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Sample records for assembly final crada

  1. CRADA FINAL REPORT FOR CRADA010393:

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Adam Z.

    2016-01-01

    This CRADA is established to jointly develop H2/Br2 flow batteries with improved materials sets and understanding between TVN Systems and LBNL. The focus of the activities is the testing and optimization of flow battery components to meet efficiency and power requirements. The proposed work is essentially all experimental where TVN Systems will use their knowledge and expertise in membrane-electrode-assembly (MEA) design and fabrication using novel catalyst and membrane materia...

  2. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of two-phase flow in a BWR fuel assembly. Final CRADA Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tentner, A.

    2009-01-01

    A direct numerical simulation capability for two-phase flows with heat transfer in complex geometries can considerably reduce the hardware development cycle, facilitate the optimization and reduce the costs of testing of various industrial facilities, such as nuclear power plants, steam generators, steam condensers, liquid cooling systems, heat exchangers, distillers, and boilers. Specifically, the phenomena occurring in a two-phase coolant flow in a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) fuel assembly include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. Traditionally, the best analysis tools for this purpose of two-phase flow phenomena inside the BWR fuel assembly have been the sub-channel codes. However, the resolution of these codes is too coarse for analyzing the detailed intra-assembly flow patterns, such as flow around a spacer element. Advanced CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes provide a potential for detailed 3D simulations of coolant flow inside a fuel assembly, including flow around a spacer element using more fundamental physical models of flow regimes and phase interactions than sub-channel codes. Such models can extend the code applicability to a wider range of situations, which is highly important for increasing the efficiency and to prevent accidents.

  3. Rapid response manufacturing (RRM). Final CRADA report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cain, W.D. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Waddell, W.L. [National Centers for Manufacturing Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1998-02-10

    US industry is fighting to maintain its competitive edge in the global market place. Markets fluctuate rapidly. Companies have to be able to respond quickly with improved, high quality, cost efficient products. Because companies and their suppliers are geographically distributed, rapid product realization is dependent on the development of a secure integrated concurrent engineering environment operating across multiple business entities. The way products are developed and brought to market can be improved and made more efficient through the proper incorporation of emerging technologies implemented in a secure environment. This documents the work done under this CRADA to develop capabilities, which permit the effective application, incorporation, and use of advanced technologies in a secure environment to facilitate the product realization process. Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES), through a CRADA with the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), worked within a consortium of major industrial firms--Ford, General Motors, Texas Instruments, United Technologies, and Eastman Kodak--and several small suppliers of advanced manufacturing technology--MacNeal-Schwendler Corp., Teknowledge Corp., Cimplex Corp., Concentra, Spatial Technology, and Structural Dynamics Research Corp. (SDRC)--to create infrastructure to support the development and implementation of secure engineering environments for Rapid Response Manufacturing. The major accomplishment achieved under this CRADA was the demonstration of a prototypical implementation of a broad-based generic framework for automating and integrating the design-to-manufacturing activities associated with machined parts in a secure NWC compliant environment. Specifically, methods needed to permit the effective application, incorporation, and use of advanced technologies in a secure environment to facilitate the product realization process were developed and demonstrated. An important aspect of this demonstration was

  4. Proximity sensor system development. CRADA final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haley, D.C.; Pigoski, T.M.

    1998-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (LMERC) and Merritt Systems, Inc. (MSI) entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) for the development and demonstration of a compact, modular proximity sensing system suitable for application to a wide class of manipulator systems operated in support of environmental restoration and waste management activities. In teleoperated modes, proximity sensing provides the manipulator operator continuous information regarding the proximity of the manipulator to objects in the workspace. In teleoperated and robotic modes, proximity sensing provides added safety through the implementation of active whole arm collision avoidance capabilities. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), managed by LMERC for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), has developed an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) design for the electronics required to support a modular whole arm proximity sensing system based on the use of capacitive sensors developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The use of ASIC technology greatly reduces the size of the electronics required to support the selected sensor types allowing deployment of many small sensor nodes over a large area of the manipulator surface to provide maximum sensor coverage. The ASIC design also provides a communication interface to support sensor commands from and sensor data transmission to a distributed processing system which allows modular implementation and operation of the sensor system. MSI is a commercial small business specializing in proximity sensing systems based upon infrared and acoustic sensors

  5. Proximity sensor system development. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haley, D.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Pigoski, T.M. [Merrit Systems, Inc. (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (LMERC) and Merritt Systems, Inc. (MSI) entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) for the development and demonstration of a compact, modular proximity sensing system suitable for application to a wide class of manipulator systems operated in support of environmental restoration and waste management activities. In teleoperated modes, proximity sensing provides the manipulator operator continuous information regarding the proximity of the manipulator to objects in the workspace. In teleoperated and robotic modes, proximity sensing provides added safety through the implementation of active whole arm collision avoidance capabilities. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), managed by LMERC for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), has developed an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) design for the electronics required to support a modular whole arm proximity sensing system based on the use of capacitive sensors developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The use of ASIC technology greatly reduces the size of the electronics required to support the selected sensor types allowing deployment of many small sensor nodes over a large area of the manipulator surface to provide maximum sensor coverage. The ASIC design also provides a communication interface to support sensor commands from and sensor data transmission to a distributed processing system which allows modular implementation and operation of the sensor system. MSI is a commercial small business specializing in proximity sensing systems based upon infrared and acoustic sensors.

  6. Development of Charge Drain Coatings: Final CRADA Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Jeffrey W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-01-17

    The primary goal of this CRADA project was to develop and optimize tunable resistive coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) for use as charge-drain coatings on the KLA-Tencor digital pattern generators (DPGs).

  7. Brain Implants for Prediction and Mitigation of Epileptic Seizures - Final CRADA Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalsami, Nachappa

    2016-09-29

    This is a CRADA final report on C0100901 between Argonne National Laboratory and Flint Hills Scientific, LLC of Lawrence, Kansas. Two brain implantable probes, a surface acoustic wave probe and a miniature cooling probe, were designed, built, and tested with excellent results.

  8. Surface Inspection Machine Infrared (SIMIR). Final CRADA report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, G.L. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Neu, J.T.; Beecroft, M. [Surface Optics Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1997-02-28

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement was a one year effort to make the surface inspection machine based on diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (Surface Inspection Machine-Infrared, SIMIR), being developed by Surface Optics Corporation, perform to its highest potential as a practical, portable surface inspection machine. The design function of the SIMIR is to inspect metal surfaces for cleanliness (stains). The system is also capable of evaluating graphite-resin systems for cure and heat damage, and for measuring the effects of moisture exposure on lithium hydride, corrosion on uranium metal, and the constituents of and contamination on wood, paper, and fabrics. Over the period of the CRADA, extensive experience with the use of the SIMIR for surface cleanliness measurements have been achieved through collaborations with NASA and the Army. The SIMIR was made available to the AMTEX CRADA for Finish on Yarn where it made a very significant contribution. The SIMIR was the foundation of a Forest Products CRADA that was developed over the time interval of this CRADA. Surface Optics Corporation and the SIMIR have been introduced to the chemical spectroscopy on-line analysis market and have made staffing additions and arrangements for international marketing of the SIMIR as an on-line surface inspection device. LMES has been introduced to a wide range of aerospace applications, the research and fabrication skills of Surface Optics Corporation, has gained extensive experience in the areas of surface cleanliness from collaborations with NASA and the Army, and an extensive introduction to the textile and forest products industries. The SIMIR, marketed as the SOC-400, has filled an important new technology need in the DOE-DP Enhanced Surveillance Program with instruments delivered to or on order by LMES, LANL, LLNL, and Pantex, where extensive collaborations are underway to implement and improve this technology.

  9. Surface Inspection Machine Infrared (SIMIR). Final CRADA report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, G.L.; Neu, J.T.; Beecroft, M.

    1997-01-01

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement was a one year effort to make the surface inspection machine based on diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (Surface Inspection Machine-Infrared, SIMIR), being developed by Surface Optics Corporation, perform to its highest potential as a practical, portable surface inspection machine. The design function of the SIMIR is to inspect metal surfaces for cleanliness (stains). The system is also capable of evaluating graphite-resin systems for cure and heat damage, and for measuring the effects of moisture exposure on lithium hydride, corrosion on uranium metal, and the constituents of and contamination on wood, paper, and fabrics. Over the period of the CRADA, extensive experience with the use of the SIMIR for surface cleanliness measurements have been achieved through collaborations with NASA and the Army. The SIMIR was made available to the AMTEX CRADA for Finish on Yarn where it made a very significant contribution. The SIMIR was the foundation of a Forest Products CRADA that was developed over the time interval of this CRADA. Surface Optics Corporation and the SIMIR have been introduced to the chemical spectroscopy on-line analysis market and have made staffing additions and arrangements for international marketing of the SIMIR as an on-line surface inspection device. LMES has been introduced to a wide range of aerospace applications, the research and fabrication skills of Surface Optics Corporation, has gained extensive experience in the areas of surface cleanliness from collaborations with NASA and the Army, and an extensive introduction to the textile and forest products industries. The SIMIR, marketed as the SOC-400, has filled an important new technology need in the DOE-DP Enhanced Surveillance Program with instruments delivered to or on order by LMES, LANL, LLNL, and Pantex, where extensive collaborations are underway to implement and improve this technology

  10. The final technical report of the CRADA, 'Medical Accelerator Technology'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, W.T.; Rawls, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Under this CRADA, Berkeley Lab and the industry partner, General Atomics (GA), have cooperatively developed hadron therapy technologies for commercialization. Specifically, Berkeley Lab and GA jointly developed beam transport systems to bring the extracted protons from the accelerator to the treatment rooms, rotating gantries to aim the treatment beams precisely into patients from any angle, and patient positioners to align the patient accurately relative to the treatment beams. We have also jointly developed a patient treatment delivery system that controls the radiation doses in the patient, and hardware to improve the accelerator performances, including a radio-frequency ion source and its low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system. This project facilitated the commercialization of the DOE-developed technologies in hadron therapy by the private sector in order to improve the quality of life of the nation

  11. Hyperspectral Sensors Final Report CRADA No. TC02173.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priest, R. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sauvageau, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-30

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), National Security Space Operations/SRBU, to develop longwave infrared (LWIR) hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensors for airborne and potentially ground and space, platforms. LLNL has designed and developed LWIR HSI sensors since 1995. The current generation of these sensors has applications to users within the U.S. Department of Defense and the Intelligence Community. User needs are for multiple copies provided by commercial industry. To gain the most benefit from the U.S. Government’s prior investments in LWIR HSI sensors developed at LLNL, transfer of technology and know-how from LLNL HSI experts to commercial industry was needed. The overarching purpose of the CRADA project was to facilitate the transfer of the necessary technology from LLNL to SAIC thereby allowing the U.S. Government to procure LWIR HSI sensors from this company.

  12. Growth of large detector crystals. CRADA final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boatner, L.A.; Samuelson, S.

    1997-01-01

    In the course of a collaborative research effort between L.A. Boatner of Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Prof. Alex Lempicki of the Department of Chemistry of Boston University, a new highly efficient and very fast scintillator for the detection of gamma-rays was discovered. This new scintillator consists of a single crystal of lutetium orthophosphate (LuPO 4 ) to which a small percentage of trivalent cerium is added as an activator ion. The new lutetium orthophosphate-cerium scintillator was found to be superior in performance to bismuth germanium oxide--a material that is currently widely used as a gamma-ray detector in a variety of medical, scientific, and technical applications. Single crystals of LuPO 4 and related rare-earth orthophosphates had been grown for a number of years in the ORNL Solid State Division prior to the discovery of the efficient gamma-ray-scintillation response of LuPO 4 :Ce. The high-temperature-solvent (flux-growth) method used for the growth of these crystals was capable of producing crystals in sizes that were adequate for research purposes but that were inadequate for commercial-scale production and widespread application. The CRADA between ORNL and Deltronic Crystal Industries of Dover, NJ was undertaken for the purpose of investigating alternate approaches, such as top-seeded-solution growth, to the growth of LuPO 4 :Ce scintillator crystals in sizes significantly larger than those obtainable through the application of standard flux-growth methods and, therefore, suitable for commercial sales and applications

  13. Laser Shot Peening System Final Report CRADA No. TC-1369-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart, B. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Harris, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    This CRADA project was established with a primary goal to develop a laser shot peening system which could operate at production throughput rates and produce the desired depth and intensity of induced shots. The first objective was to understand all parameters required for acceptable peening, including pulse energy, pulse temporal format, pulse spatial format, sample configuration and tamping mechanism. The next objective was to demonstrate the technique on representative samples and then on representative parts. The final objective was to implement the technology into a meaningful industrial peen.

  14. Advanced Analog Signal Processing for Fuzing Final Report CRADA No. TC-1306-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, C. Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Spencer, D. [Raymond Engineering, Middletown, CT (United States)

    2018-01-24

    The purpose of this CRADA between LLNL and Kaman Aerospace/Raymond Engineering Operations (Raymond) was to demonstrate the feasibility of using Analog/Digital Neural Network (ANN) Technology for advanced signal processing, fuzing, and other applications. This cooperation sought to Ieverage the expertise and capabilities of both parties--Raymond to develop the signature recognition hardware system, using Raymond’s extensive experience in the area of system development plus Raymond’s knowledge of military applications, and LLNL to apply ANN and related technologies to an area of significant interest to the United States government. This CRADA effort was anticipated to be a three-year project consisting of three phases: Phase I, Proof-of-Principle Demonstration; Phase II, Proof-of-Design, involving the development of a form-factored integrated sensor and ANN technology processo~ and Phase III, Final Design and Release of the integrated sensor and ANN fabrication process: Under Phase I, to be conducted during calendar year 1996, Raymond was to deliver to LLNL an architecture (design) for an ANN chip. LLNL was to translate the design into a stepper mask and to produce and test a prototype chip from the Raymond design.

  15. New Materials for Electric Drive Vehicles - Final CRADA Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, J. David [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-10-18

    This project was sponsored by the US DOE Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention. The object was for Ukrainian and US partners, including Argonne, AETC, and Dontech to develop special carbon materials and factory production equipment with the goal of making better car batteries to achieve DOE's goals for all-electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. Carbon materials are used in designs for lithium-ion batteries and metal-air batteries, both leading contenders for future electric cars. Specifically, the collaborators planned to use the equipment derived from this project to develop a rechargeable battery system that will use the carbon materials produced by the innovative factory process equipment. The final outcome of the project was that the Ukrainian participants consisting of the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT), the Institute of Gas of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine and the Materials Research Center, Ltd. designed, built, tested and delivered 14 pieces of processing equipment for pilot scale carbon production lines at the AETC, Arlington Heights facilities. The pilot scale equipment will be used to process materials such as activated carbon, thermally expanded graphite and carbon coated nano-particles. The equipment was shipped from Ukraine to the United States and received by AETC on December 3, 2013. The equipment is on loan from Argonne, control # 6140. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) and all-electric vehicles have already demostrated success in the U.S. as they begin to share the market with older hybrid electric designs. When the project was conceived, PHEV battery systems provided a ~40 mile driving range (2011 figures). DOE R&D targets increased this to >100 miles at reduced cost less than $250/kWh (2011 figures.) A 2016 Tesla model S has boasted 270 miles. The project object was to develop pilot-production line equipment for advanced hybrid battery system that achieves cycle life of 1000, an energy

  16. CRADA Final Report for CRADA Number NFE-10-02991 "Development and Commercialization of Alternative Carbon Precursors and Conversion Technologies"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Rober [ORNL; Paulauskas, Felix [ORNL; Naskar, Amit [ORNL; Kaufman, Michael [ORNL; Yarborough, Ken [ORNL; Derstine, Chris [The Dow Chemical Company

    2013-10-01

    The overall objective of the collaborative research performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Dow Chemical Company under this Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA NFE-10-02991) was to develop and establish pathways to commercialize new carbon fiber precursor and conversion technology. This technology is to produce alternative polymer fiber precursor formulations as well as scaled energy-efficient advanced conversion technology to enable continuous mode conversion to obtain carbonized fibers that are technically and economically viable in industrial markets such as transportation, wind energy, infrastructure and oil drilling applications. There have been efforts in the past to produce a low cost carbon fiber. These attempts have to be interpreted against the backdrop of the market needs at the time, which were strictly military aircraft and high-end aerospace components. In fact, manufacturing costs have been reduced from those days to current practice, where both process optimization and volume production have enabled carbon fiber to become available at prices below $20/lb. However, the requirements of the lucrative aerospace market limits further price reductions from current practice. This approach is different because specific industrial applications are targeted, most specifically wind turbine blade and light vehicle transportation, where aircraft grade carbon fiber is not required. As a result, researchers are free to adjust both manufacturing process and precursor chemistry to meet the relaxed physical specifications at a lower cost. This report documents the approach and findings of this cooperative research in alternative precursors and advanced conversion for production of cost-effective carbon fiber for energy missions. Due to export control, proprietary restrictions, and CRADA protected data considerations, specific design details and processing parameters are not included in this report.

  17. CRADA Final Report for CRADA Number ORNL00-0605: Advanced Engine/Aftertreatment System R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Adelman, Brad [Navistar; Derybowski, Edward [Navistar

    2011-10-01

    Navistar and ORNL established this CRADA to develop diesel engine aftertreatment configurations and control strategies that could meet emissions regulations while maintaining or improving vehicle efficiency. The early years of the project focused on reducing the fuel penalty associated with lean NOx trap (LNT), also known as NOx adsorber catalyst regeneration and desulfation. While Navistar pursued engine-based (in-cylinder) approaches to LNT regeneration, complementary experiments at ORNL focused on in-exhaust fuel injection. ORNL developed a PC-based controller for transient electronic control of EGR valve position, intake throttle position, and actuation of fuel injectors in the exhaust system of a Navistar engine installed at Oak Ridge. Aftertreatment systems consisting of different diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) in conjunction with a diesel particle filter and LNT were evaluated under quasi-steady-state conditions. Hydrocarbon (HC) species were measured at multiple locations in the exhaust system with Gas chromatograph mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Under full-load, rated speed conditions, injection of fuel upstream of the DOC reduced the fuel penalty for a given level of NOx reduction by 10-20%. GC-MS showed that fuel compounds were 'cracked' into smaller hydrocarbon species over the DOC, particularly light alkenes. GC-MS analysis of HC species entering and exiting the LNT showed high utilization of light alkenes, followed by mono-aromatics; branched alkanes passed through the LNT largely unreacted. Follow-on experiments at a 'road load' condition were conducted, revealing that the NOx reduction was better without the DOC at lower temperatures. The improved performance was attributed to the large swings in the NOx adsorber core temperature. Split-injection experiments were conducted with ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel and three pure HC compounds: 1-pentene, toluene, and iso-octane. The pure

  18. Development of an X-Ray Catheter Final Report CRADA No. TC-1265-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trebes, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schlossberg, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Toe goal of this CRADA project was to develop a catheter-based x-ray source to provide treatment of restenosis in arteries with a radiation source which can be precisely controlled and turned on and off at will.

  19. CRADA Final Report for CRADA No. ORNL99-0544, Interfacial Properties of Electron Beam Cured Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, C.J.

    2005-10-17

    Electron beam (EB) curing is a technology that promises, in certain applications, to deliver lower cost and higher performance polymer matrix composite (PMC) structures compared to conventional thermal curing processes. PMCs enhance performance by making products lighter, stronger, more durable, and less energy demanding. They are essential in weight- and performance-dominated applications. Affordable PMCs can enhance US economic prosperity and national security. US industry expects rapid implementation of electron beam cured composites in aircraft and aerospace applications as satisfactory properties are demonstrated, and implementation in lower performance applications will likely follow thereafter. In fact, at this time and partly because of discoveries made in this project, field demonstrations are underway that may result in the first fielded applications of electron beam cured composites. Serious obstacles preventing the widespread use of electron beam cured PMCs in many applications are their relatively poor interfacial properties and resin toughness. The composite shear strength and resin toughness of electron beam cured carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites were about 25% and 50% lower, respectively, than those of thermally cured composites of similar formulations. The essential purpose of this project was to improve the mechanical properties of electron beam cured, carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites, with a specific focus on composite shear properties for high performance aerospace applications. Many partners, sponsors, and subcontractors participated in this project. There were four government sponsors from three federal agencies, with the US Department of Energy (DOE) being the principal sponsor. The project was executed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), NASA and Department of Defense (DOD) participants, eleven private CRADA partners, and two subcontractors. A list of key project contacts is provided in Appendix A. In order to properly

  20. An evaluation of optical tool inspection and compensation technologies. CRADA final report for CRADA Number Y-1291-0052

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babelay, E.F. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Centola, J.; Zorger, W.; Serafin, W. [United Technologies, East Hartford, CT (United States). Pratt and Whitney Div.

    1994-05-15

    A Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) was established April 1992 between Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. and United Technologies Corporation, Pratt and Whitney Division to evaluate the existing applicability of the Energy Systems optical tool inspection and compensation system (OTICS) for use at Pratt and Whitney`s East Hartford Plant. The OTICS was developed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and optically measures the shape of a single point cutting tool. The tool shape inspection provides process information relating to tool wear and if desired the tool shape geometry can be used to generate a new numerical control machining program that is compensated for the tool forms errors. The tool wear measurement capability of OTICS was successfully evaluated in the Phase-1 testing. The testing verified that OTICS can easily detect tool wear and the {+-} 0.0001 inch resolution obtained was sufficient for the larger cutter inserts used by Pratt and Whitney (P and W). During the tool wear experiments at P and W, a second potential use identified for OTICS was the accurate on-machine dimensional verification of special ground contour forming tools. The OTICS tool path compensation experiment demonstrated the varied technologies that are integrated in the tool path compensation process. The OTICS system was successful at inspecting the 0.125 in. radius tool and compensating the tool path for tool form errors. The need for automated interfaces between the OTICS computer and controller along with the part program requirements and the overall compensation methodology were highlighted in the demonstration.

  1. Centralized Cryptographic Key Management and Critical Risk Assessment - CRADA Final Report For CRADA Number NFE-11-03562

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abercrombie, R. K. [ORNL; Peters, Scott [Sypris Electronics, LLC

    2014-05-28

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE-OE) Cyber Security for Energy Delivery Systems (CSEDS) industry led program (DE-FOA-0000359) entitled "Innovation for Increasing Cyber Security for Energy Delivery Systems (12CSEDS)," awarded a contract to Sypris Electronics LLC to develop a Cryptographic Key Management System for the smart grid (Scalable Key Management Solutions for Critical Infrastructure Protection). Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Sypris Electronics, LLC as a result of that award entered into a CRADA (NFE-11-03562) between ORNL and Sypris Electronics, LLC. ORNL provided its Cyber Security Econometrics System (CSES) as a tool to be modified and used as a metric to address risks and vulnerabilities in the management of cryptographic keys within the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) domain of the electric sector. ORNL concentrated our analysis on the AMI domain of which the National Electric Sector Cyber security Organization Resource (NESCOR) Working Group 1 (WG1) has documented 29 failure scenarios. The computational infrastructure of this metric involves system stakeholders, security requirements, system components and security threats. To compute this metric, we estimated the stakes that each stakeholder associates with each security requirement, as well as stochastic matrices that represent the probability of a threat to cause a component failure and the probability of a component failure to cause a security requirement violation. We applied this model to estimate the security of the AMI, by leveraging the recently established National Institute of Standards and Technology Interagency Report (NISTIR) 7628 guidelines for smart grid security and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 63351, Part 9 to identify the life cycle for cryptographic key management, resulting in a vector that assigned to each stakeholder an estimate of their average loss in terms of dollars per day of system

  2. Molecular engineering of polymer alloys: A final report of results obtained on CRADA No. 1078

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curro, J.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schweizer, K.S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Honeycutt, J.D. [BIOSYM Technologies, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    This report summarizes the technical progress made in the past three years on CRADA No. 1078, Molecular Engineering of Polymer Alloys. The thrust of this CRADA was to start with the basic ideas of PRISM theory and develop it to the point where it could be applied to modeling of polymer alloys. In this program, BIOSYM, Sandia and the University of Illinois worked jointly to develop the theoretical techniques and numerical formalisms necessary to implement the theoretical ideas into commercial software aimed at molecular engineering of polymer alloys. This CRADA focused on developing the techniques required to make the transition from theory to practice. These techniques were then used by BIOSYM to incorporate PRISM theory and other new developments into their commercial software.

  3. Development of a Landmine Detection Sensor Final Report CRADA No. TC02133.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, C. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sheppard, C. [First Alliance Technologies, LLC, San Ramon, CA (United States)

    2017-09-06

    This was one of two CRADAs between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and First Alliance Technologies, LLC (First Alliance), to conduct research and development activity toward an integrated system for the detecting, locating, and destroying of landmines and unexploded ordinance using a laser to destroy landmines and unexploded ordinance and First Alliance’s Land Mine Locator (LML) system. The focus of this CRADA was on developing a sensor system that accurately detects landmines, and provides exact location information in a timely manner with extreme reliability.

  4. Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Agricultural and Biorefinery Residues Final Report – CRADA #PNNL/277

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Hart, Todd R.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Zacher, Alan H.; Fjare, K. A.; Dunn, B. C.; McDonald, S. L.; Dassor, G.

    2010-07-28

    This project was performed as a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the participants: Archer-Daniels-Midland Company (ADM), ConocoPhillips (COP), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Funding from the federal government was provided by the Office of the Biomass Program within the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy assistant secretariat as part of the Thermochemical Conversion Platform. The three-year project was initiated in August 2007 with formal signing of the CRADA (#PNNL/277) in March 3, 2008 with subsequent amendments approved in November of 2008 and August of 2009. This report describes the results of the work performed by PNNL and the CRADA partners ADM and COP. It is considered Protected CRADA Information and is not available for public disclosure. The work conducted during this project involved developing process technology at PNNL for hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of agricultural and biorefinery residues and catalytic hydrothermal gasification (CHG) of the aqueous byproduct from the liquefaction step. Related work performed by the partners included assessment of aqueous phase byproducts, hydroprocessing of the bio-oil product and process analysis and economic modeling of the technology.

  5. Complex Multi-Chamber Airbag Performance Simulation Final Report CRADA No. TSB-961-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, Gregory [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kithil, Philip [Advanced Safety Concepts, Inc. (ASCI), Santa Fe, NM (United States)

    2018-01-22

    The purpose of this small business CRADA was to evaluate the performance of new airbag concepts which were developed by the Advanced Safety Concepts, Inc. (ASCI). These new airbag concepts, if successful, could have major potential savings to society in terms of fewer injuries, lost time and lives.

  6. First Principles Diffusion Modeling Final Report CRADA No. TC-1540-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    delaRubia, T. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foad, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Giles, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    The CRADA participants built on the capabilities LLNL had already developed for ab initio diffusion modeling, extending them to higher doping and damage levels, and applying them to improve the understanding of implant and annealing tradeoffs for technology-relevant conditions. The calculation results and some of the simulation capabilities developed here were transferred to Intel and Applied Materials.

  7. Design and fabrication of a prototype sensor system for waste storage tank characterization. CRADA final report for CRADA Number ORNL92-0094

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burks, B.L.; Wagner, J.

    1994-01-01

    On February 15--16 1994, ORNL and MTI presented a technology demonstration showcasing the results of a CRADA between the two organizations. The CRADA project entailed design and development of a structured light mapping system suitable for deployment in underground waste storage tanks. The CRADA expanded upon a system previously designed and deployed at the DOE Fernald site by ORNL. Enhancements in the new system include: a factor of ten increase in mapping speed; radiation and environmental hardening sufficient for use in the Hanford single-shell tanks (up to 5,000 rad/hr, pH = 12, high heat, etc.); capability to map and display data for both vertical surfaces, such as pipes, and horizontal surfaces; rugged, compact design that can be deployed through a ten centimeter riser; and a design that can be decontaminated easily after deployment

  8. Application of a Barrier Filter at a High Purity Synthetic Graphite Plant, CRADA 99-F035, Final Report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2000-01-01

    Superior Graphite Company and the US Department of Energy have entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to study the application of ceramic barrier filters at its Hopkinsville, Kentucky graphite plant. Superior Graphite Company is a worldwide leader in the application of advanced thermal processing technology to produce high purity graphite and carbons. The objective of the CRADA is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of incorporating the use of high-temperature filters to improve the performance of the offgas treatment system. A conceptual design was developed incorporating the ceramic filters into the offgas treatment system to be used for the development of a capital cost estimate and economic feasibility assessment of this technology for improving particulate removal. This CRADA is a joint effort of Superior Graphite Company, Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the US Department of Energy (DOE)

  9. Micromagnetic Code Development of Advanced Magnetic Structures Final Report CRADA No. TC-1561-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerjan, Charles J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shi, Xizeng [Read-Rite Corporation, Fremont, CA (United States)

    2017-11-09

    The specific goals of this project were to: Further develop the previously written micromagnetic code DADIMAG (DOE code release number 980017); Validate the code. The resulting code was expected to be more realistic and useful for simulations of magnetic structures of specific interest to Read-Rite programs. We also planned to further the code for use in internal LLNL programs. This project complemented LLNL CRADA TC-840-94 between LLNL and Read-Rite, which allowed for simulations of the advanced magnetic head development completed under the CRADA. TC-1561-98 was effective concurrently with LLNL non-exclusive copyright license (TL-1552-98) to Read-Rite for DADIMAG Version 2 executable code.

  10. Nano-Filament Field Emission Cathode Development Final Report CRADA No. TSB-0731-93

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernhardt, Tony [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fahlen, Ted [Candescent Technologies Corporation, San Jose, CA (United States)

    2018-01-17

    At the time the CRADA was established, Silicon Video Corporation, of Cupertino, CA was a one-year-old rapidly growing start-up company. SVC was developing flat panel displays (FPDs) to replace Cathode Ray Terminals (CRTs) for personal computers, work stations and televisions. They planned to base their products on low cost and energy efficient field emission technology. It was universally recognized that the display was both the dominant cost item and differentiating feature of many products such as laptop computers and hand-held electronics and that control of the display technology through U.S. sources was essential to success in these markets. The purpose of this CRADA project was to determine if electrochemical planarization would be a viable, inexpensive alternative to current optical polishing techniques for planarizing the surface of a ceramic backplate of a thin film display.

  11. Trinitromethyl Heterocyclic Oxidizers as a Solid Propellant Ingredient Final Report CRADA No TC02146.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagoria, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Racoveanu, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Physical Sciences, Inc. (PSI), to develop a synthesis of two novel energetic heterocyclic oxidizers as possible replacements for ammonium perchlorate (AP) in rocket propellant formulations. This CRADA resulted from the award of the Phase I Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) from DOD. The CRADA consisted of two phases. The goal for Phase 1 was to produce a new oxidizer called TNMDNP. Phase 2 is optional (based on the success of Phase 1) and the goal of Phase 2 (optional) was to produce a new oxidizer called TNMDNT. Phase 2 tasks would be performed based on the successful results of Phase 1.

  12. Electrical Resistance Tomography for Subsurface Imaging Final Report CRADA No. TC-609-93

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, William [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mondt, William [RIMtech, Inc., Westminster, CO (United States)

    2018-01-22

    The purpose of this CRADA was to develop a useful and commercially viable version of ERT technology for use in the oil, mining, engineering, and geotechnical industries. The goals required to accomplish these tasks included (1) developing commercial-grade data-acquisition systems and data analysis software, and (2) completing transfer of the state-of-the-art know-how, held by LLNL scientists and engineers, to personnel at RIMtech, Inc.

  13. Manufacturing and Characterization of Ultra Pure Ferrous Alloys Final Report CRADA No. TC02069.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesuer, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McGreevy, T. E. [Caterpillar Inc., Mossville, IL (United States)

    2017-09-06

    This CRADA was a.collaborative effort between the Lawrence Livermore National Security LLC (formerly University of California)/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL),and Caterpillar Inc. (CaterpiHar), to further advance levitation casting techniques (developed at the Central Research Institute for Material (CRIM) in St. Petersburg, Russia) for use in manufacturing high purity metal alloys. This DOE Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention Program (IPP) project was to develop and demonstrate the levitation casting technology for producing ultra-pure alloys.

  14. Enhanced control and sensing for the REMOTEC ANDROS Mk VI robot. CRADA final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spelt, P.F.; Harvey, H.W.

    1998-01-01

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., and REMOTEC, Inc., explored methods of providing operator feedback for various work actions of the ANDROS Mk VI teleoperated robot. In a hazardous environment, an extremely heavy workload seriously degrades the productivity of teleoperated robot operators. This CRADA involved the addition of computer power to the robot along with a variety of sensors and encoders to provide information about the robot's performance in and relationship to its environment. Software was developed to integrate the sensor and encoder information and provide control input to the robot. ANDROS Mk VI robots are presently used by numerous electric utilities to perform tasks in reactors where substantial exposure to radiation exists, as well as in a variety of other hazardous environments. Further, this platform has potential for use in a number of environmental restoration tasks, such as site survey and detection of hazardous waste materials. The addition of sensors and encoders serves to make the robot easier to manage and permits tasks to be done more safely and inexpensively (due to time saved in the completion of complex remote tasks). Prior research on the automation of mobile platforms with manipulators at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR, B ampersand R code KC0401030) Laboratory, a BES-supported facility, indicated that this type of enhancement is effective. This CRADA provided such enhancements to a successful working teleoperated robot for the first time. Performance of this CRADA used the CESAR laboratory facilities and expertise developed under BES funding

  15. Development of a Laser for Landmine Destruction Final Report CRADA No. TC02126.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sheppard, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-31

    This was one of two CRADAs between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and First Alliance Technologies, LLC (First Alliance), to conduct research and development activity toward an integrated system for the detecting, locating, and destroying of landmines and unexploded ordinance using a laser to destroy landmines and unexploded ordinance and First Alliance’s Land Mine Locator (LML) system.

  16. High Density, Insensitive Oxidizer With RDX Performance Final Report CRADA No. TC02178.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagoria, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Preda, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-25

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Physical Sciences, Inc. (PSI), to develop a synthesis and evaluate a novel high density, insensitive oxidizer with RDX performance. This CRADA resulted from the award of a Phase I STTR ("STTR") from DOD. In recent years, the synthesis of new energetic heterocyclic compounds to replace the energetic materials currently in the stockpile has received a great amount of attention. The Office of the Secretary of Defense has identified that there is a need to incorporate new energetic materials in current and future weapon systems in an effort to increase performance and decrease sensitivity. For many of the future weapon systems, incorporation of energetic compounds currently in the stockpile will not provide the desired performance and sensitivity goals. The success of this CRADA may lead to a Phase I option STTR from DOD and to a Phase II STTR from DOD. The goal of this CRADA was to produce and test a novel oxidizer, 2,5,8-trinitroheptazine (TNH).

  17. Non-Invasive Pneumothorax Detector Final Report CRADA No. TC02110.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, J. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Purcell, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-29

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and ElectroSonics Medical Inc. (formerly known as BIOMEC, Inc.), to develop a non-invasive pneumothorax detector based upon the micropower impulse radar technology invented at LLNL. Under a Work for Others Subcontract (L-9248), LLNL and ElectroSonics successfully demonstrated the feasibility of a novel device for non-invasive detection of pneumothorax for emergency and long-term monitoring. The device is based on Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR) Ultra Wideband (UWB) technology. Phase I experimental results were promising, showing that a pneumothorax volume even as small as 30 ml was clearly detectable from the MIR signals. Phase I results contributed to the award of a National Institute of Health (NIH) SBIR Phase II grant to support further research and development. The Phase II award led to the establishment of a LLNL/ElectroSonics CRADA related to Case No. TC02045.0. Under the subsequent CRADA, LLNL and ElectroSonics successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the pneumothorax detection in human subject research trials. Under this current CRADA TC02110.0, also referred to as Phase II Type II, the project scope consisted of seven tasks in Project Year 1; five tasks in Project Year 2; and four tasks in Project Year 3. Year 1 tasks were aimed toward the delivery of the pneumothorax detector design package for the pre-production of the miniaturized CompactFlash dockable version of the system. The tasks in Project Years 2 and 3 critically depended upon the accomplishments of Task 1. Since LLNL’s task was to provide subject matter expertise and performance verification, much of the timeline of engagement by the LLNL staff depended upon the overall project milestones as determined by the lead organization ElectroSonics. The scope of efforts were subsequently adjusted accordingly to commensurate with funding

  18. High Resolution Sub-MM Fiberoptic Endoscope Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1447-97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Gary F. [Univ. of California, Livermore, CA (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, John [CML Fiberoptics, Inc., Auburn, NY (United States)

    2018-01-22

    At the time of the CRADA, LLNL needed to develop a sub-mm outer diameter fiberoptic endoscope with 25pm or better resolution at 3-lOmm working distance to support the Enhanced Surveillance Program (ESP) and the Core Surveillance Program for DOE. The commercially available systems did not meet the image resolution requirements and development work was needed to reach three goals. We also needed to perform preliminary investigations into the production of such an endoscope with a steerable-articulated distal end. The goal of such an endoscope was to allow for a 45 degree inspection cone including the lens field of view.

