; Montefiori, David C; Ferrari, Guido; Ng, Philip; Sastry, K Jagannadha; Barry, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Most HIV-1 infections are thought to occur at mucosal surfaces during sexual contact. It has been hypothesized that vaccines delivered at mucosal surfaces may mediate better protection against HIV-1 than vaccines that are delivered systemically. To test this, rhesus macaques were vaccinated by intramuscular (i.m.) or intravaginal (ivag.) routes with helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vectors expressing HIV-1 envelope. Macaques were first immunized intranasally with species C Ad serotype 5 (Ad5) prior to serotype-switching with species C HD-Ad6, Ad1, Ad5, and Ad2 vectors expressing env followed by rectal challenge with CCR5-tropic SHIV-SF162P3. Vaccination by the systemic route generated stronger systemic CD8 T cell responses in PBMC, but weaker mucosal responses. Conversely, mucosal immunization generated stronger CD4 T cell central memory (Tcm) responses in the colon. Intramuscular immunization generated higher levels of env-binding antibodies, but neither produced neutralizing or cytotoxic antibodies. After mucosal SHIV challenge, both groups controlled SHIV better than control animals. However, more animals in the ivag. group had lower viral set points than in in the i.m. group. These data suggest mucosal vaccination may have improve protection against sexually-transmitted HIV. These data also demonstrate that helper-dependent Ad vaccines can mediate robust vaccine responses in the face of prior immunity to Ad5 and during four rounds of adenovirus vaccination.

  4. Comparison of Systemic and Mucosal Immunization with Helper-Dependent Adenoviruses for Vaccination against Mucosal Challenge with SHIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehete, Bharti P.; Yang, Guojun; Buchl, Stephanie J.; Hanley, Patrick W.; Palmer, Donna; Montefiori, David C.; Ferrari, Guido; Ng, Philip; Sastry, K. Jagannadha; Barry, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Most HIV-1 infections are thought to occur at mucosal surfaces during sexual contact. It has been hypothesized that vaccines delivered at mucosal surfaces may mediate better protection against HIV-1 than vaccines that are delivered systemically. To test this, rhesus macaques were vaccinated by intramuscular (i.m.) or intravaginal (ivag.) routes with helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vectors expressing HIV-1 envelope. Macaques were first immunized intranasally with species C Ad serotype 5 (Ad5) prior to serotype-switching with species C HD-Ad6, Ad1, Ad5, and Ad2 vectors expressing env followed by rectal challenge with CCR5-tropic SHIV-SF162P3. Vaccination by the systemic route generated stronger systemic CD8 T cell responses in PBMC, but weaker mucosal responses. Conversely, mucosal immunization generated stronger CD4 T cell central memory (Tcm) responses in the colon. Intramuscular immunization generated higher levels of env-binding antibodies, but neither produced neutralizing or cytotoxic antibodies. After mucosal SHIV challenge, both groups controlled SHIV better than control animals. However, more animals in the ivag. group had lower viral set points than in in the i.m. group. These data suggest mucosal vaccination may have improve protection against sexually-transmitted HIV. These data also demonstrate that helper-dependent Ad vaccines can mediate robust vaccine responses in the face of prior immunity to Ad5 and during four rounds of adenovirus vaccination. PMID:23844034

  5. Cyclooxygenase-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor expression in 5-fluorouracil-induced oral mucositis in hamsters: evaluation of two low-intensity laser protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Nilza Nelly Fontana; Plapler, Hélio; Chavantes, Maria Cristina; Lalla, Rajesh V; Yoshimura, Elisabeth Mateus; Alves, Maria Teresa Seixas

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms whereby low-intensity laser therapy may affect the severity of oral mucositis. A hamster cheek pouch model of oral mucositis was used with all animals receiving intraperitoneal 5-fluorouracil followed by surface irritation. Animals were randomly allocated into three groups and treated with a 35 mW laser, 100 mW laser, or no laser. Clinical severity of mucositis was assessed at four time-points by a blinded examiner. Buccal pouch tissue was harvested from a subgroup of animals in each group at four time-points. This tissue was used for immunohistochemistry for cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and factor VIII (marker of microvessel density) and the resulting staining was quantified. Peak severity of mucositis was reduced in the 35 mW laser group as compared to the 100 mW laser and control groups. This reduced peak clinical severity of mucositis in the 35 mW laser group was accompanied by a significantly lower level of COX-2 staining. The 100 mW laser did not have an effect on the severity of clinical mucositis, but was associated with a decrease in VEGF levels at the later time-points, as compared to the other groups. There was no clear relationship of VEGF levels or microvessel density to clinical mucositis severity. The tissue response to laser therapy appears to vary by dose. Low-intensity laser therapy appears to reduce the severity of mucositis, at least in part, by reducing COX-2 levels and associated inhibition of the inflammatory response.

  6. Efficacy of benzydamine oral rinse in prevention and management of radiation-induced oral mucositis: A double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheibani, Khosro M; Mafi, Ahmad R; Moghaddam, Shiva; Taslimi, Farnaz; Amiran, Ahmadreza; Ameri, Ahmad

    2015-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated positive effects of benzydamine oral rinse in prevention of radiation-induced oral mucositis. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of this medication in reducing the signs and symptoms of oral mucositis in patients receiving radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Fifty-one patients with head and neck carcinoma 2012 received external beam radiotherapy for 5 days/week to total planned cumulative radiotherapy doses of at least 5000 cGy. Patients were randomized to treatment with either benzydamine oral rinse or placebo, initiated the day before radiotherapy and continued for 2 weeks after the end of treatment. Oral cavity was divided into 14 anatomical sites and relevant sites were examined weekly, with a score given to each site based on the degree of mucositis using a 4-point scale, and then a "mean mucositis score" was calculated. Up to the end of third week, two groups did not show any difference in the severity of mucositis. However, by the end of week 4, the mean score of placebo group was more than that of treatment group (1.81 vs 1.27, P=0.001). This trend continued to end of week 7 (1.98 vs 1.43, P=0.001). Benzydamine oral rinse can be considered as an effective, safe and well-tolerated medication for prevention of radiation-induced oral mucositis and alleviating its symptoms. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Comparison of the chloride channel activator lubiprostone and the oral laxative Polyethylene Glycol 3350 on mucosal barrier repair in ischemic-injured porcine intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeser, Adam-J; Nighot, Prashant-K; Roerig, Birgit; Ueno, Ryuji; Blikslager, Anthony-T

    2008-10-21

    To investigate the effects of lubiprostone and Polyethylene Glycol 3350 (PEG) on mucosal barrier repair in ischemic-injured porcine intestine. Ileum from 6 piglets (approximately 15 kg body weight) was subjected to ischemic conditions by occluding the local mesenteric circulation for 45 min in vivo. Ileal tissues from each pig were then harvested and mounted in Ussing chambers and bathed in oxygenated Ringer's solution in vitro. Intestinal barrier function was assessed by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and mucosal-to-serosal fluxes of (3)H-mannitol and (14)C-inulin. Statistical analyses of data collected over a 120-min time course included 2-way ANOVA for the effects of time and treatment on indices of barrier function. Application of 1 micromol/L lubiprostone to the mucosal surface of ischemic-injured ileum in vitro induced significant elevations in TER compared to non-treated tissue. Lubiprostone also reduced mucosal-to-serosal fluxes of (3)H-mannitol and (14)C-inulin. Alternatively, application of a polyethylene laxative (PEG, 20 mmol/L) to the mucosal surface of ischemic tissues significantly increased flux of (3)H-mannitol and (14)C-inulin. This experiment demonstrates that lubiprostone stimulates recovery of barrier function in ischemic intestinal tissues whereas the PEG laxative had deleterious effects on mucosal repair. These results suggest that, unlike osmotic laxatives, lubiprostone stimulates repair of the injured intestinal barrier.

  8. Contact Endoscopy as a Novel Technique in the Detection and Diagnosis of Mucosal Lesions in the Head and Neck: A Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Szeto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There are a variety of described noninvasive optical detection techniques for evaluation of head and neck mucosal lesions. Contact endoscopy is a promising method of in vivo microscopic examination whereby a rigid telescope is placed on a previously dye-stained mucosa allowing evaluation of the superficial cell layers of the epithelium. This technique produces real-time, magnified images of cellular architecture of surface mucosa comparable to histology without the need for biopsy. In this review, we will briefly summarize the efficacy of CE in the detection of precancerous and cancerous mucosal lesions and its potential as a novel technique in early diagnosis, monitoring, and preoperative assessment of mucosal lesions of the head and neck. Methods. PUBMED, MEDLINE, and COCHRANE search revealed five prospective articles on contact endoscopy for the diagnosis of mucosal lesions in the head and neck. Results. The literature search yielded five prospective studies examining contact endoscopy for the diagnosis of benign versus malignant head and neck mucosal lesions. These reported a sensitivity and specificity of 77–100%, specificity of 66–100% and an accuracy of 72–92%. Conclusion. Contact endoscopy is a promising optical technology that may be a useful adjunct in the evaluation and diagnosis of benign and malignant head and neck mucosal lesions. Future prospective randomized double-blind studies of this detection method are required.

