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  1. Regulating DNA Self-assembly by DNA-Surface Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longfei; Li, Yulin; Wang, Yong; Zheng, Jianwei; Mao, Chengde

    2017-12-14

    DNA self-assembly provides a powerful approach for preparation of nanostructures. It is often studied in bulk solution and involves only DNA-DNA interactions. When confined to surfaces, DNA-surface interactions become an additional, important factor to DNA self-assembly. However, the way in which DNA-surface interactions influence DNA self-assembly is not well studied. In this study, we showed that weak DNA-DNA interactions could be stabilized by DNA-surface interactions to allow large DNA nanostructures to form. In addition, the assembly can be conducted isothermally at room temperature in as little as 5 seconds. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. ex vivo DNA assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B Fisher

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Even with decreasing DNA synthesis costs there remains a need for inexpensive, rapid and reliable methods for assembling synthetic DNA into larger constructs or combinatorial libraries. Advances in cloning techniques have resulted in powerful in vitro and in vivo assembly of DNA. However, monetary and time costs have limited these approaches. Here, we report an ex vivo DNA assembly method that uses cellular lysates derived from a commonly used laboratory strain of Escherichia coli for joining double-stranded DNA with short end homologies embedded within inexpensive primers. This method concurrently shortens the time and decreases costs associated with current DNA assembly methods.

  3. Proximity hybridization-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assembly for electrochemical immunoassay based on in situ DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Fuyi [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical College, 221004, Xuzhou (China); Yao, Yao; Luo, Jianjun; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Dengyang [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical College, 221004, Xuzhou (China); Gao, Fenglei, E-mail: jsxzgfl@sina.com [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical College, 221004, Xuzhou (China); Wang, Po, E-mail: wangpo@jsnu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China)

    2017-05-29

    Novel hybridization proximity-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assembly strategy has been proposed for electrochemical immunoassay based on in situ DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles as signal label. The DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles were characterized with atomic force microscopic and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The highly efficient electrocatalysis by DNA template synthesized Pd nanoparticles for NaBH{sub 4} oxidation produced an intense detection signal. The label-free electrochemical method achieved the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) with a linear range from 10{sup −15} to 10{sup −11} g mL{sup −1} and a detection limit of 0.43 × 10{sup −15} g mL{sup −1}. Through introducing a supersandwich reaction to increase the DNA length, the electrochemical signal was further amplified, leading to a detection limit of 0.52 × 10{sup −16} g mL{sup −1}. And it rendered satisfactory analytical performance for the determination of CEA in serum samples. Furthermore, it exhibited good reproducibility and stability; meanwhile, it also showed excellent specificity due to the specific recognition of antigen by antibody. Therefore, the DNA template synthesized Pd nanoparticles based signal amplification approach has great potential in clinical applications and is also suitable for quantification of biomarkers at ultralow level. - Graphical abstract: A novel label-free and enzyme-free electrochemical immunoassay based on proximity hybridization-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assemblies for recycling of the CEA. - Highlights: • A novel enzyme-free electrochemical immunosensor was developed for detection of CEA. • The signal amplification was based on catalytic DNA hairpin assembly and DNA-template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles. • The biosensor could detect CEA down to 0.52 × 10{sup −16} g mL{sup −1} level with a dynamic range spanning 5 orders of magnitude.

  4. The Role of the N-Terminal Domains of Bacterial Initiator DnaA in the Assembly and Regulation of the Bacterial Replication Initiation Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawilak-Pawlik, Anna; Nowaczyk, Małgorzata; Zakrzewska-Czerwińska, Jolanta

    2017-01-01

    The primary role of the bacterial protein DnaA is to initiate chromosomal replication. The DnaA protein binds to DNA at the origin of chromosomal replication (oriC) and assembles into a filament that unwinds double-stranded DNA. Through interaction with various other proteins, DnaA also controls the frequency and/or timing of chromosomal replication at the initiation step. Escherichia coli DnaA also recruits DnaB helicase, which is present in unwound single-stranded DNA and in turn recruits other protein machinery for replication. Additionally, DnaA regulates the expression of certain genes in E. coli and a few other species. Acting as a multifunctional factor, DnaA is composed of four domains that have distinct, mutually dependent roles. For example, C-terminal domain IV interacts with double-stranded DnaA boxes. Domain III drives ATP-dependent oligomerization, allowing the protein to form a filament that unwinds DNA and subsequently binds to and stabilizes single-stranded DNA in the initial replication bubble; this domain also interacts with multiple proteins that control oligomerization. Domain II constitutes a flexible linker between C-terminal domains III–IV and N-terminal domain I, which mediates intermolecular interactions between DnaA and binds to other proteins that affect DnaA activity and/or formation of the initiation complex. Of these four domains, the role of the N-terminus (domains I–II) in the assembly of the initiation complex is the least understood and appears to be the most species-dependent region of the protein. Thus, in this review, we focus on the function of the N-terminus of DnaA in orisome formation and the regulation of its activity in the initiation complex in different bacteria. PMID:28489024

  5. Method to Assemble Genomic DNA Fragments or Genes on Human Artificial Chromosome with Regulated Kinetochore Using a Multi-Integrase System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nicholas C O; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Petrov, Nikolai S; Lee, Hee-Sheung; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Earnshaw, William C; Larionov, Vladimir; Kouprina, Natalay

    2018-01-19

    The production of cells capable of carrying multiple transgenes to Mb-size genomic loci has multiple applications in biomedicine and biotechnology. In order to achieve this goal, three key steps are required: (i) cloning of large genomic segments; (ii) insertion of multiple DNA blocks at a precise location and (iii) the capability to eliminate the assembled region from cells. In this study, we designed the iterative integration system (IIS) that utilizes recombinases Cre, ΦC31 and ΦBT1, and combined it with a human artificial chromosome (HAC) possessing a regulated kinetochore (alphoid tetO -HAC). We have demonstrated that the IIS-alphoid tetO -HAC system is a valuable genetic tool by reassembling a functional gene from multiple segments on the HAC. IIS-alphoid tetO -HAC has several notable advantages over other artificial chromosome-based systems. This includes the potential to assemble an unlimited number of genomic DNA segments; a DNA assembly process that leaves only a small insertion (system that also changes cell color, and counter-selection markers at each DNA insertion step, simplifying selection of correct clones; and presence of an error proofing mechanism to remove cells with misincorporated DNA segments, which improves the integrity of assembly. In addition, the IIS-alphoid tetO -HAC carrying a locus of interest is removable, offering the unique possibility to revert the cell line to its pretransformed state and compare the phenotypes of human cells with and without a functional copy of a gene(s). Thus, IIS-alphoid tetO -HAC allows investigation of complex biomedical pathways, gene(s) regulation, and has the potential to engineer synthetic chromosomes with a predetermined set of genes.

  6. DNA-guided nanoparticle assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Oleg; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Maye, Mathew; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2013-07-16

    In some embodiments, DNA-capped nanoparticles are used to define a degree of crystalline order in assemblies thereof. In some embodiments, thermodynamically reversible and stable body-centered cubic (bcc) structures, with particles occupying <.about.10% of the unit cell, are formed. Designs and pathways amenable to the crystallization of particle assemblies are identified. In some embodiments, a plasmonic crystal is provided. In some aspects, a method for controlling the properties of particle assemblages is provided. In some embodiments a catalyst is formed from nanoparticles linked by nucleic acid sequences and forming an open crystal structure with catalytically active agents attached to the crystal on its surface or in interstices.

  7. Quantifying quality in DNA self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenbauer, Klaus F.; Wachauf, Christian H.; Dietz, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly with DNA is an attractive route for building nanoscale devices. The development of sophisticated and precise objects with this technique requires detailed experimental feedback on the structure and composition of assembled objects. Here we report a sensitive assay for the quality of assembly. The method relies on measuring the content of unpaired DNA bases in self-assembled DNA objects using a fluorescent de-Bruijn probe for three-base ‘codons’, which enables a comparison with the designed content of unpaired DNA. We use the assay to measure the quality of assembly of several multilayer DNA origami objects and illustrate the use of the assay for the rational refinement of assembly protocols. Our data suggests that large and complex objects like multilayer DNA origami can be made with high strand integration quality up to 99%. Beyond DNA nanotechnology, we speculate that the ability to discriminate unpaired from paired nucleic acids in the same macromolecule may also be useful for analysing cellular nucleic acids. PMID:24751596

  8. DNA-templated assembly of nanoscale architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanca, Sarmiza Elena; Ongaro, Andrea; Eritja, Ramon; Fitzmaurice, Donald

    2005-09-01

    The assembly and detailed structural characterization of a Y-shaped DNA template incorporating a central biotin moiety is reported. Also reported is the use of this template to assemble a model protein-functionalized three-electrode architecture. Of particular significance is the finding that a biotin-modified nanoparticle will recognize and selectively bind the central biotin moiety, once functionalized by the protein streptavidin. Potential applications of the above and related DNA templates in the emerging field of nanoelectronics are considered.

  9. DNA controlled assembly of soft nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Stefan; Simonsen, Adam Cohen; Jakobsen, Ulla

    2008-01-01

    DNA-encoding of solid nanoparticles requires surfacechemistry, which is often tedious and not generally applicable. In the present study non-covalently attached DNA are used to assemble soft nanoparticles (liposomes) in solution. This process displays remarkably sharp thermal transitions from ass...

  10. Terminating DNA Tile Assembly with Nanostructured Caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Deepak K; Jiang, Ruoyu; Reinhart, Seth; Mohammed, Abdul M; Jorgenson, Tyler D; Schulman, Rebecca

    2017-10-24

    Precise control over the nucleation, growth, and termination of self-assembly processes is a fundamental tool for controlling product yield and assembly dynamics. Mechanisms for altering these processes programmatically could allow the use of simple components to self-assemble complex final products or to design processes allowing for dynamic assembly or reconfiguration. Here we use DNA tile self-assembly to develop general design principles for building complexes that can bind to a growing biomolecular assembly and terminate its growth by systematically characterizing how different DNA origami nanostructures interact with the growing ends of DNA tile nanotubes. We find that nanostructures that present binding interfaces for all of the binding sites on a growing facet can bind selectively to growing ends and stop growth when these interfaces are presented on either a rigid or floppy scaffold. In contrast, nucleation of nanotubes requires the presentation of binding sites in an arrangement that matches the shape of the structure's facet. As a result, it is possible to build nanostructures that can terminate the growth of existing nanotubes but cannot nucleate a new structure. The resulting design principles for constructing structures that direct nucleation and termination of the growth of one-dimensional nanostructures can also serve as a starting point for programmatically directing two- and three-dimensional crystallization processes using nanostructure design.

  11. DNA-nanostructure-assembly by sequential spotting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breitenstein Michael

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to create nanostructures with biomolecules is one of the key elements in nanobiotechnology. One of the problems is the expensive and mostly custom made equipment which is needed for their development. We intended to reduce material costs and aimed at miniaturization of the necessary tools that are essential for nanofabrication. Thus we combined the capabilities of molecular ink lithography with DNA-self-assembling capabilities to arrange DNA in an independent array which allows addressing molecules in nanoscale dimensions. Results For the construction of DNA based nanostructures a method is presented that allows an arrangement of DNA strands in such a way that they can form a grid that only depends on the spotted pattern of the anchor molecules. An atomic force microscope (AFM has been used for molecular ink lithography to generate small spots. The sequential spotting process allows the immobilization of several different functional biomolecules with a single AFM-tip. This grid which delivers specific addresses for the prepared DNA-strand serves as a two-dimensional anchor to arrange the sequence according to the pattern. Once the DNA-nanoarray has been formed, it can be functionalized by PNA (peptide nucleic acid to incorporate advanced structures. Conclusions The production of DNA-nanoarrays is a promising task for nanobiotechnology. The described method allows convenient and low cost preparation of nanoarrays. PNA can be used for complex functionalization purposes as well as a structural element.

  12. DNA origami as a nanoscale template for protein assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzyk, Anton; Laitinen, Kimmo T; Toermae, Paeivi

    2009-01-01

    We describe two general approaches to the utilization of DNA origami structures for the assembly of materials. In one approach, DNA origami is used as a prefabricated template for subsequent assembly of materials. In the other, materials are assembled simultaneously with the DNA origami, i.e. the DNA origami technique is used to drive the assembly of materials. Fabrication of complex protein structures is demonstrated by these two approaches. The latter approach has the potential to be extended to the assembly of multiple materials with single attachment chemistry.

  13. DNA Assembly in 3D Printed Fluidics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G Patrick

    Full Text Available The process of connecting genetic parts-DNA assembly-is a foundational technology for synthetic biology. Microfluidics present an attractive solution for minimizing use of costly reagents, enabling multiplexed reactions, and automating protocols by integrating multiple protocol steps. However, microfluidics fabrication and operation can be expensive and requires expertise, limiting access to the technology. With advances in commodity digital fabrication tools, it is now possible to directly print fluidic devices and supporting hardware. 3D printed micro- and millifluidic devices are inexpensive, easy to make and quick to produce. We demonstrate Golden Gate DNA assembly in 3D-printed fluidics with reaction volumes as small as 490 nL, channel widths as fine as 220 microns, and per unit part costs ranging from $0.61 to $5.71. A 3D-printed syringe pump with an accompanying programmable software interface was designed and fabricated to operate the devices. Quick turnaround and inexpensive materials allowed for rapid exploration of device parameters, demonstrating a manufacturing paradigm for designing and fabricating hardware for synthetic biology.

  14. Biophysical Regulation of Vascular Differentiation and Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Gerecht, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    The ability to grow stem cells in the laboratory and to guide their maturation to functional cells allows us to study the underlying mechanisms that govern vasculature differentiation and assembly in health and disease. Accumulating evidence suggests that early stages of vascular growth are exquisitely tuned by biophysical cues from the microenvironment, yet the scientific understanding of such cellular environments is still in its infancy. Comprehending these processes sufficiently to manipulate them would pave the way to controlling blood vessel growth in therapeutic applications. This book assembles the works and views of experts from various disciplines to provide a unique perspective on how different aspects of its microenvironment regulate the differentiation and assembly of the vasculature. In particular, it describes recent efforts to exploit modern engineering techniques to study and manipulate various biophysical cues. Biophysical Regulation of Vascular Differentiation and Assembly provides an inter...

  15. Mic60/Mitofilin determines MICOS assembly essential for mitochondrial dynamics and mtDNA nucleoid organization

    OpenAIRE

    Li, H; Ruan, Y; Zhang, K; Jian, F; Hu, C; Miao, L; Gong, L; Sun, L; Zhang, X; Chen, S; Chen, H; Liu, D; Song, Z

    2015-01-01

    The MICOS complex (mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system) is essential for mitochondrial inner membrane organization and mitochondrial membrane contacts, however, the molecular regulation of MICOS assembly and the physiological functions of MICOS in mammals remain obscure. Here, we report that Mic60/Mitofilin has a critical role in the MICOS assembly, which determines the mitochondrial morphology and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) organization. The downregulati...

  16. Circuits and programmable self-assembling DNA structures

    OpenAIRE

    Carbone, Alessandra; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2002-01-01

    Self-assembly is beginning to be seen as a practical vehicle for computation. We investigate how basic ideas on tiling can be applied to the assembly and evaluation of circuits. We suggest that these procedures can be realized on the molecular scale through the medium of self-assembled DNA tiles. One layer of self-assembled DNA tiles will be used as the program or circuit that leads to the computation of a particular Boolean expression. This layer templates the assembly of tiles, and their as...

  17. Size-controllable DNA nanoribbons assembled from three types of reusable brick single-strand DNA tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaolong; Chen, Congzhou; Li, Xin; Song, Tao; Chen, Zhihua; Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Yanfeng

    2015-11-21

    Precise control of nanostructure is a significant goal shared by supramolecular chemistry, nanotechnology and materials science. In DNA nanotechnology, methods of constructing desired DNA nanostructures using programmable DNA strands have been studied extensively and have become a promising branch of research, but developing universal and low-cost (in the sense of using fewer types of DNA strands) methods remains a challenge. In this work, we propose a novel approach to assemble size-controllable DNA nanoribbons with three types of reusable brick SSTs (single-stranded DNA tiles), where the control of ribbon size is achieved by regulating the concentration ratio between manipulative strands and packed single-stranded DNA tiles. In our method, three types of brick SSTs are sufficient in assembling DNA nanoribbons of different sizes, which is much less than the number of types of unique tile-programmable assembling strategy, thus achieving a universal and low-cost method. The assembled DNA nanoribbons are observed and analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Experimental observations strongly suggest the feasibility and reliability of our method.

  18. Directed self-assembly of DNA tiles into complex nanocages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Cheng; Li, Xiang; Liu, Zhiyu; Jiang, Wen; Wang, Guansong; Mao, Chengde

    2014-07-28

    Tile-based self-assembly is a powerful method in DNA nanotechnology and has produced a wide range of well-defined nanostructures. But the resulting structures are relatively simple. Increasing the structural complexity and the scope of the accessible structures is an outstanding challenge in molecular self-assembly. A strategy to partially address this problem by introducing flexibility into assembling DNA tiles and employing directing agents to control the self-assembly process is presented. To demonstrate this strategy, a range of DNA nanocages have been rationally designed and constructed. Many of them can not be assembled otherwise. All of the resulting structures have been thoroughly characterized by gel electrophoresis and cryogenic electron microscopy. This strategy greatly expands the scope of accessible DNA nanostructures and would facilitate technological applications such as nanoguest encapsulation, drug delivery, and nanoparticle organization. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Phase behavior and selectivity of DNA-linked nanoparticle assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukatsky, D.B.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a model that can account for the experimentally observed phase behavior of DNA-nanoparticle assemblies [R. Jin et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 125, 1643 (2003); T. A. Taton et al., Science 289, 1757 (2000)]. The binding of DNA-coated nanoparticles by dissolved DNA linkers can be described by

  20. Assembly of DNA Architectures in a Non-Aqueous Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    templated semiconductor nanocrystal growth for controlled DNA packing and gene delivery. ACS Nano 2012, 6, 689–695. 21. Zang, D.Y.; Grote, J. DNA...189–212. 23. Séverac, F.; Alphonse, P.; Estève, A.; Bancaud, A.; Rossi, C. High-energy Al/ Cuo nanocomposites obtained by DNA-directed assembly. Adv

  1. pH-Controlled Assembly of DNA Tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodio, Alessia; Adedeji, Abimbola Feyisara; Castronovo, Matteo; Franco, Elisa; Ricci, Francesco

    2016-10-05

    We demonstrate a strategy to trigger and finely control the assembly of supramolecular DNA nanostructures with pH. Control is achieved via a rationally designed strand displacement circuit that responds to pH and activates a downstream DNA tile self-assembly process. We observe that the DNA structures form under neutral/basic conditions, while the self-assembly process is suppressed under acidic conditions. The strategy presented here demonstrates a modular approach toward building systems capable of processing biochemical inputs and finely controlling the assembly of DNA-based nanostructures under isothermal conditions. In particular, the presented architecture is relevant for the development of complex DNA devices able to sense and respond to molecular markers associated with abnormal metabolism.

  2. DNA-Controlled Assembly of Soft Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the emerging topic of DNA nanotechnology and DNA supramolecular chemistry in its broader sense. By taking DNA out of its biological role, this biomolecule has become a very versatile building block in materials chemistry, supramolecular chemistry and bio-nanotechnology. Many nove......-covalent systems, DNA origami, DNA based switches, DNA machines, and alternative structures and templates. This broad coverage is very appealing since it combines both the synthesis of modified DNA as well as designer concepts to successfully plan and make DNA nanostructures....

  3. Automated Robotic Liquid Handling Assembly of Modular DNA Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Luis; Pavan, Marilene; McCarthy, Lloyd; Timmons, Joshua; Densmore, Douglas M

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances in modular DNA assembly techniques have enabled synthetic biologists to test significantly more of the available "design space" represented by "devices" created as combinations of individual genetic components. However, manual assembly of such large numbers of devices is time-intensive, error-prone, and costly. The increasing sophistication and scale of synthetic biology research necessitates an efficient, reproducible way to accommodate large-scale, complex, and high throughput device construction. Here, a DNA assembly protocol using the Type-IIS restriction endonuclease based Modular Cloning (MoClo) technique is automated on two liquid-handling robotic platforms. Automated liquid-handling robots require careful, often times tedious optimization of pipetting parameters for liquids of different viscosities (e.g. enzymes, DNA, water, buffers), as well as explicit programming to ensure correct aspiration and dispensing of DNA parts and reagents. This makes manual script writing for complex assemblies just as problematic as manual DNA assembly, and necessitates a software tool that can automate script generation. To this end, we have developed a web-based software tool, http://mocloassembly.com, for generating combinatorial DNA device libraries from basic DNA parts uploaded as Genbank files. We provide access to the tool, and an export file from our liquid handler software which includes optimized liquid classes, labware parameters, and deck layout. All DNA parts used are available through Addgene, and their digital maps can be accessed via the Boston University BDC ICE Registry. Together, these elements provide a foundation for other organizations to automate modular cloning experiments and similar protocols. The automated DNA assembly workflow presented here enables the repeatable, automated, high-throughput production of DNA devices, and reduces the risk of human error arising from repetitive manual pipetting. Sequencing data show the automated DNA

  4. Physical principles for DNA tile self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Constantine G; Winfree, Erik

    2017-06-19

    DNA tiles provide a promising technique for assembling structures with nanoscale resolution through self-assembly by basic interactions rather than top-down assembly of individual structures. Tile systems can be programmed to grow based on logical rules, allowing for a small number of tile types to assemble large, complex assemblies that can retain nanoscale resolution. Such algorithmic systems can even assemble different structures using the same tiles, based on inputs that seed the growth. While programming and theoretical analysis of tile self-assembly often makes use of abstract logical models of growth, experimentally implemented systems are governed by nanoscale physical processes that can lead to very different behavior, more accurately modeled by taking into account the thermodynamics and kinetics of tile attachment and detachment in solution. This review discusses the relationships between more abstract and more physically realistic tile assembly models. A central concern is how consideration of model differences enables the design of tile systems that robustly exhibit the desired abstract behavior in realistic physical models and in experimental implementations. Conversely, we identify situations where self-assembly in abstract models can not be well-approximated by physically realistic models, putting constraints on physical relevance of the abstract models. To facilitate the discussion, we introduce a unified model of tile self-assembly that clarifies the relationships between several well-studied models in the literature. Throughout, we highlight open questions regarding the physical principles for DNA tile self-assembly.

  5. Mic60/Mitofilin determines MICOS assembly essential for mitochondrial dynamics and mtDNA nucleoid organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Ruan, Y; Zhang, K; Jian, F; Hu, C; Miao, L; Gong, L; Sun, L; Zhang, X; Chen, S; Chen, H; Liu, D; Song, Z

    2016-03-01

    The MICOS complex (mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system) is essential for mitochondrial inner membrane organization and mitochondrial membrane contacts, however, the molecular regulation of MICOS assembly and the physiological functions of MICOS in mammals remain obscure. Here, we report that Mic60/Mitofilin has a critical role in the MICOS assembly, which determines the mitochondrial morphology and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) organization. The downregulation of Mic60/Mitofilin or Mic19/CHCHD3 results in instability of other MICOS components, disassembly of MICOS complex and disorganized mitochondrial cristae. We show that there exists direct interaction between Mic60/Mitofilin and Mic19/CHCHD3, which is crucial for their stabilization in mammals. Importantly, we identified that the mitochondrial i-AAA protease Yme1L regulates Mic60/Mitofilin homeostasis. Impaired MICOS assembly causes the formation of 'giant mitochondria' because of dysregulated mitochondrial fusion and fission. Also, mtDNA nucleoids are disorganized and clustered in these giant mitochondria in which mtDNA transcription is attenuated because of remarkable downregulation of some key mtDNA nucleoid-associated proteins. Together, these findings demonstrate that Mic60/Mitofilin homeostasis regulated by Yme1L is central to the MICOS assembly, which is required for maintenance of mitochondrial morphology and organization of mtDNA nucleoids.

  6. Modified Classical Graph Algorithms for the DNA Fragment Assembly Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo M. Mallén-Fullerton

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA fragment assembly represents an important challenge to the development of efficient and practical algorithms due to the large number of elements to be assembled. In this study, we present some graph theoretical linear time algorithms to solve the problem. To achieve linear time complexity, a heap with constant time operations was developed, for the special case where the edge weights are integers and do not depend on the problem size. The experiments presented show that modified classical graph theoretical algorithms can solve the DNA fragment assembly problem efficiently.

  7. DNA-Based Self-Assembly of Fluorescent Nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Neumann, Andre; Lindlau, Jessica; Wu, Yuzhou; Pramanik, Goutam; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor; Schüder, Florian; Huber, Sebastian; Huber, Marinus; Stehr, Florian; Högele, Alexander; Weil, Tanja; Liedl, Tim

    2015-08-12

    As a step toward deterministic and scalable assembly of ordered spin arrays we here demonstrate a bottom-up approach to position fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) with nanometer precision on DNA origami structures. We have realized a reliable and broadly applicable surface modification strategy that results in DNA-functionalized and perfectly dispersed NDs that were then self-assembled in predefined geometries. With optical studies we show that the fluorescence properties of the nitrogen-vacancy color centers in NDs are preserved during surface modification and DNA assembly. As this method allows the nanoscale arrangement of fluorescent NDs together with other optically active components in complex geometries, applications based on self-assembled spin lattices or plasmon-enhanced spin sensors as well as improved fluorescent labeling for bioimaging could be envisioned.

  8. Directed Formation of DNA Nanoarrays through Orthogonal Self-Assembly

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    Eugen Stulz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe the synthesis of terpyridine modified DNA strands which selectively form DNA nanotubes through orthogonal hydrogen bonding and metal complexation interactions. The short DNA strands are designed to self-assemble into long duplexes through a sticky-end approach. Addition of weakly binding metals such as Zn(II and Ni(II induces the formation of tubular arrays consisting of DNA bundles which are 50-200 nm wide and 2-50 nm high. TEM shows additional long distance ordering of the terpy-DNA complexes into fibers.

  9. Gigadalton-scale shape-programmable DNA assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenbauer, Klaus F.; Sigl, Christian; Dietz, Hendrik

    2017-12-01

    Natural biomolecular assemblies such as molecular motors, enzymes, viruses and subcellular structures often form by self-limiting hierarchical oligomerization of multiple subunits. Large structures can also assemble efficiently from a few components by combining hierarchical assembly and symmetry, a strategy exemplified by viral capsids. De novo protein design and RNA and DNA nanotechnology aim to mimic these capabilities, but the bottom-up construction of artificial structures with the dimensions and complexity of viruses and other subcellular components remains challenging. Here we show that natural assembly principles can be combined with the methods of DNA origami to produce gigadalton-scale structures with controlled sizes. DNA sequence information is used to encode the shapes of individual DNA origami building blocks, and the geometry and details of the interactions between these building blocks then control their copy numbers, positions and orientations within higher-order assemblies. We illustrate this strategy by creating planar rings of up to 350 nanometres in diameter and with atomic masses of up to 330 megadaltons, micrometre-long, thick tubes commensurate in size to some bacilli, and three-dimensional polyhedral assemblies with sizes of up to 1.2 gigadaltons and 450 nanometres in diameter. We achieve efficient assembly, with yields of up to 90 per cent, by using building blocks with validated structure and sufficient rigidity, and an accurate design with interaction motifs that ensure that hierarchical assembly is self-limiting and able to proceed in equilibrium to allow for error correction. We expect that our method, which enables the self-assembly of structures with sizes approaching that of viruses and cellular organelles, can readily be used to create a range of other complex structures with well defined sizes, by exploiting the modularity and high degree of addressability of the DNA origami building blocks used.

  10. Integrating DNA strand-displacement circuitry with DNA tile self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, David Yu; Hariadi, Rizal F.; Choi, Harry M.T.; Winfree, Erik

    2013-01-01

    DNA nanotechnology has emerged as a reliable and programmable way of controlling matter at the nanoscale through the specificity of Watson–Crick base pairing, allowing both complex self-assembled structures with nanometer precision and complex reaction networks implementing digital and analog behaviors. Here we show how two well-developed frameworks, DNA tile self-assembly and DNA strand-displacement circuits, can be systematically integrated to provide programmable kinetic control of self-assembly. We demonstrate the triggered and catalytic isothermal self-assembly of DNA nanotubes over 10 μm long from precursor DNA double-crossover tiles activated by an upstream DNA catalyst network. Integrating more sophisticated control circuits and tile systems could enable precise spatial and temporal organization of dynamic molecular structures. PMID:23756381

  11. Assembly of DNA Architectures in a Non-Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Proctor

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the procedures for the creation of self-assembled DNA nanostructures in aqueous and non-aqueous media are described. DNA-Surfactant complex formation renders the DNA soluble in organic solvents offering an exciting way to bridge the transition of DNA origami materials electronics applications. The DNA retains its structural features, and these unique geometries provide an interesting candidate for future electronics and nanofabrication applications with potential for new properties. The DNA architectures were first assembled under aqueous conditions, and then characterized in solution (using circular dichroism (CD spectroscopy and on the surface (using atomic force microscopy (AFM. Following aqueous assembly, the DNA nanostructures were transitioned to a non-aqueous environment, where butanol was chosen for optical compatibility and thermal properties. The retention of DNA hierarchical structure and thermal stability in non-aqueous conditions were confirmed via CD spectroscopy. The formation and characterization of these higher order DNA-surfactant complexes is described in this paper.

  12. Coupling mechanisms between nucleosome assembly and the cellular response to DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lautrette, Aurelie

    2006-01-01

    Cells are continuously exposed to genotoxic stresses that induce a variety of DNA lesions. To protect their genome, cells have specific pathways that orchestrate the detection, signaling and repair of DNA damages. This work is dedicated to the characterization of such pathways that couple the DNA damage response to the assembly of chromatin, a complex that protects and regulates DNA accessibility. We have focused our study on two multifunctional proteins: Rad53, a central checkpoint kinase in the cellular response to DNA damage and Asf1, a histone chaperone involved in chromatin assembly. We have characterized in vitro the binding mode of Asf1 with Rad53 and Asfl with histones. This study is associated with the functional analysis of the role of these interactions in vivo in yeast cells. (author) [fr

  13. Mobius Assembly: A versatile Golden-Gate framework towards universal DNA assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas I Andreou

    Full Text Available Synthetic biology builds upon the foundation of engineering principles, prompting innovation and improvement in biotechnology via a design-build-test-learn cycle. A community-wide standard in DNA assembly would enable bio-molecular engineering at the levels of predictivity and universality in design and construction that are comparable to other engineering fields. Golden Gate Assembly technology, with its robust capability to unidirectionally assemble numerous DNA fragments in a one-tube reaction, has the potential to deliver a universal standard framework for DNA assembly. While current Golden Gate Assembly frameworks (e.g. MoClo and Golden Braid render either high cloning capacity or vector toolkit simplicity, the technology can be made more versatile-simple, streamlined, and cost/labor-efficient, without compromising capacity. Here we report the development of a new Golden Gate Assembly framework named Mobius Assembly, which combines vector toolkit simplicity with high cloning capacity. It is based on a two-level, hierarchical approach and utilizes a low-frequency cutter to reduce domestication requirements. Mobius Assembly embraces the standard overhang designs designated by MoClo, Golden Braid, and Phytobricks and is largely compatible with already available Golden Gate part libraries. In addition, dropout cassettes encoding chromogenic proteins were implemented for cost-free visible cloning screening that color-code different cloning levels. As proofs of concept, we have successfully assembled up to 16 transcriptional units of various pigmentation genes in both operon and multigene arrangements. Taken together, Mobius Assembly delivers enhanced versatility and efficiency in DNA assembly, facilitating improved standardization and automation.

  14. Phase Transition and Optical Properties of DNA-Gold Nanoparticle Assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Young; Harris, Nolan C.; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2007-01-01

    We review recent work on DNA-linked gold nanoparticle assemblies. The synthesis, properties, and phase behavior of such DNA-gold nanoparticle assemblies are described. These nanoparticle assemblies have strong optical extinction in the ultraviolet and visible light regions; hence, the technique is used to study the kinetics and phase transitions of DNA-gold nanoparticle assemblies. The melting transition of DNA-gold nanoparticle assemblies shows unusual trends compared to those of free DNA. T...

  15. Programmable DNA scaffolds for spatially-ordered protein assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard

    2016-02-01

    Ever since the notion of using DNA as a material was realized, it has been employed in the construction of complex structures that facilitate the assembly of nanoparticles or macromolecules with nanometer-scale precision. Specifically, tiles fashioned from DNA strands and DNA origami sheets have been shown to be suitable as scaffolds for immobilizing proteins with excellent control over their spatial positioning. Supramolecular assembly of proteins into periodic arrays in one or more dimensions is one of the most challenging aspects in the design of scaffolds for biomolecular investigations and macromolecular crystallization. This review provides a brief overview of how various biomolecular interactions with high degree of specificity such as streptavidin-biotin, antigen-antibody, and aptamer-protein interactions have been used to fabricate linear and multidimensional assemblies of structurally intact and functional proteins. The use of DNA-binding proteins as adaptors, polyamide recognition on DNA scaffolds and oligonucleotide linkers for protein assembly are also discussed.Ever since the notion of using DNA as a material was realized, it has been employed in the construction of complex structures that facilitate the assembly of nanoparticles or macromolecules with nanometer-scale precision. Specifically, tiles fashioned from DNA strands and DNA origami sheets have been shown to be suitable as scaffolds for immobilizing proteins with excellent control over their spatial positioning. Supramolecular assembly of proteins into periodic arrays in one or more dimensions is one of the most challenging aspects in the design of scaffolds for biomolecular investigations and macromolecular crystallization. This review provides a brief overview of how various biomolecular interactions with high degree of specificity such as streptavidin-biotin, antigen-antibody, and aptamer-protein interactions have been used to fabricate linear and multidimensional assemblies of structurally

  16. Negative regulation of DNA methylation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saze, Hidetoshi; Sasaki, Taku; Kakutani, Tetsuji

    2008-01-01

    Cytosine methylation of repeats and genes is important for coordination of genome stability and proper gene function. In plants, DNA methylation is regulated by DNA methyltransferases, chromatin remodeling factors and RNAi machinery. Ectopic DNA hypermethylation at genes causes transcriptional repression and silencing, and the methylation patterns often become heritable over generations. DNA methylation is antagonized by the DNA demethylation enzymes. Recently, we identified a novel jmjC-domain containing gene IBM1 (increase in bonsai methylation1) that also negatively regulates DNA methylation in Arabidopsis. The ibm1 plants show a variety of developmental phenotypes. IBM1 prevents ectopic accumulation of DNA methylation at the BNS genic region, likely through removal of heterochromatic H3K9 methylation mark. DNA and histone demethylation pathways are important for genome-wide patterning of DNA methylation and for epigenetic regulation of plant development.

  17. Hierarchically assembled DNA origami tubules with reconfigurable chirality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Haorong; Cha, Tae-Gon; Pan, Jing; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic reconfiguration of a hierarchically assembled tubular structure is demonstrated using the DNA origami technique. Short cylindrical DNA origami monomers are synthesized and linked into elongated tubules, which can then be disassembled via toehold-mediated strand displacement. The disassembled subunits are subsequently linked into tubules of a different chirality. The reconfiguration is performed with the subunits carrying dumbbell hairpin DNA oligonucleotides or gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The reconfiguration of higher order origami structures presented here is useful for constructing dynamic nanostructures that exceed the size limit of single DNA origami and may facilitate the study of molecular or particle interactions by tuning their relative distance and organization. (paper)

  18. Engineering of DNA-mediated assemblies for biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Phyllis F.

    Traditionally known as the genetic code, in recent years DNA has been engineered in new ways and applied toward novel applications in materials science and bio-nanotechnology. The nanometer features and highly specific base-pairing of DNA has enabled its use to build complex 2- and 3D nano-architectures and nano-structures. Specific DNA scaffolds include branched DNA junctions, 2D and 3D DNA "tiles" and "bricks", and DNA hydrogels that can be used for applications across various fields of materials science. Another unique feature of DNA is its ability to bind other materials through molecular recognition which has made the use of DNA aptamer or DNA-protein conjugates highly useful for applications in biosensing and identification. The main focus of this thesis is to demonstrate the use of DNA as an invaluable tool for engineering specific nanostructures for biosensing. The first chapter introduces the basics of DNA and current research in various DNA structures and assemblies and their applications. The second and third chapters describe the self-assembly of two structurally different nanomaterials using DNA, carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles. In the second chapter, the successful large-scale alignment of carbon nanotubes on a surface is shown. The study goes into the factors that affect the quality of alignment, including salt concentration, length of DNA, and annealing. In the third chapter, we show how DNA can be used to engineer discrete gold nanocrystal assemblies-"nanodumbbells"- that can adopt different structural conformations through DNA interactions. By incorporating DNA aptamers in the nanoparticle structure, these nanodumbbells can be used to sense particular analytes in solution. Chapter 4 continues the study of the nanodumbbell structures and their potential use as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) biosensors. A large measurable difference in Raman signal was experimentally obtained from the two distinct nanodumbbell conformations. This

  19. Sequential self-assembly of DNA functionalized droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin; McMullen, Angus; Pontani, Lea-Laetitia; He, Xiaojin; Sha, Ruojie; Seeman, Nadrian C; Brujic, Jasna; Chaikin, Paul M

    2017-06-16

    Complex structures and devices, both natural and manmade, are often constructed sequentially. From crystallization to embryogenesis, a nucleus or seed is formed and built upon. Sequential assembly allows for initiation, signaling, and logical programming, which are necessary for making enclosed, hierarchical structures. Although biology relies on such schemes, they have not been available in materials science. Here, we demonstrate programmed sequential self-assembly of DNA functionalized emulsions. The droplets are initially inert because the grafted DNA strands are pre-hybridized in pairs. Active strands on initiator droplets then displace one of the paired strands and thus release its complement, which in turn activates the next droplet in the sequence, akin to living polymerization. Our strategy provides time and logic control during the self-assembly process, and offers a new perspective on the synthesis of materials.Natural complex systems are often constructed by sequential assembly but this is not readily available for synthetic systems. Here, the authors program the sequential self-assembly of DNA functionalized emulsions by altering the DNA grafted strands.

  20. Collective helicity switching of a DNA-coat assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongju; Li, Huichang; He, Ying; Chen, Xi; Ma, Xiaoteng; Lee, Myongsoo

    2017-07-01

    Hierarchical assemblies of biomolecular subunits can carry out versatile tasks at the cellular level with remarkable spatial and temporal precision. As an example, the collective motion and mutual cooperation between complex protein machines mediate essential functions for life, such as replication, synthesis, degradation, repair and transport. Nucleic acid molecules are far less dynamic than proteins and need to bind to specific proteins to form hierarchical structures. The simplest example of these nucleic acid-based structures is provided by a rod-shaped tobacco mosaic virus, which consists of genetic material surrounded by coat proteins. Inspired by the complexity and hierarchical assembly of viruses, a great deal of effort has been devoted to design similarly constructed artificial viruses. However, such a wrapping approach makes nucleic acid dynamics insensitive to environmental changes. This limitation generally restricts, for example, the amplification of the conformational dynamics between the right-handed B form to the left-handed Z form of double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Here we report a virus-like hierarchical assembly in which the native DNA and a synthetic coat undergo repeated collective helicity switching triggered by pH change under physiological conditions. We also show that this collective helicity inversion occurs during translocation of the DNA-coat assembly into intracellular compartments. Translating DNA conformational dynamics into a higher level of hierarchical dynamics may provide an approach to create DNA-based nanomachines.

  1. DNA-Promoted Auto-Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles: Effect of the DNA Sequence on the Stability of the Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Doyen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA oligonucleotides has proven to be a powerful and versatile strategy to assemble nanomaterials into two (2D and three-dimensional (3D superlattices. With the aim of contributing to the elucidation of the factors that affect the stability of this type of superlattices, the assembly of gold nanoparticles grafted with different DNA oligonucleotides was characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy as a function of temperature. After establishing an appropriate methodology the effect of (i the length of the grafted oligonucleotides; (ii the length of their complementary parts and also of (iii the simultaneous grafting of different oligonucleotides was investigated. Our results indicate that the electrostatic repulsion between the particles and the cooperativity of the assembly process play crucial roles in the stability of the assemblies while the grafting density of the oligonucleotide strands seems to have little influence.

  2. Electron Microscopic Visualization of Protein Assemblies on Flattened DNA Origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Leena; Dhakal, Soma; Nichols, Joseph; Mahoney, Jacob; Dosey, Anne M; Jiang, Shuoxing; Sunahara, Roger K; Skiniotis, Georgios; Walter, Nils G

    2015-07-28

    DNA provides an ideal substrate for the engineering of versatile nanostructures due to its reliable Watson-Crick base pairing and well-characterized conformation. One of the most promising applications of DNA nanostructures arises from the site-directed spatial arrangement with nanometer precision of guest components such as proteins, metal nanoparticles, and small molecules. Two-dimensional DNA origami architectures, in particular, offer a simple design, high yield of assembly, and large surface area for use as a nanoplatform. However, such single-layer DNA origami were recently found to be structurally polymorphous due to their high flexibility, leading to the development of conformationally restrained multilayered origami that lack some of the advantages of the single-layer designs. Here we monitored single-layer DNA origami by transmission electron microscopy (EM) and discovered that their conformational heterogeneity is dramatically reduced in the presence of a low concentration of dimethyl sulfoxide, allowing for an efficient flattening onto the carbon support of an EM grid. We further demonstrated that streptavidin and a biotinylated target protein (cocaine esterase, CocE) can be captured at predesignated sites on these flattened origami while maintaining their functional integrity. Our demonstration that protein assemblies can be constructed with high spatial precision (within ∼2 nm of their predicted position on the platforms) by using strategically flattened single-layer origami paves the way for exploiting well-defined guest molecule assemblies for biochemistry and nanotechnology applications.

  3. Self-assembly of DNA rings from scaffold-free DNA tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Zhao, Zhao; Zhang, Fei; Nangreave, Jeanette; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2013-04-10

    We report a scaffold-free approach in which four- and six-helix DNA bundle units, assembled from a small number of single stranded DNA oligonucleotides precisely arranged in networks of contiguous and semicrossover strands, are connected into DNA nano rings. Nearly uniform structures with well-defined diameters of 53 ± 7, 81 ± 9, 85 ± 8, and 166 ± 13 nm were achieved by introducing uniform, in-plane curvature to the repeating units. We demonstrate that precise higher order assemblies can be achieved by fine tuning the particular features of the individual building blocks.

  4. DNA biosensor by self-assembly of carbon nanotubes and DNA to detect riboflavin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Jing [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Chongqing University, ChongQing, 400044 (China); Zhang Yunhuai, E-mail: xp2031@163.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Chongqing University, ChongQing, 400044 (China); Yang Tongyi [School of Life Science. NanJing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China); Zhang Huai [Liming Research Institute of Chemical Industry, LuoYang, 471001 (China); Yang Yixuan [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering. Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Xiao Peng [College of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2009-10-15

    The fabrication of biosensors via self-assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and DNA on a platinum electrode was presented in this paper. The carboxylic SWNTs were assembled on an amine-modified platinum electrode surface and followed by the assembly of NH{sub 2}-DNA with the carboxyl-amine coupling. The decorated surface was characterized by Field Emission Electron Microscopy (FEG-SEM) and electrochemical experiments, which showed that the reaction of DNA-SWNTs biosensor was quasi-reversible. The mechanism of DNA and riboflavin (VB{sub 2}) was studied by cyclic voltammetry and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The fabricated SWNTs-reinforced biosensor exhibits high sensitivity and low detection limit for the tested VB{sub 2} compared to the reported methods.

  5. An integer programming approach to DNA sequence assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Youngjung; Sahinidis, Nikolaos V

    2011-08-10

    De novo sequence assembly is a ubiquitous combinatorial problem in all DNA sequencing technologies. In the presence of errors in the experimental data, the assembly problem is computationally challenging, and its solution may not lead to a unique reconstruct. The enumeration of all alternative solutions is important in drawing a reliable conclusion on the target sequence, and is often overlooked in the heuristic approaches that are currently available. In this paper, we develop an integer programming formulation and global optimization solution strategy to solve the sequence assembly problem with errors in the data. We also propose an efficient technique to identify all alternative reconstructs. When applied to examples of sequencing-by-hybridization, our approach dramatically increases the length of DNA sequences that can be handled with global optimality certificate to over 10,000, which is more than 10 times longer than previously reported. For some problem instances, alternative solutions exhibited a wide range of different ability in reproducing the target DNA sequence. Therefore, it is important to utilize the methodology proposed in this paper in order to obtain all alternative solutions to reliably infer the true reconstruct. These alternative solutions can be used to refine the obtained results and guide the design of further experiments to correctly reconstruct the target DNA sequence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cellular Uptake of Tile-Assembled DNA Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabey, Samet; Meinl, Hanna; MacPherson, Iain S; Cassinelli, Valentina; Manetto, Antonio; Rothenfusser, Simon; Liedl, Tim; Lichtenegger, Felix S

    2014-12-30

    DNA-based nanostructures have received great attention as molecular vehicles for cellular delivery of biomolecules and cancer drugs. Here, we report on the cellular uptake of tubule-like DNA tile-assembled nanostructures 27 nm in length and 8 nm in diameter that carry siRNA molecules, folic acid and fluorescent dyes. In our observations, the DNA structures are delivered to the endosome and do not reach the cytosol of the GFP -expressing HeLa cells that were used in the experiments. Consistent with this observation, no elevated silencing of the GFP gene could be detected. Furthermore, the presence of up to six molecules of folic acid on the carrier surface did not alter the uptake behavior and gene silencing. We further observed several challenges that have to be considered when performing in vitro and in vivo experiments with DNA structures: (i) DNA tile tubes consisting of 42 nt-long oligonucleotides and carrying single- or double-stranded extensions degrade within one hour in cell medium at 37 °C, while the same tubes without extensions are stable for up to eight hours. The degradation is caused mainly by the low concentration of divalent ions in the media. The lifetime in cell medium can be increased drastically by employing DNA tiles that are 84 nt long. (ii) Dyes may get cleaved from the oligonucleotides and then accumulate inside the cell close to the mitochondria, which can lead to misinterpretation of data generated by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. (iii) Single-stranded DNA carrying fluorescent dyes are internalized at similar levels as the DNA tile-assembled tubes used here.

  7. Electrostatic assembly of Cu2O nanoparticles on DNA templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Li; Wei Gang; Qi Bin; Zhou Hualan; Liu Zhiguo; Song Yonghai; Yang Xiurong; Li Zhuang

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a method for highly ordered assembly of cuprous oxide (Cu 2 O) nanoparticles (NPs) by DNA templates was reported. Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)-capped Cu 2 O NPs were adsorbed onto well-aligned λ-DNA chains to form necklace-like one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures. UV-vis, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the nanostructure. The Cu 2 O nanostructures fabricated with the method are both highly ordered and quite straight

  8. Effect of water-DNA interactions on elastic properties of DNA self-assembled monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Carmen M; Ramos, Daniel; Mendieta-Moreno, Jesús I; Fierro, José L G; Mendieta, Jesús; Tamayo, Javier; Calleja, Montserrat

    2017-04-03

    DNA-water interactions have revealed as very important actor in DNA mechanics, from the molecular to the macroscopic scale. Given the particularly useful properties of DNA molecules to engineer novel materials through self-assembly and by bridging organic and inorganic materials, the interest in understanding DNA elasticity has crossed the boundaries of life science to reach also materials science and engineering. Here we show that thin films of DNA constructed through the self-assembly of sulfur tethered ssDNA strands demonstrate a Young's modulus tuning range of about 10 GPa by simply varying the environment relative humidity from 0% up to 70%. We observe that the highest tuning range occurs for ssDNA grafting densities of about 3.5 × 10 13 molecules/cm 2 , where the distance between the molecules maximizes the water mediated interactions between the strands. Upon hybridization with the complementary strand, the DNA self-assembled monolayers significantly soften by one order of magnitude and their Young's modulus dependency on the hydration state drastically decreases. The experimental observations are in agreement with molecular dynamics simulations.

  9. Surface-assisted DNA self-assembly: An enzyme-free strategy towards formation of branched DNA lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanjadeo, Madhabi M; Nayak, Ashok K; Subudhi, Umakanta

    2017-04-01

    DNA based self-assembled nanostructures and DNA origami has proven useful for organizing nanomaterials with firm precision. However, for advanced applications like nanoelectronics and photonics, large-scale organization of self-assembled branched DNA (bDNA) into periodic lattices is desired. In this communication for the first time we report a facile method of self-assembly of Y-shaped bDNA nanostructures on the cationic surface of Aluminum (Al) foil to prepare periodic two dimensional (2D) bDNA lattice. Particularly those Y-shaped bDNA structures having smaller overhangs and unable to self-assemble in solution, they are easily assembled on the surface of Al foil in the absence of ligase. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) analysis shows homogenous distribution of two-dimensional bDNA lattices across the Al foil. When the assembled bDNA structures were recovered from the Al foil and electrophoresed in nPAGE only higher order polymeric bDNA structures were observed without a trace of monomeric structures which confirms the stability and high yield of the bDNA lattices. Therefore, this enzyme-free economic and efficient strategy for developing bDNA lattices can be utilized in assembling various nanomaterials for functional molecular components towards development of DNA based self-assembled nanodevices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. DNA origami-based nanoribbons: assembly, length distribution, and twist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungmann, Ralf; Scheible, Max; Kuzyk, Anton; Pardatscher, Guenther; Simmel, Friedrich C; Castro, Carlos E

    2011-01-01

    A variety of polymerization methods for the assembly of elongated nanoribbons from rectangular DNA origami structures are investigated. The most efficient method utilizes single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides to bridge an intermolecular scaffold seam between origami monomers. This approach allows the fabrication of origami ribbons with lengths of several micrometers, which can be used for long-range ordered arrangement of proteins. It is quantitatively shown that the length distribution of origami ribbons obtained with this technique follows the theoretical prediction for a simple linear polymerization reaction. The design of flat single layer origami structures with constant crossover spacing inevitably results in local underwinding of the DNA helix, which leads to a global twist of the origami structures that also translates to the nanoribbons.

  11. DNA origami-based nanoribbons: assembly, length distribution, and twist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungmann, Ralf; Scheible, Max; Kuzyk, Anton; Pardatscher, Guenther; Simmel, Friedrich C [Lehrstuhl fuer Bioelektronik, Physik-Department and ZNN/WSI, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 4a, 85748 Garching (Germany); Castro, Carlos E, E-mail: simmel@ph.tum.de [Labor fuer Biomolekulare Nanotechnologie, Physik-Department and ZNN/WSI, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 4a, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-07-08

    A variety of polymerization methods for the assembly of elongated nanoribbons from rectangular DNA origami structures are investigated. The most efficient method utilizes single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides to bridge an intermolecular scaffold seam between origami monomers. This approach allows the fabrication of origami ribbons with lengths of several micrometers, which can be used for long-range ordered arrangement of proteins. It is quantitatively shown that the length distribution of origami ribbons obtained with this technique follows the theoretical prediction for a simple linear polymerization reaction. The design of flat single layer origami structures with constant crossover spacing inevitably results in local underwinding of the DNA helix, which leads to a global twist of the origami structures that also translates to the nanoribbons.

  12. Regulated assembly of a supramolecular centrosome scaffold in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodruff, J. B.; Wueseke, O.; Viscardi, V.

    2015-01-01

    The centrosome organizes microtubule arrays within animal cells and comprises two centrioles surrounded by an amorphous protein mass called the pericentriolar material (PCM). Despite the importance of centrosomes as microtubule-organizing centers, the mechanism and regulation of PCM assembly...... are not well understood. In Caenorhabditis elegans, PCM assembly requires the coiled-coil protein SPD-5. We found that recombinant SPD-5 could polymerize to form micrometer-sized porous networks in vitro. Network assembly was accelerated by two conserved regulators that control PCM assembly in vivo, Polo......-like kinase-1 and SPD-2/Cep192. Only the assembled SPD-5 networks, and not unassembled SPD-5 protein, functioned as a scaffold for other PCM proteins. Thus, PCM size and binding capacity emerge from the regulated polymerization of one coiled-coil protein to form a porous network....

  13. Design and Assembly of DNA Nano-Objects and 2D DNA Origami Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenyan

    DNA, which plays a central role in biology as the carrier of genetic information, is also an excellent candidate for structural nanotechnology. Researches have proven that a variety of complicated DNA assemblies, such as objects, 2D & 3D crystals, and nanomechanical devices, can be fabricated through the combination of robust branched DNA motifs and sticky ends. This dissertation focuses on the design and construction of DNA nano--objects and 2D DNA origami arrays. In this dissertation, we first describe the formation of a triangular species that has four strands per edge, held together by PX interactions. We demonstrate by nondenaturing gel electrophoresis and by atomic force microscopy (AFM) that we can combine a partial triangle with other strands to form a robust four--stranded molecule. By combining them with a novel three--domain molecule, we also demonstrate by AFM that these triangles can be self--assembled into a linear array. Second, we demonstrate our attempts to design and self--assemble 2D DNA origami arrays using several different strategies. Specifically, we introduce the self--assembly of 2D DNA origami lattices using a symmetric cross--like design. This design strategy resulted in a well--ordered woven latticework array with edge dimensions of 2--3 mum. This size is likely to be large enough to connect bottom-up methods of patterning with top--down approaches. Third, we illustrate the design and construction of DNA nano--objects for exploring the substrate preferences of topoisomerase (topo) II. We designed and fabricated four double rhombus--like DNA molecules, each of which contains a different conformation of crossover in the middle, as possible substrates to establish the structural preferences for topo II. We characterized the formation of each substrate molecule by gel electrophoresis. Finally, we study the effect of M13 DNA knotting on the formation of the DNA origami tiles. We demonstrate by atomic force microscopy (AFM) that knotted M13

  14. DNA Trojan Horses: Self-Assembled Floxuridine-Containing DNA Polyhedra for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Quanbing; Ma, Yuan; Pan, Gaifang; Xue, Bai; Yan, Deyue; Zhang, Chuan; Zhu, Xinyuan

    2017-10-02

    Based on their structural similarity to natural nucleobases, nucleoside analogue therapeutics were integrated into DNA strands through conventional solid-phase synthesis. By elaborately designing their sequences, floxuridine-integrated DNA strands were synthesized and self-assembled into well-defined DNA polyhedra with definite drug-loading ratios as well as tunable size and morphology. As a novel drug delivery system, these drug-containing DNA polyhedra could ideally mimic the Trojan Horse to deliver chemotherapeutics into tumor cells and fight against cancer. Both in vitro and in vivo results demonstrate that the DNA Trojan horse with buckyball architecture exhibits superior anticancer capability over the free drug and other formulations. With precise control over the drug-loading ratio and structure of the nanocarriers, the DNA Trojan horse may play an important role in anticancer treatment and exhibit great potential in translational nanomedicine. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Isothermal hybridization kinetics of DNA assembly of two-dimensional DNA origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jie; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Lei; Li, Qiang; Xie, Erqing; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager; Besenbacher, Flemming; Dong, Mingdong

    2013-09-09

    The Watson-Crick base-pairing with specificity and predictability makes DNA molecules suitable for building versatile nanoscale structures and devices, and the DNA origami method enables researchers to incorporate more complexities into DNA-based devices. Thermally controlled atomic force microscopy in combination with nanomechanical spectroscopy with forces controlled in the pico Newton (pN) range as a novel technique is introduced to directly investigate the kinetics of multistrand DNA hybridization events on DNA origami nanopores under defined isothermal conditions. For the synthesis of DNA nanostructures under isothermal conditions at 60 °C, a higher hybridization rate, fewer defects, and a higher stability are achieved compared to room-temperature studies. By quantifying the assembly times for filling pores in origami structures at several constant temperatures, the fill factors show a consistent exponential increase over time. Furthermore, the local hybridization rate can be accelerated by adding a higher concentration of the staples. The new insight gained on the kinetics of staple-scaffold hybridization on the synthesis of two dimensional DNA origami structures may open up new routes and ideas for designing DNA assembly systems with increased potential for their application. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Supramolecular Hydrogels Based on DNA Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yu; Jia, Haoyang; Cao, Tianyang; Liu, Dongsheng

    2017-04-18

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) provides essential supports three dimensionally to the cells in living organs, including mechanical support and signal, nutrition, oxygen, and waste transportation. Thus, using hydrogels to mimic its function has attracted much attention in recent years, especially in tissue engineering, cell biology, and drug screening. However, a hydrogel system that can merit all parameters of the natural ECM is still a challenge. In the past decade, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has arisen as an outstanding building material for the hydrogels, as it has unique properties compared to most synthetic or natural polymers, such as sequence designability, precise recognition, structural rigidity, and minimal toxicity. By simple attachment to polymers as a side chain, DNA has been widely used as cross-links in hydrogel preparation. The formed secondary structures could confer on the hydrogel designable responsiveness, such as response to temperature, pH, metal ions, proteins, DNA, RNA, and small signal molecules like ATP. Moreover, single or multiple DNA restriction enzyme sites could be incorporated into the hydrogels by sequence design and greatly expand the latitude of their responses. Compared with most supramolecular hydrogels, these DNA cross-linked hydrogels could be relatively strong and easily adjustable via sequence variation, but it is noteworthy that these hydrogels still have excellent thixotropic properties and could be easily injected through a needle. In addition, the quick formation of duplex has also enabled the multilayer three-dimensional injection printing of living cells with the hydrogel as matrix. When the matrix is built purely by DNA assembly structures, the hydrogel inherits all the previously described characteristics; however, the long persistence length of DNA structures excluded the small size meshes of the network and made the hydrogel permeable to nutrition for cell proliferation. This unique property greatly expands the cell

  17. A Case Study of the Likes and Dislikes of DNA and RNA in Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Hua; Wu, Siyu; Li, Mo; Li, Yulin; Jiang, Wen; Mao, Chengde

    2015-12-07

    Programmed self-assembly of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) is an active research area as it promises a general approach for nanoconstruction. Whereas DNA self-assembly has been extensively studied, RNA self-assembly lags much behind. One strategy to boost RNA self-assembly is to adapt the methods of DNA self-assembly for RNA self-assembly because of the chemical and structural similarities of DNA and RNA. However, these two types of molecules are still significantly different. To enable the rational design of RNA self-assembly, a thorough examination of their likes and dislikes in programmed self-assembly is needed. The current work begins to address this task. It was found that similar, two-stranded motifs of RNA and DNA lead to similar, but clearly different nanostructures. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. DNA-PK dependent targeting of DNA-ends to a protein complex assembled on matrix attachment region DNA sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauldin, S.K.; Getts, R.C.; Perez, M.L.; DiRienzo, S.; Stamato, T.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: We find that nuclear protein extracts from mammalian cells contain an activity that allows DNA ends to associate with circular pUC18 plasmid DNA. This activity requires the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK (DNA-PKcs) and Ku since it was not observed in mutants lacking Ku or DNA-PKcs but was observed when purified Ku/DNA-PKcs was added to these mutant extracts. Competition experiments between pUC18 and pUC18 plasmids containing various nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR) sequences suggest that DNA ends preferentially associate with plasmids containing MAR DNA sequences. At a 1:5 mass ratio of MAR to pUC18, approximately equal amounts of DNA end binding to the two plasmids were observed, while at a 1:1 ratio no pUC18 end-binding was observed. Calculation of relative binding activities indicates that DNA-end binding activities to MAR sequences was 7 to 21 fold higher than pUC18. Western analysis of proteins bound to pUC18 and MAR plasmids indicates that XRCC4, DNA ligase IV, scaffold attachment factor A, topoisomerase II, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase preferentially associate with the MAR plasmid in the absence or presence of DNA ends. In contrast, Ku and DNA-PKcs were found on the MAR plasmid only in the presence of DNA ends. After electroporation of a 32P-labeled DNA probe into human cells and cell fractionation, 87% of the total intercellular radioactivity remained in nuclei after a 0.5M NaCl extraction suggesting the probe was strongly bound in the nucleus. The above observations raise the possibility that DNA-PK targets DNA-ends to a repair and/or DNA damage signaling complex which is assembled on MAR sites in the nucleus

  19. Protein Self-Assembly and Protein-Induced DNA Morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawhinney, Matthew T.

    The ability of biomolecules to associate into various structural configurations has a substantial impact on human physiology. The synthesis of protein polypeptide chains using the information encoded by DNA is mediated through the use of regulatory proteins, known as transcription factors. Some transcription factors perform function by inducing local curvature in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) strands, the mechanisms of which are not entirely known. An important architectural protein, eleven zinc finger CTCF (11 ZF CTCF) is involved in genome organization and hypothesized to mediate DNA loop formation. Direct evidence for these CTCF-induced DNA loops has yet to be observed. In this thesis, the effect of 11 ZF CTCF on DNA morphology is examined using atomic force microscopy, a powerful technique for visualizing biomolecules with nanometer resolution. The presence of CTCF is revealed to induce a variety of morphologies deviating from the relaxed state of control DNA samples, including compact circular complexes, meshes, and networks. Images reveal quasi-circular DNA/CTCF complexes consistent with a single DNA molecule twice wrapped around the protein. The structures of DNA and proteins are highly important for operations in the cell. Structural irregularities may lead to a variety of issues, including more than twenty human pathologies resulting from aberrant protein misfolding into amyloid aggregates of elongated fibrils. Insulin deficiency and resistance characterizing type 2 diabetes often requires administration of insulin. Injectable and inhalable delivery methods have been documented to result in the deposition of amyloid fibrils. Oligomers, soluble multiprotein assemblies, are believed to play an important role in this process. Insulin aggregation under physiological conditions is not well understood and oligomers have not yet been fully characterized. In this thesis, in vitro insulin aggregation at acidic and neutral pH is explored using a variety of techniques

  20. High molecular weight DNA assembly in vivo for synthetic biology applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhas, Mario; Ajioka, James W

    2017-05-01

    DNA assembly is the key technology of the emerging interdisciplinary field of synthetic biology. While the assembly of smaller DNA fragments is usually performed in vitro, high molecular weight DNA molecules are assembled in vivo via homologous recombination in the host cell. Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are the main hosts used for DNA assembly in vivo. Progress in DNA assembly over the last few years has paved the way for the construction of whole genomes. This review provides an update on recent synthetic biology advances with particular emphasis on high molecular weight DNA assembly in vivo in E. coli, B. subtilis and S. cerevisiae. Special attention is paid to the assembly of whole genomes, such as those of the first synthetic cell, synthetic yeast and minimal genomes.

  1. Assembly of presynaptic filaments. Factors affecting the assembly of RecA protein onto single-stranded DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thresher, RJ; Christiansen, Gunna; Griffith, JD

    1988-01-01

    We have previously shown that the assembly of RecA protein onto single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) facilitated by SSB protein occurs in three steps: (1) rapid binding of SSB protein to the ssDNA; (2) nucleation of RecA protein onto this template; and (3) co-operative polymerization of additional Rec...... assembled onto ssDNA at net rates that varied from 250 to 900 RecA protein monomers per minute, with the rate inversely related to the concentration of SSB protein. Combined sucrose sedimentation and electron microscope analysis established that SSB protein was displaced from the ssDNA during RecA protein...

  2. The dynamic assembly of distinct RNA polymerase I complexes modulates rDNA transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torreira, Eva; Louro, Jaime Alegrio; Pazos, Irene; González-Polo, Noelia; Gil-Carton, David; Duran, Ana Garcia; Tosi, Sébastien; Gallego, Oriol; Calvo, Olga; Fernández-Tornero, Carlos

    2017-03-06

    Cell growth requires synthesis of ribosomal RNA by RNA polymerase I (Pol I). Binding of initiation factor Rrn3 activates Pol I, fostering recruitment to ribosomal DNA promoters. This fundamental process must be precisely regulated to satisfy cell needs at any time. We present in vivo evidence that, when growth is arrested by nutrient deprivation, cells induce rapid clearance of Pol I-Rrn3 complexes, followed by the assembly of inactive Pol I homodimers. This dual repressive mechanism reverts upon nutrient addition, thus restoring cell growth. Moreover, Pol I dimers also form after inhibition of either ribosome biogenesis or protein synthesis. Our mutational analysis, based on the electron cryomicroscopy structures of monomeric Pol I alone and in complex with Rrn3, underscores the central role of subunits A43 and A14 in the regulation of differential Pol I complexes assembly and subsequent promoter association.

  3. Revealing Structural Transformations during Crystallization of DNA-Nanoparticle Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yugang; Lu, Fang; van der Lelie, Daniel; Gang, Oleg

    2013-03-01

    Nanoparticle assembly via sequence-specific DNA recognition emerges as a powerful strategy for the fabrication of nanoparticle (NP)-based crystalline materials. Generally, a delicate thermal annealing is essential for the crystallization of NPs from kinetically trapped disordered states. Due to the complex coupling between interactions, entropic and chain effects in these systems, the crystallization pathway remains an intricate and open question. Herein, we present an experimental study of the crystallization process for DNA-directed nanoparticle assembly systems using synchrotron-based small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). We demonstrated the effects of two crystallization-dominant factors, namely, temperature and volume fraction, on the structural transformation and order development. By combining a single component and binary systems we uncovered the evolution of global and local particle arrangements, such as correlation length, compositional disorder and coordination number, during the phase transformation. Research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  4. The Mammalian Cell Cycle Regulates Parvovirus Nuclear Capsid Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riolobos, Laura; Domínguez, Carlos; Kann, Michael; Almendral, José M.

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown whether the mammalian cell cycle could impact the assembly of viruses maturing in the nucleus. We addressed this question using MVM, a reference member of the icosahedral ssDNA nuclear parvoviruses, which requires cell proliferation to infect by mechanisms partly understood. Constitutively expressed MVM capsid subunits (VPs) accumulated in the cytoplasm of mouse and human fibroblasts synchronized at G0, G1, and G1/S transition. Upon arrest release, VPs translocated to the nucleus as cells entered S phase, at efficiencies relying on cell origin and arrest method, and immediately assembled into capsids. In synchronously infected cells, the consecutive virus life cycle steps (gene expression, proteins nuclear translocation, capsid assembly, genome replication and encapsidation) proceeded tightly coupled to cell cycle progression from G0/G1 through S into G2 phase. However, a DNA synthesis stress caused by thymidine irreversibly disrupted virus life cycle, as VPs became increasingly retained in the cytoplasm hours post-stress, forming empty capsids in mouse fibroblasts, thereby impairing encapsidation of the nuclear viral DNA replicative intermediates. Synchronously infected cells subjected to density-arrest signals while traversing early S phase also blocked VPs transport, resulting in a similar misplaced cytoplasmic capsid assembly in mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, thymidine and density arrest signals deregulating virus assembly neither perturbed nuclear translocation of the NS1 protein nor viral genome replication occurring under S/G2 cycle arrest. An underlying mechanism of cell cycle control was identified in the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated VPs trimeric assembly intermediates, which accessed a non-conserved route distinct from the importin α2/β1 and transportin pathways. The exquisite cell cycle-dependence of parvovirus nuclear capsid assembly conforms a novel paradigm of time and functional coupling between cellular and virus life

  5. The Mammalian Cell Cycle Regulates Parvovirus Nuclear Capsid Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Ranedo, Jon; Hernando, Eva; Riolobos, Laura; Domínguez, Carlos; Kann, Michael; Almendral, José M

    2015-06-01

    It is unknown whether the mammalian cell cycle could impact the assembly of viruses maturing in the nucleus. We addressed this question using MVM, a reference member of the icosahedral ssDNA nuclear parvoviruses, which requires cell proliferation to infect by mechanisms partly understood. Constitutively expressed MVM capsid subunits (VPs) accumulated in the cytoplasm of mouse and human fibroblasts synchronized at G0, G1, and G1/S transition. Upon arrest release, VPs translocated to the nucleus as cells entered S phase, at efficiencies relying on cell origin and arrest method, and immediately assembled into capsids. In synchronously infected cells, the consecutive virus life cycle steps (gene expression, proteins nuclear translocation, capsid assembly, genome replication and encapsidation) proceeded tightly coupled to cell cycle progression from G0/G1 through S into G2 phase. However, a DNA synthesis stress caused by thymidine irreversibly disrupted virus life cycle, as VPs became increasingly retained in the cytoplasm hours post-stress, forming empty capsids in mouse fibroblasts, thereby impairing encapsidation of the nuclear viral DNA replicative intermediates. Synchronously infected cells subjected to density-arrest signals while traversing early S phase also blocked VPs transport, resulting in a similar misplaced cytoplasmic capsid assembly in mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, thymidine and density arrest signals deregulating virus assembly neither perturbed nuclear translocation of the NS1 protein nor viral genome replication occurring under S/G2 cycle arrest. An underlying mechanism of cell cycle control was identified in the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated VPs trimeric assembly intermediates, which accessed a non-conserved route distinct from the importin α2/β1 and transportin pathways. The exquisite cell cycle-dependence of parvovirus nuclear capsid assembly conforms a novel paradigm of time and functional coupling between cellular and virus life

  6. Assembly, Structure and Properties of DNA Programmable Nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Cheng

    Finite size nanoclusters can be viewed as a nanoscale analogue of molecules. Just as molecules, synthesized from atoms, give access to new properties, clusters composed of nanoparticles modulate of their functional properties of nanoparticles. In contrast to synthetic chemistry which is a mature field, the creation of nanoscale clusters with well-defined architectures is a new and challenging area of research. My work explores how to assemble model systems of nanoclusters using DNA-programmable interparticle linkages. The simplest clusters of two particles, dimers, allow one to investigate fundamental effects in these systems. Such clusters serve as a versatile platform to understand DNA-mediated interactions, especially in the non-trivial regime where the nanoparticle and DNA chains are comparable in size. I systematically studied a few fundamental questions as follows: Firstly, we examined the structure of nanoparticle dimers in detail by a combination of X-ray scattering experiments and molecular simulations. We found that, for a given DNA length, the interparticle separation within the dimer is controlled primarily by the number of linking DNA. We summarized our findings in a simple model that captures the interplay of the number of DNA bridges, their length, the particle's curvature and the excluded volume effects. We demonstrated the applicability of the model to our results, without any free parameters. As a consequence, the increase of dimer separation with increasing temperature can be understood as a result of changing the number of connecting DNA. Later, we investigated the self-assembly process of DNA-functionalized particles in the presence of various lengths of the DNA linkage strands using 3 different pathways. We observed a high yield of dimer formation when significantly long linkers were applied. Small Angle X-ray Scattering revealed two configurations of the small clusters by different pathways. In one case, the interparticle distance increases

  7. Maternal DNA Methylation Regulates Early Trophoblast Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Miguel R; King, Michelle; Perez-Garcia, Vicente; Bogutz, Aaron B; Caley, Matthew; Fineberg, Elena; Lefebvre, Louis; Cook, Simon J; Dean, Wendy; Hemberger, Myriam; Reik, Wolf

    2016-01-25

    Critical roles for DNA methylation in embryonic development are well established, but less is known about its roles during trophoblast development, the extraembryonic lineage that gives rise to the placenta. We dissected the role of DNA methylation in trophoblast development by performing mRNA and DNA methylation profiling of Dnmt3a/3b mutants. We find that oocyte-derived methylation plays a major role in regulating trophoblast development but that imprinting of the key placental regulator Ascl2 is only partially responsible for these effects. We have identified several methylation-regulated genes associated with trophoblast differentiation that are involved in cell adhesion and migration, potentially affecting trophoblast invasion. Specifically, trophoblast-specific DNA methylation is linked to the silencing of Scml2, a Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 protein that drives loss of cell adhesion in methylation-deficient trophoblast. Our results reveal that maternal DNA methylation controls multiple differentiation-related and physiological processes in trophoblast via both imprinting-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Single-step rapid assembly of DNA origami nanostructures for addressable nanoscale bioreactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Yanming; Zeng, Dongdong; Chao, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Self-assembled DNA origami nanostructures have shown great promise for bottom-up construction of complex objects with nanoscale addressability. Here we show that DNA origami-based 1D nanoribbons and nanotubes are one-pot assembled with controllable sizes and nanoscale addressability with high speed...... (within only 10-20 min), exhibiting extraordinarily high cooperativity that is often observed in assembly of natural molecular machines in cells (e.g. ribosome). By exploiting the high specificity of DNA-based self-assembly, we can precisely anchor proteins on these DNA origami nanostructures with sub-10...

