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Sample records for assembly heme synthesis

  1. CYTOCHROME P450 REGULATION: THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN ITS HEME AND APOPROTEIN MOIETIES IN SYNTHESIS, ASSEMBLY, REPAIR AND DISPOSAL123

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Maria Almira; Sinclair, Peter R.; De Matteis, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Heme is vital to our aerobic universe. Heme cellular content is finely tuned through an exquisite control of synthesis and degradation. Heme deficiency is deleterious to cells, whereas excess heme is toxic. Most of the cellular heme serves as the prosthetic moiety of functionally diverse hemoproteins, including cytochromes P450 (P450s). In the liver, P450s are its major consumers with >50% of hepatic heme committed to their synthesis. Prosthetic heme is the sine qua non of P450 catalytic biot...

  2. Overexpression of the yeast frataxin homolog (Yfh1): contrasting effects on iron-sulfur cluster assembly, heme synthesis and resistance to oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seguin, Alexandra; Bayot, Aurélien; Dancis, Andrew;

    2009-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is generally associated with defects in [Fe-S] cluster assembly/stability and heme synthesis and strong susceptibility to oxidative stress. We used the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) model of Friedreich's ataxia to study the physiological consequences of modulating the...... expression of the frataxin gene (YFH1). We show that the number of frataxin molecules per wild-type cell varies from less than 200 to 1500 according to the iron concentration in the medium. Cells overexpressing YFH1 on a plasmid (2muYFH1; about 3500 molecules Yfh1/cell) took up more iron than wild-type cells...... and displayed defective [Fe-S] cluster assembly/stability in vivo. By contrast, endogenous mitochondrial iron was more available to ferrochelatase in 2muYFH1 cells than in wild-type cells, resulting in higher levels of heme synthesis in vitro. Frataxin overproduction resulted in a shift from frataxin...

  3. Intracellular redistribution of heme in rat liver under oxidative stress: the role of heme synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliman, Pavel A; Barannik, Tatyana; Strel'chenko, Ekaterina; Inshina, Natalya; Sokol, Oxana

    2005-01-01

    Heme distribution in subcellular fractions of rat liver was studied first hours under the action of several agents causing oxidative stress in vivo. Total and post-mitochondrial heme content in liver was found to depend on both the level of hemolysis products in blood and agent's capacity to modify heme and hemoproteins. The increase of activity of 5-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS) and/or heme accumulation in mitochondria was accompanied by increase of tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) heme saturation. Membrane stabilisation by tocopherol or prevention of early ALAS induction by cycloheximide prevented both mitochondrial heme accumulation and increase of TDO heme saturation. Modification of heme fully prevented the alterations of total heme content even under severe hemolysis as well as the increase of TDO heme saturation if no increase of heme synthesis occurred. Thus heme synthesis can greatly contribute to heme intracellular redistribution under oxidative stress. PMID:15763493

  4. Acquisition of iron from transferrin regulates reticulocyte heme synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fe-salicylaldehyde isonicotinoylhydrazone (SIH), which can donate iron to reticulocytes without transferrin as a mediator, has been utilized to test the hypothesis that the rate of iron uptake from transferrin limits the rate of heme synthesis in erythroid cells. Reticulocytes take up 59Fe from [59Fe]SIH and incorporate it into heme to a much greater extent than from saturating concentrations of [59Fe]transferrin. Also, Fe-SIH stimulates [2-14C]glycine into heme when compared to the incorporation observed with saturating levels of Fe-transferrin. In addition, delta-aminolevulinic acid does not stimulate 59Fe incorporation into heme from either [59Fe]transferrin or [59Fe]SIH but does reverse the inhibition of 59Fe incorporation into heme caused by isoniazid, an inhibitor of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase. Taken together, these results suggest the hypothesis that some step(s) in the pathway of iron from extracellular transferrin to intracellular protoporphyrin limits the overall rate of heme synthesis in reticulocytes

  5. Heme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gledhill, M.; Gerringa, L.J.A.; Laan, P.; Timmermans, K.R.

    2015-01-01

    Heme is the iron-containing prosthetic group of hemoproteins, and is thus required for photosynthesis, respiration and nitrate reduction in marine phytoplankton. Here we report concentrations of heme b in Southern Ocean phytoplankton and contrast our findings with those in coastal species. The conce

  6. Identification and phylogenetic analysis of heme synthesis genes in trypanosomatids and their bacterial endosymbionts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João M P Alves

    Full Text Available It has been known for decades that some insect-infecting trypanosomatids can survive in culture without heme supplementation while others cannot, and that this capability is associated with the presence of a betaproteobacterial endosymbiont in the flagellate's cytoplasm. However, the specific mechanisms involved in this process remained obscure. In this work, we sequence and phylogenetically analyze the heme pathway genes from the symbionts and from their hosts, as well as from a number of heme synthesis-deficient Kinetoplastida. Our results show that the enzymes responsible for synthesis of heme are encoded on the symbiont genomes and produced in close cooperation with the flagellate host. Our evidence suggests that this synergistic relationship is the end result of a history of extensive gene loss and multiple lateral gene transfer events in different branches of the phylogeny of the Trypanosomatidae.

  7. CcsBA is a cytochrome c synthetase that also functions in heme transport

    OpenAIRE

    Frawley, Elaine R; Kranz, Robert G

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about trafficking of heme from its sites of synthesis to sites of heme-protein assembly. We describe an integral membrane protein that allows trapping of endogenous heme to elucidate trafficking mechanisms. We show that CcsBA, a representative of a superfamily of integral membrane proteins involved in cytochrome c biosynthesis, exports and protects heme from oxidation. CcsBA has 10 transmembrane domains (TMDs) and reconstitutes cytochrome c synthesis in the Escherichia coli pe...

  8. Control of intracellular heme levels: Heme transporters and Heme oxygenases

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Anwar A.; Quigley, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Heme serves as a co-factor in proteins involved in fundamental biological processes including oxidative metabolism, oxygen storage and transport, signal transduction and drug metabolism. In addition, heme is important for systemic iron homeostasis in mammals. Heme has important regulatory roles in cell biology, yet excessive levels of intracellular heme are toxic; thus, mechanisms have evolved to control the acquisition, synthesis, catabolism and expulsion of cellular heme. Recently, a number...

  9. Heme Concentration Dependence and Metalloporphyrin Inhibition of the System I and II Cytochrome c Assembly Pathways▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard-Fogal, Cynthia L.; Frawley, Elaine R.; Feissner, Robert E.; Kranz, Robert G.

    2007-01-01

    Studies have indicated that specific heme delivery to apocytochrome c is a critical feature of the cytochrome c biogenesis pathways called system I and II. To determine directly the heme requirements of each system, including whether other metal porphyrins can be incorporated into cytochromes c, we engineered Escherichia coli so that the natural system I (ccmABCDEFGH) was deleted and exogenous porphyrins were the sole source of porphyrins (ΔhemA). The engineered E. coli strains that produced recombinant system I (from E. coli) or system II (from Helicobacter) facilitated studies of the heme concentration dependence of each system. Using this exogenous porphyrin approach, it was shown that in system I the levels of heme used are at least fivefold lower than the levels used in system II, providing an important advantage for system I. Neither system could assemble holocytochromes c with other metal porphyrins, suggesting that the attachment mechanism is specific for Fe protoporphyrin. Surprisingly, Zn and Sn protoporphyrins are potent inhibitors of the pathways, and exogenous heme competes with this inhibition. We propose that the targets are the heme binding proteins in the pathways (CcmC, CcmE, and CcmF for system I and CcsA for system II). PMID:17085564

  10. Heme transport and erythropoiesis

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Xiaojing; Fleming, Mark D.; Hamza, Iqbal

    2013-01-01

    In humans, systemic heme homeostasis is achieved via coordinated regulation of heme synthesis, transport and degradation. Although the heme biosynthesis and degradation pathways have been well characterized, the pathways for heme trafficking and incorporation into hemoproteins remains poorly understood. In the past few years, researchers have exploited genetic, cellular and biochemical tools, to identify heme transporters and, in the process, reveal unexpected functions for this elusive group...

  11. [Heme metabolism and oxidative stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliman, P A; Barannik, T B

    2001-01-01

    The role of heme metabolism in oxidative stress development and defense reactions formation in mammals under different stress factors are discussed in the article. Heme metabolism is considered as the totality of synthesis, degradation, transport and exchange processes of exogenous heme and heme liberated from erythrocyte hemoglobin under erythrocyte aging and hemolysis. The literature data presented display normal heme metabolism including mammals heme-binding proteins and intracellular free heme pool and heme metabolism alterations under oxidative stress development. The main attention is focused to the prooxidant action of heme, the interaction of heme transport and lipid exchange, and to the heme metabolism key enzymes (delta-aminolevulinate synthase and heme oxygenase), serum heme-binding protein hemopexin and intracellular heme-binding proteins participating in metabolism adaptation under the action of factors, which cause oxidative stress. PMID:11599427

  12. Free heme pool and activity of key enzyme of heme synthesis in the rat liver under action of agents affecting reduced glutathione level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barannik, T V; Inshina, N M; Kaliman, P A

    2005-01-01

    The decrease of GSH level in the rat liver was found to be accompanied by an increase of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) heme saturation during first hours after HgCl2, phenylhydrazine (Ph) injection or rhabdomyolysis (the coefficient of correlation -0.978). The activity of the key enzyme of heme synthesis--5-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS) was 2.5-fold increased in the first hours after Ph injection and rhabdomyolysis. Glutathione injection in vivo as well as CdCl2 caused the increase of GSH content and the inhibition of ALAS. The coefficient of correlation for GSH content and ALAS activity under the action of agents altering both these parameters (CdCl2, Ph, GSH injection and rhabdomyolysis) is 0.938. Taking into account the presence of heme regulatory motif with conserved cystein in many proteins, including ALAS and TDO (accession number in SwissProt database AAH61793 and P21643, respectively), the link between alterations of GSH content, ALAS activity and heme saturation of TDO in the rat liver could be proposed. The further experiments should be performed in order to elucidate the mechanisms of GSH level influence on free heme pool formation in the liver cells. PMID:16846079

  13. CcsBA is a cytochrome c synthetase that also functions in heme transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frawley, Elaine R.; Kranz, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about trafficking of heme from its sites of synthesis to sites of heme-protein assembly. We describe an integral membrane protein that allows trapping of endogenous heme to elucidate trafficking mechanisms. We show that CcsBA, a representative of a superfamily of integral membrane proteins involved in cytochrome c biosynthesis, exports and protects heme from oxidation. CcsBA has 10 transmembrane domains (TMDs) and reconstitutes cytochrome c synthesis in the Escherichia coli periplasm; thus, CcsBA is a cytochrome c synthetase. Purified CcsBA contains heme in an “external heme binding domain” for which two external histidines are shown to serve as axial ligands that protect the heme iron from oxidation. This is likely the active site of the synthetase. Furthermore, two conserved histidines in TMDs are required for heme to travel to the external heme binding domain. Remarkably, the function of CcsBA with mutations in these TMD histidines is corrected by exogenous imidazole, a result analogous to correction of heme binding by myoglobin when its proximal histidine is mutated. These data suggest that CcsBA has a heme binding site within the bilayer and that CcsBA is a heme channel. PMID:19509336

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum anchored heme-oxygenase 1 faces the cytosol

    OpenAIRE

    Gottlieb, Yehonatan; Truman, Marianna; Cohen, Lyora A.; Leichtmann-Bardoogo, Yael; Meyron-Holtz, Esther G.

    2012-01-01

    Heme-oxygenase 1 is an endoplasmic reticulum-anchored enzyme that breaks down heme into iron, carbon monoxide and biliverdin. Heme is a hydrophobic co-factor in many proteins, including hemoglobin. Free heme is highly cytotoxic and, therefore, both heme synthesis and breakdown are tightly regulated. During turnover of heme proteins, heme is released in the phago-lysosomal compartment or the cytosol. The subcellular location of the heme-oxygenase 1 active site has not been clarified. Using con...

  15. Cytochrome c Biogenesis: Mechanisms for Covalent Modifications and Trafficking of Heme and for Heme-Iron Redox Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, Robert G.; Richard-Fogal, Cynthia; Taylor, John-Stephen; Frawley, Elaine R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Heme is the prosthetic group for cytochromes, which are directly involved in oxidation/reduction reactions inside and outside the cell. Many cytochromes contain heme with covalent additions at one or both vinyl groups. These include farnesylation at one vinyl in hemes o and a and thioether linkages to each vinyl in cytochrome c (at CXXCH of the protein). Here we review the mechanisms for these covalent attachments, with emphasis on the three unique cytochrome c assembly pathways called systems I, II, and III. All proteins in system I (called Ccm proteins) and system II (Ccs proteins) are integral membrane proteins. Recent biochemical analyses suggest mechanisms for heme channeling to the outside, heme-iron redox control, and attachment to the CXXCH. For system II, the CcsB and CcsA proteins form a cytochrome c synthetase complex which specifically channels heme to an external heme binding domain; in this conserved tryptophan-rich “WWD domain” (in CcsA), the heme is maintained in the reduced state by two external histidines and then ligated to the CXXCH motif. In system I, a two-step process is described. Step 1 is the CcmABCD-mediated synthesis and release of oxidized holoCcmE (heme in the Fe+3 state). We describe how external histidines in CcmC are involved in heme attachment to CcmE, and the chemical mechanism to form oxidized holoCcmE is discussed. Step 2 includes the CcmFH-mediated reduction (to Fe+2) of holoCcmE and ligation of the heme to CXXCH. The evolutionary and ecological advantages for each system are discussed with respect to iron limitation and oxidizing environments. PMID:19721088

  16. Measurement of heme concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, P R; Gorman, N; Jacobs, J M

    2001-05-01

    Heme (iron protoporphyrin IX) is a prosthetic group for a number of hemoproteins in different tissues (e.g., hemoglobin, myoglobin, cytochrome P-450s, mitochondrial cytochromes, catalases, and peroxidases). Mutations in the biosynthetic pathway can affect the synthesis and/or degradation of heme. Several assays are provided in this unit for quantifying heme: a spectrophotometric assay based on the characteristic absorption spectrum of oxidized and reduced form of the hemochrome formed by replacing the nitrogen ligands with pyridine; a fluorescence assay based on removal of the iron by a heated, strong oxalic acid solution to produce fluorescent protoporphyrin; a reversed-phase HPLC assay to measure heme and intermediates in the synthetic pathway; and a radiometric assay to measure newly synthesized heme in tissue culture cells.

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of sideroblastic anemias: from defective heme synthesis to abnormal RNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzola, Mario; Malcovati, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The sideroblastic anemias are a heterogeneous group of inherited and acquired disorders characterized by the presence of ring sideroblasts in the bone marrow. X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) is caused by germline mutations in ALAS2. Hemizygous males have a hypochromic microcytic anemia, which is generally mild to moderate and is caused by defective heme synthesis and ineffective erythropoiesis. XLSA is a typical iron-loading anemia; although most patients are responsive to pyridoxine, treatment of iron overload is also important in the management of these patients. Autosomal recessive sideroblastic anemia attributable to mutations in SLC25A38, a member of the mitochondrial carrier family, is a severe disease: patients present in infancy with microcytic anemia, which soon becomes transfusion dependent. Conservative therapy includes regular red cell transfusion and iron chelation, whereas allogenic stem cell transplantation represents the only curative treatment. Refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS) is a myelodysplastic syndrome characterized mainly by anemia attributable to ineffective erythropoiesis. The clinical course of RARS is generally indolent, but there is a tendency to worsening of anemia over time, so that most patients become transfusion dependent in the long run. More than 90% of these patients carry somatic mutations in SF3B1, a gene encoding a core component of the RNA splicing machinery. These mutations cause misrecognition of 3' splice sites in downstream genes, resulting in truncated gene products and/or decreased expression attributable to nonsense-mediated RNA decay; this explains the multifactorial pathogenesis of RARS. Variants of RARS include refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia and ring sideroblasts, and RARS associated with marked thrombocytosis; these variants involve additional genetic lesions. Inhibitors of molecules of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily have been shown recently to target ineffective

  18. Heme Concentration Dependence and Metalloporphyrin Inhibition of the System I and II Cytochrome c Assembly Pathways▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Richard-Fogal, Cynthia L; Frawley, Elaine R.; Feissner, Robert E.; Kranz, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    Studies have indicated that specific heme delivery to apocytochrome c is a critical feature of the cytochrome c biogenesis pathways called system I and II. To determine directly the heme requirements of each system, including whether other metal porphyrins can be incorporated into cytochromes c, we engineered Escherichia coli so that the natural system I (ccmABCDEFGH) was deleted and exogenous porphyrins were the sole source of porphyrins (ΔhemA). The engineered E. coli strains that produced ...

  19. Synthesis, assembly and device of 1-dimentional nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Synthesis and assembly of 1-dimentional (1-D) nanostructures and measurement of their electrical and optical properties are very important in fabrication of nanodevices. Recent developments in this field are summarized in this review. The assembling methods can be divided into two classes: assembly using macroscopic field forces and microfluidic-assisted-template-integration. The former can assemble nanowires by controlling direction and intensity of electric or magnetic field, while the latter represents a general assembly strategy for any kind of 1-D nanostructures. The assembly of 1-D nanostructures will make it possible to fabricate nanosensors, nanolasers and nanoscale logic gate circuits for computation.

  20. Isocyanide or nitrosyl complexation to hemes with varying tethered axial base ligand donors: synthesis and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Savita K; Kim, Hyun; Rogler, Patrick J; A Siegler, Maxime; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2016-09-01

    A series of ferrous-heme 2,6-dimethylphenyl isocyanide (DIMPI) and ferrous-heme mononitrosyl complexes have been synthesized and characterized. The heme portion of the complexes studied is varied with respect to the nature of the axial ligand, including complexes, where it is covalently tethered to the porphyrinate periphery. Reduced heme complexes, [(F8)Fe(II)], [(P(Py))Fe(II)], [(P(Im))Fe(II)], and [(P(ImH))Fe(II)], where F8 = tetrakis(2,6-difluorophenyl)-porphyrinate and P(Py), P(Im), and P(ImH) are partially fluorinated tetraaryl porphyrinates with covalently appended axial base pyridyl/imidazolyl or histamine moieties, were employed; P(ImH) is a new construct. Room temperature addition of DIMPI to these iron(II) complexes affords the bis-isocyanide species [(F8)Fe(II)-(DIMPI)2] in the case of [(F8)Fe(II)], while for the other hemes, mono-DIMPI compounds are obtained, [(P(Py))Fe(II)-(DIMPI)] [(2)-DIMPI], [(P(Im))Fe(II)-(DIMPI)] [(3)-DIMPI], and [(P(ImH))Fe(II)-(DIMPI)] [(4)-DIMPI]. The structures of complexes (3)-DIMPI and (4)-DIMPI have been determined by single crystal X-ray crystallography, where interesting H…F(porphryinate aryl group) interactions are observed. (19)F-NMR spectra determined for these complexes suggest that H…F(porphyrinate aryl groups) attractions also occur in solution, the H atom coming either from the DIMPI methyl groups or from a porphyinate axial base imidazole or porphyrinate pyrrole. Similarly, we have used nitrogen monoxide to generate ferrous-nitrosyl complexes, a five-coordinate species for F8, [(F8)Fe(II)-(NO)], or low-spin six-coordinate compounds [(P(Py))Fe(II)-(NO)], [(P(Im))Fe(II)-(NO)], and [(P(ImH))Fe(II)-(NO)]. The DIMPI and mononitrosyl complexes have also been characterized using UV-Vis, IR, (1)H-NMR, and EPR spectroscopies. PMID:27350154

  1. Functional Characterization of the Canine Heme-Regulated eIF2α Kinase: Regulation of Protein Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimon C. Kanelakis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The heme-regulated inhibitor (HRI negatively regulates protein synthesis by phosphorylating eukaryotic initiation factor-2α (eIF2α thereby inhibiting protein translation. The importance of HRI in regulating hemoglobin synthesis in erythroid cells makes it an attractive molecular target in need of further characterization. In this work, we have cloned and expressed the canine form of the HRI kinase. The canine nucleotide sequence has 86%, 82%, and 81% identity to the human, mouse, and rat HRI, respectively. It was noted that an isoleucine residue in the ATP binding site of human, rat, and mouse HRI is replaced by a valine in the canine kinase. The expression of canine HRI protein by in vitro translation using wheat germ lysate or in Sf9 cells using a baculovirus expression system was increased by the addition of hemin. Following purification, the canine protein was found to be 72 kD and showed kinase activity determined by its ability to phosphorylate a synthetic peptide substrate. Quercetin, a kinase inhibitor known to inhibit mouse and human HRI, inhibits canine HRI in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, quercetin is able to increase de novo protein synthesis in canine reticulocytes. We conclude that the canine is a suitable model species for studying the role of HRI in erythropoiesis.

  2. DNA Synthesis, Assembly and Applications in Synthetic Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Siying; Tang, Nicholas; Tian, Jingdong

    2012-01-01

    The past couple of years saw exciting new developments in microchip-based gene synthesis technologies. Such technologies hold the potential for significantly increasing the throughput and decreasing the cost of gene synthesis. Together with more efficient enzymatic error correction and genome assembly methods, these new technologies are pushing the field of synthetic biology to a higher level.

  3. A critical role for the co-repressor N-CoR in erythroid differentiation and heme synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dianzheng Zhang; Ellen Cho; Jiemin Wong

    2007-01-01

    Co-repressor N-CoR (nuclear receptor co-repressor) has important roles in different biological processes, including proliferation, differentiation and development. Mutant mice lacking N-CoR are embryonically lethal and appear to die from anemia owing to defects in definitive erythropoiesis. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of N-CoR-mediated erythroid differentiation are largely unknown. Using the human erythroleukemic K562 cell line, which can be chemically induced to differentiate into either erythroid or megakaryocytic lineages depending on the inducers used, we have investigated the role of N-CoR in erythroid differentiation. We show that knockdown of N-CoR either transiently (siRNA) or permanently (shRNA) impairs the cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C)- but not hemin-induced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. RT-PCR analysis reveals that N-CoR is required for induction by Ara-C of 5-aminolevulinate synthase (ALA-S2), a key enzyme involved in heme biosynthesis. Furthermore, the amount of N-CoR proteins increases significantly during Ara-C-induced K562 differentiation, apparently through a post-transcriptional mechanism. Consistent with the data from N-CoR-null mice, N-CoR is not required for the differentiation of K562 cells into megakaryocytic lineages, induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Thus, our in vitro study confirms a role for N-CoR in erythroid differentiation and reveals for the first time that N-CoR is required for the induction of a key enzyme involved in heme synthesis.

  4. Like Iron in the Blood of the People: The Requirement for Heme Trafficking in Iron Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal eHamza; Tamara eKorolnek

    2014-01-01

    Heme is an iron-containing porphyrin ring that serves as a prosthetic group in proteins that function in diverse metabolic pathways. Heme is also a major source of bioavailable iron in the human diet. While the synthesis of heme has been well-characterized, the pathways for heme trafficking remain poorly understood. It is likely that heme transport across membranes is highly regulated, as free heme is toxic to cells. This review outlines the requirement for heme delivery to various subcellula...

  5. The Chemistry and Biochemistry of Heme c: Functional Bases for Covalent Attachment

    OpenAIRE

    Bowman, Sarah E. J.; Bren, Kara L.

    2008-01-01

    A discussion of the literature concerning the synthesis, function, and activity of heme c-containing proteins is presented. Comparison of the properties of heme c, which is covalently bound to protein, is made to heme b, which is bound noncovalently. A question of interest is why nature uses biochemically expensive heme c in many proteins when its properties are expected to be similar to heme b. Considering the effects of covalent heme attachment on heme conformation and on the proximal histi...

  6. Like iron in the blood of the people: the requirement for heme trafficking in iron metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Korolnek, Tamara; Hamza, Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    Heme is an iron-containing porphyrin ring that serves as a prosthetic group in proteins that function in diverse metabolic pathways. Heme is also a major source of bioavailable iron in the human diet. While the synthesis of heme has been well-characterized, the pathways for heme trafficking remain poorly understood. It is likely that heme transport across membranes is highly regulated, as free heme is toxic to cells. This review outlines the requirement for heme delivery to various subcellula...

  7. Synthesis and Self-Assembly of Triangulenium Salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Dong

    This thesis describes the design and synthesis of asymmetrically substituted amphiphilic tis(dialkylamino)trioxiatriangulenium (ATOTA+) salts with different counter ions. Attention was focused on exploring the assembling properties of the ATOTA+ salts in aqueous media. A direct vortexing......-processed self-assembling method was developed to make aggregates with uniform morphologies and excellent stabilities in an equilibrium state either with pure ATOTA+ salts or with mixed systems of ATOTA+ salts and lipid molecules in aqueous media. Special emphasis was given to effects of the counterions......-assembly and triangulenium salts. Chapters 3 to 6 are mainly focused on the synthesis and self-assembly of trioxatriangulenium salts in aqueous media. In particular, chapter 3 reports a direct selfassembly of a synthetic triangulenium salt mixed with DMPC lipid (5/95 by molar ratio) to make mono disperse bilayer vesicles...

  8. Heme and erythropoieis: more than a structural role

    OpenAIRE

    Chiabrando, Deborah; Mercurio, Sonia; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    Erythropoiesis is the biological process that consumes the highest amount of body iron for heme synthesis. Heme synthesis in erythroid cells is finely coordinated with that of alpha (α) and beta (β)-globin, resulting in the production of hemoglobin, a tetramer of 2α- and 2β-globin chains, and heme as the prosthetic group. Heme is not only the structural component of hemoglobin, but it plays multiple regulatory roles during the differentiation of erythroid precursors since it controls its own ...

  9. A functional mimic of natural peroxidases : synthesis and catalytic activity of a non-heme iron/peptide hydroperoxide complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choma, Christin T.; Schudde, Ebe P.; Kellogg, Richard M.; Robillard, George T.; Feringa, Ben L.

    1998-01-01

    Site-selective attachment of unprotected peptides to a non-heme iron complex is achieved by displacing two halides on the catalyst by peptide caesium thiolates. This coupling approach should be compatible with any peptide sequence provided there is only a single reduced cysteine. The oxidation activ

  10. The Structure of the Complex between Yeast Frataxin and Ferrochelatase: CHARACTERIZATION AND PRE-STEADY STATE REACTION OF FERROUS IRON DELIVERY AND HEME SYNTHESIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderberg, Christopher; Gillam, Mallory E; Ahlgren, Eva-Christina; Hunter, Gregory A; Gakh, Oleksandr; Isaya, Grazia; Ferreira, Gloria C; Al-Karadaghi, Salam

    2016-05-27

    Frataxin is a mitochondrial iron-binding protein involved in iron storage, detoxification, and delivery for iron sulfur-cluster assembly and heme biosynthesis. The ability of frataxin from different organisms to populate multiple oligomeric states in the presence of metal ions, e.g. Fe(2+) and Co(2+), led to the suggestion that different oligomers contribute to the functions of frataxin. Here we report on the complex between yeast frataxin and ferrochelatase, the terminal enzyme of heme biosynthesis. Protein-protein docking and cross-linking in combination with mass spectroscopic analysis and single-particle reconstruction from negatively stained electron microscopic images were used to verify the Yfh1-ferrochelatase interactions. The model of the complex indicates that at the 2:1 Fe(2+)-to-protein ratio, when Yfh1 populates a trimeric state, there are two interaction interfaces between frataxin and the ferrochelatase dimer. Each interaction site involves one ferrochelatase monomer and one frataxin trimer, with conserved polar and charged amino acids of the two proteins positioned at hydrogen-bonding distances from each other. One of the subunits of the Yfh1 trimer interacts extensively with one subunit of the ferrochelatase dimer, contributing to the stability of the complex, whereas another trimer subunit is positioned for Fe(2+) delivery. Single-turnover stopped-flow kinetics experiments demonstrate that increased rates of heme production result from monomers, dimers, and trimers, indicating that these forms are most efficient in delivering Fe(2+) to ferrochelatase and sustaining porphyrin metalation. Furthermore, they support the proposal that frataxin-mediated delivery of this potentially toxic substrate overcomes formation of reactive oxygen species.

  11. Synthesis, purification and assembly of gold and iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Penghe

    The aims of the current research include developing new synthetic strategies to prepare structurally complex gold nanoparticles and new size sorting methods to separate nanoparticles of larger size, as well as studying the assembly of nanoparticles into novel hierarchical structures through both template-assisted and template-free strategies. In the synthesis section of this dissertation (Chapters 2 & 3), a size controllable synthesis of dendritic gold nanoparticles through a seed-mediated process in ethanol is described. The effect of seeds size and shape as well as the carbon chain length of alkylamines on the formation of dendritic structure was investigated. The synthetic strategy developed is capable of forming dendritic structure on various substrates, like flat or rod-like gold particles. In another work, the shape evolution of gold nanoparticles in a seed-mediated growth as well as the kinetics of reduction of HAuCl4 in the presence of seeds was studied. The reduction of the gold precursor by sodium citrate could be greatly accelerated in the presence of seed nanoparticles. Along with the enhanced reaction kinetics, dramatic shape evolution of gold nanoparticles was observed by changing ratios of precursors. In the purification section (Chapter 4), a novel method of separating nanoparticles of different sizes in a viscosity gradient was developed. The viscosity gradient was created with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) aqueous solutions. Previously, such size separation was all achieved in the density gradient, while the hidden contribution of viscosity difference inside the density gradient was not well recognized. Through this work, it is clarified that the viscosity can contribute as importantly as density in the size sorting of nanoparticles through rate zonal centrifuge. It was also demonstrated both experimentally and mathematically that the viscosity gradient is more effective in separation of larger sized nanoparticles. In the assembly section (Chapter 5

  12. Nano crystals-Related Synthesis, Assembly, and Energy Applications 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past decades, nano crystals have attracted broad attention due to their unique shape- and size-dependent physical and chemical properties that differ drastically from their bulk counterparts. Hitherto, much effort has been dedicated to achieving rational controlling over the morphology, assembly, and related energy applications of the nano materials. Therefore, the ability to manipulate the morphology, size, and size distribution of inorganic nano materials is still an important goal in modern materials physics and chemistry. Especially, the world's demand for energy supply is causing a dramatic escalation of social and political unrest. Likewise, the environmental impact of the global climate change due to the combustion of fossil fuel is becoming increasingly alarming. These problems compel us to search for effective routes to build devices that can supply sustainable energy, with not only high efficiency but also environmental friendship. One of ways to relieve the energy crisis is to exploit devices based on renewable energy sources, such as solar energy and water power. Aiming at this exploration, the primary stage requires the design of appropriate strategies for the synthesis of high-quality nano crystals with respect to size uniformity and superior electrochemical performances. As a consequence, we organize the current special issue for Journal of Nano materials to provide the authors with a platform and readers with the latest achievements of nano crystals-related synthesis, assembly, and energy applications.

  13. Synthesis and self-assembly of complex hollow materials

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Hua Chun

    2011-01-01

    Hollow materials with interiors or voids and pores are a class of lightweight nanostructured matters that promise many future technological applications, and they have received significant research attention in recent years. On the basis of well-known physicochemical phenomena and principles, for example, several solution-based protocols have been developed for the general preparation of these complex materials under mild reaction conditions. This article is thus a short introductory review on the synthetic aspects of this field of development. The synthetic methodologies can be broadly divided into three major categories: (i) template-assisted synthesis, (ii) self-assembly with primary building blocks, and (iii) induced matter relocations. In most cases, both synthesis and self-assembly are involved in the above processes. Further combinations of these methodologies appear to be very important, as they will allow one to prepare functional materials at a higher level of complexity and precision. The synthetic strategies are introduced through some simple case studies with schematic illustrations. Salient features of the methods developed have been summarized, and some urgent issues of this field have also been indicated. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  14. Dendrimers in Layer-by-Layer Assemblies: Synthesis and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko Sato

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We review the synthesis of dendrimer-containing layer-by-layer (LbL assemblies and their applications, including biosensing, controlled drug release, and bio-imaging. Dendrimers can be built into LbL films and microcapsules by alternating deposition of dendrimers and counter polymers on the surface of flat substrates and colloidal microparticles through electrostatic bonding, hydrogen bonding, covalent bonding, and biological affinity. Dendrimer-containing LbL assemblies have been used to construct biosensors, in which electron transfer mediators and metal nanoparticles are often coupled with dendrimers. Enzymes have been successfully immobilized on the surface of electrochemical and optical transducers by forming enzyme/dendrimer LbL multilayers. In this way, high-performance enzyme sensors are fabricated. In addition, dendrimer LbL films and microcapsules are useful for constructing drug delivery systems because dendrimers bind drugs to form inclusion complexes or the dendrimer surface is covalently modified with drugs. Magnetic resonance imaging of cancer cells by iron oxide nanoparticles coated with dendrimer LbL film is also discussed.

  15. TMEM14C is required for erythroid mitochondrial heme metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Yien, Yvette Yee; Robledo, Raymond F.; Schultz, Iman J.; Takahashi-Makise, Naoko; Gwynn, Babette; Bauer, Daniel Evan; Dass, Abhishek; Yi, Gloria; Li, Liangtao; Hildick-Smith, Gordon J.; Cooney, Jeffrey D.; Pierce, Eric Adam; Mohler, Kyla; Dailey, Tamara A.; Miyata, Non

    2014-01-01

    The transport and intracellular trafficking of heme biosynthesis intermediates are crucial for hemoglobin production, which is a critical process in developing red cells. Here, we profiled gene expression in terminally differentiating murine fetal liver-derived erythroid cells to identify regulators of heme metabolism. We determined that TMEM14C, an inner mitochondrial membrane protein that is enriched in vertebrate hematopoietic tissues, is essential for erythropoiesis and heme synthesis in ...

  16. Simultaneous depletion of Atm and Mdl rebalances cytosolic Fe-S cluster assembly but not heme import into the mitochondrion of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horáková, Eva; Changmai, Piya; Paris, Zdeněk; Salmon, Didier; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-11-01

    ABC transporter mitochondrial 1 (Atm1) and multidrug resistance-like 1 (Mdl) are mitochondrial ABC transporters. Although Atm1 was recently suggested to transport different forms of glutathione from the mitochondrion, which are used for iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster maturation in the cytosol, the function of Mdl remains elusive. In Trypanosoma brucei, we identified one homolog of each of these genes, TbAtm and TbMdl, which were downregulated either separately or simultaneously using RNA interference. Individual depletion of TbAtm and TbMdl led to limited growth defects. In cells downregulated for TbAtm, the enzymatic activities of the Fe-S cluster proteins aconitase and fumarase significantly decreased in the cytosol but not in the mitochondrion. Downregulation of TbMdl did not cause any change in activities of the Fe-S proteins. Unexpectedly, the simultaneous downregulation of TbAtm and TbMdl did not result in any growth defect, nor were the Fe-S cluster protein activities altered in either the cytosolic or mitochondrial compartments. Additionally, TbAtm and TbMdl were able to partially restore the growth of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Δatm1 and Δmdl2 null mutants, respectively. Because T. brucei completely lost the heme b biosynthesis pathway, this cofactor has to be obtained from the host. Based on our results, TbMdl is a candidate for mitochondrial import of heme b, which was markedly decreased in both TbMdl and TbAtm + TbMdl knockdowns. Moreover, the levels of heme a were strongly decreased in the same knockdowns, suggesting that TbMdl plays a key role in heme a biosynthesis, thus affecting the overall heme homeostasis in T. brucei. PMID:26277108

  17. Cytochrome c Biogenesis: Mechanisms for Covalent Modifications and Trafficking of Heme and for Heme-Iron Redox Control

    OpenAIRE

    Kranz, Robert G.; Richard-Fogal, Cynthia; Taylor, John-Stephen; Frawley, Elaine R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Heme is the prosthetic group for cytochromes, which are directly involved in oxidation/reduction reactions inside and outside the cell. Many cytochromes contain heme with covalent additions at one or both vinyl groups. These include farnesylation at one vinyl in hemes o and a and thioether linkages to each vinyl in cytochrome c (at CXXCH of the protein). Here we review the mechanisms for these covalent attachments, with emphasis on the three unique cytochrome c assembly pathways call...

  18. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Disulfide-Containing Uranyl Compounds. In Situ Ligand Synthesis versus Direct Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowland, Clare E. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Belai, Nebebech [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Knope, Karah E. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Cahill, Christopher L. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2010-01-29

    Three disulfide-containing uranyl compounds, [UO2(C7H4O2S)3]·H2O (1), [UO2(C7H4O2S)2(C7H5O2S)] (2), and [UO2(C7H4O2S)4] (3) have been hydrothermally synthesized. Both in situ disulfide bond formation from 3- and 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (C7H5O2S, MBA) to yield 3,3'- and 4,4'-dithiobisbenzoic acid (C14H8O4S2, DTBA) and direct assembly with the presynthesized dimeric ligands have been explored. While the starting materials 4-MBA and 4,4'-DTBA both yield 2 via in situ ligand synthesis and direct assembly, respectively, we observe the formation of 1 from the starting material 3-MBA via in situ ligand synthesis and of 3 from the direct assembly of the uranyl cation with 3,3'-DTBA. Concurrently with the synthesis of 1 and 2, we have observed the in situ formation of the crystalline dimeric organic species, 3,3'-DTBA, [(C7H5O2S)2] (4) and 4,4'-DTBA, [(C7H5O2S)2] (5). Herein we report the synthesis and crystallographic characterization of 1-5, as well as observations regarding the utility of product formation via direct assembly and in situ ligand synthesis.

  19. Synthesis and metrology of conducting carbon nanotube assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longson, Timothy Jay

    Since its discovery, the carbon nanotube (CNT) has been proposed as one of the ultimate materials for its electrical, thermal and mechanical properties due to its incredibly strong sp2 bonds, low defect density, and large aspect ratio. Many experimental results on individual CNTs have confirmed these outstanding theoretically predicted properties. However, scaling these properties to the macroscopic regime has proved to be challenging. This work focused on the synthesis and measurement of highly conducting, macroscopic, CNT assemblies. Scaling up the synthesis of vertically aligned multiwalled CNT (MWNT) forests was investigated through the development of a large, 100mm, wafer scale, cold wall chemical vapor deposition chamber. In addition to the synthesis, two distinct CNT assemblies have been investigated. A linear morphology where CNTs are strung in series for electrical transport (CNT wires) and a massively parallel 2D array of vertically aligned CNTs for Thermal Interface Material (TIM) applications. Poymer-CNT wire composites have been fabricated by developing a coaxial CNT core-polymer shell electrospinning technique. The core-shell interactions in this system have been studied by way of Hansen's solubility parameters. The most well defined CNT core was achieved using a core solvent that is semi-immiscible with the shell solution, yet still a solvent of the shell polymer. Electrical characterization of the resulting CNT core has shown a two orders of magnitude increase in conductivity over traditional, homogeneously mixed, electrospun CNT wires. A number of vertically aligned MWNT assemblies were studied for their thermal interface properties. Double-sided Silicon substrate (MWNT-Si-MWNT) TIM assemblies were characterized using a DC, 1D reference bar, thermal measurement technique. While attempts to control MWNT density via a micelle template technique produced only 'spaghetti like' CNTs, sputter deposited catalyst provided stark variations in array density

  20. Influence of food tannins on certain aspects of iron metabolism : Part 3 -- Heme synthesis and haematopoiesis in normal and anemic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannin from various fruits and vegetables at a dose level of 0.5 mg/kg wt/day helps approximately 65% recovery of the blood hemoglobin concentration in hemolytic anemic rats within 7 days resulting in normal levels of haematological parameters. While in vitro tannin at low doses (5-10 μg/mg protein) stimulates iron incorporation into protoporphyrin IX by rat liver subcellular fractions, at higher doses (15-40 μg/mg protein) it inhibits the heme synthesis in liver, the inhibition being complete at 40 μg/mg protein. In vivo studies indicate that the administration of tannin (0.5 mg/kg) exhibits significant increase in incorporation of label into hemin of anemic rats compared to that of anemic control and tannin-fed normal groups. In rats receiving supplements of tannin (0.5 mg/k.o.), incorporation of the label into hemin of anemic ones is comparatively greater when 59Fe is given by intravenous route instead of oral administration of radio-iron. The total labelling of 59Fe in red blood cells is significantly greater in tannin-fed anemic rats than anemic control. These results suggest that tannin (0.5 mg/kg) from fruits and vegetables may help iron utilization more effectively for greater haematopoiesis in hemolytic anemia. (auth.)

  1. Synthesis, assembly, and applications of single-walled carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Koungmin

    This dissertation presents the synthesis and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, and their applications in both nano-electronics such as transistor and integrated circuits and macro-electronics in energy conversion devices as transparent conducting electrodes. Also, the high performance chemical sensor using metal oxide nanowire has been demonstrated. Chapter 1 presents a brief introduction of carbon nanotube, followed by discussion of a new synthesis technique using nanosphere lithography to grow highly aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes atop quartz and sapphire substrates. This method offers great potential to produce carbon nanotube arrays with simultaneous control over the nanotube orientation, position, density, diameter and even chirality. Chapter 3 introduces the wafer-scale integration and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, including full-wafer scale synthesis and transfer of massively aligned carbon nanotube arrays, and nanotube device fabrication on 4 inch Si/SiO2 wafer to yield submicron channel transistors with high on-current density ˜ 20 muA/mum and good on/off ratio and CMOS integrated circuits. In addition, various chemical doping methods for n-type nanotube transistors are studied to fabricate CMOS integrated nanotube circuits such as inverter, NAND and NOR logic devices. Furthermore, defect-tolerant circuit design for NAND and NOR is proposed and demonstrated to guarantee the correct operation of logic circuit, regardless of the presence of mis-aligned or mis-positioned nanotubes. Carbon nanotube flexible electronics and smart textiles for ubiquitous computing and sensing are demonstrated in chapter 4. A facile transfer printing technique has been introduced to transfer massively aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes from the original sapphire/quartz substrates to virtually any other substrates, including glass, silicon, polymer sheets, and even fabrics. The characterization of transferred nanotubes reveals that the transferred

  2. Simultaneous synthesis/assembly of anisotropic cake-shaped porphyrin particles toward colloidal microcrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Kuang, Minxuan; Jin, Feng; Cai, Jinhua; Shi, Lei; Zheng, Yongmei; Wang, Jingxia; Jiang, Lei

    2016-03-01

    The one-step synthesis/assembly of a cake-shaped porphyrin colloidal microcrystal with tailored height-diameter was demonstrated based on interfacial assembly and the water-droplet template. The as-fabricated anisotropic colloidal crystals showed special optic properties and enhanced optic-limiting behavior.

  3. Transmembrane heme delivery systems

    OpenAIRE

    Goldman, Barry S; Beck, David L.; Monika, Elizabeth M.; Kranz, Robert G.

    1998-01-01

    Heme proteins play pivotal roles in a wealth of biological processes. Despite this, the molecular mechanisms by which heme traverses bilayer membranes for use in biosynthetic reactions are unknown. The biosynthesis of c-type cytochromes requires that heme is transported to the bacterial periplasm or mitochondrial intermembrane space where it is covalently ligated to two reduced cysteinyl residues of the apocytochrome. Results herein suggest that a family of integral membrane proteins in proka...

  4. Dynamic ruffling distortion of the heme substrate in non-canonical heme oxygenase enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Amanda B; Horak, Erik H; Liptak, Matthew D

    2016-06-14

    Recent work by several groups has established that MhuD, IsdG, and IsdI are non-canonical heme oxygenases that induce significant out-of-plane ruffling distortions of their heme substrates enroute to mycobilin or staphylobilin formation. However, clear explanations for the observations of "nested" S = ½ VTVH MCD saturation magnetization curves at cryogenic temperatures, and exchange broadened (1)H NMR resonances at physiologically-relevant temperatures have remained elusive. Here, MCD and NMR data have been acquired for F23A and F23W MhuD-heme-CN, in addition to MCD data for IsdI-heme-CN, in order to complete assembly of a library of spectroscopic data for cyanide-inhibited ferric heme with a wide range of ruffling deformations. The spectroscopic data were used to evaluate a number of computational models for cyanide-inhibited ferric heme, which ultimately led to the development of an accurate NEVPT2/CASSCF model. The resulting model has a shallow, double-well potential along the porphyrin ruffling coordinate, which provides clear explanations for the unusual MCD and NMR data. The shallow, double-well potential also implies that MhuD-, IsdG-, and IsdI-bound heme is dynamic, and the functional implications of these dynamics are discussed. PMID:27273757

  5. TMEM14C is required for erythroid mitochondrial heme metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yien, Yvette Y; Robledo, Raymond F; Schultz, Iman J; Takahashi-Makise, Naoko; Gwynn, Babette; Bauer, Daniel E; Dass, Abhishek; Yi, Gloria; Li, Liangtao; Hildick-Smith, Gordon J; Cooney, Jeffrey D; Pierce, Eric L; Mohler, Kyla; Dailey, Tamara A; Miyata, Non; Kingsley, Paul D; Garone, Caterina; Hattangadi, Shilpa M; Huang, Hui; Chen, Wen; Keenan, Ellen M; Shah, Dhvanit I; Schlaeger, Thorsten M; DiMauro, Salvatore; Orkin, Stuart H; Cantor, Alan B; Palis, James; Koehler, Carla M; Lodish, Harvey F; Kaplan, Jerry; Ward, Diane M; Dailey, Harry A; Phillips, John D; Peters, Luanne L; Paw, Barry H

    2014-10-01

    The transport and intracellular trafficking of heme biosynthesis intermediates are crucial for hemoglobin production, which is a critical process in developing red cells. Here, we profiled gene expression in terminally differentiating murine fetal liver-derived erythroid cells to identify regulators of heme metabolism. We determined that TMEM14C, an inner mitochondrial membrane protein that is enriched in vertebrate hematopoietic tissues, is essential for erythropoiesis and heme synthesis in vivo and in cultured erythroid cells. In mice, TMEM14C deficiency resulted in porphyrin accumulation in the fetal liver, erythroid maturation arrest, and embryonic lethality due to profound anemia. Protoporphyrin IX synthesis in TMEM14C-deficient erythroid cells was blocked, leading to an accumulation of porphyrin precursors. The heme synthesis defect in TMEM14C-deficient cells was ameliorated with a protoporphyrin IX analog, indicating that TMEM14C primarily functions in the terminal steps of the heme synthesis pathway. Together, our data demonstrate that TMEM14C facilitates the import of protoporphyrinogen IX into the mitochondrial matrix for heme synthesis and subsequent hemoglobin production. Furthermore, the identification of TMEM14C as a protoporphyrinogen IX importer provides a genetic tool for further exploring erythropoiesis and congenital anemias.

  6. TMEM14C is required for erythroid mitochondrial heme metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yien, Yvette Y.; Robledo, Raymond F.; Schultz, Iman J.; Takahashi-Makise, Naoko; Gwynn, Babette; Bauer, Daniel E.; Dass, Abhishek; Yi, Gloria; Li, Liangtao; Hildick-Smith, Gordon J.; Cooney, Jeffrey D.; Pierce, Eric L.; Mohler, Kyla; Dailey, Tamara A.; Miyata, Non; Kingsley, Paul D.; Garone, Caterina; Hattangadi, Shilpa M.; Huang, Hui; Chen, Wen; Keenan, Ellen M.; Shah, Dhvanit I.; Schlaeger, Thorsten M.; DiMauro, Salvatore; Orkin, Stuart H.; Cantor, Alan B.; Palis, James; Koehler, Carla M.; Lodish, Harvey F.; Kaplan, Jerry; Ward, Diane M.; Dailey, Harry A.; Phillips, John D.; Peters, Luanne L.; Paw, Barry H.

    2014-01-01

    The transport and intracellular trafficking of heme biosynthesis intermediates are crucial for hemoglobin production, which is a critical process in developing red cells. Here, we profiled gene expression in terminally differentiating murine fetal liver-derived erythroid cells to identify regulators of heme metabolism. We determined that TMEM14C, an inner mitochondrial membrane protein that is enriched in vertebrate hematopoietic tissues, is essential for erythropoiesis and heme synthesis in vivo and in cultured erythroid cells. In mice, TMEM14C deficiency resulted in porphyrin accumulation in the fetal liver, erythroid maturation arrest, and embryonic lethality due to profound anemia. Protoporphyrin IX synthesis in TMEM14C-deficient erythroid cells was blocked, leading to an accumulation of porphyrin precursors. The heme synthesis defect in TMEM14C-deficient cells was ameliorated with a protoporphyrin IX analog, indicating that TMEM14C primarily functions in the terminal steps of the heme synthesis pathway. Together, our data demonstrate that TMEM14C facilitates the import of protoporphyrinogen IX into the mitochondrial matrix for heme synthesis and subsequent hemoglobin production. Furthermore, the identification of TMEM14C as a protoporphyrinogen IX importer provides a genetic tool for further exploring erythropoiesis and congenital anemias. PMID:25157825

  7. How Heme Oxygenase-1 Prevents Heme-Induced Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Lilibeth Lanceta; Mattingly, Jacob M.; Chi Li; Eaton, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Earlier observations indicate that free heme is selectively toxic to cells lacking heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) but how this enzyme prevents heme toxicity remains unexplained. Here, using A549 (human lung cancer) and immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells incubated with exogenous heme, we find knock-down of HO-1 using siRNA does promote the accumulation of cell-associated heme and heme-induced cell death. However, it appears that the toxic effects of heme are exerted by "loose" (probably in...

  8. Molecular self-assembly and nanochemistry: A chemical strategy for the synthesis of nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitesides, George M.; Mathias, John P.; Seto, Christopher T.

    1991-12-01

    Molecular self assembly is the spontaneous association of molecules under equilibrium conditions into stable, structurally well-defined aggregates joined by non-covalent bonds. Molecular self-assembly is ubiquitous in biological systems, and underlies the formation of a wide variety of complex biological structures. Understanding self-assembly and the associated non-covalent interactions that connect complementary interacting molecular surfaces in biological aggregates is a central concern in structural biochemistry. Self-assembly is also emerging as a new strategy in chemical synthesis, with the potential of generating non-biological structures having dimensions of 1-10(exp 2) nanometers. Structures in the upper part of this range of sizes are presently inaccessible through chemical synthesis, and the ability to prepare them would open a route to structures comparable in size (and perhaps complementary in function) to those that can be prepared by microlithography and other techniques of microfabrication.

  9. In-situ synthesis of nanoparticles via supersolubilizing micelle self-assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In-situ synthesis of nano-particles using the self-assembly of molten salt and super soluble micellae was proposed based on a phenomenon of super solubilization of molten salt in reverse micellae and its self-assembly when the concentration reached up to 95%(w/w).The mechanism of the self-assembly indicates that the self-assembly of molten salt occurs in a reverse micelle where a homogenous phase is established between 5%(w/w)of a surfactant with a VB value of less than 1 and a hydrocarbon spe- cies.This synthesis has some unique features,such as being free of water,highly effective deposition and narrow distribution of particle size.

  10. In-situ synthesis of nanoparticles via supersolubilizing micelle self-assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG DingCong

    2007-01-01

    In-situ synthesis of nano-particles using the self-assembly of molten salt and super soluble micellae was proposed based on a phenomenon of super solubilization of molten salt in reverse micellae and its self-assembly when the concentration reached up to 95% (w/w). The mechanism of the self-assembly indicates that the self-assembly of molten salt occurs in a reverse micelle where a homogenous phase is established between 5% (w/w) of a surfactant with a VB value of less than 1 and a hydrocarbon species. This synthesis has some unique features, such as being free of water, highly effective deposition and narrow distribution of particle size.

  11. An autonomous molecular assembler for programmable chemical synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Wenjing; Muscat, Richard A.; McKee, Mireya L.; Milnes, Phillip J.; El-Sagheer, Afaf H.; Bath, Jonathan; Davis, Benjamin G.; Brown, Tom; O'Reilly, Rachel K.; Turberfield, Andrew J.

    2016-06-01

    Molecular machines that assemble polymers in a programmed sequence are fundamental to life. They are also an achievable goal of nanotechnology. Here, we report synthetic molecular machinery made from DNA that controls and records the formation of covalent bonds. We show that an autonomous cascade of DNA hybridization reactions can create oligomers, from building blocks linked by olefin or peptide bonds, with a sequence defined by a reconfigurable molecular program. The system can also be programmed to achieve combinatorial assembly. The sequence of assembly reactions and thus the structure of each oligomer synthesized is recorded in a DNA molecule, which enables this information to be recovered by PCR amplification followed by DNA sequencing.

  12. Total Chemical Synthesis,Assembly of Human Torque Teno Virus Genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Hou; Gengfu Xiao

    2011-01-01

    Torque teno virus(TTV)is a nonenveloped virus containing a single-stranded,circular DNA genome of approximately 3.8kb.We completely synthesized the 3808 nucleotides of the TTV(SANBAN isolate)genome,which contains a hairpin structure and a GC-rich region.More than 100 overlapping oligonucleotides were chemically synthesized and assembled by polymerise chain assembly reaction(PCA),and the synthesis was completed with splicing by overlap extension(SOEing).This study establishes the methodological basis of the chemical synthesis of a viral genome for use as a live attenuated vaccine or gene therapy vector.

  13. Urethane tetrathiafulvalene derivatives: synthesis, self-assembly and electrochemical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Sun

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the self-assembly of two new tetrathiafulvalene (TTF derivatives that contain one or two urethane groups. The formation of nanoribbons was evidenced by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD, which showed that the self-assembly ability of T1 was better than that of T2. The results revealed that more urethane groups in a molecule did not necessarily instigate self-assembly. UV–vis and FTIR spectra were measured to explore noncovalent interactions. The driving forces for self-assembly of TTF derivatives were mainly hydrogen bond interactions and π–π stacking interactions. The electronic conductivity of the T1 and T2 films was tested by a four-probe method.

  14. Heme uptake in bacterial pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Contreras, Heidi; Chim, Nicholas; Credali, Alfredo; Goulding, Celia W.

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for the survival of organisms. Bacterial pathogens possess specialized pathways to acquire heme from their human hosts. In this review, we present recent structural and biochemical data that provide mechanistic insights into several bacterial heme uptake pathways, encompassing the sequestration of heme from human hemoproteins to secreted or membrane-associated bacterial proteins, the transport of heme across bacterial membranes, and the degradation of heme within...

  15. Synthesis and electrocatalytic water oxidation by electrode-bound helical peptide chromophore-catalyst assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Derek M; Coggins, Michael K; Concepcion, Javier J; Ashford, Dennis L; Fang, Zhen; Alibabaei, Leila; Ma, Da; Meyer, Thomas J; Waters, Marcey L

    2014-08-01

    Artificial photosynthesis based on dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cells requires the assembly of a chromophore and catalyst in close proximity on the surface of a transparent, high band gap oxide semiconductor for integrated light absorption and catalysis. While there are a number of approaches to assemble mixtures of chromophores and catalysts on a surface for use in artificial photosynthesis based on dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cells, the synthesis of discrete surface-bound chromophore-catalyst conjugates is a challenging task with few examples to date. Herein, a versatile synthetic approach and electrochemical characterization of a series of oligoproline-based light-harvesting chromophore-water-oxidation catalyst assemblies is described. This approach combines solid-phase peptide synthesis for systematic variation of the backbone, copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) as an orthogonal approach to install the chromophore, and assembly of the water-oxidation catalyst in the final step. Importantly, the catalyst was found to be incompatible with the conditions both for amide bond formation and for the CuAAC reaction. The modular nature of the synthesis with late-stage assembly of the catalyst allows for systematic variation in the spatial arrangement of light-harvesting chromophore and water-oxidation catalyst and the role of intrastrand distance on chromophore-catalyst assembly properties. Controlled potential electrolysis experiments verified that the surface-bound assemblies function as water-oxidation electrocatalysts, and electrochemical kinetics data demonstrate that the assemblies exhibit greater than 10-fold rate enhancements compared to the homogeneous catalyst alone.

  16. Synthesis of diphenylalanine/polyaniline core/shell conducting nanowires by peptide self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jungki; Park, Chan Beum

    2009-01-01

    Breaking the mold: Self-assembled peptide nanowires were used as a template for the synthesis of hollow polyaniline (PANI) nanotubes (see scanning electron microscopy images). The thickness and the morphology of the PANI nanostructures could be controlled readily either by varying the reaction time or by applying multiple PANI coatings. PMID:19466726

  17. Design, Synthesis, Assembly, and Engineering of Peptoid Nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Ellen J; Battigelli, Alessia; Proulx, Caroline; Mannige, Ranjan V; Haxton, Thomas K; Yun, Lisa; Whitelam, Stephen; Zuckermann, Ronald N

    2016-03-15

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomically defined organic nanomaterials are an important material class with broad applications. However, few general synthetic methods exist to produce such materials in high yields and to precisely functionalize them. One strategy to form ordered 2D organic nanomaterials is through the supramolecular assembly of sequence-defined synthetic polymers. Peptoids, one such class of polymer, are designable bioinspired heteropolymers whose main-chain length and monomer sequence can be precisely controlled. We have recently discovered that individual peptoid polymers with a simple sequence of alternating hydrophobic and ionic monomers can self-assemble into highly ordered, free-floating nanosheets. A detailed understanding of their molecular structure and supramolecular assembly dynamics provides a robust platform for the discovery of new classes of nanosheets with tunable properties and novel applications. In this Account, we discuss the discovery, characterization, assembly, molecular modeling, and functionalization of peptoid nanosheets. The fundamental properties of peptoid nanosheets, their mechanism of formation, and their application as robust scaffolds for molecular recognition and as templates for the growth of inorganic minerals have been probed by an arsenal of experimental characterization techniques (e.g., scanning probe, electron, and optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, surface-selective vibrational spectroscopy, and surface tensiometry) and computational techniques (coarse-grained and atomistic modeling). Peptoid nanosheets are supramolecular assemblies of 16-42-mer chains that form molecular bilayers. They span tens of microns in lateral dimensions and freely float in water. Their component chains are highly ordered, with chains nearly fully extended and packed parallel to one another as a result of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Nanosheets form via a novel interface-catalyzed monolayer collapse mechanism. Peptoid

  18. Design, Synthesis, Assembly, and Engineering of Peptoid Nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Ellen J; Battigelli, Alessia; Proulx, Caroline; Mannige, Ranjan V; Haxton, Thomas K; Yun, Lisa; Whitelam, Stephen; Zuckermann, Ronald N

    2016-03-15

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomically defined organic nanomaterials are an important material class with broad applications. However, few general synthetic methods exist to produce such materials in high yields and to precisely functionalize them. One strategy to form ordered 2D organic nanomaterials is through the supramolecular assembly of sequence-defined synthetic polymers. Peptoids, one such class of polymer, are designable bioinspired heteropolymers whose main-chain length and monomer sequence can be precisely controlled. We have recently discovered that individual peptoid polymers with a simple sequence of alternating hydrophobic and ionic monomers can self-assemble into highly ordered, free-floating nanosheets. A detailed understanding of their molecular structure and supramolecular assembly dynamics provides a robust platform for the discovery of new classes of nanosheets with tunable properties and novel applications. In this Account, we discuss the discovery, characterization, assembly, molecular modeling, and functionalization of peptoid nanosheets. The fundamental properties of peptoid nanosheets, their mechanism of formation, and their application as robust scaffolds for molecular recognition and as templates for the growth of inorganic minerals have been probed by an arsenal of experimental characterization techniques (e.g., scanning probe, electron, and optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, surface-selective vibrational spectroscopy, and surface tensiometry) and computational techniques (coarse-grained and atomistic modeling). Peptoid nanosheets are supramolecular assemblies of 16-42-mer chains that form molecular bilayers. They span tens of microns in lateral dimensions and freely float in water. Their component chains are highly ordered, with chains nearly fully extended and packed parallel to one another as a result of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Nanosheets form via a novel interface-catalyzed monolayer collapse mechanism. Peptoid

  19. Non-heme iron enzymes: Contrasts to heme catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon, Edward I.; Decker, Andrea; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2003-01-01

    Non-heme iron enzymes catalyze a wide range of O2 reactions, paralleling those of heme systems. Non-heme iron active sites are, however, much more difficult to study because they do not exhibit the intense spectral features characteristic of the porphyrin ligand. A spectroscopic methodology was developed that provides significant mechanistic insight into the reactivity of non-heme ferrous active sites. These studies reveal a general mechanistic strategy used by these enzymes and differences i...

  20. Dioxygen reactivity of meso-hydroxylated hemes: intermediates in heme degradation process catalyzed by heme oxygenase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sankar Prasad Rath

    2006-11-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is the only enzyme in mammals known to catalyse the physiological degradation of unwanted heme into biliverdin, Fe ion and CO. The process involves introduction of the hydroxyl group at one of its meso-positions as the first fundamental step of the heme cleavage process. It was also found that meso-amino heme undergoes similar ring-cleavage process while reacting with dioxygen in presence of pyridine as an axial ligand. The present paper briefly reviews the reactions of model meso-hydroxylated heme and its analogues with dioxygen, and their relevance in the heme degradation process.

  1. Synthesis of monodisperse silver nanoparticles and their self-assembly through simple thermal decomposition approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An easy one phase synthesis of monodisperse silver nanoparticles and their self-assembly has been reported. Thermal decomposition of silver acetate in diphenyl ether in the presence of oleic acid (cis-9-octadecenoic acid) and oleylamine (cis-9-octadecenoic amine) leads to the formation of silver nanoparticles. The amount of organic content present on the surface of Ag nanoparticles affects the self-assembly of nanoparticles. In the presence of oleic acid alone, no self-assembly was observed but the presence of oleyl amine along with oleic acid led to increased organic coating on the surface of silver nanoparticles resulting in the self-assembly (cubic or hexagonal) of monodisperse silver nanoparticles. The silver nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), CHN analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and UV-visible spectroscopy.

  2. Synthesis and simultaneous self-assembly of novel antibacterial polyurethanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, J. H.; Yin, F.; Jiang, G. C.

    2016-07-01

    Novel physically crosslinked polyurethane (PUII) based on isophorone diisocyanates (IPDI) was prepared by a conventional two step method. The chemical structures of the PUII were characterized by fourier transform infrared (FTIR), proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR), gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The PUII hydrogels were subjected to solvent-induced self-assembly in THF + water to construct a variety of morphologies. The self-assembly morphology of the PUII was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Different amounts (0.2%, 0.4%, 0.6%, 0.8%, 1.0%) of 1,3,5-Tris(2-hydroxyethyl)hexahydro-1,3,5-triazine (TNO) was added as antibacterial agent to the polyurethane prepolymers. The inhibiting capacity of the antibacterial films to the Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Gray mold has been studied. The inhibiting capacity of films for each strain effect became obvious with the increase of content of antibacterial agent and the sensitive degree to all kind of bacterial species was different.

  3. Synthesis and Self-Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles by Chemically Modified Polyol Methods under Experimental Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In our present research, bottom-up self-assembly of gold (Au) nanoparticles on a flat copper (Cu) substrate is performed by a facile method. The very interesting evidence of self-assembly of Au nanoparticles on the top of the thin assembled layer was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We had discovered one of the most general and simple methods for the self-assembly of metal nanoparticles. The general physical and chemical mechanisms of the evaporation process of the solvents can be used for self-assembly of the as-prepared nanoparticles. The important roles of molecules of the used solvents are very critical to self-assembly of the as-prepared Au nanoparticles in the case without using any polymers for those processes. It is clear that self-assembly of such one nano system of the uniform Au nanoparticles is fully examined. Finally, an exciting surface plasmon resonance (SPR) phenomenon of the pure Au nanoparticles in the solvent was fully discovered in their exciting changes of the narrow and large SPR bands according to synthesis time. The SPR was considered as the collective oscillation of valence electrons of the surfaces of the pure Au nanoparticles in the solvent by incident ultraviolet-visible light. Then, the frequency of light photons matches the frequency of the oscillation of surface electrons of the Au nanoparticles that are excited.

  4. A self-assembled synthesis of carbon nanotubes for interconnects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zexiang; Cao, Guichuan; Lin, Zulun; Koehler, Irmgard; Bachmann, Peter K

    2006-02-28

    We report a novel approach to grow highly oriented, freestanding and structured carbon nanotubes (CNTs) between two substrates, using microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition. Sandwiched, multi-layered catalyst structures are employed to generate such structures. The as-grown CNTs adhere well to both the substrate and the top contact, and provide a low-resistance electric contact between the two. High-resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show that the CNTs grow perpendicular to these surfaces. This presents a simple way to grow CNTs in different, predetermined directions in a single growth step. The overall resistance of a CNT bundle and two CNT-terminal contacts is measured to be about 14.7 k Ω. The corresponding conductance is close to the quantum limit conductance G(0). This illustrates that our new approach is promising for the direct assembly of CNT-based interconnects in integrated circuits (ICs) or other micro-electronic devices.

  5. Triazolobithiophene Light Absorbing Self-Assembled Monolayers: Synthesis and Mass Spectrometry Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Séraphin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of five light absorbing triazolobithiophenic thiols, which were utilized for producing self-assembled monolayers (SAMs on gold surfaces, is presented. The monolayer formation was monitored by cyclic voltammetry, indicating excellent surface coverage. The new triazolobithiophenic compounds exhibited an absorption maximum around 340 nm, which is close to the emission wavelength of a standard nitrogen laser. Consequently these compounds could be used to aid ionization in laser desorption mass spectrometry (MS.

  6. Synthesis and Characterization of Fatty Acid/Amino Acid Self-Assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Gajowy, Joanna; Bolikal, Durgadas; Kohn, Joachim; El Fray, Miroslawa

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the synthesis and self-assembling behavior of new copolymers derived from fatty acid/amino acid components, namely dimers of linoleic acid (DLA) and tyrosine derived diphenols containing alkyl ester pendent chains, designated as “R” (DTR). Specific pendent chains were ethyl (E) and hexyl (H). These poly(aliphatic/aromatic-ester-amide)s were further reacted with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(ethylene glycol methyl ether) of different molecular masses, thus resu...