  9. High Prevalence of Tobacco Use and Associated Oral Mucosal Lesion Among Interstate Male Migrant Workers in Urban Kerala, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslesh, Ottapura Prabhakaran; Paul, Sam; Paul, Lipsy; Jayasree, Anandabhavan Kumaran

    2015-12-01

    Kerala is a highly urbanized state in India and interstate migrant laborers working there forms a marginalized community. It was generally perceived that use of tobacco and alcohol was high among the workers, but there are no epidemiological studies assessing the actual burden. To estimate the prevalence of use of tobacco and also the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions associated with such use consumption among the adult male interstate migrant workers in North Kerala. A cross sectional study was carried out among male migrant workers above 18 years working in different factories in urban parts of Kannur district. Total of 244 participants attending routine health check-up camp were assessed for the use of tobacco/alcohol, type, frequency and duration of their use by a questionnaire. The trained dental interns conducted oral cavity examination for detecting oral mucosal lesions associated with tobacco use. The prevalence of current use of smoked tobacco, smokeless tobacco and alcohol use were 41.8%, 71.7% and 56.6%, respectively among migrants. Oral mucosal lesions (OML) were seen in 36.3% of participants. Among smokeless tobacco users, 44.6% had lesions. Adjusted odds ratio for OML was 4.5 (CI: 1.9 - 19.84) among smokeless tobacco users. The current use of smokeless tobacco and oral mucosal lesions are highly prevalent among migrant workers.

  10. A low molecular weight polysaccharide isolated from Agaricus blazei suppresses tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Y C; Liu, J C; Zhao, X M; Wu, X X

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that the low molecular weight polysaccharide extracts from Agaricus blazei are potential antitumor agents or adjuvant in tumor treatment. In this study, we investigated the antitumor activity of LMPAB, a low molecular weight polysaccharide isolated from Agaricus blazei, and the molecular mechanisms of its antitumor activity. The antitumor effect of LMPAB was examined using mouse sarcoma 180 (S180) xenograft models. Antiangiogenic effect of LMPAB was determined by chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) angiogenesis and Matrigel-induced neovascularization in vivo models. The mRNA and protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were assessed using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Tumor inhibitory rates in the S180 xenograft models were 9.7, 23.9, and 33.0%, respectively, after administration of LMPAB at dose of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/day for 2 weeks. LMPAB also inhibited angiogenesis in the CAM model and Matrigel-induced neovascularization in C57BL/6 mice. The mRNA and protein levels of VEGF in tumor tissues were significantly down-regulated in the BALB/c mice received LMPAB treatment. Furthermore, significant down-regulation of serum VEGF levels was also observed in the mice. Our data suggest that LMPAB might be a promising agent for tumor therapy, and the antitumor and antiangiogenic effects of LMPAB may be related with down-regulation of VEGF.

  11. Expression of NOS and VEGF in feline mammary tumours and their correlation with angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M S; Matsumoto, M; Hidaka, R; Miyoshi, N; Yasuda, N

    2012-06-01

    In order to define the role of nitric oxide (NO) in feline mammary tumours, the expression of endothelial or inducible nitric oxide synthase (e/iNOS) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and their relationship with angiogenesis, was investigated in 23 feline mammary tumours (two hyperplastic, 19 adenocarcinoma, one osteosarcoma and one squamous cell carcinoma) by immunohistochemistry. Tumour angiogenesis was assessed by CD31 immunostaining and was expressed as microvessel density (MVD). In general, iNOS immunoreactivity was localised in tumour cells and occasionally in stromal myofibroblasts, whereas eNOS and VEGF were localised in the cytoplasm of tumour epithelial cells and endothelium. In malignancy, expression of iNOS increased from well- to less-differentiated phenotypes (Grades 1-3) and was significantly higher in G3 and G2 when compared with G1 cases. However, increasing eNOS expression was limited only in hyperplastic lesions and showed no significant changes among the grades. In addition, expression of iNOS was positively correlated with VEGF and MVD in feline mammary tumours and both measures were significantly greater in less differentiated phenotypes (Pfeline mammary tumours depended on tumour grade, and the positive correlations between iNOS and angiogenic markers suggests that iNOS synthesised by tumour cells promotes tumour growth. Thus, iNOS can be used as an important immunohistochemical marker to determine the degree of malignancy and prognosis of feline mammary carcinoma. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sandwiched polymer fibre in fibrin matrices for the dictation of endothelial cells undergoing angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukmana, I.; Djuansjah, J. R. P.

    2013-04-01

    We present here a three-dimensional (3D) sandwich system made by poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fibre and fibrin extracellular matrix (ECM) for endothelial cell dictation and angiogenesis guidance. In this three-dimensional system, Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial cells (HUVECs) were firstly cultured for 2 (two) days to cover the PET fibre before sandwiched in two layer fibrin gel containing HUVECs. After 4 (four) days of culture, cel-to-cel connection, tube-like structure and multi-cellular lumen formation were then assessed and validated. Phase contrast and fluorescence imaging using an inverted microscope were used to determine cell-to-cell and cell-ECM interactions. Laser scanning confocal microscopy and histological techniques were used to confirm the development of tube-like structure and multi-cellular lumen formation. This study shows that polymer fibres sandwiched in fibrin gel can be used to dictate endothelial cells undergoing angiogenesis with potential application in cancer and cardiovascular study and tissue engineering vascularisation.

  13. Brazilian Green Propolis Inhibits Inflammatory Angiogenesis in a Murine Sponge Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Aparecida Lima de Moura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis and inflammation are persistent features of several pathological conditions. Propolis, a sticky material that honeybees collect from living plants, has been reported to have multiple biological effects including anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplasic activities. Here, we investigated the effects of water extract of green propolis (WEP on angiogenesis, inflammatory cell accumulation and endogenous production of cytokines in sponge implants of mice over a 14-day period. Blood vessel formation as assessed by hemoglobin content and by morphometric analysis of the implants was reduced by WEP (500 mg kg−1 orally compared to the untreated group. The levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF increased progressively in the treated group but decreased after Day 10 in the control group. Accumulation of neutrophils and macrophages was determined by measuring myeloperoxidase (MPO and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG activities, respectively. Neutrophil accumulation was unaffected by propolis, but NAG activity was reduced by the treatment at Day 14. The levels TGF-β1 intra-implant increased progressively in both groups but were higher (40% at Day 14 in the control implants. The pro-inflammatory levels of TNF-α peaked at Day 7 in the control implants, and at Day 14 in the propolis-treated group. Our results indicate that the anti-inflammatory/anti-angiogenic effects of propolis are associated with cytokine modulation.

  14. Influence of neural stem cell transplantation on angiogenesis in rats with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Guo, G-H; Wang, G-S; Guan, C-X; Yue, L

    2014-08-07

    We examined the influence of neural stem cell transplantation on angiogenesis in rats with spinal cord injury. Sixty rats with spinal cord injury were divided into an experimental group and a control group and given neural stem cells or an equivalent amount of phosphate-buffered saline by intravenous transplantation, respectively. Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) motor function assessment was performed in rats at different times after transplantation, and von Willebrand factor (vWF) immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein were also performed. The BBB scores of rats in the 2 groups were both zero before transplantation. The BBB score gradually increased over time. The BBB score of the experimental group showed no significant difference compared with that of the control group (P > 0.05) 7 days after transplantation. The BBB score of the experimental group was significantly improved compared with that of the control group 14 days after transplantation (P cells and VEGF protein expression in the experimental group were significantly increased compared with those in the control group 7 and 14 days after transplantation, respectively (P stem cell transplantation may promote angiogenesis by inducing VEGF expression as well as improve functional recovery of limb movements.