  9. Self-Assembly of Complex DNA Tessellations by Using Low-Symmetry Multi-arm DNA Tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fei; Jiang, Shuoxing; Li, Wei; Hunt, Ashley; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2016-07-25

    Modular DNA tile-based self-assembly is a versatile way to engineer basic tessellation patterns on the nanometer scale, but it remains challenging to achieve high levels of structural complexity. We introduce a set of general design principles to create intricate DNA tessellations by employing multi-arm DNA motifs with low symmetry. We achieved two novel Archimedean tiling patterns, (4.8.8) and (3.6.3.6), and one pattern with higher-order structures beyond the complexity observed in Archimedean tiling. Our success in assembling complicated DNA tessellations demonstrates the broad design space of DNA structural motifs, enriching the toolbox of DNA tile-based self-assembly and expanding the complexity boundaries of DNA tile-based tessellation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Regulation of DNA repair by parkin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Shyan-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Mutation of parkin is one of the most prevalent causes of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that acts on a variety of substrates, resulting in polyubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome or monoubiquitination and regulation of biological activity. However, the cellular functions of parkin that relate to its pathological involvement in PD are not well understood. Here we show that parkin is essential for optimal repair of DNA damage. Parkin-deficient cells exhibit reduced DNA excision repair that can be restored by transfection of wild-type parkin, but not by transfection of a pathological parkin mutant. Parkin also protects against DNA damage-induced cell death, an activity that is largely lost in the pathological mutant. Moreover, parkin interacts with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a protein that coordinates DNA excision repair. These results suggest that parkin promotes DNA repair and protects against genotoxicity, and implicate DNA damage as a potential pathogenic mechanism in PD.

  11. DNA Self-Assembly and Computation Studied with a Coarse-grained Dynamic Bonded Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svaneborg, Carsten; Fellermann, Harold; Rasmussen, Steen

    2012-01-01

    We utilize a coarse-grained directional dynamic bonding DNA model [C. Svaneborg, Comp. Phys. Comm. (In Press DOI:10.1016/j.cpc.2012.03.005)] to study DNA self-assembly and DNA computation. In our DNA model, a single nucleotide is represented by a single interaction site, and complementary sites can...

  12. Logical NAND and NOR Operations Using Algorithmic Self-assembly of DNA Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanfeng; Cui, Guangzhao; Zhang, Xuncai; Zheng, Yan

    DNA self-assembly is the most advanced and versatile system that has been experimentally demonstrated for programmable construction of patterned systems on the molecular scale. It has been demonstrated that the simple binary arithmetic and logical operations can be computed by the process of self assembly of DNA tiles. Here we report a one-dimensional algorithmic self-assembly of DNA triple-crossover molecules that can be used to execute five steps of a logical NAND and NOR operations on a string of binary bits. To achieve this, abstract tiles were translated into DNA tiles based on triple-crossover motifs. Serving as input for the computation, long single stranded DNA molecules were used to nucleate growth of tiles into algorithmic crystals. Our method shows that engineered DNA self-assembly can be treated as a bottom-up design techniques, and can be capable of designing DNA computer organization and architecture.

  13. Modelling DNA origami self-assembly at the domain level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannenberg, Frits; Kwiatkowska, Marta [Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, Wolfson Building, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QD (United Kingdom); Dunn, Katherine E. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Department of Electronics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Bath, Jonathan; Turberfield, Andrew J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Ouldridge, Thomas E. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Department of Mathematics, Imperial College, 180 Queen’s Gate, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-28

    We present a modelling framework, and basic model parameterization, for the study of DNA origami folding at the level of DNA domains. Our approach is explicitly kinetic and does not assume a specific folding pathway. The binding of each staple is associated with a free-energy change that depends on staple sequence, the possibility of coaxial stacking with neighbouring domains, and the entropic cost of constraining the scaffold by inserting staple crossovers. A rigorous thermodynamic model is difficult to implement as a result of the complex, multiply connected geometry of the scaffold: we present a solution to this problem for planar origami. Coaxial stacking of helices and entropic terms, particularly when loop closure exponents are taken to be larger than those for ideal chains, introduce interactions between staples. These cooperative interactions lead to the prediction of sharp assembly transitions with notable hysteresis that are consistent with experimental observations. We show that the model reproduces the experimentally observed consequences of reducing staple concentration, accelerated cooling, and absent staples. We also present a simpler methodology that gives consistent results and can be used to study a wider range of systems including non-planar origami.

  14. Modelling DNA origami self-assembly at the domain level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dannenberg, Frits; Kwiatkowska, Marta; Dunn, Katherine E.; Bath, Jonathan; Turberfield, Andrew J.; Ouldridge, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    We present a modelling framework, and basic model parameterization, for the study of DNA origami folding at the level of DNA domains. Our approach is explicitly kinetic and does not assume a specific folding pathway. The binding of each staple is associated with a free-energy change that depends on staple sequence, the possibility of coaxial stacking with neighbouring domains, and the entropic cost of constraining the scaffold by inserting staple crossovers. A rigorous thermodynamic model is difficult to implement as a result of the complex, multiply connected geometry of the scaffold: we present a solution to this problem for planar origami. Coaxial stacking of helices and entropic terms, particularly when loop closure exponents are taken to be larger than those for ideal chains, introduce interactions between staples. These cooperative interactions lead to the prediction of sharp assembly transitions with notable hysteresis that are consistent with experimental observations. We show that the model reproduces the experimentally observed consequences of reducing staple concentration, accelerated cooling, and absent staples. We also present a simpler methodology that gives consistent results and can be used to study a wider range of systems including non-planar origami

  15. DNA templates silver clusters with magic sizes and colors for multi-cluster fluorescent assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Stacy

    2015-03-01

    The natural inclusion of information in DNA, a vital part of life's rich complexity, can also be exploited to create diverse structures with multiple scales of complexity. Now emerging in novel photonic applications, DNA-stabilized silver clusters (AgN-DNA) are compelling examples of multi-scale DNA-directed assembly: individual fluorescent clusters, each templated by specific DNA base motifs, can then be arranged together in DNA-mediated multi-cluster assemblies with nanoscale precision. We discuss how DNA imbues AgN-DNA with unique features. Our optical data on pure AgN-DNA show that DNA base-cationic silver ligands impose rod-like shapes for neutral silver clusters, whose length primarily determines fluorescence color. This shape anisotropy leads to the aspherical AgN-DNA magic number cluster sizes and ``magic color'' groupings. We exploit DNA's sequence properties to extract multi-base motifs that select certain magic cluster sizes, using machine learning algorithms applied to large data sets. With these base motifs, we design DNA scaffolds to arrange multiple atomically precise AgN together in nanoscale proximity. We demonstrate that clusters are stable when held at separations below 10 nm, both in bicolor, dual cluster DNA clamp assemblies and in one-dimensional assemblies of atomically precise clusters arrayed on DNA nanotubes. Supported by NSF-CHE-1213895 and NSF-DMR-1309410. SMC acknowledges NSF-DGE-1144085, a NSF GRFP.

  16. Hierarchical Self Assembly of Patterns from the Robinson Tilings: DNA Tile Design in an Enhanced Tile Assembly Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Jennifer E.; Liu, Wenyan; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a hierarchical self assembly algorithm that produces the quasiperiodic patterns found in the Robinson tilings and suggest a practical implementation of this algorithm using DNA origami tiles. We modify the abstract Tile Assembly Model, (aTAM), to include active signaling and glue activation in response to signals to coordinate the hierarchical assembly of Robinson patterns of arbitrary size from a small set of tiles according to the tile substitution algorithm that generates them. Enabling coordinated hierarchical assembly in the aTAM makes possible the efficient encoding of the recursive process of tile substitution. PMID:23226722

  17. Hierarchical Self Assembly of Patterns from the Robinson Tilings: DNA Tile Design in an Enhanced Tile Assembly Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Jennifer E; Liu, Wenyan; Seeman, Nadrian C

    2012-06-01

    We introduce a hierarchical self assembly algorithm that produces the quasiperiodic patterns found in the Robinson tilings and suggest a practical implementation of this algorithm using DNA origami tiles. We modify the abstract Tile Assembly Model, (aTAM), to include active signaling and glue activation in response to signals to coordinate the hierarchical assembly of Robinson patterns of arbitrary size from a small set of tiles according to the tile substitution algorithm that generates them. Enabling coordinated hierarchical assembly in the aTAM makes possible the efficient encoding of the recursive process of tile substitution.

  18. DNA vaccines: safety aspect assessment and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medjitna, T D E; Stadler, C; Bruckner, L; Griot, C; Ottiger, H P

    2006-01-01

    For licensing purposes, besides the immunogenic aspects, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) vaccines present safety considerations that must be critically assessed during preclinical or/and clinical safety studies. The major concerns with regard to safety are integration of the plasmid DNA into the host genome, adverse immunopathological effects, the formation of anti-DNA antibodies resulting in auto-immune disease and the use of novel molecular adjuvants. Moreover, for veterinary vaccines intended to be used in husbandry animals, food safety aspects will become an important issue. All new vaccine candidates should therefore be thoroughly tested in target animals, keeping in mind that for food producing animals, the products will be consumed. Finally, a further safety aspect of interest concerns the possible spread of genetic material to the environment, by the potential transformation of the environmental microflora with only a few copies of complete or fragmented plasmid. These are issues that need to be considered in the final scientific decisions underpinning the registration of vaccines. Thus, to establish criteria for guidance and regulations for industry and licensing authorities, a project has been initiated to assess such risks of plasmid DNA vaccinations. Major emphasis will be placed on aspects such as the biodistribution of plasmid in vaccinated animals. This paper is intended as a contribution to the debate on the use of biotechnology in the future and should facilitate further discussions on the various safety aspects of DNA-based immunisations.

  19. A new building block for DNA network formation by self-assembly and polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bußkamp, Holger; Keller, Sascha; Robotta, Marta; Drescher, Malte; Marx, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The predictability of DNA self-assembly is exploited in many nanotechnological approaches. Inspired by naturally existing self-assembled DNA architectures, branched DNA has been developed that allows self-assembly to predesigned architectures with dimensions on the nanometer scale. DNA is an attractive material for generation of nanostructures due to a plethora of enzymes which modify DNA with high accuracy, providing a toolbox for many different manipulations to construct nanometer scaled objects. We present a straightforward synthesis of a rigid DNA branching building block successfully used for the generation of DNA networks by self-assembly and network formation by enzymatic DNA synthesis. The Y-shaped 3-armed DNA construct, bearing 3 primer strands is accepted by Taq DNA polymerase. The enzyme uses each arm as primer strand and incorporates the branched construct into large assemblies during PCR. The networks were investigated by agarose gel electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The findings indicate that rather rigid DNA networks were formed. This presents a new bottom-up approach for DNA material formation and might find applications like in the generation of functional hydrogels.

  20. A new building block for DNA network formation by self-assembly and polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Bußkamp

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The predictability of DNA self-assembly is exploited in many nanotechnological approaches. Inspired by naturally existing self-assembled DNA architectures, branched DNA has been developed that allows self-assembly to predesigned architectures with dimensions on the nanometer scale. DNA is an attractive material for generation of nanostructures due to a plethora of enzymes which modify DNA with high accuracy, providing a toolbox for many different manipulations to construct nanometer scaled objects. We present a straightforward synthesis of a rigid DNA branching building block successfully used for the generation of DNA networks by self-assembly and network formation by enzymatic DNA synthesis. The Y-shaped 3-armed DNA construct, bearing 3 primer strands is accepted by Taq DNA polymerase. The enzyme uses each arm as primer strand and incorporates the branched construct into large assemblies during PCR. The networks were investigated by agarose gel electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The findings indicate that rather rigid DNA networks were formed. This presents a new bottom-up approach for DNA material formation and might find applications like in the generation of functional hydrogels.

  1. FOLDNA, a Web Server for Self-Assembled DNA Nanostructure Autoscaffolds and Autostaples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chensheng Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA self-assembly is a nanotechnology that folds DNA into desired shapes. Self-assembled DNA nanostructures, also known as origami, are increasingly valuable in nanomaterial and biosensing applications. Two ways to use DNA nanostructures in medicine are to form nanoarrays, and to work as vehicles in drug delivery. The DNA nanostructures perform well as a biomaterial in these areas because they have spatially addressable and size controllable properties. However, manually designing complementary DNA sequences for self-assembly is a technically demanding and time consuming task, which makes it advantageous for computers to do this job instead. We have developed a web server, FOLDNA, which can automatically design 2D self-assembled DNA nanostructures according to custom pictures and scaffold sequences provided by the users. It is the first web server to provide an entirely automatic design of self-assembled DNA nanostructure, and it takes merely a second to generate comprehensive information for molecular experiments including: scaffold DNA pathways, staple DNA directions, and staple DNA sequences. This program could save as much as several hours in the designing step for each DNA nanostructure. We randomly selected some shapes and corresponding outputs from our server and validated its performance in molecular experiments.

  2. Multi-scale coarse-graining for the study of assembly pathways in DNA-brick self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Pedro; Romano, Flavio; Schreck, John S.; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Doye, Jonathan P. K.; Louis, Ard A.

    2018-04-01

    Inspired by recent successes using single-stranded DNA tiles to produce complex structures, we develop a two-step coarse-graining approach that uses detailed thermodynamic calculations with oxDNA, a nucleotide-based model of DNA, to parametrize a coarser kinetic model that can reach the time and length scales needed to study the assembly mechanisms of these structures. We test the model by performing a detailed study of the assembly pathways for a two-dimensional target structure made up of 334 unique strands each of which are 42 nucleotides long. Without adjustable parameters, the model reproduces a critical temperature for the formation of the assembly that is close to the temperature at which assembly first occurs in experiments. Furthermore, the model allows us to investigate in detail the nucleation barriers and the distribution of critical nucleus shapes for the assembly of a single target structure. The assembly intermediates are compact and highly connected (although not maximally so), and classical nucleation theory provides a good fit to the height and shape of the nucleation barrier at temperatures close to where assembly first occurs.

  3. Electrostatic assembly of protein lysozyme on DNA visualized by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Tao; Wei Gang; Li Zhuang

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to study the assembly of protein lysozyme on DNA molecule. Based on the electrostatic interaction, the positively charged lysozyme can easily bind onto the negatively charged DNA molecule surface. The protein molecules appear as globular objects on the DNA scaffold, which are distinguishable in the AFM images. At the same time, lysozyme molecules can be assembled onto DNA as dense or sporadic pattern by varying the protein concentration. This work may provide fundamental aspects for building protein nanostructures and studying of DNA-protein interaction

  4. Plasmonic photonic crystals realized through DNA-programmable assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Daniel J; Zhang, Chuan; Ku, Jessie C; Zhou, Yu; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2015-01-27

    Three-dimensional dielectric photonic crystals have well-established enhanced light-matter interactions via high Q factors. Their plasmonic counterparts based on arrays of nanoparticles, however, have not been experimentally well explored owing to a lack of available synthetic routes for preparing them. However, such structures should facilitate these interactions based on the small mode volumes associated with plasmonic polarization. Herein we report strong light-plasmon interactions within 3D plasmonic photonic crystals that have lattice constants and nanoparticle diameters that can be independently controlled in the deep subwavelength size regime by using a DNA-programmable assembly technique. The strong coupling within such crystals is probed with backscattering spectra, and the mode splitting (0.10 and 0.24 eV) is defined based on dispersion diagrams. Numerical simulations predict that the crystal photonic modes (Fabry-Perot modes) can be enhanced by coating the crystals with a silver layer, achieving moderate Q factors (∼10(2)) over the visible and near-infrared spectrum.

  5. Proteomics reveals dynamic assembly of repair complexes during bypass of DNA cross-links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Räschle, Markus; Smeenk, Godelieve; Hansen, Rebecca K

    2015-01-01

    a technique called chromatin mass spectrometry (CHROMASS) to study protein recruitment dynamics during perturbed DNA replication in Xenopus egg extracts. Using CHROMASS, we systematically monitored protein assembly and disassembly on ICL-containing chromatin. Among numerous prospective DNA repair factors, we...... to damaged DNA in vertebrate cells....

  6. Unique nucleotide sequence-guided assembly of repetitive DNA parts for synthetic biology applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torella, JP; Lienert, F; Boehm, CR; Chen, JH; Way, JC; Silver, PA

    2014-08-07

    Recombination-based DNA construction methods, such as Gibson assembly, have made it possible to easily and simultaneously assemble multiple DNA parts, and they hold promise for the development and optimization of metabolic pathways and functional genetic circuits. Over time, however, these pathways and circuits have become more complex, and the increasing need for standardization and insulation of genetic parts has resulted in sequence redundancies-for example, repeated terminator and insulator sequences-that complicate recombination-based assembly. We and others have recently developed DNA assembly methods, which we refer to collectively as unique nucleotide sequence (UNS)-guided assembly, in which individual DNA parts are flanked with UNSs to facilitate the ordered, recombination-based assembly of repetitive sequences. Here we present a detailed protocol for UNS-guided assembly that enables researchers to convert multiple DNA parts into sequenced, correctly assembled constructs, or into high-quality combinatorial libraries in only 2-3 d. If the DNA parts must be generated from scratch, an additional 2-5 d are necessary. This protocol requires no specialized equipment and can easily be implemented by a student with experience in basic cloning techniques.

  7. Assembly and melting of DNA nanotubes from single-sequence tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobey, T L; Renner, S; Simmel, F C

    2009-01-01

    DNA melting and renaturation studies are an extremely valuable tool to study the kinetics and thermodynamics of duplex dissociation and reassociation reactions. These are important not only in a biological or biotechnological context, but also for DNA nanotechnology which aims at the construction of molecular materials by DNA self-assembly. We here study experimentally the formation and melting of a DNA nanotube structure, which is composed of many copies of an oligonucleotide containing several palindromic sequences. This is done using temperature-controlled UV absorption measurements correlated with atomic force microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. In the melting studies, important factors such as DNA strand concentration, hierarchy of assembly and annealing protocol are investigated. Assembly and melting of the nanotubes are shown to proceed via different pathways. Whereas assembly occurs in several hierarchical steps related to the formation of tiles, lattices and tubes, melting of DNA nanotubes appears to occur in a single step. This is proposed to relate to fundamental differences between closed, three-dimensional tube-like structures and open, two-dimensional lattices. DNA melting studies can lead to a better understanding of the many factors that affect the assembly process which will be essential for the assembly of increasingly complex DNA nanostructures.

  8. Noncanonical self-assembly of multifunctional DNA nanoflowers for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guizhi; Hu, Rong; Zhao, Zilong; Chen, Zhuo; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2013-11-06

    DNA nanotechnology has been extensively explored to assemble various functional nanostructures for versatile applications. Mediated by Watson-Crick base-pairing, these DNA nanostructures have been conventionally assembled through hybridization of many short DNA building blocks. Here we report the noncanonical self-assembly of multifunctional DNA nanostructures, termed as nanoflowers (NFs), and the versatile biomedical applications. These NFs were assembled from long DNA building blocks generated via rolling circle replication (RCR) of a designer template. NF assembly was driven by liquid crystallization and dense packaging of building blocks, without relying on Watson-Crick base-pairing between DNA strands, thereby avoiding the otherwise conventional complicated DNA sequence design. NF sizes were readily tunable in a wide range, by simply adjusting such parameters as assembly time and template sequences. NFs were exceptionally resistant to nuclease degradation, denaturation, or dissociation at extremely low concentration, presumably resulting from the dense DNA packaging in NFs. The exceptional biostability is critical for biomedical applications. By rational design, NFs can be readily incorporated with myriad functional moieties. All these properties make NFs promising for versatile applications. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, in this study, NFs were integrated with aptamers, bioimaging agents, and drug loading sites, and the resultant multifunctional NFs were demonstrated for selective cancer cell recognition, bioimaging, and targeted anticancer drug delivery.

  9. Solid-phase cloning for high-throughput assembly of single and multiple DNA parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundqvist, Magnus; Edfors, Fredrik; Sivertsson, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    present a robust automated protocol for restriction enzyme based SPC and its performance for the cloning of >60 000 unique human gene fragments into expression vectors. In addition, we report on SPC-based single-strand assembly for applications where exact control of the sequence between fragments...... is needed or where multiple inserts are to be assembled. In this approach, the solid support allows for head-to-tail assembly of DNA fragments based on hybridization and polymerase fill-in. The usefulness of head-to-tail SPC was demonstrated by assembly of >150 constructs with up to four DNA parts...

  10. Monitoring the hydration of DNA self-assembled monolayers using an extensional nanomechanical resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cagliani, Alberto; Kosaka, Priscila; Tamayo, Javier

    2012-01-01

    We have fabricated an ultrasensitive nanomechanical resonator based on the extensional vibration mode to weigh the adsorbed water on self-assembled monolayers of DNA as a function of the relative humidity. The water adsorption isotherms provide the number of adsorbed water molecules per nucleotide...... for monolayers of single stranded (ss) DNA and after hybridization with the complementary DNA strand. Our results differ from previous data obtained with bulk samples, showing the genuine behavior of these self-assembled monolayers. The hybridization cannot be inferred from the water adsorption isotherms due...... on the interaction between water and self-assembled monolayers of nucleic acids....

  11. The Assembly of DNA Amphiphiles at Liquid Crystal-Aqueous Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingsheng Zhou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we synthesized a type of DNA amphiphiles (called DNA-lipids and systematically studied its assembly behavior at the liquid crystal (LC—aqueous interface. It turned out that the pure DNA-lipids at various concentrations cannot trigger the optical transition of liquid crystals from planar anchoring to homeotropic anchoring at the liquid crystal—aqueous interface. The co-assembly of DNA-lipid and l-dilauroyl phosphatidylcholine (l-DLPC indicated that the DLPC assembled all over the LC-aqueous interface, and DNA-lipids prefer to couple with LC in certain areas, particularly in polarized and fluorescent image, forming micron sized net-like structures. The addition of DNA complementary to DNA-lipids forming double stranded DNA-lipids caused de-assembly of DNA-lipids from LC-aqueous interface, resulting in the disappearance of net-like structures, which can be visualized through polarized microscope. The optical changes combined with DNA unique designable property and specific interaction with wide range of target molecules, the DNA-lipids decorated LC-aqueous interface would provide a new platform for biological sensing and diagnosis.

  12. Self-assembled FUS binds active chromatin and regulates gene transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liuqing; Gal, Jozsef; Chen, Jing; Zhu, Haining

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease. Fused in sarcoma (FUS) is a DNA/RNA binding protein and mutations in FUS cause a subset of familial ALS. Most ALS mutations are clustered in the C-terminal nuclear localization sequence of FUS and consequently lead to the accumulation of protein inclusions in the cytoplasm. It remains debatable whether loss of FUS normal function in the nucleus or gain of toxic function in the cytoplasm plays a more critical role in the ALS etiology. Moreover, the physiological function of FUS in the nucleus remains to be fully understood. In this study, we found that a significant portion of nuclear FUS was bound to active chromatin and that the ALS mutations dramatically decreased FUS chromatin binding ability. Functionally, the chromatin binding is required for FUS transcription activation, but not for alternative splicing regulation. The N-terminal QGSY (glutamine-glycine-serine-tyrosine)-rich region (amino acids 1–164) mediates FUS self-assembly in the nucleus of mammalian cells and the self-assembly is essential for its chromatin binding and transcription activation. In addition, RNA binding is also required for FUS self-assembly and chromatin binding. Together, our results suggest a functional assembly of FUS in the nucleus under physiological conditions, which is different from the cytoplasmic inclusions. The ALS mutations can cause loss of function in the nucleus by disrupting this assembly and chromatin binding. PMID:25453086

  13. Applications of DNA self-assembled structures in nanoelectronics and plasmonics

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Boxuan

    2018-01-01

    In this thesis, the potential applications of DNA self-assembled structures were explored in both nanoelectronics and plasmonics. The works can be divided into two parts: electrical characterization of unmodified multilayered DNA origami and DNA-gold-nanoparticle conjugates after they were trapped between gold nanoelectrodes by dielectrophoresis, and the development of a novel fabrication method using DNA origami as a template for smooth, high resolution metallic nanostructures as ...

  14. Programmable DNA tile self-assembly using a hierarchical sub-tile strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaolong; Lu, Wei; Wang, Zhiyu; Pan, Linqiang; Cui, Guangzhao; Xu, Jin; LaBean, Thomas H

    2014-02-21

    DNA tile based self-assembly provides a bottom-up approach to construct desired nanostructures. DNA tiles have been directly constructed from ssDNA and readily self-assembled into 2D lattices and 3D superstructures. However, for more complex lattice designs including algorithmic assemblies requiring larger tile sets, a more modular approach could prove useful. This paper reports a new DNA 'sub-tile' strategy to easily create whole families of programmable tiles. Here, we demonstrate the stability and flexibility of our sub-tile structures by constructing 3-, 4- and 6-arm DNA tiles that are subsequently assembled into 2D lattices and 3D nanotubes according to a hierarchical design. Assembly of sub-tiles, tiles, and superstructures was analyzed using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and atomic force microscopy. DNA tile self-assembly methods provide a bottom-up approach to create desired nanostructures; the sub-tile strategy adds a useful new layer to this technique. Complex units can be made from simple parts. The sub-tile approach enables the rapid redesign and prototyping of complex DNA tile sets and tiles with asymmetric designs.

  15. Programmed self-assembly of DNA/RNA for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengfei

    Three self-assembly strategies were utilized for assembly of novel functional DNA/RNA nanostructures. RNA-DNA hybrid origami method was developed to fabricate nano-objects (ribbon, rectangle, and triangle) with precisely controlled geometry. Unlike conventional DNA origami which use long DNA single strand as scaffold, a long RNA single strand was used instead, which was folded by short DNA single strands (staples) into prescribed objects through sequence specific hybridization between RNA and DNA. Single stranded tiles (SST) and RNA-DNA hybrid origami were utilized to fabricate a variety of barcode-like nanostructures with unique patterns by expanding a plain rectangle via introducing spacers (10-bp dsDNA segment) between parallel duplexes. Finally, complex 2D array and 3D polyhedrons with multiple patterns within one structure were assembled from simple DNA motifs. Two demonstrations of biomedical applications of DNA nanotechnology were presented. Firstly, lambda-DNA was used as template to direct the fabrication of multi-component magnetic nanoparticle chains. Nuclear magnetic relaxation (NMR) characterization showed superb magnetic relaxativity of the nanoparticle chains which have large potential to be utilized as MRI contrast agents. Secondly, DNA nanotechnology was introduced into the conformational study of a routinely used catalytic DNAzyme, the RNA-cleaving 10-23 DNAzyme. The relative angle between two flanking duplexes of the catalytic core was determined (94.8°), which shall be able to provide a clue to further understanding of the cleaving mechanism of this DNAzyme from a conformational perspective.

  16. Katome: de novo DNA assembler implemented in rust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Łukasz; Nowak, Robert M.; Kuśmirek, Wiktor

    2017-08-01

    Katome is a new de novo sequence assembler written in the Rust programming language, designed with respect to future parallelization of the algorithms, run time and memory usage optimization. The application uses new algorithms for the correct assembly of repetitive sequences. Performance and quality tests were performed on various data, comparing the new application to `dnaasm', `ABySS' and `Velvet' genome assemblers. Quality tests indicate that the new assembler creates more contigs than well-established solutions, but the contigs have better quality with regard to mismatches per 100kbp and indels per 100kbp. Additionally, benchmarks indicate that the Rust-based implementation outperforms `dnaasm', `ABySS' and `Velvet' assemblers, written in C++, in terms of assembly time. Lower memory usage in comparison to `dnaasm' is observed.

  17. Assembly of presynaptic filaments. Factors affecting the assembly of RecA protein onto single-stranded DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thresher, RJ; Christiansen, Gunna; Griffith, JD

    1988-01-01

    We have previously shown that the assembly of RecA protein onto single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) facilitated by SSB protein occurs in three steps: (1) rapid binding of SSB protein to the ssDNA; (2) nucleation of RecA protein onto this template; and (3) co-operative polymerization of additional Rec......M in the presence of 12 mM-Mg2+), and relatively low concentrations of SSB protein (1 monomer per 18 nucleotides). Assembly was depressed threefold when SSB protein was added to one monomer per nine nucleotides. These effects appeared to be exerted at the nucleation step. Following nucleation, RecA protein...... assembled onto ssDNA at net rates that varied from 250 to 900 RecA protein monomers per minute, with the rate inversely related to the concentration of SSB protein. Combined sucrose sedimentation and electron microscope analysis established that SSB protein was displaced from the ssDNA during RecA protein...

  18. Fractal assembly of micrometre-scale DNA origami arrays with arbitrary patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirov, Grigory; Petersen, Philip; Qian, Lulu

    2017-12-01

    Self-assembled DNA nanostructures enable nanometre-precise patterning that can be used to create programmable molecular machines and arrays of functional materials. DNA origami is particularly versatile in this context because each DNA strand in the origami nanostructure occupies a unique position and can serve as a uniquely addressable pixel. However, the scale of such structures has been limited to about 0.05 square micrometres, hindering applications that demand a larger layout and integration with more conventional patterning methods. Hierarchical multistage assembly of simple sets of tiles can in principle overcome this limitation, but so far has not been sufficiently robust to enable successful implementation of larger structures using DNA origami tiles. Here we show that by using simple local assembly rules that are modified and applied recursively throughout a hierarchical, multistage assembly process, a small and constant set of unique DNA strands can be used to create DNA origami arrays of increasing size and with arbitrary patterns. We illustrate this method, which we term ‘fractal assembly’, by producing DNA origami arrays with sizes of up to 0.5 square micrometres and with up to 8,704 pixels, allowing us to render images such as the Mona Lisa and a rooster. We find that self-assembly of the tiles into arrays is unaffected by changes in surface patterns on the tiles, and that the yield of the fractal assembly process corresponds to about 0.95m - 1 for arrays containing m tiles. When used in conjunction with a software tool that we developed that converts an arbitrary pattern into DNA sequences and experimental protocols, our assembly method is readily accessible and will facilitate the construction of sophisticated materials and devices with sizes similar to that of a bacterium using DNA nanostructures.

  19. Dynamic protein assemblies in homologous recombination with single DNA molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, A.H.

    2007-01-01

    What happens when your DNA breaks? This thesis describes experimental work on the single-molecule level focusing on the interaction between DNA and DNA-repair proteins, in particular bacterial RecA and human Rad51, involved in homologous recombination. Homologous recombination and its central event

  20. Molecular Behavior of DNA Origami in Higher-Order Self-Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhe [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Liu, Minghui [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Lei, Wang [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Shandong Univ., Jinan (China); Nangreave, Jeanette [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Yan, Hao [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Liu, Yan [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2010-09-08

    DNA-based self-assembly is a unique method for achieving higher-order molecular architectures made possible by the fact that DNA is a programmable information-coding polymer. In the past decade, two main types of DNA nanostructures have been developed: branch-shaped DNA tiles with small dimensions (commonly up to ~20 nm) and DNA origami tiles with larger dimensions (up to ~100 nm). Here we aimed to determine the important factors involved in the assembly of DNA origami superstructures. We constructed a new series of rectangular-shaped DNA origami tiles in which parallel DNA helices are arranged in a zigzag pattern when viewed along the DNA helical axis, a design conceived in order to relax an intrinsic global twist found in the original planar, rectangular origami tiles. Self-associating zigzag tiles were found to form linear arrays in both diagonal directions, while planar tiles showed significant growth in only one direction. Although the series of zigzag tiles were designed to promote two-dimensional array formation, one-dimensional linear arrays and tubular structures were observed instead. We discovered that the dimensional aspect ratio of the origami unit tiles and intertile connection design play important roles in determining the final products, as revealed by atomic force microscopy imaging. This study provides insight into the formation of higher-order structures from self-assembling DNA origami tiles, revealing their unique behavior in comparison with conventional DNA tiles having smaller dimensions.

  1. The Oxidation Status of Mic19 Regulates MICOS Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakowska, Paulina; Jans, Daniel C; Mohanraj, Karthik; Riedel, Dietmar; Jakobs, Stefan; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2015-12-01

    The function of mitochondria depends on the proper organization of mitochondrial membranes. The morphology of the inner membrane is regulated by the recently identified mitochondrial contact site and crista organizing system (MICOS) complex. MICOS mutants exhibit alterations in crista formation, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. However, the mechanisms that underlie MICOS regulation remain poorly understood. MIC19, a peripheral protein of the inner membrane and component of the MICOS complex, was previously reported to be required for the proper function of MICOS in maintaining the architecture of the inner membrane. Here, we show that human and Saccharomyces cerevisiae MIC19 proteins undergo oxidation in mitochondria and require the mitochondrial intermembrane space assembly (MIA) pathway, which couples the oxidation and import of mitochondrial intermembrane space proteins for mitochondrial localization. Detailed analyses identified yeast Mic19 in two different redox forms. The form that contains an intramolecular disulfide bond is bound to Mic60 of the MICOS complex. Mic19 oxidation is not essential for its integration into the MICOS complex but plays a role in MICOS assembly and the maintenance of the proper inner membrane morphology. These findings suggest that Mic19 is a redox-dependent regulator of MICOS function. Copyright © 2015 Sakowska et al.

  2. Electrochemical DNA sensor by the assembly of graphene and DNA-conjugated gold nanoparticles with silver enhancement strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lei; Liu, Yang; Tang, Longhua; Li, Jinghong

    2011-11-21

    Sensitive and selective detection of DNA is in urgent need due to its important role in human bodies. Many disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease and various cancers, are closely related with DNA damage. In this work, a novel electrochemical DNA biosensor was constructed on a DNA-assembling graphene platform which provided a robust, simple and biocompatible platform with large surface area for DNA immobilization. The as-designed DNA sensor was fabricated by directly assembling captured ssDNA on a graphene-modified electrode through the π-π stacking interaction between graphene and ssDNA bases. Then, the target DNA sequence and oligonucleotide probes-labeled AuNPs were able to hybridize in a sandwich assay format, following the AuNPs-catalyzed silver deposition. The deposited silver was further detected by differential pulse voltammetry. Owing to the high DNA loading ability of graphene and the distinct signal amplification by AuNPs-catalyzed silver staining, the resulting biosensor exhibited a good analytical performance with a wide detection linear range from 200 pM to 500 nM, and a low detection limit of 72 pM. Additionally, the biosensor was proved to be able to discriminate the complementary sequence from the single-base mismatch sequence. The simple biosensor is promising in developing electronic, on-chip assays in clinical diagnosis, environmental control, and drug discovery.

  3. AFEAP cloning: a precise and efficient method for large DNA sequence assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fanli; Zang, Jinping; Zhang, Suhua; Hao, Zhimin; Dong, Jingao; Lin, Yibin

    2017-11-14

    Recent development of DNA assembly technologies has spurred myriad advances in synthetic biology, but new tools are always required for complicated scenarios. Here, we have developed an alternative DNA assembly method named AFEAP cloning (Assembly of Fragment Ends After PCR), which allows scarless, modular, and reliable construction of biological pathways and circuits from basic genetic parts. The AFEAP method requires two-round of PCRs followed by ligation of the sticky ends of DNA fragments. The first PCR yields linear DNA fragments and is followed by a second asymmetric (one primer) PCR and subsequent annealing that inserts overlapping overhangs at both sides of each DNA fragment. The overlapping overhangs of the neighboring DNA fragments annealed and the nick was sealed by T4 DNA ligase, followed by bacterial transformation to yield the desired plasmids. We characterized the capability and limitations of new developed AFEAP cloning and demonstrated its application to assemble DNA with varying scenarios. Under the optimized conditions, AFEAP cloning allows assembly of an 8 kb plasmid from 1-13 fragments with high accuracy (between 80 and 100%), and 8.0, 11.6, 19.6, 28, and 35.6 kb plasmids from five fragments at 91.67, 91.67, 88.33, 86.33, and 81.67% fidelity, respectively. AFEAP cloning also is capable to construct bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC, 200 kb) with a fidelity of 46.7%. AFEAP cloning provides a powerful, efficient, seamless, and sequence-independent DNA assembly tool for multiple fragments up to 13 and large DNA up to 200 kb that expands synthetic biologist's toolbox.

  4. Regulation and function of DNA methylation in plants and animals

    KAUST Repository

    He, Xinjian

    2011-02-15

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mark involved in diverse biological processes. In plants, DNA methylation can be established through the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway, an RNA interference pathway for transcriptional gene silencing (TGS), which requires 24-nt small interfering RNAs. In mammals, de novo DNA methylation occurs primarily at two developmental stages: during early embryogenesis and during gametogenesis. While it is not clear whether establishment of DNA methylation patterns in mammals involves RNA interference in general, de novo DNA methylation and suppression of transposons in germ cells require 24-32-nt piwi-interacting small RNAs. DNA methylation status is dynamically regulated by DNA methylation and demethylation reactions. In plants, active DNA demethylation relies on the repressor of silencing 1 family of bifunctional DNA glycosylases, which remove the 5-methylcytosine base and then cleave the DNA backbone at the abasic site, initiating a base excision repair (BER) pathway. In animals, multiple mechanisms of active DNA demethylation have been proposed, including a deaminase- and DNA glycosylase-initiated BER pathway. New information concerning the effects of various histone modifications on the establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation has broadened our understanding of the regulation of DNA methylation. The function of DNA methylation in plants and animals is also discussed in this review. © 2011 IBCB, SIBS, CAS All rights reserved.

  5. Surface and bulk dissolution properties, and selectivity of DNA-linked nanoparticle assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukatsky, D.B.; Frenkel, D.

    2005-01-01

    Using a simple mean-field model, we analyze the surface and bulk dissolution properties of DNA-linked nanoparticle assemblies. We find that the dissolution temperature and the sharpness of the dissolution profiles increase with the grafting density of the single-stranded DNA "probes" on the surface

  6. Searching for avidity by chemical ligation of combinatorially self-assembled DNA-encoded ligand libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysiak, Stefan; Hellmuth, Klaus; El-Sagheer, Afaf H; Shivalingam, Arun; Ariyurek, Yavuz; de Jong, Marco; Hollestelle, Martine J; Out, Ruud; Brown, Tom

    2017-12-19

    DNA encoded ligands are self-assembled into bivalent complexes and chemically ligated to link their identities. To demonstrate their potential as a combinatorial screening platform for avidity interactions, the optimal bivalent aptamer design (examplar ligands) for human alpha-thrombin is determined in a single round of selection and the DNA scaffold replaced with minimal impact on the final design.

  7. Accurate DNA assembly and genome engineering with optimized uracil excision cloning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaleiro, Mafalda; Kim, Se Hyeuk; Seppala, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Simple and reliable DNA editing by uracil excision (a.k.a. USER cloning) has been described by several research groups, but the optimal design of cohesive DNA ends for multigene assembly remains elusive. Here, we use two model constructs based on expression of gfp and a four-gene pathway that pro...

  8. DNA origami: a quantum leap for self-assembly of complex structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Thomas; Voigt, Niels Vinther; Nangreave, Jeanette

    2011-01-01

    The spatially controlled positioning of functional materials by self-assembly is one of the fundamental visions of nanotechnology. Major steps towards this goal have been achieved using DNA as a programmable building block. This tutorial review will focus on one of the most promising methods: DNA...... origami. The basic design principles, organization of a variety of functional materials and recent implementation of DNA robotics are discussed together with future challenges and opportunities....

  9. Self-Assembly of 3D DNA Crystals Containing a Torsionally Stressed Component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Carina; Birktoft, Jens J; Ohayon, Yoel P; Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard; Abdallah, Hatem; Sha, Ruojie; Stojanoff, Vivian; Mao, Chengde; Seeman, Nadrian C

    2017-11-16

    There is an increasing appreciation for structural diversity of DNA that is of interest to both DNA nanotechnology and basic biology. Here, we have explored how DNA responds to torsional stress by building on a previously reported two-turn DNA tensegrity triangle and demonstrating that we could introduce an extra nucleotide pair (np) into the original sequence without affecting assembly and crystallization. The extra np imposes a significant torsional stress, which is accommodated by global changes throughout the B-DNA duplex and the DNA lattice. The work reveals a near-atomic structure of naked DNA under a torsional stress of approximately 14%, and thus provides an example of DNA distortions that occur without a requirement for either an external energy source or the free energy available from protein or drug binding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Controlling Self-Assembly Kinetics of DNA-Functionalized Liposomes Using Toehold Exchange Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolini, Lucia; Kotar, Jurij; Di Michele, Lorenzo; Mognetti, Bortolo M

    2016-02-23

    The selectivity of Watson-Crick base pairing has allowed the design of DNA-based functional materials bearing an unprecedented level of accuracy. Examples include DNA origami, made of tiles assembling into arbitrarily complex shapes, and DNA coated particles featuring rich phase behaviors. Frequently, the realization of conceptual DNA-nanotechnology designs has been hampered by the lack of strategies for effectively controlling relaxations. In this article, we address the problem of kinetic control on DNA-mediated interactions between Brownian objects. We design a kinetic pathway based on toehold-exchange mechanisms that enables rearrangement of DNA bonds without the need for thermal denaturation, and test it on suspensions of DNA-functionalized liposomes, demonstrating tunability of aggregation rates over more than 1 order of magnitude. While the possibility to design complex phase behaviors using DNA as a glue is already well recognized, our results demonstrate control also over the kinetics of such systems.

  11. Adsorption behavior of DNA-wrapped carbon nanotubes on self-assembled monolayer surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangmeister, Rebecca A; Maslar, James E; Opdahl, Aric; Tarlov, Michael J

    2007-05-22

    We have examined the adsorption of DNA-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (DNA-SWNTs) on hydrophobic, hydrophilic, and charged surfaces of alkylthiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold. Our goal is to understand how DNA-SWNTs interact with surfaces of varying chemical functionality. These samples were characterized using reflection absorption FTIR (RAIRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Raman spectroscopy. We have found that DNA-SWNTs preferentially adsorb to positively charged amine-terminated SAMs and to bare gold surfaces versus hydrophobic methyl-terminated or negatively charged carboxylic acid-terminated SAMs. Examination of the adsorption on gold of single-strand DNA (ssDNA) of the same sequence used to wrap the SWNTs suggests that the DNA wrapping plays a role in the adsorption behavior of DNA-SWNTs.

  12. Self-assembling protein arrays on DNA chips by auto-labeling fusion proteins with a single DNA address

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, M.A.; Litjens, R.H.G.M.

    2006-01-01

    The high-throughput deposition of recombinant proteins on chips, beads or biosensor devices would be greatly facilitated by the implementation of self-assembly concepts. DNA-directed immobilization via conjugation of proteins to an oligonucleotide would be preeminently suited for this purpose. Here,

  13. DNA self-assembly-driven positioning of molecular components on nanopatterned surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymonik, M.; Davies, A. G.; Wälti, C.

    2016-09-01

    We present a method for the specific, spatially targeted attachment of DNA molecules to lithographically patterned gold surfaces—demonstrated by bridging DNA strands across nanogap electrode structures. An alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer was employed as a molecular resist, which could be selectively removed via electrochemical desorption, allowing the binding of thiolated DNA anchoring oligonucleotides to each electrode. After introducing a bridging DNA molecule with single-stranded ends complementary to the electrode-tethered anchoring oligonucleotides, the positioning of the DNA molecule across the electrode gap, driven by self-assembly, occurred autonomously. This demonstrates control of molecule positioning with resolution limited only by the underlying patterned structure, does not require any alignment, is carried out entirely under biologically compatible conditions, and is scalable.

  14. 7 CFR 301.45-7 - Assembly and inspection of regulated articles and outdoor household articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Assembly and inspection of regulated articles and outdoor household articles. 301.45-7 Section 301.45-7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... QUARANTINE NOTICES Gypsy Moth § 301.45-7 Assembly and inspection of regulated articles and outdoor household...

  15. Self-assembly of fully addressable DNA nanostructures from double crossover tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Lin, Tong; Zhang, Suoyu; Bai, Tanxi; Mi, Yongli; Wei, Bryan

    2016-09-19

    DNA origami and single-stranded tile (SST) are two proven approaches to self-assemble finite-size complex DNA nanostructures. The construction elements appeared in structures from these two methods can also be found in multi-stranded DNA tiles such as double crossover tiles. Here we report the design and observation of four types of finite-size lattices with four different double crossover tiles, respectively, which, we believe, in terms of both complexity and robustness, will be rival to DNA origami and SST structures. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. DNA self-assembly on graphene surface studied by SERS mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Botti, Sabina; Rufoloni, Alessandro; Laurenzi, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    The self-assembly of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) segments on two variations of graphene surfaces having nano-platelets with different lateral sizes and thicknesses was investigated using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. Due...... nano-platelets. Results from the EIS analysis supported the SERS findings and confirmed that SERS mapping is a reliable method for a rapid monitoring of the procedures used to interface DNA with graphene surfaces. The present study, linking DNA anchoring morphology to the conductive properties of nano...

  17. Gold-nanoparticle-mediated jigsaw-puzzle-like assembly of supersized plasmonic DNA origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Guangbao; Li, Jiang; Chao, Jie; Pei, Hao; Liu, Huajie; Zhao, Yun; Shi, Jiye; Huang, Qing; Wang, Lianhui; Huang, Wei; Fan, Chunhai

    2015-03-02

    DNA origami has rapidly emerged as a powerful and programmable method to construct functional nanostructures. However, the size limitation of approximately 100 nm in classic DNA origami hampers its plasmonic applications. Herein, we report a jigsaw-puzzle-like assembly strategy mediated by gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to break the size limitation of DNA origami. We demonstrated that oligonucleotide-functionalized AuNPs function as universal joint units for the one-pot assembly of parent DNA origami of triangular shape to form sub-microscale super-origami nanostructures. AuNPs anchored at predefined positions of the super-origami exhibited strong interparticle plasmonic coupling. This AuNP-mediated strategy offers new opportunities to drive macroscopic self-assembly and to fabricate well-defined nanophotonic materials and devices. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Optimizing DNA assembly based on statistical language modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Gang; Zhang, Shemin; Dong, Yafei

    2017-12-15

    By successively assembling genetic parts such as BioBrick according to grammatical models, complex genetic constructs composed of dozens of functional blocks can be built. However, usually every category of genetic parts includes a few or many parts. With increasing quantity of genetic parts, the process of assembling more than a few sets of these parts can be expensive, time consuming and error prone. At the last step of assembling it is somewhat difficult to decide which part should be selected. Based on statistical language model, which is a probability distribution P(s) over strings S that attempts to reflect how frequently a string S occurs as a sentence, the most commonly used parts will be selected. Then, a dynamic programming algorithm was designed to figure out the solution of maximum probability. The algorithm optimizes the results of a genetic design based on a grammatical model and finds an optimal solution. In this way, redundant operations can be reduced and the time and cost required for conducting biological experiments can be minimized. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Stepwise Assembly and Characterization of DNA Linked Two-Color Quantum Dot Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopersmith, Kaitlin; Han, Hyunjoo; Maye, Mathew M

    2015-07-14

    The DNA-mediated self-assembly of multicolor quantum dot (QD) clusters via a stepwise approach is described. The CdSe/ZnS QDs were synthesized and functionalized with an amphiphilic copolymer, followed by ssDNA conjugation. At each functionalization step, the QDs were purified via gradient ultracentrifugation, which was found to remove excess polymer and QD aggregates, allowing for improved conjugation yields and assembly reactivity. The QDs were then assembled and disassembled in a stepwise manner at a ssDNA functionalized magnetic colloid, which provided a convenient way to remove unreacted QDs and ssDNA impurities. After assembly/disassembly, the clusters' optical characteristics were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and the assembly morphology and stoichiometry was imaged via electron microscopy. The results indicate that a significant amount of QD-to-QD energy transfer occurred in the clusters, which was studied as a function of increasing acceptor-to-donor ratios, resulting in increased QD acceptor emission intensities compared to controls.

  20. Understanding the Elementary Steps in DNA Tile-Based Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shuoxing; Hong, Fan; Hu, Huiyu; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2017-09-26

    Although many models have been developed to guide the design and implementation of DNA tile-based self-assembly systems with increasing complexity, the fundamental assumptions of the models have not been thoroughly tested. To expand the quantitative understanding of DNA tile-based self-assembly and to test the fundamental assumptions of self-assembly models, we investigated DNA tile attachment to preformed "multi-tile" arrays in real time and obtained the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of single tile attachment in various sticky end association scenarios. With more sticky ends, tile attachment becomes more thermostable with an approximately linear decrease in the free energy change (more negative). The total binding free energy of sticky ends is partially compromised by a sequence-independent energy penalty when tile attachment forms a constrained configuration: "loop". The minimal loop is a 2 × 2 tetramer (Loop4). The energy penalty of loops of 4, 6, and 8 tiles was analyzed with the independent loop model assuming no interloop tension, which is generalizable to arbitrary tile configurations. More sticky ends also contribute to a faster on-rate under isothermal conditions when nucleation is the rate-limiting step. Incorrect sticky end contributes to neither the thermostability nor the kinetics. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of DNA tile attachment elucidated here will contribute to the future improvement and optimization of tile assembly modeling, precise control of experimental conditions, and structural design for error-free self-assembly.

  1. Designing and Implementing Algorithmic DNA Assembly Pipelines for Multi-Gene Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Szu-Yi; Smanski, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    Advances in DNA synthesis and assembly technology allow for the high-throughput fabrication of hundreds to thousands of multi-part genetic constructs in a short time. This allows for rapid hypothesis-testing and genetic optimization in multi-gene biological systems. Here, we discuss key considerations to design and implement an algorithmic DNA assembly pipeline that provides the freedom to change nearly any design variable in a multi-gene system. In addition to considerations for pipeline design, we describe protocols for three useful molecular biology techniques in plasmid construction.

  2. Parallel Assisted Assembly of Multilayer DNA and Protein Nanoparticle Structures Using a CMOS Electronic Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Michael J.; Dehlinger, Dietrich A.; Sullivan, Benjamin D.

    2006-09-01

    A CMOS electronic microarray device was used to carry out the rapid parallel assembly of functionalized nanoparticles into multilayer structures. Electronic microarrays produce reconfigurable DC electric fields that allow DNA, proteins as well as charged molecules to be rapidly transported from the bulk solution and addressed to specifically activated sites on the array surface. Such a device was used to carry out the assisted self-assembly DNA, biotin and streptavidin derivatized fluorescent nanoparticles into multilayer structures. Nanoparticle addressing could be carried out in about 15 seconds, and forty depositions of nanoparticles were completed in less than one hour. The final multilayered 3D nanostructures were verified by scanning electron microscopy.

  3. Cooperative assembly of Co-Smad4 MH1 with R-Smad1/3 MH1 on DNA: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guihong Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Smads, the homologs of Sma and MAD proteins, play a key role in gene expression regulation in the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β signaling pathway. Recent experimental studies have revealed that Smad4/R-Smad heterodimers bound on DNA are energetically more favorable than homodimeric R-Smad/R-Smad complexes bound on DNA, which indicates that Smad4 might act as binding vehicle to cooperatively assemble with activated R-Smads on DNA in the nucleus. However, the details of interaction mechanism for cooperative recruitment of Smad4 protein to R-Smad proteins on DNA, and allosteric communication between the Smad4-DNA and R-Smad-DNA interfaces via DNA mediating are not yet clear so far. METHODOLOGY: In the present work, we have constructed a series of Smadn+DNA+Smadn (n = 1, 3, 4 models and carried out molecular dynamics simulations, free energy calculations and DNA dynamics analysis for them to study the interaction properties of Smadn (n = 1, 3, 4 with DNA molecule. RESULTS: The results revealed that the binding of Smad4 protein to DNA molecule facilitates energetically the formation of the heteromeric Smad4+DNA+Smad1/3 complex by increasing the affinity of Smad1/3 with DNA molecule. Further investigations through the residue/base motion correlation and DNA dynamics analyses predicted that the binding of Smad4 protein to DNA molecule in the heteromeric Smad4+DNA+Smad1/3 model induces an allosteric communication from the Smad4-DNA interface to Smad1/Smad3-DNA interface via DNA base-pair helical motions, surface conformation changes and new hydrogen bond formations. The present work theoretically explains the mechanism of cooperative recruitment of Smad4 protein to Smad1/3 protein via DNA-mediated indirect readout mode in the nucleus.

  4. RADOM, an efficient in vivo method for assembling designed DNA fragments up to 10 kb long in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiuhui; Jia, Bin; Mitchell, Leslie A; Luo, Jingchuan; Yang, Kun; Zeller, Karen I; Zhang, Wenqian; Xu, Zhuwei; Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Bader, Joel S; Boeke, Jef D; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2015-03-20

    We describe rapid assembly of DNA overlapping multifragments (RADOM), an improved assembly method via homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which combines assembly in yeasto with blue/white screening in Escherichia coli. We show that RADOM can successfully assemble ∼3 and ∼10 kb DNA fragments that are highly similar to the yeast genome rapidly and accurately. This method was tested in the Build-A-Genome course by undergraduate students, where 125 ∼3 kb "minichunks" from the synthetic yeast genome project Sc2.0 were assembled. Here, 122 out of 125 minichunks achieved insertions with correct sizes, and 102 minichunks were sequenced verified. As this method reduces the time-consuming and labor-intensive efforts of yeast assembly by improving the screening efficiency for correct assemblies, it may find routine applications in the construction of DNA fragments, especially in hierarchical assembly projects.

  5. Recruitment, assembly, and molecular architecture of the SpoIIIE DNA pump revealed by superresolution microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Bernard Fiche

    Full Text Available ATP-fuelled molecular motors are responsible for rapid and specific transfer of double-stranded DNA during several fundamental processes, such as cell division, sporulation, bacterial conjugation, and viral DNA transport. A dramatic example of intercompartmental DNA transfer occurs during sporulation in Bacillus subtilis, in which two-thirds of a chromosome is transported across a division septum by the SpoIIIE ATPase. Here, we use photo-activated localization microscopy, structured illumination microscopy, and fluorescence fluctuation microscopy to investigate the mechanism of recruitment and assembly of the SpoIIIE pump and the molecular architecture of the DNA translocation complex. We find that SpoIIIE assembles into ∼45 nm complexes that are recruited to nascent sites of septation, and are subsequently escorted by the constriction machinery to the center of sporulation and division septa. SpoIIIE complexes contain 47±20 SpoIIIE molecules, a majority of which are assembled into hexamers. Finally, we show that directional DNA translocation leads to the establishment of a compartment-specific, asymmetric complex that exports DNA. Our data are inconsistent with the notion that SpoIIIE forms paired DNA conducting channels across fused membranes. Rather, our results support a model in which DNA translocation occurs through an aqueous DNA-conducting pore that could be structurally maintained by the divisional machinery, with SpoIIIE acting as a checkpoint preventing membrane fusion until completion of chromosome segregation. Our findings and proposed mechanism, and our unique combination of innovating methodologies, are relevant to the understanding of bacterial cell division, and may illuminate the mechanisms of other complex machineries involved in DNA conjugation and protein transport across membranes.

  6. Evidence of impurities in thiolated single-stranded DNA oligomers and their effect on DNA self-assembly on gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Ying; Canavan, Heather E; Gamble, Lara J; Castner, David G

    2005-05-24

    The diversity of techniques used in the synthesis, treatment, and purification of the single-stranded DNA oligomers containing a thiol anchor group (SH-ssDNA) has led to a significant variation in the purity of commercially available SH-ssDNA. In this work, we use X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to study how the impurities present in commercially synthesized SH-ssDNA oligomers affected the structure of the resulting DNA films on Au. XPS results indicate that two of the purchased SH-ssDNA oligomers contain excess carbon and sulfur. The molecular fragmentation patterns obtained with ToF-SIMS were used to determine the identity of several contaminants in the DNA films, including poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), lipid molecules, and sulfur-containing molecules. In particular, the ToF-SIMS results determined that the excess sulfur detected by XPS was due to the presence of dithiothreitol, a reductant often used to cleave disulfide precursors. Furthermore, we found that the SH-ssDNA self-assembly process is affected by the presence of these contaminants. When relatively pure SH-ssDNA is used to prepare the DNA films, the P, N, O, and C atomic percentages were observed by XPS to increase over a 24-h time period. In contrast, surfaces prepared using SH-ssDNA containing higher levels of contaminants did not follow this trend. XPS result indicates that, after the initial SH-ssDNA adsorption, the remaining material incorporated into these films was due to contamination.

  7. Building superlattices from individual nanoparticles via template-confined DNA-mediated assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qing-Yuan; Mason, Jarad A.; Li, Zhongyang; Zhou, Wenjie; O’Brien, Matthew N.; Brown, Keith A.; Jones, Matthew R.; Butun, Serkan; Lee, Byeongdu; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Aydin, Koray; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2018-02-01

    A polymer pore template can control the order of assembly of nanoparticles into well-defined stacks and create superlattices. Lin et al. used DNA strands on gold nanoparticles to control interparticle distance. The DNA strands contained modified adenines with more rigid ribose groups that formed stronger base pairs. The height of the stacks of three different types of gold nanoparticle could be changed with different solvents, which in turn changed their optical response.

  8. Simple cloning and DNA assembly in Escherichia coli by prolonged overlap extension PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Chun; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2014-01-01

    We developed a simple method (Simple Cloning) for subcloning one, two, or three DNA fragments into any location of a targeted vector without the need for restriction enzyme, ligase, exonuclease, or recombinase. This cloning technology can be applied to a few common Escherichia coli hosts (e.g., BL21(DE3), DH5α, JM109, TOP10). The protocol includes three steps: (a) linear DNA fragments (i.e., the insert DNA and the vector backbone) with two overlap ends were generated by regular high-fidelity PCR, (b) the DNA multimers were generated based on these equimolar DNA templates by using prolonged overlap extension PCR (POE-PCR) without primers added, and (c) the POE-PCR product was transformed to E. coli strains directly. Because positive colony efficiencies are very high, it is not necessary to identify desired clones by using colony PCR. Simple Cloning provides a new cloning and DNA assembly method with great simplicity and flexibility.

  9. Dynamic protein assembly by programmable DNA strand displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rebecca P.; Blackstock, Daniel; Sun, Qing; Chen, Wilfred

    2018-03-01

    Inspired by the remarkable ability of natural protein switches to sense and respond to a wide range of environmental queues, here we report a strategy to engineer synthetic protein switches by using DNA strand displacement to dynamically organize proteins with highly diverse and complex logic gate architectures. We show that DNA strand displacement can be used to dynamically control the spatial proximity and the corresponding fluorescence resonance energy transfer between two fluorescent proteins. Performing Boolean logic operations enabled the explicit control of protein proximity using multi-input, reversible and amplification architectures. We further demonstrate the power of this technology beyond sensing by achieving dynamic control of an enzyme cascade. Finally, we establish the utility of the approach as a synthetic computing platform that drives the dynamic reconstitution of a split enzyme for targeted prodrug activation based on the sensing of cancer-specific miRNAs.

  10. Structurally Ordered Nanowire Formation from Co-Assembly of DNA Origami and Collagen-Mimetic Peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Tao [Department; Meyer, Travis A. [Wallace; Modlin, Charles [Department; Zuo, Xiaobing [X-ray; Conticello, Vincent P. [Department; Ke, Yonggang [Wallace

    2017-10-02

    We describe the co-assembly of two different building units: collagen-mimetic peptides and DNA origami. Two peptides CP++ and sCP(++) are designed with a sequence comprising a central block (Pro-Hyp-Gly) and two positively charged domains (Pro-Arg-Gly) at both N- and C-termini. Co-assembly of peptides and DNA origami two-layer (TL) nanosheets affords the formation of one-dimensional nanowires with repeating periodicity of similar to 10 nm. Structural analyses suggest a face-to-face stacking of DNA nanosheets with peptides aligned perpendicularly to the sheet surfaces. We demonstrate the potential of selective peptide-DNA association between face-to-face and edge-to-edge packing by tailoring the size of DNA nanostructures. This study presents an attractive strategy to create hybrid biomolecular assemblies from peptide and DNA-based building blocks that takes advantage of the intrinsic chemical and physical properties of the respective components to encode structural and, potentially, functional complexity within readily accessible biomimetic materials.

  11. Nuclear translocation contributes to regulation of DNA excision repair activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Nina Østergaard; Andersen, Sofie Dabros; Lützen, Anne

    2009-01-01

    DNA mutations are circumvented by dedicated specialized excision repair systems, such as the base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mismatch repair (MMR) pathways. Although the individual repair pathways have distinct roles in suppressing changes in the nuclear DNA, it ...... co-import appears to be a mechanism employed by the composite repair systems NER and MMR to enhance and regulate nuclear accumulation of repair proteins thereby ensuring faithful DNA repair....

  12. Norgal: extraction and de novo assembly of mitochondrial DNA from whole-genome sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nakeeb, Kosai; Petersen, Thomas Nordahl; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    2017-11-21

    Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) projects provide short read nucleotide sequences from nuclear and possibly organelle DNA depending on the source of origin. Mitochondrial DNA is present in animals and fungi, while plants contain DNA from both mitochondria and chloroplasts. Current techniques for separating organelle reads from nuclear reads in WGS data require full reference or partial seed sequences for assembling. Norgal (de Novo ORGAneLle extractor) avoids this requirement by identifying a high frequency subset of k-mers that are predominantly of mitochondrial origin and performing a de novo assembly on a subset of reads that contains these k-mers. The method was applied to WGS data from a panda, brown algae seaweed, butterfly and filamentous fungus. We were able to extract full circular mitochondrial genomes and obtained sequence identities to the reference sequences in the range from 98.5 to 99.5%. We also assembled the chloroplasts of grape vines and cucumbers using Norgal together with seed-based de novo assemblers. Norgal is a pipeline that can extract and assemble full or partial mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes from WGS short reads without prior knowledge. The program is available at: https://bitbucket.org/kosaidtu/norgal .

  13. Toward reliable algorithmic self-assembly of DNA tiles: a fixed-width cellular automaton pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujibayashi, Kenichi; Hariadi, Rizal; Park, Sung Ha; Winfree, Erik; Murata, Satoshi

    2008-07-01

    Bottom-up fabrication of nanoscale structures relies on chemical processes to direct self-assembly. The complexity, precision, and yield achievable by a one-pot reaction are limited by our ability to encode assembly instructions into the molecules themselves. Nucleic acids provide a platform for investigating these issues, as molecular structure and intramolecular interactions can encode growth rules. Here, we use DNA tiles and DNA origami to grow crystals containing a cellular automaton pattern. In a one-pot annealing reaction, 250 DNA strands first assemble into a set of 10 free tile types and a seed structure, then the free tiles grow algorithmically from the seed according to the automaton rules. In our experiments, crystals grew to approximately 300 nm long, containing approximately 300 tiles with an initial assembly error rate of approximately 1.4% per tile. This work provides evidence that programmable molecular self-assembly may be sufficient to create a wide range of complex objects in one-pot reactions.

  14. One-pot DNA construction for synthetic biology: the Modular Overlap-Directed Assembly with Linkers (MODAL) strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casini, Arturo; MacDonald, James T.; Jonghe, Joachim De; Christodoulou, Georgia; Freemont, Paul S.; Baldwin, Geoff S.; Ellis, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Overlap-directed DNA assembly methods allow multiple DNA parts to be assembled together in one reaction. These methods, which rely on sequence homology between the ends of DNA parts, have become widely adopted in synthetic biology, despite being incompatible with a key principle of engineering: modularity. To answer this, we present MODAL: a Modular Overlap-Directed Assembly with Linkers strategy that brings modularity to overlap-directed methods, allowing assembly of an initial set of DNA parts into a variety of arrangements in one-pot reactions. MODAL is accompanied by a custom software tool that designs overlap linkers to guide assembly, allowing parts to be assembled in any specified order and orientation. The in silico design of synthetic orthogonal overlapping junctions allows for much greater efficiency in DNA assembly for a variety of different methods compared with using non-designed sequence. In tests with three different assembly technologies, the MODAL strategy gives assembly of both yeast and bacterial plasmids, composed of up to five DNA parts in the kilobase range with efficiencies of between 75 and 100%. It also seamlessly allows mutagenesis to be performed on any specified DNA parts during the process, allowing the one-step creation of construct libraries valuable for synthetic biology applications. PMID:24153110

  15. Self-assembly of complex two-dimensional shapes from single-stranded DNA tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bryan; Vhudzijena, Michelle K; Robaszewski, Joanna; Yin, Peng

    2015-05-08

    Current methods in DNA nano-architecture have successfully engineered a variety of 2D and 3D structures using principles of self-assembly. In this article, we describe detailed protocols on how to fabricate sophisticated 2D shapes through the self-assembly of uniquely addressable single-stranded DNA tiles which act as molecular pixels on a molecular canvas. Each single-stranded tile (SST) is a 42-nucleotide DNA strand composed of four concatenated modular domains which bind to four neighbors during self-assembly. The molecular canvas is a rectangle structure self-assembled from SSTs. A prescribed complex 2D shape is formed by selecting the constituent molecular pixels (SSTs) from a 310-pixel molecular canvas and then subjecting the corresponding strands to one-pot annealing. Due to the modular nature of the SST approach we demonstrate the scalability, versatility and robustness of this method. Compared with alternative methods, the SST method enables a wider selection of information polymers and sequences through the use of de novo designed and synthesized short DNA strands.

  16. Engineered Diblock Polypeptides Improve DNA and Gold Solubility during Molecular Assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Estrich, Nicole A.; Hernandez-Garcia, Armando; Vries, De Renko; LaBean, Thomas H.

    2017-01-01

    Programmed molecular recognition is being developed for the bionanofabrication of mixed organic/inorganic supramolecular assemblies for applications in electronics, photonics, and medicine. For example, DNA-based nanotechnology seeks to exploit the easily programmed complementary base-pairing of

  17. 7 CFR 301.50-7 - Assembly and inspection of regulated articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Assembly and inspection of regulated articles. 301.50-7 Section 301.50-7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Pine Shoot Beetle § 301.50-7 Assembly and inspection of...

  18. 7 CFR 301.51-7 - Assembly and inspection of regulated articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Assembly and inspection of regulated articles. 301.51-7 Section 301.51-7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Asian Longhorned Beetle § 301.51-7 Assembly and inspection of...

  19. Interactions between Cytochrome c and DNA Strands Self-Assembled at Gold Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Ruojun; Wang, Lihua; Wan, Ying; Zhang, Jiong; Song, Shiping; Zhang, Zhizhou; Fan, Chunhai; He, Lin

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we reported the investigation on the interaction between DNA strands self-assembled at gold electrodes and an electron transfer protein, cytochrome c. We observed that cytochrome c exhibited well-defined electrochemistry in both double-stranded and single-stranded DNA films. This suggested that the electron transfer reaction of cytochrome c arose possibly due to the electron hopping along DNA strands rather than wiring along the double helix. We also compared the heterogeneous electron transfer rate of cytochrome c with that of a ruthenium complex, which further confirmed this mechanism.