  19. Development of Personal Decontamination System Final Report CRADA No. TC-02078-04

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); O' Dell, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    This was a collaborative effort between The Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and O’Dell Engineering, Ltd. (O’Dell) to develop an improved low-cost personal decontamination system for Toxic Industrial Chemicals (TICs) and chemical agents. The significant change to the project was that COTS (Commercial Off-the Shelf Components) were identified that performed as well, or better than, the proprietary materials created and tested as part of this CRADA. These COTS components were combined to create a new LPDS (low-cost personal decontamination system) that met all specifications.

  20. Improved Advanced Actuated Hybrid Mirrors Final Report CRADA No. TC02130.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbee, T. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ealey, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-25

    This was a collaborative effort to develop and demonstrate an improved Advanced Actuated Hybrid Mirrors (AAHM) for commercial or Government purposes. The AAHM consists of a nanolaminate film replicating a precision optical surface bonded to a Silicon Carbide (SiC) substrate with active figure control capability. The goal of this project was to further the development of specific AAHM technologies. The intent of the CRADA was to combine the expertise of LLNL and NG Xinetics in the manufacture and test of a very high quality AAHM, incorporating lessons learned from earlier joint efforts.

  1. Scale Up of Malonic Acid Fermentation Process: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-16-612

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schell, Daniel J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-04-16

    The goal of this work is to use the large fermentation vessels in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF) to scale-up Lygos' biological-based process for producing malonic acid and to generate performance data. Initially, work at the 1 L scale validated successful transfer of Lygos' fermentation protocols to NREL using a glucose substrate. Outside of the scope of the CRADA with NREL, Lygos tested their process on lignocellulosic sugars produced by NREL at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (LBNL) Advanced Biofuels Process Development Unit (ABPDU). NREL produced these cellulosic sugar solutions from corn stover using a separate cellulose/hemicellulose process configuration. Finally, NREL performed fermentations using glucose in large fermentors (1,500- and 9,000-L vessels) to intermediate product and to demonstrate successful performance of Lygos' technology at larger scales.

  2. In-service testing of Ni{sub 3}Al coupons and trays in carburizing furnaces at Delphi Saginaw. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K.; Santella, M.L.; Viswanathan, S.; Swindeman, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chatterjee, M. [General Motors Corporaion, Saginaw Division (United States)

    1998-08-01

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) report deals with the development of nickel aluminide alloy for improved longer life heat-resistant fixture assemblies for batch and continuous pusher carburizing furnaces. The nickel aluminide development was compared in both coupon and component testing with the currently used Fe-Ni-Cr heat-resisting alloy known as HU. The specific goals of the CRADA were: (1) casting process development, (2) characterization and possible modification of the alloy composition to optimize its manufacturing ability and performance under typical furnace operating conditions, and (3) testing and evaluation of specimens and prototype fixtures. In support of the CRADA objectives, coupons of nickel aluminide and the HU alloy were installed in both batch and pusher furnaces. The coupons were taken from two silicon levels and contained welds made with two different filler compositions (IC-221LA and IC-221W). Both nickel-aluminide and HU coupons were removed from the batch and pusher carburizing furnace at time intervals ranging from one month to one year. The exposed coupons were cut and mounted for metallographic, hardness, and microprobe analysis. The results of the microstructural analysis have been transmitted to General Motors Corporation, Saginaw Division (Delphi Saginaw) through reports that were presented at periodic CRADA review meetings. Based on coupon testing and verification of the coupon results with the testing of trays, Delphi Saginaw moved forward with the use of six additional trays in a batch furnace and two assemblies in a pusher furnace. Fifty percent of the trays and fixtures are in the as-cast condition and the remaining trays and fixtures are in the preoxidized condition. The successful operating experience of two assemblies in the pusher furnace for nearly a year formed the basis for a production run of 63 more assemblies. The production run required melting of 94 heats weighing 500 lb. each. Twenty

  3. Development of a Commercial Prototype of the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System Final Report CRADA No. TC-02077-04

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzenitis, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Haigh, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    This was a collaborative effort between The Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and GE Ion Track, Inc. (GEIT) to develop a commercial prototype of the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS), an instrument that monitors the air for all three biological threat agents (bacteria, viruses and toxins). This was originally a one year CRADA project, with the cost of the work at LLNL being funded by the Department of Homeland Security's Office of National Laboratories. The original project consisted of five major tasks and deliverables. The CRADA was then amended, converting the CRADA from a programmatically funded CRADA to a funds-in CRADA, extending the project for an additional 14 months, and adding four new tasks and deliverable to the project.

  4. Tire Development for Effective Transportation and Utilization of Used Tires, CRADA 01-N044, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Maley

    2004-03-31

    Scrap tires represent a significant disposal and recycling challenge for the United States. Over 280 million tires are generated on an annual basis, and several states have large stockpiles or abandoned tire piles that are slated for remediation. While most states have programs to address the accumulation and generation of scrap tires, most of these states struggle with creating and sustaining recycling or beneficial end use markets. One of the major issues with market development has been the costs associated with transporting and processing the tires into material for recycling or disposal. According to a report by the Rubber Manufactures Association tire-derived fuel (TDF) represents the largest market for scrap tires, and approximately 115 million tires were consumed in 2001 as TDF (U.S. Scrap Tire Markets, 2001, December 2002, www.rma.org/scraptires). This market is supported primarily by cement kilns, followed by various industries including companies that operate utility and industrial boilers. However the use of TDF has not increased and the amount of TDF used by boiler operators has declined. The work completed through this cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) has shown the potential of a mobile tire shredding unit to economically produce TDF and to provide an alterative low cost fuel to suitable coal-fired power systems. This novel system addresses the economic barriers by processing the tires at the retailer, thereby eliminating the costs associated with hauling whole tires. The equipment incorporated into the design allow for small 1-inch chunks of TDF to be produced in a timely fashion. The TDF can then be co-fired with coal in suitable combustion systems, such as a fluidized bed. Proper use of TDF has been shown to boost efficiency and reduce emissions from power generation systems, which is beneficial to coal utilization in existing power plants. Since the original scope of work outlined in the CRADA could not be completed because

  5. Low Voltage Electron Beam Processing Final Report CRADA No. TC-645-93-A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wakalopulos, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    This CRADA project was established to develop a small, inexpensive sealed-tube electron beam processing system having immediate applications in industrial, high speed manufacturing processes, and in the Department of Energy (DOE) waste treatment/cleanup operations. The technical work involved the development and demonstration of a compact, sealed, 50-75 kilovolt (kV) EB generator prototype, including controls and power supply. The specific goals of this project were to develop a low cost vacuum tube capable of shooting an electron beam several inches into the air, and to demonstrate that wide area materials processing is feasible by stacking the tubes to produce continuous beams. During the project, we successfully demonstrated the producibility of a low cost electron beam system and several material processing operations of interest to US industry, DOE and, since September 11, 2001, the Homeland Security.

  6. Laser Materials Processing Final Report CRADA No. TC-1526-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crane, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lehane, C. J. [United Technologies Corp., East Hartford, CT (United States)

    2017-09-08

    This CRADA project was a joint effort between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and United Technologies Corporation (UTC)/Pratt & Whitney (P&W) to demonstrate process capability for drilling holes in turbine airfoils using LLNL-developed femtosecond laser machining technology. The basis for this development was the ability of femtosecond lasers to drill precision holes in variety of materials with little or no collateral damage. The ultimate objective was to develop a laser machine tool consisting of an extremely advanced femtosecond laser subsystem to be developed by LLNL on a best-effort basis and a drilling station for turbine blades and vanes to be developed by P&W. In addition, P&W was responsible for commercializing the system. The goal of the so called Advanced Laser Drilling (ALD) system was to drill specified complex hole-shapes in turbine blades and vanes with a high degree precision and repeatability and simultaneously capable of very high speed processing.

  7. Optical Mode Converters Final Report CRADA No. TC-0838-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pocha, Michael D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Carey, Kent [Hewlett-Packard Company, Palo Alto, CA (United States). Agilent Technologies

    2017-11-09

    The information age was maturing, and photonics was emerging as a significant technology with important'national security and commercial implications at the time of the CRADA. This was largely due to the vast information carrying capacity of optical beams and the availability of cheap.and effective optical fiber waveguides to guide the light. However, a major limitation to the widespread deployment of photonic systems was the high-cost (in an economic and performance sense) associated with coupling optical power between optoelectronic waveguide devices or between a device and an optical fiber. The problem was critical in the case of single-mode waveguide devices. Mitigating these costs would be a significant and pervasive enabler of the technology for a wide variety of applications that would have crucial defense and economic impact. The partners worked together to develop optical mode size converters on silicon substrates. Silicon was chosen because of its compatibility with the required photolithographic and micromachining techniques. By choosing silicon, these techniques could enable the close coupling of high-speed, high density silicon electronic circuitry to efficient low-cost photonics. The efficient coupling of electronics and photonics technologies would be important for many information age technologies. The joint nature of this project was intended to allow HP to benefit from some unique LLNL capabilities, and LLNL would be in a position to learn from HP and enhance its value to fundamental DP missions. Although the CRADA began as a hardware development project to develop the mode converter, it evolved into a software development venture. LLNL and HP researchers examined literature, performed some preliminary calculations, and evaluated production trade-offs of several known techniques to determine the best candidates for an integrated system.

  8. Recycling end-of-life vehicles of the future. Final CRADA report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jody, B. J.; Pomykala, J. A.; Spangenberger, J. S.; Daniels, E.; Energy Systems

    2010-01-14

    Argonne National Laboratory (the Contractor) entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the following Participants: Vehicle Recycling Partnership, LLC (VRP, which consists of General Motors [GM], Ford, and Chrysler), and the American Chemistry Council - Plastics Division (ACC-PD). The purpose of this CRADA is to provide for the effective recycling of automotive materials. The long-term goals are to (1) enable the optimum recycling of automotive materials, thereby obviating the need for legislative mandates or directives; (2) enable the recovery of automotive materials in a cost-competitive manner while meeting the performance requirements of the applications and markets for the materials; and (3) remove recycling barriers/reasons, real or perceived, to the use of advanced lightweighting materials or systems in future vehicles. The issues, technical requirements, and cost and institutional considerations in achieving that goal are complex and will require a concerted, focused, and systematic analysis, together with a technology development program. The scope and tasks of this program are derived from 'A Roadmap for Recycling End-of-Life Vehicles of the Future,' prepared in May 2001 for the DOE Office of Energy, Efficiency, and Renewable Energy (EERE)-Vehicle Technologies Program. The objective of this research program is to enable the maximum recycling of automotive materials and obsolete vehicles through the development and commercialization of technologies for the separation and recovery of materials from end-of-life vehicles (ELVs). The long-term goals are to (1) enable the optimum recycling of automotive materials, thereby obviating the need for legislative mandates or directives; (2) enable the recovery of automotive materials in a cost-competitive manner while meeting the performance requirements of the applications and markets for the materials; and (3) remove recycling barriers/reasons, real or perceived, to the use

  9. Development of YBCO Superconductor for Electric Systems: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-04-150

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, R.

    2013-03-01

    The proposed project will be collaborative in exploration of high temperature superconductor oxide films between SuperPower, Inc. and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This CRADA will attempt to develop YBCO based high temperature oxide technology.

  10. High Temperature Catalytic Combustion Suppports Final Report CRADA No. TSB-0841-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hair, Lucy [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Magno, Scott [Catalytic Combustion Systems, Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States)

    2018-01-19

    This Small Business CRADA between LLNL and Catalytica was executed on January 25, 1995. The total estimated cost of this project was 113K. LLNL's contribution was estimated at $50K funded under the DOE/Defense Program Small Business Initiative. Catalytica's in-kind contribution was estimated at 63K. Catalytic combusion catalyst systems operate at temperatures from 600°C to above 1300°C. Catalytica has developed technology that limits the catalyst temperature to below 1000°C. At temperatures in the range of 850 to 1000°C, the thermal stability of the catalyst is an important issue. Typical supports such as stabilized aluminas, hexaluminates, zirconia and stabilized zirconia supports are typically used but lack either thermal stability or other desirable properties. Catalytica had developed a new concept for thermally stable mixed oxide supports but this concept required the preparation of molecularly uniform precursors; that is, prior to high temperature treatment of these materials, the elements that make up the mixed oxide must be as nearly uniform as possible on a molecular level. The technique of sol gel processing appeared to be the preferred technique to make these molecularly uniform precursors, and a cooperative program with LLNL was established to prepare and test the proposed compounds. Catalytica proposed the composition and concentration levels for the materials to be prepared.

  11. Development of HANAA to Achieve Commercialization Final Report CRADA No. TC-2025-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, R. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schmidt, J. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    The objective of this project was to provide DOD and the intelligence agencies with highly portable, advanced, bio-detection instruments and to further the DOE objective of putting advanced instrumentation for the detection of biological terrorism agents into the hands of first responders. All sponsors of the HANAA development work at LLNL believed that the technology must be commercialized to fully contribute to their missions. Intelligence organizations, military teams, and first responders must be able to purchase the instruments for a reasonable price and obtain maintenance services and support equipment from a reliable supplier in order for the instrument to be useful to them. The goal was to efficiently transfer HANAA technology from LLNL to ETG, a company that would manufacture the instrument and make it commercially available to the constituencies important to our sponsors. This was to include a current beta test instrument and all knowledge of problems with the instrument and recommendations for solving those problems in a commercial version. The following tasks were to be completed under this CRADA.

  12. Predictive Model and Methodology for Heat Treatment Distortion Final Report CRADA No. TC-298-92

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikkel, D. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McCabe, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    This project was a multi-lab, multi-partner CRADA involving LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Martin Marietta Energy Systems and the industrial partner, The National Center of Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS). A number of member companies of NCMS participated including General Motors Corporation, Ford Motor Company, The Torrington Company, Gear Research, the Illinois Institute of Technology Research Institute, and Deformation Control Technology •. LLNL was the lead laboratory for metrology technology used for validation of the computational tool/methodology. LLNL was also the lead laboratory for the development of the software user interface , for the computational tool. This report focuses on the participation of LLNL and NCMS. The purpose of the project was to develop a computational tool/methodology that engineers would use to predict the effects of heat treatment on the _size and shape of industrial parts made of quench hardenable alloys. Initially, the target application of the tool was gears for automotive power trains.

  13. Atrial Model Development and Prototype Simulations: CRADA Final Report on Tasks 3 and 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhang, X. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Villongco, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lightstone, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Richards, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-28

    The goal of this CRADA was to develop essential tools needed to simulate human atrial electrophysiology in 3-dimensions using an anatomical image-based anatomy and physiologically detailed human cellular model. The atria were modeled as anisotropic, representing the preferentially longitudinal electrical coupling between myocytes. Across the entire anatomy, cellular electrophysiology was heterogeneous, with left and right atrial myocytes defined differently. Left and right cell types for the “control” case of sinus rhythm (SR) was compared with remodeled electrophysiology and calcium cycling characteristics of chronic atrial fibrillation (cAF). The effects of Isoproterenol (ISO), a beta-adrenergic agonist that represents the functional consequences of PKA phosphorylation of various ion channels and transporters, was also simulated in SR and cAF to represent atrial activity under physical or emotional stress. Results and findings from Tasks 3 & 4 are described. Tasks 3 and 4 are, respectively: Input parameters prepared for a Cardioid simulation; Report including recommendations for additional scenario development and post-processing analytic strategy.

  14. Position and Orientation Tracking System graphical user interface. CRADA final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, R.E.; Armstrong, G.A.; Burks, B.L.

    1997-01-01

    Under the Department of Energy's Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP) Tank Waste Retrieval (TWR) program, a major effort is under way to develop technology for remediating the waste in underground storage tanks that contain radioactive and hazardous waste. A large part of the program's effort has gone towards development of remotely operable robotics equipment, including the Houdini Vehicle and the Position and Orientation Tracking System (POTS). Since planned operation of this equipment is to be completely remote, a significant effort is needed to ensure that operators have sufficient system information to operate the equipment efficiently and safely. ORNL developed POTS and RedZone Robotics, Inc. developed Houdini which can be operated together to provide both position and orientation descriptions of the Houdini vehicle, relative to a world reference frame, while operating inside an underground storage tank. The Houdini vehicle has been outfitted with an optical detection system that houses infrared detectors. The infrared detectors are part of the POTS tracking system. The sensors provide a set of timing pulses to the POTS control computer whenever a laser beam from one of the four POTS laser scanners strikes a detector. Using the pointing angle information from each POTS laser scanners, the POTS control computer is able to compute the pose of the Houdini vehicle at a rate of approximately 25 Hz. This information, along with the orientation of the Houdini's Schilling Titan II robot arm, is used to present the pose information to the operator in a 3-D graphical user interface using software that has been developed by this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA). The graphical display presents the data to the operator in a format that is readily understood. The equipment operators are able to use the information in real-time to enhance the operator's ability to safely and efficiently control the remotely-operated vehicle

  15. Performance improvement of silicon nitride ball bearings by ion implantation. CRADA final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.M.; Miner, J.

    1998-01-01

    The present report summarizes technical results of CRADA No. ORNL 92-128 with the Pratt and Whitney Division of United Technologies Corporation. The stated purpose of the program was to assess the 3effect of ion implantation on the rolling contact performance of engineering silicon nitride bearings, to determine by post-test analyses of the bearings the reasons for improved or reduced performance and the mechanisms of failure, if applicable, and to relate the overall results to basic property changes including but not limited to swelling, hardness, modulus, micromechanical properties, and surface morphology. Forty-two control samples were tested to an intended runout period of 60 h. It was possible to supply only six balls for ion implantation, but an extended test period goal of 150 h was used. The balls were implanted with C-ions at 150 keV to a fluence of 1.1 x 10 17 /cm 2 . The collection of samples had pre-existing defects called C-cracks in the surfaces. As a result, seven of the control samples had severe spalls before reaching the goal of 60 h for an unacceptable failure rate of 0.003/sample-h. None of the ion-implanted samples experienced engineering failure in 150 h of testing. Analytical techniques have been used to characterize ion implantation results, to characterize wear tracks, and to characterize microstructure and impurity content. In possible relation to C-cracks. It is encouraging that ion implantation can mitigate the C-crack failure mode. However, the practical implications are compromised by the fact that bearings with C-cracks would, in no case, be acceptable in engineering practice, as this type of defect was not anticipated when the program was designed. The most important reason for the use of ceramic bearings is energy efficiency

  16. Development of improved x-ray optics for analytical x-ray microbeams. CRADA final report for CRADA Number Y-1294-0283

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, D.A.; Gao, N.; Xiao, Q.F.; Ponomarev, I.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this CRADA was to develop improved glass capillary, x-ray optics for analytical x-ray microbeam applications. X-Ray Optical Systems, Inc. (XOS) designed and fabricated capillary optics and LMES tested those optics for x-ray microanalytical applications using its unique X-Ray Microprobe. Tapered capillaries with 3-microm and 8-microm output openings were fabricated and tested. The tapered capillaries had better spectral quality for x-ray microfluorescence (XRMF) analysis, than non-tapered, straight capillaries that are currently used in the system. X-ray beam count-rates for the tapered capillaries were also greater than the straight capillaries. Two monolithic, polycapillary optics were fabricated and tested. The polycapillary optics produced focal spots of 40 and 100 microm. Beam intensities for the polycapillaries were, respective, 44 and 18 times the intensities found in straight 50-microm and 100-microm capillaries. High-sensitivity scanning will be possible because of the enhanced intensity of the polycapillary optic. LMES and the DP program will benefit from improved capabilities for nondestructive x-ray microanalysis, while XOS will benefit from test results that will enhance the marketability of their products

  17. Advanced variable speed air source integrated heat pump (AS-IHP) development - CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Van D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rice, C. Keith [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Munk, Jeffrey D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ally, Moonis Raza [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shen, Bo [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Between August 2011 and September 2015, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Nordyne, LLC (now Nortek Global HVAC LLC, NGHVAC) engaged in a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop an air-source integrated heat pump (AS-IHP) system for the US residential market. Two generations of laboratory prototype systems were designed, fabricated, and lab-tested during 2011-2013. Performance maps for the system were developed using the latest research version of the DOE/ORNL Heat Pump Design Model, or HPDM, (Rice 1991; Rice and Jackson 2005; Shen et al 2012) as calibrated against the lab test data. These maps were the input to the TRNSYS (SOLAR Energy Laboratory, et al, 2010) system to predict annual performance relative to a baseline suite of equipment meeting minimum efficiency standards in effect in 2006 (combination of 13 SEER air-source heat pump (ASHP) and resistance water heater with Energy Factor (EF) of 0.9). Predicted total annual energy savings, while providing space conditioning and water heating for a tight, well insulated 2600 ft2 (242 m2) house at 5 U.S. locations, ranged from 46 to 61%, averaging 52%, relative to the baseline system (lowest savings at the cold-climate Chicago location). Predicted energy use for water heating was reduced 62 to 76% relative to resistance WH. Based on these lab prototype test and analyses results a field test prototype was designed and fabricated by NGHVAC. The unit was installed in a 2400 ft2 (223 m2) research house in Knoxville, TN and field tested from May 2014 to April 2015. Based on the demonstrated field performance of the AS-IHP prototype and estimated performance of a baseline system operating under the same loads and weather conditions, it was estimated that the prototype would achieve ~40% energy savings relative to the minimum efficiency suite. The estimated WH savings were >60% and SC mode savings were >50%. But estimated SH savings were only about 20%. It is believed that had the test

  18. Application of a Barrier Filter at a High Purity Synthetic Graphite Plant, CRADA 99-F035, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2000-08-31

    Superior Graphite Company and the US Department of Energy have entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to study the application of ceramic barrier filters at its Hopkinsville, Kentucky graphite plant. Superior Graphite Company is a worldwide leader in the application of advanced thermal processing technology to produce high purity graphite and carbons. The objective of the CRADA is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of incorporating the use of high-temperature filters to improve the performance of the offgas treatment system. A conceptual design was developed incorporating the ceramic filters into the offgas treatment system to be used for the development of a capital cost estimate and economic feasibility assessment of this technology for improving particulate removal. This CRADA is a joint effort of Superior Graphite Company, Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the US Department of Energy (DOE).

  19. Development of a Multi-Sensor Cancer Detection Probe Final Report CRADA No. TC-2026-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hular, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    This collaboration continued work started under a previous CRADA (TSB-2023-00) to take a detailed concept specification for a multi-sensor needle/probe suitable for breast cancer analysis and produce a prototype system suitable for human FDA trials.

  20. EnergyPlus Hysteresis PCM Model: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-16-639

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Edwin S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-02-22

    Under the CRADA, NREL will provide assistance to NRGsim to debug and convert the EnergyPlus Hysteresis Phase Change Material ('PCM') model to C++ for adoption into the main code package of the EnergyPlus simulation engine.

  1. Mobile Ocean Test Berth Support: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-413

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LiVecchi, Albert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (NNMREC), headquartered at the Oregon State University, is establishing the capabilities to test prototype wave energy conversion devices in the ocean. This CRADA will leverage the technical expertise and resources at NREL in the wind industry and in ocean engineering to support and enhance the development of the NNMREC Mobile Ocean Test Berth (MOTB). This CRADA will provide direct support to NNMREC by providing design evaluation and review of the MOTB, developing effective protocols for testing of the MOTB and wave energy conversion devices in the ocean, assisting in the specification of appropriate instrumentation and data acquisition packages, and providing guidance on obtaining and maintaining A2LA (American Association for Laboratory Accreditation) accreditation.

  2. Data summary report for M.W. Kellogg Z-sorb sorbent tests. CRADA 92-008 Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, C E; Monaco, S J

    1994-05-01

    A series of tests were undertaken from August 6, 1992 through July 6, 1993 at METC`s High Pressure Bench-Scale Hot Gas Desulfurization Unit to support a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between METC`s Sorbent Development Cluster and M.W. Kellogg. The M.W. Kellogg Company is currently developing a commercial offering of a hot gas clean-up system to be used in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. The intent of the CRADA agreement was to identify a suitable zinc-based desulfurization sorbent for the Sierra Pacific Power Company Clean Coal Technology Project, to identify optimum operating conditions for the sorbent, and to estimate potential sorbent loss per year. This report presents results pertaining to Phillips Petroleum`s Z-Sorb III sorbent.

  3. The Use of Vaporous Hydrogen Peroxide for Building Decontamination Final Report CRADA No. TC-2053-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verce, M. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schwartz, L. I. [Strategic Technology Enterprises, Inc., Mentor, OH (United States)

    2017-09-08

    This was a collaborative effort between LLNL and STE to investigate the use of vaporized hydrogen peroxide (VHP®) to decontaminate spore-contaminated heating, ventilation, and cooling (HV AC) systems in a trailer sized room. LLNL's effort under this CRADA was funded by DOE's Chemical and Biological National Security Program (CBNP), which later became part of Department of Homeland Security in 2004.

  4. Fiber Based Optical Amplifier for High Energy Laser Pulses Final Report CRADA No. TC02100.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messerly, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cunningham, P. [Boeing Company, Springfield, VA (United States)

    2017-09-06

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (formerly The Regents of the University of California)/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and The Boeing Company to develop an optical fiber-based laser amplifier capable of producing and sustaining very high-energy, nanosecond-scale optical pulses. The overall technical objective of this CRADA was to research, design, and develop an optical fiber-based amplifier that would meet specific metrics.

  5. Phase II CRADA ORNL99-0568 Report : Developing Transmission-Less Inverter Drive Systems for Axial-Gap Permanent magnet Accessory and Traction Motors and Generators; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKeever, J.W.

    2001-01-01

    Researchers of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNLs) Power Electronics and Electric Machine Research Center (PEEMRC) collaborated with Visual Computing Systems (VCS) to develop an electric axial-gap permanent magnet (PM) motor controlled by a self-sensing inverter for driving vehicle accessories such as power steering, air conditioning, and brakes. VCS designed an 8 kW motor based on their Segmented Electromagnetic Array (SEMA) technology. ORNL designed a 10 kW inverter to fit within the volume of a housing, which had been integrated with the motor. This modular design was pursued so that multiple modules could be used for higher power applications. ORNL built the first inverter under the cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) ORNL 98-0514 and drove a refurbished Delta motor with no load during the Merit Review at ORNL on Monday, May 17, 1999. Inverter circuitry and instructions for assembling the inverters were sent to VCS. A report was prepared and delivered during the Future Car Congress in April 2000, at Arlington, Virginia. Collaboration continued under CRADA ORNL 99-0568 as VCS designed and built a SEMA motor with a dual coil platter to be the traction motor for an electric truck. VCS and ORNL assembled two 45 kW inverters. Each inverter drove one coil, which was designed to deliver 15 kW continuous power and 45 kW peak power for 90 s. The vehicle was road tested as part of the Future Truck Competition. A report was prepared and delivered during the PCIM in October 2000, at Boston, Massachusetts

  6. Pulsed Plasma Processing of Diesel Engine Exhaust Final Report CRADA No. TC-0336-92-1-C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merritt, Bernard T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Broering, Louis [Cummins Engine Company, Inc., Columbus, IN (United States)

    2017-11-09

    The goal was to develop an exhaust-gas treatment process for the reduction of NOx and hydrocarbon from diesel engines. The project began believing that direct chemical reduction on NOx was possible through the use of non-thermal plasmas. The original CRADA began in 1993 and was scheduled to finish in 1996. It had as its goals three metrics: 1) remove two grams/brake-horse-power-hour of NOx, 2) have no more than five percent energy penalty, and 3) cost no more than ten percent of the engine cost. These goals were all aimed at heavy-duty diesel trucks. This CRADA had its Defense Program funding eliminated by DOE prior to completion in 1995. Prior to loss of funding from DOE, LLNL discovered that due to the large oxygen content in diesel exhaust, direct chemical reduction was not possible. In understanding why, a breakthrough was achieved that combined the use of a non-thermal plasma and a catalyst. This process was named Plasma Assisted Catalytic Reduction (P ACR). Because of this breakthrough, the CRADA became a funds-in only CRADA, once DOE DP funding ended. As a result, the funding decreased from about 1M dollars per year to about $400k per year. Subsequently, progress slowed as well. The CRADA was amended several times to reflect the funds-in nature. At each amendment, the deliverables were modified; the goals remained the same but the focus changed from heavy-duty to lightduty to SUVs. The diesel-engine NOx problem is similar to the furnace and boiler NOx emission problem with the added constraint that ammonia-like additives are impractical for a mobile source. Lean-burning gasoline engines are an additional area of application because the standard three-way catalyst is rendered ineffective by the presence of oxygen. In the P ACR process an electrical discharge is used to create a non-thermal plasma that contains oxidative radicals O and OH. These oxidative radicals convert NO to NO2. Selective catalytic

  7. Radiation Hardened Telerobotic Dismantling System Development Final Report CRADA No. TC-1340-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lightman, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    This project was a collaborative effort between the University of California, LLNL and RedZone Robotics, Inc. for the development of radiation-hardened telerobotic dismantling systems for use in applications such as nuclear facility remediation, nuclear accident response, and Chemobyltype remediation. The project supported the design, development, fabrication and testing of a Ukrainian robotic systems. The project was completed on time and within budget. All deliverables were completed. The final project deliverables were consistent with the plans developed in the original project with the exception that the fabricated systems remained in Ukraine.

  8. Solutions for Digital Video Transmission Technology Final Report CRADA No. TC02068.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rivers, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-07

    This Project aimed at development of software for seismic data processing based on the Geotool code developed by the American company Multimax., Inc. The Geotool code was written in early 90-es for the UNIX platform. Under Project# 2821, functions of the old Geotool code were transferred into a commercial version for the Microsoft XP and Vista platform with addition of new capabilities on visualization and data processing. The developed new version of the Geotool+ was implemented using the up-to-date tool Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 and uses capabilities of the .NET platform. C++ was selected as the main programming language for the Geotool+. The two-year Project was extended by six months and funding levels increased from 600,000 to $670,000. All tasks were successfully completed and all deliverables were met for the project even though both the industrial partner and LLNL principal investigator left the project before its final report.

  9. Bipolar plate materials in molten carbonate fuel cells. Final CRADA report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumpelt, M.

    2004-06-01

    Advantages of implementation of power plants based on electrochemical reactions are successfully demonstrated in the USA and Japan. One of the msot promising types of fuel cells (FC) is a type of high temperature fuel cells. At present, thanks to the efforts of the leading countries that develop fuel cell technologies power plants on the basis of molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are really close to commercialization. One of the problems that are to be solved for practical implementation of MCFC and SOFC is a problem of corrosion of metal components of stacks that are assembled of a number of fuel cells. One of the major components of MCFC and SOFC stacks is a bipolar separator plate (BSP) that performs several functions - it is separation of reactant gas flows sealing of the joints between fuel cells, and current collection from the surface of electrodes. The goal of Task 1 of the project is to develop new cost-effective nickel coatings for the Russian 20X23H18 steel for an MCFC bipolar separator plate using technological processes usually implemented to apply corrosion stable coatings onto the metal parts for products in the defense. There was planned the research on production of nickel coatings using different methods, first of all the galvanic one and the explosion cladding one. As a result of the works, 0.4 x 712 x 1296 mm plates coated with nickel on one side were to be made and passed to ANL. A line of 4 galvanic baths 600 liters was to be built for the galvanic coating applications. The goal of Task 2 of the project is the development of a new material of an MCFC bipolar separator plate with an upgraded corrosion stability, and development of a technology to produce cold roll sheets of this material the sizes of which will be 0.8 x 712x 1296 mm. As a result of these works, a pilot batch of the rolled material in sheets 0.8 x 712 x 1296 mm in size is to be made (in accordance with the norms and standards of the Russian

  10. Development of Operational Free-Space-Optical (FSO) Laser Communication Systems Final Report CRADA No. TC02093.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggiero, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Orgren, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This project was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (formerly The Regents of the University of California)/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and LGS Innovations, LLC (formerly Lucent Technologies, Inc.), to develop long-range and mobile operational free-space optical (FSO) laser communication systems for specialized government applications. LLNL and LGS Innovations formerly Lucent Bell Laboratories Government Communications Systems performed this work for a United States Government (USG) Intelligence Work for Others (I-WFO) customer, also referred to as "Government Customer", or "Customer" and "Government Sponsor." The CRADA was a critical and required part of the LLNL technology transfer plan for the customer.

  11. Development of XRMF techniques for measurement of multi-layer film thicknesses on semiconductors for VLSI and ULSI integrated circuits. Final CRADA report for CRADA number Y-1292-0130

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, D.A.; Golijanin, D.L.; Wherry, D.

    1997-01-01

    A CRADA with Kevex Instruments was carried out to develop improved XRMF instrumentation for the nondestructive analysis of electronic components during manufacture. Experiments conducted at Y-12 proved the feasibility of a new Kevex x-ray tube design. Tests also show that the current commercial supply of straight glass capillaries is unreliable; however, other vendors of tapered single and multiple glass capillaries were identified. The stability of the Y-12 x-ray microprobe was significantly enhanced as a result of this CRADA

  12. CRADA Final Report for CRADA Number ORNL98-0521 : Development of an Electric Bus Inverter Based on ORNL Auxiliary Resonant Tank (ART) Soft-Switching Technology; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayers, C.W.

    2001-01-01

    The Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has for many years been developing technologies for power converters for motor drives and many other applications. Some of the research goals are to improve efficiency and reduce audible and electromagnetic interference noise generation for inverters and the driven loads. The converters are being required to produce more power with reduced weight and volume, which requires improvements in heat removal from the electronics, as well as improved circuit designs that have fewer electrical losses. PEEMRC has recently developed and patented a soft-switching inverter topology called an Auxiliary Resonant Tank (ART), and this design has been tested and proven at ORNL using a 10-kW laboratory prototype. The objective of this project was to develop, test, and install the ART inverter technology in an electric transit bus with the final goal of evaluating performance of the ORNL inverter under field conditions in a vehicle. A scaled-up inverter with the capacity to drive a 22-e bus was built based on the 10-kW ORNL laboratory prototype ART soft-switching inverter. Most (if not all) commercially available inverters for traction drive and other applications use hard-switching inverters. A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement was established with the Chattanooga Area Regional Transit Authority (CARTA), the Electric Transit Vehicle Institute (ETVI), and Advanced Vehicle Systems (AVS), all of Chattanooga, along with ORNL. CARTA, which maintains and operates the public transit system in Chattanooga, provided an area for testing the vehicle alongside other similar vehicles in the normal operating environment. ETVI offers capabilities in standardized testing and reporting and also provides exposure in the electric transit vehicle arena for ORNL's technologies. The third Chattanooga partner, (AVS) manufactures all-electric and hybrid electric transit buses using

  13. Development of a Delivery System for Treating Cerebrovascular Aneurysms Final Report CRADA No. TC-1440-97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Derbin, J. T. [Micrus Corp., Mountain View, CA (United States)

    2018-01-24

    The objective of the project was to develop a system for delivering an implantable medical device used to treat cerebrovascular aneurysms, which can cause disability or hemorrhagic stroke (over 15,000 strokes in the U.S. each year are caused by ruptured aneurysms). Micrus has developed an implantable device with the potential to significantly improve the treatment of cerebrovascular aneurysms. This implantable device should significantly reduce the number of hemorrhagic strokes. LLNL has performed proof-of-concept experiments for a delivery system that could be modified to deploy the Micrus device into aneurysms. The purpose of this CRADA was to complete development of the LLNL delivery system and to integrate it with the Micrus device. The goal of the project was to develop an integrated minimally-invasive medical device for treating cerebrovascular aneurysms. The device was designed to access aneurysms through commercially-available catheters which are introduced into the patient through a small incision in the leg.