  15. Clotrimazole nanoparticle gel for mucosal administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposito, Elisabetta, E-mail: ese@unife.it [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Ferrara, I-44121 Ferrara (Italy); Ravani, Laura [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Ferrara, I-44121 Ferrara (Italy); Contado, Catia [Department of Chemistry, University of Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Costenaro, Andrea [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Ferrara, I-44121 Ferrara (Italy); Drechsler, Markus [Macromolecular Chemistry II, University of Bayreuth (Germany); Rossi, Damiano [Department of Biology and Evolution, LT Terra and Acqua Tech UR7, University of Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Menegatti, Enea [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Ferrara, I-44121 Ferrara (Italy); Grandini, Alessandro [Department of Biology and Evolution, LT Terra and Acqua Tech UR7, University of Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Cortesi, Rita [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Ferrara, I-44121 Ferrara (Italy)

    2013-01-01

    In this study a formulation suitable to be applied on oral and/or vaginal mucosa has been developed for the treatment of fungal infections. The aim of the research is a comparison between clotrimazole (CLO) containing semisolid formulations based on monoolein aqueous dispersion (MAD) or nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC). MAD and NLC have been characterized in terms of morphology and dimensional distribution by cryogenic Transmission Electron Microscopy (cryo-TEM) and Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS). CLO was encapsulated with high entrapment efficiency both in MAD and in NLC, according to Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation (SdFFF) combined with HPLC. CLO recovery in MAD and NLC has been investigated by time. In order to obtain formulations with suitable viscosity for mucosal application, MAD was diluted with a carbomer gel, while NLC was directly viscosized by the addition of poloxamer 407 in the dispersion. The rheological properties of MAD and NLC after viscosizing have been investigated. Franz cell has been employed to study CLO diffusion from the different vehicles, evidencing diffusion rates from MAD and NLC superimposable to that obtained using Canesten{sup Registered-Sign }. An anticandidal activity study demonstrated that both CLO-MAD and CLO-NLC were more active against Candida albicans with respect to the pure drug. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison between monoolein aqueous dispersion (MAD) and nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Clotrimazole (CLO) encapsulated with high entrapment efficiency both in MAD and in NLC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The solid matrix of NLC controls CLO degradation better than MAD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CLO containing MAD and NLC exhibits a higher anticandidal activity than the free drug. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple production of CLO-NLC based poloxamer gel, suitable for industry scaling up.

  16. Identification of Target Genes Involved in Wound Healing Angiogenesis of Endothelial Cells with the Treatment of a Chinese 2-Herb Formula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Chor Wing Tam

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is vitally important in diabetic wound healing. We had previously demonstrated that a Chinese 2-herb formula (NF3 significantly stimulated angiogenesis of HUVEC in wound healing. However, the molecular mechanism has not yet been elucidated. In line with this, global expression profiling of NF3-treated HUVEC was performed so as to assess the regulatory role of NF3 involved in the underlying signaling pathways in wound healing angiogenesis. The microarray results illustrated that different panels of differentially expressed genes were strictly governed in NF3-treated HUVEC in a time-regulated manner. The microarray analysis followed by qRT-PCR and western blotting verification of NF3-treated HUVEC at 6 h revealed the involvement of various genes in diverse biological process, e.g., MAP3K14 in anti-inflammation; SLC5A8 in anti-tumorogenesis; DNAJB7 in protein translation; BIRC5, EPCAM, INSL4, MMP8 and NPR3 in cell proliferation; CXCR7, EPCAM, HAND1 and MMP8 in migration; CXCR7, EPCAM and MMP8 in tubular formation; and BIRC5, CXCR7, EPCAM, HAND1, MMP8 and UBD in angiogenesis. After 16 h incubation of NF3, other sets of genes were shown with differential expression in HUVEC, e.g., IL1RAPL2 and NR1H4 in anti-inflammation; miR28 in anti-tumorogenesis; GRIN1 and LCN1 in anti-oxidation; EPB41 in intracellular signal transduction; PRL and TFAP2A in cell proliferation; miR28, PRL and SCG2 in cell migration; PRL in tubular formation; and miR28, NR1H4 and PRL in angiogenesis. This study provided concrete scientific evidence in support of the regulatory role of NF3 on endothelial cells involved in wound healing angiogenesis.

  17. Gene therapy and angiogenesis in patients with coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Not all patients with severe coronary artery disease can be treated satisfactorily with current recommended medications and revascularization techniques. Various vascular growth factors have the potential to induce angiogenesis in ischemic tissue. Clinical trials have only evaluated the effect...... of VEGF and FGF in patients with coronary artery disease. The initial small and unblinded studies with either recombinant growth factor proteins or genes encoding growth factors were encouraging, demonstrating both clinical improvement and evidence of angiogenesis. However, subsequent larger double...... an improvement in clinical results can be obtained with a cocktail of growth factors or by a combination of gene and stem cell therapy in patients with severe coronary artery disease, which cannot be treated effectively with current treatment strategies....

  18. Angiogenesis and Inflammation in Peritoneal Dialysis: The Role of Adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Shi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation and angiogenesis are the most common complications in patients undergoing maintenance peritoneal dialysis (PD, resulting in progressive peritoneum remolding and, eventually, utrafiltration failure. Contributing to the deeper tissue under the peritoneal membrane, adipocytes play a neglected role in this process. Some adipokines act as inflammatory and angiogenic promoters, while others have the opposite effects. Adipokines, together with inflammatory factors and other cytokines, modulate inflammation and neovascularization in a coordinated fashion. This review will also emphasize cellular regulators and their crosstalk in long-term PD. Understanding the molecular mechanism, targeting changes in adipocytes and regulating adipokine secretion will help extend therapeutic methods for preventing inflammation and angiogenesis in PD.

  19. Regulation of Angiogenesis by Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C. Mirando

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In addition to their canonical roles in translation the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs have developed secondary functions over the course of evolution. Many of these activities are associated with cellular survival and nutritional stress responses essential for homeostatic processes in higher eukaryotes. In particular, six ARSs and one associated factor have documented functions in angiogenesis. However, despite their connection to this process, the ARSs are mechanistically distinct and exhibit a range of positive or negative effects on aspects of endothelial cell migration, proliferation, and survival. This variability is achieved through the appearance of appended domains and interplay with inflammatory pathways not found in prokaryotic systems. Complete knowledge of the non-canonical functions of ARSs is necessary to understand the mechanisms underlying the physiological regulation of angiogenesis.

  20. Ramucirumab (IMC-1121B): a novel attack on angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratlin, Jennifer L; Mulder, Karen E; Mackey, John R

    2010-07-01

    Angiogenesis is a critical hallmark of malignancy, and attempts to inhibit this process have characterized the age of biologic anticancer therapies for solid tumors. VEGF receptor-2 is the premier receptor responsible for many of the cancer-driven VEGF-induced spectrum of biologic changes, including modification of blood vessel structure and function, proliferation and migration. Unlike all clinically approved angiogenesis inhibitors, the fully human monoclonal antibody ramucirumab (IMC-1121B) specifically and potently inhibits VEGF receptor-2. Phase I clinical trials have shown safety across a wide range of ramucirumab doses with impressive, albeit early, evidence of both stable disease and partial responses in a variety of tumor types. In this article, we review the current data on ramucirumab and make comparisons with commercially available antiangiogenic agents.

  1. Marine-Derived Angiogenesis Inhibitors for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Qing Wang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis inhibitors have been successfully used for cancer therapy in the clinic. Many marine-derived natural products and their analogues have been reported to show antiangiogenic activities. Compared with the drugs in the clinic, these agents display interesting characteristics, including diverse sources, unique chemical structures, special modes of action, and distinct activity and toxicity profiles. This review will first provide an overview of the current marine-derived angiogenesis inhibitors based on their primary targets and/or mechanisms of action. Then, the marine-derived antiangiogenic protein kinase inhibitors will be focused on. And finally, the clinical trials of the marine-derived antiangiogenic agents will be discussed, with special emphasis on their application potentials, problems and possible coping strategies in their future development as anticancer drugs.