  7. Self assembled homodinuclear dithiocarbamates: One pot synthesis and spectral characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nami, Shahab A. A.; Husain, Ahmad; Ullah, Irfan

    2014-01-01

    Several self assembled homodinuclear complexes of the type [M2(Ldtc)2·4H2O] derived from quadridentate ligand (Ldtc), where Ldtc = 2-aminobenzoylhydrazidebis(dithiocarbamate) and M = Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) have been reported. The in situ procedure gives high yield with the formation of single product as evident by TLC and various other physicochemical techniques. Elemental analysis, TGA, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, ESI mass spectrometry, EPR, UV-vis. and IR spectroscopy were used to characterize the homodinuclear complexes. The spectroscopic evidences and room temperature magnetic moment values suggest that all the complexes have octahedral geometry around the transition metal atom. A symmetrical bidentate coordination of the dithiocarbamato moiety has been observed in all the complexes. The energy-minimized structure of the molecule also showed that each metal atom acquires a distorted octahedral geometry. The complexes exhibit a three-step thermolytic pattern and are non-electrolyte in nature.

  8. Self assembled homodinuclear dithiocarbamates: one pot synthesis and spectral characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nami, Shahab A A; Husain, Ahmad; Ullah, Irfan

    2014-01-24

    Several self assembled homodinuclear complexes of the type [M2(Ldtc)2·4H2O] derived from quadridentate ligand (Ldtc), where Ldtc = 2-aminobenzoylhydrazidebis(dithiocarbamate) and M = Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) have been reported. The in situ procedure gives high yield with the formation of single product as evident by TLC and various other physicochemical techniques. Elemental analysis, TGA, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, ESI mass spectrometry, EPR, UV-vis. and IR spectroscopy were used to characterize the homodinuclear complexes. The spectroscopic evidences and room temperature magnetic moment values suggest that all the complexes have octahedral geometry around the transition metal atom. A symmetrical bidentate coordination of the dithiocarbamato moiety has been observed in all the complexes. The energy-minimized structure of the molecule also showed that each metal atom acquires a distorted octahedral geometry. The complexes exhibit a three-step thermolytic pattern and are non-electrolyte in nature. PMID:24064153

  9. Bacterial Nitric Oxide Synthase Is Required for the Staphylococcus aureus Response to Heme Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdel, Matthew C; Dutter, Brendan F; Sulikowski, Gary A; Skaar, Eric P

    2016-08-12

    Staphylococcus aureus is a pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Within the vertebrate host, S. aureus requires heme as a nutrient iron source and as a cofactor for multiple cellular processes. Although required for pathogenesis, excess heme is toxic. S. aureus employs a two-component system, the heme sensor system (HssRS), to sense and protect against heme toxicity. Upon activation, HssRS induces the expression of the heme-regulated transporter (HrtAB), an efflux pump that alleviates heme toxicity. The ability to sense and respond to heme is critical for the pathogenesis of numerous Gram-positive organisms, yet the mechanism of heme sensing remains unknown. Compound '3981 was identified in a high-throughput screen as an activator of staphylococcal HssRS that triggers HssRS independently of heme accumulation. '3981 is toxic to S. aureus; however, derivatives of '3981 were synthesized that lack toxicity while retaining HssRS activation, enabling the interrogation of the heme stress response without confounding toxic effects of the parent molecule. Using '3981 derivatives as probes of the heme stress response, numerous genes required for '3981-induced activation of HssRS were uncovered. Specifically, multiple genes involved in the production of nitric oxide were identified, including the gene encoding bacterial nitric oxide synthase (bNOS). bNOS protects S. aureus from oxidative stress imposed by heme. Taken together, this work identifies bNOS as crucial for the S. aureus heme stress response, providing evidence that nitric oxide synthesis and heme sensing are intertwined. PMID:27626297

  10. Controllable synthesis of self-assembly Co3O4 nanoflake microspheres for electrochemical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fangyan; Zhang, Binbin; Su, Hai; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Weiqing

    2016-09-01

    Tuning the ratios of ethanol to water, self-assembling microspheres composed of Co3O4 nanoflakes are synthesized by the hydrothermal method. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of as-grown samples obviously show that the dispersive multilayered structures gradually change into micro/nanobelts and cubic blocks structures, and then into the desired self-assembled microspheres with increasing ratios of ethanol to water. Also, all the x-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns evidently demonstrate that all obtained Co3O4 has cubic crystal structure. The corresponding synthesis mechanism is discussed in detail. More importantly, the unique self-assembling Co3O4 nanoflake microspheres have excellent electrochemical performance with large specific capacitance, good rate capability and excellent cycling performance, evidently presenting a potential capability of Co3O4 nanoflake microspheres to act as electrode materials for supercapacitors in sustainable power sources.

  11. Hydrothermal synthesis of self-assembled hierarchical tungsten oxides hollow spheres and their gas sensing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinwei; Liu, Xin; Cui, Jiashan; Sun, Jianbo

    2015-05-20

    Hierarchical self-assembled hollow spheres (HS) of tungsten oxide nanosheets have been synthesized via a template-free hydrothermal method. Morphology evolution of the products is determined by the amount of H2C2O4 (oxalic acid) which serves as chelating agent. Structural features of the products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In addition, the porous structure was analyzed using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) approach. The synthesis mechanism of the products with self-assembled hierarchical structures was proposed. The NO2 gas sensing properties of self-assembled hierarchical WO3 HS materials were investigated, the gas sensing properties of WO3 synthesized by a variety of formulations were compared, and the possible gas sensing mechanism was discussed. The obvious enhancement of the gas sensing properties was ascribed to the structure of the hierarchical HS.

  12. Assembly fabrication of linkers on glass surface and their effect on DNA synthesis and hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShenJiayao; XiaoPengfeng; HouPeng; JiMeiju; SunXiao; HeNongyue

    2003-01-01

    Linkers were assembled on a glass surface based on the hydrolysis and condensation of 3-glycidoxy-propyltrimethoxysilane (GPS). After the assembly of GPS, four approaches were tried to open the ending epoxide group of GPS or to further elongate the linkers. The effect of these approaches on DNA in situ synthesis and hybridization was investigated. For the spacing of the synthesis initiation sites, the wettability of the support and the length of the linking group that attaches the initiation site to the surface have direct influences on the yield of coupling reactions and the subsequent hybridization events. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and mean contact angles of deionized water of the above slides were measured to assess the linker's characteristics in each procedure. It was proved that the glass slides were successfully modified and became excellent supports for the oligonucleotides synthesis. In addition, it proved best for the in situ oligonueleotides synthesis that a glass slide was in turn treated with ethylenediamine, glutaradehyde, ethanolamine and sodium borohydride solution at ambient temperature after silanized with GPS.

  13. How Heme Oxygenase-1 Prevents Heme-Induced Cell Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilibeth Lanceta

    Full Text Available Earlier observations indicate that free heme is selectively toxic to cells lacking heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 but how this enzyme prevents heme toxicity remains unexplained. Here, using A549 (human lung cancer and immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells incubated with exogenous heme, we find knock-down of HO-1 using siRNA does promote the accumulation of cell-associated heme and heme-induced cell death. However, it appears that the toxic effects of heme are exerted by "loose" (probably intralysosomal iron because cytotoxic effects of heme are lessened by pre-incubation of HO-1 deficient cells with desferrioxamine (which localizes preferentially in the lysosomal compartment. Desferrioxamine also decreases lysosomal rupture promoted by intracellularly generated hydrogen peroxide. Supporting the importance of endogenous oxidant production, both chemical and siRNA inhibition of catalase activity predisposes HO-1 deficient cells to heme-mediated killing. Importantly, it appears that HO-1 deficiency somehow blocks the induction of ferritin; control cells exposed to heme show ~10-fold increases in ferritin heavy chain expression whereas in heme-exposed HO-1 deficient cells ferritin expression is unchanged. Finally, overexpression of ferritin H chain in HO-1 deficient cells completely prevents heme-induced cytotoxicity. Although two other products of HO-1 activity--CO and bilirubin--have been invoked to explain HO-1-mediated cytoprotection, we conclude that, at least in this experimental system, HO-1 activity triggers the induction of ferritin and the latter is actually responsible for the cytoprotective effects of HO-1 activity.

  14. Synthesis of self-assembly plasmonic silver nanoparticles with tunable luminescence color

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ghamdi, Haifa S.; Mahmoud, Waleed E., E-mail: w_e_mahmoud@yahoo.com

    2014-01-15

    Assembly is an elegant and effective bottom-up approach to prepare arrays of nanoparticles from nobel metals. Noble metal nanoparticles are perfect building blocks because they can be prepared with an adequate functionalization to allow their assembly and with controlled sizes. Herein, we report a novel recipe for the synthesis of self-assembled silver nanoparticles with tunable optical properties and sizes. The synthetic route followed here based on the covalent binding among silver nanoparticles by means of poly vinyl alcohol for the first time. The size of silver nanoparticle is governed by varying the amount of sodium borohydride. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, selected area electron diffraction and UV–vis spectroscopy. Results depicted that self-assembly of mono-dispersed silver nanoparticles with different sizes have been achieved. The silver nanostructure has a single crystalline faced centered cubic structure with growth orientation along (1 1 1) facet. These nanoparticles exhibited localized surface plasmon resonance at 403 nm. The luminescence peaks were red-sifted from violet to green due to the increase of the particle sizes. -- Highlights: • Self-assembled silver nanoparticles based PVA were synthesized. • NaBH{sub 4} amount was found particle size dependent. • Silver nanoparticles strongly affected the surface plasmon resonance. • Highly symmetric luminescence emission band narrow width is obtained. • Dark field image showed a tunable color change from violet to green.

  15. Serum iron increases with acute induction of hepatic heme oxygenase-1 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostert, Volker; Nakayama, Akihiro; Austin, Lori M; Levander, Ximena A; Ferris, Christopher D; Hill, Kristina E; Burk, Raymond F

    2007-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 is induced by oxidative stress and protects against oxidant injury. We examined the effect of rapid induction of hepatic HO-1 on serum iron level. Serum iron was approximately doubled within 6 h when HO-1 was induced by phenobarbital treatment of selenium-deficient mice. Blocking heme synthesis with diethyl 1,4-dihydro-2,4,6-trimethyl-3,5-pyridinedicarboxylate (DDC) prevented the induction of HO-1 and the rise in serum iron. DDC did not block HO-1 induction by hemin. Inhibition of HO activity by tin protoporphyrin prevented a rise in serum iron that occurred following phorone treatment. These results indicate that heme synthesis or an exogenous source of heme is needed to allow induction of HO-1. Further, they link HO-1 induction with a rise in serum iron, suggesting that the iron resulting from catabolism of heme by HO-1 is released by the liver.

  16. Heme degradation and vascular injury

    OpenAIRE

    Belcher, John D.; Beckman, Joan D.; Balla György; Balla József (1959-) (belgyógyász, nephrológus); Gregory M Vercellotti

    2010-01-01

    Heme is an essential molecule in aerobic organisms. Heme consists of protoporphyrin IX and a ferrous (Fe2+) iron atom, which has high affinity for oxygen (O2). Hemoglobin, the major oxygen-carrying protein in blood, is the most abundant heme-protein in animals and humans. Hemoglobin consists of four globin subunits (α2β2), with each subunit carrying a heme group. Ferrous (Fe2+) hemoglobin is easily oxidized in circulation to ferric (Fe3+) hemoglobin, which readily releases free hemin. Hemin i...

  17. Heme degradation and vascular injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, John D; Beckman, Joan D; Balla, Gyorgy; Balla, Jozsef; Vercellotti, Gregory

    2010-02-01

    Heme is an essential molecule in aerobic organisms. Heme consists of protoporphyrin IX and a ferrous (Fe(2+)) iron atom, which has high affinity for oxygen (O(2)). Hemoglobin, the major oxygen-carrying protein in blood, is the most abundant heme-protein in animals and humans. Hemoglobin consists of four globin subunits (alpha(2)beta(2)), with each subunit carrying a heme group. Ferrous (Fe(2+)) hemoglobin is easily oxidized in circulation to ferric (Fe(3+)) hemoglobin, which readily releases free hemin. Hemin is hydrophobic and intercalates into cell membranes. Hydrogen peroxide can split the heme ring and release "free" redox-active iron, which catalytically amplifies the production of reactive oxygen species. These oxidants can oxidize lipids, proteins, and DNA; activate cell-signaling pathways and oxidant-sensitive, proinflammatory transcription factors; alter protein expression; perturb membrane channels; and induce apoptosis and cell death. Heme-derived oxidants induce recruitment of leukocytes, platelets, and red blood cells to the vessel wall; oxidize low-density lipoproteins; and consume nitric oxide. Heme metabolism, extracellular and intracellular defenses against heme, and cellular cytoprotective adaptations are emphasized. Sickle cell disease, an archetypal example of hemolysis, heme-induced oxidative stress, and cytoprotective adaptation, is reviewed. PMID:19697995

  18. Protein sources of heme for Haemophilus influenzae.

    OpenAIRE

    Stull, T L

    1987-01-01

    Although Haemophilus influenzae requires heme for growth, the source of heme during invasive infections is not known. We compared heme, lactoperoxidase, catalase, cytochrome c, myoglobin, and hemoglobin as sources of heme for growth in defined media. The minimum concentration of heme permitting unrestricted growth of strain E1a, an H. influenzae type b isolate from cerebrospinal fluid, was 0.02 micrograms/ml. Using molar equivalents of heme as lactoperoxidase, catalase, cytochrome c, myoglobi...

  19. Facile synthesis of self-assembled biporous NiO and its electrochemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muruganandham, M.; Suri, Rominder P. S.; Sillanpää, Mika; Lee, Gang-Juan; Wu, Jerry J.

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we report the synthesis of self-assembled bi-porous nickel oxide on a large scale without using any templates or matrix. Porous NiO microspheres composed of particles were obtained by thermal decomposition of nickel oxalate, which was prepared using nickel salt and oxalic acid as precursors. The as-obtained nickel oxalate and nickel oxide were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis. The influence of various experimental conditions on the formation nickel oxalate and NiO were studied. The nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis showed that the synthesized NiO possesses a biporous (both mesoporous and macroporous) surface structur. The NiO microspheres showed a discharge capacity of 2929 mAh g-1. A plausible mechanism for the NiO self-assembly was proposed.

  20. The Heme Sensor System of Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Stauff, Devin L; Skaar, Eric P.

    2009-01-01

    The important human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is able to satisfy its nutrient iron requirement by acquiring heme from host hemoglobin in the context of infection. However, heme acquisition exposes S. aureus to heme toxicity. In order to detect the presence of toxic levels of exogenous heme, S. aureus is able to sense heme through the heme sensing system (HssRS) two-component system. Upon sensing heme, HssRS directly regulates the expression of the heme-regulated ABC transporter HrtAB, wh...

  1. Quantitation of Heme Oxygenase-1: Heme Titration Increases Yield of Purified Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, Warren J.; Backes, Wayne L.

    2007-01-01

    Free heme binds to heme oxygenase as a prosthetic group and substrate in the conversion of heme to biliverdin, carbon monoxide, and free iron. Current methods for quantifying heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) involve reconstitution of the enzyme with heme, followed by a hydroxyapatite column to remove the excess heme. As a result of the hydroxyapatite chromatography, there are significant losses of purified protein. We have developed a method which allows accurate quantitation of HO-1 using a heme titr...

  2. Synthesis of 5-hydroxyectoine from ectoine: crystal structure of the non-heme iron(II and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase EctD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Reuter

    Full Text Available As a response to high osmolality, many microorganisms synthesize various types of compatible solutes. These organic osmolytes aid in offsetting the detrimental effects of low water activity on cell physiology. One of these compatible solutes is ectoine. A sub-group of the ectoine producer's enzymatically convert this tetrahydropyrimidine into a hydroxylated derivative, 5-hydroxyectoine. This compound also functions as an effective osmostress protectant and compatible solute but it possesses properties that differ in several aspects from those of ectoine. The enzyme responsible for ectoine hydroxylation (EctD is a member of the non-heme iron(II-containing and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (EC 1.14.11. These enzymes couple the decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate with the formation of a high-energy ferryl-oxo intermediate to catalyze the oxidation of the bound organic substrate. We report here the crystal structure of the ectoine hydroxylase EctD from the moderate halophile Virgibacillus salexigens in complex with Fe(3+ at a resolution of 1.85 A. Like other non-heme iron(II and 2-oxoglutarate dependent dioxygenases, the core of the EctD structure consists of a double-stranded beta-helix forming the main portion of the active-site of the enzyme. The positioning of the iron ligand in the active-site of EctD is mediated by an evolutionarily conserved 2-His-1-carboxylate iron-binding motif. The side chains of the three residues forming this iron-binding site protrude into a deep cavity in the EctD structure that also harbours the 2-oxoglutarate co-substrate-binding site. Database searches revealed a widespread occurrence of EctD-type proteins in members of the Bacteria but only in a single representative of the Archaea, the marine crenarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus. The EctD crystal structure reported here can serve as a template to guide further biochemical and structural studies of this biotechnologically interesting enzyme family.

  3. Synthesis of 5-hydroxyectoine from ectoine: crystal structure of the non-heme iron(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase EctD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Klaus; Pittelkow, Marco; Bursy, Jan; Heine, Andreas; Craan, Tobias; Bremer, Erhard

    2010-01-01

    As a response to high osmolality, many microorganisms synthesize various types of compatible solutes. These organic osmolytes aid in offsetting the detrimental effects of low water activity on cell physiology. One of these compatible solutes is ectoine. A sub-group of the ectoine producer's enzymatically convert this tetrahydropyrimidine into a hydroxylated derivative, 5-hydroxyectoine. This compound also functions as an effective osmostress protectant and compatible solute but it possesses properties that differ in several aspects from those of ectoine. The enzyme responsible for ectoine hydroxylation (EctD) is a member of the non-heme iron(II)-containing and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (EC 1.14.11). These enzymes couple the decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate with the formation of a high-energy ferryl-oxo intermediate to catalyze the oxidation of the bound organic substrate. We report here the crystal structure of the ectoine hydroxylase EctD from the moderate halophile Virgibacillus salexigens in complex with Fe(3+) at a resolution of 1.85 A. Like other non-heme iron(II) and 2-oxoglutarate dependent dioxygenases, the core of the EctD structure consists of a double-stranded beta-helix forming the main portion of the active-site of the enzyme. The positioning of the iron ligand in the active-site of EctD is mediated by an evolutionarily conserved 2-His-1-carboxylate iron-binding motif. The side chains of the three residues forming this iron-binding site protrude into a deep cavity in the EctD structure that also harbours the 2-oxoglutarate co-substrate-binding site. Database searches revealed a widespread occurrence of EctD-type proteins in members of the Bacteria but only in a single representative of the Archaea, the marine crenarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus. The EctD crystal structure reported here can serve as a template to guide further biochemical and structural studies of this biotechnologically interesting enzyme family. PMID:20498719

  4. Distributions of particulate Heme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gledhill, M.; Achterberg, E.P.; Honey, D.J.; Nielsdottir, M.C.; Rijkenberg, M.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Concentrations of heme b, the iron-containing component of b-type hemoproteins, ranged from?

  5. Biofabrication methods for the patterned assembly and synthesis of viral nanotemplates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerasopoulos, K; Ghodssi, R [MEMS Sensors and Actuators Laboratory (MSAL), University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); McCarthy, M [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Banerjee, P [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Fan, X [Institute for Systems Research, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Culver, J N, E-mail: ghodssi@umd.edu [Center for Biosystems Research, University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute, MD 20742 (United States)

    2010-02-05

    This paper reports on novel methodologies for the patterning and templated synthesis of virus-structured nanomaterials in two- and three-dimensional microfabricated architectures using the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). The TMV is a high aspect ratio biological molecule which can be engineered to include amino acids with enhanced binding properties. These modifications facilitate self-assembly of the TMV onto various substrates and enable its use as a template for the synthesis of nanostructured materials. This work focuses on the combination of this bottom-up biologically inspired fabrication method with standard top-down micromachining processes that allow direct integration of the virus-structured materials into batch-fabricated devices. Photolithographic patterning of uncoated as well as nickel-coated TMV nanostructures has been achieved using a lift-off process in both solvent and mild basic solutions and their assembly onto three-dimensional polymer and silicon microstructures is demonstrated. In addition to these patterning techniques, in situ formation of metal oxide TMV coatings in patterned microfabricated environments is shown using atomic layer deposition directly on the nickel-coated viruses. The biofabrication 'process toolbox' presented in this work offers a simple and versatile alternative for the hierarchical patterning and incorporation of biotemplated nanomaterials into micro/nanofabrication schemes.

  6. Molecular Design of Bioinspired Nanostructures for Biomedical Applications: Synthesis, Self-Assembly and Functional Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hesheng Victor; Zheng, Xin Ting; Mok, Beverly Yin Leng; Ibrahim, Salwa Ali; Yu, Yong; Tan, Yen Nee

    2016-08-01

    Biomolecules are the nanoscale building blocks of cells, which play multifaceted roles in the critical biological processes such as biomineralization in a living organism. In these processes, the biological molecules such as protein and nucleic acids use their exclusive biorecognition properties enabled from their unique chemical composition, shape and function to initiate a cascade of cellular events. The exceptional features of these biomolecules, coupled with the recent advancement in nanotechnology, have led to the emergence of a new research field that focuses on the molecular design of bioinspired nanostructures that inherit the extraordinary function of natural biomaterials. These “bioinspired” nanostructures could be formulated by biomimetic approaches through either self-assembling of biomolecules or acting as a biomolecular template/precursor to direct the synthesis of nanocomposite. In either situation, the resulting nanomaterials exhibit phenomenal biocompatibility, superb aqueous solubility and excellent colloidal stability, branding them exceptionally desirable for both in vitro and in vivo biomedical applications. In this review, we will present the recent developments in the preparation of “bioinspired” nanostructures through biomimetic self-assembly and biotemplating synthesis, as well as highlight their functional properties and potential applications in biomedical diagnostics and therapeutic delivery. Lastly, we will conclude this topic with some personal perspective on the challenges and future outlooks of the “bioinspired” nanostructures for nanomedicine.

  7. Controllable Synthesis of Mesoporous Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Assemblies for Chemoselective Catalytic Reduction of Nitroarenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadas, Ioannis T; Fountoulaki, Stella; Lykakis, Ioannis N; Armatas, Gerasimos S

    2016-03-18

    Iron(III) oxide is a low-cost material with applications ranging from electronics to magnetism, and catalysis. Recent efforts have targeted new nanostructured forms of Fe2O3 with high surface area-to-volume ratio and large pore volume. Herein, the synthesis of 3D mesoporous networks consisting of 4-5 nm γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles by a polymer-assisted aggregating self-assembly method is reported. Iron oxide assemblies obtained from the hybrid networks after heat treatment have an open-pore structure with high surface area (up to 167 m(2)g(-1)) and uniform pores (ca. 6.3 nm). The constituent iron oxide nanocrystals can undergo controllable phase transition from γ-Fe2O3 to α-Fe2O3 and to Fe3O4 under different annealing conditions while maintaining the 3D structure and open porosity. These new ensemble structures exhibit high catalytic activity and stability for the selective reduction of aryl and alkyl nitro compounds to the corresponding aryl amines and oximes, even in large-scale synthesis. PMID:26880681

  8. Shape-controlled synthesis of cubic-like selenium nanoparticles via the self-assembly method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luesakul, Urarika; Komenek, Seamkwan; Puthong, Songchan; Muangsin, Nongnuj

    2016-11-20

    The ability to control the morphology of nanoparticles by molecular design and synthesis is gaining increasing attention for achieving improved unique properties. In this work, we designed the chemical structure of a stabilizer for controlling the shape of selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) via a self-assembly process. When folic acid-gallic acid-N,N,N-trimethyl chitosan (FA-GA-TMC) was used as a stabilizer, SeNPs were observed to self-organize into cubic-like structures with an average size of approximately 300nm. In contrast to the product obtained when unmodified chitosan was used as a stabilizer, this method resulted in spherical shape with an average size of approximately 200nm. The data suggested that the cubic-like SeNPs were controlled by a combination of electrostatic interaction, π-π stacking and hydrogen bonding between neighboring particles. Furthermore, the cubic-like SeNPs exhibited good anticancer efficacy and cellular uptake against breast cancer cells while exhibiting low toxicity against normal cells. These data demonstrates a simple approach for the shape-controlled synthesis of cubic-like SeNPs for biological applications via the self-assembly method. PMID:27561515

  9. Unusual Heme Binding in the Bacterial Iron Response Regulator Protein (Irr): Spectral Characterization of Heme Binding to Heme Regulatory Motif

    OpenAIRE

    Ishikawa, Haruto; Nakagaki, Megumi; Bamba, Ai; Uchida, Takeshi; Hori, Hiroshi; O'Brian, Mark R.; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Ishimori, Koichiro

    2011-01-01

    We characterized heme binding in the bacterial iron response regulator (Irr) protein, which is a simple heme-regulated protein having a single “heme-regulatory motif”, HRM, and plays a key role in the iron homeostasis of a nitrogen fixing bacterium. The heme titration to wild-type and mutant Irr clearly showed that Irr has two heme binding sites: one of the heme binding sites is in the HRM, where 29Cys is the axial ligand, and the other one, the secondary heme binding site, is located outside...

  10. Synthesis and Self-Assembly of a Mikto-Arm Star Dual Drug Amphiphile Containing both Paclitaxel and Camptothecin

    OpenAIRE

    Cheetham, A.G.; Zhang, P.; Lin, Y.-A; Lin, R; Cui, H

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly of anticancer therapeutics into discrete nanostructures provides an innovative way to develop a self-delivering nanomedicine with a high, quantitative drug loading. We report here the synthesis and assembly of a mikto-arm star dual drug amphiphile (DA) containing both a bulky paclitaxel (PTX) and a planar camptothecin (CPT). The two anti-cancer drugs of interest were stochastically conjugated to a β-sheet forming peptide (Sup35) and under physiologically-relevant conditions the ...

  11. High thermoelectric figure of merit nanostructured pnictogen chalcogenides by bottom-up synthesis and assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Rutvik J.

    Thermoelectric materials offer promise for realizing transformative environmentallyfriendly solid-state refrigeration technologies that could replace current technologies based on ozone-depleting liquid coolants. The fruition of this vision requires factorial enhancements in the figure of merit (ZT) of thermoelectric materials, necessitating high Seebeck coefficient (alpha), high electrical conductivity (sigma) and low thermal conductivity (kappa). This thesis reports a novel bottom-up approach to scalably sculpt large quantities (>10g/minute) of V 2VI3 nanocrystals with controllable shapes and sizes, and assemble them into bulk samples to obtain both high power factors alpha 2sigma as well as unprecedentedly low kappa through tunable doping and nanostructuring. The thesis demonstrates a surfactant-mediated microwave-solvothermal synthesis technique that selectively yields both n- and p-typed pnictogen chalcogenide (Bi2Te3, Sb2Te3, Bi2Se3) nanoplates and, nanowires and nanotubes (Sb 2Se3) that can be sintered to obtain 25-250 % increases in ZT>1 compared to their non-nanostructured and un-doped counterparts. A key result is that nanostructuring diminishes the lattice thermal conductivity kappa L to ultra-low values of 0.2-0.5 Wm-1K-1. Sub-atomic-percent sulfur doping and sulfurization of the pnictogen chalcogenides induced through mercaptan-terminated organic surfactants used in the synthesis result in large Seebeck coefficients between -240 nanocomposites by mixing nanoplates of different materials (e.g., S-doped Sb2Te3 and S-doped Bi2Te3) and forming heterostructures of metals and chalcogenides. The thesis finally demonstrates the extendibility of the novel synthesis and assembly approach to tailor the thermoelectric properties of other non-traditional thermoelectric materials systems.

  12. Heme in intestinal epithelial cell turnover, differentiation,detoxification, inflammation, carcinogenesis, absorption and motility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Phillip S Oates; Adrian R West

    2006-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is lined by a simple epithelium that undergoes constant renewal involving cell division,differentiation and cell death. In addition, the epithelial lining separates the hostile processes of digestion and absorption that occur in the intestinal lumen from the aseptic environment of the internal milieu by defensive mechanisms that protect the epithelium from being breached. Central to these defensive processes is the synthesis of heme and its catabolism by heme oxygenase (HO). Dietary heme is also an important source of iron for the body which is taken up intact by the enterocyte.This review describes the recent literature on the diverse properties of heme/HO in the intestine tract.The roles of heme/HO in the regulation of the cell cycle/apoptosis, detoxification of xenobiotics, oxidative stress,inflammation, development of colon cancer, hemeiron absorption and intestinal motility are specifically examined.

  13. Bacterial heme-transport proteins and their heme-coordination modes

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Yong; Guo, Maolin

    2008-01-01

    Efficient iron acquisition is critical for an invading microbe’s survival and virulence. Most of the iron in mammals is incorporated into heme, which can be plundered by certain bacterial pathogens as a nutritional iron source. Utilization of exogenous heme by bacteria involves the binding of heme or hemoproteins to the cell surface receptors, followed by the transport of heme into cells. Once taken into the cytosol, heme is presented to heme oxygenases where the tetrapyrrole ring is cleaved ...

  14. Eucalyptus ESTs corresponding to the protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase enzyme related to the synthesis of heme, chlorophyll, and to the action of herbicides

    OpenAIRE

    Edivaldo Domingues Velini; Maria Lúcia Bueno Trindade; Elza Alves; Ana Catarina Catâneo; Celso Luis Marino; Ivan de Godoy Maia; Edson Seizo Mori; Edson Luiz Furtado; Iraê Amaral Guerrini; Carlos Frederico Wilcken

    2005-01-01

    This work was aimed at locating Eucalyptus ESTs corresponding to the PROTOX or PPO enzyme (Protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase, E.C. 1.3.3.4) directly related to resistance to herbicides that promote oxidative stress, changing the functionality of this enzyme. PROTOX, which is the site of action of diphenyl-ether (oxyfluorfen, lactofen, fomesafen), oxadiazole (oxadiazon and oxadiargyl), and aryl triazolinone (sulfentrazone and carfentrazone) herbicides, acts on the synthesis route of porphyrins whi...

  15. Reduced heme levels underlie the exponential growth defect of the Shewanella oneidensis hfq mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Brennan

    Full Text Available The RNA chaperone Hfq fulfills important roles in small regulatory RNA (sRNA function in many bacteria. Loss of Hfq in the dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 results in slow exponential phase growth and a reduced terminal cell density at stationary phase. We have found that the exponential phase growth defect of the hfq mutant in LB is the result of reduced heme levels. Both heme levels and exponential phase growth of the hfq mutant can be completely restored by supplementing LB medium with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA, the first committed intermediate synthesized during heme synthesis. Increasing expression of gtrA, which encodes the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in heme biosynthesis, also restores heme levels and exponential phase growth of the hfq mutant. Taken together, our data indicate that reduced heme levels are responsible for the exponential growth defect of the S. oneidensis hfq mutant in LB medium and suggest that the S. oneidensis hfq mutant is deficient in heme production at the 5-ALA synthesis step.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of mesoporous TiO{sub 2} assembled as microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beitollahi, Ali, E-mail: beitolla@iust.ac.i [Nanomaterial Research Group, Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Eng., Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Narmak, Farjam, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Daie, Amir Hossein Haj [Nanomaterial Research Group, Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Eng., Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Narmak, Farjam, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Samie, Leyla [Nanomaterial Research Group, Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Eng., Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Narmak, Farjam, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute of Petroleum Industries, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akbarnejad, Mohammad Mehdi [Research Institute of Petroleum Industries, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-02-04

    In the work presented here, we report the successful synthesis of highly porous (219 m{sup 2}/g) mesostructured titania powder assembled as microspheres of uniform wormlike channels of {approx}6-7 nm widths by spray pyrolysis of a titania sol prepared by templating approach using P123 pluronic block copolymer (BC). This method involves the preparation of a Ti{sup 4+}-sol containing titanium tertraisopropoxide (TTIP), pluronic BC P123, 2-propanol, acetyl acetonate (ACAC) and hydrochloric acid (HCl) as well as H{sub 2}O followed by spray pyrolysis of the obtained sol into the hot zone of a pre-heated reactor at 800 deg. C, 900 deg. C and 1000 deg. C. For all of these pyrolyzed samples, the formation of anatase as the major phase along with rutile as the minor one could be confirmed. The appearance of wormlike mesopores rather than highly ordered cubic or hexagonal mesostructures is related to the lack of appropriate drying conditions normally applied to induce self assembly as well as formation of rather large titania crystallite sizes.

  17. Synthesis and Characterization of Fatty Acid/Amino Acid Self-Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Gajowy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss the synthesis and self-assembling behavior of new copolymers derived from fatty acid/amino acid components, namely dimers of linoleic acid (DLA and tyrosine derived diphenols containing alkyl ester pendent chains, designated as “R” (DTR. Specific pendent chains were ethyl (E and hexyl (H. These poly(aliphatic/aromatic-ester-amides were further reacted with poly(ethylene glycol (PEG and poly(ethylene glycol methyl ether of different molecular masses, thus resulting in ABA type (hydrophilic-hydrophobic-hydrophilic triblock copolymers. We used Fourier transform infrared (FTIR and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopies to evaluate the chemical structure of the final materials. The molecular masses were estimated by gel permeation chromatography (GPC measurements. The self-organization of these new polymeric systems into micellar/nanospheric structures in aqueous environment was evaluated using ultraviolet/visible (UV-VIS spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The polymers were found to spontaneously self-assemble into nanoparticles with sizes in the range 196–239 nm and critical micelle concentration (CMC of 0.125–0.250 mg/mL. The results are quite promising and these materials are capable of self-organizing into well-defined micelles/nanospheres encapsulating bioactive molecules, e.g., vitamins or antibacterial peptides for antibacterial coatings on medical devices.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of Fatty acid/amino Acid self-assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajowy, Joanna; Bolikal, Durgadas; Kohn, Joachim; Fray, Miroslawa El

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the synthesis and self-assembling behavior of new copolymers derived from fatty acid/amino acid components, namely dimers of linoleic acid (DLA) and tyrosine derived diphenols containing alkyl ester pendent chains, designated as "R" (DTR). Specific pendent chains were ethyl (E) and hexyl (H). These poly(aliphatic/aromatic-ester-amide)s were further reacted with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(ethylene glycol methyl ether) of different molecular masses, thus resulting in ABA type (hydrophilic-hydrophobic-hydrophilic) triblock copolymers. We used Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies to evaluate the chemical structure of the final materials. The molecular masses were estimated by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) measurements. The self-organization of these new polymeric systems into micellar/nanospheric structures in aqueous environment was evaluated using ultraviolet/visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The polymers were found to spontaneously self-assemble into nanoparticles with sizes in the range 196-239 nm and critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 0.125-0.250 mg/mL. The results are quite promising and these materials are capable of self-organizing into well-defined micelles/nanospheres encapsulating bioactive molecules, e.g., vitamins or antibacterial peptides for antibacterial coatings on medical devices. PMID:25347356

  19. RAFT Synthesis and Self-Assembly of Free-Base Porphyrin Cored Star Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT synthesis and self-assembly of free-base porphyrin cored star polymers are reported. The polymerization, in the presence of a free-base porphyrin cored chain transfer agent (CTA-FBP, produced porphyrin star polymers with controlled molecular weights and narrow polydispersities for a number of monomers including N, N-dimethylacrylamide (DMA and styrene (St. Well-defined amphiphilic star block copolymers, P-(PS-PDMA4 and P-(PDMA-PS4 (P: porphyrin, were also prepared and used for self-assembly studies. In methanol, a selective solvent for PDMA, spherical micelles were observed for both block copolymers as characterized by TEM. UV-vis studies suggested star-like micelles were formed from P-(PS-PDMA4, while P-(PDMA-PS4 aggregated into flower-like micelles. Spectrophotometric titrations indicated that the optical response of these two micelles to external ions was a function of micellar structures. These structure-related properties will be used for micelle studies and functional material development in the future.

  20. Polymer-virus core-shell structures prepared via co-assembly and template synthesis methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUTHIWANGCHAROEN; Nisaraporn; PREVELIGE; Peter; E.Jr

    2010-01-01

    Bionanoparticles(BNPs),consisting of virus and virus-like assemblies,have attracted much attention in the biomedical field for their applications such as imaging and targeted drug delivery,owing to their well-defined structures and well-controlled chemistries.BNPs-based core-shell structures provide a unique system for the investigation of biological interactions such as protein-protein and protein-carbohydrate interactions.However,it is still a challenge to prepare the BNPs-based core-shell structures.Herein,we describe(i) co-assembly method and(ii) template synthesis method in the development of polymer-BNPs core-shell structures.These two methods can be divided into three different systems.In system A,different polymers including poly(2-vinylpyridine)(P2VP),poly(4-vinylpyridine)(P4VP) and poly(ε-caprolactone)-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine)(PCL-b-P2VP) can form a raspberry-like structure with BNPs.In system B,polystyrene(PS) spheres end capped with free amine and BNPs can form a core-shell structure.In System C,layer-by-layer(LBL) method is used to prepare positive charged PS particles,which can be used as a template to form the core-shell structures with BNPs.These two methods may open a new way for preparing novel protein-based functional materials for potential applications in the biomedical field.

  1. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Heme Biosynthetic Mutants Utilize Heme and Hemoglobin as a Heme Source but Fail To Grow within Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Paul C; Thomas, Christopher E.; Elkins, Christopher; Clary, Susan; Sparling, P F

    1998-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens, including pathogenic neisseriae, can use heme as an iron source for growth. To study heme utilization by Neisseria gonorrhoeae, two heme biosynthetic mutants were constructed, one with a mutation in hemH (the gene encoding ferrochelatase) and one with a mutation in hemA (the gene encoding γ-glutamyl tRNA reductase). The hemH mutant failed to grow without an exogenous supply of heme or hemoglobin, whereas the hemA mutant failed to grow unless heme, hemoglobin, or heme...

  2. The P. aeruginosa Heme Binding Protein PhuS is a Heme Oxygenase Titratable Regulator of Heme Uptake

    OpenAIRE

    O’Neill, Maura J.; Wilks, Angela

    2013-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa heme utilization (Phu) system encodes several proteins involved in the acquisition of heme as an iron source. Once internalized heme is degraded by the iron-regulated heme oxygenase, HemO to biliverdin (BV) IXδ and β. In vitro studies have shown holo-PhuS transfers heme to the iron-regulated HemO. This protein-protein interaction is specific for HemO as PhuS does not interact with the α-regioselective heme oxygenase, BphO. Bacterial genetics and isotopic labeling...

  3. Templated Synthesis of Magnetic Nanoparticles through the Self-Assembly of Polymers and Surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vo Thu An Nguyen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs for various technological applications continues to be an interesting research topic. The successful application of superparamagnetic NPs to each specific area typically depends on the achievement of high magnetization for the nanocrystals obtained, which is determined by their average size and size distribution. The size dispersity of magnetic NPs (MNPs is markedly improved when, during the synthesis, the nucleation and growth steps of the reaction are well-separated. Tuning the nucleation process with the assistance of a hosting medium that encapsulates the precursors (such as self-assembled micelles, dispersing them in discrete compartments, improves control over particle formation. These inorganic-organic hybrids inherit properties from both the organic and the inorganic materials, while the organic component can also bring a specific functionality to the particles or prevent their aggregation in water. The general concept of interest in this review is that the shape and size of the synthesized MNPs can be controlled to some extent by the geometry and the size of the organic templates used, which thus can be considered as molds at the nanometer scale, for both porous continuous matrices and suspensions.

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Stimuli Responsive Block Copolymers, Self-Assembly Behavior and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Determan, Michael Duane [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-12-17

    The central theme of this thesis work is to develop new block copolymer materials for biomedical applications. While there are many reports of stimuli-responsive amphiphilic [19-21] and crosslinked hydrogel materials [22], the development of an in situ gel forming, pH responsive pentablock copolymer is a novel contribution to the field, Figure 1.1 is a sketch of an ABCBA pentablock copolymer. The A blocks are cationic tertiary amine methacrylates blocked to a central Pluronic F127 triblock copolymer. In addition to the prerequisite synthetic and macromolecular characterization of these new materials, the self-assembled supramolecular structures formed by the pentablock were experimentally evaluated. This synthesis and characterization process serves to elucidate the important structure property relationships of these novel materials, The pH and temperature responsive behavior of the pentablock copolymer were explored especially with consideration towards injectable drug delivery applications. Future synthesis work will focus on enhancing and tuning the cell specific targeting of DNA/pentablock copolymer polyplexes. The specific goals of this research are: (1) Develop a synthetic route for gel forming pentablock block copolymers with pH and temperature sensitive properties. Synthesis of these novel copolymers is accomplished with ATRP, yielding low polydispersity and control of the block copolymer architecture. Well defined macromolecular characteristics are required to tailor the phase behavior of these materials. (2) Characterize relationship between the size and shape of pentablock copolymer micelles and gel structure and the pH and temperature of the copolymer solutions with SAXS, SANS and CryoTEM. (3) Evaluate the temperature and pH induced phase separation and macroscopic self-assembly phenomenon of the pentablock copolymer. (4) Utilize the knowledge gained from first three goals to design and formulate drug delivery formulations based on the multi

  5. Structural Characterization of Heme Environmental Mutants of CgHmuT that Shuttles Heme Molecules to Heme Transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norifumi Muraki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Corynebacteria contain a heme uptake system encoded in hmuTUV genes, in which HmuT protein acts as a heme binding protein to transport heme to the cognate transporter HmuUV. The crystal structure of HmuT from Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgHmuT reveals that heme is accommodated in the central cleft with His141 and Tyr240 as the axial ligands and that Tyr240 forms a hydrogen bond with Arg242. In this work, the crystal structures of H141A, Y240A, and R242A mutants were determined to understand the role of these residues for the heme binding of CgHmuT. Overall and heme environmental structures of these mutants were similar to those of the wild type, suggesting that there is little conformational change in the heme-binding cleft during heme transport reaction with binding and the dissociation of heme. A loss of one axial ligand or the hydrogen bonding interaction with Tyr240 resulted in an increase in the redox potential of the heme for CgHmuT to be reduced by dithionite, though the wild type was not reduced under physiological conditions. These results suggest that the heme environmental structure stabilizes the ferric heme binding in CgHmuT, which will be responsible for efficient heme uptake under aerobic conditions where Corynebacteria grow.

  6. Eucalyptus ESTs corresponding to the protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase enzyme related to the synthesis of heme, chlorophyll, and to the action of herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edivaldo Domingues Velini

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This work was aimed at locating Eucalyptus ESTs corresponding to the PROTOX or PPO enzyme (Protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase, E.C. 1.3.3.4 directly related to resistance to herbicides that promote oxidative stress, changing the functionality of this enzyme. PROTOX, which is the site of action of diphenyl-ether (oxyfluorfen, lactofen, fomesafen, oxadiazole (oxadiazon and oxadiargyl, and aryl triazolinone (sulfentrazone and carfentrazone herbicides, acts on the synthesis route of porphyrins which is associated with the production of chlorophyll a, catalases, and peroxidases. One cluster and one single read were located, with e-values better than e-70, associated to PROTOX. The alignment results between amino acid sequences indicated that this enzyme is adequately represented in the ESTs database of the FORESTs project.

  7. Solvothermal synthesis and controlled self-assembly of monodisperse titanium-based perovskite colloidal nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruntu, Daniela; Rostamzadeh, Taha; Costanzo, Tommaso; Salemizadeh Parizi, Saman; Caruntu, Gabriel

    2015-07-01

    The rational design of monodisperse ferroelectric nanocrystals with controlled size and shape and their organization into hierarchical structures has been a critical step for understanding the polar ordering in nanoscale ferroelectrics, as well as the design of nanocrystal-based functional materials which harness the properties of individual nanoparticles and the collective interactions between them. We report here on the synthesis and self-assembly of aggregate-free, single-crystalline titanium-based perovskite nanoparticles with controlled morphology and surface composition by using a simple, easily scalable and highly versatile colloidal route. Single-crystalline, non-aggregated BaTiO3 colloidal nanocrystals, used as a model system, have been prepared under solvothermal conditions at temperatures as low as 180 °C. The shape of the nanocrystals was tuned from spheroidal to cubic upon changing the polarity of the solvent, whereas their size was varied from 16 to 30 nm for spheres and 5 to 78 nm for cubes by changing the concentration of the precursors and the reaction time, respectively. The hydrophobic, oleic acid-passivated nanoparticles exhibit very good solubility in non-polar solvents and can be rendered dispersible in polar solvents by a simple process involving the oxidative cleavage of the double bond upon treating the nanopowders with the Lemieux-von Rudloff reagent. Lattice dynamic analysis indicated that regardless of their size, BaTiO3 nanocrystals present local disorder within the perovskite unit cell, associated with the existence of polar ordering. We also demonstrate for the first time that, in addition to being used for fabricating large area, crack-free, highly uniform films, BaTiO3 nanocubes can serve as building blocks for the design of 2D and 3D mesoscale structures, such as superlattices and superparticles. Interestingly, the type of superlattice structure (simple cubic or face centered cubic) appears to be determined by the type of solvent

  8. Heme-heme magnetic interaction of cytochrome c3 studied by Mössbauer effect

    OpenAIRE

    Utuno, M.; Ôno, K.; Kimura, K.; Inokuchi, H; Yagi, T

    1980-01-01

    A Mössbauer effect study was carried out on cytochrome c3 to investigate the heme-heme magnetic interaction. Results observed in the spectrum of partially reduced cytochrome c3 at 4.2 K shows that a strongly enhanced heme-heme magnetic interaction exists between cytochrome c 3 molecules.

  9. Convenient synthesis and application of versatile nucleic acid lipid membrane anchors in the assembly and fusion of liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ries, Oliver; Löffler, Philipp M. G.; Vogel, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Hydrophobic moieties like lipid membrane anchors are highly demanded modifications for nucleic acid oligomers. Membrane-anchor modified oligonucleotides are applicable in biomedicine leading to new delivery strategies as well as in biophysical investigations towards assembly and fusion of liposomes...... or the construction of DNA origami structures. We herein present the synthesis and applications of versatile lipid membrane anchor building blocks suitable for solid phase oligonucleotide synthesis. These are readily synthesized in bulk in five to seven steps from commercially available precursors and can...

  10. Heme on innate immunity and inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Dutra, Fabianno F.; Bozza, Marcelo T.

    2014-01-01

    Heme is an essential molecule expressed ubiquitously all through our tissues. Heme plays major functions in cellular physiology and metabolism as the prosthetic group of diverse proteins. Once released from cells and from hemeproteins free heme causes oxidative damage and inflammation, thus acting as a prototypic damage-associated molecular pattern. In this context, free heme is a critical component of the pathological process of sterile and infectious hemolytic conditions including malaria, ...

  11. Recent advances in bacterial heme protein biochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Mayfield, Jeffery A.; Dehner, Carolyn A.; Dubois, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent progress in genetics, fed by the burst in genome sequence data, has led to the identification of a host of novel bacterial heme proteins that are now being characterized in structural and mechanistic terms. The following short review highlights very recent work with bacterial heme proteins involved in the uptake, biosynthesis, degradation, and use of heme in respiration and sensing.

  12. Hemoglobin and heme scavenger receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Møller, Holger Jon; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2010-01-01

    Heme, the functional group of hemoglobin, myoglobin, and other hemoproteins, is a highly toxic substance when it appears in the extracellular milieu. To circumvent potential harmful effects of heme from hemoproteins released during physiological or pathological cell damage (such as hemolysis...... and rhabdomyolysis), specific high capacity scavenging systems have evolved in the mammalian organism. Two major systems, which essentially function in a similar way by means of a circulating latent plasma carrier protein that upon ligand binding is recognized by a receptor, are represented by a) the hemoglobin...

  13. Synthesis and Self-Assembly of Amphiphilic Triblock Terpolymers with Complex Macromolecular Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Polymeropoulos, George

    2015-11-25

    Two star triblock terpolymers (PS-b-P2VP-b-PEO)3 and one dendritic-like terpolymer [PS-b-P2VP-b-(PEO)2]3 of PS (polystyrene), P2VP (poly(2-vinylpyridine)), and PEO (poly(ethylene oxide)), never reported before, were synthesized by combining atom transfer radical and anionic polymerizations. The synthesis involves the transformation of the -Br groups of the previously reported Br-terminated 3-arm star diblock copolymers to one or two -OH groups, followed by anionic polymerization of ethylene oxide to afford the star or dendritic structure, respectively. The well-defined structure of the terpolymers was confirmed by static light scattering, size exclusion chromatography, and NMR spectroscopy. The self-assembly in solution and the morphology in bulk of the terpolymers, studied by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy, respectively, reveal new insights in the phase separation of these materials with complex macromolecular architecture. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  14. Controllable Assembly and Separation of Colloidal Nanoparticles through a One-Tube Synthesis Based on Density Gradient Centrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiaohan; Li, Minglin; Kuang, Yun; Wang, Cheng; Cai, Zhao; Zhang, Jin; You, Shusen; Yin, Meizhen; Wan, Pengbo; Luo, Liang; Sun, Xiaoming

    2015-05-01

    Self-assembly of gold nanoparticles into one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures with finite primary units was achieved by introducing a thin salt (NaCl) solution layer into density gradient before centrifugation. The electrostatic interactions between Au nanoparticles would be affected and cause 1D assembly upon passing through the salt layer. A negatively charged polymer such as poly(acrylic acid) was used as an encapsulation/stabilization layer to help the formation of 1D Au assemblies, which were subsequently sorted according to unit numbers at succeeding separation zones. A centrifugal field was introduced as the external field to overcome the random Brownian motion of NPs and benefit the assembly effect. Such a facile "one-tube synthesis" approach couples assembly and separation in one centrifuge tube by centrifuging once. The method can be tuned by changing the concentration of interference salt layer, encapsulation layer, and centrifugation rate. Furthermore, positively charged fluorescent polymers such as perylenediimide-poly(N,N-diethylaminoethyl methacrylate) could encapsulate the assemblies to give tunable fluorescence properties. PMID:25809533

  15. Fabrication of Zeolite A Rods with Irregular Macropores by Self-assembly of Zeolite A Microcrystals Using Microwave-assisted Hydrothermal Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程志林; 万惠霖; 刘赞

    2004-01-01

    Zeolite A rods by self-assembly of zeolite A microcrystal were successfully synthesized by microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis. The average size of zeolite crystals consisting of self-assembling materials was about 300 nm and the length of zeolite rods was in the range of 15-30 μm.

  16. Structural and Functional Models of Non-Heme Iron Enzymes : A Study of the 2-His-1-Carboxylate Facial Triad Structural Motif

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijnincx, P.C.A.

    2007-01-01

    The structural and functional modeling of a specific group of non-heme iron enzymes by the synthesis of small synthetic analogues is the topic of this thesis. The group of non-heme iron enzymes with the 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad has recently been established as a common platform for the activ

  17. Synergistic self-assembly of scaffolds and building blocks for directed synthesis of organic nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dergunov, Sergey [ORNL; Richter, Andrew G [ORNL; Kim, Mariya D. [Saint Louis University; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh [ORNL; Urban, Volker S [ORNL; Pinkhassik, Eugene [University of Memphis

    2013-01-01

    Surfactants and hydrophobic monomers spontaneously assemble into vesicles containing monomers within the bilayer. The joint action of monomers and surfactants is essential in this synergistic self-assembly. Polymerization in the bilayer formed hollow polymer nanocapsules.

  18. Direct Heme Transfer Reactions in the Group A Streptococcus Heme Acquisition Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Chunmei Lu; Gang Xie; Mengyao Liu; Hui Zhu; Benfang Lei

    2012-01-01

    The heme acquisition machinery in Group A Streptococcus (GAS) consists of the surface proteins Shr and Shp and ATP-binding cassette transporter HtsABC. Shp cannot directly acquire heme from methemoglobin (metHb) but directly transfers its heme to HtsA. It has not been previously determined whether Shr directly relays heme from metHb to Shp. Thus, the complete pathway for heme acquisition from metHb by the GAS heme acquisition machinery has remained unclear. In this study, the metHb-to-Shr and...

  19. Controlled Synthesis, Manipulation of Surface Hydrophobicity and Self-Assembly of Hematite Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL; Johs, Alexander [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL

    2008-07-01

    The preparation of uniform iron oxide monolayer thin films is of great interest not only in advanced materials synthesis but also in studies of microbial cell and iron oxide mineral interface interactions by techniques such as neutron reflectometry, which requires the use of uniform thin films of the mineral on a substrate. Here we report three techniques for fabricating such uniform hematite ( -Fe2O3) nanocrystal thin films. The nanocrystals with controlled sizes and morphologies were first synthesized by thermal hydrolysis of Fe3+ ions in acidic aqueous solution. Three methods were tested to enhance the surface hydrophobicity of the synthesized nanoparticles, including thermal dissociation of surface hydroxyl groups, stepwise solvent exchange, and surfactant-assisted phase transfer. FTIR and Raman spectroscopic analyses were used to elucidate the mechanisms of surface hydrophobicity changes on hematite nanoparticles. Results indicate that techniques of thermal treatment and stepwise solvent exchange caused the dissociation of surface -Fe OH groups into Fe-O-Fe structures, whereas surfactant-assisted phase transfer gave rise to surface hydrophobicity due to sorbed hydrocarbon chains. These surface modified hematite nanoparticles were found to readily self-assemble into monolayers at the water-air interface, which provided an effective means to obtain hematite nanoparticle thin films with controlled packing density and layer thicknesses in a Langmuir-Blodgett trough. Langmuir isotherm, SEM, TEM, AFM, UV-visible spectroscopy, and neutron reflectometry were used to characterize these thin films for their stability and uniformity before they were used for studies of the interactions between hematite and macromolecules.

  20. ApoHRP-based Assay to Measure Intracellular Regulatory Heme

    OpenAIRE

    Atamna, Hani; Brahmbhatt, Marmik; Atamna, Wafa; Shanower, Gregory A.; Dhahbi, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of the heme-binding proteins possess a “heme-pocket” that stably binds with heme. Usually known as housekeeping heme-proteins, they participate in a variety of metabolic reactions (e.g., catalase). Heme also binds with lower affinity to the “Heme-Regulatory Motifs” (HRM) in specific regulatory proteins. This type of heme binding is known as exchangeable or regulatory heme (RH). Heme binding to HRM proteins regulates their function (e.g., Bach1). Although there are well-establishe...

  1. Time-resolved Studies of IsdG Protein Identify Molecular Signposts along the Non-canonical Heme Oxygenase Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Bennett R; Kant, Ravi; Tokmina-Lukaszewska, Monika; Celis, Arianna I; Machovina, Melodie M; Skaar, Eric P; Bothner, Brian; DuBois, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    IsdGs are heme monooxygenases that break open the tetrapyrrole, releasing the iron, and thereby allowing bacteria expressing this protein to use heme as a nutritional iron source. Little is currently known about the mechanism by which IsdGs degrade heme, although the products differ from those generated by canonical heme oxygenases. A synthesis of time-resolved techniques, including in proteo mass spectrometry and conventional and stopped-flow UV/visible spectroscopy, was used in conjunction with analytical methods to define the reaction steps mediated by IsdG from Staphylococcus aureus and their time scales. An apparent meso-hydroxyheme (forming with k = 0.6 min(-1), pH 7.4, 10 mm ascorbate, 10 μm IsdG-heme, 22 °C) was identified as a likely common intermediate with the canonical heme oxygenases. Unlike heme oxygenases, this intermediate does not form with added H2O2 nor does it convert to verdoheme and CO. Rather, the next observable intermediates (k = 0.16 min(-1)) were a set of formyloxobilin isomers, similar to the mycobilin products of the IsdG homolog from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MhuD). These converted in separate fast and slow phases to β-/δ-staphylobilin isomers and formaldehyde (CH2O). Controlled release of this unusual C1 product may support IsdG's dual role as both an oxygenase and a sensor of heme availability in S. aureus. PMID:26534961

  2. One-pot hydrothermal synthesis of an assembly of magnetite nanoneedles on a scaffold of cyclic-diphenylalanine nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assembly of metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) on a biomolecular template by a one-pot hydrothermal synthesis method is achieved for the first time. Magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoneedles (length: ∼100 nm; width: ∼10 nm) were assembled on cyclic-diphenylalanine (cFF) nanorods (length: 2–10 μm; width: 200 nm). The Fe3O4 nanoneedles and cFF nanorods were simultaneously synthesized from FeSO4 and l-phenylalanine by hydrothermal synthesis (220 °C and 22 MPa), respectively. The samples were analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry. Experimental results indicate that Fe3O4 nanoneedles were assembled on cFF nanorods during the hydrothermal reaction. The composite contained 3.3 wt% Fe3O4 nanoneedles without any loss of the original magnetic properties of Fe3O4.

  3. One-pot hydrothermal synthesis of an assembly of magnetite nanoneedles on a scaffold of cyclic-diphenylalanine nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togashi, Takanari, E-mail: togashi@tagen.tohoku.ac.jp [Tohoku University, Advanced Institute for Material Research (Japan); Umetsu, Mitsuo [Tohoku University, Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering (Japan); Naka, Takashi [National Institute for Material Science, Innovative Materials Engineering Laboratory (Japan); Ohara, Satoshi [Osaka University, Joining and Welding Research Institute (Japan); Hatakeyama, Yoshiharu [Tohoku University, Institute for Multidisciplinary for Advanced Material (Japan); Adschiri, Tadafumi [Tohoku University, Advanced Institute for Material Research (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    The assembly of metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) on a biomolecular template by a one-pot hydrothermal synthesis method is achieved for the first time. Magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoneedles (length: {approx}100 nm; width: {approx}10 nm) were assembled on cyclic-diphenylalanine (cFF) nanorods (length: 2-10 {mu}m; width: 200 nm). The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoneedles and cFF nanorods were simultaneously synthesized from FeSO{sub 4} and l-phenylalanine by hydrothermal synthesis (220 Degree-Sign C and 22 MPa), respectively. The samples were analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry. Experimental results indicate that Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoneedles were assembled on cFF nanorods during the hydrothermal reaction. The composite contained 3.3 wt% Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoneedles without any loss of the original magnetic properties of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}.

  4. Molecular self-assembly: Design, synthesis, and characterization of peptidic materials for bio- and nano-technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Matthew S.

    The research presented in this dissertation focuses on the design, synthesis, and characterization of amphiphilic peptides capable of self-assembling into beta-sheet fibrils under specific aqueous solution conditions. The peptide design consists of two beta-sheet forming strands of alternating valine and lysine residues, flanking a central tetrapeptide sequence that contains a diproline. Depending on the chirality of the prolines the peptide can assume either an intramolecularly folded or an extended conformation in the self-assembled state. For the peptide where intramolecular folding is designed against, the self-assembled nanostructure was found to exhibit a unique, nontwisted laminated morphology. Experimental techniques including transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction were employed to characterize the self-assembled structure and kinetics. With the understanding of the self-assembly process gained from these first peptides, other peptide sequences were rationally designed to assemble with a desired nanostructure. For example, the effect of peptide strand length in conserving the laminated morphology and controlling the fibril height was investigated. In addition, other peptides were designed so as to affect the self-assembled nanostructure by enforcing a parallel versus anti-parallel beta-sheet or by disrupting the registry of laminating beta-sheet filaments. In some cases, the peptides assembled into structures predicted by the initial design while other peptides assembled into unexpected fibril morphologies. The major conclusions from the research on these peptides is that the diproline sequence plays an important role in disrupting the beta-strand twist thereby resulting in a nontwisted laminated morphology. However, when the flanking beta-strands become long enough, the effect of the diproline sequence becomes diminished and the fibrils do

  5. Insitu synthesis of self-assembled gold nanoparticles on glass or silicon substrates through reactive inkjet printing

    KAUST Repository

    Abulikemu, Mutalifu

    2013-12-18

    A facile and low cost method for the synthesis of self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs) with minimal size variation and chemical waste by using reactive inkjet printing was developed. Gold NPs with diameters as small as (8±2)nm can be made at low temperature (120 °C). The size of the resulting NPs can be readily controlled through the concentration of the gold precursor and oleylamine ink. The pure gold composition of the synthesized NPs was confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) analysis. High-resolution SEM (HRSEM) and TEM (HRTEM), and X-ray diffraction revealed their size and face-centered cubic (fcc) crystal structure, respectively. Owing to the high density of the NP film, UV/Vis spectroscopy showed a red shift in the intrinsic plasmonic resonance peak. We envision the extension of this approach to the synthesis of other nanomaterials and the production of tailored functional nanomaterials and devices. Midas touch: The use of low-cost manufacturing approaches in the synthesis of nanoparticles is critical for many applications. Reactive inkjet printing, along with a judicious choice of precursor/solvent system, was used to synthesize a relatively uniform assembly of crystalline gold nanoparticles, with diameters as small as (8±2)nm, over a given substrate surface. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH.

  6. Human mitochondrial holocytochrome c synthase’s heme binding, maturation determinants, and complex formation with cytochrome c

    OpenAIRE

    San Francisco, Brian; Bretsnyder, Eric C.; Kranz, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Proper functioning of the mitochondrion requires the orchestrated assembly of respiratory complexes with their cofactors. Cytochrome c, an essential electron carrier in mitochondria and a critical component of the apoptotic pathway, contains a heme cofactor covalently attached to the protein at a conserved CXXCH motif. Although it has been known for more than two decades that heme attachment requires the mitochondrial protein holocytochrome c synthase (HCCS), the mechanism remained unknown. W...

  7. Structural Characterization of Heme Environmental Mutants of CgHmuT that Shuttles Heme Molecules to Heme Transporters

    OpenAIRE

    Norifumi Muraki; Chihiro Kitatsuji; Mariko Ogura; Takeshi Uchida; Koichiro Ishimori; Shigetoshi Aono

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacteria contain a heme uptake system encoded in hmuTUV genes, in which HmuT protein acts as a heme binding protein to transport heme to the cognate transporter HmuUV. The crystal structure of HmuT from Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgHmuT) reveals that heme is accommodated in the central cleft with His141 and Tyr240 as the axial ligands and that Tyr240 forms a hydrogen bond with Arg242. In this work, the crystal structures of H141A, Y240A, and R242A mutants were determined to understand ...

  8. Effect of disordered hemes on energy transfer rates between tryptophans and heme in myoglobin.

    OpenAIRE

    Gryczynski, Z.; Fronticelli, C; Tenenholz, T; Bucci, E

    1993-01-01

    Our recent linear dichroism study of heme transitions (Gryczynski, Z., E. Bucci, and J. Kusba. 1993. Photochem. Photobiology. in press) indicate that heme cannot be considered a planar oscillator when it acts as an acceptor of radiationless excitation energy transfer from tryptophan. The linear nature of the heme absorption transition moment in the near-UV region implies a strong dependence of the transfer rate factors on the relative angular position of the heme and tryptophan, i.e., on the ...

  9. Overcoming the Heme Paradox: Heme Toxicity and Tolerance in Bacterial Pathogens▿

    OpenAIRE

    Anzaldi, Laura L.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2010-01-01

    Virtually all bacterial pathogens require iron to infect vertebrates. The most abundant source of iron within vertebrates is in the form of heme as a cofactor of hemoproteins. Many bacterial pathogens have elegant systems dedicated to the acquisition of heme from host hemoproteins. Once internalized, heme is either degraded to release free iron or used intact as a cofactor in catalases, cytochromes, and other bacterial hemoproteins. Paradoxically, the high redox potential of heme makes it a l...

  10. Cell-free synthesis of the H-cluster: a model for the in vitro assembly of metalloprotein metal centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchenreuther, Jon M; Shiigi, Stacey A; Swartz, James R

    2014-01-01

    Many organometallic cofactors are highly complex and require multiple accessory proteins for both their assembly and transfer to a target protein. A cell-free system in which the biosynthetic pathway for a prosthetic group has been fully or even partially reconstructed enables investigations of the reaction sequence as well as the cofactor itself. As a model for the in vitro assembly of protein-bound metal centers, we describe a procedure for the cell-free synthesis of the H-cluster in the context of producing purified and active [FeFe] hydrogenase samples for spectroscopic studies. In general terms, this in vitro system is a combination of non-purified accessory proteins, exogenous substrates, and purified hydrogenase apoprotein. We also describe methods for making the required components used in the cell-free system. Specifically, these procedures include anaerobic expression of heterologous metalloproteins in Escherichia coli, anaerobic cell lysate production, and anaerobic metalloprotein purification using Strep-Tactin(®) chromatography.

  11. Synthesis of nanosheets-assembled lithium titanate hollow microspheres and their application to lithium ion battery anodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Li4Ti5O12 hollow microspheres were prepared by a simple method. • Li4Ti5O12 showed superior electrochemical performance due to the hollow microsphere. • A possible growth mechanism of Li4Ti5O12 hollow microspheres assembled by nanosheets was further expounded. - Abstract: Hierarchical assembly of hollow microstructures is of great scientificity and practical value. In this paper, a hydrothermal synthesis of Li4Ti5O12 hollow microspheres assembled by nanosheets is introduced. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image shows that such Li4Ti5O12 microspheres, with sizes of 2 μm in diameter, are composed of a hollow inner cavity and thin outer shell assembled by nanosheets. A possible growth mechanism of the structure is further expounded. The Li4Ti5O12 hollow microspheres calcinated at 700 °C display extremely good electrochemical performance, including high capacity (147.3 mA h g−1 at 3 C), excellent cyclic stability (95.0% capacity retention after 100 cycles at 3 C) and remarkable rate capability (131.3 mA h g−1 at 20 C)

  12. Heme Oxygenase-1 and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Protect Against Heme-induced Toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagener, F.A.D.T.G.; Dankers, A.C.A.; Summeren, F. van; Scharstuhl, A.; Heuvel, J.J. van den; Koenderink, J.B.; Pennings, S.W.C.; Russel, F.G.M.; Masereeuw, R.