  20. Structural mechanisms of DREAM complex assembly and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiley, Keelan Z; Liban, Tyler J; Felthousen, Jessica G; Ramanan, Parameshwaran; Litovchick, Larisa; Rubin, Seth M

    2015-05-01

    The DREAM complex represses cell cycle genes during quiescence through scaffolding MuvB proteins with E2F4/5 and the Rb tumor suppressor paralog p107 or p130. Upon cell cycle entry, MuvB dissociates from p107/p130 and recruits B-Myb and FoxM1 for up-regulating mitotic gene expression. To understand the biochemical mechanisms underpinning DREAM function and regulation, we investigated the structural basis for DREAM assembly. We identified a sequence in the MuvB component LIN52 that binds directly to the pocket domains of p107 and p130 when phosphorylated on the DYRK1A kinase site S28. A crystal structure of the LIN52-p107 complex reveals that LIN52 uses a suboptimal LxSxExL sequence together with the phosphate at nearby S28 to bind the LxCxE cleft of the pocket domain with high affinity. The structure explains the specificity for p107/p130 over Rb in the DREAM complex and how the complex is disrupted by viral oncoproteins. Based on insights from the structure, we addressed how DREAM is disassembled upon cell cycle entry. We found that p130 and B-Myb can both bind the core MuvB complex simultaneously but that cyclin-dependent kinase phosphorylation of p130 weakens its association. Together, our data inform a novel target interface for studying MuvB and p130 function and the design of inhibitors that prevent tumor escape in quiescence. © 2015 Guiley et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  1. Complex shapes self-assembled from single-stranded DNA tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bryan; Dai, Mingjie; Yin, Peng

    2012-05-30

    Programmed self-assembly of strands of nucleic acid has proved highly effective for creating a wide range of structures with desired shapes. A particularly successful implementation is DNA origami, in which a long scaffold strand is folded by hundreds of short auxiliary strands into a complex shape. Modular strategies are in principle simpler and more versatile and have been used to assemble DNA or RNA tiles into periodic and algorithmic two-dimensional lattices, extended ribbons and tubes, three-dimensional crystals, polyhedra and simple finite two-dimensional shapes. But creating finite yet complex shapes from a large number of uniquely addressable tiles remains challenging. Here we solve this problem with the simplest tile form, a 'single-stranded tile' (SST) that consists of a 42-base strand of DNA composed entirely of concatenated sticky ends and that binds to four local neighbours during self-assembly. Although ribbons and tubes with controlled circumferences have been created using the SST approach, we extend it to assemble complex two-dimensional shapes and tubes from hundreds (in some cases more than one thousand) distinct tiles. Our main design feature is a self-assembled rectangle that serves as a molecular canvas, with each of its constituent SST strands--folded into a 3 nm-by-7 nm tile and attached to four neighbouring tiles--acting as a pixel. A desired shape, drawn on the canvas, is then produced by one-pot annealing of all those strands that correspond to pixels covered by the target shape; the remaining strands are excluded. We implement the strategy with a master strand collection that corresponds to a 310-pixel canvas, and then use appropriate strand subsets to construct 107 distinct and complex two-dimensional shapes, thereby establishing SST assembly as a simple, modular and robust framework for constructing nanostructures with prescribed shapes from short synthetic DNA strands.

  2. Programming Self-Assembly of DNA Origami Honeycomb Two-Dimensional Lattices and Plasmonic Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengfei; Gaitanaros, Stavros; Lee, Seungwoo; Bathe, Mark; Shih, William M; Ke, Yonggang

    2016-06-22

    Scaffolded DNA origami has proven to be a versatile method for generating functional nanostructures with prescribed sub-100 nm shapes. Programming DNA-origami tiles to form large-scale 2D lattices that span hundreds of nanometers to the micrometer scale could provide an enabling platform for diverse applications ranging from metamaterials to surface-based biophysical assays. Toward this end, here we design a family of hexagonal DNA-origami tiles using computer-aided design and demonstrate successful self-assembly of micrometer-scale 2D honeycomb lattices and tubes by controlling their geometric and mechanical properties including their interconnecting strands. Our results offer insight into programmed self-assembly of low-defect supra-molecular DNA-origami 2D lattices and tubes. In addition, we demonstrate that these DNA-origami hexagon tiles and honeycomb lattices are versatile platforms for assembling optical metamaterials via programmable spatial arrangement of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) into cluster and superlattice geometries.

  3. Crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protein clusters assembled on to damaged DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miggiano, Riccardo; Perugino, Giuseppe; Ciaramella, Maria; Serpe, Mario; Rejman, Dominik; Páv, Ondřej; Pohl, Radek; Garavaglia, Silvia; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rizzi, Menico; Rossi, Franca

    2016-01-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MtOGT) contributes to protect the bacterial GC-rich genome against the pro-mutagenic potential of O(6)-methylated guanine in DNA. Several strains of M. tuberculosis found worldwide encode a point-mutated O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (OGT) variant (MtOGT-R37L), which displays an arginine-to-leucine substitution at position 37 of the poorly functionally characterized N-terminal domain of the protein. Although the impact of this mutation on the MtOGT activity has not yet been proved in vivo, we previously demonstrated that a recombinant MtOGT-R37L variant performs a suboptimal alkylated-DNA repair in vitro, suggesting a direct role for the Arg(37)-bearing region in catalysis. The crystal structure of MtOGT complexed with modified DNA solved in the present study reveals details of the protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions occurring during alkylated-DNA binding, and the protein capability also to host unmodified bases inside the active site, in a fully extrahelical conformation. Our data provide the first experimental picture at the atomic level of a possible mode of assembling three adjacent MtOGT monomers on the same monoalkylated dsDNA molecule, and disclose the conformational flexibility of discrete regions of MtOGT, including the Arg(37)-bearing random coil. This peculiar structural plasticity of MtOGT could be instrumental to proper protein clustering at damaged DNA sites, as well as to protein-DNA complexes disassembling on repair. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  4. Self-Assembling Molecular Logic Gates Based on DNA Crossover Tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Eleanor A; Peterson, Evan; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M

    2017-07-05

    DNA-based computational hardware has attracted ever-growing attention due to its potential to be useful in the analysis of complex mixtures of biological markers. Here we report the design of self-assembling logic gates that recognize DNA inputs and assemble into crossover tiles when the output signal is high; the crossover structures disassemble to form separate DNA stands when the output is low. The output signal can be conveniently detected by fluorescence using a molecular beacon probe as a reporter. AND, NOT, and OR logic gates were designed. We demonstrate that the gates can connect to each other to produce other logic functions. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Software-Supported USER Cloning Strategies for Site-Directed Mutagenesis and DNA Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genee, Hans Jasper; Bonde, Mads Tvillinggaard; Bagger, Frederik Otzen

    2015-01-01

    USER cloning is a fast and versatile method for engineering of plasmid DNA. We have developed a user friendly Web server tool that automates the design of optimal PCR primers for several distinct USER cloning-based applications. Our Web server, named AMUSER (Automated DNA Modifications with USER...... cloning), facilitates DNA assembly and introduction of virtually any type of site-directed mutagenesis by designing optimal PCR primers for the desired genetic changes. To demonstrate the utility, we designed primers for a simultaneous two-position site-directed mutagenesis of green fluorescent protein...... (GFP) to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), which in a single step reaction resulted in a 94% cloning efficiency. AMUSER also supports degenerate nucleotide primers, single insert combinatorial assembly, and flexible parameters for PCR amplification. AMUSER is freely available online at ....

  6. Self-assembly of genetically encoded DNA-protein hybrid nanoscale shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praetorius, Florian; Dietz, Hendrik

    2017-03-24

    We describe an approach to bottom-up fabrication that allows integration of the functional diversity of proteins into designed three-dimensional structural frameworks. A set of custom staple proteins based on transcription activator-like effector proteins folds a double-stranded DNA template into a user-defined shape. Each staple protein is designed to recognize and closely link two distinct double-helical DNA sequences at separate positions on the template. We present design rules for constructing megadalton-scale DNA-protein hybrid shapes; introduce various structural motifs, such as custom curvature, corners, and vertices; and describe principles for creating multilayer DNA-protein objects with enhanced rigidity. We demonstrate self-assembly of our hybrid nanostructures in one-pot mixtures that include the genetic information for the designed proteins, the template DNA, RNA polymerase, ribosomes, and cofactors for transcription and translation. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Feedback regulation of DNA methyltransferase gene expression by methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, A; Cervoni, N; Pinard, M; Szyf, M

    1999-08-01

    This paper tests the hypothesis that expression of the DNA methyltransferase, dnmt1, gene is regulated by a methylation-sensitive DNA element. Methylation of DNA is an attractive system for feedback regulation of DNA methyltransferase as the final product of the reaction, methylated DNA, can regulate gene expression in cis. We show that an AP-1-dependent regulatory element of dnmt1 is heavily methylated in most somatic tissues and in the mouse embryonal cell line, P19, and completely unmethylated in a mouse adrenal carcinoma cell line, Y1. dnmt1 is highly over expressed in Y1 relative to P19 cell lines. Global inhibition of DNA methylation in P19 cells by 5-azadeoxycytidine results in demethylation of the AP-1 regulatory region and induction of dnmt1 expression in P19cells, but not Y1 cells. We propose that this regulatory region of dnmt1 acts as a sensor of the DNA methylation capacity of the cell. These results provide an explanation for the documented coexistence of global hypomethylation and high levels of DNA methyltransferase activity in many cancer cells and for the carcinogenic effect of hypomethylating diets.

  8. Mechanochemical regulations of RPA's binding to ssDNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; Le, Shimin; Basu, Anindita; Chazin, Walter J.; Yan, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a ubiquitous eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein that serves to protect ssDNA from degradation and annealing, and as a template for recruitment of many downstream factors in virtually all DNA transactions in cell. During many of these transactions, DNA is tethered and is likely subject to force. Previous studies of RPA's binding behavior on ssDNA were conducted in the absence of force; therefore the RPA-ssDNA conformations regulated by force remain unclear. Here, using a combination of atomic force microscopy imaging and mechanical manipulation of single ssDNA tethers, we show that force mediates a switch of the RPA bound ssDNA from amorphous aggregation to a much more regular extended conformation. Further, we found an interesting non-monotonic dependence of the binding affinity on monovalent salt concentration in the presence of force. In addition, we discovered that zinc in micromolar concentrations drives ssDNA to a unique, highly stiff and more compact state. These results provide new mechanochemical insights into the influences and the mechanisms of action of RPA on large single ssDNA.

  9. Tuning the Cavity Size and Chirality of Self-Assembling 3D DNA Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Chad R.; Zhang, Fei; MacCulloch, Tara; Fahmi, Noureddine; Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; Liu, Yan; Seeman, Nadrian C. [Department; Yan, Hao

    2017-08-02

    The foundational goal of structural DNA nanotechnology—the field that uses oligonucleotides as a molecular building block for the programmable self-assembly of nanostructured systems—was to use DNA to construct three-dimensional (3D) lattices for solving macromolecular structures. The programmable nature of DNA makes it an ideal system for rationally constructing self-assembled crystals and immobilizing guest molecules in a repeating 3D array through their specific stereospatial interactions with the scaffold. In this work, we have extended a previously described motif (4 × 5) by expanding the structure to a system that links four double-helical layers; we use a central weaving oligonucleotide containing a sequence of four six-base repeats (4 × 6), forming a matrix of layers that are organized and dictated by a series of Holliday junctions. In addition, we have assembled mirror image crystals (l-DNA) with the identical sequence that are completely resistant to nucleases. Bromine and selenium derivatives were obtained for the l- and d-DNA forms, respectively, allowing phase determination for both forms and solution of the resulting structures to 3.0 and 3.05 Å resolution. Both right- and left-handed forms crystallized in the trigonal space groups with mirror image 3-fold helical screw axes P32 and P31 for each motif, respectively. The structures reveal a highly organized array of discrete and well-defined cavities that are suitable for hosting guest molecules and allow us to dictate a priori the assembly of guest–DNA conjugates with a specified crystalline hand.

  10. Regulation of rDNA stability by sumoylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine; Lisby, Michael

    2009-01-01

    , the eukaryotic cell has evolved mechanisms to favor equal sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and suppress unequal SCE, single-strand annealing and break-induced replication. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the tight regulation of homologous recombination at the rDNA locus is dependent on the Smc5-Smc......Repair of DNA lesions by homologous recombination relies on the copying of genetic information from an intact homologous sequence. However, many eukaryotic genomes contain repetitive sequences such as the ribosomal gene locus (rDNA), which poses a risk for illegitimate recombination. Therefore......6 complex and sumoylation of Rad52, which directs DNA double-strand breaks in the rDNA to relocalize from within the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm before association with the recombination machinery. The relocalization before repair is important for maintaining rDNA stability. The focus...

  11. PNA-Peptide Assembly in a 3D DNA Nanocage at Room Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flory, Justin D. [Center; Shinde, Sandip [Center; Lin, Su [Center; Liu, Yan [Center; Yan, Hao [Center; Ghirlanda, Giovanna [Center; Fromme, Petra [Center

    2013-04-12

    Proteins and peptides fold into dynamic structures that access a broad functional landscape; however, designing artificial polypeptide systems is still a great challenge. Conversely, DNA engineering is now routinely used to build a wide variety of 2D and 3D nanostructures from hybridization based rules, and their functional diversity can be significantly expanded through site specific incorporation of the appropriate guest molecules. Here we demonstrate a new approach to rationally design 3D nucleic acid–amino acid complexes using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) to assemble peptides inside a 3D DNA nanocage. The PNA-peptides were found to bind to the preassembled DNA nanocage in 5–10 min at room temperature, and assembly could be performed in a stepwise fashion. Biophysical characterization of the DNA-PNA-peptide complex was performed using gel electrophoresis as well as steady state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Based on these results we have developed a model for the arrangement of the PNA-peptides inside the DNA nanocage. This work demonstrates a flexible new approach to leverage rationally designed nucleic acid (DNA-PNA) nanoscaffolds to guide polypeptide engineering.

  12. Emergent properties arising from the assembly of amphiphiles. Artificial vesicle membranes as reaction promoters and regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walde, Peter; Umakoshi, Hiroshi; Stano, Pasquale; Mavelli, Fabio

    2014-09-14

    This article deals with artificial vesicles and their membranes as reaction promoters and regulators. Among the various molecular assemblies which can form in an aqueous medium from amphiphilic molecules, vesicle systems are unique. Vesicles compartmentalize the aqueous solution in which they exist, independent on whether the vesicles are biological vesicles (existing in living systems) or whether they are artificial vesicles (formed in vitro from natural or synthetic amphiphiles). After the formation of artificial vesicles, their aqueous interior (the endovesicular volume) may become - or may be made - chemically different from the external medium (the exovesicular solution), depending on how the vesicles are prepared. The existence of differences between endo- and exovesicular composition is one of the features on the basis of which biological vesicles contribute to the complex functioning of living organisms. Furthermore, artificial vesicles can be formed from mixtures of amphiphiles in such a way that the vesicle membranes become molecularly, compositionally and organizationally highly complex, similarly to the lipidic matrix of biological membranes. All the various properties of artificial vesicles as membranous compartment systems emerge from molecular assembly as these properties are not present in the individual molecules the system is composed of. One particular emergent property of vesicle membranes is their possible functioning as promoters and regulators of chemical reactions caused by the localization of reaction components, and possibly catalysts, within or on the surface of the membranes. This specific feature is reviewed and highlighted with a few selected examples which range from the promotion of decarboxylation reactions, the selective binding of DNA or RNA to suitable vesicle membranes, and the reactivation of fragmented enzymes to the regulation of the enzymatic synthesis of polymers. Such type of emergent properties of vesicle membranes may

  13. Lipid-bilayer-assisted two-dimensional self-assembly of DNA origami nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly is a ubiquitous approach to the design and fabrication of novel supermolecular architectures. Here we report a strategy termed ‘lipid-bilayer-assisted self-assembly' that is used to assemble DNA origami nanostructures into two-dimensional lattices. DNA origami structures are electrostatically adsorbed onto a mica-supported zwitterionic lipid bilayer in the presence of divalent cations. We demonstrate that the bilayer-adsorbed origami units are mobile on the surface and self-assembled into large micrometre-sized lattices in their lateral dimensions. Using high-speed atomic force microscopy imaging, a variety of dynamic processes involved in the formation of the lattice, such as fusion, reorganization and defect filling, are successfully visualized. The surface modifiability of the assembled lattice is also demonstrated by in situ decoration with streptavidin molecules. Our approach provides a new strategy for preparing versatile scaffolds for nanofabrication and paves the way for organizing functional nanodevices in a micrometer space. PMID:26310995

  14. Gene assembly via one-pot chemical ligation of DNA promoted by DNA nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manuguerra, Ilenia; Croce, Stefano; El-Sagheer, Afaf H.

    2018-01-01

    Current gene synthesis methods are driven by enzymatic reactions. Here we report the one-pot synthesis of a chemically-ligated gene from 14 oligonucleotides. The chemical ligation benefits from the highly efficient click chemistry approach templated by DNA nanostructures, and produces modified DNA...

  15. Structure and assembly of the essential RNA ring component of a viral DNA packaging motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Fang; Lu, Changrui; Zhao, Wei; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Anderson, Dwight L; Jardine, Paul J; Grimes, Shelley; Ke, Ailong

    2011-05-03

    Prohead RNA (pRNA) is an essential component in the assembly and operation of the powerful bacteriophage 29 DNA packaging motor. The pRNA forms a multimeric ring via intermolecular base-pairing interactions between protomers that serves to guide the assembly of the ring ATPase that drives DNA packaging. Here we report the quaternary structure of this rare multimeric RNA at 3.5 Å resolution, crystallized as tetrameric rings. Strong quaternary interactions and the inherent flexibility helped rationalize how free pRNA is able to adopt multiple oligomerization states in solution. These characteristics also allowed excellent fitting of the crystallographic pRNA protomers into previous prohead/pRNA cryo-EM reconstructions, supporting the presence of a pentameric, but not hexameric, pRNA ring in the context of the DNA packaging motor. The pentameric pRNA ring anchors itself directly to the phage prohead by interacting specifically with the fivefold symmetric capsid structures that surround the head-tail connector portal. From these contacts, five RNA superhelices project from the pRNA ring, where they serve as scaffolds for binding and assembly of the ring ATPase, and possibly mediate communication between motor components. Construction of structure-based designer pRNAs with little sequence similarity to the wild-type pRNA were shown to fully support the packaging of 29 DNA.

  16. DNA-mediated self-assembly of tetrahedral plasmonic clusters for metafluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, Nicholas; Sun, Li; Lee, You-Jin; Fan, Jonathan; Capasso, Federico; Yi, Gi-Ra; Manoharan, Vinothan

    2014-03-01

    We direct the self-assembly of clusters of gold nanospheres with the goal of creating a bulk, isotropic, optical metafluid. We use spherical gold nanoparticles that are exceptionally smooth, monocrystalline, and monodisperse. These particles exhibit highly reproducible scattering spectra compared with commercially available gold colloids. We label them with DNA sequences and mix them together to self-assemble small clusters. By controlling the particle sizes and the interactions between them, we maximize the yield of tetrahedral clusters, the ideal structures for isotropic metamaterials.

  17. DNA-nanoparticle assemblies go organic: Macroscopic polymeric materials with nanosized features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mentovich Elad D

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the goals in the field of structural DNA nanotechnology is the use of DNA to build up 2- and 3-D nanostructures. The research in this field is motivated by the remarkable structural features of DNA as well as by its unique and reversible recognition properties. Nucleic acids can be used alone as the skeleton of a broad range of periodic nanopatterns and nanoobjects and in addition, DNA can serve as a linker or template to form DNA-hybrid structures with other materials. This approach can be used for the development of new detection strategies as well as nanoelectronic structures and devices. Method Here we present a new method for the generation of unprecedented all-organic conjugated-polymer nanoparticle networks guided by DNA, based on a hierarchical self-assembly process. First, microphase separation of amphiphilic block copolymers induced the formation of spherical nanoobjects. As a second ordering concept, DNA base pairing has been employed for the controlled spatial definition of the conjugated-polymer particles within the bulk material. These networks offer the flexibility and the diversity of soft polymeric materials. Thus, simple chemical methodologies could be applied in order to tune the network's electrical, optical and mechanical properties. Results and conclusions One- two- and three-dimensional networks have been successfully formed. Common to all morphologies is the integrity of the micelles consisting of DNA block copolymer (DBC, which creates an all-organic engineered network.

  18. Assembly and structural analysis of a covalently closed nano-scale DNA cage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Félicie Faucon; Knudsen, Bjarne; Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto De

    2008-01-01

     The inherent properties of DNA as a stable polymer with unique affinity for partner molecules determined by the specific Watson-Crick base pairing makes it an ideal component in self-assembling structures. This has been exploited for decades in the design of a variety of artificial substrates...... are necessary before complex DNA structures can be routinely designed for the use in basal science and/or biotechnology. Here we present the design, construction and structural analysis of a covalently closed and stable 3D DNA structure with the connectivity of an octahedron, as defined by the double...... be described as a nano-scale DNA cage, Hence, in theory it could hold proteins or other bio-molecules to enable their investigation in certain harmful environments or even allow their organization into higher order structures...

  19. Multiple competition reactions for RPA order the assembly of the DNA polymerase delta holoenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzhakov, A; Kelman, Z; Hurwitz, J; O'Donnell, M

    1999-11-01

    Processive extension of DNA in eukaryotes requires three factors to coordinate their actions. First, DNA polymerase alpha-primase synthesizes the primed site. Then replication factor C loads a proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) clamp onto the primer. Following this, DNA polymerase delta assembles with PCNA for processive extension. This report shows that these proteins each bind the primed site tightly and trade places in a highly coordinated fashion such that the primer terminus is never left free of protein. Replication protein A (RPA), the single-stranded DNA-binding protein, forms a common touchpoint for each of these proteins and they compete with one another for it. Thus these protein exchanges are driven by competition-based protein switches in which two proteins vie for contact with RPA.

  20. A new biochromatography model based on DNA origami assembled PPARγ: construction and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Meng, Lingchang; Sun, Chong; Chen, Shanshan; Sun, Fang; Luo, Pei; Zhao, Yongxing

    2017-05-01

    As drug targets, receptors have potential to screen drugs. Silica is an attractive support to immobilize receptors; however, the lack of biocompatibility makes it easier for receptors to lose bioactivity, which remains an obstacle to its widespread use. With the advantage of biocompatibility, DNA origami can be used as a biological carrier to improve the biocompatibility of silica and assemble receptors. In this study, a new biochromatography model based on DNA origami was constructed. A large quantity of M13ssDNA was used as a scaffold, leading to significant costs, so M13ssDNA was self-produced from the bacteriophage particles. This approach is demonstrated using the ligand binding domain of gamma isoform peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ-LBD) as a research object. PPARγ-LBD was assembled on DNA origami carrier and then coupled on the surface of silica. The products were packed into the column as stationary phase to construct the biochromatography with the ability to recognize drugs. Affinity and specificity of the biochromatography model were evaluated by HPLC. The final results showed that the biochromatography could recognize rosiglitazone specifically, which further proved that the model could screen chemical compositions interacted with PPARγ. It was the first time to take advantage of DNA origami to assemble PPARγ to construct biochromatography. The new biochromatography model has the advantages of being efficient, convenient, and high-throughput. This method affords a new way to rapidly and conveniently screen active ingredients from complex sample plant extracts and natural product-like libraries.

  1. DNA driven self-assembly of micron-sized rods using DNA-grafted bacteriophage fd virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, R R; Cabanas, R A; Yanagishima, T; Blower, T R; Takahashi, H; Salmond, G P C; Edwardson, J M; Fraden, S; Eiser, E

    2015-03-28

    We have functionalized the sides of fd bacteriophage virions with oligonucleotides to induce DNA hybridization driven self-assembly of high aspect ratio filamentous particles. Potential impacts of this new structure range from an entirely new building block in DNA origami structures, inclusion of virions in DNA nanostructures and nanomachines, to a new means of adding thermotropic control to lyotropic liquid crystal systems. A protocol for producing the virions in bulk is reviewed. Thiolated oligonucleotides are attached to the viral capsid using a heterobifunctional chemical linker. A commonly used system is utilized, where a sticky, single-stranded DNA strand is connected to an inert double-stranded spacer to increase inter-particle connectivity. Solutions of fd virions carrying complementary strands are mixed, annealed, and their aggregation is studied using dynamic light scattering (DLS), fluorescence microscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Aggregation is clearly observed on cooling, with some degree of local order, and is reversible when temperature is cycled through the DNA hybridization transition.

  2. Maintenance and regulation of DNA methylation patterns in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhao-xia; Riggs, Arthur D

    2005-08-01

    Proper establishment and faithful maintenance of epigenetic information is crucial for the correct development of complex organisms. For mammals, it is now accepted that DNA methylation is an important mechanism for establishing stable heritable epigenetic marks. The distribution of methylation in the genome is not random, and patterns of methylated and unmethylated DNA are well regulated during normal development. The molecular mechanisms by which methylation patterns are established and maintained are complex and just beginning to be understood. In this review, we summarize recent progress in understanding the regulation of mammalian DNA methylation patterns, with an emphasis on the emerging roles of several protein and possible RNA factors. We also revisit the stochastic model of maintenance methylation and discuss its implications for epigenetic fidelity and gene regulation.

  3. Defined DNA-mediated assemblies of gene-expressing giant unilamellar vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadorn, M.; Boenzli, E.; Sørensen, Kristian T.

    2013-01-01

    of giant unilamellar vesicles functionalized with a basic cellular machinery to express green fluorescent protein and specified neighbor-to-neighbor interactions. We show both that the local and programmable DNA pairing rules on the nanoscale are able to direct the microscale vesicles into macroscale soft...... matter assemblies and that the highly sensitive gene-expression machinery remains intact and active during multiple experimental steps. An in silico model recapitulates the experiments performed in vitro and covers additional experimental setups highlighting the parameters that control the DNA...

  4. Concentration and length dependence of DNA looping in transcriptional regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Han

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In many cases, transcriptional regulation involves the binding of transcription factors at sites on the DNA that are not immediately adjacent to the promoter of interest. This action at a distance is often mediated by the formation of DNA loops: Binding at two or more sites on the DNA results in the formation of a loop, which can bring the transcription factor into the immediate neighborhood of the relevant promoter. These processes are important in settings ranging from the historic bacterial examples (bacterial metabolism and the lytic-lysogeny decision in bacteriophage, to the modern concept of gene regulation to regulatory processes central to pattern formation during development of multicellular organisms. Though there have been a variety of insights into the combinatorial aspects of transcriptional control, the mechanism of DNA looping as an agent of combinatorial control in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes remains unclear. We use single-molecule techniques to dissect DNA looping in the lac operon. In particular, we measure the propensity for DNA looping by the Lac repressor as a function of the concentration of repressor protein and as a function of the distance between repressor binding sites. As with earlier single-molecule studies, we find (at least two distinct looped states and demonstrate that the presence of these two states depends both upon the concentration of repressor protein and the distance between the two repressor binding sites. We find that loops form even at interoperator spacings considerably shorter than the DNA persistence length, without the intervention of any other proteins to prebend the DNA. The concentration measurements also permit us to use a simple statistical mechanical model of DNA loop formation to determine the free energy of DNA looping, or equivalently, the for looping.

  5. Building superlattices from individual nanoparticles via template-confined DNA-mediated assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Qing-Yuan; Mason, Jarad A.; Li, Zhongyang; Zhou, Wenjie; O’Brien, Matthew N.; Brown, Keith A.; Jones, Matthew R.; Butun, Serkan; Lee, Byeongdu; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Aydin, Koray; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2018-01-18

    DNA programmable assembly has been combined with top-down lithography to construct superlattices of discrete, reconfigurable nanoparticle architectures on a gold surface over large areas. Specifically, individual colloidal plasmonic nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes are assembled with ‘locked” nucleic acids in polymer pores into oriented architectures that feature tunable arrangements and independently controllable distances at both nanometer and micrometer length scales. These structures, which would be difficult to construct via other common assembly methods, provide a platform to systematically study and control light-matter interactions in nanoparticle-based optical materials. The generality and potential of this approach is explored by identifying a broadband absorber with a solvent polarity response that allows dynamic tuning of the wavelength response and amplitude of visible light absorption.

  6. Assembling the Streptococcus thermophilus clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) array for multiplex DNA targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lijun; Xu, Kun; Liu, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Cunfang; Xin, Ying; Zhang, Zhiying

    2015-06-01

    In addition to the advantages of scalable, affordable, and easy to engineer, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) technology is superior for multiplex targeting, which is laborious and inconvenient when achieved by cloning multiple gRNA expressing cassettes. Here, we report a simple CRISPR array assembling method which will facilitate multiplex targeting usage. First, the Streptococcus thermophilus CRISPR3/Cas locus was cloned. Second, different CRISPR arrays were assembled with different crRNA spacers. Transformation assays using different Escherichia coli strains demonstrated efficient plasmid DNA targeting, and we achieved targeting efficiency up to 95% with an assembled CRISPR array with three crRNA spacers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. PLC-γ1 Regulates Fibronectin Assembly and Cell Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooke, Cornelia E.; Pozzi, Ambra; Carpenter, Graham F.

    2009-01-01

    Phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1) mediates cell adhesion and migration through an undefined mechanism. Here, we examine the role of PLC-γ1 in cell-matrix adhesion in a hanging drop assay of cell aggregation. Plcg1 Null (−/−) mouse embryonic fibroblasts formed aggregates that were larger and significantly more resistant to dissociation than cells in which PLC-γ1 is re-expressed (Null + cells). Aggregate formation could be disrupted by inhibition of fibronectin interaction with integrins, indicating that fibronectin assembly may mediate aggregate formation. Fibronectin assembly was mediated by integrin α5β1 in both cell lines, while assays measuring fibronectin assembly revealed increased assembly in the Null cells. Null and Null + cells exhibited equivalent fibronectin mRNA levels and equivalent levels of fibronectin protein in pulse-labeling experiments. However, levels of secreted fibronectin in the conditioned medium were increased in Null cells. The data implicates a negative regulatory role for PLC-γ1 in cell aggregation by controlling the secretion of fibronectin into the media and its assembly into fibrils. PMID:19379731

  8. Cloning Should Be Simple: Escherichia coli DH5α-Mediated Assembly of Multiple DNA Fragments with Short End Homologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Ruth E.; Suzuki, Yo

    2015-01-01

    Numerous DNA assembly technologies exist for generating plasmids for biological studies. Many procedures require complex in vitro or in vivo assembly reactions followed by plasmid propagation in recombination-impaired Escherichia coli strains such as DH5α, which are optimal for stable amplification of the DNA materials. Here we show that despite its utility as a cloning strain, DH5α retains sufficient recombinase activity to assemble up to six double-stranded DNA fragments ranging in size from 150 bp to at least 7 kb into plasmids in vivo. This process also requires surprisingly small amounts of DNA, potentially obviating the need for upstream assembly processes associated with most common applications of DNA assembly. We demonstrate the application of this process in cloning of various DNA fragments including synthetic genes, preparation of knockout constructs, and incorporation of guide RNA sequences in constructs for clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) genome editing. This consolidated process for assembly and amplification in a widely available strain of E. coli may enable productivity gain across disciplines involving recombinant DNA work. PMID:26348330

  9. Regulation of mitotic progression by the spindle assembly checkpoint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lischetti, Tiziana; Nilsson, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Equal segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis requires that pairs of kinetochores establish proper attachment to microtubules emanating from opposite poles of the mitotic spindle. The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) protects against errors in segregation by delaying sister separation...... in response to improper kinetochore-microtubule interactions, and certain checkpoint proteins help to establish proper attachments. Anaphase entry is inhibited by the checkpoint through assembly of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) composed of the 2 checkpoint proteins, Mad2 and BubR1, bound to Cdc20...

  10. Complex shapes self–assembled from single–stranded DNA tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bryan; Dai, Mingjie; Yin, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Programmed self-assembly of strands of nucleic acid has proved highly effective for creating a wide range of structures with desired shapes1–25. A particularly successful implementation is DNA origami, in which a long scaffold strand is folded by hundreds of short auxiliary strands into a complex shape9, 14–16,18–21,25. Modular strategies are in principle simpler and more versatile and have been used to assemble DNA2–5,8,10–13,17,23 or RNA7,22 tiles into periodic3,4,7,22 and algorithmic5 two-dimensional lattices, extended ribbons10,12 and tubes4,12,13, three-dimensional crystals17, polyhedra11 and simple finite two-dimensional shapes7,8. But creating finite yet complex shapes from a large number of uniquely addressable tiles remains challenging. Here we solve this problem with the simplest tile form, a ‘single-stranded tile’ (SST) that consists of a 42-base strand of DNA composed entirely of concatenated sticky ends and that binds to four local neighbours during self-assembly12. Although ribbons and tubes with controlled circumferences12 have been created using the SST approach, we extend it to assemble complex two-dimensional shapes and tubes from hundreds (in some cases more than one thousand) distinct tiles. Our main design feature is a self-assembled rectangle that serves as a molecular canvas, with each of its constituent SST strands—folded into a 3nm-by-7 nm tile and attached to four neighbouring tiles—acting as a pixel. A desired shape, drawn on the canvas, is then produced by one-pot annealing of all those strands that correspond to pixels covered by the target shape; the remaining strands are excluded. We implement the strategy with a master strand collection that corresponds to a 310-pixel canvas, and then use appropriate strand subsets to construct 107 distinct and complex two-dimensional shapes, thereby establishing SST assembly as a simple, modular and robust framework for constructing nanostructures with prescribed shapes from short

  11. Pydna: a simulation and documentation tool for DNA assembly strategies using python.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Filipa; Azevedo, Flávio; Carvalho, Ângela; Ribeiro, Gabriela F; Budde, Mark W; Johansson, Björn

    2015-05-02

    Recent advances in synthetic biology have provided tools to efficiently construct complex DNA molecules which are an important part of many molecular biology and biotechnology projects. The planning of such constructs has traditionally been done manually using a DNA sequence editor which becomes error-prone as scale and complexity of the construction increase. A human-readable formal description of cloning and assembly strategies, which also allows for automatic computer simulation and verification, would therefore be a valuable tool. We have developed pydna, an extensible, free and open source Python library for simulating basic molecular biology DNA unit operations such as restriction digestion, ligation, PCR, primer design, Gibson assembly and homologous recombination. A cloning strategy expressed as a pydna script provides a description that is complete, unambiguous and stable. Execution of the script automatically yields the sequence of the final molecule(s) and that of any intermediate constructs. Pydna has been designed to be understandable for biologists with limited programming skills by providing interfaces that are semantically similar to the description of molecular biology unit operations found in literature. Pydna simplifies both the planning and sharing of cloning strategies and is especially useful for complex or combinatorial DNA molecule construction. An important difference compared to existing tools with similar goals is the use of Python instead of a specifically constructed language, providing a simulation environment that is more flexible and extensible by the user.

  12. Growth regulators, DNA content and anatomy in vitro -cultivated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth regulators, DNA content and anatomy in vitro-cultivated Curcuma longa seedlings. Dirlane Antoniazzi, Meire Pereira de Souza Ferrari, Andressa Bezerra Nascimento, Flávia Aparecida Silveira, Leila Aparecida Salles Pio, Moacir Pasqual, Hélida Mara Magalhães ...

  13. What DNA sequence tells us about gene regulation - The ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahul Siddharthan

    2007-11-03

    Nov 3, 2007 ... Predicting cis-regulatory modules: eve enhancers. Performance, even without prior WMs, comparable to dedicated CRM prediction programs like Stubb. Rahul Siddharthan. (The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai 600 113. What DNA sequence tells us about gene regulation. 03/11/2007. 27 / 34 ...

  14. Dynamic regulation of cerebral DNA repair genes by psychological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, Kristin; Aalling, Nadia; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2015-01-01

    for maintaining genomic integrity. The aim of the present study was to characterize the pattern of cerebral DNA repair enzyme regulation after stress through the quantification of a targeted range of gene products involved in different types of DNA repair. 72 male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either......Neuronal genotoxic insults from oxidative stress constitute a putative molecular link between stress and depression on the one hand, and cognitive dysfunction and dementia risk on the other. Oxidative modifications to DNA are repaired by specific enzymes; a process that plays a critical role...... restraint stress (6h/day) or daily handling (controls), and sacrificed after 1, 7 or 21 stress sessions. The mRNA expression of seven genes (Ogg1, Ape1, Ung1, Neil1, Xrcc1, Ercc1, Nudt1) involved in the repair of oxidatively damaged DNA was determined by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction...

  15. Epigenetic regulation during fetal femur development: DNA methylation matters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María C de Andrés

    Full Text Available Epigenetic modifications are heritable changes in gene expression without changes in DNA sequence. DNA methylation has been implicated in the control of several cellular processes including differentiation, gene regulation, development, genomic imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation. Methylated cytosine residues at CpG dinucleotides are commonly associated with gene repression; conversely, strategic loss of methylation during development could lead to activation of lineage-specific genes. Evidence is emerging that bone development and growth are programmed; although, interestingly, bone is constantly remodelled throughout life. Using human embryonic stem cells, human fetal bone cells (HFBCs, adult chondrocytes and STRO-1(+ marrow stromal cells from human bone marrow, we have examined a spectrum of developmental stages of femur development and the role of DNA methylation therein. Using pyrosequencing methodology we analysed the status of methylation of genes implicated in bone biology; furthermore, we correlated these methylation levels with gene expression levels using qRT-PCR and protein distribution during fetal development evaluated using immunohistochemistry. We found that during fetal femur development DNA methylation inversely correlates with expression of genes including iNOS (NOS2 and COL9A1, but not catabolic genes including MMP13 and IL1B. Furthermore, significant demethylation was evident in the osteocalcin promoter between the fetal and adult developmental stages. Increased TET1 expression and decreased expression of DNA (cytosine-5--methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1 in adult chondrocytes compared to HFBCs could contribute to the loss of methylation observed during fetal development. HFBC multipotency confirms these cells to be an ideal developmental system for investigation of DNA methylation regulation. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate the role of epigenetic regulation, specifically DNA methylation, in bone development

  16. DNA Tumor Virus Regulation of Host DNA Methylation and Its Implications for Immune Evasion and Oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuss-Duerkop, Sharon K; Westrich, Joseph A; Pyeon, Dohun

    2018-02-13

    Viruses have evolved various mechanisms to evade host immunity and ensure efficient viral replication and persistence. Several DNA tumor viruses modulate host DNA methyltransferases for epigenetic dysregulation of immune-related gene expression in host cells. The host immune responses suppressed by virus-induced aberrant DNA methylation are also frequently involved in antitumor immune responses. Here, we describe viral mechanisms and virus-host interactions by which DNA tumor viruses regulate host DNA methylation to evade antiviral immunity, which may contribute to the generation of an immunosuppressive microenvironment during cancer development. Recent trials of immunotherapies have shown promising results to treat multiple cancers; however, a significant number of non-responders necessitate identifying additional targets for cancer immunotherapies. Thus, understanding immune evasion mechanisms of cancer-causing viruses may provide great insights for reversing immune suppression to prevent and treat associated cancers.

  17. DNA Tumor Virus Regulation of Host DNA Methylation and Its Implications for Immune Evasion and Oncogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon K. Kuss-Duerkop

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Viruses have evolved various mechanisms to evade host immunity and ensure efficient viral replication and persistence. Several DNA tumor viruses modulate host DNA methyltransferases for epigenetic dysregulation of immune-related gene expression in host cells. The host immune responses suppressed by virus-induced aberrant DNA methylation are also frequently involved in antitumor immune responses. Here, we describe viral mechanisms and virus–host interactions by which DNA tumor viruses regulate host DNA methylation to evade antiviral immunity, which may contribute to the generation of an immunosuppressive microenvironment during cancer development. Recent trials of immunotherapies have shown promising results to treat multiple cancers; however, a significant number of non-responders necessitate identifying additional targets for cancer immunotherapies. Thus, understanding immune evasion mechanisms of cancer-causing viruses may provide great insights for reversing immune suppression to prevent and treat associated cancers.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA in the regulation of innate immune responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunju Fang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mitochondrion is known as the energy factory of the cell, which is also a unique mammalian organelle and considered to be evolved from aerobic prokaryotes more than a billion years ago. Mitochondrial DNA, similar to that of its bacterial ancestor’s, consists of a circular loop and contains significant number of unmethylated DNA as CpG islands. The innate immune system plays an important role in the mammalian immune response. Recent research has demonstrated that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA activates several innate immune pathways involving TLR9, NLRP3 and STING signaling, which contributes to the signaling platforms and results in effector responses. In addition to facilitating antibacterial immunity and regulating antiviral signaling, mounting evidence suggests that mtDNA contributes to inflammatory diseases following cellular damage and stress. Therefore, in addition to its well-appreciated roles in cellular metabolism and energy production, mtDNA appears to function as a key member in the innate immune system. Here, we highlight the emerging roles of mtDNA in innate immunity.

  19. Regulation of lineage specific DNA hypomethylation in mouse trophectoderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Masaaki; Oxley, David; Dean, Wendy; Reik, Wolf

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is reprogrammed during early embryogenesis by active and passive mechanisms in advance of the first differentiation event producing the embryonic and extraembryonic lineage cells which contribute to the future embryo proper and to the placenta respectively. Embryonic lineage cells re-acquire a highly methylated genome dependent on the DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b that are required for de novo methylation. By contrast, extraembryonic lineage cells remain globally hypomethylated but the mechanisms that underlie this hypomethylation remain unknown. We have employed an inducible system that supports differentiation between these two lineages and recapitulates the DNA methylation asymmetry generated in vivo. We find that in vitro down-regulation of Oct3/4 in ES cells recapitulates the decline in global DNA methylation associated with trophoblast. The de novo DNMTs Dnmt3a2 and Dnmt3b are down-regulated during trophoblast differentiation. Dnmt1, which is responsible for maintenance methylation, is expressed comparably in embryonic and trophoblast lineages, however importantly in trophoblast giant cells Dnmt1fails to be attracted to replication foci, thus allowing loss of DNA methylation while implicating a passive demethylation mechanism. Interestingly, Dnmt1 localization was restored by exogenous Np95/Uhrf1, a Dnmt1 chaperone required for Dnmt1-targeting to replication foci, yet DNA methylation levels remained low. Over-expression of de novo DNMTs also failed to increase DNA methylation in target sequences. We propose that induced trophoblast cells may have a mechanism to resist genome-wide increases of DNA methylation, thus reinforcing the genome-wide epigenetic distinctions between the embryonic and extraembryonic lineages in the mouse. This resistance may be based on transcription factors or on global differences in chromatin structure.

  20. Regulation of lineage specific DNA hypomethylation in mouse trophectoderm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Oda

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is reprogrammed during early embryogenesis by active and passive mechanisms in advance of the first differentiation event producing the embryonic and extraembryonic lineage cells which contribute to the future embryo proper and to the placenta respectively. Embryonic lineage cells re-acquire a highly methylated genome dependent on the DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b that are required for de novo methylation. By contrast, extraembryonic lineage cells remain globally hypomethylated but the mechanisms that underlie this hypomethylation remain unknown.We have employed an inducible system that supports differentiation between these two lineages and recapitulates the DNA methylation asymmetry generated in vivo. We find that in vitro down-regulation of Oct3/4 in ES cells recapitulates the decline in global DNA methylation associated with trophoblast. The de novo DNMTs Dnmt3a2 and Dnmt3b are down-regulated during trophoblast differentiation. Dnmt1, which is responsible for maintenance methylation, is expressed comparably in embryonic and trophoblast lineages, however importantly in trophoblast giant cells Dnmt1fails to be attracted to replication foci, thus allowing loss of DNA methylation while implicating a passive demethylation mechanism. Interestingly, Dnmt1 localization was restored by exogenous Np95/Uhrf1, a Dnmt1 chaperone required for Dnmt1-targeting to replication foci, yet DNA methylation levels remained low. Over-expression of de novo DNMTs also failed to increase DNA methylation in target sequences.We propose that induced trophoblast cells may have a mechanism to resist genome-wide increases of DNA methylation, thus reinforcing the genome-wide epigenetic distinctions between the embryonic and extraembryonic lineages in the mouse. This resistance may be based on transcription factors or on global differences in chromatin structure.

  1. A dynamic combinatorial approach for identifying side groups that stabilize DNA-templated supramolecular self-assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolantoni, Delphine; Cantel, Sonia; Dumy, Pascal; Ulrich, Sébastien

    2015-02-06

    DNA-templated self-assembly is an emerging strategy for generating functional supramolecular systems, which requires the identification of potent multi-point binding ligands. In this line, we recently showed that bis-functionalized guanidinium compounds can interact with ssDNA and generate a supramolecular complex through the recognition of the phosphodiester backbone of DNA. In order to probe the importance of secondary interactions and to identify side groups that stabilize these DNA-templated self-assemblies, we report herein the implementation of a dynamic combinatorial approach. We used an in situ fragment assembly process based on reductive amination and tested various side groups, including amino acids. The results reveal that aromatic and cationic side groups participate in secondary supramolecular interactions that stabilize the complexes formed with ssDNA.

  2. A Dynamic Combinatorial Approach for Identifying Side Groups that Stabilize DNA-Templated Supramolecular Self-Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Paolantoni

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA-templated self-assembly is an emerging strategy for generating functional supramolecular systems, which requires the identification of potent multi-point binding ligands. In this line, we recently showed that bis-functionalized guanidinium compounds can interact with ssDNA and generate a supramolecular complex through the recognition of the phosphodiester backbone of DNA. In order to probe the importance of secondary interactions and to identify side groups that stabilize these DNA-templated self-assemblies, we report herein the implementation of a dynamic combinatorial approach. We used an in situ fragment assembly process based on reductive amination and tested various side groups, including amino acids. The results reveal that aromatic and cationic side groups participate in secondary supramolecular interactions that stabilize the complexes formed with ssDNA.

  3. Stabilization of Pt nanoparticles by single stranded DNA and the binary assembly of Au and Pt nanoparticles without hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J.; Lee, Jim Yang; Too, Heng-Phon; Chow, Gan-Moog; Gan, Leong M.

    2006-01-01

    The non-specific interaction between single stranded DNA (ssDNA) and 12 nm Pt nanoparticles is investigated in this work. The data show a strong and non-specific interaction between the two which can be exploited for the stabilization of Pt nanoparticles in aqueous solutions. Based on the experimental findings, a non-hybridization based protocol to assemble 17 nm Au and Pt nanoparticles (12 nm cubic and 3.6 nm spherical) by single-stranded DNA was developed. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-visible spectroscopy confirmed that Au and Pt nanoparticles could be assembled by the non-specific interaction in an orderly manner. The experimental results also caution against the potential pitfalls in using DNA melting point analysis to infer metal nanoparticle assembly by DNA hybridization

  4. DNA nanotubes assembled from tensegrity triangle tiles with circular DNA scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshan, Noshin; Ali, Mashooq; Wang, Meng; Baig, Mirza Muhammad Faran Ashraf; Xiao, Shou-Jun

    2017-11-16

    Using small circular DNA molecules of different lengths as scaffolds, we successfully synthesised DNA nanotubes consisting of Mao's DNA tensegrity triangle tiles with four-arm junctions (Holliday junctions) at all vertices. Due to the intrinsic curvature of the triangle tile and the consecutive tile alignment, the 2D arrays are organised in the form of nanotubes. Two sized triangle tiles with equilateral side lengths of 1.5 and 2.5 full helical turns are connected by the sticky ended cohesion of a duplex with a length of 2.5 helical turns respectively, and their parallel lozenge tiling lattices were demonstrated by high resolution AFM images, where the former lozenge unit cell has a lattice constant of 13.6 nm, and the latter has a larger lattice constant of 17.0 nm. Modification of the triangle tile with infinitesimal disturbance on side lengths and insertion of one thymine single stranded loop at every vertex resulted in comparably similar nanotubes.

  5. DNA damage response clamp 9-1-1 promotes assembly of ZMM proteins for formation of crossovers and synaptonemal complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Miki; Hayashihara, Kayoko; Grubb, Jennifer T.; Bishop, Douglas K.; Shinohara, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Formation of crossovers between homologous chromosomes during meiosis is positively regulated by the ZMM proteins (also known as SIC proteins). DNA damage checkpoint proteins also promote efficient formation of interhomolog crossovers. Here, we examined, in budding yeast, the meiotic role of the heterotrimeric DNA damage response clamp composed of Rad17, Ddc1 and Mec3 (known as ‘9-1-1’ in other organisms) and a component of the clamp loader, Rad24 (known as Rad17 in other organisms). Cytological analysis indicated that the 9-1-1 clamp and its loader are not required for the chromosomal loading of RecA homologs Rad51 or Dmc1, but are necessary for the efficient loading of ZMM proteins. Interestingly, the loading of ZMM proteins onto meiotic chromosomes was independent of the checkpoint kinase Mec1 (the homolog of ATR) as well as Rad51. Furthermore, the ZMM member Zip3 (also known as Cst9) bound to the 9-1-1 complex in a cell-free system. These data suggest that, in addition to promoting interhomolog bias mediated by Rad51–Dmc1, the 9-1-1 clamp promotes crossover formation through a specific role in the assembly of ZMM proteins. Thus, the 9-1-1 complex functions to promote two crucial meiotic recombination processes, the regulation of interhomolog recombination and crossover formation mediated by ZMM. PMID:25736290

  6. DNA damage response and spindle assembly checkpoint function throughout the cell cycle to ensure genomic integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine S Lawrence

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Errors in replication or segregation lead to DNA damage, mutations, and aneuploidies. Consequently, cells monitor these events and delay progression through the cell cycle so repair precedes division. The DNA damage response (DDR, which monitors DNA integrity, and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC, which responds to defects in spindle attachment/tension during metaphase of mitosis and meiosis, are critical for preventing genome instability. Here we show that the DDR and SAC function together throughout the cell cycle to ensure genome integrity in C. elegans germ cells. Metaphase defects result in enrichment of SAC and DDR components to chromatin, and both SAC and DDR are required for metaphase delays. During persistent metaphase arrest following establishment of bi-oriented chromosomes, stability of the metaphase plate is compromised in the absence of DDR kinases ATR or CHK1 or SAC components, MAD1/MAD2, suggesting SAC functions in metaphase beyond its interactions with APC activator CDC20. In response to DNA damage, MAD2 and the histone variant CENPA become enriched at the nuclear periphery in a DDR-dependent manner. Further, depletion of either MAD1 or CENPA results in loss of peripherally associated damaged DNA. In contrast to a SAC-insensitive CDC20 mutant, germ cells deficient for SAC or CENPA cannot efficiently repair DNA damage, suggesting that SAC mediates DNA repair through CENPA interactions with the nuclear periphery. We also show that replication perturbations result in relocalization of MAD1/MAD2 in human cells, suggesting that the role of SAC in DNA repair is conserved.

  7. Nanopore DNA Sequencing and Genome Assembly on the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Wallace, Sarah L; Chiu, Charles Y; John, Kristen K; Stahl, Sarah E; Rubins, Kathleen H; McIntyre, Alexa B R; Dworkin, Jason P; Lupisella, Mark L; Smith, David J; Botkin, Douglas J; Stephenson, Timothy A; Juul, Sissel; Turner, Daniel J; Izquierdo, Fernando; Federman, Scot; Stryke, Doug; Somasekar, Sneha; Alexander, Noah; Yu, Guixia; Mason, Christopher E; Burton, Aaron S

    2017-12-21

    We evaluated the performance of the MinION DNA sequencer in-flight on the International Space Station (ISS), and benchmarked its performance off-Earth against the MinION, Illumina MiSeq, and PacBio RS II sequencing platforms in terrestrial laboratories. Samples contained equimolar mixtures of genomic DNA from lambda bacteriophage, Escherichia coli (strain K12, MG1655) and Mus musculus (female BALB/c mouse). Nine sequencing runs were performed aboard the ISS over a 6-month period, yielding a total of 276,882 reads with no apparent decrease in performance over time. From sequence data collected aboard the ISS, we constructed directed assemblies of the ~4.6 Mb E. coli genome, ~48.5 kb lambda genome, and a representative M. musculus sequence (the ~16.3 kb mitochondrial genome), at 100%, 100%, and 96.7% consensus pairwise identity, respectively; de novo assembly of the E. coli genome from raw reads yielded a single contig comprising 99.9% of the genome at 98.6% consensus pairwise identity. Simulated real-time analyses of in-flight sequence data using an automated bioinformatic pipeline and laptop-based genomic assembly demonstrated the feasibility of sequencing analysis and microbial identification aboard the ISS. These findings illustrate the potential for sequencing applications including disease diagnosis, environmental monitoring, and elucidating the molecular basis for how organisms respond to spaceflight.

  8. Assembly of a biocompatible triazole-linked gene by one-pot click-DNA ligation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukwikila, Mikiembo; Gale, Nittaya; El-Sagheer, Afaf H.; Brown, Tom; Tavassoli, Ali

    2017-11-01

    The chemical synthesis of oligonucleotides and their enzyme-mediated assembly into genes and genomes has significantly advanced multiple scientific disciplines. However, these approaches are not without their shortcomings; enzymatic amplification and ligation of oligonucleotides into genes and genomes makes automation challenging, and site-specific incorporation of epigenetic information and/or modified bases into large constructs is not feasible. Here we present a fully chemical one-pot method for the assembly of oligonucleotides into a gene by click-DNA ligation. We synthesize the 335 base-pair gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein iLOV from ten functionalized oligonucleotides that contain 5ʹ-azide and 3ʹ-alkyne units. The resulting click-linked iLOV gene contains eight triazoles at the sites of chemical ligation, and yet is fully biocompatible; it is replicated by DNA polymerases in vitro and encodes a functional iLOV protein in Escherichia coli. We demonstrate the power and potential of our one-pot gene-assembly method by preparing an epigenetically modified variant of the iLOV gene.

  9. Coordinate regulation of DNA methyltransferase expression during oogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bestor Timothy H

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Normal mammalian development requires the action of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs for the establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation within repeat elements and imprinted genes. Here we report the expression dynamics of Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b, as well as a regulator of DNA methylation, Dnmt3L, in isolated female germ cells. Results Our results indicate that these enzymes are coordinately regulated and that their expression peaks during the stage of postnatal oocyte development when maternal methylation imprints are established. We find that Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b, Dnmt3L and Dnmt1o transcript accumulation is related to oocyte diameter. Furthermore, DNMT3L deficient 15 dpp oocytes have aberrantly methylated Snrpn, Peg3 and Igf2r DMRs, but normal IAP and LINE-1 methylation levels, thereby highlighting a male germ cell specific role for DNMT3L in the establishment of DNA methylation at repeat elements. Finally, real-time RT-PCR analysis indicates that the depletion of either DNMT3L or DNMT1o in growing oocytes results in the increased expression of the de novo methyltransferase Dnmt3b, suggesting a potential compensation mechanism by this enzyme for the loss of one of the other DNA methyltransferases. Conclusion Together these results provide a better understanding of the developmental regulation of Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b and Dnmt3L at the time of de novo methylation during oogenesis and demonstrate that the involvement of DNMT3L in retrotransposon silencing is restricted to the male germ line. This in turn suggests the existence of other factors in the oocyte that direct DNA methylation to transposons.

  10. Self-assembling of calcium salt of the new DNA base 5-carboxylcytosine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irrera, Simona [Department of Chemistry, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Grodon Street, WC1H0AJ London (United Kingdom); Ruiz-Hernandez, Sergio E. [School of Chemistry, Cardiff University Main Building, Park Place, CF103AT Cardiff (United Kingdom); Reggente, Melania [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Passeri, Daniele, E-mail: daniele.passeri@uniroma1.it [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Natali, Marco [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Gala, Fabrizio [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Department of Medical-Surgical, Techno-Biomedical Sciences and Translational Medicine of SAPIENZA University of Rome, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Zollo, Giuseppe [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Rossi, Marco [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Research Center for Nanotechnology applied to Engineering of SAPIENZA University of Rome (CNIS), Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Portalone, Gustavo, E-mail: gustavo.portalone@uniroma1.it [Department of Chemistry, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Ca salt of 5-carboxylcytosine has been deposited on HOPG substrate. • Molecules self-assembled in monolayers and filaments. • Height of the features were measured by atomic force microscopy. • Ab-initio calculations confirmed the AFM results. - Abstract: Supramolecular architectures involving DNA bases can have a strong impact in several fields such as nanomedicine and nanodevice manufacturing. To date, in addition to the four canonical nucleobases (adenine, thymine, guanine and cytosine), four other forms of cytosine modified at the 5 position have been identified in DNA. Among these four new cytosine derivatives, 5-carboxylcytosine has been recently discovered in mammalian stem cell DNA, and proposed as the final product of the oxidative epigenetic demethylation pathway on the 5 position of cytosine. In this work, a calcium salt of 5-carboxylcytosine has been synthesized and deposited on graphite surface, where it forms self-assembled features as long range monolayers and up to one micron long filaments. These structures have been analyzed in details combining different theoretical and experimental approaches: X-ray single-crystal diffraction data were used to simulate the molecule-graphite interaction, first using molecular dynamics and then refining the results using density functional theory (DFT); finally, data obtained with DFT were used to rationalize atomic force microscopy (AFM) results.

  11. Optimized assembly and covalent coupling of single-molecule DNA origami nanoarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Ashwin; Rothemund, Paul W K

    2014-12-23

    Artificial DNA nanostructures, such as DNA origami, have great potential as templates for the bottom-up fabrication of both biological and nonbiological nanodevices at a resolution unachievable by conventional top-down approaches. However, because origami are synthesized in solution, origami-templated devices cannot easily be studied or integrated into larger on-chip architectures. Electrostatic self-assembly of origami onto lithographically defined binding sites on Si/SiO2 substrates has been achieved, but conditions for optimal assembly have not been characterized, and the method requires high Mg2+ concentrations at which most devices aggregate. We present a quantitative study of parameters affecting origami placement, reproducibly achieving single-origami binding at 94±4% of sites, with 90% of these origami having an orientation within ±10° of their target orientation. Further, we introduce two techniques for converting electrostatic DNA-surface bonds to covalent bonds, allowing origami arrays to be used under a wide variety of Mg2+-free solution conditions.

  12. DNA-library assembly programmed by on-demand nano-liter droplets from a custom microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangen, Uwe; Minero, Gabriel Antonio S; Sharma, Abhishek; Wagler, Patrick F; Cohen, Rafael; Raz, Ofir; Marx, Tzipy; Ben-Yehezkel, Tuval; McCaskill, John S

    2015-07-01

    Nanoscale synthetic biology can benefit from programmable nanoliter-scale processing of DNA in microfluidic chips if they are interfaced effectively to biochemical arrays such as microwell plates. Whereas active microvalve chips require complex fabrication and operation, we show here how a passive and readily fabricated microchip can be employed for customizable nanoliter scale pipetting and reaction control involving DNA. This recently developed passive microfluidic device, supporting nanoliter scale combinatorial droplet generation and mixing, is here used to generate a DNA test library with one member per droplet exported to addressed locations on microwell plates. Standard DNA assembly techniques, such as Gibson assembly, compatible with isothermal on-chip operation, are employed and checked using off-chip PCR and assembly PCR. The control of output droplet sequences and mixing performance was verified using dyes and fluorescently labeled DNA solutions, both on-chip and in external capillary channels. Gel electrophoresis of products and DNA sequencing were employed to further verify controlled combination and functional enzymatic assembly. The scalability of the results to larger DNA libraries is also addressed by combinatorial input expansion using sequential injection plugs from a multiwell plate. Hence, the paper establishes a proof of principle of the production of functional combinatorial mixtures at the nanoliter scale for one sequence per well DNA libraries.

  13. In vivo assembly of DNA-fragments in the moss, Physcomitrella patens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    King, Brian Christopher; Vavitsas, Konstantinos; Ikram, Nur Kusaira Binti Khairul

    2016-01-01

    enabled the complete replacement of eukaryotic chromosomes with heterologous DNA. The moss Physcomitrella patens, a non-vascular and spore producing land plant (Bryophyte), has a well-established capacity for homologous recombination. Here, we demonstrate the in vivo assembly of multiple DNA fragments...

  14. 7 CFR 301.32-7 - Assembly and inspection of regulated articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Assembly and inspection of regulated articles. 301.32-7 Section 301.32-7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Fruit Flies § 301...

  15. Structural and thermodynamic analysis of modified nucleosides in self-assembled DNA cross-tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakker, Lauren; Marchi, Alexandria N; Harris, Kimberly A; LaBean, Thomas H; Agris, Paul F

    2014-01-01

    DNA Holliday junctions are important natural strand-exchange structures that form during homologous recombination. Immobile four-arm junctions, analogs to Holliday junctions, have been designed to self-assemble into cross-tile structures by maximizing Watson-Crick base pairing and fixed crossover points. The cross-tiles, self-assembled from base pair recognition between designed single-stranded DNAs, form higher order lattice structures through cohesion of self-associating sticky ends. These cross-tiles have 16 unpaired nucleosides in the central loop at the junction of the four duplex stems. The importance of the centralized unpaired nucleosides to the structure's thermodynamic stability and self-assembly is unknown. Cross-tile DNA nanostructures were designed and constructed from nine single-stranded DNAs with four shell strands, four arms, and a central loop containing 16 unpaired bases. The 16 unpaired bases were either 2'-deoxyribothymidines, 2'-O-methylribouridines, or abasic 1',2'-dideoxyribonucleosides. Thermodynamic profiles and structural base-stacking contributions were assessed using UV absorption spectroscopy during thermal denaturation and circular dichroism spectroscopy, respectively, and the resulting structures were observed by atomic force microscopy. There were surprisingly significant changes in the thermodynamic and structural properties of lattice formation as a result of altering only the 16 unpaired, centralized nucleosides. The 16 unpaired 2'-O-methyluridines were stabilizing and produced uniform tubular structures. In contrast, the abasic nucleosides were destabilizing producing a mixture of structures. These results strongly indicate the importance of a small number of centrally located unpaired nucleosides within the structures. Since minor modifications lead to palpable changes in lattice formation, DNA cross-tiles present an easily manipulated structure convenient for applications in biomedical and biosensing devices.

  16. DNA polymerase-α regulates type I interferon activation through cytosolic RNA:DNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starokadomskyy, Petro; Gemelli, Terry; Rios, Jonathan J.; Xing, Chao; Wang, Richard C.; Li, Haiying; Pokatayev, Vladislav; Dozmorov, Igor; Khan, Shaheen; Miyata, Naoteru; Fraile, Guadalupe; Raj, Prithvi; Xu, Zhe; Xu, Zigang; Ma, Lin; Lin, Zhimiao; Wang, Huijun; Yang, Yong; Ben-Amitai, Dan; Orenstein, Naama; Mussaffi, Huda; Baselga, Eulalia; Tadini, Gianluca; Grunebaum, Eyal; Sarajlija, Adrijan; Krzewski, Konrad; Wakeland, Edward K.; Yan, Nan; de la Morena, Maria Teresa; Zinn, Andrew R.; Burstein, Ezra

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant nucleic acids generated during viral replication are the main trigger for antiviral immunity, and mutations disrupting nucleic acid metabolism can lead to autoinflammatory disorders. Here we investigated the etiology of X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder (XLPDR), a primary immunodeficiency with autoinflammatory features. We discovered that XLPDR is caused by an intronic mutation that disrupts expression of POLA1, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase-α. Unexpectedly, POLA1 deficiency results in increased type I interferon production. This enzyme is necessary for RNA:DNA primer synthesis during DNA replication and strikingly, POLA1 is also required for the synthesis of cytosolic RNA:DNA, which directly modulates interferon activation. Altogether, this work identified POLA1 as a critical regulator of the type I interferon response. PMID:27019227

  17. The Oxidation Status of Mic19 Regulates MICOS Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Sakowska, Paulina; Jans, Daniel C.; Mohanraj, Karthik; Riedel, Dietmar; Jakobs, Stefan; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    The function of mitochondria depends on the proper organization of mitochondrial membranes. The morphology of the inner membrane is regulated by the recently identified mitochondrial contact site and crista organizing system (MICOS) complex. MICOS mutants exhibit alterations in crista formation, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. However, the mechanisms that underlie MICOS regulation remain poorly understood. MIC19, a peripheral protein of the inner membrane and component of the MICOS comp...

  18. Crystal structure of vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase reveals dimeric assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeLucas Lawrence

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uracil-DNA glycosylases (UDGs catalyze excision of uracil from DNA. Vaccinia virus, which is the prototype of poxviruses, encodes a UDG (vvUDG that is significantly different from the UDGs of other organisms in primary, secondary and tertiary structure and characteristic motifs. It adopted a novel catalysis-independent role in DNA replication that involves interaction with a viral protein, A20, to form the processivity factor. UDG:A20 association is essential for assembling of the processive DNA polymerase complex. The structure of the protein must have provisions for such interactions with A20. This paper provides the first glimpse into the structure of a poxvirus UDG. Results Results of dynamic light scattering experiments and native size exclusion chromatography showed that vvUDG is a dimer in solution. The dimeric assembly is also maintained in two crystal forms. The core of vvUDG is reasonably well conserved but the structure contains one additional β-sheet at each terminus. A glycerol molecule is found in the active site of the enzyme in both crystal forms. Interaction of this glycerol molecule with the protein possibly mimics the enzyme-substrate (uracil interactions. Conclusion The crystal structures reveal several distinctive features of vvUDG. The new structural features may have evolved for adopting novel functions in the replication machinery of poxviruses. The mode of interaction between the subunits in the dimers suggests a possible model for binding to its partner and the nature of the processivity factor in the polymerase complex.

  19. PTEN stabilizes TOP2A and regulates the DNA decatenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xi; Song, Chang; Du, Xiao; Zhang, Cong; Liu, Yu; Liang, Ling; He, Jinxue; Lamb, Kristy; Shen, Wen H.; Yin, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    PTEN is a powerful tumor suppressor that antagonizes the cytoplasmic PI3K-AKT pathway and suppresses cellular proliferation. PTEN also plays a role in the maintenance of genomic stability in the nucleus. Here we report that PTEN facilitates DNA decatenation and controls a decatenation checkpoint. Catenations of DNA formed during replication are decatenated by DNA topoisomerase II (TOP2), and this process is actively monitored by a decatenation checkpoint in G2 phase. We found that PTEN deficient cells form ultra-fine bridges (UFBs) during anaphase and these bridges are generated as a result of insufficient decatenation. We show that PTEN is physically associated with a decatenation enzyme TOP2A and that PTEN influences its stability through OTUD3 deubiquitinase. In the presence of PTEN, ubiquitination of TOP2A is inhibited by OTUD3. Deletion or deficiency of PTEN leads to down regulation of TOP2A, dysfunction of the decatenation checkpoint and incomplete DNA decatenation in G2 and M phases. We propose that PTEN controls DNA decatenation to maintain genomic stability and integrity. PMID:26657567

  20. Self-assembled alignment of nanorod by using DNA brush (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijiro, Kuniharu; Nakamura, Satoshi; Mitomo, Hideyuki; Pike, Andrew; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Niikura, Kenichi

    2016-09-01

    Surface modification with polymer is widely applied to various kinds of applications. Recently, polymer brushes, which is a layer of polymers attached with one end to a surface, have attracted much attention as functionalized surfaces. In particular, ionic polymer brushes provide ultra-low friction or anti-fouling because they act as highly hydrated soft film. Almost ionic polymer brushes have been prepared from synthetic polymers. Few biopolymers have been investigated for polymer brush studies. DNA which is one of ionic biopolymers has unique functions and conformations which synthetic polymers don't have. We found that cationic gold nanorods (30 x 10 nm) were adsorbed to DNA bush (148 bp) prepared on a glass surface in an aqueous solution by observation using extinction spectra. When the cationic charge density of gold nanorods were decreased, nanorods were immobilized perpendicularly to the substrate by binding to DNA elongated. This indicates that self-assembled alignment of gold nanorods can be achieved by using DNA brush. Formed aligned gold nanorods can be used for plasmonic color analysis.

  1. Assembling high activity phosphotriesterase composites using hybrid nanoparticle peptide-DNA scaffolded architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breger, Joyce C.; Buckhout-White, Susan; Walper, Scott A.; Oh, Eunkeu; Susumu, Kimihiro; Ancona, Mario G.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2017-06-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) display potentially offers a new way to both stabilize and, in many cases, enhance enzyme activity over that seen for native protein in solution. However, the large, globular and sometimes multimeric nature of many enzymes limits their ability to attach directly to the surface of NPs, especially when the latter are colloidally stabilized with bulky PEGylated ligands. Engineering extended protein linkers into the enzymes to achieve direct attachment through the PEG surface often detrimentally alters the enzymes catalytic ability. Here, we demonstrate an alternate, hybrid biomaterials-based approach to achieving directed enzyme assembly on PEGylated NPs. We self-assemble a unique architecture consisting of a central semiconductor quantum dot (QD) scaffold displaying controlled ratios of extended peptide-DNA linkers which penetrate through the PEG surface to directly couple enzymes to the QD surface. As a test case, we utilize phosphotriesterase (PTE), an enzyme of bio-defense interest due to its ability to hydrolyze organophosphate nerve agents. Moreover, this unique approach still allows PTE to maintain enhanced activity while also suggesting the ability of DNA to enhance enzyme activity in and of itself.