  2. Mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of Teleost fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Irene; Zhang, Yong-An; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2012-01-01

    As physical barriers that separate teleost fish from the external environment, mucosae are also active immunological sites that protect them against exposure to microbes and stressors. In mammals, the sites where antigens are sampled from mucosal surfaces and where stimulation of naive T and B lymphocytes occurs are known as inductive sites and are constituted by mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). According to anatomical location, the MALT in teleost fish is subdivided into gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), and gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT). All MALT contain a variety of leukocytes, including, but not limited to, T cells, B cells, plasma cells, macrophages and granulocytes. Secretory immunoglobulins are produced mainly by plasmablasts and plasma cells, and play key roles in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. Until recently, teleost fish B cells were thought to express only two classes of immunoglobulins, IgM and IgD, in which IgM was thought to be the only one responding to pathogens both in systemic and mucosal compartments. However, a third teleost immunoglobulin class, IgT/IgZ, was discovered in 2005, and it has recently been shown to behave as the prevalent immunoglobulin in gut mucosal immune responses. The purpose of this review is to summarise the current knowledge of mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of fish MALT. Moreover, we attempt to integrate the existing knowledge on both basic and applied research findings on fish mucosal immune responses, with the goal to provide new directions that may facilitate the development of novel vaccination strategies that stimulate not only systemic, but also mucosal immunity. PMID:22133710

  3. Paradoxic effects of metformin on endothelial cells and angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Antonino; Cantelmo, Anna R.; Albini, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    The biguanide metformin is used in type 2 diabetes management and has gained significant attention as a potential cancer preventive agent. Angioprevention represents a mechanism of chemoprevention, yet conflicting data concerning the antiangiogenic action of metformin have emerged. Here, we clarify some of the contradictory effects of metformin on endothelial cells and angiogenesis, using in vitro and in vivo assays combined with transcriptomic and protein array approaches. Metformin inhibits formation of capillary-like networks by endothelial cells; this effect is partially dependent on the energy sensor adenosine-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as shown by small interfering RNA knockdown. Gene expression profiling of human umbilical vein endothelial cells revealed a paradoxical modulation of several angiogenesis-associated genes and proteins by metformin, with short-term induction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), cyclooxygenase 2 and CXC chemokine receptor 4 at the messenger RNA level and downregulation of ADAMTS1. Antibody array analysis shows an essentially opposite regulation of numerous angiogenesis-associated proteins in endothelial and breast cancer cells including interleukin-8, angiogenin and TIMP-1, as well as selective regulation of angiopioetin-1, -2, endoglin and others. Endothelial cell production of the cytochrome P450 member CYP1B1 is upregulated by tumor cell supernatants in an AMPK-dependent manner, metformin blocks this effect. Metformin inhibits VEGF-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and the inhibition of AMPK activity abrogates this event. Metformin hinders angiogenesis in matrigel pellets in vivo, prevents the microvessel density increase observed in obese mice on a high-fat diet, downregulating the number of white adipose tissue endothelial precursor cells. Our data show that metformin has an antiangiogenic activity in vitro and in vivo associated with a contradictory short

  4. Paradoxic effects of metformin on endothelial cells and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallaglio, Katiuscia; Bruno, Antonino; Cantelmo, Anna R; Esposito, Alessia I; Ruggiero, Luca; Orecchioni, Stefania; Calleri, Angelica; Bertolini, Francesco; Pfeffer, Ulrich; Noonan, Douglas M; Albini, Adriana

    2014-05-01

    The biguanide metformin is used in type 2 diabetes management and has gained significant attention as a potential cancer preventive agent. Angioprevention represents a mechanism of chemoprevention, yet conflicting data concerning the antiangiogenic action of metformin have emerged. Here, we clarify some of the contradictory effects of metformin on endothelial cells and angiogenesis, using in vitro and in vivo assays combined with transcriptomic and protein array approaches. Metformin inhibits formation of capillary-like networks by endothelial cells; this effect is partially dependent on the energy sensor adenosine-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as shown by small interfering RNA knockdown. Gene expression profiling of human umbilical vein endothelial cells revealed a paradoxical modulation of several angiogenesis-associated genes and proteins by metformin, with short-term induction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), cyclooxygenase 2 and CXC chemokine receptor 4 at the messenger RNA level and downregulation of ADAMTS1. Antibody array analysis shows an essentially opposite regulation of numerous angiogenesis-associated proteins in endothelial and breast cancer cells including interleukin-8, angiogenin and TIMP-1, as well as selective regulation of angiopioetin-1, -2, endoglin and others. Endothelial cell production of the cytochrome P450 member CYP1B1 is upregulated by tumor cell supernatants in an AMPK-dependent manner, metformin blocks this effect. Metformin inhibits VEGF-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and the inhibition of AMPK activity abrogates this event. Metformin hinders angiogenesis in matrigel pellets in vivo, prevents the microvessel density increase observed in obese mice on a high-fat diet, downregulating the number of white adipose tissue endothelial precursor cells. Our data show that metformin has an antiangiogenic activity in vitro and in vivo associated with a contradictory short

  5. SDF-1, DC1/DC2, and Tumor Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    pm-pore transwell Figure 1. Malignant ascies fid induces potent in vivo angiogenesis. C57 mice plates (Neuro Probe. Gaithersburg, MD). CXCL12 and VEGF...Towarowski A, Britsch S, et al. Toll-like receptor expression reveals CpG DNA as a unique microbial stimulus for plasmacytoid dendritic cells which syner...into the tumour by blocking the CXCR4 signal; AMD31 00 might also suppress tumour vascularization/metastasis CpG nucleotides activate plasmacytoid DCs

  6. Role of Caveolin-1 in Prostate Cancer Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    and cav-1−/− animals. We previously noted that in mice under 6 months of age soft urinary calculi were seen in the bladders of more than 60% of the...the older mice evaluated in the present study soft calculi and calcified deposits were also frequentlyFig. 5. H&E-stained sections of urinary bladder...activators and inhibitors differentially regulate caveolin-1 expression and caveo- lae formation in vascular endothelial cells. Angiogenesis inhibitors

  7. An IP-10 (CXCL10)-Derived Peptide Inhibits Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates-Binder, Cecelia C.; Rodgers, Margaret; Jaynes, Jesse; Wells, Alan; Bodnar, Richard J.; Turner, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays a critical role in processes such as organ development, wound healing, and tumor growth. It requires well-orchestrated integration of soluble and matrix factors and timely recognition of such signals to regulate this process. Previous work has shown that newly forming vessels express the chemokine receptor CXC receptor 3 (CXCR3) and, activation by its ligand IP-10 (CXCL10), both inhibits development of new vasculature and causes regression of newly formed vessels. To identify and develop new therapeutic agents to limit or reverse pathological angiogenesis, we identified a 21 amino acid fragment of IP-10, spanning the α-helical domain residues 77–98, that mimic the actions of the whole IP-10 molecule on endothelial cells. Treatment of the endothelial cells with the 22 amino acid fragment referred to as IP-10p significantly inhibited VEGF-induced endothelial motility and tube formation in vitro, properties critical for angiogenesis. Using a Matrigel plug assay in vivo, we demonstrate that IP-10p both prevented vessel formation and induced involution of nascent vessels. CXCR3 neutralizing antibody was able to block the inhibitory effects of the IP-10p, demonstrating specificity of the peptide. Inhibition of endothelial function by IP-10p was similar to that described for IP-10, secondary to CXCR3-mediated increase in cAMP production, activation of PKA inhibiting cell migration, and inhibition of VEGF-mediated m-calpain activation. IP-10p provides a novel therapeutic agent that inhibits endothelial cell function thus, allowing for the modulation of angiogenesis. PMID:22815829

  8. Angiogenesis and immune supression: yin and yang of tumor progression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Szala

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Specialized variants of neoplastic cells that appear in tumors during cancer disease progression possess the ability to recruit certain kinds of hematopoietic and mesenchymal cells from the bone marrow or bloodstream. These tumor-recruited hematopoietic cells include monocytes, macrophages, granulocytes, mast and dendritic cells, as well as myeloblastic suppressor cells. Fibroblasts derived from undifferentiated mesenchymal cells are also recruited. Some of these cells (especially macrophages and fibroblasts then undergo “education-like” phenotype reprogramming under the influence of the neoplastic cell population, resulting in the appearance of tumor-associated macrophages (TAM and fibroblasts (CAF. Together with the extracellular matrix (ECM as well with the remaining types of recruited cells, they contribute to the formation of a specific tumor microenvironment. Both the cells forming the tumor microenvironment and neoplastic cells engage in the two intimately linked processes of angiogenesis and immune suppression. The network of defective blood vessels formed during tumor angiogenesis and the resulting fluctuations in blood flow lead to under-oxygenation of the surrounding neoplastic cells and have substantial impact on their metabolic profile. A number of processes triggered in these under-oxygenated neoplastic cells appear to strongly favor further tumor progression. Such processes result in lower oxygen demand, enhanced angiogenesis, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition, owing to which the neoplastic cells acquire the ability to translocate. Under-oxygenation also leads to augmented genetic instability of the neoplastic cells. The tumor environment-forming cells also have their share in the establishment of an immunosuppressive environment which enables the neoplastic cells to escape immune surveillance. By providing a sophisticated milieu for the selection of increasingly malignant neoplastic cells (i.e. with proangiogenic and

  9. TRF2 acts as a transcriptional regulator in tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maï, Mounir El; Wagner, Kay-Dietrich; Michiels, Jean-François; Gilson, Eric; Wagner, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    We recently showed that telomeric repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) regulates gene expression to promote angiogenesis. We found that TRF2 is highly expressed in tumor vessels and transcriptionally activates platelet-derived growth factor receptor β to promote endothelial cell angiogenic properties independently of its function in telomere protection. This work identifies TRF2 as a promising dual target for cancer therapy.