  14. Evaluation of advanced gas chromatographs for on-site analysis. Final CRADA report for number Y-1295-0374

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, M.B.; Guerin, M.R.; Palausky, A.; Merriweather, R. [Lockheed Martin Energy Research, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Forsberg, R.E. [Mine Safety Appliances-Baseline Industries, Lyons, CO (United States)

    1997-02-21

    The EKHO gas chromatography (GC) is being marketed by Mine Safety Appliances as an instrument for on-site environmental analysis and for process applications. This GC utilizes a unique bundled capillary column produced in Russia that provides very fast analysis and a wide linear dynamic range. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in a CRADA with Mine Safety Appliances in order to evaluate the analytical performance of the EKHO GC and is suitability for on-site environmental applications. Tests that were performed at ORNL included the analysis of air, water, and soil samples for aromatic hydrocarbons including benzene, toluene, xylene, and ethylbenzene (BTEX). These compounds were selected in order to simulate contamination by gasoline and other petroleum fuels. Performance factors that were studied included the instrument detection limits, the linearity, dynamic range, and precision for replicate samples. Other factors that were evaluated include the ease of set-up and operation.

  15. Commercialization of Ultra-Hard Ceramics for Cutting Tools Final Report CRADA No. TC0279.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landingham, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Neumann, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Greenleaf Corporation (Greenleaf) to develop the technology for forming unique precursor nano-powders process that can be consolidated into ceramic products for industry. LLNL researchers have developed a solgel process for forming nano-ceramic powders. The nano powders are highly tailorable, allowing the explicit design of desired properties that lead to ultra hard materials with fine grain size. The present CRADA would allow the two parties to continue the development of the sol-gel process and the consolidation process in order to develop an industrially sound process for the manufacture of these ultra-hard materials.

  16. High Performance Parallel Processing (HPPP) Finite Element Simulation of Fluid Structure Interactions Final Report CRADA No. TC-0824-94-A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couch, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ziegler, D. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-24

    This project was a muki-partner CRADA. This was a partnership between Alcoa and LLNL. AIcoa developed a system of numerical simulation modules that provided accurate and efficient threedimensional modeling of combined fluid dynamics and structural response.

  17. National Security Science and Technology Initiative: Air Cargo Screening, Final Report for CRADA Number NFE-07-01081

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, Philip [ORNL; Bush, John [Battelle Memorial Institute; Bowerman, Biays [Brookhaven National Laboratory; Cespedes, Ernesto [Idaho National Laboratory; White, Timothy [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2004-12-01

    The non-intrusive inspection (NII) of consolidated air cargo carried on commercial passenger aircraft continues to be a technically challenging, high-priority requirement of the Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate (DHS S&T), the Transportation Security Agency and the Federal Aviation Administration. The goal of deploying a screening system that can reliably and cost-effectively detect explosive threats in consolidated cargo without adversely affecting the flow of commerce will require significant technical advances that will take years to develop. To address this critical National Security need, the Battelle Memorial Institute (Battelle), under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with four of its associated US Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories (Oak Ridge, Pacific Northwest, Idaho, and Brookhaven), conducted a research and development initiative focused on identifying, evaluating, and integrating technologies for screening consolidated air cargo for the presence of explosive threats. Battelle invested $8.5M of internal research and development funds during fiscal years 2007 through 2009.

  18. High Specific Stiffness Shafts and Advanced Bearing Coatings for Gas Turbine Engines Final Report CRADA No. TC-1089-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbee, Troy [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chin, Herbert [United Technologies Corporation, East Hartford, CT (United States)

    2017-11-09

    At the time of the CRADA, the largest in-service gas-turbine aircraft engines strove for increased thrust and power density to meet the requirements for take-off thrust, given the increase in take-off gross weight (TOGW) associated with longer range transport requirements. The trend in modem turbo shaft engines was toward turbine shafts with higher and higher length-to-diameter ratios, which reduced the shaft critical speed. Using co nventional shaft materials, this lead to shafts that needed to operate near or above sensitive shaft bending critical speeds, therefore requiring multiple bearings and/ or multiple squeeze-film dampers to control the dynamic response. Using new materials and d esign concepts this project demonstrated the use of new shaft materials which could provide increased shaft speed range above existing maximum engine speeds without encountering a critic al speed event and high vector deflections. This increased main shaft speed also resulted in decreased bearing life associated with lower heat dissipation and higher centrifugal forces. Thus, a limited effort was devoted to feasibility of higher performance bearing coatings to mitigate the speed effects.

  19. Laboratory Testing of the Boundary Layer Momentum Transfer Rotational Filter Systems, NETL-Innovatech, Inc., CRADA 98-F026, Final Report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2000-01-01

    A patented dynamic mechanical filter developed by InnovaTech was previously shown to remove fine particulate matter from industrial process gas streams at ambient temperatures and pressures. An all-metal, high-temperature version of this novel media-less filter was fabricated under this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with DOE/NETL-Morgantown for hot gas testing of the device. The technology is entirely different in both concept and design from conventional vortex separators, cyclones, or porous media filters. This new filtration concept is capable of separating heavy loading of fine particles without blinding, fouling or bridging, and would require minimal operational costs over its anticipated multi-year service life. The all-metal filter design eliminates thermal stress cracking and premature failure prevalent in conventional porous ceramic filters. In contrast, conventional porous media filters (i.e., ceramic cross-flow or candles) easily foul, require periodic cleaning (typically backpulsing), frequent replacement and subsequent disposal

  20. Fiber Optic Hydrogen Sensor Development: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-05-00158

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringer, M.

    2010-01-01

    NREL and Nuclear Filter Technology collaborated to develop a prototype product for a hydrogen threshold sensor that was used to monitor hydrogen production in the transport of nuclear waste transport containers. This application is a core business area for Nuclear Filter Technology and will provide a basis for creating sensor products that are used in other licensed fields of use. Activities included design and construction of prototype product, product testing and debugging, and finalizing a prototype for initial field tests.

  1. Hazardous and Medical Waste Destruction Using the AC Plasmatron Final Report CRADA No. TC-1560-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caplan, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bucher, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tulupov, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-28

    The goal of this project was to develop a prototype medical waste destruction facility based on the AC plasma torch capable of processing 150 kg of waste per hour while satisfying US EPA emission standards. The project was to provide the first opportunity for a joint U.S.-Russian project using an AC Plasma Torch in a hazardous waste destruction system to be assembled and operated in the U.S. thus promoting the commercialization in the U.S. of this joint U.S.-Russian developed technology. This project was a collaboration between the Russian Institute Soliton- NTT, the U.S industrial partner Scientific Utilization Inc. (SUI) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ( LLNL). The project was funded by DOE for a total of $1.2 million with $600K for allocated for Phase I and $600K for Phase II. The Russian team received about $800K over the two (2) year period while LLNL received $400K. SUI was to provide in kind matching funds totaling $1.2 million.

  2. Conversion of Indigenous Agricultural Waste Feedstocks to Fuel Ethanol. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-13-504

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elander, Richard [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-27

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) is between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a world leader in biomass conversion research and Ecopetrol American Inc., Ecopetrol S.A.'s U.S. subsidiary. The research and development efforts described in the Joint Work Statement (JWS) will take advantage of the strengths of both parties. NREL will use its Integrated Biorefinery Facility and vast experience in the conversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks to fuel ethanol to develop processes for the conversion of Ecopetrol's feedstocks. Ecopetrol will establish the infrastructure in Columbia to commercialize the conversion process.

  3. CENER/NREL Collaboration in Testing Facility and Code Development: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-207

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriarty, P.

    2014-11-01

    Under the funds-in CRADA agreement, NREL and CENER will collaborate in the areas of blade and drivetrain testing facility development and code development. The project shall include NREL assisting in the review and instruction necessary to assist in commissioning the new CENER blade test and drivetrain test facilities. In addition, training will be provided by allowing CENER testing staff to observe testing and operating procedures at the NREL blade test and drivetrain test facilities. CENER and NREL will exchange blade and drivetrain facility and equipment design and performance information. The project shall also include exchanging expertise in code development and data to validate numerous computational codes.

  4. Final Report of a CRADA Between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Cummins, Incorporated (CRADA No.PNNL/283): “Enhanced High and Low Temperature Performance of NOx Reduction Catalyst Materials”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Feng [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Szanyi, Janos [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Yilin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Yong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Peden, Charles HF [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Howden, Ken [US Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Currier, Neal [Cummins Inc., Columbus, IN (United States); Kamasamudram, Krishna [Cummins Inc., Columbus, IN (United States); Kumar, Ashok [Cummins Inc., Columbus, IN (United States); Li, J. [Cummins Inc., Columbus, IN (United States); Stafford, R. J. [Cummins Inc., Columbus, IN (United States); Yezerets, Aleksey [Cummins Inc., Columbus, IN (United States); Luo, J. [Cummins Inc., Columbus, IN (United States); Chen, H. Y. [Johnson Matthey Company, Royston (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    of the most daunting challenges in R&D on new catalyst materials and processes that can effectively eliminate emissions at these quite low exhaust temperatures. This project has two clear focuses: (1) development of potassium-based high-temperature NSR materials, and studying their key causes of deactivation and methods of regeneration. By comparing results obtained on ‘Simple Model’ Pt-K/Al2O3 with ‘Enhanced Model’ Pt-K/ MgAlOx and Pt-K/TiO2 materials, we have developed an understanding of the role of various additives on the deactivation and regeneration processes. Studies have also been performed on the real commercial samples being used in a Dodge Ram truck with a Cummins diesel emission control system. However, the results about these ‘commercial samples’ will not be covered in this report. Following a brief description of our experimental approach, we will present a few highlights from some of the work performed in this CRADA with more details about these results provided in publications/reports/presentations lists presented at the end of the report. (2) for the Cu and Fe/Chabazite SCR catalysts, since these are so newly developed and references from open literature and industry are nearly absent, our work started from zeolite synthesis and catalyst synthesis methodology development, before research on their low- and high-temperature performance, deactivation, regeneration, etc. was conducted. Again, most work reported here is based on our “model” catalysts synthesized in-house. Work done on the ‘commercial samples’ will not be covered in this report.

  5. Laboratory Testing of the Boundary Layer Momentum Transfer Rotational Filter Systems, NETL-Innovatech, Inc., CRADA 98-F026, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2000-08-22

    A patented dynamic mechanical filter developed by InnovaTech was previously shown to remove fine particulate matter from industrial process gas streams at ambient temperatures and pressures. An all-metal, high-temperature version of this novel media-less filter was fabricated under this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with DOE/NETL-Morgantown for hot gas testing of the device. The technology is entirely different in both concept and design from conventional vortex separators, cyclones, or porous media filters. This new filtration concept is capable of separating heavy loading of fine particles without blinding, fouling or bridging, and would require minimal operational costs over its anticipated multi-year service life. The all-metal filter design eliminates thermal stress cracking and premature failure prevalent in conventional porous ceramic filters. In contrast, conventional porous media filters (i.e., ceramic cross-flow or candles) easily foul, require periodic cleaning (typically backpulsing), frequent replacement and subsequent disposal.

  6. Particulate Emissions Control using Advanced Filter Systems: Final Report for Argonne National Laboratory, Corning Inc. and Hyundai Motor Company CRADA Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Hee Je [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Choi, Seungmok [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-10-09

    This is a 3-way CRADA project working together with Corning, Inc. and Hyundai Motor Co. (HMC). The project is to understand particulate emissions from gasoline direct-injection engines (GDI) and their physico-chemical properties. In addition, this project focuses on providing fundamental information about filtration and regeneration mechanisms occurring in gasoline particulate filter (GPF) systems. For the work, Corning provides most advanced filter substrates for GPF applications and HMC provides three-way catalyst (TWC) coating services of these filter by way of a catalyst coating company. Then, Argonne National Laboratory characterizes fundamental behaviors of filtration and regeneration processes as well as evaluated TWC functionality for the coated filters. To examine aging impacts on TWC and GPF performance, the research team evaluates gaseous and particulate emissions as well as back-pressure increase with ash loading by using an engine-oil injection system to accelerate ash loading in TWC-coated GPFs.

  7. Development of a General-Purpose Analysis System Based on a Programmable Fluid Processor Final Report CRADA No. TC-2027-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConaghy, C. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gascoyne, P. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-28

    The purpose ofthis project was to develop a general-purpose analysis system based on a programmable fluid processor (PFP). The PFP is an array of electrodes surrounded by fluid reservoirs and injectors. Injected droplets of various reagents are manjpulated and combined on the array by Dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces. The goal was to create a small handheld device that could accomplish the tasks currently undertaken by much larger, time consuming, manual manipulation in the lab. The entire effo1t was funded by DARPA under the Bio-Flips program. MD Anderson Cancer Center was the PI for the DARPA effort. The Bio-Flips program was a 3- year program that ran from September 2000 to September 2003. The CRADA was somewhat behind the Bi-Flips program running from June 2001 to June 2004 with a no cost extension to September 2004.

  8. Assessment of Veritainer's Spreader-Bar-Mounted Radiation Detection Systems Final Report CRADA No. TC02150.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labov, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Alioto, J. I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-05-29

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and VeriTainer Corporation, to develop algorithms and testing of VeriTainer’s spreader-bar mounted radiation detection system, the VeriSpreader™. The goal of the project was to improve the VeriSpreader™ System to the point where it would meet or exceed "DOE Guidance" for radiation detection, in order to be deployed for commercial and government applications. The VeriSpreader™ had gone through several rounds of testing by DHS and DOE. NNSA had requested that VeriTainer engage in a CRADA with a national lab in order to further develop and test the VeriSpreader™ System.

  9. Advanced BorobondTM Shields for Nuclear Materials Containment and BorobondTM Immobilization of Volatile Fission Products - Final CRADA Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagh, Arun S.

    2016-01-01

    Borobond is a company-proprietary material developed by the CRADA partner in collaboration with Argonne, and is based on Argonne's Ceramicrete technology. It is being used by DOE for nuclear materials safe storage, and Boron Products, LLC is the manufacturer and supplier of Borobond. The major objective of this project was to produce a more versatile composition of this material and find new applications. Major target applications were use for nuclear radiation shields, such as in dry storage casks; use in immobilization of most difficult waste streams, such as Hanford K-Basin waste; use for soluble and volatile fission products, such as Cs, Tc, Sr, and I; and use for corrosion and fire protection applications in nuclear facilities.

  10. Concepts for the Design of a Diagnostic Device to Detect Malignancies in Human Tissues Final Report CRADA No. TSB-2023-00

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DaSilva, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marion, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chase, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    BioLuminate, Inc. planned to develop, produce and market a revolutionary diagnostic device for early breast cancer diagnosis. The device was originally invented by NASA; and exclusively licensed to BioLuminate for commercialization. At the time of the CRADA, eighty-five percent (85%) of all biopsies in the United States were found negative each year. The number of biopsies cost the health care system $23 billio n annually. A multi-sensor probe would allow surgeons to improve breast cancer scre ening and significantly reduce the number of biopsies. BioLuminate was developing an in-vivo system for the detection of cancer using a multi-sensor needle/probe. The first system would be developed for the detection of breast cancer. LLNL, in collaboration with BioLuminate worked toward a detailed concept specification for the prototype multi-sensor needle/probe suitable for breast cancer analysis. BioLuminate in collaboration with LLNL, worked to develop a new version of the needle probe that would be the same size as needles commonly used to draw blood.

  11. Plug and Play Solar Power: Simplifying the Integration of Solar Energy in Hybrid Applications; Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-13-523

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstrom, Blake R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-07-05

    The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) is Australia's national science agency. CSIRO received funding from the Australian Solar Institute (ASI) for the United States-Australia Solar Energy Collaboration (USASEC) project 1-USO032 Plug and Play Solar Power: Simplifying the Integration of Solar Energy in Hybrid Applications (Broader Project). The Australian Solar Institute (ASI) operated from August 2009 to December 2012 before being merged into the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA). The Broader Project sought to simplify the integration, accelerate the deployment, and lower the cost of solar energy in hybrid distributed generation applications by creating plug and play solar technology. CSIRO worked with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as set out in a Joint Work Statement to review communications protocols relevant to plug-and-play technology and perform prototype testing in its Energy System Integration Facility (ESIF). For the avoidance of doubt, this CRADA did not cover the whole of the Broader Project and only related to the work described in the Joint Work Statement, which was carried out by NREL.

  12. CRADA Final Report For CRADA NO. CR-12-006 [Operation and Testing of an SO2-depolarized Electrolyzer (SDE) for the Purpose of Hydrogen and Sulfuric Acid Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, W. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Colon-Mercado, H. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Steimke, J. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Zahn, Steffen [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

    2014-02-24

    continuous operation. A new membrane electrode assembly (MEA) was fabricated and installed in the single cell electrolyzer (60 cm2 active cell area). Shakedown testing was conducted, and several modifications were made to the test facility equipment. Seven different MEAs were used during testing. Beginning on May 20, 2013, SRNL was able to test the SDE continuously for 1200 hours, including 1000 hours under power to generate hydrogen at an average rate of 10.8 liters per hour. The SDE was not removed or repaired during the 50-day test and was successfully restarted after each shutdown. The test was intentionally stopped after 1200 hours (1000 hours of hydrogen production) due to funding constraints. Post-test examination of the MEA using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Microanalysis (EDAX) showed no elemental sulfur deposits or sulfur layer inside the cell, thus successfully achieving the test goals. The results demonstrated that the SDE could be operated for extended periods without major performance degradation or the buildup of sulfur inside the MEA. Air Products conducted an assessment of the economic viability of the SDE based on the “as tested” design. The results indicated that the SDE faces significant economic obstacles in its current state. Further development and scale-up are necessary before the SDE is ready for commercialization.

  13. CRADA Final Report For CRADA NO. CR-12-006 [Operation and Testing of an SO2-depolarized Electrolyzer (SDE) for the Purpose of Hydrogen and Sulfuric Acid Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, W. A.; Colon-Mercado, H. R.; Steimke, J. L.; Zahn, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    electrode assembly (MEA) was fabricated and installed in the single cell electrolyzer (60 cm 2 active cell area). Shakedown testing was conducted, and several modifications were made to the test facility equipment. Seven different MEAs were used during testing. Beginning on May 20, 2013, SRNL was able to test the SDE continuously for 1200 hours, including 1000 hours under power to generate hydrogen at an average rate of 10.8 liters per hour. The SDE was not removed or repaired during the 50-day test and was successfully restarted after each shutdown. The test was intentionally stopped after 1200 hours (1000 hours of hydrogen production) due to funding constraints. Post-test examination of the MEA using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Microanalysis (EDAX) showed no elemental sulfur deposits or sulfur layer inside the cell, thus successfully achieving the test goals. The results demonstrated that the SDE could be operated for extended periods without major performance degradation or the buildup of sulfur inside the MEA. Air Products conducted an assessment of the economic viability of the SDE based on the ''as tested'' design. The results indicated that the SDE faces significant economic obstacles in its current state. Further development and scale-up are necessary before the SDE is ready for commercialization

  14. Biodiesel/Cummins CRADA Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    dedicated totes). This change provided uncontaminated containers to transport the delivery of biodiesel to the ANT, and better control for dosing as...emissions calculations. Each approach makes assumptions for farming practices, the biodiesel production process, and transportation and distribution... Biodiesel /Cummins CRADA Report Distribution Statement A: Approved for Public Release; distribution is unlimited. July 2014 Report

  15. TFTR Inner Support Structure final assembly and installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocco, R.E.; Brown, G.; Carglia, G.; Heitzenroeder, P.; Koenig, F.; Mookerjee, S.; Raugh, J.

    1983-01-01

    The Inner Support Structure (ISS) of the TFTR provides a specific level of restraint to the net centering force and overturning moment produced by the Toroidal Field (TF) coils and to the vertical forces produced by the Inner Poloidal Field (PF) coils. This is accomplished consistent with the need for four radial dielectric breaks running the entire length of the ISS to prevent eddy current loops. A brief description of the major components, method of manufacture and material selection of the ISS and PF coils is presented. Particular attention is given to the integration of the PF coils and the ISS components into the total assembly and the installation of strain gauges and crack monitors on the ISS. The requirements of no gaps at the interfaces of the ISS teeth at all three horizontal planes is discussed. The problem encountered with achieving the no gap requirement and the successful resolution of this problem, including its impact on installation of the ISS, is also discussed. The installation of the ISS, including setting in position, preloading with TF coil clips, and final tensioning of the tension bars is discussed. A brief description of the lower and upper lead stem splicing operation is presented. Subsequent to the final assembly, electrical tests were performed prior to and after installation on the TFTR machine. An overview of the tests and their results is presented

  16. Flexible Assembly Solar Technology (FAST) Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toister, Elad [BrightSource Energy Inc., Jerusalem (Israel)

    2014-11-06

    The Flexible Assembly Solar Technology (FAST) project was initiated by BrightSource in an attempt to provide potential solar field EPC contractors with an effective set of tools to perform specific construction tasks. These tasks are mostly associated with heliostat assembly and installation, and require customized non-standard tools. The FAST concept focuses on low equipment cost, reduced setup time and increased assembly throughput as compared to the Ivanpah solar field construction tools.

  17. Evaluation of Novel Semiconductor Materials Potentially Useful in Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-06-00172

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisz, J.

    2010-07-01

    Evaluation of novel semiconductor materials potentially useful in solar cells. NREL will fabricate, test and analyze solar cells from EpiWorks' wafers produced in 2-3 separate growth campaigns. NREL will also characterize material from 2-3 separate EpiWorks material development campaigns. Finally, NREL will visit EpiWorks and help establish any necessary process, such as spectral CV measurements and III-V on Si metalization processes and help validate solar cell designs and performance.

  18. CRADA Final Report for NFE-08-01826: Development and application of processing and processcontrol for nano-composite materials for lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, C.; Armstrong, B.; Maxey, C.; Sabau, A.; Wang, H.; Hagans, P. (A123 Systems, Inc.); and Babinec, S. (A123 Systems, Inc.)

    2012-12-15

    parameters such as slurry quality and equipment optimization were examined. Removal of particles and gels by filtering, control of viscosity by %solids and mixing adjustments, removal of trapped gas in the slurry and modification of coater speed and slot die gap were all found to be important for producing uniform and flaw-free coatings. Second, an in-line Hi-Pot testing method has been developed specifically for NCS that will enable detection of coating flaws that could lead to soft or hard electrical shorts within the cell. In this way flawed material can be rejected before incorporation into the cell thus greatly reducing the amount of scrap that is generated. Improved battery safety is an extremely important benefit of NCS. Evaluation of battery safety is usually accomplished by conducting a variety of tests including nail penetration, hot box, over charge, etc. For these tests entire batteries must be built but the resultant temperature and voltage responses reveal little about the breakdown mechanism. In this report is described a pinch test which is used to evaluate NCS quality at various stages including coated anode and cathode as well as assembled cell. Coupled with post-microscopic examination of the damaged ‘pinch point’ test data can assist in the coating optimization from an improved end-use standpoint. As a result of this work two invention disclosures, one for optimizing drying methodology and the other for an in-line system for flaw detection, have been filed. In addition, 2 papers are being written for submission to peer-reviewed journals.

  19. Automated Array Assembly, Phase 2. Final technical progress report, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbajal, B.G.

    1979-11-01

    The 1979 phase of this Automated Array Assembly, Phase 2 contract was devoted solely to the tasks of scaling up the Tandem Junction Cell (TJC) from 2 cm x 2 cm to 6.2 cm x 6.2 cm and the assembly of several modules using these large-area TJCs. The scale-up of the TJC was based on using the existing process and doing the necessary design activities to increase the cell area to an acceptably large area. The design was carried out using available device models. The design was verified and sample large-area TJCs were fabricated. Mechanical and process problems occurred causing a schedule slippage that resulted in contract expiration before enough large-area TCs were fabricated to populate the sample Tandem Junction Modules (TJMs). A TJM design was carried out in which the module interconnects served to augment the current collecting buses on the cell. The module was made up of a 5 x 6 TJC matrix mounted on a porcelainized steel substrate with a glass cover. The TJC matrix was series-parallel connected using copper clad Invar interconnects soldered to the TJC metallization. Sample cell matrices were assembled using dummy cells. No sample TJMs were assembled due to a shortage of large-area TJCs and contract expiration.

  20. Bioremediation of PCBs. CRADA final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klasson, K.T.; Abramowicz, D.A.

    1996-06-01

    The Cooperative Research and Development Agreement was signed between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and General Electric Company (GE) on August 12, 1991. The objective was a collaborative venture between researchers at GE and ORNL to develop bioremediation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The work was conducted over three years, and this report summarizes ORNL's effort. It was found that the total concentration of PCBs decreased by 70% for sequential anaerobic-aerobic treatment compared with a 67% decrease for aerobic treatment alone. The sequential treatment resulted in PCB products with fewer chlorines and shorter halflives in humans compared with either anaerobic or aerobic treatment alone. The study was expected to lead to a technology applicable to a field experiment that would be performed on a DOE contaminated site

  1. Bioremediation of PCBs. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasson, K.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div., TN (United States); Abramowicz, D.A. [General Electric Co. Corporate Research and Development, Niskayuna, NY (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The Cooperative Research and Development Agreement was signed between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and General Electric Company (GE) on August 12, 1991. The objective was a collaborative venture between researchers at GE and ORNL to develop bioremediation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The work was conducted over three years, and this report summarizes ORNL`s effort. It was found that the total concentration of PCBs decreased by 70% for sequential anaerobic-aerobic treatment compared with a 67% decrease for aerobic treatment alone. The sequential treatment resulted in PCB products with fewer chlorines and shorter halflives in humans compared with either anaerobic or aerobic treatment alone. The study was expected to lead to a technology applicable to a field experiment that would be performed on a DOE contaminated site.

  2. CRADA Final Report: Weld Predictor App

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billings, Jay Jay [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2018-01-25

    Welding is an important manufacturing process used in a broad range of industries and market sectors, including automotive, aerospace, heavy manufacturing, medical, and defense. During welded fabrication, high localized heat input and subsequent rapid cooling result in the creation of residual stresses and distortion. These residual stresses can significantly affect the fatigue resistance, cracking behavior, and load-carrying capacity of welded structures during service. Further, additional fitting and tacking time is often required to fit distorted subassemblies together, resulting in non-value added cost. Using trial-and-error methods to determine which welding parameters, welding sequences, and fixture designs will most effectively reduce distortion is a time-consuming and expensive process. For complex structures with many welds, this approach can take several months. For this reason, efficient and accurate methods of mitigating distortion are in-demand across all industries where welding is used. Analytical and computational methods and commercial software tools have been developed to predict welding-induced residual stresses and distortion. Welding process parameters, fixtures, and tooling can be optimized to reduce the HAZ softening and minimize weld residual stress and distortion, improving performance and reducing design, fabrication and testing costs. However, weld modeling technology tools are currently accessible only to engineers and designers with a background in finite element analysis (FEA) who work with large manufacturers, research institutes, and universities with access to high-performance computing (HPC) resources. Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the US do not typically have the human and computational resources needed to adopt and utilize weld modeling technology. To allow an engineer with no background in FEA and SMEs to gain access to this important design tool, EWI and the Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC) developed the online weld application software tool “WeldPredictor” ( https://eweldpredictor.ewi.org ). About 1400 users have tested this application. This project marked the beginning of development on the next version of WeldPredictor that addresses many outstanding features of the original, including 3D models, allow more material hardening laws, model material phase transformation, and uses open source finite element solvers to quickly solve problems (as opposed to expensive commercial tools).

  3. Rapid Response Manufacturing (RRM). Final CRADA report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cain, W.D. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Waddell, W.L. [National Centers for Manufacturing Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1997-08-28

    A major accomplishment of the Rapid Response Manufacturing (RRM) project was the development of a broad-based generic framework for automating and integrating the design-to-manufacturing activities associated with machined part products. Key components of the framework are a manufacturing model that integrates product and process data in a consistent, minimally redundant manner, an advanced computer-aided engineering working environment, knowledge-based software systems for design, process planning, and manufacturing and new production technologies for making products directly from design application software.

  4. Final report on the Vitro CRADA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    ORNL and Vitro investigated the application of advanced Geographic Information System (GIS) technologies to site characterization and environmental remediation work. The six tasks were to do feasibility studies for integrating GIS tools with DBMS, graphics, and other packages to aid in environmental analyses, develop environmental and geographic data standards and guidelines including data structures/quality assurance practices/metadata, investigate environmental and remediation predictive modeling and their integration with GIS, study remote sensing techniques including Global Positioning Systems techniques, and investigate display enhancement techniques including 2D/3D visualization coupled with GIS data bases

  5. Membranes for corrosive oxidations. Final CRADA report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this project is to develop porous hydrophilic membranes that are highly resistant to oxidative and corrosive conditions and to deploy them for recovery and purification of high tonnage chemicals such as hydrogen peroxide and other oxychemicals. The research team patented a process for membrane-based separation of hydrogen peroxide (US Patent No. 5,662,878). The process is based on using a hydrophilic membrane to separate hydrogen peroxide from the organic working solution. To enable this process, a new method for producing hydrophilic membrane materials (Patent No.6,464,880) was reported. We investigated methods of producing these hydrophilic materials and evaluated separations performance in comparison to membrane stability. It was determined that at the required membrane flux, membrane stability was not sufficient to design a commercial process. This work was published (Hestekin et al., J. Membrane Science 2006). To meet the performance needs of the process, we developed a membrane contactor method to extract the hydrogen peroxide, then we surveyed several commercial and pre-commercial membrane materials. We identified pre-commercial hydrophilic membranes with the required selectivity, flux, and stability to meet the needs of the process. In addition, we invented a novel reaction/separations format that greatly increases the performance of the process. To test the performance of the membranes and the new formats we procured and integrated reactor/membrane separations unit that enables controlled mixing, flow, temperature control, pressure control, and sampling. The results were used to file a US non-provisional patent application (ANL-INV 03-12). Hydrogen peroxide is widely used in pulp and paper applications, environmental treatment, and other industries. Virtually all hydrogen peroxide production is now based on a process featuring catalytic hydrogenation followed by auto-oxidation of suitable organic carrier molecules. This process has several drawbacks, particularly in the extraction phase. One general disadvantage of this technology is that hydrogen peroxide must be produced at large centralized plants where it is concentrated to 70% by distillation and transported to the users plant sites where it is diluted before use. Advanced membranes have the potential to enable more efficient, economic, and safe manufacture of hydrogen peroxide. Advanced membrane technology would allow filtration-based separation to replace the difficult liquid-liquid extraction based separation step of the hydrogen peroxide process. This would make it possible for hydrogen peroxide to be produced on-site in mini-plants at 30% concentration and used at the same plant location without distillation and transportation. As a result, production could become more cost-effective, safe and energy efficient.

  6. Linac4: the final assembly stage is under way

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    The Linac4 radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) module was installed at the accelerator test-stand in Building 152 last August. After an assembly phase and tests that concluded last March with the acceleration of a hydrogen beam to 3 MeV, the module has just been permanently installed in the new Linac4 tunnel (Building 400). The installation of the MEBT (Medium Energy Beam Transport) will begin shortly, followed by the start of the first Linac4 commissioning phase.     To find out more about the Linac4 RFQ module, read the previous Bulletin articles published in Nos. 21-22/2010 and 35-36/2012.

  7. Autonomous intelligent assembly systems LDRD 105746 final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Robert J.

    2013-04-01

    This report documents a three-year to develop technology that enables mobile robots to perform autonomous assembly tasks in unstructured outdoor environments. This is a multi-tier problem that requires an integration of a large number of different software technologies including: command and control, estimation and localization, distributed communications, object recognition, pose estimation, real-time scanning, and scene interpretation. Although ultimately unsuccessful in achieving a target brick stacking task autonomously, numerous important component technologies were nevertheless developed. Such technologies include: a patent-pending polygon snake algorithm for robust feature tracking, a color grid algorithm for uniquely identification and calibration, a command and control framework for abstracting robot commands, a scanning capability that utilizes a compact robot portable scanner, and more. This report describes this project and these developed technologies.

  8. Reconciling Basin-Scale Top-Down and Bottom-Up Methane Emission Measurements for Onshore Oil and Gas Development: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-14-572

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, Garvin A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-12-04

    The overall objective of the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America (RPSEA)-funded research project is to develop independent estimates of methane emissions using top-down and bottom-up measurement approaches and then to compare the estimates, including consideration of uncertainty. Such approaches will be applied at two scales: basin and facility. At facility scale, multiple methods will be used to measure methane emissions of the whole facility (controlled dual tracer and single tracer releases, aircraft-based mass balance and Gaussian back-trajectory), which are considered top-down approaches. The bottom-up approach will sum emissions from identified point sources measured using appropriate source-level measurement techniques (e.g., high-flow meters). At basin scale, the top-down estimate will come from boundary layer airborne measurements upwind and downwind of the basin, using a regional mass balance model plus approaches to separate atmospheric methane emissions attributed to the oil and gas sector. The bottom-up estimate will result from statistical modeling (also known as scaling up) of measurements made at selected facilities, with gaps filled through measurements and other estimates based on other studies. The relative comparison of the bottom-up and top-down estimates made at both scales will help improve understanding of the accuracy of the tested measurement and modeling approaches. The subject of this CRADA is NREL's contribution to the overall project. This project resulted from winning a competitive solicitation no. RPSEA RFP2012UN001, proposal no. 12122-95, which is the basis for the overall project. This Joint Work Statement (JWS) details the contributions of NREL and Colorado School of Mines (CSM) in performance of the CRADA effort.

  9. Final report for Assembling Microorganisms into Energy Converting Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahin, Ozgur

    2018-03-26

    The goal of this project was to integrate microorganisms capable of reversible energy transduction in response to changing relative humidity with non-biological materials to create hybrid energy conversion systems. While plants and many other biological organisms have developed structures that are extraordinarily effective in converting changes in relative humidity into mechanical energy, engineered energy transduction systems rarely take advantage of this powerful phenomenon. Rather than developing synthetic materials that can convert changes in relative humidity in to mechanical energy, we developed approaches to assemble bacterial spores into larger materials. These materials can convert energy from evaporation of water in dry atmospheric conditions, which we demonstrated by building energy harvesters from these materials. We have also developed experiments to investigate the interaction of water with the spore material, and to determine how this interaction imposes limits on energy conversion. In addition, we carried out theoretical calculations to investigate the limits imposed by the environmental conditions to the power available in the energy harvesting process. These calculations took into account heat and water vapor transfer in the atmosphere surrounding the spore based materials. Overall, our results suggest that biomolecular materials are promising candidates to convert energy from evaporation.

  10. The human genome: Some assembly required. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The Human Genome Project promises to be one of the most rewarding endeavors in modern biology. The cost and the ethical and social implications, however, have made this project the source of considerable debate both in the scientific community and in the public at large. The 1994 Graduate Student Symposium addresses the scientific merits of the project, the technical issues involved in accomplishing the task, as well as the medical and social issues which stem from the wealth of knowledge which the Human Genome Project will help create. To this end, speakers were brought together who represent the diverse areas of expertise characteristic of this multidisciplinary project. The keynote speaker addresses the project`s motivations and goals in the larger context of biological and medical sciences. The first two sessions address relevant technical issues, data collection with a focus on high-throughput sequencing methods and data analysis with an emphasis on identification of coding sequences. The third session explores recent advances in the understanding of genetic diseases and possible routes to treatment. Finally, the last session addresses some of the ethical, social and legal issues which will undoubtedly arise from having a detailed knowledge of the human genome.

  11. University of Washington/ Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center Tidal Current Technology Test Protocol, Instrumentation, Design Code, and Oceanographic Modeling Collaboration: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-452

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, Frederick R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The University of Washington (UW) - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (UW-NNMREC) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will collaborate to advance research and development (R&D) of Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) renewable energy technology, specifically renewable energy captured from ocean tidal currents. UW-NNMREC is endeavoring to establish infrastructure, capabilities and tools to support in-water testing of marine energy technology. NREL is leveraging its experience and capabilities in field testing of wind systems to develop protocols and instrumentation to advance field testing of MHK systems. Under this work, UW-NNMREC and NREL will work together to develop a common instrumentation system and testing methodologies, standards and protocols. UW-NNMREC is also establishing simulation capabilities for MHK turbine and turbine arrays. NREL has extensive experience in wind turbine array modeling and is developing several computer based numerical simulation capabilities for MHK systems. Under this CRADA, UW-NNMREC and NREL will work together to augment single device and array modeling codes. As part of this effort UW NNMREC will also work with NREL to run simulations on NREL's high performance computer system.

  12. A conceptual design and structural stabilities of in-pit assembly tools for the completion of final sector assembly at tokamak hall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, K.O.; Park, H.K.; Kim, D.J.; Ahn, H.J.; Kim, K.K.; Im, K.; Shaw, R.