    2013-01-01

    Heme is the functional group of diverse hemoproteins and crucial for many cellular processes. However, heme is increasingly recognized as a culprit for a wide variety of pathologies, including sepsis, malaria, and kidney failure. Excess of free heme can be detrimental to tissues by mediating oxidati

  13. Rapamycin Induces Heme Oxygenase-1 in Liver but Inhibits Bile Flow Recovery after Ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kist, Alwine; Wakkie, Joris; Madu, Max; Versteeg, Ruth; ten Berge, Judith; Nikolic, Andrej; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Porte, Robert J.; Padbury, Robert T. A.; Barritt, Greg J.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims. Rapamycin, which is employed in the management of patients undergoing liver surgery, induces the synthesis of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in some non-liver cell types. The aim was to investigate whether rapamycin can induce HO-1 expression in the liver, and to test the effects of rapamy

  14. Synthesis, characterization and self-assembly of Co3+ complexes appended with phenol and catechol groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Afsar Ali; Deepak Bansal; Rajeev Gupt

    2014-09-01

    This work presents the syntheses, characterization and hydrogen bonding based self-assembly of Co3+ complexes of pyridine-amide based bidentate ligands containing appended phenol and catechol groups. Placement of multiple hydrogen bond donors (phenolic OH and amidic NH groups) and acceptors (Oamide groups) in these molecules results in interesting self-assembled architectures.

  15. DNA-surfactant complexes : preparation, self-assembly properties and applications in synthesis and bioelectronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Kai

    2015-01-01

    The powerful ionic self-assembly behavior of DNA-surfactant complexes make it a unique material for various applications from optoelectronics to biomedicine. Three types of DNA-surfactant assemblies, including bulk films, lyotropic liquid crystals (LCs) and hydrogels have been investigated extensive

  16. Quantum dot-polypeptide hybrid assemblies: Synthesis, fundamental properties, and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thedjoisworo, Bayu Atmaja

    We report the development of a multifunctional system that has the capability to target cancer cells, as well as simultaneously image and deliver therapeutics to these targeted cells. Such a "three-in-one" technology that has integrated targeting, imaging, and drug delivery capabilities is highly desirable in the field of cancer therapy. The material that we have developed for this application is a quantum dot (QD)-polypeptide hybrid assembly system that is spontaneously formed through the self-assembly of carboxyl-functionalized QDs and poly(diethylene glycol L-lysine)-poly(L-lysine) (PEGLL-PLL) diblock copolypeptide molecules. The hybrid assemblies could be modified to target a great variety of cancer biomarkers and have potential ability to carry therapeutic agents with diverse chemical and physical properties. In addition, the QD-polypeptide assemblies have the advantage of extensive tunability and versatility that allow their properties to be tailored and optimized for a broad range of applications. Cancer targeting can be achieved by modifying the QD-polypeptide hybrid assemblies with ligands that have affinity for certain biomarkers, which are overexpressed on cancer cells. Upon binding and uptake by the target cells through specific ligand-receptor mediated interactions, the assemblies could then allow for the simultaneous imaging of the cells and delivery of therapeutic agents to these cells. Imaging of the cells is done through detection of the QD fluorescence, and drug-delivery can be effected by loading the assembly with therapeutic agents and releasing them by means that disrupt the self-assembly. When compared to other dual imaging and drug-delivery systems, our QD-polypeptide hybrid assemblies have the advantage of extensive tunability and versatility. To showcase the tunability of the assembly, we demonstrated how its tumor-cell binding characteristics could be modulated and optimized by changing the PEGLL x-PLLy, architecture and the self-assembly

  17. Molecularly Imprinted Electropolymer for a Hexameric Heme Protein with Direct Electron Transfer and Peroxide Electrocatalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Peng; Aysu Yarman; Jetzschmann, Katharina J.; Jae-Hun Jeoung; Daniel Schad; Holger Dobbek; Ulla Wollenberger; Scheller, Frieder W.

    2016-01-01

    For the first time a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) with direct electron transfer (DET) and bioelectrocatalytic activity of the target protein is presented. Thin films of MIPs for the recognition of a hexameric tyrosine-coordinated heme protein (HTHP) have been prepared by electropolymerization of scopoletin after oriented assembly of HTHP on a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) on gold electrodes. Cavities which should resemble the shape and size of HTHP wer...

  18. The IsdG-family of heme oxygenases degrades heme to a novel chromophore

    OpenAIRE

    Reniere, Michelle L.; Ukpabi, Georgia N.; Harry, S. Reese; Stec, Donald F.; Krull, Robert; Wright, David W.; Bachmann, Brian O.; Murphy, Michael E; Skaar, Eric P.

    2010-01-01

    Enzymatic heme catabolism by heme oxygenases is conserved from bacteria to humans and proceeds through a common mechanism leading to the formation of iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin. The first members of a novel class of heme oxygenases were recently identified in Staphylococcus aureus (IsdG and IsdI) and were termed the IsdG-family of heme oxygenases. Enzymes of the IsdG-family form tertiary structures distinct from those of the canonical heme oxygenase family, suggesting that IsdG-fam...

  19. A role for heme in Alzheimer's disease: Heme binds amyloid β and has altered metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Atamna, Hani; Frey, William H.

    2004-01-01

    Heme is a common factor linking several metabolic perturbations in Alzheimer's disease (AD), including iron metabolism, mitochondrial complex IV, heme oxygenase, and bilirubin. Therefore, we determined whether heme metabolism was altered in temporal lobes obtained at autopsy from AD patients and age-matched nondemented subjects. AD brain demonstrated 2.5-fold more heme-b (P < 0.01) and 26% less heme-a (P = 0.16) compared with controls, resulting in a highly significant 2.9-fold decrease in he...

  20. Quick synthesis of highly aligned or randomly oriented nanofibrous structures composed of C60 molecules via self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosu, Shunji; Fukuda, Takahiro; Maekawa, Toru

    2013-06-01

    Assemblies, which are composed of nanoparticles such as nanofibres, have been intensively studied in recent years. This has particularly been the case in the field of biomedicine, where the aim is to develop efficient methodologies for capturing and separating target biomolecules and cells and/or encouraging bio-chemical reactions, utilizing the extremely high surface area to volume ratio of assemblies. There is an urgent need for the development of a quick synthesis method of forming nanofibrous structures on the surface of biomedical microchips and devices for the investigation of the interactions between biomolecules/cells and the nanostructures. Here, we produce nanofibrous structures composed of C60 molecules, which are aligned in one direction or randomly oriented, by dissolving C60 molecules and sulphur in benzene and evaporating a droplet of the solution on a glass substrate under appropriate conditions. The synthesis time is as short as 30 s. Sulphur is extracted and nanofibres are crystallized by leaving them in supercritical carbon dioxide.

  1. Heme dynamics and trafficking factors revealed by genetically encoded fluorescent heme sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, David A; Harvey, Raven M; Martinez-Guzman, Osiris; Yuan, Xiaojing; Chandrasekharan, Bindu; Raju, Gheevarghese; Outten, F Wayne; Hamza, Iqbal; Reddi, Amit R

    2016-07-01

    Heme is an essential cofactor and signaling molecule. Heme acquisition by proteins and heme signaling are ultimately reliant on the ability to mobilize labile heme (LH). However, the properties of LH pools, including concentration, oxidation state, distribution, speciation, and dynamics, are poorly understood. Herein, we elucidate the nature and dynamics of LH using genetically encoded ratiometric fluorescent heme sensors in the unicellular eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae We find that the subcellular distribution of LH is heterogeneous; the cytosol maintains LH at ∼20-40 nM, whereas the mitochondria and nucleus maintain it at concentrations below 2.5 nM. Further, we find that the signaling molecule nitric oxide can initiate the rapid mobilization of heme in the cytosol and nucleus from certain thiol-containing factors. We also find that the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase constitutes a major cellular heme buffer, and is responsible for maintaining the activity of the heme-dependent nuclear transcription factor heme activator protein (Hap1p). Altogether, we demonstrate that the heme sensors can be used to reveal fundamental aspects of heme trafficking and dynamics and can be used across multiple organisms, including Escherichia coli, yeast, and human cell lines. PMID:27247412

  2. Electrochemical and spectroscopic investigations of immobilized de novo designed heme proteins on metal electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrecht, Tim; Li, WW; Ulstrup, Jens;

    2005-01-01

    by self-assembled monolayers of mercaptopropionic acid, whereas cysteamine-based monolayers were employed for covalent attachment of proteins with cysteine. Immobilized residues in the binding domain (MOP-C) proteins were studied by surface-enhanced resonance Roman (SERR) spectroscopy and electrochemical...... electron-transfer rate constant of 13 s(-1) is similar to those reported for natural heme proteins with comparable electron-transfer distances, which indicates that covalently bound synthetic heme proteins provide efficient electronic communication with a metal electrode as a prerequisite for potential...

  3. Mechanisms of heme utilization by Francisella tularensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Lindgren

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent facultative intracellular pathogen causing the severe disease tularemia in mammals. As for other bacteria, iron is essential for its growth but very few mechanisms for iron acquisition have been identified. Here, we analyzed if and how F. tularensis can utilize heme, a major source of iron in vivo. This is by no means obvious since the bacterium lacks components of traditional heme-uptake systems. We show that SCHU S4, the prototypic strain of subspecies tularensis, grew in vitro with heme as the sole iron source. By screening a SCHU S4 transposon insertion library, 16 genes were identified as important to efficiently utilize heme, two of which were required to avoid heme toxicity. None of the identified genes appeared to encode components of a potential heme-uptake apparatus. Analysis of SCHU S4 deletion mutants revealed that each of the components FeoB, the siderophore system, and FupA, contributed to the heme-dependent growth. In the case of the former two systems, iron acquisition was impaired, whereas the absence of FupA did not affect iron uptake but led to abnormally high binding of iron to macromolecules. Overall, the present study demonstrates that heme supports growth of F. tularensis and that the requirements for the utilization are highly complex and to some extent novel.

  4. Towards molecular systems capable of self-assembly on gold surfaces: synthesis and characterisation of ruthenium and osmium based terpyridine complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Tasca, Stefania

    2005-01-01

    The synthesis, spectroscopic and electrochemical characterisation of Ru(II) and Os(II) mononuclear complexes are described. Special attention is paid to the synthesis of a new series of terpyridine complexes capable of self-assembled on gold surfaces such as pyridine or thiol group. Chapter 1 is an introductory chapter in that the basic concepts regarding Ru(II) polypyridyl chemistry are introduced and explained. The parent complex [Ru(bpy)3]2+ is examined along with its photochemical and...

  5. Salicylic acid induces mitochondrial injury by inhibiting ferrochelatase heme biosynthesis activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vipul; Liu, Shujie; Ando, Hideki; Ishii, Ryohei; Tateno, Shumpei; Kaneko, Yuki; Yugami, Masato; Sakamoto, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Nureki, Osamu; Handa, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Salicylic acid is a classic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Although salicylic acid also induces mitochondrial injury, the mechanism of its antimitochondrial activity is not well understood. In this study, by using a one-step affinity purification scheme with salicylic acid-immobilized beads, ferrochelatase (FECH), a homodimeric enzyme involved in heme biosynthesis in mitochondria, was identified as a new molecular target of salicylic acid. Moreover, the cocrystal structure of the FECH-salicylic acid complex was determined. Structural and biochemical studies showed that salicylic acid binds to the dimer interface of FECH in two possible orientations and inhibits its enzymatic activity. Mutational analysis confirmed that Trp301 and Leu311, hydrophobic amino acid residues located at the dimer interface, are directly involved in salicylic acid binding. On a gel filtration column, salicylic acid caused a shift in the elution profile of FECH, indicating that its conformational change is induced by salicylic acid binding. In cultured human cells, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis, whereas salicylic acid did not exert its inhibitory effect in FECH knockdown cells. Concordantly, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis in zebrafish embryos. Strikingly, the salicylic acid-induced effect in zebrafish was partially rescued by FECH overexpression. Taken together, these findings illustrate that FECH is responsible for salicylic acid-induced inhibition of heme synthesis, which may contribute to its antimitochondrial and anti-inflammatory function. This study establishes a novel aspect of the complex pharmacological effects of salicylic acid.

  6. Heme sensing in Bacillus thuringiensis: a supplementary HssRS-regulated heme resistance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Rachel M; Carter, Micaela M; Chu, Michelle L; Latario, Casey J; Stadler, Sarah K; Stauff, Devin L

    2016-05-01

    Several Gram-positive pathogens scavenge host-derived heme to satisfy their nutritional iron requirement. However, heme is a toxic molecule capable of damaging the bacterial cell. Gram-positive pathogens within the phylum Firmicutes overcome heme toxicity by sensing heme through HssRS, a two-component system that regulates the heme detoxification transporter HrtAB. Here we show that heme sensing by HssRS and heme detoxification by HrtAB occur in the insect pathogen Bacillus thuringiensis We find that in B. thuringiensis, HssRS directly regulates an operon, hrmXY, encoding hypothetical membrane proteins that are not found in other Firmicutes with characterized HssRS and HrtAB systems. This novel HssRS-regulated operon or its orthologs BMB171_c3178 and BMB171_c3330 are required for maximal heme resistance. Furthermore, the activity of HrmXY is not dependent on expression of HrtAB. These results suggest that B. thuringiensis senses heme through HssRS and induces expression of separate membrane-localized systems capable of overcoming different aspects of heme toxicity.

  7. Synthesis, double-helix formation, and higher-assembly formation of chiral polycyclic aromatic compounds: conceptual development of polyketide aldol synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masahiko; Shigeno, Masanori; Saito, Nozomi; Yamamoto, Koji

    2014-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic compounds are an important group of substances in chemistry, and the study of their properties is a subject of interest in the development of drugs and materials. We have been conducting studies to develop chiral polycyclic aromatic compounds, i.e., helicenes and equatorenes. These helical molecules showed notable aggregate-forming properties and the capability for chiral recognition exerted by noncovalent bond interactions, which were not observed in compounds with central chirality. Homo- and hetero-double-helix-forming helicene oligomers were developed, and the latter self-assembled to form gels and vesicles. In this article, we describe such hierarchical studies of polycyclic aromatic compounds, which were started from polyketide aldol synthesis.

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Can Utilize Heme as an Iron Source▿

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Christopher M.; Niederweis, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Most iron in mammals is found within the heme prosthetic group. Consequently, many bacterial pathogens possess heme acquisition systems to utilize iron from the host. Here, we demonstrate that Mycobacterium tuberculosis can utilize heme as an iron source, suggesting that M. tuberculosis possesses a yet-unknown heme acquisition system.

  9. Self-assembly strategies for the synthesis of functional nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perego, M.; Seguini, G.

    2016-06-01

    Self-assembly is the autonomous organization of components into patterns or structures without human intervention. This is the approach followed by nature to generate living cells and represents one of the practical strategies to fabricate ensembles of nanostructures. In static self-assembly the formation of ordered structures could require energy but once formed the structures are stable. The introduction of additional regular features in the environment could be used to template the self-assembly guiding the organization of the components and determining the final structure they form. In this regard self-assembly of block copolymers represents a potent platform for fundamental studies at the nanoscale and for application-driven investigation as a tool to fabricate functional nanostructured materials. Block copolymers can hierarchically assemble into chemically distinct domains with size and periodicity on the order of 10nm or below, offering a potentially inexpensive route to generate large-area nanostructured materials. The final structure characteristics of these materials are dictated by the properties of the elementary block copolymers, like chain length, volume fraction or degree of block incompatibility. Modern synthetic chemistry offers the possibility to design these macromolecules with very specific length scales and geometries, directly embodying in the block copolymers the code that drives their self- assembling process. The understanding of the kinetics and thermodynamics of the block copolymer self-assembly process in the bulk phase as well as in thin films represents a fundamental prerequisite toward the exploitation of these materials. Incorporating block copolymer into device fabrication procedures or directly into devices, as active elements, will lead to the development of a new generation of devices fabricated using the fundamental law of nature to our advantage in order to minimize cost and power consumption in the fabrication process

  10. Synthesis of Self-Assembled Multifunctional Nanocomposite Catalysts with Highly Stabilized Reactivity and Magnetic Recyclability

    OpenAIRE

    Xu Yu; Gong Cheng; Si-Yang Zheng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a multifunctional Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite catalyst with highly stabilized reactivity and magnetic recyclability was synthesized by a self-assembled method. The magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles were coated with a thin layer of the SiO2 to obtain a negatively charged surface. Then positively charged poly(ethyleneimine) polymer (PEI) was self-assembled onto the Fe3O4@SiO2 by electrostatic interaction. Next, negatively charged glutathione capped gold nanoparticles (GSH-A...

  11. Influence of heme-thiolate in shaping the catalytic properties of a bacterial nitric-oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Luciana; Somasundaram, Ramasamy; Tejero, Jesús; Wilson, Adjele; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2011-11-11

    Nitric-oxide synthases (NOS) are heme-thiolate enzymes that generate nitric oxide (NO) from L-arginine. Mammalian and bacterial NOSs contain a conserved tryptophan (Trp) that hydrogen bonds with the heme-thiolate ligand. We mutated Trp(66) to His and Phe (W66H, W66F) in B. subtilis NOS to investigate how heme-thiolate electronic properties control enzyme catalysis. The mutations had opposite effects on heme midpoint potential (-302, -361, and -427 mV for W66H, wild-type (WT), and W66F, respectively). These changes were associated with rank order (W66H < WT < W66F) changes in the rates of oxygen activation and product formation in Arg hydroxylation and N-hydroxyarginine (NOHA) oxidation single turnover reactions, and in the O(2) reactivity of the ferrous heme-NO product complex. However, enzyme ferrous heme-O(2) autoxidation showed an opposite rank order. Tetrahydrofolate supported NO synthesis by WT and the mutant NOS. All three proteins showed similar extents of product formation (L-Arg → NOHA or NOHA → citrulline) in single turnover studies, but the W66F mutant showed a 2.5 times lower activity when the reactions were supported by flavoproteins and NADPH. We conclude that Trp(66) controls several catalytic parameters by tuning the electron density of the heme-thiolate bond. A greater electron density (as in W66F) improves oxygen activation and reactivity toward substrate, but decreases heme-dioxy stability and lowers the driving force for heme reduction. In the WT enzyme the Trp(66) residue balances these opposing effects for optimal catalysis.

  12. HEME-HEME COMUNICATION DURING THE ALKALINE INDUCED STRUCTURAL TRANSITION IN CYTOCROME C OXIDASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hong; Rousseau, Denis L.; Yeh, Syun-Ru

    2009-01-01

    Alkaline induced conformational changes at pH 12.0 in the oxidized as well as the reduced state of cytochrome c oxidase have been systematically studied with time-resolved optical absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopies. In the reduced state, the heme a3 first converts from the native five-coordinate configuration to a six-coordinate bis-histidine intermediate as a result of the coordination of one of the CuB ligands, H290 or H291, to the heme iron. The coordination state change in the heme a3 causes the alteration in the microenvironment of the formyl group of the heme a3 and the disruption of the H-bond between R38 and the formyl group of the heme a. This structural transition, which occurs within 1 minute following the initiation of the pH jump, is followed by a slower reaction, in which Schiff base linkages are formed between the formyl groups of the two hemes and their nearby amino acid residues, presumably R38 and R302 for the heme a and a3, respectively. In the oxidized enzyme, a similar Schiff base modification on heme a and a3 was observed but it is triggered by the coordination of the H290 or H291 to heme a3 followed by the breakage of the native proximal H378-iron and H376-iron bonds in heme a and a3, respectively. In both oxidation states, the synchronous formation of the Schiff base linkages in heme a and a3 relies on the structural communication between the two hemes via the H-bonding network involving R438 and R439 and the propionate groups of the two hemes as well as the helix X housing the two proximal ligands, H378 and H376, of the hemes. The heme-heme communication mechanism revealed in this work may be important in controlling the coupling of the oxygen and redox chemistry in the heme sites to proton pumping during the enzymatic turnover of CcO. PMID:18187199

  13. π-Conjugated aromatics based on truxene: synthesis, self-assembly, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ke; Wang, Jie-Yu; Pei, Jian

    2015-02-01

    Recently, many efforts have been devoted to developing novel polycyclic aromatics due to their unique optical and electronic properties and broad applications, such as in organic field-effect transistors, organic photovoltaics, and organic light-emitting diodes. Among various π-conjugated molecules, many truxene derivatives have interesting characteristics such as C3 -symmetry, strong blue emission, and a planar rigid structure. Moreover, compared with many other π-conjugated aromatics, the synthesis and modification of truxene are particularly facile and diverse. In this account, we summarize investigations into truxene derivatives from synthesis and physical properties to applications in organic electronics.

  14. Microwave-assisted click polymerization for the synthesis of A beta(16-22) cyclic oligomers and their self-assembly into polymorphous aggregates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elgersma, R.C.; van Dijk, M.; Dechesne, A.C.; van Nostrum, C.F.; Hennink, W.E.; Rijkers, D.T.S.; Liskamp, R.M.J.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the design, synthesis, and structural analysis of cyclic oligomers with an amyloidogenic peptide sequence as the repeating unit to obtain novel self-assembling bionanomaterials. The peptide was derived from the Alzheimer A beta(16-22) sequence since its strong tendency to form antiparal

  15. Design and Synthesis of a Highly Stable Six-hydrogen-bonded Self-assembly Yellowish Green Electroluminescent Molecular Duplex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the design, synthesis and characterization of a hydrogen-bonded molecular duplex with 1,8-naphthalimide fluorescent pendants. The two oligoamide molecular strands, with complementary hydrogen bond sequences of DDADAA and AADADD, caa form an ultra stable self-assembly duplex. Its molecular structure was confirmed by 1H NMR and ESI-MS, and its photoluminescence properties were determined. The resulting duplex exhibited a dramatically enhanced photoluminescence (PL) quantum efficiency of 63.7% compared to the corresponding 1,8-naphthalimide segment (32.4%), suggesting that the formation of the duplex with larger molecular weight could successfully inhibit the quenching of the fluorescent pendant.This novel duplex is a prospective candidate for new electroluminescent emitter.

  16. Heme environment in HmuY, the heme-binding protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojtowicz, Halina [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, Tamka 2, 50-137 Wroclaw (Poland); Wojaczynski, Jacek [Department of Chemistry, University of Wroclaw, 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland); Olczak, Mariusz [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, Tamka 2, 50-137 Wroclaw (Poland); Kroliczewski, Jaroslaw [Laboratory of Biophysics, Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, 50-148 Wroclaw (Poland); Latos-Grazynski, Lechoslaw [Department of Chemistry, University of Wroclaw, 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland); Olczak, Teresa, E-mail: Teresa.Olczak@biotech.uni.wroc.pl [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, Tamka 2, 50-137 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2009-05-29

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium implicated in the development and progression of chronic periodontitis, acquires heme for growth by a novel mechanism composed of HmuY and HmuR proteins. The aim of this study was to characterize the nature of heme binding to HmuY. The protein was expressed, purified and detailed investigations using UV-vis absorption, CD, MCD, and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy were carried out. Ferric heme bound to HmuY may be reduced by sodium dithionite and re-oxidized by potassium ferricyanide. Heme complexed to HmuY, with a midpoint potential of 136 mV, is in a low-spin Fe(III) hexa-coordinate environment. Analysis of heme binding to several single and double HmuY mutants with the methionine, histidine, cysteine, or tyrosine residues replaced by an alanine residue identified histidines 134 and 166 as potential heme ligands.

  17. Self-assembled M2L4 coordination cages : Synthesis and potential applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, Andrea; Casini, Angela; Kuehn, Fritz E.

    2014-01-01

    Metal-mediated self-assemblies of the general formula MxLy (M = metal ion, L = ligand) have emerged as a promising research area of supramolecular chemistry because of their applicability in various fields such as molecular recognition, catalysis and drug delivery. The focus of this review is on dis

  18. Synthesis of a new macrocyclic compound and its self-assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN, Zhi-Quan; LUO, Qin-Hui; LUO, Qin-Hui; LONG, De-Liang; CHEN, Jiu-Tong

    2000-01-01

    A new macrocyclic compound has been synthesized by condensation of pyridine-1-oxide-2, 6-dialdehyde with diethylenetriamine. The self-assemly behaviours were studied by X-ray diffraction. The results show that the self-assembly were controlled by intermolecular hydrogen bonds and π-π stacking effects.

  19. The Crystal Structure of the C-Terminal Domain of the Salmonella enterica PduO Protein: An Old Fold with a New Heme-Binding Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz de Orué Lucana, Darío; Hickey, Neal; Hensel, Michael; Klare, Johann P; Geremia, Silvano; Tiufiakova, Tatiana; Torda, Andrew E

    2016-01-01

    The two-domain protein PduO, involved in 1,2-propanediol utilization in the pathogenic Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica is an ATP:Cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase, but this is a function of the N-terminal domain alone. The role of its C-terminal domain (PduOC) is, however, unknown. In this study, comparative growth assays with a set of Salmonella mutant strains showed that this domain is necessary for effective in vivo catabolism of 1,2-propanediol. It was also shown that isolated, recombinantly-expressed PduOC binds heme in vivo. The structure of PduOC co-crystallized with heme was solved (1.9 Å resolution) showing an octameric assembly with four heme moieities. The four heme groups are highly solvent-exposed and the heme iron is hexa-coordinated with bis-His ligation by histidines from different monomers. Static light scattering confirmed the octameric assembly in solution, but a mutation of the heme-coordinating histidine caused dissociation into dimers. Isothermal titration calorimetry using the PduOC apoprotein showed strong heme binding (K d = 1.6 × 10(-7) M). Biochemical experiments showed that the absence of the C-terminal domain in PduO did not affect adenosyltransferase activity in vitro. The evidence suggests that PduOC:heme plays an important role in the set of cobalamin transformations required for effective catabolism of 1,2-propanediol. Salmonella PduO is one of the rare proteins which binds the redox-active metabolites heme and cobalamin, and the heme-binding mode of the C-terminal domain differs from that in other members of this protein family. PMID:27446048

  20. Structural analysis of heme proteins: implications for design and prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Bonkovsky Herbert L; Li Ting; Guo Jun-tao

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Heme is an essential molecule and plays vital roles in many biological processes. The structural determination of a large number of heme proteins has made it possible to study the detailed chemical and structural properties of heme binding environment. Knowledge of these characteristics can provide valuable guidelines in the design of novel heme proteins and help us predict unknown heme binding proteins. Results In this paper, we constructed a non-redundant dataset of 125 ...

  1. Transcriptional Profile of Haemophilus influenzae: Effects of Iron and Heme

    OpenAIRE

    Whitby, Paul W.; VanWagoner, Timothy M.; Seale, Thomas W.; Morton, Daniel J; Stull, Terrence L.

    2006-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae requires either heme or a porphyrin and iron source for growth. Microarray studies of H. influenzae strain Rd KW20 identified 162 iron/heme-regulated genes, representing ∼10% of the genome, with ≥1.5-fold changes in transcription in response to iron/heme availability in vitro. Eighty genes were preferentially expressed under iron/heme restriction; 82 genes were preferentially expressed under iron/heme-replete conditions.

  2. Synthesis of GoldMag particles with assembled structure and their applications in immunoassay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI; Yali; ZHANG; Lianying; SU; Jing; ZHANG; Caifeng; LI; Qi; CUI; Ting; JIN; Boquan; CHEN; Chao

    2006-01-01

    Micrometer-sized Fe3O4 particles and nano-sized gold particles were first synthesized by methods of self-aggregation of surface-chemically modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles and citrate reduction of the Au3+ to Au0, respectively. Interaction between these two types of particles resulted in the assembly of nano-sized gold particles on the surface of the micrometer-sized Fe3O4 particles, forming an assembled structure with the Fe3O4 core particles around which are attached nano-sized gold particles. The Fe3O4/Au structure is named GoldMag particles with assembled structure. The synthetic process, structure, and magnetic property of the GoldMag particles were analyzed. GoldMag particles with assembled structure have an irregular shape, rough surface with a diameter of 2-3 (m. These particles exhibit the superparamagnetic property with saturated magnetization of 41 A·m2/kg. In a single step, antibodies could be readily immobilized onto the surface of the particles with a high binding capacity. The GoldMag particles can be used as a novel carrier in immunoassays. The maximum quantity of human IgG immobilized onto GoldMag particles was 330 (g/mg. In order to validate the quality of the GoldMag particles as immunoassay carriers, an immunoassay system was used. The relative amount of immobilized human IgG was measured by HRP-labeled anti human IgG. The coefficient of variation within parallel samples of each group was below 6% and the coefficient of variation of means between five groups carried out separately was below 7%. Based on the sandwich method, the Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) were also analyzed by qualitative and quantitative detection, respectively. The result indicated that the GoldMag particles with assembled structure were an ideal carrier in immunoassay.

  3. Expeditious organic–free assembly: morphologically controlled synthesis of iron oxides using microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    A microwave hydrothermal method is developed for the synthesis of iron oxides, α-Fe2O3, β-FeOOH, and the junction of α-Fe2O3–β-FeOOH. This method is absolutely organic-free, and various structures could be obtained simply by changing th...

  4. Spectroscopic evidence for a heme-heme binuclear center in the cytochrome bd ubiquinol oxidase from Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, J J; Alben, J O; Gennis, R B

    1993-01-01

    The cytochrome bd complex is a ubiquinol oxidase, which is part of the aerobic respiratory chain of Escherichia coli. This enzyme is structurally unrelated to the heme-Cu oxidases such as cytochrome c oxidase. While the cytochrome bd complex contains no copper, it does have three heme prosthetic groups: heme b558, heme b595, and heme d (a chlorin). Heme b558 appears to be involved in the oxidation of quinol, and heme d is known to be the site where oxygen binds and is reduced to water. The ro...

  5. Shigella dysenteriae ShuS Promotes Utilization of Heme as an Iron Source and Protects against Heme Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Wyckoff, Elizabeth E.; Lopreato, Gregory F.; Tipton, Kimberly A.; Shelley M Payne

    2005-01-01

    Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1, a major cause of bacillary dysentery in humans, can use heme as a source of iron. Genes for the transport of heme into the bacterial cell have been identified, but little is known about proteins that control the fate of the heme molecule after it has entered the cell. The shuS gene is located within the heme transport locus, downstream of the heme receptor gene shuA. ShuS is a heme binding protein, but its role in heme utilization is poorly understood. In this...

  6. In vitro synthesis of intermediates involved in the assembly of enterobacterial common antigen (ECA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ECA is a cell surface antigen found in all bacteria belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. The serological specificity of ECA is determined by a linear heteropolysaccharide comprised of trisaccharide repeat units; the component sugars are N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc), N-acetyl-D-mannosaminuronic acid (ManNAcUA), and 4-acetamido-D-fucose (Fuc4NAc). In vivo studies have suggested that GlcNAc-pyrophosphorylundecaprenol (GlcNAc-PP-lipid) is an intermediate in ECA synthesis. More recently, they have demonstrated UDP-GlcNAc:undecaprenylphosphate GlcNAc-1-phosphate transferase activity in cell envelope preparations of E. coli. Radioactivity from UDP-[3H]Glc-NAc was incorporated into endogenous lipid acceptor, and the labeled product was characterized as GlcNAc-PP-lipid (lipid I). Transferase activity was inhibited by tunicamycin and UMP, but it was unaffected by UDP. The reaction was reversible, and the synthesis of UDP-[3H]GlcNAc from UMP and [3H]GlcNAc-PP-lipid was also sensitive to tunicamycin. The simultaneous addition of UDP-[14C]ManNAcUA and UDP-[3H]GlcNAc to cell envelope preparations resulted in the synthesis of a more polar lipid (lipid II) that contained both labeled sugars in equimolar amounts. Synthesis of lipid II was dependent on prior synthesis of lipid I. Accordingly, [3H]GlcNAc-PP-lipid that had been synthesized in vivo served as an acceptor in vitro of ManNAcUA residues from UDP-ManNAcUA. Lipid II has been tentatively identified as ManNAcUA-GlcNAc-pyrophosphorylundecaprenol

  7. Self-assembly versus stepwise synthesis: heterometal-organic frameworks based on metalloligands with tunable luminescence properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Ran; Du, Dong-Ying; Tan, Ke; Qin, Jun-Sheng; Dong, Hui-Qing; Li, Shun-Li; He, Wen-Wen; Lan, Ya-Qian; Shen, Ping; Su, Zhong-Min

    2013-08-19

    A new family of heterometal-organic frameworks has been prepared by two synthesis strategies, in which IFMC-26 and IFMC-27 are constructed by self-assembly and IFMC-28 is obtained by stepwise synthesis based on the metalloligand (IFMC=Institute of Functional Material Chemistry). IFMC-26 is a (3,6)-connected net and IFMC-27 is a (4,8)-connected 3D framework. The metalloligands {Ni(H4 L)}(NO3 )2 are connected by binuclear lanthanide clusters giving rise to a 2D sheet structure in IFMC-28. Notably, IFMC-26-Eux Tby and IFMC-28-Eux Tby have been obtained by changing the molar ratios of raw materials. Owing to the porosity of IFMC-26, Tb(3+) @IFMC-26-Eu and Eu(3+) @IFMC-26-Tb are obtained by postencapsulating Tb(III) and Eu(III) ions into the pores, respectively. Tunable luminescence in metal-organic frameworks is achieved by the two kinds of doping methods. In particular, the quantum yields of heterometal-organic frameworks are apparently enhanced by postencapsulation of Ln(III) ions.

  8. Confined cooperative self-assembly and synthesis of optically and electrically active nanostructures : final LDRD report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coker, Eric Nicholas; Haddad, Raid Edward (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Fan, Hongyou; Ta, Anh (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Bai, Feng (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Huang, Jian Yu

    2011-10-01

    In this project, we developed a confined cooperative self-assembly process to synthesize one-dimensional (1D) j-aggregates including nanowires and nanorods with controlled diameters and aspect ratios. The facile and versatile aqueous solution process assimilates photo-active macrocyclic building blocks inside surfactant micelles, forming stable single-crystalline high surface area nanoporous frameworks with well-defined external morphology defined by the building block packing. Characterizations using TEM, SEM, XRD, N{sub 2} and NO sorption isotherms, TGA, UV-vis spectroscopy, and fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy indicate that the j-aggregate nanostructures are monodisperse and may further assemble into hierarchical arrays with multi-modal functional pores. The nanostructures exhibit enhanced and collective optical properties over the individual chromophores. This project was a small footprint research effort which, nonetheless, produced significant progress towards both the stated goal as well as unanticipated research directions.

  9. Block copolymer self-assembly-directed synthesis of mesoporous gyroidal superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Spencer W; Beaucage, Peter A; Sai, Hiroaki; Tan, Kwan Wee; Werner, Jörg G; Sethna, James P; DiSalvo, Francis J; Gruner, Sol M; Van Dover, Robert B; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Superconductors with periodically ordered mesoporous structures are expected to have properties very different from those of their bulk counterparts. Systematic studies of such phenomena to date are sparse, however, because of a lack of versatile synthetic approaches to such materials. We demonstrate the formation of three-dimensionally continuous gyroidal mesoporous niobium nitride (NbN) superconductors from chiral ABC triblock terpolymer self-assembly-directed sol-gel-derived niobium oxide with subsequent thermal processing in air and ammonia gas. Superconducting materials exhibit a critical temperature (T c) of about 7 to 8 K, a flux exclusion of about 5% compared to a dense NbN solid, and an estimated critical current density (J c) of 440 A cm(-2) at 100 Oe and 2.5 K. We expect block copolymer self-assembly-directed mesoporous superconductors to provide interesting subjects for mesostructure-superconductivity correlation studies. PMID:27152327

  10. Synthesis of LECBD grown cluster assembled SeO{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rath, S. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar-751 005 (India); Das, K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur-721302 (India); Sarangi, S.N. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar-751 005 (India); Dash, A.K. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar-751 005 (India); Ray, S.K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur-721302 (India); Sahu, S.N. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar-751 005 (India)]. E-mail: sahu@iopb.res.in

    2006-12-15

    Cluster assembled selenium oxide (SeO{sub 2}) thin films, as a function of oxygen flow pressure (OFP) have been synthesized by a low energy cluster beam deposition (LECBD) technique. The OFP dependent surface morphology leading to well separated nanoclusters (size ranging from 50 to 200 nm) and fractal features are confirmed from transmission electron microscopic (TEM) measurements. A diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) mediated fractal growth with dimension as 1.71 {+-} 0.01 has been observed for high OFP (60 mbar). Structural analysis by glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GXRD) and selected area diffraction (SAD) studies identify the presence of tetragonal phase SeO{sub 2} in the deposit. Micro-Raman studies indicate the shifts in bending and stretching vibrational phonon modes in cluster assembled SeO{sub 2} as compared to their bulk counter part due to the phonon confinement effect.

  11. Synthesis of LECBD grown cluster assembled SeO 2 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, S.; Das, K.; Sarangi, S. N.; Dash, A. K.; Ray, S. K.; Sahu, S. N.

    2006-12-01

    Cluster assembled selenium oxide (SeO 2) thin films, as a function of oxygen flow pressure (OFP) have been synthesized by a low energy cluster beam deposition (LECBD) technique. The OFP dependent surface morphology leading to well separated nanoclusters (size ranging from 50 to 200 nm) and fractal features are confirmed from transmission electron microscopic (TEM) measurements. A diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) mediated fractal growth with dimension as 1.71 ± 0.01 has been observed for high OFP (60 mbar). Structural analysis by glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GXRD) and selected area diffraction (SAD) studies identify the presence of tetragonal phase SeO 2 in the deposit. Micro-Raman studies indicate the shifts in bending and stretching vibrational phonon modes in cluster assembled SeO 2 as compared to their bulk counter part due to the phonon confinement effect.

  12. Solvothermal synthesis of three-dimensional microspherical bismuth oxychloride self-assembled by microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tengfei; Lin, Liyang; Wei, Hongmei; Liang, Guoqiang; Kuang, Xinliang; Liu, Tianmo

    2016-02-01

    Uniform BiOCl microspheres have been synthesized via a facile solvothermal route. The structural features of the as-prepared BiOCl samples were systematically characterized by the X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The SEM characterization results indicated that BiOCl microspheres possessed a superstructure composed of several hierarchical microspheres, which were assembled by numerous two dimensional nanosheets. This kind of special BiOCl 3D microstructure exhibited a large BET surface area of about 14.24 m2 g-1. Besides, the photocatalytic properties of BiOCl hollow microsphere sample and sheet-like sample were investigated in detail. Significantly, BiOCl hollow microsphere sample presented faster degradation rate toward RhB even under visible light, which should be attributed to the unique BiOCl nanosheets self-assembled hollow microspheres.

  13. Stepwise Synthesis of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles on a Microfluidic Assembly Line

    OpenAIRE

    Matosevic, Sandro; Brian M Paegel

    2011-01-01

    Among the molecular milieu of the cell, the membrane bilayer stands out as a complex and elusive synthetic target. We report a microfluidic assembly line that produces uniform cellular compartments from droplet, lipid, and oil/water interface starting materials. Droplets form in a lipid-containing oil flow and travel to a junction where the confluence of oil and extracellular aqueous media establishes a flow-patterned interface that is both stable and reproducible. A triangular post mediates ...

  14. Development of Self-Assembled Supramolecular Catalysts and Their Applications to Organic Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiro IKEGAMI

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction In modern synthetic organic chemistry, the development of efficient reagent or catalyst recycling systems is regarded as one of the most important topics. We have previously reported a self-assembled process between poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) based polymer ligands and an inorganic species[1]. This process afforded a networked supramolecular complex where the polymers are cross-linked together by the inorganic species. Thus obtained complex was insoluble in water and worked as an efficient triphase catalyst.

  15. Synthesis and self-assembly of multiple thermoresponsive amphiphilic block copolymers

    OpenAIRE

    Weiß, Jan

    2011-01-01

    In the present thesis, the self-assembly of multi thermoresponsive block copolymers in dilute aqueous solution was investigated by a combination of turbidimetry, dynamic light scattering, TEM measurements, NMR as well as fluorescence spectroscopy. The successive conversion of such block copolymers from a hydrophilic into a hydrophobic state includes intermediate amphiphilic states with a variable hydrophilic-to-lipophilic balance. As a result, the self-organization is not following an all-or-...

  16. Precise positioning and compliance synthesis for automatic assembly using Lorentz levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, R. L.; Salcudean, S.

    1992-01-01

    Many manufacturing assembly tasks require fine compliant motion and fast, accurate positioning. Conventional robots perform poorly in these tasks because of their large mass, friction and backlash in gears, cogging in drive motors and other deleterious effects. Even robots equipped with special control systems enabling compliant operation offer only partial solutions. It is difficult or impossible to automate many product assemblies requiring fine, compliant motion. This problem can be greatly alleviated by dividing the manipulation system into coarse and fine domains. In this scenario, a standard industrial robot can serve as a coarse positioner which in turn carries a six degrees of freedom fine motion wrist. Thus the robot can access a workspace measured in meters at low bandwidth and low resolution while the wrist can move over millimeters at high bandwidth and high resolution during the final phase of the assembly operation. Work indicates that fine motion wrists using Lorentz levitation can greatly augment the accuracy and dexterity of robots because they are frictionless, have high bandwidths and have a single back drivable moving part. Also, since there is no contact between the moving and stationary parts, wear and contamination can be eliminated. The use of six Lorentz force actuators in combination with real time position and orientation sensing offers several important advantages over magnetic bearing approaches.

  17. Synthesis, optical properties, and helical self-assembly of a bivaline-containing tetraphenylethene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongkun; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Su, Huimin; Lam, Jacky W. Y.; Sing Wong, Kam; Xue, Shan; Huang, Xuejiao; Huang, Xuhui; Li, Bing Shi; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2016-01-01

    A chiral tetraphenylethene derivative with two valine-containing attachments (TPE-DVAL), was synthesized by Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne “click” reaction. The optical properties and self-assembling behaviours of TPE-DVAL were investigated. The molecule is non-emissive and circular dichroism (CD)-silent in solution, but shows strong fluorescence and Cotton effects in the aggregation state, demonstrating aggregation-induced emission (AIE) and CD (AICD) characteristics. TPE-DVAL exhibits good circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) when depositing on the surface of quartz to allow the evaporation of its 1,2-dichloroethane solution. SEM and TEM images of the molecule show that the molecule readily self-assembles into right-handed helical nanofibers upon the evaporation of its solvent of DCE. The molecular alignments and interactions in assembling process are further explored through XRD analysis and computational simulation. The driving forces for the formation of the helical fibers were from the cooperative effects of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, π-π interactions and steric effect.

  18. Precise positioning and compliance synthesis for automatic assembly using Lorentz levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, R. L.; Salcudean, S.

    1992-05-01

    Many manufacturing assembly tasks require fine compliant motion and fast, accurate positioning. Conventional robots perform poorly in these tasks because of their large mass, friction and backlash in gears, cogging in drive motors and other deleterious effects. Even robots equipped with special control systems enabling compliant operation offer only partial solutions. It is difficult or impossible to automate many product assemblies requiring fine, compliant motion. This problem can be greatly alleviated by dividing the manipulation system into coarse and fine domains. In this scenario, a standard industrial robot can serve as a coarse positioner which in turn carries a six degrees of freedom fine motion wrist. Thus the robot can access a workspace measured in meters at low bandwidth and low resolution while the wrist can move over millimeters at high bandwidth and high resolution during the final phase of the assembly operation. Work indicates that fine motion wrists using Lorentz levitation can greatly augment the accuracy and dexterity of robots because they are frictionless, have high bandwidths and have a single back drivable moving part. Also, since there is no contact between the moving and stationary parts, wear and contamination can be eliminated. The use of six Lorentz force actuators in combination with real time position and orientation sensing offers several important advantages over magnetic bearing approaches.

  19. Structural mechanisms of nonplanar hemes in proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelnutt, J.A.

    1997-05-01

    The objective is to assess the occurrence of nonplanar distortions of hemes and other tetrapyrroles in proteins and to determine the biological function of these distortions. Recently, these distortions were found by us to be conserved among proteins belonging to a functional class. Conservation of the conformation of the heme indicates a possible functional role. Researchers have suggested possible mechanisms by which heme distortions might influence biological properties; however, no heme distortion has yet been shown conclusively to participate in a structural mechanism of hemoprotein function. The specific aims of the proposed work are: (1) to characterize and quantify the distortions of the hemes in all of the more than 300 hemoprotein X-ray crystal structures in terms of displacements along the lowest-frequency normal coordinates, (2) to determine the structural features of the protein component that generate and control these nonplanar distortions by using spectroscopic studies and molecular-mechanics calculations for the native proteins, their mutants and heme-peptide fragments, and model porphyrins, (3) to determine spectroscopic markers for the various types of distortion, and, finally, (4) to discover the functional significance of the nonplanar distortions by correlating function with porphyrin conformation for proteins and model porphyrins.

  20. Synthesis and self-assembly of thio derivatives of calix[4]arene on noble metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genorio, Bostjan; He, Tao; Meden, Anton; Polanc, Slovenko; Jamnik, Janko; Tour, James M

    2008-10-21

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) provide a simple route to functionalize electrode surfaces with organic molecules. Herein we use cavity-containing derivatives of calix[4]arenes in SAMs. Bound to noble metal surface, the assembled molecules are candidates to serve as molecular sieves for H 2 molecules and H (+) ions, which could have relevance for fuel cell applications. Tetra- O-alkylated calix[4]arenes with thiolacetate and thiolamide wide-rim anchoring groups in cone and partial-cone conformations were designed, synthesized and self-assembled onto Au, Pt, and Pd surfaces. The resulting SAMs were systematically examined. Single crystal X-ray diffraction of 5,11,17,23-tetrakis(thioacetyl)-25,26,27,28-tetra- i-propoxycalix[4]arene confirmed the cone conformation and revealed the cavity dimensions of the SAMs that were formed by immersing noble metal substrates (Au, Pt and Pd deposited on Si-wafers) in solutions of calix[4]arenes. Surface characterization techniques including ellipsometry, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used, indicating that the metal surface is terminated with a monomolecular layer. Experimental thicknesses obtained from the ellipsometry are consistent with the calculated values. CV results showed 50 to 80% physical passivation against the Fe(CN) 6 (3-/4-) couple, implying an overall relatively low concentration of defects and pinholes in the films. The binding energies of the S2p core level in the XPS were consistent with the literature values and revealed that up to 3.2 out of four anchoring groups were bonded to the noble metal surface.

  1. Synthesis of Self-Assembled Multifunctional Nanocomposite Catalysts with Highly Stabilized Reactivity and Magnetic Recyclability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xu; Cheng, Gong; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a multifunctional Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite catalyst with highly stabilized reactivity and magnetic recyclability was synthesized by a self-assembled method. The magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles were coated with a thin layer of the SiO2 to obtain a negatively charged surface. Then positively charged poly(ethyleneimine) polymer (PEI) was self-assembled onto the Fe3O4@SiO2 by electrostatic interaction. Next, negatively charged glutathione capped gold nanoparticles (GSH-AuNPs) were electrostatically self-assembled onto the Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI. After that, silver was grown on the surface of the nanocomposite due to the reduction of the dopamine in the alkaline solution. An about 5 nm thick layer of polydopamine (PDA) was observed to form the Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite. The Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite was carefully characterized by the SEM, TEM, FT-IR, XRD and so on. The Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite shows a high saturation magnetization (Ms) of 48.9 emu/g, which allows it to be attracted rapidly to a magnet. The Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite was used to catalyze the reduction of p-nitrophenol (4-NP) to p-aminophenol (4-AP) as a model system. The reaction kinetic constant k was measured to be about 0.56 min‑1 (R2 = 0.974). Furthermore, the as-prepared catalyst can be easily recovered and reused for 8 times, which didn’t show much decrease of the catalytic capability.

  2. Synthesis and self-assembly of reactive H-shaped block copolymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng ZOU; Caiyuan PAN

    2008-01-01

    The H-shaped block copolymers (PTMSPMA)2-PEG(PMPSTMSPMA)2 with two compositions, (EG)91-b-(TMSPMA)92 and (EG)455-b-(TMSPMA)176 have been successfully synthesized by atom transfer radical polymer-ization (ATRP) of tri(methoxylsilyl)propyl methacrylate (TMSPMA) at room temperature in methanol. The ini-tiation system applied was composed of 2,2-bis(methylene α-bromoisobutyrate)propionyl terminated poly(ethylene glycol) (Br2PEGBr2) with Mn= 4000 or 20000, CuBr and 2,2'-bipyridine. The macroinitiator, Br2PEGBr2, was pre-pared by the reaction of two hydroxyl groups terminated PEG with 2,2-bis(methylene α-bromoisobutyrate)propionyl chloride. The NMR spectroscopy and GPC measurements were used to characterize the structure and molecular weight and molecular weight distribution of the resultant copolymers. The H-shaped block copolymers Sam 1 and Sam 2 were self-assembled in DMF/water mixtures and then the trimethoxysilyl groups in PTMSPMA were cross-linked by condensation reaction in the presence of triethylamine. Stable large-compound vesicles with 10 nm diameter of cavities were formed for Sam 1 which contains a short PEG chain. However, the self-assembling of the Sam 2 in the selective solvents resulted in big vesicles aggre-gates. These two different morphologies of aggregates are attributed to their relative chain length of water soluble PEG. The vesicles formed from Saml with short PEG chains have big surface energy which will lead them to self-assemble further, forming large-compound vesicles.

  3. Synthesis of D-Desosamine and Analogs by Rapid Assembly of 3-Amino Sugars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ziyang; Fukuzaki, Takehiro; Myers, Andrew G

    2016-01-11

    D-Desosamine is synthesized in 4 steps from methyl vinyl ketone and sodium nitrite. The key step in this chromatography-free synthesis is the coupling of (R)-4-nitro-2-butanol and glyoxal (trimeric form) mediated by cesium carbonate, which affords in crystalline form 3-nitro-3,4,6-trideoxy-α-D-glucose, a nitro sugar stereochemically homologous to D-desosamine. This strategy has enabled the syntheses of an array of analogous 3-nitro sugars. In each case the 3-nitro sugars are obtained in pure form by crystallization.

  4. The assembly and properties of protobiological structures - The beginnings of cellular peptide synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, S. W.; Nakashima, T.

    1980-01-01

    New data indicate that lysine-rich proteinoids have the ability to catalyze the synthesis of peptide bonds from a variety of amino acids and ATP. This capacity is evident in aqueous solution, in suspension of phase-separated complexes of lysine-rich proteinoid with acidic proteinoids, and in suspension of phase-separated particles composed of lysine-rich proteinoids with polynucleotides. Since the proteinoid complexes can contain other catalytic activities, including ability to catalyze internucleotide bond formation, it is inferred that the first protocells on earth already had a number of biological types of activity.

  5. Synthesis and Self-Assembly of Donor–Acceptor–Donor Based Oligothiophenes and Their Optoelectronic Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siram, Raja Bhaskar Kanth; Tandy, Kristen; Horecha, Marta;

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the synthesis of an oligothiophene having a donor–acceptor–donor (D–A–D) chromophore with hydrogen bonding groups is described. The D–A–D molecule was demonstrated to self-organize via intermolecular H-bonding between barbituric acid units. Interactions between the oligothiophene...... subunits were also found to be important, affording nanoribbons that could be observed by atomic force and transmission electron microscopy. The applicability of the oligothiophene for organic electronic applications was investigated by fabricating organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and organic...

  6. Heme biosynthesis and its regulation : Toward understanding and improvement of heme biosynthesis in filamentous fungi.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lokman, Christien; Franken, A.C.; Ram, A.F.; Punt, P.J.; Hondel, C.A. van den; Weert, S. de

    2011-01-01

    Heme biosynthesis in fungal host strains has acquired considerable interest in relation to the production of secreted heme-containing peroxidases. Class II peroxidase enzymes have been suggested as eco-friendly replacements of polluting chemical processes in industry. These peroxidases are naturally

  7. Heme biosynthesis and its regulation: Towards understanding and improvement of heme biosynthesis in filamentous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, A.C.W.; Lokman, B.C.; Ram, A.F.J.; Punt, P.J.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Weert, S. de

    2011-01-01

    Heme biosynthesis in fungal host strains has acquired considerable interest in relation to the production of secreted heme-containing peroxidases. Class II peroxidase enzymes have been suggested as eco-friendly replacements of polluting chemical processes in industry. These peroxidases are naturally

  8. Controlled synthesis of pompon-like self-assemblies of Pd nanoparticles under microwave irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pd nanoparticles with uniform, self-assembled pompon-like nanostructure were synthesized by thermal decomposition of palladium acetate under microwave irradiation with methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) as a solvent in the presence of a little amount of ethylene glycol (EG) and KOH without using any special stabilizers. The as-synthesized Pd nano-pompons were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The results show that the as-prepared Pd nano-pompons with the average diameters in the range of 28-81 nm were self-assemblies organized by hundreds of smaller primary nanoparticles with an average dimension of about 2.4 nm. The sizes of Pd nano-pompons can be well controlled by adjusting the concentration of palladium acetate. A little amount of EG and KOH also plays an important role in controlling the size, uniformity and dispersion of Pd nano-pompons. The Pd nano-pompons can be easily supported on γ-Al2O3 and their catalytic activity was examined preliminarily.

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of Self-Assembled Nanogels Made of Pullulan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia A. Ferreira

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Self-assembled nanogels made of hydrophobized pullulan were obtained using a versatile, simple, reproducible and low-cost method. In a first reaction pullulan was modified with hydroxyethyl methacrylate or vinyl methacrylate, further modified in the second step with hydrophobic 1-hexadecanethiol, resulting as an amphiphilic material, which self-assembles in water via the hydrophobic interaction among alkyl chains. Structural features, size, shape, surface charge and stability of the nanogels were studied using hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance, fluorescence spectroscopy, cryo-field emission scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Above the critical aggregation concentration spherical polydisperse macromolecular micelles revealed long-term colloidal stability in aqueous medium, with a nearly neutral negative surface charge and mean hydrodynamic diameter in the range 100–400 nm, depending on the polymer degree of substitution. Good size stability was observed when nanogels were exposed to potential destabilizing pH conditions. While the size stability of the nanogel made of pullulan with vinyl methacrylate and more hydrophobic chains grafted was affected by the ionic strength and urea, nanogel made of pullulan with hydroxyethyl methacrylate and fewer hydrophobic chains grafted remained stable.

  10. Synthesis and self-assembly of temperature and anion double responsive ionic liquid block copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ju; Wu, Wenlan; Li, Junbo; Han, Chen; Zhang, Shijie; Guo, Jinwu; Zhou, Huiyun

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, double hydrophilic ionic liquid block copolymers (ILBCs), poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-block-poly[1-methyl-3-(2-methacryloyloxy propylimidazolium bromine)] (PNIPAM- b-PMMPImB), were polymerized by two-step reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) process. The composition and molecular weight distributions of ILBCs were characterized using 1HNMR and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The self-assembly and temperature- and anion-responsive behaviors of ILBCs were investigated by UV-Vis spectroscopy, TEM and dynamic light scattering (DLS). With increasing the concentration of (CF3SO2)2N-, the micellization of self-assembling PNIPAM- b-PMMPImB was induced to form a core—shell structure containing the core with hydrophilic PMMPIm-(CF3SO2)2N- surrounded by the shell of PNIPAM via the anion-responsive properties of ILBCs. However, upon temperature increasing, PNIPAM- b-PMMPImB formed the micelles composing of PNIPAM core and PMMPImB shell. The ionic liquid segment with strong hydrophilic property enhanced the hydrogen bonding interaction which expanded the temperature range of phase transition and increased the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the system. These results indicate that ILBCs prepared in this paper have excellent temperature and anion double responsive properties, and may be applied as a kind of potential environmental responsive polymer nanoparticles.

  11. THE AMPHIPHILIC MULTIARM COPOLYMERS BASED ON HYPERBRANCHED POLYESTER AND LYSINE: SYNTHESIS AND SELF-ASSEMBLY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wang; Yuan Yao; Bing Ji; Wei Huang; Yong-feng Zhou; De-yue Yan

    2011-01-01

    The amphiphilic multiarm copolymers were synthesized through the modification of commercially available hyperbranched polyesters (Boltom H40) with N-ε-carbobenzoxy-L-Lysine N-carboxyanhydride (ZLys-NCA). After being condensed with N-Boc-phenylalanine (Boc-NPhe) and deprotected the Boc-groups in trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), the original terminal hydroxyl groups were transformed into the amino groups and then initiated the ring-opening polymerization of ZLys-NCA. The hydrophilic poly(L-lysine) was grafted to the surface of Boltorn H40 successfully after the protecting benzyl groups were removed by the HBr solution in glacial acetic acid (33 wt%). The resulting multiarm copolymers were characterized by the 1H-NMR, GPC and FTIR. The arm length calculated by NMR and GPC analysis was about 3 and 13 lysine-units for H40-Phe-PLysl and H40-Phe-PLys2 respectively. Due to the amphiphilic molecular structure, they displayed ability to self-assemble into spherical micelles in aqueous solution with the average diameter in the range from 70 nm to 250 nm. The CMC of H40-Phe-PLysl and H40-Phe-PLys2 was 0.013 mg/mL and 0.028 mg/mL, respectively,indicating that H40-Phe-PLysl with shorter arm length is easier to self-assemble than H40-Phe-PLys2 with longer arm length.

  12. Self-assembled synthesis and characterization of microchannels in polymeric membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahsai, Wintana T.; Pham, Uyen H. T.; Sankaran, Jeyantt S.; Iqbal, Samir M.

    2012-07-01

    This article describes a novel self-assembly approach to create microchannels in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes using poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and polyurethane (PU). The interactions between hydrophilic PEO/PU and hydrophobic PDMS, as it cross-links, result into PEO/PU pushed out of the bulk PDMS. As this occurs, PEO/PU particles leave behind their tracks. PEO depicts ease of handling, better inherent alignment, and excellent repeatability. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, optical/confocal laser scanning microscopy, and fluid flow measurements are done to characterize the microfluidic channels. These channels have a circular cross-section and are parallel to each other. PEO generates smaller channels compared to PU. The diameter, arrangement, and height of these channels are seen to depend on temperature; for example, channel length increases linearly with temperature. An interdependent relationship between temperature, pore size, and number of pores is also exhibited. During phase separation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic materials, interface shows concentric circular arrangements of hydrophilic molten polymer. The circular pattern shows almost similar radial change in size. The flow behavior of colored ink solutions shows higher velocity at the entrance of microchannels which decreases to sustained lower velocity as fluid travels farther in the microchannels. The fabrication of membrane does not need lithography or etching, and channels are self-assembled from bottom-up interactions. These microchannel membranes can have applications in drug delivery, cell culture studies, mixing of solutions, separation of mixtures, lab-on-a-chip, etc.

  13. Synthesis and Self-assembling of Coumarin-based Low-molecular Weight Organogelators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Guo-jun; XUE Peng-chong; LU Ran; SONG Dong-po; BAO Chun-yan; XU Ting-hua; ZHAO Ying-ying

    2009-01-01

    Four coumarin derivatives(4a-4d) with different alkoxy chains were synthesized.It was found that compound 4d showed a better gelation ability than the other compounds,for example,it could self-assemble into organogeis in various organic fluids via ultrasound treatment or heating-cooling process,whereas compound 4c could only gel in a few mixed solvents and compounds 4a,4b could not form organogel.The results from fluorescent and F%IR spectra indicate that π-π interaction had an effect on the formation of the organogels of compound 4d besides H-bonding and van der Waals interaction,which were the driving forces for the self-assembling of compound 4c in gel state.The gel of compound 4d in toluene could emit strong fluorescence under UV irradiation and the [2+2]cyclo-addition was suggested by 1H NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy.This light-sensitive organogel might find application in optical materials.

  14. Heme-containing dioxygenases involved in tryptophan oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, Elizabeth S; Efimov, Igor; Basran, Jaswir; Handa, Sandeep; Mowat, Christopher G; Raven, Emma Lloyd

    2012-04-01

    Heme iron is often used in biology for activation of oxygen. The mechanisms of oxygen activation by heme-containing monooxygenases (the cytochrome P450s) are well known, and involve formation of a Compound I species, but information on the heme-containing dioxygenase enzymes involved in tryptophan oxidation lags far behind. In this review, we gather together information emerging recently from structural, mechanistic, spectroscopic, and computational approaches on the heme dioxygenase enzymes involved in tryptophan oxidation. We explore the subtleties that differentiate various heme enzymes from each other, and use this to piece together a developing picture for oxygen activation in this particular class of heme-containing dioxygenases.

  15. Self-assembling Polypeptide Nanoparticles: Design, Synthesis, Biophysical Characterization and Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo Pereira Falcao Pimentel, Tais de

    Inspired by the architecture of icosahedral viruses, self-assembling polypeptide nanoparticles (SAPN) with icosahedral symmetry were developed. The building block for the SAPN was a single polypeptide chain. Similarly, the capsid of quite a few small viruses are built from one single peptide chain. The polypeptide chain of the SAPN consists of a pentameric coiled-coil domain at the N-terminus joined by a short linker segment to a trimeric coiled-coil domain at the C-terminus. Here we have studied factors governing self-assembly of the SAPN such as linker constitution and trimer length. The interdomain linker 2i88 afforded the most homogenous nanoparticles as verified by TEM and DLS. Furthermore, AUC and STEM analyses suggest that the nanoparticles formed using the linker 2i88 have a T=3-like architecture confirming computer modeling predictions. As for trimer length, we have shown that it is possible to synthesize SAPN with a trimer that is as short as only 17 amino acids. Given that the N-terminus and C-terminus of the SAPN can be extended to include epitopes and give rise to a repetitive antigen display system, vaccine applications of the SAPN were also investigated here. We grafted parts of the SARS virus' spike protein onto our SAPN to repetitively display this B-cell epitope. Biophysical characterization showed that single nanoparticles of the expected size range were formed. Immunization experiments in mice at University of Colorado Denver revealed that the antibodies elicited were conformation-specific. Moreover, the antibodies significantly inhibited SARS virus infection of Vero E6 cells. SAPN were also functionalized at the C-terminus with a B-cell epitope from the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and at the N-terminus with CTL epitopes from CSP. The trimeric coiled-coil domains of these malaria SAPN were modified to include a HTL epitope. Even will all these modifications, self-assembly occurred as confirmed by

  16. A Novel Heme-responsive Element Mediates Transcriptional Regulation in Caenorhabditis elegans*

    OpenAIRE

    Sinclair, Jason; Hamza, Iqbal

    2010-01-01

    Hemes are prosthetic groups that participate in diverse biochemical pathways across phylogeny. Although heme can also regulate broad physiological processes by directly modulating gene expression in Metazoa, the regulatory pathways for sensing and responding to heme are not well defined. Caenorhabditis elegans is a heme auxotroph and relies solely on environmental heme for sustenance. Worms respond to heme availability by regulating heme-responsive genes such as hrg-1, an intestinal heme tran...

  17. Synthesis and characterization of polystyrene coated iron oxide nanoparticles and asymmetric assemblies by phase inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Xie, Yihui

    2014-09-02

    Films with a gradient concentration of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are reported, based on a phase inversion membrane process. Nanoparticles with ∼13 nm diameter were prepared by coprecipitation in aqueous solution and stabilized by oleic acid. They were further functionalized by ATRP leading to grafted polystyrene brush. The final nanoparticles of 33 nm diameter were characterized by TGA, FTIR spectroscopy, GPC, transmission electron microscopy, and dynanmic light scattering. Asymmetric porous nanoparticle assemblies were then prepared by solution casting and immersion in water. The nanocomposite film production with functionalized nanoparticles is fast and technically scalable. The morphologies of films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, demonstrating the presence of sponge-like structures and finger-like cavities when 50 and 13 wt % casting solutions were, respectively, used. The magnetic properties were evaluated using vibrating sample magnetometer.

  18. Synthesis of mercaptothiadiazole-functionalized gold nanoparticles and their self-assembly on Au substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) stabilized with mercaptothiadiazole ligands, 2,5-dimercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole (DMT), 5-amino-2-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole (AMT) and 5-methyl-2-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole (MMT), were prepared by the reaction of the respective ligands with HAuCl4 and NaBH4 in an aqueous medium. TEM images show that the average size of AuNPs was 6.5 ± 0.5 nm, irrespective of the capping ligands. The colloidal solution of both DMT-capped AuNPs (DMT-AuNPs) and AMT-capped AuNPs (AMT-AuNPs) were highly stable for several months. However, several changes were noticed for MMT-capped AuNPs (MMT-AuNPs) after 2 h from its formation. The SPR band intensity at 518 nm decreases and the narrow SPR absorption band slowly changes into a flat absorption pattern with a broad peak from 518 to 1000 nm which was accompanied by a colour change of the solution from red to purple and then blue and thereafter unchanged. The TEM image of MMT-AuNPs after 96 h shows that most of the spherical shape of the AuNPs assembled to form a nanowire-like structure. The observed changes may be due to the absence of a strong stabilizing force on the surface of the MMT-AuNPs. The amino and thiolate groups on the surface of the AMT-AuNPs and DMT-AuNPs, respectively, were directly self-assembled on Au electrodes. They exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of AA by enhancing its oxidation current twice in addition to more than 200 mV negative shift in the oxidation potential in contrast to bare Au electrode

  19. Biomimetic synthesis of enamel-like hydroxyapatite on self-assembled monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou, 510632 (China); Huang Weiya [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou, 510632 (China); Zhang Yuanming [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou, 510632 (China)]. E-mail: tzhangym@jnu.edu.cn; Zhong Mei [Department of Stomatology, Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, 510632 (China)

    2007-05-16

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) crystals mimicking tooth enamel in chemical composition and morphology were formed on sulfonic-terminated self-assembled monolayer (SAM) in 1.5SBF with F{sup -} at 50 {sup o}C for 7 days. F{sup -} ions showed a marked effect on the composition and morphology of deposited HAp crystals. In the absence of F{sup -} ions, HAp containing CO{sub 3} {sup 2-} were formed on SAM, and worm-like crystals of 200-300 nm in length aggregated to form a spherical morphology. When F{sup -} was added, HAp crystals containing both CO{sub 3} {sup 2-} and F{sup -} were formed on SAM. Needle-shaped crystals of high aspect ratio and 1-2 {mu}m in length grew elongated along the c-axial direction. In addition, these needle-shaped crystals grew in bundles, mimicking HAp crystals in tooth enamel. After the process of ripening, the needles in bundle grew to large size of up to 10 {mu}m in length, and still kept no crystal-crystal fusion like enamel HAp crystals. The formation of enamel-like HAp can be attributed to the substitute of F{sup -} for OH{sup -} by disturbing the normal progress of HAp formation on SAM. The results suggest potential applications in preparing a novel dental material by a simple method. -- Graphical abstract: Hydroxyapatite (HAp) crystals mimicking tooth enamel in chemical composition and morphology were formed on self-assembled monolayer (SAM) by a biomimetic process. The needle-shaped crystals grew in bundles, mimicking HAp crystals in tooth enamel. Display Omitted.