  10. Standardization of a method to study angiogenesis in a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAVID FEDER

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the adult organism, angiogenesis is restricted to a few physiological conditions. On the other hand, uncontrolled angiogenesis have often been associated to angiogenesis-dependent pathologies. A variety of animal models have been described to provide more quantitative analysis of in vivo angiogenesis and to characterize pro- and antiangiogenic molecules. However, it is still necessary to establish a quantitative, reproducible and specific method for studies of angiogenesis factors and inhibitors. This work aimed to standardize a method for the study of angiogenesis and to investigate the effects of thalidomide on angiogenesis. Sponges of 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 cm were implanted in the back of mice groups, control and experimental (thalidomide 200 mg/K/day by gavage. After seven days, the sponges were removed. The dosage of hemoglobin in sponge and in circulation was performed and the ratio between the values was tested using nonparametric Mann-Whitney test. Results have shown that sponge-induced angiogenesis quantitated by ratio between hemoglobin content in serum and in sponge is a helpful model for in vivo studies on angiogenesis. Moreover, it was observed that sponge-induced angiogenesis can be suppressed by thalidomide, corroborating to the validity of the standardized method.

  11. Correlation between {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI uptake and angiogenesis in MIBI-positive breast lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekis, Recep [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dokuz Eyluel University School of Medicine, Inciralti-Izmir 35340 (Turkey)]. E-mail: recep.bekis@deu.edu.tr; Degirmenci, Berna [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dokuz Eyluel University School of Medicine, Inciralti-Izmir 35340 (Turkey); Aydin, Aysel [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dokuz Eyluel University School of Medicine, Inciralti-Izmir 35340 (Turkey); Ozdogan, Ozhan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dokuz Eyluel University School of Medicine, Inciralti-Izmir 35340 (Turkey); Canda, Tulay [Department of Pathology, Dokuz Eyluel University School of Medicine, Inciralti-Izmir 35340 (Turkey); Durak, Hatice [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dokuz Eyluel University School of Medicine, Inciralti-Izmir 35340 (Turkey)

    2005-07-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the correlation between the degree of accumulation and the washout of 99m technetium methoxyisobutylisonitrile ({sup 99m}Tc-MIBI) and angiogenesis in MIBI-positive breast lesions. Twenty-eight patients (mean age, 51{+-}11 years) with 31 breast lesions who underwent scintimammography were studied. Anterior, left and right prone lateral images were obtained 20 min and 3 h after the injection of 740 MBq {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI. All breast lesions showed increased {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI uptake. Early and delayed tumor to background activity ratios (T/BG) and washout index (early tumor uptake-delayed tumor uptake divided by early tumor uptake) were calculated. Vascular endothelium was immunohistochemically labeled using a biotinylated monoclonal antibody directed against the factor-VIII-associated antigen using standard biotin-avidin technique. Angiogenesis was evaluated by assessing the vascular surface density (VSD) and the microvessel number (NVES) within 10 randomly chosen areas. All pathological data were compared with early and delayed T/BG activity ratios and washout index of {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI. Statistical analysis was performed using Spearman correlation test. There was no statistically significant correlation between the degree of angiogenesis and early T/BG (r=.287, P>.05 with VSD, r=.351, P>.05 with NVES), delayed T/BG (r=.277, P>.05 with VSD, r=.315, P>.05 with NVES) and the washout index (r=.268, P>.05 with VSD, r=.285, P>.05 with NVES) of {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI in all breast lesions. There was no statistically significant correlation between the degree of angiogenesis and early T/BG (r=.235, P>.05 with VSD, r=.356, P>.05 with NVES), delayed T/BG (r=.181, P>.05 with VSD, r=.285, P>.05 with NVES) and the washout index (r=.158, P>.05 with VSD, r=.187, P>.05 with NVES) of {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI in 24 invasive breast lesions. No statistically significant correlation was found between the degree of angiogenesis and early T/BG (r=-.036, P>.05 with VSD

  12. Advances in neuroimaging techniques for the evaluation of tumor growth, vascular permeability, and angiogenesis in gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstner, Elizabeth R; Sorensen, A Gregory; Jain, Rakesh K; Batchelor, Tracy T

    2008-12-01

    This review will summarize new neuroimaging techniques, particularly MRI and PET imaging, that can be used to assess brain tumor growth and angiogenesis. Glioma tumor vasculature is abnormal, and advances in MRI now permit visualization of the hemodynamic properties of gliomas including cerebral blood volume and blood flow, vascular permeability, and blood vessel diameter. New radiolabeled PET tracers have allowed more specific interrogation of glioma physiology such as hypoxia assessment or tumor proliferation rate. These two techniques are complementary and will likely yield important information on tumor response to therapy, particularly in the setting of antiangiogenic agents, which confound the interpretation of standard contrast-enhanced MRI scans. These techniques may allow development of patient-specific therapy to improve outcome in patients with gliomas.

  13. Photoacoustic imaging of angiogenesis in subdermal islet transplant sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Pawlick, Rena; Bruni, Antonio; Rafiei, Yasmin; Pepper, Andrew R.; Gala-Lopez, Boris; Choi, Min; Malcolm, Andrew; Zemp, Roger J.; Shapiro, A. M. James

    2016-03-01

    Exogenous insulin administration is the mainstay treatment therapy for patients with Type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, for select patients, clinical islet transplantation is an alternative therapeutic treatment. In this procedure, islets are transplanted into the hepatic portal vein, and despite improved success within the last decade, obstacles are still associated with this approach. It has been discovered that the subcutaneous space may be an effective alternative site for islet transplantation, and may provide advantages of easy access and potential for simple monitoring. The ability to monitor islet viability and the transplant microenvironment may be key to future success in islet transplantation. A subcutaneous device-less technique has been developed to facilitate angiogenesis in the islet transplant site, however, a method for monitoring the potential engraftment site have yet to be explored fully. Here we demonstrate the ability to track angiogenesis in mice with 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks post-catheter implant on both sides of the abdomen using a FujiFilm VisualSonics Vevo-LAZR system. Quantitative analysis on vessel densities exhibited gradual vessel growth successfully induced by catheter implantation. Our study demonstrates the ability of employing photoacoustic and micro-ultrasound imaging to track angiogenesis around the catheter site prior to islet transplantation.

  14. Apparent diffusion coefficient correlation with oesophageal tumour stroma and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Tomoyoshi; Shuto, Kiyohiko; Okazumi, Shinichi; Hayano, Kohichi; Satoh, Asami; Saitoh, Hiroshige; Shimada, Hideaki; Nabeya, Yoshihiro; Kazama, Toshiki; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2012-06-01

    Because diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can predict the prognosis of patients with oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), we hypothesised that apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values might be correlated with the collagen content and tumour angiogenesis. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between ADC values of ESCC before treatment and oesophageal tumour stroma and angiogenesis. Seventeen patients with ESCC were enrolled. The ADC values were calculated from the DWI score. Seventeen patients who had undergone oesophagectomy were analysed for tumour stroma, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and CD34. Tissue collagen was stained with azocarmine and aniline blue to quantitatively analyse the extracellular matrix in cancer stroma. Tissues were stained with VEGF and CD34 to analyse the angiogenesis. The ADC values decreased with stromal collagen growth. We found a negative correlation between the tumour ADC and the amount of stromal collagen (r = -0.729, P = 0.001), i.e. the ADC values decreased with growth of VEGF. We also found a negative correlation between the ADC of the tumours and the amount of VEGF (r = 0.538, P = 0.026). Our results indicated that the ADC value may be a novel prognostic factor and contribute to the treatment of oesophageal cancer. • Magnetic resonance apparent diffusion coefficient values inversely indicate tumour stromal collagen • There is also negative correlation between ADCs and vascular endothelial growth factor • ADC values may contribute to the treatment of oesophageal cancer.

  15. Obesity and cancer phenotype: Is angiogenesis a missed link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Fernando; Soares, Raquel

    2015-10-15

    Obesity remains nowadays one of the main threats to human health, being a problem of worldwide proportions. It is characterized by augmented storage of fatty acids in an enlarged adipose tissue. This process is possible thanks to a rich capillary network, supported by a mechanism that has also a crucial role on cancer: angiogenesis. Given that several studies point obesity as a risk factor for cancer development, angiogenesis may be approached as the missed link between these two pathologies. Understanding the different pathways behind angiogenesis becomes essential to break this link by developing new anti-angiogenic therapies or improving the actual ones. In the first phase, this paper will focus the structural and cellular changes that adipose tissue suffers in obesity. Then, the main pro-angiogenic players will be reviewed, taking into account the pathways that explain their putative role in obesity-cancer link. Finally, the clinical implications of the presented mechanisms will also be regarded, being the main focus on the anti-angiogenic therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Endothelial Notch activity promotes angiogenesis and osteogenesis in bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Saravana K.; Kusumbe, Anjali P.; Wang, Lin; Adams, Ralf H.