  2. Cholesterol-conjugated supramolecular assemblies of low generations polyamidoamine dendrimers for enhanced EGFP plasmid DNA transfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golkar, Nasim; Samani, Soliman Mohammadi; Tamaddon, Ali Mohammad, E-mail: amtamadon@gmail.com [Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Aimed to prepare an enhanced gene delivery system with low cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency, various cholesterol-conjugated derivates of low generation polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers were prepared. The conjugates were characterized by TNBS assay, FTIR, and {sup 1}H-NMR spectroscopy. Self-assembly of the dendrimer conjugates (G1-Chol, G2-Chol, and G3-Chol) was investigated by pyrene assay. Following formation of the complexes between enhanced green fluorescence protein plasmid and the dendrimer conjugates at various N (primary amine)/P (phosphate) mole ratios, plasmid condensation, biologic stability, cytotoxicity, and protein expression were investigated. The conjugates self-assembled into micellar dispersions with the critical micelle concentration values (<50 µg/ml) depending on the dendrimer generation and cholesterol/amine mole ratio. Cholesterol conjugation resulted in higher resistance of the condensed plasmid DNA in a competition assay with heparin sulfate. Also, the transfection efficiency was determined higher for the cholesterol conjugates than unmodified dendrimers in HepG2 cells, showing the highest for G2-Chol at 40 % degree of cholesterol modification (G2-Chol{sub 40 %}) among various dendrimer generations. Interestingly, such conjugate showed a complete protection of plasmid against serum nucleases. Our results confirmed that the cholesterol conjugation to PAMAM dendrimers of low generations bearing little cytotoxicity improves their several physicochemical and biological characteristics required for an enhanced delivery of plasmid DNA into cells.

  3. Low-Cost, High-Throughput Sequencing of DNA Assemblies Using a Highly Multiplexed Nextera Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapland, Elaine B; Holmes, Victor; Reeves, Christopher D; Sorokin, Elena; Durot, Maxime; Platt, Darren; Allen, Christopher; Dean, Jed; Serber, Zach; Newman, Jack; Chandran, Sunil

    2015-07-17

    In recent years, next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has greatly reduced the cost of sequencing whole genomes, whereas the cost of sequence verification of plasmids via Sanger sequencing has remained high. Consequently, industrial-scale strain engineers either limit the number of designs or take short cuts in quality control. Here, we show that over 4000 plasmids can be completely sequenced in one Illumina MiSeq run for less than $3 each (15× coverage), which is a 20-fold reduction over using Sanger sequencing (2× coverage). We reduced the volume of the Nextera tagmentation reaction by 100-fold and developed an automated workflow to prepare thousands of samples for sequencing. We also developed software to track the samples and associated sequence data and to rapidly identify correctly assembled constructs having the fewest defects. As DNA synthesis and assembly become a centralized commodity, this NGS quality control (QC) process will be essential to groups operating high-throughput pipelines for DNA construction.

  4. Can specific transcriptional regulators assemble a universal cancer signature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Janine; Isik, Zerrin; Pilarsky, Christian; Schroeder, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Recently, there is a lot of interest in using biomarker signatures derived from gene expression data to predict cancer progression. We assembled signatures of 25 published datasets covering 13 types of cancers. How do these signatures compare with each other? On one hand signatures answering the same biological question should overlap, whereas signatures predicting different cancer types should differ. On the other hand, there could also be a Universal Cancer Signature that is predictive independently of the cancer type. Initially, we generate signatures for all datasets using classical approaches such as t-test and fold change and then, we explore signatures resulting from a network-based method, that applies the random surfer model of Google's PageRank algorithm. We show that the signatures as published by the authors and the signatures generated with classical methods do not overlap - not even for the same cancer type - whereas the network-based signatures strongly overlap. Selecting 10 out of 37 universal cancer genes gives the optimal prediction for all cancers thus taking a first step towards a Universal Cancer Signature. We furthermore analyze and discuss the involved genes in terms of the Hallmarks of cancer and in particular single out SP1, JUN/FOS and NFKB1 and examine their specific role in cancer progression.

  5. PTEN regulates RPA1 and protects DNA replication forks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangxi; Li, Yang; Wang, Pan; Liang, Hui; Cui, Ming; Zhu, Minglu; Guo, Limei; Su, Qian; Sun, Yujie; McNutt, Michael A; Yin, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    Tumor suppressor PTEN regulates cellular activities and controls genome stability through multiple mechanisms. In this study, we report that PTEN is necessary for the protection of DNA replication forks against replication stress. We show that deletion of PTEN leads to replication fork collapse and chromosomal instability upon fork stalling following nucleotide depletion induced by hydroxyurea. PTEN is physically associated with replication protein A 1 (RPA1) via the RPA1 C-terminal domain. STORM and iPOND reveal that PTEN is localized at replication sites and promotes RPA1 accumulation on replication forks. PTEN recruits the deubiquitinase OTUB1 to mediate RPA1 deubiquitination. RPA1 deletion confers a phenotype like that observed in PTEN knockout cells with stalling of replication forks. Expression of PTEN and RPA1 shows strong correlation in colorectal cancer. Heterozygous disruption of RPA1 promotes tumorigenesis in mice. These results demonstrate that PTEN is essential for DNA replication fork protection. We propose that RPA1 is a target of PTEN function in fork protection and that PTEN maintains genome stability through regulation of DNA replication. PMID:26403191

  6. Regulated Proteolysis of DNA Polymerase Eta During the DNA Damage Response in C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Hwan; Michael, W. Matthew

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Both the POLH-1 (pol eta) trans-lesion synthesis DNA polymerase and the GEI-17 SUMO E3 ligase are essential for the efficient replication of damaged chromosomes in C. elegans embryos. Here, we study how POLH-1 is regulated during a DNA damage response in these embryos. We report that DNA damage triggers the degradation of POLH-1, and that degradation is mediated by the Cul4-Ddb1-Cdt2 (CRL4-Cdt2) pathway that has previously been shown to degrade the replication factor Cdt1 during S phase. We also show that GEI-17 protects POLH-1 from CRL4-Cdt2 mediated destruction, until after it has performed its function in TLS, and this is likely via SUMOylation of POLH-1. These studies reveal that POLH-1 undergoes DNA damage-induced proteolysis, and that GEI-17 regulates the timing of this proteolysis. Implications for how this system may control the removal of POLH-1 from replication forks after TLS are discussed. PMID:19111656

  7. Regulated proteolysis of DNA polymerase eta during the DNA-damage response in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Hwan; Michael, W Matthew

    2008-12-26

    Both the POLH-1 (pol eta) translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerase and the GEI-17 SUMO E3 ligase are essential for the efficient replication of damaged chromosomes in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. Here we study how POLH-1 is regulated during a DNA-damage response in these embryos. We report that DNA damage triggers the degradation of POLH-1 and that degradation is mediated by the Cul4-Ddb1-Cdt2 (CRL4-Cdt2) pathway that has previously been shown to degrade the replication factor Cdt1 during S phase. We also show that GEI-17 protects POLH-1 from CRL4-Cdt2-mediated destruction until after it has performed its function in TLS, and this is likely via SUMOylation of POLH-1. These studies reveal that POLH-1 undergoes DNA-damage-induced proteolysis and that GEI-17 regulates the timing of this proteolysis. Implications for how this system may control the removal of POLH-1 from replication forks after TLS are discussed.

  8. Assembling and auditing a comprehensive DNA barcode reference library for European marine fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, L M; Knebelsberger, T; Landi, M; Soares, P; Raupach, M J; Costa, F O

    2016-12-01

    A large-scale comprehensive reference library of DNA barcodes for European marine fishes was assembled, allowing the evaluation of taxonomic uncertainties and species genetic diversity that were otherwise hidden in geographically restricted studies. A total of 4118 DNA barcodes were assigned to 358 species generating 366 Barcode Index Numbers (BIN). Initial examination revealed as much as 141 BIN discordances (more than one species in each BIN). After implementing an auditing and five-grade (A-E) annotation protocol, the number of discordant species BINs was reduced to 44 (13% grade E), while concordant species BINs amounted to 271 (78% grades A and B) and 14 other had insufficient data (grade D). Fifteen species displayed comparatively high intraspecific divergences ranging from 2·6 to 18·5% (grade C), which is biologically paramount information to be considered in fish species monitoring and stock assessment. On balance, this compilation contributed to the detection of 59 European fish species probably in need of taxonomic clarification or re-evaluation. The generalized implementation of an auditing and annotation protocol for reference libraries of DNA barcodes is recommended. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  9. Assembly of Francisella novicida Cpf1 endonuclease in complex with guide RNA and target DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcón, Pablo; Montoya, Guillermo; Stella, Stefano

    2017-07-01

    Bacteria and archaea use the CRISPR-Cas system as an adaptive response against infection by foreign nucleic acids. Owing to its remarkable flexibility, this mechanism has been harnessed and adopted as a powerful tool for genome editing. The CRISPR-Cas system includes two classes that are subdivided into six types and 19 subtypes according to conservation of the cas gene and loci organization. Recently, a new protein with endonuclease activity belonging to class 2 type V has been identified. This endonuclease, termed Cpf1, in complex with a single CRISPR RNA (crRNA) is able to recognize and cleave a target DNA preceded by a 5'-TTN-3' protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) complementary to the RNA guide. To obtain structural insight into the inner workings of Cpf1, the crystallization of an active complex containing the full extent of the crRNA and a 31-nucleotide dsDNA target was attempted. The gene encoding Cpf1 from Francisella novicida was cloned, overexpressed and purified. The crRNA was transcribed and purified in vitro. Finally, the ternary FnCpf1-crRNA-DNA complex was assembled and purified by preparative electrophoresis before crystallization. Crystals belonging to space group C222 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 85.2, b = 137.6, c = 320.5 Å, were obtained and subjected to preliminary diffraction experiments.

  10. Self-assembling of calcium salt of the new DNA base 5-carboxylcytosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrera, Simona; Ruiz-Hernandez, Sergio E.; Reggente, Melania; Passeri, Daniele; Natali, Marco; Gala, Fabrizio; Zollo, Giuseppe; Rossi, Marco; Portalone, Gustavo

    2017-06-01

    Supramolecular architectures involving DNA bases can have a strong impact in several fields such as nanomedicine and nanodevice manufacturing. To date, in addition to the four canonical nucleobases (adenine, thymine, guanine and cytosine), four other forms of cytosine modified at the 5 position have been identified in DNA. Among these four new cytosine derivatives, 5-carboxylcytosine has been recently discovered in mammalian stem cell DNA, and proposed as the final product of the oxidative epigenetic demethylation pathway on the 5 position of cytosine. In this work, a calcium salt of 5-carboxylcytosine has been synthesized and deposited on graphite surface, where it forms self-assembled features as long range monolayers and up to one micron long filaments. These structures have been analyzed in details combining different theoretical and experimental approaches: X-ray single-crystal diffraction data were used to simulate the molecule-graphite interaction, first using molecular dynamics and then refining the results using density functional theory (DFT); finally, data obtained with DFT were used to rationalize atomic force microscopy (AFM) results.

  11. Engineering Metal Ion Coordination to Regulate Amyloid Fibril Assembly And Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, J.; Canfield, J.M.; Mehta, A.K.; Shokes, J.E.; Tian, B.; Childers, W.S.; Simmons, J.A.; Mao, Z.; Scott, R.A.; Warncke, K.; Lynn, D.G.

    2009-06-02

    Protein and peptide assembly into amyloid has been implicated in functions that range from beneficial epigenetic controls to pathological etiologies. However, the exact structures of the assemblies that regulate biological activity remain poorly defined. We have previously used Zn{sup 2+} to modulate the assembly kinetics and morphology of congeners of the amyloid {beta} peptide (A{beta}) associated with Alzheimer's disease. We now reveal a correlation among A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} coordination, peptide self-assembly, and neuronal viability. By using the central segment of A{beta}, HHQKLVFFA or A{beta}(13-21), which contains residues H13 and H14 implicated in A{beta}-metal ion binding, we show that Cu{sup 2+} forms complexes with A{beta}(13-21) and its K16A mutant and that the complexes, which do not self-assemble into fibrils, have structures similar to those found for the human prion protein, PrP. N-terminal acetylation and H14A substitution, Ac-A{beta}(13-21)H14A, alters metal coordination, allowing Cu{sup 2+} to accelerate assembly into neurotoxic fibrils. These results establish that the N-terminal region of A{beta} can access different metal-ion-coordination environments and that different complexes can lead to profound changes in A{beta} self-assembly kinetics, morphology, and toxicity. Related metal-ion coordination may be critical to the etiology of other neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. An atomic model of HIV-1 capsid-SP1 reveals structures regulating assembly and maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schur, Florian K M; Obr, Martin; Hagen, Wim J H; Wan, William; Jakobi, Arjen J; Kirkpatrick, Joanna M; Sachse, Carsten; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Briggs, John A G

    2016-07-29

    Immature HIV-1 assembles at and buds from the plasma membrane before proteolytic cleavage of the viral Gag polyprotein induces structural maturation. Maturation can be blocked by maturation inhibitors (MIs), thereby abolishing infectivity. The CA (capsid) and SP1 (spacer peptide 1) region of Gag is the key regulator of assembly and maturation and is the target of MIs. We applied optimized cryo-electron tomography and subtomogram averaging to resolve this region within assembled immature HIV-1 particles at 3.9 angstrom resolution and built an atomic model. The structure reveals a network of intra- and intermolecular interactions mediating immature HIV-1 assembly. The proteolytic cleavage site between CA and SP1 is inaccessible to protease. We suggest that MIs prevent CA-SP1 cleavage by stabilizing the structure, and MI resistance develops by destabilizing CA-SP1. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Analysis of the self-assembly of 4x4 DNA tiles by temperature-dependent FRET spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccà, Barbara; Meyer, Rebecca; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2009-12-21

    Correct and efficient self-assembly of oligonucleotides into highly ordered superstructures essentially depends on the structural integrity and thermal stability of DNA motifs such as junctions or tiles that build up the superstructure. To investigate the assembly/disassembly process of DNA tiles, we recently described a microplate-based method employing Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy, which enables the analysis of DNA superstructure formation in real time and with high throughput. This method allows thermodynamic parameters of the self-assembly process to be extracted, and we here apply it for detailed analysis of the self-assembly of five different 4x4 DNA tile motifs. To specifically investigate whether the FRET probes tethered to the DNA motifs report local thermodynamic stabilities in the immediate proximity of the chromophores, or whether the global stability of the entire motif is monitored, systematic variations of the labeling position within one tile are carried out. Combined with gel electrophoretic, UV spectroscopic, and microcalorimetric analysis, this study reveals that the FRET method mainly reports the thermodynamics of local microenvironment assembly, rather than that of the entire motif. Nonetheless, the thermodynamic data derived from FRET analysis are also influenced by the structural surroundings of the motif, and thus rapid and detailed analysis and identification of potential "weak points" within a superstructure which influence the structural integrity of a given tile design are enabled. Therefore, the microplate FRET method readily provides insights into the assembly process of complex DNA superstructures to verify and complement theoretical design approaches.

  14. The self-assembly of particles with isotropic interactions: Using DNA coated colloids to create designer nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R. B.; Dion, S.; Konigslow, K. von

    2014-01-01

    Self-consistent field theory equations are presented that are suitable for use as a coarse-grained model for DNA coated colloids, polymer-grafted nanoparticles and other systems with approximately isotropic interactions. The equations are generalized for arbitrary numbers of chemically distinct colloids. The advantages and limitations of such a coarse-grained approach for DNA coated colloids are discussed, as are similarities with block copolymer self-assembly. In particular, preliminary results for three species self-assembly are presented that parallel results from a two dimensional ABC triblock copolymer phase. The possibility of incorporating crystallization, dynamics, inverse statistical mechanics and multiscale modelling techniques are discussed

  15. Bub3 is a spindle assembly checkpoint protein regulating chromosome segregation during mouse oocyte meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Li

    Full Text Available In mitosis, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC prevents anaphase onset until all chromosomes have been attached to the spindle microtubules and aligned correctly at the equatorial metaphase plate. The major checkpoint proteins in mitosis consist of mitotic arrest-deficient (Mad1-3, budding uninhibited by benzimidazole (Bub1, Bub3, and monopolar spindle 1(Mps1. During meiosis, for the formation of a haploid gamete, two consecutive rounds of chromosome segregation occur with only one round of DNA replication. To pull homologous chromosomes to opposite spindle poles during meiosis I, both sister kinetochores of a homologue must face toward the same pole which is very different from mitosis and meiosis II. As a core member of checkpoint proteins, the individual role of Bub3 in mammalian oocyte meiosis is unclear. In this study, using overexpression and RNA interference (RNAi approaches, we analyzed the role of Bub3 in mouse oocyte meiosis. Our data showed that overexpressed Bub3 inhibited meiotic metaphase-anaphase transition by preventing homologous chromosome and sister chromatid segregations in meiosis I and II, respectively. Misaligned chromosomes, abnormal polar body and double polar bodies were observed in Bub3 knock-down oocytes, causing aneuploidy. Furthermore, through cold treatment combined with Bub3 overexpression, we found that overexpressed Bub3 affected the attachments of microtubules and kinetochores during metaphase-anaphase transition. We propose that as a member of SAC, Bub3 is required for regulation of both meiosis I and II, and is potentially involved in kinetochore-microtubule attachment in mammalian oocytes.

  16. Electrostatics and charge regulation in polyelectrolyte multilayered assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherstvy, Andrey G

    2014-05-01

    We examine the implications of electrostatic interactions on formation of polyelectrolyte multilayers, in application to field-effect based biosensors for label-free detection of charged macromolecules. We present a quantitative model to describe the experimental potentiometric observations and discuss its possibilities and limitations for detection of polyelectrolyte adsorption. We examine the influence of the ionic strength and pH on the sensor response upon polyelectrolyte layer-by-layer formation. The magnitude of potential oscillations on the sensor-electrolyte interface predicted upon repetitive adsorption charge-alternating polymers agrees satisfactorily with experimental results. The model accounts for different screening by mobile ions in electrolyte and inside tightly interdigitated multilayered structure. In particular, we show that sensors' potential oscillations are larger and more persistent at lower salt conditions, while they decay faster with the number of layers at higher salt conditions, in agreement with experiments. The effects of polyelectrolyte layer thickness, substrate potential, and charge regulation on the sensor surface triggered by layer-by-layer deposition are also analyzed.

  17. Functional interfaces for biomimetic energy harvesting: CNTs-DNA matrix for enzyme assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelm, Rachel M E; Garcia, Kristen E; Babanova, Sofia; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Matanovic, Ivana; Banta, Scott; Atanassov, Plamen

    2016-05-01

    The development of 3D structures exploring the properties of nano-materials and biological molecules has been shown through the years as an effective path forward for the design of advanced bio-nano architectures for enzymatic fuel cells, photo-bio energy harvesting devices, nano-biosensors and bio-actuators and other bio-nano-interfacial architectures. In this study we demonstrate a scaffold design utilizing carbon nanotubes, deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) and a specific DNA binding transcription factor that allows for directed immobilization of a single enzyme. Functionalized carbon nanotubes were covalently bonded to a diazonium salt modified gold surface through carbodiimide chemistry creating a brush-type nanotube alignment. The aligned nanotubes created a highly ordered structure with high surface area that allowed for the attachment of a protein assembly through a designed DNA scaffold. The enzyme immobilization was controlled by a zinc finger (ZNF) protein domain that binds to a specific dsDNA sequence. ZNF 268 was genetically fused to the small laccase (SLAC) from Streptomyces coelicolor, an enzyme belonging to the family of multi-copper oxidases, and used to demonstrate the applicability of the developed approach. Analytical techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and enzymatic activity analysis, allowed characterization at each stage of development of the bio-nano architecture. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. CasEMBLR: Cas9-Facilitated Multiloci Genomic Integration of in Vivo Assembled DNA Parts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakociunas, Tadas; Rajkumar, Arun Stephen; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    , we present a method for marker-free multiloci integration of in vivo assembled DNA parts. By the use of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated one-step double-strand breaks at single, double and triple integration sites we report the successful in vivo assembly and chromosomal integration of DNA parts. We call our......Homologous recombination (HR) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been harnessed for both plasmid construction and chromosomal integration of foreign DNA. Still, native HR machinery is not efficient enough for complex and marker-free genome engineering required for modern metabolic engineering. Here...... method CasEMBLR and validate its applicability for genome engineering and cell factory development in two ways: (i) introduction of the carotenoid pathway from 15 DNA parts into three targeted loci, and (ii) creation of a tyrosine production strain using ten parts into two loci, simultaneously knocking...

  19. Healing assessment of tile sets for error tolerance in DNA self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashempour, M; Mashreghian Arani, Z; Lombardi, F

    2008-12-01

    An assessment of the effectiveness of healing for error tolerance in DNA self-assembly tile sets for algorithmic/nano-manufacturing applications is presented. Initially, the conditions for correct binding of a tile to an existing aggregate are analysed using a Markovian approach; based on this analysis, it is proved that correct aggregation (as identified with a so-called ideal tile set) is not always met for the existing tile sets for nano-manufacturing. A metric for assessing tile sets for healing by utilising punctures is proposed. Tile sets are investigated and assessed with respect to features such as error (mismatched tile) movement, punctured area and bond types. Subsequently, it is shown that the proposed metric can comprehensively assess the healing effectiveness of a puncture type for a tile set and its capability to attain error tolerance for the desired pattern. Extensive simulation results are provided.

  20. Mapping Nanoscale Hotspots with Single-Molecule Emitters Assembled into Plasmonic Nanocavities Using DNA Origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikkaraddy, Rohit; Turek, V. A.; Kongsuwan, Nuttawut; Benz, Felix; Carnegie, Cloudy; van de Goor, Tim; de Nijs, Bart; Demetriadou, Angela; Hess, Ortwin; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2018-01-01

    Fabricating nanocavities in which optically-active single quantum emitters are precisely positioned, is crucial for building nanophotonic devices. Here we show that self-assembly based on robust DNA-origami constructs can precisely position single molecules laterally within sub-5nm gaps between plasmonic substrates that support intense optical confinement. By placing single-molecules at the center of a nanocavity, we show modification of the plasmon cavity resonance before and after bleaching the chromophore, and obtain enhancements of $\\geq4\\times10^3$ with high quantum yield ($\\geq50$%). By varying the lateral position of the molecule in the gap, we directly map the spatial profile of the local density of optical states with a resolution of $\\pm1.5$ nm. Our approach introduces a straightforward non-invasive way to measure and quantify confined optical modes on the nanoscale.

  1. RpoS Regulates a Novel Type of Plasmid DNA Transfer in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yanmei; Shi, Chunyu; Yu, Jiafei; Ren, Jingjing; Sun, Dongchang

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous plasmid transformation of Escherichia coli is independent of the DNA uptake machinery for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) entry. The one-hit kinetic pattern of plasmid transformation indicates that double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) enters E. coli cells on agar plates. However, DNA uptake and transformation regulation remain unclear in this new type of plasmid transformation. In this study, we developed our previous plasmid transformation system and induced competence at early stationary pha...

  2. Discovery of human inversion polymorphisms by comparative analysis of human and chimpanzee DNA sequence assemblies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Feuk

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available With a draft genome-sequence assembly for the chimpanzee available, it is now possible to perform genome-wide analyses to identify, at a submicroscopic level, structural rearrangements that have occurred between chimpanzees and humans. The goal of this study was to investigate chromosomal regions that are inverted between the chimpanzee and human genomes. Using the net alignments for the builds of the human and chimpanzee genome assemblies, we identified a total of 1,576 putative regions of inverted orientation, covering more than 154 mega-bases of DNA. The DNA segments are distributed throughout the genome and range from 23 base pairs to 62 mega-bases in length. For the 66 inversions more than 25 kilobases (kb in length, 75% were flanked on one or both sides by (often unrelated segmental duplications. Using PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization we experimentally validated 23 of 27 (85% semi-randomly chosen regions; the largest novel inversion confirmed was 4.3 mega-bases at human Chromosome 7p14. Gorilla was used as an out-group to assign ancestral status to the variants. All experimentally validated inversion regions were then assayed against a panel of human samples and three of the 23 (13% regions were found to be polymorphic in the human genome. These polymorphic inversions include 730 kb (at 7p22, 13 kb (at 7q11, and 1 kb (at 16q24 fragments with a 5%, 30%, and 48% minor allele frequency, respectively. Our results suggest that inversions are an important source of variation in primate genome evolution. The finding of at least three novel inversion polymorphisms in humans indicates this type of structural variation may be a more common feature of our genome than previously realized.

  3. Cholesterol-conjugated supramolecular assemblies of low generations polyamidoamine dendrimers for enhanced EGFP plasmid DNA transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golkar, Nasim; Samani, Soliman Mohammadi; Tamaddon, Ali Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    Aimed to prepare an enhanced gene delivery system with low cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency, various cholesterol-conjugated derivates of low generation polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers were prepared. The conjugates were characterized by TNBS assay, FTIR, and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Self-assembly of the dendrimer conjugates (G1-Chol, G2-Chol, and G3-Chol) was investigated by pyrene assay. Following formation of the complexes between enhanced green fluorescence protein plasmid and the dendrimer conjugates at various N (primary amine)/P (phosphate) mole ratios, plasmid condensation, biologic stability, cytotoxicity, and protein expression were investigated. The conjugates self-assembled into micellar dispersions with the critical micelle concentration values (transfection efficiency was determined higher for the cholesterol conjugates than unmodified dendrimers in HepG2 cells, showing the highest for G2-Chol at 40 % degree of cholesterol modification (G2-Chol40 %) among various dendrimer generations. Interestingly, such conjugate showed a complete protection of plasmid against serum nucleases. Our results confirmed that the cholesterol conjugation to PAMAM dendrimers of low generations bearing little cytotoxicity improves their several physicochemical and biological characteristics required for an enhanced delivery of plasmid DNA into cells.

  4. Parkin regulates translesion DNA synthesis in response to UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuefei; Ma, Xiaolu; Tu, Yingfeng; Huang, Min; Liu, Hongmei; Wang, Fengli; Gong, Juanjuan; Wang, Jiuqiang; Li, Xiaoling; Chen, Qian; Shen, Hongyan; Zhu, Shu; Wang, Yun; Liu, Yang; Guo, Caixia; Tang, Tie-Shan

    2017-05-30

    Deficiency of Parkin is a major cause of early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Notably, PD patients also exhibit a significantly higher risk in melanoma and other skin tumors, while the mechanism remains largely unknown. In this study, we show that depletion of Parkin causes compromised cell viability and genome stability after ultraviolet (UV) radiation. We demonstrate that Parkin promotes efficient Rad18-dependent proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) monoubiquitination by facilitating the formation of Replication protein A (RPA)-coated ssDNA upon UV radiation. Furthermore, Parkin is found to physically interact with NBS1 (Nijmegen breakage syndrome 1), and to be required for optimal recruitment of NBS1 and DNA polymerase eta (Polη) to UV-induced damage sites. Consequently, depletion of Parkin leads to increased UV-induced mutagenesis. These findings unveil an important role of Parkin in protecting genome stability through positively regulating translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) upon UV damage, providing a novel mechanistic link between Parkin deficiency and predisposition to skin cancers in PD patients.

  5. Regulation of blood-testis barrier assembly in vivo by germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xiu-Xia; Jin, Cheng; Wang, Yu-Qian; Sun, Tie-Cheng; Li, Jian; Tang, Ji-Xin; Batool, Alia; Deng, Shou-Long; Chen, Su-Ren; Cheng, C Yan; Liu, Yi-Xun

    2018-01-03

    The assembly of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) during postnatal development is crucial to support meiosis. However, the role of germ cells in BTB assembly remains unclear. Herein, Kit W /Kit WV mice were used as a study model. These mice were infertile, failing to establish a functional BTB to support meiosis due to c-Kit mutation. Transplantation of undifferentiated spermatogonia derived from normal mice into the testis of Kit W /Kit WV mice triggered functional BTB assembly, displaying cyclic remodeling during the epithelial cycle. Also, transplanted germ cells were capable of inducing Leydig cell testosterone production, which could enhance the expression of integral membrane protein claudin 3 in Sertoli cells. Early spermatocytes were shown to play a vital role in directing BTB assembly by expressing claudin 3, which likely created a transient adhesion structure to mediate BTB and cytoskeleton assembly in adjacent Sertoli cells. In summary, the positive modulation of germ cells on somatic cell function provides useful information regarding somatic-germ cell interactions.-Li, X.-Y., Zhang, Y., Wang, X.-X., Jin, C., Wang, Y.-Q., Sun, T.-C., Li, J., Tang, J.-X., Batool, A., Deng, S.-L., Chen, S.-R., Cheng, C. Y., Liu, Y.-X. Regulation of blood-testis barrier assembly in vivo by germ cells.

  6. A cassette of basic amino acids in histone H2B regulates nucleosome dynamics and access to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Yesenia; Duan, Mingrui; Wyrick, John J; Smerdon, Michael J

    2018-03-27

    Nucleosome dynamics, such as spontaneous DNA unwrapping, are postulated to have a critical role in regulating the access of DNA repair machinery to DNA lesions within nucleosomes. However, the specific histone domains that regulate nucleosome dynamics and their impact on DNA repair are not well understood. Previous studies have identified the histone H2B repression (or HBR) domain, a highly conserved, basic region in the N-terminal tail of histone H2B, which significantly influences gene expression, chromatin assembly, and DNA damage and repair. However, knowledge about the molecular mechanism(s) that may account for these observations is limited. Here, we characterized the stability and dynamics of ΔHBR mutant nucleosome core particles (NCPs) in vitro by restriction-enzyme accessibility, FRET, and temperature-induced sliding of histone octamers. Our results indicate that ΔHBR NCPs are more dynamic and the steady-state fraction of the ΔHBR NCP population occupying the unwrapped state is larger than that of WT NCPs. Moreover, ΔHBR-histone octamers are more susceptible to temperature-induced sliding on DNA than WT histone octamers. Notably, the activity of base-excision repair (BER) enzymes at uracil lesions and single-nucleotide gaps is enhanced in a site-specific manner in ΔHBR NCPs and correlates well with increased DNA unwrapping in these damaged regions. Finally, removal of the HBR domain is insufficient for completely alleviating the structural constraints imposed by histone octamers on the activity of BER enzymes. In summary, our findings indicate that the conserved HBR domain of histone H2B regulates the accessibility of repair factors to DNA lesions in nucleosomes. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. A Self-Assembled DNA Origami-Gold Nanorod Complex for Cancer Theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qiao; Shi, Yuefeng; Zhang, Qian; Li, Na; Zhan, Pengfei; Song, Linlin; Dai, Luru; Tian, Jie; Du, Yang; Cheng, Zhen; Ding, Baoquan

    2015-10-01

    A self-assembled DNA origami (DO)-gold nanorod (GNR) complex, which is a dual-functional nanotheranostics constructed by decorating GNRs onto the surface of DNA origami, is demonstrated. After 24 h incubation of two structured DO-GNR complexes with human MCF7 breast cancer cells, significant enhancement of cell uptake is achieved compared to bare GNRs by two-photon luminescence imaging. Particularly, the triangle shaped DO-GNR complex exhibits optimal cellular accumulation. Compared to GNRs, improved photothermolysis against tumor cells is accomplished for the triangle DO-GNR complex by two-photon laser or NIR laser irradiation. Moreover, the DO-GNR complex exhibits enhanced antitumor efficacy compared with bare GNRs in nude mice bearing breast tumor xenografts. The results demonstrate that the DO-GNR complex can achieve optimal two-photon cell imaging and photothermal effect, suggesting a promising candidate for cancer diagnosis and therapy both in vitro and in vivo. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Hierarchical Assembly of Plasmonic Nanostructures using Virus Capsid Scaffolds on DNA Origami Tiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Debin; Capehart, Stacy L.; Pal, Suchetan; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Lei; Schuck, P. J.; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao; Francis, Matthew B.; De Yoreo, James J.

    2014-07-07

    Plasmonic nanoarchitectures using biological scaffolds have shown the potential to attain controllable plasmonic fluorescence via precise spatial arrangement of fluorophores and plasmonic antennae. However, previous studies report a predominance of fluorescence quenching for small metal nanoparticles (less than ~60 nm) due to their small scattering cross-sections. In this work, we report the design and performance of fluorescent plasmonic structures composed of fluorophore-modified virus capsids and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) assembled on DNA origami tiles. The virus capsid creates a scaffold for control over the three dimensional arrangement of the fluorophores, whereas the DNA origami tile provides precise control over the distance between the capsid and the AuNP. Using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical simulations and multimodal single-particle imaging measurements, we show that the judicial design of these structures places the dye molecules near the hot spot of the AuNP. This effectively increases the fluorescence intensity in the quenching regime of the AuNP, with an enhancement factor that increases with increasing AuNP size. This strategy of using biological scaffolds to control fluorescence paves the way for exploring the parameters that determine plasmonic fluorescence. It may lead to a better understanding of the antenna effects of photon absorption and emission, enabling the construction of multicomponent plasmonic systems.

  9. Efficient self-assembly of DNA-functionalized fluorophores and gold nanoparticles with DNA functionalized silicon surfaces: the effect of oligomer spacers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, James A.; Patole, Samson; Yin, Huabing; Xiao, Qiang; Brown, Tom; Melvin, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    Although strategies for the immobilization of DNA oligonucleotides onto surfaces for bioanalytical and top-down bio-inspired nanobiofabrication approaches are well developed, the effect of introducing spacer molecules between the surface and the DNA oligonucleotide for the hybridization of nanoparticle–DNA conjugates has not been previously assessed in a quantitative manner. The hybridization efficiency of DNA oligonucleotides end-labelled with gold nanoparticles (1.4 or 10 nm diameter) with DNA sequences conjugated to silicon surfaces via hexaethylene glycol phosphate diester oligomer spacers (0, 1, 2, 6 oligomers) was found to be independent of spacer length. To quantify both the density of DNA strands attached to the surfaces and hybridization with the surface-attached DNA, new methodologies have been developed. Firstly, a simple approach based on fluorescence has been developed for determination of the immobilization density of DNA oligonucleotides. Secondly, an approach using mass spectrometry has been created to establish (i) the mean number of DNA oligonucleotides attached to the gold nanoparticles and (ii) the hybridization density of nanoparticle–oligonucleotide conjugates with the silicon surface–attached complementary sequence. These methods and results will be useful for application with nanosensors, the self-assembly of nanoelectronic devices and the attachment of nanoparticles to biomolecules for single-molecule biophysical studies. PMID:23361467

  10. Structural determinants of APOBEC3B non-catalytic domain for molecular assembly and catalytic regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xiao; Yang, Hanjing; Arutiunian, Vagan; Fang, Yao; Besse, Guillaume; Morimoto, Cherie; Zirkle, Brett; Chen, Xiaojiang S. (USC)

    2017-05-30

    The catalytic activity of human cytidine deaminase APOBEC3B (A3B) has been correlated with kataegic mutational patterns within multiple cancer types. The molecular basis of how the N-terminal non-catalytic CD1 regulates the catalytic activity and consequently, biological function of A3B remains relatively unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of a soluble human A3B-CD1 variant and delineate several structural elements of CD1 involved in molecular assembly, nucleic acid interactions and catalytic regulation of A3B. We show that (i) A3B expressed in human cells exists in hypoactive high-molecular-weight (HMW) complexes, which can be activated without apparent dissociation into low-molecular-weight (LMW) species after RNase A treatment. (ii) Multiple surface hydrophobic residues of CD1 mediate the HMW complex assembly and affect the catalytic activity, including one tryptophan residue W127 that likely acts through regulating nucleic acid binding. (iii) One of the highly positively charged surfaces on CD1 is involved in RNA-dependent attenuation of A3B catalysis. (iv) Surface hydrophobic residues of CD1 are involved in heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) binding to A3B. The structural and biochemical insights described here suggest that unique structural features on CD1 regulate the molecular assembly and catalytic activity of A3B through distinct mechanisms.

  11. Design and experimental validation of a generic model for combinatorial assembly of DNA tiles into 1D-structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laisne, Aude; Lesniewska, Eric; Pompon, Denis

    2011-06-01

    Quantitative modeling of the self-assembly of DNA tiles leading either to defined end-products or distribution of biopolymers is of practical importance for biotechnology and synthetic biology. The combinatorial process describing tile assembly was implemented into a generic algorithm allowing quantitative description of the population of significant species accumulating during the reaction course. Experimental formation and characterization by optical and electrophoresis approaches of copolymers resulting from the self-assembly of a limited number of half-complementary tiles were used to define and validate generic rules allowing definition of model parameters. Factors controlling the structure and the dynamic of the oligomer population were evidenced for assemblies leading or not to defined end-products. Primary parameters were experimentally determined using rapid mixing experiments. Adjustment of simulations to experimental profiles allowed definition of generic rules for calculation of secondary parameters that take into account macro- and microenvironment of individual hybridization steps. In the case of copolymers, accurate simulation of experimental profiles was achieved for formation of linear assemblies. Overall length of species and structure of the DNA regions flanking the hybridization sites are critical parameters for which calculation rules were defined. The computational approach quantitatively predicted the parameters affecting time-course and distribution of accumulating products for different experimental designs. The computational and parameter evaluation procedures designed for the assembly of DNA tiles into large 1D-structures are more generally applicable for the construction of non-DNA polymers by extremities-specific recognition of molecular blocks. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. DMPD: Innate immune recognition of, and regulation by, DNA. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16979939 Innate immune recognition of, and regulation by, DNA. Ishii KJ, Akira S. T...rends Immunol. 2006 Nov;27(11):525-32. Epub 2006 Sep 18. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Innate immune reco...gnition of, and regulation by, DNA. PubmedID 16979939 Title Innate immune recognition of, and regulation b

  13. Characterization and Application of DNA-templated Silver Nanoclusters and Polarized Spectroscopy of Self-Assembled Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carro-Temboury, Miguel R.

    In this thesis two different systems are investigated envisioning their potential applications: DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) and ionic self-assembled (ISA) nanostructures based on azo-dyes. Mainly Visible-NIR spectroscopy was used to probe electronic transitions with absorbance...... other applications are possible such as detection of analytes, pH detection or their use as active layer of Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLEDs). The fluorophores studied here, DNAAgNCs, are few nanometer sized and formed by a few to ca. 20 silver atoms templated by one or two single stranded DNA (ss...... fluorescence decay time as a function of emission wavelength (Average decay time spectra). This proved to be a robust method to characterize the complexity of the system due to the multi-exponential decay of the emitters. In order to study the electroluminescence from the C24-AgNCs in Self-Assembled Monolayer...

  14. De novo assembly of the carrot mitochondrial genome using next generation sequencing of whole genomic DNA provides first evidence of DNA transfer into an angiosperm plastid genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iorizzo Massimo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence analysis of organelle genomes has revealed important aspects of plant cell evolution. The scope of this study was to develop an approach for de novo assembly of the carrot mitochondrial genome using next generation sequence data from total genomic DNA. Results Sequencing data from a carrot 454 whole genome library were used to develop a de novo assembly of the mitochondrial genome. Development of a new bioinformatic tool allowed visualizing contig connections and elucidation of the de novo assembly. Southern hybridization demonstrated recombination across two large repeats. Genome annotation allowed identification of 44 protein coding genes, three rRNA and 17 tRNA. Identification of the plastid genome sequence allowed organelle genome comparison. Mitochondrial intergenic sequence analysis allowed detection of a fragment of DNA specific to the carrot plastid genome. PCR amplification and sequence analysis across different Apiaceae species revealed consistent conservation of this fragment in the mitochondrial genomes and an insertion in Daucus plastid genomes, giving evidence of a mitochondrial to plastid transfer of DNA. Sequence similarity with a retrotransposon element suggests a possibility that a transposon-like event transferred this sequence into the plastid genome. Conclusions This study confirmed that whole genome sequencing is a practical approach for de novo assembly of higher plant mitochondrial genomes. In addition, a new aspect of intercompartmental genome interaction was reported providing the first evidence for DNA transfer into an angiosperm plastid genome. The approach used here could be used more broadly to sequence and assemble mitochondrial genomes of diverse species. This information will allow us to better understand intercompartmental interactions and cell evolution.

  15. Pyrococcus horikoshii TET2 peptidase assembling process and associated functional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appolaire, Alexandre; Rosenbaum, Eva; Durá, M Asunción; Colombo, Matteo; Marty, Vincent; Savoye, Marjolaine Noirclerc; Godfroy, Anne; Schoehn, Guy; Girard, Eric; Gabel, Frank; Franzetti, Bruno

    2013-08-02

    Tetrahedral (TET) aminopeptidases are large polypeptide destruction machines present in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here, the rules governing their assembly into hollow 12-subunit tetrahedrons are addressed by using TET2 from Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhTET2) as a model. Point mutations allowed the capture of a stable, catalytically active precursor. Small angle x-ray scattering revealed that it is a dimer whose architecture in solution is identical to that determined by x-ray crystallography within the fully assembled TET particle. Small angle x-ray scattering also showed that the reconstituted PhTET2 dodecameric particle displayed the same quaternary structure and thermal stability as the wild-type complex. The PhTET2 assembly intermediates were characterized by analytical ultracentrifugation, native gel electrophoresis, and electron microscopy. They revealed that PhTET2 assembling is a highly ordered process in which hexamers represent the main intermediate. Peptide degradation assays demonstrated that oligomerization triggers the activity of the TET enzyme toward large polypeptidic substrates. Fractionation experiments in Pyrococcus and Halobacterium cells revealed that, in vivo, the dimeric precursor co-exists together with assembled TET complexes. Taken together, our observations explain the biological significance of TET oligomerization and suggest the existence of a functional regulation of the dimer-dodecamer equilibrium in vivo.

  16. Polyamines inhibit the assembly of stress granules in normal intestinal epithelial cells regulating apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Tongtong; Rao, Jaladanki N; Liu, Lan; Xiao, Lan; Cui, Yu-Hong; Jiang, Zhengran; Ouyang, Miao; Donahue, James M; Wang, Jian-Ying

    2012-07-01

    Polyamines regulate multiple signaling pathways and are implicated in many aspects of cellular functions, but the exact molecular processes governed by polyamines remain largely unknown. In response to environmental stress, repression of translation is associated with the assembly of stress granules (SGs) that contain a fraction of arrested mRNAs and are thought to function as mRNA storage. Here we show that polyamines modulate the assembly of SGs in normal intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and that induced SGs following polyamine depletion are implicated in the protection of IECs against apoptosis. Increasing the levels of cellular polyamines by ectopic overexpression of the ornithine decarboxylase gene decreased cytoplasmic levels of SG-signature constituent proteins eukaryotic initiation factor 3b and T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1)-related protein and repressed the assembly of SGs induced by exposure to arsenite-induced oxidative stress. In contrast, depletion of cellular polyamines by inhibiting ornithine decarboxylase with α-difluoromethylornithine increased cytoplasmic eukaryotic initiation factor 3b and TIA-1 related protein abundance and enhanced arsenite-induced SG assembly. Polyamine-deficient cells also exhibited an increase in resistance to tumor necrosis factor-α/cycloheximide-induced apoptosis, which was prevented by inhibiting SG formation with silencing SG resident proteins Sort1 and TIA-1. These results indicate that the elevation of cellular polyamines represses the assembly of SGs in normal IECs and that increased SGs in polyamine-deficient cells are crucial for increased resistance to apoptosis.

  17. Optimized Method of Extracting Rice Chloroplast DNA for High-Quality Plastome Resequencing and de Novo Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Takamatsu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Chloroplasts, which perform photosynthesis, are one of the most important organelles in green plants and algae. Chloroplasts maintain an independent genome that includes important genes encoding their photosynthetic machinery and various housekeeping functions. Owing to its non-recombinant nature, low mutation rates, and uniparental inheritance, the chloroplast genome (plastome can give insights into plant evolution and ecology and in the development of biotechnological and breeding applications. However, efficient methods to obtain high-quality chloroplast DNA (cpDNA are currently not available, impeding powerful sequencing and further functional genomics research. To investigate effects on rice chloroplast genome quality, we compared cpDNA extraction by three extraction protocols: liquid nitrogen coupled with sucrose density gradient centrifugation, high-salt buffer, and Percoll gradient centrifugation. The liquid nitrogen–sucrose gradient method gave a high yield of high-quality cpDNA with reliable purity. The cpDNA isolated by this technique was evaluated, resequenced, and assembled de novo to build a robust framework for genomic and genetic studies. Comparison of this high-purity cpDNA with total DNAs revealed the read coverage of the sequenced regions; next-generation sequencing data showed that the high-quality cpDNA eliminated noise derived from contamination by nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, which frequently occurs in total DNA. The assembly process produced highly accurate, long contigs. We summarize the extent to which this improved method of isolating cpDNA from rice can provide practical progress in overcoming challenges related to chloroplast genomes and in further exploring the development of new sequencing technologies.

  18. Amphiphilic DNA tiles for controlled insertion and 2D assembly on fluid lipid membranes: the effect on mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohno, Chikara; Makishi, Shingo; Nakatani, Kazuhiko; Contera, Sonia

    2017-03-02

    Future lipid membrane-associated DNA nanostructures are expected to find applications ranging from synthetic biology to nanomedicine. Here we have designed and synthesized DNA tiles and modified them with amphiphilic covalent moieties. dod-DEG groups, which consist of a hydrophilic diethylene glycol (DEG) and a hydrophobic dodecyl group, are introduced at the phosphate backbone to create amphiphilic DNA strands which are subsequently introduced into one face of the DNA tiles. In this way the tile becomes able to stably bind to lipid membranes by insertion of the hydrophobic groups inside the bilayer core. The functionalized tiles do not aggregate in solution. Our results show that these amphiphilic DNA tiles can bind and assemble into 2D lattices on both gel and fluid lipid bilayers. The binding of the DNA structures to membranes is dependent on the lipid phase of the membrane, the concentration of Mg 2+ cations, the length of the amphiphilic modifications to the DNA as well as on the density of the modifications within the tile. Atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy is used to investigate the effect of the inserted DNA tiles on the mechanical properties of the lipid membranes. The results indicate that the insertion of DNA tiles produces an approx. 20% increase of the bilayer breakthrough force.

  19. Regulation of supramolecular chirality in co-assembled polydiacetylene LB films with removable azobenzene derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Chen, Xin; Pan, Xiujuan; Zou, Gang; Zhang, Qijin

    2012-05-14

    Herein, we report a novel model that combines supramolecular chemistry and the LB technique for the chirality regulation of the PDA films. The helical packing of PCDA molecules and the chiroptical properties of the resulting PDA LB films can be easily modulated by different azobenzene derivatives. Moreover, the effect of the photo-isomerization of azobenzene chromophores on the helical formation of PCDA assemblies is investigated in detail. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Dynamic assembly of Hda and the sliding clamp in the regulation of replication licensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin S; Nanfara, Michael T; Chodavarapu, Sundari; Jin, Kyeong S; Babu, Vignesh M P; Ghazy, Mohamed A; Chung, Scisung; Kaguni, Jon M; Sutton, Mark D; Cho, Yunje

    2017-04-20

    Regulatory inactivation of DnaA (RIDA) is one of the major regulatory mechanisms of prokaryotic replication licensing. In RIDA, the Hda-sliding clamp complex loaded onto DNA directly interacts with adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-bound DnaA and stimulates the hydrolysis of ATP to inactivate DnaA. A prediction is that the activity of Hda is tightly controlled to ensure that replication initiation occurs only once per cell cycle. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the Hda-β clamp complex. This complex contains two pairs of Hda dimers sandwiched between two β clamp rings to form an octamer that is stabilized by three discrete interfaces. Two separate surfaces of Hda make contact with the β clamp, which is essential for Hda function in RIDA. The third interface between Hda monomers occludes the active site arginine finger, blocking its access to DnaA. Taken together, our structural and mutational analyses of the Hda-β clamp complex indicate that the interaction of the β clamp with Hda controls the ability of Hda to interact with DnaA. In the octameric Hda-β clamp complex, the inability of Hda to interact with DnaA is a novel mechanism that may regulate Hda function. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Regulation of mitotic spindle assembly factor NuMA by Importin-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Chia; Huang, Tzu-Lun; Shimamoto, Yuta; Tsai, Su-Yi; Hsia, Kuo-Chiang

    2017-11-06

    Ran-guanosine triphosphatase orchestrates mitotic spindle assembly by modulation of the interaction between Importin-α/-β and spindle assembly factors (SAFs). The inhibition of SAFs performed by importins needs to be done without much sequestration from abundant nuclear localization signal (NLS) -containing proteins. However, the molecular mechanisms that determine NLS-binding selectivity and that inhibit activity of Importin-β-regulated SAFs (e.g., nuclear mitotic apparatus protein [NuMA]) remain undefined. Here, we present a crystal structure of the Importin-α-NuMA C terminus complex showing a novel binding pattern that accounts for selective NLS recognition. We demonstrate that, in the presence of Importin-α, Importin-β inhibits the microtubule-binding function of NuMA. Further, we have identified a high-affinity microtubule-binding region that lies carboxyl-terminal to the NLS, which is sterically masked by Importin-β on being bound by Importin-α. Our study provides mechanistic evidence of how Importin-α/-β regulates the NuMA functioning required for assembly of higher-order microtubule structures, further illuminating how Ran-governed transport factors regulate diverse SAFs and accommodate various cell demands. © 2017 Chang et al.

  2. Mechanisms of DNA binding and regulation of Bacillus anthracis DNA primase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Subhasis B; Wydra, Eric; Biswas, Esther E

    2009-08-11

    DNA primases are pivotal enzymes in chromosomal DNA replication in all organisms. In this article, we report unique mechanistic characteristics of recombinant DNA primase from Bacillus anthracis. The mechanism of action of B. anthracis DNA primase (DnaG(BA)) may be described in several distinct steps as follows. Its mechanism of action is initiated when it binds to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in the form of a trimer. Although DnaG(BA) binds to different DNA sequences with moderate affinity (as expected of a mobile DNA binding protein), we found that DnaG(BA) bound to the origin of bacteriophage G4 (G4ori) with approximately 8-fold higher affinity. DnaG(BA) was strongly stimulated (>or=75-fold) by its cognate helicase, DnaB(BA), during RNA primer synthesis. With the G4ori ssDNA template, DnaG(BA) formed short (primers in the absence of DnaB(BA). The presence of DnaB(BA) increased the rate of primer synthesis. The observed stimulation of primer synthesis by cognate DnaB(BA) is thus indicative of a positive effector role for DnaB(BA). By contrast, Escherichia coli DnaB helicase (DnaB(EC)) did not stimulate DnaG(BA) and inhibited primer synthesis to near completion. This observed effect of E. coli DnaB(EC) is indicative of a strong negative effector role for heterologous DnaB(EC). We conclude that DnaG(BA) is capable of interacting with DnaB proteins from both B. anthracis and E. coli; however, between DnaB proteins derived from these two organisms, only the homologous DNA helicase (DnaB(BA)) acted as a positive effector of primer synthesis.

  3. Self-assembled nanocomplexes of anionic pullulan and polyallylamine for DNA and pH-sensitive intracellular drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vora, Lalit [University under Sect. 3 of UGC Act – 1956, Elite Status and Center of Excellence – Govt. of Maharashtra, Center for Novel Drug Delivery Systems, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology (India); Tyagi, Monica [Advanced Center for Treatment, Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Gupta Lab, Cancer Research Institute (India); Patel, Ketan [University under Sect. 3 of UGC Act – 1956, Elite Status and Center of Excellence – Govt. of Maharashtra, Center for Novel Drug Delivery Systems, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology (India); Gupta, Sanjay [Advanced Center for Treatment, Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Gupta Lab, Cancer Research Institute (India); Vavia, Pradeep, E-mail: vaviapradeep@yahoo.com [University under Sect. 3 of UGC Act – 1956, Elite Status and Center of Excellence – Govt. of Maharashtra, Center for Novel Drug Delivery Systems, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology (India)

    2014-12-15

    The amalgamation of chemotherapy and gene therapy is promising treatment option for cancer. In this study, novel biocompatible self-assembled nanocomplexes (NCs) between carboxylmethylated pullulan t335 (CMP) with polyallylamine (CMP–PAA NCs) were developed for plasmid DNA (pDNA) and pH-sensitive doxorubicin (DOX) delivery. DOX was conjugated to CMP (DOX–CMP) via hydrazone and confirmed by FTIR and {sup 1}H-NMR. In vitro release studies of pH-sensitive DOX–CMP conjugate showed 23 and 85 % release after 48 h at pH 7.4 (physiological pH) and pH 5 (intracellular/tumoral pH), respectively. The CMP–PAA NCs or DOX–CMP–PAA NCs self-assembled into a nanosized (<250 nm) spherical shape as confirmed by DLS and TEM. The hemolysis and cytotoxicity study indicated that the CMP–PAA NCs did not show cytotoxicity in comparison with plain polyallylamine. Gel retardation assay showed complete binding of pDNA with CMP–PAA NCs at 1:2 weight ratio. CMP–PAA NCs/pDNA showed significantly higher transfection in HEK293 cells compared to PAA/pDNA complexes. Confocal imaging demonstrated successful cellular uptake of DOX–CMP–PAA NCs in HEK293 cells. Thus, NCs hold great potential for targeted pDNA and pH-sensitive intratumoral drug delivery.

  4. Self-Assembled Molecular Hybrids of CoS-DNA for Enhanced Water Oxidation with Low Cobalt Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthick, Kannimuthu; Anantharaj, Sengeni; Karthik, Pitchiah E; Subramanian, Balasubramanian; Kundu, Subrata

    2017-06-05

    Water oxidation in alkaline medium was efficiently catalyzed by the self-assembled molecular hybrids of CoS-DNA that had 20 times lower Co loading than the commonly used loading. The morphological outcome was directed by varying the molar ratio of metal precursor Co(Ac) 2 and DNA and three different sets of CoS-DNA molecular hybrids, viz. CoS-DNA(0.036), CoS-DNA(0.06), and CoS-DNA(0.084) were prepared. These morphologically distinct hybrids had shown similar electrocatalytic behavior, because of the fact that they all contained the same cobalt content. The CoS-DNA(0.036), CoS-DNA(0.06), and CoS-DNA(0.084) required very low overpotentials of 350, 364, and 373 mV at a current density of 10 mA cm -2 (1 M KOH), respectively. The advantages of lower overpotential, lower Tafel slope (42.7 mV dec -1 ), high Faradaic efficiency (90.28%), high stability and reproducibility after all, with a lower cobalt loading, have certainly shown the worth of these molecular hybrids in large-scale water oxidation. Moreover, since DNA itself a good binder, CoS-DNA molecular hybrids were directly casted on substrate electrodes and used after drying. It also showed minimum intrinsic resistance as DNA is a good ionic and electronic conductor. Besides, the present method may also be extended for the preparation of other active electrocatalysts for water splitting.

  5. Crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protein clusters assembled on to damaged DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miggiano, R.; Perugino, G.; Ciaramella, M.; Serpe, M.; Rejman, Dominik; Páv, Ondřej; Pohl, Radek; Garavaglia, S.; Lahiri, S.; Rizzi, M.; Rossi, F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 473, č. 2 (2016), s. 123-133 ISSN 0264-6021 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 241587 - SYSTEMTB Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : DNA repair * DNA-binding protein * Mycobacterium tuberculosis * O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase * co-operativity * crystal structure Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.797, year: 2016

  6. Regulation of the activity of the dual-function DnaA protein in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Fernandez-Fernandez

    Full Text Available DnaA is a conserved essential bacterial protein that acts as the initiator of chromosomal replication as well as a master transcriptional regulator in Caulobacter crescentus. Thus, the intracellular levels of active DnaA need to be tightly regulated during the cell cycle. Our previous work suggested that DnaA may be regulated at the level of its activity by the replisome-associated protein HdaA. Here, we describe the construction of a mutant DnaA protein [DnaA(R357A]. The R357 residue in the AAA+ domain of the C. crescentus DnaA protein is equivalent to the R334 residue of the E. coli DnaA protein, which is required for the Regulatory Inactivation of DnaA (RIDA. We found that the expression of the DnaA(R357A mutant protein in C. crescentus, but not the expression of the wild-type DnaA protein at similar levels, causes a severe phenotype of over-initiation of chromosomal replication and that it blocks cell division. Thus, the mutant DnaA(R357A protein is hyper-active to promote the initiation of DNA replication, compared to the wild-type DnaA protein. DnaA(R357A could not replace DnaA in vivo, indicating that the switch in DnaA activity once chromosomal replication has started may be an essential process in C. crescentus. We propose that the inactivation of DnaA is the main mechanism ensuring that chromosomal replication starts only once per cell cycle. We further observed that the R357A substitution in DnaA does not promote the activity of DnaA as a direct transcriptional activator of four important genes, encoding HdaA, the GcrA master cell cycle regulator, the FtsZ cell division protein and the MipZ spatial regulator of cell division. Thus, the AAA+ domain of DnaA may play a role in temporally regulating the bifunctionality of DnaA by reallocating DnaA molecules from initiating DNA replication to transcribing genes within the unique DnaA regulon of C. crescentus.

  7. Rapid and annealing-free self-assembly of DNA building blocks for 3D hydrogel chaperoned by cationic comb-type copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng; Wu, Yuyang; Yu, Feng; Niu, Chaoqun; Du, Zhi; Chen, Yong; Du, Jie

    2017-10-01

    The construction and self-assembly of DNA building blocks are the foundation of bottom-up development of three-dimensional DNA nanostructures or hydrogels. However, most self-assembly from DNA components is impeded by the mishybridized intermediates or the thermodynamic instability. To enable rapid production of complicated DNA objects with high yields no need for annealing process, herein different DNA building blocks (Y-shaped, L- and L'-shaped units) were assembled in presence of a cationic comb-type copolymer, poly (L-lysine)-graft-dextran (PLL-g-Dex), under physiological conditions. The results demonstrated that PLL-g-Dex not only significantly promoted the self-assembly of DNA blocks with high efficiency, but also stabilized the assembled multi-level structures especially for promoting the complicated 3D DNA hydrogel formation. This study develops a novel strategy for rapid and high-yield production of DNA hydrogel even derived from instable building blocks at relatively low DNA concentrations, which would endow DNA nanotechnology for more practical applications.

  8. A DNA aptamer recognising a malaria protein biomarker can function as part of a DNA origami assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godonoga, Maia; Lin, Ting-Yu; Oshima, Azusa; Sumitomo, Koji; Tang, Marco S. L.; Cheung, Yee-Wai; Kinghorn, Andrew B.; Dirkzwager, Roderick M.; Zhou, Cunshan; Kuzuya, Akinori; Tanner, Julian A.; Heddle, Jonathan G.

    2016-01-01

    DNA aptamers have potential for disease diagnosis and as therapeutics, particularly when interfaced with programmable molecular technology. Here we have combined DNA aptamers specific for the malaria biomarker Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH) with a DNA origami scaffold. Twelve aptamers that recognise PfLDH were integrated into a rectangular DNA origami and atomic force microscopy demonstrated that the incorporated aptamers preserve their ability to specifically bind target protein. Captured PfLDH retained enzymatic activity and protein-aptamer binding was observed dynamically using high-speed AFM. This work demonstrates the ability of DNA aptamers to recognise a malaria biomarker whilst being integrated within a supramolecular DNA scaffold, opening new possibilities for malaria diagnostic approaches based on DNA nanotechnology. PMID:26891622

  9. An unusual dimeric structure and assembly for TLR4 regulator RP105-MD-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sung-il; Hong, Minsun; Wilson, Ian A [Scripps

    2011-11-16

    RP105-MD-1 modulates the TLR4-MD-2-mediated, innate immune response against bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The crystal structure of the bovine 1:1 RP105-MD-1 complex bound to a putative endogenous lipid at 2.9 Å resolution shares a similar overall architecture to its homolog TLR4-MD-2 but assembles into an unusual 2:2 homodimer that differs from any other known TLR-ligand assembly. The homodimer is assembled in a head-to-head orientation that juxtaposes the N-terminal leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) of the two RP105 chains, rather than the usual tail-to-tail configuration of C-terminal LRRs in ligand-activated TLR dimers, such as TLR1-TRL2, TLR2-TLR6, TLR3-TLR3 and TLR4-TLR4. Another unusual interaction is mediated by an RP105-specific asparagine-linked glycan, which wedges MD-1 into the co-receptor binding concavity on RP105. This unique mode of assembly represents a new paradigm for TLR complexes and suggests a molecular mechanism for regulating LPS responses.

  10. Acetylation regulates WRN catalytic activities and affects base excision DNA repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muftuoglu, Meltem; Kusumoto, Rika; Speina, Elzbieta

    2008-01-01

    The Werner protein (WRN), defective in the premature aging disorder Werner syndrome, participates in a number of DNA metabolic processes, and we have been interested in the possible regulation of its function in DNA repair by post-translational modifications. Acetylation mediated by histone...... acetyltransferases is of key interest because of its potential importance in aging, DNA repair and transcription....

  11. Self-assembly of microcapsules regulated via the repressilator signaling network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, Henry; Yashin, Victor V; Balazs, Anna C

    2015-05-14

    One of the intriguing challenges in designing active matter is devising systems that not only self-organize, but also exhibit self-regulation. Inspired by biological regulatory networks, we design a collection of self-organizing, self-regulating microcapsules that move in response to self-generated chemical signals. Three microcapsules act as localized sources of distinct chemicals that diffuse through surrounding fluid. Production rates are modulated by the "repressilator" regulatory network motif: each chemical species represses the production of the next in a cycle. Depending on the maximum production rates and capsule separation distances, we show that immobile capsules either exhibit steady or oscillatory chemical production. We then consider movement of the microcapsules over the substrate, induced by gradients in surface energy due to adsorbed chemicals. We numerically simulate this advection-diffusion-reaction system with solid-fluid interactions by combining lattice Boltzmann, immersed boundary and finite difference methods, and thereby, construct systems where the three capsules spontaneously assemble to form a close-packed triad. Chemical oscillations are shown to be critical to this assembly. By adjusting parameters, the triad can either remain stationary or translate as a cohesive group. Stationary triads can also be made to "turn off", producing chemicals at minimal rates after assembly. These findings provide design rules for creating synthetic material systems that encompass biomimetic feedback loops, which enable dynamic collective behavior.

  12. Self-Assembled Functional Nanostructure of Plasmid DNA with Ionic Liquid [Bmim][PF₆]: Enhanced Efficiency in Bacterial Gene Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Sarvesh K; Sarkar, Sampa; Mirzadeh, Nedaossadat; Selvakannan, P R; Bhargava, Suresh K

    2015-04-28

    The electrostatic interaction between the negatively charged phosphate groups of plasmid DNA and the cationic part of hydrophobic ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([Bmim][PF6]), initiates spontaneous self-assembly to form the functional nanostructures made up of DNA and ionic liquid (IL). These functional nanostructures were demonstrated as promising synthetic nonviral vectors for the efficient bacterial pGFP gene transformation in cells. In particular, the functional nanostructures that were made up of 1 μL of IL ([Bmim][PF6]) and 1 μg of plasmid DNA can increase the transformation efficiency by 300-400% in microbial systems, without showing any toxicity for E. coli DH5α cells. (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopic analysis revealed that the electrostatic interaction between negatively charged phosphate oxygen and cationic Bmim(+) tends to initiate the self-assembly process. Thermogravimetric analysis of the DNA-IL functional nanostructures showed that these nanostructures consist of ∼16 wt % ionic liquid, which is considered to provide the stability to the plasmid DNA that eventually enhanced the transformation efficiency.

  13. Regulation of DNA repair processes in mammalian cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bil'din, V.N.; Sergina, T.B.; Zhestyanikov, V.D.

    1992-01-01

    A study was made of the repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) in proliferating and quiescent mouse Swiss 3T6 cells and in those stimulated from the quiet status by epidermal growth factor in combination with insulin, in the presence of specific inhibitors of DNA polymerase α and β (aphidicolin) and DNA polymerase β (2', 3'-dideoxythjymidine-5'-triphosphate). The repair of DNA SSB induced by X-ray-irradiation (10 Gy) or by γ-ray irradiation (150 Gy) is more sensitive to aphidicolin and mitogen-simulated cells three times stronger than in proliferating cells. The influence of 2', 3'-dideoxythymidine-5'-triphosphate on the rate of DNA SSB repair in cells of all the three types does not differ. Thus, the decrease in DNA repair efficiency in quiescent cells is connected with a decrease in the activity of aphidicolin-sensitive DNA polymerase, apparently DNA polymerase α

  14. De Novo Transcriptome Sequence Assembly from Coconut Leaves and Seeds with a Focus on Factors Involved in RNA-Directed DNA Methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya-Yi; Lee, Chueh-Pai; Fu, Jason L.; Chang, Bill Chia-Han; Matzke, Antonius J. M.; Matzke, Marjori

    2014-01-01

    Coconut palm (Cocos nucifera) is a symbol of the tropics and a source of numerous edible and nonedible products of economic value. Despite its nutritional and industrial significance, coconut remains under-represented in public repositories for genomic and transcriptomic data. We report de novo transcript assembly from RNA-seq data and analysis of gene expression in seed tissues (embryo and endosperm) and leaves of a dwarf coconut variety. Assembly of 10 GB sequencing data for each tissue resulted in 58,211 total unigenes in embryo, 61,152 in endosperm, and 33,446 in leaf. Within each unigene pool, 24,857 could be annotated in embryo, 29,731 could be annotated in endosperm, and 26,064 could be annotated in leaf. A KEGG analysis identified 138, 138, and 139 pathways, respectively, in transcriptomes of embryo, endosperm, and leaf tissues. Given the extraordinarily large size of coconut seeds and the importance of small RNA-mediated epigenetic regulation during seed development in model plants, we used homology searches to identify putative homologs of factors required for RNA-directed DNA methylation in coconut. The findings suggest that RNA-directed DNA methylation is important during coconut seed development, particularly in maturing endosperm. This dataset will expand the genomics resources available for coconut and provide a foundation for more detailed analyses that may assist molecular breeding strategies aimed at improving this major tropical crop. PMID:25193496

  15. De novo transcriptome sequence assembly from coconut leaves and seeds with a focus on factors involved in RNA-directed DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya-Yi; Lee, Chueh-Pai; Fu, Jason L; Chang, Bill Chia-Han; Matzke, Antonius J M; Matzke, Marjori

    2014-09-04

    Coconut palm (Cocos nucifera) is a symbol of the tropics and a source of numerous edible and nonedible products of economic value. Despite its nutritional and industrial significance, coconut remains under-represented in public repositories for genomic and transcriptomic data. We report de novo transcript assembly from RNA-seq data and analysis of gene expression in seed tissues (embryo and endosperm) and leaves of a dwarf coconut variety. Assembly of 10 GB sequencing data for each tissue resulted in 58,211 total unigenes in embryo, 61,152 in endosperm, and 33,446 in leaf. Within each unigene pool, 24,857 could be annotated in embryo, 29,731 could be annotated in endosperm, and 26,064 could be annotated in leaf. A KEGG analysis identified 138, 138, and 139 pathways, respectively, in transcriptomes of embryo, endosperm, and leaf tissues. Given the extraordinarily large size of coconut seeds and the importance of small RNA-mediated epigenetic regulation during seed development in model plants, we used homology searches to identify putative homologs of factors required for RNA-directed DNA methylation in coconut. The findings suggest that RNA-directed DNA methylation is important during coconut seed development, particularly in maturing endosperm. This dataset will expand the genomics resources available for coconut and provide a foundation for more detailed analyses that may assist molecular breeding strategies aimed at improving this major tropical crop. Copyright © 2014 Huang et al.

  16. Negative regulation of active zone assembly by a newly identified SR protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ervin L; Fetter, Richard D; Davis, Graeme W

    2009-09-01

    Presynaptic, electron-dense, cytoplasmic protrusions such as the T-bar (Drosophila) or ribbon (vertebrates) are believed to facilitate vesicle movement to the active zone (AZ) of synapses throughout the nervous system. The molecular composition of these structures including the T-bar and ribbon are largely unknown, as are the mechanisms that specify their synapse-specific assembly and distribution. In a large-scale, forward genetic screen, we have identified a mutation termed air traffic controller (atc) that causes T-bar-like protein aggregates to form abnormally in motoneuron axons. This mutation disrupts a gene that encodes for a serine-arginine protein kinase (SRPK79D). This mutant phenotype is specific to SRPK79D and is not secondary to impaired kinesin-dependent axonal transport. The srpk79D gene is neuronally expressed, and transgenic rescue experiments are consistent with SRPK79D kinase activity being necessary in neurons. The SRPK79D protein colocalizes with the T-bar-associated protein Bruchpilot (Brp) in both the axon and synapse. We propose that SRPK79D is a novel T-bar-associated protein kinase that represses T-bar assembly in peripheral axons, and that SRPK79D-dependent repression must be relieved to facilitate site-specific AZ assembly. Consistent with this model, overexpression of SRPK79D disrupts AZ-specific Brp organization and significantly impairs presynaptic neurotransmitter release. These data identify a novel AZ-associated protein kinase and reveal a new mechanism of negative regulation involved in AZ assembly. This mechanism could contribute to the speed and specificity with which AZs are assembled throughout the nervous system.