  20. Biomimetic synthesis of enamel-like hydroxyapatite on self-assembled monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) crystals mimicking tooth enamel in chemical composition and morphology were formed on sulfonic-terminated self-assembled monolayer (SAM) in 1.5SBF with F- at 50 oC for 7 days. F- ions showed a marked effect on the composition and morphology of deposited HAp crystals. In the absence of F- ions, HAp containing CO32- were formed on SAM, and worm-like crystals of 200-300 nm in length aggregated to form a spherical morphology. When F- was added, HAp crystals containing both CO32- and F- were formed on SAM. Needle-shaped crystals of high aspect ratio and 1-2 μm in length grew elongated along the c-axial direction. In addition, these needle-shaped crystals grew in bundles, mimicking HAp crystals in tooth enamel. After the process of ripening, the needles in bundle grew to large size of up to 10 μm in length, and still kept no crystal-crystal fusion like enamel HAp crystals. The formation of enamel-like HAp can be attributed to the substitute of F- for OH- by disturbing the normal progress of HAp formation on SAM. The results suggest potential applications in preparing a novel dental material by a simple method. -- Graphical abstract: Hydroxyapatite (HAp) crystals mimicking tooth enamel in chemical composition and morphology were formed on self-assembled monolayer (SAM) by a biomimetic process. The needle-shaped crystals grew in bundles, mimicking HAp crystals in tooth enamel. Display Omitted

  1. The surface protein Shr of Streptococcus pyogenes binds heme and transfers it to the streptococcal heme-binding protein Shp

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Benfang; Liu Mengyao; Zhu Hui

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The heme acquisition machinery in Streptococcus pyogenes is believed to consist of the surface proteins, Shr and Shp, and heme-specific ATP-binding cassette transporter HtsABC. Shp has been shown to rapidly transfer its heme to the lipoprotein component, HtsA, of HtsABC. The function of Shr and the heme source of Shp have not been established. Results The objective of this study was to determine whether Shr binds heme and is a heme source of Shp. To achieve the objective, ...

  2. ApoHRP-based Assay to Measure Intracellular Regulatory Heme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamna, Hani; Brahmbhatt, Marmik; Atamna, Wafa; Shanower, Gregory A.; Dhahbi, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of the heme-binding proteins possess a “heme-pocket” that stably binds with heme. Usually known as housekeeping heme-proteins, they participate in a variety of metabolic reactions (e.g., catalase). Heme also binds with lower affinity to the “Heme-Regulatory Motifs” (HRM) in specific regulatory proteins. This type of heme binding is known as exchangeable or regulatory heme (RH). Heme binding to HRM proteins regulates their function (e.g., Bach1). Although there are well-established methods for assaying total cellular heme (e.g., heme-proteins plus RH), currently there is no method available for measuring RH independently from the total heme (TH). The current study describes and validates a new method to measure intracellular RH. The method is based on the reconstitution of apo-horseradish peroxidase (apoHRP) with heme to form holoHRP. The resulting holoHRP activity is then measured with a colorimetric substrate. The results show that apoHRP specifically binds RH but not with heme from housekeeping heme-proteins. The RH assay detects intracellular RH. Furthermore, using conditions that create positive (hemin) or negative (N-methyl protoporphyrin IX) controls for heme in normal human fibroblasts (IMR90), the RH assay shows that RH is dynamic and independent from TH. We also demonstrated that short-term exposure to subcytotoxic concentrations of lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), or amyloid-β(Aβ) significantly alters intracellular RH with little effect on TH. In conclusion the RH assay is an effective assay to investigate intracellular RH concentration and demonstrates that RH represents ~6% of total heme in IMR90 cells. PMID:25525887

  3. Regulation of intracellular heme trafficking revealed by subcellular reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaojing; Rietzschel, Nicole; Kwon, Hanna; Walter Nuno, Ana Beatriz; Hanna, David A; Phillips, John D; Raven, Emma L; Reddi, Amit R; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-08-30

    Heme is an essential prosthetic group in proteins that reside in virtually every subcellular compartment performing diverse biological functions. Irrespective of whether heme is synthesized in the mitochondria or imported from the environment, this hydrophobic and potentially toxic metalloporphyrin has to be trafficked across membrane barriers, a concept heretofore poorly understood. Here we show, using subcellular-targeted, genetically encoded hemoprotein peroxidase reporters, that both extracellular and endogenous heme contribute to cellular labile heme and that extracellular heme can be transported and used in toto by hemoproteins in all six subcellular compartments examined. The reporters are robust, show large signal-to-background ratio, and provide sufficient range to detect changes in intracellular labile heme. Restoration of reporter activity by heme is organelle-specific, with the Golgi and endoplasmic reticulum being important sites for both exogenous and endogenous heme trafficking. Expression of peroxidase reporters in Caenorhabditis elegans shows that environmental heme influences labile heme in a tissue-dependent manner; reporter activity in the intestine shows a linear increase compared with muscle or hypodermis, with the lowest heme threshold in neurons. Our results demonstrate that the trafficking pathways for exogenous and endogenous heme are distinct, with intrinsic preference for specific subcellular compartments. We anticipate our results will serve as a heuristic paradigm for more sophisticated studies on heme trafficking in cellular and whole-animal models.

  4. Synthesis and magnetic properties of self-assembled FeRh nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Z.; Harrell, J. W.; Misra, R. D. K.

    2008-07-01

    We report here the synthesis and magnetization behavior of tunable FeRh magnetic nanoparticles with both controllable composition and size. FexRh1-x (x=0.35,0.44,0.51) nanoparticles of 4-20nm size range were fabricated using a polyol coreduction process. The stoichiometry of FexRh1-x nanoparticles was altered by tuning the molar ratio of rhodium acetylacetonate and iron acetylacetonate. The particle size was tunable via control of surfactant concentration. Magnetic measurements were made for films of the particles cast onto silicon wafers. The coercivity of Fe51Rh49 nanoparticles was ˜250Oe at room temperature after annealing at 700°C for 2h, indicating CsCl-type phase transition. The temperature dependent magnetization measurement of annealed Fe51Rh49 confirmed the antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic transition and was supported by x-ray diffraction measurements.

  5. The CcmC:Heme:CcmE Complex in Heme Trafficking and Cytochrome c Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard-Fogal, Cynthia; Kranz, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    A superfamily of integral membrane proteins is characterized by a conserved tryptophan-rich region (called the WWD domain) in an external loop at the inner membrane surface. The three major members of this family (CcmC, CcmF, and CcsBA) are each involved in cytochrome c biosynthesis, yet the function of the WWD domain is unknown. It has been hypothesized that the WWD domain binds heme to present it to an acceptor protein (apoCcmE for CcmC or apocytochrome c for CcmF and CcsBA) such that the heme vinyl group(s) covalently attaches to the acceptors. Alternative proposals suggest that the WWD domain interacts directly with the acceptor protein (e.g., apoCcmE for CcmC). Here, it is shown that CcmC is only trapped with heme when its cognate acceptor protein CcmE is present. It is demonstrated that CcmE only interacts stably with CcmC when heme is present; thus, specific residues in each protein provide sites of interaction with heme to form this very stable complex. For the first time, evidence that the external WWD domain of CcmC interacts directly with heme is presented. Single and multiple substitutions of completely conserved residues in the WWD domain of CcmC alter the spectral properties of heme in the stable CcmC:heme:CcmE complexes. Moreover, some mutations reduce the binding of heme up to 100%. It is likely that endogenously synthesized heme enters the external WWD domain of CcmC either via a channel within this six-transmembrane-spanning protein or from the membrane. The data suggest that a specific heme channel (i.e., heme binding site within membrane spanning helices) is not present in CcmC, in contrast to the CcsBA protein. We discuss the likelihood that it is not important to protect the heme via trafficking in CcmC whereas it is critical in CcsBA. PMID:20599545

  6. Two novel series of allocolchicinoids with modified seven membered B-rings: design, synthesis, inhibition of tubulin assembly and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büttner, Frank; Bergemann, Silke; Guénard, Daniel; Gust, Ronald; Seitz, Gunther; Thoret, Sylviane

    2005-05-16

    Two new attractive series of allocolchicinoids were designed as inhibitors of tubulin assembly using the potent ketone 4 and the tetracyclic, pyrazole annulated NCME variant 7 (NCME = N-acetyl colchinol-O-methylether (2)) as lead structures. The first group of inhibitors of type 6 with novel oxepine and azepine B-ring structures belongs to the NCME-series and was synthesized via a multistep total synthesis starting from simple and cheap 3-methoxybenzaldehyde (12) and 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzaldehyde (13). Biaryl-coupling of the starting materials 12 and 13 was accomplished via Ziegler-Ullmann-reaction to furnish the biphenyl 11 equipped with two carbaldehyde functions. The subsequent Cannizzaro reaction of this dicarbaldehyde 11 proceeded with high regioselectivity to yield almost exclusively the key compound, the hydroxymethyl carboxylic acid 9. Ring closure to the o,o'-bridged biphenyls was accomplished by two routes: on the one hand, treatment of 9 with aqueous hydrochloric acid yielded the lactone 15. On the other hand, a four step sequence starting from the isomeric mixture 9/10 furnished the constitutionally isomeric lactams 23 and 24; these could be converted to the corresponding thiolactams 25 and 26 and to the tetrazole annulated NCME-type derivatives 27 and 28. The second series of bioactive compounds are congeners of allocolchicine (3). The well known desacetyl allocolchicine (29) was easily oxidized to the oxime 30, which was further transformed to the corresponding ketone 31. This served as key precursor for the syntheses of various tetracyclic allocolchicine modifications 33-36 annulated with a pyrazole, isoxazole, pyrimidine or 2-aminopyrimidine heterocycle, respectively. Unexpectedly, all the NCME-variants with a substituent in position 7 like in NCME (2) inhibited the tubulin assembly only moderately. In contrast, the new series of allocolchicine modifications proved to be highly potent antimicrotubule agents. Inhibition of tubulin assembly occurred at

  7. Synthesis, physical properties and self-assembly behavior of azole-fused pyrene derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jinchong; Xiao, Xuyu; Zhao, Yanlei; Wu, Bo; Liu, Zhenying; Zhang, Xuemin; Wang, Sujuan; Zhao, Xiaohui; Liu, Lei; Jiang, Li

    2013-05-01

    A novel selenadiazole-fused pyrene derivative PySe was successfully synthesized and characterized. Its single structure is almost planar and adopts a sandwich-herringbone packing model. The self-assembly behaviors based on compound PySe and its analogue thiadiazole-fused pyrene derivative PyS were studied in detail and the as-formed nanostructures were fully characterized by means of UV-vis absorption, emission spectra, X-ray diffraction, field emission SEM and TEM. We attribute the bathochromic shift absorption and emission spectra of PyS and PySe in aqueous solution to the formation of J-type aggregation. In addition, our investigation demonstrated that the shape and size of the as-prepared nanostructures could be tuned by different chalcogen analogues and the volume ratio of water to organic solvent.A novel selenadiazole-fused pyrene derivative PySe was successfully synthesized and characterized. Its single structure is almost planar and adopts a sandwich-herringbone packing model. The self-assembly behaviors based on compound PySe and its analogue thiadiazole-fused pyrene derivative PyS were studied in detail and the as-formed nanostructures were fully characterized by means of UV-vis absorption, emission spectra, X-ray diffraction, field emission SEM and TEM. We attribute the bathochromic shift absorption and emission spectra of PyS and PySe in aqueous solution to the formation of J-type aggregation. In addition, our investigation demonstrated that the shape and size of the as-prepared nanostructures could be tuned by different chalcogen analogues and the volume ratio of water to organic solvent. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TGA analysis, spectra characterization data for compound 1, 2, 3 and X-ray crystallographic data for compound PySe (2, CIF). CCDC 917821. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00523b

  8. ARSENITE INDUCTION OF HEME OXYGENASE AS A BIOMARKER

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARSENITE INDUCTION OF HEME OXYGENASE AS A BIOMARKER Useful biomarkers of arsenic effects in both experimental animals and humans are needed. Arsenate and arsenite are good inducers of rat hepatic and renal heme oxygenase (HO); monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsi...

  9. Lanthanide-directed synthesis of luminescent self-assembly supramolecular structures and mechanically bonded systems from acyclic coordinating organic ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Dawn E; Caffrey, David F; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur

    2016-06-01

    Herein some examples of the use of lanthanide ions (f-metal ions) to direct the synthesis of luminescent self-assembly systems (architectures) will be discussed. This area of lanthanide supramolecular chemistry is fast growing, thanks to the unique physical (magnetic and luminescent) and coordination properties of the lanthanides, which are often transferred to the resulting supermolecule. The emphasis herein will be on systems that are luminescent, and hence, generated by using either visibly emitting ions (such as Eu(III), Tb(III) and Sm(III)) or near infrared emitting ions (like Nd(III), Yb(III) and Er(III)), formed through the use of templating chemistry, by employing structurally simple ligands, possessing oxygen and nitrogen coordinating moieties. As the lanthanides have high coordination requirements, their use often allows for the formation of coordination compounds and supramolecular systems such as bundles, grids, helicates and interlocked molecules that are not synthetically accessible through the use of other commonly used templating ions such as transition metal ions. Hence, the use of the rare-earth metal ions can lead to the formation of unique and stable species in both solution and in the solid state, as well as functional and responsive structures.

  10. Facile Synthesis of Gold-nanoparticles-decorated Polymer Assemblies and Core-Shell Gold Nanoparticles Using Pluronic Block Copolymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHOU Qing-hui; GUO Chen; GAO Hong-shuai; ZHOU Hua-cong; LIU Chun-zhao; LIU Hui-zhou

    2011-01-01

    Abstract:Synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and Pluronic triblock copolymer composite in aqueous medium was studied.Gold-polymer nanocomposite with different structures was fabricated by tailoring the molar ratio of gold precursors to Pluronic P123 molecules or pH value of the P123 solution.When a lower volume ratio of [AuCl4-]/[P123] (0.05) was employed at pH 11.1,a nanostructure similar to plum pudding was obtained.AuNPs with an average diameter of 13.1 nm were embedded in Pluronic assemblies,and each one held about 21 single gold nanoparticles.When [AuCl4-]/[P123] was increased to 0.1,core-shell structure was obtained if the pH value was in the range of 10.6~11.6,while gold polyhedra were fabricated when pH value was 8.1.Typical core-shell AuNPs had an average diameter of 9.6 nm with a narrow size distribution,while gold polyhedras with a mean diameter of 12.8 nm was obtained.The specific morphologies of the resultant nanocomposite were presumably obtained due to the synergistic interaction among the reactants.

  11. Size- and shape-controlled synthesis of hexagonal bipyramidal crystals and hollow self-assembled Al-MOF spheres

    KAUST Repository

    Sarawade, Pradip

    2013-11-25

    We report an efficient protocol for the synthesis of monodisperse crystals of an aluminum (Al)-based metal organic framework (MOF) while obtaining excellent control over the size and shape solely by tuning of the reaction parameters without the use of a template or structure-directing agent. The size of the hexagonal crystals of the Al-MOF can be selectively varied from 100 nm to 2000 nm by simply changing the reaction time and temperature via its nucleation-growth mechanism. We also report a self-assembly phenomenon, observed for the first time in case of Al-MOF, whereby hollow spheres of Al-MOF were formed by the spontaneous organization of triangular sheet building blocks. These MOFs showed broad hysteresis loops during the CO2 capture, indicating that the adsorbed CO2 is not immediately desorbed upon decreasing the external pressure and is instead confined within the framework, which allows for the capture and subsequent selective trapping of CO2 from gaseous mixtures. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. A spray-drying strategy for synthesis of nanoscale metal-organic frameworks and their assembly into hollow superstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carné-Sánchez, Arnau; Imaz, Inhar; Cano-Sarabia, Mary; Maspoch, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are among the most attractive porous materials known today. Their miniaturization to the nanoscale--into nanoMOFs--is expected to serve myriad applications from drug delivery to membranes, to open up novel avenues to more traditional storage and catalysis applications, and to enable the creation of sophisticated superstructures. Here, we report the use of spray-drying as a versatile methodology to assemble nanoMOFs, yielding spherical hollow superstructures with diameters smaller than 5 µm. This strategy conceptually mimics the emulsions used by chemists to confine the synthesis of materials, but does not require secondary immiscible solvents or surfactants. We demonstrate that the resulting spherical, hollow superstructures can be processed into stable colloids, whose disassembly by sonication affords discrete, homogeneous nanoMOFs. This spray-drying strategy enables the construction of multicomponent MOF superstructures, and the encapsulation of guest species within these superstructures. We anticipate that this will provide new routes to capsules, reactors and composite materials.

  13. Synthesis, characterization and anticorrosion potentials of chitosan-g-PEG assembled on silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefni, Hassan H H; Azzam, Eid M; Badr, Emad A; Hussein, M; Tawfik, Salah M

    2016-02-01

    Chitosan (Ch) grafted with poly(ethylene glycol) (Ch-g-mPEG) were synthesized using mPEG with molecular weights 2000 g/mol. The synthesized Ch-g-mPEG was characterized using gel permeation chromatography (GPC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Ch-g-mPEG silver nanoparticles has been synthesized and characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX). The synthesized Ch-g-mPEG and its nanostructure were examined as corrosion inhibitors for carbon steel in 1M HCl solution using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The results revealed that the inhibition efficiency obtained by Ch-g-mPEG self-assembled on silver nanoparticles is greater than that obtained by Ch-g-mPEG only. Potentiodynamic polarization results reveal that the synthesized compound could be classified as mixed-type corrosion inhibitors with predominant control of the cathodic reaction. The results of EIS indicate that the both charge transfer resistance and inhibition efficiency tend to increase by increasing the inhibitor concentration.

  14. Synthesis, characterization and self-assembly of well-defined linear heptablock quaterpolymers

    KAUST Repository

    Ntaras, Christos

    2016-05-17

    Two well-defined heptablock quaterpolymers of the ABCDCBA type [Α: polystyrene (PS), B: poly(butadiene) with ∼90% 1,4-microstructure (PB1,4), C: poly(isoprene) with ∼55% 3,4-microstructure (PI3,4) and D: poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)] were synthesized by combining anionic polymerization high vacuum techniques and hydrosilylation/chlorosilane chemistry. All intermediates and final products were characterized by size exclusion chromatography, membrane osmometry, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to further verify the chemical modification reaction of the difunctional PDMS. The self-assembly in bulk of these novel heptablock quarterpolymers, studied by transmission electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering, revealed 3-phase 4-layer alternating lamellae morphology of PS, PB1,4, and mixed PI3,4/PDMS domains. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to further confirm the miscibility of PI3,4 and PDMS blocks. It is the first time that PDMS is the central segment in such multiblock polymers (≥3 chemically different blocks). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2016, 54, 1443–1449. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Colloid electrostatic self-assembly synthesis of SnO{sub 2}/graphene nanocomposite for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yankun; Liu, Yushan; Zhang, Jianmin, E-mail: zhjm@zzu.edu.cn [Zhengzhou University, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering (China)

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, a simple and fast colloid electrostatic self-assembly method was adopted to prepare the SnO{sub 2}/graphene nanocomposite (SGNC). The crystal structure, chemical composition, and porous property of composite were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption experiments. The morphology analyses showed that the SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles about 5 nm were distributed homogenously on the reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets surface. The electrochemical performance measurements exhibited that SGNC possessed the specific capacitance of 347.3 F g{sup −1} at a scan rate of 5 mV s{sup −1} in 1 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte solution. Furthermore, this material also showed excellent cycling stability, and the specific capacitance still retained 90 % after 3000 cycles. These results indicate that the SGNC is a promising electrode material for high-performance supercapacitors.

  16. Divalent Amino-Acid-Based Amphiphilic Antioxidants: Synthesis, Self-Assembling Properties, and Biological Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosselin, Marie; Meyer, Grégory; Guillet, Pierre; Cheviet, Thomas; Walther, Guillaume; Meister, Annette; Hadjipavlou-Litina, Dimitra; Durand, Grégory

    2016-03-16

    We report herein the synthesis of a divalent amphiphilic carrier onto which α-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN) and 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid (Trolox) antioxidants were grafted to give the divalent derivative called FATxPBN. The divalent carrier consists of two lysine amino acids as a scaffold upon which the antioxidant moieties are grafted, a perfluorinated chain that supplies hydrophobicity, and a sugar-based polar headgroup that ensures water solubility. For the sake of comparison, a divalent PBN derivative called FADiPBN was also synthesized. The self-aggregation properties of FATxPBN and FADiPBN were studied by means of surface tension, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy methods, and showed they form small micelles (i.e., 12 and 6 nm diameter, respectively) at submillimolar concentrations (i.e., 0.01 and 0.05 mM, respectively), in agreement with partition coefficient values. The superior antioxidant properties of FATxPBN over FADiPBN and the parent compounds PBN and Trolox were demonstrated using in vitro ABTS(•+) reduction (98%) and soybean lipoxygenase inhibition (94%) assays. Finally, FATxPBN was found to significantly inhibit hyperglycemia-induced toxicity on an ex-vivo rat model, demonstrating its potency as a bioactive antioxidant against oxidative stress-induced damage. PMID:26850367

  17. Kidney injury and heme oxygenase-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-xing MAI

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available     Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is one of the main pathways to degrade heme in mammals, and the main degradation products are free iron (Fe2+, carbon monoxide (CO, and bilirubin. Heme plays an important role in promoting cell survival, circulation of intracellular substrates, and immune regulation. Previous studies suggest that HO-1 pathway is an important internal factor in determining the susceptibility and severity of acute kidney injury (AKI. The induction of HO-1 expression can attenuate the severity of renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI, and the inhibition of HO-1 expression will aggravate IRI. The present article summarizes the latest advances in research abroad and at home on protective mechanism by which HO-1 prevents AKI to further deepen our understanding of the role of HO-1 in the treatment of AKI.   

  18. Red meat and colon cancer : how dietary heme initiates hyperproliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJssennagger, N.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in Western countries. The risk to develop colorectal cancer is associated with the intake of red meat. Red meat contains the porphyrin pigment heme. Heme is an irritant for the colonic wall and it is previously shown that the addition of heme to

  19. Synthesis of self-assembled nanorod vanadium oxide bundles by sonochemical treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y. H. Taufiq-Yap; Y.C. Wong; Z. Zainal; M.Z. Hussein

    2009-01-01

    Self-assembled nanorod of vanadium oxide bundles were synthesized by treating bulk V_2O_5 with high intensity sonochemical technique. The synthesized materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD),scanning electron microscope (SEM),transmission electron microscope (TEM) and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) in H_2. Catalytic behaviour of the materials over anaerobic n-butane oxidation was studied through temperature-programmed reaction (TPRn). Catalytic evaluation of the sonochemical treated V_2O_5 products was also studied on microreactor. XRD patterns of all the vanadium samples were perfectly indexed to V_2O_5. The morphologies of the nanorod vanadium oxides as shown in SEM and TEM depended on the duration of the ultrasound irradiation. Prolonging the ultrasound irradiation duration resulted in materials with uniform,well defined shapes and surface structures and smaller size of nanorod vanadium oxide bundles. H_2-TPR profiles showed that larger amount of oxygen species were removed from the nanorod V_2O_5 compared to the bulk. Furthermore,the nanorod vanadium oxide bundles,which were produced after 90,120 and 180 min of sonochemical treatment,showed an additional reduction peak at lower temperature (~850 K),suggesting the presence of some highly active oxygen species. TPRn in n-butane/He over these materials showed that the nanorod V_2O_5 with highly active oxygen species showed markedly higher activity than the bulk material,which was further proven by catalytic oxidation of n-butane.

  20. Analysis of Heme oxygenase isomers in rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-ZhuLi; Wen-JunCui; Xue-HongZhang; Qing-XiangShen; JianWang; She

    2002-01-01

    AIM:To purify and identify heme oxygenase(HO) isomers which exist in rat liver,spleen and brain treated with hematin and phenylhydrazine and in untrated rat liver and to investigate the characteristics of HO isomers,to isolate and confirm the rat HO-1 cDNA that actually encodes HO-1 by expressing cDNA in monkey Kidney cells(COS-1 cells),to prepare the rat heme oxygenase-1(HO-1)mutant and to detect inhibition of HO-1 mutated enzyme.

  1. Heme oxygenase-1 system and gastrointestinal tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie; CM; Lin; Hsiangfu; Kung

    2010-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1(HO-1) system catabolizes heme into three products:carbon monoxide,biliverdin/bilirubin and free iron.It is involved in many physiological and pathophysiological processes.A great deal of data has demonstrated the roles of HO-1 in the formation,growth and metastasis of tumors.The interest in this system by investigators involved in gastrointestinal tumors is fairly recent,and few papers on HO-1 have touched upon this subject.This review focuses on the current understanding of the physiologic...

  2. Hydrogen bonding discotic liquid crystals: Synthesis, self-assembly, and molecular recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushey, Mark Lawrence

    The triamides shown below form discotic liquid crystalline phases with intermolecular hydrogen bonding stabilizing the columnar structure, A and B. The mesomorphic orientations of the columns are dependent on the amide side chain. Three mesophasic orientations are described: columns aligned perpendicular to the surface, columns aligned parallel to the surface in a radial pattern, and columns aligned parallel to the surface in a parallel or aligned pattern. The aggregation of the tridodecyloxy-triamides show N-H shifting in the IR at elevated temperatures, an indication that hydrogen bonding is important in the association of liquid crystalline mesophases. Powder X-ray diffraction studies indicate packing of the columns into a hexagonal lattice.* Studies on triamides with chiral side chains result in molecules stacking into columns displaying a helical pitch. In concentrated solutions of dodecane, molecules with chiral side chains display behavior consistent with chiral nematic liquid crystals; a super helical packing of the chiral columns. These superhelical packed systems show temperature dependent selective reflection of visible light and fingerprint textures. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) confirms in sub-monolayer films, that molecules preferring an edge-on orientation form long columns on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), those that prefer a face-on orientation form large amorphous domains. Electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) images of the domains of molecules in the edge-on orientation provides no discernible polarity, imaging of the domains of molecules in the face-on orientation indicates a negative polar orientation. Scanning probe measurements (SPM) of the tridodecynyl-triamide have shown similar edge-on orientations of other tridodecyloxy-triamides. Powder X-ray diffraction of these liquid crystalline phases shows a hexagonal packing of the columnar assembly. Electro-optic switching studies indicate a piezoelectric switching mechanism, possibly

  3. In vitro assembly of catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baureder, Michael; Barane, Elisabeth; Hederstedt, Lars

    2014-10-10

    Most aerobic organisms contain catalase, which functions to decompose hydrogen peroxide. Typical catalases are structurally complex homo-tetrameric enzymes with one heme prosthetic group buried in each subunit. It is not known how catalase in the cell is assembled from its constituents. The bacterium Enterococcus faecalis cannot synthesize heme but can acquire it from the environment to form a cytoplasmic catalase. We have in E. faecalis monitored production of the enzyme polypeptide (KatA) depending on the availability of heme and used our findings to devise a procedure for the purification of preparative amounts of in vivo-synthesized apocatalase. We show that fully active catalase can be obtained in vitro by incubating isolated apoprotein with hemin. We have characterized features of the assembly process and describe a temperature-trapped hemylated intermediate of the enzyme maturation process. Hemylation of apocatalase does not require auxiliary cell components, but rapid assembly of active enzyme seemingly is assisted in the cell. Our findings provide insight about catalase assembly and offer new experimental possibilities for detailed studies of this process.

  4. Heme oxygenase is the major 32-kDa stress protein induced in human skin fibroblasts by UVA radiation, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium arsenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have shown that UVA (320-380 nm) radiation, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium arsenite induce a stress protein of approximately 32 kDa in human skin fibroblasts. The synthesis and cloning of cDNA from arsenite-induced mRNA populations have now allowed us to unequivocally identify the 32-kDa protein as heme oxygenase. By mRNA analysis we have shown that the heme oxygenase gene is also induced in cultured human skin fibroblasts by UVA radiation, hydrogen peroxide, cadmium chloride, iodoacetamide, and menadione. The known antioxidant properties of heme catabolites taken together with the observation of a high level of induction of the enzyme in cells from an organ not involved in hemoglobin breakdown strongly supports the proposal that the induction of heme oxygenase may be a general response to oxidant stress and constitutes an important cellular defense mechanism against oxidative damage

  5. One-pot system for synthesis, assembly, and display of functional single-span membrane proteins on oil-water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunker, Peter J; Asahara, Haruichi; Hung, Kuo-Chan; Landry, Corey; Arriaga, Laura R; Akartuna, Ilke; Heyman, John; Chong, Shaorong; Weitz, David A

    2016-01-19

    Single-span membrane proteins (ssMPs) represent approximately one-half of all membrane proteins and play important roles in cellular communications. However, like all membrane proteins, ssMPs are prone to misfolding and aggregation because of the hydrophobicity of transmembrane helices, making them difficult to study using common aqueous solution-based approaches. Detergents and membrane mimetics can solubilize membrane proteins but do not always result in proper folding and functionality. Here, we use cell-free protein synthesis in the presence of oil drops to create a one-pot system for the synthesis, assembly, and display of functional ssMPs. Our studies suggest that oil drops prevent aggregation of some in vitro-synthesized ssMPs by allowing these ssMPs to localize on oil surfaces. We speculate that oil drops may provide a hydrophobic interior for cotranslational insertion of the transmembrane helices and a fluidic surface for proper assembly and display of the ectodomains. These functionalized oil drop surfaces could mimic cell surfaces and allow ssMPs to interact with cell surface receptors under an environment closest to cell-cell communication. Using this approach, we showed that apoptosis-inducing human transmembrane proteins, FasL and TRAIL, synthesized and displayed on oil drops induce apoptosis of cultured tumor cells. In addition, we take advantage of hydrophobic interactions of transmembrane helices to manipulate the assembly of ssMPs and create artificial clusters on oil drop surfaces. Thus, by coupling protein synthesis with self-assembly at the water-oil interface, we create a platform that can use recombinant ssMPs to communicate with cells. PMID:26721399

  6. Malaria impairs resistance to Salmonella through heme- and heme oxygenase-dependent dysfunctional granulocyte mobilization

    OpenAIRE

    Cunnington, A. J.; de Souza, J.B.; Walther, R-M.; Riley, E M

    2011-01-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, invasive non-Typhoid Salmonella (NTS) is a common and often fatal complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mediates tolerance to the cytotoxic effects of heme during malarial hemolysis but might impair resistance to NTS by limiting production of bactericidal reactive oxygen species. We show that co-infection of mice with Plasmodium yoelii 17XNL (Py17XNL) and S. typhimurium causes acute, fatal bacteremia with increased bacteri...

  7. Inhibition of Heme Peroxidases by Melamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattaraporn Vanachayangkul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2008 melamine-contaminated infant formula and dairy products in China led to over 50,000 hospitalizations of children due to renal injuries. In North America during 2007 and in Asia during 2004, melamine-contaminated pet food products resulted in numerous pet deaths due to renal failure. Animal studies have confirmed the potent renal toxicity of melamine combined with cyanuric acid. We showed previously that the solubility of melamine cyanurate is low at physiologic pH and ionic strength, provoking us to speculate how toxic levels of these compounds could be transported through the circulation without crystallizing until passing into the renal filtrate. We hypothesized that melamine might be sequestered by heme proteins, which could interfere with heme enzyme activity. Four heme peroxidase enzymes were selected for study: horseradish peroxidase (HRP, lactoperoxidase (LPO, and cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (COX-1 and -2. Melamine exhibited noncompetitive inhibition of HRP (9.5±0.7mM, and LPO showed a mixed model of inhibition (14.5±4.7mM. The inhibition of HRP and LPO was confirmed using a chemiluminescent peroxidase assay. Melamine also exhibited COX-1 inhibition, but inhibition of COX-2 was not detected. Thus, our results demonstrate that melamine inhibits the activity of three heme peroxidases.

  8. Activation of lactoperoxidase by heme-linked protonation and heme-independent iodide binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Akira; Tominaga, Aya; Inoue, Tatsuo; Takeuchi, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LPO), a mammalian secretory heme peroxidase, catalyzes the oxidation of thiocyanate by hydrogen peroxide to produce hypothiocyanate, an antibacterial agent. Although LPO is known to be activated at acidic pH and in the presence of iodide, the structural basis of the activation is not well understood. We have examined the effects of pH and iodide concentration on the catalytic activity and the structure of LPO. Electrochemical and colorimetric assays have shown that the catalytic activity is maximized at pH 4.5. The heme Soret absorption band exhibits a small red-shift at pH 5.0 upon acidification, which is ascribable to a structural transition from a neutral to an acidic form. Resonance Raman spectra suggest that the heme porphyrin core is slightly contracted and the Fe-His bond is strengthened in the acidic form compared to the neutral form. The structural change of LPO upon activation at acidic pH is similar to that observed for myeloperoxidase, another mammalian heme peroxidase, upon activation at neutral pH. Binding of iodide enhances the catalytic activity of LPO without affecting either the optimum pH of activity or the heme structure, implying that the iodide binding occurs at a protein site away from the heme-linked protonation site.

  9. Identification of the receptor scavenging hemopexin-heme complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Vibeke; Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Jacobsen, Christian;

    2005-01-01

    Heme released from heme-binding proteins on internal hemorrhage, hemolysis, myolysis, or other cell damage is highly toxic due to oxidative and proinflammatory effects. Complex formation with hemopexin, the high-affinity heme-binding protein in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid, dampens these effects...... and is suggested to facilitate cellular heme metabolism. Using a ligand-affinity approach, we purified the human hemopexin-heme receptor and identified it as the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP)/CD91, a receptor expressed in several cell types including macrophages, hepatocytes......, neurons, and syncytiotrophoblasts. Binding experiments, including Biacore analysis, showed that hemopexin-heme complex formation elicits the high receptor affinity. Uptake studies of radio-labeled hemopexin-heme complex in LRP/CD91-expressing COS cells and confocal microscopy of the cellular processing of...

  10. Microwave-assisted click polymerization for the synthesis of Abeta(16-22) cyclic oligomers and their self-assembly into polymorphous aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgersma, Ronald C; van Dijk, Maarten; Dechesne, Annemarie C; van Nostrum, Cornelus F; Hennink, Wim E; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Liskamp, Rob M J

    2009-11-01

    We report on the design, synthesis, and structural analysis of cyclic oligomers with an amyloidogenic peptide sequence as the repeating unit to obtain novel self-assembling bionanomaterials. The peptide was derived from the Alzheimer Abeta(16-22) sequence since its strong tendency to form antiparallel beta-sheets ensured the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bridges on which the supramolecular assembly of the individual cyclic oligomers was based. The synthesis of the cyclic oligomers was performed via a microwave-assisted Cu(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of azido-Lys-Leu-Val-Phe-Phe-Ala-Glu-propargyl amide as the monomer. The formation of cyclic oligomers, up to pentamers (35 amino acid residues), was verified by MALDI-TOF analysis and the individual cyclic monomer and dimer could be isolated by HPLC. Gelation behavior and the self-assembly of the linear monomer and the cyclic monomer and dimer were studied by TEM, FTIR and CD. Significant differences were observed in the morphology of the supramolecular aggregates of these three peptides that could be explained by alterations of the hydrogen bond network. PMID:19830304

  11. Mechanisms of Mitochondrial Holocytochrome c Synthase and the Key Roles Played by Cysteines and Histidine of the Heme Attachment Site, Cys-XX-Cys-His*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Shalon E.; San Francisco, Brian; Mendez, Deanna L.; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S.; Rodgers, Kenton R.; Bretsnyder, Eric C.; Kranz, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c assembly requires the covalent attachment of heme by thioether bonds between heme vinyl groups and a conserved CXXCH motif of cytochrome c/c1. The enzyme holocytochrome c synthase (HCCS) binds heme and apocytochrome c substrate to catalyze this attachment, subsequently releasing holocytochrome c for proper folding to its native structure. We address mechanisms of assembly using a functional Escherichia coli recombinant system expressing human HCCS. Human cytochrome c variants with individual cysteine, histidine, double cysteine, and triple cysteine/histidine substitutions (of CXXCH) were co-purified with HCCS. Single and double mutants form a complex with HCCS but not the triple mutant. Resonance Raman and UV-visible spectroscopy support the proposal that heme puckering induced by both thioether bonds facilitate release of holocytochrome c from the complex. His-19 (of CXXCH) supplies the second axial ligand to heme in the complex, the first axial ligand was previously shown to be from HCCS residue His-154. Substitutions of His-19 in cytochrome c to seven other residues (Gly, Ala, Met, Arg, Lys, Cys, and Tyr) were used with various approaches to establish other roles played by His-19. Three roles for His-19 in HCCS-mediated assembly are suggested: (i) to provide the second axial ligand to the heme iron in preparation for covalent attachment; (ii) to spatially position the two cysteinyl sulfurs adjacent to the two heme vinyl groups for thioether formation; and (iii) to aid in release of the holocytochrome c from the HCCS active site. Only H19M is able to carry out these three roles, albeit at lower efficiencies than the natural His-19. PMID:25170082

  12. Single or functionalized fullerenes interacting with heme group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Wallison Chaves; Diniz, Eduardo Moraes, E-mail: eduardo.diniz@ufma.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, Avenida dos Portugueses, 1966, CEP 65080-805, São Luís - MA (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    The heme group is responsible for iron transportation through the bloodstream, where iron participates in redox reactions, electron transfer, gases detection etc. The efficiency of such processes can be reduced if the whole heme molecule or even the iron is somehow altered from its original oxidation state, which can be caused by interactions with nanoparticles as fullerenes. To verify how such particles alter the geometry and electronic structure of heme molecule, here we report first principles calculations based on density functional theory of heme group interacting with single C{sub 60} fullerene or with C{sub 60} functionalized with small functional groups (−CH{sub 3}, −COOH, −NH{sub 2}, −OH). The calculations shown that the system heme + nanoparticle has a different spin state in comparison with heme group if the fullerene is functionalized. Also a functional group can provide a stronger binding between nanoparticle and heme molecule or inhibit the chemical bonding in comparison with single fullerene results. In addition heme molecule loses electrons to the nanoparticles and some systems exhibited a geometry distortion in heme group, depending on the binding energy. Furthermore, one find that such nanoparticles induce a formation of spin up states in heme group. Moreover, there exist modifications in density of states near the Fermi energy. Although of such changes in heme electronic structure and geometry, the iron atom remains in the heme group with the same oxidation state, so that processes that involve the iron might not be affected, only those that depend on the whole heme molecule.

  13. Assembling Synthesis of ZnSe Orthohexagonal Slices through Emulsion Liquid Membrane System of Gas-liquid Transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu LIU; Qing Sheng WU; Ya Ping DING; Hua Jie LIU

    2005-01-01

    Orthohexagonal slices assembled by ZnSe quantum dots were synthesized through emulsion liquid membrane system. These orthohexagonal slices were 1.5-3.5 μm in side length and were self-assembled by ZnSe quantum dots of 2-3 nm. It was proposed the surfactant molecules on ZnSe quantum dots played a key role in the self-assembly process.

  14. A novel water-soluble anionic conjugated copolymer containing poly(p-phenylene vinylene) segments: Copolymer synthesis and multilayer construction by assembling poly(diallyl dimethyl ammonium chloride)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Bao; LIN Hang; TANG Jun; LIU JunSong

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the synthesis of a water soluble conjugated polymer poly(p-phenylene vinylene-co-sodium methacrylate) (ws-P(PV-co-SMA)) and the multilayer of the derived copolymer assembling poly(diallyl dimethyl ammanium chloride) (PDDA). The self-assembling process of the mulUlayer was monitored by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, and the data indicated a linear increase in film thick-ness with a number of ws-P(PV-co-SMA)/PDDA bilayers. The alternative deposition of ws-P (PV-co-SMA) and PDDA allowed the insertion of a non-conjugated layer between the conjugated layers, thus the migration of the photogenerated polarons was effectively confined in the isolated ws-P (PV-co-SMA) chains. Consequently, the photoluminescence quantum yield reached 0.68, 30 times higher than that of pure poly(p-phenylen vinylene). The distinct electronic interactions between conjugated segments were confirmed by comparative analyses of the excitation spectra and time-resolved photolumines-cence spectra of ws-P(PV-co-SMA) solid film and the assembled multilayers. The confinement effect of the PDDA layer on the photogenerated carriers was verified by the surface photovoltage spectroscopic measurement on both ws-P(PV-co-SMA) solid film and self-assembled multilayers.

  15. Direct synthesis of a mesoporous TiO2-RuO2 composite through evaporation-induced polymeric micelle assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastakoti, Bishnu Prasad; Salunkhe, Rahul R; Ye, Jinhua; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2014-06-14

    Here we report a direct synthesis of a mesoporous TiO2-RuO2 composite. Titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) and RuCl3 are used as inorganic precursors for TiO2 and RuO2, respectively. Evaporation-induced assembly of spherical micelles made of an asymmetric poly(styrene-b-2-vinyl pyridine-b-ethylene oxide) triblock copolymer enables the fabrication of a mesoporous TiO2-RuO2 composite with a uniform pore size of 30 nm. PMID:24760227

  16. Identification of essential histidine residues involved in heme binding and Hemozoin formation in heme detoxification protein from Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Keisuke; Ishikawa, Haruto; Aono, Shigetoshi; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Malaria parasites digest hemoglobin within a food vacuole to supply amino acids, releasing the toxic product heme. During the detoxification, toxic free heme is converted into an insoluble crystalline form called hemozoin (Hz). Heme detoxification protein (HDP) in Plasmodium falciparum is one of the most potent of the hemozoin-producing enzymes. However, the reaction mechanisms of HDP are poorly understood. We identified the active site residues in HDP using a combination of Hz formation assay and spectroscopic characterization of mutant proteins. Replacement of the critical histidine residues His122, His172, His175, and His197 resulted in a reduction in the Hz formation activity to approximately 50% of the wild-type protein. Spectroscopic characterization of histidine-substituted mutants revealed that His122 binds heme and that His172 and His175 form a part of another heme-binding site. Our results show that the histidine residues could be present in the individual active sites and could be ligated to each heme. The interaction between heme and the histidine residues would serve as a molecular tether, allowing the proper positioning of two hemes to enable heme dimer formation. The heme dimer would act as a seed for the crystal growth of Hz in P. falciparum. PMID:25138161

  17. Role of Heme and Heme-Proteins in Trypanosomatid Essential Metabolic Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina E. J. Tripodi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Around the world, trypanosomatids are known for being etiological agents of several highly disabling and often fatal diseases like Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi, leishmaniasis (Leishmania spp., and African trypanosomiasis (Trypanosoma brucei. Throughout their life cycle, they must cope with diverse environmental conditions, and the mechanisms involved in these processes are crucial for their survival. In this review, we describe the role of heme in several essential metabolic pathways of these protozoans. Notwithstanding trypanosomatids lack of the complete heme biosynthetic pathway, we focus our discussion in the metabolic role played for important heme-proteins, like cytochromes. Although several genes for different types of cytochromes, involved in mitochondrial respiration, polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism, and sterol biosynthesis, are annotated at the Tritryp Genome Project, the encoded proteins have not yet been deeply studied. We pointed our attention into relevant aspects of these protein functions that are amenable to be considered for rational design of trypanocidal agents.

  18. Holo- And Apo- Structures of Bacterial Periplasmic Heme Binding Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, W.W.; Li, H.; Eakanunkul, S.; Tong, Y.; Wilks, A.; Guo, M.; Poulos, T.L.

    2009-06-01

    An essential component of heme transport in Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the periplasmic protein that shuttles heme between outer and inner membranes. We have solved the first crystal structures of two such proteins, ShuT from Shigella dysenteriae and PhuT from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both share a common architecture typical of Class III periplasmic binding proteins. The heme binds in a narrow cleft between the N- and C-terminal binding domains and is coordinated by a Tyr residue. A comparison of the heme-free (apo) and -bound (holo) structures indicates little change in structure other than minor alterations in the heme pocket and movement of the Tyr heme ligand from an 'in' position where it can coordinate the heme iron to an 'out' orientation where it points away from the heme pocket. The detailed architecture of the heme pocket is quite different in ShuT and PhuT. Although Arg{sup 228} in PhuT H-bonds with a heme propionate, in ShuT a peptide loop partially takes up the space occupied by Arg{sup 228}, and there is no Lys or Arg H-bonding with the heme propionates. A comparison of PhuT/ShuT with the vitamin B{sub 12}-binding protein BtuF and the hydroxamic-type siderophore-binding protein FhuD, the only two other structurally characterized Class III periplasmic binding proteins, demonstrates that PhuT/ShuT more closely resembles BtuF, which reflects the closer similarity in ligands, heme and B{sub 12}, compared with ligands for FhuD, a peptide siderophore.

  19. Detailed NMR Analysis of the Heme-Protein Interactions in Component IV Glycera dibranchiata Monomeric Hemoglobin-CO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete 13C, 15N, and 1H resonance assignments have been obtained for the recombinant, ferrous CO-ligated form of component IV monomeric hemoglobin from Glycera dibranchiata. This 15642 Da myoglobin-like protein contains a large number of glycine and alanine residues (47) and a heme prosthetic group. Coupling constant information has allowed the determination of χ1 and χ2 torsion angles, backbone φ angles, as well as 43 of 81 possible assignments to Hβ2/β3 pairs. The 13Cα, 13Cβ, 13C', and 1Hα assignments yield a consensus chemical shift index (CSI) that, in combination with NOE information and backbone torsion angles, defines seven distinct helical regions for the protein's global architecture. Discrepancies between the CSI and NOE/3JHNHα-based secondary structure definitions have been attributed to heme ring current shifts on the basis of calculations from a model structure [Alam et al. (1994) J. Protein Chem., 13, 151-164]. The agreement can be improved by correcting the 1Hα chemical shifts for the ring current contributions. Because the holoprotein was assembled from isotopically enriched globin and natural isotope-abundance heme, data from 13C-filtered/13C-edited and 13C-filtered/13C-filtered 2D NOESY experiments could be used to determine complete heme proton assignments and to position the heme within the protein. The results confirm the unusual presence of Phe31(B10) and Leu58(E7) side chains near the heme ligand binding site which may alter the polarity and steric environment and thus the functional properties of this protein

  20. Heme oxygenase-1 is the candidate targeting for organ transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Le-ping; ZHANG Li; PENG Li-pan; CHENG Li

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the role of heme oxyenase-1 in organ transplantation and explore the potential applications targeted on overexpression of heme oxyenase-1 gene.Data sources The data cited in this review were mainly obtained from the articles listed in Medline and PubMed,published from January 1996 to December 2008.The search terms were "heme oxygenase-1" and "transplantation".Study selection Articles regarding the role of heme oxyenase-1 in organ transplantation and its protective role in transplants were selected.Protective effects of heme oxygenase-1 overexpression using a gene transfer approach against ischaemic reperfusion injury during transplantation were widely explored.Results Local heme oxygenase-1 overexpression in the graft ameliorates the ischaemic reperfusion injury.This is due to removal of heme, a potent prooxidant and proinflammatory agent, but also because of generation of biologically active products.Conclusions Overexpressive heme oxygenase-1 activity is associated with tissue protection in the setting of graft,ischaemic reperfusion injury.Gene therapy is attractive to us; but a long way from general application.In terms of heme oxygenase-1, the gene promoters are polymorphic.Although individualization is an important principle during clinical application, it is difficult to put into practice.

  1. Free Heme and the Polymerization of Sickle Cell Hemoglobin

    OpenAIRE

    Uzunova, Veselina V.; Pan, Weichun; Galkin, Oleg; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2010-01-01

    In search of novel control parameters for the polymerization of sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS), the primary pathogenic event of sickle cell anemia, we explore the role of free heme, which may be excessively released in sickle erythrocytes. We show that the concentration of free heme in HbS solutions typically used in the laboratory is 0.02–0.04 mole heme/mole HbS. We show that dialysis of small molecules out of HbS solutions arrests HbS polymerization. The addition of 100–260 μM of free heme to...

  2. Pyridine Hemochromagen Assay for Determining the Concentration of Heme in Purified Protein Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Barr, Ian; Guo, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Heme is a common cofactor in proteins, found in hemoglobin, myoglobin, cytochrome P450, DGCR8, and nitric oxide synthase, among others. This protocol describes a method for quantifying heme that works best in purified protein samples. This protocol might be used to, for example, determine whether a given heme-binding protein is fully occupied by heme, thus allowing correlation of heme content with activity. This requires the absolute heme concentration and an accurate protein concentration. A...

  3. Bacillus anthracis HssRS signaling to HrtAB regulates heme resistance during infection

    OpenAIRE

    Stauff, Devin L; Skaar, Eric P.

    2009-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis proliferates to high levels within vertebrate tissues during the pathogenesis of anthrax. This growth is facilitated by the acquisition of nutrient iron from host heme. However, heme acquisition can lead to the accumulation of toxic amounts of heme within B. anthracis. Here, we show that B. anthracis resists heme toxicity by sensing heme through the HssRS two-component system, which regulates expression of the heme-detoxifying transporter HrtAB. In addition, we demonstrate ...

  4. Iron acquisition from heme and hemoglobin by a Serratia marcescens extracellular protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Létoffé, S; Ghigo, J M; Wandersman, C

    1994-01-01

    Several pathogenic bacteria are able to use heme and hemoproteins as iron sources independent of siderophore production by mechanisms involving outer membrane heme-binding proteins and heme transport systems. Here we show that Serratia marcescens has such a property and we identify an extracellular heme-binding protein, HasA (for heme acquisition system), allowing the release of heme from hemoglobin. This protein is secreted by S. marcescens under conditions of iron depletion and is essential...

  5. CYB5D2 requires heme-binding to regulate HeLa cell growth and confer survival from chemotherapeutic agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Bruce

    Full Text Available The cytochrome b5 domain containing 2 (CYB5D2; Neuferricin protein has been reported to bind heme, however, the critical residues responsible for heme-binding are undefined. Furthermore, the relationship between heme-binding and CYB5D2-mediated intracellular functions remains unknown. Previous studies examining heme-binding in two cytochrome b5 heme-binding domain-containing proteins, damage-associated protein 1 (Dap1; Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1, have revealed that conserved tyrosine (Y 73, Y79, aspartic acid (D 86, and Y127 residues present in human CYB5D2 may be involved in heme-binding. CYB5D2 binds to type b heme, however, only the substitution of glycine (G at D86 (D86G within its cytochrome b5 heme-binding (cyt-b5 domain abolished its heme-binding ability. Both CYB5D2 and CYB5D2(D86G localize to the endoplasmic reticulum. Ectopic CYB5D2 expression inhibited cell proliferation and anchorage-independent colony growth of HeLa cells. Conversely, CYB5D2 knockdown and ectopic CYB5D2(D86G expression increased cell proliferation and colony growth. As PGRMC1 has been reported to regulate the expression and activities of cytochrome P450 proteins (CYPs, we examined the role of CYB5D2 in regulating the activities of CYPs involved in sterol synthesis (CYP51A1 and drug metabolism (CYP3A4. CYB5D2 co-localizes with cytochrome P450 reductase (CYPOR, while CYB5D2 knockdown reduced lanosterol demethylase (CYP51A1 levels and rendered HeLa cells sensitive to mevalonate. Additionally, knockdown of CYB5D2 reduced CYP3A4 activity. Lastly, CYB5D2 expression conferred HeLa cell survival from chemotherapeutic agents (paclitaxel, cisplatin and doxorubicin, with its ability to promote survival being dependent on its heme-binding ability. Taken together, this study provides evidence that heme-binding is critical for CYB5D2 in regulating HeLa cell growth and survival, with endogenous CYB5D2 being required to

  6. Studies of the interaction between heme oxygenase - 1 and human HBP

    OpenAIRE

    Jodłowska, Iga Karolina

    2014-01-01

    The presented work aimed to examine for the first time the interaction between heme oxygenase -1 (HO-1) and heme bound human HBP (hHBP). The protein hHBP is thought to be a heme binding protein involved in heme transport during heme metabolism in cells, although the exact function is unknown. Heme binds with a mM Kd. Therefore if hHBP is being used to transport heme, a partner needs to be present to accept the heme ring. Unpublished results have shown that HO-1 is present...

  7. Molecular Mechanism Governing Heme Signaling in Yeast: a Higher-Order Complex Mediates Heme Regulation of the Transcriptional Activator HAP1

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Li; Hach, Angela; Wang, Cheng

    1998-01-01

    Apart from serving as a prosthetic group in globins and enzymes, heme is a key regulator controlling a wide range of molecular and cellular processes involved in oxygen sensing and utilization. To gain insights into molecular mechanisms of heme signaling and oxygen sensing in eukaryotes, we investigated the yeast heme-responsive transcriptional activator HAP1. HAP1 activity is regulated precisely and tightly by heme. Here we show that in the absence of heme, HAP1 forms a biochemically distinc...

  8. Heme Recognition By a Staphylococcus Aureus IsdE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, J.C.; Vermeiren, C.L.; Heinrichs, D.E.; Murphy, M.E.P.

    2009-06-03

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen and a leading cause of hospital acquired infections. Because the free iron concentration in the human body is too low to support growth, S. aureus must acquire iron from host sources. Heme iron is the most prevalent iron reservoir in the human body and a predominant source of iron for S. aureus. The iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) system removes heme from host heme proteins and transfers it to IsdE, the cognate substrate-binding lipoprotein of an ATP-binding cassette transporter, for import and subsequent degradation. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the soluble portion of the IsdE lipoprotein in complex with heme. The structure reveals a bi-lobed topology formed by an N- and C-terminal domain bridged by a single {alpha}-helix. The structure places IsdE as a member of the helical backbone metal receptor superfamily. A six-coordinate heme molecule is bound in the groove established at the domain interface, and the heme iron is coordinated in a novel fashion for heme transporters by Met{sup 78} and His{sup 229}. Both heme propionate groups are secured by H-bonds to IsdE main chain and side chain groups. Of these residues, His{sup 299} is essential for IsdE-mediated heme uptake by S. aureus when growth on heme as a sole iron source is measured. Multiple sequence alignments of homologues from several other Gram-positive bacteria, including the human pathogens pyogenes, Bacillus anthracis, and Listeria monocytogenes, suggest that these other systems function equivalently to S. aureus IsdE with respect to heme binding and transport.

  9. Hydrothermal Synthesis and Crystal Structure of Manganese(Ⅱ) Coordination Polymer Assembled by 4-Sulfophthalate and 4,4'-Bipyridine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Introduction The rational design and synthesis of metal-directed supramolecular framework compounds have received much attention in coordination chemistry because of their potential applications in catalysis, molecular selection, nonlinear optics, ion exchange, and microelectronics[1-4].

  10. Bone marrow: its contribution to heme catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mähönen, Y; Anttinen, M; Vuopio, P; Tenhunen, R

    1976-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) and biliverdin reductase (BR), the two NADPH-dependent enzymes involved in the degradation of hemoglobin and its derivatives, were measured in bone marrow aspirates from 5 hematologically normal persons, 4 patients with chronic leucemia (CL), 11 patients with acute leucemia (AL), 8 patients with refractory sideroblastic anemia (RA), 7 patients with iron-deficiency anemia (IA), 5 patients with hemolytic anemia (HA), and 7 patients with secondary anemia (SA) to determine the enzymatic capacity of the bone marrow in different hematologic disorders for heme catabolism. HO activity in the bone marrow of normal persons was 0.42 +/- 0.28 (SD) nmoles bilirubin/10 mg protein/min; in CL, 2.15 +/- 1.34; in AL, 0.39 +/- 0.25; in RA, 0.58 +/- 0.37; in IA, 0.41 +/- 0.28; in HA, 2.56 +/- 1.40; and in SA, 1.72 +/- 1.06. BR activity, respectively, was in normal persons 8.7 +/- 2.4 (SD) nmoles bilirubin/10 mg protein/min; in CL, 13.6 +/- 9.1; in AL, 3.8 +/- 3.1 in RA, 5.1 +/- 2.7; in IA, 5.5 +/- 3.7; in HA, 17.0 +/- 7.2; and in SA, 10.5 +/- 4.2. On the basis of these findings it seems evident that both oxygenase and biliverdin reductase activities of the bone marrow are capable of adaptive regulation. The physiologic role of bone marrow in heme catabolism seems to be of significant importance.

  11. Dietary heme-mediated PPARα activation does not affect the heme-induced epithelial hyperproliferation and hyperplasia in mouse colon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noortje Ijssennagger

    Full Text Available Red meat consumption is associated with an increased colon cancer risk. Heme, present in red meat, injures the colon surface epithelium by luminal cytotoxicity and reactive oxygen species. This surface injury is overcompensated by hyperproliferation and hyperplasia of crypt cells. Transcriptome analysis of mucosa of heme-fed mice showed, besides stress- and proliferation-related genes, many upregulated lipid metabolism-related PPARα target genes. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of PPARα in heme-induced hyperproliferation and hyperplasia. Male PPARα KO and WT mice received a purified diet with or without heme. As PPARα is proposed to protect against oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, we hypothesized that the absence of PPARα leads to more surface injury and crypt hyperproliferation in the colon upon heme-feeding. Heme induced luminal cytotoxicity and lipid peroxidation and colonic hyperproliferation and hyperplasia to the same extent in WT and KO mice. Transcriptome analysis of colonic mucosa confirmed similar heme-induced hyperproliferation in WT and KO mice. Stainings for alkaline phosphatase activity and expression levels of Vanin-1 and Nrf2-targets indicated a compromised antioxidant defense in heme-fed KO mice. Our results suggest that the protective role of PPARα in antioxidant defense involves the Nrf2-inhibitor Fosl1, which is upregulated by heme in PPARα KO mice. We conclude that PPARα plays a protective role in colon against oxidative stress, but PPARα does not mediate heme-induced hyperproliferation. This implies that oxidative stress of surface cells is not the main determinant of heme-induced hyperproliferation and hyperplasia.

  12. Absorption by Isolated Ferric Heme Nitrosyl Cations In Vacuo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyer, Jean; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted

    2012-01-01

    Keywords:biophysics;gas-phase spectroscopy;heme proteins;mass spectrometry;nitric oxide Almost innocent: In photobiophysical studies of ferric heme nitrosyl complexes, the absorption spectra of six-coordinate complexes with NO and Met or Cys are similar to that of the five-coordinate complex ion Fe...

  13. Spectroscopy of Ferric Heme and Protoporphyrin IX Ions In Vacuo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyer, Jean; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted

    2013-01-01

    This chapter deals with gas-phase spectroscopy of protoporphyrin IX and heme ions, two important biochromophores in nature. These ions strongly absorb blue and green light, which accounts for e.g. the red colour of blood. We present absorption spectra of four-coordinate ferric heme cations at room...

  14. Identification of the receptor scavenging hemopexin-heme complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Vibeke; Maniecki, Maciej B; Jacobsen, Christian;

    2005-01-01

    , and syncytiotrophoblasts. Binding experiments, including Biacore analysis, showed that hemopexin-heme complex formation elicits the high receptor affinity. Uptake studies of radio-labeled hemopexin-heme complex in LRP/CD91-expressing COS cells and confocal microscopy of the cellular processing of fluorescent hemopexin...

  15. Heme oxygenase is the major 32-kDa stress protein induced in human skin fibroblasts by UVA radiation, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium arsenite.

    OpenAIRE

    Keyse, S M; Tyrrell, R M

    1989-01-01

    We have shown that UVA (320-380 nm) radiation, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium arsenite induce a stress protein of approximately 32 kDa in human skin fibroblasts. The synthesis and cloning of cDNA from arsenite-induced mRNA populations have now allowed us to unequivocally identify the 32-kDa protein as heme oxygenase. By mRNA analysis we have shown that the heme oxygenase gene is also induced in cultured human skin fibroblasts by UVA radiation, hydrogen peroxide, cadmium chloride, iodoacetamide...

  16. Non Heme System Asymmetric Epoxidation Reaction Made Progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the Chinese Academy of Sciences "Hundred Talents Program", the Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences Oxo Synthesis and Selective Oxidation State Key Laboratory of biological and Biomimetic Catalytic task group has recently developed a new type of non heme enzyme simulation system, the system uses the benz- imidazole instead of four nitrogen ligands pyridine units, natural proline derivatives two amine instead of HMDA skeleton, the manganese complexes in asymmetric epoxidation reaction shown high activity, but in 1/10000 the amount of catalyst under conditions of high selectivity to obtain corresponding product, TON (Turnover numbers) up to 9600, TOF (Turnover frequency) up to 59000 h-1. It is currently reported the highest activity in epoxidation catalyst. Use the H202/AcOH or peracetic acid as oxidant, 180 isotope la- beling experiments, were found different degrees of 180 isotope labeling of epoxy products, won the first direct evidence of response is obtained by the high Mn O intermediates in the process, the work was pub- lished recently in Chem. Eur. J. (Chem. Eur. J. 2012, 18, 6750--6753. ).

  17. Gas-phase spectroscopy of ferric heme-NO complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyer, J.A.; Jørgensen, Anders; Pedersen, Bjarke;

    2013-01-01

    Weakly bound complexes between ferric heme cations and NO were synthesised in the gas phase from ion-molecule reactions, and their absorption measured based on photodissociation yields. The Soret band, which serves as an important marker band for heme-protein spectroscopy, is maximal at 357±5 nm...... and significantly blue-shifted compared to ferric heme nitrosyl proteins (maxima between 408 and 422 nm). This is in stark contrast to the Q-band absorption where the protein microenvironment is nearly innocent in perturbing the electronic structure of the porphyrin macrocycle. Photodissociation is...... absorption maxima of heme and its complexes with amino acids and NO. Not so innocent: Weakly bound complexes between ferric heme and NO were synthesised in the gas phase, and their absorption measured from photodissociation yields. Opposite absorption trends in the Soret-band are seen upon NO addition to...

  18. Multi-heme proteins: nature's electronic multi-purpose tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewley, Kathryn D; Ellis, Katie E; Firer-Sherwood, Mackenzie A; Elliott, Sean J

    2013-01-01

    While iron is often a limiting nutrient to Biology, when the element is found in the form of heme cofactors (iron protoporphyrin IX), living systems have excelled at modifying and tailoring the chemistry of the metal. In the context of proteins and enzymes, heme cofactors are increasingly found in stoichiometries greater than one, where a single protein macromolecule contains more than one heme unit. When paired or coupled together, these protein associated heme groups perform a wide variety of tasks, such as redox communication, long range electron transfer and storage of reducing/oxidizing equivalents. Here, we review recent advances in the field of multi-heme proteins, focusing on emergent properties of these complex redox proteins, and strategies found in Nature where such proteins appear to be modular and essential components of larger biochemical pathways. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Metals in Bioenergetics and Biomimetics Systems.

  19. Caenorhabditis elegans ATAD-3 modulates mitochondrial iron and heme homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Ecker, Daniela; Hoffmann, Michael; Müting, Gesine; Maglioni, Silvia; Herebian, Diran; Mayatepek, Ertan; Ventura, Natascia; Distelmaier, Felix

    2015-11-13

    ATAD3 (ATPase family AAA domain-containing protein 3) is a mitochondrial protein, which is essential for cell viability and organismal development. ATAD3 has been implicated in several important cellular processes such as apoptosis regulation, respiratory chain function and steroid hormone biosynthesis. Moreover, altered expression of ATAD3 has been associated with several types of cancer. However, the exact mechanisms underlying ATAD3 effects on cellular metabolism remain largely unclear. Here, we demonstrate that Caenorhabditis elegans ATAD-3 is involved in mitochondrial iron and heme homeostasis. Knockdown of atad-3 caused mitochondrial iron- and heme accumulation. This was paralleled by changes in the expression levels of several iron- and heme-regulatory genes as well as an increased heme uptake. In conclusion, our data indicate a regulatory role of C. elegans ATAD-3 in mitochondrial iron and heme metabolism.

  20. Synthesis and electrochemical characterization of myoglobin-antibody protein immobilized self-assembled gold nanoparticles on ITO-glass plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajesh, E-mail: rajesh_csir@yahoo.com [Polymer and Soft Material Section, National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Sharma, Vikash; Mishra, Sujeet K.; Biradar, Ashok M. [Polymer and Soft Material Section, National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2012-01-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Mb-Ab was covalently bonded to carboxyl groups of the mixed MUA and MPA over self-assembled GNPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This assembly on ITO-glass plate was used as an impedimetric immunosensor for myoglobin detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High loading of Mb-Ab, on the GNPs results in a wide range of Mb-Ag detection from 0.01 {mu}g to 1.65 {mu}g mL{sup -1} Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The simple method and wide range of Mb-Ag detection makes this advantageous over other methods. - Abstract: We report a protein immobilized self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) on indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated glass plate. The protein-antibody, Mb-Ab, was covalently immobilized over the self-assembly of GNPs through a mixed SAM of 11-mercapto undecanoic acid (MUA) and 3-mercapto propionic acid (MPA) via carbodiimide coupling reaction using N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N Prime -ethyl carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxy succinimide (NHS). The whole assembly was constructed on 0.25 cm{sup 2} area of ITO-glass plate (Mb-Ab/MUA-MPA/GNPs/APTES/ITO-glass) and an impedimetric study was carried out for its application in myoglobin detection. This prototype assembly was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and electrochemical techniques. The modified electrode showed an increased electron-transfer resistance on coupling with protein antigen, Mb-Ag, in the presence of a redox probe [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3-/4-}. Its exhibits an electrochemical impedance response to protein myoglobin-antigen, Mb-Ag, concentration in a linear range from 0.01 {mu}g to 1.65 {mu}g mL{sup -1} with a lowest detection limit of 1.4 ng mL{sup -1}.