    2014-03-01

    Blood vessel growth in the skeletal system and osteogenesis seem to be coupled, suggesting the existence of molecular crosstalk between endothelial and osteoblastic cells. Understanding the nature of the mechanisms linking angiogenesis and bone formation should be of great relevance for improved fracture healing or prevention of bone mass loss. Here we show that vascular growth in bone involves a specialized, tissue-specific form of angiogenesis. Notch signalling promotes endothelial cell proliferation and vessel growth in postnatal long bone, which is the opposite of the well-established function of Notch and its ligand Dll4 in the endothelium of other organs and tumours. Endothelial-cell-specific and inducible genetic disruption of Notch signalling in mice not only impaired bone vessel morphology and growth, but also led to reduced osteogenesis, shortening of long bones, chondrocyte defects, loss of trabeculae and decreased bone mass. On the basis of a series of genetic experiments, we conclude that skeletal defects in these mutants involved defective angiocrine release of Noggin from endothelial cells, which is positively regulated by Notch. Administration of recombinant Noggin, a secreted antagonist of bone morphogenetic proteins, restored bone growth and mineralization, chondrocyte maturation, the formation of trabeculae and osteoprogenitor numbers in endothelial-cell-specific Notch pathway mutants. These findings establish a molecular framework coupling angiogenesis, angiocrine signals and osteogenesis, which may prove significant for the development of future therapeutic applications.

  17. Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis by Brahma Rasayana (BR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangapazham, Rajesh L; Sharma, Anuj; Gaddipati, Jaya P; Singh, Anoop K; Maheshwari, Radha K

    2006-01-01

    The current therapy for prostate cancer includes radical prostatectomy, radiation therapy and hormonal ablation. Chemotherapy also provides beneficial results for some patients with advanced prostate cancer but with several harmful side effects. Hence there is a need to identify and develop alternate therapies, which can reduce the disease progression with minimal or few side effects. Earlier studies from our laboratory have shown that a Polyherbal mixture, Brahma Rasayna (BR) rich in anti-oxidant principles has a potential to be an anti-tumor agent. BR treatment of MAT-LyLu cell inoculated Copenhagen rats resulted in a decrease of palpable tumor incidence, delay in tumor occurrence and lower mean tumor volumes. Also, a significant reduction in tumor weight and lung metastasis was observed in BR treated animals in comparison to untreated controls. In the present study, we focused to examine the effect of BR on angiogenesis and regulation of molecular markers involved in angiogenesis using in-vivo and in-vitro models. BR treatment showed a significant reduction in Factor VIII expression compared to control indicating reduced angiogenesis. BR treated tumor specimens showed a decrease in the pro-angiogenic factors like VEGF, MMP-9 and MMP-2. Methanolic extract of BR was found to inhibit the proliferation, tube formation, cell migration and attachment of HUVEC on matrigel in a dose dependant manner. These findings suggest the possible mechanism(s) of action of BR in the reduction of tumor growth and metastatic spread.

  18. Apparent diffusion coefficient correlation with oesophageal tumour stroma and angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyagi, Tomoyoshi; Shuto, Kiyohiko; Okazumi, Shinichi; Hayano, Kohichi; Satoh, Asami; Saitoh, Hiroshige; Shimada, Hideaki; Nabeya, Yoshihiro; Matsubara, Hisahiro [Chiba University, Department of Frontier Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba (Japan); Kazama, Toshiki [Chiba University, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    Because diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can predict the prognosis of patients with oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), we hypothesised that apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values might be correlated with the collagen content and tumour angiogenesis. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between ADC values of ESCC before treatment and oesophageal tumour stroma and angiogenesis. Seventeen patients with ESCC were enrolled. The ADC values were calculated from the DWI score. Seventeen patients who had undergone oesophagectomy were analysed for tumour stroma, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and CD34. Tissue collagen was stained with azocarmine and aniline blue to quantitatively analyse the extracellular matrix in cancer stroma. Tissues were stained with VEGF and CD34 to analyse the angiogenesis. The ADC values decreased with stromal collagen growth. We found a negative correlation between the tumour ADC and the amount of stromal collagen (r = -0.729, P = 0.001), i.e. the ADC values decreased with growth of VEGF. We also found a negative correlation between the ADC of the tumours and the amount of VEGF (r = 0.538, P = 0.026). Our results indicated that the ADC value may be a novel prognostic factor and contribute to the treatment of oesophageal cancer. circle Magnetic resonance apparent diffusion coefficient values inversely indicate tumour stromal collagen circle There is also negative correlation between ADCs and vascular endothelial growth factor circle ADC values may contribute to the treatment of oesophageal cancer. (orig.)

  19. OSM Enhances Angiogenesis and Improves Cardiac Function after Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotian Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncostatin M (OSM has been reported to stimulate angiogenesis by upregulating VEGF and bFGF, implying that it could be a therapeutic strategy in treating ischemic diseases. The present study was aimed at investigating whether OSM could improve cardiac function via prompting angiogenesis following myocardial infarction (MI. Wild type (WT and Oβ knock-out (Oβ−/− mice were, respectively, randomized into sham group, MI + vehicle group, and MI + OSM group. WT mice displayed significantly impaired cardiac function after MI. OSM treatment attenuated cardiac dysfunction in WT MI mice, while Oβ deletion abrogated the protective effects. Besides, OSM attenuated heart hypertrophy and pulmonary congestion evidenced by decreased heart weight/body weight and lung weight/body weight ratio. Further, reduction of apoptosis and fibrosis in infarct border zone was observed in OSM treated WT MI mice compared with vehicle. Moreover, in WT mice subjected to MI, OSM treatment significantly increased capillary density along with upregulation of p-Akt and angiogenic factors VEGF and bFGF in comparison with vehicle, and this phenomenon was not found in Oβ−/− mice. In conclusion, OSM treatment preserved cardiac function, inhibited apoptosis and fibrosis, and stimulated angiogenesis via upregulating VEGF and bFGF in infarct border zone of ischemic myocardium, indicating that OSM could be a novel therapeutic target for MI.

  20. Matairesinol inhibits angiogenesis via suppression of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Boram; Kim, Ki Hyun; Jung, Hye Jin [Chemical Genomics National Research Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Ho Jeong, E-mail: kwonhj@yonsei.ac.kr [Chemical Genomics National Research Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol suppresses mitochondrial ROS generation during hypoxia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol exhibits potent anti-angiogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol could be a basis for the development of novel anti-angiogenic agents. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) are involved in cancer initiation and progression and function as signaling molecules in many aspects of hypoxia and growth factor-mediated signaling. Here we report that matairesinol, a natural small molecule identified from the cell-based screening of 200 natural plants, suppresses mROS generation resulting in anti-angiogenic activity. A non-toxic concentration of matairesinol inhibited the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The compound also suppressed in vitro angiogenesis of tube formation and chemoinvasion, as well as in vivo angiogenesis of the chorioallantoic membrane at non-toxic doses. Furthermore, matairesinol decreased hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} in hypoxic HeLa cells. These results demonstrate that matairesinol could function as a novel angiogenesis inhibitor by suppressing mROS signaling.