  17. Negative regulation of active zone assembly by a newly identified SR protein kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ervin L Johnson

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Presynaptic, electron-dense, cytoplasmic protrusions such as the T-bar (Drosophila or ribbon (vertebrates are believed to facilitate vesicle movement to the active zone (AZ of synapses throughout the nervous system. The molecular composition of these structures including the T-bar and ribbon are largely unknown, as are the mechanisms that specify their synapse-specific assembly and distribution. In a large-scale, forward genetic screen, we have identified a mutation termed air traffic controller (atc that causes T-bar-like protein aggregates to form abnormally in motoneuron axons. This mutation disrupts a gene that encodes for a serine-arginine protein kinase (SRPK79D. This mutant phenotype is specific to SRPK79D and is not secondary to impaired kinesin-dependent axonal transport. The srpk79D gene is neuronally expressed, and transgenic rescue experiments are consistent with SRPK79D kinase activity being necessary in neurons. The SRPK79D protein colocalizes with the T-bar-associated protein Bruchpilot (Brp in both the axon and synapse. We propose that SRPK79D is a novel T-bar-associated protein kinase that represses T-bar assembly in peripheral axons, and that SRPK79D-dependent repression must be relieved to facilitate site-specific AZ assembly. Consistent with this model, overexpression of SRPK79D disrupts AZ-specific Brp organization and significantly impairs presynaptic neurotransmitter release. These data identify a novel AZ-associated protein kinase and reveal a new mechanism of negative regulation involved in AZ assembly. This mechanism could contribute to the speed and specificity with which AZs are assembled throughout the nervous system.

  18. Dynamic assembly of MinD on phospholipid vesicles regulated by ATP and MinE

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Zonglin; Gogol, Edward P.; Lutkenhaus, Joe

    2002-01-01

    Selection of the division site in Escherichia coli is regulated by the min system and requires the rapid oscillation of MinD between the two halves of the cell under the control of MinE. In this study we have further investigated the molecular basis for this oscillation by examining the interaction of MinD with phospholipid vesicles. We found that MinD bound to phospholipid vesicles in the presence of ATP and, upon binding, assembled into a well-ordered helical array that deformed the vesicle...

  19. The brome mosaic virus 3' untranslated sequence regulates RNA replication, recombination, and virion assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, A L N; Cheng Kao, C

    2015-08-03

    The 3' untranslated region in each of the three genomic RNAs of Brome mosaic virus (BMV) is highly homologous and contains a sequence that folds into a tRNA-like structure (TLS). Experiments performed over the past four decades revealed that the BMV 3' TLS regulates many important steps in BMV infection. This review summarizes in vitro and in vivo studies of the roles of the BMV 3' TLS functioning as a minus-strand promoter, in RNA recombination, and to nucleate virion assembly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. CasEMBLR: Cas9-Facilitated Multiloci Genomic Integration of in Vivo Assembled DNA Parts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakočiūnas, Tadas; Rajkumar, Arun S; Zhang, Jie; Arsovska, Dushica; Rodriguez, Angelica; Jendresen, Christian Bille; Skjødt, Mette L; Nielsen, Alex T; Borodina, Irina; Jensen, Michael K; Keasling, Jay D

    2015-11-20

    Homologous recombination (HR) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been harnessed for both plasmid construction and chromosomal integration of foreign DNA. Still, native HR machinery is not efficient enough for complex and marker-free genome engineering required for modern metabolic engineering. Here, we present a method for marker-free multiloci integration of in vivo assembled DNA parts. By the use of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated one-step double-strand breaks at single, double and triple integration sites we report the successful in vivo assembly and chromosomal integration of DNA parts. We call our method CasEMBLR and validate its applicability for genome engineering and cell factory development in two ways: (i) introduction of the carotenoid pathway from 15 DNA parts into three targeted loci, and (ii) creation of a tyrosine production strain using ten parts into two loci, simultaneously knocking out two genes. This method complements and improves the current set of tools available for genome engineering in S. cerevisiae.

  1. Properties of the chromatin assembled on DNA injected into Xenopus oocytes and eggs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gargiulo, G.; Wasserman, W.; Worcel, A.

    1983-01-01

    The onset of DNA synthesis occurs between 10 and 30 minutes after activation of the egg and thus the transition from nuclease-sensitive to nuclease-resistant supercoils may take place on the newly replicated DNA. To test this possibility, the nonradioactive circular 5-kb DNA carrying the Drosophila histone gene repeat and [α -32 P]dCTP were coinjected into fertilized eggs. Such protocol labels both the injected, replicated heterologous DNA and the replicated endogenous, maternal Xenopus DNA. The labeled, presumably replicated, supercoiled DNA is resistant to micrococcal nuclease as expected. The endogenous, high-molecular-weight Xenopus DNA is degraded to 180-bp nucleosomal DNA. Thus, the nuclease resistance is not a general property of chromatin during the cleavage stage of the Xenopus embryo but is a peculiar feature of the injected DNA. 42 references, 5 figures

  2. Assembly mechanism of the sixty-subunit nanoparticles via interaction of RNA with the reengineered protein connector of phi29 DNA-packaging motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Feng; Demeler, Borries; Guo, Peixuan

    2010-06-22

    Bacterial virus phi29 genomic DNA is packaged into a procapsid shell with the aid of a motor containing a 12-subunit connector channel and a hexameric pRNA (packaging RNA) ring. The wide end, or the C-terminus, of the cone-shaped connector is embedded within the procapsid shell, whereas the narrow end, or N-terminus, extends outside of the procapsid, providing a binding location for pRNA. Recently, we have reported the mechanism of in vivo assembly of an ellipsoid nanoparticle with seven connectors through an interaction among a peptide tag. Here we report the formation of a similar nanoparticle in vitro via the addition of DNA or RNA oligos to connector proteins. Free connectors guided by one or two copies of oligonucleotides were assembled into a rosette structure containing 60 subunits of reengineered proteins. The number of oligonucleotides within the particle is length-dependent but sequence-independent. Reversible shifting between the 12- and 60-subunit nanoparticles (between individual connectors and rosette structures, respectively) was demonstrated by the alternative addition of oligonucleotides and the treatment of ribonuclease, suggesting a potential application as a switch or regulator in nanobiotechnology. This advancement allows for a simple method to produce multivalent nanoparticles that contain five 12-unit nanoparticles with defined structure and stoichiometry. That is, it will be possible to assemble nanoparticles in vitro with the combination of 60 assortments of ligands, tags, therapeutic drugs, and diagnostic moieties for multivalent delivery or enhancement of signal detection in nanotechnological and nanomedicinal applications.

  3. Nup98 regulates bipolar spindle assembly through association with microtubules and opposition of MCAK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Marie K; Powers, Maureen A

    2011-03-01

    During mitosis, the nuclear pore complex is disassembled and, increasingly, nucleoporins are proving to have mitotic functions when released from the pore. We find a contribution of the nucleoporin Nup98 to mitotic spindle assembly through regulation of microtubule dynamics. When added to Xenopus extract spindle assembly assays, the C-terminal domain of Nup98 stimulates uncontrolled growth of microtubules. Conversely, inhibition or depletion of Nup98 leads to formation of stable monopolar spindles. Spindle bipolarity is restored by addition of purified, recombinant Nup98 C-terminus. The minimal required region of Nup98 corresponds to a portion of the C-terminal domain lacking a previously characterized function. We show association between this region of the C-terminus of Nup98 and both Taxol-stabilized microtubules and the microtubule-depolymerizing mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK). Importantly, we demonstrate that this domain of Nup98 inhibits MCAK depolymerization activity in vitro. These data support a model in which Nup98 interacts with microtubules and antagonizes MCAK activity, thus promoting bipolar spindle assembly.

  4. The Escherichia coli Hfq protein: an unattended DNA-transactions regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz M Cech

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Hfq protein was discovered in Escherichia coli as a host factor for bacteriophage Qβ RNA replication. Subsequent studies indicated that Hfq is a pleiotropic regulator of bacterial gene expression. The regulatory role of Hfq is ascribed mainly to its function as an RNA-chaperone, facilitating interactions between bacterial noncoding RNA and its mRNA target. Thus, it modulates mRNA translation and stability. Nevertheless, Hfq is able to interact with DNA as well. Its role in the regulation of DNA-related processes has been demonstrated. In this mini-review, it is discussed how Hfq interacts with DNA and what is the role of this protein in regulation of DNA transactions. Particularly, Hfq has been demonstrated to be involved in the control of ColE1 plasmid DNA replication, transposition, and possibly also transcription. Possible mechanisms of these Hfq-mediated regulations are described and discussed.

  5. Autophosphorylation of DNA-PKCS regulates its dynamics at DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Naoya; Weterings, Eric; Yano, Ken-ichi; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Jakob, Burkhard; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Mari, Pierre-Olivier; van Gent, Dik C; Chen, Benjamin P C; Chen, David J

    2007-04-23

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PK(CS)) plays an important role during the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). It is recruited to DNA ends in the early stages of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) process, which mediates DSB repair. To study DNA-PK(CS) recruitment in vivo, we used a laser system to introduce DSBs in a specified region of the cell nucleus. We show that DNA-PK(CS) accumulates at DSB sites in a Ku80-dependent manner, and that neither the kinase activity nor the phosphorylation status of DNA-PK(CS) influences its initial accumulation. However, impairment of both of these functions results in deficient DSB repair and the maintained presence of DNA-PK(CS) at unrepaired DSBs. The use of photobleaching techniques allowed us to determine that the kinase activity and phosphorylation status of DNA-PK(CS) influence the stability of its binding to DNA ends. We suggest a model in which DNA-PK(CS) phosphorylation/autophosphorylation facilitates NHEJ by destabilizing the interaction of DNA-PK(CS) with the DNA ends.

  6. Nuclear Pores Regulate Muscle Development and Maintenance by Assembling a Localized Mef2C Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raices, Marcela; Bukata, Lucas; Sakuma, Stephen; Borlido, Joana; Hernandez, Leanora S; Hart, Daniel O; D'Angelo, Maximiliano A

    2017-06-05

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are multiprotein channels connecting the nucleus with the cytoplasm. NPCs have been shown to have tissue-specific composition, suggesting that their function can be specialized. However, the physiological roles of NPC composition changes and their impacts on cellular processes remain unclear. Here we show that the addition of the Nup210 nucleoporin to NPCs during myoblast differentiation results in assembly of an Mef2C transcriptional complex required for efficient expression of muscle structural genes and microRNAs. We show that this NPC-localized complex is essential for muscle growth, myofiber maturation, and muscle cell survival and that alterations in its activity result in muscle degeneration. Our findings suggest that NPCs regulate the activity of functional gene groups by acting as scaffolds that promote the local assembly of tissue-specific transcription complexes and show how nuclear pore composition changes can be exploited to regulate gene expression at the nuclear periphery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Collaborating functions of BLM and DNA topoisomerase I in regulating human rDNA transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grierson, Patrick M.; Acharya, Samir; Groden, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is an inherited disorder caused by loss of function of the recQ-like BLM helicase. It is characterized clinically by severe growth retardation and cancer predisposition. BLM localizes to PML nuclear bodies and to the nucleolus; its deficiency results in increased intra- and inter-chromosomal recombination, including hyper-recombination of rDNA repeats. Our previous work has shown that BLM facilitates RNA polymerase I-mediated rRNA transcription in the nucleolus (Grierson et al., 2012 [18]). This study uses protein co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro transcription/translation (IVTT) to identify a direct interaction of DNA topoisomerase I with the C-terminus of BLM in the nucleolus. In vitro helicase assays demonstrate that DNA topoisomerase I stimulates BLM helicase activity on a nucleolar-relevant RNA:DNA hybrid, but has an insignificant effect on BLM helicase activity on a control DNA:DNA duplex substrate. Reciprocally, BLM enhances the DNA relaxation activity of DNA topoisomerase I on supercoiled DNA substrates. Our study suggests that BLM and DNA topoisomerase I function coordinately to modulate RNA:DNA hybrid formation as well as relaxation of DNA supercoils in the context of nucleolar transcription

  8. How does chromatin package DNA within nucleus and regulate gene expression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazary, Ahmed E; Ju, Yi-Hsu; Abd-Rabboh, Hisham S M

    2017-08-01

    The human body is made up of 60 trillion cells, each cell containing 2 millions of genomic DNA in its nucleus. How is this genomic deoxyribonucleic acid [DNA] organised into nuclei? Around 1880, W. Flemming discovered a nuclear substance that was clearly visible on staining under primitive light microscopes and named it 'chromatin'; this is now thought to be the basic unit of genomic DNA organization. Since long before DNA was known to carry genetic information, chromatin has fascinated biologists. DNA has a negatively charged phosphate backbone that produces electrostatic repulsion between adjacent DNA regions, making it difficult for DNA to fold upon itself. In this article, we will try to shed light on how does chromatin package DNA within nucleus and regulate gene expression? Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. NUCLEAR MYOSIN II REGULATES THE ASSEMBLY OF PREINITIATION COMPLEX FOR ICAM-1 GENE TRANSCRIPTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingjie; Sarna, Sushil K.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Actin-myosin II motor converts chemical energy into force/motion in muscle and non-muscle cells. The phosphorylation of regulatory light chain (MLC20) is critical to the cytoplasmic functions of these motors. We do not know whether myosin II and actins in the nucleus function as motors to generate relative motion, such as that between RNA polymerase II holoenzyme and DNA, for assembly of the preinitiation complex. Methods The experiments were performed on primary cultures of human colonic circular smooth muscle cells (HCCSMCs) and rat colonic circular muscle strips. Results We show that myosin II and α- and β-actins are present in the nuclei of colonic smooth muscle cells. The nuclear myosin II is tethered to recognition sequence AGCTCC (−39/−34) in the ICAM-1 core promoter region. The actins are known to complex with RNA polymerase II and they are tethered to the nucleoskeleton. The dephosphorylation of MLC20 increases the transcription of ICAM-1, whereas its phosphorylation decreases it. Colonic inflammation suppresses nuclear MLCK, which increases the unphosphorylated form of nuclear MLC20, resulting in enhanced transcription of ICAM-1. Conclusions 1) Myosin II is a core transcription factor; 2) the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of nuclear MLC20 results in the sliding of myosin and actin molecules past each other producing relative motion between the DNA bound to the myosin II and RNA polymerase II holoenzyme bound to actins and nucleoskeleton. PMID:19328794

  10. Nucleosome–nucleosome interactions via histone tails and linker DNA regulate nuclear rigidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, Yuta; Tamura, Sachiko; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Cells, as well as the nuclei inside them, experience significant mechanical stress in diverse biological processes, including contraction, migration, and adhesion. The structural stability of nuclei must therefore be maintained in order to protect genome integrity. Despite extensive knowledge on nuclear architecture and components, however, the underlying physical and molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. We address this by subjecting isolated human cell nuclei to microneedle-based quantitative micromanipulation with a series of biochemical perturbations of the chromatin. We find that the mechanical rigidity of nuclei depends on the continuity of the nucleosomal fiber and interactions between nucleosomes. Disrupting these chromatin features by varying cation concentration, acetylating histone tails, or digesting linker DNA results in loss of nuclear rigidity. In contrast, the levels of key chromatin assembly factors, including cohesin, condensin II, and CTCF, and a major nuclear envelope protein, lamin, are unaffected. Together with in situ evidence using living cells and a simple mechanical model, our findings reveal a chromatin-based regulation of the nuclear mechanical response and provide insight into the significance of local and global chromatin structures, such as those associated with interdigitated or melted nucleosomal fibers. PMID:28428255

  11. Nephrin regulates lamellipodia formation by assembling a protein complex that includes Ship2, filamin and lamellipodin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudan Venkatareddy

    Full Text Available Actin dynamics has emerged at the forefront of podocyte biology. Slit diaphragm junctional adhesion protein Nephrin is necessary for development of the podocyte morphology and transduces phosphorylation-dependent signals that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics. The present study extends our understanding of Nephrin function by showing in cultured podocytes that Nephrin activation induced actin dynamics is necessary for lamellipodia formation. Upon activation Nephrin recruits and regulates a protein complex that includes Ship2 (SH2 domain containing 5' inositol phosphatase, Filamin and Lamellipodin, proteins important in regulation of actin and focal adhesion dynamics, as well as lamellipodia formation. Using the previously described CD16-Nephrin clustering system, Nephrin ligation or activation resulted in phosphorylation of the actin crosslinking protein Filamin in a p21 activated kinase dependent manner. Nephrin activation in cell culture results in formation of lamellipodia, a process that requires specialized actin dynamics at the leading edge of the cell along with focal adhesion turnover. In the CD16-Nephrin clustering model, Nephrin ligation resulted in abnormal morphology of actin tails in human podocytes when Ship2, Filamin or Lamellipodin were individually knocked down. We also observed decreased lamellipodia formation and cell migration in these knock down cells. These data provide evidence that Nephrin not only initiates actin polymerization but also assembles a protein complex that is necessary to regulate the architecture of the generated actin filament network and focal adhesion dynamics.

  12. Rapid assembly of multiple DNA fragments through direct transformation of PCR products into E. coli and Lactobacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Pinghua; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Guangxian; Wang, Yaoyue; Chen, Yulin

    2014-11-01

    This article describes a rapid, highly efficient and versatile method for seamlessly assembling multiple DNA fragments into a vector at any desired position. The inserted fragments and vector backbone were amplified by high-fidelity PCR containing 20 bp to 50 bp overlapping regions at 3' and/or 5' termini. These linearised fragments were equimolarly mixed, and then cyclised in a prolonged overlap extension PCR without adding primers. The resulting PCR products were DNA multimers that could be directly transformed into host strains, yielding the desired chimeric plasmid. The proposed method was illustrated by constructing an Escherichia coli co-expression vector. The feasibility of the method in Lactobacillus was further validated by assembling an E. coli-Lactobacillus shuttle vector. Results showed that three to four fragments could be simultaneously and precisely inserted in a vector in only 2-3 days using the proposed method. The acceptable transformation efficiency was determined through the tested host strains; more than 95% of the colonies were positive transformants. Therefore, the proposed method is sufficiently competent for high-efficiency insertion of multiple DNA fragments into a plasmid and has theoretically good application potential for gene cloning and protein expression because it is simple, easy to implement, flexible and yields highly positive clones. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Enzyme-free amplification for sensitive electrochemical detection of DNA via target-catalyzed hairpin assembly assisted current change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yong; Wang, Chunyan; Gao, Fenglei

    2014-12-01

    An isothermal, enzyme-free and sensitive method for electrochemical detection of DNA is proposed based on target catalyzed hairpin assembly and for signal amplification. Molecular beacon 1 (MB1) contains a ferrocene (Fc) tag, which was immobilized on the gold electrode as recognition probe to hybridize with target DNA. Then, molecular beacon 2 hybridized with the opened MB1, allowing the target to be displaced. The displaced target again triggered the next round of strand exchange reaction resulting in many Fc far away from the GE to achieve signal amplification for sensitive DNA detection. The current signal amplification strategy is relatively simple and inexpensive owing to avoid the use of any kind of enzyme or sophisticated equipment. It can achieve a sensitivity of 42 fM with a wide linear dynamic range from 10(-13) to 10(-9)M and discriminate mismatched DNA from perfect matched target DNA with a high selectivity. The proposed method showed excellent specificity, high sensitivity and low detection limit, and could be applied in analysis of real samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Conserved residues in the delta subunit help the E. coli clamp loader, gamma complex, target primer-template DNA for clamp assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Siying; Coman, Maria Magdalena; Sakato, Miho; O'Donnell, Michael; Hingorani, Manju M

    2008-06-01

    The Escherichia coli clamp loader, gamma complex (gamma(3)deltadelta'lambdapsi), catalyzes ATP-driven assembly of beta clamps onto primer-template DNA (p/tDNA), enabling processive replication. The mechanism by which gamma complex targets p/tDNA for clamp assembly is not resolved. According to previous studies, charged/polar amino acids inside the clamp loader chamber interact with the double-stranded (ds) portion of p/tDNA. We find that dsDNA, not ssDNA, can trigger a burst of ATP hydrolysis by gamma complex and clamp assembly, but only at far higher concentrations than p/tDNA. Thus, contact between gamma complex and dsDNA is necessary and sufficient, but not optimal, for the reaction, and additional contacts with p/tDNA likely facilitate its selection as the optimal substrate for clamp assembly. We investigated whether a conserved sequence-HRVW(279)QNRR--in delta subunit contributes to such interactions, since Tryptophan-279 specifically cross-links to the primer-template junction. Mutation of delta-W279 weakens gamma complex binding to p/tDNA, hampering its ability to load clamps and promote proccessive DNA replication, and additional mutations in the sequence (delta-R277, delta-R283) worsen the interaction. These data reveal a novel location in the C-terminal domain of the E. coli clamp loader that contributes to DNA binding and helps define p/tDNA as the preferred substrate for the reaction.

  15. OligArch: A software tool to allow artificially expanded genetic information systems (AEGIS to guide the autonomous self-assembly of long DNA constructs from multiple DNA single strands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M. Bradley

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic biologists wishing to self-assemble large DNA (L-DNA constructs from small DNA fragments made by automated synthesis need fragments that hybridize predictably. Such predictability is difficult to obtain with nucleotides built from just the four standard nucleotides. Natural DNA's peculiar combination of strong and weak G:C and A:T pairs, the context-dependence of the strengths of those pairs, unimolecular strand folding that competes with desired interstrand hybridization, and non-Watson–Crick interactions available to standard DNA, all contribute to this unpredictability. In principle, adding extra nucleotides to the genetic alphabet can improve the predictability and reliability of autonomous DNA self-assembly, simply by increasing the information density of oligonucleotide sequences. These extra nucleotides are now available as parts of artificially expanded genetic information systems (AEGIS, and tools are now available to generate entirely standard DNA from AEGIS DNA during PCR amplification. Here, we describe the OligArch (for "oligonucleotide architecting" software, an application that permits synthetic biologists to engineer optimally self-assembling DNA constructs from both six- and eight-letter AEGIS alphabets. This software has been used to design oligonucleotides that self-assemble to form complete genes from 20 or more single-stranded synthetic oligonucleotides. OligArch is therefore a key element of a scalable and integrated infrastructure for the rapid and designed engineering of biology.

  16. Smurf2 as a novel mitotic regulator: From the spindle assembly checkpoint to tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore Finola E

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The execution of the mitotic program with high fidelity is dependent upon precise spatiotemporal regulation of posttranslational protein modifications. For example, the timely polyubiquitination of critical mitotic regulators by Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C is essential for the metaphase to anaphase transition and mitotic exit. The spindle assembly checkpoint prevents unscheduled activity of APC/C-Cdc20 in early mitosis, allowing bipolar attachment of kinetochores to mitotic spindle and facilitating equal segregation of sister chromatids. The critical effector of the spindle checkpoint, Mitotic arrest deficient 2 (Mad2, is recruited to unattached kinetochores forming a complex with other regulatory proteins to efficiently and cooperatively inhibit APC/C-Cdc20. A weakened and/or dysfunctional spindle checkpoint has been linked to the development of genomic instability in both cell culture and animal models, and evidence suggests that aberrant regulation of the spindle checkpoint plays a critical role in human carcinogenesis. Recent studies have illuminated a network of both degradative and non-degradative ubiquitination events that regulate the metaphase to anaphase transition and mitotic exit. Within this context, our recent work showed that the HECT (Homologous to E6-AP C-terminus-family E3 ligase Smurf2 (Smad specific ubiquitin regulatory factor 2, known as a negative regulator of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β signaling, is required for a functional spindle checkpoint by promoting the functional localization and stability of Mad2. Here we discuss putative models explaining the role of Smurf2 as a new regulator in the spindle checkpoint. The dynamic mitotic localization of Smurf2 to the centrosome and other critical mitotic structures provides implications about mitotic checkpoint control dependent on various ubiquitination events. Finally, deregulated Smurf2 activity may contribute to carcinogenesis by

  17. PTEN Regulates DNA Replication Progression and Stalled Fork Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinxue; Kang, Xi; Yin, Yuxin; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Shen, Wen H.

    2015-01-01

    Faithful DNA replication is a cornerstone of genomic integrity. PTEN plays multiple roles in genome protection and tumor suppression. Here we report on the importance of PTEN in DNA replication. PTEN depletion leads to impairment of replication progression and stalled fork recovery, indicating an elevation of endogenous replication stress. Exogenous replication inhibition aggravates replication-originated DNA lesions without inducing S-phase arrest in cells lacking PTEN, representing replication stress tolerance. Our analysis reveals the physical association of PTEN with DNA replication forks and PTEN-dependent recruitment of Rad51. PTEN deletion results in Rad51 dissociation from replication forks. Stalled replication forks in Pten null cells can be reactivated by ectopic Rad51 or PTEN, the latter facilitating chromatin loading of Rad51. These data highlight the interplay of PTEN with Rad51 in promoting stalled fork restart. We propose that loss of PTEN may initiate a replication stress cascade that progressively deteriorates through the cell cycle. PMID:26158445

  18. Label-free DNA biosensor based on resistance change of platinum nanoparticles assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotadis, Evangelos; Voutyras, Konstantinos; Chatzipetrou, Marianneza; Tsekenis, Georgios; Patsiouras, Lampros; Madianos, Leonidas; Chatzandroulis, Stavros; Zergioti, Ioanna; Tsoukalas, Dimitris

    2016-07-15

    A novel nanoparticle based biosensor for the fast and simple detection of DNA hybridization events is presented. The sensor utilizes hybridized DNA's charge transport properties, combining them with metallic nanoparticle networks that act as nano-gapped electrodes. The DNA hybridization events can be detected by a significant reduction in the sensor's resistance due to the conductive bridging offered by hybridized DNA. By modifying the nanoparticle surface coverage, which can be controlled experimentally being a function of deposition time, and the structural properties of the electrodes, an optimized biosensor for the in situ detection of DNA hybridization events is ultimately fabricated. The fabricated biosensor exhibits a wide response range, covering four orders of magnitude, a limit of detection of 1nM and can detect a single base pair mismatch between probe and complementary DNA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Mismatch discrimination of lipidated DNA and LNA-probes (LiNAs) in hybridization-controlled liposome assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Ulla; Vogel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    nucleic acids) probe designs, including membrane-anchoring requirements, studies on different probes and target lengths (including overhangs), DNA and RNA targets (including sequences associated with pathogens) for lipidated nucleic acids (LiNAs). Advantages and limitations of the liposome assembly based...... assay in the context of mismatch discrimination and SNP detection are presented. The advantages of membrane-anchored LiNA-probes compared to chemically attached probes on solid nanoparticles (e.g. gold nanoparticles) are described. Key functionalities such as non-covalent attachment of LiNA probes...

  20. RNA polymerase III regulates cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids and intracellular microRNA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Christine Xing'er; Kobiyama, Kouji; Shen, Yu J; LeBert, Nina; Ahmad, Shandar; Khatoo, Muznah; Aoshi, Taiki; Gasser, Stephan; Ishii, Ken J

    2015-03-20

    RNA:DNA hybrids form in the nuclei and mitochondria of cells as transcription-induced R-loops or G-quadruplexes, but exist only in the cytosol of virus-infected cells. Little is known about the existence of RNA:DNA hybrids in the cytosol of virus-free cells, in particular cancer or transformed cells. Here, we show that cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids are present in various human cell lines, including transformed cells. Inhibition of RNA polymerase III (Pol III), but not DNA polymerase, abrogated cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids. Cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids bind to several components of the microRNA (miRNA) machinery-related proteins, including AGO2 and DDX17. Furthermore, we identified miRNAs that are specifically regulated by Pol III, providing a potential link between RNA:DNA hybrids and the miRNA machinery. One of the target genes, exportin-1, is shown to regulate cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids. Taken together, we reveal previously unknown mechanism by which Pol III regulates the presence of cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids and miRNA biogenesis in various human cells. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. RNA Polymerase III Regulates Cytosolic RNA:DNA Hybrids and Intracellular MicroRNA Expression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Christine Xing'er; Kobiyama, Kouji; Shen, Yu J.; LeBert, Nina; Ahmad, Shandar; Khatoo, Muznah; Aoshi, Taiki; Gasser, Stephan; Ishii, Ken J.

    2015-01-01

    RNA:DNA hybrids form in the nuclei and mitochondria of cells as transcription-induced R-loops or G-quadruplexes, but exist only in the cytosol of virus-infected cells. Little is known about the existence of RNA:DNA hybrids in the cytosol of virus-free cells, in particular cancer or transformed cells. Here, we show that cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids are present in various human cell lines, including transformed cells. Inhibition of RNA polymerase III (Pol III), but not DNA polymerase, abrogated cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids. Cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids bind to several components of the microRNA (miRNA) machinery-related proteins, including AGO2 and DDX17. Furthermore, we identified miRNAs that are specifically regulated by Pol III, providing a potential link between RNA:DNA hybrids and the miRNA machinery. One of the target genes, exportin-1, is shown to regulate cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids. Taken together, we reveal previously unknown mechanism by which Pol III regulates the presence of cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids and miRNA biogenesis in various human cells. PMID:25623070

  2. Restarting and recentering genetic algorithm variations for DNA fragment assembly: The necessity of a multi-strategy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, James Alexander; Houghten, Sheridan; Ashlock, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    DNA Fragment assembly - an NP-Hard problem - is one of the major steps in of DNA sequencing. Multiple strategies have been used for this problem, including greedy graph-based algorithms, deBruijn graphs, and the overlap-layout-consensus approach. This study focuses on the overlap-layout-consensus approach. Heuristics and computational intelligence methods are combined to exploit their respective benefits. These algorithm combinations were able to produce high quality results surpassing the best results obtained by a number of competitive algorithms specially designed and tuned for this problem on thirteen of sixteen popular benchmarks. This work also reinforces the necessity of using multiple search strategies as it is clearly observed that algorithm performance is dependent on problem instance; without a deeper look into many searches, top solutions could be missed entirely. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. Preserving Yeast Genetic Heritage through DNA Damage Checkpoint Regulation and Telomere Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huilin Zhou

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to preserve genome integrity, extrinsic or intrinsic DNA damages must be repaired before they accumulate in cells and trigger other mutations and genome rearrangements. Eukaryotic cells are able to respond to different genotoxic stresses as well as to single DNA double strand breaks (DSBs, suggesting highly sensitive and robust mechanisms to detect lesions that trigger a signal transduction cascade which, in turn, controls the DNA damage response (DDR. Furthermore, cells must be able to distinguish natural chromosomal ends from DNA DSBs in order to prevent inappropriate checkpoint activation, DDR and chromosomal rearrangements. Since the original discovery of RAD9, the first DNA damage checkpoint gene identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, many genes that have a role in this pathway have been identified, including MRC1, MEC3, RAD24, RAD53, DUN1, MEC1 and TEL1. Extensive studies have established most of the genetic basis of the DNA damage checkpoint and uncovered its different functions in cell cycle regulation, DNA replication and repair, and telomere maintenance. However, major questions concerning the regulation and functions of the DNA damage checkpoint remain to be answered. First, how is the checkpoint activity coupled to DNA replication and repair? Second, how do cells distinguish natural chromosome ends from deleterious DNA DSBs? In this review we will examine primarily studies performed using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system.

  4. DNA-hybrid materials : from supramolecular assembly to applications in catalysis and biosensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prusty, Deepak Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Het proefschrift van Deepak Prusty heeft nieuwe toepassingen van DNA als onderwerp. DNA heeft het vermogen om heel specifiek andere moleculen te herkennen en is daarom een uitstekende bouwsteen voor het maken van zelf-assemblerende nano structuren. Met behulp van bijvoorbeeld fluoroforen

  5. Self-assembling of large ordered DNA arrays using superhydrophobic patterned surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciasca, G; Papi, M; Chiarpotto, M; Palmieri, V; De Spirito, M; Businaro, L; Notargiacomo, A; De Ninno, A; Carta, S; Giovine, E; Gerardino, A

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a simple and robust method to realize highly ordered arrays of stretched and suspended DNA molecules over the millimeter length scale. To this end we used an ad hoc designed superhydrophobic surface made of high aspect-ratio silicon pillars, where we deposited a droplet containing genomic DNA. A precise positioning of DNA strands was achieved by shaping the silicon pillars so that sharpened features resembling tips were included. Such features allowed us to accurately control the droplet de-wetting dynamics, pinning DNA strands in a well-defined position above pillars. The proposed technique has the potential to positively impact on the development of novel DNA chips for genetic analysis. (paper)

  6. Target guided synthesis using DNA nano-templates for selectively assembling a G-quadruplex binding c-MYC inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Deepanjan; Saha, Puja; Das, Tania; Dash, Jyotirmayee

    2017-07-01

    The development of small molecules is essential to modulate the cellular functions of biological targets in living system. Target Guided Synthesis (TGS) approaches have been used for the identification of potent small molecules for biological targets. We herein demonstrate an innovative example of TGS using DNA nano-templates that promote Huisgen cycloaddition from an array of azide and alkyne fragments. A G-quadruplex and a control duplex DNA nano-template have been prepared by assembling the DNA structures on gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles. The DNA nano-templates facilitate the regioselective formation of 1,4-substituted triazole products, which are easily isolated by magnetic decantation. The G-quadruplex nano-template can be easily recovered and reused for five reaction cycles. The major triazole product, generated by the G-quadruplex inhibits c-MYC expression by directly targeting the c-MYC promoter G-quadruplex. This work highlights that the nano-TGS approach may serve as a valuable strategy to generate target-selective ligands for drug discovery.

  7. Host Cell Plasma Membrane Phosphatidylserine Regulates the Assembly and Budding of Ebola Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu-Gyamfi, Emmanuel; Johnson, Kristen A; Fraser, Mark E; Scott, Jordan L; Soni, Smita P; Jones, Keaton R; Digman, Michelle A; Gratton, Enrico; Tessier, Charles R; Stahelin, Robert V

    2015-09-01

    Lipid-enveloped viruses replicate and bud from the host cell where they acquire their lipid coat. Ebola virus, which buds from the plasma membrane of the host cell, causes viral hemorrhagic fever and has a high fatality rate. To date, little has been known about how budding and egress of Ebola virus are mediated at the plasma membrane. We have found that the lipid phosphatidylserine (PS) regulates the assembly of Ebola virus matrix protein VP40. VP40 binds PS-containing membranes with nanomolar affinity, and binding of PS regulates VP40 localization and oligomerization on the plasma membrane inner leaflet. Further, alteration of PS levels in mammalian cells inhibits assembly and egress of VP40. Notably, interactions of VP40 with the plasma membrane induced exposure of PS on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane at sites of egress, whereas PS is typically found only on the inner leaflet. Taking the data together, we present a model accounting for the role of plasma membrane PS in assembly of Ebola virus-like particles. The lipid-enveloped Ebola virus causes severe infection with a high mortality rate and currently lacks FDA-approved therapeutics or vaccines. Ebola virus harbors just seven genes in its genome, and there is a critical requirement for acquisition of its lipid envelope from the plasma membrane of the human cell that it infects during the replication process. There is, however, a dearth of information available on the required contents of this envelope for egress and subsequent attachment and entry. Here we demonstrate that plasma membrane phosphatidylserine is critical for Ebola virus budding from the host cell plasma membrane. This report, to our knowledge, is the first to highlight the role of lipids in human cell membranes in the Ebola virus replication cycle and draws a clear link between selective binding and transport of a lipid across the membrane of the human cell and use of that lipid for subsequent viral entry. Copyright © 2015, American

  8. DNA context represents transcription regulation of the gene in mouse embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Misook; Hong, Soondo

    2016-04-01

    Understanding gene regulatory information in DNA remains a significant challenge in biomedical research. This study presents a computational approach to infer gene regulatory programs from primary DNA sequences. Using DNA around transcription start sites as attributes, our model predicts gene regulation in the gene. We find that H3K27ac around TSS is an informative descriptor of the transcription program in mouse embryonic stem cells. We build a computational model inferring the cell-type-specific H3K27ac signatures in the DNA around TSS. A comparison of embryonic stem cell and liver cell-specific H3K27ac signatures in DNA shows that the H3K27ac signatures in DNA around TSS efficiently distinguish the cell-type specific H3K27ac peaks and the gene regulation. The arrangement of the H3K27ac signatures inferred from the DNA represents the transcription regulation of the gene in mESC. We show that the DNA around transcription start sites is associated with the gene regulatory program by specific interaction with H3K27ac.

  9. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA regulates primordial follicle assembly by promoting apoptosis of oocytes in fetal and neonatal mouse ovaries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Xu

    Full Text Available Primordial follicles, providing all the oocytes available to a female throughout her reproductive life, assemble in perinatal ovaries with individual oocytes surrounded by granulosa cells. In mammals including the mouse, most oocytes die by apoptosis during primordial follicle assembly, but factors that regulate oocyte death remain largely unknown. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, a key regulator in many essential cellular processes, was shown to be differentially expressed during these processes in mouse ovaries using 2D-PAGE and MALDI-TOF/TOF methodology. A V-shaped expression pattern of PCNA in both oocytes and somatic cells was observed during the development of fetal and neonatal mouse ovaries, decreasing from 13.5 to 18.5 dpc and increasing from 18.5 dpc to 5 dpp. This was closely correlated with the meiotic prophase I progression from pre-leptotene to pachytene and from pachytene to diplotene when primordial follicles started to assemble. Inhibition of the increase of PCNA expression by RNA interference in cultured 18.5 dpc mouse ovaries strikingly reduced the apoptosis of oocytes, accompanied by down-regulation of known pro-apoptotic genes, e.g. Bax, caspase-3, and TNFα and TNFR2, and up-regulation of Bcl-2, a known anti-apoptotic gene. Moreover, reduced expression of PCNA was observed to significantly increase primordial follicle assembly, but these primordial follicles contained fewer granulosa cells. Similar results were obtained after down-regulation by RNA interference of Ing1b, a PCNA-binding protein in the UV-induced apoptosis regulation. Thus, our results demonstrate that PCNA regulates primordial follicle assembly by promoting apoptosis of oocytes in fetal and neonatal mouse ovaries.

  10. An Arginine Finger Regulates the Sequential Action of Asymmetrical Hexameric ATPase in the Double-Stranded DNA Translocation Motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhengyi; De-Donatis, Gian Marco; Schwartz, Chad; Fang, Huaming; Li, Jingyuan; Guo, Peixuan

    2016-10-01

    Biological motors are ubiquitous in living systems. Currently, how the motor components coordinate the unidirectional motion is elusive in most cases. Here, we report that the sequential action of the ATPase ring in the DNA packaging motor of bacteriophage ϕ29 is regulated by an arginine finger that extends from one ATPase subunit to the adjacent unit to promote noncovalent dimer formation. Mutation of the arginine finger resulted in the interruption of ATPase oligomerization, ATP binding/hydrolysis, and DNA translocation. Dimer formation reappeared when arginine mutants were mixed with other ATPase subunits that can offer the arginine to promote their interaction. Ultracentrifugation and virion assembly assays indicated that the ATPase was presenting as monomers and dimer mixtures. The isolated dimer alone was inactive in DNA translocation, but the addition of monomer could restore the activity, suggesting that the hexameric ATPase ring contained both dimer and monomers. Moreover, ATP binding or hydrolysis resulted in conformation and entropy changes of the ATPase with high or low DNA affinity. Taking these observations together, we concluded that the arginine finger regulates sequential action of the motor ATPase subunit by promoting the formation of the dimer inside the hexamer. The finding of asymmetrical hexameric organization is supported by structural evidence of many other ATPase systems showing the presence of one noncovalent dimer and four monomer subunits. All of these provide clues for why the asymmetrical hexameric ATPase gp16 of ϕ29 was previously reported as a pentameric configuration by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) since the contact by the arginine finger renders two adjacent ATPase subunits closer than other subunits. Thus, the asymmetrical hexamer would appear as a pentamer by cryo-EM, a technology that acquires the average of many images. Copyright © 2016 Zhao et al.

  11. The ATPases of cohesin interface with regulators to modulate cohesin-mediated DNA tethering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çamdere, Gamze; Guacci, Vincent; Stricklin, Jeremiah; Koshland, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Cohesin tethers together regions of DNA, thereby mediating higher order chromatin organization that is critical for sister chromatid cohesion, DNA repair and transcriptional regulation. Cohesin contains a heterodimeric ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) ATPase comprised of Smc1 and Smc3 ATPase active sites. These ATPases are required for cohesin to bind DNA. Cohesin’s DNA binding activity is also promoted by the Eco1 acetyltransferase and inhibited by Wpl1. Recently we showed that after cohesin stably binds DNA, a second step is required for DNA tethering. This second step is also controlled by Eco1 acetylation. Here, we use genetic and biochemical analyses to show that this second DNA tethering step is regulated by cohesin ATPase. Furthermore, our results also suggest that Eco1 promotes cohesion by modulating the ATPase cycle of DNA-bound cohesin in a state that is permissive for DNA tethering and refractory to Wpl1 inhibition. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11315.001 PMID:26583750

  12. ZMYM3 regulates BRCA1 localization at damaged chromatin to promote DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Justin W C; Makharashvili, Nodar; Agarwal, Poonam; Chiu, Li-Ya; Pourpre, Renaud; Cammarata, Michael B; Cannon, Joe R; Sherker, Alana; Durocher, Daniel; Brodbelt, Jennifer S; Paull, Tanya T; Miller, Kyle M

    2017-02-01

    Chromatin connects DNA damage response factors to sites of damaged DNA to promote the signaling and repair of DNA lesions. The histone H2A variants H2AX, H2AZ, and macroH2A represent key chromatin constituents that facilitate DNA repair. Through proteomic screening of these variants, we identified ZMYM3 (zinc finger, myeloproliferative, and mental retardation-type 3) as a chromatin-interacting protein that promotes DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR). ZMYM3 is recruited to DNA double-strand breaks through bivalent interactions with both histone and DNA components of the nucleosome. We show that ZMYM3 links the HR factor BRCA1 to damaged chromatin through specific interactions with components of the BRCA1-A subcomplex, including ABRA1 and RAP80. By regulating ABRA1 recruitment to damaged chromatin, ZMYM3 facilitates the fine-tuning of BRCA1 interactions with DNA damage sites and chromatin. Consistent with a role in regulating BRCA1 function, ZMYM3 deficiency results in impaired HR repair and genome instability. Thus, our work identifies a critical chromatin-binding DNA damage response factor, ZMYM3, which modulates BRCA1 functions within chromatin to ensure the maintenance of genome integrity. © 2017 Leung et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  13. DNA demethylases target promoter transposable elements to positively regulate stress responsive genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tuan-Ngoc; Schumann, Ulrike; Smith, Neil A; Tiwari, Sameer; Au, Phil Chi Khang; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Taylor, Jennifer M; Kazan, Kemal; Llewellyn, Danny J; Zhang, Ren; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2014-09-17

    DNA demethylases regulate DNA methylation levels in eukaryotes. Arabidopsis encodes four DNA demethylases, DEMETER (DME), REPRESSOR OF SILENCING 1 (ROS1), DEMETER-LIKE 2 (DML2), and DML3. While DME is involved in maternal specific gene expression during seed development, the biological function of the remaining DNA demethylases remains unclear. We show that ROS1, DML2, and DML3 play a role in fungal disease resistance in Arabidopsis. A triple DNA demethylase mutant, rdd (ros1 dml2 dml3), shows increased susceptibility to the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. We identify 348 genes differentially expressed in rdd relative to wild type, and a significant proportion of these genes are downregulated in rdd and have functions in stress response, suggesting that DNA demethylases maintain or positively regulate the expression of stress response genes required for F. oxysporum resistance. The rdd-downregulated stress response genes are enriched for short transposable element sequences in their promoters. Many of these transposable elements and their surrounding sequences show localized DNA methylation changes in rdd, and a general reduction in CHH methylation, suggesting that RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM), responsible for CHH methylation, may participate in DNA demethylase-mediated regulation of stress response genes. Many of the rdd-downregulated stress response genes are downregulated in the RdDM mutants nrpd1 and nrpe1, and the RdDM mutants nrpe1 and ago4 show enhanced susceptibility to F. oxysporum infection. Our results suggest that a primary function of DNA demethylases in plants is to regulate the expression of stress response genes by targeting promoter transposable element sequences.

  14. Assembly and function of DNA double-strand break repair foci in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2010-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most cytotoxic types of DNA damage, which if left unrepaired can lead to mutations or gross chromosomal aberrations, and promote the onset of diseases associated with genomic instability such as cancer. One of the most discernible hallmarks...... of the cellular response to DSBs is the accumulation and local concentration of a plethora of DNA damage signaling and repair proteins in the vicinity of the lesion, initiated by ATM-mediated phosphorylation of H2AX (¿-H2AX) and culminating in the generation of distinct nuclear compartments, so-called Ionizing...... of such DNA repair foci still remains limited. In this review, we focus on recent discoveries on the mechanisms that govern the formation of IRIF, and discuss the implications of such findings in light of our understanding of the physiological importance of these structures....

  15. The Nucleosome Assembly Activity of NAP1 Is Enhanced by Alien▿

    OpenAIRE

    Eckey, Maren; Hong, Wei; Papaioannou, Maria; Baniahmad, Aria

    2007-01-01

    The assembly of nucleosomes into chromatin is essential for the compaction of DNA and inactivation of the DNA template to modulate and repress gene expression. The nucleosome assembly protein 1, NAP1, assembles nucleosomes independent of DNA synthesis and was shown to enhance coactivator-mediated gene expression, suggesting a role for NAP1 in transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that Alien, known to harbor characteristics of a corepressor of nuclear hormone receptors such as of the vitam...

  16. Self-Assembly DNA Polyplex Vaccine inside Dissolving Microneedles for High-Potency Intradermal Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jing-Fong; Lee, Jin-Ching; Lin, Chun-Kuang; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Yang, Hung-Wei

    2017-01-01

    The strong immunogenicity induction is the powerful weapon to prevent the virus infections. This study demonstrated that one-step synthesis of DNA polyplex vaccine in microneedle (MN) patches can induce high immunogenicity through intradermal vaccination and increase the vaccine stability for storage outside the cold chain. More negative charged DNA vaccine was entrapped into the needle region of MNs followed by DNA polyplex formation with branched polyethylenimine (bPEI) pre-coated in the cavities of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) molds that can deliver more DNA vaccine to immune-cell rich epidermis with high transfection efficiency. Our data in this study support the safety and immunogenicity of the MN-based vaccine; the MN patch delivery system induced an immune response 3.5-fold as strong as seen with conventional intramuscular administration; the DNA polyplex formulation provided excellent vaccine stability at high temperature (could be stored at 45ºC for at least 4 months); the DNA vaccine is expected to be manufactured at low cost and not generate sharps waste. We think this study is significant to public health because there is a pressing need for an effective vaccination in developing countries. PMID:28819449

  17. Rolling cycle amplification based single-color quantum dots–ruthenium complex assembling dyads for homogeneous and highly selective detection of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Chen; Liu, Yufei; Ye, Tai; Xiang, Xia; Ji, Xinghu; He, Zhike, E-mail: zhkhe@whu.edu.cn

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A universal, label-free, homogeneous, highly sensitive, and selective fluorescent biosensor for DNA detection is developed by using rolling-circle amplification (RCA) based single-color quantum dots–ruthenium complex (QDs–Ru) assembling dyads. - Highlights: • The single-color QDs–Ru assembling dyads were applied in homogeneous DNA assay. • This biosensor exhibited high selectivity against base mismatched sequences. • This biosensor could be severed as universal platform for the detection of ssDNA. • This sensor could be used to detect the target in human serum samples. • This DNA sensor had a good selectivity under the interference of other dsDNA. - Abstract: In this work, a new, label-free, homogeneous, highly sensitive, and selective fluorescent biosensor for DNA detection is developed by using rolling-circle amplification (RCA) based single-color quantum dots–ruthenium complex (QDs–Ru) assembling dyads. This strategy includes three steps: (1) the target DNA initiates RCA reaction and generates linear RCA products; (2) the complementary DNA hybridizes with the RCA products to form long double-strand DNA (dsDNA); (3) [Ru(phen){sub 2}(dppx)]{sup 2+} (dppx = 7,8-dimethyldipyrido [3,2-a:2′,3′-c] phenanthroline) intercalates into the long dsDNA with strong fluorescence emission. Due to its strong binding propensity with the long dsDNA, [Ru(phen){sub 2}(dppx)]{sup 2+} is removed from the surface of the QDs, resulting in restoring the fluorescence of the QDs, which has been quenched by [Ru(phen){sub 2}(dppx)]{sup 2+} through a photoinduced electron transfer process and is overlaid with the fluorescence of dsDNA bonded Ru(II) polypyridyl complex (Ru-dsDNA). Thus, high fluorescence intensity is observed, and is related to the concentration of target. This sensor exhibits not only high sensitivity for hepatitis B virus (HBV) ssDNA with a low detection limit (0.5 pM), but also excellent selectivity in the complex matrix. Moreover

  18. Norgal: Extraction and de novo assembly of mitochondrial DNA from whole-genome sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Nakeeb, Kosai Ali Ahmed; Petersen, Thomas Nordahl; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    and performing a de novo assembly on a subset of reads that contains these k-mers. The method was applied to WGS data from a panda, brown algae seaweed, butterfly and filamentous fungus. We were able to extract full circular mitochondrial genomes and obtained sequence identities to the reference sequences...

  19. DNA directed protein immobilization on mixed ssDNA/oligo /ethylene glycol/ self-assembled monolayers for sensitive biosensors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boozer, C.; Ladd, J.; Chen, S.; Yu, Q.; Homola, Jiří; Jiang, S. Y.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 23 (2004), s. 6967-6972 ISSN 0003-2700 Grant - others:US FDA (US) FD-U-002250 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : arrays * biosensors * surface plasmon resonance * gold Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 5.450, year: 2004

  20. Regulating Cell Apoptosis on Layer-by-Layer Assembled Multilayers of Photosensitizer-Coupled Polypeptides and Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Ruirui; Jiao, Tifeng; Ma, Kai; Ma, Guanghui; Möhwald, Helmuth; Yan, Xuehai

    2016-05-01

    The design of advanced, nanostructured materials by layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly at the molecular level is of great interest because of the broad application of these materials in the biomedical field especially in regulating cell growth, adhesion, movement, differentiation and detachment. Here, we fabricated functional hybrid multilayer films by LbL assembly of biocompatible photosensitizer-coupled polypeptides and collagen-capped gold nanoparticles. The resulting multilayer film can well accommodate cells for adhesion, growth and proliferation. Most significantly, controlled cell apoptosis (detachment) and patterning of the multilayer film is achieved by a photochemical process yielding reactive oxygen species (ROS). Moreover, the site and shape of apoptotic cells can be controlled easily by adjusting the location and shape of the laser beam. The LbL assembled multilayer film with integration of functions provides an efficient platform for regulating cell growth and apoptosis (detachment).

  1. A DNA Origami Mechanical Device for the Regulation of Microcosmic Structural Rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Neng; Hong, Zhouping; Wang, Huading; Fu, Xin; Zhang, Ziyue; Li, Chao; Xia, Han; Fang, Yan; Li, Maoteng; Zhan, Yi; Yang, Xiangliang

    2017-11-01

    DNA origami makes it feasible to fabricate a tremendous number of DNA nanostructures with various geometries, dimensions, and functionalities. Moreover, an increasing amount of research on DNA nanostructures is focused on biological and biomedical applications. Here, the reversible regulation of microcosmic structural rigidity is accomplished using a DNA origami device in vitro. The designed DNA origami monomer is composed of an internal central axis and an external sliding tube. Due to the external tube sliding, the device transforms between flexible and rigid states. By transporting the device into the liposome, the conformational change of the origami device induces a structural change in the liposome. The results obtained demonstrate that the programmed DNA origami device can be applied to regulate the microcosmic structural rigidity of liposomes. Because microcosmic structural rigidity is important to cell proliferation and function, the results obtained potentially provide a foundation for the regulation of cell microcosmic structural rigidity using DNA nanostructures. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Regular Nanoscale Protein Patterns via Directed Adsorption through Self-Assembled DNA Origami Masks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Saminathan; Subramaniam, Sivaraman; Stewart, A Francis; Grundmeier, Guido; Keller, Adrian

    2016-11-16

    DNA origami has become a widely used method for synthesizing well-defined nanostructures with promising applications in various areas of nanotechnology, biophysics, and medicine. Recently, the possibility to transfer the shape of single DNA origami nanostructures into different materials via molecular lithography approaches has received growing interest due to the great structural control provided by the DNA origami technique. Here, we use ordered monolayers of DNA origami nanostructures with internal cavities on mica surfaces as molecular lithography masks for the fabrication of regular protein patterns over large surface areas. Exposure of the masked sample surface to negatively charged proteins results in the directed adsorption of the proteins onto the exposed surface areas in the holes of the mask. By controlling the buffer and adsorption conditions, the protein coverage of the exposed areas can be varied from single proteins to densely packed monolayers. To demonstrate the versatility of this approach, regular nanopatterns of four different proteins are fabricated: the single-strand annealing proteins Redβ and Sak, the iron-storage protein ferritin, and the blood protein bovine serum albumin (BSA). We furthermore demonstrate the desorption of the DNA origami mask after directed protein adsorption, which may enable the fabrication of hierarchical patterns composed of different protein species. Because selectivity in adsorption is achieved by electrostatic interactions between the proteins and the exposed surface areas, this approach may enable also the large-scale patterning of other charged molecular species or even nanoparticles.

  3. DNA methylation patterns of candidate genes regulated by thymine DNA glycosylase in patients with TP53 germline mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortes, F.P. [CIPE, Laboratrio de Oncogentica Molecular, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Kuasne, H. [CIPE, Laboratrio NeoGene, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Urologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Marchi, F.A. [CIPE, Laboratrio NeoGene, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Programa Inter-Institucional em Bioinformtica, Instituto de Matemtica e Estatstica, Universidade So Paulo, So Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miranda, P.M. [CIPE, Laboratrio NeoGene, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rogatto, S.R. [CIPE, Laboratrio NeoGene, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Urologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Achatz, M.I. [CIPE, Laboratrio de Oncogentica Molecular, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Oncogentica, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, So Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-04-28

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare, autosomal dominant, hereditary cancer predisposition disorder. In Brazil, the p.R337H TP53 founder mutation causes the variant form of LFS, Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome. The occurrence of cancer and age of disease onset are known to vary, even in patients carrying the same mutation, and several mechanisms such as genetic and epigenetic alterations may be involved in this variability. However, the extent of involvement of such events has not been clarified. It is well established that p53 regulates several pathways, including the thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) pathway, which regulates the DNA methylation of several genes. This study aimed to identify the DNA methylation pattern of genes potentially related to the TDG pathway (CDKN2A, FOXA1, HOXD8, OCT4, SOX2, and SOX17) in 30 patients with germline TP53mutations, 10 patients with wild-type TP53, and 10 healthy individuals. We also evaluated TDG expression in patients with adrenocortical tumors (ADR) with and without the p.R337H TP53 mutation. Gene methylation patterns of peripheral blood DNA samples assessed by pyrosequencing revealed no significant differences between the three groups. However, increased TDG expression was observed by quantitative reverse transcription PCR in p.R337H carriers with ADR. Considering the rarity of this phenotype and the relevance of these findings, further studies using a larger sample set are necessary to confirm our results.

  4. Self-assembled Multifunctional DNA Nanoflowers for the Circumvention of Multidrug Resistance in Targeted Anticancer Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Lei; Zhu, Guizhi; Qiu, Liping; Wu, Cuichen; Chen, Huapei; Liang, Hao; Cansiz, Sena; Lv, Yifan; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2015-11-01

    Cancer chemotherapy has been impeded by side effects and multidrug resistance (MDR) partially caused by drug efflux from cancer cells, which call for targeted drug delivery systems additionally able to circumvent MDR. Here we report multifunctional DNA nanoflowers (NFs) for targeted drug delivery to both chemosensitive and MDR cancer cells and circumvent MDR in both leukemia and breast cancer cell models. NFs are self-assembled via liquid crystallization of DNA generated by Rolling Circle Replication, during which NFs are incorporated with aptamers for specific cancer cell recognition, fluorophores for bioimaging, and Doxorubicin (Dox)-binding DNA for drug delivery. NF sizes are tunable (down to ~200 nm in diameter), and the densely packed drug-binding motifs and porous intrastructures endow NFs with high drug loading capacity (71.4%, wt/wt). The Dox-loaded NFs (NF-Dox) are stable at physiological pH, yet drug release is facilitated in acidic or basic conditions. NFs deliver Dox into target chemosensitive and MDR cancer cells, preventing drug efflux and enhancing drug retention in MDR cells. Consequently, NF-Dox induces potent cytotoxicity in both target chemosensitive cells and MDR cells, but not nontarget cells, thus concurrently circumventing MDR and reducing side effects. Overall, these NFs are promising to circumvent MDR in targeted cancer therapy.

  5. Constructing of DNA vectors with controlled nanosize and single dispersion by block copolymer coating gold nanoparticles as template assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Junbo, E-mail: Lijunbo@haust.edu.cn [Henan University of Science and Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmaceutics (China); Wu, Wenlan [Henan University of Science and Technology, School of Medicine (China); Gao, Jiayu; Liang, Ju; Zhou, Huiyun; Liang, Lijuan [Henan University of Science and Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmaceutics (China)

    2017-03-15

    Synthesized vectors with nanoscale size and stable colloid dispersion are highly desirable for improving gene delivery efficiency. Here, a core-shell template particle was constructed with polyethylene glycol-b-poly1-(3-aminopropyl)-3-(2-methacryloyloxy propylimidazolium bromine) (PEG-b-PAMPImB) coating gold nanoparticles (PEG-b-PAMPImB-@-Au NPs) for loading DNA and delivering in vitro. Data from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) suggest that these nanoplexes, by forming an electrostatic complex with DNA at the inner PAMPImB shell, offer steric protection for the outer PEG corona leading to single dispersion and small size. Notably, higher colloid stability and lower cytotoxicity were achieved with these nanoplexes when compared with PAMPImB monolayer-coated gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Confocal laser scanning microscopy and intracellular trafficking TEM further indicate that the nanoplexes can translocate across the cell membrane and partly enter the nucleus for high efficient expression. Thus, template assembly represents a promising approach to control the size and colloid stability of gene vectors and ensure safety and efficiency of DNA delivery.

  6. DNA bases assembled on the Au(110)/electrolyte interface: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvatore, Princia; Nazmutdinov, Renat R.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2015-01-01

    , accompanied by a pair of strong voltammetry peaks in the double-layer region in acid solutions. Adsorption of the DNA bases gives featureless voltammograms with lower double-layer capacitance, suggesting that all the bases are chemisorbed on the Au(110) surface. Further investigation of the surface structures...... of the adlayers of the four DNA bases by EC-STM disclosed lifting of the Au(110) reconstruction, specific molecular packing in dense monolayers, and pH dependence of the A and G adsorption. DFT computations based on a cluster model for the Au(110) surface were performed to investigate the adsorption energy...... and geometry of the DNA bases in different adsorbate orientations. The optimized geometry is further used to compute models for STM images which are compared with the recorded STM images. This has provided insight into the physical nature of the adsorption. The specific orientations of A, C, G, and T on Au(110...

  7. Nuclear sensing of viral DNA, epigenetic regulation of herpes simplex virus infection, and innate immunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knipe, David M., E-mail: david_knipe@hms.harvard.edu

    2015-05-15

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) undergoes a lytic infection in epithelial cells and a latent infection in neuronal cells, and epigenetic mechanisms play a major role in the differential gene expression under the two conditions. HSV viron DNA is not associated with histones but is rapidly loaded with heterochromatin upon entry into the cell. Viral proteins promote reversal of the epigenetic silencing in epithelial cells while the viral latency-associated transcript promotes additional heterochromatin in neuronal cells. The cellular sensors that initiate the chromatinization of foreign DNA have not been fully defined. IFI16 and cGAS are both essential for innate sensing of HSV DNA, and new evidence shows how they work together to initiate innate signaling. IFI16 also plays a role in the heterochromatinization of HSV DNA, and this review will examine how IFI16 integrates epigenetic regulation and innate sensing of foreign viral DNA to show how these two responses are related. - Highlights: • HSV lytic and latent gene expression is regulated differentially by epigenetic processes. • The sensors of foreign DNA have not been defined fully. • IFI16 and cGAS cooperate to sense viral DNA in HSV-infected cells. • IFI16 plays a role in both innate sensing of HSV DNA and in restricting its expression.

  8. Nuclear sensing of viral DNA, epigenetic regulation of herpes simplex virus infection, and innate immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knipe, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) undergoes a lytic infection in epithelial cells and a latent infection in neuronal cells, and epigenetic mechanisms play a major role in the differential gene expression under the two conditions. HSV viron DNA is not associated with histones but is rapidly loaded with heterochromatin upon entry into the cell. Viral proteins promote reversal of the epigenetic silencing in epithelial cells while the viral latency-associated transcript promotes additional heterochromatin in neuronal cells. The cellular sensors that initiate the chromatinization of foreign DNA have not been fully defined. IFI16 and cGAS are both essential for innate sensing of HSV DNA, and new evidence shows how they work together to initiate innate signaling. IFI16 also plays a role in the heterochromatinization of HSV DNA, and this review will examine how IFI16 integrates epigenetic regulation and innate sensing of foreign viral DNA to show how these two responses are related. - Highlights: • HSV lytic and latent gene expression is regulated differentially by epigenetic processes. • The sensors of foreign DNA have not been defined fully. • IFI16 and cGAS cooperate to sense viral DNA in HSV-infected cells. • IFI16 plays a role in both innate sensing of HSV DNA and in restricting its expression

  9. Genomic libraries: II. Subcloning, sequencing, and assembling large-insert genomic DNA clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quail, Mike A; Matthews, Lucy; Sims, Sarah; Lloyd, Christine; Beasley, Helen; Baxter, Simon W

    2011-01-01

    Sequencing large insert clones to completion is useful for characterizing specific genomic regions, identifying haplotypes, and closing gaps in whole genome sequencing projects. Despite being a standard technique in molecular laboratories, DNA sequencing using the Sanger method can be highly problematic when complex secondary structures or sequence repeats are encountered in genomic clones. Here, we describe methods to isolate DNA from a large insert clone (fosmid or BAC), subclone the sample, and sequence the region to the highest industry standard. Troubleshooting solutions for sequencing difficult templates are discussed.

  10. PIG3 Functions in DNA Damage Response through Regulating DNA-PKcs Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Bing; Shang, Zeng-Fu; Yin, Jiao-Jiao; Xu, Qin-Zhi; Liu, Xiao-Dan; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Shi-Meng; Guan, Hua; Zhou, Ping-Kun

    2013-01-01

    The p53-inducible gene 3 (PIG3) recently has been reported to be a new player in DNA damage signaling and response, but the crucial mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, the potential mechanism of PIG3 participation in the DNA damage response induced by ionizing radiation (IR) was investigated in multiple cell lines with depleted expression of PIG3 transiently or stably by the small interference RNA and lentivirus-mediated shRNA expression strategies. PIG3 knockdown led to an abnor...

  11. RpoS regulates a novel type of plasmid DNA transfer in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmei Zhang

    Full Text Available Spontaneous plasmid transformation of Escherichia coli is independent of the DNA uptake machinery for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA entry. The one-hit kinetic pattern of plasmid transformation indicates that double-stranded DNA (dsDNA enters E. coli cells on agar plates. However, DNA uptake and transformation regulation remain unclear in this new type of plasmid transformation. In this study, we developed our previous plasmid transformation system and induced competence at early stationary phase. Despite of inoculum size, the development of competence was determined by optical cell density. DNase I interruption experiment showed that DNA was taken up exponentially within the initial 2 minutes and most transforming DNA entered E. coli cells within 10 minutes on LB-agar plates. A half-order kinetics between recipient cells and transformants was identified when cell density was high on plates. To determine whether the stationary phase master regulator RpoS plays roles in plasmid transformation, we investigated the effects of inactivating and over-expressing its encoding gene rpoS on plasmid transformation. The inactivation of rpoS systematically reduced transformation frequency, while over-expressing rpoS increased plasmid transformation. Normally, RpoS recognizes promoters by its lysine 173 (K173. We found that the K173E mutation caused RpoS unable to promote plasmid transformation, further confirming a role of RpoS in regulating plasmid transformation. In classical transformation, DNA was transferred across membranes by DNA uptake proteins and integrated by DNA processing proteins. At stationary growth phase, RpoS regulates some genes encoding membrane/periplasmic proteins and DNA processing proteins. We quantified transcription of 22 of them and found that transcription of only 4 genes (osmC, yqjC, ygiW and ugpC encoding membrane/periplasmic proteins showed significant differential expression when wildtype RpoS and RpoS(K173E mutant were expressed

  12. RpoS regulates a novel type of plasmid DNA transfer in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanmei; Shi, Chunyu; Yu, Jiafei; Ren, Jingjing; Sun, Dongchang

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous plasmid transformation of Escherichia coli is independent of the DNA uptake machinery for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) entry. The one-hit kinetic pattern of plasmid transformation indicates that double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) enters E. coli cells on agar plates. However, DNA uptake and transformation regulation remain unclear in this new type of plasmid transformation. In this study, we developed our previous plasmid transformation system and induced competence at early stationary phase. Despite of inoculum size, the development of competence was determined by optical cell density. DNase I interruption experiment showed that DNA was taken up exponentially within the initial 2 minutes and most transforming DNA entered E. coli cells within 10 minutes on LB-agar plates. A half-order kinetics between recipient cells and transformants was identified when cell density was high on plates. To determine whether the stationary phase master regulator RpoS plays roles in plasmid transformation, we investigated the effects of inactivating and over-expressing its encoding gene rpoS on plasmid transformation. The inactivation of rpoS systematically reduced transformation frequency, while over-expressing rpoS increased plasmid transformation. Normally, RpoS recognizes promoters by its lysine 173 (K173). We found that the K173E mutation caused RpoS unable to promote plasmid transformation, further confirming a role of RpoS in regulating plasmid transformation. In classical transformation, DNA was transferred across membranes by DNA uptake proteins and integrated by DNA processing proteins. At stationary growth phase, RpoS regulates some genes encoding membrane/periplasmic proteins and DNA processing proteins. We quantified transcription of 22 of them and found that transcription of only 4 genes (osmC, yqjC, ygiW and ugpC) encoding membrane/periplasmic proteins showed significant differential expression when wildtype RpoS and RpoS(K173E) mutant were expressed. Further

  13. Delineation of the role of chromatin assembly and the Rtt101Mms1 E3 ubiquitin ligase in DNA damage checkpoint recovery in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ting Diao

    Full Text Available The DNA damage checkpoint is activated in response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. We had previously shown that chromatin assembly mediated by the histone chaperone Asf1 triggers inactivation of the DNA damage checkpoint in yeast after DSB repair, also called checkpoint recovery. Here we show that chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF-1 also contributes to chromatin reassembly after DSB repair, explaining its role in checkpoint recovery. Towards understanding how chromatin assembly promotes checkpoint recovery, we find persistent presence of the damage sensors Ddc1 and Ddc2 after DSB repair in asf1 mutants. The genes encoding the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex Rtt101Mms1 are epistatic to ASF1 for survival following induction of a DSB, and Rtt101Mms1 are required for checkpoint recovery after DSB repair but not for chromatin assembly. By contrast, the Mms22 substrate adaptor that is degraded by Rtt101Mms1 is required for DSB repair per se. Deletion of MMS22 blocks loading of Rad51 at the DSB, while deletion of ASF1 or RTT101 leads to persistent Rad51 loading. We propose that checkpoint recovery is promoted by Rtt101Mms1-mediated ubiquitylation of Mms22 in order to halt Mms22-dependent loading of Rad51 onto double-stranded DNA after DSB repair, in concert with the chromatin assembly-mediated displacement of Rad51 and checkpoint sensors from the site of repair.

  14. Use of a DNA film on a self-assembled monolayer for investigating the physical process of DNA damage induced by core electron ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Ayumi; Fujii, Kentaro; Baba, Yuji; Shimoyama, Iwao

    2016-11-01

    A novel two-layer sample composed of a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) film and self-assembled monolayer (SAM) was prepared on an inorganic surface to mimic the processes in which DNA is damaged by soft X-ray irradiation. A mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTS) SAM was formed on a sapphire surface, then oligonucleotide (OGN) molecules were adsorbed on the MPTS-SAM. The thicknesses and chemical states of the layers were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge X-ray fine structure (NEXAFS) around the phosphorus (P) and sulfur (S) K-edges. To induce the damage to the OGN molecules, the sample was irradiated with synchrotron soft X-rays. The chemical state of the OGN molecules before and after irradiation was examined by NEXAFS around the nitrogen (N) K-edge region. The thickness of the MPTS-OGN layer was approximately 7.7 nm. The S atom of the OGN molecules was located at the bottom of the OGN layer. The peak shape of the N K-edge NEXAFS spectra of the MPTS-OGN layers clearly changed following irradiation. The MPTS-OGN layer formed on the sapphire surface. The chemical states and the structure of the interface were elucidated using synchrotron soft X-rays. The OGN molecules adsorbed on the MPTS films decomposed upon exposure to soft X-ray irradiation.

  15. Angiogenin enhances cell migration by regulating stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saisai Wei

    Full Text Available Angiogenin (ANG acts on both vascular endothelial cells and cancer cells, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we carried out a co-immunoprecipitation assay in HeLa cells and identified 14 potential ANG-interacting proteins. Among these proteins, β-actin, α-actinin 4, and non-muscle myosin heavy chain 9 are stress fiber components and involved in cytoskeleton organization and movement, which prompted us to investigate the mechanism of action of ANG in cell migration. Upon confirmation of the interactions between ANG and the three proteins, further studies revealed that ANG co-localized with β-actin and α-actinin 4 at the leading edge of migrating cells. Down-regulation of ANG resulted in fewer but thicker stress fibers with less dynamics, which was associated with the enlargements of focal adhesions. The focal adhesion kinase activity and cell migration capacity were significantly decreased in ANG-deficient cells. Taken together, our data demonstrated that the existence of ANG in the cytoplasm optimizes stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion formation to accommodate cell migration. The finding that ANG promoted cancer cell migration might provide new clues for tumor metastasis research.