  1. Synthesis and electrochemical characterization of myoglobin-antibody protein immobilized self-assembled gold nanoparticles on ITO-glass plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The Mb-Ab was covalently bonded to carboxyl groups of the mixed MUA and MPA over self-assembled GNPs. ► This assembly on ITO-glass plate was used as an impedimetric immunosensor for myoglobin detection. ► High loading of Mb-Ab, on the GNPs results in a wide range of Mb-Ag detection from 0.01 μg to 1.65 μg mL−1 ► The simple method and wide range of Mb-Ag detection makes this advantageous over other methods. - Abstract: We report a protein immobilized self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) on indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated glass plate. The protein-antibody, Mb-Ab, was covalently immobilized over the self-assembly of GNPs through a mixed SAM of 11-mercapto undecanoic acid (MUA) and 3-mercapto propionic acid (MPA) via carbodiimide coupling reaction using N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N′-ethyl carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxy succinimide (NHS). The whole assembly was constructed on 0.25 cm2 area of ITO-glass plate (Mb-Ab/MUA-MPA/GNPs/APTES/ITO-glass) and an impedimetric study was carried out for its application in myoglobin detection. This prototype assembly was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and electrochemical techniques. The modified electrode showed an increased electron-transfer resistance on coupling with protein antigen, Mb-Ag, in the presence of a redox probe [Fe(CN)6]3−/4−. Its exhibits an electrochemical impedance response to protein myoglobin-antigen, Mb-Ag, concentration in a linear range from 0.01 μg to 1.65 μg mL−1 with a lowest detection limit of 1.4 ng mL−1.

  2. Co-Assembled Supported Catalysts: Synthesis of Nano-Structured Supported Catalysts with Hierarchic Pores through Combined Flow and Radiation Induced Co-Assembled Nano-Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galip Akay

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel generic method of silica supported catalyst system generation from a fluid state is presented. The technique is based on the combined flow and radiation (such as microwave, thermal or UV induced co-assembly of the support and catalyst precursors forming nano-reactors, followed by catalyst precursor decomposition. The transformation from the precursor to supported catalyst oxide state can be controlled from a few seconds to several minutes. The resulting nano-structured micro-porous silica supported catalyst system has a surface area approaching 300 m2/g and X-ray Diffraction (XRD-based catalyst size controlled in the range of 1–10 nm in which the catalyst structure appears as lamellar sheets sandwiched between the catalyst support. These catalyst characteristics are dependent primarily on the processing history as well as the catalyst (Fe, Co and Ni studied when the catalyst/support molar ratio is typically 0.1–2. In addition, Ca, Mn and Cu were used as co-catalysts with Fe and Co in the evaluation of the mechanism of catalyst generation. Based on extensive XRD, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM studies, the micro- and nano-structure of the catalyst system were evaluated. It was found that the catalyst and silica support form extensive 0.6–2 nm thick lamellar sheets of 10–100 nm planar dimensions. In these lamellae, the alternate silica support and catalyst layer appear in the form of a bar-code structure. When these lamellae structures pack, they form the walls of a micro-porous catalyst system which typically has a density of 0.2 g/cm3. A tentative mechanism of catalyst nano-structure formation is provided based on the rheology and fluid mechanics of the catalyst/support precursor fluid as well as co-assembly nano-reactor formation during processing. In order to achieve these structures and characteristics, catalyst support must be in the form of silane coated silica nano

  3. Synthesis, self-assembly and photoinduced surface-relief gratings of a polyacrylate-based Azo polyelectrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yaning; Wang, Haopeng; Tuo, Xinlin; Deng, Wei; Wang, Xiaogong

    2004-06-01

    A polyacrylate-based azo polyelectrolyte was synthesized and characterized by the spectroscopic methods and thermal analysis. Layer-by-layer self-assembly of the azo polyelectrolyte through electrostatic adsorption was explored. By using a dipping solution of the anionic azo polyelectrolyte in anhydrous DMF, together with an aqueous solution of cationic poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDAC), high quality multilayer films were obtained through the sequential deposition of the oppositely charged polyelectrolytes. With interfering illumination of Ar + laser beams (488 nm), significant surface-relief gratings formed on the self-assembled multiplayer films were observed.

  4. Absorption in the Q-band region by isolated ferric heme+ and heme+(histidine) in vacuo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyer, Jean Ann; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen

    2010-08-28

    Absorption by heme proteins is determined by the heme microenvironment that is often vacuumlike (hydrophobic pocket). Here we provide absorption spectra in the Q-band region of isolated ferric heme(+) and heme(+)(histidine) ions in vacuo to be used as references in protein biospectroscopy. Ions were photoexcited in an electrostatic storage ring and their decay monitored in time. Both ions display a triple band structure with maxima at 500, 518, and 530 nm. Previous attempts to study four-coordinate Fe(III)-heme(+) were hampered by the strong affinity of Fe(3+) for water and anions. Absorption at higher wavelengths is also measured, which is ascribed to charge-transfer transitions from the porphyrin to the iron. Finally, our data serve to benchmark theoretical calculations. PMID:20815568

  5. Synthesis and characterization of self-assembled ZnO nano-dots grown on SiNx/Si(001) substrates by radio frequency magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the synthesis and characterization of self-assembled ZnO nano-dots deposited on SiNx/Si(001) substrates by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The effect of the working pressure on the microstructure of the as-grown ZnO thin films was examined. At a working pressure of 6 x 10-3 Torr, a flat layered structure was dominant with a preferred orientation of the ZnO(0002) plane, while ZnO nano-structures were observed on the samples grown at 2 x 10-2 Torr. This was attributed to the columnar growth that facilitated the nucleation of ZnO nano-structures on the growing surfaces. Hexagonal nano-pyramids were formed, which then transformed into nano-dots as the film became thicker. The ZnO nano-dots were uniform and well dispersed, exhibiting distinct photoluminescence spectra due to the quantum confinement effect.

  6. Ethylene glycol-mediated synthesis of nanoporous anatase TiO{sub 2} rods and rutile TiO{sub 2} self-assembly chrysanthemums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Quanjun [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Qianwei Road, Changchun 130012 (China); Liu Bingbing [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Qianwei Road, Changchun 130012 (China)], E-mail: liubb@jlu.edu.cn; Li Yingai; Liu Ran; Li Xianglin; Li Dongmei; Yu Shidan; Liu Dedi; Wang Peng; Li Bing; Zou Bo; Cui Tian; Zou Guangtian [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Qianwei Road, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2009-03-05

    Nanoporous anatase TiO{sub 2} rods and rutile TiO{sub 2} chrysanthemums were successfully synthesized via a simple ethylene glycol-mediated synthesis route. Their morphologies, phase compositions and components were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman and IR, respectively. The results show that a self-assembly growth takes place in the calcination under vacuum, which makes the titanium glycolate rods transform into rutile TiO{sub 2}/C chrysanthemums rather than anatase TiO{sub 2} rods. It also indicates that the carbon plays an important role in the phase transition process which promotes the phase transition to rutile TiO{sub 2} at a lower temperature (400 deg. C). It provides a new approach to prepare nanoporous rutile TiO{sub 2} nanomaterials under low temperature.

  7. Ethylene glycol-mediated synthesis of nanoporous anatase TiO2 rods and rutile TiO2 self-assembly chrysanthemums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoporous anatase TiO2 rods and rutile TiO2 chrysanthemums were successfully synthesized via a simple ethylene glycol-mediated synthesis route. Their morphologies, phase compositions and components were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman and IR, respectively. The results show that a self-assembly growth takes place in the calcination under vacuum, which makes the titanium glycolate rods transform into rutile TiO2/C chrysanthemums rather than anatase TiO2 rods. It also indicates that the carbon plays an important role in the phase transition process which promotes the phase transition to rutile TiO2 at a lower temperature (400 deg. C). It provides a new approach to prepare nanoporous rutile TiO2 nanomaterials under low temperature

  8. A novel perylene diimide-based tetrahedral molecule: Synthesis, characterization and self-assembly with gold nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jun-bo Li; Xiang-Lin Yu; Jing Fu; Xiwen Liu; Yang Zeng

    2010-11-01

    In this study, a novel tetrahedral molecule TPPY was successfully designed and synthesized. The self-assembly of TPPY with gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) in toluene has also been investigated. The aggregation morphologies of Au NPs can be controlled to produce different aggregate structures by changing the concentration of ligand TPPY.

  9. Assembly of a Complex Branched Oligosaccharide by Combining Fluorous-Supported Synthesis and Stereoselective Glycosylations using Anomeric Sulfonium Ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Wei; Gao, Qi; Boons, Geert Jan

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop reliable strategies for the rapid assembly of complex oligosaccharides. This paper presents a set of strategically selected orthogonal protecting groups, glycosyl donors modified by a (S)-phenylthiomethylbenzyl ether at C-2, and a glycosyl acceptor containing a flu

  10. Synthesis of Crown Ether-tethered β-Cyclodextrin and Fabrication of Its Self-assembled Monolayer on Gold Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A novel β-cyclodextrin derivative 6 bearing a crown ether moiety has been synthesized by a convenient method in 9.4% yield. Its self-assembled monolayer (SAM) was fabricated on the gold surface, which was characterized by using surface-enhanced Raman spectra.

  11. Heme binding properties of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Luciana; Collins, Daniel; Brassard, Julie; Chakravarti, Ritu; Vempati, Rajesh; Dorlet, Pierre; Santolini, Jérôme; Dawson, John H; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2012-10-30

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a glycolytic enzyme that also functions in transcriptional regulation, oxidative stress, vesicular trafficking, and apoptosis. Because GAPDH is required for the insertion of cellular heme into inducible nitric oxide synthase [Chakravarti, R., et al. (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 18004-18009], we extensively characterized the heme binding properties of GAPDH. Substoichiometric amounts of ferric heme bound to GAPDH (one heme per GAPDH tetramer) to form a low-spin complex with UV-visible maxima at 362, 418, and 537 nm and when reduced to ferrous gave maxima at 424, 527, and 559 nm. Ferric heme association and dissociation rate constants at 10 °C were as follows: k(on) = 17800 M(-1) s(-1), k(off1) = 7.0 × 10(-3) s(-1), and k(off2) = 3.3 × 10(-4) s(-1) (giving approximate affinities of 19-390 nM). Ferrous heme bound more poorly to GAPDH and dissociated with a k(off) of 4.2 × 10(-3) s(-1). Magnetic circular dichroism, resonance Raman, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic data on the ferric, ferrous, and ferrous-CO complexes of GAPDH showed that the heme is bis-ligated with His as the proximal ligand. The distal ligand in the ferric complex was not displaced by CN(-) or N(3)(-) but in the ferrous complex could be displaced by CO at a rate of 1.75 s(-1) (for >0.2 mM CO). Studies with heme analogues revealed selectivity toward the coordinating metal and porphyrin ring structure. The GAPDH-heme complex was isolated from bacteria induced to express rabbit GAPDH in the presence of δ-aminolevulinic acid. Our finding of heme binding to GAPDH expands the protein's potential roles. The strength, selectivity, reversibility, and redox sensitivity of heme binding to GAPDH are consistent with it performing heme sensing or heme chaperone-like functions in cells.

  12. Self-Assembled Structures of PMAA-PMMA Block Copolymers : Synthesis, Characterization, and Self-Consistent Field Computations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Feng; Schellekens, Mike; de Bont, Jens; Peters, Ron; Overbeek, Ad; Leermakers, Frans A. M.; Tuinier, Remco

    2015-01-01

    Block copolymers composed of methacrylic acid (MAA) and methyl methacrylate (MMA) blocks are interesting candidates for replacing surfactants in emulsion polymerization methods. Here the synthesis and experimental characterization of well-defined PMAA-PMMA block copolymers made via RAFT polymerizati

  13. Translational control of catalase synthesis by hemin in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, Barbara; Hofbauer, Reinhold; Ruis, Helmut

    1982-01-01

    mRNA-dependent cell-free protein synthesis systems were prepared from a heme-deficient ole3 mutant of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown either in the absence or in the presence of the heme precursor δ-aminolevulinate. When supplemented with total yeast mRNA, the two systems—from heme-deficient and from heme-containing cells—translate most mRNAs with comparable efficiencies. mRNAs coding for the hemoproteins catalase T and catalase A, however, are translated at a low rate by the system ...

  14. Mechanism of assembly of functional cytochrome C oxidase (CCO) in yeast Candida utilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copper deficiency prevents the assembly of functional CCO; however it was found that both the apoprotein and porphyrin a are synthesized and integrated into the mitochondrial membrane. When copper-deficient cells are grown in copper-supplemented medium in the presence of [14C]δ-aminolevulinic acid, precursor of hemes (Hms) and porphyrins (Porphs), and either chloramphenicol (Cm, inhibitor of mitochondrial protein synthesis) or cycloheximide (CHI, inhibitor of cytoplasmic protein synthesis), the amount of labeled Hms and Porphs is respectively 64% and 5.5% of the control value. When isolated mitochondria from cells grown in the presence of Cm or CHI are solubilized and incubated with antibodies against CCO, radioactivity is found to be associated with the immunoprecipitate. HCl fractionation of Hms and Porphs from the mitochondria and immunoprecipitate shows that a significant amount of radioactivity is extracted with 20% HCl which is the HCl number of porphyrin a. Data indicate that the formation of functional CCO depends on the assembly of holoenzyme, so that ferrochelatase incorporates iron into porphyrin a

  15. Organic-inorganic random copolymers from methacrylate-terminated poly(ethylene oxide) with 3-methacryloxypropylheptaphenyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane: synthesis via RAFT polymerization and self-assembly behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Kun; Li, Lei; Zheng, Sixun; Wang, Ge; Liang, Qi

    2014-01-14

    In this contribution, we report the synthesis of organic-inorganic random polymers from methacrylate-terminated poly(ethylene oxide) (MAPEO) (Mn = 950) and 3-methacryloxypropylheptaphenyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (MAPOSS) macromers via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization with 4-cyano-4-(thiobenzoylthio) valeric acid (CTBTVA) as the chain transfer agent. The organic-inorganic random copolymers were characterized by means of (1)H NMR spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results of GPC indicate that the polymerizations were carried out in a controlled fashion. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the organic-inorganic random copolymers in bulk were microphase-separated and the POSS microdomains were formed via POSS-POSS interactions. In aqueous solutions the organic-inorganic random copolymers were capable of self-assembling into spherical nanoobjects as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic laser scattering (DLS). The self-assembly behavior of the organic-inorganic random copolymers was also found to occur in the mixtures with the precursors of epoxy. The nanostructures were further fixed via subsequent curing reaction and thus the organic-inorganic nanocomposites were obtained. The formation of nanophases in epoxy thermosets was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). The organic-inorganic nanocomposites displayed the enhanced surface hydrophobicity as evidenced by surface contact angle measurements.

  16. Mimics of the self-assembling chlorosomal bacteriochlorophylls: regio- and stereoselective synthesis and stereoanalysis of acyl(1-hydroxyalkyl)porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Teodor Silviu; Bhise, Anil Dnyanoba; Bringmann, Gerhard; Bürck, Jochen; Chappaz-Gillot, Cyril; Eichhöfer, Andreas; Fenske, Dieter; Götz, Daniel C G; Knauer, Michael; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Mössinger, Dennis; Rösner, Harald; Roussel, Christian; Schraut, Michaela; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Vanthuyne, Nicolas

    2009-10-14

    Diacylation of copper 10,20-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylphenylporphyrin) using Friedel-Crafts conditions at short reaction times, high concentrations of catalyst, and 0-4 degrees C affords only the 3,17-diacyl-substituted porphyrins, out of the 12 possible regioisomers. At longer reaction times and higher temperatures, the 3,13-diacyl compounds are also formed, and the two isomers can be conveniently separated by normal chromatographic techniques. Monoreduction of these diketones affords in good yields the corresponding acyl(1-hydroxyalkyl)porphyrins, which after zinc metalation are mimics of the natural chlorosomal bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) d. Racemate resolution by HPLC on a variety of chiral columns was achieved and further optimized, thus permitting easy access to enantiopure porphyrins. Enantioselective reductions proved to be less effective in this respect, giving moderate yields and only 79% ee in the best case. The absolute configuration of the 3(1)-stereocenter was assigned by independent chemical and spectroscopic methods. Self-assembly of a variety of these zinc BChl d mimics proves that a collinear arrangement of the hydroxyalkyl substituent with the zinc atom and the carbonyl substituent is not a stringent requirement, since both the 3,13 and the 3,17 regioisomers self-assemble readily as the racemates. Interestingly, the separated enantiomers self-assemble less readily, as judged by absorption, fluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy studies. Circular dichroism spectra of the self-assemblies show intense Cotton effects, which are mirror-images for the two 3(1)-enantiomers, proving that the supramolecular chirality is dependent on the configuration at the 3(1)-stereocenter. Upon disruption of these self-assemblies with methanol, which competes with zinc ligation, only very weak monomeric Cotton effects are present. The favored heterochiral self-assembly process may also be encountered for the natural BChls. This touches upon the long

  17. The housekeeping dipeptide permease is the Escherichia coli heme transporter and functions with two optional peptide binding proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Létoffé, Sylvie; Delepelaire, Philippe; Wandersman, Cécile

    2006-01-01

    Heme, a major iron source, is transported through the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria by specific heme/hemoprotein receptors and through the inner membrane by heme-specific, periplasmic, binding protein-dependent, ATP-binding cassette permeases. Escherichia coli K12 does not use exogenous heme, and no heme uptake genes have been identified. Nevertheless, a recombinant E. coli strain expressing just one foreign heme outer membrane receptor can use exogenous heme as an iron source. Thi...

  18. The free heme concentration in healthy human erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aich, Anupam; Freundlich, Melissa; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Heme, the prosthetic group of hemoglobin, may be released from its host due to an intrinsic instability of hemoglobin and accumulate in the erythrocytes. Free heme is in the form of hematin (Fe3+ protoporphyrin IX OH) and follows several pathways of biochemical toxicity to tissues, cells, and organelles since it catalyzes the production of reactive oxygen species. To determine concentration of soluble free heme in human erythrocytes, we develop a new method. We lyse the red blood cells and isolate free heme from hemoglobin by dialysis. We use the heme to reconstitute horseradish peroxidase (HRP) from an excess of the apoenzyme and determine the HRP reaction rate from the evolution of the emitted luminescence. We find that in a population of five healthy adults the average free heme concentration in the erythrocytes is 21 ± 2 μM, ca. 100× higher than previously determined. Tests suggest that the lower previous value was due to the use of elevated concentrations of NaCl, which drive hematin precipitation and re-association with apoglobin. We show that the found hematin concentration is significantly higher than estimates based on equilibrium release and the known hematin dimerization. The factors that lead to enhanced heme release remain an open question. PMID:26460266

  19. SYNTHESIS OF pH-RESPONSIVE AMPHIPHILIC DIBLOCK COPOLYMERS CONTAINING POLYISOBUTYLENE via OXYANION-INITIATED POLYMERIZATION AND THEIR MULTIPLE SELF-ASSEMBLY MORPHOLOGIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huai-chao Wang; Ming-zu Zhang; Pei-hong Ni; Jin-lin He; Ying Hao; Yi-xian Wu

    2013-01-01

    Two pH-responsive amphiphilic diblock copolymers,namely polyisobutylene-block-poly[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PIB-b-PDMAEMA) and polyisobutylene-block-poly(metharylic acid) (PIB-b-PMAA),were synthesized via oxyanion-initiated polymerization,and their multiple self-assembly behaviors have been studied.An exo-o1efin-terminated highly reactive polyisobutylene (HRPIB) was first changed to hydroxyl-terminated PIB (PIB-OH) via hydroboration-oxidation of C=C double bond in the chain end,and then reacted with KH to yield a potassium alcoholate of PIB (PIB-O-K+).PIB-O-K+ was immediately used as a macroinitiator to polymerize DMAEMA monomer,resulting in a cationic diblock copolymer PIB-b-PDMAEMA.With the similar synthesis procedure,the anionic diblock copolymer PIB-b-PMAA could be prepared via a combination of oxyanion-initiated polymerization of tert-butyl methacrylate (tBMA) and subsequent hydrolysis of tert-butyl ester groups in PtBMA block.The functional PIB and block copolymers have been fully characterized by 1H-NMR,FT-IR spectroscopy,and gel permeation chromatography (GPC).These samples allowed us to systematically investigate the effects of block composition on the pH responsivity and various self-assembled morphologies of the copolymers in THF/water mixed solvent.Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images revealed that these diblock copolymers containing small amount of original PIB without exo-olefin-terminated group are able to self-assemble into micelles,vesicles with different particle sizes and cylindrical aggregates,depending on various factors including block copolymer composition,solvent polarity and pH value.

  20. Synthesis of Janus-like gold nanoparticles with hydrophilic/hydrophobic faces by surface ligand exchange and their self-assemblies in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Ryo; Kawamura, Hitoshi; Niikura, Kenichi; Kimura, Takashi; Sekiguchi, Shota; Joti, Yasumasa; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Mitomo, Hideyuki; Nishino, Yoshinori; Ijiro, Kuniharu

    2015-04-14

    This study aims at the synthesis of Janus gold nanoparticles (Janus GNPs) with hydrophilic/hydrophobic faces by a simple ligand exchange reaction in an homogeneous system and at the elucidation of the self-assembled structures of the Janus GNPs in water. As hydrophilic surface ligands, we synthesized hexaethylene glycol (E6)-terminated thiolate ligands with C3, C7, or C11 alkyl chains, referred to as E6C3, E6C7, and E6C11, respectively. As a hydrophobic ligand, a butyl-headed thiolate ligand C4-E6C11, in which a C4 alkyl was introduced on the E6C11 terminus, was synthesized. The degree of segregation between the two ligands on the GNPs (5 nm in diameter) was examined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of fright mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. We found that the choice of immobilization methods, one-step or two-step addition of the two ligands to the GNP solution, crucially affects the degree of segregation. The two-step addition of a hydrophilic ligand (E6C3) followed by a hydrophobic ligand (C4-E6C11) produced a large degree of segregation on the GNPs, providing Janus-like GNPs. When dispersed in water, these Janus-like GNPs formed assemblies of ∼160 nm in diameter, whereas Domain GNPs, in which the two ligands formed partial domains on the surface, were precipitated even when the molar ratio of the hydrophilic ligand and the hydrophobic ligand on the surface of the NPs was almost 1:1. The assembled structure of the Janus-like GNPs in water was directly observed by pulsed coherent X-ray solution scattering using an X-ray free-electron laser, revealing irregular spherical structures with uneven surfaces.

  1. The effect of proteins from animal source foods on heme iron bioavailability in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Valenzuela, Carolina; Brito, Alex; Weinborn, Valerie; Flores, Sebastián; Arredondo, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Forty-five women (35-45 year) were randomly assigned to three iron (Fe) absorption sub-studies, which measured the effects of dietary animal proteins on the absorption of heme Fe. Study 1 was focused on heme, red blood cell concentrate (RBCC), hemoglobin (Hb), RBCC+beef meat; study 2 on heme, heme+fish, chicken, and beef; and study 3 on heme and heme+purified animal protein (casein, collagen, albumin). Study 1: the bioavailability of heme Fe from Hb was similar to heme only (∼13.0%). RBCC (25.0%) and RBCC+beef (21.3%) were found to be increased 2- and 1.6-fold, respectively, when compared with heme alone (pProteins from animal source foods and their digestion products did not enhance heme Fe absorption.

  2. Design, synthesis, and self-assembly of optically active perylenetetracarboxylic diimide bearing two peripheral chiral binaphthyl moieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optically active perylenetetracarboxylic diimide (PTCDI) bearing two optically active binaphthyl moieties has been designed and synthesized. The self-assembly properties of these novel PTCDI derivatives in DMF/H2O were systematically investigated by electronic absorption, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, IR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Observation of CD signal in the whole absorption region of PTCDI chromophore, indicates effective chiral information transfer from the chiral binaphthyl units to the central PTCDI chromophore at molecular level. The intermolecular π–π interaction between PTCDI rings together with the additionally formed hydrogen bonds between the crown ether moieties of (S)-1 and additional water molecules and the chiral discrimination of periphery chiral side chains induces further intensified asymmetrical perturbation of the chiral binaphthyl units to the central PTCDI chromophore during the self-assembly process, resulting in the formation of right-handed helical arrangement of corresponding molecules in a stack of PTCDI chromophores in aggregates. In addition, the formed nanostructures were revealed to show good semiconducting properties. - Graphical abstract: An optically active perylenetetracarboxylic diimide bearing two optically active binaphthyl moieties has been prepared. Self-assembly properties of this novel PTCDI derivative in DMF/H2O were systematically investigated. Experimental results indicate the effective chiral information transfer and expression at molecular and intermolecular level. Highlights: ► An optically active perylenetetracarboxylic diimide bearing two optically active binaphthyl moieties has been prepared. ► Self-assembly properties of this novel PTCDI derivative in DMF/H2O were systematically investigated. ► Experimental results indicate the effective chiral information transfer and expression at molecular

  3. Synthesis of skeletally diverse alkaloid-like molecules: exploitation of metathesis substrates assembled from triplets of building blocks

    OpenAIRE

    Maurya, Sushil K.; Mark Dow; Stuart Warriner; Adam Nelson

    2013-01-01

    A range of metathesis substrates was assembled from triplets of unsaturated building blocks. The approach involved the iterative attachment of a propagating and a terminating building block to a fluorous-tagged initiating building block. Metathesis cascade chemistry was used to “reprogram” the molecular scaffolds. Remarkably, in one case, a cyclopropanation reaction competed with the expected metathesis cascade process. Finally, it was demonstrated that the metathesis products could be deriva...

  4. From Polymeric Nanoparticles to Dye-containing Photonic Crystals:Synthesis,Self-assembling,Optical Features, Possible Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.V.Yakimansky; A.Yu.Menshikova; N.N.Shevchenko; A.G.Bazhenova; S.K.Sazonov; A.I.Vedernikov; S.P.Gromov; V.A.Sazhnikov; M.V.Alfimov

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Self-assembling of monodisperse polymeric nanoparticles is a perspective method of obtaining photonic crystalline materials for optoelectronics,telecommunication industry and optosensorics.For tuning optical characteristics of photonic crystals it is advisable to functionalize nanoparticles by dyes absorbing or emitting light in the vicinity of the photonic band gap,which position depends on the nanoparticle diameter.To prepare monodisperse nanoparticles with the dye-functionalyzed surface emu...

  5. Self-assembling Synthesis of Vanadium Oxide Nanotubes and Simple Determination of the Content of Ⅴ(Ⅳ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAI Li-qiang; CHEN Wen; XU Qing; ZHU Quan-yao; HAN Chun-hua; PENG Jun-feng

    2003-01-01

    High-yielding low-cost vanadium oxide nanotubes were prepared by the hydrothermal self-assembling process from vanadium pentoxide and organic molecules as structure-directing templates. Moreover, a new method was discovered for determining the content of V (Ⅳ) in vanadium oxide nanotubes by thermogravimetric analysis ( TGA ). This method is simple, precise and feasible and can be extended to determine the content of low oxidation state in the other transition metal oxide nanomaterials.

  6. Magnetic and structural characterization of transition metal porphyrin complexes and the heme sites of heme peroxidases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, K.R.

    1988-01-01

    Four studies of heme and heme model systems are described. The first study involves low temperature solution structural characterization of high-valent porphinatomanganese complexes via {sup 2}H- and {sup 13}C-NMR, and ESR spectroscopies. The reactive species were generated by low temperature reaction with chlorine (0) and chlorine(I) reagents. The implications of these species are discussed in terms of the relative reactivity of other +4 first row transition metal complexes and in terms of the catalytic effectiveness of porphinatomanganese (III) complexes in oxo-transfer reactions. The second study involved the analysis of isotropic {sup 2}H-NMR shifts observed for specifically deuterated chloro-N-methylporphinatomanganese(II) complexes. An ESR spectroscopic study of several ferrous heme peroxidase/NO complexes is presented. The {sup 14}N and {sup 15}N hyperfine splitting patterns and coupling constants in the ESR spectra clearly demonstrate the presence of a nitrogen-bound proximal ligand in lactoperoxidase. Finally, a catalytic autoxidation system involving cyclohexene and/or propanal as substrates is described. This reaction is catalyzed by high spin tetraarylporphinatoiron (III) complexes and evolves CO{sub 2}.

  7. Development of a heme protein structure–electrochemical function database

    OpenAIRE

    Reedy, Charles J.; Elvekrog, Margaret M.; Gibney, Brian R.

    2007-01-01

    Proteins containing heme, iron(protoporphyrin IX) and its variants, continue to be one of the most-studied classes of biomolecules due to their diverse range of biological functions. The literature is abundant with reports of structural and functional characterization of individual heme proteins which demonstrate that heme protein reduction potential values, E m, span the range from –550 mV to +450 mV versus SHE. In order to unite these data for the purposes of global analysis, a new web-base...

  8. Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Novel Genes Essential for Heme Homeostasis in Caenorhabditiselegans

    OpenAIRE

    Severance, Scott; Rajagopal, Abbhirami; Rao, Anita U.; Cerqueira, Gustavo C; Mitreva, Makedonka; El-Sayed, Najib M.; Krause, Michael; Hamza, Iqbal

    2010-01-01

    Heme is a cofactor in proteins that function in almost all sub-cellular compartments and in many diverse biological processes. Heme is produced by a conserved biosynthetic pathway that is highly regulated to prevent the accumulation of heme—a cytotoxic, hydrophobic tetrapyrrole. Caenorhabditis elegans and related parasitic nematodes do not synthesize heme, but instead require environmental heme to grow and develop. Heme homeostasis in these auxotrophs is, therefore, regulated in accordance wi...

  9. Carbon monoxide-driven reduction of ferric heme and heme proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickar, D; Bonaventura, C; Bonaventura, J

    1984-09-10

    Oxidized cytochrome c oxidase in a carbon monoxide atmosphere slowly becomes reduced as shown by changes in its visible spectra and its reactivity toward oxygen. The "auto-reduction" of cytochrome c oxidase by this procedure has been used to prepare mixed valence hybrids. We have found that this process is a general phenomenon for oxygen-binding heme proteins, and even for isolated hemin in basic aqueous solution. This reductive reaction may have physiological significance. It also explains why oxygen-binding heme proteins become oxidized much more slowly and appear to be more stable when they are kept under a CO atmosphere. Oxidized alpha and beta chains of human hemoglobin become reduced under CO much more slowly than does cytochrome c oxidase, where the CO-binding heme is coupled with another electron accepting metal center. By observing the reaction in both the forward and reverse direction, we have concluded that the heme is reduced by an equivalent of the water-gas shift reaction (CO + H2O----CO2 + 2e- + 2H+). The reaction does not require molecular oxygen. However, when the CO-driven reduction of cytochrome c oxidase occurs in the presence of oxygen, there is a competition between CO and oxygen for the reduced heme and copper of cytochrome alpha 3. Under certain conditions when both CO and oxygen are present, a peroxide adduct derived from oxygen reduction can be observed. This "607 nm complex," described in 1981 by Nicholls and Chanady (Nicholls, P., and Chanady, G. (1981) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 634, 256-265), forms and decays with kinetics in accord with the rate constants for CO dissociation, oxygen association and reduction, and dissociation of the peroxide adduct. In the absence of oxygen, if a mixture of cytochrome c and cytochrome c oxidase is incubated under a CO atmosphere, auto-reduction of the cytochrome c as well as of the cytochrome c oxidase occurs. By our proposed mechanism this involves a redistribution of electrons from cytochrome alpha 3 to

  10. The influence of heme ruffling on spin densities in ferricytochromes c probed by heme core 13C NMR

    OpenAIRE

    Kleingardner, Jesse G.; Bowman, Sarah E. J.; Bren, Kara L.

    2013-01-01

    The heme in cytochromes c undergoes a conserved out-of-plane distortion known as ruffling. For cytochromes c from the bacteria Hydrogenobacter thermophilus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, NMR and EPR spectra have been shown to be sensitive to the extent of heme ruffling and to provide insights into the effect of ruffling on electronic structure. Using mutants of each of these cytochromes that differ in the amount of heme ruffling, NMR characterization of the low-spin (S=1/2) ferric proteins has c...

  11. Water-soluble, luminescent ZnTe quantum dots: supersaturation-controlled synthesis and self-assembly into nanoballs, nanonecklaces and nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Sovan Kumar; Bhushan, Bhavya; Priyam, Amiya

    2016-03-01

    A supersaturation-controlled aqueous synthesis route has been developed for ZnTe quantum dots (QDs) with high monodispersity, size tunability, stability, band-edge luminescence (full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) 10-12 nm) and negligibly small Stokes' shift (2-4 nm). The degree of supersaturation of the initial reaction mixture was varied by increasing the reagent concentration, but keeping the molar ratio Zn(2+) : thioglycolic acid : Te(2-) constant at 1 : 2.5 : 0.5. For a 10× increase in supersaturation, the photoluminescence (PL) peak underwent a 50 nm blue shift from 330 to 280 nm at pH 6. The effect was more pronounced at pH 12, where the PL peak blue-shifted by 100 nm from 327 to 227 nm. Concomitantly, the FWHM was also reduced to a low value of 10 nm, indicating high monodispersity. For a 10× change in supersaturation, the particle size decreased by 63% (from 2.2 to 0.8 nm) at pH 12, whereas it changed by 19% (from 2.1 to 1.7 nm) at pH 6. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction data further revealed that the QDs synthesized at higher supersaturation had a better crystallinity. These QDs exhibited the unique property of undergoing isotropic and anisotropic self-assembly, which resulted in a blue shift and a red shift in the absorption and PL spectra, respectively. Isotropic assembly into spherical nanoballs (100 nm diameter, 1 nm inter-QD separation) occurred when the QDs were stored at pH 12 for 3 weeks at room temperature. The nanoballs further self-assembled into a 'pearl necklace' arrangement. On the partial removal of the capping agents, the QDs self-organized anisotropically into nanowires (1.3 μm long and 4.6 nm in diameter). The self-assembled nanostructures showed exciton-exciton coupling and excellent PL properties, which may be useful in enhanced optoelectronics, photovoltaics and biochemical sensing. PMID:26830257

  12. Synthesis of skeletally diverse alkaloid-like molecules: exploitation of metathesis substrates assembled from triplets of building blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushil K. Maurya

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A range of metathesis substrates was assembled from triplets of unsaturated building blocks. The approach involved the iterative attachment of a propagating and a terminating building block to a fluorous-tagged initiating building block. Metathesis cascade chemistry was used to “reprogram” the molecular scaffolds. Remarkably, in one case, a cyclopropanation reaction competed with the expected metathesis cascade process. Finally, it was demonstrated that the metathesis products could be derivatised to yield the final products. At each stage, purification was facilitated by the presence of a fluorous-tagged protecting group.

  13. SYNTHESIS AND pH-SENSITIVE SELF-ASSEMBLY OF DENDRITIC POLY(AMIDOAMINE)-b-POLY(L-GLUTAMATE) BIOHYBRIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董常明

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic poly(amidoamine)-b-poly(L-glutamate)(PAMAM-b-PLG) biohybrids were synthesized by the ring-opening polymerization ofγ-benzyl-L-glutamate N-carboxyanhydride monomer,followed by the deprotection of benzyl groups on poly(benzyl-L-glutamate),and were characterized by ~1H-NMR,FT-IR and gel permeation chromatography.The self-assembly behavior of the PAMAM-b-PLG biohybrid was investigated by means of UV-Vis,dynamic light scattering (DLS),transmission electronic microscopy(TEM) and ~1H-NMR.UV-Vis analys...

  14. Self-Assembled M2L4 Nanocapsules: Synthesis, Structure and Host-Guest Recognition Toward Square Planar Metal Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Christophe Desmarets; Thierry Ducarre; Marie Noelle Rager; Geoffrey Gontard; Hani Amouri

    2014-01-01

    Metallosupramolecular cages of the general formulas [M2(L)4][X]4 can be self-assembled in good yields, where M = Pd, X = NO3, L = L1 (1a); M = Pd, X = OTf, L = L1 (1b); M = Pt, X = OTf, L = L1 (2); M = Pd, X = OTf, L = L2 (3); L1 = 1,3-bis(pyridin-3-ylethynyl)-5-methoxybenzene; and L2 = 2,6-(pyridin-3-ylethynyl)- 4-methoxyaniline, respectively. These cages have been fully characterized using 1H, 13C NMR, elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, and electrospray mass spectrometry. Additionally ...

  15. Synthesis and self-assembly behavior of a biodegradable and sustainable soybean oil-based copolymer nanomicelle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Lixia; Bian, Longchun; Zhao, Mimi; Lei, Jingxin; Wang, Jiliang

    2014-08-01

    Herein, we report a novel amphiphilic biodegradable and sustainable soybean oil-based copolymer (SBC) prepared by grafting hydrophilic and biocompatible hydroxyethyl acrylate (HEA) polymeric segments onto the natural hydrophobic soybean oil chains. FTIR, H1-NMR, and GPC measurements have been used to investigate the molecular structure of the obtained SBC macromolecules. Self-assembly behaviors of the prepared SBC in aqueous solution have also been extensively evaluated by fluorescence spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The prepared SBC nanocarrier with the size range of 40 to 80 nm has a potential application in the biomedical field.

  16. Bacillus anthracis secretes proteins that mediate heme acquisition from hemoglobin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony W Maresso

    Full Text Available Acquisition of iron is necessary for the replication of nearly all bacterial pathogens; however, iron of vertebrate hosts is mostly sequestered by heme and bound to hemoglobin within red blood cells. In Bacillus anthracis, the spore-forming agent of anthrax, the mechanisms of iron scavenging from hemoglobin are unknown. We report here that B. anthracis secretes IsdX1 and IsdX2, two NEAT domain proteins, to remove heme from hemoglobin, thereby retrieving iron for bacterial growth. Unlike other Gram-positive bacteria, which rely on cell wall anchored Isd proteins for heme scavenging, B. anthracis seems to have also evolved NEAT domain proteins in the extracellular milieu and in the bacterial envelope to provide for the passage of heme.

  17. Mechanisms of heme iron absorption: Current questions and controversies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Iron is a critical micronutrient, and iron derived from heme contributes a large proportion of the total iron absorbed in a typical Western diet. Heine iron is absorbed by different mechanisms than non-heine iron, but despite considerable study over many years these mechanisms remain poorly understood. This review provides an overview of the importance of heme iron in the diet and discusses the two prevailing hypotheses of heine absorption; namely receptor mediated endocytosis of heme, and direct transport into the intestinal enterocyte by recently discovered heine transporters. A specific emphasis is placed on the questions surrounding the site of heme catabolism and the identity of the enzyme that performs this task. Additionally, we present the hypothesis that a nonheme iron transport protein may be required for heine iron absorption and discuss the experiences of our laboratory in examining this hypothesis.

  18. Cytochrome c peroxidase activity of heme bound amyloid β peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Manas; Ghosh, Chandradeep; Basu, Olivia; Dey, Somdatta Ghosh

    2016-09-01

    Heme bound amyloid β (Aβ) peptides, which have been associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), can catalytically oxidize ferrocytochrome c (Cyt c(II)) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The rate of catalytic oxidation of Cyt(II) c has been found to be dependent on several factors, such as concentration of heme(III)-Aβ, Cyt(II) c, H2O2, pH, ionic strength of the solution, and peptide chain length of Aβ. The above features resemble the naturally occurring enzyme cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) which is known to catalytically oxidize Cyt(II) c in the presence of H2O2. In the absence of heme(III)-Aβ, the oxidation of Cyt(II) c is not catalytic. Thus, heme-Aβ complex behaves as CCP. PMID:27270708

  19. ARSENIC INDUCTION OF HEME OXYGENASE AS A BIOMARKER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Useful biomarkers of arsenic effects in both experimental animals and humans are needed. Arsenate and arsenite are good inducers of rat hepatic and renal heme oxygenase (HO); monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) are not. Therefore, HO enzyme induction ...

  20. Cytochrome c peroxidase activity of heme bound amyloid β peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Manas; Ghosh, Chandradeep; Basu, Olivia; Dey, Somdatta Ghosh

    2016-09-01

    Heme bound amyloid β (Aβ) peptides, which have been associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), can catalytically oxidize ferrocytochrome c (Cyt c(II)) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The rate of catalytic oxidation of Cyt(II) c has been found to be dependent on several factors, such as concentration of heme(III)-Aβ, Cyt(II) c, H2O2, pH, ionic strength of the solution, and peptide chain length of Aβ. The above features resemble the naturally occurring enzyme cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) which is known to catalytically oxidize Cyt(II) c in the presence of H2O2. In the absence of heme(III)-Aβ, the oxidation of Cyt(II) c is not catalytic. Thus, heme-Aβ complex behaves as CCP.

  1. Immunolocalization of heme oxygenase-1 in periodontal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Gayathri

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: The results of our study is an increasing evidence of involvement of antioxidant enzymes like heme oxygenase-1 in periodontal inflammation and their implication for treatment of chronic periodontitis.

  2. Solvothermal synthesis of magnetic Fe3O4 microparticles via self-assembly of Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Fenglei Shen; Ruoyu Hong

    2011-01-01

    Ferromagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized and then self-assembled into microparticles via a solvothermal method, using FeCI3.6H2O as the iron source, sodium oleate as the surfactant, and ethylene glycol as the reducing agent and solvent. The obtained Fe3O4 microparticles were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The size and morphology of the particles were examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The Fe3O4 microparticles of nearly monodisperse diameters, controllable in the range of 120-400 nm, consist of assemblies of Fe3O4nanoparticles with a diameter of 22 nm. The effects of reaction time, amount of surfactant and NaAc on the products were discussed. Interestingly, by using the pre-synthesized Fe3O4 microparticles as the growth substrates, spherical and smooth-looking Fe3O4 microparticles with average diameter of lμmwere obtained. A plausible formation process was discussed.

  3. A heme-binding domain controls regulation of ATP-dependent potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Mark J; Kapetanaki, Sofia M; Chernova, Tatyana; Jamieson, Andrew G; Dorlet, Pierre; Santolini, Jérôme; Moody, Peter C E; Mitcheson, John S; Davies, Noel W; Schmid, Ralf; Raven, Emma L; Storey, Nina M

    2016-04-01

    Heme iron has many and varied roles in biology. Most commonly it binds as a prosthetic group to proteins, and it has been widely supposed and amply demonstrated that subtle variations in the protein structure around the heme, including the heme ligands, are used to control the reactivity of the metal ion. However, the role of heme in biology now appears to also include a regulatory responsibility in the cell; this includes regulation of ion channel function. In this work, we show that cardiac KATP channels are regulated by heme. We identify a cytoplasmic heme-binding CXXHX16H motif on the sulphonylurea receptor subunit of the channel, and mutagenesis together with quantitative and spectroscopic analyses of heme-binding and single channel experiments identified Cys628 and His648 as important for heme binding. We discuss the wider implications of these findings and we use the information to present hypotheses for mechanisms of heme-dependent regulation across other ion channels.

  4. Binding and storage of heme by vitellin from the cattle tick, Boophilus microplus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logullo, C; Moraes, J; Dansa-Petretski, M; Vaz, I S; Masuda, A; Sorgine, M H F; Braz, G R; Masuda, H; Oliveira, P L

    2002-12-01

    We have previously shown (, Curr. Biol. 9, 703-706) that the cattle tick Boophilus microplus does not synthesize heme, relying solely on the recovery of the heme from the diet to make all its hemeproteins. Here we present evidence that Vitellin (VN(1)), the main tick yolk protein, is a reservoir of heme for embryo development. VN was isolated from eggs at different days throughout embryogenesis. Immediately after oviposition, Boophilus VN contains approximately one mol of heme/mol of protein. During embryo development about one third of egg VN is degraded. The remaining VN molecules bind part of the heme released. These results suggest that VN functions as a heme reservoir, binding any free heme that exceeds the amount needed for development. In vitro measurement of the binding of heme to VN showed that each VN molecule binds up to 31 heme molecules. The association of heme with VN strongly inhibits heme-induced lipid peroxidation, suggesting that binding of heme is an important antioxidant mechanism to protect embryo cells from oxidative damage. This mechanism allows this hematophagous arthropod to safely store heme obtained from a blood meal inside their eggs for future use. Taken together our data suggest that, besides its known roles, VN also plays additional functions as a heme deposit and an antioxidant protective molecule. PMID:12429132

  5. Analysis of Heme oxygenase isomers in rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Wei Xia; Wen-Jun Cui; Xue-Hong Zhang; Qing-Xiang Shen; Jian Wang; Yun-Zhu Li; Shen-Nian Chen; Shan-Chang Yu

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To purify and identify heme oxygenase (HO) isomers which exist in rat liver, spleen and brain treated with hematin and phenylhydrazine and in untreated rat liver and to investigate the characteristics of HO isomers, to isolate and confirm the rat HO-1 cDNA that actually encodes HO-1 by expressing cDNA in monkey kidney cells (COS-1 cells), to prepare the rat heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mutant and to detect inhibition of HO-1 mutated enzyme.METHODS: First, rat liver, spleen and brain microsomal fi-actions were purified by DEAE-Sephacel and hydroxylapatite. The characteristics including activity, immunity and inducibility of two isomers (HO-1 and HO-2), and their apparent molecular weight were measured by detecting enzymatic activities, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blotting analysis, respectively. Second, plasmid pcDNA3HO1 containing native rat HO-1 cDNA and pcDNA3HO1D25 carrying mutated rat HO-1 cDNA (His25Ala) were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. COS-1 cells transfected with pcDNA3HO1 and pcDNA3HO1D25 were collected and disrupted by sonication, the microsomes were prepared by ultracentrifugation. Third, the inhibition of rat HO-1 mutant was analyzed.RESULTS: Two isomers were purified and identified in treated rat liver, spleen, brain and untreated rat liver. HO-1 was the predominant form with a ratio of 2.0:1 and 3.2:1 of HO-1 and HO-2 in liver and spleen, respectively, but only the activity of HO-2 in the brain and untreated liver could be detected. The apparent molecular weights of HO-1 and HO-2 were about Mr 30 000 and Mr 36 000 under reducing conditions, respectively. The antiserum against liver HO-2 was employed in Western blotting analysis, the reactivity of HO-1 in the liver was not observed. The plasmid pcDNA3HO1 was highly expressed in endoplasmic reticulum of transfected COS-1 cells. The specific activity was ≈5-fold higher than that of the control. However, the enzyme activity of mutated HO-1 declined. While

  6. Synthesis of self-assembly BaTiO3 nanowire by sol-gel and microwave method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self-assembly ferroelectric BaTiO3 nanowires were fabricated using sol-gel and microwave method. The X-ray diffraction patterns show that BaTiO3 nanowires belong to the tetragonal perovskite structure. An increase in the intensity of (1 1 0) peak was observed as the annealing time increased. The shape of BaTiO3 nanowires microwave-annealed for different minutes was investigated using atomic force microscopy. It is found that nanowires of BaTiO3 annealed for 2.5 min are very clear-cut, orderly and almost uninterrupted. The height of nanowire is near to the film thickness. However, nanowires of BaTiO3 annealed for 5 min are lesser, shorter and lower, and the distances among these nanowires are wider and well-proportioned. The origin of the distinct differences due to the remotion of atoms obtained enough energy was discussed.

  7. Self-assembled Synthesis of 3D CuO Flocculus-like Nanosheet-based Hierarchical Nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Yong-kui; XU Yan-Li; LI Ying; REN Feng-yun; LI Shuang-jing; JIN Ge; LI Miao-jing

    2013-01-01

    A simple,surfactant-free,and environmentally benign method has been developed to synthesize a novel 3D flocculus-like CuO hierarchical nanostructure self-assembled with 2D nanosheet as building blocks.Detailed proofs demonstrate that the overall synthetic process underwent the dehydration and re-crystallization of precursor Cu(OH)2 nanowires,and the subsequent two-step oriented attachment.In addition,3D butterfly-like and flower-like CuO nanostructures consisted of 2D nanosheets could be obtained by adjusting the concentration of NaOH(cNaOH) in the solution.cNaOH played a key role in tailoring the thickness of the nanosheets and changing the morphology of the product.This report may be helpful to constructing fine-tune hierarchical CuO nanostructures under basic conditions.

  8. H-Bonding Self-assembled Template-directed Synthesis of a Reactive Amide-bridged Ladder Polyvinylsiloxane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You Zhi WAN; Ying Hua LIU; Ping XIE; Rong Ben ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    A novel, reactive amide-bridged ladder polyvinylsiloxane (abbr. LP) with Mn = 2.4×104was synthesized for the first time by means of aryl amide H-bonding self-assembled template.The regularity of LP was characterized by the XRD, 29Si NMR and DSC methods. XRD analysis demonstrated the ladder width w = 9.09 A and the ladder thickness t = 3.89 A, respectively, which are approximately consistent with the molecular simulation-calculated ones: w'= 10.60 A and t'=3.06 A. 29Si NMR displayed a resonance peak with small half peak width, △1/2 ~ 4 ppm, for the moiety [=Si(Vi)O2/2-]n of LP. Besides, as a collateral evidence, DSC measurement revealed a high glass transition temperature Tg = 225℃, suggesting high stiffness of the ladder main chain of LP.

  9. Miktoarms hyperbranched polymer brushes:One-step fast synthesis by parallel click chemistry and hierarchical self-assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Spherical molecular brushes with amphiphilic heteroarms were facilely synthesized by grafting the arms of hydrophobic 2-azidoethyle palmitate and hydrophilic monoazide-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) onto the core of alkyne-modified hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG) with high molecular weight (Mn=122 kDa) via one-pot parallel click chemistry.The parallel click grafting strategy was demonstrated to be highly efficient (~100%),very fast (~ 2 h) and well controllable to the amphilicity of molecular brushes.Through adjusting the feeding ratio of hydrophobic and hydrophilic arms,a series of brushes with different arm ratios were readily obtained.The resulting miktoarms hyperbranched polymer brushes (HPG-g-C16/PEG350) were characterized by hydrogen-nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR),Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy,gel permeation chromatography (GPC),and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements.The spherical molecular brushes showed high molecular weights up to 230 kDa,and thus could be visualized by atomic force microscopy (AFM).AFM and dynamic laser light scattering (DLS) were employed to investigate the self-assembly properties of amphiphilic molecular brushes with closed proportion of hydrophobic and hydrophilic arms.The brushes could self-assemble hierarchically into spherical micelles,and network-like fibre structures,and again spherical micelles by addition of n-hexane into the dichloromethane or chloroform solution of brushes.In addition,this kind of miktoarms polymer brush also showed the ability of dye loading via host-guest encapsulation,which promises the potential application of spherical molecular brushes in supramolecular chemistry.

  10. Enzymatic synthesis of 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (KDO) and its application for LPS assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Liuqing; Zheng, Yuan; Li, Tiehai; Wang, Peng George

    2016-06-15

    The studies of 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (KDO) have been hindered due to its limited availability. Herein, an efficient enzymatic system for the facile synthesis of KDO from easy-to-get starting materials is described. In this one-pot three-enzyme (OPME) system, d-ribulose 5-phosphate, which was prepared from d-xylose, was employed as starting materials. The reaction process involves the isomerization of d-ribulose 5-phosphate to d-arabinose 5-phosphate catalyzed by d-arabinose 5-phosphate isomerase (KdsD), the aldol condensation of d-arabinose 5-phosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) catalyzed by KDO 8-phosphate synthetase (KdsA), and the hydrolysis of KDO-8-phosphate catalyzed by KDO 8-phosphate phosphatase (KdsC). By using this OPME system, 72% isolated yield was obtained. The obtained KDO was further transferred to lipid A by KDO transferase from Escherichia coli (WaaA). PMID:27173798

  11. From Self-Assembled Monolayers to Coatings: Advances in the Synthesis and Nanobio Applications of Polymer Brushes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myungwoong Kim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we describe the latest advances in synthesis, characterization, and applications of polymer brushes. Synthetic advances towards well-defined polymer brushes, which meet criteria such as: (i Efficient and fast grafting, (ii Applicability on a wide range of substrates; and (iii Precise control of surface initiator concentration and hence, chain density are discussed. On the characterization end advances in methods for the determination of relevant physical parameters such as surface initiator concentration and grafting density are discussed. The impact of these advances specifically in emerging fields of nano- and bio-technology where interfacial properties such as surface energies are controlled to create nanopatterned polymer brushes and their implications in mediating with biological systems is discussed.

  12. Heme-binding plasma membrane proteins of K562 erythroleukemia cells: Adsorption to heme-microbeads, isolation with affinity chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majuri, R. (Minerva Foundation Institute for Medical Research, Helsinki (Finland))

    1989-01-01

    Heme-microbeads attached themselves to the surface of viable K562 cells in a manner inhibitable by free hemin, indicating heme-recptor interaction. The microbeads were at first evenly distributed, but after prolonged incubation at 37 deg. C they formed a cap on one pole of the cells indicating clustering of the membrane heme receptors. Membrane proteins were labeled by culturing the cells in the presence of {sup 35}S-methionine and were then solubilized with Triton X-114. The hydrophobic proteins contained about 20% of the total bound label. The solubilized membrane proteins were subsequently adsorbed to a heme-Sepharose affinity gel. According to SDS-electrophorsis and subsequent autoradiography, the immobilized heme captures two proteins or a protein with two polypeptides of 20 000 and 32 000 daltons. The larger of these was only wekly labeled with {sup 35}S. The same two bands were observed if the cell surface proteins were labeled with {sup 125}I by the lactoperoxidase method and the subsequently solubilized membrane proteins were isolated with heme-Sepharose. (author).

  13. The CcmC:Heme:CcmE Complex in Heme Trafficking and Cytochrome c Biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Richard-Fogal, Cynthia; Kranz, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    A superfamily of integral membrane proteins is characterized by a conserved tryptophan-rich region (called the WWD domain) in an external loop at the inner membrane surface. The three major members of this family (CcmC, CcmF, and CcsBA) are each involved in cytochrome c biosynthesis, yet the function of the WWD domain is unknown. It has been hypothesized that the WWD domain binds heme to present it to an acceptor protein (apoCcmE for CcmC or apocytochrome c for CcmF and CcsBA) such that the h...

  14. The Role of the Cytoplasmic Heme-binding Protein (PhuS) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Intracellular Heme Trafficking and Iron Homeostasis*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur, Ajinder P.; Lansky, Ila B.; Wilks, Angela

    2009-01-01

    The cytoplasmic heme-binding protein PhuS, encoded within the Fur-regulated Pseudomonas heme utilization (phu) operon, has previously been shown to traffic heme to the iron-regulated heme oxygenase (HO). We further investigate the role of PhuS in heme trafficking to HO on disruption of the phuS and hemO genes in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophore-deficient and wild-type background. Previous studies have shown that deletion of hemO prevents the cells from utilizin...

  15. Surface-tuned electron transfer and electrocatalysis of hexameric tyrosine-coordinated heme protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lei; Utesch, Tillmann; Yarman, Aysu; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Steinborn, Silke; Dobbek, Holger; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Tanne, Johannes; Wollenberger, Ulla; Scheller, Frieder W

    2015-05-11

    Molecular modeling, electrochemical methods, and quartz crystal microbalance were used to characterize immobilized hexameric tyrosine-coordinated heme protein (HTHP) on bare carbon or on gold electrodes modified with positively and negatively charged self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), respectively. HTHP binds to the positively charged surface but no direct electron transfer (DET) is found due to the long distance of the active sites from the electrode surfaces. At carboxyl-terminated surfaces, the neutrally charged bottom of HTHP can bind to the SAM. For this "disc" orientation all six hemes are close to the electrode and their direct electron transfer should be efficient. HTHP on all negatively charged SAMs showed a quasi-reversible redox behavior with rate constant ks values between 0.93 and 2.86 s(-1) and apparent formal potentials ${E{{0{^{\\prime }}\\hfill \\atop {\\rm app}\\hfill}}}$ between -131.1 and -249.1 mV. On the MUA/MU-modified electrode, the maximum surface concentration corresponds to a complete monolayer of the hexameric HTHP in the disc orientation. HTHP electrostatically immobilized on negatively charged SAMs shows electrocatalysis of peroxide reduction and enzymatic oxidation of NADH. PMID:25825040

  16. Design, synthesis, and properties of a new class of building blocks for assembly of molecule-based magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiolek, Andrzej Wladyslaw

    In this work, mono and dianions of the tetrone 1 were proposed as discrete building blocks for assembly of molecular magnets.* These anionic subunits are designed to form extended multidimensional structures upon complexation with metal rations. This particular framework also was chosen so that dianion 12- (or its derivatives) would possess a paramagnetic triplet as a ground state. High quality ab-initio CASSCF(14, 12)/6-31+G* calculations showed that indeed the singlet-triplet gap of metal complexes of 1 2- is small and its sign and magnitude tongly depends on structural modifications. For example a 17.3 kcal/mol preference for a singlet is predicted for isolated 12- while the triplet state is preferred by 4.3 kcal/mol for the symmetrically coordinated complex 1(AlF2)2.* Synthetic procedures leading to a family of neutral aryl substituted tetrones (2) has been developed and electrochemical studies have shown that they may be reversibly reduced in two successive one-electron processes to mono- and dianions. These mono- and dianions have been generated on a preparative scale by reduction of the parent tetrones with alkali metals under anaerobic conditions. Solutions of anions were characterized by Vis-NIR, NMR and EPR spectroscopy. EPR of the anion radicals 2- reveals the high symmetry of the spin delocalisation. Spectroscopic studies of dianions were hampered by low solubility and aggregation phenomena and no definite answer concerning their ground spin states could be obtained. Several attempts were made to grow single crystals of 2 - and 22- in order to probe the self-assembling properties of those species and to obtain definite answers concerning the ground state of the dianion. These attempts turned out to be successful only for alkali metal salts of the monoanion (t-Bu) 8(MeO)42-. Its K + salt crystallized as 1-D chains with the expected bridging and chelating mode of coordination. The closely related Na+ salt, recently crystallized by Robert Gentner, shows a

  17. On-Surface Synthesis of Two-Dimensional Covalent Organic Structures versus Halogen-Bonded Self-Assembly: Competing Formation of Organic Nanoarchitectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrot, David; Silly, Fabien

    2016-05-24

    The competition between the on-surface synthesis of covalent nanoarchitectures and the self-assembly of star-shaped 1,3,5-Tris(4-iodophenyl)benzene molecules on Au(111) in vacuum is investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy above room temperature. The molecules form covalent polygonal nanoachitectures at the gold surface step edges and at the elbows of the gold reconstruction at low coverage. With coverage increasing two-dimensional halogen-bonded structures appear and grow on the surface terraces. Two different halogen-bonded nanoarchitectures are coexisting on the surface and hybrid covalent-halogen bonded structures are locally observed. At high coverage covalent nanoarchitectures are squeezed at the domain boundary of the halogen-bonded structures. The competitive growth between the covalent and halogen-bonded nanoarchitectures leads to formation of a two-layer film above one monolayer deposition. For this coverage, the covalent nanoarchitectures are propelled on top of the halogen-bonded first layer. These observations open up new opportunities for decoupling covalent nanoarchitectures from catalytically active and metal surfaces in vacuum.

  18. Novel EGCG assisted ultrasound synthesis of self-assembled Ca2SiO4:Eu(3+) hierarchical superstructures: Photometric characteristics and LED applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataravanappa, M; Nagabhushana, H; Darshan, G P; Daruka Prasad, B; Vijayakumar, G R; Premkumar, H B; Udayabhanu

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports for the first time ultrasound, EGCG assisted synthesis of pure and Eu(3+) (1-5mol%) activated Ca2SiO4 nanophosphors having self-assembled superstructures with high purity. The shape, size and morphology of the product were tuned by controlling influential parameters. It was found that morphology was highly dependent on EGCG concentration, sonication time, pH and sonication power. The probable formation mechanism for various hierarchical superstructures was proposed. The PL studies of Ca2SiO4:Eu(3+) phosphors can be effectively excited by the near ultraviolet (UV) (396nm) light and exhibited strong red emission around 613nm, which was attributed to the Eu(3+) ((5)D0→(7)F2) transition. The concentration quenching phenomenon was explained based on energy transfer between defect and Eu(3+) ions, electron-phonon coupling and Eu(3+)-Eu(3+) interaction. The Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters and radiative properties were estimated by using PL emission spectra. The photometric studies indicate that the obtained phosphors could be a promising red component for possible applications in the field of white light emitting diodes. PMID:27245974

  19. Synthesis of two subunits of the macrolide domain of the immunosuppressive agent sanglifehrin a and assembly of a macrolactone precursor. application of masamune anti-aldol condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttisintong, Khomson; White, James D

    2015-02-20

    Asymmetric anti-aldol coupling of a norephedrine-derived ester with an α-chiral aldehyde was used to synthesize a carboxylic acid representing the C13-C19 segment of the macrocyclic domain present in the immunosuppressive agent sanglifehrin A. Felkin addition set configuration at the C14-C17 stereotetrad in this unit in which hydroxyl functions at C15 and C17 were masked as an internal ketal. The carboxyl group of this segment was coupled to the N-terminus of the tripeptide portion (C1-N12) of sanglifehrin A macrolactone to assemble the C1-C19 domain. Synthesis of the C20-C25 subunit of sanglifehrin A containing a (23S) alcohol was completed via asymmetric allylation of (E)-3-iodo-2-methylprop-2-enal followed by oxidative cleavage of the terminal vinyl appendage and a Takai olefination with pinacol dichloromethylboronate. Esterification of this alcohol with a C1-C19 carboxylic acid furnished an open C1-C25 macrolactone precursor, but this substance failed to undergo macrocyclization via intramolecular Suzuki-Miyaura coupling. PMID:25584782

  20. Self-assembled nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jin Z; Liu, Jun; Chen, Shaowei; Liu, Gang-yu

    2003-01-01

    Nanostructures refer to materials that have relevant dimensions on the nanometer length scales and reside in the mesoscopic regime between isolated atoms and molecules in bulk matter. These materials have unique physical properties that are distinctly different from bulk materials. Self-Assembled Nanostructures provides systematic coverage of basic nanomaterials science including materials assembly and synthesis, characterization, and application. Suitable for both beginners and experts, it balances the chemistry aspects of nanomaterials with physical principles. It also highlights nanomaterial-based architectures including assembled or self-assembled systems. Filled with in-depth discussion of important applications of nano-architectures as well as potential applications ranging from physical to chemical and biological systems, Self-Assembled Nanostructures is the essential reference or text for scientists involved with nanostructures.

  1. Compact Binary Assembly in the First Nuclear Star Clusters and r-Process Synthesis in the Early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Roberts, Luke F; Lee, William H; Saladino-Rosas, Martha I

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of element abundances in the ancient and most metal deficient stars are extremely important because they serve as tests of variable nucleosynthesis pathways and can provide critical inferences of the type of stars that lived and died before them. The presence of r-process elements in a handful of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars, which are assumed to be closely connected to the chemical yield from the first stars, is hard to reconcile with standard neutron star mergers. Here we show that the production rate of dynamically assembled compact binaries in high-z nuclear star clusters can attain a sufficient high value to be a potential viable source of heavy r-material in CEMP stars. The predicted frequency of such events in the early Galaxy, much lower than the frequency of Type II supernovae but with significantly higher mass ejected per event, can naturally lead to a high level of scatter of Eu as observed in CEMP stars.

  2. Facile synthesis of TiO2 hierarchical microspheres assembled by ultrathin nanosheets for dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •TiO2 hierarchical spheres were prepared via one-pot solvothermal route. •TiO2 hierarchical spheres based DSSCs shows a conversion efficiency of 5.56%. •The performance of DSSC is dependence of the thickness of photoanode. -- Abstract: TiO2 hierarchical microspheres assembled by ultrathin nanosheets were prepared via solvothermal route for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The performance of cells was investigated by diffuse and reflectance spectra, photocurrent–voltage measurement, incident-photon-to-current conversion efficiency and electrochemical impedance spectra. Photoanodes with different thickness of TiO2 hierarchical spheres were studied, which proves that the photoanode with thickness of 15.9 μm exhibits higher performance (short-circuit current density of 12.36 mA cm−2, open-circuit voltage of 0.73 mV, fill factor of 61.95, and conversion efficiency of 5.56%) than that of P25-based DSSC due to the excellent particle interconnections, low electron recombination and high specific surface area (78 m2 g−1)

  3. Assembly of a Complex Branched Oligosaccharide by Combining Fluorous-Supported Synthesis and Stereoselective Glycosylations using Anomeric Sulfonium Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Gao, Qi; Boons, Geert-Jan

    2015-09-01

    There is an urgent need to develop reliable strategies for the rapid assembly of complex oligosaccharides. This paper presents a set of strategically selected orthogonal protecting groups, glycosyl donors modified by a (S)-phenylthiomethylbenzyl ether at C-2, and a glycosyl acceptor containing a fluorous tag, which makes it possible to rapidly prepare complex branched oligosaccharides of biological importance. The C-2 auxiliary controlled the 1,2-cis anomeric selectivity of the various galactosylations. The orthogonal protecting groups, 2-naphthylmethyl ether (Nap) and levulinic ester (Lev), made it possible to generate glycosyl acceptors and allowed the installation of a crowded branching point. After the glycosylations, the chiral auxiliary could be removed using acidic conditions, which was compatible with the presence of the orthogonal protecting groups Lev and Nap, thereby allowing the efficient installation of 1,2-linked glycosides. The light fluorous tag made it possible to purify the compounds by a simple filtration method using silica gel modified by fluorocarbons. The set of building blocks was successfully employed for the preparation of the carbohydrate moiety of the GPI anchor of Trypanosoma brucei, which is a parasite that causes sleeping sickness in humans and similar diseases in domestic animals. PMID:26250358

  4. Synthesis of visible light emitting self assembled Ge nanocrystals embedded within a SiO{sub 2} matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Hernandez, A.; De Moure-Flores, F.; Quinones-Galvan, J. G.; Santoyo-Salazar, J.; Melendez-Lira, M. [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, A.P. 14740, C.P. 07300, Mexico, Distrito Federal (Mexico); Rangel-Kuoppa, V. T. [Institute of Semiconductor and Solid State Physics, Johannes Kepler Universitaet, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Plach, Thomas [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Microscopic and Spectroscopic Material Characterization, Center for Surface and Nanoanalytics, Johannes Kepler Universitaet, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Zapata-Torres, M. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Legaria IPN, Calzada Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico, Distrito Federal (Mexico); Hernandez-Hernandez, L. A. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edificio 9 U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, C.P. 07730 (Mexico)

    2012-02-15

    As-grown light emitting self-assembled Ge nanocrystals (Ge-NCs) embedded in a SiO{sub 2} matrix were produced via a sequential deposition process of SiO{sub 2}/Ge/SiO{sub 2} layers employing a reactive radio frequency sputtering technique. Obtained Ge-NCs show a crystallographic phase, the proportion, size, quality, and specific orientation of which are determined by the oxygen partial pressure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra indicate that the size distribution of Ge-NCs is reduced and centered on about 8 nm when higher oxygen partial pressure is employed; the formation of Ge-NCs is corroborated by transmission electron microscopy measurements, and their sizes are consistent with estimates from PL measurements. Resistivity measurements are explained by a near neighbors hopping process, with specific features depending on the Ge-NCs' size. The features of PL and resistivity measurements indicate that there is no appreciable dependence of the number of interfacial defects on the oxygen partial pressure.