    2010-01-01

    The final assembly of main components of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak, Vacuum Vessel (VV) and Toroidal Field Coils (TFCs), is achieved by the sequential assembly of the nine sub-assembled 40 o sectors in tokamak pit. Each sub-assembled 40 o sector is composed of one VV 40 o sector, two TFCs, and in-between Vacuum Vessel Thermal Shield (VVTS) segments. Sub-assembly is carried out in the assembly building and then the sub-assembled sectors are transferred into tokamak pit, in sequence, to complete sector assembly. The role of in-pit assembly tool is to support and align the sub-assembled sectors in tokamak pit. It also plays the role of reference datum during assembly until the completion of main components assembly. Korea Domestic Agency (KO DA) has developed the conceptual design of most ITER purpose-built assembly tools under the collaboration with the ITER Organization. Among the conceptual designs carried out, this paper describes the function, the structure, the selected material and the design results of the in-pit assembly tools comprising central column, radial beams and their supports, TF inner supports and in-pit working floor. The results of structural analysis using ANSYS for the various loading cases are given as well. The resultant stresses and deflections turned out to fall within the allowable ranges.

  13. National Ignition Facility subsystem design requirements final optics assembly subsystem SSDR 1.8.7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, C.

    1996-01-01

    This SSDR establishes the performance, design, development and test requirements for the Final Optic Assembly (FOA). The FOA (WBS 1.8.7) as part of the Target Experimental System (1.8) includes vacuum windows, frequency conversion crystals, focus lens, debris shields and supporting mechanical equipment

  14. Ultraviolet Light Generation and Transport in the Final Optics Assembly of the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegner, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hackel, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Feit, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Parham, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kozlowski, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Whitman, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-02-12

    The design of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) includes a Final Optics Assembly (FOA) subsystem for ultraviolet (UV) light generation and transport for each of the 192 beamlines. Analytical and experimental work has been done to help understand and predict the performance of FOA.

  15. Functional Materials for Microsystems: Smart Self-Assembled Photochromic Films: Final Report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BURNS, ALAN R.; SASAKI, DARRYL Y.; CARPICK, R.W.; SHELNUTT, JOHN A.; BRINKER, C. JEFFREY

    2001-01-01

    This project set out to scientifically-tailor ''smart'' interfacial films and 3-D composite nanostructures to exhibit photochromic responses to specific, highly-localized chemical and/or mechanical stimuli, and to integrate them into optical microsystems. The project involved the design of functionalized chromophoric self-assembled materials that possessed intense and environmentally-sensitive optical properties (absorbance, fluorescence) enabling their use as detectors of specific stimuli and transducers when interfaced with optical probes. The conjugated polymer polydiacetylene (PDA) proved to be the most promising material in many respects, although it had some drawbacks concerning reversibility. Throughout his work we used multi-task scanning probes (AFM, NSOM), offering simultaneous optical and interfacial force capabilities, to actuate and characterize the PDA with localized and specific interactions for detailed characterization of physical mechanisms and parameters. In addition to forming high quality mono-, bi-, and tri-layers of PDA via Langmuir-Blodgett deposition, we were successful in using the diacetylene monomer precursor as a surfactant that directed the self-assembly of an ordered, mesostructured inorganic host matrix. Remarkably, the diacetylene was polymerized in the matrix, thus providing a PDA-silica composite. The inorganic matrix serves as a perm-selective barrier to chemical and biological agents and provides structural support for improved material durability in microsystems. Our original goal was to use the composite films as a direct interface with microscale devices as optical elements (e.g., intracavity mirrors, diffraction gratings), taking advantage of the very high sensitivity of device performance to real-time dielectric changes in the films. However, our optical physics colleagues (M. Crawford and S. Kemme) were unsuccessful in these efforts, mainly due to the poor optical quality of the composite films

  16. Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Ordered Macromolecular Assemblies. Final report for May 1, 1988 - June 30, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, G.

    2005-02-11

    The final report describes studies over a 13 year period having to do with photoinduced electron transfer for active chromophores and redox agents, including assembly of the components in water soluble polymers or polypeptides. The findings include observation of long range charge separation and electron transport using laser phototransient spectroscopy. The systems targeted in these studies include peptide assemblies for which helical conformations and aggregation are documented. Oligomeric peptides modified with non-native redox active groups were also selected for investigation. Highly charged polymers or peptides were investigated as host agents that resemble proteins. The overall goal of these investigations focused on the design and characterization of systems capable of artificial photosynthesis.

  17. CRADA Payment Options | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI TTC CRADA PAYMENT OPTIONS: Electronic Payments by Wire Transfer via Fedwire, Mail a check to the Institute or Center, or Automated Clearing House (ACH)/Electronic Funds Transfer (ETF) payments via Pay.gov (NCI ONLY).

  18. CRADAs: They're Not Just for NCI Anymore | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Karen Surabian, Thomas Stackhouse, and Jeffrey Thomas, Contributing Writers, and Bruce Crise, Guest Writer Advancing scientific discovery is increasingly dependent on diverse and innovative partnerships, and the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) is an essential tool for establishing partnerships. CRADAs allow a federal laboratory to enter into collaborative research and development (R&D) projects with outside parties (commercial or nonprofit).

  19. Final Approval of California Air Plan Revision; Antelope Valley Air Quality Management District; VOCs From Motor Vehicle Assembly Coating Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is taking final action to approve a revision to the Antelope Valley Air Quality Management District (AVAQMD) portion of the California SIP concerning the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from motor vehicle assembly coating operations.

  20. Contemporaneous assembly of Western Gondwana and final Rodinia break-up: Implications for the supercontinent cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Oriolo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Geological, geochronological and isotopic data are integrated in order to present a revised model for the Neoproterozoic evolution of Western Gondwana. Although the classical geodynamic scenario assumed for the period 800–700 Ma is related to Rodinia break-up and the consequent opening of major oceanic basins, a significantly different tectonic evolution can be inferred for most Western Gondwana cratons. These cratons occupied a marginal position in the southern hemisphere with respect to Rodinia and recorded subduction with back-arc extension, island arc development and limited formation of oceanic crust in internal oceans. This period was thus characterized by increased crustal growth in Western Gondwana, resulting from addition of juvenile continental crust along convergent margins. In contrast, crustal reworking and metacratonization were dominant during the subsequent assembly of Gondwana. The Río de la Plata, Congo-São Francisco, West African and Amazonian cratons collided at ca. 630–600 Ma along the West Gondwana Orogen. These events overlap in time with the onset of the opening of the Iapetus Ocean at ca. 610–600 Ma, which gave rise to the separation of Baltica, Laurentia and Amazonia and resulted from the final Rodinia break-up. The East African/Antarctic Orogen recorded the subsequent amalgamation of Western and Eastern Gondwana after ca. 580 Ma, contemporaneously with the beginning of subduction in the Terra Australis Orogen along the southern Gondwana margin. However, the Kalahari Craton was lately incorporated during the Late Ediacaran–Early Cambrian. The proposed Gondwana evolution rules out the existence of Pannotia, as the final Gondwana amalgamation postdates latest connections between Laurentia and Amazonia. Additionally, a combination of introversion and extroversion is proposed for the assembly of Gondwana. The contemporaneous record of final Rodinia break-up and Gondwana assembly has major implications for the

  1. CRADA Final Report for CRADA Number NFE-08-01671 Materials for Advanced Turbocharger Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, P. J. [ORNL; Wilson, M. [Honeywell

    2014-11-28

    Results were obtained on residual stresses in the weld of the steel shaft to the Ni-based superalloy turbine wheel for turbochargers. Neutron diffraction studies at the HFIR Residual Stress Facility showed asymmetric tensile stresses after electron-beam welding of the wheel and shaft. A post-weld heat-treatment was found to relieve and reduce the residual stresses. Results were also obtained on cast CF8C-Plus steel as an upgrade alternative to cast irons (SiMo, Ni-resist) for higher temperature capability and performance for the turbocharger housing. CF8C-Plus steel has demonstrated creep-rupture resistance at 600-950oC, and is more creep-resistant than HK30Nb, but lacks oxidation-resistance at 800oC and above in 10% water vapor. New modified CF8C-Plus Cu/W steels with Cr and Ni additions show better oxidation resistance at 800oC in 10% water vapor, and have capability to higher temperatures. For automotive gasoline engine turbocharger applications, higher temperatures are required, so at the end of this project, testing began at 1000oC and above.

  2. Ion Beam Drift Compression Technology for NDCX. CRADA Final Report. CRADA No. LB05-001820

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldron, William L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary of the specific research and project accomplishments: Through this collaboration, LBNL and FPSI determined the specific energy manipulations that apply to the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) ion beam and developed the preliminary design of a Fast Induction Energy Corrector (FIEC). This effort was successfully completed, firmly establishing the technical feasibility of the proposed approach for regulating the longitudinal energy distribution of the NDCX ion beam. This is a critical step in achieving the NDCX goal of axial compression of the beam by a factor of 100 during neutralized drift.

  3. Cost Effective Bioethanol via Acid Pretreatment of Corn Stover, Saccharification, and Conversion via a Novel Fermentation Organism: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number: CRD-12-485

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowe, N.

    2014-05-01

    This research program will convert acid pretreated corn stover to sugars at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and then transfer these sugars to Honda R&D and its partner the Green Earth Institute (GEI) for conversion to ethanol via a novel fermentation organism. In phase one, NREL will adapt its pretreatment and saccharification process to the unique attributes of this organism, and Honda R&D/GEI will increase the sugar conversion rate as well as the yield and titer of the resulting ethanol. In later phases, NREL, Honda R&D, and GEI will work together at NREL to optimize and scale-up to pilot-scale the Honda R&D/GEI bioethanol production process. The final stage will be to undertake a pilot-scale test at NREL of the optimized bioethanol conversion process.

  4. Phase I ResonantSonic CRADA report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richterich, L.R.; Amos, L.O.; Fancher, J.D.; McLellan, G.W.; Setzer, W.V.; Tuttle, B.G.; Hockey, R.L.; Ferris, R.H.; Riechers, D.M.; Pitman, S.G.

    1994-01-01

    This test report describes the Phase 1 testing and results of the ResonantSonic drilling method. This effort was conducted as part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the US Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Westinghouse Hanford Company and Water Development Corporation. The purpose of this demonstration was to evaluate the Water Development Corporation's ResonantSonic drilling system, modify components as necessary and determine compatible drilling applications for the ResonantSonic drilling method for use at facilities in the DOE complex and private industry. Initially, the ResonantSonic drill was used to drill several test holes at the Drilling Technology Test Site to assess the feasibility of drilling vertical and angle holes. After this initial phase, a 45 degree angle vapor extraction well was drilled to a depth of 168 feet at the 200 West Carbon Tetrachloride Site. This well was drilled and completed in nine days. Extensive geologic and vapor sampling were conducted while drilling this well. In addition, testing was also conducted at the test site to evaluated drilling with larger diameter casing (8 5/8 inch). Evaluation of the Resonant Sonic drilling method will be continued during the Phase 2 portion of testing to determine if improvements to the ResonantSonic system will make it a more viable method for drilling and sampling

  5. Final Report: Photo-Directed Molecular Assembly of Multifunctional Inorganic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.G. Potter, Jr.

    2010-10-15

    This final report details results, conclusions, and opportunities for future effort derived from the study. The work involved combining the molecular engineering of photoactive Ti-alkoxide systems and the optical excitation of hydrolysis and condensation reactions to influence the development of the metal-oxygen-metal network at the onset of material formation. Selective excitation of the heteroleptic alkoxides, coupled with control of alkoxide local chemical environment, enabled network connectivity to be influenced and formed the basis for direct deposition and patterning of Ti-oxide-based materials. The research provided new insights into the intrinsic photoresponse and assembly of these complex, alkoxide molecules. Using a suite of electronic, vibrational, and nuclear spectroscopic probes, coupled with quantum chemical computation, the excitation wavelength and fluence dependence of molecular photoresponse and the nature of subsequent hydrolysis and condensation processes were probed in pyridine-carbinol-based Ti-alkoxides with varied counter ligand groups. Several methods for the patterning of oxide material formation were demonstrated, including the integration of this photoprocessing approach with conventional, dip-coating methodologies.

  6. Start of Final Assembly of the CMS Barrel Yoke on schedule at P5 the 1st august, 2000. I

    CERN Multimedia

    Hubert Gerwig, CERN/ EP-CMI

    2000-01-01

    The Barrel Yoke and the vacuumtank weigh 6500 tonnes. The barrel Yoke consists of 5 rings eacu one weighing 1200 tonnes. The vacuum tank is a stainless steel structure weighing 270 tonnes (length = 13 m , outer diamter 7.6 m) The final assembly of these items will take approximately 1 year from now on.

  7. Novel CO{sub 2} capture. Final CRADA Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

    2009-11-30

    The goal of this work was to use electrochemically driven pH control to develop a second generation, enzyme-based contained liquid membrane (CLM) permeator to extract CO{sub 2} from a variety of coal-based flue gas streams more efficiently than does the CLM current design, while achieving performance coincident with DOE targets of less than 45% Cost of electricity (COE) in 2007 and less than 20% COE in 2012. Central to this goal the CLM would be alkaline (>pH 8) at the feed gas side and acid (

  8. CRADA Final Report, 2011S003, Faraday Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraday Technologies

    2012-01-01

    This Phase I SBIR program addressed the need for an improved manufacturing process for electropolishing niobium RF superconducting cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC). The ILC is a proposed particle accelerator that will be used to gain a deeper understanding of the forces of energy and matter by colliding beams of electrons and positrons at nearly the speed of light. The energy required for this to happen will be achieved through the use of advanced superconducting technology, specifically ∼16,000 RF superconducting cavities operating at near absolute zero. The RF superconductor cavities will be fabricated from highly pure Nb, which has an extremely low surface resistance at 2 Kelvin when compared to other materials. To take full advantage of the superconducting properties of the Nb cavities, the inner surface must be a) polished to a microscale roughness < 0.1 µm with removal of at least 100 µm of material, and b) cleaned to be free of impurities that would degrade performance of the ILC. State-of-the-art polishing uses either chemical polishing or electropolishing, both of which require hydrofluoric acid to achieve breakdown of the strong passive film on the surface. In this Phase I program, Faraday worked with its collaborators at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) to demonstrate the feasibility of an electropolishing process for pure niobium, utilizing an environmentally benign alternative to chemical or electrochemical polishing electrolytes containing hydrofluoric acid. Faraday utilized a 31 wt% aqueous sulfuric acid solution (devoid of hydrofluoric acid) in conjunction with the FARADAYICSM Process, which uses pulse/pulse reverse fields for electropolishing, to demonstrate the ability to electropolish niobium to the desired surface finish. The anticipated benefits of the FARADAYICSM Electropolishing process will be a simpler, safer, and less expensive method capable of surface finishing high purity niobium cavities. Another potential benefit would be for the medical industry that uses hydrofluoric acid to electropolish niobium-alloy materials. The FARADAYICSM Electropolishing process will eliminate the environmental hazards posed by the use of hydrofluoric acid employed by chemical polishing and conventional electropolishing. Further, improved performance benefits may be possible. The overall objective of the Phase I program was to demonstrate that FARADAYIC Electropolishing of niobium cavities in electrolytes free of hydrofluoric acid can meet the RF superconducting performance criteria of those cavities. The FARADAYIC Electropolishing Process developed in the Phase I program was used to polish 50 mm Nb disks to a surface roughness (RA) of < 1 nm over a small area through process and post-processing optimization. An excellent level of surface cleanliness was achieved. While the desired 2K RF performance has not yet been achieved, Faraday believes that surface oxide state can be controlled through manipulation of the process parameters, to meet the 2K RF standard. Faraday is establishing apparatus and facilities infrastructure for single-cell SRF cavity electropolishing, through a synergistic effort with the Fermi National Accelerator Facility (Fermilab) to scale-up electropolishing of superconducting RF cavities. Faraday proposes to commercialize the subject technology via an IP based strategic relationship with a partner with established market channels within two primary commercialization avenues: 1) the superconducting particle accelerator community, 2) the medical device and implant market. Faraday will initially maintain Low Rate Initial Production capabilities for an application, but latterly seek a strategic partner who is solely dedicated to high rate production

  9. Electron Beam Curing of Polymer Matrix Composites - CRADA Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, C. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howell, Dave [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Norris, Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1997-05-01

    The major cost driver in manufacturing polymer matrix composite (PMC) parts and structures, and one of the elements having the greatest effect on their quality and performance, is the standard thermal cure process. Thermal curing of PMCs requires long cure times and high energy consumption, creates residual thermal stresses in the part, produces volatile toxic by-products, and requires expensive tooling that is tolerant of the high cure temperatures.

  10. Hybrid Wing Body Multi-Bay Test Article Analysis and Assembly Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velicki, Alexander; Hoffman, Krishna; Linton, Kim A.; Baraja, Jaime; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.; Thrash, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    This report summarizes work performed by The Boeing Company, through its Boeing Research & Technology organization located in Huntington Beach, California, under the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project. The report documents work performed to structurally analyze and assemble a large-scale Multi-bay Box (MBB) Test Article capable of withstanding bending and internal pressure loadings representative of a Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft. The work included fabrication of tooling elements for use in the fabrication and assembly of the test article.

  11. Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Engineering Unit 2 (ASRG EU2) Final Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriti, Salvatore M.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has recently completed the assembly of a unique Stirling generator test article for laboratory experimentation. Under the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) flight development contract, NASA GRC initiated a task to design and fabricate a flight-like generator for in-house testing. This test article was given the name ASRG Engineering Unit 2 (EU2) as it was effectively the second engineering unit to be built within the ASRG project. The intent of the test article was to duplicate Lockheed Martin's qualification unit ASRG design as much as possible to enable system-level tests not previously possible at GRC. After the cancellation of the ASRG flight development project, the decision was made to continue the EU2 build, and make use of a portion of the hardware from the flight development project. GRC and Lockheed Martin engineers collaborated to develop assembly procedures, leveraging the valuable knowledge gathered by Lockheed Martin during the ASRG development contract. The ASRG EU2 was then assembled per these procedures at GRC with Lockheed Martin engineers on site. The assembly was completed in August 2014. This paper details the components that were used for the assembly, and the assembly process itself.

  12. Reliability of CGA/LGA/HDI Package Board/Assembly (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffaroam. Reza

    2014-01-01

    Package manufacturers are now offering commercial-off-the-shelf column grid array (COTS CGA) packaging technologies in high-reliability versions. Understanding the process and quality assurance (QA) indicators for reliability are important for low-risk insertion of these advanced electronics packages. The previous reports, released in January of 2012 and January of 2013, presented package test data, assembly information, and reliability evaluation by thermal cycling for CGA packages with 1752, 1517, 1509, and 1272 inputs/outputs (I/Os) and 1-mm pitch. It presented the thermal cycling (-55C either 100C or 125C) test results for up to 200 cycles. This report presents up to 500 thermal cycles with quality assurance and failure analysis evaluation represented by optical photomicrographs, 2D real time X-ray images, dye-and-pry photomicrographs, and optical/scanning electron Microscopy (SEM) cross-sectional images. The report also presents assembly challenge using reflowing by either vapor phase or rework station of CGA and land grid array (LGA) versions of three high I/O packages both ceramic and plastic configuration. A new test vehicle was designed having high density interconnect (HDI) printed circuit board (PCB) with microvia-in-pad to accommodate both LGA packages as well as a large number of fine pitch ball grid arrays (BGAs). The LGAs either were assembled onto HDI PCB as an LGA or were solder paste print and reflow first to form solder dome on pads before assembly. Both plastic BGAs with 1156 I/O and ceramic LGAs were assembled. It also presented the X-ray inspection results as well as failures due to 200 thermal cycles. Lessons learned on assembly of ceramic LGAs are also presented.

  13. Stress relief of ceramic components in high voltage assemblies. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinen, R.J.

    1979-02-01

    Two types of ceramic packages were evaluated to determine the effectiveness of encapsulating the ceramic components in beta eucryptite filled epoxy. The requirements (no high voltage breakdown, no ceramic cracking, and no encapsulant cracking) were met by the spark gap assembly, but the sprytron assembly had cracking in the encapsulant after thermal cycling. The encapsulation of the ceramic component in beta eucryptite filled epoxy with a stress decoupling material selectively applied in the stress concentrated areas were used to prevent cracking in the sprytron encapsulant. This method is proposed as the standard encapsulation process for high voltage ceramic components

  14. Industrializing Offshore Wind Power with Serial Assembly and Lower-cost Deployment - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kempton, Willett [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)

    2017-12-11

    A team of engineers and contractors has developed a method to move offshore wind installation toward lower cost, faster deployment, and lower environmental impact. A combination of methods, some incremental and some breaks from past practice, interact to yield multiple improvements. Three designs were evaluated based on detailed engineering: 1) a 5 MW turbine on a jacket with pin piles (base case), 2) a 10 MW turbine on a conventional jacket with pin piles, assembled at sea, and 3) a 10 MW turbine on tripod jacket with suction buckets (caissons) and with complete turbine assembly on-shore. The larger turbine, assembly ashore, and the use of suction buckets together substantially reduce capital cost of offshore wind projects. Notable capital cost reductions are: changing from 5 MW to 10 MW turbine, a 31% capital cost reduction, and assembly on land then single-piece install at sea an additional 9% capital cost reduction. An estimated Design 4) estimates further cost reduction when equipment and processes of Design 3) are optimized, rather than adapted to existing equipment and process. Cost of energy for each of the four Designs are also calculated, yielding approximately the same percentage reductions. The methods of Design 3) analyzed here include accepted structures such as suction buckets used in new ways, innovations conceived but previously without engineering and economic validation, combined with new methods not previously proposed. Analysis of Designs 2) and 3) are based on extensive engineering calculations and detailed cost estimates. All design methods can be done with existing equipment, including lift equipment, ports and ships (except that design 4 assumes a more optimized ship). The design team consists of experienced offshore structure designers, heavy lift engineers, wind turbine designers, vessel operators, and marine construction contractors. Comparing the methods based on criteria of cost and deployment speed, the study selected the third design

  15. Final Scientific Report - Electromagnetic Interactions in Self-Assembled Metallo-Dielectric Biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dragnea, Bogdan G. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2017-05-03

    Achievements which resulted from previous DOE funding include: templated virus-like particle assembly thermodynamics, development of single particle photothermal absorption spectroscopy and dark- field spectroscopy instrumentation for the measurement of optical properties of virus-like nanoparticles, electromagnetic simulations of coupled nanoparticle cluster systems, virus contact mechanics, energy transfer and fluorescence quenching in multichromophore systems supported on biomolecular templates, and photo physical work on virus-aptamer systems. A current total of eight published research articles and a book chapter are acknowledging DOE support for the period 2013-2016.

  16. Final irradiation and postirradiation data from the NRC/PNL instrumented assembly IFA-432

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanning, D.D.; Bradley, E.R.

    1986-02-01

    The instrumented six-rod test assembly IFA-432, sponsored by USNRC, operated in the Halden Reactor from December 1975 to May 1984, with surviving fuel thermocouples, neutron detectors and pressure transducers. Peak burnups of 46 MWd/kgM were achieved. Interim destructive examination data were obtained at peak burnups of 24 and 34 MWd/kgM. This paper presents a synopsis of the irradiation histories and postirradiation examination data for the high burnup rods. The postirradiation condition of the rods correlates well with their individual design parameters and operating conditions

  17. Final Report - High Performance, Durable, Low Cost Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Transportation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbach, Andrew [3M Company, Maplewood, MN (United States)

    2017-05-31

    The primary project objective was development of improved polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) which address the key DOE barriers of performance, durability and cost. Additional project objectives were to address commercialization barriers specific to MEAs comprising 3M nanostructured thin film (NSTF) electrodes, including a larger-than-acceptable sensitivity to operating conditions, an unexplained loss of rated power capability with operating time, and slow break-in conditioning. Significant progress was made against each of these barriers, and most DOE 2020 targets were met or substantially approached.

  18. TFTR bumper limiter and final protective plate engineering, fabrication and assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmich, R.C.; Snook, P.G.; Loesser, G.D.; Reilly, T.B.; Trachsel, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    The inner vacuum vessel wall of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is protected from plasma impingement by a bumper limiter and from neutral beam bombardment by protective plates. Engineering problems and solutions relating to Inconel 718, such as welding, machining in the annealed or age-hardened condition, selection of feeds, speeds and the need for rigid tooling are discussed. Vacuum furnace brazing of the 5/16'' Inconel 600 cooling tubing to the backing plates in both horizontal and vertical sections are shown. A detailed description of the plate and tile fabrication and assembly, with manufacturing and management techniques is outlined in this paper

  19. Automated Solar Cell Assembly Teamed Process Research. Final subcontract report, 6 January 1993--31 October 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowlan, M. J.; Hogan, S. J.; Breen, W. F.; Murach, J. M.; Sutherland, S. F.; Patterson, J. S.; Darkazalli, G. [Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (US)

    1996-02-01

    This is the Final Technical Report for a program entitled ''Automated Solar Cell Assembly Teamed Process Research,'' funded by the US Department of Energy. This program was part of Phase 3A of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project, which addressed the generic needs of the photovoltaic (PV) industry for improved quality, accelerated production scale-up, and substantially reduced manufacturing cost. Crystalline silicon solar cells (Czochralski monocrystalline, cast polycrystalline, and ribbon polycrystalline) are used in the great majority of PV modules produced in the US, accounting for 95% of all shipments in 1994. Spire's goal in this program was to reduce the cost of these modules by developing high throughput (5 MW per year) automated processes for interconnecting solar cells made from standard and thin silicon wafers. Spire achieved this goal by developing a completely new automated processing system, designated the SPI-ASSEMBLER{trademark} 5000, which is now offered as a commercial product to the PV industry. A discussion of the project and of the Assembler is provided.

  20. Evaluation of environmental qualification period for Conax electrical penetration assemblies. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doroshuk, B.; Hager, M.; Brown, R.

    1995-05-01

    This report evaluates the environmental qualification period of Conax electrical penetration assemblies (EPAs) for extension from forty (40) years to sixty (60) years. The evaluation was performed based on a review of Conax EPAs supplied to Baltimore Gas ampersand Electric's (BGE) Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant Units 1 and 2. The report has been prepared so that it may be of use to any utility involved in the extension of the environmental qualification period for Conax EPAs installed in their plant(s). The report includes a section on the strategy which was developed for the effort to extend the qualified lives of the Conax EPAs. A review of documentation and plant conditions specific to BGE is included in the report to demonstrate the methodology. The documentation included qualification testing performed by Conax of the materials of construction of the EPA models. The plant conditions reviewed included both normal and accident environments, both of which are specific to Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant Units 1 and 2. This report can be used as a guide in the evaluation of similar installations of Conax electrical penetration assemblies in other nuclear power plants by applying the methodologies used herein in conjunction with the plant specific test reports, materials, and conditions

  1. Final report: Seven-layer membrane electrode assembly - an innovative approach to PEM fuel cell design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, A.

    2005-07-01

    Costs of materials and fabrication, rather than appropriateness of technology, are the major barriers to the sales of fuel cells. With the objective of reducing costs, potential alternative component materials for (a) the fluid flow plate (FFP) and (b) the gas diffusion layers were investigated. The concept of a 7-layer membrane electrode assembly (MEA), in which components are bonded into a unitised module, was also studied. The advantages of the bonded cell, and the flow field design, are expounded. Low-cost carbon particle composites were developed for the FFPs. The modular 7-layer MEA has an order of magnitude saving over current materials. Overall, the study has led to a greater volumetric power output, lower costs and greater reliability. The work was carried out by Morgan Group Technology Limited and funded by the DTI.

  2. Exploring synchrotron radiation capabilities: The ALS-Intel CRADA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gozzo, F.; Cossy-Favre, A.; Padmore, H.

    1997-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation spectroscopy and spectromicroscopy were applied, at the Advanced Light Source, to the analysis of materials and problems of interest to the commercial semiconductor industry. The authors discuss some of the results obtained at the ALS using existing capabilities, in particular the small spot ultra-ESCA instrument on beamline 7.0 and the AMS (Applied Material Science) endstation on beamline 9.3.2. The continuing trend towards smaller feature size and increased performance for semiconductor components has driven the semiconductor industry to invest in the development of sophisticated and complex instrumentation for the characterization of microstructures. Among the crucial milestones established by the Semiconductor Industry Association are the needs for high quality, defect free and extremely clean silicon wafers, very thin gate oxides, lithographies near 0.1 micron and advanced material interconnect structures. The requirements of future generations cannot be met with current industrial technologies. The purpose of the ALS-Intel CRADA (Cooperative Research And Development Agreement) is to explore, compare and improve the utility of synchrotron-based techniques for practical analysis of substrates of interest to semiconductor chip manufacturing. The first phase of the CRADA project consisted in exploring existing ALS capabilities and techniques on some problems of interest. Some of the preliminary results obtained on Intel samples are discussed here

  3. Final configuration with assembly assessment of the 100 kV high voltage bushing for the Indian test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Dheeraj Kumar; Shah, Sejal; Venkata Nagaraju, M.; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak; Rotti, Chandramouli; Chakraborty, Arun Kumar

    2015-01-01

    HVB is addressed which is related to the assembly of the INTF HVB with INTF Vessel. During Assembly, INTF HVB will be rotated from vertical to horizontal orientation (as per port orientation on INTF vessel) which requires support to all the feedlines to avoid deflection, in the long unsupported span of the feedlines, due to gravity effect. This paper describes the final configuration with assembly assessment of INTF HVB. (author)

  4. Final Project Report Project 10749-4.2.2.1 2007-2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacher, Alan H.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Frye, J. G.; Brown, Heather M.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Oberg, Aaron A.

    2009-05-11

    This is the final report for the DOE Project 10749-4.2.2.1 for the FY2007 - FY2009 period. This report is non-proprietary, and will be submitted to DOE as a final project report. The report covers activities under the DOE Project inside CRADA 269 (Project 53231) as well as project activites outside of that CRADA (Project 56662). This is the final report that is summarized from the non-proprietary quarterlies submitted to DOE over the past 2.5 years, which in turn are summaries from the proprietary technical reporting to UOP.

  5. A national laboratory/private industry cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritchard, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the history and process of establishing a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between Sandia National Laboratories and Magnavox Electronic Systems Company for the design, development, and testing of a 360-degree scanning, imaging, intrusion detection sensor. The subject of the CRADA is the Advanced Exterior Sensor (AES). It is intended for exterior use at ranges from 50 to 1,500 meters and uses a combination of three sensing technologies (infrared, visible, and radar) and a new data processing method to provide low false-alarm intrusion detection and tracking combined with immediate visual assessment. The establishment of this CRADA represents a new paradigm in the cooperation between the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, the National Laboratories and Private Industry. Although a formal document has now been executed, a CRADA is, nonetheless, primarily an agreement to work with each other to achieve goals that might otherwise be unattainable. For the DoD, a program continues in the face of uncertain funding. For the DOE, a CRADA is in place that meets congressionally mandated guidelines. For Sandia, sponsors are in agreement on requirements and synergistic funding. And for Magnavox, an opportunity is in hand to work with researchers in developing advanced security technology

  6. Measurements on spent-fuel assemblies at Arkansas Nuclear One using the Fork system. Final report, January 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing, R.I.; Bronowski, D.R.; Bosler, G.E.; Siebelist, R.; Priore, J.; Hansford, C.H.; Sullivan, S.

    1997-03-01

    The Fork measurement system has been used to examine spent-fuel assemblies at the two reactors of Arkansas Nuclear One, operated by Entergy Operations, Inc. The Unit 1 reactor is a Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) design, and the Unit 2 reactor is a Combustion Engineering (CE) design. The neutron and gamma-ray emissions from individual spent-fuel assemblies were measured in the storage pools by raising each assembly pathway out of the storage rack and performing a measurement near the center of the assembly. The overall accuracy of the measurements after corrections is about 2%. Thirty-four assemblies were examined at Unit 1, and forty-one assemblies at Unit 2. The average deviation of the burnup measurements from the calibration was 3.0% at Unit 1 and 3.5% at Unit 2, indicating 2 to 3% random variation among the reactor records. There was no indication of clearly anomalous assemblies. Axial Scans of the variation in neutron and gamma ray emission were obtained by collecting data at several locations along the length of three assemblies at Unit 2. Two of these assemblies were nonstandard in that each contained a small neutron source. The sources were detected by the axial scans. The test program was a cooperative effort involving Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Entergy Operations, Inc., the Electric Power Research Institute, and the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management of the US Department of Energy

  7. Automation Study for Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant Hand Held Signal Flight Assembly, Rocket Barrel Assembly, 40 MM Signal, Final Packaging/Pack-Out, and Star Finishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    wood protectors in the HHS Rocket Barrel Assembly Operations. d) Use of hot melt sealant rather than lacquer on the end of the assembled Hand Held...4OL.UA8LYADHRlE CG411!cLVPAM-1 ~LW7m~I~o~c~c LCA ~TM18UX"Y.31nSRGU-11 STiIM ASSELYJMACE FINh1TZ1A1*4CWAJKRZAM’ WAOiNt rs~my" LOCATM1ED 0~7 LOCA1ED’ IWCM-1W...Moorfeed Fairview, PA Indianapolis, IN Voice Synthesis Module Square D Micro Chip Technology Palatine, IL Chandler, AZ 85224 Vacuum Unit Venturi’s

  8. High-resolution simulations of the final assembly of Earth-like planets. 2. Water delivery and planetary habitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Sean N; Quinn, Thomas; Lunine, Jonathan I

    2007-02-01

    The water content and habitability of terrestrial planets are determined during their final assembly, from perhaps 100 1,000-km "planetary embryos " and a swarm of billions of 1-10-km "planetesimals. " During this process, we assume that water-rich material is accreted by terrestrial planets via impacts of water-rich bodies that originate in the outer asteroid region. We present analysis of water delivery and planetary habitability in five high-resolution simulations containing about 10 times more particles than in previous simulations. These simulations formed 15 terrestrial planets from 0.4 to 2.6 Earth masses, including five planets in the habitable zone. Every planet from each simulation accreted at least the Earth's current water budget; most accreted several times that amount (assuming no impact depletion). Each planet accreted at least five water-rich embryos and planetesimals from the past 2.5 astronomical units; most accreted 10-20 water-rich bodies. We present a new model for water delivery to terrestrial planets in dynamically calm systems, with low-eccentricity or low-mass giant planets-such systems may be very common in the Galaxy. We suggest that water is accreted in comparable amounts from a few planetary embryos in a " hit or miss " way and from millions of planetesimals in a statistically robust process. Variations in water content are likely to be caused by fluctuations in the number of water-rich embryos accreted, as well as from systematic effects, such as planetary mass and location, and giant planet properties.

  9. 78 FR 28866 - Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Opportunity With the Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... commercialization access to critical assay components such as the recombinant 3ABC* protein (* indicates that the 3C... and Mouth Disease virus (FMDV) non-structural proteins (NSP): 3A, 3B, or 3C. This new FMDV 3ABC ELISA... this CRADA will be to develop and validate the FMDV 3ABC ELISA assay in collaboration with DHS S&T and...

  10. 78 FR 71632 - Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Opportunity With the Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... processes leading to efficiencies while also saving money over time than employing single-use ISO bolts... automate processes leading to efficiencies and cost savings. Cross-border Commerce: Conveyance security... CRADA does not imply the future purchase of any materials, equipment, or services from the collaborating...

  11. 78 FR 42532 - Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Opportunity With the Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Opportunity With the Department of Homeland Security for the Development of a Foot-and-Mouth Disease 3ABC ELISA Diagnostic Kit; Correction AGENCY: Science and Technology Directorate, Plum Island Animal Disease Center...

  12. Final report [FASEB Summer Research Conference ''Virus Assembly''--agenda and attendee list

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feiss, Michael

    2001-01-31

    The conference brought together researchers working on virus structure and virus assembly in diverse systems. Information was integrated from many viral systems, including plant bacterial and eukaryotic viruses, and many techniques such as biophysical approaches of x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and spectroscopy, along with molecular biological and molecular genetic analysis.

  13. Agreement Execution Process Study: CRADAs and NF-WFO Agreements and the Speed of Business

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrer, Bruce J.; Cejka, Cheryl L.; Macklin, Richard; Miksovic, Ann

    2011-02-01

    This report summarizes the findings of a study on the execution of Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) and Non-Federal Work for Others (NF-WFO) agreements across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratory complex. The study provides quantitiative estimates of times required to negotiate and execute these agreements across the DOE complex. It identifies factors impacting on cycle times and describes best practicies used at various laboratories and site offices that reduce cycle times.