  16. SMN control of RNP assembly: from post-transcriptional gene regulation to motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Darrick K; Tisdale, Sarah; Lotti, Francesco; Pellizzoni, Livio

    2014-08-01

    At the post-transcriptional level, expression of protein-coding genes is controlled by a series of RNA regulatory events including nuclear processing of primary transcripts, transport of mature mRNAs to specific cellular compartments, translation and ultimately, turnover. These processes are orchestrated through the dynamic association of mRNAs with RNA binding proteins and ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes. Accurate formation of RNPs in vivo is fundamentally important to cellular development and function, and its impairment often leads to human disease. The survival motor neuron (SMN) protein is key to this biological paradigm: SMN is essential for the biogenesis of various RNPs that function in mRNA processing, and genetic mutations leading to SMN deficiency cause the neurodegenerative disease spinal muscular atrophy. Here we review the expanding role of SMN in the regulation of gene expression through its multiple functions in RNP assembly. We discuss advances in our understanding of SMN activity as a chaperone of RNPs and how disruption of SMN-dependent RNA pathways can cause motor neuron disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. PTEN Regulates Glucose Transporter Recycling by Impairing SNX27 Retromer Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Swapnil Rohidas; Maddika, Subbareddy

    2017-11-07

    The tumor suppressor PTEN executes cellular functions predominantly through its phosphatase activity. Here we identified a phosphatase-independent role for PTEN during vesicular trafficking of the glucose transporter GLUT1. PTEN physically interacts with SNX27, a component of the retromer complex that recycles transmembrane receptors such as GLUT1 from endosomes to the plasma membrane. PTEN binding with SNX27 prevents GLUT1 accumulation at the plasma membrane because of defective recycling and thus reduces cellular glucose uptake. Mechanistically, PTEN blocks the association of SNX27 with VPS26 and thereby hinders assembly of a functional retromer complex during the receptor recycling process. Importantly, we found a PTEN somatic mutation (T401I) that is defective in disrupting the association between SNX27 and VPS26, suggesting a critical role for PTEN in controlling optimal GLUT1 levels at the membrane to prevent tumor progression. Together, our results reveal a fundamental role of PTEN in the regulation of the SNX27 retromer pathway, which governs glucose transport and might contribute to PTEN tumor suppressor function. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Soil moisture--a regulator of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal community assembly and symbiotic phosphorus uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepika, Sharma; Kothamasi, David

    2015-01-01

    Multiple species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can colonize roots of an individual plant species but factors which determine the selection of a particular AMF species in a plant root are largely unknown. The present work analysed the effects of drought, flooding and optimal soil moisture (15-20 %) on AMF community composition and structure in Sorghum vulgare roots, using PCR-RFLP. Rhizophagus irregularis (isolate BEG 21), and rhizosphere soil (mixed inoculum) of Heteropogon contortus, a perennial C4 grass, collected from the semi-arid Delhi ridge, were used as AMF inocula. Soil moisture functioned as an abiotic filter and affected AMF community assembly inside plant roots by regulating AMF colonization and phylotype diversity. Roots of plants in flooded soils had lowest AMF diversity whilst root AMF diversity was highest under the soil moisture regime of 15-20 %. Although plant biomass was not affected, root P uptake was significantly influenced by soil moisture. Plants colonized with R. irregularis or mixed AMF inoculum showed higher root P uptake than non-mycorrhizal plants in drought and control treatments. No differences in root P levels were found in the flooded treatment between plants colonized with R. irregularis and non-mycorrhizal plants, whilst under the same treatment, root P uptake was lower in plants colonized with mixed AMF inoculum than in non-mycorrhizal plants.

  19. Regulating charge injection in ambipolar organic field-effect transistors by mixed self-assembled monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yong; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Park, Won-Tae; Cho, Ara; Choi, Eun-Young; Noh, Yong-Young

    2014-08-27

    We report on a technique using mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) to finely regulate ambipolar charge injection in polymer organic field-effect transistors. Differing from the other works that employ single SAM specifically for efficient charge injection in p-type and n-type transistors, we blend two different SAMs of alkyl- and perfluoroalkyl thiols at different ratios and apply them to ambipolar OFETs and inverter. Thanks to the utilization of ambipolar semiconductor and one SAM mixture, the device and circuit fabrications are facile with only one step for semiconductor deposition and another for SAM treatment. This is much simpler with respect to the conventional scheme for the unipolar-device-based complementary circuitry that demands separate deposition and processing for individual p-channel and n-channel transistors. Our results show that the mixed-SAM treatments not only improve ambipolar charge injection manifesting as higher hole- and electron-mobility and smaller threshold voltage but also gradually tune the device characteristics to reach a desired condition for circuit application. Therefore, this simple but useful approach is promising for ambipolar electronics.

  20. Regulation of DNA Alkylation Damage Repair: Lessons and Therapeutic Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soll, Jennifer M; Sobol, Robert W; Mosammaparast, Nima

    2017-03-01

    Alkylation chemotherapy is one of the most widely used systemic therapies for cancer. While somewhat effective, clinical responses and toxicities of these agents are highly variable. A major contributing factor for this variability is the numerous distinct lesions that are created upon alkylation damage. These adducts activate multiple repair pathways. There is mounting evidence that the individual pathways function cooperatively, suggesting that coordinated regulation of alkylation repair is critical to prevent toxicity. Furthermore, some alkylating agents produce adducts that overlap with newly discovered methylation marks, making it difficult to distinguish between bona fide damaged bases and so-called 'epigenetic' adducts. Here, we discuss new efforts aimed at deciphering the mechanisms that regulate these repair pathways, emphasizing their implications for cancer chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Self-regulation of recombinant DNA technology in Japan in the 1970s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Hiroyuki; Nukaga, Yoshio; Saeki, Koji; Akabayashi, Akira

    2009-07-01

    Recombinant DNA technology was developed in the United States in the early 1970s. Leading scientists held an international Asilomar Conference in 1975 to examine the self regulation of recombinant DNA technology, followed by the U.S. National Institutes of Health drafting the Recombinant DNA Research Guidelines in 1976. The result of this conference significantly affected many nations, including Japan. However, there have been few historical studies on the self-regulation of recombinant technologies conducted by scientists and government officials in Japan. The purpose of this paper is to analyze how the Science Council of Japan, the Ministry of Education, Science adn Culture, and the Science and Technology Agency developed self-regulation policies for recombinant DNA technology in Japan in the 1970s. Groups of molecular biologist and geneticists played a key role in establishing guidelines in cooperation with government officials. Our findings suggest that self-regulation policies on recombinant DNA technology have influenced safety management for the life sciences and establishment of institutions for review in Japan.

  2. Functionalized Nanostructures: Redox-Active Porphyrin Anchors for Supramolecular DNA Assemblies

    KAUST Repository

    Börjesson, Karl

    2010-09-28

    We have synthesized and studied a supramolecular system comprising a 39-mer DNA with porphyrin-modified thymidine nucleosides anchored to the surface of large unilamellar vesicles (liposomes). Liposome porphyrin binding characteristics, such as orientation, strength, homogeneity, and binding site size, was determined, suggesting that the porphyrin is well suited as a photophysical and redox-active lipid anchor, in comparison to the inert cholesterol anchor commonly used today. Furthermore, the binding characteristics and hybridization capabilities were studied as a function of anchor size and number of anchoring points, properties that are of importance for our future plans to use the addressability of these redox-active nodes in larger DNA-based nanoconstructs. Electron transfer from photoexcited porphyrin to a lipophilic benzoquinone residing in the lipid membrane was characterized by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence and verified by femtosecond transient absorption. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  3. MiR-185 Targets the DNA Methyltransferases 1 and Regulates Global DNA Methylation in human glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Rong

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perturbation of DNA methylation is frequent in cancers and has emerged as an important mechanism involved in tumorigenesis. To determine how DNA methylation is modified in the genome of primary glioma, we used Methyl-DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP and Nimblegen CpG promoter microarrays to identify differentially DNA methylation sequences between primary glioma and normal brain tissue samples. Methods MeDIP-chip technology was used to investigate the whole-genome differential methylation patterns in glioma and normal brain tissues. Subsequently, the promoter methylation status of eight candidate genes was validated in 40 glioma samples and 4 cell lines by Sequenom's MassARRAY system. Then, the epigenetically regulated expression of these genes and the potential mechanisms were examined by chromatin immunoprecipitation and quantitative real-time PCR. Results A total of 524 hypermethylated and 104 hypomethylated regions were identified in glioma. Among them, 216 hypermethylated and 60 hypomethylated regions were mapped to the promoters of known genes related to a variety of important cellular processes. Eight promoter-hypermethylated genes (ANKDD1A, GAD1, HIST1H3E, PCDHA8, PCDHA13, PHOX2B, SIX3, and SST were confirmed in primary glioma and cell lines. Aberrant promoter methylation and changed histone modifications were associated with their reduced expression in glioma. In addition, we found loss of heterozygosity (LOH at the miR-185 locus located in the 22q11.2 in glioma and induction of miR-185 over-expression reduced global DNA methylation and induced the expression of the promoter-hypermethylated genes in glioma cells by directly targeting the DNA methyltransferases 1. Conclusion These comprehensive data may provide new insights into the epigenetic pathogenesis of human gliomas.

  4. Serine-based gemini surfactants with different spacer linkages: from self-assembly to DNA compaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Sandra G; Oliveira, Isabel S; do Vale, M Luísa C; Marques, Eduardo F

    2014-12-14

    Cationic gemini surfactants have strong potential as compaction agents of nucleic acids for efficient non-viral gene delivery. In this work, we present the aggregation behavior of three novel cationic serine-based gemini surfactants as well as their ability to compact DNA per se and mixed with a helper lipid, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE). All the surfactants have a 12-12-12 configuration, i.e. two main 12-carbon alkyl chains linked to the nitrogen atom of the amino acid residue and a 12 methylene spacer, but they differ in the nature of the spacer linkage: for (12Ser)2N12, an amine bond; for (12Ser)2CON12, an amide bond; and for (12Ser)2COO12, an ester bond. Interestingly, while the amine-based gemini aggregates into micelles, the amide and ester ones spontaneously form vesicles, which denotes a strong influence of the type of linkage on the surfactant packing parameter. The size, ζ-potential and stability of the vesicles have been characterized by light microscopy, cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The interaction of the gemini aggregates with DNA at different charge ratios and in the absence and presence of DOPE has been studied by DLS, fluorescence spectroscopy and cryo-SEM. All the compounds are found to efficiently compact DNA (complexation > 90%), but relevant differences are obtained in terms of the size, ζ-potential and stability of the lipoplexes formed. Results are rationalized in terms of headgroup differences and the type of aggregates present prior to DNA condensation.

  5. Cost-effective sequencing of full-length cDNA clones powered by a de novo-reference hybrid assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginaldo M Kuroshu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sequencing full-length cDNA clones is important to determine gene structures including alternative splice forms, and provides valuable resources for experimental analyses to reveal the biological functions of coded proteins. However, previous approaches for sequencing cDNA clones were expensive or time-consuming, and therefore, a fast and efficient sequencing approach was demanded. METHODOLOGY: We developed a program, MuSICA 2, that assembles millions of short (36-nucleotide reads collected from a single flow cell lane of Illumina Genome Analyzer to shotgun-sequence approximately 800 human full-length cDNA clones. MuSICA 2 performs a hybrid assembly in which an external de novo assembler is run first and the result is then improved by reference alignment of shotgun reads. We compared the MuSICA 2 assembly with 200 pooled full-length cDNA clones finished independently by the conventional primer-walking using Sanger sequencers. The exon-intron structure of the coding sequence was correct for more than 95% of the clones with coding sequence annotation when we excluded cDNA clones insufficiently represented in the shotgun library due to PCR failure (42 out of 200 clones excluded, and the nucleotide-level accuracy of coding sequences of those correct clones was over 99.99%. We also applied MuSICA 2 to full-length cDNA clones from Toxoplasma gondii, to confirm that its ability was competent even for non-human species. CONCLUSIONS: The entire sequencing and shotgun assembly takes less than 1 week and the consumables cost only approximately US$3 per clone, demonstrating a significant advantage over previous approaches.

  6. Cost-effective sequencing of full-length cDNA clones powered by a de novo-reference hybrid assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroshu, Reginaldo M; Watanabe, Junichi; Sugano, Sumio; Morishita, Shinichi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kasahara, Masahiro

    2010-05-07

    Sequencing full-length cDNA clones is important to determine gene structures including alternative splice forms, and provides valuable resources for experimental analyses to reveal the biological functions of coded proteins. However, previous approaches for sequencing cDNA clones were expensive or time-consuming, and therefore, a fast and efficient sequencing approach was demanded. We developed a program, MuSICA 2, that assembles millions of short (36-nucleotide) reads collected from a single flow cell lane of Illumina Genome Analyzer to shotgun-sequence approximately 800 human full-length cDNA clones. MuSICA 2 performs a hybrid assembly in which an external de novo assembler is run first and the result is then improved by reference alignment of shotgun reads. We compared the MuSICA 2 assembly with 200 pooled full-length cDNA clones finished independently by the conventional primer-walking using Sanger sequencers. The exon-intron structure of the coding sequence was correct for more than 95% of the clones with coding sequence annotation when we excluded cDNA clones insufficiently represented in the shotgun library due to PCR failure (42 out of 200 clones excluded), and the nucleotide-level accuracy of coding sequences of those correct clones was over 99.99%. We also applied MuSICA 2 to full-length cDNA clones from Toxoplasma gondii, to confirm that its ability was competent even for non-human species. The entire sequencing and shotgun assembly takes less than 1 week and the consumables cost only approximately US$3 per clone, demonstrating a significant advantage over previous approaches.

  7. Sam68 Is Required for DNA Damage Responses via Regulating Poly(ADP-ribosylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Sun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The rapid and robust synthesis of polymers of adenosine diphosphate (ADP-ribose (PAR chains, primarily catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1, is crucial for cellular responses to DNA damage. However, the precise mechanisms through which PARP1 is activated and PAR is robustly synthesized are not fully understood. Here, we identified Src-associated substrate during mitosis of 68 kDa (Sam68 as a novel signaling molecule in DNA damage responses (DDRs. In the absence of Sam68, DNA damage-triggered PAR production and PAR-dependent DNA repair signaling were dramatically diminished. With serial cellular and biochemical assays, we demonstrated that Sam68 is recruited to and significantly overlaps with PARP1 at DNA lesions and that the interaction between Sam68 and PARP1 is crucial for DNA damage-initiated and PARP1-conferred PAR production. Utilizing cell lines and knockout mice, we illustrated that Sam68-deleted cells and animals are hypersensitive to genotoxicity caused by DNA-damaging agents. Together, our findings suggest that Sam68 plays a crucial role in DDR via regulating DNA damage-initiated PAR production.

  8. Mechanisms Governing DDK Regulation of the Initiation of DNA Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larasati

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The budding yeast Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK complex—comprised of cell division cycle (Cdc7 kinase and its regulatory subunit dumbbell former 4 (Dbf4—is required to trigger the initiation of DNA replication through the phosphorylation of multiple minichromosome maintenance complex subunits 2-7 (Mcm2-7. DDK is also a target of the radiation sensitive 53 (Rad53 checkpoint kinase in response to replication stress. Numerous investigations have determined mechanistic details, including the regions of Mcm2, Mcm4, and Mcm6 phosphorylated by DDK, and a number of DDK docking sites. Similarly, the way in which the Rad53 forkhead-associated 1 (FHA1 domain binds to DDK—involving both canonical and non-canonical interactions—has been elucidated. Recent work has revealed mutual promotion of DDK and synthetic lethal with dpb11-1 3 (Sld3 roles. While DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2-7 subunits facilitates their interaction with Sld3 at origins, Sld3 in turn stimulates DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2. Details of a mutually antagonistic relationship between DDK and Rap1-interacting factor 1 (Rif1 have also recently come to light. While Rif1 is able to reverse DDK-mediated Mcm2-7 complex phosphorylation by targeting the protein phosphatase glycogen 7 (Glc7 to origins, there is evidence to suggest that DDK can counteract this activity by binding to and phosphorylating Rif1.

  9. Tcf4 Regulates Synaptic Plasticity, DNA Methylation, and Memory Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Kennedy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human haploinsufficiency of the transcription factor Tcf4 leads to a rare autism spectrum disorder called Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS, which is associated with severe language impairment and development delay. Here, we demonstrate that Tcf4 haploinsufficient mice have deficits in social interaction, ultrasonic vocalization, prepulse inhibition, and spatial and associative learning and memory. Despite learning deficits, Tcf4(+/− mice have enhanced long-term potentiation in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. In translationally oriented studies, we found that small-molecule HDAC inhibitors normalized hippocampal LTP and memory recall. A comprehensive set of next-generation sequencing experiments of hippocampal mRNA and methylated DNA isolated from Tcf4-deficient and WT mice before or shortly after experiential learning, with or without administration of vorinostat, identified “memory-associated” genes modulated by HDAC inhibition and dysregulated by Tcf4 haploinsufficiency. Finally, we observed that Hdac2 isoform-selective knockdown was sufficient to rescue memory deficits in Tcf4(+/− mice.

  10. Tcf4 Regulates Synaptic Plasticity, DNA Methylation, and Memory Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Andrew J; Rahn, Elizabeth J; Paulukaitis, Brynna S; Savell, Katherine E; Kordasiewicz, Holly B; Wang, Jing; Lewis, John W; Posey, Jessica; Strange, Sarah K; Guzman-Karlsson, Mikael C; Phillips, Scott E; Decker, Kyle; Motley, S Timothy; Swayze, Eric E; Ecker, David J; Michael, Todd P; Day, Jeremy J; Sweatt, J David

    2016-09-06

    Human haploinsufficiency of the transcription factor Tcf4 leads to a rare autism spectrum disorder called Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS), which is associated with severe language impairment and development delay. Here, we demonstrate that Tcf4 haploinsufficient mice have deficits in social interaction, ultrasonic vocalization, prepulse inhibition, and spatial and associative learning and memory. Despite learning deficits, Tcf4(+/-) mice have enhanced long-term potentiation in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. In translationally oriented studies, we found that small-molecule HDAC inhibitors normalized hippocampal LTP and memory recall. A comprehensive set of next-generation sequencing experiments of hippocampal mRNA and methylated DNA isolated from Tcf4-deficient and WT mice before or shortly after experiential learning, with or without administration of vorinostat, identified "memory-associated" genes modulated by HDAC inhibition and dysregulated by Tcf4 haploinsufficiency. Finally, we observed that Hdac2 isoform-selective knockdown was sufficient to rescue memory deficits in Tcf4(+/-) mice. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Local chromatin structure of heterochromatin regulates repeated DNA stability, nucleolus structure, and genome integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Jamy C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Heterochromatin constitutes a significant portion of the genome in higher eukaryotes; approximately 30% in Drosophila and human. Heterochromatin contains a high repeat DNA content and a low density of protein-encoding genes. In contrast, euchromatin is composed mostly of unique sequences and contains the majority of single-copy genes. Genetic and cytological studies demonstrated that heterochromatin exhibits regulatory roles in chromosome organization, centromere function and telomere protection. As an epigenetically regulated structure, heterochromatin formation is not defined by any DNA sequence consensus. Heterochromatin is characterized by its association with nucleosomes containing methylated-lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me), heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) that binds H3K9me, and Su(var)3-9, which methylates H3K9 and binds HP1. Heterochromatin formation and functions are influenced by HP1, Su(var)3-9, and the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. My thesis project investigates how heterochromatin formation and function impact nuclear architecture, repeated DNA organization, and genome stability in Drosophila melanogaster. H3K9me-based chromatin reduces extrachromosomal DNA formation; most likely by restricting the access of repair machineries to repeated DNAs. Reducing extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA stabilizes rDNA repeats and the nucleolus structure. H3K9me-based chromatin also inhibits DNA damage in heterochromatin. Cells with compromised heterochromatin structure, due to Su(var)3-9 or dcr-2 (a component of the RNAi pathway) mutations, display severe DNA damage in heterochromatin compared to wild type. In these mutant cells, accumulated DNA damage leads to chromosomal defects such as translocations, defective DNA repair response, and activation of the G2-M DNA repair and mitotic checkpoints that ensure cellular and animal viability. My thesis research suggests that DNA replication, repair, and recombination mechanisms in heterochromatin differ from those in

  12. DNA-Assembled Core-Satellite Upconverting-Metal-Organic Framework Nanoparticle Superstructures for Efficient Photodynamic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Liangcan; Brasino, Michael; Mao, Chenchen; Cho, Suehyun; Park, Wounjhang; Goodwin, Andrew P; Cha, Jennifer N

    2017-06-01

    DNA-mediated assembly of core-satellite structures composed of Zr(IV)-based porphyrinic metal-organic framework (MOF) and NaYF 4 ,Yb,Er upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) for photodynamic therapy (PDT) is reported. MOF NPs generate singlet oxygen ( 1 O 2 ) upon photoirradiation with visible light without the need for additional small molecule, diffusional photosensitizers such as porphyrins. Using DNA as a templating agent, well-defined MOF-UCNP clusters are produced where UCNPs are spatially organized around a centrally located MOF NP. Under NIR irradiation, visible light emitted from the UCNPs is absorbed by the core MOF NP to produce 1 O 2 at significantly greater amounts than what can be produced from simply mixing UCNPs and MOF NPs. The MOF-UCNP core-satellite superstructures also induce strong cell cytotoxicity against cancer cells, which are further enhanced by attaching epidermal growth factor receptor targeting affibodies to the PDT clusters, highlighting their promise as theranostic photodynamic agents. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Regulation of Xenopus laevis DNA topoisomerase I activity by phosphorylation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiserman, H.B.; Ingebritsen, T.S.; Benbow, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase I has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from ovaries of the frog Xenopus laevis. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the most purified fraction revealed a single major band at 110 kDa and less abundant minor bands centered at 62 kDa. Incubation of the most purified fraction with immobilized calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase abolished all DNA topoisomerase enzymatic activity in a time-dependent reaction. Treatment of the dephosphorylated X. laevis DNA topoisomerase I with a X. laevis casein kinase type II activity and ATP restored DNA topoisomerase activity to a level higher than that observed in the most purified fraction. In vitro labeling experiments which employed the most purified DNA topoisomerase I fraction, [γ- 32 P]ATP, and the casein kinase type II enzyme showed that both the 110- and 62-kDa bands became phosphorylated in approximately molar proportions. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that only serine residues became phosphorylated. Phosphorylation was accompanied by an increase in DNA topoisomerase activity in vitro. Dephosphorylation of DNA topoisomerase I appears to block formation of the initial enzyme-substrate complex on the basis of the failure of the dephosphorylated enzyme to nick DNA in the presence of camptothecin. The authors conclude that X. laevis DNA topoisomerase I is partially phosphorylated as isolated and that this phosphorylation is essential for expression of enzymatic activity in vitro. On the basis of the ability of the casein kinase type II activity to reactivate dephosphorylated DNA topoisomerase I, they speculate that this kinase may contribute to the physiological regulation of DNA topoisomerase I activity

  14. Cell cycle regulation of DNA polymerase beta in rotenone-based Parkinson's disease models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongcai Wang

    Full Text Available In Parkinson's disease (PD, neuronal cells undergo mitotic catastrophe and endoreduplication prior to cell death; however, the regulatory mechanisms remain to be defined. In this study, we investigated cell cycle regulation of DNA polymerase β (poly β in rotenone-based dopaminergic cellular and animal models. Incubation with a low concentration (0.25 µM of rotenone for 1.5 to 7 days resulted in a flattened cell body and decreased DNA replication during S phase, whereas a high concentration (2 µM of rotenone exposure resulted in enlarged, multi-nucleated cells and converted the mitotic cycle into endoreduplication. Consistently, DNA poly β, which is mainly involved in DNA repair synthesis, was upregulated to a high level following exposure to 2 µM rotenone. The abrogation of DNA poly β by siRNA transfection or dideoxycytidine (DDC treatment attenuated the rotenone-induced endoreduplication. The cell cycle was reactivated in cyclin D-expressing dopaminergic neurons from the substantia nigra (SN of rats following stereotactic (ST infusion of rotenone. Increased DNA poly β expression was observed in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc and the substantia nigra pars reticulate (SNr of rotenone-treated rats. Collectively, in the in vitro model of rotenone-induced mitotic catastrophe, the overexpression of DNA poly β promotes endoreduplication; in the in vivo model, the upregulation of DNA poly β and cell cycle reentry were also observed in the adult rat substantia nigra. Therefore, the cell cycle regulation of DNA poly β may be involved in the pathological processes of PD, which results in the induction of endoreduplication.

  15. Self-Assembly of Large-Scale Shape-Controlled DNA Nano-Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-16

    have transformative impact. 15. SUBJECT TERMS DNA nanotechnology, nucleic acid structures, patterning, barcoding 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...other standard keyboard symbols, 10 emoticons, 9 astrological symbols, 6 Chinese characters and various miscellaneous symbols. F,ach image is 150 nm X...100 \\iM stock in 0.5 x Tris/EDTA buffer (5 niM Tris, pH 7.9, 1 mM I-D’l’A) supplemented with 40 mM MgCl,. For Z-crystals and ZX-crystals, the final

  16. Porcine transcriptome analysis based on 97 non-normalized cDNA libraries and assembly of 1,021,891 expressed sequence tags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Cirera, Susanna; Hedegaard, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    public databases. The Sino-Danish ESTs were generated from one normalized and 97 non-normalized cDNA libraries representing 35 different tissues and three developmental stages. RESULTS: Using the Distiller package, the ESTs were assembled to roughly 48,000 contigs and 73,000 singletons, of which...

  17. Mycobacterium smegmatis PafBC is involved in regulation of DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudrini Olivencia, Begonia; Müller, Andreas U; Roschitzki, Bernd; Burger, Sibylle; Weber-Ban, Eilika; Imkamp, Frank

    2017-10-25

    Two genes, pafB and pafC, are organized in an operon with the Pup-ligase gene pafA, which is part of the Pup-proteasome system (PPS) present in mycobacteria and other actinobacteria. The PPS is crucial for Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance towards reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI). However, pafB and pafC apparently play only a minor role in RNI resistance. To characterize their function, we generated a pafBC deletion in Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm). Proteome analysis of the mutant strain revealed decreased cellular levels of various proteins involved in DNA damage repair, including recombinase A (RecA). In agreement with this finding, Msm ΔpafBC displayed increased sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. In mycobacteria two pathways regulate DNA repair genes: the LexA/RecA-dependent SOS response and a predominant pathway that controls gene expression via a LexA/RecA-independent promoter, termed P1. PafB and PafC feature winged helix-turn-helix DNA binding motifs and we demonstrate that together they form a stable heterodimer in vitro, implying a function as a heterodimeric transcriptional regulator. Indeed, P1-driven transcription of recA was decreased in Msm ΔpafBC under standard conditions and induction of recA expression upon DNA damage was strongly impaired. Taken together, our data indicate an important regulatory function of PafBC in the mycobacterial DNA damage response.

  18. Regulation of genome-wide DNA methylation by mobile small RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamiru, Muluneh; Hardcastle, Thomas J; Lewsey, Mathew G

    2018-01-01

    Contents Summary 540 I. Introduction 540 II. There are different types of sRNA mobility 541 III. Mechanisms of sRNA movement 541 IV. Long-distance, shoot-root, mobile siRNAs influence DNA methylation in recipient tissues 541 V. Classes of interactions between shoot-root mobile siRNAs and DNA methylation 542 VI. Loci targeted directly and indirectly by shoot-root mobile siRNAs are associated with different histone modifications 543 VII. Is mobile siRNA-regulated DNA methylation important in specific tissues or under specific conditions? 543 VIII. Mobile sRNAs can be used to modify plant traits 544 IX. Conclusions 544 Acknowledgements 544 References 544 SUMMARY: RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) at cytosine residues regulates gene expression, silences transposable elements and influences genome stability. The mechanisms responsible for RdDM are guided to target loci by small RNAs (sRNAs) that can move within plants cell to cell and long distance. Here we discuss recent advances in the understanding of interactions between mobile sRNAs and DNA methylation. We describe the mechanisms of sRNA movement, the differences between known classes of mobile sRNA-DNA methylation interactions and the limits of current knowledge. Finally, we discuss potential applications of mobile sRNAs in modifying plant traits. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. A Potential Structural Switch for Regulating DNA-Binding by TEAD Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Sun; Vonrhein, Clemens; Albarado, Diana; Raman, C S; Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2016-06-19

    TEA domain (TEAD) transcription factors are essential for the normal development of eukaryotes and are the downstream effectors of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. Whereas our earlier work established the three-dimensional structure of the highly conserved DNA-binding domain using solution NMR spectroscopy, the structural basis for regulating the DNA-binding activity remains unknown. Here, we present the X-ray crystallographic structure and activity of a TEAD mutant containing a truncated L1 loop, ΔL1 TEAD DBD. Unexpectedly, the three-dimensional structure of the ΔL1 TEAD DBD reveals a helix-swapped homodimer wherein helix 1 is swapped between monomers. Furthermore, each three-helix bundle in the domain-swapped dimer is a structural homolog of MYB-like domains. Our investigations of the DNA-binding activity reveal that although the formation of the three-helix bundle by the ΔL1 TEAD DBD is sufficient for binding to an isolated M-CAT-like DNA element, multimeric forms are deficient for cooperative binding to tandemly duplicated elements, indicating that the L1 loop contributes to the DNA-binding activity of TEAD. These results suggest that switching between monomeric and domain-swapped forms may regulate DNA selectivity of TEAD proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Quick-responsive DNA Nanotechnology Device for Bio-molecular Homeostasis Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songlin; Wang, Pei; Xiao, Chen; Li, Zheng; Yang, Bing; Fu, Jieyang; Chen, Jing; Wan, Neng; Ma, Cong; Li, Maoteng; Yang, Xiangliang; Zhan, Yi

    2016-08-10

    Physiological processes such as metabolism, cell apoptosis and immune responses, must be strictly regulated to maintain their homeostasis and achieve their normal physiological functions. The speed with which bio-molecular homeostatic regulation occurs directly determines the ability of an organism to adapt to conditional changes. To produce a quick-responsive regulatory system that can be easily utilized for various types of homeostasis, a device called nano-fingers that facilitates the regulation of physiological processes was constructed using DNA origami nanotechnology. This nano-fingers device functioned in linked open and closed phases using two types of DNA tweezers, which were covalently coupled with aptamers that captured specific molecules when the tweezer arms were sufficiently close. Via this specific interaction mechanism, certain physiological processes could be simultaneously regulated from two directions by capturing one biofactor and releasing the other to enhance the regulatory capacity of the device. To validate the universal application of this device, regulation of the homeostasis of the blood coagulant thrombin was attempted using the nano-fingers device. It was successfully demonstrated that this nano-fingers device achieved coagulation buffering upon the input of fuel DNA. This nano-device could also be utilized to regulate the homeostasis of other types of bio-molecules.

  1. DNA-directed protein immobilization on mixed self-assembled monolayers via a streptavidin bringe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ladd, J.; Boozer, C.; Yu, Q.; Chen, S.; Homola, Jiří; Jiang, S.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 19 (2004), s. 8090-8095 ISSN 0743-7463 Grant - others:US FDA (US) FD-U-002250 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : biosensors * surface plasmon resonance * optical sensors Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 3.295, year: 2004

  2. DNA methylation regulates transcriptional homeostasis of algal endosymbiosis in the coral model Aiptasia

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yong

    2017-11-03

    The symbiotic relationship between cnidarians and dinoflagellates is the cornerstone of coral reef ecosystems. Although research is focusing on the molecular mechanisms underlying this symbiosis, the role of epigenetic mechanisms, which have been implicated in transcriptional regulation and acclimation to environmental change, is unknown. To assess the role of DNA methylation in the cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis, we analyzed genome-wide CpG methylation, histone associations, and transcriptomic states of symbiotic and aposymbiotic anemones in the model system Aiptasia. We find methylated genes are marked by histone H3K36me3 and show significant reduction of spurious transcription and transcriptional noise, revealing a role of DNA methylation in the maintenance of transcriptional homeostasis. Changes in DNA methylation and expression show enrichment for symbiosis-related processes such as immunity, apoptosis, phagocytosis recognition and phagosome formation, and unveil intricate interactions between the underlying pathways. Our results demonstrate that DNA methylation provides an epigenetic mechanism of transcriptional homeostasis during symbiosis.

  3. The role of the epigenetic signal, DNA methylation, in gene regulation during erythroid development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginder, Gordon D; Gnanapragasam, Merlin N; Mian, Omar Y

    2008-01-01

    The sequence complexity of the known vertebrate genomes alone is insufficient to account for the diversity between individuals of a species. Although our knowledge of vertebrate biology has evolved substantially with the growing compilation of sequenced genomes, understanding the temporal and spatial regulation of genes remains fundamental to fully exploiting this information. The importance of epigenetic factors in gene regulation was first hypothesized decades ago when biologists posited that methylation of DNA could heritably alter gene expression [Holliday and Pugh, 1975. Science 187(4173), 226-232; Riggs, 1975. Cytogenet. and Cell Genet.14(1), 9-25; Scarano et al., 1967. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 57(5), 1394-1400)]. It was subsequently shown that vertebrate DNA methylation, almost exclusively at the 5' position of cytosine in the dinucleotide CpG, played a role in a number of processes including embryonic development, genetic imprinting, cell differentiation, and tumorigenesis. At the time of this writing, a large and growing list of genes is known to exhibit DNA methylation-dependent regulation, and we understand in some detail the mechanisms employed by cells in using methylation as a regulatory modality. In this context, we revisit one of the original systems in which the role of DNA methylation in vertebrate gene regulation during development was described and studied: erythroid cells. We briefly review the recent advances in our understanding of DNA methylation and, in particular, its regulatory role in red blood cells during differentiation and development. We also address DNA methylation as a component of erythroid chromatin architecture, and the interdependence of CpG methylation and histone modification.

  4. The SWI/SNF Chromatin Regulator BRG1 Modulates the Transcriptional Regulatory Activity of the Epstein-Barr Virus DNA Polymerase Processivity Factor BMRF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Mei-Tzu; Wang, Ya-Ting; Chen, Yen-Ju; Lin, Su-Fang; Tsai, Ching-Hwa; Chen, Mei-Ru

    2017-05-01

    early proteins Zta and Rta turn on the expression of early proteins that assemble into viral DNA replication complexes. The DNA polymerase accessory factor, BMRF1, also is known to transactivate early gene expression through its interaction with SP1 or Zta on specific promoters. Through a global analysis, we demonstrate that BMRF1 also turns on a subset of Rta-regulated, late structural gene promoters. Searching for BMRF1-interacting cellular partners revealed that the SWI/SNF chromatin modifier BRG1 contributes to BMRF1-mediated transactivation of a subset of late promoters through protein-protein interaction and viral chromatin binding. Our findings indicate that BMRF1 regulates the expression of more viral genes than thought previously through distinct viral DNA replication-independent mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. Specific DNA-binding proteins and DNA sequences involved in steroid hormone regulation of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spelsberg, T.; Hora, J.; Horton, M.; Goldberger, A.; Littlefield, B.; Seelke, R.; Toyoda, H.

    1987-01-01

    Steroid hormones circulate in the blood and are taken by target cells via complexes with intracellular binding proteins termed receptors, that are hormone and tissue specific. Each receptor binds it specific steroid with very high affinity, having an equilibrium dissociation constant (K/sub d/) in the range of 10 -9 to 10 -10 M. Once bound by their specific steroid hormones, the steroid receptors undergo a conformational change which allows them to bind with high affinity to sites on chromatin, termed nuclear acceptor sites. There are estimated 5,000 to 10,000 of these sites expressed with an equal number not expressed (''masked'') in intact chromatin. The result of the binding to nuclear acceptor sites is an alteration of gene transcription or, in some cases, gene expression as measured by the changing levels of specific RNAs and proteins in that target tissue. Each steroid regulates specific effects on the RNA and protein profiles. The chronology of the above mechanism of action after injection of radiolabelled steroid as is follows: Steroid-receptor complex formation (1 minute), nuclear acceptor sites (2 minutes), effects on RNA synthesis (10 to 30 minutes), and finally the changing protein profiles via changes in protein synthesis and protein turnover (1 to 6 hours). Thus steroid receptors represent one of the first identified intracellular gene regulation proteins. The receptor molecules themselves are regulated by the presence or absence of the steroid molecule

  6. Nup132 modulates meiotic spindle attachment in fission yeast by regulating kinetochore assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Hui-Ju; Asakawa, Haruhiko; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    During meiosis, the kinetochore undergoes substantial reorganization to establish monopolar spindle attachment. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the KNL1?Spc7-Mis12-Nuf2 (KMN) complex, which constitutes the outer kinetochore, is disassembled during meiotic prophase and is reassembled before meiosis I. Here, we show that the nucleoporin Nup132 is required for timely assembly of the KMN proteins: In the absence of Nup132, Mis12 and Spc7 are precociously assembled at the centromer...

  7. Final report : LDRD project 79824 carbon nanotube sorting via DNA-directed self-assembly.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, David B; Leung, Kevin; Rempe, Susan B.; Dossa, Paul D.; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Martin, Marcus Gary

    2007-10-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have shown great promise in novel applications in molecular electronics, biohazard detection, and composite materials. Commercially synthesized nanotubes exhibit a wide dispersion of geometries and conductivities, and tend to aggregate. Hence the key to using these materials is the ability to solubilize and sort carbon nanotubes according to their geometric/electronic properties. One of the most effective dispersants is single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), but there are many outstanding questions regarding the interaction between nucleic acids and SWNTs. In this work we focus on the interactions of SWNTs with single monomers of nucleic acids, as a first step to answering these outstanding questions. We use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to calculate the binding energy of six different nucleotide monophosphates (NMPs) to a (6,0) single-wall carbon nanotube in aqueous solution. We find that the binding energies are generally favorable, of the order of a few kcal/mol. The binding energies of the different NMPs were very similar in salt solution, whereas we found a range of binding energies for NMPs in pure water. The binding energies are sensitive to the details of the association of the sodium ions with the phosphate groups and also to the average conformations of the nucleotides. We use electronic structure (Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Moller-Plesset second order perturbation to uncorrelated Hartree Fock theory (MP2)) methods to complement the classical force field study. With judicious choices of DFT exchange correlation functionals, we find that DFT, MP2, and classical force field predictions are in qualitative and even quantitative agreement; all three methods should give reliable and valid predictions. However, in one important case, the interactions between ions and metallic carbon nanotubes--the SWNT polarization-induced affinity for ions, neglected in most classical force field studies, is found to be extremely

  8. Structural Basis for DNA Recognition by the Two-Component Response Regulator RcsB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina V. Filippova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available RcsB is a highly conserved transcription regulator of the Rcs phosphorelay system, a complex two-component signal transduction system (N. Majdalani and S. Gottesman, Annu Rev Microbiol 59:379–405, 2005; A. J. Wolfe, Curr Opin Microbiol 13:204–209, 2010, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mib.2010.01.002; D. J. Clarke, Future Microbiol 5:1173–1184, 2010, https://doi.org/10.2217/fmb.10.83. RcsB plays an important role in virulence and pathogenicity in human hosts by regulating biofilm formation. RcsB can regulate transcription alone or together with its auxiliary transcription regulators by forming heterodimers. This complexity allows RcsB to regulate transcription of more than 600 bacterial genes in response to different stresses (D. Wang et al., Mol Plant Microbe Interact 25:6–17, 2012, https://doi.org/10.1094/MPMI-08-11-0207. Despite increasing knowledge of RcsB importance, molecular mechanisms that drive the ability of RcsB to control transcription of a large number of genes remain unclear. Here, we present crystal structures of unphosphorylated RcsB in complex with the consensus DNA-binding sequence of 22-mer (DNA22 and 18-mer (DNA18 of the flhDC operon from Escherichia coli determined at 3.15- and 3.37-Å resolution, respectively. The results of our structural analysis combined with the results of in vitro binding assays provide valuable insights to the protein regulatory mechanism, demonstrate how RcsB recognizes target DNA sequences, and reveal a unique oligomeric state that allows RcsB to form homo- and heterodimers. This information will help us understand the complex mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by RcsB in bacteria.

  9. The human cytomegalovirus gene products essential for late viral gene expression assemble into prereplication complexes before viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isomura, Hiroki; Stinski, Mark F; Murata, Takayuki; Yamashita, Yoriko; Kanda, Teru; Toyokuni, Shinya; Tsurumi, Tatsuya

    2011-07-01

    The regulation of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) late gene expression by viral proteins is poorly understood, and these viral proteins could be targets for novel antivirals. HCMV open reading frames (ORFs) UL79, -87, and -95 encode proteins with homology to late gene transcription factors of murine gammaherpesvirus 68 ORFs 18, 24, and 34, respectively. To determine whether these HCMV proteins are also essential for late gene transcription of a betaherpesvirus, we mutated HCMV ORFs UL79, -87, and -95. Cells were infected with the recombinant viruses at high and low multiplicities of infection (MOIs). While viral DNA was detected with the recombinant viruses, infectious virus was not detected unless the wild-type viral proteins were expressed in trans. At a high MOI, mutation of ORF UL79, -87, or -95 had no effect on the level of major immediate-early (MIE) gene expression or viral DNA replication, but late viral gene expression from the UL44, -75, and -99 ORFs was not detected. At a low MOI, preexpression of UL79 or -87, but not UL95, in human fibroblast cells negatively affected the level of MIE viral gene expression and viral DNA replication. The products of ORFs UL79, -87, and -95 were expressed as early viral proteins and recruited to prereplication complexes (pre-RCs), along with UL44, before the initiation of viral DNA replication. All three HCMV ORFs are indispensable for late viral gene expression and viral growth. The roles of UL79, -87, and -95 in pre-RCs for late viral gene expression are discussed.

  10. A Novel Supramolecular Assembly Film of Porphyrin Bound DNA: Characterization and Catalytic Behaviors Towards Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Ikeda

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available A stable Fe(4-TMPyP-DNA-PADDA (FePyDP film was characterized onpyrolytic graphite electrode (PGE or an indium-tin oxide (ITO electrode through thesupramolecular interaction between water-soluble iron porphyrin (Fe(4-TMPyP and DNAtemplate, where PADDA (poly(acrylamide-co-diallyldimethylammonium chloride isemployed as a co-immobilizing polymer. Cyclic voltammetry of FePyDP film showed a pairof reversible FeIII/FeII redox peaks and an irreversible FeIV/FeIII peak at –0.13 V and 0.89vs. Ag|AgCl in pH 7.4 PBS, respectively. An excellent catalytic reduction of NO wasdisplayed at –0.61 V vs. Ag|AgCl at a FePyDP film modified electrode.Chronoamperometric experiments demonstrated a rapid response to the reduction of NOwith a linear range from 0.1 to 90 μM and a detection limit of 30 nM at a signal-to-noiseratio of 3. On the other hand, it is the first time to apply high-valent iron porphyrin ascatalyst at modified electrode for NO catalytic oxidation at 0.89 vs. Ag|AgCl. The sensorshows a high selectivity of some endogenous electroactive substances in biological systems.The mechanism of response of the sensors to NO is preliminary studied.

  11. Rho GTPases: Novel Players in the Regulation of the DNA Damage Response?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Fritz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1 belongs to the family of Ras-homologous small GTPases. It is well characterized as a membrane-bound signal transducing molecule that is involved in the regulation of cell motility and adhesion as well as cell cycle progression, mitosis, cell death and gene expression. Rac1 also adjusts cellular responses to genotoxic stress by regulating the activity of stress kinases, including c-Jun-N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK/SAPK and p38 kinases as well as related transcription factors. Apart from being found on the inner side of the outer cell membrane and in the cytosol, Rac1 has also been detected inside the nucleus. Different lines of evidence indicate that genotoxin-induced DNA damage is able to activate nuclear Rac1. The exact mechanisms involved and the biological consequences, however, are unclear. The data available so far indicate that Rac1 might integrate DNA damage independent and DNA damage dependent cellular stress responses following genotoxin treatment, thereby coordinating mechanisms of the DNA damage response (DDR that are related to DNA repair, survival and cell death.

  12. DNA damage response and prostate cancer: defects, regulation and therapeutic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanika, Styliani; Karantanos, Theodoros; Li, Likun; Corn, Paul G.; Thompson, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage response (DDR) includes the activation of numerous cellular activities that prevent duplication of DNA lesions and maintain genomic integrity, which is critical for the survival of normal and cancer cells. Specific genes involved in the DDR such as BRCA1/2 and P53 are mutated during prostate cancer progression, while various oncogenic signaling such as Akt and c-Myc are activated, enhancing the replication stress and increasing the genomic instability of cancer cells. These events may render prostate cancer cells particularly sensitive to inhibition of specific DDR pathways, such as PARP in homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair and Chk1 in cell cycle checkpoint and DNA repair, creating opportunities for synthetic lethality or synergistic cytotoxicity. Recent reports highlight the critical role of androgen receptor (AR) as a regulator of DDR genes, providing a rationale for combining DNA-damaging agents or targeted DDR inhibitors with hormonal manipulation or AR inhibition as treatment for aggressive disease. The aims of this review are to discuss specific DDR defects in prostate cancer that occur during disease progression, to summarize recent advances in understanding the regulation of DDR in prostate cancer, and to present potential therapeutic opportunities through combinational targeting of the intact components of DDR signaling pathways. PMID:25132269

  13. Regulation of the pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 protein by DNA-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, Patricia; Montminy, Marc R; Van Obberghen, Emmanuel

    2005-11-18

    The transcription factor PDX-1 plays a crucial role during pancreatic development and in the function of insulin-producing beta cells. Disruption of the pdx-1 gene in these cells induces overt diabetes in mice, and this gene is modified in several type 2 diabetic families. It is thus crucial to determine the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of PDX-1 expression and/or activation. We identified new proteins associated with PDX-1 by mass spectrometry. These proteins, Ku70 and Ku80, are regulatory subunits of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). We determined that the interaction between PDX-1 and Ku70 or Ku80 is dependent on the homeodomain of PDX-1. Most interestingly, we demonstrated in vitro that the DNA-PK phosphorylates PDX-1 on threonine 11. Although this residue is located in the transactivation domain, this phosphorylation does not seem to be implicated in the transcriptional activation of PDX-1. However, in response to radiation, which activates DNA-PK, a second form of the PDX-1 protein appears rapidly. This form is phosphorylated on threonine and seems to drive PDX-1 degradation by the proteosome. In correlation with this degradation, we observed a subsequent reduction in the activation of the insulin promoter and a decrease in PDX-1-mediated gene expression, i.e. glut2 and glucokinase. Our study demonstrates that radiation, through the activation of DNA-PK, may regulate PDX-1 protein expression.

  14. Inhibition of DNA methyltransferases regulates cocaine self-administration by rats: a genome-wide DNA methylation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonteneau, M; Filliol, D; Anglard, P; Befort, K; Romieu, P; Zwiller, J

    2017-03-01

    DNA methylation is a major epigenetic process which regulates the accessibility of genes to the transcriptional machinery. In the present study, we investigated whether modifying the global DNA methylation pattern in the brain would alter cocaine intake by rats, using the cocaine self-administration test. The data indicate that treatment of rats with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitors 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (dAZA) and zebularine enhanced the reinforcing properties of cocaine. To obtain some insights about the underlying neurobiological mechanisms, a genome-wide methylation analysis was undertaken in the prefrontal cortex of rats self-administering cocaine and treated with or without dAZA. The study identified nearly 189 000 differentially methylated regions (DMRs), about half of them were located inside gene bodies, while only 9% of DMRs were found in the promoter regions of genes. About 99% of methylation changes occurred outside CpG islands. Gene expression studies confirmed the inverse correlation usually observed between increased methylation and transcriptional activation when methylation occurs in the gene promoter. This inverse correlation was not observed when methylation took place inside gene bodies. Using the literature-based Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, we explored how the differentially methylated genes were related. The analysis showed that increase in cocaine intake by rats in response to DNA methyltransferase inhibitors underlies plasticity mechanisms which mainly concern axonal growth and synaptogenesis as well as spine remodeling. Together with the Akt/PI3K pathway, the Rho-GTPase family was found to be involved in the plasticity underlying the effect of dAZA on the observed behavioral changes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  15. Different domains of P21Cip1/waf1 regulate DNA replication and DNA repair-associated processes after UV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soria, Gaston; Speroni, Juliana; Podhajcer, Osvaldo L.; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Prives, Carol

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Many genotoxic insults result in p21 up-regulation and p21-dependent cell cycle arrest but UV irradiation triggers p21 proteolysis. The significance of the increased p21 turnover is unclear and might be associated to DNA repair. While the role of p21 in Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) remains controversial, two recent reports explore its effect on Translesion DNA Synthesis (TLS), a process that avoids replication blockage during S phase. The first report shows that p21 degradation is required for efficient PCNA ubiquitination, a post transcriptional modification that is relevant for TLS. The second report demonstrates that p21 (-/-) cells have increased TLS-associated mutagenic rates. Herein we analyze the effect of p21 on different PCNA-driven processes including DNA replication, NER and TLS. Whereas only the CDK binding domain of p21 is required for cell cycle arrest in unstressed cells; neither the CDK- nor the PCNA-binding domains of p21 are able to block early and late steps of NER. Intriguingly, through its PCNA binding domain, p21 inhibited recruitment of the TLS-polymerase, polη to PCNA foci after UV. Moreover, this obstruction correlates with accumulation of γH2AX and increased apoptosis. Taking together, our data emphasizes the link between p21 turnover and efficient TLS. This might also suggest a potential effect of p21 on other activities of polζ, a DNA polymerase with central roles in other biological scenarios such as genetic conversion, homologous recombination and modulation of the cellular response to genotoxic agents [es

  16. DNA biosensor for detection of Salmonella typhi from blood sample of typhoid fever patient using gold electrode modified by self-assembled monolayers of thiols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryapratiwi, Windha Novita; Paat, Vlagia Indira; Gaffar, Shabarni; Hartati, Yeni Wahyuni

    2017-05-01

    Electrochemical biosensors are currently being developed in order to handle various clinical problems in diagnosing infectious diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria, or viruses. On this research, voltammetric DNA biosensor using gold electrode modified by thiols with self-assembled monolayers had been developed to detect a certain sequence of Salmonella typhi DNA from blood sample of typhoid fever patient. Thiol groups of cysteamines (Cys) and aldehyde groups from glutaraldehydes (Glu) were used as a link to increase the performance of gold electrode in detecting guanine oxidation signal of hybridized S. typhi DNA and ssDNA probe. Standard calibration method was used to determine analytical parameters from the measurements. The result shown that, the detection of S. typhi DNA from blood sample of typhoid fever patient can be carried out by voltammetry using gold electrode modified by self-assembled monolayers of thiols. A characteristic oxidation potential of guanine using Au/Cys/Gluwas obtained at +0.17 until +0.20 V. Limit of detection and limit of quantification from this measurements were 1.91μg mL-1 and 6.35 μg mL-1. The concentration of complement DNA from sample was 6.96 μg mL-1.

  17. DNA-promoted electrochemical assembly of [Ru(bpy){sub 2}dpp]{sup 3+/2+} on the ITO electrode by introducing copper(II) ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Su [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Li Hong [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)], E-mail: lihong@scnu.edu.cn; Guo Qingyu; Xu Zhenghe [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Ji Liangnian [Department of Chemistry, Zhongshan University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2008-06-30

    The electrochemical assembly of [Ru(bpy){sub 2}dpp]{sup 3+/2+} (where bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, dpp = 2,3-bis (2-pyridyl) pyrazine) promoted by calf thymus DNA on an ITO electrode based on the introduction of copper(II) ion has been investigated. There exists a diffusion-controlled wave and two prewaves for the complex in the differential pulse voltammetric sweeping process. The formal potential of the high prewave shift ca. 0.530 V negatively compared with that of the diffusion-controlled wave. Dpp ligand with two vacant chelating N sites in the complex can bite Cu{sup 2+} and the resultant heterometallic complex shows a weakened assembly in contrast to that of [Ru(bpy){sub 2}dpp]{sup 3+/2+} alone. Furthermore, double stranded DNA is able to accelerate the assembly of the ruthenium complex and heterometallic complex generated by chelating with Cu{sup 2+} by using the ITO surface, the prompted strength of the latter is far stronger than the former. Their assembled mechanism enhanced by DNA is proposed.

  18. DNA-promoted electrochemical assembly of [Ru(bpy)2dpp]3+/2+ on the ITO electrode by introducing copper(II) ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Su; Li Hong; Guo Qingyu; Xu Zhenghe; Ji Liangnian

    2008-01-01

    The electrochemical assembly of [Ru(bpy) 2 dpp] 3+/2+ (where bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, dpp = 2,3-bis (2-pyridyl) pyrazine) promoted by calf thymus DNA on an ITO electrode based on the introduction of copper(II) ion has been investigated. There exists a diffusion-controlled wave and two prewaves for the complex in the differential pulse voltammetric sweeping process. The formal potential of the high prewave shift ca. 0.530 V negatively compared with that of the diffusion-controlled wave. Dpp ligand with two vacant chelating N sites in the complex can bite Cu 2+ and the resultant heterometallic complex shows a weakened assembly in contrast to that of [Ru(bpy) 2 dpp] 3+/2+ alone. Furthermore, double stranded DNA is able to accelerate the assembly of the ruthenium complex and heterometallic complex generated by chelating with Cu 2+ by using the ITO surface, the prompted strength of the latter is far stronger than the former. Their assembled mechanism enhanced by DNA is proposed

  19. Krebs cycle intermediates regulate DNA and histone methylation: epigenetic impact on the aging process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Antero; Kauppinen, Anu; Hiltunen, Mikko; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2014-07-01

    Many aging theories have proposed that mitochondria and energy metabolism have a major role in the aging process. There are recent studies indicating that Krebs cycle intermediates can shape the epigenetic landscape of chromatin by regulating DNA and histone methylation. A growing evidence indicates that epigenetics plays an important role in the regulation of healthspan but also is involved in the aging process. 2-Oxoglutarate (α-ketoglutarate) is a key metabolite in the Krebs cycle but it is also an obligatory substrate for 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (2-OGDO). The 2-OGDO enzyme family includes the major enzymes of DNA and histone demethylation, i.e. Ten-Eleven Translocation (TETs) and Jumonji C domain containing (JmjC) demethylases. In addition, 2-OGDO members can regulate collagen synthesis and hypoxic responses in a non-epigenetical manner. Interestingly, succinate and fumarate, also Krebs cycle intermediates, are potent inhibitors of 2-OGDO enzymes, i.e. the balance of Krebs cycle reactions can affect the level of DNA and histone methylation and thus control gene expression. We will review the epigenetic mechanisms through which Krebs cycle intermediates control the DNA and histone methylation. We propose that age-related disturbances in the Krebs cycle function induce stochastic epigenetic changes in chromatin structures which in turn promote the aging process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. SIRT3 restricts HBV transcription and replication via epigenetic regulation of cccDNA involving SUV39H1 and SETD1A histone methyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ji-Hua; Hu, Jie-Li; Cheng, Sheng-Tao; Yu, Hai-Bo; Wong, Vincent Kam Wai; Law, Betty Yuen Kwan; Yang, Yong-Feng; Huang, Ying; Liu, Yi; Chen, Wei-Xian; Cai, Xue-Fei; Tang, Hua; Hu, Yuan; Zhang, Wen-Lu; Liu, Xiang; Long, Quan-Xin; Zhou, Li; Tao, Na-Na; Zhou, Hong-Zhong; Yang, Qiu-Xia; Ren, Fang; He, Lin; Gong, Rui; Huang, Ai-Long; Chen, Juan

    2018-04-06

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major health problem worldwide. Maintenance of the covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) which serves as a template for HBV RNA transcription is responsible for the failure of eradicating chronic HBV during current antiviral therapy. cccDNA is assembled with cellular histone proteins into chromatin, but little is known about the regulation of HBV chromatin by histone posttranslational modifications. In this study, we identified SIRT3 as a host factor restricting HBV transcription and replication by screening seven members of Sirtuin family which is the class III histone deacetylase. Ectopic SIRT3 expression significantly reduced total HBV RNAs, 3.5-kb RNA as well as replicative intermediate DNA in HBV-infected HepG2-NTCP cells and PHH. In contrast, gene silencing of SIRT3 promoted HBV transcription and replication. Mechanistic study found nuclear SIRT3 was recruited to the HBV cccDNA, where it deacetylated histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9). Importantly, occupancy of SIRT3 onto cccDNA could increase the recruitment of histone methyltransferase SUV39H1 to cccDNA and decrease recruitment of SETD1A, leading to a marked increase of H3K9me3 and a decrease of H3K4me3 on cccDNA. Moreover, SIRT3-mediated HBV cccDNA transcriptional repression involved decreased binding of host RNA polymerase II and transcription factor YY1 to cccDNA. Finally, viral protein HBx could relieve SIRT3-mediated cccDNA transcriptional repression by inhibiting both SIRT3 expression and its recruitment to cccDNA. SIRT3 is a novel host factor epigenetically restricting HBV cccDNA transcription by acting cooperatively with histone methyltransferase. These data provided a rational for the use of SIRT3 activators in the prevention or treatment of HBV infection. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  1. A Hybrid Parallel Strategy Based on String Graph Theory to Improve De Novo DNA Assembly on the TianHe-2 Supercomputer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Liao, Xiangke; Peng, Shaoliang; Cui, Yingbo; Wang, Bingqiang; Zhu, Xiaoqian; Liu, Jie

    2016-06-01

    ' The de novo assembly of DNA sequences is increasingly important for biological researches in the genomic era. After more than one decade since the Human Genome Project, some challenges still exist and new solutions are being explored to improve de novo assembly of genomes. String graph assembler (SGA), based on the string graph theory, is a new method/tool developed to address the challenges. In this paper, based on an in-depth analysis of SGA we prove that the SGA-based sequence de novo assembly is an NP-complete problem. According to our analysis, SGA outperforms other similar methods/tools in memory consumption, but costs much more time, of which 60-70 % is spent on the index construction. Upon this analysis, we introduce a hybrid parallel optimization algorithm and implement this algorithm in the TianHe-2's parallel framework. Simulations are performed with different datasets. For data of small size the optimized solution is 3.06 times faster than before, and for data of middle size it's 1.60 times. The results demonstrate an evident performance improvement, with the linear scalability for parallel FM-index construction. This results thus contribute significantly to improving the efficiency of de novo assembly of DNA sequences.

  2. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA): a key factor in DNA replication and cell cycle regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzalka, Wojciech; Ziemienowicz, Alicja

    2011-05-01

    PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) has been found in the nuclei of yeast, plant and animal cells that undergo cell division, suggesting a function in cell cycle regulation and/or DNA replication. It subsequently became clear that PCNA also played a role in other processes involving the cell genome. This review discusses eukaryotic PCNA, with an emphasis on plant PCNA, in terms of the protein structure and its biochemical properties as well as gene structure, organization, expression and function. PCNA exerts a tripartite function by operating as (1) a sliding clamp during DNA synthesis, (2) a polymerase switch factor and (3) a recruitment factor. Most of its functions are mediated by its interactions with various proteins involved in DNA synthesis, repair and recombination as well as in regulation of the cell cycle and chromatid cohesion. Moreover, post-translational modifications of PCNA play a key role in regulation of its functions. Finally, a phylogenetic comparison of PCNA genes suggests that the multi-functionality observed in most species is a product of evolution. Most plant PCNAs exhibit features similar to those found for PCNAs of other eukaryotes. Similarities include: (1) a trimeric ring structure of the PCNA sliding clamp, (2) the involvement of PCNA in DNA replication and repair, (3) the ability to stimulate the activity of DNA polymerase δ and (4) the ability to interact with p21, a regulator of the cell cycle. However, many plant genomes seem to contain the second, probably functional, copy of the PCNA gene, in contrast to PCNA pseudogenes that are found in mammalian genomes.

  3. SOG1: a master regulator of the DNA damage response in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshiyama, Kaoru Okamoto

    2016-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a critical mechanism to maintain the genome stability of an organism upon exposure to endogenous and exogenous DNA-damaging factors. The DDR system is particularly important for plants as these organisms, owing to their intrinsic immobility, are inevitably exposed to environmental stress factors, some of which induce DNA damage. Arabidopsis thaliana has orthologs of several DDR factors that are present in animals; however, some of the important animal regulators, such as the tumor suppressor p53 and the DDR kinases CHK1 and CHK2, have not been found in plants. These observations imply a unique DDR system in plants. The present review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of the DDR in A. thaliana and, in particular, on the function and role of SUPPRESSOR OF GAMMA RESPONSE 1 (SOG1), a plant-specific transcription factor that regulates the DDR. The most obvious response to DNA damage in A. thaliana is a rapid and robust change in the transcriptional regulation of numerous genes, in which SOG1 is an essential regulatory factor. Mutation of SOG1 causes various defects in the activation of cell cycle arrest, programmed cell death, and endoreduplication in response to DNA damage. These observations indicate that SOG1 is a master regulator of the DDR. Phylogenetic analyses of SOG1 reveal that orthologs of this crucial transcription factor are present not only in angiosperms but also in gymnosperms, suggesting that the SOG1 system is conserved across spermatophytes. Finally, future prospects for SOG1 research are also discussed.

  4. Mutations in BALB mitochondrial DNA induce CCL20 up-regulation promoting tumorigenic phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sligh, James [Department of Medicine—Dermatology Division, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Janda, Jaroslav [University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Jandova, Jana, E-mail: jjandova@email.arizona.edu [Department of Medicine—Dermatology Division, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Alterations in mitochondrial DNA are commonly found in various human cancers. • Mutations in BALB mitochondrial DNA induce up-regulation of chemokine CCL20. • Increased growth and motility of mtBALB cells is associated with CCL20 levels. • mtDNA changes in BALB induce in vivo tumor growth through CCL20 up-regulation. • Mutations in mitochondrial DNA play important roles in keratinocyte neoplasia. - Abstract: mtDNA mutations are common in human cancers and are thought to contribute to the process of neoplasia. We examined the role of mtDNA mutations in skin cancer by generating fibroblast cybrids harboring a mutation in the gene encoding the mitochondrial tRNA for arginine. This somatic mutation (9821insA) was previously reported in UV-induced hyperkeratotic skin tumors in hairless mice and confers specific tumorigenic phenotypes to mutant cybrids. Microarray analysis revealed and RT-PCR along with Western blot analysis confirmed the up-regulation of CCL20 and its receptor CCR6 in mtBALB haplotype containing the mt-Tr 9821insA allele compared to wild type mtB6 haplotype. Based on reported role of CCL20 in cancer progression we examined whether the hyper-proliferation and enhanced motility of mtBALB haplotype would be associated with CCL20 levels. Treatment of both genotypes with recombinant CCL20 (rmCCL20) resulted in enhanced growth and motility of mtB6 cybrids. Furthermore, the acquired somatic alteration increased the in vivo tumor growth of mtBALB cybrids through the up-regulation of CCL20 since neutralizing antibody significantly decreased in vivo tumor growth of these cells; and tumors from anti-CCL20 treated mice injected with mtBALB cybrids showed significantly decreased CCL20 levels. When rmCCL20 or mtBALB cybrids were used as chemotactic stimuli, mtB6 cybrids showed increased motility while anti-CCL20 antibody decreased the migration and in vivo tumor growth of mtBALB cybrids. Moreover, the inhibitors of MAPK signaling and NF

  5. Rif1: a conserved regulator of DNA replication and repair hijacked by telomeres in yeasts

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    Stefano eMattarocci

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rif1 was originally identified in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae as a telomere-binding protein that negatively regulates telomerase-mediated telomere elongation. Although this function is conserved in the distantly related fission yeast S. pombe, recent studies, both in yeasts and in metazoans, reveal that Rif1 also functions more globally, both in the temporal control of DNA replication and in DNA repair. Rif1 proteins are large and characterized by N-terminal HEAT repeats, predicted to form an elongated alpha-helical structure. In addition, all Rif1 homologues contain two short motifs, abbreviated RVxF/SILK, that are implicated in recruitment of the PP1 (yeast Glc7 phosphatase. In yeasts the RVxF/SILK domains have been shown to play a role in control of DNA replication initiation, at least in part through targeted de-phosphorylation of proteins in the pre-Replication Complex. In human cells Rif1 is recruited to DNA double-strand breaks through an interaction with 53BP1 where it counteracts DNA resection, thus promoting repair by non-homologous end-joining. This function requires the N-terminal HEAT repeat-containing domain. Interestingly, this domain is also implicated in DNA end protection at un-capped telomeres in yeast. We conclude by discussing the deployment of Rif1 at telomeres in yeasts from both an evolutionary perspective and in light of its recently discovered global functions.

  6. The down regulation of target genes by photo activated DNA nanoscissors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Lin; Shieh, Dar-Bin; Yeh, Chen-Sheng; Tzeng, Yonhua; Htet, Khant; Chuang, Kao-Shu; Hwu, Jih Ru; Su, Wu-Chou

    2010-09-01

    An artificial, targeted, light-activated nanoscissor (ATLANS) was developed for precision photonic cleavage of DNA at selectable target sequences. The ATLANS is comprised of nanoparticle core and a monolayer of hydrazone-modified triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs), which recognize and capture the targeted DNA duplex. Upon photo-illumination (lambda = 460 nm), the attached hydrazone scissor specifically cleaves the targeted DNA at a pre-designed nucleotide pair. Electrophoretic mobility shift and co-precipitation assays revealed sequence-specific binding with the short-fragment and long-form plasmid DNA of both TFO and TFO-nanoparticle probes. Upon photo-illumination, ATLANS introduced a precise double-stranded break 12bp downstream the TFO binding sequence and down-regulated the target gene in HeLa cell system. Gold nanoparticles multiplexed the cutting efficiency and potential for simultaneous manipulation of multiple targets, as well as protected DNA from non-specific photo-damage. This photon-mediated DNA manipulation technology will facilitate high spatial and temporal precision in simultaneous silencing at the genome level, and advanced simultaneous manipulation of multiple targeted genes. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Genome-Wide Expression of MicroRNAs Is Regulated by DNA Methylation in Hepatocarcinogenesis

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    Jing Shen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Previous studies, including ours, have examined the regulation of microRNAs (miRNAs by DNA methylation, but whether this regulation occurs at a genome-wide level in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is unclear. Subjects/Methods. Using a two-phase study design, we conducted genome-wide screening for DNA methylation and miRNA expression to explore the potential role of methylation alterations in miRNAs regulation. Results. We found that expressions of 25 miRNAs were statistically significantly different between tumor and nontumor tissues and perfectly differentiated HCC tumor from nontumor. Six miRNAs were overexpressed, and 19 were repressed in tumors. Among 133 miRNAs with inverse correlations between methylation and expression, 8 miRNAs (6% showed statistically significant differences in expression between tumor and nontumor tissues. Six miRNAs were validated in 56 additional paired HCC tissues, and significant inverse correlations were observed for miR-125b and miR-199a, which is consistent with the inactive chromatin pattern found in HepG2 cells. Conclusion. These data suggest that the expressions of miR-125b and miR-199a are dramatically regulated by DNA hypermethylation that plays a key role in hepatocarcinogenesis.

  8. 3′-Terminated Overhangs Regulate DNA Double-Strand Break Processing in Escherichia coli

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    Edyta Đermić

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Double-strand breaks (DSBs are lethal DNA lesions, which are repaired by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. To study DSB processing in vivo, we induced DSBs into the E. coli chromosome by γ-irradiation and measured chromosomal degradation. We show that the DNA degradation is regulated by RecA protein concentration and its rate of association with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA. RecA decreased DNA degradation in wild-type, recB, and recD strains, indicating that it is a general phenomenon in E. coli. On the other hand, DNA degradation was greatly reduced and unaffected by RecA in the recB1080 mutant (which produces long overhangs and in a strain devoid of four exonucleases that degrade a 3′ tail (ssExos. 3′–5′ ssExos deficiency is epistatic to RecA deficiency concerning DNA degradation, suggesting that bound RecA is shielding the 3′ tail from degradation by 3′–5′ ssExos. Since 3′ tail preservation is common to all these situations, we infer that RecA polymerization constitutes a subset of mechanisms for preserving the integrity of 3′ tails emanating from DSBs, along with 3′ tail’s massive length, or prevention of their degradation by inactivation of 3′–5′ ssExos. Thus, we conclude that 3′ overhangs are crucial in controlling the extent of DSB processing in E. coli. This study suggests a regulatory mechanism for DSB processing in E. coli, wherein 3′ tails impose a negative feedback loop on DSB processing reactions, specifically on helicase reloading onto dsDNA ends.