  5. Synthesis of visible light emitting self assembled Ge nanocrystals embedded within a SiO2 matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Hernández, A.; Rangel-Kuoppa, V. T.; Plach, Thomas; De Moure-Flores, F.; Quiñones-Galván, J. G.; Santoyo-Salazar, J.; Zapata-Torres, M.; Hernández-Hernández, L. A.; Meléndez-Lira, M.

    2012-02-01

    As-grown light emitting self-assembled Ge nanocrystals (Ge-NCs) embedded in a SiO2 matrix were produced via a sequential deposition process of SiO2/Ge/SiO2 layers employing a reactive radio frequency sputtering technique. Obtained Ge-NCs show a crystallographic phase, the proportion, size, quality, and specific orientation of which are determined by the oxygen partial pressure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra indicate that the size distribution of Ge-NCs is reduced and centered on about 8 nm when higher oxygen partial pressure is employed; the formation of Ge-NCs is corroborated by transmission electron microscopy measurements, and their sizes are consistent with estimates from PL measurements. Resistivity measurements are explained by a near neighbors hopping process, with specific features depending on the Ge-NCs' size. The features of PL and resistivity measurements indicate that there is no appreciable dependence of the number of interfacial defects on the oxygen partial pressure.

  6. Synthesis of Inorganic Nanocomposites by Selective Introduction of Metal Complexes into a Self-Assembled Block Copolymer Template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Wakayama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic nanocomposites have characteristic structures that feature expanded interfaces, quantum effects, and resistance to crack propagation. These structures are promising for the improvement of many materials including thermoelectric materials, photocatalysts, and structural materials. Precise control of the inorganic nanocomposites’ morphology, size, and chemical composition is very important for these applications. Here, we present a novel fabrication method to control the structures of inorganic nanocomposites by means of a self-assembled block copolymer template. Different metal complexes were selectively introduced into specific polymer blocks of the block copolymer, and subsequent removal of the block copolymer template by oxygen plasma treatment produced hexagonally packed porous structures. In contrast, calcination removal of the block copolymer template yielded nanocomposites consisting of metallic spheres in a matrix of a metal oxide. These results demonstrate that different nanostructures can be created by selective use of processes to remove the block copolymer templates. The simple process of first mixing block copolymers and magnetic nanomaterial precursors and then subsequently removing the block copolymer template enables structural control of magnetic nanomaterials, which will facilitate their applicability in patterned media, including next-generation perpendicular magnetic recording media.

  7. Self-Assembled M2L4 Nanocapsules: Synthesis, Structure and Host-Guest Recognition Toward Square Planar Metal Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Desmarets

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metallosupramolecular cages of the general formulas [M2(L4][X]4 can be self-assembled in good yields, where M = Pd, X = NO3, L = L1 (1a; M = Pd, X = OTf, L = L1 (1b; M = Pt, X = OTf, L = L1 (2; M = Pd, X = OTf, L = L2 (3; L1 = 1,3-bis(pyridin-3-ylethynyl-5-methoxybenzene; and L2 = 2,6-(pyridin-3-ylethynyl- 4-methoxyaniline, respectively. These cages have been fully characterized using 1H, 13C NMR, elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, and electrospray mass spectrometry. Additionally the molecular structure of [Pd2(L14][OTf]4 (1b was confirmed using single crystal X-ray diffraction. The capacity of central cavities of M2L4 cages to accommodate square planar metal complexes was investigated. In particular, the tetracationic cage [Pd2(L24][OTf]4 (3 was found to encapsulate the anionic metal complex [PtCl4]2− through electrostatic interactions and also via hydrogen bonding with the amino groups of the bridging ligand displayed by this nanocage.

  8. α-Hemoglobin-stabilizing Protein (AHSP) Perturbs the Proximal Heme Pocket of Oxy-α-hemoglobin and Weakens the Iron-Oxygen Bond*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Claire F.; Rich, Anne M.; D'Avigdor, William M. H.; Collins, Daniel A. T.; Lowry, Jason A.; Mollan, Todd L.; Khandros, Eugene; Olson, John S.; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Mackay, Joel P.; Lay, Peter A.; Gell, David A.

    2013-01-01

    α-Hemoglobin (αHb)-stabilizing protein (AHSP) is a molecular chaperone that assists hemoglobin assembly. AHSP induces changes in αHb heme coordination, but how these changes are facilitated by interactions at the αHb·AHSP interface is not well understood. To address this question we have used NMR, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and ligand binding measurements to probe αHb conformational changes induced by AHSP binding. NMR chemical shift analyses of free CO-αHb and CO-αHb·AHSP indicated that the seven helical elements of the native αHb structure are retained and that the heme Fe(II) remains coordinated to the proximal His-87 side chain. However, chemical shift differences revealed alterations of the F, G, and H helices and the heme pocket of CO-αHb bound to AHSP. Comparisons of iron-ligand geometry using extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy showed that AHSP binding induces a small 0.03 Å lengthening of the Fe-O2 bond, explaining previous reports that AHSP decreases αHb O2 affinity roughly 4-fold and promotes autooxidation due primarily to a 3–4-fold increase in the rate of O2 dissociation. Pro-30 mutations diminished NMR chemical shift changes in the proximal heme pocket, restored normal O2 dissociation rate and equilibrium constants, and reduced O2-αHb autooxidation rates. Thus, the contacts mediated by Pro-30 in wild-type AHSP promote αHb autooxidation by introducing strain into the proximal heme pocket. As a chaperone, AHSP facilitates rapid assembly of αHb into Hb when βHb is abundant but diverts αHb to a redox resistant holding state when βHb is limiting. PMID:23696640

  9. α-Hemoglobin-stabilizing protein (AHSP) perturbs the proximal heme pocket of oxy-α-hemoglobin and weakens the iron-oxygen bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Claire F; Rich, Anne M; D'Avigdor, William M H; Collins, Daniel A T; Lowry, Jason A; Mollan, Todd L; Khandros, Eugene; Olson, John S; Weiss, Mitchell J; Mackay, Joel P; Lay, Peter A; Gell, David A

    2013-07-01

    α-Hemoglobin (αHb)-stabilizing protein (AHSP) is a molecular chaperone that assists hemoglobin assembly. AHSP induces changes in αHb heme coordination, but how these changes are facilitated by interactions at the αHb·AHSP interface is not well understood. To address this question we have used NMR, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and ligand binding measurements to probe αHb conformational changes induced by AHSP binding. NMR chemical shift analyses of free CO-αHb and CO-αHb·AHSP indicated that the seven helical elements of the native αHb structure are retained and that the heme Fe(II) remains coordinated to the proximal His-87 side chain. However, chemical shift differences revealed alterations of the F, G, and H helices and the heme pocket of CO-αHb bound to AHSP. Comparisons of iron-ligand geometry using extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy showed that AHSP binding induces a small 0.03 Å lengthening of the Fe-O2 bond, explaining previous reports that AHSP decreases αHb O2 affinity roughly 4-fold and promotes autooxidation due primarily to a 3-4-fold increase in the rate of O2 dissociation. Pro-30 mutations diminished NMR chemical shift changes in the proximal heme pocket, restored normal O2 dissociation rate and equilibrium constants, and reduced O2-αHb autooxidation rates. Thus, the contacts mediated by Pro-30 in wild-type AHSP promote αHb autooxidation by introducing strain into the proximal heme pocket. As a chaperone, AHSP facilitates rapid assembly of αHb into Hb when βHb is abundant but diverts αHb to a redox resistant holding state when βHb is limiting.

  10. Facile synthesis of hexagonal-shaped polypyrrole self-assembled particles for the electrochemical detection of dopamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-Yi; Hsu, Di-Yao; Prasannan, Adhimoorthy; Kalaivani, Raman; Hong, Po-Da

    2016-02-01

    Nanomaterials have been used as an electroactive medium to enhance the efficiency of bio/chemical sensors, primarily when synergy is reached upon mixing different materials. In this study, we report on the facile synthesis of hexagonal-shaped plate-like polypyrrole (PPY-IC) prepared through inclusion polymerization of the host-guest pyrrole monomeric inclusion complex of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) to be used in the detection of the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA). The amount of the monomer complex plays a crucial role in the fabrication of well-defined hexagonal-shaped PPY-IC through intermolecular interactions such as π-π interactions and hydrogen bonding between the β-CD and PPY. The microstructure and morphology of the PPY-IC were examined by using various analytical techniques and a tentative mechanism for the growth process proposed which elucidates the formation of the hierarchical structure of the PPY-IC. Cyclo-voltammetry was performed with a PPY-IC modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for the electrochemical detection of DA. The concepts behind the novel architecture of the PPY-IC modified electrodes have potential for the production of materials to be used in electrochemical sensors and biosensors.

  11. Synthesis of Co submicrospheres self-assembled by Co nanosheets via a complexant-assisted hydrothermal approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Co submicrospheres with the typical diameter of ca. 500 nm, and possessing beautiful morphologies composed of dense Co nanosheets ca. 10 nm thick, were synthesized by a facile and low-cost complexant-assisted hydrothermal approach. Magnetic measurement at room temperature indicated the coercivity of the submicrospheres reached 268 Oe, which was much higher than that of bulk Co and of some microstructure cobalt materials reported previously. Hexagonal close-packed (hcp) and face-centered cubic (fcc) cobalt phases in the materials were identified by X-ray diffractometer (XRD). It was revealed that the addition of the complexant sodium tartrate played a crucial role in the formation of the hierarchical architectures of the Co submicrospheres. We believe that the high coercivity of the synthesized submicrospheres may result from their special nano-micro structure, and we suggest that this low-cost and facile synthesis approach can be used for large-scale production of Co magnetic materials with special structures and morphologies, as well as excellent magnetic properties.

  12. RING Dimerization Links Higher-Order Assembly of TRIM5α to Synthesis of K63-Linked Polyubiquitin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinaida Yudina

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Members of the tripartite motif (TRIM protein family of RING E3 ubiquitin (Ub ligases promote innate immune responses by catalyzing synthesis of polyubiquitin chains linked through lysine 63 (K63. Here, we investigate the mechanism by which the TRIM5α retroviral restriction factor activates Ubc13, the K63-linkage-specific E2. Structural, biochemical, and functional characterization of the TRIM5α:Ubc13-Ub interactions reveals that activation of the Ubc13-Ub conjugate requires dimerization of the TRIM5α RING domain. Our data explain how higher-order oligomerization of TRIM5α, which is promoted by the interaction with the retroviral capsid, enhances the E3 Ub ligase activity of TRIM5α and contributes to its antiretroviral function. This E3 mechanism, in which RING dimerization is transient and depends on the interaction of the TRIM protein with the ligand, is likely to be conserved in many members of the TRIM family and may have evolved to facilitate recognition of repetitive epitope patterns associated with infection.

  13. Computational prediction of heme-binding residues by exploiting residue interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Liu

    Full Text Available Computational identification of heme-binding residues is beneficial for predicting and designing novel heme proteins. Here we proposed a novel method for heme-binding residue prediction by exploiting topological properties of these residues in the residue interaction networks derived from three-dimensional structures. Comprehensive analysis showed that key residues located in heme-binding regions are generally associated with the nodes with higher degree, closeness and betweenness, but lower clustering coefficient in the network. HemeNet, a support vector machine (SVM based predictor, was developed to identify heme-binding residues by combining topological features with existing sequence and structural features. The results showed that incorporation of network-based features significantly improved the prediction performance. We also compared the residue interaction networks of heme proteins before and after heme binding and found that the topological features can well characterize the heme-binding sites of apo structures as well as those of holo structures, which led to reliable performance improvement as we applied HemeNet to predicting the binding residues of proteins in the heme-free state. HemeNet web server is freely accessible at http://mleg.cse.sc.edu/hemeNet/.

  14. Computational prediction of heme-binding residues by exploiting residue interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Hu, Jianjun

    2011-01-01

    Computational identification of heme-binding residues is beneficial for predicting and designing novel heme proteins. Here we proposed a novel method for heme-binding residue prediction by exploiting topological properties of these residues in the residue interaction networks derived from three-dimensional structures. Comprehensive analysis showed that key residues located in heme-binding regions are generally associated with the nodes with higher degree, closeness and betweenness, but lower clustering coefficient in the network. HemeNet, a support vector machine (SVM) based predictor, was developed to identify heme-binding residues by combining topological features with existing sequence and structural features. The results showed that incorporation of network-based features significantly improved the prediction performance. We also compared the residue interaction networks of heme proteins before and after heme binding and found that the topological features can well characterize the heme-binding sites of apo structures as well as those of holo structures, which led to reliable performance improvement as we applied HemeNet to predicting the binding residues of proteins in the heme-free state. HemeNet web server is freely accessible at http://mleg.cse.sc.edu/hemeNet/. PMID:21991319

  15. Self-assembled one-pot synthesis of red luminescent CdS:Mn/Mn(OH)2 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a novel method of growing red luminescent (635 nm) Mn-doped CdS (CdS:Mn) nanoparticles capped by an inorganic shell of Mn(OH)2. CdSO4, Na2S2O3 and Mn(NO3)2 were used as the precursors, and thioglycerol (C3H8O2S) was employed as the capping agent and also the catalyst of the reaction. Using these materials resulted in very slow rate of the reaction and particles growth. The self-assembled one-pot process was performed at pH of 8 and Mn:Cd ratio of 10, and took about 10 days for completion. CdS:Mn nanoparticles are slowly formed in the first day of the process; however, the luminescence is weak. After 7 days, the solution turns white turbid through the formation of additional particles, which precipitate on the walls on the next day. At this stage, a relatively strong red luminescence at 635 nm appears from transparent solution of the CdS:Mn nanoparticles. The white deposit on the walls turns to dark-brown color and luminescence increases on the 9th day. Finally, the CdS:Mn nanoparticles agglomerate and precipitate out of the solution on 10th day. X-ray diffraction and optical spectroscopy showed crystalline phase CdS nanoparticles with an average size of 3.6 nm. We explain the luminescence enhancement based on the formation of a Mn(OH)2 shell on the surface of the CdS:Mn nanoparticles during the precipitation stage. This can passivate the S dangling bonds located on the particles surface. As the surface Cd sites are previously capped with thioglycerol molecules, a complete surface passivation is achieved and results in emergence of high-intensity luminescence

  16. Self-assembly synthesis,crystal structure and nonlinear optical properties of cluster compound containing PPh2Py ligand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jian-liang; WEI Chuan-jun; TONG Hai-xia; CHUN Xiao-gai; CHEN Qi-yuan

    2008-01-01

    Self-assembly cluster compound [WS4Cu3(PPh2Py)3Br]2·CH3OH (1) was synthesized by the reaction of (NH4)2WS4,CuBr and diphenyl-2-pyridyl-phosphine (PPh2Py) in CH3OH solution under a purified nitrogen atmosphere using standard Schlenk techniques.Its structure was determined by X-ray crystallography.It crystallizes in the triclinic crystal system P-1 space group with α=1.178 6(1)nm,b=1.302 6(1)nm,c=1.9917(2)nm,α=74.671(7)°,β=86.188(8)°,γ=64.141(6)°,V=2.649 5(5)nm',Z=1.The W center is slightly distorted from tetrahedral coordination geometry,and the structure is built up from three [Cu(PPh2Py)]+ units bridged by WS2-4 multifunctional ligand to form a tetranuclear symmetrical cube-like molecule.Measurement of the nonlinear optical (NLO) properties using the Z-scan technique with an 8 ns pulsed laser at 532 nm shows that the compound possesses NLO absorption and effective self-focusing effect at α2=6.7×10-11m/W and n2=5.64×10-18m2/W in a 1.5×10-4mol/L DMF solution.

  17. Synthesis, characterization, molecular docking and biological studies of self assembled transition metal dithiocarbamates of substituted pyrrole-2-carboxaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nami, Shahab A A; Ullah, Irfan; Alam, Mahboob; Lee, Dong-Ung; Sarikavakli, Nursabah

    2016-07-01

    A series of self assembled 3d transition metal dithiocarbamate, M(pdtc) [where M=Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II)] have been synthesized and spectroscopically characterized. The bidentate dithiocarbamate ligand Na2pdtc (Disodium-1,4-phenyldiaminobis (pyrrole-1-sulfino)dithioate) was prepared by insertion reaction of carbondisulfide with Schiff base, N,N'-bis-(1H-pyrrol-2-ylmethylene)-benzene-1,4-diamine (L1) in basic medium. The simple substitution reaction between the metal halide and Na2pdtc yielded the title complexes in moderate yields. However, the in situ procedure gives high yield with the formation of single product as evident by TLC. Elemental analysis, IR, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra, UV-vis., magnetic susceptibility and conductance measurements were done to characterize the complexes, M(pdtc). All the evidences suggest that the complexes have tetrahedral geometry excepting Cu(II) which is found to be square planar. A symmetrical bidentate coordination of the dithiocarbamato moiety has been observed in all the complexes. The conductivity data show that the complexes are non-electrolyte in nature. The anti-oxidant activity of the ligand, Na2pdtc and its transition metal complexes, M(pdtc) have been carried out using DPPH and Cu(pdtc) was found to be most effective. The anti-microbial activity of the Na2pdtc and M(pdtc) complexes have been carried out and on this basis the molecular docking study of the most effective complex, Cu(pdtc) has also been reported. PMID:27197060

  18. 新型超分子化合物的合成自组装及应用研究的新进展%Recent Research Achievements on Synthesis,Self-assembly and Applications of New Supramolecular Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张来新; 胡小兵

    2014-01-01

    This paper briefly introduced the definition, concept, generation and application of supramolecular chemistry. Emphases were put on three parts:① synthesis and self-assembly of new supramolecular compounds;② synthesis and selective recognition effects of new supramolecular compounds;③synthesis and application of su-pramolecular crown ether metal complexes.%简要介绍了超分子化学的定义、概念、产生及应用,详细介绍了:①新型超分子化合物合成及自组装;②新型超分子化合物的合成及选择性识别作用;③超分子冠醚金属配合物的合成及应用。

  19. [Heme oxygenase activity in rat organs during cadmium chloride administration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strel'chenko, E V; Nikitchenko, I V; Kaliman, P A

    2002-01-01

    Heme oxygenase activity, the level of spontaneous and ascorbat-induced LPO in the liver, kidney and spleen homogenates of rats and blood serum absorption spectrum in the Soret region in different periods both after CdCl2 and prior alpha-tocopherol administration were studied. The increase in the hemolysis products content in the serum was observed in 15 min after CdCl2 injection and remained during 24 h. Heme oxygenase activity in the liver and kidney increased after 6 h and stayed at the same level 24 h after CdCl2 administration. The level of spontaneous LPO in the spleen increased after 6 h, and in the liver and kidney the level of spontaneous and ascorbat-induced LPO increased in 24 h after CdCl2 injection. The preliminary alpha-tocopherol administration did not prevent the accumulation of hemolysis products in the serum and the increase of heme oxygenase activity in the liver and kidney caused by CdCl2 administration. However, the increase in the ascorbat-induced LPO in these organs was completely blocked. The role of heme and LPO in the heme oxygenase induction by CdCl2 are discussed. PMID:12916165

  20. Identification and treatment of heme depletion attributed to overexpression of a lineage of evolved P450 monooxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michener, Joshua K; Nielsen, Jens; Smolke, Christina D

    2012-11-20

    Recent advances in metabolic engineering have demonstrated that microbial biosynthesis can provide a viable alternative to chemical synthesis for the production of bulk and fine chemicals. Introduction of a new biosynthetic pathway typically requires the expression of multiple heterologous enzymes in the production host, which can impose stress on the host cell and, thereby, limit performance of the pathway. Unfortunately, analysis and treatment of the host stress response can be difficult, because there are many sources of stress that may interact in complex ways. We use a systems biological approach to analyze the stress imposed by expressing different enzyme variants from a lineage of soluble P450 monooxygenases, previously evolved for heterologous activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our analysis identifies patterns of stress imposed on the host by heterologous enzyme overexpression that are consistent across the evolutionary lineage, ultimately implicating heme depletion as the major stress. We show that the monooxygenase evolution, starting from conditions of either high or low stress, caused the cellular stress to converge to a common level. Overexpression of rate-limiting enzymes in the endogenous heme biosynthetic pathway alleviates the stress imposed by expression of the P450 monooxygenases and increases the enzymatic activity of the final evolved P450 by an additional 2.3-fold. Heme overexpression also increases the total activity of an endogenous cytosolic heme-containing catalase but not a heterologous P450 that is membrane-associated. This work demonstrates the utility of combining systems and synthetic biology to analyze and optimize heterologous enzyme expression. PMID:23129650

  1. Heme oxygenase activity correlates with serum indices of iron homeostasis in healthy nonsmokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the breakdown of heme to carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin. While the use of genetically altered animal models in investigation has established distinct associations between HO activity and systemic iron availability, studies have not yet confirm...

  2. [Metabolism of heme and hemoproteins in rat liver upon administration of mercuric chloride].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliman, P A; Nikitchenko, I V; Barannik, T V; Sokol, O A

    1999-01-01

    Rat liver delta-aminolevulinate synthase (delta-ALAS) activity in the early period after mercury chloride administration (0.7 mg per 100 g body weight) was found to be followed by free heme level increase, which was registered by the increase of heme saturation of the heme-binding protein tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (T-2,3-DO). delta-ALAS and heme oxygenase activity increase was observed 24 h after action. Microsomal cytochromes P450 and b5 levels decrease. Heme saturation of the T-2,3-DO returned to control level. Heme oxygenase and T-2,3-DO induction promoted hepatocytes free heme level normalization. Heme oxygenase and delta-ALAS induction role in the liver cells defense from the oxidative damage is discussed. PMID:10820853

  3. Heme oxygenase-1 deletion affects stress erythropoiesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-An Cao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Homeostatic erythropoiesis leads to the formation of mature red blood cells under non-stress conditions, and the production of new erythrocytes occurs as the need arises. In response to environmental stimuli, such as bone marrow transplantation, myelosuppression, or anemia, erythroid progenitors proliferate rapidly in a process referred to as stress erythropoiesis. We have previously demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 deficiency leads to disrupted stress hematopoiesis. Here, we describe the specific effects of HO-1 deficiency on stress erythropoiesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a transplant model to induce stress conditions. In irradiated recipients that received hmox(+/- or hmox(+/+ bone marrow cells, we evaluated (i the erythrocyte parameters in the peripheral blood; (ii the staining intensity of CD71-, Ter119-, and CD49d-specific surface markers during erythroblast differentiation; (iii the patterns of histological iron staining; and (iv the number of Mac-1(+-cells expressing TNF-α. In the spleens of mice that received hmox(+/- cells, we show (i decreases in the proerythroblast, basophilic, and polychromatophilic erythroblast populations; (ii increases in the insoluble iron levels and decreases in the soluble iron levels; (iii increased numbers of Mac-1(+-cells expressing TNF-α; and (iv decreased levels of CD49d expression in the basophilic and polychromatophilic erythroblast populations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: As reflected by effects on secreted and cell surface proteins, HO-1 deletion likely affects stress erythropoiesis through the retention of erythroblasts in the erythroblastic islands of the spleen. Thus, HO-1 may serve as a therapeutic target for controlling erythropoiesis, and the dysregulation of HO-1 may be a predisposing condition for hematologic diseases.

  4. Synthesis, Characterization and Application of Poly (Styrene-4- Vinyl Pyridine) Membranes Assembled With Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    He, Haoze

    2011-06-01

    Poly(styrene‐4‐vinylpyridine) (PS‐P4VP) isoporous membranes were prepared and their properties were evaluated in this research. The solution was prepared by dissolving PS‐P4VP polymer with necessary additives into a 1:1:1 1,4‐dioxane – N,N‐dimethyl formamide – tetrahydrofuran (DOX‐DMF‐THF, DDT) solvent. Then 0.5‐1.0 mL of the primary solution was cast onto the non‐woven substrate membrane on a glass slide, evaporated for 15‐20 sec and immersed into de‐ionized water for more than 30 min for the solidification of isoporous structure and for the formation of the primary films, which could be post‐processed in different ways for different tests. The membrane surface presents a well‐ordered, hexagonal self‐assembly structure, which is fit for aqueous and gaseous filtration. The pore size of the isoporous surface is 30~40 nm. The pore size is also sensitive to [H+] in the solution and a typical pair of S‐shape pH‐correlation curves with significant hysteresis was found. Four techniques were tried to improve the properties of the membranes in this research: 1) 1,4‐diiodobutane was introduced to chemically change the structure as a cross‐linking agent. 2) single‐wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) was linked to the membranes in order to strengthen the stability and rigidity and to reduce the hysteresis. 3) Homo‐poly(4‐vinylpyridine) (homo‐P4VP) was added and inserted into the PS‐P4VP micelles to affect the pore size and surface structure. 4) Copper acetate (Cu(Ac)2) was used as substitute of dioxane to prepare the Cu(Ac)2‐DMF‐THF (CDT) mixed solvent, for a better SWCNT dispersion. All the possible improvements were judged by the atomic force microscopy (AFM) images, water and gas flux tests and pH‐correlation curves. The introduction of SWCNT was the most important innovation in this research and is promising in future applications.

  5. Crystal Structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cytoplasmic Heme Binding Protein, Apo-PhuS

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi, Sarvind; O'Neill, Maura J.; Wilks, Angela; Poulos, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential element to all living organisms and is an important determinant of bacterial virulence. Bacteria have evolved specialized systems to sequester and transport iron from the environment or host. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen, uses two outer membrane receptor mediated systems (Phu and Has) to utilize host heme as a source of iron. PhuS is a 39 kDa soluble cytoplasmic heme binding protein which interacts and transports heme from the inner membrane heme tran...

  6. Computational Prediction of Heme-Binding Residues by Exploiting Residue Interaction Network

    OpenAIRE

    Rong Liu; Jianjun Hu

    2011-01-01

    Computational identification of heme-binding residues is beneficial for predicting and designing novel heme proteins. Here we proposed a novel method for heme-binding residue prediction by exploiting topological properties of these residues in the residue interaction networks derived from three-dimensional structures. Comprehensive analysis showed that key residues located in heme-binding regions are generally associated with the nodes with higher degree, closeness and betweenness, but lower ...

  7. Heme in pathophysiology: a matter of scavenging, metabolism and trafficking across cell membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Deborah eChiabrando; Francesca eVinchi; Veronica eFiorito; Sonia eMercurio; Emanuela eTolosano

    2014-01-01

    Heme (iron-protoporphyrin IX) is an essential co-factor involved in multiple biological processes: oxygen transport and storage, electron transfer, drug and steroid metabolism, signal transduction, and micro RNA processing. However, excess free-heme is highly toxic due to its ability to promote oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, thus leading to membrane injury and, ultimately, apoptosis. Thus, heme metabolism needs to be finely regulated. Intracellular heme amount is controlled at multi...

  8. Effect of Growth Conditions on Yield and Heme Content of Vitreoscilla

    OpenAIRE

    Lamba, Parveen; Webster, Dale A.

    1980-01-01

    Vitreoscilla, a gliding bacterium in the Beggiatoaceae, is an obligate aerobe in which cytochrome o functions as the terminal oxidase. Protoheme IX is the only heme type present in this organism. The yield and heme content of Vitreoscilla cells grown in yeast extract, peptone, and acetate were dependent on growth conditions. Cells harvested in early stationary phase contained roughly three times as much heme as cells in early log phase. There was an optimal shaking rate for maximum heme conte...

  9. Regulation of protein synthesis by phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha in intact reticulocytes and reticulocyte lysates.

    OpenAIRE

    Leroux, A; London, I M

    1982-01-01

    Studies in intact rabbit reticulocytes and reticulocyte lysates provide further evidence of a functional role for the phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF-2 alpha) in the regulation of initiation of protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells. In intact reticulocytes treated with isonicotinic acid hydrazide to inhibit heme synthesis, the phosphorylation of eIF-2 alpha was significantly greater than in control cells. In heme-deficient reticulocyte lysates and in lysates treat...

  10. Anion-controlled assembly of metal 3,5-bis(benzimidazol-1-ylmethyl) benzoate complexes: Synthesis, characterization and property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuai, Hai-Wei [Coordination Chemistry Institute, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Faculty of Life Science and Chemical Engineering, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huaian 223003 (China); Lv, Gao-Chao; Hou, Chao [Coordination Chemistry Institute, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Sun, Wei-Yin, E-mail: sunwy@nju.edu.cn [Coordination Chemistry Institute, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Hydrothermal reactions of 3,5-bis(benzimidazol-1-ylmethyl)benzoic acid (HL) with Cd(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) salts provide eight new metal complexes which were characterized by single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction, IR, elemental and thermogravimetric analyses. Two cadmium frameworks [Cd(L){sub 2}]·2H{sub 2}O (1) and [Cd(L)Cl] (2) have 3D structures with (4{sup 2}.6{sup 5}.8{sup 3})(4{sup 2}.6) and rtl (4.6{sup 2}){sub 2}(4{sup 2}.6{sup 10}.8{sup 3}) topologies, respectively. Structural diversity of four copper complexes [Cu{sub 3}(L){sub 2}]·NO{sub 3}·0.5H{sub 2}O (3), [Cu{sub 2}(HL){sub 2}(SO{sub 4})]·3.5H{sub 2}O (4), [Cu(L)(bdc){sub 0.5}]·1.5H{sub 2}O (5) and [Cu{sub 2}(L)(HL)(Hbdc)] (6) (H{sub 2}bdc=1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid) is achieved through the alteration of copper salts and addition of auxiliary ligand. As a result, 3 has a 1D ladder structure, 4 is a discrete dinuclear complex, 5 displays a (3,4)-connected 2-nodal 3-fold interpenetrating framework with (4{sup 2}.6.10{sup 2}.12)(4{sup 2}.6) topology, 6 exhibits a 4-connected uninodal 2D sql (4{sup 4}.6{sup 2}) network. Within the zinc series, ZnCl{sub 2} and ZnSO{sub 4} were used for the syntheses of [Zn(L)Cl] (7) and [Zn(L)(SO{sub 4}){sub 0.5}]·2H{sub 2}O (8), respectively. 7 shows a 3-connected uninodal 2D hcb network with (6{sup 3}) topology and 8 is a (3,6)-connected 2-nodal 3D framework with (4{sup 2}.6){sub 2}(4{sup 4}.6{sup 2}.8{sup 8}.10) topology. The luminescent properties of the Cd(II) and Zn(II) complexes were investigated. - Graphical abstract: Eight new complexes have been successfully synthesized from the hydrothermal reactions of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) salts with 3,5-bis(benzimidazol-1-ylmethyl)benzoic acid. The complexes exhibited anion-controlled structural diversity. - Highlights: • Metal complexes have diverse structures of 1D chains, 2D networks and 3D frameworks. • Anion-controlled assembly of the complexes is reported. • The luminescent properties of the Cd

  11. Heme uptake by Leishmania amazonensis is mediated by the transmembrane protein LHR1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chau Huynh

    Full Text Available Trypanosomatid protozoan parasites lack a functional heme biosynthetic pathway, so must acquire heme from the environment to survive. However, the molecular pathway responsible for heme acquisition by these organisms is unknown. Here we show that L. amazonensis LHR1, a homolog of the C. elegans plasma membrane heme transporter HRG-4, functions in heme transport. Tagged LHR1 localized to the plasma membrane and to endocytic compartments, in both L. amazonensis and mammalian cells. Heme deprivation in L. amazonensis increased LHR1 transcript levels, promoted uptake of the fluorescent heme analog ZnMP, and increased the total intracellular heme content of promastigotes. Conversely, deletion of one LHR1 allele reduced ZnMP uptake and the intracellular heme pool by approximately 50%, indicating that LHR1 is a major heme importer in L. amazonensis. Viable parasites with correct replacement of both LHR1 alleles could not be obtained despite extensive attempts, suggesting that this gene is essential for the survival of promastigotes. Notably, LHR1 expression allowed Saccharomyces cerevisiae to import heme from the environment, and rescued growth of a strain deficient in heme biosynthesis. Syntenic genes with high sequence identity to LHR1 are present in the genomes of several species of Leishmania and also Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei, indicating that therapeutic agents targeting this transporter could be effective against a broad group of trypanosomatid parasites that cause serious human disease.

  12. 14 CFR 135.271 - Helicopter hospital emergency medical evacuation service (HEMES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... evacuation service (HEMES). 135.271 Section 135.271 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION....271 Helicopter hospital emergency medical evacuation service (HEMES). (a) No certificate holder may... 24-consecutive hour period of a HEMES assignment, unless an emergency medical evacuation operation...

  13. Determinants of Ligand Affinity and Heme Reactivity in H-NOX Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Weinert, Emily E.; Plate, Lars; Whited, Charlotte A.; Olea, Charles; Marletta, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    O_2 balks at extra bulk: The introduction of distal-pocket bulk into the Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis H-NOX (heme nitric oxide/oxygen) domain caused key changes in the protein structure. Rearrangement of the heme pocket resulted in dramatic differences in O_2-binding kinetics and heme reactivity (see picture).

  14. AN INTEGRATED PHARMACOKINETIC AND PHARMACODYNAMIC STUDY OF ARSENITE ACTION 2. HEME OXYGENASE INDUCTION IN MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation and its activity has a significant impact on intracellular heme pools. Rat studies indicate that HO induction is a sensitive, dose-dependent response to arsenite (AsIII) exposure in both liver and kidney. The o...

  15. Heme Utilization in Bordetella avium Is Regulated by RhuI, a Heme-Responsive Extracytoplasmic Function Sigma Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Amy E.; Metzger, Daniel J.; Murphy, Erin R.; Connell, Terry D.

    2001-01-01

    Efficient utilization of heme as an iron (Fe) source by Bordetella avium requires bhuR, an Fe-regulated gene which encodes an outer membrane heme receptor. Upstream of bhuR is a 507-bp open reading frame, hereby designated rhuI (for regulator of heme uptake), which codes for a 19-kDa polypeptide. Whereas the 19-kDa polypeptide had homology to a subfamily of alternative sigma factors known as the extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors, it was hypothesized that rhuI encoded a potential in-trans regulator of the heme receptor gene in trans. Support for the model was strengthened by the identification of nucleotide sequences common to ECF sigma-dependent promoters in the region immediately upstream of bhuR. Experimental evidence for the regulatory activities of rhuI was first revealed by recombinant experiments in which overproduction of rhuI was correlated with a dramatically increased expression of BhuR. A putative rhuI-dependent bhuR promoter was identified in the 199-bp region located proximal to bhuR. When a transcriptional fusion of the 199-bp region and a promoterless lacZ gene was introduced into Escherichia coli, promoter activity was evident, but only when rhuI was coexpressed in the cell. Sigma competition experiments in E. coli demonstrated that rhuI conferred biological properties on the cell that were consistent with RhuI having sigma factor activity. Heme, hemoglobin, and several other heme-containing proteins were shown to be the extracellular inducers of the rhuI-dependent regulatory system. Fur titration assays indicated that expression of rhuI was probably Fur dependent. PMID:11598070

  16. Analysis of Heme Iron Coordination in DGCR8: The Heme-Binding Component of the Microprocessor Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girvan, Hazel M; Bradley, Justin M; Cheesman, Myles R; Kincaid, James R; Liu, Yilin; Czarnecki, Kazimierz; Fisher, Karl; Leys, David; Rigby, Stephen E J; Munro, Andrew W

    2016-09-13

    DGCR8 is the RNA-binding partner of the nuclease Drosha. Their complex (the "Microprocessor") is essential for processing of long, primary microRNAs (pri-miRNAs) in the nucleus. Binding of heme to DGCR8 is essential for pri-miRNA processing. On the basis of the split Soret ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrum of ferric DGCR8, bis-thiolate sulfur (cysteinate, Cys(-)) heme iron coordination of DGCR8 heme iron was proposed. We have characterized DGCR8 heme ligation using the Δ276 DGCR8 variant and combined electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), electron nuclear double resonance, resonance Raman, and electronic absorption spectroscopy. These studies indicate DGCR8 bis-Cys heme iron ligation, with conversion from bis-thiolate (Cys(-)/Cys(-)) axial coordination in ferric DGCR8 to bis-thiol (CysH/CysH) coordination in ferrous DGCR8. Pri-miRNA binding does not perturb ferric DGCR8's optical spectrum, consistent with the axial ligand environment being separated from the substrate-binding site. UV-vis absorption spectra of the Fe(II) and Fe(II)-CO forms indicate discrete species exhibiting peaks with absorption coefficients substantially larger than those for ferric DGCR8 and that previously reported for a ferrous form of DGCR8. Electron-nuclear double resonance spectroscopy data exclude histidine or water as axial ligands for ferric DGCR8 and favor bis-thiolate coordination in this form. UV-vis MCD and near-infrared MCD provide data consistent with this conclusion. UV-vis MCD data for ferrous DGCR8 reveal features consistent with bis-thiol heme iron coordination, and resonance Raman data for the ferrous-CO form are consistent with a thiol ligand trans to the CO. These studies support retention of DGCR8 cysteine coordination upon reduction, a conclusion distinct from those of previous studies of a different ferrous DGCR8 isoform.

  17. Ibuprofen impairs allosterically peroxynitrite isomerization by ferric human serum heme-albumin.

    OpenAIRE

    Ascenzi, Paolo; di Masi, Alessandra; Coletta, Massimo; Ciaccio, Chiara; Fanali, Gabriella; Nicoletti, Francesco P; Smulevich, Giulietta; Fasano, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) participates in heme scavenging; in turn, heme endows HSA with myoglobin-like reactivity and spectroscopic properties. Here, the allosteric effect of ibuprofen on peroxynitrite isomerization to NO3− catalyzed by ferric human serum heme-albumin (HSA-heme-Fe(III)) is reported. Data were obtained at 22.0 °C. HSA-heme-Fe(III) catalyzes peroxynitrite isomerization in the absence and presence of CO2; the values of the second order catalytic rate constant (kon) are 4.1 × 10...

  18. DiGeorge Critical Region 8 (DGCR8) Is a Double-cysteine-ligated Heme Protein*

    OpenAIRE

    Barr, Ian; Smith, Aaron T.; Senturia, Rachel; Chen, Yanqiu; Scheidemantle, Brooke D.; Burstyn, Judith N.; Guo, Feng

    2011-01-01

    All known heme-thiolate proteins ligate the heme iron using one cysteine side chain. We previously found that DiGeorge Critical Region 8 (DGCR8), an essential microRNA processing factor, associates with heme of unknown redox state when overexpressed in Escherichia coli. On the basis of the similarity of the 450-nm Soret absorption peak of the DGCR8-heme complex to that of cytochrome P450 containing ferrous heme with CO bound, we identified cysteine 352 as a probable axial ligand in DGCR8. Her...

  19. HutZ Is Required for Efficient Heme Utilization in Vibrio cholerae

    OpenAIRE

    Wyckoff, Elizabeth E.; Schmitt, Michael; Wilks, Angela; Shelley M Payne

    2004-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, requires iron for growth. One mechanism by which it acquires iron is the uptake of heme, and several heme utilization genes have been identified in V. cholerae. These include three distinct outer membrane receptors, two TonB systems, and an apparent ABC transporter to transfer heme across the inner membrane. However, little is known about the fate of the heme after it enters the cell. In this report we show that a novel heme utilization protein...

  20. Malaria parasite-synthesized heme is essential in the mosquito and liver stages and complements host heme in the blood stages of infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viswanathan Arun Nagaraj

    Full Text Available Heme metabolism is central to malaria parasite biology. The parasite acquires heme from host hemoglobin in the intraerythrocytic stages and stores it as hemozoin to prevent free heme toxicity. The parasite can also synthesize heme de novo, and all the enzymes in the pathway are characterized. To study the role of the dual heme sources in malaria parasite growth and development, we knocked out the first enzyme, δ-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS, and the last enzyme, ferrochelatase (FC, in the heme-biosynthetic pathway of Plasmodium berghei (Pb. The wild-type and knockout (KO parasites had similar intraerythrocytic growth patterns in mice. We carried out in vitro radiolabeling of heme in Pb-infected mouse reticulocytes and Plasmodium falciparum-infected human RBCs using [4-(14C] aminolevulinic acid (ALA. We found that the parasites incorporated both host hemoglobin-heme and parasite-synthesized heme into hemozoin and mitochondrial cytochromes. The similar fates of the two heme sources suggest that they may serve as backup mechanisms to provide heme in the intraerythrocytic stages. Nevertheless, the de novo pathway is absolutely essential for parasite development in the mosquito and liver stages. PbKO parasites formed drastically reduced oocysts and did not form sporozoites in the salivary glands. Oocyst production in PbALASKO parasites recovered when mosquitoes received an ALA supplement. PbALASKO sporozoites could infect mice only when the mice received an ALA supplement. Our results indicate the potential for new therapeutic interventions targeting the heme-biosynthetic pathway in the parasite during the mosquito and liver stages.

  1. The Synthetic Analogs of Oxygen-Binding Heme Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suslick, Kenneth S.; Reinert, Thomas J.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses model studies aimed at elucidating various ways in which molecular oxygen interacts with metalloproteins. The focus is on the chemistry of iron(II) porphyrins and their adducts with nitrogenous bases, carbon monoxide, and dioxygen, which are most relevant to the functional proteries of the heme proteins, hemoglobin, and myoglobin. (JN)

  2. Heme and HO-1 inhibition of HCV, HBV, and HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren N Schmidt

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and hepatitis B virus are chronic viral infections that cause considerable morbidity and mortality throughout the world. In the decades following the identification and sequencing of these viruses, in vitro experiments demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1, its oxidative products, and related compounds of the heme oxygenase system are virucidal for all three viruses. The purpose of this review is to critically evaluate and summarize the seminal studies that described and characterized this remarkable behavior. It will also discuss more recent work that discovered the antiviral mechanisms and target sites of these unique antiviral agents. In spite of the fact that these viruses are diverse pathogens with quite profound differences in structure and life cycle, it is significant that heme and related compounds show striking similarity for viral target sites across all three species. Collectively, these findings strongly indicate that we should move forward and develop heme and related tetrapyrroles into versatile antiviral agents that could be used therapeutically in patients with single or multiple viral infections.

  3. Structural and spectroscopic characterisation of a heme peroxidase from sorghum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnamchi, Chukwudi I; Parkin, Gary; Efimov, Igor; Basran, Jaswir; Kwon, Hanna; Svistunenko, Dimitri A; Agirre, Jon; Okolo, Bartholomew N; Moneke, Anene; Nwanguma, Bennett C; Moody, Peter C E; Raven, Emma L

    2016-03-01

    A cationic class III peroxidase from Sorghum bicolor was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme contains a high-spin heme, as evidenced by UV-visible spectroscopy and EPR. Steady state oxidation of guaiacol was demonstrated and the enzyme was shown to have higher activity in the presence of calcium ions. A Fe(III)/Fe(II) reduction potential of -266 mV vs NHE was determined. Stopped-flow experiments with H2O2 showed formation of a typical peroxidase Compound I species, which converts to Compound II in the presence of calcium. A crystal structure of the enzyme is reported, the first for a sorghum peroxidase. The structure reveals an active site that is analogous to those for other class I heme peroxidase, and a substrate binding site (assigned as arising from binding of indole-3-acetic acid) at the γ-heme edge. Metal binding sites are observed in the structure on the distal (assigned as a Na(+) ion) and proximal (assigned as a Ca(2+)) sides of the heme, which is consistent with the Ca(2+)-dependence of the steady state and pre-steady state kinetics. It is probably the case that the structural integrity (and, thus, the catalytic activity) of the sorghum enzyme is dependent on metal ion incorporation at these positions.

  4. The effect of proteins from animal source foods on heme iron bioavailability in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Valenzuela, Carolina; Brito, Alex; Weinborn, Valerie; Flores, Sebastián; Arredondo, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Forty-five women (35-45 year) were randomly assigned to three iron (Fe) absorption sub-studies, which measured the effects of dietary animal proteins on the absorption of heme Fe. Study 1 was focused on heme, red blood cell concentrate (RBCC), hemoglobin (Hb), RBCC+beef meat; study 2 on heme, heme+fish, chicken, and beef; and study 3 on heme and heme+purified animal protein (casein, collagen, albumin). Study 1: the bioavailability of heme Fe from Hb was similar to heme only (∼13.0%). RBCC (25.0%) and RBCC+beef (21.3%) were found to be increased 2- and 1.6-fold, respectively, when compared with heme alone (p<0.05). Study 2: the bioavailability from heme alone (10.3%) was reduced (p<0.05) when it was blended with fish (7.1%) and chicken (4.9%), however it was unaffected by beef. Study 3: casein, collagen, and albumin did not affect the bioavailability of Fe. Proteins from animal source foods and their digestion products did not enhance heme Fe absorption. PMID:26593548

  5. Heme-copper-dioxygen complexes: toward understanding ligand-environmental effects on the coordination geometry, electronic structure, and reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halime, Zakaria; Kieber-Emmons, Matthew T; Qayyum, Munzarin F; Mondal, Biplab; Gandhi, Thirumanavelan; Puiu, Simona C; Chufán, Eduardo E; Sarjeant, Amy A N; Hodgson, Keith O; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2010-04-19

    The nature of the ligand is an important aspect of controlling the structure and reactivity in coordination chemistry. In connection with our study of heme-copper-oxygen reactivity relevant to cytochrome c oxidase dioxygen-reduction chemistry, we compare the molecular and electronic structures of two high-spin heme-peroxo-copper [Fe(III)O(2)(2-)Cu(II)](+) complexes containing N(4) tetradentate (1) or N(3) tridentate (2) copper ligands. Combining previously reported and new resonance Raman and EXAFS data coupled to density functional theory calculations, we report a geometric structure and more complete electronic description of the high-spin heme-peroxo-copper complexes 1 and 2, which establish mu-(O(2)(2-)) side-on to the Fe(III) and end-on to Cu(II) (mu-eta(2):eta(1)) binding for the complex 1 but side-on/side-on (mu-eta(2):eta(2)) mu-peroxo coordination for the complex 2. We also compare and summarize the differences and similarities of these two complexes in their reactivity toward CO, PPh(3), acid, and phenols. The comparison of a new X-ray structure of mu-oxo complex 2a with the previously reported 1a X-ray structure, two thermal decomposition products respectively of 2 and 1, reveals a considerable difference in the Fe-O-Cu angle between the two mu-oxo complexes ( angleFe-O-Cu = 178.2 degrees in 1a and angleFe-O-Cu = 149.5 degrees in 2a). The reaction of 2 with 1 equiv of an exogenous nitrogen-donor axial base leads to the formation of a distinctive low-temperature-stable, low-spin heme-dioxygen-copper complex (2b), but under the same conditions, the addition of an axial base to 1 leads to the dissociation of the heme-peroxo-copper assembly and the release of O(2). 2b reacts with phenols performing H-atom (e(-) + H(+)) abstraction resulting in O-O bond cleavage and the formation of high-valent ferryl [Fe(IV)=O] complex (2c). The nature of 2c was confirmed by a comparison of its spectroscopic features and reactivity with those of an independently prepared

  6. Heme degradation by Staphylococcus aureus IsdG and IsdI liberates formaldehyde rather than carbon monoxide

    OpenAIRE

    Matsui, Toshitaka; Nambu, Shusuke; Ono, Yukari; Goulding, Celia W.; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Ikeda-Saito, Masao

    2013-01-01

    IsdG and IsdI from Staphylococcus aureus are novel heme degrading enzymes containing unusually non-planar (ruffled) heme. While canonical heme degrading enzymes, heme oxygenases, catalyze heme degradation coupled with the release of CO, in this study we demonstrate that the primary C1 product of the S. aureus enzymes is formaldehyde. This finding clearly reveals that both IsdG and IsdI degrade heme by an unusual mechanism distinct from the well-characterized heme oxygenase mechanism as recent...

  7. Chemoselective approaches to glycoprotein assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oligosaccharides on proteins and lipids play central roles in human health and disease. The molecular analysis of glycoconjugate function has benefited tremendously from new methods for their chemical synthesis, which provides homogeneous material not attainable from biosynthetic systems. Still, glycoconjugate synthesis requires the manipulation of multiple stereocenters and protecting groups and remains the domain of a few expert laboratories around the world. This account summarizes chemoselective approaches for assembling homogeneous glycoconjugates that attempt to reduce the barriers to their synthesis. The objective of these methods is to make glycoconjugate synthesis accessible to a broader community, thereby accelerating progress in glycobiology

  8. Dietary heme-mediated PPARa activation does not affect the heme-induced epithelial hyperproliferation and hyperplasia in mouse colon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJssenagger, N.; Wit, de N.J.W.; Muller, M.R.; Meer, van der R.

    2012-01-01

    Red meat consumption is associated with an increased colon cancer risk. Heme, present in red meat, injures the colon surface epithelium by luminal cytotoxicity and reactive oxygen species. This surface injury is overcompensated by hyperproliferation and hyperplasia of crypt cells. Transcriptome anal

  9. Supramolecular assembly based on a heteropolyanion: Synthesis and crystal structure of Na3(H2O)6[Al(OH)6Mo6O18]$\\cdot$2H2O

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vaddypally Shivaiah; Samar K Das

    2005-05-01

    Synthesis and structural characterization of a polyoxometalate compound Na3(H2O)6 [Al(OH)6Mo6O18]$\\cdot$2H2O (1) have been described. Compound 1 exhibits three-dimensional network structure in the solid state, which is assembled by Anderson-type heteropolyanions, [Al(OH)6Mo6O18]$_n^{3n-}$, as building blocks sharing sodium cations. 1 possesses ``sinuous" channels occupied by supramolecular water dimers as guests. Anderson anions, sodium-coordinated water and crystal water are additionally involved in an intricate hydrogen-bonding network in the crystal of 1.

  10. A Soret marker band for four-coordinate ferric heme proteins from absorption spectra of isolated Fe(III)-Heme+ and Fe(III)-Heme+(His) ions in vacuo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykkegaard, Morten Køcks; Ehlerding, Anneli; Hvelplund, Preben; Kadhane, Umesh; Kirketerp, Maj-Britt Suhr; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted; Panja, Subhasis; Wyer, Jean Ann; Zettergren, Henning

    2008-09-10

    In this work, we report the absorption spectra in the Soret band region of isolated Fe(III)-heme+ and Fe(III)-heme+(His) ions in vacuo from action spectroscopy. Fe(III)-heme+ refers to iron(III) coordinated by the dianion of protoporphyrin IX. We find that the absorption of the five-coordinate complex is similar to that of pentacoordinate metmyoglobin variants with hydrophobic binding pockets except for an overall blueshift of about 16 nm. In the case of four-coordinate iron(III), the Soret band is similar to that of five-coordinate iron(III) but much narrower. These spectra serve as a benchmark for theoretical modeling and also serve to identify the coordination state of ferric heme proteins. To our knowledge this is the first unequivocal spectroscopic characterization of isolated 4c ferric heme in the gas phase. PMID:18700762

  11. Differential induction of heme oxygenase and other stress proteins in cultured hippocampal astrocytes and neurons by inorganic lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the effects of exposure to inorganic lead (Pb2+) on the induction of stress proteins in cultured hippocampal neurons and astrocytes, with particular emphasis on the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). In radiolabeled neuronal cultures, Pb2+ exposure had no significant effect on the synthesis of any protein at any concentration (up to 250 μM) or duration of exposure (up to 4 days). In radiolabeled astrocyte cultures, however, Pb2+ exposure (100 nM to 100 μM; 1-4 days) increased synthesis of proteins with approximate molecular weights of 23, 32, 45, 57, 72, and 90 kDa. Immunoblot experiments showed that Pb2+ exposure (100 nM to 10 μM, 1-14 days) induces HO-1 synthesis in astrocytes, but not in neurons; this is probably the 32-kDa protein. The other heme oxygenase isoform, HO-2, is present in both neurons and astrocytes, but is not inducible by Pb2+ at concentrations up to 100 μM. HO-1 can be induced by a variety of stimuli. We found that HO-1 induction in astrocytes is increased by combined exposure to Pb2+ and many other stresses, including heat, nitric oxide, H2O2, and superoxide. One of the stimuli that may induce HO-1 is oxidative stress. Lead exposure causes oxidative stress in many cell types, including astrocytes. Induction of HO-1 by Pb2+ is reduced by the hydroxyl radical scavengers dimethylthiourea (DMTU) and mannitol, but not by inhibitors of calmodulin, calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, protein kinase C, or extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). Therefore, we conclude that oxidative stress is an important mechanism by which Pb2+ induces HO-1 synthesis in astrocytes

  12. Transfection of the Human Heme Oxygenase Gene Into Rabbit Coronary Microvessel Endothelial Cells: Protective Effect Against Heme and Hemoglobin Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, N. G.; Lavrovsky, Y.; Schwartzman, M. L.; Stoltz, R. A.; Levere, R. D.; Gerritsen, M. E.

    1995-07-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is a stress protein and has been suggested to participate in defense mechanisms against agents that may induce oxidative injury such as metals, endotoxin, heme/hemoglobin, and various cytokines. Overexpression of HO in cells might therefore protect against oxidative stress produced by certain of these agents, specifically heme and hemoglobin, by catalyzing their degradation to bilirubin, which itself has antioxidant properties. We report here the successful in vitro transfection of rabbit coronary microvessel endothelial cells with a functioning gene encoding the human HO enzyme. A plasmid containing the cytomegalovirus promoter and the human HO cDNA complexed to cationic liposomes (Lipofectin) was used to transfect rabbit endothelial cells. Cells transfected with human HO exhibited an ≈3.0-fold increase in enzyme activity and expressed a severalfold induction of human HO mRNA as compared with endogenous rabbit HO mRNA. Transfected and nontransfected cells expressed factor VIII antigen and exhibited similar acetylated low-density lipoprotein uptake (two important features that characterize endothelial cells) with >85% of cells staining positive for each marker. Moreover, cells transfected with the human HO gene acquired substantial resistance to toxicity produced by exposure to recombinant hemoglobin and heme as compared with nontransfected cells. The protective effect of HO overexpression against heme/hemoglobin toxicity in endothelial cells shown in these studies provides direct evidence that the inductive response of human HO to such injurious stimuli represents an important tissue adaptive mechanism for moderating the severity of cell damage produced by these blood components.

  13. Molecularly Imprinted Electropolymer for a Hexameric Heme Protein with Direct Electron Transfer and Peroxide Electrocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lei; Yarman, Aysu; Jetzschmann, Katharina J; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Schad, Daniel; Dobbek, Holger; Wollenberger, Ulla; Scheller, Frieder W

    2016-01-01

    For the first time a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) with direct electron transfer (DET) and bioelectrocatalytic activity of the target protein is presented. Thin films of MIPs for the recognition of a hexameric tyrosine-coordinated heme protein (HTHP) have been prepared by electropolymerization of scopoletin after oriented assembly of HTHP on a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) on gold electrodes. Cavities which should resemble the shape and size of HTHP were formed by template removal. Rebinding of the target protein sums up the recognition by non-covalent interactions between the protein and the MIP with the electrostatic attraction of the protein by the SAM. HTHP bound to the MIP exhibits quasi-reversible DET which is reflected by a pair of well pronounced redox peaks in the cyclic voltammograms (CVs) with a formal potential of -184.4 ± 13.7 mV vs. Ag/AgCl (1 M KCl) at pH 8.0 and it was able to catalyze the cathodic reduction of peroxide. At saturation the MIP films show a 12-fold higher electroactive surface concentration of HTHP than the non-imprinted polymer (NIP). PMID:26907299

  14. Molecularly Imprinted Electropolymer for a Hexameric Heme Protein with Direct Electron Transfer and Peroxide Electrocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Peng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available For the first time a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP with direct electron transfer (DET and bioelectrocatalytic activity of the target protein is presented. Thin films of MIPs for the recognition of a hexameric tyrosine-coordinated heme protein (HTHP have been prepared by electropolymerization of scopoletin after oriented assembly of HTHP on a self-assembled monolayer (SAM of mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA on gold electrodes. Cavities which should resemble the shape and size of HTHP were formed by template removal. Rebinding of the target protein sums up the recognition by non-covalent interactions between the protein and the MIP with the electrostatic attraction of the protein by the SAM. HTHP bound to the MIP exhibits quasi-reversible DET which is reflected by a pair of well pronounced redox peaks in the cyclic voltammograms (CVs with a formal potential of −184.4 ± 13.7 mV vs. Ag/AgCl (1 M KCl at pH 8.0 and it was able to catalyze the cathodic reduction of peroxide. At saturation the MIP films show a 12-fold higher electroactive surface concentration of HTHP than the non-imprinted polymer (NIP.

  15. PREFACE: IUMRS-ICA 2008 Symposium, Sessions 'X. Applications of Synchrotron Radiation and Neutron Beam to Soft Matter Science' and 'Y. Frontier of Polymeric Nano-Soft-Materials - Precision Polymer Synthesis, Self-assembling and Their Functionalization'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahara, Atsushi; Kawahara, Seiichi

    2009-09-01

    Tashiro (Toyota Technological Institute) Professor Kazuo Sakurai(Kitakyushu University) Professor Keiji Tanaka (Kyushu University) Dr Sono Sasaki (JASRI/Spring-8) Professor Naoya Torikai (KENS) Professor Moonhor Ree (POSTECH) Professor Kookheon Char (Seoul National University) Professor Charles C Han (CAS) Professor Atsushi Takahara(Kyushu University) Frontier of Polymeric Nano-Soft-Materials, Precision Polymer Synthesis, Self-assembling and Their Functionalization (Symposium Y of IUMRS-ICA2008) Seiichi Kawahara, Rong-Ming Ho, Hiroshi Jinnai, Masami Kamigaito, Takashi Miyata, Hiroshi Morita, Hideyuki Otsuka, Daewon Sohn, Keiji Tanaka It is our great pleasure and honor to publish peer-reviewed papers, presented in Symposium Y 'Frontier of Polymeric Nano-Soft-Materials Precision Polymer Synthesis, Self-assembling and Their Functionalization' at the International Union of Materials Research Societies International Conference in Asia 2008 (IUMRS-ICA2008), which was held on 9-13 December 2008, at Nagoya Congress Center, Nagoya, Japan. 'Polymeric nano-soft-materials' are novel outcomes based on a recent innovative evolution in polymer science, i.e. precision polymer synthesis, self-assembling and functionalization of multi-component systems. The materials are expected to exhibit specific functions and unique properties due to their hierarchic morphologies brought either by naturally-generated ordering or by artificial manipulation of the systems, e.g., crystallization and phase-separation. The emerging precision synthesis has brought out new types of polymers with well-controlled primary structures. Furthermore, the surface and interface of the material are recognized to play an important role in the outstanding mechanical, electrical and optical properties, which are required for medical and engineering applications. In order to understand structure-property relationships in the nano-soft-materials, it is indispensable to develop novel characterization techniques. Symposium Y

  16. The Effect of Plant Proteins Derived from Cereals and Legumes on Heme Iron Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Weinborn

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the effect of proteins from cereals and legumes on heme iron (Fe absorption. The absorption of heme Fe without its native globin was measured. Thirty adult females participated in two experimental studies (15 per study. Study I focused on the effects of cereal proteins (zein, gliadin and glutelin and study II on the effects of legume proteins (soy, pea and lentil on heme Fe absorption. When heme was given alone (as a control, study I and II yielded 6.2% and 11.0% heme absorption (p > 0.05. In study I, heme Fe absorption was 7.2%, 7.5% and 5.9% when zein, gliadin and glutelin were added, respectively. From this, it was concluded that cereal proteins did not affect heme Fe absorption. In study II, heme Fe absorption was 7.3%, 8.1% and 9.1% with the addition of soy, pea and lentil proteins, respectively. Only soy proteins decreased heme Fe absorption (p < 0.05. These results suggest that with the exception of soy proteins, which decreased absorption, proteins derived from cereals and legumes do not affect heme Fe absorption.

  17. The Effect of Plant Proteins Derived from Cereals and Legumes on Heme Iron Absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinborn, Valerie; Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Brito, Alex; Arredondo, Miguel; Flores, Sebastián; Valenzuela, Carolina

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of proteins from cereals and legumes on heme iron (Fe) absorption. The absorption of heme Fe without its native globin was measured. Thirty adult females participated in two experimental studies (15 per study). Study I focused on the effects of cereal proteins (zein, gliadin and glutelin) and study II on the effects of legume proteins (soy, pea and lentil) on heme Fe absorption. When heme was given alone (as a control), study I and II yielded 6.2% and 11.0% heme absorption (p > 0.05). In study I, heme Fe absorption was 7.2%, 7.5% and 5.9% when zein, gliadin and glutelin were added, respectively. From this, it was concluded that cereal proteins did not affect heme Fe absorption. In study II, heme Fe absorption was 7.3%, 8.1% and 9.1% with the addition of soy, pea and lentil proteins, respectively. Only soy proteins decreased heme Fe absorption (p < 0.05). These results suggest that with the exception of soy proteins, which decreased absorption, proteins derived from cereals and legumes do not affect heme Fe absorption. PMID:26529009

  18. Bioavailability of Heme Iron in Biscuit Filling Using Piglets as an Animal Model for Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Guillermo Quintero-Gutiérrez, Guillermina González-Rosendo, Jonathan Sánchez-Muñoz, Javier Polo-Pozo, José Juan Rodríguez-Jerez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the bioavailability of heme iron added to biscuit filling. It comprised two stages: first, the development of the heme iron enriched biscuit filling; second, the evaluation of the bioavailability of the mineral in fattening piglets. Two groups were selected randomly and fed: a Low iron feed and biscuits with heme iron supplemented filling; b Normal feed (with ferrous sulphate. Weight and blood parameters were measured every fifteen days. Averages were compared after duplicate analyses. The filling had a creamy appearance, chocolate taste and smell, appropriate spreadability, heme iron content of 2.6 mg per gram and a shelf-life of a month. The heme iron supplemented pigs registered a greater (P<0.05 weight gain (27.8% more than the control group. Mortality in the heme iron group was 10%, compared to 50% in the control group. The amount of iron measured in the different compartment was greater in the heme group (3315 mg than in the control group (2792 mg. However, the amount of iron consumed in the latter was greater. We show that an acceptable product with high heme iron content can be formulated, suitable for use as biscuit filling. The heme iron supplement produced better weight increase and lesser mortality in fattening pigs. The bioavailability of heme iron was 23% greater (P<0.05 compared to ferrous sulphate.

  19. Alteration by irradiation and storage at amount of heme iron in poultry meat; Alteracoes provocadas pela irradiacao e armazenamento nos teores de ferro heme em carne de frango

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Adriana Regia Marques de; Arthur, Valter Arthur [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Irradiacao de Alimentos e Radioentomologia; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Agroindustria, Alimentos e Nutricao]. E-mail: sgcbraza@esalq.usp.br

    2007-04-15

    Studies of irradiation and storage effects in chicken were carried out to discover the influence in iron heme, non-heme amount, color and total pigments. Chicken thighs and chicken breast were studied. These were irradiated to 0, 1 and 2 kGy stored by 14 days to 4 deg C in refrigerator. Determining the heme content and non-heme of meat was done using the colorimeter method and the Ferrozine reagent. The values of iron heme were influenced both by the irradiation and the storage, reducing the amount throughout the course of time. The iron non-heme was also influenced by the doses and the storage time, however the values increased throughout the course of time, because of the conversion of iron heme in non-heme. The color did not show that it was influenced by the studied doses, except for the storage, and the total number of pigments was affected by the irradiation and the time, reducing the values with the increase of storage. Irradiation was shown to be a good method to conserve iron. (author)

  20. REGULATION OF RAT HEPATIC DELTA-AMINOLEVULINIC ACID SYNTHETASE AND HEME OXYGENASE ACTIVITIES: EVIDENCE FOR CONTROL BY HEME AND AGAINST MEDIATION BY PROSTHETIC IRON

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of in vivo administration of 6 compounds on the activity of delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthetase and heme oxygenase were determined. The order of decreasing potency in reducing ALA synthetase activity was heme, bilirubin, protoporphyrin IX, bilirubin dimethyl es...