  1. VEGF/VEGFR2 Axis in Periodontal Disease Progression and Angiogenesis: Basic Approach for a New Therapeutic Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladau, Mircea; Cimpean, Anca Maria; Balica, Raluca Amalia; Jitariu, Andreea Adriana; Popovici, Ramona Amina; Raica, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal lesions are associated with activation of pathological angiogenesis and a high number of newly-formed blood vessels. Most angiogenic growth factors have been studied in the crevicular fluid or serum, but tissue correlations with vascular density or endothelial proliferation, are very rare, even inexistent. We assessed the VEGF/VEGFR2 axis expression in a multimodal fashion, in both epithelial and stromal compartments, with emphasis to endothelial proliferation and severity of periodontal lesions. Compared to normal gingiva, negative for VEGF/VEGFR2, periodontal lesions had a progressive increase for these markers from low to severe periodontal lesions. The transition from low to moderate periodontal lesions represents the milestone in disease progression and implies an active angiogenesis based on the highest angiogenic parameter variability observed for these lesions. Epithelial vascularization was firstly observed in moderate periodontal lesions and persists during severe periodontal disease. All the parameters used to quantify angiogenesis in periodontal lesions, were significantly increased in severe periodontal lesions dependent on VEGF expression in both the epithelial and stromal compartment. Our results support the use of anti-VEGF/VEGFR2-targeted therapy as adjuvant treatment for severe periodontal lesions. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  2. Combined Effects of Growth Hormone and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate on Growth, Differentiation, and Angiogenesis in Human Dental Pulp Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hyung-Mun; Chang, Seok-Woo; Park, Kyung-Ran; Herr, Lan; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of growth hormone (GH) on mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) with regard to cell adhesion, growth, odontoblastic differentiation, and angiogenesis in human dental pulp cells and the underlying signal pathway mechanisms. Cell adhesion and proliferation were assessed by adhesion analysis and cell counting. Differentiation was examined by alkaline phosphatase activity, alizarin red staining, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for marker genes. Angiogenesis was evaluated by human umbilical vein endothelial cell migration and capillary tube formation assays. Signaling pathways were analyzed by Western blotting and confocal microscopy. Combined treatment with GH and MTA enhanced cell adhesion, growth, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcified nodules, expression of marker mRNAs, migration, and capillary tube formation, compared with treatment with MTA or GH alone. In addition, GH plus MTA increased expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 mRNA, phosphorylation of Smad 1/5/8, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, JNK, and p38 MAPK, and increased the levels of the transcription factors Runx2 and Osterix, compared with MTA alone. Collectively, our results demonstrate that a combination of MTA and GH promotes cell adhesion, growth, differentiation, and angiogenesis of MTA in human dental pulp cells via the activation of bone morphogenetic protein and MAPK pathway. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Oxidative stress is closely associated with tumor angiogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Masayasu; Nishikawa, Taichiro; Nakajima, Tomoki; Okada, Yoshihisa; Yamaguchi, Kanji; Mitsuyoshi, Hironori; Yasui, Kohichiroh; Minami, Masahito; Iwai, Masaki; Kagawa, Keizo; Itoh, Yoshito; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2011-06-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) plays an important role in the progression of chronic liver disease and hepatocarcinogenesis. However, the role of OS in the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is unclear. The aim of this study was to assess whether OS promotes angiogenesis in HCC. The expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor2 (VEGFR2), and phosphorylated Akt were assessed, and microvessel density (MVD) and the cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) population were examined by immunohistological staining in 55 HCC samples. The OS level in these tissues was assessed using 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) immunostaining, and an 8-OHdG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The expression and activation of angiogenic factors and the effect of growth stimulation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were also assessed in vitro, using HLE hepatoma-derived cells and conditioned medium with or without treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂); a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, wortmannin; and an anti-oxidative agent, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). A higher OS grade was significantly associated with higher MVD, VEGF expression, Akt activity, and OS grade of CAFs, but not with the percentage of the CAF population in HCC tissues. Additionally, cancer cells constituted a major population of OS marker-positive cells in HCC tissues. In vitro, H₂O₂ treatment induced up-regulation of VEGF at both the mRNA and protein levels, activated Akt, and resulted in the proliferation of HUVECs; the addition of wortmannin and NAC counteracted the effects of OS. OS enhances the malignant potential of HCC through the stimulation of angiogenesis by activation of the Akt-VEGF pathway.

  4. Interventions for preventing oral mucositis in patients with cancer receiving treatment: cytokines and growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Philip; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Worthington, Helen V; Littlewood, Anne; Fernandez Mauleffinch, Luisa M; Clarkson, Jan E; McCabe, Martin G

    2017-11-28

    Oral mucositis is a side effect of chemotherapy, head and neck radiotherapy, and targeted therapy, affecting over 75% of high-risk patients. Ulceration can lead to severe pain and difficulty with eating and drinking, which may necessitate opioid analgesics, hospitalisation and supplemental nutrition. These complications may disrupt cancer therapy, which may reduce survival. There is also a risk of death from sepsis if pathogens enter the ulcers of immunocompromised patients. Ulcerative oral mucositis can be costly to healthcare systems, yet there are few preventive interventions proven to be beneficial. Cytokines and growth factors may help the regeneration of cells lining of the mouth, thus preventing or reducing oral mucositis and its negative effects. To assess the effects of cytokines and growth factors for preventing oral mucositis in patients with cancer who are receiving treatment. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (searched 10 May 2017); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2017, Issue 4) in the Cochrane Library (searched 10 May 2017); MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 10 May 2017); Embase Ovid (7 December 2015 to 10 May 2017); CINAHL EBSCO (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature; 1937 to 10 May 2017); and CANCERLIT PubMed (1950 to 10 May 2017). The US National Institutes of Health Ongoing Trials Register (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials. We included parallel-design randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of cytokines and growth factors in patients with cancer receiving treatment. Two review authors independently screened the results of electronic searches, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. For dichotomous outcomes, we reported risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). For continuous outcomes, we reported

  5. PEP-1-CAT-Transduced Mesenchymal Stem Cells Acquire an Enhanced Viability and Promote Ischemia-Induced Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Dong, Xiao-Wei; Wang, Jia-Ning; Tang, Jun-Ming; Yang, Jian-Ye; Guo, Ling-Yun; Zheng, Fei; Kong, Xia; Huang, Yong-Zhang; Chen, Shi-You

    2012-01-01

    Objective Poor survival of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) compromised the efficacy of stem cell therapy for ischemic diseases. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of PEP-1-CAT transduction in MSC survival and its effect on ischemia-induced angiogenesis. Methods MSC apoptosis was evaluated by DAPI staining and quantified by Annexin V and PI double staining and Flow Cytometry. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, and Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) activities were simultaneously measured. MSC mitochondrial membrane potential was analyzed with JC-1 staining. MSC survival in rat muscles with gender-mismatched transplantation of the MSC after lower limb ischemia was assessed by detecting SRY expression. MSC apoptosis in ischemic area was determined by TUNEL assay. The effect of PEP-1-CAT-transduced MSC on angiogenesis in vivo was determined in the lower limb ischemia model. Results PEP-1-CAT transduction decreased MSC apoptosis rate while down-regulating MDA content and blocking LDH release as compared to the treatment with H2O2 or CAT. However, SOD activity was up-regulated in PEP-1-CAT-transduced cells. Consistent with its effect on MSC apoptosis, PEP-1-CAT restored H2O2-attenuated mitochondrial membrane potential. Mechanistically, PEP-1-CAT blocked H2O2-induced down-regulation of PI3K/Akt activity, an essential signaling pathway regulating MSC apoptosis. In vivo, the viability of MSC implanted into ischemic area in lower limb ischemia rat model was increased by four-fold when transduced with PEP-1-CAT. Importantly, PEP-1-CAT-transduced MSC significantly enhanced ischemia-induced angiogenesis by up-regulating VEGF expression. Conclusions PEP-1-CAT-transduction was able to increase MSC viability by regulating PI3K/Akt activity, which stimulated ischemia-induced angiogenesis. PMID:23285080

  6. Nilotinib Enhances Tumor Angiogenesis and Counteracts VEGFR2 Blockade in an Orthotopic Breast Cancer Xenograft Model with Desmoplastic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Zafarnia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF/VEGF receptor (VEGFR-targeted therapies predominantly affect nascent, immature tumor vessels. Since platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR blockade inhibits vessel maturation and thus increases the amount of immature tumor vessels, we evaluated whether the combined PDGFR inhibition by nilotinib and VEGFR2 blockade by DC101 has synergistic therapy effects in a desmoplastic breast cancer xenograft model. In this context, besides immunohistological evaluation, molecular ultrasound imaging with BR55, the clinically used VEGFR2-targeted microbubbles, was applied to monitor VEGFR2-positive vessels noninvasively and to assess the therapy effects on tumor angiogenesis. DC101 treatment alone inhibited tumor angiogenesis, resulting in lower tumor growth and in significantly lower vessel density than in the control group after 14 days of therapy. In contrast, nilotinib inhibited vessel maturation but enhanced VEGFR2 expression, leading to markedly increased tumor volumes and a significantly higher vessel density. The combination of both drugs led to an almost similar tumor growth as in the DC101 treatment group, but VEGFR2 expression and microvessel density were higher and comparable to the controls. Further analyses revealed significantly higher levels of tumor cell–derived VEGF in nilotinib-treated tumors. In line with this, nilotinib, especially in low doses, induced an upregulation of VEGF and IL-6 mRNA in the tumor cells in vitro, thus providing an explanation for the enhanced angiogenesis observed in nilotinib-treated tumors in vivo. These findings suggest that nilotinib inhibits vessel maturation but counteracts the effects of antiangiogenic co-therapy by enhancing VEGF expression by the tumor cells and stimulating tumor angiogenesis.