  9. Analysis of Chromatin Regulators Reveals Specific Features of Rice DNA Methylation Pathways1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Feng; Zhou, Chao; Zhou, Qiangwei; Yang, Wenjing; Li, Guoliang

    2016-01-01

    Plant DNA methylation that occurs at CG, CHG, and CHH sites (H = A, C, or T) is a hallmark of the repression of repetitive sequences and transposable elements (TEs). The rice (Oryza sativa) genome contains about 40% repetitive sequence and TEs and displays specific patterns of genome-wide DNA methylation. The mechanism responsible for the specific methylation patterns is unclear. Here, we analyzed the function of OsDDM1 (Deficient in DNA Methylation 1) and OsDRM2 (Deficient in DNA Methylation 1) in genome-wide DNA methylation, TE repression, small RNA accumulation, and gene expression. We show that OsDDM1 is essential for high levels of methylation at CHG and, to a lesser extent, CG sites in heterochromatic regions and also is required for CHH methylation that mainly locates in the genic regions of the genome. In addition to a large member of TEs, loss of OsDDM1 leads to hypomethylation and up-regulation of many protein-coding genes, producing very severe growth phenotypes at the initial generation. Importantly, we show that OsDRM2 mutation results in a nearly complete loss of CHH methylation and derepression of mainly small TE-associated genes and that OsDDM1 is involved in facilitating OsDRM2-mediated CHH methylation. Thus, the function of OsDDM1 and OsDRM2 defines distinct DNA methylation pathways in the bulk of DNA methylation of the genome, which is possibly related to the dispersed heterochromatin across chromosomes in rice and suggests that DNA methylation mechanisms may vary among different plant species. PMID:27208249

  10. Does a cdc2 kinase-like recognition motif on the core protein of hepadnaviruses regulate assembly and disintegration of capsids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrasa, M I; Guo, J T; Saputelli, J; Mason, W S; Seeger, C

    2001-02-01

    Hepadnaviruses are enveloped viruses, each with a DNA genome packaged in an icosahedral nucleocapsid, which is the site of viral DNA synthesis. In the presence of envelope proteins, DNA-containing nucleocapsids are assembled into virions and secreted, but in the absence of these proteins, nucleocapsids deliver viral DNA into the cell nucleus. Presumably, this step is identical to the delivery of viral DNA during the initiation of an infection. Unfortunately, the mechanisms triggering the disintegration of subviral core particles and delivery of viral DNA into the nucleus are not yet understood. We now report the identification of a sequence motif resembling a serine- or threonine-proline kinase recognition site in the core protein at a location that is required for the assembly of core polypeptides into capsids. Using duck hepatitis B virus, we demonstrated that mutations at this sequence motif can have profound consequences for RNA packaging, DNA replication, and core protein stability. Furthermore, we found a mutant with a conditional phenotype that depended on the cell type used for virus replication. Our results support the hypothesis predicting that this motif plays a role in assembly and disassembly of viral capsids.

  11. Structural Basis for DNA Recognition by the Two-Component Response Regulator RcsB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippova, Ekaterina V; Zemaitaitis, Bozena; Aung, Theint; Wolfe, Alan J; Anderson, Wayne F

    2018-02-27

    RcsB is a highly conserved transcription regulator of the Rcs phosphorelay system, a complex two-component signal transduction system (N. Majdalani and S. Gottesman, Annu Rev Microbiol 59:379-405, 2005; A. J. Wolfe, Curr Opin Microbiol 13:204-209, 2010, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mib.2010.01.002; D. J. Clarke, Future Microbiol 5:1173-1184, 2010, https://doi.org/10.2217/fmb.10.83). RcsB plays an important role in virulence and pathogenicity in human hosts by regulating biofilm formation. RcsB can regulate transcription alone or together with its auxiliary transcription regulators by forming heterodimers. This complexity allows RcsB to regulate transcription of more than 600 bacterial genes in response to different stresses (D. Wang et al., Mol Plant Microbe Interact 25:6-17, 2012, https://doi.org/10.1094/MPMI-08-11-0207). Despite increasing knowledge of RcsB importance, molecular mechanisms that drive the ability of RcsB to control transcription of a large number of genes remain unclear. Here, we present crystal structures of unphosphorylated RcsB in complex with the consensus DNA-binding sequence of 22-mer (DNA22) and 18-mer (DNA18) of the flhDC operon from Escherichia coli determined at 3.15- and 3.37-Å resolution, respectively. The results of our structural analysis combined with the results of in vitro binding assays provide valuable insights to the protein regulatory mechanism, demonstrate how RcsB recognizes target DNA sequences, and reveal a unique oligomeric state that allows RcsB to form homo- and heterodimers. This information will help us understand the complex mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by RcsB in bacteria. IMPORTANCE RcsB is a well-studied two-component response regulator of the Rcs phosphorelay system, conserved within the family Enterobacteriaceae , which includes many pathogens. It is a global regulator, controlling more than 5% of bacterial genes associated with capsule biosynthesis, flagellar biogenesis, cell wall biosynthesis

  12. DNA synthesis and microtubule assembly-related events in fertilized Paracentrotus lividus eggs: reversible inhibition by 10 mM procaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, M N; Foucault, G; Coffe, G; Pudles, J

    1986-04-01

    This report describes the effects of 10 mM procaine on microtubule assembly and on DNA synthesis, as followed by [3H]colchicine binding assays and [3H]thymidine incorporation respectively, in fertilized Paracentrotus lividus eggs. In the absence of microtubule assembly inhibitors, about 25% of the total egg tubulin is submitted to two cycles of polymerization prior to the first cell division, this polymerization process precedes DNA synthesis. If the zygotes are treated with 10 mM procaine in the course of the cell cycle, tubulin polymerization is inhibited or microtubules are disassembled. DNA synthesis is inhibited when procaine treatment is performed 10 min, before the initiation of the S-period. However, when the drug is applied in the course of this synthetic period, the process is normally accomplished, but the next S-period becomes inhibited. Moreover, procaine treatment increases the cytoplasmic pH of the fertilized eggs by about 0.6 to 0.8 pH units. This pH increase precedes microtubule disassembly and inhibition of DNA synthesis. Washing out the drug induces a decrease of the intracellular pH which returns to about the same value as that of the fertilized egg controls. This pH change is then followed by the reinitiation of microtubule assembly, DNA synthesis and cell division. Our results show that the inhibition of both tubulin polymerization and DNA synthesis in fertilized eggs treated with 10 mM procaine, appears to be related to the drug-induced increase in cytoplasmic pH.

  13. BRCA1 Regulates IFI16 Mediated Nuclear Innate Sensing of Herpes Viral DNA and Subsequent Induction of the Innate Inflammasome and Interferon-β Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipanjan Dutta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system pattern recognition receptors (PRR are the first line of host defenses recognizing the various pathogen- or danger-associated molecular patterns and eliciting defenses by regulating the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-18 or interferon β (IFN-β. NOD-like receptors (NLRs and AIM2-like receptors (ALRs are cytoplasmic inflammasome sensors of foreign molecules, including DNA. IFI16, a sequence-independent nuclear innate sensor ALR, recognizes episomal dsDNA genomes of herpes viruses such as KSHV, EBV, and HSV-1 in the infected cell nuclei, forms an inflammasome complex with ASC and procaspase1, and relocates into the cytoplasm leading into Caspase-1 and IL-1β generation. IFI16 also induces IFN-β during HSV-1 infection via the cytoplasmic STING-TBK1-IRF3 pathway. Thus far, whether IFI16 recognizes foreign DNA directly or utilizes other host protein(s is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that BRCA1, a DNA damage repair sensor and transcription regulator, is in complex with IFI16 in the host cell nucleus, and their association increases in the presence of nuclear viral genomes during de novo KSHV, EBV and HSV-1 infection, and in latent KSHV or EBV infection, but not by DNA damage responses (DDR induced by bleomycin and vaccinia virus cytoplasmic dsDNA. BRCA1 is a constituent of the triggered IFI16-inflammasome and is translocated into the cytoplasm after genome recognition along with the IFI16-inflammasome. The absence of BRCA1 abrogated IFI16-viral genome association, inflammasome assembly, IFI16 cytoplasmic localization, and Caspase-1 and IL-1β production. The absence of BRCA1 also abolished the cytoplasmic IFI16-STING interaction, downstream IRF3 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation of pIRF3 and IFN-β production during de novo KSHV and HSV-1 infection. These findings highlight that BRCA1 plays a hitherto unidentified innate immunomodulatory role by facilitating nuclear foreign DNA sensing by

  14. The ATP Sites of AAA+ Clamp Loaders Work Together as a Switch to Assemble Clamps on DNA*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzahn, Melissa R.; Hayner, Jaclyn N.; Finkelstein, Jeff; O'Donnell, Mike; Bloom, Linda B.

    2014-01-01

    Clamp loaders belong to a family of proteins known as ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA+). These proteins utilize the energy from ATP binding and hydrolysis to perform cellular functions. The clamp loader is required to load the clamp onto DNA for use by DNA polymerases to increase processivity. ATP binding and hydrolysis are coordinated by several key residues, including a conserved Lys located within the Walker A motif (or P-loop). This residue is required for each subunit to bind ATP. The specific function of each ATP molecule bound to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae clamp loader is unknown. A series of point mutants, each lacking a single Walker A Lys residue, was generated to study the effects of abolishing ATP binding in individual clamp loader subunits. A variety of biochemical assays were used to analyze the function of ATP binding during discrete steps of the clamp loading reaction. All mutants reduced clamp binding/opening to different degrees. Decreased clamp binding activity was generally correlated with decreases in the population of open clamps, suggesting that differences in the binding affinities of Walker A mutants stem from differences in stabilization of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in an open conformation. Walker A mutations had a smaller effect on DNA binding than clamp binding/opening. Our data do not support a model in which each ATP site functions independently to regulate a different step in the clamp loading cycle to coordinate these steps. Instead, the ATP sites work in unison to promote conformational changes in the clamp loader that drive clamp loading. PMID:24436332

  15. The ATP sites of AAA+ clamp loaders work together as a switch to assemble clamps on DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzahn, Melissa R; Hayner, Jaclyn N; Finkelstein, Jeff; O'Donnell, Mike; Bloom, Linda B

    2014-02-28

    Clamp loaders belong to a family of proteins known as ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA+). These proteins utilize the energy from ATP binding and hydrolysis to perform cellular functions. The clamp loader is required to load the clamp onto DNA for use by DNA polymerases to increase processivity. ATP binding and hydrolysis are coordinated by several key residues, including a conserved Lys located within the Walker A motif (or P-loop). This residue is required for each subunit to bind ATP. The specific function of each ATP molecule bound to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae clamp loader is unknown. A series of point mutants, each lacking a single Walker A Lys residue, was generated to study the effects of abolishing ATP binding in individual clamp loader subunits. A variety of biochemical assays were used to analyze the function of ATP binding during discrete steps of the clamp loading reaction. All mutants reduced clamp binding/opening to different degrees. Decreased clamp binding activity was generally correlated with decreases in the population of open clamps, suggesting that differences in the binding affinities of Walker A mutants stem from differences in stabilization of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in an open conformation. Walker A mutations had a smaller effect on DNA binding than clamp binding/opening. Our data do not support a model in which each ATP site functions independently to regulate a different step in the clamp loading cycle to coordinate these steps. Instead, the ATP sites work in unison to promote conformational changes in the clamp loader that drive clamp loading.

  16. Regulation of expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase and the treatment of glioblastoma (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    CABRINI, GIULIO; FABBRI, ENRICA; NIGRO, CRISTIANA LO; DECHECCHI, MARIA CRISTINA; GAMBARI, ROBERTO

    2015-01-01

    O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is an abundantly expressed nuclear protein dealkylating O6-methylguanine (O6-MG) DNA residue, thus correcting the mismatches of O6-MG with a thymine residue during DNA replication. The dealkylating effect of MGMT is relevant not only in repairing DNA mismatches produced by environmental alkylating agents promoting tumor pathogenesis, but also when alkylating molecules are applied in the chemotherapy of different cancers, including glioma, the most common primary tumor of the central nervous system. Elevated MGMT gene expression is known to confer resistance to the treatment with the alkylating drug temozolomide in patients affected by gliomas and, on the contrary, methylation of MGMT gene promoter, which causes reduction of MGMT protein expression, is known to predict a favourable response to temozolomide. Thus, detecting expression levels of MGMT gene is crucial to indicate the option of alkylating agents or to select patients directly for a second line targeted therapy. Further study is required to gain insights into MGMT expression regulation, that has attracted growing interest recently in MGMT promoter methylation, histone acetylation and microRNAs expression. The review will focus on the epigenetic regulation of MGMT gene, with translational applications to the identification of biomarkers predicting response to therapy and prognosis. PMID:26035292

  17. Retinoblastoma Binding Protein 4 Modulates Temozolomide Sensitivity in Glioblastoma by Regulating DNA Repair Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaspar J. Kitange

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Here we provide evidence that RBBP4 modulates temozolomide (TMZ sensitivity through coordinate regulation of two key DNA repair genes critical for recovery from TMZ-induced DNA damage: methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT and RAD51. Disruption of RBBP4 enhanced TMZ sensitivity, induced synthetic lethality to PARP inhibition, and increased DNA damage signaling in response to TMZ. Moreover, RBBP4 silencing enhanced TMZ-induced H2AX phosphorylation and apoptosis in GBM cells. Intriguingly, RBBP4 knockdown suppressed the expression of MGMT, RAD51, and other genes in association with decreased promoter H3K9 acetylation (H3K9Ac and increased H3K9 tri-methylation (H3K9me3. Consistent with these data, RBBP4 interacts with CBP/p300 to form a chromatin-modifying complex that binds within the promoter of MGMT, RAD51, and perhaps other genes. Globally, RBBP4 positively and negatively regulates genes involved in critical cellular functions including tumorigenesis. The RBBP4/CBP/p300 complex may provide an interesting target for developing therapy-sensitizing strategies for GBM and other tumors.

  18. Arabidopsis EDM2 promotes IBM1 distal polyadenylation and regulates genome DNA methylation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Mingguang; La, Honggui; Lu, Kun; Wang, Pengcheng; Miki, Daisuke; Ren, Zhizhong; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Wang, Xingang; Tang, Kai; Zeng, Liang; Yang, Lan; Zhang, Heng; Nie, Wenfeng; Liu, Pan; Zhou, Jianping; Liu, Renyi; Zhong, Yingli; Liu, Dong; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2014-01-07

    DNA methylation is important for the silencing of transposons and other repetitive elements in many higher eukaryotes. However, plant and mammalian genomes have evolved to contain repetitive elements near or inside their genes. How these genes are kept from being silenced by DNA methylation is not well understood. A forward genetics screen led to the identification of the putative chromatin regulator Enhanced Downy Mildew 2 (EDM2) as a cellular antisilencing factor and regulator of genome DNA methylation patterns. EDM2 contains a composite Plant Homeo Domain that recognizes both active and repressive histone methylation marks at the intronic repeat elements in genes such as the Histone 3 lysine 9 demethylase gene Increase in BONSAI Methylation 1 (IBM1) and is necessary for maintaining the expression of these genes by promoting mRNA distal polyadenylation. Because of its role in maintaining IBM1 expression, EDM2 is required for preventing CHG methylation in the bodies of thousands of genes. Our results thus increase the understanding of antisilencing, genome methylation patterns, and regulation of alternative RNA processing by intronic heterochromatin.

  19. FANCJ/BACH1 acetylation at lysine 1249 regulates the DNA damage response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Xie

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available BRCA1 promotes DNA repair through interactions with multiple proteins, including CtIP and FANCJ (also known as BRIP1/BACH1. While CtIP facilitates DNA end resection when de-acetylated, the function of FANCJ in repair processing is less well defined. Here, we report that FANCJ is also acetylated. Preventing FANCJ acetylation at lysine 1249 does not interfere with the ability of cells to survive DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs. However, resistance is achieved with reduced reliance on recombination. Mechanistically, FANCJ acetylation facilitates DNA end processing required for repair and checkpoint signaling. This conclusion was based on the finding that FANCJ and its acetylation were required for robust RPA foci formation, RPA phosphorylation, and Rad51 foci formation in response to camptothecin (CPT. Furthermore, both preventing and mimicking FANCJ acetylation at lysine 1249 disrupts FANCJ function in checkpoint maintenance. Thus, we propose that the dynamic regulation of FANCJ acetylation is critical for robust DNA damage response, recombination-based processing, and ultimately checkpoint maintenance.

  20. Regulation of DNA methylation on EEF1D and RPL8 expression in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuan; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Qin; Jiang, Li

    2017-10-01

    Dynamic changes to the epigenome play a critical role in a variety of biology processes and complex traits. Many important candidate genes have been identified through our previous genome wide association study (GWAS) on milk production traits in dairy cattle. However, the underlying mechanism of candidate genes have not yet been clearly understood. In this study, we analyzed the methylation variation of the candidate genes, EEF1D and RPL8, which were identified to be strongly associated with milk production traits in dairy cattle in our previous studies, and its effect on protein and mRNA expression. We compared DNA methylation profiles and gene expression levels of EEF1D and RPL8 in five different tissues (heart, liver, mammary gland, ovary and muscle) of three cows. Both genes showed the highest expression level in mammary gland. For RPL8, there was no difference in the DNA methylation pattern in the five tissues, suggesting no effect of DNA methylation on gene expression. For EEF1D, the DNA methylation levels of its first CpG island differed in the five tissues and were negatively correlated with the gene expression levels. To further investigate the function of DNA methylation on the expression of EEF1D, we collected blood samples of three cows at early stage of lactation and in dry period and analyzed its expression and the methylation status of the first CpG island in blood. As a result, the mRNA expression of EEF1D in the dry period was higher than that at the early stage of lactation, while the DNA methylation level in the dry period was lower than that at the early stage of lactation. Our result suggests that the DNA methylation of EEF1D plays an important role in the spatial and temporal regulation of its expression and possibly have an effect on the milk production traits.

  1. Toward allotetraploid cotton genome assembly: integration of a high-density molecular genetic linkage map with DNA sequence information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Cotton is the world’s most important natural textile fiber and a significant oilseed crop. Decoding cotton genomes will provide the ultimate reference and resource for research and utilization of the species. Integration of high-density genetic maps with genomic sequence information will largely accelerate the process of whole-genome assembly in cotton. Results In this paper, we update a high-density interspecific genetic linkage map of allotetraploid cultivated cotton. An additional 1,167 marker loci have been added to our previously published map of 2,247 loci. Three new marker types, InDel (insertion-deletion) and SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) developed from gene information, and REMAP (retrotransposon-microsatellite amplified polymorphism), were used to increase map density. The updated map consists of 3,414 loci in 26 linkage groups covering 3,667.62 cM with an average inter-locus distance of 1.08 cM. Furthermore, genome-wide sequence analysis was finished using 3,324 informative sequence-based markers and publicly-available Gossypium DNA sequence information. A total of 413,113 EST and 195 BAC sequences were physically anchored and clustered by 3,324 sequence-based markers. Of these, 14,243 ESTs and 188 BACs from different species of Gossypium were clustered and specifically anchored to the high-density genetic map. A total of 2,748 candidate unigenes from 2,111 ESTs clusters and 63 BACs were mined for functional annotation and classification. The 337 ESTs/genes related to fiber quality traits were integrated with 132 previously reported cotton fiber quality quantitative trait loci, which demonstrated the important roles in fiber quality of these genes. Higher-level sequence conservation between different cotton species and between the A- and D-subgenomes in tetraploid cotton was found, indicating a common evolutionary origin for orthologous and paralogous loci in Gossypium. Conclusion This study will serve as a valuable genomic resource

  2. Dysfunction of chromatin assembly Factor 1 induces shortening of telomeres and loss of 45S rDNA in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mozgová, I.; Mokroš, P.; Fajkus, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 8 (2010), s. 2768-2780 ISSN 1040-4651 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) GD204/08/H054 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : telomere * rDNA * chromatin assembly Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 9.396, year: 2010

  3. Preparation and phase behaviour of surface-active pharmaceuticals: self-assembly of DNA and surfactants with membranes. Differential adiabatic scanning microcalorimetric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süleymanoğlu, Erhan

    2005-08-01

    Some energetics issues relevant to preparation and surface characterization of zwitterionic phospholipid-DNA self-assemblies, as alternative models of the currently used problematic lipoplexes are presented. Nucleic acid compaction capacities of Mg(2+) and N-alkyl-N,N,N-trimetylammonium ions (C(n)TMA, n=12) were compared, with regard to surface interaction with unilamellar vesicles. Differential adiabatic scanning microcalorimetric measurements of synthetic phosphatidylcholine liposomes and calf thymus DNA and their ternary complexes with Mg(2+) and C(12)TMA, were employed for deduction of the thermodynamic model describing their structural transitions. Small monodisperce and highly stable complexes are established after precompaction of DNA with detergent, followed by addition of liposomes. In contrast, divalent metal cation-mediated aggregation of vesicles either leads to heterogeneous multilamellar DNA-lipid arrangements, or to DNA-induced bilayer destabilization and lipid fusion. Possible dependence of the cellular internalization and gene transfection efficiency on the structure and physicochemical properties of DNA-Mg(2+)-liposomes or DNA-cationic surfactant-liposome systems is emphasized by proposing the structure of their molecular self-organizations with further implications in gene transfer research.

  4. Regulation of chromosomal replication by DnaA protein availability in Escherichia coli: effects of the datA region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morigen, H.; Boye, E.; Skarstad, K.

    2001-01-01

    A copy number, we introduced a minichromosome which only replicates from oriC., using a host cell which replicates its chromosome independently of oriC. Our data show that a moderate increase in datA copy number is accompanied by increased DnaA protein synthesis that allows oriC initiation to occur...... suggest that the datA locus plays a significant role in regulating oriC initiation, by its capacity to bind DnaA. They also suggest that auto regulation of the dnaA gene is of minor importance in regulation of chromosome initiation....

  5. MsJ1, an alfalfa DnaJ-like gene, is tissue-specific and transcriptionally regulated during cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frugis, G; Mele, G; Giannino, D; Mariotti, D

    1999-06-01

    DnaJ-like proteins are molecular chaperones that regulate Hsp70 ATPase activity both in protein folding, assembly and disassembly of protein complexes. Here we report the isolation of MsJ1, an alfalfa gene encoding a protein homologous to cytosolic DnaJ-like proteins. MsJ1 was induced under heat-shock treatment in both leaves and stems of adult plants. In the absence of heat shock MsJ1 expression was tissue-specific with the highest levels of mRNA in roots and in embryonal structures. High levels of transcript were also detected in cotyledons where active degradation of storage protein occurs. In synchronized alfalfa suspension-cultured cells the MsJ1 transcript was actively expressed and showed a phase-specific modulation during cell cycle with a 2-fold induction in G2/M. These findings suggest that DnaJ-like proteins play an active role in regulating normal cellular events like protein degradation, morphogenesis and cell cycle progression.

  6. DNA Scaffolds for the Dictated Assembly of Left-/Right-Handed Plasmonic Au NP Helices with Programmed Chiro-Optical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconello, Alessandro; Kahn, Jason S; Lu, Chun-Hua; Khosravi Khorashad, Larousse; Govorov, Alexander O; Willner, Itamar

    2016-08-10

    Within the broad interest of assembling chiral left- and right-handed helices of plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs), we introduce the DNA-guided organization of left- or right-handed plasmonic Au NPs on DNA scaffolds. The method involves the self-assembly of stacked 12 DNA quasi-rings interlinked by 30 staple-strands. By the functionalization of one group of staple units with programmed tether-nucleic acid strands and additional staple elements with long nucleic acid chains, acting as promoter strands, the promoter-guided assembly of barrels modified with 12 left- or right-handed tethers is achieved. The subsequent hybridization of Au NPs functionalized with single nucleic acid tethers yields left- or right-handed structures of plasmonic NPs. The plasmonic NP structures reveal CD spectra at the plasmon absorbance, and the NPs are imaged by HR-TEM. Using geometrical considerations corresponding to the left- and right-handed helices of the Au NPs, the experimental CD spectra of the plasmonic Au NPs are modeled by theoretical calculations.

  7. Parallel molecular computation of modular-multiplication with two same inputs over finite field GF(2(n)) using self-assembly of DNA tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongnan; Xiao, Limin; Ruan, Li

    2014-06-01

    Two major advantages of DNA computing - huge memory capacity and high parallelism - are being explored for large-scale parallel computing, mass data storage and cryptography. Tile assembly model is a highly distributed parallel model of DNA computing. Finite field GF(2(n)) is one of the most commonly used mathematic sets for constructing public-key cryptosystem. It is still an open question that how to implement the basic operations over finite field GF(2(n)) using DNA tiles. This paper proposes how the parallel tile assembly process could be used for computing the modular-square, modular-multiplication with two same inputs, over finite field GF(2(n)). This system could obtain the final result within less steps than another molecular computing system designed in our previous study, because square and reduction are executed simultaneously and the previous system computes reduction after calculating square. Rigorous theoretical proofs are described and specific computing instance is given after defining the basic tiles and the assembly rules. Time complexity of this system is 3n-1 and space complexity is 2n(2). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Positive regulation of DNA double strand break repair activity during differentiation of long life span cells: the example of adipogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Meulle

    Full Text Available Little information is available on the ability of terminally differentiated cells to efficiently repair DNA double strand breaks (DSBs, and one might reasonably speculate that efficient DNA repair of these threatening DNA lesions, is needed in cells of long life span with no or limited regeneration from precursor. Few tissues are available besides neurons that allow the study of DNA DSBs repair activity in very long-lived cells. Adipocytes represent a suitable model since it is generally admitted that there is a very slow turnover of adipocytes in adult. Using both Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE and the disappearance of the phosphorylated form of the histone variant H2AX, we demonstrated that the ability to repair DSBs is increased during adipocyte differentiation using the murine pre-adipocyte cell line, 3T3F442A. In mammalian cells, DSBs are mainly repaired by the non-homologous end-joining pathway (NHEJ that relies on the DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK activity. During the first 24 h following the commitment into adipogenesis, we show an increase in the expression and activity of the catalytic sub-unit of the DNA-PK complex, DNA-PKcs. The increased in DNA DSBs repair activity observed in adipocytes was due to the increase in DNA-PK activity as shown by the use of DNA-PK inhibitor or sub-clones of 3T3F442A deficient in DNA-PKcs using long term RNA interference. Interestingly, the up-regulation of DNA-PK does not regulate the differentiation program itself. Finally, similar positive regulation of DNA-PKcs expression and activity was observed during differentiation of primary culture of pre-adipocytes isolated from human sub-cutaneous adipose tissue. Our results show that DNA DSBs repair activity is up regulated during the early commitment into adipogenesis due to an up-regulation of DNA-PK expression and activity. In opposition to the general view that DNA DSBs repair is decreased during differentiation, our results demonstrate

  9. DNA mediated wire-like clusters of self-assembled TiO₂ nanomaterials: supercapacitor and dye sensitized solar cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithiyanantham, U; Ramadoss, Ananthakumar; Ede, Sivasankara Rao; Kundu, Subrata

    2014-07-21

    A new route for the formation of wire-like clusters of TiO₂ nanomaterials self-assembled in DNA scaffold within an hour of reaction time is reported. TiO₂ nanomaterials are synthesized by the reaction of titanium-isopropoxide with ethanol and water in the presence of DNA under continuous stirring and heating at 60 °C. The individual size of the TiO₂ NPs self-assembled in DNA and the diameter of the wires can be tuned by controlling the DNA to Ti-salt molar ratios and other reaction parameters. The eventual diameter of the individual particles varies between 15 ± 5 nm ranges, whereas the length of the nanowires varies in the 2-3 μm range. The synthesized wire-like DNA-TiO₂ nanomaterials are excellent materials for electrochemical supercapacitor and DSSC applications. From the electrochemical supercapacitor experiment, it was found that the TiO₂ nanomaterials showed different specific capacitance (Cs) values for the various nanowires, and the order of Cs values are as follows: wire-like clusters (small size) > wire-like clusters (large size). The highest Cs of 2.69 F g(-1) was observed for TiO₂ having wire-like structure with small sizes. The study of the long term cycling stability of wire-like clusters (small size) electrode were shown to be stable, retaining ca. 80% of the initial specific capacitance, even after 5000 cycles. The potentiality of the DNA-TiO₂ nanomaterials was also tested in photo-voltaic applications and the observed efficiency was found higher in the case of wire-like TiO₂ nanostructures with larger sizes compared to smaller sizes. In future, the described method can be extended for the synthesis of other oxide based materials on DNA scaffold and can be further used in other applications like sensors, Li-ion battery materials or treatment for environmental waste water.

  10. TRIM30α Is a Negative-Feedback Regulator of the Intracellular DNA and DNA Virus-Triggered Response by Targeting STING.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanming Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled immune responses to intracellular DNA have been shown to induce autoimmune diseases. Homeostasis regulation of immune responses to cytosolic DNA is critical for limiting the risk of autoimmunity and survival of the host. Here, we report that the E3 ubiquitin ligase tripartite motif protein 30α (TRIM30α was induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 infection in dendritic cells (DCs. Knockdown or genetic ablation of TRIM30α augmented the type I IFNs and interleukin-6 response to intracellular DNA and DNA viruses. Trim30α-deficient mice were more resistant to infection by DNA viruses. Biochemical analyses showed that TRIM30α interacted with the stimulator of interferon genes (STING, which is a critical regulator of the DNA-sensing response. Overexpression of TRIM30α promoted the degradation of STING via K48-linked ubiquitination at Lys275 through a proteasome-dependent pathway. These findings indicate that E3 ligase TRIM30α is an important negative-feedback regulator of innate immune responses to DNA viruses by targeting STING.

  11. A novel function of CRL4(Cdt2): regulation of the subunit structure of DNA polymerase δ in response to DNA damage and during the S phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sufang; Zhao, Hong; Darzynkiewicz, Zbiegniew; Zhou, Pengbo; Zhang, Zhongtao; Lee, Ernest Y C; Lee, Marietta Y W T

    2013-10-11

    DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ4) is a heterotetrameric enzyme, whose p12 subunit is degraded in response to DNA damage, leaving behind a trimer (Pol δ3) with altered enzymatic characteristics that participate in gap filling during DNA repair. We demonstrate that CRL4(Cdt2), a key regulator of cell cycle progression that targets replication licensing factors, also targets the p12 subunit of Pol δ4 in response to DNA damage and on entry into S phase. Evidence for the involvement of CRL4(Cdt2) included demonstration that p12 possesses a proliferating cell nuclear antigen-interacting protein-degron (PIP-degron) and that knockdown of the components of the CRL4(Cdt2) complex inhibited the degradation of p12 in response to DNA damage. Analysis of p12 levels in synchronized cell populations showed that p12 is partially degraded in S phase and that this is affected by knockdowns of CUL4A or CUL4B. Laser scanning cytometry of overexpressed wild type p12 and a mutant resistant to degradation showed that the reduction in p12 levels during S phase was prevented by mutation of p12. Thus, CRL4(Cdt2) also regulates the subunit composition of Pol δ during the cell cycle. These studies reveal a novel function of CRL4(Cdt2), i.e. the direct regulation of DNA polymerase δ, adding to its known functions in the regulation of the licensing of replication origins and expanding the scope of its overall control of DNA replication. The formation of Pol δ3 in S phase as a normal aspect of cell cycle progression leads to the novel implications that it is involved in DNA replication as well as DNA repair.

  12. Spire and Formin 2 synergize and antagonize in regulating actin assembly in meiosis by a ping-pong mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Montaville

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In mammalian oocytes, three actin binding proteins, Formin 2 (Fmn2, Spire, and profilin, synergistically organize a dynamic cytoplasmic actin meshwork that mediates translocation of the spindle toward the cortex and is required for successful fertilization. Here we characterize Fmn2 and elucidate the molecular mechanism for this synergy, using bulk solution and individual filament kinetic measurements of actin assembly dynamics. We show that by capping filament barbed ends, Spire recruits Fmn2 and facilitates its association with barbed ends, followed by rapid processive assembly and release of Spire. In the presence of actin, profilin, Spire, and Fmn2, filaments display alternating phases of rapid processive assembly and arrested growth, driven by a "ping-pong" mechanism, in which Spire and Fmn2 alternately kick off each other from the barbed ends. The results are validated by the effects of injection of Spire, Fmn2, and their interacting moieties in mouse oocytes. This original mechanism of regulation of a Rho-GTPase-independent formin, recruited by Spire at Rab11a-positive vesicles, supports a model for modulation of a dynamic actin-vesicle meshwork in the oocyte at the origin of asymmetric positioning of the meiotic spindle.

  13. Assembly of the chloroplast ATP-dependent Clp protease in Arabidopsis is regulated by the ClpT accessory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Lars L E; Clarke, Adrian K

    2011-01-01

    The ATP-dependent caseinolytic protease (Clp) is an essential housekeeping enzyme in plant chloroplasts. It is by far the most complex of all known Clp proteases, with a proteolytic core consisting of multiple catalytic ClpP and noncatalytic ClpR subunits. It also includes a unique form of Clp protein of unknown function designated ClpT, two of which exist in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. Inactivation of ClpT1 or ClpT2 significantly reduces the amount of Clp proteolytic core, whereas loss of both proves seedling lethal under autotrophic conditions. During assembly of the Clp proteolytic core, ClpT1 first binds to the P-ring (consisting of ClpP3-6 subunits) followed by ClpT2, and only then does the P-ring combine with the R-ring (ClpP1, ClpR1-4 subunits). Most of the ClpT proteins in chloroplasts exist in vivo as homodimers, which then apparently monomerize prior to association with the P-ring. Despite their relative abundance, however, the availability of both ClpT proteins is rate limiting for the core assembly, with the addition of recombinant ClpT1 and ClpT2 increasing core content up to fourfold. Overall, ClpT appears to regulate the assembly of the chloroplast Clp protease, revealing a new and sophisticated control mechanism on the activity of this vital protease in plants.

  14. Negative Regulation of Active Zone Assembly by a Newly Identified SR Protein Kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Ervin L.; Fetter, Richard D.; Davis, Graeme W.

    2009-01-01

    Presynaptic, electron-dense, cytoplasmic protrusions such as the T-bar (Drosophila) or ribbon (vertebrates) are believed to facilitate vesicle movement to the active zone (AZ) of synapses throughout the nervous system. The molecular composition of these structures including the T-bar and ribbon are largely unknown, as are the mechanisms that specify their synapse-specific assembly and distribution. In a large-scale, forward genetic screen, we have identified a mutation termed air traffic cont...

  15. Kinase Mediated Regulation of 40S Ribosome Assembly in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE...month worked: 2 Contribution to Project: Dr. Karbstein supervises the effort in the Karbstein lab. Funding Support: Name: Homa Ghalei Project...Moffitt Cancer Center) seeks to validate targeting 40S ribosome assembly as a therapeutic target for aggressive breast cancer subtypes, including

  16. De novo assembly and annotation of the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) repeatome with dnaPipeTE from raw genomic reads and comparative analysis with the yellow fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti).

    OpenAIRE

    Goubert, Clément; Modolo, Laurent; Vieira, Cristina; ValienteMoro, Claire; Mavingui, Patrick; Boulesteix, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Repetitive DNA, including transposable elements (TEs), is found throughout eukaryotic genomes. Annotating and assembling the "repeatome" during genome-wide analysis often poses a challenge. To address this problem, we present dnaPipeTE-a new bioinformatics pipeline that uses a sample of raw genomic reads. It produces precise estimates of repeated DNA content and TE consensus sequences, as well as the relative ages of TE families. We shows that dnaPipeTE performs well u...

  17. SET oncoprotein accumulation regulates transcription through DNA demethylation and histone hypoacetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Luciana O; Neto, Marinaldo P C; Sousa, Lucas O; Tannous, Maryna A; Curti, Carlos; Leopoldino, Andreia M

    2017-04-18

    Epigenetic modifications are essential in the control of normal cellular processes and cancer development. DNA methylation and histone acetylation are major epigenetic modifications involved in gene transcription and abnormal events driving the oncogenic process. SET protein accumulates in many cancer types, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); SET is a member of the INHAT complex that inhibits gene transcription associating with histones and preventing their acetylation. We explored how SET protein accumulation impacts on the regulation of gene expression, focusing on DNA methylation and histone acetylation. DNA methylation profile of 24 tumour suppressors evidenced that SET accumulation decreased DNA methylation in association with loss of 5-methylcytidine, formation of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and increased TET1 levels, indicating an active DNA demethylation mechanism. However, the expression of some suppressor genes was lowered in cells with high SET levels, suggesting that loss of methylation is not the main mechanism modulating gene expression. SET accumulation also downregulated the expression of 32 genes of a panel of 84 transcription factors, and SET directly interacted with chromatin at the promoter of the downregulated genes, decreasing histone acetylation. Gene expression analysis after cell treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-AZA) and Trichostatin A (TSA) revealed that histone acetylation reversed transcription repression promoted by SET. These results suggest a new function for SET in the regulation of chromatin dynamics. In addition, TSA diminished both SET protein levels and SET capability to bind to gene promoter, suggesting that administration of epigenetic modifier agents could be efficient to reverse SET phenotype in cancer.

  18. Rab33B Controls Hepatitis B Virus Assembly by Regulating Core Membrane Association and Nucleocapsid Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartusch, Christina; Döring, Tatjana; Prange, Reinhild

    2017-06-21

    Many viruses take advantage of cellular trafficking machineries to assemble and release new infectious particles. Using RNA interference (RNAi), we demonstrate that the Golgi/autophagosome-associated Rab33B is required for hepatitis B virus (HBV) propagation in hepatoma cell lines. While Rab33B is dispensable for the secretion of HBV subviral envelope particles, its knockdown reduced the virus yield to 20% and inhibited nucleocapsid (NC) formation and/or NC trafficking. The overexpression of a GDP-restricted Rab33B mutant phenocopied the effect of deficit Rab33B, indicating that Rab33B-specific effector proteins may be involved. Moreover, we found that HBV replication enhanced Rab33B expression. By analyzing HBV infection cycle steps, we identified a hitherto unknown membrane targeting module in the highly basic C-terminal domain of the NC-forming core protein. Rab33B inactivation reduced core membrane association, suggesting that membrane platforms participate in HBV assembly reactions. Biochemical and immunofluorescence analyses provided further hints that the viral core, rather than the envelope, is the main target for Rab33B intervention. Rab33B-deficiency reduced core protein levels without affecting viral transcription and hampered core/NC sorting to envelope-positive, intracellular compartments. Together, these results indicate that Rab33B is an important player in intracellular HBV trafficking events, guiding core transport to NC assembly sites and/or NC transport to budding sites.

  19. Regulation of biosynthesis and intracellular localization of rice and tobacco homologues of nucleosome assembly protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Aiwu; Zhu, Yan; Yu, Yu; Cao, Kaiming; Sun, Chongrong; Shen, Wen-Hui

    2003-02-01

    The nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1) is considered to be a conserved histone chaperone, facilitating the assembly of nucleosomes in all eukaryotes. However, studies in yeast and animal cells also indicated that NAP1 proteins have diverse functions likely independent of nucleosome-assembly activity. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of cDNAs encoding NAP1-like proteins from the monocotyledon rice ( Oryza sativa L.) and the dicotyledon tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum L.). Northern-blot analysis demonstrated that the two rice NAP1-like genes are predominantly expressed in stem tissues such as root and shoot apical meristems as well as in young flowers. During the cell cycle, all four tobacco NAP1-like genes are highly expressed, with one of them showing a slightly increased expression at the G1/S transition. These results are consistent with a role for plant NAP1-like proteins in cell division. In vitro binding assays revealed that different NAP1-like proteins bind, with distinct relative binding strengths, to different classes of histone. Intracellular localization analyses showed that some NAP1-like proteins could be targeted into the nucleus whereas others are exclusively cytoplasm-localized. It is thus likely that different plant NAP1-like proteins have distinct functions in vivo. Plant NAP1-like proteins were observed to concentrate around the metaphase plate and in the phragmoplast, suggesting a role in mitotic events and cytokinesis.

  20. Enzyme-regulated the changes of pH values for assembling a colorimetric and multistage interconnection logic network with multiple readouts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yanyan; Ran, Xiang; Lin, Youhui [Laboratory of Chemical Biology, Division of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin 130022 (China); Graduate School of University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Ren, Jinsong, E-mail: jren@ciac.ac.cn [Laboratory of Chemical Biology, Division of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin 130022 (China); Qu, Xiaogang [Laboratory of Chemical Biology, Division of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin 130022 (China)

    2015-04-22

    Highlights: • A colorimetric and multistage biological network has been developed. • This system was on the basis of the enzyme-regulated changes of pH values. • This enzyme-based system could assemble large biological circuit. • Two signal transducers (DNA/AuNPs and acid–base indicators) were used. • The compositions of samples could be detected through visual output signals. - Abstract: Based on enzymatic reactions-triggered changes of pH values and biocomputing, a novel and multistage interconnection biological network with multiple easy-detectable signal outputs has been developed. Compared with traditional chemical computing, the enzyme-based biological system could overcome the interference between reactions or the incompatibility of individual computing gates and offer a unique opportunity to assemble multicomponent/multifunctional logic circuitries. Our system included four enzyme inputs: β-galactosidase (β-gal), glucose oxidase (GOx), esterase (Est) and urease (Ur). With the assistance of two signal transducers (gold nanoparticles and acid–base indicators) or pH meter, the outputs of the biological network could be conveniently read by the naked eyes. In contrast to current methods, the approach present here could realize cost-effective, label-free and colorimetric logic operations without complicated instrument. By designing a series of Boolean logic operations, we could logically make judgment of the compositions of the samples on the basis of visual output signals. Our work offered a promising paradigm for future biological computing technology and might be highly useful in future intelligent diagnostics, prodrug activation, smart drug delivery, process control, and electronic applications.

  1. Structure of a new DNA-binding domain which regulates pathogenesis in a wide variety of fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Matthew B; Rosenberg, Oren S; Cox, Jeffery S; Stroud, Robert M; Finer-Moore, Janet S; Johnson, Alexander D

    2014-07-22

    WOPR-domain proteins are found throughout the fungal kingdom where they function as master regulators of cell morphology and pathogenesis. Genetic and biochemical experiments previously demonstrated that these proteins bind to specific DNA sequences and thereby regulate transcription. However, their primary sequence showed no relationship to any known DNA-binding domain, and the basis for their ability to recognize DNA sequences remained unknown. Here, we describe the 2.6-Å crystal structure of a WOPR domain in complex with its preferred DNA sequence. The structure reveals that two highly conserved regions, separated by an unconserved linker, form an interdigitated β-sheet that is tilted into the major groove of DNA. Although the main interaction surface is in the major groove, the highest-affinity interactions occur in the minor groove, primarily through a deeply penetrating arginine residue. The structure reveals a new, unanticipated mechanism by which proteins can recognize specific sequences of DNA.

  2. PI3K/mTOR-dependent signaling pathway as a possible regulator of processing bodies’ assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filonenko V. V.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the role of PI3K/mTOR signaling pathway in regulation of processing body (PB assembly. Methods. During this study we employed cell imaging technique and Western blot analysis. Results. It was shown that treatment of cells with the specific inhibitors of PI3K/mTOR pathway leads to changes of PBs’ number and size within cells as well as proteasomal degradation of their scaffold protein RCD-8. Conclusions. We speculate that mTOR/PI3K pathway may regulate in part the dynamic of PB formation in the cell by affecting the stability of RCD-8 protein and therefore controle mRNA metabolism

  3. Synthesis and studies of polypeptide materials: Self-assembled block copolypeptide amphiphiles, DNA-condensing block copolypeptides and membrane-interactive random copolypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrsta, Michael Dmytro

    A new class of transition metal initiators for the controlled polymerization of alpha-aminoacid-N-carboxyanhydrides (alpha-NCAs), has been developed by Deming et al. This discovery has allowed for the synthesis of well-defined "protein-like" polymers. Using this chemistry we have made distinct block/random copolypeptides for biomedical applications. Drug delivery, gene delivery, and antimicrobial polymers were the focus of our research efforts. The motivation for the synthesis and study of synthetic polypeptide based materials comes from proteins. Natural proteins are able to adopt a staggeringly large amount of uniquely well-defined folded structures. These structures account for the diversity in properties of proteins. As catalysts (enzymes) natural proteins perform some of the most difficult chemistry with ease and precision at ambient pressures and temperatures. They also exhibit incredible structural properties that directly result from formation of complex hierarchical assemblies. Self-assembling block copolymers were synthesized with various compositions and architectures. In general, di- and tri-block amphiphiles were studied for their self-assembling properties. Both spherical and tubular vesicles were found to assemble from di- and tri-block amphiphiles, respectively. In addition to self-assembly, pH responsiveness was engineered into these amphiphiles by the incorporation of basic residues (lysine) into the hydrophobic block. Another form of self-assembly studied was the condensation of DNA using cationic block copolymers. It was found that cationic block copolymers could condense DNA into compact, ordered, water-soluble aggregates on the nanoscale. These aggregates sufficiently protected DNA from nucleases and yet were susceptible to proteases. These studies form the basis of a gene delivery platform. The ease with which NCAs are polymerized renders them completely amenable to parallel synthetic methods. We have employed this technique to discover new

  4. Coordinate regulation of stromelysin and collagenase genes determined with cDNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, S.M.; Clark, E.J.; Werb, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Secreted proteinases are required for tumor metastasis, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling during wound healing and embryonic growth. Thus, the regulation of the genes of secreted proteinases may serve as an interesting model for growth-controlled genes in general. The authors studied the genes of the secreted proteinases stromelysin and collagenase by using molecularly cloned cDNAs from each proteinase. Stromelysin cDNA was cloned by differential screening of a total cDNA library from rabbit synovial cells treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, which yielded a clone of 1.2 kilobase pairs; collagenase cDNA was obtained by cloning reverse transcripts of anti-collagenase-immunoadsorbed polysomal mRNA, which yielded a clone of 0.8 kilobase pairs. Stromelysin and collagenase mRNA species of 2.2 and 2.4 kilobases, respectively, were detected on hybridization blots of RNA from phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-treated but not untreated rabbit synovial cells. Expression of stromelysin mRNA was also induced in rabbit alveolar macrophages and rabbit brain capillary endothelial cells treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Stromelysin and collagenase mRNA were both induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and cytochalasin B at a constant ratio of the two gene products; this suggest coordinate regulation. The fact that induction was blocked after inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide implicates an indirect signal transduction pathway that requires new protein synthesis

  5. Metformin regulates global DNA methylation via mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuyàs, E; Fernández-Arroyo, S; Verdura, S; García, R Á-F; Stursa, J; Werner, L; Blanco-González, E; Montes-Bayón, M; Joven, J; Viollet, B; Neuzil, J; Menendez, J A

    2018-02-15

    The anti-diabetic biguanide metformin may exert health-promoting effects via metabolic regulation of the epigenome. Here we show that metformin promotes global DNA methylation in non-cancerous, cancer-prone and metastatic cancer cells by decreasing S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), a strong feedback inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent DNA methyltransferases, while promoting the accumulation of SAM, the universal methyl donor for cellular methylation. Using metformin and a mitochondria/complex I (mCI)-targeted analog of metformin (norMitoMet) in experimental pairs of wild-type and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-, serine hydroxymethyltransferase 2 (SHMT2)- and mCI-null cells, we provide evidence that metformin increases the SAM:SAH ratio-related methylation capacity by targeting the coupling between serine mitochondrial one-carbon flux and CI activity. By increasing the contribution of one-carbon units to the SAM from folate stores while decreasing SAH in response to AMPK-sensed energetic crisis, metformin can operate as a metabolo-epigenetic regulator capable of reprogramming one of the key conduits linking cellular metabolism to the DNA methylation machinery.

  6. Crystal Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv AldR (Rv2779c), a Regulator of the ald Gene: DNA BINDING AND IDENTIFICATION OF SMALL MOLECULE INHIBITORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Abhishek; Shree, Sonal; Pandey, Sarvesh Kumar; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2016-06-03

    Here we report the crystal structure of M. tuberculosis AldR (Rv2779c) showing that the N-terminal DNA-binding domains are swapped, forming a dimer, and four dimers are assembled into an octamer through crystal symmetry. The C-terminal domain is involved in oligomeric interactions that stabilize the oligomer, and it contains the effector-binding sites. The latter sites are 30-60% larger compared with homologs like MtbFFRP (Rv3291c) and can consequently accommodate larger molecules. MtbAldR binds to the region upstream to the ald gene that is highly up-regulated in nutrient-starved tuberculosis models and codes for l-alanine dehydrogenase (MtbAld; Rv2780). Further, the MtbAldR-DNA complex is inhibited upon binding of Ala, Tyr, Trp and Asp to the protein. Studies involving a ligand-binding site G131T mutant show that the mutant forms a DNA complex that cannot be inhibited by adding the amino acids. Comparative studies suggest that binding of the amino acids changes the relative spatial disposition of the DNA-binding domains and thereby disrupt the protein-DNA complex. Finally, we identified small molecules, including a tetrahydroquinoline carbonitrile derivative (S010-0261), that inhibit the MtbAldR-DNA complex. The latter molecules represent the very first inhibitors of a feast/famine regulatory protein from any source and set the stage for exploring MtbAldR as a potential anti-tuberculosis target. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus K8 Is an RNA Binding Protein That Regulates Viral DNA Replication in Coordination with a Noncoding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongcheng; Wang, Yan; Yuan, Yan

    2018-01-10

    KSHV lytic replication and constant primary infection of fresh cells are crucial for viral tumorigenicity. Virus-encoded b-Zip family protein K8 plays an important role in viral DNA replication in both viral reactivation and de novo infection. The mechanism underlying the functional role of K8 in the viral life cycle is elusive. Here we report that K8 is a RNA binding protein, which also associates with many proteins including other RNA binding proteins. Many K8-involved protein-protein interactions are mediated by RNA. Using a c ross l inking and i mmuno p recipitation (CLIP) procedure combined with high-throughput sequencing, RNAs that are associated with K8 in BCBL-1 cells were identified, that include both viral (PAN, T1.4, T0.7 and etc.) and cellular (MALAT-1, MRP, 7SK and etc.) RNAs. An RNA-binding motif in K8 was defined, and mutation of the motif abolished the ability of K8 binding to many noncoding RNAs as well as viral DNA replication during de novo infection, suggesting that the K8 functions in viral replication are carried out through RNA association. The function of K8 and associated T1.4 RNA was investigated in details and results showed that T1.4 mediates the binding of K8 with ori-Lyt DNA. T1.4-K8 complex physically bound to KSHV ori-Lyt DNA and recruited other proteins and cofactors to assemble replication complex. Depletion of T1.4 abolished the DNA replication in primary infection. These findings provide mechanistic insights into the role of K8 in coordination with T1.4 RNA in regulating KSHV DNA replication during de novo infection. Importance Genome wide analyses of the mammalian transcriptome revealed that a large proportion of sequence previously annotated as noncoding region are actually transcribed and give rise to stable RNAs. Emergence of a large number of noncoding RNAs suggests that functional RNA-protein complexes exampled by ribosome or spliceosome are not ancient relics of the last riboorganism but would be well adapted for

  8. Wnt5a Regulates the Assembly of Human Adipose Derived Stromal Vascular Fraction-Derived Microvasculatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkat M Ramakrishnan

    Full Text Available Human adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction (hSVF cells are an easily accessible, heterogeneous cell system that can spontaneously self-assemble into functional microvasculatures in vivo. However, the mechanisms underlying vascular self-assembly and maturation are poorly understood, therefore we utilized an in vitro model to identify potential in vivo regulatory mechanisms. We utilized passage one (P1 hSVF because of the rapid UEA1+ endothelium (EC loss at even P2 culture. We exposed hSVF cells to a battery of angiogenesis inhibitors and found that the pan-Wnt inhibitor IWP2 produced the most significant hSVF-EC networking decrease (~25%. To determine which Wnt isoform(s and receptor(s may be involved, hSVF was screened by PCR for isoforms associated with angiogenesis, with only WNT5A and its receptor, FZD4, being expressed for all time points observed. Immunocytochemistry confirmed Wnt5a protein expression by hSVF. To see if Wnt5a alone could restore IWP2-induced EC network inhibition, recombinant human Wnt5a (0-150 ng/ml was added to IWP2-treated cultures. The addition of rhWnt5a significantly increased EC network area and significantly decreased the ratio of total EC network length to EC network area compared to untreated controls. To determine if Wnt5a mediates in vivo microvascular self-assembly, 3D hSVF constructs containing an IgG isotype control, anti-Wnt5a neutralizing antibody or rhWnt5a were implanted subcutaneously for 2w in immune compromised mice. Compared to IgG controls, anti-Wnt5a treatment significantly reduced vessel length density by ~41%, while rhWnt5a significantly increased vessel length density by ~62%. However, anti-Wnt5a or rhWnt5a did not significantly affect the density of segments and nodes, both of which measure vascular complexity. Taken together, this data demonstrates that endogenous Wnt5a produced by hSVF plays a regulatory role in microvascular self-assembly in vivo. These findings also suggest that

  9. Role of XRCC4 phosphorylation by DNA-PK in the regulation of NHEJ repair pathway of DNA double strand break

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Imamichi, Shoji; Fukuchi, Mikoto; Kamdar, Radhika P.; Sicheng, Liu; Wanotayan, Rujira; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the predominant pathway of DNA double strand breaks in higher eukaryotes and is active throughout the cell cycle. NHEJ repair includes many factors as Ku70/86, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4-Ligase IV complex and XLF (also known as Cernunnos). In these factors, DNA-PKcs acts as central regulator in NHEJ repair. It recruited at the DNA damages site after DNA damage and after association with Ku its kinase activity is activated. It phosphorylates many of important NHEJ proteins in vitro including XRCC4, Ku 70/86, Artemis, and even DNA-PKcs but till now, very less studies have been done to know the role and significance of phosphorylation in the NHEJ repair. Studies by other researchers identified various phosphorylation sites in XRCC4 by DNA-PK using mass spectrometry but these phosphorylation sites were shown to be dispensable for DSB repair. In the present investigation, we identified 3 serine and one new threonine phosphorylation sites in XRCC4 protein by DNA-PK. In vivo phosphorylation at these sites was verified by generating phosphorylation specific antibodies and the requirement for DNA-PK therein was verified by using DNA-PK inhibitor and DNA-PK proficient and deficient cell lines in response to radiation and zeocin treatment. We have also found that phosphorylation at these sites showed dose dependency in response to radiation treatment. The two serine and one threonine phosphorylation site is also biological important as their mutation into alanine significantly elevated radiosensitivity as measured by colony formation assay. Neutral comet assay showed delayed kinetics in DSB repair of these mutants. Furthermore, we have found a protein, with putative DSB repair function, which interacts with domain including the phosphorylation sites.These results indicate that these phosphorylation sites would mediate functional link between XRCC4 and DNA-PK. (author)

  10. DNA Repair Network Analysis Reveals Shieldin as a Key Regulator of NHEJ and PARP Inhibitor Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Rajat; Somyajit, Kumar; Narita, Takeo

    2018-01-01

    -switch recombination (CSR), and fusion of unprotected telomeres. Shieldin functions as a downstream effector of 53BP1-RIF1 in restraining DNA end resection and in sensitizing BRCA1-deficient cells to PARP inhibitors. These findings have implications for understanding cancer-associated PARPi resistance...... expressed DNA repair factors 53BP1, BRCA1, and MDC1. Our spatially resolved interaction maps reveal rich network intricacies, identify shared and bait-specific interaction modules, and implicate previously concealed regulators in this process. We identified a novel vertebrate-specific protein complex......, shieldin, comprising REV7 plus three previously uncharacterized proteins, RINN1 (CTC-534A2.2), RINN2 (FAM35A), and RINN3 (C20ORF196). Recruitment of shieldin to DSBs, via the ATM-RNF8-RNF168-53BP1-RIF1 axis, promotes NHEJ-dependent repair of intrachromosomal breaks, immunoglobulin class...

  11. Oleoyl Coenzyme A Regulates Interaction of Transcriptional Regulator RaaS (Rv1219c) with DNA in Mycobacteria*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turapov, Obolbek; Waddell, Simon J.; Burke, Bernard; Glenn, Sarah; Sarybaeva, Asel A.; Tudo, Griselda; Labesse, Gilles; Young, Danielle I.; Young, Michael; Andrew, Peter W.; Butcher, Philip D.; Cohen-Gonsaud, Martin; Mukamolova, Galina V.

    2014-01-01

    We have recently shown that RaaS (regulator of antimicrobial-assisted survival), encoded by Rv1219c in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and by bcg_1279c in Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin, plays an important role in mycobacterial survival in prolonged stationary phase and during murine infection. Here, we demonstrate that long chain acyl-CoA derivatives (oleoyl-CoA and, to lesser extent, palmitoyl-CoA) modulate RaaS binding to DNA and expression of the downstream genes that encode ATP-dependent efflux pumps. Moreover, exogenously added oleic acid influences RaaS-mediated mycobacterial improvement of survival and expression of the RaaS regulon. Our data suggest that long chain acyl-CoA derivatives serve as biological indicators of the bacterial metabolic state. Dysregulation of efflux pumps can be used to eliminate non-growing mycobacteria. PMID:25012658

  12. Oleoyl coenzyme A regulates interaction of transcriptional regulator RaaS (Rv1219c) with DNA in mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turapov, Obolbek; Waddell, Simon J; Burke, Bernard; Glenn, Sarah; Sarybaeva, Asel A; Tudo, Griselda; Labesse, Gilles; Young, Danielle I; Young, Michael; Andrew, Peter W; Butcher, Philip D; Cohen-Gonsaud, Martin; Mukamolova, Galina V

    2014-09-05

    We have recently shown that RaaS (regulator of antimicrobial-assisted survival), encoded by Rv1219c in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and by bcg_1279c in Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin, plays an important role in mycobacterial survival in prolonged stationary phase and during murine infection. Here, we demonstrate that long chain acyl-CoA derivatives (oleoyl-CoA and, to lesser extent, palmitoyl-CoA) modulate RaaS binding to DNA and expression of the downstream genes that encode ATP-dependent efflux pumps. Moreover, exogenously added oleic acid influences RaaS-mediated mycobacterial improvement of survival and expression of the RaaS regulon. Our data suggest that long chain acyl-CoA derivatives serve as biological indicators of the bacterial metabolic state. Dysregulation of efflux pumps can be used to eliminate non-growing mycobacteria. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Expression patterns and miRNA regulation of DNA methyltransferases in chicken primordial germ cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deivendran Rengaraj

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is widespread in most species, from bacteria to mammals, and is crucial for genomic imprinting, gene expression, and embryogenesis. DNA methylation occurs via two major classes of enzymatic reactions: maintenance-type methylation catalyzed by DNA (cytosine-5--methyltransferase (DNMT 1, and de novo methylation catalyzed by DNMT 3 alpha (DNMT3A and -beta (DNMT3B. The expression pattern and regulation of DNMT genes in primordial germ cells (PGCs and germ line cells has not been sufficiently established in birds. Therefore, we employed bioinformatics, RT-PCR, real-time PCR, and in situ hybridization analyses to examine the structural conservation and conserved expression patterns of chicken DNMT family genes. We further examined the regulation of a candidate de novo DNA methyltransferase gene, cDNMT3B by cotransfection of cDNMT3B 3'UTR- and cDNMT3B 3'UTR-specific miRNAs through a dual fluorescence reporter assay. All cDNMT family members were differentially detected during early embryonic development. Of interest, cDNMT3B expression was highly detected in early embryos and in PGCs. During germ line development and sexual maturation, cDNMT3B expression was reestablished in a female germ cell-specific manner. In the dual fluorescence reporter assay, cDNMT3B expression was significantly downregulated by four miRNAs: gga-miR-15c (25.82%, gga-miR-29b (30.01%, gga-miR-383 (30.0%, and gga-miR-222 (31.28%. Our data highlight the structural conservation and conserved expression patterns of chicken DNMTs. The miRNAs investigated in this study may induce downregulation of gene expression in chicken PGCs and germ cells.

  14. DNA methylation and histone deacetylation regulating insulin sensitivity due to chronic cold exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Lai; Sun, Yizheng; Li, Ruiping; Deng, Jinbo; Deng, Jiexin

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the causal relationship between chronic cold exposure and insulin resistance and the mechanisms of how DNA methylation and histone deacetylation regulate cold-reduced insulin resistance. 46 adult male mice from postnatal day 90-180 were randomly assigned to control group and cold-exposure group. Mice in cold-exposure group were placed at temperature from -1 to 4 °C for 30 days to mimic chronic cold environment. Then, fasting blood glucose, blood insulin level and insulin resistance index were measured with enzymatic methods. Immunofluorescent labeling was carried out to visualize the insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2), Obese receptor (Ob-R, a leptin receptor), voltage-dependent anion channel protein 1 (VDAC1), cytochrome C (cytC), 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) positive cells in hippocampal CA1 area. Furthermore, the expressions of some proteins mentioned above were detected with Western blot. The results showed: ① Chronic cold exposure could reduce the insulin resistance index (P cold-exposure group than in control group with both immunohistochemical staining and Western blot (P cold exposure increased DNA methylation and histone deacetylation in the pyramidal cells of CA1 area and led to an increase in the expression of histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and DNA methylation relative enzymes (P cold exposure can improve insulin sensitivity, with the involvement of DNA methylation, histone deacetylation and the regulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. These epigenetic modifications probably form the basic mechanism of cold-reduced insulin resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Multiple markers for melanoma progression regulated by DNA methylation: insights from transcriptomic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, William M; Bergin, Orla E; Rafferty, Mairin; Kelly, Zoë D; Nolan, Ilse-Maria; Fox, Edward J P; Culhane, Aedin C; McArdle, Linda; Fraga, Mario F; Hughes, Linda; Currid, Caroline A; O'Mahony, Fiona; Byrne, Aileen; Murphy, Alison A; Moss, Catherine; McDonnell, Susan; Stallings, Raymond L; Plumb, Jane A; Esteller, Manel; Brown, Robert; Dervan, Peter A; Easty, David J

    2005-11-01

    The incidence of melanoma is increasing rapidly, with advanced lesions generally failing to respond to conventional chemotherapy. Here, we utilized DNA microarray-based gene expression profiling techniques to identify molecular determinants of melanoma progression within a unique panel of isogenic human melanoma cell lines. When a poorly tumorigenic cell line, derived from an early melanoma, was compared with two increasingly aggressive derivative cell lines, the expression of 66 genes was significantly changed. A similar pattern of differential gene expression was found with an independently derived metastatic cell line. We further examined these melanoma progression-associated genes via use of a tailored TaqMan Low Density Array (LDA), representing the majority of genes within our cohort of interest. Considerable concordance was seen between the transcriptomic profiles determined by DNA microarray and TaqMan LDA approaches. A range of novel markers were identified that correlated here with melanoma progression. Most notable was TSPY, a Y chromosome-specific gene that displayed extensive down-regulation in expression between the parental and derivative cell lines. Examination of a putative CpG island within the TSPY gene demonstrated that this region was hypermethylated in the derivative cell lines, as well as metastatic melanomas from male patients. Moreover, treatment of the derivative cell lines with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 2'-deoxy-5-azacytidine (DAC), restored expression of the TSPY gene to levels comparable with that found in the parental cells. Additional DNA microarray studies uncovered a subset of 13 genes from the above-mentioned 66 gene cohort that displayed re-activation of expression following DAC treatment, including TSPY, CYBA and MT2A. DAC suppressed tumor cell growth in vitro. Moreover, systemic treatment of mice with DAC attenuated growth of melanoma xenografts, with consequent re-expression of TSPY mRNA. Overall, our data support

  16. NLRX1 Sequesters STING to Negatively Regulate the Interferon Response, Thereby Facilitating the Replication of HIV-1 and DNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Haitao; König, Renate; Deng, Meng; Riess, Maximilian; Mo, Jinyao; Zhang, Lu; Petrucelli, Alex; Yoh, Sunnie M; Barefoot, Brice; Samo, Melissa; Sempowski, Gregory D; Zhang, Aiping; Colberg-Poley, Anamaris M; Feng, Hui; Lemon, Stanley M; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Yanping; Wen, Haitao; Zhang, Zhigang; Damania, Blossom; Tsao, Li-Chung; Wang, Qi; Su, Lishan; Duncan, Joseph A; Chanda, Sumit K; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2016-04-13

    Understanding the negative regulators of antiviral immune responses will be critical for advancing immune-modulated antiviral strategies. NLRX1, an NLR protein that negatively regulates innate immunity, was previously identified in an unbiased siRNA screen as required for HIV infection. We find that NLRX1 depletion results in impaired nuclear import of HIV-1 DNA in human monocytic cells. Additionally, NLRX1 was observed to reduce type-I interferon (IFN-I) and cytokines in response to HIV-1 reverse-transcribed DNA. NLRX1 sequesters the DNA-sensing adaptor STING from interaction with TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1), which is a requisite for IFN-1 induction in response to DNA. NLRX1-deficient cells generate an amplified STING-dependent host response to cytosolic DNA, c-di-GMP, cGAMP, HIV-1, and DNA viruses. Accordingly, Nlrx1(-/-) mice infected with DNA viruses exhibit enhanced innate immunity and reduced viral load. Thus, NLRX1 is a negative regulator of the host innate immune response to HIV-1 and DNA viruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Moiré-regulated self-assembly of cesium adatoms on epitaxial graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Marin; Lazić, Predrag; Runte, Sven; Michely, Thomas; Busse, Carsten; Kralj, Marko

    2017-08-01

    Upon adsorption onto epitaxial graphene on Ir(111) at room temperature, Cs adatoms donate part of their charge to the substrate, which effectively creates mutually repelling entities that can diffuse across the graphene surface. By using scanning tunneling microscopy at 6 K, an ordered hexagonal structure of Cs adatoms with several rotated domains has been identified. The amount of charge transferred to graphene has been determined from the presented valence-band photoemission data. Density-functional calculations show that the repulsive interaction is additionally modulated by preferential adsorption of Cs to the atop region within the moiré unit cell. Our results provide direct atomistic insight into the self-assembly of individual atoms on epitaxial graphene, and they demonstrate how the moiré structure acts as a perturbation to that process.

  18. Up-regulation of DNA-dependent protein kinase correlates with radiation resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shintani, Satoru; Mihara, Mariko; Li, Chunnan; Nakahara Yuuji; Hino, Satoshi; Nakashiro, Koh-ichi; Hamakawa, Hiroyuki

    2003-01-01

    DNA-PK is a nuclear protein with serine/threonine kinase activity and forms a complex consisting of the DNA-PKcs and a heterodimer of Ku70 and Ku80 proteins. Recent laboratory experiments have demonstrated that the DNA-PK complex formation is one of the major pathways by which mammalian cells respond to DNA double-strand breaks induced by ionizing radiation. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between expression levels of DNA-PKcs, Ku70 and Ku80 proteins and radiation sensitivity in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines and in OSCC patients treated with preoperative radiation therapy. The OSCC cell lines greatly differed in their response to irradiation, as assessed by a standard colony formation assay. However, the expression levels of the DNA-PK complex proteins were all similar, and there was no association between the magnitude of their expression and the tumor radiation sensitivity. Expression of DNA-PK complex proteins increased after radiation treatment, and the increased values correlated with the tumor radiation resistance. Expression of DNA-PKcs and Ku70 after irradiation was increased in the surviving cells of OSCC tissues irradiated preoperatively. These results suggest that up-regulation of DNA-PK complex protein, especially DNA-PKcs, after radiation treatment correlates to radiation resistance. DNA-PKcs might be a molecular target for a novel radiation sensitization therapy of OSCC. (author)

  19. Highly Sensitive and Quality Self-Testable Electrochemiluminescence Assay of DNA Methyltransferase Activity Using Multifunctional Sandwich-Assembled Carbon Nitride Nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiyu; Lv, Yanqin; Shen, Yanfei; Ji, Jingjing; Zhou, Qing; Liu, Songqin; Zhang, Yuanjian

    2018-02-28

    DNA methylation catalyzed by methylase plays a key role in many biological activities. However, developing a highly sensitive, simple, and reliable way for evaluation of DNA methyltransferase (MTase) activity is still a challenge. Here, we report a sandwich-assembled electrochemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor using multifunctional carbon nitride nanosheets (CNNS) to evaluate the Dam MTase activity. The CNNS could not only be used as an excellent substrate to conjugate a large amount of hairpin probe DNA to improve the sensitivity but also be utilized as an internal reliability checker and an analyte reporter in the bottom and top layers of the biosensor, respectively. Such a unique sandwich configuration of CNNS well coupled the advantages of ECL luminophor that were generally assembled in the bottom or top layer in a conventional manner. As a result, the biosensor exhibited an ultralow detection limit down to 0.043 U/mL and a linear range between 0.05 and 80 U/mL, superior to the MTase activity assay in most previous reports. We highlighted the great potential of emerging CNNS luminophor in developing highly sensitive and smart quality self-testable ECL sensing systems using a sandwiched configuration for early disease diagnosis, treatment, and management.