  1. Ribosome Assembly as Antimicrobial Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolay, Rainer; Schmidt, Sabine; Schlömer, Renate; Deuerling, Elke; Nierhaus, Knud H

    2016-01-01

    Many antibiotics target the ribosome and interfere with its translation cycle. Since translation is the source of all cellular proteins including ribosomal proteins, protein synthesis and ribosome assembly are interdependent. As a consequence, the activity of translation inhibitors might indirectly cause defective ribosome assembly. Due to the difficulty in distinguishing between direct and indirect effects, and because assembly is probably a target in its own right, concepts are needed to identify small molecules that directly inhibit ribosome assembly. Here, we summarize the basic facts of ribosome targeting antibiotics. Furthermore, we present an in vivo screening strategy that focuses on ribosome assembly by a direct fluorescence based read-out that aims to identify and characterize small molecules acting as primary assembly inhibitors. PMID:27240412

  2. Cyanide binding to human plasma heme-hemopexin: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ascenzi, Paolo, E-mail: ascenzi@uniroma3.it [Laboratorio Interdipartimentale di Microscopia Elettronica, Universita Roma Tre, Roma (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Biostrutture e Biosistemi, Roma (Italy); Leboffe, Loris [Istituto Nazionale di Biostrutture e Biosistemi, Roma (Italy); Polticelli, Fabio [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita Roma Tre, Roma (Italy)

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyanide binding to ferric HHPX-heme-Fe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyanide binding to ferrous HHPX-heme-Fe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dithionite-mediated reduction of ferric HHPX-heme-Fe-cyanide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyanide binding to HHPX-heme-Fe is limited by ligand deprotonation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyanide dissociation from HHPX-heme-Fe-cyanide is limited by ligand protonation. -- Abstract: Hemopexin (HPX) displays a pivotal role in heme scavenging and delivery to the liver. In turn, heme-Fe-hemopexin (HPX-heme-Fe) displays heme-based spectroscopic and reactivity properties. Here, kinetics and thermodynamics of cyanide binding to ferric and ferrous hexa-coordinate human plasma HPX-heme-Fe (HHPX-heme-Fe(III) and HHPX-heme-Fe(II), respectively), and for the dithionite-mediated reduction of the HHPX-heme-Fe(III)-cyanide complex, at pH 7.4 and 20.0 Degree-Sign C, are reported. Values of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for cyanide binding to HHPX-heme-Fe(III) and HHPX-heme-Fe(II) are K = (4.1 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} M, k{sub on} = (6.9 {+-} 0.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 1} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, and k{sub off} = 2.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} s{sup -1}; and H = (6 {+-} 1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -1} M, h{sub on} = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -1} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, and h{sub off} = (7.1 {+-} 0.8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} s{sup -1}, respectively. The value of the rate constant for the dithionite-mediated reduction of the HHPX-heme-Fe(III)-cyanide complex is l = 8.9 {+-} 0.8 M{sup -1/2} s{sup -1}. HHPX-heme-Fe reactivity is modulated by proton acceptor/donor amino acid residue(s) (e.g., His236) assisting the deprotonation and protonation of the incoming and outgoing ligand, respectively.

  3. Challenging Density Functional Theory Calculations with Hemes and Porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Visser, Sam P; Stillman, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we review recent advances in computational chemistry and specifically focus on the chemical description of heme proteins and synthetic porphyrins that act as both mimics of natural processes and technological uses. These are challenging biochemical systems involved in electron transfer as well as biocatalysis processes. In recent years computational tools have improved considerably and now can reproduce experimental spectroscopic and reactivity studies within a reasonable error margin (several kcal·mol(-1)). This paper gives recent examples from our groups, where we investigated heme and synthetic metal-porphyrin systems. The four case studies highlight how computational modelling can correctly reproduce experimental product distributions, predicted reactivity trends and guide interpretation of electronic structures of complex systems. The case studies focus on the calculations of a variety of spectroscopic features of porphyrins and show how computational modelling gives important insight that explains the experimental spectra and can lead to the design of porphyrins with tuned properties. PMID:27070578

  4. Challenging Density Functional Theory Calculations with Hemes and Porphyrins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam P. de Visser

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we review recent advances in computational chemistry and specifically focus on the chemical description of heme proteins and synthetic porphyrins that act as both mimics of natural processes and technological uses. These are challenging biochemical systems involved in electron transfer as well as biocatalysis processes. In recent years computational tools have improved considerably and now can reproduce experimental spectroscopic and reactivity studies within a reasonable error margin (several kcal·mol−1. This paper gives recent examples from our groups, where we investigated heme and synthetic metal-porphyrin systems. The four case studies highlight how computational modelling can correctly reproduce experimental product distributions, predicted reactivity trends and guide interpretation of electronic structures of complex systems. The case studies focus on the calculations of a variety of spectroscopic features of porphyrins and show how computational modelling gives important insight that explains the experimental spectra and can lead to the design of porphyrins with tuned properties.

  5. Challenging Density Functional Theory Calculations with Hemes and Porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Visser, Sam P; Stillman, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we review recent advances in computational chemistry and specifically focus on the chemical description of heme proteins and synthetic porphyrins that act as both mimics of natural processes and technological uses. These are challenging biochemical systems involved in electron transfer as well as biocatalysis processes. In recent years computational tools have improved considerably and now can reproduce experimental spectroscopic and reactivity studies within a reasonable error margin (several kcal·mol(-1)). This paper gives recent examples from our groups, where we investigated heme and synthetic metal-porphyrin systems. The four case studies highlight how computational modelling can correctly reproduce experimental product distributions, predicted reactivity trends and guide interpretation of electronic structures of complex systems. The case studies focus on the calculations of a variety of spectroscopic features of porphyrins and show how computational modelling gives important insight that explains the experimental spectra and can lead to the design of porphyrins with tuned properties.

  6. Irradiation of bovine meat: effect of heme-iron concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The irradiation is often used, nowadays, for meat conservation and it is important to know how much this process interferes with the nutritional quality of the meat. In this study round cut meat, ground and steaks (from a local supermarket) was irradiated with doses of O; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 7,5 and 10 kGy (JS-7500 Nordium Inc -Canada) and the interference of irradiation and the process of food preparation on heme-iron (H Fe) content was determined. Half of the sample was kept raw and the other half was grilled in a pre-warmed oven at 250 deg C for 9 min and a controlled humidity of 70%. The chemical composition, the total iron (T Fe) (EM) and the heme iron concentration were determined (Hornsey,1956) and the sensorial quality evaluated. The average T Fe concentration of raw and ground , ground and grilled, raw steaks and grilled steak meat, on dry and degreased basis was 113 mug/g, 121 mug/g , 91 mug/g and 77 mug/g; and the H Fe concentration 105 mug/g (93% of T Fe) , 88 mug/g (73% of T Fe), 90 mug/g (99% of T Fe) and 52 mug/g (68% of T Fe) respectively. Data were evaluated by ANOVA with fixed effects and multiple comparisons. The irradiation neither altered the chemical composition nor the proportion of heme iron of meat. The preparation conditions (temperature, cooking time, environment humidity, meat presentation) of the sample interfered more with the heme iron content than the irradiation. With the sensorial analysis we verified that meats irradiated with doses of 3 kGy were better evaluated in softness and succulency attributes than the others. Meat submitted to irradiation doses up to 3 kGy were accepted by the specialists' panel. (author)

  7. Bacillus anthracis IsdG, a Heme-Degrading Monooxygenase

    OpenAIRE

    Skaar, Eric P.; Gaspar, Andrew H.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2006-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, utilizes hemin and hemoglobin for growth in culture, suggesting that these host molecules serve as sources for the nutrient iron during bacterial infection. Bioinformatic analyses of the B. anthracis genome revealed genes with similarity to the iron-regulated surface determinant (isd) system responsible for heme uptake in Staphylococcus aureus. We show that the protein product of one of these genes, isdG, binds hemin in a manner resembling t...

  8. Heme oxygenase-1 polymorphism is not associated with risk of colorectal cancer: a Danish prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Andersen, Vibeke; Christensen, Jane;

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Intake of red and processed meat confers risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). We wanted to test whether heme in meat promotes carcinogenesis. Methods: Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, HMOX1) A-413T (rs2071746) was assessed in a nested case–cohort study of 383 CRC cases and 763 randomly selected...... for interaction=0.55). Conclusion: The studied HO-1 polymorphism was not associated with risk of CRC suggesting that heme from meat is not important in CRC development....

  9. Bioavailability of Heme Iron in Biscuit Filling Using Piglets as an Animal Model for Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Adrián Guillermo Quintero-Gutiérrez, Guillermina González-Rosendo, Jonathan Sánchez-Muñoz, Javier Polo-Pozo, José Juan Rodríguez-Jerez

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the bioavailability of heme iron added to biscuit filling. It comprised two stages: first, the development of the heme iron enriched biscuit filling; second, the evaluation of the bioavailability of the mineral in fattening piglets. Two groups were selected randomly and fed: a) Low iron feed and biscuits with heme iron supplemented filling; b) Normal feed (with ferrous sulphate). Weight and blood parameters were measured every fifteen days. Averages ...

  10. Heme deficiency may be a factor in the mitochondrial and neuronal decay of aging

    OpenAIRE

    Atamna, Hani; Killilea, David W.; Killilea, Alison Nisbet; Bruce N. Ames

    2002-01-01

    Heme, a major functional form of iron in the cell, is synthesized in the mitochondria by ferrochelatase inserting ferrous iron into protoporphyrin IX. Heme deficiency was induced with N-methylprotoporphyrin IX, a selective inhibitor of ferrochelatase, in two human brain cell lines, SHSY5Y (neuroblastoma) and U373 (astrocytoma), as well as in rat primary hippocampal neurons. Heme deficiency in brain cells decreases mitochondrial complex IV, activates nitric oxide synthase, alters amyloid precu...

  11. Porphyrin-induced photodynamic cross-linking of hepatic heme-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, S H; Holeman, B; Cully, B C; Muller-Eberhard, U

    1986-01-27

    Three types of hepatic proteins, a heme-binding Z protein, a mixture of the glutathione S-transferases and a cytochrome P450 isozyme, were shown to be susceptible to photodynamic cross-linking and loss in antigenicity by naturally occurring porphyrins. At 50 microM, uroporphyrin caused the most and protoporphyrin the least photodecomposition. Hemopexin, a specific serum heme carrier, was photodecomposed but no cross-linking was detected. Heme and scavengers of singlet oxygen partially prevented protein photodecomposition.

  12. Heme Transfer from Streptococcal Cell Surface Protein Shp to HtsA of Transporter HtsABC

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Mengyao; Lei, Benfang

    2005-01-01

    Human pathogen group A streptococcus (GAS) can take up heme from host heme-containing proteins as a source of iron. Little is known about the heme acquisition mechanism in GAS. We recently identified a streptococcal cell surface protein (designated Shp) and the lipoprotein component (designated HtsA) of an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter made by GAS as heme-binding proteins. In an effort to delineate the molecular mechanism involved in heme acquisition by GAS, heme-free Shp (apo-Shp) a...

  13. The hmuQ and hmuD Genes from Bradyrhizobium japonicum Encode Heme-Degrading Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Puri, Sumant; O'Brian, Mark R.

    2006-01-01

    Utilization of heme by bacteria as a nutritional iron source involves the transport of exogenous heme, followed by cleavage of the heme macrocycle to release iron. Bradyrhizobium japonicum can use heme as an iron source, but no heme-degrading oxygenase has been described. Here, bioinformatics analyses of the B. japonicum genome identified two paralogous genes renamed hmuQ (bll7075) and hmuD (bll7423) that encode proteins with weak similarity to the heme-degrading monooxygenase IsdG from Staph...

  14. Altered heme catabolism by heme oxygenase-1 caused by mutations in human NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Amit V., E-mail: amit@pandeylab.org [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, Tiefenaustrasse 120c, CH-3004 Bern (Switzerland); Flueck, Christa E.; Mullis, Primus E. [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, Tiefenaustrasse 120c, CH-3004 Bern (Switzerland)

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Mutations in POR identified from patients lead to reduced HO-1 activities. {yields} POR mutation Y181D affecting FMN binding results in total loss of HO-1 activity. {yields} POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F, lost 50-70% activity. {yields} Mutations in FAD binding domain, R457H, Y459H and V492E lost all HO-1 activity. {yields} POR polymorphisms P228L, R316W, G413S, A503V and G504R have normal activity. -- Abstract: Human heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) carries out heme catabolism supported by electrons supplied from the NADPH through NADPH P450 reductase (POR, CPR). Previously we have shown that mutations in human POR cause a rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of mutations in POR on HO-1 activity. We used purified preparations of wild type and mutant human POR and in vitro reconstitution with purified HO-1 to measure heme degradation in a coupled assay using biliverdin reductase. Here we show that mutations in POR found in patients may reduce HO-1 activity, potentially influencing heme catabolism in individuals carrying mutant POR alleles. POR mutants Y181D, A457H, Y459H, V492E and R616X had total loss of HO-1 activity, while POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F lost 50-70% activity. The POR variants P228L, R316W and G413S, A503V and G504R identified as polymorphs had close to WT activity. Loss of HO-1 activity may result in increased oxidative neurotoxicity, anemia, growth retardation and iron deposition. Further examination of patients affected with POR deficiency will be required to assess the metabolic effects of reduced HO-1 activity in affected individuals.

  15. Irradiation of bovine meat: effect of heme-iron concentration.; Irradiacao de carne bovina: efeito na concentracao de ferro heme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistura, Liliana Perazzini Furtado

    2002-07-01

    The irradiation is often used, nowadays, for meat conservation and it is important to know how much this process interferes with the nutritional quality of the meat. In this study round cut meat, ground and steaks (from a local supermarket) was irradiated with doses of O; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 7,5 and 10 kGy (JS-7500 Nordium Inc -Canada) and the interference of irradiation and the process of food preparation on heme-iron (H Fe) content was determined. Half of the sample was kept raw and the other half was grilled in a pre-warmed oven at 250 deg C for 9 min and a controlled humidity of 70%. The chemical composition, the total iron (T Fe) (EM) and the heme iron concentration were determined (Hornsey,1956) and the sensorial quality evaluated. The average T Fe concentration of raw and ground , ground and grilled, raw steaks and grilled steak meat, on dry and degreased basis was 113 mug/g, 121 mug/g , 91 mug/g and 77 mug/g; and the H Fe concentration 105 mug/g (93% of T Fe) , 88 mug/g (73% of T Fe), 90 mug/g (99% of T Fe) and 52 mug/g (68% of T Fe) respectively. Data were evaluated by ANOVA with fixed effects and multiple comparisons. The irradiation neither altered the chemical composition nor the proportion of heme iron of meat. The preparation conditions (temperature, cooking time, environment humidity, meat presentation) of the sample interfered more with the heme iron content than the irradiation. With the sensorial analysis we verified that meats irradiated with doses of 3 kGy were better evaluated in softness and succulency attributes than the others. Meat submitted to irradiation doses up to 3 kGy were accepted by the specialists' panel. (author)

  16. Direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of heme-proteins in regenerated silk fibroin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A biocompatible silk fibroin (SF) film provided a feasible microenvironment for heme-proteins to direct electron transfer on graphite electrodes (GE). Myoglobin (Mb), hemoglobin (Hb), horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and catalase (Cat) incorporated in SF films exhibited a pair of well-defined, nearly reversible cyclic voltammetric peaks, corresponding to the reaction of hemeFe (III) + e → hemeFe (II). The formal potential (E 0), the apparent coverage (Γ) and the electron transfer rate constant (k s) of four proteins in SF films were evaluated by analyzing the cyclic voltammograms (CVs) of heme-proteins. The formal potential was pH dependent, suggesting that proton ion was involved in the reaction. Ultraviolet visible (UV-vis) spectra and reflectance absorbance infrared (RAIR) spectra indicated that heme-proteins in SF films were not grossly denatured. The structure of heme-proteins-SF films was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and RAIR. It indicated that there existed intermolecular interaction between heme-proteins and SF and this governed their different morphology in SF films. Hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide were catalytically reduced by the heme-proteins in SF films, showing the potential applicability of the heme-proteins-SF films as the new type of biosensors based on the protein film voltammetry

  17. In vivo and in vitro olefin cyclopropanation catalyzed by heme enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Pedro S; Brustad, Eric M; Arnold, Frances H; Wang, Zhan; Lewis, Jared C

    2015-03-31

    The present invention provides methods for catalyzing the conversion of an olefin to any compound containing one or more cyclopropane functional groups using heme enzymes. In certain aspects, the present invention provides a method for producing a cyclopropanation product comprising providing an olefinic substrate, a diazo reagent, and a heme enzyme; and admixing the components in a reaction for a time sufficient to produce a cyclopropanation product. In other aspects, the present invention provides heme enzymes including variants and fragments thereof that are capable of carrying out in vivo and in vitro olefin cyclopropanation reactions. Expression vectors and host cells expressing the heme enzymes are also provided by the present invention.

  18. Benfang Lei’s research on heme acquisition in Gram-positive pathogens and bacterial pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Benfang Lei’s laboratory conducts research on pathogenesis of human pathogen Group A Streptococcus (GAS)and horse pathogen Streptococcus equi(S.equi). His current research focuses on heme acquisition in Gram-positive pathogens and molecular mechanism of GAS and S.equi pathogenesis.Heme is an important source of essential iron for bacterial pathogens.Benfang Lei and colleagues identified the first cell surface heme-binding protein in Gram-positive pathogens and the heme acquisition system in GAS,demonstrated direct heme transfer from one protein to another,demonstrated an experimental pathway of heme acquisition by the Staphylococcus aureus Isd system,elucidated the activated heme transfer mechanism,and obtained evidence for a chemical mechanism of direct axial ligand displacement during the Shp-to-HtsA heme transfer reaction.These findings have considerably contributed to the progress that has been made over recent years in understanding the heme acquisition process in Grampositive pathogens.Pathogenesis of GAS is mediated by an abundance of extracellular proteins,and pathogenic role and functional mechanism are not known for many of these virulence factors.Lei laboratory identified a secreted protein of GAS as a CovRS-regulated virulence factor that is a protective antigen and is critical for GAS spreading in the skin and systemic dissemination.These studies may lead to development of novel strategies to prevent and treat GAS infections.

  19. Nitrosylation of c heme in cd(1)-nitrite reductase is enhanced during catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, Serena; Giardina, Giorgio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2014-08-29

    The reduction of nitrite into nitric oxide (NO) in denitrifying bacteria is catalyzed by nitrite reductase. In several species, this enzyme is a heme-containing protein with one c heme and one d1 heme per monomer (cd1NiR), encoded by the nirS gene. For many years, the evidence of a link between NO and this hemeprotein represented a paradox, given that NO was known to tightly bind and, possibly, inhibit hemeproteins, including cd1NiRs. It is now established that, during catalysis, cd1NiRs diverge from "canonical" hemeproteins, since the product NO rapidly dissociates from the ferrous d1 heme, which, in turn, displays a peculiar "low" affinity for NO (KD=0.11 μM at pH 7.0). It has been also previously shown that the c heme reacts with NO at acidic pH but c heme nitrosylation was not extensively investigated, given that in cd1NiR it was considered a side reaction, rather than a genuine process controlling catalysis. The spectroscopic study of the reaction of cd1NiR and its semi-apo derivative (containing the sole c heme) with NO reported here shows that c heme nitrosylation is enhanced during catalysis; this evidence has been discussed in order to assess the potential of c heme nitrosylation as a regulatory process, as observed for cytochrome c nitrosylation in mammalian mitochondria.

  20. Out of plane distortions of the heme b of Escherichia coli succinate dehydrogenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quang M Tran

    Full Text Available The role of the heme b in Escherichia coli succinate dehydrogenase is highly ambiguous and its role in catalysis is questionable. To examine whether heme reduction is an essential step of the catalytic mechanism, we generated a series of site-directed mutations around the heme binding pocket, creating a library of variants with a stepwise decrease in the midpoint potential of the heme from the wild-type value of +20 mV down to -80 mV. This difference in midpoint potential is enough to alter the reactivity of the heme towards succinate and thus its redox state under turnover conditions. Our results show both the steady state succinate oxidase and fumarate reductase catalytic activity of the enzyme are not a function of the redox potential of the heme. As well, lower heme potential did not cause an increase in the rate of superoxide production both in vitro and in vivo. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectrum of the heme in the wild-type enzyme is a combination of two distinct signals. We link EPR spectra to structure, showing that one of the signals likely arises from an out-of-plane distortion of the heme, a saddled conformation, while the second signal originates from a more planar orientation of the porphyrin ring.

  1. Regulating the nitrite reductase activity of myoglobin by redesigning the heme active center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei-Bin; Yuan, Hong; Gao, Shu-Qin; You, Yong; Nie, Chang-Ming; Wen, Ge-Bo; Lin, Ying-Wu; Tan, Xiangshi

    2016-07-01

    Heme proteins perform diverse functions in living systems, of which nitrite reductase (NIR) activity receives much attention recently. In this study, to better understand the structural elements responsible for the NIR activity, we used myoglobin (Mb) as a model heme protein and redesigned the heme active center, by introducing one or two distal histidines, and by creating a channel to the heme center with removal of the native distal His64 gate (His to Ala mutation). UV-Vis kinetic studies, combined with EPR studies, showed that a single distal histidine with a suitable position to the heme iron, i.e., His43, is crucial for nitrite (NO2(-)) to nitric oxide (NO) reduction. Moreover, creation of a water channel to the heme center significantly enhanced the NIR activity compared to the corresponding mutant without the channel. In addition, X-ray crystallographic studies of F43H/H64A Mb and its complexes with NO2(-) or NO revealed a unique hydrogen-bonding network in the heme active center, as well as unique substrate and product binding models, providing valuable structural information for the enhanced NIR activity. These findings enriched our understanding of the structure and NIR activity relationship of heme proteins. The approach of creating a channel in this study is also useful for rational design of other functional heme proteins. PMID:27108710

  2. A Novel Approach for Identifying the Heme-Binding Proteins from Mouse Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaolei Li; Rong Wang; Zhongsheng Sun; Zuyuan Xu; Jingyue Bao; Xiuqing Zhang; Xiaoli Feng; Siqi Liu; Xiaoshan Wang; Kang Zhao; Zhengfeng Zhou; Caifeng Zhao; Ren Yan; Liang Lin; Tingting Lei; Jianning Yin

    2003-01-01

    Heme is a key cofactor in aerobic life, both in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Because of the high reactivity of ferrous protoporphyrin IX, the reactions of heme in cells are often carried out through heme-protein complexes. Traditionally studies of hemebinding proteins have been approached on a case by case basis, thus there is a limited global view of the distribution of heme-binding proteins in different cells or tissues. The procedure described here is aimed at profiling hemne-binding proteins in mouse tissues sequentially by 1) purification of heme-binding proteins by hemeagarose, an affinity chromatographic resin; 2) isolation of heme-binding proteins by SDS-PAGE or two-dimensional electrophoresis; 3) identification of heme-binding proteins by mass spectrometry. In five mouse tissues, over 600 protein spots were visualized on 2DE gel stained by Commassie blue and 154 proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF, in which most proteins belong to heme related. This methodology makes it possible to globally characterize the heme-binding proteins in a biological system.

  3. Investigations of ultrafast ligand rebinding to heme and heme proteins using temperature and strong magnetic field perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenyu

    This thesis is written to summarize investigations of the mechanisms that underlie the kinetics of diatomic ligand rebinding to the iron atom of the heme group, which is chelated inside heme proteins. The family of heme proteins is a major object of studies for several branches of scientific research activity. Understanding the ligand binding mechanisms and pathways is one of the major goals for biophysics. My interests mainly focus on the physics of this ligand binding process. Therefore, to investigate the problem, isolated from the influence of the protein matrix, Fe-protophorphyrin IX is chosen as the prototype system in my studies. Myoglobin, the most extensively and intensively studied protein, is another ideal system that allows coupling the protein polypeptide matrix into the investigation. A technique to synchro-lock two laser pulse trains electronically is applied to our pump-probe spectroscopic studies. Based on this technique, a two color, fs/ps pump-probe system is developed which extends the temporal window for our investigation to 13ns and fills a gap existing in previous pump-probe investigations. In order to apply this newly-developed pump-probe laser system to implement systematic studies on the kinetics of diatomic ligand (NO, CO, O2) rebinding to heme and heme proteins, several experimental setups are utilized. In Chapter 1, the essential background knowledge, which helps to understand the iron-ligand interaction, is briefly described. In Chapter 2, in addition to a description of the preparation protocols of protein samples and details of the method for data analysis, three home-made setups are described, which include: a picosecond laser regenerative amplifier, a pump-probe application along the bore (2-inch in diameter) of a superconducting magnet and a temperature-controllable cryostat for spinning sample cell. Chapter 3 presents high magnetic field studies of several heme-ligand or protein-ligand systems. Pump-probe spectroscopy is used to

  4. TPR domain of NrfG mediates complex formation between heme lyase and formate-dependent nitrite reductase in Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dohyun; Kim, Kyunggon; Oh, Jongkil; Park, Jungeun; Kim, Youngsoo

    2008-02-15

    Escherichia coli synthesize C-type cytochromes only during anaerobic growth in media supplemented with nitrate and nitrite. The reduction of nitrate to ammonium in the periplasm of Escherichia coli involves two separate periplasmic enzymes, nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase. The nitrite reductase involved, NrfA, contains cytochrome C and is synthesized coordinately with a membrane-associated cytochrome C, NrfB, during growth in the presence of nitrite or in limiting nitrate concentrations. The genes NrfE, NrfF, and NrfG are required for the formate-dependent nitrite reduction pathway, which involves at least two C-type cytochrome proteins, NrfA and NrfB. The NrfE, NrfF, and NrfG genes (heme lyase complex) are involved in the maturation of a special C-type cytochrome, apocytochrome C (apoNrfA), to cytochrome C (NrfA) by transferring a heme to the unusual heme binding motif of the Cys-Trp-Ser-Cys-Lys sequence in apoNrfA protein. Thus, in order to further investigate the roles of NrfG in the formation of heme lyase complex (NrfEFG) and in the interaction between heme lyase complex and formate-dependent nitrite reductase (NrfA), we determined the crystal structure of NrfG at 2.05 A. The structure of NrfG showed that the contact between heme lyase complex (NrfEFG) and NrfA is accomplished via a TPR domain in NrfG which serves as a binding site for the C-terminal motif of NrfA. The portion of NrfA that binds to TPR domain of NrfG has a unique secondary motif, a helix followed by about a six-residue C-terminal loop (the so called "hook conformation"). This study allows us to better understand the mechanism of special C-type cytochrome assembly during the maturation of formate-dependent nitrite reductase, and also adds a new TPR binding conformation to the list of TPR-mediated protein-protein interactions.

  5. Functional analysis of the zinc cluster domain of the CYP1 (HAP1) complex regulator in heme-sufficient and heme-deficient yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defranoux, N; Gaisne, M; Verdière, J

    1994-03-01

    CYP1 determines the expression of several genes whose transcription is heme-dependent in yeast. It exerts regulatory functions even in the absence of heme, usually considered to be its effector. It mediates both positive and negative effects, depending on the target gene and on the redox state of the cell. In the presence of heme, it binds through a cysteine-rich domain in which a histidine residue occupies the position of the sixth and essential cysteine of the otherwise classical zinc cluster DNA-binding domain exemplified by GAL4. We constructed specific missense mutations in the potential CYP1 zinc cluster domain by site-directed mutagenesis and looked for regulatory effects of the mutated proteins under specific physiological conditions. We show that CYP1 does belong to the zinc cluster regulatory family since a sixth essential cysteine residue is indeed present, albeit at a modified position when compared to the consensus sequence. We also show that the amino acid preceding the first cysteine residue of the DNA-binding domain critically affects the efficiency of regulation both in the presence and in the absence of heme: mutations known to affect DNA binding under heme-sufficient conditions also affect regulation under heme-deficient conditions. We therefore surmise that regulation under heme-deficient conditions is dependent upon DNA binding. PMID:8152420

  6. Calcium-Dependent Conformation of a Heme and Fingerprint Peptide of the Di-Heme Cytochrome c Peroxidase from Paracoccus Pantotrophus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PAULETA,SOFIA R.; LU,YI; GOODHEW,CELIA F.; MOURA,ISABEL; PETTIGREW,GRAHAM W.; SHELNUTT,JOHN A.

    2000-12-18

    The structural changes in the heme macrocycle and substituents caused by binding of Ca{sup 2+} to the diheme cytochrome c peroxidase from Paracoccuspantotrophus were clarified by resonance Raman spectroscopy of the inactive filly oxidized form of the enzyme. The changes in the macrocycle vibrational modes are consistent with a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent increase in the out-of-plane distortion of the low-potential heme, the proposed peroxidatic heme. Most of the increase in out-of-plane distortion occurs when the high affinity site I is occupied, but a small further increase in distortion occurs when site II is also occupied by Ca{sup 2+}or Mg{sup 2+}. This increase in the heme distortion also explains the red shift in the Soret absorption band that occurs upon Ca{sup 2+} binding. Changes also occur in the low frequency substituent modes of the heme, indicating that a structural change in the covalently attached fingerprint pentapeptide of the LP heme occurs upon CM{sup 2+} binding to site I. These structural changes, possibly enhanced in the semi-reduced form of the enzyme, may lead to loss of the sixth ligand at the peroxidatic heme and activation of the enzyme.

  7. Differential effects of metalloporphyrins on messenger RNA levels of delta-aminolevulinate synthase and heme oxygenase. Studies in cultured chick embryo liver cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Cable, E. E.; Pepe, J A; Karamitsios, N C; Lambrecht, R W; Bonkovsky, H. L.

    1994-01-01

    The acute porphyrias in relapse are commonly treated with intravenous heme infusion to decrease the activity of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase, normally the rate-controlling enzyme in heme biosynthesis. The biochemical effects of heme treatment are short-lived, probably due in part to heme-mediated induction of heme oxygenase, the rate-controlling enzyme for heme degradation. In this work, selected nonheme metalloporphyrins were screened for their ability to reduce delta-aminolevulinic ac...

  8. O2-mediated oxidation of ferrous nitrosylated human serum heme-albumin is limited by nitrogen monoxide dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Human serum heme-albumin displays globin-like properties. → O2-mediated oxidation of ferrous nitrosylated human serum heme-albumin. → Allosteric modulation of human serum heme-albumin reactivity. → Rifampicin is an allosteric effector of human serum heme-albumin. → Human serum heme-albumin is a ROS and NOS scavenger. -- Abstract: Human serum heme-albumin (HSA-heme-Fe) displays globin-like properties. Here, kinetics of O2-mediated oxidation of ferrous nitrosylated HSA-heme-Fe (HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO) is reported. Values of the first-order rate constants for O2-mediated oxidation of HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO (i.e., for ferric HSA-heme-Fe formation) and for NO dissociation from HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO (i.e., for NO replacement by CO) are k = 9.8 x 10-5 and 8.3 x 10-4 s-1, and h = 1.3 x 10-4 and 8.5 x 10-4 s-1, in the absence and presence of rifampicin, respectively, at pH = 7.0 and T = 20.0 oC. The coincidence of values of k and h indicates that NO dissociation represents the rate limiting step of O2-mediated oxidation of HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO. Mixing HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO with O2 does not lead to the formation of the transient adduct(s), but leads to the final ferric HSA-heme-Fe derivative. These results reflect the fast O2-mediated oxidation of ferrous HSA-heme-Fe and highlight the role of drugs in modulating allosterically the heme-Fe-atom reactivity.

  9. O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of ferrous nitrosylated human serum heme-albumin is limited by nitrogen monoxide dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ascenzi, Paolo, E-mail: ascenzi@uniroma3.it [Interdepartmental Laboratory of Electron Microscopy, University Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 79, I-00146 Roma (Italy); National Institute for Infectious Diseases I.R.C.C.S. ' Lazzaro Spallanzani' , Via Portuense 292, I-00149 Roma (Italy); Gullotta, Francesca; Gioia, Magda; Coletta, Massimo [Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Roma ' Tor Vergata' , Via Montpellier 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Interuniversity Consortium for the Research on the Chemistry of Metals in Biological Systems, Piazza Umberto I 1, I-87100 Bari (Italy); Fasano, Mauro [Department of Structural and Functional Biology, and Center of Neuroscience, University of Insubria, Via Alberto da Giussano 12a, I-21052 Busto Arsizio, VA (Italy)

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Human serum heme-albumin displays globin-like properties. {yields} O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of ferrous nitrosylated human serum heme-albumin. {yields} Allosteric modulation of human serum heme-albumin reactivity. {yields} Rifampicin is an allosteric effector of human serum heme-albumin. {yields} Human serum heme-albumin is a ROS and NOS scavenger. -- Abstract: Human serum heme-albumin (HSA-heme-Fe) displays globin-like properties. Here, kinetics of O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of ferrous nitrosylated HSA-heme-Fe (HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO) is reported. Values of the first-order rate constants for O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO (i.e., for ferric HSA-heme-Fe formation) and for NO dissociation from HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO (i.e., for NO replacement by CO) are k = 9.8 x 10{sup -5} and 8.3 x 10{sup -4} s{sup -1}, and h = 1.3 x 10{sup -4} and 8.5 x 10{sup -4} s{sup -1}, in the absence and presence of rifampicin, respectively, at pH = 7.0 and T = 20.0 {sup o}C. The coincidence of values of k and h indicates that NO dissociation represents the rate limiting step of O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO. Mixing HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO with O{sub 2} does not lead to the formation of the transient adduct(s), but leads to the final ferric HSA-heme-Fe derivative. These results reflect the fast O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of ferrous HSA-heme-Fe and highlight the role of drugs in modulating allosterically the heme-Fe-atom reactivity.

  10. Reciprocal allosteric modulation of carbon monoxide and warfarin binding to ferrous human serum heme-albumin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Bocedi

    Full Text Available Human serum albumin (HSA, the most abundant protein in human plasma, could be considered as a prototypic monomeric allosteric protein, since the ligand-dependent conformational adaptability of HSA spreads beyond the immediate proximity of the binding site(s. As a matter of fact, HSA is a major transport protein in the bloodstream and the regulation of the functional allosteric interrelationships between the different binding sites represents a fundamental information for the knowledge of its transport function. Here, kinetics and thermodynamics of the allosteric modulation: (i of carbon monoxide (CO binding to ferrous human serum heme-albumin (HSA-heme-Fe(II by warfarin (WF, and (ii of WF binding to HSA-heme-Fe(II by CO are reported. All data were obtained at pH 7.0 and 25°C. Kinetics of CO and WF binding to the FA1 and FA7 sites of HSA-heme-Fe(II, respectively, follows a multi-exponential behavior (with the same relative percentage for the two ligands. This can be accounted for by the existence of multiple conformations and/or heme-protein axial coordination forms of HSA-heme-Fe(II. The HSA-heme-Fe(II populations have been characterized by resonance Raman spectroscopy, indicating the coexistence of different species characterized by four-, five- and six-coordination of the heme-Fe atom. As a whole, these results suggest that: (i upon CO binding a conformational change of HSA-heme-Fe(II takes place (likely reflecting the displacement of an endogenous ligand by CO, and (ii CO and/or WF binding brings about a ligand-dependent variation of the HSA-heme-Fe(II population distribution of the various coordinating species. The detailed thermodynamic and kinetic analysis here reported allows a quantitative description of the mutual allosteric effect of CO and WF binding to HSA-heme-Fe(II.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of supramolecule self-assembly polyami-doamine (PAMAM G1-G1 NH2, CO2H end group Megamer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Louie

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Supramolecule self-assembly polyamidoamine (PAMAM dendrimer refers to the chemical sys-tems made up of a discrete number of assembled molecular subunits or components. These strat-egies involve the covalent assembly of hierarchical components reactive monomers, branch cells or dendrons around atomic or molecular cores according to divergent/convergent dendritic branching principles, systematic filling of space around a core with shells (layers of branch cells. The polydispersity index (PDI for the supramolecule megamer are pretty closed to one, are in agreement with the Poisson probability distribution. Polyamidoamine (PAMAM den-drimer G1-G1 that it was PAMAM Megamer NH2, COOH end groupsynthesized and character-ized by FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMRspectra and GelPermeation Chromatography (GPC.

  12. Facile synthesis of large-scale Ag nanosheet-assembled films with sub-10 nm gaps as highly active and homogeneous SERS substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongbo; Meng, Guowen; Liang, Ting; Zhang, Zhuo; Zhu, Xiaoguang

    2013-01-01

    We report a facile low-cost synthetic approach to large-scale Ag nanosheet-assembled films with a high density of uniformly distributed sub-10 nm gaps between the adjacent nanosheets on Si substrates via galvanic cell reactions. The distribution density of Ag nanosheets on substrates could be tailored by tuning the duration of the HF-etching and the concentration of citric acid in the solution. Furthermore, in conjunction with a conventional photolithography, highly uniform patterned Ag nanosheet-assembled structures with different morphologies can be achieved on Si substrates via galvanic-cell-induced growth. By using rhodamine 6G as a standard test molecule, the large-scale Ag nanosheet-assembled films exhibit highly active and homogenous surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect and also show promising potentials as reliable SERS substrates for rapid detection of trace polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).

  13. Construction of diverse supramolecular assemblies of dimetal subunits differing in coordinated water molecules via strong hydrogen bonding interactions: Synthesis, crystal structures and spectroscopic properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sadhika Khullar; Sanjay K Mandal

    2014-09-01

    Three new supramolecular assemblies (constructed through strong hydrogen bonding) of [Co2(bpta)2(adc)(H2O)4](ClO4)2.2H2O (1), [Cu2(bpta)2(fum)(H2O)2](ClO4)2 (2) and [Cu2(bpta)2(tdc)(H2O) (ClO4)](ClO4).3H2O (3), which are synthesised by one pot self-assembly of the metal salt, bpta ligand and the corresponding dicarboxylate under the same reaction conditions, are reported (where adc = acetylene dicarboxylate, fum = fumarate, tdc = 2,5-thiophenedicarboxylate and bpta = N,N'-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-tertbutylamine). These compounds have varying degrees of coordinatedwater molecules per dimetal subunits (four for 1, two for 2 and one for 3, respectively). Furthermore, the orientation of the coordinated water molecules in 1 and 2, with respect to the mono (carboxylato)-bridged dimetal subunit, is different (cis and trans, respectively). On the other hand, there is a coordinated perchlorate ion in 3 making the two metal centers inequivalent. Unlike 1 and 3, there are no lattice water molecules in 2. This difference in the dimetal subunit in 1-3 and the presence or absence of the lattice water molecules are the keys to forming the diverse supramolecular assemblies. In 1 and 3, the involvement of lattice water molecules in the construction of such assemblies is distinctly different. In case of 2, the formation of supramolecular assembly depends on the coordinated water molecule (trans to each other) and thus a ladder shaped supramolecular assembly is the result. The strength of hydrogen bonding observed in the networks of 1-3 is indicated in the O…O distances (2.596 Å to 3.160 Å) and the OH…O angles 124° to 176°. All are characterised by elemental analysis, FTIR spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies.

  14. Sequence assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Hoffmann, S.; Frankel, Annett Maria;

    2009-01-01

    and plays an important role in processing the information generated by these methods. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the current publicly available sequence assembly programs. We describe the basic principles of computational assembly along with the main concerns, such as repetitive sequences...

  15. Pilot-scale tests of HEME and HEPA dissolution process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qureshi, Z.H.; Strege, D.K.

    1994-06-01

    A series of pilot-scale demonstration tests for the dissolution of High Efficiency Mist Eliminators (HEME`s) and High Efficiency Particulate Airfilters (HEPA) were performed on a 1/5th linear scale. These fiberglass filters are to be used in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to decontaminate the effluents from the off-gases generated during the feed preparation process and vitrification. When removed, these filters will be dissolved in the Decontamination Waste Treatment Tank (DWTT) using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The contaminated fiberglass is converted to an aqueous stream which will be transferred to the waste tanks. The filter metal structure will be rinsed with process water before its disposal as low-level solid waste. The pilot-scale study reported here successfully demonstrated a simple one step process using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The proposed process requires the installation of a new water spray ring with 30 nozzles. In addition to the reduced waste generated, the total process time is reduced to 48 hours only (66% saving in time). The pilot-scale tests clearly demonstrated that the dissolution process of HEMEs has two stages - chemical digestion of the filter and mechanical erosion of the digested filter. The digestion is achieved by a boiling 5 wt% caustic solutions, whereas the mechanical break down of the digested filter is successfully achieved by spraying process water on the digested filter. An alternate method of breaking down the digested filter by increased air sparging of the solution was found to be marginally successful are best. The pilot-scale tests also demonstrated that the products of dissolution are easily pumpable by a centrifugal pump.

  16. Heme-copper terminal oxidase using both cytochrome c and ubiquinol as electron donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ye; Meyer, Björn; Sokolova, Lucie; Zwicker, Klaus; Karas, Michael; Brutschy, Bernd; Peng, Guohong; Michel, Hartmut

    2012-02-28

    The cytochrome c oxidase Cox2 has been purified from native membranes of the hyperthermophilic eubacterium Aquifex aeolicus. It is a cytochrome ba(3) oxidase belonging to the family B of the heme-copper containing terminal oxidases. It consists of three subunits, subunit I (CoxA2, 63.9 kDa), subunit II (CoxB2, 16.8 kDa), and an additional subunit IIa of 5.2 kDa. Surprisingly it is able to oxidize both reduced cytochrome c and ubiquinol in a cyanide sensitive manner. Cox2 is part of a respiratory chain supercomplex. This supercomplex contains the fully assembled cytochrome bc(1) complex and Cox2. Although direct ubiquinol oxidation by Cox2 conserves less energy than ubiquinol oxidation by the cytochrome bc(1) complex followed by cytochrome c oxidation by a cytochrome c oxidase, ubiquinol oxidation by Cox2 is of advantage when all ubiquinone would be completely reduced to ubiquinol, e.g., by the sulfidequinone oxidoreductase, because the cytochrome bc(1) complex requires the presence of ubiquinone to function according to the Q-cycle mechanism. In the case that all ubiquinone has been reduced to ubiquinol its reoxidation by Cox2 will enable the cytochrome bc(1) complex to resume working. PMID:22334648

  17. Effects of chemical modifications of heme on kinetics of carbon monoxide binding to free home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sono, M.; McCray, J.A.; Asakura, T.

    1977-11-10

    The rates of carbon monoxide recombination to six different kinds of chemically modified heme with various substituents at positions 2 and 4 have been studied in the protein-free state (free heme) by the laser flash photolysis method in a mixture of ethylene glycol and 0.02 N NaOH (80:20, v/v) (80% ethylene glycol). The carbon monoxide combination rate constants to the various free hemes obtained in 80% ethylene glycol at 22/sup 0/ were 1.4, 2.1, 2.1, 3.7, 4.5, and 6.4 x 10/sup 7/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ for 2,4-diformyl-, spirographis (2-formyl-4-vinyl-), isospirographis (2-vinyl-4-formyl-) proto-(2,4-divinyl-), deutero-(2,4-dihydrogen-), and meso-(2,4-diethyl-), hemes, respectively. This order of increase in carbon monoxide combination rate constants for these hemes correlates exactly with decrease in electron attractivity of heme side chains (i.e., increase in pK/sub 3/, basicity of nitrogen base of prophyrin) and is completely opposite to that obtained for carbon monoxide binding to these hemes reconstituted with apomyoglobin. Contrary to the results for myoglobin, the two isomers of monoformyl-monovinylheme exhibited similar optical properties and the same combination rate constant indicating that the differences in the optical and kinetic results observed in myoglobin are due to different interactions of these isomeric hemes with protein.

  18. TLR Stimulation Dynamically Regulates Heme and Iron Export Gene Expression in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Philip

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic bacteria have evolved multiple mechanisms to capture iron or iron-containing heme from host tissues or blood. In response, organisms have developed defense mechanisms to keep iron from pathogens. Very little of the body’s iron store is available as free heme; rather nearly all body iron is complexed with heme or other proteins. The feline leukemia virus, subgroup C (FeLV-C receptor, FLVCR, exports heme from cells. It was unknown whether FLVCR regulates heme-iron availability after infection, but given that other heme regulatory proteins are upregulated in macrophages in response to bacterial infection, we hypothesized that macrophages dynamically regulate FLVCR. We stimulated murine primary macrophages or macrophage cell lines with LPS and found that Flvcr is rapidly downregulated in a TLR4/MD2-dependent manner; TLR1/2 and TLR3 stimulation also decreased Flvcr expression. We identified several candidate TLR-activated transcription factors that can bind to the Flvcr promoter. Macrophages must balance the need to sequester iron from systemic circulating or intracellular pathogens with the macrophage requirement for heme and iron to produce reactive oxygen species. Our findings underscore the complexity of this regulation and point to a new role for FLVCR and heme export in macrophages responses to infection and inflammation.

  19. TLR Stimulation Dynamically Regulates Heme and Iron Export Gene Expression in Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Mary; Chiu, Edison Y.; Hajjar, Adeline M.; Abkowitz, Janis L.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria have evolved multiple mechanisms to capture iron or iron-containing heme from host tissues or blood. In response, organisms have developed defense mechanisms to keep iron from pathogens. Very little of the body's iron store is available as free heme; rather nearly all body iron is complexed with heme or other proteins. The feline leukemia virus, subgroup C (FeLV-C) receptor, FLVCR, exports heme from cells. It was unknown whether FLVCR regulates heme-iron availability after infection, but given that other heme regulatory proteins are upregulated in macrophages in response to bacterial infection, we hypothesized that macrophages dynamically regulate FLVCR. We stimulated murine primary macrophages or macrophage cell lines with LPS and found that Flvcr is rapidly downregulated in a TLR4/MD2-dependent manner; TLR1/2 and TLR3 stimulation also decreased Flvcr expression. We identified several candidate TLR-activated transcription factors that can bind to the Flvcr promoter. Macrophages must balance the need to sequester iron from systemic circulating or intracellular pathogens with the macrophage requirement for heme and iron to produce reactive oxygen species. Our findings underscore the complexity of this regulation and point to a new role for FLVCR and heme export in macrophages responses to infection and inflammation. PMID:27006955

  20. Alteration by irradiation and storage at amount of heme iron in poultry meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of irradiation and storage effects in chicken were carried out to discover the influence in iron heme, non-heme amount, color and total pigments. Chicken thighs and chicken breast were studied. These were irradiated to 0, 1 and 2 kGy stored by 14 days to 4 deg C in refrigerator. Determining the heme content and non-heme of meat was done using the colorimeter method and the Ferrozine reagent. The values of iron heme were influenced both by the irradiation and the storage, reducing the amount throughout the course of time. The iron non-heme was also influenced by the doses and the storage time, however the values increased throughout the course of time, because of the conversion of iron heme in non-heme. The color did not show that it was influenced by the studied doses, except for the storage, and the total number of pigments was affected by the irradiation and the time, reducing the values with the increase of storage. Irradiation was shown to be a good method to conserve iron. (author)

  1. Alteration by irradiation and storage at amount of heme iron in poultry meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of irradiation and storage effects in chicken were carried out to discover the influence in iron heme, non-heme amount, color and total pigments. Chicken thighs and chicken breast were studied. These were irradiated to 0, 1 and 2 kGy stored by 14 days to 4 °C in refrigerator. Determining the heme content and non-heme of meat was done using the colorimeter method and the Ferrozine reagent. The values of iron heme were influenced both by the irradiation and the storage, reducing the amount throughout the course of time. The iron non-heme was also influenced by the doses and the storage time, however the values increased throughout the course of time, because of the conversion of iron heme in non-heme. The color did not show that it was influenced by the studied doses, except for the storage, and the total number of pigments was affected by the irradiation and the time, reducing the values with the increase of storage. Irradiation was shown to be a good method to conserve iron. (author)

  2. AN ENZYME LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY FOR THE HO-1 ISOFORM OF HEME OXYGENASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    AN ENZYME LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY FOR THE HO-1 ISOFORM OF HEME OXYGENASE Heme oxygenase (HO) occurs in biological tissues as two major isoforms HO-1 and HO-2. HO-1 is inducible by many treatments, particularly oxidative stress-related conditions such as depletion of gl...

  3. Natural chlorophyll but not chlorophyllin prevents heme-induced cytotoxic and hyperproliferative effects in rat colon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, de J.; Jonker-Termont, D.S.M.L.; Katan, M.B.; Meer, van der R.

    2005-01-01

    Diets high in red meat and low in green vegetables are associated with an increased risk of colon cancer. In rats, dietary heme, mimicking red meat, increases colonic cytotoxicity and proliferation of the colonocytes, whereas addition of chlorophyll from green vegetables inhibits these heme-induced

  4. Heme and chlorophyll intake and risk of colorectal cancer in the Netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balder, H.F.; Vogel, J. de; Jansen, M.C.J.F.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Westenbrink, S.; Meer, R.D. van der; Goldbohm, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The evidence for red meat as a determinant of colorectal cancer remains equivocal, which might be explained by differences in heme content. Heme is the prooxidant, iron-containing porphyrin pigment of meat and its content depends on the type of meat. Chlorophyll from green vegetables mig

  5. Heme metabolism in stress regulation and protein production: from Cinderella to a key player

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez, J. L.; Petranovic, D.; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Heme biosynthesis is a highly conserved pathway which is present in all kingdoms, from Archaea to higher organisms such as plants and mammals. The heme molecule acts as a prosthetic group for different proteins and enzymes involved in energy metabolism and reactions involved in electron transfer....

  6. Dietary heme adversely affects experimental colitis in rats, despite heat-shock protein induction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepens, Marloes A. A.; Vink, Carolien; Schonewille, Arjan J.; Dijkstra, Gerard; van der Meer, Roelof; Bovee-Oudenhoven, Ingeborg M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Research on dietary modulation of inflammatory bowel disease is in its infancy. Dietary heme, mimicking red meat, is cytotoxic to colonic epithelium and thus may aggravate colitis. Alternatively, heme-induced colonic stress might also result in potential protective heat-shock proteins (HS

  7. Unsaturated Glycerophospholipids Mediate Heme Crystallization: Biological Implications for Hemozoin Formation in the Kissing Bug Rhodnius prolixus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiebler, R.; Majerowicz, D.; Knudsen, Jens;

    2014-01-01

    Hemozoin (Hz) is a heme crystal produced by some blood-feeding organisms, as an efficient way to detoxify heme derived from hemoglobin digestion. In the triatomine insect Rhodnius prolixus, Hz is essentially produced by midgut extracellular phospholipid membranes known as perimicrovillar membrane...

  8. One-pot hydrothermal synthesis of hollow Fe3O4 microspheres assembled with nanoparticles for lithium-ion battery anodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yanguo; Wang, Xiaoliang; Ma, Wuming;

    2016-01-01

    Hollow Fe3O4 microspheres assembled with nanoparticles were successfully synthesized without the addition of any templates or subsequent treatments. When used as the anode materials for lithium-ion battery (LIB), the products showed good lithium storage properties, demonstrating their promising...

  9. Substructural controller synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tzu-Jeng; Craig, Roy R., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A decentralized design procedure which combines substructural synthesis, model reduction, decentralized controller design, subcontroller synthesis, and controller reduction is proposed for the control design of flexible structures. The structure to be controlled is decomposed into several substructures, which are modeled by component mode synthesis methods. For each substructure, a subcontroller is designed by using the linear quadratic optimal control theory. Then, a controller synthesis scheme called Substructural Controller Synthesis (SCS) is used to assemble the subcontrollers into a system controller, which is to be used to control the whole structure.

  10. Hemoglobin fructation promotes heme degradation through the generation of endogenous reactive oxygen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, M.; Moosavi-Movahedi, A. A.; Habibi-Rezaei, M.; Shourian, M.; Ghourchian, H.; Ahmad, F.; Farhadi, M.; Saboury, A. A.; Sheibani, N.

    2014-09-01

    Protein glycation is a cascade of nonenzymatic reactions between reducing sugars and amino groups of proteins. It is referred to as fructation when the reducing monosaccharide is fructose. Some potential mechanisms have been suggested for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by protein glycation reactions in the presence of glucose. In this state, glucose autoxidation, ketoamine, and oxidative advance glycation end products (AGEs) formation are considered as major sources of ROS and perhaps heme degradation during hemoglobin glycation. However, whether fructose mediated glycation produces ROS and heme degradation is unknown. Here we report that ROS (H2O2) production occurred during hemoglobin fructation in vitro using chemiluminescence methods. The enhanced heme exposure and degradation were determined using UV-Vis and fluorescence spectrophotometry. Following accumulation of ROS, heme degradation products were accumulated reaching a plateau along with the detected ROS. Thus, fructose may make a significant contribution to the production of ROS, glycation of proteins, and heme degradation during diabetes.

  11. Cyanide does more to inhibit heme enzymes, than merely serving as an active-site ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parashar, Abhinav [Center for Biomedical Research, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, 632014 India (India); Venkatachalam, Avanthika [REDOx Lab, PSG Institute of Advanced Studies, Avinashi Road, Peelamedu, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, 641004 (India); Gideon, Daniel Andrew [Center for Biomedical Research, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, 632014 India (India); Manoj, Kelath Murali, E-mail: satyamjayatu@yahoo.com [REDOx Lab, PSG Institute of Advanced Studies, Avinashi Road, Peelamedu, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, 641004 (India)

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Cyanide (CN) is a well-studied toxic principle, known to inhibit heme-enzymes. • Inhibition is supposed to result from CN binding at the active site as a ligand. • Diverse heme enzymes’ CN inhibition profiles challenge prevailing mechanism. • Poor binding efficiency of CN at low enzyme concentrations and ligand pressures. • CN-based diffusible radicals cause ‘non-productive electron transfers’ (inhibition). - Abstract: The toxicity of cyanide is hitherto attributed to its ability to bind to heme proteins’ active site and thereby inhibit their activity. It is shown herein that the long-held interpretation is inadequate to explain several observations in heme-enzyme reaction systems. Generation of cyanide-based diffusible radicals in heme-enzyme reaction milieu could shunt electron transfers (by non-active site processes), and thus be detrimental to the efficiency of oxidative outcomes.

  12. Formal synthesis of (+)-discodermolide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francavilla, Charles; Chen, Weichun; Kinder, Frederick R

    2003-04-17

    [structure: see text] Herein we report the formal total synthesis of (+)-discodermolide in 21 steps (longest linear sequence) from commercially available Roche ester. This synthesis features the assembly of C(9-18) and C(19-24) fragments via a metal-chelated aldol coupling reaction.

  13. Imatinib binding to human serum albumin modulates heme association and reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Muzio, Elena; Polticelli, Fabio; Trezza, Viviana; Fanali, Gabriella; Fasano, Mauro; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2014-10-15

    Imatinib, an inhibitor of the Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase, is approximately 95% bound to plasma proteins, α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) being the primary carrier. However, human serum albumin (HSA) may represent the secondary carrier of imatinib in pathological states characterized by low AGP levels, such as pancreatic cancer, hepatic cirrhosis, hepatitis, hyperthyroidism, nephrotic syndrome, malnutrition, and cachexia. Here, thermodynamics of imatinib binding to full-length HSA and its recombinant Asp1-Glu382 truncated form (containing only the FA1, FA2, FA6, and FA7 binding sites; trHSA), in the absence and presence of ferric heme (heme-Fe(III)), and the thermodynamics of heme-Fe(III) binding to HSA and trHSA, in the absence and presence of imatinib, has been investigated. Moreover, the effect of imatinib on kinetics of peroxynitrite detoxification by ferric human serum heme-albumin (HSA-heme-Fe(III)) and ferric truncated human serum heme-albumin (trHSA-heme-Fe(III)) has been explored. All data were obtained at pH 7.0, and 20.0 °C and 37.0 °C. Imatinib binding to the FA7 site of HSA and trHSA inhibits allosterically heme-Fe(III) association to the FA1 site and vice versa, according to linked functions. Moreover, imatinib binding to the secondary FA2 site of HSA-heme-Fe(III) inhibits allosterically peroxynitrite detoxification. Docking simulations and local structural comparison with other imatinib-binding proteins support functional data indicating the preferential binding of imatinib to the FA1 and FA7 sites of HSA, and to the FA2 and FA7 sites of HSA-heme-Fe(III). Present results highlight the allosteric coupling of the FA1, FA2, and FA7 sites of HSA, and may be relevant in modulating ligand binding and reactivity properties of HSA in vivo. PMID:25057771

  14. Duodenal Absorption and Tissue Utilization of Dietary Heme and Nonheme Iron Differ in Rats123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chang; Thomas, Carrie E.; Insogna, Karl L.; O'Brien, Kimberly O.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dietary heme contributes to iron intake, yet regulation of heme absorption and tissue utilization of absorbed heme remains undefined. Objectives: In a rat model of iron overload, we used stable iron isotopes to examine heme- and nonheme-iron absorption in relation to liver hepcidin and to compare relative utilization of absorbed heme and nonheme iron by erythroid (RBC) and iron storage tissues (liver and spleen). Methods: Twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to groups for injections of either saline or iron dextran (16 or 48 mg Fe over 2 wk). After iron loading, rats were administered oral stable iron in the forms of 57Fe-ferrous sulfate and 58Fe-labeled hemoglobin. Expression of liver hepcidin and duodenal iron transporters and tissue stable iron enrichment was determined 10 d postdosing. Results: High iron loading increased hepatic hepcidin by 3-fold and reduced duodenal expression of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) by 76%. Nonheme-iron absorption was 2.5 times higher than heme-iron absorption (P = 0.0008). Absorption of both forms of iron was inversely correlated with hepatic hepcidin expression (heme-iron absorption: r = −0.77, P = 0.003; nonheme-iron absorption: r = −0.80, P = 0.002), but hepcidin had a stronger impact on nonheme-iron absorption (P = 0.04). Significantly more 57Fe was recovered in RBCs (P = 0.02), and more 58Fe was recovered in the spleen (P = 0.01). Conclusions: Elevated hepcidin significantly decreased heme- and nonheme-iron absorption but had a greater impact on nonheme-iron absorption. Differential tissue utilization of heme vs. nonheme iron was evident between erythroid and iron storage tissues, suggesting that some heme may be exported into the circulation in a form different from that of nonheme iron. PMID:25332470

  15. Heme ligand identification and redox properties of the cytochrome c synthetase, CcmF†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Brian San; Bretsnyder, Eric C.; Rodgers, Kenton R.; Kranz, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome c maturation in many bacteria, archaea, and plant mitochondria involves the integral membrane protein CcmF, which is thought to function as a cytochrome c synthetase by facilitating the final covalent attachment of heme to the apocytochrome c. We previously reported that the E. coli CcmF protein contains a b-type heme that is stably and stoichiometrically associated with the protein and is not the heme attached to apocytochrome c. Here, we show that mutation of either of two conserved transmembrane histidines (His261 or His491) impairs stoichiometric b-heme binding in CcmF and results in spectral perturbations in the remaining heme. Exogeneous imidazole is able to correct cytochrome c maturation for His261 and His491 substitutions with small side chains (Ala or Gly), suggesting that a “cavity” is formed in these CcmF mutants in which imidazole binds and acts as a functional ligand to the b-heme. The results of resonance Raman spectroscopy on wild-type CcmF are consistent with a hexacoordinate low spin b-heme with at least one endogeneous axial His ligand. Analysis of purified recombinant CcmF proteins from diverse prokaryotes reveals that the b-heme in CcmF is widely conserved. We have also determined the reduction potential of the CcmF b-heme (Em,7 = -147 mV). We discuss these results in the context of CcmF structure and functions as a heme reductase and cytochrome c synthetase. PMID:22066495

  16. Endogenous Estrogen-Mediated Heme Oxygenase Regulation in Experimental Menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anikó Pósa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen deficiency is one of the main causes of age-associated diseases in the cardiovascular system. Female Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups: pharmacologically ovariectomized, surgically ovariectomized, and 24-month-old intact aging animals were compared with a control group. The activity and expression of heme oxygenases (HO in the cardiac left ventricle, the concentrations of cardiac interleukin-6 (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, the myeloperoxidase (MPO activity in the cardiac left ventricle, and the effects of heme oxygenase blockade (by 24-hour and 1-hour pretreatment with tin-protoporphyrin IX, SnPP on the epinephrine and phentolamine-induced electrocardiogram ST segment changes in vivo were investigated. The cardiac HO activity and the expression of HO-1 and HO-2 were significantly decreased in the aged rats and after ovariectomy. Estrogen depletion was accompanied by significant increases in the expression of IL-6 and TNF-α. The aged and ovariectomized animals exhibited a significantly elevated MPO activity and a significant ST segment depression. After pretreatment with SnPP augmented ST segment changes were determined. These findings demonstrate that the sensitivity to cardiac ischemia in estrogen depletion models is associated with suppression of the activity and expression of the HO system and increases in the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and biomarkers.

  17. Heme and menaquinone induced electron transport in lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Filipe

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For some lactic acid bacteria higher biomass production as a result of aerobic respiration has been reported upon supplementation with heme and menaquinone. In this report, we have studied a large number of species among lactic acid bacteria for the existence of this trait. Results Heme- (and menaquinone stimulated aerobic growth was observed for several species and genera of lactic acid bacteria. These include Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacilllus brevis, Lactobacillus paralimentarius, Streptococcus entericus and Lactococcus garviae. The increased biomass production without further acidification, which are respiration associated traits, are suitable for high-throughput screening as demonstrated by the screening of 8000 Lactococcus lactis insertion mutants. Respiration-negative insertion-mutants were found with noxA, bd-type cytochrome and menaquinol biosynthesis gene-disruptions. Phenotypic screening and in silico genome analysis suggest that respiration can be considered characteristic for certain species. Conclusion We propose that the cyd-genes were present in the common ancestor of lactic acid bacteria, and that multiple gene-loss events best explains the observed distribution of these genes among the species.

  18. Heme oxygenase-1 regulates mitochondrial quality control in the heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Travis D.; Boddu, Ravindra; Guo, Lingling; Tisher, Cornelia C.; Traylor, Amie M.; Patel, Bindiya; Joseph, Reny; Prabhu, Sumanth D.; Suliman, Hagir B.; Piantadosi, Claude A.; Agarwal, Anupam; George, James F.

    2016-01-01

    The cardioprotective inducible enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) degrades prooxidant heme into equimolar quantities of carbon monoxide, biliverdin, and iron. We hypothesized that HO-1 mediates cardiac protection, at least in part, by regulating mitochondrial quality control. We treated WT and HO-1 transgenic mice with the known mitochondrial toxin, doxorubicin (DOX). Relative to WT mice, mice globally overexpressing human HO-1 were protected from DOX-induced dilated cardiomyopathy, cardiac cytoarchitectural derangement, and infiltration of CD11b+ mononuclear phagocytes. Cardiac-specific overexpression of HO-1 ameliorated DOX-mediated dilation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum as well as mitochondrial disorganization in the form of mitochondrial fragmentation and increased numbers of damaged mitochondria in autophagic vacuoles. HO-1 overexpression promotes mitochondrial biogenesis by upregulating protein expression of NRF1, PGC1α, and TFAM, which was inhibited in WT animals treated with DOX. Concomitantly, HO-1 overexpression inhibited the upregulation of the mitochondrial fission mediator Fis1 and resulted in increased expression of the fusion mediators, Mfn1 and Mfn2. It also prevented dynamic changes in the levels of key mediators of the mitophagy pathway, PINK1 and parkin. Therefore, these findings suggest that HO-1 has a novel role in protecting the heart from oxidative injury by regulating mitochondrial quality control. PMID:27110594

  19. Studies of multi-heme cytochromes from Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokkuluri, P. Raj; Londer, Yuri, Y.; Orshonsky, Valerie; Orshonsky, Lisa; Duke, Norma; Schiffer, Marianne

    2006-04-05

    The Geobacteraceae family predominates in the reduction of uranium in subsurface environments. We are focusing on the model organism, Geobacter sulfurreducens; its genome contains a large number (>100) of cytochromes c that function in metal reduction pathways. Intensive functional genomics and physiological studies are in progress in Prof. Derek Lovley's laboratory, and the complete genome sequence of this organism has been determined by Methe et al. 2003. We are studying cytochromes from the c{sub 7} family that are required for the reduction of Fe(III). Previously, we expressed in E. coli (Londer et al., 2002) and determined the three-dimensional structure at 1.45 {angstrom} resolution (Pokkuluri et al., 2004a) of the three-heme cytochrome c{sub 7} (PpcA, coded by ORF01023) characterized by Lloyd et al., 2003. Further we identified in the G. sulfurreducens genome ORFs for several of its homologs (Pokkuluri et al., 2004a). Four of the ORFs are the same size as PpcA; three other ORFs are polymers of c7-type domains, two of which consist of four domains and one of nine domains, that contain 12 and 27 hemes respectively.

  20. An Ag(I) energetic metal-organic framework assembled with the energetic combination of furazan and tetrazole: synthesis, structure and energetic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xiao-Ni; Zhang, Sheng; Wang, Bo-Zhou; Yang, Qi; Han, Jing; Wei, Qing; Xie, Gang; Chen, San-Ping

    2016-04-28

    A novel Ag(I) energetic MOF [Ag16(BTFOF)9]n·[2(NH4)]n () assembled with Ag(iI ions and a furazan derivative, 4,4'-oxybis[3,3'-(1H-5-tetrazol)]furazan (H2BTFOF) was successfully synthesized and structurally characterized, featuring a three-dimensional porous structure incorporating ammonium cations. The thermal stability and energetic properties were determined, revealing that the 3D energetic MOF had an outstanding insensitivity (IS > 40 J), an ultrahigh detonation pressure (P) of 65.29 GPa and a detonation velocity (D) of 11.81 km cm(-3). In addition, the self-accelerating decomposition temperature (TSADT) and the critical temperature of thermal explosion (Tb) are also discussed in detail. The finding exemplifies that the assembly strategy plays a decisive role in the density and energetic properties of MOF-based energetic materials.

  1. Synthesis, Tubulin Assembly, and Antiproliferative Activity Against MCF7 and NCI/ADR-RES Cancer Cells of 10-O-Acetyl-5′-hydroxybutitaxel

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Haibo; Wang, Jianmei; Kayser, Margaret M.; Himes, Richard H.; Georg, Gunda I.

    2008-01-01

    A highly efficient kinetic resolution of racemic cis-4-(2-tert-butyldimethylsilyloxy-1,1-dimethyl)ethyl-3-tert-butyldimethylsilyloxy-azetidin-2-one with 7-O-triethylsilylbaccatin III was carried out to furnish 10-O-acetyl-5′-hydroxybutitaxel after removal of the silyl protecting groups. The compound was 50% as active as paclitaxel in a tubulin assembly assay and showed significantly decreased activity against MCF7 cell proliferation compared to paclitaxel.