  14. WIPP [Waste Isolation Pilot Plant]/SRL in situ tests: Part 2, Pictorial history of MIIT [Materials Interface Interactions Tests] and final MIIT matrices, assemblies, and sample listings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.; Weinle, M.E.; Molecke, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    In situ testing of Savannah River Plant [SRP] waste glass is an important component in ensuring technical and public confidence in the safety and effective performance of the wasteforms. Savannah River Laboratory [SRL] is currently involved in joint programs involving field testing of SRP waste in Sweden, Belgium, and the United Kingdom. Most recently, this in situ effort has been expanded to include the first field tests to be conducted in the United States, involving burial of a variety of simulated nuclear waste systems. This new effort, called the Materials Interface Interactions Tests or MIIT, is a program jointly conducted by Sandia National Laboratory/Waste Isolation Pilot Plant [WIPP] and SRL. Over 1800 samples, supplied by the United States, France, West Germany, Belgium, Canada, Japan, and the United Kingdom, were buried approximately 650m below the earth's surface in the salt geology at WIPP, near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The MIIT program is one of the largest cooperative efforts ever undertaken in the waste management field; the data produced from these tests are designed to benefit a wide cross-section of the waste management community. An earlier document provided an overview of the WIPP MIIT program and described its place in the waste glass assessment program at Savannah River. This document represents the second in this series and its objectives include: (1) providing a pictorial history of assembly and installation of wasteforms, metals, and geologic samples in WIPP; (2) providing 'finalized and completed' sample matrices for the entire 7-part MIIT program; (3) documenting final sample assemblies by the use of schematic drawings, including each sample, its orientation, and its environment; and (4) providing a complete listing of all samples and the means for managing analyses and resulting data

  15. Monolithic circuits for barium fluoride detectors used in nuclear physics experiments. CRADA final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varner, R.L.; Blankenship, J.L.; Beene, J.R.; Todd, R.A.

    1998-02-01

    Custom monolithic electronic circuits have been developed recently for large detector applications in high energy physics where subsystems require tens of thousands of channels of signal processing and data acquisition. In the design and construction of these enormous detectors, it has been found that monolithic circuits offer significant advantages over discrete implementations through increased performance, flexible packaging, lower power and reduced cost per channel. Much of the integrated circuit design for the high energy physics community is directly applicable to intermediate energy heavy-ion and electron physics. This STTR project conducted in collaboration with researchers at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, sought to develop a new integrated circuit chip set for barium fluoride (BaF 2 ) detector arrays based upon existing CMOS monolithic circuit designs created for the high energy physics experiments. The work under the STTR Phase 1 demonstrated through the design, simulation, and testing of several prototype chips the feasibility of using custom CMOS integrated circuits for processing signals from BaF 2 detectors. Function blocks including charge-sensitive amplifiers, comparators, one shots, time-to-amplitude converters, analog memory circuits and buffer amplifiers were implemented during Phase 1 effort. Experimental results from bench testing and laboratory testing with sources were documented

  16. Breast Cancer Diagnostic System Final Report CRADA No. TC02098.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubenchik, A. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); DaSilva, L. B. [BioTelligent, Inc., Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-06

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (formerly The Regents of the University of California)/Lawrence Liver more National Laboratory (LLNL) and BioTelligent, Inc. together with a Russian Institution (BioFil, Ltd.), to develop a new system ( diagnostic device, operating procedures, algorithms and software) to accurately distinguish between benign and malignant breast tissue (Breast Cancer Diagnostic System, BCDS).

  17. Development and demonstration of biosorbents for clean-up of uranium in water. CRADA final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faison, B.D.; Hu, M.Z.C.; Norman, J.M.; Reeves, M.E.; Williams, L.; Schmidt-Kuster, W.; Darnell, K.

    1997-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CSU, a nongenetically engineered bacterial strain known to bind dissolved hexavalent uranium, shows particular promise as the basis of an immobilized-cell process for removal of dissolved uranium from contaminated wastewaters. It was characterized with respect to its sorptive active. Living, heat-killed, permeabilized, and unreconstituted lyophilized cells were all capable of binding uranium. The uranium biosorption equilibrium could be described by the Langmuir isotherm. The rate of uranium adsorption increased following permeabilization of the outer and/or cytoplasmic membrane by organic solvents such as acetone. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was significantly more sorptive toward uranium than certain novel, patented biosorbents derived from algal or fungal biomass sources. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was also competitive with commercial cation-exchange resins, particularly in the presence of dissolved transition metals. Uranium binding by P. aeruginosa was clearly pH dependent. Uranium loading capacity increased with increasing pH under acidic conditions, presumably as a function of uranium speciation and due to the H + competition at some binding sites. Nevertheless, preliminary evidence suggests that this microorganism is also capable of binding anionic hexavalent uranium complexes. Ferric iron was a strong inhibitor of uranium binding to P. aeruginosa CSU biomass, and the presence of uranium also decreased the Fe 3+ loading when the biomass was not saturated with Fe 3+ , suggesting that Fe 3+ and uranium may share the same binding sites on biomass

  18. Fuel Testing for Sylvatex: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-16-636

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, Jonathan L. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-02-07

    Sylvatex is a green nano-chemistry company that has developed a platform technology utilizing renewable, non-toxic inputs to create a stable nanoparticle that can be used in multiple applications. Their mission is to increase the use of renewables globally, to empower a cleaner and healthier future. The main application is a fuel technology product - MicroX - that utilizes proprietary knowledge to scale low-cost, cleaner-burning renewable diesel fuel and additives by using a co-location commercial model. The aspects of this project will include testing of two Sylvatex MicroX fuels on an engine dynamometer platform. Industry standard ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) B3 fuel and a ULSD B20 will both be used for comparison of the Sylvatex fuels (U.S. standard diesel fuel at the pump contains an average of approximately 3% biodiesel; this is why B3 would be used as a baseline comparison). Sylvatex is currently using a prototype formulation (MicroX 1) that applies a high cost surfactant. An experimental formulation (MicroX 2) that uses lower cost materials is under development. The MicroX 1 will be blended at a 10% level into the B3 ULSD fuel and the MicroX 2 will be blended at a 10% level into both the B3 and the B20 ULSD fuels for study on the engine dynamometer test platform. All fuel blends will be tested over the FTP transient engine test cycle and a steady state ramped modal engine test cycle. Each test cycle will be performed a minimum of 3 times for each fuel. Tailpipe and/or engine out gaseous exhaust emissions (CO2, CO, NOx, THC, O2,), engine out PM emissions, and brake-specific fuel consumption rates will be evaluated for all test cycles.

  19. Electrically Heated Afterburner Final Report CRADA No. TC-0537-93

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernazza, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gehrman, F. H. [Retech Services, Inc., Ukiah, CA (United States)

    2018-01-24

    This project was established as a three-year collaboration to develop and improve an innovative hazardous waste-processing system via the addition of an electrically heated afterburner. The fundamental objective of this project was comprehensive engineering of a plasma-fired afterburner with the goal of delivering a scaled demonstration model to process the gaseous effluent from a Plasma Arc Centrifugal Treatment (PACT) system. The first stage PACT technology has been already well developed by Retech Services, Inc. (Retech).

  20. Improved Fiber Optics Final Report CRADA No. TSB-957-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Glenn [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Livermore, CA (United States); Wilford, Sandy [Lumenyte futemational Corporation (LIC), Irvine, CA (United States)

    2018-01-22

    The existing chemistry of Lumenyte® (an illumination fiber optic developed by LIC) was such that the component monomers inherently polymerized to a very hard mass if exposed to environmental IR, UV, or a combination of these frequencies. Lumenyte optic also would cure to a hard mass by exposure to the UV & IR generated by the illuminating lamps-although this could occur at a much slower rate, and the hardening could occur even when the adverse frequencies were filtered. The resultant product did not have the flexibility for the required applications. LIC's objective was to include other monomeric components in the formulation to impart permanent flexibility. LIC sought the expertise and the use of the facilities in the Polymeric Materials Section at LLNL to achieve this objective.

  1. Laser Shot Peening Final Report CRADA No. TC-02059-03

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart, B. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hackel, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    This was a collaborative effort between The Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Metal Improvement Company, Inc. (MIC), to further develop the laser shot peening technology. This project had an emphasis on laser development and government and military applications including DOE’s natural gas and oil technology program (NGOTP), Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), F-22 Fighter, etc.

  2. Mosaic Transparent Armor System Final Report CRADA No. TC02162.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntz, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Breslin, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-29

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and The Protective Group, Inc. (TPG) to improve the performance of the mosaic transparent armor system (MTAS) for transparent armor applications, military and civilian. LLNL was to provide the unique MTAS technology and designs to TPG for innovative construction and ballistic testing of improvements needed for current and near future application of the armor windows on vehicles and aircraft. The goal of the project was to advance the technology of MTAS to the point that these mosaic transparent windows would be introduced and commercially manufactured for military vehicles and aircraft.

  3. Interventional Application of Shape Memory Polymer Foam Final Report CRADA No. TC-02067-03

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maitland, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Metzger, M. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    This was a collaborative effort between The Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sierra Interventions, LLC, to develop shape memory polymer foam devices for treating hemorrhagic stroke.

  4. Optimization of electron-cyclotron-resonance charge-breeder ions : Final CRADA Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, R.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of 1+ beam properties and associated performance of ECR Charge Breeder source determined by total efficiency measurement and charge state distributions from the ECR Charge Breeder. These results were communicated to Far-Tech personnel who used them to benchmark the newly developed programs that model ion capture and charge breeding in the ECR Charge Breeder Source. Providing the basic data described above and in the discussion below to Far-Tech allowed them to improve and refine their calculational tools for ECR ion sources. These new tools will be offered for sale to industry and will also provide important guidance to other research labs developing Charge Breeding ion sources for radioactive beam physics research.

  5. CRADA Final Report: Identification of New Therapies with Potential for Treatment of Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissell, Mina J.

    2002-10-21

    This project represents a collaboration between two research groups at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the research facility at the Chiron corporation, in which each group supplied unique and essential contributions. Mina Bissell, at LBNL, provided the resources and expertise of her research group in a physiologically relevant culture system with particular utility for investigating the development of breast cancer. Chiron Corporation, of Emeryville, California, generated high-quality cDNA microarrays, hybridized cDNA prepared from cultures and cell lines developed in the Bissell laboratory, and performed preliminary analysis of the resultant dataset. Saira Mian, at LBNL, used sophisticated statistical and Bayesian techniques for analysis of the enormously complex dataset to reveal key genes involved in signaling pathways responsible for development of breast cancer. These results have indicated separate and distinct groups of genes associated only with the nonmalignant cells, with the malignant cells, and the reverted cells. Currently, the project team is involved in data verification, to be followed by testing selected genes for utility as potential tumor suppressors. However, the results already obtained were so striking that a disclosure has been filed on 367 of the selected genes for potential use in therapy.

  6. Solidification Technologies for Radioactive and Chemical Liquid Waste Treatment - Final CRADA Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castiglioni, Andrew J.; Gelis, Artem V.

    2016-01-01

    This project, organized under DOE/NNSA's Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention program, joined Russian and DOE scientists in developing more effective solidification and storage technologies for liquid radioactive waste. Several patent applications were filed by the Russian scientists (Russia only) and in 2012, the technology developed was approved by Russia's Federal State Unitary Enterprise RADON for application throughout Russia in cleaning up and disposing of radioactive waste.

  7. Numerical Simulations of 3D Seismic Data Final Report CRADA No. TC02095.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedmann, S. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kostov, C. [Schlumberger Cambridge Research (United Kingdom)

    2017-09-06

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (formerly The Regents of the University of Califomia)/Lawrence-Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Schlumberger Cambridge Research (SCR), to develop synthetic seismic data sets and supporting codes.

  8. Biochemical basis of drought tolerance in hybrid Populus grown under field production conditions. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschaplinski, T.J.; Tuskan, G.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wierman, C. [Boise Cascade Corp., Wallula, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this cooperative effort was to assess the use of osmotically active compounds as molecular selection criteria for drought tolerance in Populus in a large-scale field trial. It is known that some plant species, and individuals within a plant species, can tolerate increasing stress associated with reduced moisture availability by accumulating solutes. The biochemical matrix of such metabolites varies among species and among individuals. The ability of Populus clones to tolerate drought has equal value to other fiber producers, i.e., the wood products industry, where irrigation is used in combination with other cultural treatments to obtain high dry weight yields. The research initially involved an assessment of drought stress under field conditions and characterization of changes in osmotic constitution among the seven clones across the six moisture levels. The near-term goal was to provide a mechanistic basis for clonal differences in productivity under various irrigation treatments over time.

  9. Development of CVD Diamond for Industrial Applications Final Report CRADA No. TC-2047-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caplan, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Olstad, R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Jory, H. [Communications and Power Industries, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Vikharov, A. L. [Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-09-08

    This project was a collaborative effort to develop and demonstrate a new millimeter microwave assisted chemical vapor deposition(CVD) process for manufacturing large diamond disks with greatly reduced processing times and costs from those now available. In the CVD process, carbon based gases (methane) and hydrogen are dissociated into plasma using microwave discharge and then deposited layer by layer as polycrystalline diamond onto a substrate. The available low frequency (2.45GHz) microwave sources used elsewhere (De Beers) result in low density plasmas and low deposition rates: 4 inch diamond disks take 6-8 weeks to process. The new system developed in this project uses a high frequency 30GHz Gyrotron as the microwave source and a quasi-optical CVD chamber resulting in a much higher density plasma which greatly reduced the diamond processing times (1-2 weeks)

  10. Development of DNA Pillar Chip Final Report CRADA No. TSB-2035-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ness, K. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Long, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    This was a collaborative effort between The Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Tetracore, to demonstrate a proof of principal device for the capture and controlled release of DNA moving within a flow stream.

  11. Laser Drilling Development Trial Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1538-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, M. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hebbar, R. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    This project performed various laser drilling tests to demonstrate femtosecond laser drilling of fuel injector nozzles with minimal recast, minimal heat affected zone and no collateral damage. LLNL had extensive experience in ultra short-pulse laser systems and developed specialized hardware for these applications.

  12. Technology Assessment for Powertrain Components Final Report CRADA No. TC-1124-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokarz, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gough, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    LLNL utilized its defense technology assessment methodologies in combination with its capabilities in the energy; manufacturing, and transportation technologies to demonstrate a methodology that synthesized available but incomplete information on advanced automotive technologies into a comprehensive framework.

  13. Development of Weldable Superplastic Forming Aluminum Alloy Sheet Final Report CRADA No. TC-1086-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesuer, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sun, T. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Numerous applications could exist for superplastic formable, weldable aluminum alloys in the automotive, aerospace, architectural, and construction industries. In this project, LLNL and Kaiser worked with the Institute for Metals Superplasticity Problems to develop and evaluate weldable superplastic alloys.

  14. LST CGM Generator and Viewer Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1558-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vickers, Don [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Larson, Don [Larson Software Technology, Houston, TX (United States)

    2017-11-09

    The purpose of this project was to jointly develop and test a software plug-in that would convert native Pro /ENGINEER digital engineering drawings to Computer Graphics Metafile (CGM) format. If it was not feasible to convert the Pro/ENGINEER files, we planned to develop and test a similar conversion of native AutoCAD engineering drawings to CGM. CGM viewer plug-ins were developed as needed. There were four main tasks in this project: 1. Requirements for CGM Plug-in 2. Product Evaluation 3. Product Development Feasibility Study 4. Developing a "Plug-In" Application.

  15. ALPHA SMP SYSTEM(S) Final Report CRADA No. TC-1404-97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seager, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Beaudet, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    Within the scope of this subcontract, Digital Equipment Corporation (DIGITAL) and the University, through the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), engaged in joint research and development activities of mutual interest and benefit. The primary objectives of these activities were, for LLNL to improve its capability to perform its mission, and for DIGITAL to develop technical capability complimentary to this mission. The collaborative activities had direct manpower investments by DIGITAL and LLNL. The project was divided into four areas of concern, which were handled concurrently. These areas included Gang Scheduling, Numerical Methods, Applications Development and Code Development Tools.

  16. Development of Rotational Accelerometers Final Report CRADA No. TSB-2008-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Crosson, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    One of the difficulties in fabricating an inexpensive angular rate or rotation sensor is producing a device that is insensitive to acceleration, including the constant acceleration of gravity. The majority of rate sensors are either tuning fork type devices sensing a relatively weak force (i.e., Coriolis effect) and thus not very sensitive, or gyroscopes (either rotating or fiber optic based) that are large, consume lots of power and are expensive. This project was a collaborative effort between LLNL and The Fredericks Company to develop a rotational sensor as a standardized, commercial product. The Fredericks Company possessed expertise and capabilities in the technical aspects of manufacturing this type of sensor, and they were interested in collaborating with LLNL to manufacture the rotational rate sensors as a commercial product.

  17. Automotive Airbag Safety Enhancement Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1165-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutting, Jack [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Durrell, Robert [Quantic Industries, Inc., San Carlos, CA (United States)

    2017-11-09

    The Vehicle Safety systems (VSS) Division of Quantic Industries, Inc. (QII) manufactured automotive airbag components. When both the driver and the passenger side airbags inflated in a tightly sealed passenger compartment, the compression of the surrounding air could and, in some instances, would cause damage to the eardrums of the occupants. The Aerospace and Division (ADD) of QII had partially developed the technology to fracture the canopy of a jet aircraft at the time of pilot ejection. The technical problem was how to adapt the canopy fracturing technology to the rear window of a motor vehicle in a safe and cost effective manner. The existing approach was to replace the embedded rear window defroster with a series-parallel network of exploding bridge wires (EBWs). This would still provide the defrost function at low voltage/ current, but would cause fracturing of the window when a high current/voltage pulse was applied without pyrotechnics or explosives. The elements of this system were the embedded EBW network and a trunk-mounted fireset. The fireset would store the required energy to fire the network upon the receipt of a trigger signal from the existing air bag crash sensor.

  18. Carbon-carbon composites for orthopedic prosthesis and implants. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T D; Klett, J W; Strizak, J P [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Baker, C [FMI, Biddeford, ME (United States)

    1998-01-21

    The prosthetic implant market is extensive. For example, because of arthritic degeneration of hip and knee cartilage and osteoporotic fractures of the hip, over 200,000 total joint replacements (TJRs) are performed in the United States each year. Current TJR devices are typically metallic (stainless steel, cobalt, or titanium alloy) and are fixed in the bone with polymethylacrylate (PMMA) cement. Carbon-carbon composite materials offer several distinct advantages over metals for TJR prosthesis. Their mechanical properties can be tailored to match more closely the mechanical properties of human bone, and the composite may have up to 25% porosity, the size and distribution of which may be controlled through processing. The porous nature of carbon-carbon composites will allow for the ingrowth of bone, achieving biological fixation, and eliminating the need for PMMA cement fixation.

  19. Investigation of the fundamentals of low-energy nanosecond pulse ignition: Final CRADA Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallner, Thomas [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Scarcelli, Riccardo [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Zhang, Anqi [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sevik, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Biruduganti, Munidhar [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bihari, Bipin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Matusik, Katarzyna E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Duke, Daniel J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Powell, Christopher F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kastengren, Alan L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A detailed investigation of the fundamentals of low-energy nanosecond pulse ignition was performed with the objective to overcome the barrier presented by limited knowledge and characterization of nonequilibrium plasma ignition for realistic internal combustion engine applications (be it in the automotive or power generation field) and shed light on the mechanisms which improve the performance of the advanced TPS ignition system compared to conventional state-of-the-art hardware. Three main tasks of the research included experimental evaluation on a single-cylinder automotive gasoline engine, experimental evaluation on a single-cylinder stationary natural gas engine and energy quantification using x-ray diagnostics.

  20. Field Emission Cathode Based X-Ray Source Final Report CRADA No. TSV-1456-97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morse, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Turner, D. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    To characterize the aging mechanisms of the nuclear stockpile, sensors and diagnostics were required for identifying the precursors to degradation of the materials and components. Existing approaches utilized an invasive sampling of the vacuum system surrounding the components to identify the presence of any chemicals that could outgas from the components by techniques such as ion mass spectrometry. This resulted in the inactivation of the system for a period of time, and possibly the destruction of the system as well. Furthermore, this approach did not allow for real time monitoring in order to determine rates of degradation. Instead, it provided an integration of the amount of degradation over the sample period.

  1. Ozone/UV treatment to enhance biodegradation of surfactants in industrial wastewater. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, J.E. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sullivan, P.F. [Specialty Industrial Products, Inc., Spartanburg, SC (United States); Lovejoy, M.A.; Collier, J. [Sun River Innovations, Ltd., Lexington, KY (United States); Adams, C.D. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The new owners of a surfactant manufacturing plant wanted to triple production but were limited by the plant`s wastewater treatment capacity. Mass balance calculations indicated that little aerobic biodegradation was occurring in the plant`s wastewater treatment system. Literature reviews and laboratory tests confirmed that as much as 60% of the plant`s products might resist aerobic biodegradation. Overall chemical losses, both solid and aqueous, were estimated at 3.8% of theoretical. Organic loadings to the wastewater treatment system were 170 kg/d of which 50 kg/d reached the biological treatment system. Pollution prevention measures have allowed a > 20% increase in production levels with a > 30% decrease in effluent volume and no increase in discharge of chemical oxygen demand (COD). A new dissolved air flotation (DAF) system removes 70% of the organic loading. Sludge volumes are lower by an order of magnitude than with the clarifier/drum-filter process it replaced.

  2. Rapid Assessment of Individual Soldier Operational Readiness Final Report CRADA No. TC02104.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turteltaub, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mapes, J. [Rules Based Medicine, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    2017-09-08

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security (LLNS) (formerly The Regents of the University of California), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Rules Based Medicine, Inc. {RBM), to identify markers in blood that would be candidates for determining the combat readiness of troops.

  3. Image Matrix Processor for Volumetric Computations Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1148-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberson, G. Patrick [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Browne, Jolyon [Advanced Research & Applications Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    2018-01-22

    The development of an Image Matrix Processor (IMP) was proposed that would provide an economical means to perform rapid ray-tracing processes on volume "Giga Voxel" data sets. This was a multi-phased project. The objective of the first phase of the IMP project was to evaluate the practicality of implementing a workstation-based Image Matrix Processor for use in volumetric reconstruction and rendering using hardware simulation techniques. Additionally, ARACOR and LLNL worked together to identify and pursue further funding sources to complete a second phase of this project.

  4. Miniature CCD X-Ray Imaging Camera Technology Final Report CRADA No. TC-773-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conder, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mummolo, F. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    The goal of the project was to develop a compact, large active area, high spatial resolution, high dynamic range, charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to replace film for digital imaging of visible light, ultraviolet radiation, and soft to penetrating X-rays. The camera head and controller needed to be capable of operation within a vacuum environment and small enough to be fielded within the small vacuum target chambers at LLNL.

  5. Rapidly Deployable Security System Final Report CRADA No. TC-2030-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohlhepp, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Whiteman, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McKibben, M. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-28

    The ultimate objective of the LEADER and LLNL strategic partnership was to develop and commercialize_a security-based system product and platform for the use in protecting the substantial physical and economic assets of the government and commerce of the United States. The primary goal of this project was to integrate video surveillance hardware developed by LLNL with a security software backbone developed by LEADER. Upon completion of the project, a prototype hardware/software security system that is highly scalable was to be demonstrated.

  6. Algorithms and Architectures for Elastic-Wave Inversion Final Report CRADA No. TC02144.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lindtjorn, O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Schlumberger Technology Corporation (STC), to perform a computational feasibility study that investigates hardware platforms and software algorithms applicable to STC for Reverse Time Migration (RTM) / Reverse Time Inversion (RTI) of 3-D seismic data.

  7. Development of Physics Package Sensors Final Report CRADA No. TC02094.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpenko, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Salmon, J. [Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    2017-09-06

    The goal of this project was to work together through the project phases to conceive, demonstrate, and produce concepts for detecting, locating, tracking, imaging, and assessing emissions passively or actively. The initial Sensor Concept Exploration Phase was postulated and assessed concepts at a first-order level to ascertain whether the parties’ concepts (either separately developed or jointly developed) had merit for missile defense and homeland security applications

  8. Rapid tooling for functional prototyping of metal mold processes. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacharia, T.; Ludtka, G.M.; Bjerke, M.A.; Gray, W.H.

    1997-12-01

    The overall scope of this endeavor was to develop an integrated computer system, running on a network of heterogeneous computers, that would allow the rapid development of tool designs, and then use process models to determine whether the initial tooling would have characteristics which produce the prototype parts. The major thrust of this program for ORNL was the definition of the requirements for the development of the integrated die design system with the functional purpose to link part design, tool design, and component fabrication through a seamless software environment. The principal product would be a system control program that would coordinate the various application programs and implement the data transfer so that any networked workstation would be useable. The overall system control architecture was to be required to easily facilitate any changes, upgrades, or replacements of the model from either the manufacturing end or the design criteria standpoint. The initial design of such a program is described in the section labeled ``Control Program Design``. A critical aspect of this research was the design of the system flow chart showing the exact system components and the data to be transferred. All of the major system components would have been configured to ensure data file compatibility and transferability across the Internet. The intent was to use commercially available packages to model the various manufacturing processes for creating the die and die inserts in addition to modeling the processes for which these parts were to be used. In order to meet all of these requirements, investigative research was conducted to determine the system flow features and software components within the various organizations contributing to this project. This research is summarized.

  9. Advanced Manufacturing - National Information Infrastructure (AM-NII) Final Report CRADA No. TO-4013-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vickers, Don [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2001-03-23

    Advanced Manufacturing - National Information Infrastructure (AM-NII) was a multiyear DOE/DP program, involving multiple DOE laboratories and production facilities, focused on improving the manufacturing capabilities of the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) through the application of modem information technologies. AM-NII's published mission states: "In partnership with the manufacturing business sector, AMNII will leverage DOE capabilities to develop, demonstrate, and pilot industrial information infrastructure and applications that enhance national security." LLNL's AM-NII project targeted two opportunities for improving NWC manufacturing capabilities. First was the link between the NWC and its outside suppliers of manufactured parts - web-based supply-chain integration. Second was the cross-site enterprise integration (EI) within the Complex itself. The general approach to supply-chain integration was to leverage the National Information Infrastructure (including Internet) to demonstrate the procurement of fabricated electrical and mechanical parts using a completely paperless procurement process. The general approach to NWC enterprise integration was to utilize SecureNet, a network that provides a secure, high-speed data link among the various NWC sites. If one looks at SecureNet as "the track," our goal was to get the trains running. Cross-site enterprise integration presupposes there is some level of local integration, so we worked both local and cross-site is sues simultaneously. Our EI work was in support of the LLNL Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs), the Submarine Launch Ballistic Missile Warhead Protection Program (SWPP), and the Laser Cutter Workstation installed at Y-12.

  10. Modification of Color Centers by Electron Bombardment: Final Report CRADA No. TC-0460-93-A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Bibber, Karl [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Alger, Don M. [Quali-Tech, Inc., Columbia, MO (United States)

    2000-11-30

    The purpose of the project was to: Identify those electron beam irradiation parameters most relevant to process quality and efficiency, to producing and modifying color centers in topaz. Develop and test improved radiation processing techniques, and evaluate their potential applicability to other types of semi-precious gems. Develop an optimized data base for the process and procedures for identifying and characterizing material from new and diverse sources. Transfer new processing technology to the private sector, and, until they are implemented industrially, to perform radiation dosing to partially satisfy existing excess demand. We planned to define the interaction between sample purity level, the physics of irradiation to achieve color cent-er modification on a reproducible basis and demonstration of the resulting process on a commercially viable basis. The primary deliverable was the increased knowledge base in terms of expanded understanding of the systematics of color center modification in materials, and an extensive database of electron beam parameters which would optimize the efficiency and quality of radiation processing of topaz from diverse sources. The radiation processing of these stones constitutes a deliverable to Quali-Tech by LLNL.

  11. Plastic Substrate Active Matrix Displays Final Report CRADA No. TC-2011-00

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernhardt, A. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, P. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-28

    This project was a collaborative effort between the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and FlexICs, Inc. to develop thin film transistor (TFT) electronics for active matrix displays.

  12. Development and demonstration of biosorbents for clean-up of uranium in water. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faison, B.D.; Hu, M.Z.C.; Norman, J.M.; Reeves, M.E.; Williams, L.; Schmidt-Kuster, W.; Darnell, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Ogden Environmental Service, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CSU, a nongenetically engineered bacterial strain known to bind dissolved hexavalent uranium, shows particular promise as the basis of an immobilized-cell process for removal of dissolved uranium from contaminated wastewaters. It was characterized with respect to its sorptive active. Living, heat-killed, permeabilized, and unreconstituted lyophilized cells were all capable of binding uranium. The uranium biosorption equilibrium could be described by the Langmuir isotherm. The rate of uranium adsorption increased following permeabilization of the outer and/or cytoplasmic membrane by organic solvents such as acetone. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was significantly more sorptive toward uranium than certain novel, patented biosorbents derived from algal or fungal biomass sources. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was also competitive with commercial cation-exchange resins, particularly in the presence of dissolved transition metals. Uranium binding by P. aeruginosa was clearly pH dependent. Uranium loading capacity increased with increasing pH under acidic conditions, presumably as a function of uranium speciation and due to the H{sup +} competition at some binding sites. Nevertheless, preliminary evidence suggests that this microorganism is also capable of binding anionic hexavalent uranium complexes. Ferric iron was a strong inhibitor of uranium binding to P. aeruginosa CSU biomass, and the presence of uranium also decreased the Fe{sup 3+} loading when the biomass was not saturated with Fe{sup 3+}, suggesting that Fe{sup 3+} and uranium may share the same binding sites on biomass.

  13. Artificial Retina Project: Final Report for CRADA ORNL 01-0625

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenbaum, E; Little, J [Second Sight Medical Products

    2011-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Artificial Retina Project is a collaborative, multi-institutional effort to develop an implantable microelectronic retinal prosthesis that restores useful vision to people blinded by retinal diseases. The ultimate goal of the project is to restore reading ability, facial recognition, and unaided mobility in people with retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. The project taps into the unique research technologies and resources developed at DOE national laboratories to surmount the many technical challenges involved with developing a safe, effective, and durable product. The research team includes six DOE national laboratories, four universities, and private industry.

  14. Letter to Eduard Smetanin, dated March 2, 2007: Final CRADA report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    The IPP/DOE program office has finished its evaluation of the alpha-emitting isotope work with Kurchatov Institute and IPPE, and they have made an important decision about the future of this work. IPP/DOE has directed us to re-program the work and add more funds, so the emphasis will be on production of Th228. By making this re-direction of the isotope work, IPPE will see several important benefits: (a) the payments will be made faster to IPPE by using the ISTC Agreement; (b) a larger amount of money will be paid to IPPE; and (c) a profitable future business opportunity for IPPE is more probable.

  15. Electromagnetic Simulations for Aerospace Application Final Report CRADA No. TC-0376-92

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meredith, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-24

    Electromagnetic (EM) simulation tools play an important role in the design cycle, allowing optimization of a design before it is fabricated for testing. The purpose of this cooperative project was to provide Lockheed with state-of-the-art electromagnetic (EM) simulation software that will enable the optimal design of the next generation of low-observable (LO) military aircraft through the VHF regime. More particularly, the project was principally code development and validation, its goal to produce a 3-D, conforming grid,time-domain (TD) EM simulation tool, consisting of a mesh generator, a DS13D-based simulation kernel, and an RCS postprocessor, which was useful in the optimization of LO aircraft, both for full-aircraft simulations run on a massively parallel computer and for small scale problems run on a UNIX workstation.

  16. Laser Texturing of Magnetic Recording Media Final Report CRADA No. TSV-1298-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackel, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marshall, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    The Commercial Laser Systems Group at LLNL developed a concept for patterning of computer magnetic recording discs. Magnetic recording media require texturing over areas designated for contact in order to minimize friction with data transducing heads. In fabricating a hard disk, an aluminum nickel-phosphorous substrate was polished to a specular finish then a mechanical means was used to roughen an annular area intended to be the head contact band. In a previous patent (US Patent 5,062,021) it was proposed that the focused output of a low power laser with short pulse length could be used to generate the textured pattern. However, the patterned area typically required 75,000 textured spots that needed to be rapidly (less than 10 seconds) printed with good uniformity. A means to achieve the accurate placement and uniform profile, as well as a meaningfully rapid process time, was not discussed in the referenced patent. The LLNL team devised a system that could rapidly and inexpensively accomplish the texturing.

  17. Infrared Imaging Camera Final Report CRADA No. TC02061.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, E. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nebeker, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-08

    This was a collaborative effort between the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Cordin Company (Cordin) to enhance the U.S. ability to develop a commercial infrared camera capable of capturing high-resolution images in a l 00 nanoseconds (ns) time frame. The Department of Energy (DOE), under an Initiative for Proliferation Prevention (IPP) project, funded the Russian Federation Nuclear Center All-Russian Scientific Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC-VNIIEF) in Sarov. VNIIEF was funded to develop a prototype commercial infrared (IR) framing camera and to deliver a prototype IR camera to LLNL. LLNL and Cordin were partners with VNIIEF on this project. A prototype IR camera was delivered by VNIIEF to LLNL in December 2006. In June of 2007, LLNL and Cordin evaluated the camera and the test results revealed that the camera exceeded presently available commercial IR cameras. Cordin believes that the camera can be sold on the international market. The camera is currently being used as a scientific tool within Russian nuclear centers. This project was originally designated as a two year project. The project was not started on time due to changes in the IPP project funding conditions; the project funding was re-directed through the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC), which delayed the project start by over one year. The project was not completed on schedule due to changes within the Russian government export regulations. These changes were directed by Export Control regulations on the export of high technology items that can be used to develop military weapons. The IR camera was on the list that export controls required. The ISTC and Russian government, after negotiations, allowed the delivery of the camera to LLNL. There were no significant technical or business changes to the original project.

  18. Ceramicrete stabilization of radioactive-salt-containing liquid waste and sludge water. Final CRADA report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehst, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-08-04

    It was found that the Ceramicrete Specimens incorporated the Streams 1 and 2 sludges with the adjusted loading about 41.6 and 31.6%, respectively, have a high solidity. The visible cracks in the matrix materials and around the anionite AV-17 granules included could not obtain. The granules mentioned above fixed by Ceramicrete matrix very strongly. Consequently, we can conclude that irradiation of Ceramecrete matrix, goes from the high radioactive elements, not result the structural degradation. Based on the chemical analysis of specimens No.462 and No.461 used it was shown that these matrix included the formation elements (P, K, Mg, O), but in the different samples their correlations are different. These ratios of the content of elements included are about {+-} 10%. This information shows a great homogeneity of matrix prepared. In the list of the elements founded, expect the matrix formation elements, we detected also Ca and Si (from the wollastonite - the necessary for Ceramicrete compound); Na, Al, S, O, Cl, Fe, Ni also have been detected in the Specimen No.642 from the waste forms: NaCl, Al(OH){sub 3}, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Fe(OH){sub 3}, nickel ferrocyanide and Ni(NO{sub 3})2. The unintelligible results also were found from analysis of an AV-17 granules, in which we obtain the great amount of K. The X-ray radiographs of the Ceramicrete specimens with loading 41.4 % of Stream 1 and 31.6% of Stream 2, respectively showed that the realization of the advance technology, created at GEOHKI, leads to formation of excellent ceramic matrix with high amount of radioactive streams up to 40% and more. Really, during the interaction with start compounds MgO and KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} with the present of H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} and Wollastonite this process run with high speed under the controlled regimes. That fact that the Ceramicrete matrix with 30-40% of Streams 1 and 2 have a crystalline form, not amorphous matter, allows to permit that these matrix should be very stable, reliable for incorporation of a radionuclides.

  19. Evaluation of Aerogel Clad Optical Fibers Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1448-97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maitland, Duncan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Droege, M. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-22

    Fiber-optic based sensors will be needed for in situ monitoring of degradation products in various components of nuclear weapons. These sensors typically consist of a transducer located at the measurement site whose optical properties are modulated by interaction with the targeted degradation product. The interrogating light source and the detector for determining sensor response are located remotely. These two subsystems are connected by fiber optic cables. LLNL has developed a new technology, aerogel clad optical fibers, that have the advantage of accepting incident rays over a much wider angular range than normal glass clad fibers. These fibers are also capable of transmitting light more efficiently. These advantages can lead to a factor of 2-4 improvement in sensitivity and detection limit.