  7. Evaluation of GX1 and RGD-GX1 peptides as new radiotracers for angiogenesis evaluation in experimental glioma models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Érica Aparecida; Faintuch, Bluma Linkowski; Targino, Roselaine Campos; Moro, Ana Maria; Martinez, Raquel Chacon Ruiz; Pagano, Rosana Lima; Fonoff, Erich Talamoni; Carneiro, Camila de Godoi; Garcez, Alexandre Teles; Faria, Daniele de Paula; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto

    2016-03-01

    Gliomas are the most common type among all central nervous system tumors. The aggressiveness of gliomas is correlated with the level of angiogenesis and is often associated with prognosis. The aim of this study is to evaluate the novel GX1 peptide and the heterodimer RGD-GX1 radiolabeled with technetium-99m, for angiogenesis detection in glioma models. Radiolabeling and radiochemical controls were assessed for both radioconjugates. In vitro binding studies in glioma tumor cells were performed, as well as biodistribution in SCID mice bearing tumor cells, in order to evaluate the biological behavior and tumor uptake of the radiocomplexes. Blocking and imaging studies were also conducted. MicroSPECT/CT images were acquired in animals with experimentally implanted intracranial tumor. Open field activity was performed to evaluate behavior, as well as perfusion and histology analysis. The radiochemical purity of both radiotracers was greater than 96 %. In vitro binding studies revealed rather similar binding profi le for each molecule. The highest binding was for RGD-GX1 peptide at 120 min in U87MG cells (1.14 ± 0.35 %). Tumor uptake was also favorable for RGD-GX1 peptide in U87MG cells, reaching 2.96 ± 0.70 % at 1 h p.i. with 47 % of blocking. Imaging studies also indicated better visualization for RGD-GX1 peptide in U87MG cells. Behavior evaluation pointed brain damage and histology studies confirmed actual tumor in the uptake site. The results with the angiogenesis seeking molecule (99m)Tc-HYNIC-E-[c(RGDfk)-c(GX1)] were successful, and better than with (99m)Tc-HYNIC-PEG4-c(GX1). Future studies targeting angiogenesis in other glioma and nonglioma tumor models are recommended.

  8. Administration of probiotic mixture DM#1 ameliorated 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis and dysbiosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yan; Wu, Yingtao; Huang, Ziyi; Dong, Weiwei; Deng, Ying; Wang, Fengjiao; Li, Ming; Yuan, Jieli

    2017-01-01

    The use of probiotics to alleviate chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis is supported by clinical consensus. However, no studies to date, to our knowledge, have systematically analyzed the effects of a probiotic mixture on chemotherapy-induced mucositis or assessed changes in the intestinal microbiota after probiotic treatment. The aim of this study was to report the effects of a probiotic mixture, DM#1, on intestinal mucositis and dysbiosis of rats treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Twenty-eight male Sprague Dawley rats weighing 180 to 220 g were randomly divided into four groups: control, 5-FU, probiotic high (PH), and probiotic low (PL). Except for the control group, all other groups received intraperitoneal injections of 5-FU for 5 d, and the PH and PL groups received DM#1 intragastrically (1 × 109 or 1 × 108 colony-forming units/kg, respectively) for 8 d. One day after the last administration, rats were sacrificed and the ilea were removed for histopathologic assessment and evaluation of permeability, myeloperoxidase activity, levels of cytokines (interleukin [IL]-4, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α), and mRNA of toll-like receptors (TLR; TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9). Additionally, intestinal microbiota profiles were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and quantitative real-time PCR. Treatment with DM#1 ameliorated 5-FU-induced intestinal mucosal injury in rats, possibly by reducing proinflammatory cytokine levels and neutrophil infiltration. The increased intestinal permeability caused by 5-FU was ameliorated. These results were closely associated with the reestablishment of intestinal microbial homeostasis and alteration of the TLR2/TLR4 signaling pathway. Administration of the probiotic mixture DM#1 ameliorated 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis and dysbiosis in rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mucositis Secondary to Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection: Expanding the Mycoplasma pneumoniae-Induced Rash and Mucositis Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor-Ibarguren, Ander; Feito-Rodriguez, Marta; González-Ramos, Jéssica; Del Rosal-Rabes, Teresa; González-Sainz, Francisco Javier; Sánchez-Orta, Alba; de Lucas-Laguna, Raul

    2017-07-01

    The term Mycoplasma pneumoniae-induced rash and mucositis (MIRM) was recently proposed to identify the mucocutaneous condition secondary to M. pneumoniae infection that had historically been regarded among the more confusing pathologies of erythema multiforme and Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Based on a number of previous reports, these syndromes require differentiation since they have different prognoses and specific treatment requirements. We report a case of oral and genital erosions that strongly resembled MIRM without rash but were found to be secondary to a Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. After a thorough review of the literature on this subject, we propose that C. pneumoniae should also be considered a potential causative agent of MIRM and that this term should be amended to include C. pneumoniae infection. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Prevalence of Oral Mucosal Lesions in Patients with Dermatological Diseases Attending Tertiary Care Hospital in Central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Shivakumar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The oral cavity is a unique environment where systemic maladies may be amplified by the oral mucosa. Sometimes, oral lesions are the first indication of a systemic problem. Oral mucosal lesions may be the initial feature or the only clinical sign of mucocutaneous diseases commonly observed in a dermatologic practice. Aim and Objectives: To assess the frequency of the oral manifestations in patients who suffer from dermatologic diseases, emphasizing the aspects referring to their, sex and age of the patients. Material and Methods:A cross sectional hospital-based study was carried out focusing on patients with skin lesions, for data gathering only patients included in the research were clinically examined aiming at identifying oral and cuteneous alterations. Information was recorded in individual clinical cards, as well as personal information, health conditions, family diseases and current and previous diseases. The structured interview was done in the local language containing questions regarding socio-demographics (gender, age, education and occupation general and oral health related characteristics and lifestyle. Results: In our study, the prevalence rate of oral mucosal lesions in patients with dermatological diseases is relatively low (94/489. Our study results showed that there is a positive correlation of oral manifestations with their respective dermatological diseases Conclusion: Oral mucosal lesions in skin diseases deserve special attention, Documenting the frequency of oral mucosal lesions in dermatological diseases may alert the dental surgeons and gives scope for early diagnosis and progress for such diseases and a multidisciplinary approach

  11. Chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients: new trends in pathophysiology, prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensadoun, R J; Magné, N; Marcy, P Y; Demard, F

    2001-11-01

    Mucositis is the intensity-limiting toxicity in the management of locally advanced non-resectable head and neck cancer with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. New radiation modalities (hyperfractionation and/or acceleration) as well as combined modality regimens in this situation induce higher rates of acute toxicity. Hyperfractionation, for example, allows higher control rates, with few late toxicities, but it slightly increases acute mucositis. The addition of chemotherapy introduces systemic toxicity and can exacerbate local tissue reactions when used concurrently with radiotherapy. Mucositis is recognized as the principal limiting factor to further treatment intensification. As local regional control and overall survival are related to dose-intensity in this case, further research into the assessment, analysis, prevention and treatment of mucosal toxicity is not only crucial to improvement in quality of life, but certainly also to improved rates of disease control. Several topical and systemic treatments are directed to the decrease and the acceptance of this acute toxicity, but few have shown a significant preventive effect. The efficacy of low-level laser therapy in the management of such toxicity could hence yield important developments with this method in the field of oncology.

  12. Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies Display Potential for Prevention of HIV-1 Infection of Mucosal Tissue Superior to That of Nonneutralizing Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheeseman, Hannah M; Olejniczak, Natalia J; Rogers, Paul M; Evans, Abbey B; King, Deborah F L; Ziprin, Paul; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Shattock, Robin J

    2017-01-01

    been defined. While bnAbs are highly effective against cell-free virus, they are not induced by current vaccine candidates. However, nnAbs, readily induced by vaccines, can trigger antibody-dependent cellular effector functions, through engagement of their Fc-gamma receptors. Fc-mediated antiviral activity has been implicated as a secondary correlate of decreased HIV-1 risk in the RV144 vaccine efficacy trial, suggesting that protection might be mediated in the absence of classical neutralization. To aid vaccine design and selection of antibodies for use in passive protection strategies, we assessed a range of bnAbs and nnAbs for their potential to block ex vivo challenge of mucosal tissues. Our data clearly indicate the superior efficacy of neutralizing antibodies in preventing mucosal acquisition of infection. These results underscore the importance of maintaining the central focus of HIV-1 vaccine research on the induction of potently neutralizing antibodies. Copyright © 2016 Cheeseman et al.

  13. Ginseng on Cancer: Potential Role in Modulating Inflammation-Mediated Angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Daisy; Zhang, Chun-Feng; Williams, Stephanie; Yuan, Chun-Su; Wang, Chong-Zhi

    2017-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a regulated process integral to many physiological and pathological situations, including carcinogenesis and tumor growth. The majority of the angiogenic processes are related to inflammation. The interplay is not only important in the case of pathogen entry but also influential in chronic inflammatory diseases, tumor growth and tissue regeneration. Modulating the interaction between inflammation and