  2. Synthesis and catalytic properties of highly ordered mesostructured silica-pillared α-zirconium phosphate: Self-assembly via interlayered templating method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Huihui, E-mail: maohuihui_beijing@126.com [Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Fine Petrochemical Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213164 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Lu, Xinhao; Li, Mingshi [Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Fine Petrochemical Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213164 (China); Yang, Jihe, E-mail: yangjihe@cczu.edu.c [Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Fine Petrochemical Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213164 (China); Li, Baoshan [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2013-07-01

    We present a facile organic surfactant templating self-assembly method with suitable cationic surfactant method for silica-pillared α-ZrP with ordered interlayered mesoporous structure. The synthetic silica-pillared α-ZrP powders with interlayer spaces and interlayer pore sizes ranging from 3.0 to 3.7 nm and 1.4 to 2.1 nm by varying the molar ratio of surfactant/α-ZrP during self-assembly process. The structure and properties of the silica-pillared α-ZrP powders were characterized by using XRD, SEM/TEM, FT-IR, TPD and N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherms systematically. A bilayers arrangement-molecular micelles{sub 1} phase transformation formation mechanism was proposed for the molecular assembly. The acylation reaction of fatty acid methyl esters (methyl stearate) with ethanolamine to form monoethanolamides was chosen as a probe reaction to evaluate the catalytic activity of the resulting microspherical silica-pillared α-ZrP materials, which showed high activity, with about 92.9% methyl stearate conversion at 393 K for 16 h. The enhanced performance in the reaction is determined by the large surface area, ordered pore size and the increased number of acidic sites in the silica-pillared α-ZrP powders.

  3. Synthesis and self-assembly behavior of amphiphilic diblock copolymer dextran-block-poly(ε-caprolactone (DEX-b-PCL in aqueous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available An amphiphilic diblock copolymer, dextran-block-poly(ε-caprolactone (DEX-b-PCL, with a series of welldefined chain lengths of each block was prepared by conjugating a dextran chain with a PCL block via aza-Michael addition reaction under mild conditions. For the dextran block, samples with relatively uniform molecular weight, 3.5 and 6.0 kDa, were used, and the PCL blocks were prepared via ring-opening polymerization at defined ratios of ε-caprolactone to initiator in order to give copolymers with mass fraction of dextran (fDEX ranging from 0.16 to 0.45. When these copolymers were allowed to self-assemble in aqueous solution, the morphology of assembled aggregates varied as a function of fDEX when characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM, fluorescence microscope (FM and dynamic laser scattering (DLS. As fDEX decreases gradually from 0.45 to 0.16, the morphology of the copolymer assembly changes from spherical micelles to worm-like micelles and eventually to polymersomes, together with an increase in particle sizes.

  4. Crystallographic and spectroscopic insights into heme degradation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis MhuD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Amanda B; Morse, Robert P; Chao, Alex; Iniguez, Angelina; Goulding, Celia W; Liptak, Matthew D

    2014-06-16

    Mycobacterium heme utilization degrader (MhuD) is a heme-degrading protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis responsible for extracting the essential nutrient iron from host-derived heme. MhuD has been previously shown to produce unique organic products compared to those of canonical heme oxygenases (HOs) as well as those of the IsdG/I heme-degrading enzymes from Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of cyanide-inhibited MhuD (MhuD-heme-CN) as well as detailed (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), UV/vis absorption, and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopic characterization of this species. There is no evidence for an ordered network of water molecules on the distal side of the heme substrate in the X-ray crystal structure, as was previously reported for canonical HOs. The degree of heme ruffling in the crystal structure of MhuD is greater than that observed for HO and less than that observed for IsdI. As a consequence, the Fe 3dxz-, 3dyz-, and 3dxy-based MOs are very close in energy, and the room-temperature (1)H NMR spectrum of MhuD-heme-CN is consistent with population of both a (2)Eg electronic state with a (dxy)(2)(dxz,dyz)(3) electron configuration, similar to the ground state of canonical HOs, and a (2)B2g state with a (dxz,dyz)(4)(dxy)(1) electron configuration, similar to the ground state of cyanide-inhibited IsdI. Variable temperature, variable field MCD saturation magnetization data establishes that MhuD-heme-CN has a (2)B2g electronic ground state with a low-lying (2)Eg excited state. Our crystallographic and spectroscopic data suggest that there are both structural and electronic contributions to the α-meso regioselectivity of MhuD-catalyzed heme cleavage. The structural distortion of the heme substrate observed in the X-ray crystal structure of MhuD-heme-CN is likely to favor cleavage at the α- and γ-meso carbons, whereas the spin density distribution may favor selective oxygenation of the α-meso carbon. PMID

  5. A Synthesis of Lamellarins via Regioselective Assembly of 1,2,3-Differentially Substituted 5,6-Dihydropyrrolo[2,1-a]Isoquinoline Core

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuda, Tsutomu; SATO, Daichi; Iwao, Masatomo

    2015-01-01

    A modular synthesis of the marine natural products lamellarins has been developed. The key reactions utilized are C3-selective Vilsmeier-Haack formylation followed by iterative bromination/cross-coupling of the 5,6-dihydropyrrolo[2,1-a]isoquinoline core. The 1,2-diaryl-5,6-dihydropyrrolo[2,1-a]isoquinoline-3-carbaldehyde thus synthesized was readily converted to the lamellarin skeleton by mean of palladium-catalyzed oxidative lactonization.

  6. A new type of hemophore-dependent heme acquisition system of Serratia marcescens reconstituted in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Ghigo, J M; Létoffé, S; Wandersman, C

    1997-01-01

    The utilization by Serratia marcescens of heme bound to hemoglobin requires HasA, an extracellular heme-binding protein. This unique heme acquisition system was studied in an Escherichia coli hemA mutant that was a heme auxotroph. We identified a 92-kDa iron-regulated S. marcescens outer membrane protein, HasR, which alone enabled the E. coli hemA mutant to grow on heme or hemoglobin as a porphyrin source. The concomitant secretion of HasA by the HasR-producing hemA mutant greatly facilitates...

  7. Interaction of HoloCcmE with CcmF in Heme Trafficking and Cytochrome c Biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco, Brian San; Kranz, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    The periplasmic heme chaperone holoCcmE is essential for heme trafficking in the cytochrome c biosynthetic pathway in many bacteria, archaea, and plant mitochondria. This pathway, called system I, involves two steps: i) formation and release of holoCcmE (by the ABC-transporter complex CcmABCD), and ii) delivery of the heme in holoCcmE to the putative cytochrome c heme lyase complex, CcmFH. CcmFH is believed to facilitate the final covalent attachment of heme (from holoCcmE) to the apocytochro...

  8. Improved method for assembly of hemeprotein neuronal NO-synthase heterodimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, Yoshihiro; Zhang, Haoming; Lau, Miranda; Osawa, Yoichi

    2016-10-15

    The assembly of mutated and wild type monomers into functional heterodimeric hemeproteins has provided important mechanistic insights. As in the case of NO synthase (NOS), the existing methods to make such heterodimeric NOSs are inefficient and labor intensive with typical yields of about 5%. We have found that expression of neuronal NOS heterodimers in insect cells, where we take advantage of an exogenous heme-triggered chaperone-assisted assembly process, provides an approximately 43% yield in heterodimeric NOS. In contrast, in Escherichia coli little heterodimerization occurred. Thus, insect cells are preferred and may represent a valuable method for assembly of other dimeric hemeproteins. PMID:27487179

  9. Heme oxygenase activity and some indices of antioxidant protection in rat liver and kidney in glycerol model of rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliman, P A; Strel'chenko, E V; Nikitchenko, I V; Filimonenko, V P

    2003-01-01

    Activity of heme oxygenase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase, the content of reduced glutathione and total heme in the liver and kidneys, and serum absorption spectrum in the Soret band were studied in rats with glycerol-induced rhabdomyolysis. Glycerol increased the content of heme-containing metabolites in the serum and the total heme content in the liver and kidneys, and decreased the content of reduced glutathione and catalase activity in the examined organs. Superoxide dismutase activity increased in the liver and decreased in the kidneys. Heme oxygenase activity increased in the liver and kidneys 2 and 6 h postinjection, respectively. The effects of heme delivered to the liver and kidneys from the vascular bed on the antioxidant defense and heme oxygenase activity were studied. PMID:12717508

  10. Proinflammatory Responses of Heme in Alveolar Macrophages: Repercussion in Lung Hemorrhagic Episodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael L. Simões

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and experimental observations have supported the notion that free heme released during hemorrhagic and hemolytic episodes may have a major role in lung inflammation. With alveolar macrophages (AM being the main line of defense in lung environments, the influence of free heme on AM activity and function was investigated. We observed that heme in a concentration range found during hemolytic episodes (3–30 μM elicits AM to present a proinflammatory profile, stimulating reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide (NO generation and inducing IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 secretion. ROS production is NADPH oxidase-dependent, being inhibited by DPI and apocynin, and involves p47 subunit phosphorylation. Furthermore, heme induces NF-κB nuclear translocation, iNOS, and also HO-1 expression. Moreover, AM stimulated with free heme show enhanced phagocytic and bactericidal activities. Taken together, the data support a dual role for heme in the inflammatory response associated with lung hemorrhage, acting as a proinflammatory molecule that can either act as both an adjuvant of the innate immunity and as an amplifier of the inflammatory response, leading tissue injury. The understanding of heme effects on pulmonary inflammatory processes can lead to the development of new strategies to ameliorate tissue damage associated with hemorrhagic episodes.

  11. XAS study of the active site of a bacterial heme-sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denitrifying bacteria control NO and NO2 cytosolic levels by regulating the expression of denitrification gene clusters via REDOX signalling of specific transcriptional factors that may act as NO sensors in vivo. A protein belonging to the subclass DNR (dissimilative nitrate respiration regulator) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been recently suggested to be a heme containing protein. Very recently the three dimensional structure of the apo-form of DNR (in the absence of heme) has been determined by X-Ray crystallography, whereas the holo-form (in the presence of heme) has not yet been crystallized. We have investigated the heme local structure in solution of ferric and ferrous holo-DNR by XAS. The Fe K-edge XANES spectrum of the ferric adduct displays typical features of a low-spin hexacoordinate Fe-heme complex, having two histidines ligated. After chemical reduction, relevant changes of the XANES fingerprints suggest a repositioning of the heme inside the hydrophobic core of the protein in agreement with previously reported structural and spectroscopic evidence. Partial release of the axial ligands leaves the Fe(II)heme available, and very reactive, to bind exogenous ligands like NO, thus supporting its role as the cofactor involved in NO sensing activity.

  12. XAS study of the active site of a bacterial heme-sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Longa, S.; Arcovito, A.; Brunori, M.; Castiglione, N.; Cutruzzolà, F.; D'Angelo, P.; Giardina, G.; Rinaldo, S.

    2009-11-01

    Denitrifying bacteria control NO and NO2 cytosolic levels by regulating the expression of denitrification gene clusters via REDOX signalling of specific transcriptional factors that may act as NO sensors in vivo. A protein belonging to the subclass DNR (dissimilative nitrate respiration regulator) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been recently suggested to be a heme containing protein. Very recently the three dimensional structure of the apo-form of DNR (in the absence of heme) has been determined by X-Ray crystallography, whereas the holo-form (in the presence of heme) has not yet been crystallized. We have investigated the heme local structure in solution of ferric and ferrous holo-DNR by XAS. The Fe K-edge XANES spectrum of the ferric adduct displays typical features of a low-spin hexacoordinate Fe-heme complex, having two histidines ligated. After chemical reduction, relevant changes of the XANES fingerprints suggest a repositioning of the heme inside the hydrophobic core of the protein in agreement with previously reported structural and spectroscopic evidence. Partial release of the axial ligands leaves the Fe(II)heme available, and very reactive, to bind exogenous ligands like NO, thus supporting its role as the cofactor involved in NO sensing activity.

  13. Distinct mechanisms for DNA cleavage by myoglobin with a designed heme active center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuan; Du, Ke-Jie; Gao, Shu-Qin; He, Bo; Wen, Ge-Bo; Tan, Xiangshi; Lin, Ying-Wu

    2016-03-01

    Heme proteins perform diverse biological functions, of which myoglobin (Mb) is a representative protein. In this study, the O2 carrier Mb was shown to cleave double stranded DNA upon aerobic dithiothreitol-induced reduction, which is fine-tuned by an additional distal histidine, His29 or His43, engineered in the heme active center. Spectroscopic (UV-vis and EPR) and inhibition studies suggested that free radicals including singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radical are responsible for efficient DNA cleavage via an oxidative cleavage mechanism. On the other hand, L29E Mb, with a distinct heme active center involving three water molecules in the met form, was found to exhibit an excellent DNA cleavage activity that was not depending on O2. Inhibition and ligation studies demonstrated for the first time that L29E Mb cleaves double stranded DNA into both the nicked circular and linear forms via a hydrolytic cleavage mechanism, which resembles native endonucleases. This study provides valuable insights into the distinct mechanisms for DNA cleavage by heme proteins, and lays down a base for creating artificial DNA endonucleases by rational design of heme proteins. Moreover, this study suggests that the diverse functions of heme proteins can be fine-tuned by rational design of the heme active center with a hydrogen-bonding network.

  14. Respiration triggers heme transfer from cytochrome c peroxidase to catalase in yeast mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiresan, Meena; Martins, Dorival; English, Ann M

    2014-12-01

    In exponentially growing yeast, the heme enzyme, cytochrome c peroxidase (Ccp1) is targeted to the mitochondrial intermembrane space. When the fermentable source (glucose) is depleted, cells switch to respiration and mitochondrial H2O2 levels rise. It has long been assumed that CCP activity detoxifies mitochondrial H2O2 because of the efficiency of this activity in vitro. However, we find that a large pool of Ccp1 exits the mitochondria of respiring cells. We detect no extramitochondrial CCP activity because Ccp1 crosses the outer mitochondrial membrane as the heme-free protein. In parallel with apoCcp1 export, cells exhibit increased activity of catalase A (Cta1), the mitochondrial and peroxisomal catalase isoform in yeast. This identifies Cta1 as a likely recipient of Ccp1 heme, which is supported by low Cta1 activity in ccp1Δ cells and the accumulation of holoCcp1 in cta1Δ mitochondria. We hypothesized that Ccp1's heme is labilized by hyperoxidation of the protein during the burst in H2O2 production as cells begin to respire. To test this hypothesis, recombinant Ccp1 was hyperoxidized with excess H2O2 in vitro, which accelerated heme transfer to apomyoglobin added as a surrogate heme acceptor. Furthermore, the proximal heme Fe ligand, His175, was found to be ∼ 85% oxidized to oxo-histidine in extramitochondrial Ccp1 isolated from 7-d cells, indicating that heme labilization results from oxidation of this ligand. We conclude that Ccp1 responds to respiration-derived H2O2 via a previously unidentified mechanism involving H2O2-activated heme transfer to apoCta1. Subsequently, the catalase activity of Cta1, not CCP activity, contributes to mitochondrial H2O2 detoxification. PMID:25422453

  15. Heme as a danger molecule in pathogen recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegiel, Barbara; Hauser, Carl J; Otterbein, Leo E

    2015-12-01

    Appropriate control of redox mechanisms are critical for and effective innate immune response, which employs multiple cell types, receptors and molecules that recognize danger signals when they reach the host. Recognition of pathogen-associated pattern molecules (PAMPs) is a fundamental host survival mechanism for efficient elimination of invading pathogens and resolution of the infection and inflammation. In addition to PAMPs, eukaryotic cells contain a plethora of intracellular molecules that are normally secured within the confines of the plasma membrane, but if liberated and encountered in the extracellular milieu can provoke rapid cell activation. These are known as Alarmins or Danger-Associated Molecular Patterns (DAMPs) and can be released actively by cells or passively as a result of sterile cellular injury after trauma, ischemia, or toxin-induced cell rupture. Both PAMPs and DAMPs are recognized by a series of cognate receptors that increase the generation of free radicals and activate specific signaling pathways that result in regulation of a variety of stress response, redox sensitive genes. Multiple mediators released, as cells die include, but are not limited to ATP, hydrogen peroxide, heme, formyl peptides, DNA or mitochondria provide the second signal to amplify immune responses. In this review, we will focus on how sterile and infective stimuli activate the stress response gene heme oxygenase-1 (Hmox1, HO-1), a master gene critical to an appropriate host response that is now recognized as one with enormous therapeutic potential. HO-1 gene expression is regulated in large part by redox-sensitive proteins including but not limited to nrf2. Both PAMPs and DAMPs increase the activation of nrf2 and HO-1. Heme is a powerful pro-oxidant and as such should be qualified as a DAMP. With its degradation by HO-1a molecule of carbon monoxide (CO) is generated that in turn serves as a bioactive signaling molecule. PAMPs such as bacterial endotoxin activate HO-1

  16. Self-Assembled Templates of Aromatic Pentapeptides for Synthesis of CdS Quantum-Dots to Detect the Trace Amounts of Hg(2+) in Aqueous Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Min; Dou, Yingying; Xu, Wenlong; Hao, Jingcheng

    2016-05-01

    Molecular self-assembly has become a popular tool to prepare nanomaterials with potential applications, such as ion-responsive detection of Hg(2+) in aqueous solutions. In this study, FFACD aromatic pentapeptides, whose N-terminuses were protected by carboxyl (Ac-FFACD) or a 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl group (Fmoc-FFACD), were chosen as building blocks to produce nanostructures in solutions. Based on the preliminary determination of the critical aggregation concentration (CAC) of Ac-FFACD and Fmoc-FFACD aromatic pentapeptides in water, the order of magnitude of which is 10(-5) mol·L(-1), self-assembled spiral and networked nanowires can be easily obtained over a range of concentrations. These nanowires were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The self-assembled spiral and networked nanowires were designed to be used as templates for preparing CdS quantum dots (QDs) in-situ at room temperature. The peptide-functionalized, nanowire-encapsulated CdS QDs can be used for rapid, sensitive, and selective detection of trace amounts of mercuric ions (Hg(2+)) in aqueous solutions. This method enables rapid, linear detection (the linear correlation coefficients are 0.9972 of ΔF = 257.09 + 3.58 cHg(2+) for Ac-FFACD and 0.9994 of ΔF = 48.13 + 32.96 cHg(2+) for Fmoc-FFACD) with the Hg(2+) limit of detection at 300.85 ng·L(-1) and 32.09 ng·L(-1) for Ac-FFACD and Fmoc-FFACD, respectively. The supramolecular, self-assembled nanowires, fabricated from the two aromatic pentapeptides and having encapsulated QDs, exhibit superior properties attributable to the large loading capacity and the coordination sites of these peptides with Hg(2+). These structures can serve as novel Hg(2+) sensors and have possible applications for detection of various targets in scientific and engineering systems. PMID:27086999

  17. H-BONDING SELF-ASSEMBLED TEMPLATE-CONTROLLED SYNTHESIS OF A NOVEL SOLUBLE AND REACTIVE AMIDE-BRIDGED LADDERLIKE POLYHYDROSILOXANE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan-qun Zhong; Qing-hua Duan; Kui-lin Deng; Ai-qin Zhang; Ping Xie; Hai-liang Zhang; Rong-ben Zhang

    2006-01-01

    A novel soluble and reactive amide-bridged ladderlike polyhydrosiloxane (ALPHS) was first synthesized by an amido H-bonding self-assembled template. ALPHS with molecular weight M-n = 18300 has very highly ordered ladderlike structure, which was confirmed by a sharp resonance absorption peak of [-Si(H)O2/2 ] moiety with the half peak width A1/2 < 0.5 in 29Si-NMR spectrum. Presence of the reactive Si-H groups gives ALPHS an opportunity to further derive a variety of functional polymers by versatile Si-H reactions such as hydrosilylation, condensation, and so on.

  18. Synthesis of perylene-bridged bis(dibenzo-24-crown-8) and its assembly behavior with a fullerene-based secondary dibenzylammonium salt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the synthesis of a perylene-bridged bis(crown ether) through the condensation reaction between primary amine-armed dibenzo-24-crown-8 and 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride.Pseudorotaxane with a perylene moiety at the wheel and a fullerene unit in the middle of the axle was prepared,which was evidenced by 1H NMR and fluorescence experiments.Subsequent investigations show that the formation and disassociation of the pseudorotaxane can be controlled by the alternating addition of KPF6 and 18-crown-6,following the change of the florescence intensity of perylene.

  19. Non-heme iron availability of usual and improved meals from selected regions in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of non-heme iron in 12 usual and 12 improved meals from four selected regions in the Philippines was determined using in-vitro radiochemical method. Geometric mean values of 5.8 and 6.4% non-heme iron availability were obtained from one-day usual meals and meals improved to correct nutritional deficiencies, respectively. Comparison between usual and improved meals (breakfast, lunch and dinner) for each region showed significant differences in non-heme iron availability for breakfast (Central Luzon, P.05). (author). 26 refs.; 3 tabs

  20. Construction of a bisaquo heme enzyme and binding by exogenous ligands.

    OpenAIRE

    McRee, D E; Jensen, G M; Fitzgerald, M M; Siegel, H A; Goodin, D. B.

    1994-01-01

    The crystal structure of the His-175-->Gly (H175G) mutant of cytochrome-c peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.5), missing its only heme ligand, reveals that the histidine is replaced by solvent to give a bisaquo heme protein. This protein retains some residual activity, which can be stimulated or inhibited by addition of exogenous ligands. Structural analysis confirms the binding of imidazole to the heme at the position of the wild-type histidine ligand. This imidazole complex reacts readily with hydrogen ...

  1. Heme ligand identification and redox properties of the cytochrome c synthetase, CcmF†

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco, Brian San; Bretsnyder, Eric C.; Rodgers, Kenton R.; Kranz, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome c maturation in many bacteria, archaea, and plant mitochondria involves the integral membrane protein CcmF, which is thought to function as a cytochrome c synthetase by facilitating the final covalent attachment of heme to the apocytochrome c. We previously reported that the E. coli CcmF protein contains a b-type heme that is stably and stoichiometrically associated with the protein and is not the heme attached to apocytochrome c. Here, we show that mutation of either of two conser...

  2. Synthesis of novel 3D SnO flower-like hierarchical architectures self-assembled by nano-leaves and its photocatalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Novel 3D SnO flowers self-assembled by 2D nano-leaves were synthesized by hydrothermal method. • The SnO nano-leaf is of single crystalline nature. • The band gap of 2.59 eV of as-prepared products was obtained. • The as-synthesized material will be a promising photocatalytic material. - Abstract: In this report, the novel 3D SnO flower-like hierarchical architectures self-assembled by 2D SnO nano-leaves are successfully synthesized via template-free hydrothermal approach under facile conditions. The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy results demonstrate that the 2D nano-leaves structure is of single crystalline nature. The band gap 2.59 eV for prepared product is obtained from UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectrum. The photocatalysis of the as prepared SnO for degrading methyl orange (MO) has been studied. A good photocatalytic activity is obtained and the mechanism is discussed in detail. Results indicate that the SnO nanostructures are the potential candidates for photocatalyst applications

  3. Synthesis and microwave absorption properties of electromagnetic functionalized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-polyaniline hollow sphere nanocomposites produced by electrostatic self-assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yao-Feng; Ni, Qing-Qing, E-mail: nqq@zstu.edu.cn; Fu, Ya-Qin [Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology Ministry of Education (China); Natsuki, Toshiaki [Shinshu University, Department of Functional Machinery and Mechanics (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    Highly regulated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-polyelectrolyte-modified polyaniline (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-PE@PANI) hollow sphere nanocomposites were successfully synthesized using an electrostatic self-assembly approach. The morphology and structure of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-PE@PANI nanocomposites were characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results showed that the as-prepared nanocomposites had well-defined sizes and shapes, and the average size is about 500 nm. The assembly process was investigated. Magnetization measurements showed that the saturation magnetization of the nanocomposites was 38.6 emu g{sup -1}. It was also found that the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-PE@PANI nanocomposites exhibited excellent reflection loss abilities and wide response bandwidths compared with those of PANI hollow spheres in the range 0.5-15 GHz. The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-PE@PANI nanocomposites are, therefore, promising for microwave absorption applications.

  4. Synthesis of novel 3D SnO flower-like hierarchical architectures self-assembled by nano-leaves and its photocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Yongkui; Wang, Fengping, E-mail: fpwang@ustb.edu.cn; Iqbal, M. Zubair; Wang, Ziya; Li, Yan; Tu, Jianhai

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Novel 3D SnO flowers self-assembled by 2D nano-leaves were synthesized by hydrothermal method. • The SnO nano-leaf is of single crystalline nature. • The band gap of 2.59 eV of as-prepared products was obtained. • The as-synthesized material will be a promising photocatalytic material. - Abstract: In this report, the novel 3D SnO flower-like hierarchical architectures self-assembled by 2D SnO nano-leaves are successfully synthesized via template-free hydrothermal approach under facile conditions. The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy results demonstrate that the 2D nano-leaves structure is of single crystalline nature. The band gap 2.59 eV for prepared product is obtained from UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectrum. The photocatalysis of the as prepared SnO for degrading methyl orange (MO) has been studied. A good photocatalytic activity is obtained and the mechanism is discussed in detail. Results indicate that the SnO nanostructures are the potential candidates for photocatalyst applications.

  5. Heme Oxygenase-1 Promotes Delayed Wound Healing in Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Ying Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic ulcers are one of the most serious and costly chronic complications for diabetic patients. Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress may play an important role in diabetes and its complications. The aim of the study was to explore the effect of heme oxygenase-1 on wound closure in diabetic rats. Diabetic wound model was prepared by making an incision with full thickness in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Wounds from diabetic rats were treated with 10% hemin ointment for 21 days. Increase of HO-1 protein expression enhanced anti-inflammation and antioxidant in diabetic rats. Furthermore, HO-1 increased the levels of VEGF and ICAM-1 and expressions of CBS and CSE protein. In summary, HO-1 promoted the wound closure by augmenting anti-inflammation, antioxidant, and angiogenesis in diabetic rats.

  6. Immobilized cytochrome c bound to cardiolipin exhibits peculiar oxidation state-dependent axial heme ligation and catalytically reduces dioxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Antonio; Millo, Diego; Di Rocco, Giulia; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Bortolotti, Carlo A; Borsari, Marco; Sola, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c (cytc) plays an important role in programmed cell death upon binding to cardiolipin (CL), a negatively charged phospholipid of the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM). Although this binding has been thoroughly investigated in solution, little is known on the nature and reactivity of the adduct (cytc-CL) immobilized at IMM. In this work, we have studied electrochemically cytc-CL immobilized on a hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of decane-1-thiol. This construct would reproduce the motional restriction and the nonpolar environment experienced by cytc-CL at IMM. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman (SERR) studies allowed the axial heme iron ligands to be identified, which were found to be oxidation state dependent and differ from those of cytc-CL in solution. In particular, immobilized cytc-CL experiences an equilibrium between a low-spin (LS) 6c His/His and a high-spin (HS) 5c His/- coordination states. The former prevails in the oxidized and the latter in the reduced form. Axial coordination of the ferric heme thus differs from the (LS) 6c His/Lys and (LS) 6c His/OH(-) states observed in solution. Moreover, a relevant finding is that the immobilized ferrous cytc-CL is able to catalytically reduce dioxygen, likely to superoxide ion. These findings indicate that restriction of motional freedom due to interaction with the membrane is an additional factor playing in the mechanism of cytc unfolding and cytc-mediated peroxidation functional to the apoptosis cascade. PMID:25627142

  7. Self-assembled monolayers of Aβ peptides on Au electrodes: an artificial platform for probing the reactivity of redox active metals and cofactors relevant to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Debajyoti; Sengupta, Kushal; Mukherjee, Soumya; Dey, Somdatta Ghosh; Dey, Abhishek

    2012-07-25

    The water-soluble hydrophilic part of human Aβ peptide has been extended to include a C-terminal cysteine residue. Utilizing the thiol functionality of this cysteine residue, self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of these peptides are formed on Au electrodes. Atomic force microscopy imaging confirms formation of small Aβ aggregates on the surface of the electrode. These aggregates bind redox active metals like Cu and cofactors like heme, both of which are proposed to generate toxic partially reduced oxygen species (PROS) and play a vital role in Alzheimer's disease. The spectroscopic and electrochemical properties of these Cu and heme bound Aβ SAM are similar to those reported for the soluble Cu and heme bound Aβ peptide. Experiments performed on these Aβ-SAM electrodes clearly demonstrate that (1) heme bound Aβ is kinetically more competent in reducing O(2) than Cu bound Aβ, (2) under physiological conditions the reduced Cu site produces twice as much PROS (measured in situ) than the reduced heme site, and (3) chelators like clioquinol remove Cu from these aggregates, while drugs like methylene blue inhibit O(2) reactivity of the heme cofactor. This artificial construct provides a very easy platform for investigating potential drugs affecting aggregation of human Aβ peptides and PROS generation by its complexes with redox active metals and cofactors.

  8. Normal coordinate structural decomposition of the heme distortions of hemoglobin in various quaternary states and bound to allosteric effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laberge, Monique; Yonetani, Takashi; Fidy, Judit

    2003-01-01

    The distortions of the alpha1, alpha2, beta1, and beta2 hemes of human hemoglobin (HbA) in various quaternary states and as affected by the presence of allosteric effectors was investigated by subjecting CHARMM energy-minimized models to normal coordinate structural decomposition (NSD) analysis. NSD was applied to the individual hemes extracted from the R, T, and R2-state models of HbA and to HbA bound to DPG and to IHP. Overall, NSD results are indicative of characteristic distortions, not only for the hemes of the different HbA quaternary states, but also for the hemes of the HbA models bound to allosteric effectors. Comparing the distortions of the inequivalent alpha and beta hemes in T-state HbA, we show good correlation between NSD and the experimentally observed low-frequency nu52 (Eg) and gamma7 (A2u) modes reported in the literature for alpha and beta HbA hemes while noting substantial differences between these types for B2u and B1u distortions. For the R2 hemes, NSD yields heme distortions that are more comparable to those of the R-state, especially in magnitude. However, the R2 hemes do not exhibit inequivalence of alpha and beta heme distortions, a result that may contribute to an understanding of the functional importance of this state. Relative to T-state heme distortions, NSD results on the effector-bound hemes show that tertiary changes induced in T-state HbA as a result of binding DPG and IHP drastically affect heme distortions. In the alpha hemes extracted from the HbA-DPG model, most noteworthy are the increased wav(x) and wav(y) distortions and enhancement of ruf and dom deformations. In the beta hemes, the wav(y) is the most affected distortion with increase in sad. The NSD results are also different for the hemes of the HbA-IHP model, in that the beta sad and ruf deformations are more enhanced with increase of doming in the alpha hemes. Our results describe the effect of the subtle protein-induced changes on the nonplanarity of the HbA hemes

  9. Furnace assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayotou, Nicholas F.; Green, Donald R.; Price, Larry S.

    1985-01-01

    A method of and apparatus for heating test specimens to desired elevated temperatures for irradiation by a high energy neutron source. A furnace assembly is provided for heating two separate groups of specimens to substantially different, elevated, isothermal temperatures in a high vacuum environment while positioning the two specimen groups symmetrically at equivalent neutron irradiating positions.

  10. Direct synthesis of Ti-containing SBA-16-type mesoporous material by the evaporation-induced self-assembly method and its catalytic performance for oxidative desulfurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Asma Tufail; Li, Baoshan; Abdalla, Zaki Eldin Ali

    2009-08-15

    A novel Ti-containing SBA-16-type mesoporous material (with various Ti loadings of 5, 10, and 15 wt%) was synthesized by an evaporation-induced self-assembly method using F127 copolymer as template. The materials were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TG-DTA, N(2) adsorption, SEM, HRTEM, and XPS. The characterization results show that the material possesses high thermal stability, thick pore walls (10.43-10.68 nm), and high surface area (642.26-691.5 m(2)/g) with a mesoporous worm-like structure, and titanium was successfully incorporated into the silica matrix with a tetrahedral environment. The material showed high activity in the oxidative desulfurization of DBT and its activity was not reduced even after three times recycling; further reuse resulted in a gradual decrease in its activity. PMID:19450808

  11. Facile synthesis of 3D hierarchical foldaway-lantern-like LiMnPO4 by nanoplate self-assembly, and electrochemical performance for Li-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dezhi; Wei, Wei; Wang, Ruining; Lang, Xiu-Feng; Tian, Yu; Guo, Lin

    2012-08-01

    Olivine-structured LiMnPO(4) with 3D foldaway-lantern-like hierarchical structures have been prepared via a one-step, template-free, solvothermal approach in ethylene glycol. The foldaway-lantern-like LiMnPO(4) microstructures are composed of numerous nanoplates with thickness of about 20 nm. A series of electron microscopy characterization results indicate that the obtained primary LiMnPO(4) nanoplates are single crystalline in nature, growing along the [010] direction in the (100) plane. Time-dependent morphology evolution suggests that ethylene glycol plays dual roles in oriented growth and self-assembly of such unique structures. After carbon coating, the as-prepared LiMnPO(4) cathode demonstrated a flat potential at 4.1 V versus Li/Li(+) with a specific capacity close to 130 mA h g(-1) at 0.1 C, along with excellent cycling stability.

  12. Synthesis and self-assembly of Chitosan-g-Polystyrene copolymer: A new route for the preparation of heavy metal nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Francis, Raju S.

    2015-01-01

    Amphiphilic graft copolymers made of a Chitosan (CS) backbone and three arm polystyrene (PS) grafts were prepared by "grafting onto" strategy using Toluene Diisocyanate. IR spectroscopy and SEC show the successful grafting process. SEM pictures of Chitosan-g-Polystyrene (CS-g-PS) indicate a spherulite like surface and exhibit properties that result from the disappearance of Chitosan crystallinity. The introduced polystyrene star grafts units improve hydrophobic properties considerably as confirmed by the very high solubility of (CS-g-PS) in organic solvents. The graft copolymer which self-assembles into polymeric micelles in organic media demonstrates much better adsorption of transition and inner transition metal ions than pure Chitosan whose amine groups are not necessarily available due to crystallinity.

  13. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES Density-controllable nonvolatile memory devices having metal nanocrystals through chemical synthesis and assembled by spin-coating technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guangli, Wang; Yubin, Chen; Yi, Shi; Lin, Pu; Lijia, Pan; Rong, Zhang; Youdou, Zheng

    2010-12-01

    A novel two-step method is employed, for the first time, to fabricate nonvolatile memory devices that have metal nanocrystals. First, size-averaged Au nanocrystals are synthesized chemically; second, they are assembled into memory devices by a spin-coating technique at room temperature. This attractive approach makes it possible to tailor the diameter and control the density of nanocrystals individually. In addition, processes at room temperature prevent Au diffusion, which is a main concern for the application of metal nanocrystal-based memory. The experimental results, both the morphology characterization and the electrical measurements, reveal that there is an optimum density of nanocrystal monolayer to balance between long data retention and a large hysteresis memory window. At the same time, density-controllable devices could also feed the preferential emphasis on either memory window or retention time. All these facts confirm the advantages and novelty of our two-step method.

  14. Gelation-induced enhanced fluorescence emission from organogels of salicylanilide-containing compounds exhibiting excited-state intramolecular proton transfer: synthesis and self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Manoj Kumar; Kim, Byung-Hwa; Kwon, Ji Eon; Park, Sanghyuk; Seo, Jangwon; Chung, Jong Won; Park, Soo Young

    2010-07-01

    Self-assembly structure, stability, hydrogen-bonding interaction, and optical properties of a new class of low molecular weight organogelators (LMOGs) formed by salicylanilides 3 and 4 have been investigated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV/Vis absorption and photoluminescence, as well as theoretical studies by DFT and semiempirical calculations with CI (AM1/PECI=8) methods. It was found that salicylanilides form gels in nonpolar solvents due to pi-stacking interaction complemented by the presence of both inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding. The supramolecular arrangement in these organogels predicted by XRD shows lamellar and hexagonal columnar structures for gelators 3 and 4, respectively. Of particular interest is the observation of significant fluorescence enhancement accompanying gelation, which was ascribed to the formation of J-aggregates and inhibition of intramolecular rotation in the gel state. PMID:20491121

  15. Synthesis and self-assembly of amphiphilic poly(acrylicacid)-poly(ɛ-caprolactone)-poly(acrylicacid) block copolymer as novel carrier for 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy camptothecin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djurdjic, Beti; Dimchevska, Simona; Geskovski, Nikola; Petrusevska, Marija; Gancheva, Valerya; Georgiev, Georgi; Petrov, Petar; Goracinova, Katerina

    2015-01-01

    The process of molecular self-assembly plays a crucial role in formulation of polymeric nanoparticulated drug delivery carriers as it creates the possibility for enhanced drug encapsulation and carrier surface engineering. This study aimed to develop a novel self-assembled polymeric micelles for targeted delivery in tumor cells in order to overcome not only various drawbacks of 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy camptothecin (SN-38) but also various reported limitations of other drug delivery systems, especially low drug loading and premature release. Custom synthesized amphiphilic triblock copolymer poly(acrylic acid)-poly(ɛ-caprolactone)-poly(acrylic acid) (PAA(13)-PCL(35)-PAA(13)) was used to prepare kinetically stable micelles by nanoprecipitation and modified nanoprecipitation procedure. Core-shell micelles with diameter of 120-140 nm, negative zeta potential and satisfactory drug loading were produced. The prepared formulations were stable in pH range of 3-12 and in media with NaCl concentration <1 mol/l. Screening mixed level factorial 3 × 2(2) design identified that the process temperature as well as the type of organic solvent has influence upon the efficacy of encapsulation, particle size, dissolution rate and burst release. Fourier transform infrared and differential scanning calorimetry analyses confirmed the entrapment of the active substance into the micelles. The kinetic analysis of dissolution studies revealed that the main mechanism of drug release from the prepared formulations is Fickian diffusion. Growth inhibition studies as well as DNA fragmentation assay performed on SW-480 cell lines clearly demonstrated increased growth inhibition effect and presence of fragmented DNA in cells treated with loaded micelles compared to SN-38 solution. Altogether, these results point out to potential biomedical and clinical application of PAA-PCL-PAA systems in the future.

  16. Microwave-assisted synthesis of self-assembled BiO{sub 1.84}H{sub 0.08} hierarchical nanostructures as a new photocatalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Pei; Hou, Dongfang; Shi, Hongyu; Chen, Chaoji; Huang, Yunhui; Hu, Xianluo, E-mail: huxl@mail.hust.edu.cn

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Hierarchical BiO{sub 1.84}H{sub 0.08} nanostructures were prepared by microwave irradiation. • The microwave-hydrothermal method is rapid, one-pot, and low-temperature. • The morphology of the BiO{sub 1.84}H{sub 0.08} nanostructures can be tailored. • The photocatalytic properties were studied upon UV–visible irradiation. • Self-assembled flower-like BiO{sub 1.84}H{sub 0.08} shows enhanced photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: Self-assembled hierarchical nanostructures of BiO{sub 1.84}H{sub 0.08} spheres have been successfully synthesized by a rapid, one-pot, low-temperature hydrothermal route under microwave irradiation. The as-prepared hierarchically nanostructured BiO{sub 1.84}H{sub 0.08} possesses a high surface area of 113 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. By adjusting the reaction temperature and reactant concentration, the morphology of the as-formed BiO{sub 1.84}H{sub 0.08} nanostructures can be tailored. As a new photocatalyst, the flower-like spherical BiO{sub 1.84}H{sub 0.08} exhibits enhanced photocatalytic activity for degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) under UV–visible light. The synthetic procedure is simple, efficient, and scalable for mass production. Therefore, the as-formed BiO{sub 1.84}H{sub 0.08} hierarchical nanostructures may offer great potential applications for decomposition of organic contaminants.

  17. Synthesis of polyaniline/carbon black hybrid hollow microspheres by layer-by-layer assembly used as electrode materials for supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The polyaniline/carbon black hybrid hollow microspheres with a external diameter about 3.0 μm were prepared via layer-by-layer assembly technique, and the electrochemical tests showed that polyaniline/carbon black hybrid hollow microspheres would be a potential candidates of electrode materials for supercapacitors with high specific capacitance. Highlights: ► The PAn/CB hybrid hollow microspheres were prepared via LBL technique. ► The specific capacitance increased with the increase in the adsorption of PAn and CB. ► The hollow structure and synergistic effect of shell enhance the specific capacitance. ► The PAn/CB hollow microsphere is a candidate of electrode material for supercapacitor. -- Abstract: The polyaniline (PAn)/carbon black (CB) hybrid hollow microspheres have been prepared by the layer-by-layer assembly technique alternately adsorbing of PAn and CB onto the polystyrene sulfonate microsphere templates after etching the templates by dialysis. The hollow structure of the obtained hybrid hollow microspheres was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, which indicated that the external diameter of the hollow microspheres was about 3.0 μm. When the hybrid hollow microsphere were used as the electrode material for supercapacitors, the results showed that the specific capacitance increased with the increase in the adsorption numbers of PAn and CB, which was as high as 532 F g−1 at a charge–discharge current density of 10 mA cm−2 in 1.0 M H2SO4 electrolyte after alternately adsorbing of PAn and CB six times

  18. The lipocalin alpha1-microglobulin protects erythroid K562 cells against oxidative damage induced by heme and reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Magnus G; Olofsson, Tor; Tapper, Hans; Akerstrom, Bo

    2008-08-01

    Alpha(1)-microglobulin is a 26 kDa plasma and tissue glycoprotein that belongs to the lipocalin protein superfamily. Recent reports show that it is a reductase and radical scavenger and that it binds heme and has heme-degrading properties. This study has investigated the protective effects of alpha(1)-microglobulin against oxidation by heme and reactive oxygen species in the human erythroid cell line, K562. The results show that alpha(1)-microglobulin prevents intracellular oxidation and up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 induced by heme, hydrogen peroxide and Fenton reaction-generated hydroxyl radicals in the culture medium. It also reduces the cytosol of non-oxidized cells. Endogeneous expression of alpha(1)-microglobulin was up-regulated by these oxidants and silencing of the alpha(1)-microglobulin expression increased the cytosol oxidation. alpha(1)-microglobulin also inhibited cell death caused by heme and cleared cells from bound heme. Binding of heme to alpha(1)-microglobulin increased the radical reductase activity of the protein as compared to the apo-protein. Finally, alpha(1)-microglobulin was localized mainly at the cell surface both when administered exogeneously and in non-treated cells. The results suggest that alpha(1)-microglobulin is involved in the defence against oxidative cellular injury caused by haemoglobin and heme and that the protein may employ both heme-scavenging and one-electron reduction of radicals to achieve this.

  19. The Role of Heme and Reactive Oxygen Species in Proliferation and Survival of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Cristina Paes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan responsible for Chagas disease, has a complex life cycle comprehending two distinct hosts and a series of morphological and functional transformations. Hemoglobin degradation inside the insect vector releases high amounts of heme, and this molecule is known to exert a number of physiological functions. Moreover, the absence of its complete biosynthetic pathway in T. cruzi indicates heme as an essential molecule for this trypanosomatid survival. Within the hosts, T. cruzi has to cope with sudden environmental changes especially in the redox status and heme is able to increase the basal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS which can be also produced as byproducts of the parasite aerobic metabolism. In this regard, ROS sensing is likely to be an important mechanism for the adaptation and interaction of these organisms with their hosts. In this paper we discuss the main features of heme and ROS susceptibility in T. cruzi biology.

  20. A switch in the electron transfer from heme a to binuclear centre of cytochrome c oxidase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王敖金; 徐建兴

    2002-01-01

    New experimental evidence that a switch controls the reduction of the heme a3-CuB binuclear centre has beenobserved in the N2-dried thin film of purified cytochrome oxidase. When immersing the enzyme film into the acidphosphate buffer with extremely low concentration of dithionite, a spectrum was given to show a reduction of heme awith no electrons resting on CuA. By increasing dithionite, electrons could be accumulated gradually on CuA, but thebinuclear centre still remains in the oxidized state. When the accumulation of electrons on CuA and/or heme a exceededa threshold, a turnover of reduction of the binuclear centre and oxidation of heme a occurred abruptly. This switch-likeaction is pH-dependent.

  1. The roles of cysteines in the heme domain of human soluble guanylate cyclase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Fang Zhong; Xiao Xiao Liu; Jie Pan; Zhong Xian Huang; Xiang Shi Tan

    2012-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is a critical heme-containing enzyme involved in NO signaling.The dimerization of sGC subunits is necessary for its bioactivity and its mechanism is a striiking and an indistinct issue.The roles of heme domain cysteines of the sGC on the dimerization and heme binding were investigated herein.The site-directed mutations of three conserved cysteines (C78A,C 122A and C 174S) were studied systematically and the three mutants were characterized by gel filtration analysis,UV-vis spectroscopy and heime transfer examination.Cys78 was involved in heme binding but not referred to the dimerization,while Cys174 was demonstrated to be involved in the homodimerization.These results provide new insights into the cysteine-related dimerization regulation of sGC.

  2. Assembly of 4-, 6- and 8-connected Cd(II) pseudo-polymorphic coordination polymers: Synthesis, solvent-dependent structural variation and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhao-Hao; Xue, Li-Ping; Miao, Shao-Bin; Zhao, Bang-Tun

    2016-08-01

    The reaction of Cd(NO3)2·4H2O, 2,5-thiophenedicarboxylic acid (H2tdc) and 1,2-bis(imidazol-1‧-yl)methane (bimm) by modulating solvent systems yielded three highly connected pseudo-polymorphic coordination polymers based on different dinuclear [Cd2(CO2)2] subunits bridged by carboxylate groups. Single crystal structural analyses reveal structural variation from 4-connected 2D sql layer, 6-connected 2-fold interpenetrated 3D pcu to 8-connected 3D bcu-type network in compounds 1-3. The structural dissimilarity in the structures dependent on the coordination environments of Cd(II) ions and linking modes of mixed ligand influenced by different solvent systems during the synthesis process. Moreover, thermogravimetric and photoluminescence behaviors of 1-3 were also investigated for the first time, and all the complexes emit blue luminescence in the solid state.

  3. Heme photolysis occurs by ultrafast excited state metal-to-ring charge transfer.

    OpenAIRE

    Franzen, S.; Kiger, L.; Poyart, C; Martin, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    Ultrafast time-resolved resonance Raman spectra of carbonmonoxy hemoglobin (Hb), nitroxy Hb, and deoxy Hb are compared to determine excited state decay mechanisms for both ligated and unligated hemes. Transient absorption and Raman data provide evidence for a sequential photophysical relaxation pathway common to both ligated and unligated forms of Hb* (photolyzed heme), in which the excited state 1Q decays sequentially: 1Q-->Hb*I-->Hb*II-->Hb ground state. Consistent with the observed kinetic...

  4. Oxidant stress leads to transcriptional activation of the human heme oxygenase gene in cultured skin fibroblasts.

    OpenAIRE

    Keyse, S M; Applegate, L. A.; Tromvoukis, Y; Tyrrell, R M

    1990-01-01

    Treatment of cultured human skin fibroblasts with near-UV radiation, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium arsenite induces accumulation of heme oxygenase mRNA and protein. In this study, these treatments led to a dramatic increase in the rate of RNA transcription from the heme oxygenase gene but had no effect on mRNA stability. Transcriptional activation, therefore, appears to be the major mechanism of stimulation of expression of this gene by either oxidative stress or sulfydryl reagents.

  5. Heme-mediated SPI-C induction promotes monocyte differentiation into iron-recycling macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Haldar, Malay; Kohyama, Masako; So, Alex Yick-Lun; Wumesh, KC; Wu, Xiaodi; Briseno, Carlos G.; Satpathy, Ansuman T.; Kretzer, Nicole M.; Rajasekaran, Namakkal Soorappan; Wang, Li; Egawa, Takeshi; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Baltimore, David; Murphy, Theresa L; Murphy, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    Splenic red pulp macrophages (RPM) degrade senescent erythrocytes and recycle heme-associated iron. The transcription factor SPI-C is selectively expressed by RPM and is required for their development, but the physiologic stimulus inducing Spic is unknown. Here, we report that Spic also regulated the development of F4/80^+VCAM1^+ bone marrow macrophages (BMM) and that Spic expression in BMM and RPM development was induced by heme, a metabolite of erythrocyte degradation. Pathologic hemolysis ...

  6. Conserved Residues of the Human Mitochondrial Holocytochrome c Synthase Mediate Interactions with Heme

    OpenAIRE

    Babbitt, Shalon E.; San Francisco, Brian; Bretsnyder, Eric C.; Kranz, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    C-type cytochromes are distinguished by the covalent attachment of a heme cofactor, a modification that is typically required for its subsequent folding, stability, and function. Heme attachment takes place in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and, in most eukaryotes, is mediated by holocytochrome c synthase (HCCS). HCCS is the primary component of the eukaryotic cytochrome c biogenesis pathway, known as System III. The catalytic function of HCCS depends on its ability to coordinate inter...

  7. Thiol redox requirements and substrate specificities of recombinant cytochrome c assembly systems II and III

    OpenAIRE

    Richard-Fogal, Cynthia L; Francisco, Brian San; Frawley, Elaine R.; Kranz, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    The reconstitution of biosynthetic pathways from heterologous hosts can help define the minimal genetic requirements for pathway function and facilitate detailed mechanistic studies. Each of the three pathways for the assembly of cytochrome c in nature (called systems I, II, and III) has been shown to function recombinantly in Escherichia coli, covalently attaching heme to the cysteine residues of a CXXCH motif of a c-type cytochrome. However, recombinant systems I (CcmABCDEFGH) and II (CcsBA...

  8. Mutations in Cytochrome Assembly and Periplasmic Redox Pathways in Bordetella pertussis

    OpenAIRE

    Feissner, Robert E.; Beckett, Caroline S.; Loughman, Jennifer A.; Kranz, Robert G.

    2005-01-01

    Transposon mutagenesis of Bordetella pertussis was used to discover mutations in the cytochrome c biogenesis pathway called system II. Using a tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine cytochrome c oxidase screen, 27 oxidase-negative mutants were isolated and characterized. Nine mutants were still able to synthesize c-type cytochromes and possessed insertions in the genes for cytochrome c oxidase subunits (ctaC, -D, and -E), heme a biosynthesis (ctaB), assembly of cytochrome c oxidase (sco2), or ferroch...

  9. The Fowler syndrome-associated protein FLVCR2 is an importer of heme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Simon P; Shing, Jennifer; Saraon, Punit; Berger, Lloyd C; Eiden, Maribeth V; Wilde, Andrew; Tailor, Chetankumar S

    2010-11-01

    Mutations in FLVCR2, a cell surface protein related by homology and membrane topology to the heme exporter/retroviral receptor FLVCR1, have recently been associated with Fowler syndrome, a vascular disorder of the brain. We previously identified FLVCR2 to function as a receptor for FY981 feline leukemia virus (FeLV). However, the cellular function of FLVCR2 remains unresolved. Here, we report the cellular function of FLVCR2 as an importer of heme, based on the following observations. First, FLVCR2 binds to hemin-conjugated agarose, and binding is competed by free hemin. Second, mammalian cells and Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing FLVCR2 display enhanced heme uptake. Third, heme import is reduced after the expression of FLVCR2-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) or after the binding of the FY981 FeLV envelope protein to the FLVCR2 receptor. Finally, cells overexpressing FLVCR2 are more sensitive to heme toxicity, a finding most likely attributable to enhanced heme uptake. Tissue expression analysis indicates that FLVCR2 is expressed in a broad range of human tissues, including liver, placenta, brain, and kidney. The identification of a cellular function for FLVCR2 will have important implications in elucidating the pathogenic mechanisms of Fowler syndrome and of phenotypically associated disorders.

  10. Heme-mediated apoptosis and fusion damage in BeWo trophoblast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingli; Hassana, Salifu; Stiles, Jonathan K.

    2016-01-01

    Placental malaria (PM) is a complication associated with malaria infection during pregnancy that often leads to abortion, premature delivery, intrauterine growth restriction and low birth weight. Increased levels of circulating free heme, a by-product of Plasmodium-damaged erythrocytes, is a major contributor to inflammation, tissue damage and loss of blood brain barrier integrity associated with fatal experimental cerebral malaria. However, the role of heme in PM remains unknown. Proliferation and apoptosis of trophoblasts and fusion of the mononucleated state to the syncytial state are of major importance to a successful pregnancy. In the present study, we examined the effects of heme on the viability and fusion of a trophoblast-derived cell line (BeWo). Results indicate that heme induces apoptosis in BeWo cells by activation of the STAT3/caspase-3/PARP signaling pathway. In the presence of forskolin, which triggers trophoblast fusion, heme inhibits BeWo cell fusion through activation of STAT3. Understanding the effects of free plasma heme in pregnant women either due to malaria, sickle cell disease or other hemolytic diseases, will enable identification of high-risk women and may lead to discovery of new drug targets against associated adverse pregnancy outcome. PMID:27796349

  11. Human hemoglobin structural and functional alterations and heme degradation upon interaction with benzene: A spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Reza; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2016-03-01

    Here, the effect of benzene on hemoglobin structure, stability and heme prosthetic group integrity was studied by different methods. These included UV-vis absorption spectrophotometry, normal and synchronous fluorescence techniques, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Our results indicated that benzene has high hemolytic potential even at low concentrations. The UV-vis spectroscopic results demonstrated that benzene altered both the globin chain and the heme prosthetic group of hemoglobin increasing met- and deoxy-Hb, while decreasing oxy-Hb. However, with increasing benzene the concentration of all species decreased due to heme destruction. The spectrophotometric results show that benzene has a high potential for penetrating the hydrophobic pocket of hemoglobin. These results were consistent with the molecular docking simulation results of benzene-hHb. Aggregation and thermal denaturation studies show that the increased benzene concentration induced hemoglobin aggregation with a decrease in stability, which is consistent with the DSC results. Conventional fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that the heme degradation species were produced in the presence of benzene. The results of constant wavelength synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (CWSFS) indicated that at least five heme-degraded species were produced. Together, our results indicated that benzene has adverse effects on hemoglobin structure and function, and heme degradation.

  12. Comparison of ligand migration and binding in heme proteins of the globin family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin, Nienhaus; Ulrich Nienhaus, G.

    2015-12-01

    The binding of small diatomic ligands such as carbon monoxide or dioxygen to heme proteins is among the simplest biological processes known. Still, it has taken many decades to understand the mechanistic aspects of this process in full detail. Here, we compare ligand binding in three heme proteins of the globin family, myoglobin, a dimeric hemoglobin, and neuroglobin. The combination of structural, spectroscopic, and kinetic experiments over many years by many laboratories has revealed common properties of globins and a clear mechanistic picture of ligand binding at the molecular level. In addition to the ligand binding site at the heme iron, a primary ligand docking site exists that ensures efficient ligand binding to and release from the heme iron. Additional, secondary docking sites can greatly facilitate ligand escape after its dissociation from the heme. Although there is only indirect evidence at present, a preformed histidine gate appears to exist that allows ligand entry to and exit from the active site. The importance of these features can be assessed by studies involving modified proteins (via site-directed mutagenesis) and comparison with heme proteins not belonging to the globin family.

  13. Heme-mediated SPI-C induction promotes monocyte differentiation into iron-recycling macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Malay; Kohyama, Masako; So, Alex Yick-Lun; Kc, Wumesh; Wu, Xiaodi; Briseño, Carlos G; Satpathy, Ansuman T; Kretzer, Nicole M; Arase, Hisashi; Rajasekaran, Namakkal S; Wang, Li; Egawa, Takeshi; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Baltimore, David; Murphy, Theresa L; Murphy, Kenneth M

    2014-03-13

    Splenic red pulp macrophages (RPM) degrade senescent erythrocytes and recycle heme-associated iron. The transcription factor SPI-C is selectively expressed by RPM and is required for their development, but the physiologic stimulus inducing Spic is unknown. Here, we report that Spic also regulated the development of F4/80(+)VCAM1(+) bone marrow macrophages (BMM) and that Spic expression in BMM and RPM development was induced by heme, a metabolite of erythrocyte degradation. Pathologic hemolysis induced loss of RPM and BMM due to excess heme but induced Spic in monocytes to generate new RPM and BMM. Spic expression in monocytes was constitutively inhibited by the transcriptional repressor BACH1. Heme induced proteasome-dependent BACH1 degradation and rapid Spic derepression. Furthermore, cysteine-proline dipeptide motifs in BACH1 that mediate heme-dependent degradation were necessary for Spic induction by heme. These findings are the first example of metabolite-driven differentiation of a tissue-resident macrophage subset and provide new insights into iron homeostasis. PMID:24630724

  14. Multi-heme Cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: Structures, functions and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuer, Marian; Rosso, Kevin M.; Blumberger, Jochen; Butt, Julea N.

    2014-11-05

    Multi-heme cytochromes are employed by a range of microorganisms to transport electrons over distances of up to tens of nanometers. Perhaps the most spectacular utilization of these proteins is in the reduction of extracellular solid substrates, including electrodes and insoluble mineral oxides of Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV), by species of Shewanella and Geobacter. However, multi-heme cytochromes are found in numerous and phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes where they participate in electron transfer and redox catalysis that contributes to biogeochemical cycling of N, S and Fe on the global scale. These properties of multi-heme cytochromes have attracted much interest and contributed to advances in bioenergy applications and bioremediation of contaminated soils. Looking forward there are opportunities to engage multi-heme cytochromes for biological photovoltaic cells, microbial electrosynthesis and developing bespoke molecular devices. As a consequence it is timely to review our present understanding of these proteins and we do this here with a focus on the multitude of functionally diverse multi-heme cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We draw on findings from experimental and computational approaches which ideally complement each other in the study of these systems: computational methods can interpret experimentally determined properties in terms of molecular structure to cast light on the relation between structure and function. We show how this synergy has contributed to our understanding of multi-heme cytochromes and can be expected to continue to do so for greater insight into natural processes and their informed exploitation in biotechnologies.

  15. The Alternative Route to Heme in the Methanogenic Archaeon Methanosarcina barkeri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Kühner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In living organisms heme is formed from the common precursor uroporphyrinogen III by either one of two substantially different pathways. In contrast to eukaryotes and most bacteria which employ the so-called “classical” heme biosynthesis pathway, the archaea use an alternative route. In this pathway, heme is formed from uroporphyrinogen III via the intermediates precorrin-2, sirohydrochlorin, siroheme, 12,18-didecarboxysiroheme, and iron-coproporphyrin III. In this study the heme biosynthesis proteins AhbAB, AhbC, and AhbD from Methanosarcina barkeri were functionally characterized. Using an in vivo enzyme activity assay it was shown that AhbA and AhbB (Mbar_A1459 and Mbar_A1460 together catalyze the conversion of siroheme into 12,18-didecarboxysiroheme. The two proteins form a heterodimeric complex which might be subject to feedback regulation by the pathway end-product heme. Further, AhbC (Mbar_A1793 was shown to catalyze the formation of iron-coproporphyrin III in vivo. Finally, recombinant AhbD (Mbar_A1458 was produced in E. coli and purified indicating that this protein most likely contains two [4Fe-4S] clusters. Using an in vitro enzyme activity assay it was demonstrated that AhbD catalyzes the conversion of iron-coproporphyrin III into heme.

  16. Synthesis and photophysical studies of chiral helical macrocyclic scaffolds via coordination-driven self-assembly of 1,8,9,16-tetraethynyltetraphenylene. formation of monometallic platinum(II) and dimetallic platinum(II)-ruthenium(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fang; Peng, Hai-Yan; Chen, Jing-Xing; Chik, David T W; Cai, Zongwei; Wong, Keith M C; Yam, Vivian W W; Wong, Henry N C

    2010-11-24

    This paper is concerned with the synthesis and reactions of enantiopure 1,8,9,16-tetraethynyltetraphenylene (3). We obtained 3 in 34% yield through four steps starting from 1,8,9,16-tetrahydroxytetraphenylene (2a) via a functional group interconversion strategy. On the basis of this chiral "helical" building block, three rigid helical macrocycles 14, 15, and 22 were designed. Complexes 14 and 15 were constructed via coordination-driven self-assembly with platinum(II) complexes 8 and 9b, while 22 cannot be obtained successfully. Then macrocycle 28 was designed on the structural basis of 22 to which octyl chains were introduced, in the hope of improving the solubility of the complex. Macrocycle 28 was finally formed and was characterized by NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and electrospray mass spectrometry. For the enantiopure 15 and 28, circular dichroism (CD) spectra also exhibited chiral properties. Complexes 27 and 28 both exhibited an intense emission band at 621 nm in acetonitrile at 298 K upon excitation at λ > 420 nm. PMID:21033663

  17. Pressure effects reveal that changes in the redox states of the heme iron complexes in the sensor domains of two heme-based oxygen sensor proteins, EcDOS and YddV, have profound effects on their flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzenbacher, Pavel; Marchal, Stéphane; Palacký, Jan; Anzenbacherová, Eva; Domaschke, Thomas; Lange, Reinhard; Shimizu, Toru; Kitanishi, Kenichi; Stranava, Martin; Stiborová, Marie; Martinkova, Marketa

    2014-12-01

    The catalytic activity of a heme-based oxygen sensor phosphodiesterase from Escherichia coli (EcDOS) towards cyclic diGMP is regulated by the redox state of the heme iron complex in the enzyme's sensing domain and the association of external ligands with the iron center. Specifically, the Fe(II) complex is more active towards cyclic diGMP than the Fe(III) complex, and its activity is further enhanced by O2 or CO binding. In order to determine how the redox state and coordination of the heme iron atom regulate the catalytic activity of EcDOS, we investigated the flexibility of its isolated N-terminal heme-binding domain (EcDOS-heme) by monitoring its spectral properties at various hydrostatic pressures. The most active form of the heme-containing domain, i.e. the Fe(II)-CO complex, was found to be the least flexible. Conversely, the oxidized Fe(III) forms of EcDOS-heme and its mutants had relatively high flexibilities, which appeared to be linked to the low catalytic activity of the corresponding intact enzymes. These findings corroborate the suggestion, made on the basis of crystallographic data, that there is an inverse relationship between the flexibility of the heme-containing domain of EcDOS and its catalytic activity. The Fe(II)-CO form of the heme domain of a second heme-based oxygen sensor, diguanylate cyclase (YddV), was also found to be quite rigid. Interestingly, the incorporation of a water molecule into the heme complex of YddV caused by mutation of the Leu65 residue reduced the flexibility of this heme domain. Conversely, mutation of the Tyr43 residue increased its flexibility.

  18. Synthesis and Relaxivity Studies of a DOTA-Based Nanomolecular Chelator Assembly Supported by an Icosahedral Closo-B122− -Core for MRI: A Click Chemistry Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish S. Jalisatgi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available An icosahedral closo-B122− scaffold based nano-sized assembly capable of carrying a high payload of Gd3+-chelates in a sterically crowded configuration is developed by employing the azide-alkyne click reaction. The twelve copies of DO3A-t-Bu-ester ligands were covalently attached to an icosahedral closo-B122− core via suitable linkers through click reaction. This nanomolecular structure supporting a high payload of Gd3+-chelate is a new member of the closomer MRI contrast agents that we are currently developing in our laboratory. The per Gd ion relaxivity (r1 of the newly synthesized MRI contrast agent was obtained in PBS, 2% tween/PBS and bovine calf serum using a 7 Tesla micro MRI instrument and was found to be slightly higher (r1 = 4.7 in PBS at 25 °C compared to the clinically used MRI contrast agents Omniscan (r1 = 4.2 in PBS at 25 °C and ProHance (r1 = 3.1 in PBS at 25 °C.

  19. Study of the synthesis and self-assembly of CO2-philic copolymers with complexing groups: application to decontamination in supercritical CO2 medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of sustainable development, a priority is to decrease the volume of nuclear wastes. The use of supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) could allow to solve this problem. The aim of this study is to extract an ionic or particle cobalt contamination deposited on textile lab coats. The strategy uses CO2-philic/CO2-phobic copolymers soluble in scCO2 and containing complexing groups. This approach combines the use of amphiphilic copolymers for steric stabilization of particles, of surfactants able to self-assemble to promote extraction and of ligands. Controlled radical polymerization is used to synthesize fluorinated gradient or block copolymers. Cloud point curves of the copolymers are determined experimentally in scCO2. Prediction of polymer/scCO2 phase diagrams was assessed by Perturbed-Chain Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (PC-SAFT) modeling. Gradient copolymers appear more advantageous than block copolymers due to their solubility in much milder conditions of pressure and temperature. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) allowed us to evidence the pressure-induced aggregation of the gradient copolymers in scCO2. Their interface properties were demonstrated: they allow to form water-in-CO2 microemulsions and to stabilize cobalt hydroxide dispersions in scCO2. Lastly, in presence of a very low quantity of water, Co2+ ions were removed with a rate of 37 % from a cotton/polyester matrix by a gradient copolymer. (author)

  20. Synthesis, properties and surface self-assembly of a pentanuclear cluster based on the new π-conjugated TTF-triazole ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Long; Geng, Yan-Fang; Leong, Chanel F.; Ma, Qian; D’Alessandro, Deanna M.; Deng, Ke; Zeng, Qing-Dao; Zuo, Jing-Lin

    2016-05-01

    The new π-extended redox-active ligand with both TTF and triazole units, 6-(4,5-bis(propylthio)-1,3-dithiol-2-ylidene)-1H-[1,3]dithiolo[4‧,5‧:4,5]benzo [1,2-d] [1–3]triazole, has been successfully prepared. Based on the versatile ligand and Cu(tta)2 precursors (tta‑ = 4,4,4-trifluoro-1-(thiophen-2-yl)butane-1,3-dione), a TTF-based pentanuclear CuII cluster (Cu5(tta)4(TTFN3)6) is synthesized and structurally characterized. Their absorption and electrochemical properties are investigated. Antiferromagnetic couplings are operative between metal ion centers bridged by triazoles in the complex. The self-assembled structure of the cluster complex on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface was observed using scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to provide insight into the formation mechanism. The introduction of the redox-active TTF unit into the cluster complexes with interesting magnetic properties renders them promising candidates for new multifunctional materials.