  20. Water Treatment Using Advanced Ultraviolet Light Sources Final Report CRADA No. TC02089.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppes, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Oster, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Teknichal Services, LLC (TkS), to develop water treatment systems using advanced ultraviolet light sources. The Russian institutes involved with this project were The High Current Electronics Institute (HCEI) and Russian Institute of Technical Physics-Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF). HCEI and VNIIEF developed and demonstrated the potential commercial viability of short-wavelength ultraviolet excimer lamps under a Thrust 1 Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (IPP) Program. The goals of this collaboration were to demonstrate both the commercial viability of excilampbased water disinfection and achieve further substantial operational improvement in the lamps themselves; particularly in the area of energy efficiency.

  1. Optical Encoding Technology for Viral Screening Panels Final Report CRADA No TC02132.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenhoff, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Haushalter, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Parallel Synthesis Technologies, Inc. (PSTI), to develop Optical Encoding Technology for Viral Screening Panels. The goal for this effort was to prepare a portable bead reader system that would enable the development of viral and bacterial screening panels which could be used for the detection of any desired set of bacteria or viruses in any location. The main objective was to determine if the combination of a bead-based, PCR suspension array technology, formulated from Parallume encoded beads and PSTI’s multiplex assay reader system (MARS), could provide advantages in terms of the number of simultaneously measured samples, portability, ruggedness, ease of use, accuracy, precision or cost as compared to the Luminexbased system developed at LLNL. The project underwent several no cost extensions however the overall goal of demonstrating the utility of this new system was achieved. As a result of the project a significant change to the type of bead PSTI used for the suspension system was implemented allowing better performance than the commercial Luminex system.

  2. Ceramic High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filter Final Report CRADA No. TC02160.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bergman, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-25

    The technical objective of this project was to develop a ceramic HEPA filter technology, by initially producing and testing coupon ceramics, small scale prototypes, and full scale prototype HEPA filters, and to address relevant manufacturing and commercialization technical issues.

  3. Low Temperature Metal Coating Method Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1155-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sang-Wook [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gabel, Howard [Innovative Technology, Inc., Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2018-01-19

    A new metal coating method, cidled KEM (kinetic energy metal.lization), demonstrated in the laboratory by lnovati, utilized fast-moving solid particIes entrained in a gas that are caused to fiow through a nozzIe to effect particle deposition on metal surfaces at room temperature conditions. This method (US Patent 5,795,626) was an attractive and viabIe alternative to the currentIy available high-temperature coating methods avaiIabIe. Since it differs significantly from existing metal coating technologies, a brief description of the method is incIuded here. The proposed method, KEM, achieves cohesive and adhesive metallurgical bonding through the high-speed coUision of powder with a substrate and the subsequent discharge of electrical charge at the substrate. Such coating is effected by entraining metal powder in a gas and accelerating this mixture through a supersonic nozzle. The gas/powder is directed towards the substrate to be coated. Collisions occur, initiaIly between the powder and the substrate, and, as the first Iayer of the coating forms, between the powder and the coating. During these collisions the powder is rapidly deformed, causing the exposure of fresh (oxide free) active metal surface. When these’active surfaces contact one another, they agglomerate and form true metaIIurgicaI bonds. The resultant coating has Iow porosity and high adhesive and cohesive strength. The formation of metaIIurgicaI bonds is potentiated by the discharge of electrical energy. This electrical energy is the result of triboeIectric charging of the particIes during acceleration and transit to the nozzIe. An advantage of the method is that it does not raise the temperature of the powder being appLiedor that of the substrate. Consequently, materials sensitive to high temperature may be applied without changing Me properties of the materkd or substrate.

  4. Production of Ra225 precursor for Ac225/Bi213 generators. Final CRADA Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    Russian subcontractors shipped two small deliveries of Ra225 to PNNL for evaluation. The activity was close to the requisite amount in the subcontract. The first labeled properly; the second did not. This showed that the Russians could supply Ra225 to the US; however they proved unable to meet future demands for larger amounts of activity. The US DOE attempts to get Ra225 from Russian should be terminated; the Russians, under Rosatom, are not interested in this business.

  5. Feasibility of correlating V-Cr-Ti alloy weld strength with weld chemistry. CRADA final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Odom, R.W.

    1998-06-01

    The mechanical properties of refractory metals such as vanadium are determined to a large extent by the interstitial impurities in the alloy. In the case of welding, interstitial impurities are introduced in the welding process from the atmosphere and by dissolution of existing precipitates in the alloy itself. Because of the necessity of having an ultra-pure atmosphere, a vacuum chamber or a glove box is necessary. In the V-Cr-Ti system, the titanium serves as a getter to control the concentration of oxygen and nitrogen in solid solution in the alloy. In this project the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) technique was used to detect, measure, and map the spacial distribution of impurity elements in welds in the alloy V-4Cr-4Ti. An attempt was then made to correlate the concentrations and distributions of the impurities with mechanical properties of the welds. Mechanical integrity of the welds was determined by Charpy V-notch testing. Welds were prepared by the gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) method. Charpy testing established a correlation between weld impurity concentration and the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). Higher concentrations of oxygen resulted in a higher DBTT. An exception was noted in the case of a low-oxygen weld which had a high hydrogen concentration resulting in a brittle weld. The concentrations and distributions of the impurities determined by SIMS could not be correlated with the mechanical properties of the welds. This research supports efforts to develop fusion reactor first wall and blanket structural materials

  6. Development and Demonstration of Carbon Fuel Cell Final Report CRADA No. TC02091.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, J. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Berner, J. K. [Contained Energy, Inc., Shaker Heights, OH (United States)

    2017-09-08

    This was a collaborative effort between The Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Contained Energy, Inc. (CEI), to conduct necessary research and to develop, fabricate and test a multi-cell carbon fuel cell.

  7. Textile Resource Conservation Final Report CRADA No. TC-0699-93

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, John [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McCreight, Dan J. [Institute of Textile Technology, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2018-01-22

    This project was undertaken to develop and demonstrate on a pilot scale the use of electro-osmotic transport to increase the efficiency of textiles wet processing operations. In particular, we sought to develop a means of rinsing textiles to remove material entrapped between the individual fibers that constitute a yarn. Material trapped within the yarn is slow to exchange with rinse water flowing primarily in the open weave are abetween the yarns. The application of an external field (strength, 5-50 kV /m) requires only a few volts for most fabric thicknesses. This field is sufficient to promote a rapid exchange of material to enhance rinsing and reduce the water required for rinsing from about 20 kg/kg-fabric to 3-6 kg/kg-fabric. We successfully developed technical and economic models of application of the process to the rinsing of many materials of industrial importance, including dyes, tints, chemicals, detergents and dye electrolytes. We demonstrated the process on a pilot plant scale using a translator designed in cooperation with Milliken and Company (Spartanburg, SC).

  8. Microwave Sintering of Ceramic Materials for Industrial Application Final Report CRADA No. TC-1116-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caplan, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tandon, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Callis, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    The goal of this project was to develop the commercial capability in the US to sinter alumina oxide ceramic parts for the semiconductor manufacturing equipment industry. We planned to use the millimeter microwave (30 GHz) sintering system first developed by IAP in Russia.

  9. Ceramic High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filter Final Report CRADA No. TC02102.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Morse, T. [Flanders Corp., Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-09-06

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (formerly The Regents of the University of California)/Lawrence Livermor e National Laboratory (LLNL) and Flanders-Precisionaire (Flanders), to develop ceramic HEP A filters under a Thrust II Initiative for Proliferation Prevention (IPP) project. The research was conducted via the IPP Program at Commonwe alth of Independent States (CIS) Institutes, which are handled under a separate agreement. The institutes (collectively referred to as "CIS Institutes") involved with this project were: Bochvar: Federal State Unitarian Enterprise All-Russia Scientific and Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (FSUE VNIINM); Radium Khlopin: Federal State Unitarian Enterprise NPO Radium Institute named (FSUE NPO Radium Institute); and Bakor: Science and Technology Center Bakor (STC Bakor).

  10. HCCI Combustion Engines Final Report CRADA No. TC02032.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aceves, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lyford-Pike, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-08

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (formerly The Regents of the University of California)/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Cummins Engine Company (Cwnmins), to advance the state of the art on HomogeneousCharge Compression-Ignition (HCCI) engines, resulting in a clean, high-efficiency alternative to diesel engines.

  11. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shoichi; Hirano, Yasushi.

    1998-01-01

    A one-half or more of entire fuel rods in a fuel assembly comprises MOX fuel rods containing less than 1wt% of burnable poisons, and at least a portion of the burnable poisons comprises gadolinium. Then, surplus reactivity at an initial stage of operation cycle is controlled to eliminate burnable poisons remained unburnt at a final stage, as well as increase thermal reactivity. In addition, the content of fission plutonium is determined to greater than the content of uranium 235, and fuel rods at corner portions are made not to incorporate burnable poisons. Fuel rods not containing burnable poisons are disposed at positions in adjacent with fuel rods facing to a water rod at one or two directions. Local power at radial center of the fuel assembly is increased to flatten the distortion of radial power distribution. (N.H.)

  12. A study of Multistage/Multifunction Column for Fine Coal Cleaning CRADA PC93-005, Final Report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralph Lai; Shiao-Hung Chiang; Daxin He; Yuru Feng

    1998-01-01

    The overall objective of the this research project is to explore the potential applicability of a multistage column for fine coal cleaning and other applications in fluid particle separation. The research work identifies the design parameters and their effects on the performance of the separation device. The results of this study provide an engineering data basis for further development of this technology in coal cleaning and in general areas of fluid and particle separations

  13. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wataumi, Kazutoshi; Tajiri, Hiroshi.

    1992-01-01

    In a fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor, a pellet to be loaded comprises an external layer of fissile materials containing burnable poisons and an internal layer of fissile materials not containing burnable poison. For example, there is provided a dual type pellet comprising an external layer made of UO 2 incorporated with Gd 2 O 3 at a predetermined concentration as the burnable poisons and an internal layer made of UO 2 not containing Gd 2 O 3 . The amount of the burnable poisons required for predetermined places is controlled by the thickness of the ring of the external layer. This can dissipate an unnecessary poisoning effect at the final stage of the combustion cycle. Further, since only one or a few kinds of powder mixture of the burnable poisons and the fissile materials is necessary, production and product control can be facilitated. (I.N.)

  14. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Yoko; Aoyama, Motoo; Oyama, Jun-ichi.

    1995-01-01

    Burnable poison-incorporating fuel rods of a first group are disposed in a region in adjacent with a water rod having a large diameter (neutron moderator rod) disposed to the central portion of a fuel assembly. Burnable poison-incorporating fuel rods of a second group are disposed to a region other than peripheral zone in adjacent with a channel box and corners positioned at an inner zone, in adjacent with the channel box. The average concentration of burnable poisons of the burnable poison-incorporating fuel rods of the first group is made greater than that of the second group. With such a constitution, when the burnable poisons of the first group are burnt out, the burnable poisons of the second group are also burnt out at the same time. Accordingly, an amount of burnable poisons left unburnt at the final stage of the operation cycle is reduced, to improve the reactivity. This can improve the economical property. (I.N.)

  15. Assembly of the PLT device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, R.

    1975-11-01

    The assembly of the PLT device began in June 1974 with a preassembly of the mechanical structure at a remote site. The preassembly sequence incorporated final fabrication procedures with an initial staging operation. This successful staging/fabrication procedure proved to be an invaluable asset when the final assembly was started in August 1974. The assembly continued with the initial reassembly of the previously tested structural components at the final machine site. Construction was interrupted at several points to allow for toroidal field coil, vacuum vessel, and poloidal coil installation. Two phases of toroidal field coil power tests were included in the assembly sequence prior to, and just after the vacuum vessel insertion

  16. A conceptual design of assembly strategy and dedicated tools for assembly of 40o sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.K.; Nam, K.O.; Kim, D.J.; Ahn, H.J.; Lee, J.H.; Im, K.; Shaw, R.

    2010-01-01

    The International Thermanuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak device is composed of 9 vacuum vessel (VV)/toroidal field coils (TFCs)/vacuum vessel thermal shields (VVTS) 40 o sectors. Each VV/TFCs/VVTS 40 o sector is made up of one 40 o VV, two 20 o TFCs and associated VVTS segments. The 40 o sectors are sub-assembled at assembly hall respectively and then nine 40 o sectors sub-assembled at assembly hall are finally assembled at tokamak in-pit hall. The assembly strategy and tools for the 40 o sector sub-assembly and final assembly should be developed to satisfy the basic assembly requirements of the ITER tokamak device. Accordingly, the purpose-built assembly tools should be designed and manufactured considering assembly plan, available space, cost, safety, easy operation, efficient maintenance, and so on. The 40 o sector assembly tools are classified into 2 groups. One group is the sub-assembly tools including upending tool, lifting tool, sub-assembly tool, VV supports and bracing tools used at assembly hall and the other group is the in-pit assembly tools including lifting tool, central column, radial beams and their supports. This paper describes the current status of the assembly strategy and major tools for the VV/TFCs/VVTS 40 o sector assembly at in-pit hall and assembly hall. The conceptual design of the major assembly tools and assembly process at assembly hall and tokamak in-pit hall are presented also.

  17. Construction and final assembly of an automatic arc welding machine; Construccion y puesta a punto de una maquina automatica para soldadura remota por arco bajo atmosfera inerte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrero Alvarez, J; Diaz Diaz, J; Diaz Diaz, J L

    1972-07-01

    It has been constructed a remote are welding machine, wholly transistorized, to be used in a Hot Cell of 1.000 Cu. In this work are presented the different parts of the equipment and its electronic description. Finally, some works of final preparation are shown such as ending of irradiation capsules, thermocouples welding, stainless steel cover welding. For these types of welding are quoted its relative programs. (Author)

  18. Bacteriophage Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia A. Aksyuk

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages have been a model system to study assembly processes for over half a century. Formation of infectious phage particles involves specific protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, as well as large conformational changes of assembly precursors. The sequence and molecular mechanisms of phage assembly have been elucidated by a variety of methods. Differences and similarities of assembly processes in several different groups of bacteriophages are discussed in this review. The general principles of phage assembly are applicable to many macromolecular complexes.

  19. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Masafumi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent scattering of gaseous fission products released from fuel assemblies stored in an fbr type reactor. Constitution; A cap provided with means capable of storing gas is adapted to amount to the assembly handling head, for example, by way of threading in a storage rack of spent fuel assemblies consisting of a bottom plate, a top plate and an assembly support mechanism. By previously eliminating the gas inside of the assembly and the cap in the storage rack, gaseous fission products upon loading, if released from fuel rods during storage, are stored in the cap and do not scatter in the storage rack. (Horiuchi, T.)

  20. Sequence assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Hoffmann, S.; Frankel, Annett Maria

    2009-01-01

    Despite the rapidly increasing number of sequenced and re-sequenced genomes, many issues regarding the computational assembly of large-scale sequencing data have remain unresolved. Computational assembly is crucial in large genome projects as well for the evolving high-throughput technologies and...... in genomic DNA, highly expressed genes and alternative transcripts in EST sequences. We summarize existing comparisons of different assemblers and provide a detailed descriptions and directions for download of assembly programs at: http://genome.ku.dk/resources/assembly/methods.html....

  1. OCP TECD Report - TARDEC Blast Mitigation Program (BMP) and National Defense Industrial Association (NDIA) Michigan (MI) Chapter Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-26

    Standard, MIL-STD-3058, Occupant-Centric Protection for Military Ground Vehicles. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Occupant Centric Platform Technology-Enabled...Capability Demonstration (OCP TECD), Occupant-centric, Occupant Protection , Underbody Blast, National Defense Industrial Association (NDIA...Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF

  2. Investigation of proposed process sequence for the array automated assembly task. Phase I and II. Final report, October 1, 1977-June 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardesich, N.; Garcia, A.; Eskenas, K.

    1980-08-01

    A selected process sequence for the low cost fabrication of photovoltaic modules was defined during this contract. Each part of the process sequence was looked at regarding its contribution to the overall dollars per watt cost. During the course of the research done, some of the initially included processes were dropped due to technological deficiencies. The printed dielectric diffusion mask, codiffusion of the n+ and p+ regions, wraparound front contacts and retention of the diffusion oxide for use as an AR coating were all the processes that were removed for this reason. Other process steps were retained to achieve the desired overall cost and efficiency. Square wafers, a polymeric spin-on PX-10 diffusion source, a p+ back surface field and silver front contacts are all processes that have been recommended for use in this program. The printed silver solderable pad for making contact to the aluminum back was replaced by an ultrasonically applied tin-zinc pad. Also, the texturized front surface was dropped as inappropriate for the sheet silicon likely to be available in 1986. Progress has also been made on the process sequence for module fabrication. A shift from bonding with a conformal coating to laminating with ethylene vinyl acetate and a glass superstrate is recommended for further module fabrication. The finalized process sequence is described.

  3. A Portable Cell Maintenance System for Rapid Toxicity Monitoring Final Report CRADA No. TC-02081-04

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhou, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    The Phase I STTR research project was targeted at meeting the objectives and requirements stated in STTR solicitation A04-T028 for a Portable Cell Maintenance System for Rapid Toxicity Monitoring. In accordance with the requirements for STTR programs, collaboration was formed between a small business, Kionix, Inc., and The Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The collaboration included CytoDiscovery, Inc. (CDI) which, in collaboration with Kionix, provided access to membrane chip technology and provided program support and coordination. The objective of the overall program (excerpted from the original solicitation) was: “To develop a small, portable cell maintenance system for the transport, storage, and monitoring of viable vertebrate cells and tissues.” The goal of the Phase I project was to demonstrate the feasibility of achieving the program objectives utilizing a system comprised of a small-size, microfluidic chip-based cell maintenance cartridge (CMC) and a portable cell maintenance system (CMS) capable of housing a minimum of four CMCs. The system was designed to be capable of optimally maintaining multiple vertebrate cell types while supporting a wide variety of cellular assays.

  4. Projecting Fatalities in Crashes Involving Older Drivers, 2000–2025, CRADA No. ORNL98-0500 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Patricia S. [ORNL; Jones, Donald W. [ORNL; Reuscher, Timothy [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education; Schmoyer, Richard S. [ORNL; Truett, Lorena F. [ORNL

    2000-04-01

    At the turn of the century – the 20th century that is – the median age in the United States was under 30 years; America was 60% rural in nature; and there were only 36 highway fatalities all year. As we leave the 20th century behind, the route into the 21st century is very different. “Intelligent” cars speed down multi-lane “smart” highways in a nation that is 75% urban. According to the Federal Highway Administration’s Highway Statistics, there are 28,000 times more vehicles on the road in 2000 than there were in 1900, and these vehicles travel about 2.6 trillion miles each year. Annual fatalities resulting from highway crashes have also increased – by over 1100%. We see other changes as well. The face of America is changing. It is growing older. In 2025, persons 65 and over will make up 18.5% of the total population. The number of persons aged 85 and over is increasing more rapidly than any other age group. More importantly, the elderly are taking more trips, driving further, and continuing to drive much later in life. These conditions lead to concerns about traffic safety. Although the elderly are healthier and drive safer cars than they did just two decades ago, their frailty makes them more susceptible to injury than younger persons involved in traffic crashes of the same severity. In addition, visual, physical, and cognitive skills, all of which contribute to driving abilities, decrease with advancing age. The familiar “U”-shaped curve depicting the rate of fatalities per vehicle miles traveled, shows that the elderly experience a higher highway fatality rate than any other age group except teenagers. While the overall number of highway fatalities has decreased regularly since 1972, the number of fatalities of elderly travelers has continued to increase steadily. This increase is cause for concern for both the elderly driver and for other persons on the roads who migh tbe placed in danger through crashes involving elderly drivers.

  5. Graded Reflectivity Mirror for the Solid State Heat Capacity Laser Final Report CRADA No. TC-2085-04

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Davis, J. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    This was a collaborative effort between The Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Boeing Company, to develop a Graded Reflectivity Mirror (GRM) to achieve improved near field fill and higher brightness in the far field output of LLNL’s Solid State Heat Capacity Laser (SSHCL).

  6. Economic and Performance Analysis of Gear Box Failures. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-236

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Jonathan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, CO, USA is forming a collaborative within the wind energy industry to address reliability issues on wind turbines. The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), leading the collaborative effort, will allow gearbox manufacturers, bearing manufacturers, wind turbine owner/operators, and wind turbine manufacturers to team up for joint projects that address specific issues regarding design and reliability of wind turbine gearboxes. The primary means of investigation will be through full scale testing and analysis of actual gearboxes, both in the field and in the NREL 2.5 MW dynamometer test facility. These teams would contribute resources into a campaign that is intended to serve the mutual interests of a majority of the wind and gearbox industry stakeholders in addition to the specific project team objectives. that address specific issues regarding design and reliability of wind turbine gearboxes. The primary means of investigation will be through full scale testing and analysis of actual gearboxes, both in the field and in the NREL 2.5 MW dynamometer test facility. These teams would contribute resources into a campaign that is intended to serve the mutual interests of a majority of the wind and gearbox industry stakeholders in addition to the specific project team objectives.

  7. Development of Electrodeposited CIGS Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-357

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neale, Nathan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-09-01

    At present, most PV materials are fabricated by vacuum technologies. Some of the many disadvantages of vacuum technology are complicated instrumentation, material waste, high cost of deposition per surface area, and instability of some compounds at the deposition temperature. Solution-based approaches for thin-film deposition on large areas are particularly desirable because of the low capital cost of the deposition equipment, relative simplicity of the processes, ease of doping, uniform deposition on a variety of substrates (including interior and exterior of tubes and various nonplanar devices), and potential compatibility with high-throughput (e.g., roll-to-roll) processing. Of the nonsilicon solar photovoltaic device modules that have been deployed to date, those based on the n-CdS/p-CdTe is a leading candidate. Two features in the optical characteristics of CdTe absorber are particularly attractive for photovoltaic conversion of sunlight; (a) its energy bandgap of 1.5 eV, which provides an optimal match with the solar spectrum and thus facilitates its efficient utilization and (b) the direct mode of the main optical transition which results in a large absorption coefficient and turn permits the use of thin layer (1-2 um) of active material. Thin films of CdTe required for these devices have been fabricated by a variety of methods (e.g., vapor transport deposition, vacuum deposition, screen printing and close-spaced sublimation). Electrodeposition is another candidate deserves more attention. This project will focus on delivering low-cost, high efficiency electrodeposited CdTe-based device.

  8. Rapid Tooling for Functional Prototype of Metal Mold Processes Final Report CRADA No. TC-1032-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heestand, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jaskolski, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    Production inserts for die-casting were generally fabricated from materials with sufficient strength and· good wear properties at casting temperatures for long life. Frequently tool steels were used and machining was done with a combination of. conventional and Electric Discharge Machining (EDM) with some handwork, an expensive and time consuming process, partilly for prototype work. We proposed electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) as a process for rapid fabrication of dies. Metals, ranging from low melting point to refractory metals (Ta, Mo, etc.), would be evaporated and deposited at high rates (-2mm/hr.). Alloys could be easily evaporated and deposited if their constituent vapor pressures were similar and with more difficulty if they were not. Of course, layering of different materials was possible if required for a specific application. For example, a hard surface layer followed by a tough steel and backed by a high thermal conductivity (possibly cooled) copper layer could be fabricated. Electron-beam deposits exhibited 100% density and lull strength when deposited at a substrate (mandrel) temperature that was a substantial fraction of the deposited material's melting point. There were several materials that could have the required high temperature properties and ease of fabrication required for such a mandrel. We had successfully used graphite, machined from free formed objects with a replicator, to produce aluminum-bronze test molds. There were several parting layer materials of interest, but the ideal material depended upon the specific application.

  9. Sorghum to Ethanol Research Initiative: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-291

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfrum, E.

    2011-10-01

    The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of using sorghum to produce ethanol. The work performed included a detailed examination of the agronomics and composition of a large number of sorghum varieties, laboratory experiments to convert sorghum to ethanol, and economic and life-cycle analyses of the sorghum-to-ethanol process. This work showed that sorghum has a very wide range of composition, which depended on the specific sorghum cultivar as well as the growing conditions. The results of laboratory- and pilot-scale experiments indicated that a typical high-biomass sorghum variety performed very similarly to corn stover during the multi-step process required to convert biomass feedstocks to ethanol; yields of ethanol for sorghum were very similar to the corn stover used as a control in these experiments. Based on multi-year agronomic data and theoretical ethanol production, sorghum can achieve more than 1,300 gallons of ethanol per acre given the correct genetics and environment. In summary, sorghum may be a compelling dedicated bioenergy crop that could help provide a portion of the feedstocks required to produce renewable domestic transportation fuels.

  10. Modeling Parasitic Energy Losses and the Impact of Advanced Tribological Concepts on Fuel Efficiency - Final CRADA Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenske, George [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-11-28

    Our primary task for this project was to perform FMEP calculations for a broad range of parameters including engine type [spark ignition (SI) or compression ignition (CI)], engine size, engine mode (speed and load), lubricant viscosity, asperity friction, surface finish, oil type (mineral or synthetic), and additive (friction modifier), as discussed previously [1–3]. The actual analysis was limited to a large diesel engine and it included both load and speed dependencies as well as lubricant viscosity and speed.

  11. Accelerator-Detector Complex for Photonuclear Detection of Hidden Explosives Final Report CRADA No. TC2065.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowdermilk, W. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brothers, L. J. [Valley Forge Composite Technologies, Inc., Covington, KY (United States)

    2017-09-06

    This was a collaborative effort by Lawrence Livermore National Security (formerly the University of California)/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Valley Forge Composite Technologies, Inc., and the following Russian Institutes: P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Innovative Technologies Center.(AUO CIT), Central Design Bureau-Almas (CDB Almaz), Moscow Instrument Automation Research Institute, and Institute for High Energy Physics (IBEP) to develop equipment and procedures for detecting explosive materials concealed in airline checked baggage and cargo.

  12. Process Parameter Evaluation and Optimization for Advanced Material Development Final Report CRADA No. TC-1234-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrubesh, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McGann, T. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    This project was established as a three-year collaboration to produce and characterize · silica aerogels prepared by a Rapid Supercritical Extraction (RSCE) process to meet . BNA, Inc. application requirements. The objectives of this project were to study the parameters necessary to produce optimized aerogel parts with narrowly specified properties and establish the range and limits of the process for producing such aerogels. The project also included development of new aerogel materials useful for high temperature applications. The results of the project were expected to set the conditions necessary to produce quantities of aerogels having particular specifications such as size, shape, density, and mechanical strength. BNA, Inc. terminated the project on April 7, 1999, 10-months prior to the anticipated completion date, due to termination of corporate funding for the project. The technical accomplishments achieved are outlined in Paragraph C below.

  13. Development of Advanced Materials for Electro-Ceramic Application Final Report CRADA No. TC-1331-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caplan, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Olstad, R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); McMillan, L. [Symetrix International, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO (United States); Tulupov, A. [Soliton-NTT, Moscow (Russia)

    2017-10-19

    The goal of this project was to further develop and characterize the electrochemical methods originating in Russia for producing ultra high purity organometallic compounds utilized as precursors in the production of high quality electro-ceramic materials. Symetrix planned to use electro-ceramic materials with high dielectric constant for microelectronic memory circuit applications. General Atomics planned to use the barium titanate type ceramics with low loss tangent for producing a high power ferroelectric tuner used to match radio frequency power into their Dill-D fusion machine. Phase I of the project was scheduled to have a large number of organometallic (alkoxides) chemical samples produced using various methods. These would be analyzed by LLNL, Soliton and Symetrix independently to determine the level of chemical impurities thus verifying each other's analysis. The goal was to demonstrate a cost-effective production method, which could be implemented in a large commercial facility to produce high purity organometallic compounds. In addition, various compositions of barium-strontium-titanate ceramics were to be produced and analyzed in order to develop an electroceramic capacitor material having the desired characteristics with respect to dielectric constant, loss tangent, temperature characteristics and non-linear behavior under applied voltage. Upon optimizing the barium titanate material, 50 capacitor preforms would be produced from this material demonstrating the ability to produce, in quantity, the pills ultimately required for the ferroelectric tuner (approx 2000-3000 ceramic pills).

  14. Phase II, Compact AMS System for Biological Tracer Detection Final Report CRADA No. TSV-1533-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hamm, R. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this collaboration between LLNL and AccSys Technology, Inc. of Pleasanton, California was to build and demonstrate a low cost, compact tritium (3H) Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (AMS) system matched to the requirements of biomedical research.

  15. Phase II: Automated System for Aneuploidy Detection in Sperm Final Report CRADA No. TC-1554-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrobek, W. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dunlay, R. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-28

    This was a collaborative effort between the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Cellomics, Inc. (formerly BioDx and Biological Detection, Inc.) to develop an automated system for detecting human sperm aneuploidy. Aneuploidy (an abnormal number of chromosomes) is one of the major categories of chromosomally abnormal sperm, which results in chromosomally defective pregnancies and babies. An automated system would be used for testing the effects of toxic agents and for other research and clinical applications. This collaborated effort was funded by a National Institutes of Environmental Health Services, Phase II, Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR) grant to Cellornics (Contract No. N44-ES-82004).

  16. Public Key-Based Need-to-Know Authorization Engine Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1553-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Williams, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    The goals of this project were to develop a public key-based authentication service plug-in based on LLNL's requirements, integrate the public key-based authentication with the Intra Verse authorization service adn the LLNL NTK server by developing a full-featured version of the prototyped Intra Verse need-to-know plug in; and to test the authorization and need-to-know plug-in in a secured extranet prototype among selected national Labs.

  17. Development of Chemically Amplified Optical Sensors for Continuous Blood Glucose Monitoring Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1162-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Stephen M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Livermore, CA (United States); Mastrototaro, John J. [Minimed Technologies, Inc., Sylmar, CA (United States)

    2018-01-22

    Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects 14 million people in the U.S. and more than 110 million people worldwide. Each year in this country 27,000 diabetic patients become blind, 15,000 have kidney failure, and over 54,000 have peripheral limb amputations. In 1992, total healthcare costs in the U.S. for diabetes were more than $105 billion, approximately 15% of our healthcare budget. Conventional therapy for the most severe form of diabetes, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) or Type I diabetes, is to administer one or two injections per day of various forms of insulin while monitoring blood glucose levels twice or three times daily with commercial glucometers that require blood samples. Near normal blood sugar levels (glycemic control) is difficult to achieve with conventional therapy. In the fall of 1993, the results of the 10-year $165 million Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) were published which showed that intensive insulin management would lead to dramatically fewer cases of retinopathy (which leads to blindness), nephropathy (which leads to kidney failure), and neuropathy (which can lead to limb amputations) [New England Journal of Medicine, Vo1239, No.14 977-986 (1993)]. If existing commercial insulin pumps could be combined with a continuous glucose sensor, a more physiological and fine-tuned therapy could be provided - in effect, an artificial biomechanical pancreas would be available. Existing research suggested that such a development would dramatically improve glucose control, thus greatly reducing morbidity and mortality from this disease. MiniMed Technologies in Sylmar, CA, identified a number of optically based sensor strategies as well as candidate chemical reactions that could be used to implement a minimally invasive opto-chemical glucose sensor. LLNL evaluated these sensor strategies and chemical reactions. These evaluations were the first steps leading to development of a sensor of considerable importance that could maintain near normal physiological glycemic levels, thus dramatically reducing the risk of the microvascular complications mentioned above.

  18. Heavy-duty diesel engine NO{sub x} reduction with nitrogen-enriched combustion air. Final CRADA report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, S.; Energy Systems

    2010-07-28

    The concept of engine emissions control by modifying intake combustion gas composition from that of ambient air using gas separation membranes has been developed during several programs undertaken at Argonne. These have led to the current program which is targeted at heavy-duty diesel truck engines. The specific objective is reduction of NO{sub x} emissions by the target engine to meet anticipated 2007 standards while extracting a maximum of 5 percent power loss and allowing implementation within commercial constraints of size, weight, and cost. This report includes a brief review of related past programs, describes work completed to date during the current program, and presents interim conclusions. Following a work schedule adjustment in August 2002 to accommodate problems in module procurement and data analysis, activities are now on schedule and planned work is expected to be completed in September, 2004. Currently, we believe that the stated program requirements for the target engine can be met, based upon extrapolation of the work completed. Planned project work is designed to experimentally confirm these projections and result in a specification for a module package that will meet program objectives.

  19. Automated System for Aneuploidy Detection in Sperm Final Report CRADA No. TC-1364-96: Phase I SBIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrobek, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dunlay, R. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    This project was a relationship between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Biological Detection, Inc. (now known as Cellomics, Inc.) It was funded as a Phase I SBIR from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) awarded to Cellomics, Inc. with a subcontract to LLNL.

  20. Biodiesel Performance with Modern Engines. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-05-153

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-01-29

    NREL and the National Biodiesel Board (NBB) will work cooperatively to assess the effects of biodiesel blends on the performance of modern diesel engines and emissions control systems meeting increasingly strict emissions standards. This work will include research to understand the impact of biodiesel blends on the operation and durability of particle filters and NOx control sorbents/catalysts, to quantify the effect on emission control systems performance, and to understand effects on engine component durability. Work to assess the impact of biodiesel blends on real world fleet operations will be performed. Also, research to develop appropriate ASTM standards for biodiesel quality and stability will be conducted. The cooperative project will involve engine testing and fleet evaluation studies at NREL using biodiesel from a variety of sources. In addition, NREL will work with NBB to set up an Industrial Steering Committee to design the scope for the various projects and to provide technical oversight to these projects. NREL and NBB will cooperatively communicate the study results to as broad an audience as possible.

  1. Design of 3x3 Focusing Array for Heavy Ion Driver Final Report on CRADA TC-02082-04

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martovetsky, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-28

    This memo presents a design of a 3x3 quadrupole array for HIF. It contains 3 D magnetic field computations of the array build with racetrack coils with and without different shields. It is shown that it is possible to have a low error magnetic field in the cells and shield the stray fields to acceptable levels. The array design seems to be a practical solution to any size array for future multi-beam heavy ion fusion drivers.

  2. Compiling for Application Specific Computational Acceleration in Reconfigurable Architectures Final Report CRADA No. TSB-2033-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Supinski, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Caliga, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-28

    The primary objective of this project was to develop memory optimization technology to efficiently deliver data to, and distribute data within, the SRC-6's Field Programmable Gate Array- ("FPGA") based Multi-Adaptive Processors (MAPs). The hardware/software approach was to explore efficient MAP configurations and generate the compiler technology to exploit those configurations. This memory accessing technology represents an important step towards making reconfigurable symmetric multi-processor (SMP) architectures that will be a costeffective solution for large-scale scientific computing.

  3. Sperm Scoring Using Multi-Spectral Flow Imaging and FISH-IS Final Report CRADA No. TC02088.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Morrissey, P. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    This was to be a collaborative effort between The Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Amnis Corporation, to develop an automated system for scoring sperm interphase cells for the presence of chromosomal abnormalities using fluorescence in situ hybridization and the Amnis ImageStream technology platform.

  4. Optimization of Diode Laser System to Treat Benign Prostate Hyperplasia Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1154-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, Richard A [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Byrne, Mark [Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2018-01-22

    Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) is a pervasive condition of enlargement of the male prostate gland which leads to several urinary difficulties ranging from hesitancy to incontinence to kidney dysfunction in severe cases. Currently the most common therapy is transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) utilizing an electrosurgical device. Although TURP is largely successful, new BPH therapy methods are desired to reduce the cost and recovery time, improve the success rate, and reduce side effects. Recently, lasers have been introduced for this purpose. Indigo Medical Inc. is currently engaged in the development, testing, and preparation for sales of a new diode laser based BPH therapy system. The development is based on laboratory experiments, animal studies, and a limited FDA-approved clinical trial in the US and in other countries. The addition of sophisticated numerical modeling, of the sort that has been highly developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, can greatly aid in the design of the system and treatment protocol. The benefits to DOE include the maintenance and advancement of numerical modeling expertise in radiation-matter interactions of the sort essential for the stockpile stewardship, inertial confinement fusion, and advanced manufacturing, and the push on advanced scientific computational methods, ultimately in areas such as 3-D transport.