  20. Red Fluorescent Proteins for Gene Expression and Protein Localization Studies in Streptococcus pneumoniae and Efficient Transformation with DNA Assembled via the Gibson Assembly Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilharz, Katrin; van Raaphorst, Renske; Kjos, Morten; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2015-10-01

    During the last decades, a wide range of fluorescent proteins (FPs) have been developed and improved. This has had a great impact on the possibilities in biological imaging and the investigation of cellular processes at the single-cell level. Recently, we have benchmarked a set of green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) and generated a codon-optimized superfolder GFP for efficient use in the important human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae and other low-GC Gram-positive bacteria. In the present work, we constructed and compared four red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) in S. pneumoniae. Two orange-red variants, mOrange2 and TagRFP, and two far-red FPs, mKate2 and mCherry, were codon optimized and examined by fluorescence microscopy and plate reader assays. Notably, protein fusions of the RFPs to FtsZ were constructed by direct transformation of linear Gibson assembly (isothermal assembly) products, a method that speeds up the strain construction process significantly. Our data show that mCherry is the fastest-maturing RFP in S. pneumoniae and is best suited for studying gene expression, while mKate2 and TagRFP are more stable and are the preferred choices for protein localization studies. The RFPs described here will be useful for cell biology studies that require multicolor labeling in S. pneumoniae and related organisms. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Assembly and interrogation of Alzheimer's disease genetic networks reveal novel regulators of progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soline Aubry

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a complex multifactorial disorder with poorly characterized pathogenesis. Our understanding of this disease would thus benefit from an approach that addresses this complexity by elucidating the regulatory networks that are dysregulated in the neural compartment of AD patients, across distinct brain regions. Here, we use a Systems Biology (SB approach, which has been highly successful in the dissection of cancer related phenotypes, to reverse engineer the transcriptional regulation layer of human neuronal cells and interrogate it to infer candidate Master Regulators (MRs responsible for disease progression. Analysis of gene expression profiles from laser-captured neurons from AD and controls subjects, using the Algorithm for the Reconstruction of Accurate Cellular Networks (ARACNe, yielded an interactome consisting of 488,353 transcription-factor/target interactions. Interrogation of this interactome, using the Master Regulator INference algorithm (MARINa, identified an unbiased set of candidate MRs causally responsible for regulating the transcriptional signature of AD progression. Experimental assays in autopsy-derived human brain tissue showed that three of the top candidate MRs (YY1, p300 and ZMYM3 are indeed biochemically and histopathologically dysregulated in AD brains compared to controls. Our results additionally implicate p53 and loss of acetylation homeostasis in the neurodegenerative process. This study suggests that an integrative, SB approach can be applied to AD and other neurodegenerative diseases, and provide significant novel insight on the disease progression.

  2. miR-24-mediated down-regulation of H2AX suppresses DNA repair in terminally differentiated blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Ashish; Pan, Yunfeng; Navarro, Francisco; Dykxhoorn, Derek M.; Moreau, Lisa; Meire, Eti; Bentwich, Zvi; Lieberman, Judy; Chowdhury, Dipanjan

    2010-01-01

    Terminally differentiated cells have reduced capacity to repair double strand breaks (DSB), but the molecular mechanism behind this down-regulation is unclear. Here we find that miR-24 is consistently up-regulated during post-mitotic differentiation of hematopoietic cell lines and regulates the histone variant H2AX, a key DSB repair protein that activates cell cycle checkpoint proteins and retains DSB repair factors at DSB foci. The H2AX 3’UTR contains conserved miR-24 binding sites regulated by miR-24. Both H2AX mRNA and protein are substantially reduced during hematopoietic cell terminal differentiation by miR-24 up-regulation both in in vitro differentiated cells and primary human blood cells. miR-24 suppression of H2AX renders cells hypersensitive to γ-irradiation and genotoxic drugs. Antagonizing miR-24 in differentiating cells protects them from DNA damage-induced cell death, while transfecting miR-24 mimics in dividing cells increases chromosomal breaks and unrepaired DNA damage and reduces viability in response to DNA damage. This DNA repair phenotype can be fully rescued by over-expressing miR-24-insensitive H2AX. Therefore, miR-24 up-regulation in post-replicative cells reduces H2AX and thereby renders them highly vulnerable to DNA damage. PMID:19377482

  3. ATX-LPA1 axis contributes to proliferation of chondrocytes by regulating fibronectin assembly leading to proper cartilage formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Tatsuji; Arima, Naoaki; Kano, Kuniyuki; Hama, Kotaro; Itai, Eriko; Yukiura, Hiroshi; Kise, Ryoji; Inoue, Asuka; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna; Moolenaar, Wouter H; Chun, Jerold; Aoki, Junken

    2016-03-23

    The lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signals via six distinct G protein-coupled receptors to mediate both unique and overlapping biological effects, including cell migration, proliferation and survival. LPA is produced extracellularly by autotaxin (ATX), a secreted lysophospholipase D, from lysophosphatidylcholine. ATX-LPA receptor signaling is essential for normal development and implicated in various (patho)physiological processes, but underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Through gene targeting approaches in zebrafish and mice, we show here that loss of ATX-LPA1 signaling leads to disorganization of chondrocytes, causing severe defects in cartilage formation. Mechanistically, ATX-LPA1 signaling acts by promoting S-phase entry and cell proliferation of chondrocytes both in vitro and in vivo, at least in part through β1-integrin translocation leading to fibronectin assembly and further extracellular matrix deposition; this in turn promotes chondrocyte-matrix adhesion and cell proliferation. Thus, the ATX-LPA1 axis is a key regulator of cartilage formation.

  4. Cytochrome P450 regulation: the interplay between its heme and apoprotein moieties in synthesis, assembly, repair, and disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Maria Almira; Sinclair, Peter R; De Matteis, Francesco

    2011-02-01

    Heme is vital to our aerobic universe. Heme cellular content is finely tuned through an exquisite control of synthesis and degradation. Heme deficiency is deleterious to cells, whereas excess heme is toxic. Most of the cellular heme serves as the prosthetic moiety of functionally diverse hemoproteins, including cytochromes P450 (P450s). In the liver, P450s are its major consumers, with >50% of hepatic heme committed to their synthesis. Prosthetic heme is the sine qua non of P450 catalytic biotransformation of both endo- and xenobiotics. This well-recognized functional role notwithstanding, heme also regulates P450 protein synthesis, assembly, repair, and disposal. These less well-appreciated aspects are reviewed herein.

  5. Illegal trade of regulated and protected aquatic species in the Philippines detected by DNA barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asis, Angelli Marie Jacynth M; Lacsamana, Joanne Krisha M; Santos, Mudjekeewis D

    2016-01-01

    Illegal trade has greatly affected marine fish stocks, decreasing fish populations worldwide. Despite having a number of aquatic species being regulated, illegal trade still persists through the transport of dried or processed products and juvenile species trafficking. In this regard, accurate species identification of illegally traded marine fish stocks by DNA barcoding is deemed to be a more efficient method in regulating and monitoring trade than by morphological means which is very difficult due to the absence of key morphological characters in juveniles and processed products. Here, live juvenile eels (elvers) and dried products of sharks and rays confiscated for illegal trade were identified. Twenty out of 23 (87%) randomly selected "elvers" were identified as Anguilla bicolor pacifica and 3 (13%) samples as Anguilla marmorata. On the other hand, 4 out of 11 (36%) of the randomly selected dried samples of sharks and rays were Manta birostris. The rest of the samples were identified as Alopias pelagicus, Taeniura meyeni, Carcharhinus falciformis, Himantura fai and Mobula japonica. These results confirm that wild juvenile eels and species of manta rays are still being caught in the country regardless of its protected status under Philippine and international laws. It is evident that the illegal trade of protected aquatic species is happening in the guise of dried or processed products thus the need to put emphasis on strengthening conservation measures. This study aims to underscore the importance of accurate species identification in such cases of illegal trade and the effectivity of DNA barcoding as a tool to do this.

  6. A Novel Aspect of Tumorigenesis-BMI1 Functions in Regulating DNA Damage Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaozeng; Ojo, Diane; Wei, Fengxiang; Wong, Nicholas; Gu, Yan; Tang, Damu

    2015-12-01

    BMI1 plays critical roles in maintaining the self-renewal of hematopoietic, neural, intestinal stem cells, and cancer stem cells (CSCs) for a variety of cancer types. BMI1 promotes cell proliferative life span and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Upregulation of BMI1 occurs in multiple cancer types and is associated with poor prognosis. Mechanistically, BMI1 is a subunit of the Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), and binds the catalytic RING2/RING1b subunit to form a functional E3 ubiquitin ligase. Through mono-ubiquitination of histone H2A at lysine 119 (H2A-K119Ub), BMI1 represses multiple gene loci; among these, the INK4A/ARF locus has been most thoroughly investigated. The locus encodes the p16INK4A and p14/p19ARF tumor suppressors that function in the pRb and p53 pathways, respectively. Its repression contributes to BMI1-derived tumorigenesis. BMI1 also possesses other oncogenic functions, specifically its regulative role in DNA damage response (DDR). In this process, BMI1 ubiquitinates histone H2A and γH2AX, thereby facilitating the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) through stimulating homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining. Additionally, BMI1 compromises DSB-induced checkpoint activation independent of its-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. We review the emerging role of BMI1 in DDR regulation and discuss its impact on BMI1-derived tumorigenesis.

  7. DNA breaks and chromatin structural changes enhance the transcription of autoimmune regulator target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Mithu; Saare, Mario; Maslovskaja, Julia; Kisand, Kai; Liiv, Ingrid; Haljasorg, Uku; Tasa, Tõnis; Metspalu, Andres; Milani, Lili; Peterson, Pärt

    2017-04-21

    The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) protein is the key factor in thymic negative selection of autoreactive T cells by promoting the ectopic expression of tissue-specific genes in the thymic medullary epithelium. Mutations in AIRE cause a monogenic autoimmune disease called autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy. AIRE has been shown to promote DNA breaks via its interaction with topoisomerase 2 (TOP2). In this study, we investigated topoisomerase-induced DNA breaks and chromatin structural alterations in conjunction with AIRE-dependent gene expression. Using RNA sequencing, we found that inhibition of TOP2 religation activity by etoposide in AIRE-expressing cells had a synergistic effect on genes with low expression levels. AIRE-mediated transcription was not only enhanced by TOP2 inhibition but also by the TOP1 inhibitor camptothecin. The transcriptional activation was associated with structural rearrangements in chromatin, notably the accumulation of γH2AX and the exchange of histone H1 with HMGB1 at AIRE target gene promoters. In addition, we found the transcriptional up-regulation to co-occur with the chromatin structural changes within the genomic cluster of carcinoembryonic antigen-like cellular adhesion molecule genes. Overall, our results suggest that the presence of AIRE can trigger molecular events leading to an altered chromatin landscape and the enhanced transcription of low-expressed genes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Restriction-based Multiple-fragment Assembly Strategy to Avoid Random Mutation during Long cDNA Cloning

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Shang; Chen, Wen; Zhang, Kai; Jiao, Peng; Mo, Lihua; Yang, Xiaoxu; Hu, Xiang; Zhang, Jian; Wei, Chenxi; Xiang, Shuanglin

    2015-01-01

    Long fragment cloning is a challenge for its difficulty in accurate amplifying and tendency to get unwanted mutation. Here we discuss Restriction-based Multiple-fragment Assembly Strategy's advantages and limitations. In this strategy, rather than PCR amplifying the entire coding sequence (CDS) at one time, we amplified and sequenced smaller fragments which are shorter than 1.5kb spanning the CDS. After that, the sequence-proved fragments were assembled by digestion-ligation cloning to the ta...

  9. Pirh2: an E3 ligase with central roles in the regulation of cell cycle, DNA damage response, and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halaby, Marie-jo; Hakem, Razqallah; Hakem, Anne

    2013-09-01

    Ubiquitylation is currently recognized as a major posttranslational modification that regulates diverse cellular processes. Pirh2 is a ubiquitin E3 ligase that regulates the turnover and functionality of several proteins involved in cell proliferation and differentiation, cell cycle checkpoints, and cell death. Here we review the role of Pirh2 as a regulator of the DNA damage response through the ubiquitylation of p53, Chk2, p73, and PolH. By ubiquitylating these proteins, Pirh2 regulates cell cycle checkpoints and cell death in response to DNA double-strand breaks or the formation of bulky DNA lesions. We also discuss how Pirh2 affects cell proliferation and differentiation in unstressed conditions through ubiquitylation and degradation of c-Myc, p63, and p27(kip1). Finally, we link these different functions of Pirh2 to its role as a tumor suppressor in mice and as a prognosis marker in various human cancer subtypes.

  10. Virus-sized self-assembling lamellar complexes between plasmid DNA and cationic micelles promote gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitard, Bruno; Aguerre, Olivier; Airiau, Marc; Lachagès, Anne-Marie; Boukhnikachvili, Tsiala; Byk, Gérardo; Dubertret, Catherine; Herviou, Christian; Scherman, Daniel; Mayaux, Jean-François; Crouzet, Joël

    1997-01-01

    Gene therapy is based on the vectorization of genes to target cells and their subsequent expression. Cationic amphiphile-mediated delivery of plasmid DNA is the nonviral gene transfer method most often used. We examined the supramolecular structure of lipopolyamine/plasmid DNA complexes under various condensing conditions. Plasmid DNA complexation with lipopolyamine micelles whose mean diameter was 5 nm revealed three domains, depending on the lipopolyamine/plasmid DNA ratio. These domains respectively corresponded to negatively, neutrally, and positively charged complexes. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray scattering experiments on complexes originating from these three domains showed that although their morphology depends on the lipopolyamine/plasmid DNA ratio, their particle structure consists of ordered domains characterized by even spacing of 80 Å, irrespective of the lipid/DNA ratio. The most active lipopolyamine/DNA complexes for gene transfer were positively charged. They were characterized by fully condensed DNA inside spherical particles (diameter: 50 nm) sandwiched between lipid bilayers. These results show that supercoiled plasmid DNA is able to transform lipopolyamine micelles into a supramolecular organization characterized by ordered lamellar domains. PMID:9405626

  11. Auto-assembly of nanometer thick, water soluble layers of plasmid DNA complexed with diamines and basic amino acids on graphite: Greatest DNA protection is obtained with arginine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, T T; Boulanouar, O; Heintz, O; Fromm, M

    2017-02-01

    We have investigated the ability of diamines as well as basic amino acids to condense DNA onto highly ordered pyrolytic graphite with minimum damage after re-dissolution in water. Based on a bibliographic survey we briefly summarize DNA binding properties with diamines as compared to basic amino acids. Thus, solutions of DNA complexed with these linkers were drop-cast in order to deposit ultra-thin layers on the surface of HOPG in the absence or presence of Tris buffer. Atomic Force Microscopy analyses showed that, at a fixed ligand-DNA mixing ratio of 16, the mean thickness of the layers can be statistically predicted to lie in the range 0-50nm with a maximum standard deviation ±6nm, using a simple linear law depending on the DNA concentration. The morphology of the layers appears to be ligand-dependent. While the layers containing diamines present holes, those formed in the presence of basic amino acids, except for lysine, are much more compact and dense. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy measurements provide compositional information indicating that, compared to the maximum number of DNA sites to which the ligands may bind, the basic amino acids Arg and His are present in large excess. Conservation of the supercoiled topology of the DNA plasmids was studied after recovery of the complex layers in water. Remarkably, arginine has the best protection capabilities whether Tris was present or not in the initial solution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Adenovirus core protein VII down-regulates the DNA damage response on the host genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avgousti, Daphne C; Della Fera, Ashley N; Otter, Clayton J; Herrmann, Christin; Pancholi, Neha J; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2017-08-09

    Viral manipulation of cellular proteins allows viruses to suppress host defenses and generate infectious progeny. Due to the linear double-stranded DNA nature of the adenovirus genome, the cellular DNA damage response (DDR) is considered a barrier for successful infection. The adenovirus genome is packaged with protein VII, a viral-encoded histone-like core protein that is suggested to protect incoming viral genomes from detection by cellular DNA damage machinery. We showed that protein VII localizes to host chromatin during infection, leading us to hypothesize that protein VII may affect DNA damage responses on the cellular genome. Here, we show that protein VII at cellular chromatin results in a significant decrease in accumulation of phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX) following irradiation, indicating that protein VII inhibits DDR signaling. The oncoprotein SET was recently suggested to modulate the DDR by affecting access of repair proteins to chromatin. Since protein VII binds SET, we investigated a role for SET in DDR inhibition by protein VII. We show that knockdown of SET partially rescues the protein VII-induced decrease in γH2AX accumulation on the host genome, suggesting that SET is required for inhibition. Finally, we show that knockdown of SET also allows ATM to localize to incoming viral genomes bound by protein VII during infection with a mutant lacking early region E4. Together, our data suggest that the protein VII-SET interaction contributes to DDR evasion by adenovirus. Our results provide an additional example of a strategy used by adenovirus to manipulate the host DDR and show how viruses can modify cellular processes through manipulation of host chromatin. IMPORTANCE The DNA damage response (DDR) is a cellular network crucial for maintaining genome integrity. DNA viruses replicating in the nucleus challenge the resident genome and must overcome cellular responses, including the DDR. Adenoviruses are prevalent human pathogens that can cause a

  13. CADM1 controls actin cytoskeleton assembly and regulates extracellular matrix adhesion in human mast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P Moiseeva

    Full Text Available CADM1 is a major receptor for the adhesion of mast cells (MCs to fibroblasts, human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs and neurons. It also regulates E-cadherin and alpha6beta4 integrin in other cell types. Here we investigated a role for CADM1 in MC adhesion to both cells and extracellular matrix (ECM. Downregulation of CADM1 in the human MC line HMC-1 resulted not only in reduced adhesion to HASMCs, but also reduced adhesion to their ECM. Time-course studies in the presence of EDTA to inhibit integrins demonstrated that CADM1 provided fast initial adhesion to HASMCs and assisted with slower adhesion to ECM. CADM1 downregulation, but not antibody-dependent CADM1 inhibition, reduced MC adhesion to ECM, suggesting indirect regulation of ECM adhesion. To investigate potential mechanisms, phosphotyrosine signalling and polymerisation of actin filaments, essential for integrin-mediated adhesion, were examined. Modulation of CADM1 expression positively correlated with surface KIT levels and polymerisation of cortical F-actin in HMC-1 cells. It also influenced phosphotyrosine signalling and KIT tyrosine autophosphorylation. CADM1 accounted for 46% of surface KIT levels and 31% of F-actin in HMC-1 cells. CADM1 downregulation resulted in elongation of cortical actin filaments in both HMC-1 cells and human lung MCs and increased cell rigidity of HMC-1 cells. Collectively these data suggest that CADM1 is a key adhesion receptor, which regulates MC net adhesion, both directly through CADM1-dependent adhesion, and indirectly through the regulation of other adhesion receptors. The latter is likely to occur via docking of KIT and polymerisation of cortical F-actin. Here we propose a stepwise model of adhesion with CADM1 as a driving force for net MC adhesion.

  14. Histone dosage regulates DNA damage sensitivity in a checkpoint-independent manner by the homologous recombination pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Dun; Burkhart, Sarah Lyn; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Kabbaj, Marie-Helene Miquel; Gunjan, Akash

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, multiple genes encode histone proteins that package genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and regulate its accessibility. Because of their positive charge, ‘free’ (non-chromatin associated) histones can bind non-specifically to the negatively charged DNA and affect its metabolism, including DNA repair. We have investigated the effect of altering histone dosage on DNA repair in budding yeast. An increase in histone gene dosage resulted in enhanced DNA damage sensitivity, whereas deletion of a H3–H4 gene pair resulted in reduced levels of free H3 and H4 concomitant with resistance to DNA damaging agents, even in mutants defective in the DNA damage checkpoint. Studies involving the repair of a HO endonuclease-mediated DNA double-strand break (DSB) at the MAT locus show enhanced repair efficiency by the homologous recombination (HR) pathway on a reduction in histone dosage. Cells with reduced histone dosage experience greater histone loss around a DSB, whereas the recruitment of HR factors is concomitantly enhanced. Further, free histones compete with the HR machinery for binding to DNA and associate with certain HR factors, potentially interfering with HR-mediated repair. Our findings may have important implications for DNA repair, genomic stability, carcinogenesis and aging in human cells that have dozens of histone genes. PMID:22850743

  15. A simplified and versatile system for the simultaneous expression of multiple siRNAs in mammalian cells using Gibson DNA Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Fang; Chen, Xiang; Liao, Zhan; Yan, Zhengjian; Wang, Zhongliang; Deng, Youlin; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Zhonglin; Ye, Jixing; Qiao, Min; Li, Ruifang; Denduluri, Sahitya; Wang, Jing; Wei, Qiang; Li, Melissa; Geng, Nisha; Zhao, Lianggong; Zhou, Guolin; Zhang, Penghui; Luu, Hue H; Haydon, Rex C; Reid, Russell R; Yang, Tian; He, Tong-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) denotes sequence-specific mRNA degradation induced by short interfering double-stranded RNA (siRNA) and has become a revolutionary tool for functional annotation of mammalian genes, as well as for development of novel therapeutics. The practical applications of RNAi are usually achieved by expressing short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) or siRNAs in cells. However, a major technical challenge is to simultaneously express multiple siRNAs to silence one or more genes. We previously developed pSOS system, in which siRNA duplexes are made from oligo templates driven by opposing U6 and H1 promoters. While effective, it is not equipped to express multiple siRNAs in a single vector. Gibson DNA Assembly (GDA) is an in vitro recombination system that has the capacity to assemble multiple overlapping DNA molecules in a single isothermal step. Here, we developed a GDA-based pSOK assembly system for constructing single vectors that express multiple siRNA sites. The assembly fragments were generated by PCR amplifications from the U6-H1 template vector pB2B. GDA assembly specificity was conferred by the overlapping unique siRNA sequences of insert fragments. To prove the technical feasibility, we constructed pSOK vectors that contain four siRNA sites and three siRNA sites targeting human and mouse β-catenin, respectively. The assembly reactions were efficient, and candidate clones were readily identified by PCR screening. Multiple β-catenin siRNAs effectively silenced endogenous β-catenin expression, inhibited Wnt3A-induced β-catenin/Tcf4 reporter activity and expression of Wnt/β-catenin downstream genes. Silencing β-catenin in mesenchymal stem cells inhibited Wnt3A-induced early osteogenic differentiation and significantly diminished synergistic osteogenic activity between BMP9 and Wnt3A in vitro and in vivo. These findings demonstrate that the GDA-based pSOK system has been proven simplistic, effective and versatile for simultaneous expression of multiple

  16. Fluorometric sensing of DNA using curcumin encapsulated in nanoparticle-assembled microcapsules prepared from poly(diallylammonium chloride-co-sulfur dioxide)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patra, D.; Aridi, R.; Bouhadir, K.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the synthesis of microcapsules (MCs) containing self-assembled nanoparticles formed from poly[diallylammonium chloride-co-(sulfur dioxide)] in the presence of citrate and silica sol nanoparticles. The MCs are spherical, and SEM and optical microscopy reveal them to have micrometer size. The fluorescent probe curcumin was encapsulated in the MCs and found to be located in the shell. The fluorescence of curcumin in the MCs is altered depending on their microenvironment. Effects of pH and ammonia on the fluorescence of curcumin in the MCs also were studied. The brightness of the probe in the MCs increases on addition of DNA. The effect was used to determine DNA from fish sperm by fluorometry. The association constant (K) is 4000 mL. g -1 , and the number of binding sites is ∼1.0. (author)

  17. Small RNA-mediated regulation of DNA dosage in the ciliateOxytricha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Jaspreet S; Clay, Derek M; Moreira, Sandrine; Wang, Xing; Landweber, Laura F

    2018-01-01

    Dicer-dependent small noncoding RNAs play important roles in gene regulation in a wide variety of organisms. Endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are part of an ancient pathway of transposon control in plants and animals. The ciliate, Oxytricha trifallax, has approximately 16,000 gene-sized chromosomes in its somatic nucleus. Long noncoding RNAs establish high ploidy levels at the onset of sexual development, but the factors that regulate chromosome copy numbers during cell division and growth have been a mystery. We report a novel function of a class of Dicer (Dcl-1)- and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP)-dependent endogenous small RNAs in regulating chromosome copy number and gene dosage in O. trifallax Asexually growing populations express an abundant class of 21-nt sRNAs that map to both coding and noncoding regions of most chromosomes. These sRNAs are bound to chromatin and their levels surprisingly do not correlate with mRNA levels. Instead, the levels of these small RNAs correlate with genomic DNA copy number. Reduced sRNA levels in dcl-1 or rdrp mutants lead to concomitant reduction in chromosome copy number. Furthermore, these cells show no signs of transposon activation, but instead display irregular nuclear architecture and signs of replication stress. In conclusion, Oxytricha Dcl-1 and RdRP-dependent small RNAs that derive from the somatic nucleus contribute to the maintenance of gene dosage, possibly via a role in DNA replication, offering a novel role for these small RNAs in eukaryotes. © 2018 Khurana et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  18. Temperature-Controlled Encapsulation and Release of an Active Enzyme in the Cavity of a Self-Assembled DNA Nanocage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Sissel; Iacovelli, Federico; Falconi, Mattia

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT We demonstrate temperature-controlled encapsulation and release of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase using a preassembled and covalently closed three-dimensional DNA cage structure as a controllable encapsulation device. The utilized cage structure was covalently closed and composed of 12...... double-stranded B-DNA helices that constituted the edges of the structure. The double stranded helices were interrupted by short single-stranded thymidine linkers constituting the cage corners except for one, which was composed by four 32 nucleotide long stretches of DNA with a sequence that allowed them...... of the cargo in the central cavity of the cage at 4 C. The entrapped enzyme was catalytically active inside the DNA cage and was able to convert substrate molecules penetrating the apertures in the DNA lattice that surrounded the central cavity of the cage....

  19. Lrp, a major regulatory protein in Escherichia coli, bends DNA and can organize the assembly of a higher-order nucleoprotein structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q; Calvo, J M

    1993-06-01

    Lrp (Leucine-responsive regulatory protein) is a global regulatory protein that controls the expression of many operons in Escherichia coli. One of those operons, ilvIH, contains six Lrp binding sites located within a several hundred base pair region upstream of the promoter region. Analysis of the binding of Lrp to a set of circularly permuted DNA fragments from this region indicates that Lrp induces DNA bending. The results of DNase I footprinting experiments suggest that Lrp binding to this region facilitates the formation of a higher-order nucleoprotein structure. To define more precisely the degree of bending associated with Lrp binding, one or two binding sites were separately cloned into a pBend vector and analyzed. Lrp induced a bend of approximately 52 degrees upon binding to a single binding site, and the angle of bending is increased to at least 135 degrees when Lrp binds to two adjacent sites. Lrp-induced DNA bending, and a natural sequence-directed bend that exists within ilvIH DNA, may be architectural elements that facilitate the assembly of a nucleoprotein complex.

  20. The PCNA-associated protein PARI negatively regulates homologous recombination via the inhibition of DNA repair synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burkovics, Peter; Dome, Lili; Juhasz, Szilvia

    2016-01-01

    Successful and accurate completion of the replication of damage-containing DNA requires mainly recombination and RAD18-dependent DNA damage tolerance pathways. RAD18 governs at least two distinct mechanisms: translesion synthesis (TLS) and template switching (TS)-dependent pathways. Whereas TS...... is mainly error-free, TLS can work in an error-prone manner and, as such, the regulation of these pathways requires tight control to prevent DNA errors and potentially oncogenic transformation and tumorigenesis. In humans, the PCNA-associated recombination inhibitor (PARI) protein has recently been shown...... to inhibit homologous recombination (HR) events. Here, we describe a biochemical mechanism in which PARI functions as an HR regulator after replication fork stalling and during double-strand break repair. In our reconstituted biochemical system, we show that PARI inhibits DNA repair synthesis during...

  1. RUNX1 regulates site specificity of DNA demethylation by recruitment of DNA demethylation machineries in hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takahiro; Shimizu, Yuri; Furuhata, Erina; Maeda, Shiori; Kishima, Mami; Nishimura, Hajime; Enomoto, Saaya; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Suzuki, Harukazu

    2017-09-12

    RUNX1 is an essential master transcription factor in hematopoietic development and plays important roles in immune functions. Although the gene regulatory mechanism of RUNX1 has been characterized extensively, the epigenetic role of RUNX1 remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that RUNX1 contributes DNA demethylation in a binding site-directed manner in human hematopoietic cells. Overexpression analysis of RUNX1 showed the RUNX1-binding site-directed DNA demethylation. The RUNX1-mediated DNA demethylation was also observed in DNA replication-arrested cells, suggesting an involvement of active demethylation mechanism. Coimmunoprecipitation in hematopoietic cells showed physical interactions between RUNX1 and DNA demethylation machinery enzymes TET2, TET3, TDG, and GADD45. Further chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing revealed colocalization of RUNX1 and TET2 in the same genomic regions, indicating recruitment of DNA demethylation machinery by RUNX1. Finally, methylome analysis revealed significant overrepresentation of RUNX1-binding sites at demethylated regions during hematopoietic development. Collectively, the present data provide evidence that RUNX1 contributes site specificity of DNA demethylation by recruitment of TET and other demethylation-related enzymes to its binding sites in hematopoietic cells.

  2. DNA-guided assembly of a five-component enzyme cascade for enhanced conversion of cellulose to gluconic acid and H2O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Yu, Sooyoun; Myung, Nosang; Chen, Wilfred

    2017-12-10

    Enzymatic fuel cells have received considerable attention because of their potential for direct conversion of abundant raw materials such as cellulose to electricity. The use of multi-enzyme cascades is particularly attractive as they offer the possibility of achieving a series of complex reactions at higher efficiencies. Here we reported the use of a DNA-guided approach to assemble a five-component enzyme cascade for direct conversion of cellulose to gluconic acid and H 2 O 2 . Site-specific co-localization of β-glucosidase and glucose oxidase resulted in over 11-fold improvement in H 2 O 2 production from cellobiose, highlighting the benefit of substrate channeling. Although a more modest 1.5-fold improvement in H 2 O 2 production was observed using a five-enzyme cascade, due to H 2 O 2 inhibition on enzyme activity, these results demonstrated the possibility to enhance the production of gluconic acid and H 2 O 2 directly from cellulose by DNA-guided enzyme assembly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The intracellular immune receptor Rx1 regulates the DNA-binding activity of a Golden2-like transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Philip D; Dixon, Christopher H; Slootweg, Erik J; Sukarta, Octavina C A; Yang, Ally W H; Hughes, Timothy R; Sharples, Gary J; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L W; Goverse, Aska; Cann, Martin J

    2018-03-02

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable the immune system to recognize and respond to pathogen attack. An early consequence of immune activation is transcriptional reprogramming, and some NLRs have been shown to act in the nucleus and interact with transcription factors. The Rx1 NLR protein of potato is further able to bind and distort double-stranded DNA. However, Rx1 host targets that support a role for Rx1 in transcriptional reprogramming at DNA are unknown. Here, we report a functional interaction between Rx1 and Nb Glk1, a Golden2-like transcription factor. Rx1 binds to Nb Glk1 in vitro and in planta. Nb Glk1 binds to known Golden2-like consensus DNA sequences. Rx1 reduces the binding affinity of Nb Glk1 for DNA in vitro. Nb Glk1 activates cellular responses to potato virus X, whereas Rx1 associates with Nb Glk1 and prevents its assembly on DNA in planta unless activated by PVX. This study provides new mechanistic insight into how an NLR can coordinate an immune signaling response at DNA following pathogen perceptions. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. The Hcp-like protein HilE inhibits homodimerization and DNA binding of the virulence-associated transcriptional regulator HilD inSalmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes-Amaya, Claudia C; Valdés-García, Gilberto; Juárez-González, Víctor R; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Bustamante, Víctor H

    2018-03-13

    HilD is an AraC-like transcriptional regulator that plays a central role in Salmonella virulence. HilD controls the expression of the genes within the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) and of several genes located outside SPI-1, which are mainly required for Salmonella invasion of host cells. The expression, amount and activity of HilD are tightly controlled by the activities of several factors. The HilE protein represses the expression of the SPI-1 genes through its interaction with HilD; however, the mechanism by which HilE affects HilD is unknown. In this study, we used genetic and biochemical assays revealing how HilE controls the transcriptional activity of HilD. We found that HilD needs to assemble in homodimers to induce expression of its target genes. Our results further indicated that HilE individually interacts with each the central and the C-terminal HilD regions, mediating dimerization and DNA binding, respectively. We also observed that these interactions consistently inhibit HilD dimerization and DNA binding. Interestingly, a computational analysis revealed that HilE shares sequence and structural similarities with Hcp proteins, which act as structural components of type 6 secretion systems in Gram-negative bacteria. In conclusion, our results uncover the molecular mechanism by which the Hcp-like protein HilE controls dimerization and DNA binding of the virulence-promoting transcriptional regulator HilD. Our findings may indicate that HilE's activity represents a functional adaptation during the evolution of Salmonella pathogenicity. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. DNA mediated wire-like clusters of self-assembled TiO2 nanomaterials: supercapacitor and dye sensitized solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithiyanantham, U.; Ramadoss, Ananthakumar; Ede, Sivasankara Rao; Kundu, Subrata

    2014-06-01

    A new route for the formation of wire-like clusters of TiO2 nanomaterials self-assembled in DNA scaffold within an hour of reaction time is reported. TiO2 nanomaterials are synthesized by the reaction of titanium-isopropoxide with ethanol and water in the presence of DNA under continuous stirring and heating at 60 °C. The individual size of the TiO2 NPs self-assembled in DNA and the diameter of the wires can be tuned by controlling the DNA to Ti-salt molar ratios and other reaction parameters. The eventual diameter of the individual particles varies between 15 +/- 5 nm ranges, whereas the length of the nanowires varies in the 2-3 μm range. The synthesized wire-like DNA-TiO2 nanomaterials are excellent materials for electrochemical supercapacitor and DSSC applications. From the electrochemical supercapacitor experiment, it was found that the TiO2 nanomaterials showed different specific capacitance (Cs) values for the various nanowires, and the order of Cs values are as follows: wire-like clusters (small size) > wire-like clusters (large size). The highest Cs of 2.69 F g-1 was observed for TiO2 having wire-like structure with small sizes. The study of the long term cycling stability of wire-like clusters (small size) electrode were shown to be stable, retaining ca. 80% of the initial specific capacitance, even after 5000 cycles. The potentiality of the DNA-TiO2 nanomaterials was also tested in photo-voltaic applications and the observed efficiency was found higher in the case of wire-like TiO2 nanostructures with larger sizes compared to smaller sizes. In future, the described method can be extended for the synthesis of other oxide based materials on DNA scaffold and can be further used in other applications like sensors, Li-ion battery materials or treatment for environmental waste water.A new route for the formation of wire-like clusters of TiO2 nanomaterials self-assembled in DNA scaffold within an hour of reaction time is reported. TiO2 nanomaterials are

  6. hSSB1 phosphorylation is dynamically regulated by DNA-PK and PPP-family protein phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Nicholas W; Paquet, Nicolas; Shirran, Sally L; Bolderson, Emma; Kariawasam, Ruvini; Touma, Christine; Fallahbaghery, Azadeh; Gamsjaeger, Roland; Cubeddu, Liza; Botting, Catherine; Pollock, Pamela M; O'Byrne, Kenneth J; Richard, Derek J

    2017-06-01

    The maintenance of genomic stability is essential for cellular viability and the prevention of diseases such as cancer. Human single-stranded DNA-binding protein 1 (hSSB1) is a protein with roles in the stabilisation and restart of stalled DNA replication forks, as well as in the repair of oxidative DNA lesions and double-strand DNA breaks. In the latter process, phosphorylation of threonine 117 by the ATM kinase is required for hSSB1 stability and efficient DNA repair. The regulation of hSSB1 in other DNA repair pathways has however remained unclear. Here we report that hSSB1 is also directly phosphorylated by DNA-PK at serine residue 134. While this modification is largely suppressed in undamaged cells by PPP-family protein phosphatases, S134 phosphorylation is enhanced following the disruption of replication forks and promotes cellular survival. Together, these data thereby represent a novel mechanism for hSSB1 regulation following the inhibition of replication. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. DNA damage regulates alternative splicing through changes in POL II elongation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, M.J.; Perez Santangelo, M.S.; De la Mata, M.; Kornblihtt, A.R.

    2008-01-01

    Many apoptotic genes are regulated via alternative splicing (AS) but little is known about the mechanisms controlling AS in stress situations derived from DNA damage. Here we show that ultraviolet (UV) radiation affects co-transcriptional, but not post transcriptional, AS through a systemic mechanism involving a CDK-9-dependent hyper phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II carboxy terminal domain (CTD) and a subsequent and unprecedented inhibition of transcriptional elongation, estimated in vivo and in real time by FRAP. To mimic this hyper phosphorylation we used CTD mutants with serines 2 or 5 substituted by glutamic acids and found that they not only display lower elongation rates but duplicate the effects of UV light on AS in the absence of irradiation. Consistently, substitution of the serines with alanines prevents the UV effect on splicing. These results represent the first in vivo proof of modulation of elongation in response to an environmental signal, affecting in turn the kinetic coupling between transcription and splicing. (authors)

  8. Evolutionarily conserved domain of heat shock transcription factor negatively regulates oligomerization and DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Azumi; Enoki, Yasuaki; Yamamoto, Noritaka; Sawai, Maki; Sakurai, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    Heat shock transcription factor (HSF) regulates the expression of genes encoding molecular chaperones and stress-responsive proteins. Conversion of HSF from a monomer to a homotrimer or heterotrimer is essential for its binding to heat shock elements (HSEs) comprised of inverted repeats of the pentamer nGAAn. Here, we constructed various human HSF1 derivatives and analyzed their transcriptional activity through the continuously and discontinuously arranged nGAAn units. We identified a short stretch of amino acids that inhibits the activation ability of HSF1, especially through discontinuous HSEs. This stretch is conserved in HSFs of various organisms, interacts with the hydrophobic repeat regions that mediate HSF oligomerization, and impedes homotrimer formation and DNA binding. This conserved domain plays an important role in maintaining HSF in an inactive monomeric form. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. CHH islands: de novo DNA methylation in near-gene chromatin regulation in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gent, Jonathan I; Ellis, Nathanael A; Guo, Lin; Harkess, Alex E; Yao, Yingyin; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Dawe, R Kelly

    2013-04-01

    Small RNA-mediated regulation of chromatin structure is an important means of suppressing unwanted genetic activity in diverse plants, fungi, and animals. In plants specifically, 24-nt siRNAs direct de novo methylation to repetitive DNA, both foreign and endogenous, in a process known as RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM). Many components of the de novo methylation machinery have been identified recently, including multiple RNA polymerases, but specific genetic features that trigger methylation remain poorly understood. By applying whole-genome bisulfite sequencing to maize, we found that transposons close to cellular genes (particularly within 1 kb of either a gene start or end) are strongly associated with de novo methylation, as evidenced both by 24-nt siRNAs and by methylation specifically in the CHH sequence context. In addition, we found that the major classes of transposons exhibited a gradient of CHH methylation determined by proximity to genes. Our results further indicate that intergenic chromatin in maize exists in two major forms that are distinguished based on proximity to genes-one form marked by dense CG and CHG methylation and lack of transcription, and one marked by CHH methylation and activity of multiple forms of RNA polymerase. The existence of the latter, which we call CHH islands, may have implications for how cellular gene expression could be coordinated with immediately adjacent transposon repression in a large genome with a complex organization of genes interspersed in a landscape of transposons.

  10. Transcription factor interactions: Selectors of positive or negative regulation from a single DNA element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, M.I.; Miner, J.N.; Yoshinaga, S.K.; Yamamoto, K.R. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

    1990-09-14

    The mechanism by which a single factor evokes opposite regulatory effects from a specific DNA sequence is not well understood. In this study, a 25-base pair element that resides upstream of the mouse proliferin gene was examined; it conferred on linked promoters either positive or negative glucocorticoid regulation, depending upon physiological context. This sequence, denoted a composite glucocorticoid response element (GRE), was bound selective in vitro both by the glucocorticoid receptor and by c-Jun and c-Fos, components of the phorbol ester-activated AP-1 transcription factor. Indeed, c-Jun and c-Fos served as selectors of hormone responsiveness: the composite GRE was inactive in the absence of c-Jun, whereas it conferred a positive glucocorticoid effect in the presence of c-Jun, and a negative glucocorticoid effect in the presence of c-Jun and relatively high levels of c-Fos. The receptor also interacted selectively with c-Jun in vitro. A general model for composite GRE action is proposed that invokes both DNA binding and protein-protein interactions by receptor and nonreceptor factors.

  11. A Novel Aspect of Tumorigenesis—BMI1 Functions in Regulating DNA Damage Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozeng Lin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BMI1 plays critical roles in maintaining the self-renewal of hematopoietic, neural, intestinal stem cells, and cancer stem cells (CSCs for a variety of cancer types. BMI1 promotes cell proliferative life span and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT. Upregulation of BMI1 occurs in multiple cancer types and is associated with poor prognosis. Mechanistically, BMI1 is a subunit of the Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1, and binds the catalytic RING2/RING1b subunit to form a functional E3 ubiquitin ligase. Through mono-ubiquitination of histone H2A at lysine 119 (H2A-K119Ub, BMI1 represses multiple gene loci; among these, the INK4A/ARF locus has been most thoroughly investigated. The locus encodes the p16INK4A and p14/p19ARF tumor suppressors that function in the pRb and p53 pathways, respectively. Its repression contributes to BMI1-derived tumorigenesis. BMI1 also possesses other oncogenic functions, specifically its regulative role in DNA damage response (DDR. In this process, BMI1 ubiquitinates histone H2A and γH2AX, thereby facilitating the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs through stimulating homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining. Additionally, BMI1 compromises DSB-induced checkpoint activation independent of its-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. We review the emerging role of BMI1 in DDR regulation and discuss its impact on BMI1-derived tumorigenesis.

  12. A Novel Aspect of Tumorigenesis—BMI1 Functions in Regulating DNA Damage Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaozeng; Ojo, Diane; Wei, Fengxiang; Wong, Nicholas; Gu, Yan; Tang, Damu

    2015-01-01

    BMI1 plays critical roles in maintaining the self-renewal of hematopoietic, neural, intestinal stem cells, and cancer stem cells (CSCs) for a variety of cancer types. BMI1 promotes cell proliferative life span and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Upregulation of BMI1 occurs in multiple cancer types and is associated with poor prognosis. Mechanistically, BMI1 is a subunit of the Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), and binds the catalytic RING2/RING1b subunit to form a functional E3 ubiquitin ligase. Through mono-ubiquitination of histone H2A at lysine 119 (H2A-K119Ub), BMI1 represses multiple gene loci; among these, the INK4A/ARF locus has been most thoroughly investigated. The locus encodes the p16INK4A and p14/p19ARF tumor suppressors that function in the pRb and p53 pathways, respectively. Its repression contributes to BMI1-derived tumorigenesis. BMI1 also possesses other oncogenic functions, specifically its regulative role in DNA damage response (DDR). In this process, BMI1 ubiquitinates histone H2A and γH2AX, thereby facilitating the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) through stimulating homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining. Additionally, BMI1 compromises DSB-induced checkpoint activation independent of its-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. We review the emerging role of BMI1 in DDR regulation and discuss its impact on BMI1-derived tumorigenesis. PMID:26633535

  13. Friends-enemies: endogenous retroviruses are major transcriptional regulators of human DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzdin, Anton A.; Prassolov, Vladimir; Garazha, Andrew V.

    2017-06-01

    Endogenous retroviruses are mobile genetic elements hardly distinguishable from infectious, or “exogenous”, retroviruses at the time of insertion in the host DNA. Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are not rare. They gave rise to multiple families of closely related mobile elements that occupy 8% of the human genome. Together, they shape genomic regulatory landscape by providing at least 320,000 human transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) located on 110,000 individual HERV elements. The HERVs host as many as 155,000 mapped DNaseI hypersensitivity sites, which denote loci active in the regulation of gene expression or chromatin structure. The contemporary view of the HERVs evolutionary dynamics suggests that at the early stages after insertion, the HERV is treated by the host cells as a foreign genetic element, and is likely to be suppressed by the targeted methylation and mutations. However, at the later stages, when significant number of mutations has been already accumulated and when the retroviral genes are broken, the regulatory potential of a HERV may be released and recruited to modify the genomic balance of transcription factor binding sites. This process goes together with further accumulation and selection of mutations, which reshape the regulatory landscape of the human DNA. However, developmental reprogramming, stress or pathological conditions like cancer, inflammation and infectious diseases, can remove the blocks limiting expression and HERV-mediated host gene regulation. This, in turn, can dramatically alter the gene expression equilibrium and shift it to a newer state, thus further amplifying instability and exacerbating the stressful situation.

  14. The levels of male gametic mitochondrial DNA are highly regulated in angiosperms with regard to mitochondrial inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan-Yang; Zhang, Quan; Liu, Yang; Lin, Zhi-Fu; Zhang, Shao-Xiang; Sun, Meng-Xiang; Sodmergen

    2010-07-01

    The mechanisms that regulate mitochondrial inheritance are not yet clear, even though it is 100 years since the first description of non-Mendelian genetics. Here, we quantified the copy numbers of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the gametic cells of angiosperm species. We demonstrate that each egg cell from Arabidopsis thaliana, Antirrhinum majus, and Nicotiana tabacum possesses 59.0, 42.7, and 73.0 copies of mtDNA on average, respectively. These values are equivalent to those in Arabidopsis mesophyll cells, at 61.7 copies per cell. On the other hand, sperm or generative cells from Arabidopsis, A. majus, and N. tabacum possess minor amounts of mtDNA, at 0.083, 0.47, and 1 copy on average, respectively. We further reveal a 50-fold degradation of mtDNA during pollen development in A. majus. In contrast, markedly high levels of mtDNA are found in the male gametic cells of Cucumis melo and Pelargonium zonale (1296.3 and 256.7 copies, respectively). Our results provide direct evidence for mitochondrial genomic insufficiency in the eggs and somatic cells and indicate that a male gamete of an angiosperm may possess mtDNA at concentrations as high as 21-fold (C. melo) or as low as 0.1% (Arabidopsis) of the levels in somatic cells. These observations reveal the existence of a strong regulatory system for the male gametic mtDNA levels in angiosperms with regard to mitochondrial inheritance.

  15. The Levels of Male Gametic Mitochondrial DNA Are Highly Regulated in Angiosperms with Regard to Mitochondrial Inheritance[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan-Yang; Zhang, Quan; Liu, Yang; Lin, Zhi-Fu; Zhang, Shao-Xiang; Sun, Meng-Xiang; Sodmergen

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms that regulate mitochondrial inheritance are not yet clear, even though it is 100 years since the first description of non-Mendelian genetics. Here, we quantified the copy numbers of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the gametic cells of angiosperm species. We demonstrate that each egg cell from Arabidopsis thaliana, Antirrhinum majus, and Nicotiana tabacum possesses 59.0, 42.7, and 73.0 copies of mtDNA on average, respectively. These values are equivalent to those in Arabidopsis mesophyll cells, at 61.7 copies per cell. On the other hand, sperm or generative cells from Arabidopsis, A. majus, and N. tabacum possess minor amounts of mtDNA, at 0.083, 0.47, and 1 copy on average, respectively. We further reveal a 50-fold degradation of mtDNA during pollen development in A. majus. In contrast, markedly high levels of mtDNA are found in the male gametic cells of Cucumis melo and Pelargonium zonale (1296.3 and 256.7 copies, respectively). Our results provide direct evidence for mitochondrial genomic insufficiency in the eggs and somatic cells and indicate that a male gamete of an angiosperm may possess mtDNA at concentrations as high as 21-fold (C. melo) or as low as 0.1% (Arabidopsis) of the levels in somatic cells. These observations reveal the existence of a strong regulatory system for the male gametic mtDNA levels in angiosperms with regard to mitochondrial inheritance. PMID:20605854

  16. Torsional regulation of hRPA-induced unwinding of double-stranded DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vlaminck, I.; Vidic, I.; Van Loenhout, M.T.J.; Kanaar, R.; Lebbink, J.H.G.; Dekker, C.

    2010-01-01

    All cellular single-stranded (ss) DNA is rapidly bound and stabilized by single stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs). Replication protein A, the main eukaryotic SSB, is able to unwind double-stranded (ds) DNA by binding and stabilizing transiently forming bubbles of ssDNA. Here, we study the

  17. Using herbarium-derived DNAs to assemble a large-scale DNA barcode library for the vascular plants of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmina, Maria L; Braukmann, Thomas W A; Fazekas, Aron J; Graham, Sean W; Dewaard, Stephanie L; Rodrigues, Anuar; Bennett, Bruce A; Dickinson, Timothy A; Saarela, Jeffery M; Catling, Paul M; Newmaster, Steven G; Percy, Diana M; Fenneman, Erin; Lauron-Moreau, Aurélien; Ford, Bruce; Gillespie, Lynn; Subramanyam, Ragupathy; Whitton, Jeannette; Jennings, Linda; Metsger, Deborah; Warne, Connor P; Brown, Allison; Sears, Elizabeth; Dewaard, Jeremy R; Zakharov, Evgeny V; Hebert, Paul D N

    2017-12-01

    Constructing complete, accurate plant DNA barcode reference libraries can be logistically challenging for large-scale floras. Here we demonstrate the promise and challenges of using herbarium collections for building a DNA barcode reference library for the vascular plant flora of Canada. Our study examined 20,816 specimens representing 5076 of 5190 vascular plant species in Canada (98%). For 98% of the specimens, at least one of the DNA barcode regions was recovered from the plastid loci rbcL and matK and from the nuclear ITS2 region. We used beta regression to quantify the effects of age, type of preservation, and taxonomic affiliation (family) on DNA sequence recovery. Specimen age and method of preservation had significant effects on sequence recovery for all markers, but influenced some families more (e.g., Boraginaceae) than others (e.g., Asteraceae). Our DNA barcode library represents an unparalleled resource for metagenomic and ecological genetic research working on temperate and arctic biomes. An observed decline in sequence recovery with specimen age may be associated with poor primer matches, intragenomic variation (for ITS2), or inhibitory secondary compounds in some taxa.

  18. Paramecium tetraurelia chromatin assembly factor-1-like protein PtCAF-1 is involved in RNA-mediated control of DNA elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignarski, Michael; Singh, Aditi; Swart, Estienne C; Arambasic, Miroslav; Sandoval, Pamela Y; Nowacki, Mariusz

    2014-10-29

    Genome-wide DNA remodelling in the ciliate Paramecium is ensured by RNA-mediated trans-nuclear crosstalk between the germline and the somatic genomes during sexual development. The rearrangements include elimination of transposable elements, minisatellites and tens of thousands non-coding elements called internally eliminated sequences (IESs). The trans-nuclear genome comparison process employs a distinct class of germline small RNAs (scnRNAs) that are compared against the parental somatic genome to select the germline-specific subset of scnRNAs that subsequently target DNA elimination in the progeny genome. Only a handful of proteins involved in this process have been identified so far and the mechanism of DNA targeting is unknown. Here we describe chromatin assembly factor-1-like protein (PtCAF-1), which we show is required for the survival of sexual progeny and localizes first in the parental and later in the newly developing macronucleus. Gene silencing shows that PtCAF-1 is required for the elimination of transposable elements and a subset of IESs. PTCAF-1 depletion also impairs the selection of germline-specific scnRNAs during development. We identify specific histone modifications appearing during Paramecium development which are strongly reduced in PTCAF-1 depleted cells. Our results demonstrate the importance of PtCAF-1 for the epigenetic trans-nuclear cross-talk mechanism. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Label-free and ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescence detection of microRNA based on long-range self-assembled DNA nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ting; Chen, Xian; Hong, Cheng-Yi; Xu, Xiao-Ping; Yang, Huang-Hao

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemiluminescence (ECL) integrates the advantages of electrochemical detection and chemiluminescent techniques. The method has received particular attention because it is highly sensitive and selective, has a wide linear range but low reagent costs. The use of nanomaterials with their unique physical and chemical properties has led to new kinds of biosensors that exhibit high sensitivity and stability. Compared to other nanomaterials, DNA nanostructures are more biocompatible, more hydrophilic, and thus less prone to nonspecific adsorption onto the electrode surface. We describe here a label-free and ultrasensitive ECL biosensor for detecting a cancer-associated microRNA at a femtomolar level. We have designed two auxiliary probes that cause the formation of a long-range self-assembly in the form of a μm-long 1-dimensional DNA concatamer. These can be used as carriers for signal amplification. The intercalation of the ECL probe Ru(phen) 3 2+ into the grooves of the concatamers leads to a substantial increase in ECL intensity. This amplified sensor shows high selectivity for discriminating complementary target and other mismatched RNAs. The biosensor enables the quantification of the expression of microRNA-21 in MCF-7 cells. It also displays very low limits of detection and provides an alternative approach for the detection of RNA or DNA detection in diagnostics and gene analysis. (author)

  20. Restriction-based Multiple-fragment Assembly Strategy to Avoid Random Mutation during Long cDNA Cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shang; Chen, Wen; Zhang, Kai; Jiao, Peng; Mo, Lihua; Yang, Xiaoxu; Hu, Xiang; Zhang, Jian; Wei, Chenxi; Xiang, Shuanglin

    2015-01-01

    Long fragment cloning is a challenge for its difficulty in accurate amplifying and tendency to get unwanted mutation. Here we discuss Restriction-based Multiple-fragment Assembly Strategy's advantages and limitations. In this strategy, rather than PCR amplifying the entire coding sequence (CDS) at one time, we amplified and sequenced smaller fragments which are shorter than 1.5kb spanning the CDS. After that, the sequence-proved fragments were assembled by digestion-ligation cloning to the target vector. We test its universality in our script programmed in Python. Our data shows that, among the entire human and mouse CDS, at least 70% of long CDS cloning will benefit from this strategy.

  1. Endoglin expression in blood and endothelium is differentially regulated by modular assembly of the Ets/Gata hemangioblast code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimanda, John E; Chan, Wan Y I; Wilson, Nicola K; Smith, Aileen M; Kinston, Sarah; Knezevic, Kathy; Janes, Mary E; Landry, Josette-Renée; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Frampton, Jonathan; Tannahill, David; Ottersbach, Katrin; Follows, George A; Lacaud, Georges; Kouskoff, Valerie; Göttgens, Berthold

    2008-12-01

    Endoglin is an accessory receptor for TGF-beta signaling and is required for normal hemangioblast, early hematopoietic, and vascular development. We have previously shown that an upstream enhancer, Eng -8, together with the promoter region, mediates robust endothelial expression yet is inactive in blood. To identify hematopoietic regulatory elements, we used array-based methods to determine chromatin accessibility across the entire locus. Subsequent transgenic analysis of candidate elements showed that an endothelial enhancer at Eng +9 when combined with an element at Eng +7 functions as a strong hemato-endothelial enhancer. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-chip analysis demonstrated specific binding of Ets factors to the promoter as well as to the -8, +7+9 enhancers in both blood and endothelial cells. By contrast Pu.1, an Ets factor specific to the blood lineage, and Gata2 binding was only detected in blood. Gata2 was bound only at +7 and GATA motifs were required for hematopoietic activity. This modular assembly of regulators gives blood and endothelial cells the regulatory freedom to independently fine-tune gene expression and emphasizes the role of regulatory divergence in driving functional divergence.

  2. Tec kinases regulate actin assembly and cytokine expression in LPS-stimulated human neutrophils via JNK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemans, Rachel L; Arndt, Patrick G

    2009-01-01

    The acute inflammatory response involves neutrophils wherein recognition of bacterial products, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), activates intracellular signaling pathways. We have shown that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) c-Jun NH(2) terminal kinase (JNK) is activated by LPS in neutrophils and plays a critical role in monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 expression and actin assembly. As the Tec family kinases are expressed in neutrophils and regulate activation of the MAPKs in other cell systems, we hypothesized that the Tec kinases are an upstream component of the signaling pathway leading to LPS-induced MAPKs activation in neutrophils. Herein, we show that the Tec kinases are activated in LPS-stimulated human neutrophils and that inhibition of the Tec kinases, with leflunomide metabolite analog (LFM-A13), decreased LPS-induced JNK, but not p38, activity. Furthermore, LPS-induced actin polymerization as well as MCP-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1beta expression are dependent on Tec kinase activity.

  3. The Antiviral and Cancer Genomic DNA Deaminase APOBEC3H Is Regulated by an RNA-Mediated Dimerization Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaban, Nadine M; Shi, Ke; Lauer, Kate V; Carpenter, Michael A; Richards, Christopher M; Salamango, Daniel; Wang, Jiayi; Lopresti, Michael W; Banerjee, Surajit; Levin-Klein, Rena; Brown, William L; Aihara, Hideki; Harris, Reuben S

    2018-01-04

    Human APOBEC3H and homologous single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminases are unique to mammals. These DNA-editing enzymes function in innate immunity by restricting the replication of viruses and transposons. APOBEC3H also contributes to cancer mutagenesis. Here, we address the fundamental nature of RNA in regulating human APOBEC3H activities. APOBEC3H co-purifies with RNA as an inactive protein, and RNase A treatment enables strong DNA deaminase activity. RNA-binding-defective mutants demonstrate clear separation of function by becoming DNA hypermutators. Biochemical and crystallographic data demonstrate a mechanism in which double-stranded RNA mediates enzyme dimerization. Additionally, APOBEC3H separation-of-function mutants show that RNA binding is required for cytoplasmic localization, packaging into HIV-1 particles, and antiviral activity. Overall, these results support a model in which structured RNA negatively regulates the potentially harmful DNA deamination activity of APOBEC3H while, at the same time, positively regulating its antiviral activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Regulation of DNA Damage Response by Estrogen Receptor β-Mediated Inhibition of Breast Cancer Associated Gene 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Hao Lee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that ubiquitin E3 ligases are involved in cancer development as their mutations correlate with genomic instability and genetic susceptibility to cancer. Despite significant findings of cancer-driving mutations in the BRCA1 gene, estrogen receptor (ER-positive breast cancers progress upon treatment with DNA damaging-cytotoxic therapies. In order to understand the underlying mechanism by which ER-positive breast cancer cells develop resistance to DNA damaging agents, we employed an estrogen receptor agonist, Erb-041, to increase the activity of ERβ and negatively regulate the expression and function of the estrogen receptor α (ERα in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Upon Erb-041-mediated ERα down-regulation, the transcription of an ERα downstream effector, BCA2 (Breast Cancer Associated gene 2, correspondingly decreased. The ubiquitination of chromatin-bound BCA2 was induced by ultraviolet C (UVC irradiation but suppressed by Erb-041 pretreatment, resulting in a blunted DNA damage response. Upon BCA2 silencing, DNA double-stranded breaks increased with Rad51 up-regulation and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM activation. Mechanistically, UV-induced BCA2 ubiquitination and chromatin binding were found to promote DNA damage response and repair via the interaction of BCA2 with ATM, γH2AX and Rad51. Taken together, this study suggests that Erb-041 potentiates BCA2 dissociation from chromatin and co-localization with Rad51, resulting in inhibition of homologous recombination repair.

  5. CALM/AF10-positive leukemias show upregulation of genes involved in chromatin assembly and DNA repair processes and of genes adjacent to the breakpoint at 10p12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulaw, M A; Krause, A; Krause, A J; Deshpande, A J; Krause, L F; Rouhi, A; La Starza, R; Borkhardt, A; Buske, C; Mecucci, C; Ludwig, W-D; Lottaz, C; Bohlander, S K

    2012-05-01

    The t(10;11)(p12;q14) is a recurring chromosomal translocation that gives rise to the CALM/AF10 fusion gene, which is found in acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia and malignant lymphoma. We analyzed the fusion transcripts in 20 new cases of CALM/AF10-positive leukemias, and compared the gene expression profile of 10 of these to 125 patients with other types of leukemia and 10 normal bone marrow samples. Based on gene set enrichment analyses, the CALM/AF10-positive samples showed significant upregulation of genes involved in chromatin assembly and maintenance and DNA repair process, and downregulation of angiogenesis and cell communication genes. Interestingly, we observed a striking upregulation of four genes located immediately centromeric to the break point of the t(10;11)(p12;q14) on 10p12 (COMMD3 (COMM domain containing 3), BMI1 (B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 homolog), DNAJC1 (DnaJ (Hsp40) homolog subfamily C member 1) and SPAG6 (sperm associated antigen 6)). We also conducted semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis on leukemic blasts from a murine CALM/AF10 transplantation model that does not have the translocation. Commd3, Bmi1 and Dnajc1, but not Spag6 were upregulated in these samples. These results strongly indicate that the differential regulation of these three genes is not due to the break point effect but as a consequence of the CALM/AF10 fusion gene expression, though the mechanism of regulation is not well understood.

  6. Self-assembled carbon nanotube-DNA hybrids at the nanoscale : Morphological and conductive properties probed by atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santonicola, M.; Laurenzi, Susanna; Schön, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Our research is focused on the engineering of novel, highly sensitive and miniaturized hybrid materials from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and DNA molecules for applications in biosensors and medical devices. These hybrid sensors allow for a high degree of miniaturization, a key factor in the design of

  7. Nickel induces transcriptional down-regulation of DNA repair pathways in tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Susan E; Scanlon, Christine D; Hegan, Denise C; Sulkowski, Parker L; Glazer, Peter M

    2017-06-01

    The heavy metal nickel is a known carcinogen, and occupational exposure to nickel compounds has been implicated in human lung and nasal cancers. Unlike many other environmental carcinogens, however, nickel does not directly induce DNA mutagenesis, and the mechanism of nickel-related carcinogenesis remains incompletely understood. Cellular nickel exposure leads to signaling pathway activation, transcriptional changes and epigenetic remodeling, processes also impacted by hypoxia, which itself promotes tumor growth without causing direct DNA damage. One of the mechanisms by which hypoxia contributes to tumor growth is the generation of genomic instability via down-regulation of high-fidelity DNA repair pathways. Here, we find that nickel exposure similarly leads to down-regulation of DNA repair proteins involved in homology-dependent DNA double-strand break repair (HDR) and mismatch repair (MMR) in tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic human lung cells. Functionally, nickel induces a defect in HDR capacity, as determined by plasmid-based host cell reactivation assays, persistence of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks and cellular hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. Mechanistically, we find that nickel, in contrast to the metalloid arsenic, acutely induces transcriptional repression of HDR and MMR genes as part of a global transcriptional pattern similar to that seen with hypoxia. Finally, we find that exposure to low-dose nickel reduces the activity of the MLH1 promoter, but only arsenic leads to long-term MLH1 promoter silencing. Together, our data elucidate novel mechanisms of heavy metal carcinogenesis and contribute to our understanding of the influence of the microenvironment on the regulation of DNA repair pathways. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Anchoring of self-assembled plasmid DNA/ anti-DNA antibody/cationic lipid micelles on bisphosphonate-modified stent for cardiovascular gene delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma G

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Guilei Ma,1,# Yong Wang,1,# Ilia Fishbein,2 Mei Yu,1 Linhua Zhang,1 Ivan S Alferiev,2 Jing Yang,1 Cunxian Song,1 Robert J Levy2 1Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 2Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Abramson Research Building, Philadelphia, PA, USA #These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: To investigate the anchoring of plasmid DNA/anti-DNA antibody/cationic lipid tri-complex (DAC micelles onto bisphosphonate-modified 316 L coronary stents for cardiovascular site-specific gene delivery. Methods: Stents were first modified with polyallylamine bisphosphonate (PAA-BP, thereby enabling the retention of a PAA-BP molecular monolayer that permits the anchoring (via vector-binding molecules of DAC micelles. DAC micelles were then chemically linked onto the PAA-BP-modified stents by using N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithiol-propionate (SPDP as a crosslinker. Rhodamine-labeled DNA was used to assess the anchoring of DAC micelles, and radioactive-labeled antibody was used to evaluate binding capacity and stability. DAC micelles (encoding green fluorescent protein were tethered onto the PAA-BP-modified stents, which were assessed in cell culture. The presence of a PAA-BP molecular monolayer on the steel surface was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscope analysis. Results: The anchoring of DAC micelles was generally uniform and devoid of large-scale patches of defects. Isotopic quantification confirmed that the amount of antibody chemically linked on the stents was 17-fold higher than that of the physical adsorbed control stents and its retention time was also significantly longer. In cell culture, numerous green fluorescent protein-positive cells were found on the PAA-BP modified stents, which demonstrated high localization and efficiency of gene delivery. Conclusion: The DAC micelle

  9. Phylogeny, expression patterns and regulation of DNA Methyltransferases in early development of the flatfish, Solea senegalensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmino, Joana; Carballo, Carlos; Armesto, Paula; Campinho, Marco A; Power, Deborah M; Manchado, Manuel

    2017-07-17

    The identification of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmt) expression patterns during development and their regulation is important to understand the epigenetic mechanisms that modulate larval plasticity in marine fish. In this study, dnmt1 and dnmt3 paralogs were identified in the flatfish Solea senegalensis and expression patterns in early developmental stages and juveniles were determined. Additionally, the regulation of Dnmt transcription by a specific inhibitor (5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine) and temperature was evaluated. Five paralog genes of dnmt3, namely dnmt3aa, dnmt3ab, dnmt3ba, dnmt3bb.1 and dnmt3bb.2 and one gene for dnmt1 were identified. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the dnmt gene family was highly conserved in teleosts and three fish-specific genes, dnmt3aa, dnmt3ba and dnmt3bb.2 have evolved. The spatio-temporal expression patterns of four dnmts (dnmt1, dnmt3aa, dnmt3ab and dnmt3bb.1) were different in early larval stages although all of them reduced expression with the age and were detected in neural organs and dnmt3aa appeared specific to somites. In juveniles, the four dnmt genes were expressed in brain and hematopoietic tissues such as kidney, spleen and gills. Treatment of sole embryos with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine down-regulated dntm1 and up-regulated dntm3aa. Moreover, in lecithotrophic larval stages, dnmt3aa and dnmt3ab were temperature sensitive and their expression was higher in larvae incubated at 16 °C relative to 20 °C. Five dnmt3 and one dnmt1 paralog were identified in sole and their distinct developmental and tissue-specific expression patterns indicate that they may have different roles during development. The inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine modified the transcript abundance of dntm1 and dntm3aa in embryos, which suggests that a regulatory feedback mechanism exists for these genes. The impact of thermal regime on expression levels of dnmt3aa and dnmt3ab in lecithotrophic larval stages suggests that these paralogs might be involved in

  10. DNA-PKcs Negatively Regulates Cyclin B1 Protein Stability through Facilitating Its Ubiquitination Mediated by Cdh1-APC/C Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Zeng-Fu; Tan, Wei; Liu, Xiao-Dan; Yu, Lan; Li, Bing; Li, Ming; Song, Man; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Bei-Bei; Zhong, Cai-Gao; Guan, Hua; Zhou, Ping-Kun

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is a critical component of the non-homologous end-joining pathway of DNA double-stranded break repair. DNA-PKcs has also been shown recently functioning in mitotic regulation. Here, we report that DNA-PKcs negatively regulates the stability of Cyclin B1 protein through facilitating its ubiquitination mediated by Cdh1 / E 3 ubiquitin ligase APC/C pathway. Loss of DNA-PKcs causes abnormal accumulation of Cyclin B1 protein. Cyclin B1 degradation is delayed in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells as result of attenuated ubiquitination. The impact of DNA-PKcs on Cyclin B1 stability relies on its kinase activity. Our study further reveals that DNA-PKcs interacts with APC/C core component APC2 and its co-activator Cdh1. The destruction of Cdh1 is accelerated in the absence of DNA-PKcs. Moreover, overexpression of exogenous Cdh1 can reverse the increase of Cyclin B1 protein in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells. Thus, DNA-PKcs, in addition to its direct role in DNA damage repair, functions in mitotic progression at least partially through regulating the stability of Cyclin B1 protein.

  11. Tet1 oxidase regulates neuronal gene transcription, active DNA hydroxymethylation, object location memory, and threat recognition memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic equilibrium between DNA methylation and demethylation of neuronal activity-regulated genes is crucial for memory processes. However, the mechanisms underlying this equilibrium remain elusive. Tet1 oxidase has been shown to play a key role in the active DNA demethylation in the central nervous system. In this study, we used Tet1 gene knockout (Tet1KO mice to examine the involvement of Tet1 in memory consolidation and storage in the adult brain. We found that Tet1 ablation leads to altered expression of numerous neuronal activity-regulated genes, compensatory upregulation of active demethylation pathway genes, and upregulation of various epigenetic modifiers. Moreover, Tet1KO mice showed an enhancement in the consolidation and storage of threat recognition (cued and contextual fear conditioning and object location memories. We conclude that Tet1 plays a critical role in regulating neuronal transcription and in maintaining the epigenetic state of the brain associated with memory consolidation and storage.

  12. [Nitrogen oxide is involved in the regulation of the Fe-S cluster assembly in proteins and the formation of biofilms by Escherichia coli cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'eva, S V; Streltsova, D A; Starostina, I A; Sanina, N A

    2013-01-01

    The functions of nitrogen oxide (NO) in the regulation of the reversible processes of Fe-S cluster assembly in proteins and the formation of Escherichia coli biofilms have been investigated. S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and crystalline nitrosyl complexes of iron with sulfur-containing aliphatic ligands cisaconite (CisA) and penaconite have been used as NO donors for the first time. Wild-type E. coli cells of the strain MC4100, mutants deltaiscA and deltasufA, and the double paralog mutant deltaiscA/sufA with deletions in the alternative pathways of Fe2+ supply for cluster assembly (all derived from the above-named strain) were used in this study. Plankton growth of bacterial cultures, the mass of mature biofilms, and the expression of the SoxRS[2Fe-2S] regulon have been investigated and shown to depend on strain genotype, the process of Fe-S cluster assembly in iron-sulfur proteins, NO donor structure, and the presence of Fe2+ chelator ferene in the incubation medium. The antibiotic ciprofloxacine (CF) was used as an inhibitor of E. coli biofilm formation in the positive control. NO donors regulating Fe-S cluster assembly in E. coli have been shown to control plankton growth of the cultures and the process of mature biofilm formation; toxic doses of NO caused a dramatic (3- to 4-fold) stimulation of cell entry into biofilms as a response to nitrosative stress; NO donors CisA and GSNO in physiological concentrations suppressed the formation of mature biofilms, and the activity of these compounds was comparable to that of CE Regulation of both Fe-S cluster assembly in iron-sulfur proteins and biofilm formation by NO is indicative of the connection between these proc