  5. Manufacturing Steps for Commercial Production of Nano-Structure Capacitors Final Report CRADA No. TC02159.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbee, T. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schena, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-29

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and TroyCap LLC, to develop manufacturing steps for commercial production of nano-structure capacitors. The technical objective of this project was to demonstrate high deposition rates of selected dielectric materials which are 2 to 5 times larger than typical using current technology.

  6. Rarefaction Shock Wave Cutter for Offshore Oil-Gas Platform Removal Final Report CRADA No. TC02009.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, L. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barker, J. [Halliburton Energy Services, Alvarado, TX (United States)

    2017-09-06

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) (formerly the University of California) and Jet Research Center, a wholly owned division of Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. to design and prototype an improved explosive cutter for cutting the support legs of offshore oil and gas platforms.

  7. Extraction of Iodine from Source Rock and Oil for Radioiodine Dating Final Report CRADA No. TC-1550-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Summa, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    This was a collaborative effort between the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Exxon Production Research Company (EPR) to develop improved techniques for extracting, concentrating, and measuring iodine from large volumes of source rock and oil. The purpose of this project was to develop a technique for measuring total iodine extracted from rock, obtain isotopic ratios, and develop age models for samples provided by EPR.

  8. Tracking of Polycarbonate Films using Low-energy Ions Final Report CRADA No. TC-774-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musket, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-24

    Ion tracking is performed almost exclusively using ions with energies near or above the maximum in electronic stopping. For the present study, we have examined the results of etching ion tracks created by ions bombarding polycarbonate films with energies corresponding to stopping well below the maximum and just above the anticipated threshold for creating etchable latent tracks. Low-energy neon and argon ions with 18-60 keV /amu and fluences of about 108/cm2 were used to examine the limits for producing etchable tracks in polycarbonate films. By concentrating on the early stages of etching (i.e., -20 nm < SEM hole diameter < -100 nm), we can directly relate the energy deposition calculated for the incident ion to the creation of etchable tracks. The experimental results will be discussed with regard to the energy losses of the ions in the polycarbonate films and to the formation of continuous latent tracks through the entire thickness the films. These results have significant implications with respect to the threshold for formation of etchable tracks and to the use of low-energy ions for lithographic applications.

  9. Community Energy Storage Thermal Analysis and Management: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-445

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kandler A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-01-09

    The goal of this project is to create thermal solutions and models for community energy storage devices using both purpose-designed batteries and EV or PHEV batteries. Modeling will be employed to identify major factors of a device's lifetime and performance. Simultaneously, several devices will be characterized to determine their electrical and thermal performance under controlled conditions. After the factors are identified, a variety of thermal design approaches will be evaluated to improve the performance of energy storage devices. Upon completion of this project, recommendations for community energy storage device enclosures, thermal management systems, and/or battery sourcing will be made. NREL's interest is in both new and aged batteries.

  10. Flow Visualization Studies in the Novacor Left Ventricular Assist System CRADA PC91-002, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovetz, H.S.; Shaffer, F.; Schaub, R.; Lund, L.; Woodard, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses a series of experiments to visualize and measure flow fields in the Novacor left ventricular assist system (LVAS). The experiments utilize a multiple exposure, optical imaging technique called fluorescent image tracking velocimetry (FITV) to hack the motion of small, neutrally-buoyant particles in a flowing fluid.

  11. Southern California Edison Grid Integration Evaluation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-376

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mather, Barry [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-07-09

    The objective of this project is to use field verification to improve DOE’s ability to model and understand the impacts of, as well as develop solutions for, high penetration PV deployments in electrical utility distribution systems. The Participant will work with NREL to assess the existing distribution system at SCE facilities and assess adding additional PV systems into the electric power system.

  12. Research and Development of Zinc Air Fuel Cell To Achieve Commercialization Final Report CRADA No. TC-1544-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, J. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Haley, H. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-28

    The specific goal of this project was to advance the development of the zinc air fuel cell (ZAFC) towards commercial readiness in different mobile applications, including motor bikes, passenger cars, vans, buses and off-road vehicles (golf carts, factory equipment), and different stationary applications including generator sets, uninterruptible power systems and electric utility loading leveling and distributive power.

  13. Medical Isotope Program: O-18, C-13, and Xe-129 Final Report CRADA No. TC-2043-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheibner, K. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fought, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    This was a collaborative effort between the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Spectra Gases, Inc., to develop new and cheaper sources of Oxgyen-18 (O-18), Carbon-13 (C-13), and Xenon-129 (Xe-129), and to develop new applications of these stable medical isotopes in medicine resulting in a substantial increase in stable isotopes that are important to human health sciences.

  14. Analysis and Design of a Fiber-optic Probe for DNA Sensors Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1147-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molau, Nicole [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vail, Curtis [Accu.Photonics, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2018-01-24

    In 1995, a challenge in the field of genetics dealt with the acquisition of efficient DNA sequencing techniques for reading the 3 billion base-pairs that comprised the human genome. AccuPhotonics, Inc. proposed to develop and manufacture a state-of-the-art near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) fiber-optic probe that was expected to increase probe efficiency by two orders of magnitude over the existing state-of-the-art and to improve resolution to 10Å. The detailed design calculation and optimization of electrical properties of the fiber-optic probe tip geometry would be performed at LLNL, using existing finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) electromagnetic (EM) codes.

  15. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Wireless Charging of Electric Vehicles - CRADA Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onar, Omer C [ORNL; Campbell, Steven L [ORNL; Seiber, Larry Eugene [ORNL; White, Cliff P [ORNL; Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan [ORNL; Tang, Lixin [ORNL; Chambon, Paul H [ORNL; Ozpineci, Burak [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL

    2016-06-20

    Wireless power transfer (WPT) is a paradigm shift in electric-vehicle (EV) charging that offers the consumer an autonomous, safe, and convenient option to conductive charging and its attendant need for cables. With WPT, charging process can be fully automated due to the vehicle and grid side radio communication systems, and is non-contacting; therefore issues with leakage currents, ground faults, and touch potentials do not exist. It also eliminates the need for touching the heavy, bulky, dirty cables and plugs. It eliminates the fear of forgetting to plug-in and running out of charge the following day and eliminates the tripping hazards in public parking lots and in highly populated areas such as shopping malls, recreational areas, parking buildings, etc. Furthermore, the high-frequency magnetic fields employed in power transfer across a large air gap are focused and shielded, so that fringe fields (i.e., magnetic leakage/stray fields) attenuate rapidly over a transition region to levels well below limits set by international standards for the public zone (which starts at the perimeter of the vehicle and includes the passenger cabin). Oak Ridge National Laboratory s approach to WPT charging places strong emphasis on radio communications in the power regulation feedback channel augmented with software control algorithms. The over-arching goal for WPT is minimization of vehicle on-board complexity by keeping the secondary side content confined to coil tuning, rectification, filtering, and interfacing to the regenerative energy-storage system (RESS). This report summarizes the CRADA work between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Toyota Research Institute of North America, Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing North America (TEMA) on the wireless charging of electric vehicles which was funded by Department of Energy under DE-FOA-000667. In this project, ORNL is the lead agency and Toyota TEMA is one of the major partners. Over the course of the project

  16. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Hideaki; Sakai, Takao; Ishida, Tomio; Yokota, Norikatsu.

    1992-01-01

    The lower ends of a plurality of plate-like shape memory alloys are secured at the periphery of the upper inside of the handling head of a fuel assembly. As the shape memory alloy, a Cu-Zn alloy, a Ti-Pd alloy or a Fe-Ni alloy is used. When high temperature coolants flow out to the handling head, the shape memory alloy deforms by warping to the outer side more greatly toward the upper portion thereof with the temperature increase of the coolants. As the result, the shape of the flow channel of the coolants is changed so as to enlarge at the exit of the upper end of the fuel assembly. Then, the pressure loss of the coolants in the fuel assembly is decreased by the enlargement. Accordingly, the flow rate of the coolants in the fuel assembly is increased to lower the temperature of the coolants. Further, high temperature coolants and low temperature coolants are mixed sufficiently just above the fuel assembly. This can suppress the temperature fluctuation of the mixed coolants in the upper portion of the reactor core, thereby enabling to decrease a fatigue and failures of the structural components in the upper portion of the reactor core. (I.N.)

  17. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Masafumi; Matsuzuka, Ryuji.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a fuel assembly which can decrease pressure loss of coolant to uniform temperature. Structure: A sectional area of a flow passage in the vicinity of an inner peripheral surface of a wrapper tube is limited over the entire length to prevent the temperature of a fuel element in the outermost peripheral portion from being excessively decreased to thereby flatten temperature distribution. To this end, a plurality of pincture-frame-like sheet metals constituting a spacer for supporting a fuel assembly, which has a plurality of fuel elements planted lengthwise and in given spaced relation within the wrapper tube, is disposed in longitudinal grooves and in stacked fashion to form a substantially honeycomb-like space in cross section. The fuel elements are inserted and supported in the space to form a fuel assembly. (Kamimura, M.)

  18. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, Mamoru; Yoshioka, Ritsuo

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively utilize nuclear fuels by increasing the reactivity of a fuel assembly and reduce the concentration at the central region thereof upon completion of the burning. Constitution: A fuel assembly is bisected into a central region and a peripheral region by disposing an inner channel box within a channel box. The flow rate of coolants passing through the central region is made greater than that in the peripheral region. The concentration of uranium 235 of the fuel rods in the central region is made higher. In such a structure, since the moderating effect in the central region is improved, the reactivity of the fuel assembly is increased and the uranium concentration in the central region upon completion of the burning can be reduced, fuel economy and effective utilization of uranium can be attained. (Kamimura, M.)

  19. Further analysis of extended storage of spent fuel. Final report of a co-ordinated research programme on the behaviour of spent fuel assemblies during extended storage (BEFAST-III) 1991-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    Considerable quantities of spent fuel continue to be produced and to accumulate in a number of countries. Although some new reprocessing facilities have been constructed, many countries are investigating the option of extended spent fuel storage prior to reprocessing or fuel disposal. Wet storage continues to predominate as an established technology. However, dry storage is becoming increasingly used with many countries considering dry storage for the longer term. This Technical Document is the final report of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on the Behaviour of Spent Fuel Assemblies During Extended Storage (BEFAST-III, 1991-1996). It contains analyses of wet and dry spent fuel storage technologies obtained from 16 organizations representing 13 countries (Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, the Republic of Korea, Japan, the Russian Federation, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the USA) which participated in the co-ordinated research programme as participants or observers. The report contains information presented during the three Research Co-ordination meetings and also data which were submitted by the participants in response to request by the Scientific Secretary. 48 refs, 4 tabs

  20. Valve assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandling, M.

    1981-01-01

    An improved valve assembly, used for controlling the flow of radioactive slurry, is described. Radioactive contamination of the air during removal or replacement of the valve is prevented by sucking air from the atmosphere through a portion of the structure above the valve housing. (U.K.)

  1. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjertsen, R.K.; Bassler, E.A.; Huckestein, E.A.; Salton, R.B.; Tower, S.N.

    1988-01-01

    A fuel assembly adapted for use with a pressurized water nuclear reactor having capabilities for fluid moderator spectral shift control is described comprising: parallel arranged elongated nuclear fuel elements; means for providing for axial support of the fuel elements and for arranging the fuel elements in a spaced array; thimbles interspersed among the fuel elements adapted for insertion of a rod control cluster therewithin; means for structurally joining the fuel elements and the guide thimbles; fluid moderator control means for providing a volume of low neutron absorbing fluid within the fuel assembly and for removing a substantially equivalent volume of reactor coolant water therefrom, a first flow manifold at one end of the fuel assembly sealingly connected to a first end of the moderator control tubes whereby the first ends are commonly flow connected; and a second flow manifold, having an inlet passage and an outlet passage therein, sealingly connected to a second end of the moderator control tubes at a second end of the fuel assembly

  2. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Tokunobu.

    1990-01-01

    A fuel assembly used in a FBR type nuclear reactor comprises a plurality of fuel rods and a moderator guide member (water rod). A moderator exit opening/closing mechanism is formed at the upper portion of the moderator guide member for opening and closing a moderator exit. In the initial fuel charging operation cycle to the reactor, the moderator exit is closed by the moderator exit opening/closing mechanism. Then, voids are accumulated at the inner upper portion of the moderator guide member to harden spectrum and a great amount of plutonium is generated and accumulated in the fuel assembly. Further, in the fuel re-charging operation cycle, the moderator guide member is used having the moderator exit opened. In this case, voids are discharged from the moderator guide member to decrease the ratio, and the plutonium accumulated in the initial charging operation cycle is burnt. In this way, the fuel economy can be improved. (I.N.)

  3. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echigoya, Hironori; Nomata, Terumitsu.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To render the axial distribution relatively flat. Constitution: First nuclear element comprises a fuel can made of zircalloy i.e., the metal with less neutron absorption, which is filled with a plurality of UO 2 pellets and sealed by using a lower end plug, a plenum spring and an upper end plug by means of welding. Second fuel element is formed by substituting a part of the UO 2 pellets with a water tube which is sealed with water and has a space for allowing the heat expansion. The nuclear fuel assembly is constituted by using the first and second fuel elements together. In such a structure, since water reflects neutrons and decrease their leakage to increase the temperature, reactivity is added at the upper portion of the fuel assembly to thereby flatten the axial power distribution. Accordingly, stable operation is possible only by means of deep control rods while requiring no shallow control rods. (Sekiya, K.)

  4. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Mitsuo.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the corrosion rate and suppress the increase of radioactive corrosion products in reactor water of nuclear fuel assemblies for use in BWR type reactors having spacer springs made of nickel based deposition reinforced type alloys. Constitution: Spacer rings made of nickel based deposition reinforced type alloy are incorporated and used as fuel assemblies after applying treatment of dipping and maintaining at high temperature water followed by heating in steams. Since this can remove the nickel leaching into reactor water at the initial stage, Co-58 as the radioactive corrosion products in the reactor water can be reduced, and the operation at in-service inspection or repairement can be facilitated to improve the working efficiency of the nuclear power plant. The dipping time is desirably more than 10 hours and more desirably more than 30 hours. (Horiuchi, T. )

  5. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    5th April, 2016 – Ordinary General Assembly of the Staff Association! In the first semester of each year, the Staff Association (SA) invites its members to attend and participate in the Ordinary General Assembly (OGA). This year the OGA will be held on Tuesday, April 5th 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00 in BE Auditorium, Meyrin (6-2-024). During the Ordinary General Assembly, the activity and financial reports of the SA are presented and submitted for approval to the members. This is the occasion to get a global view on the activities of the SA, its financial management, and an opportunity to express one’s opinion, including taking part in the votes. Other points are listed on the agenda, as proposed by the Staff Council. Who can vote? Only “ordinary” members (MPE) of the SA can vote. Associated members (MPA) of the SA and/or affiliated pensioners have a right to vote on those topics that are of direct interest to them. Who can give his/her opinion? The Ordinary General Asse...

  6. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Sei; Ando, Ryohei; Mitsutake, Toru.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention concerns a fuel assembly suitable to a BWR-type reactor and improved especially with the nuclear characteristic, heat performance, hydraulic performance, dismantling or assembling performance and economical property. A part of poison rods are formed as a large-diameter/multi-region poison rods having a larger diameter than a fuel rod. A large number of fuel rods are disposed surrounding a large diameter water rod and a group of the large-diameter/multi-region poison rods in adjacent with the water rod. The large-diameter water rod has a burnable poison at the tube wall portion. At least a portion of the large-diameter poison rods has a coolant circulation portion allowing coolants to circulate therethrough. Since the large-diameter poison rods are disposed at a position of high neutron fluxes, a large neutron multiplication factor suppression effect can be provided, thereby enabling to reduce the number of burnable poison rods relative to fuels. As a result, power peaking in the fuel assembly is moderated and a greater amount of plutonium can be loaded. In addition the flow of cooling water which tends to gather around the large diameter water rod can be controlled to improve cooling performance of fuels. (N.H.)

  7. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibayashi, Toru.

    1970-01-01

    Herein disclosed is a fuel assembly in which a fuel rod bundle is easily detachable by rotating a fuel rod fastener rotatably mounted to the upper surface of an upper tie-plate supporting a fuel bundle therebelow. A locking portion at the leading end of each fuel rod protrudes through the upper tie-plate and is engaged with or separated from the tie-plate by the rotation of the fastener. The removal of a desired fuel rod can therefore be remotely accomplished without the necessity of handling pawls, locking washers and nuts. (Owens, K.J.)

  8. Assembling consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assembling Consumption marks a definitive step in the institutionalisation of qualitative business research. By gathering leading scholars and educators who study markets, marketing and consumption through the lenses of philosophy, sociology and anthropology, this book clarifies and applies...... the investigative tools offered by assemblage theory, actor-network theory and non-representational theory. Clear theoretical explanation and methodological innovation, alongside empirical applications of these emerging frameworks will offer readers new and refreshing perspectives on consumer culture and market...... societies. This is an essential reading for both seasoned scholars and advanced students of markets, economies and social forms of consumption....

  9. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Kunitoshi; Azekura, Kazuo.

    1992-01-01

    In a reactor core of a heavy water moderated light water cooled pressure tube type reactor, no sufficient effects have been obtained for the transfer width to a negative side of void reactivity change in a region of a great void coefficient. Then, a moderation region divided into upper and lower two regions is disposed at the central portion of a fuel assembly. Coolants flown into the lower region can be discharged to the cooling region from an opening disposed at the upper end portion of the lower region. Light water flows from the lower region of the moderator region to the cooling region of the reactor core upper portion, to lower the void coefficient. As a result, the reactivity performance at low void coefficient, i.e., a void reaction rate is transferred to the negative side. Thus, this flattens the power distribution in the fuel assembly, increases the thermal margin and enables rapid operaiton and control of the reactor core, as well as contributes to the increase of fuel burnup ratio and reduction of the fuel cycle cost. (N.H.)

  10. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaki, Masao; Nishida, Koji; Karasawa, Hidetoshi; Kanazawa, Toru; Orii, Akihito; Nagayoshi, Takuji; Kashiwai, Shin-ichi; Masuhara, Yasuhiro

    1998-01-01

    The present invention concerns a fuel assembly, for a BWR type nuclear reactor, comprising fuel rods in 9 x 9 matrix. The inner width of the channel box is about 132mm and the length of the fuel rods which are not short fuel rods is about 4m. Two water rods having a circular cross section are arranged on a diagonal line in a portion of 3 x 3 matrix at the center of the fuel assembly, and two fuel rods are disposed at vacant spaces, and the number of fuel rods is 74. Eight fuel rods are determined as short fuel rods among 74 fuel rods. Assuming the fuel inventory in the short fuel rod as X(kg), and the fuel inventory in the fuel rods other than the short fuel rods as Y(kg), X and Y satisfy the relation: X + Y ≥ 173m, Y ≤ - 9.7X + 292, Y ≤ - 0.3X + 203 and X > 0. Then, even when the short fuel rods are used, the fuel inventory is increased and fuel economy can be improved. (I.N.)

  11. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fushimi, Atsushi; Shimada, Hidemitsu; Aoyama, Motoo; Nakajima, Junjiro

    1998-01-01

    In a fuel assembly for an n x n lattice-like BWR type reactor, n is determined to 9 or greater, and the enrichment degree of plutonium is determined to 4.4% by weight or less. Alternatively, n is determined to 10 or greater, and the enrichment degree of plutonium is determined to 5.2% by weight or less. An average take-out burnup degree is determined to 39GWd/t or less, and the matrix is determined to 9 x 9 or more, or the average take-out burnup degree is determined to 51GWd/t, and the matrix is determined to 10 x 10 or more and the increase of the margin of the maximum power density obtained thereby is utilized for the compensation of the increase of distortion of power distribution due to decrease of the kinds of plutonium enrichment degree, thereby enabling to reduce the kind of the enrichment degree of MOX fuel rods to one. As a result, the manufacturing step for fuel pellets can be simplified to reduce the manufacturing cost for MOX fuel assemblies. (N.H.)

  12. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : 1- Adoption de l’ordre du jour. 2- Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. 3- Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. 4- Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. 5- Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. 6- Programme 2015. 7- Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. 8- Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. 9- Élections des membres de la Commission é...

  13. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 5 avril 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2016. Programme de travail 2017. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2017 Approbation du taux de cotisation pour 2018. Modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposées. Élections des membres de la Commission électorale. Élections des vérifica...

  14. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Mardi 5 avril à 11 h 00 BE Auditorium Meyrin (6-2-024) Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 5 mai 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2015. Programme de travail 2016. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2016 Approbation du taux de cotisation pour 2017. Modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commissio...

  15. General assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. Programme 2015. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commission électorale. &am...

  16. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomata, Terumitsu.

    1993-01-01

    Among fuel pellets to be loaded to fuel cans of a fuel assembly, fuel pellets having a small thermal power are charged in a region from the end of each of spacers up to about 50mm on the upstream of coolants that flow vertically at the periphery of fuel rods. Coolants at the periphery of fuel rods are heated by the heat generation, to result in voids. However, since cooling effect on the upstream of the spacers is low due to influences of the spacers. Further, since the fuel pellets disposed in the upstream region have small thermal power, a void coefficient is not increased. Even if a thermal power exceeding cooling performance should be generated, there is no worry of causing burnout in the upstream region. Even if burnout should be caused, safety margin and reliability relative to burnout are improved, to increase an allowable thermal power, thereby enabling to improve integrity and reliability of fuel rods and fuel assemblies. (N.H.)

  17. Comparing Memory-Efficient Genome Assemblers on Stand-Alone and Cloud Infrastructures

    KAUST Repository

    Kleftogiannis, Dimitrios A.; Kalnis, Panos; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2013-01-01

    methodologies, we propose two general assembly strategies that can improve short-read assembly approaches and result in reduction of the memory footprint. Finally, we discuss the possibility of utilizing cloud infrastructures for genome assembly and we comment

  18. Assembly study for JT-60SA tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibanuma, K., E-mail: shibanuma.kiyoshi@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki-ken 311-0193 (Japan); Arai, T.; Hasegawa, K.; Hoshi, R.; Kamiya, K.; Kawashima, H.; Kubo, H.; Masaki, K.; Saeki, H.; Sakurai, S.; Sakata, S.; Sakasai, A.; Sawai, H.; Shibama, Y.K.; Tsuchiya, K.; Tsukao, N.; Yagyu, J.; Yoshida, K.; Kamada, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki-ken 311-0193 (Japan); Mizumaki, S. [Toshiba Corporation, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8001 (Japan); and others

    2013-10-15

    The assembly scenarios and assembly tools of the major tokamak components for JT-60SA are studied in the following. (1) The assembly frame (with a dedicated 30-tonne crane), which is located around the JT-60SA tokamak, is adopted for effective assembly works in the torus hall and the temporary support of the components during assembly. (2) Metrology for precise positioning of the components is also studied by defining the metrology points on the components. (3) The sector segmentation for weld joints and positioning of the vacuum vessel (VV), the assembly scenario and tools for VV thermal shield (TS), the connection of the outer intercoil structure (OIS) and the installation of the final toroidal field coil (TFC) are studied, as typical examples of the assembly scenarios and tools for JT-60SA.

  19. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Makoto; Ogiya, Shunsuke.

    1989-01-01

    For improving the economy of a BWR type reactor by making the operation cycle longer, the fuel enrichment degree has to be increased further. However, this makes the subcriticality shallower in the upper portion of the reactor core, to bring about a possibility that the reactor shutdown becomes impossible. In the present invention, a portion of fuel rod is constituted as partial length fuel rods (P-fuel rods) in which the entire stack length in the effective portion is made shorter by reducing the concentration of fissionable materials in the axial portion. A plurality of moderator rods are disposed at least on one diagonal line of a fuel assembly and P-fuel rods are arranged at a position put between the moderator rods. This makes it possible to reactor shutdown and makes the axial power distribution satisfactory even if the fuel enrichment degree is increased. (T.M.)

  20. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bando, Masaru.

    1993-01-01

    As neutron irradiation progresses on a fuel assembly of an FBR type reactor, a strong force is exerted to cause ruptures if the arrangement of fuel elements is not displaced, whereas the fuel elements may be brought into direct contact with each other not by way of spacers to cause burning damages if the arrangement is displaced. In the present invention, the circumference of fuel elements arranged in a normal triangle lattice is surrounded by a wrapper tube having a hexagonal cross section, wire spacers are wound therearound, and deformable spacers are distributed to optional positions for fuel elements in the wrapper tube. Interaction between the fuel elements caused by irradiation is effectively absorbed, thereby enabling to delay the occurrence of the rupture and burning damages of the elements. (N.H.)

  1. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Makoto.

    1991-01-01

    In a fuel assembly in which spectral shift type moderator guide members are arranged, the moderator guide member has a flow channel resistance member, that provides flow resistance against the moderators, in the upstream of a moderator flowing channel, by which the ratio of removing coolants is set greater at the upstream than downstream. With such a constitution, the void distribution increasing upward in the channel box except for the portion of the moderator guide member is moderated by the increase of the area of the void region that expands downward in the guide member. Accordingly, the axial power distribution is flattened throughout the operation cycle and excess distortion is eliminated to improve the fuel integrity. (T.M.)

  2. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Ritsuo.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the operation performance of a BWR type reactor by improving the distribution of the uranium enrichment and the incorporation amount of burnable poisons in fuel assemblies. Constitution: The average enrichment of uranium 235 is increased in the upper portion as compared with that in the lower portion, while the incorporation amount of burnable poisons is increased in an upper portion as compared with that in the lower portion. The difference in the incorporation amount of the burnable poisons between the upper and lower portions is attained by charging two kinds of fuel rods; the ones incorporated with the burnable poisons over the entire length and the others incorporated with the burnable poisons only in the upper portions. (Seki, T.)

  3. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirukawa, Koji; Sakurada, Koichi.

    1992-01-01

    In a fuel assembly for a BWR type reactor, water rods or water crosses are disposed between fuel rods, and a value with a spring is disposed at the top of the coolant flow channel thereof, which opens a discharge port when pressure is increased to greater than a predetermined value. Further, a control element for the amount of coolant flow rate is inserted retractable to a control element guide tube formed at the lower portion of the water rod or the water cross. When the amount of control elements inserted to the control element guide tube is small and the inflown coolant flow rate is great, the void coefficient at the inside of the water rod is less than 5%. On the other hand, when the control elements are inserted, the flow resistance is increased, so that the void coefficient in the water rod is greater than 80%. When the pressure in the water rod is increased, the valve with the spring is raised to escape water or steams. Then, since the variation range of the change of the void coefficient can be controlled reliably by the amount of the control elements inserted, and nuclear fuel materials can be utilized effectively. (N.H.)

  4. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraiwa, Koji; Ueda, Makoto

    1989-01-01

    In a fuel assembly used for a light water cooled reactor such as a BWR type reactor, a water rod is divided axially into an upper outer tube and a lower outer tube by means of a plug disposed from the lower end of a water rod to a position 1/4 - 1/2 of the entire length for the water rod. Inlet apertures and exit apertures for moderators are respectively perforated for the divided outer tube and upper and lower portions. Further, an upper inner tube with less neutron irradiation growing amount than the outer tube is perforated on the plug in the outer tube, while a lower inner tube with greater neutron irradiation growing amount than the outer tube is suspended from the lower surface of the plug in the outer tube. Then, the opening area for the exit apertures disposed to the upper outer tube and the lower outer tube is controlled depending on the difference of the neutron irradiation growing amount between the upper inner tube and the upper outer tube, and the difference of the neutron irradiation growing amount between the lower inner tube and the lower outer tube. This enables effective spectral shift operation and improve the fuel economy. (T.M.)

  5. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hajime.

    1995-01-01

    In a fuel assembly having fuel rods of different length, fuel pellets of mixed oxides of uranium and plutonium are loaded to a short fuel rod. The volume ratio of a pellet-loaded portion to a plenum portion of the short fuel rod is made greater than the volume ratio of a fuel rod to which uranium fuel pellets are loaded. In addition, the volume of the plenum portion of the short fuel rod is set greater depending on the plutonium content in the loaded fuel pellets. MOX fuel pellets are loaded on the short fuel rods having a greater degree of freedom relevant to the setting for the volume of the plenum portion compared with that of a long rod fuel, and the volume of the plenum portion is ensured greater depending on the plutonium content. Even if a large amount of FP gas and He gas are discharged from the MOX fuels compared with that from the uranium fuels, the internal pressure of the MOX fuel rod during operation is maintained substantially identical with that of the uranium fuel rod, so that a risk of generating excess stresses applied to the fuel cladding tubes and rupture of fuels are greatly reduced. (N.H.)

  6. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Akiyoshi; Bessho, Yasunori; Aoyama, Motoo; Koyama, Jun-ichi; Hirakawa, Hiromasa; Yamashita, Jun-ichi; Hayashi, Tatsuo

    1998-01-01

    In a fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor in which a water rod of a large diameter is disposed at the central portion, the cross sectional area perpendicular to the axial direction comprises a region a of a fuel rod group facing to a wide gap water region to which a control rod is inserted, a region b of a fuel rod group disposed on the side of the wide gap water region other than the region a, a region d of a fuel rod group facing to a narrow gap water region and a region c of a fuel rod group disposed on the side of the narrow gap water region other than the region d. When comparing an amount of fission products contained in the four regions relative to that in the entire regions and average enrichment degrees of fuel rods for the four regions, the relative amount and the average enrichment degree of the fuel rod group of the region a is minimized, and the relative amount and the average enrichment degree of the fuel rod group in the region b is maximized. Then, reactor shut down margin during cold operation can be improved while flattening the power in the cross section perpendicular to the axial direction. (N.H.)

  7. Optimizing Transcriptome Assemblies for Eleusine indica Leaf and Seedling by Combining Multiple Assemblies from Three De Novo Assemblers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Chen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to rapid advances in sequencing technology, increasing amounts of genomic and transcriptomic data are available for plant species, presenting enormous challenges for biocomputing analysis. A crucial first step for a successful transcriptomics-based study is the building of a high-quality assembly. Here, we utilized three different de novo assemblers (Trinity, Velvet, and CLC and the EvidentialGene pipeline tr2aacds to assemble two optimized transcript sets for the notorious weed species, . Two RNA sequencing (RNA-seq datasets from leaf and aboveground seedlings were processed using three assemblers, which resulted in 20 assemblies for each dataset. The contig numbers and N50 values of each assembly were compared to study the effect of read number, k-mer size, and in silico normalization on assembly output. The 20 assemblies were then processed through the tr2aacds pipeline to remove redundant transcripts and to select the transcript set with the best coding potential. Each assembly contributed a considerable proportion to the final transcript combination with the exception of the CLC-k14. Thus each assembler and parameter set did assemble better contigs for certain transcripts. The redundancy, total contig number, N50, fully assembled contig number, and transcripts related to target-site herbicide resistance were evaluated for the EvidentialGene and Trinity assemblies. Comparing the EvidentialGene set with the Trinity assembly revealed improved quality and reduced redundancy in both leaf and seedling EvidentialGene sets. The optimized transcriptome references will be useful for studying herbicide resistance in and the evolutionary process in the three allotetraploid offspring.

  8. Newnes electronics assembly handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Brindley, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Newnes Electronics Assembly Handbook: Techniques, Standards and Quality Assurance focuses on the aspects of electronic assembling. The handbook first looks at the printed circuit board (PCB). Base materials, basic mechanical properties, cleaning of assemblies, design, and PCB manufacturing processes are then explained. The text also discusses surface mounted assemblies and packaging of electromechanical assemblies, as well as the soldering process. Requirements for the soldering process; solderability and protective coatings; cleaning of PCBs; and mass solder/component reflow soldering are des

  9. Self-assembled nanomaterials for photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Pei-Pei; Zhao, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, extensive endeavors have been paid to construct functional self-assembled nanomaterials for various applications such as catalysis, separation, energy and biomedicines. To date, different strategies have been developed for preparing nanomaterials with diversified structures and functionalities via fine tuning of self-assembled building blocks. In terms of biomedical applications, bioimaging technologies are urgently calling for high-efficient probes/contrast agents for high-performance bioimaging. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging whole-body imaging modality offering high spatial resolution, deep penetration and high contrast in vivo. The self-assembled nanomaterials show high stability in vivo, specific tolerance to sterilization and prolonged half-life stability and desirable targeting properties, which is a kind of promising PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. Herein, we focus on summarizing recent advances in smart self-assembled nanomaterials with NIR absorption as PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. According to the preparation strategy of the contrast agents, the self-assembled nanomaterials are categorized into two groups, i.e., the ex situ and in situ self-assembled nanomaterials. The driving forces, assembly modes and regulation of PA properties of self-assembled nanomaterials and their applications for long-term imaging, enzyme activity detection and aggregation-induced retention (AIR) effect for diagnosis and therapy are emphasized. Finally, we conclude with an outlook towards future developments of self-assembled nanomaterials for PA imaging.

  10. Self-assembled nanomaterials for photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Pei-Pei; Zhao, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Hao

    2016-02-07

    In recent years, extensive endeavors have been paid to construct functional self-assembled nanomaterials for various applications such as catalysis, separation, energy and biomedicines. To date, different strategies have been developed for preparing nanomaterials with diversified structures and functionalities via fine tuning of self-assembled building blocks. In terms of biomedical applications, bioimaging technologies are urgently calling for high-efficient probes/contrast agents for high-performance bioimaging. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging whole-body imaging modality offering high spatial resolution, deep penetration and high contrast in vivo. The self-assembled nanomaterials show high stability in vivo, specific tolerance to sterilization and prolonged half-life stability and desirable targeting properties, which is a kind of promising PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. Herein, we focus on summarizing recent advances in smart self-assembled nanomaterials with NIR absorption as PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. According to the preparation strategy of the contrast agents, the self-assembled nanomaterials are categorized into two groups, i.e., the ex situ and in situ self-assembled nanomaterials. The driving forces, assembly modes and regulation of PA properties of self-assembled nanomaterials and their applications for long-term imaging, enzyme activity detection and aggregation-induced retention (AIR) effect for diagnosis and therapy are emphasized. Finally, we conclude with an outlook towards future developments of self-assembled nanomaterials for PA imaging.

  11. Heat transfer enhanced microwave process for stabilization of liquid radioactive waste slurry. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, T.L.

    1995-01-01

    The objectve of this CRADA is to combine a polymer process for encapsulation of liquid radioactive waste slurry developed by Monolith Technology, Inc. (MTI), with an in-drum microwave process for drying radioactive wastes developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), for the purpose of achieving a fast, cost-effectve commercial process for solidification of liquid radioactive waste slurry. Tests performed so far show a four-fold increase in process throughput due to the direct microwave heating of the polymer/slurry mixture, compared to conventional edge-heating of the mixer. We measured a steady-state throughput of 33 ml/min for 1.4 kW of absorbed microwave power. The final waste form is a solid monolith with no free liquids and no free particulates

  12. Final Report on Design, Fabrication and Test of HANARO Instrumented Capsule (07M-13N) for the Researches of Irradiation Performance of Parts of X-Gen Nuclear Fuel Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, K. N.; Kim, B. G.; Kang, Y. H. (and others)

    2008-08-15

    An instrumented capsule of 07M-13N was designed, fabricated and irradiated for an evaluation of the neutron irradiation properties of the parts of a X-Gen nuclear fuel assembly for PWR requested by KNF. Some specimens of control rod materials of AP1000 reactor requested by Westinghouse Co. were inserted in this capsule as a preliminary irradiation test and Polyimide specimens requested by Hanyang university were also inserted. 463 specimens such as buckling and spring test specimens of cell spacer grid, tensile, microstructure and tensile of welded parts, irradiation growth, spring test specimens made of HANA tube, Zirlo, Zircaloy-4, Inconel-718, Polyimide, Ag and Ag-In-Cd alloys were placed in the capsule. During the irradiation test, the temperature of the specimens and the thermal/fast neutron fluences were measured by 14 thermocouples and 7 sets of neutron fluence monitors installed in the capsule. A new friction welded tube between STS304 and Al1050 alloys was introduced in the capsule to prevent a coolant leakage into a capsule during a capsule cutting process in HANARO. The capsule was irradiated for 95.19 days (4 cycles) in the CT test hole of HANARO of a 30MW thermal output at 230 {approx} 420 .deg. C. The specimens were irradiated up to a maximum fast neutron fluence of 1.27x10{sup 21}(n/cm{sup 2}) (E>1.0MeV) and the dpa of the irradiated specimens were evaluated as 1.21 {approx} 1.97. The irradiated specimens were tested to evaluate the irradiation performance of the parts of an X-Gen fuel assembly in the IMEF hot cell and the obtained results will be very valuable for the related researches of the users.

  13. Comparing de novo assemblers for 454 transcriptome data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sujai; Blaxter, Mark L

    2010-10-16

    Roche 454 pyrosequencing has become a method of choice for generating transcriptome data from non-model organisms. Once the tens to hundreds of thousands of short (250-450 base) reads have been produced, it is important to correctly assemble these to estimate the sequence of all the transcripts. Most transcriptome assembly projects use only one program for assembling 454 pyrosequencing reads, but there is no evidence that the programs used to date are optimal. We have carried out a systematic comparison of five assemblers (CAP3, MIRA, Newbler, SeqMan and CLC) to establish best practices for transcriptome assemblies, using a new dataset from the parasitic nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis. Although no single assembler performed best on all our criteria, Newbler 2.5 gave longer contigs, better alignments to some reference sequences, and was fast and easy to use. SeqMan assemblies performed best on the criterion of recapitulating known transcripts, and had more novel sequence than the other assemblers, but generated an excess of small, redundant contigs. The remaining assemblers all performed almost as well, with the exception of Newbler 2.3 (the version currently used by most assembly projects), which generated assemblies that had significantly lower total length. As different assemblers use different underlying algorithms to generate contigs, we also explored merging of assemblies and found that the merged datasets not only aligned better to reference sequences than individual assemblies, but were also more consistent in the number and size of contigs. Transcriptome assemblies are smaller than genome assemblies and thus should be more computationally tractable, but are often harder because individual contigs can have highly variable read coverage. Comparing single assemblers, Newbler 2.5 performed best on our trial data set, but other assemblers were closely comparable. Combining differently optimal assemblies from different programs however gave a more credible

  14. Comparing de novo assemblers for 454 transcriptome data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaxter Mark L

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Roche 454 pyrosequencing has become a method of choice for generating transcriptome data from non-model organisms. Once the tens to hundreds of thousands of short (250-450 base reads have been produced, it is important to correctly assemble these to estimate the sequence of all the transcripts. Most transcriptome assembly projects use only one program for assembling 454 pyrosequencing reads, but there is no evidence that the programs used to date are optimal. We have carried out a systematic comparison of five assemblers (CAP3, MIRA, Newbler, SeqMan and CLC to establish best practices for transcriptome assemblies, using a new dataset from the parasitic nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis. Results Although no single assembler performed best on all our criteria, Newbler 2.5 gave longer contigs, better alignments to some reference sequences, and was fast and easy to use. SeqMan assemblies performed best on the criterion of recapitulating known transcripts, and had more novel sequence than the other assemblers, but generated an excess of small, redundant contigs. The remaining assemblers all performed almost as well, with the exception of Newbler 2.3 (the version currently used by most assembly projects, which generated assemblies that had significantly lower total length. As different assemblers use different underlying algorithms to generate contigs, we also explored merging of assemblies and found that the merged datasets not only aligned better to reference sequences than individual assemblies, but were also more consistent in the number and size of contigs. Conclusions Transcriptome assemblies are smaller than genome assemblies and thus should be more computationally tractable, but are often harder because individual contigs can have highly variable read coverage. Comparing single assemblers, Newbler 2.5 performed best on our trial data set, but other assemblers were closely comparable. Combining differently optimal assemblies

  15. Fuel assembly guide tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1979-01-01

    This invention is directed toward a nuclear fuel assembly guide tube arrangement which restrains spacer grid movement due to coolant flow and which offers secondary means for supporting a fuel assembly during handling and transfer operations

  16. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e. g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is

  17. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Y.; Tashima, J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of nuclear reactor fuel assemblies arranged in the form of a lattice wherein there is attached to the interface of one of two adjacent fuel assemblies a plate spring having a concave portion curved toward said interface and to the interface of the other fuel assembly a plate spring having a convex portion curved away from said interface

  18. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David H [Redondo Beach, CA

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  19. Biologic Constraints on Modelling Virus Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Garcea

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematic modelling of icosahedral virus assembly has drawn increasing interest because of the symmetric geometry of the outer shell structures. Many models involve equilibrium expressions of subunit binding, with reversible subunit additions forming various intermediate structures. The underlying assumption is that a final lowest energy state drives the equilibrium toward assembly. In their simplest forms, these models have explained why high subunit protein concentrations and strong subunit association constants can result in kinetic traps forming off pathway partial and aberrant structures. However, the cell biology of virus assembly is exceedingly complex. The biochemistry and biology of polyoma and papillomavirus assembly described here illustrates many of these specific issues. Variables include the use of cellular ‘chaperone’ proteins as mediators of assembly fidelity, the coupling of assembly to encapsidation of a specific nucleic acid genome, the use of cellular structures as ‘workbenches’ upon which assembly occurs, and the underlying problem of making a capsid structure that is metastable and capable of rapid disassembly upon infection. Although formidable to model, incorporating these considerations could advance the relevance of mathematical models of virus assembly to the real world.

  20. Assembly and handling apparatus for the EBFA Marx generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staller, G.E.; Hiett, G.E.; Hamilton, I.D.; Aker, M.F.; Daniels, G.A.

    1979-05-01

    Marx generators, a major slow-pulsed power component in Sandia Laboratories' Electron Beam Fusion Accelerator (EBFA), were assembled at a remote facility modified to utilize an assembly-line technique. Due to the size and weight of the various components, as well as the final Marx generator assembly, special handling apparatus was designed. Time and manpower constraints required that this assembly be done in parallel with the construction of the Electron Beam Fusion Facility (EBFF). The completed Marx generators were temporarily stored and then moved from the assembly building to the EBFF using special transportation racks designed specifically for this purpose

  1. Soldering in electronics assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Judd, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Soldering in Electronics Assembly discusses several concerns in soldering of electronic assemblies. The book is comprised of nine chapters that tackle different areas in electronic assembly soldering. Chapter 1 discusses the soldering process itself, while Chapter 2 covers the electronic assemblies. Chapter 3 talks about solders and Chapter 4 deals with flux. The text also tackles the CS and SC soldering process. The cleaning of soldered assemblies, solder quality, and standards and specifications are also discussed. The book will be of great use to professionals who deal with electronic assem

  2. Nuclear fuel string assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ip, A.K.; Koyanagi, K.; Tarasuk, W.R.

    1976-01-01

    A method of fabricating rodded fuels suitable for use in pressure tube type reactors and in pressure vessel type reactors is described. Fuel rods are secured as an inner and an outer sub-assembly, each rod attached between mounting rings secured to the rod ends. The two sub-assemblies are telescoped together and positioned by spaced thimbles located between them to provide precise positioning while permittng differential axial movement between the sub-assemblies. Such sub-assemblies are particularly suited for mounting as bundle strings. The method provides particular advantages in the assembly of annular-section fuel pins, which includes booster fuel containing enriched fuel material. (LL)

  3. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmonier, Pierre; Mesnage, Bernard; Nervi, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    This invention refers to fuel assemblies for a liquid metal cooled fast neutron reactor. Each assembly is composed of a hollow vertical casing, of regular polygonal section, containing a bundle of clad pins filled with a fissile or fertile substance. The casing is open at its upper end and has a cylindrical foot at its lower end for positioning the assembly in a housing provided in the horizontal diagrid, on which the core assembly rests. A set of flat bars located on the external surface of the casing enables it to be correctly orientated in its housing among the other core assemblies [fr

  4. Fuel assembly and reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriwaki, Masanao; Aoyama, Motoo; Masumi, Ryoji; Ishibashi, Yoko.

    1995-01-01

    A fuel assembly comprises a plurality of fuel rods filled with nuclear fuels, a plurality of burnable poison-incorporated fuel rods and a spectral shift-type water rod. As the burnable poison for the burnable poison-incorporated fuel rod, a plurality of burnable poison elements each having a different neutron absorption cross section are used. A burnable poison element such as boron having a relatively small neutron absorbing cross section is disposed more in the upper half region than the lower half region of the burnable poison-incorporated fuel rods. In addition, a burnable poison element such as gadolinium having a relatively large neutron absorbing cross section is disposed more in the lower half-region than the upper half region thereof. This can flatten the power distribution in the vertical direction of the fuel assembly and the power distribution in the horizontal direction at the final stage of the operation cycle. (I.N.)

  5. Magnetic self-assembly of small parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetye, Sheetal B.

    used to characterize part-to-substrate MSA. It is shown that the assembly rate and the yield are most dependent on the rotational symmetry of the magnet pattern. Simultaneous and sequential heterogeneous assembly of two types of parts with selective bonding is also demonstrated, with the average assembly yield of 93% in 60 s and 99% in 3.5 min respectively. Finally, MSA with functional electrical interconnects is also demonstrated with a yield of 90.5%.

  6. CRADA with Teledyne Electronic Technologies and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNL-096): The Exposure-to-Risk monitoring system. Final letter report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thrall, K.D.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the ``Exposure-to- Risk`` monitoring system in an actual occupational environment. The system is a unique combination of existing hardware with proprietary software to create an integrated means of assessing occupational exposures to volatile organic compounds. One component of this system utilizes a portable mass spectrometer developed by Teledyne Electronic Technologies. Integration of the system was accomplished under Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) funding. Commercialization of the system will take place following demonstration in an actual occupational environment, and will include, in part, Teledyne Electronic Technologies. The Exposure-to-Risk monitoring system will benefit DOE by overcoming present-day limitations in worker health protection monitoring. There are numerous sites within the` DOE complex where many different hazardous chemicals are used on a routine basis. These chemicals range from paint stripers and cleaning solvents to chemical warfare agents, each having its own degree of potential adverse health risk to a worker. Thus, a real concern for DOE is to ensure that a worker is properly monitored to assess any adverse health risk from exposure to potentially hazardous chemicals. With current industrial hygiene technologies, this is an arduous task. The Exposure-to-Risk monitoring system integrates a patented breath-inlet device connecting a subject`s exhaled breath directly with a field-portable mass spectrometer with physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to estimate the target tissue dose following a chemical exposure. Estimation of the adverse health risk prediction follows from the exposure/dose calculation based on currently accepted methodologies. This new system can determine, in the field, the possible adverse health risks on a daily basis to an individual worker.

  7. Development of Carbon-14 Waste Destruction and Recovery System Using AC Plasma Torch Technology Final Report CRADA No. TC02108.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Althouse, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McKannay, R. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and ISOFLEX USA (ISOFLEX), to 1) develop and test a prototype waste destruction system ("System") using AC plasma torch technology to break down and drastically reduce the volume of Carbon-14 (C-14) contaminated medical laboratory wastes while satisfying all environmental regulations, and 2) develop and demonstrate methods for recovering 99%+ of the carbon including the C-14 allowing for possible re-use as a tagging and labeling tool in the biomedical industry.

  8. Catalytic Depolymerization and Upgrading of Lignin for Vanillin Production: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-14-545

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckham, Gregg [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-03-31

    Examine catalytic conversion of lignin using multifunctional catalysts that are able to depolymerize and oxidize lignin to a vanillin-rich stream. Examine separation processes for isolation of vanillin from product mixtures. Conduct preliminary experiments to determine if deconstructed lignin streams can be metabolized by Pseudomonas putida.

  9. Hyperspectral Geobotanical Remote Sensing for Monitoring and Verifying CO2 Containment Final Report CRADA No. TC-2036-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickles, W. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ebrom, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-28

    This collaborative effort was in support of the CO2 Capture Project (CCP), to develop techniques that integrate overhead images of plant species, plant health, geological formations, soil types, aquatic, and human use spatial patterns for detection and discrimination of any CO2 releases from underground storage formations. The goal of this work was to demonstrate advanced hyperspectral geobotanical remote sensing methods to assess potential leakage of CO2 from underground storage. The timeframes and scales relevant to the long-term storage of CO2 in the subsurface make remote sensing methods attractive. Moreover, it has been shown that individual field measurements of gas composition are subject to variability on extremely small temporal and spatial scales. The ability to verify ultimate reservoir integrity and to place individual surface measurements into context will be crucial to successful long-term monitoring and verification activities. The desired results were to produce a defined and tested procedure that could be easily used for long-term monitoring of possible CO2 leakage from underground CO2 sequestration sites. This testing standard will be utilized on behalf of the oil industry.

  10. Portfolio-Scale Optimization of Customer Energy Efficiency Incentive and Marketing: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-13-535

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brackney, Larry J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-02-17

    North East utility National Grid (NGrid) is developing a portfolio-scale application of OpenStudio designed to optimize incentive and marketing expenditures for their energy efficiency (EE) programs. NGrid wishes to leverage a combination of geographic information systems (GIS), public records, customer data, and content from the Building Component Library (BCL) to form a JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) input file that is consumed by an OpenStudio-based expert system for automated model generation. A baseline model for each customer building will be automatically tuned using electricity and gas consumption data, and a set of energy conservation measures (ECMs) associated with each NGrid incentive program will be applied to the model. The simulated energy performance and return on investment (ROI) will be compared with customer hurdle rates and available incentives to A) optimize the incentive required to overcome the customer hurdle rate and B) determine if marketing activity associated with the specific ECM is warranted for that particular customer. Repeated across their portfolio, this process will enable NGrid to substantially optimize their marketing and incentive expenditures, targeting those customers that will likely adopt and benefit from specific EE programs.

  11. Biomass Pyrolysis to Hydrocarbon Fuels in the Petroleum Refining Context: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-500

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chum, Helena L. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-01-01

    This work focuses on developing a thermochemical route to produce biofuels from agricultural wastes such as sugar cane bagasse, wood chips or corn stover; more specifically it intends to develop the biomass pyrolysis route, which produces bio-oils. Production of bio-oils by pyrolysis is a commercial technology. However, bio-oils are currently not being used for liquid fuels production. Although bio-oils can be produced by high-pressure liquefaction, pyrolysis is a less expensive technology. Nevertheless, bio-oils cannot be used directly as a transportation fuel without upgrading, since they are generally unstable, viscous, and acidic. Thus NREL and Petrobras intend to use their combined expertise to develop a two-step route to biofuels production: in the first step, a stable bio-oil is produced by NREL biomass pyrolysis technology, while in the second step it is upgraded by using two distinct catalytic processes under development by Petrobras. The first process converts bio-oil into gasoline, LPG, and fuel oil using the catalytic cracking process, while the second one, converts bio-oil into synthesis gas. Syngas gasification catalysts provided by both NREL and Petrobras will be tested. The work includes experiments at both sites to produce bio-oil and then biofuels, life-cycle analysis of each route, personnel training and development of analytical methods with a duration time of two years.

  12. Commercialization of LLNL Zinc Air Fuel Cell Technology For Stationary And Mobile Applications And Electromechanical Battery For Mobile Applications Final Report CRADA No. TC-1420-97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokarz, F. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cooper, J. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Haley, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Utility deregulation is occurring throughout the world. Energy storage, peak demand leveling and power quality are becoming increasingly important. New, innovative costeffective methods are critical to the financial success or failure of utility companies in the new free market environment. The implementation of energy storage gives a utility the ability to better utilize existing generating capacity. Energy is stored in the periods of low overall demand and then the stored energy is connected to the power grid during peak demand periods. Storing energy in this manner will lead to significant economic benefits to utilities as well as their customers. Furthermore, because the utility's system is operated more efficiently there is a direct reduction in atmospheric pollutants including greenhouse gases.

  13. Synthesis of a Novel Energetic Heterocyclic Oxidizer with Higher Energy and Lower Sensitivity (Phase 2) Final Report CRADA No. TC02125.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagoria, P. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Racoveanu, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-08

    This project was a continuation of work originally performed under a Phase 1 of the Small Business Technology Transfer (STIR). The success of the Phase 1 led to the award of a Phase 2 of the STIR. In Phase 1 of the STIR, the target energetic compound, 3,4-bis(4-nitro-l,2,5- oxadiazol-3yl)-1,2,5-oxadiazole-l-oxide (DNTF), was synthesized at the 5g scale and small-scale safety tests were performed. DNTF showed promising performance· and safety properties. DNTF was shown to be relatively insensitive while performing better than the current industry standard, H1vIX, in solid propellant formulations. Because of the successful research and development project involving PSI, LLNL and Aerojet in Phase I of the STIR, the sponsors wanted to obtain larger quantities of DNTF for further testing.

  14. Synthesis of a Novel Energetic Heterocyclic Oxidizer with Higher Energy and Lower Sensitivity Final Report CRADA No. TC02099.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagoria, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Racoveanu, A. [Physical Sciences, Inc., Andover, MD (United States)

    2017-09-08

    The project involved the synthesis of 5g of a target energetic compound, 3,4-bis(5-nitro-1,2,5- oxadiazol-4-yl)-1,2,5-oxadiazole-1-oxide (DNTF. The deliverables were the synthesis of 5g of DNTF along with quantities of the precursor compounds. In addition, small-scale safety tests on DNTF were performed, which to confirmed that DNTF has no undesirable safety properties before scaling up the synthesis in Phase II of this project.

  15. Development of a Bio-Equivalent Ultraviolet Dosimeter to Monitor the Capacity for Vitamin D Synthesis of Sunlight Final Report CRADA No. TC02086.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wood, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This project represents a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Rhyolite Technology Group, Inc. (Rhyolite) to develop concepts and designs for a consumer ultraviolet (UV) biodosimeter based on the human biochemistry of Vitamin D synthesis. Rhyolite was established to engage in product development, licensing and consulting for the manufacture and supply of new products worldwide. Rhyolite worked jointly with LLNL and the Kiev Institute of Physics (KIP) in Ukraine to leverage previously developed UV sensor technologies by extending the previous work into commercially viable products. The project consisted primarily of the scientific, engineering and business activities needed to develop the UV bio-dosimeter for applications that include health and industrial measurement of ultraviolet radiation.

  16. Demonstration of Laser Plasma X-Ray Source with X-Ray Collimator Final Report CRADA No. TC-1564-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, S. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Forber, R. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-28

    This collaborative effort between the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and JMAR Research, Inc. (JRI), was to demonstrate that LLNL x-ray collimators can effectively increase the wafer throughput of JRI's laser based x-ray lithography systems. The technical objectives were expected to be achieved by completion of the following tasks, which are separated into two task lists by funding source. The organization (LLNL or JMAR) having primary responsibility is given parenthetically for each task.

  17. Studies on the impact, detection, and control of microbiology influenced corrosion related to pitting failures in the Russian oil and gas industry. Final CRADA report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehst, D.

    2006-09-30

    The objectives of the Project are: (1) to design effective anti-corrosion preparations (biocides, inhibitors, penetrants and their combinations) for gas- and oil-exploration industries; (2) to study a possibility of development of environmentally beneficial ('green') biocides and inhibitors of the new generation; (3) to develop chemical and microbiological methods of monitoring of sites at risk of corrosion; and (4) to evaluate potentialities in terms of technology, raw materials and material and technical basis to set up a production of effective anti-corrosion preparations of new generation in Russia. During the four years of the project 228 compounds and formulations were synthesized and studied in respect to their corrosion inhibiting activity. A series of compounds which were according to the Bubble tests more efficient (by a factor of 10-100) than the reference inhibitor SXT-1102, some possessing the similar activity or slightly better activity than new inhibitor ??-1154? (company ONDEO/Nalco). Two synthetic routes for the synthesis of mercaptopyrimidines as perspective corrosion inhibitors were developed. Mercaptopyrimidine derivatives can be obtained in one or two steps from cheap and easily available precursors. The cost for their synthesis is not high and can be further reduced after the optimization of the production processes. A new approach for lignin utilization was proposed. Water-soluble derivative of lignin can by transformed to corrosion protective layer by its electropolymerization on a steel surface. Varying lignosulfonates from different sources, as well as conditions of electrooxidation we proved, that drop in current at high anodic potentials is due to electropolymerization of lignin derivative at steel electrode surface. The electropolymerization potential can be sufficiently decreased by an increase in ionic strength of the growing solution. The lignosulfonate electropolymerization led to the considerable corrosion protection effect of carbon steel. More than three times decrease of corrosion rate on steel surface was observed after lignosulfonate electropolymerization, exceeding protective effect of standard commercially available corrosion inhibitor. Solikamsky lignin could be a promising candidate as a base for the development of the future green corrosion inhibitor. A protective effect of isothiazolones in compositions with other biocides and inhibitors was investigated. Additionally to high biocidal properties, combination of kathon 893 and copper sulfate may also produce a strong anticorrosion effect depending on concentrations of the biocides. Based on its joint biocidal and anticorrosion properties, this combination can be recommended for protection of pipelines against carbon dioxide-induced corrosion. By means of linear polarization resistance test, corrosion properties of biocides of different classes were studied. Isothiazolones can be recommended for treating oil-processing waters in Tatarstan to curb carbon dioxide - induced corrosion. A laboratory research on evaluation of the efficiency of biocides, inhibitors and penetrants by biological and physical-and-chemical methods has been carried out. It was shown that action of corrosion inhibitors and biocides strongly depends on character of their interaction with mineral substances available in waters on oil-exploration sites. It was found that one of approaches to designing environmentally safe ('green') antimicrobial formulations may be the use of synergetic combinations, which allow one to significantly decrease concentrations of biocides. It was shown that the efficacy of biocides and inhibitors depends on physicochemical characteristics of the environment. Anticorrosion and antimicrobial effects of biocides and inhibitors depended in much on the type of medium and aeration regimen. Effects of different biocides, corrosion inhibitors. penetrants and their combinations on the biofilm were investigated. It has been shown that minimal inhibiting concentrations of the reagents for the biofilm are much higher than those for aquatic microorganisms. Results obtained from the research in stationary conditions have been confirmed with data from experiments carried out in hydrodynamic conditions. New approaches to the investigation of biocorrosive processes on the basis of bioluminescent method of intracellular ATP determination have been developed. Approaches and methods developed on the basis of bioluminescent method could significantly simplify the analysis of biocorrosion processes and allow to conduct the analysis directly under the field conditions in situ. An express method to assess biogenic sulfate reduction in soil and water samples has been elaborated. The method intends for field application and allows one to no-problem assess action of such harmful and corrosion provoking microorganisms, as sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  18. High Penetration Photovoltaic Power Electronics and Energy Management Technology Research, Development and Demonstration: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-13-517

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudgins, Andrew P. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-01-25

    Advanced Energy Industries, Inc., will partner with DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to conduct research and development to demonstrate technologies that will increase the penetration of photovoltaic (PV) technologies for commercial and utility applications. Standard PV power control systems use simple control techniques that only provide real power to the grid. A focus of this partnership is to demonstrate how state of the art control and power electronic technologies can be combined to create a utility interactive control platform.

  19. Defining the Interactions of Cellobiohydrolase with Substrate through Structure Function Studies: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-409

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckham, G. T.; Himmel, M. E.

    2013-07-01

    NREL researchers will use their expertise and skilled resources in numerical computational modeling to generate structure-function relationships for improved cellulase variant enzymes to support the development of cellulases with improved performance in biomass conversion.

  20. A Compact, Portable, Reduced-Cost, Gamma Ray Spectroscopic System for Nuclear Verification Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1551-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavietes, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kalkhoran, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    The overall goal of this project was to demonstrate a compact gamma-ray spectroscopic system with better energy resolution and lower costs than scintillator-based detector systems for uranium enrichment analysis applications.

  1. Catalysis for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis from Biomass Derived Syngas: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-292

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hensley, J.

    2013-04-01

    The Dow Chemical Company (Dow) developed and tested catalysts for production of mixed alcohols from synthesis gas (syngas), under research and development (R&D) projects that were discontinued a number of years ago. Dow possesses detailed laboratory notebooks, catalyst samples, and technical expertise related to this past work. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is conducting R&D in support of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to develop methods for economically producing ethanol from gasified biomass. NREL is currently conducting biomass gasification research at an existing 1/2 ton/day thermochemical test platform. Both Dow and NREL believe that the ability to economically produce ethanol from biomass-derived syngas can be enhanced through collaborative testing, refinement, and development of Dow's mixed-alcohol catalysts at NREL's and/or Dow's bench- and pilot-scale facilities. Dow and NREL further agree that collaboration on improvements in catalysts as well as gasifier operating conditions (e.g., time, temperature, upstream gas treatment) will be necessary to achieve technical and economic goals for production of ethanol and other alcohols.

  2. Assembly tool design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanamori, Naokazu; Nakahira, Masataka; Ohkawa, Yoshinao; Tada, Eisuke; Seki, Masahiro

    1996-06-01

    The reactor core of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is assembled with a number of large and asymmetric components within a tight tolerance in order to assure the structural integrity for various loads and to provide the tritium confinement. In addition, the assembly procedure should be compatible with remote operation since the core structures will be activated by 14-MeV neutrons once it starts operation and thus personal access will be prohibited. Accordingly, the assembly procedure and tool design are quite essential and should be designed from the beginning to facilitate remote operation. According to the ITER Design Task Agreement, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has performed design study to develop the assembly procedures and associated tool design for the ITER tokamak assembly. This report describes outlines of the assembly tools and the remaining issues obtained in this design study. (author)

  3. Plural beam electron gun assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratton, M.G.

    1977-01-01

    The invention relates to a cathode ray tube plural-beam-in-line bi-potential electron gun assembly, having applied beam currents of differing levels, manifests structurally modified gun structures to effect focused beam landings at the screen that are evidenced as substantially equi-sized spots thereby providing improved resolution and brightness of the screen imagery. The structural changes embody modifications of the related focusing and accelerator electrodes of the respective guns to provide a partial telescoping arrangement for effecting the discrete placement, forming and shielding of the final focusing lenses. The three lenses so formed are in different planes in partial overlapping axial relationship

  4. Fuel assembly storage pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiranuma, Hiroshi.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To remove limitation of the number of storage of fuel assemblies to increase the number of storage thereof so as to relatively reduce the water depth required for shielding radioactive rays. Structure: Fuel assembly storage rack containers for receiving a plurality of spent fuel assembly racks are stacked in multi-layer fashion within a storage pool filled with water for shielding radioactive rays and removing heat. (Furukawa, Y.)

  5. Microfluidic device for the assembly and transport of microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Conrad D [Albuquerque, NM; Kumar, Anil [Framingham, MA; Khusid, Boris [New Providence, NJ; Acrivos, Andreas [Stanford, CA

    2010-06-29

    A microfluidic device comprising independently addressable arrays of interdigitated electrodes can be used to assembly and transport large-scale microparticle structures. The device and method uses collective phenomena in a negatively polarized suspension exposed to a high-gradient strong ac electric field to assemble the particles into predetermined locations and then transport them collectively to a work area for final assembly by sequentially energizing the electrode arrays.

  6. Target Assembly Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Target Assembly Facility integrates new armor concepts into actual armored vehicles. Featuring the capability ofmachining and cutting radioactive materials, it...

  7. Composite turbine bucket assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotta, Gary Charles; Garcia-Crespo, Andres

    2014-05-20

    A composite turbine blade assembly includes a ceramic blade including an airfoil portion, a shank portion and an attachment portion; and a transition assembly adapted to attach the ceramic blade to a turbine disk or rotor, the transition assembly including first and second transition components clamped together, trapping said ceramic airfoil therebetween. Interior surfaces of the first and second transition portions are formed to mate with the shank portion and the attachment portion of the ceramic blade, and exterior surfaces of said first and second transition components are formed to include an attachment feature enabling the transition assembly to be attached to the turbine rotor or disk.

  8. CAD Parts-Based Assembly Modeling by Probabilistic Reasoning

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Kai-Ke; Hu, Kai-Mo; Yin, Li-Cheng; Yan, Dongming; Wang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, increasing amount of parts and sub-assemblies are publicly available, which can be used directly for product development instead of creating from scratch. In this paper, we propose an interactive design framework for efficient and smart assembly modeling, in order to improve the design efficiency. Our approach is based on a probabilistic reasoning. Given a collection of industrial assemblies, we learn a probabilistic graphical model from the relationships between the parts of assemblies. Then in the modeling stage, this probabilistic model is used to suggest the most likely used parts compatible with the current assembly. Finally, the parts are assembled under certain geometric constraints. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our framework through a variety of assembly models produced by our prototype system. © 2015 IEEE.

  9. CAD Parts-Based Assembly Modeling by Probabilistic Reasoning

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Kai-Ke

    2016-04-11

    Nowadays, increasing amount of parts and sub-assemblies are publicly available, which can be used directly for product development instead of creating from scratch. In this paper, we propose an interactive design framework for efficient and smart assembly modeling, in order to improve the design efficiency. Our approach is based on a probabilistic reasoning. Given a collection of industrial assemblies, we learn a probabilistic graphical model from the relationships between the parts of assemblies. Then in the modeling stage, this probabilistic model is used to suggest the most likely used parts compatible with the current assembly. Finally, the parts are assembled under certain geometric constraints. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our framework through a variety of assembly models produced by our prototype system. © 2015 IEEE.

  10. Safety for fuel assembly handling in the nuclear ship Mutsu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Yoshio

    1978-01-01

    The safety for fuel assembly handling in the nuclear ship Mutsu is deliberated by the committee of general inspection and repair technique examination for Mutsu. The result of deliberation for both cases of removing fuel assemblies and keeping them in the reactor is outlined. The specification of fuel assemblies, and the nuclides and designed radioactivity of fission products of fuel are described. The possibility of shielding repair work and general safety inspection keeping the fuel assemblies in the reactor, the safety consideration when the fuel assemblies are removed at a quay, in a dry dock and on the ocean, the safety of fuel transport in special casks and fuel storage are explained. It is concluded finally that the safety of shielding repair work and general inspection work is secured when the fuel assemblies are kept in the reactor and also when the fuel assemblies are removed from the reactor by cautious working. (Nakai, Y.)

  11. Paired replacement fuel assemblies for BWR-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguchi, Kazushige.

    1997-01-01

    There are disposed a large-diameter water rod constituting a non-boiling region at a central portion and paired replacement fuel assemblies for two streams having the same average enrichment degree and different amount of burnable poisons. The paired replacement fuel assemblies comprise a first fuel assembly having a less amount of burnable poisons and a second fuel assembly having a larger amount of burnable poisons. A number of burnable poison-containing fuel rods in adjacent with the large diameter water rod is increased in the second fuel assembly than the first fuel assembly. Then, the poison of the paired replacement fuel assemblies for the BWR type reactor can be annihilated simultaneously at the final stage of the cycle. Accordingly, fuels for a BWR type reactor excellent in economical property and safety and facilitating the design of the replacement reactor core can be obtained. (N.H.)

  12. SP-100 nuclear assembly test: Test assembly functional requirements and system arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallas, T.T.; Gluck, R.; Motwani, K.; Clay, H.; O'Neill, G.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the functional requirements and the system that will be tested to validate the reactor, flight shield, and flight controller of the SP-100 Generic Flight System (GFS). The Nuclear Assembly Test (NAT) consists of the test article (SP-100 reactor with control devices and the flight shield) and its supporting systems. The NAT test assembly is being designed by GE. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) is designing the test cell and vacuum vessel system that will contain the NAT test assembly (Renkey et al. 1989). Preliminary design reviews have been completed and the final design is under way

  13. PDX, mechanical design update and assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knutson, D.; Cavalluzzo, S.; Davenport, J.; Kaminsky, E.; Perry, E.; Willard, J.

    1977-01-01

    Mechanical design changes and refinements have occurred since the Sixth Symposium on Engineering Problems of Fusion Research. Particular attention is focused on the area of the toroidal field coil lap joint. Preassembly of major components and final assembly and alignment of the toroidal and poloidal field coils is discussed

  14. Butanol / Honda CRADA Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Beam Overall (includes collar) 8’-6” Cruise Speed 35 knots @ 4500 RPM Operational Draft (DIW4 with engines vertical) 3’-3” Maximum Operating...system, it froze upon startup. To restart the system, the test engineer remotely walked the boat crewman through the required steps.  Interaction...install request, automatically installing a mouse driver on the port. The data flowing through the port caused this “virtual mouse ” to randomly

  15. Setting planned leadtimes in customer-order-driven assembly systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atan, Z.; Kok, de A.G.; Dellaert, N.P.; Janssen, F.B.S.L.P.; Boxel, van R.

    2016-01-01

    We study an assembly system with a number of parallel multistage processes feeding a multistage final assembly process. Each stage has a stochastic throughput time. We assume that the system is controlled by planned leadtimes at each stage. From these planned leadtimes the start and due times of all

  16. Identifying wrong assemblies in de novo short read primary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Finally, some mis-assembly detecting tools have been evaluated for their ability to detect the wrongly assembledprimary contigs, suggesting a lot of scope for improvement in this area. The present work also proposes a simpleunsupervised learning-based novel approach to identify mis-assemblies in the contigs which was ...

  17. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delafosse, Jacques.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a nuclear fuel assembly for a light or heavy water reactor, or for a fast reactor of the kind with a bundle of cladded pins, maintained parallel to each other in a regular network by an assembly of separate supporting grids, fitted with elastic bearing surfaces on these pins [fr

  18. Assembling Transgender Moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greteman, Adam J.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the author seeks to assemble moments--scholarly, popular, and aesthetic--in order to explore the possibilities that emerge as moments collect in education's encounters with the needs, struggles, and possibilities of transgender lives and practices. Assembling moments, the author argues, illustrates the value of "moments"…

  19. Vertical pump assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dohnal, M.; Rosel, J.; Skarka, V.

    1988-01-01

    The mounting is described of the drive assembly of a vertical pump for nuclear power plants in areas with seismic risk. The assembly is attached to the building floor using flexible and damping elements. The design allows producing seismically resistant pumps without major design changes in the existing types of vertical pumps. (E.S.). 1 fig

  20. Fuel Assembly Damping Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kanghee; Kang, Heungseok; Oh, Dongseok; Yoon, Kyungho; Kim, Hyungkyu; Kim, Jaeyong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    This paper summary the fuel assembly damping data in air/in still water/under flow, released from foreign fuel vendors, compared our data with the published data. Some technical issues in fuel assembly damping measurement testing are also briefly discussed. Understanding of each fuel assembly damping mechanisms according to the surrounding medium and flow velocity can support the fuel design improvement in fuel assembly dynamics and structural integrity aspect. Because the upgraded requirements of the newly-developed advanced reactor system will demands to minimize fuel design margin in integrity evaluation, reduction in conservatism of fuel assembly damping can contribute to alleviate the fuel design margin for sure. Damping is an energy dissipation mechanism in a vibrating mechanical structure and prevents a resonant structure from having infinite vibration amplitudes. The sources of fuel assembly damping are various from support friction to flow contribution, and it can be increased by the viscosity or drag of surrounding fluid medium or the average velocity of water flowing. Fuel licensing requires fuel design evaluation in transient or accidental condition. Dynamic response analysis of fuel assembly is to show fuel integrity and requires information on assembly-wise damping in dry condition and under wet or water flowing condition. However, damping measurement test for the full-scale fuel assembly prototype is not easy to carry out because of the scale (fuel prototype, test facility), unsteadiness of test data (scattering, random sampling and processing), instrumentation under water flowing (water-proof response measurement), and noise. LWR fuel technology division in KAERI is preparing the infra structure for damping measurement test of full-scale fuel assembly, to support fuel industries and related research activities. Here is a preliminary summary of fuel assembly damping, published in the literature. Some technical issues in fuel assembly damping

  1. Self-assembled nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jin Z; Liu, Jun; Chen, Shaowei; Liu, Gang-yu

    2003-01-01

    Nanostructures refer to materials that have relevant dimensions on the nanometer length scales and reside in the mesoscopic regime between isolated atoms and molecules in bulk matter. These materials have unique physical properties that are distinctly different from bulk materials. Self-Assembled Nanostructures provides systematic coverage of basic nanomaterials science including materials assembly and synthesis, characterization, and application. Suitable for both beginners and experts, it balances the chemistry aspects of nanomaterials with physical principles. It also highlights nanomaterial-based architectures including assembled or self-assembled systems. Filled with in-depth discussion of important applications of nano-architectures as well as potential applications ranging from physical to chemical and biological systems, Self-Assembled Nanostructures is the essential reference or text for scientists involved with nanostructures.

  2. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurney, Kevin R. [Arizona Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2015-01-12

    This document constitutes the final report under DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649. The organization of this document is as follows: first, I will review the original scope of the proposed research. Second, I will present the current draft of a paper nearing submission to Nature Climate Change on the initial results of this funded effort. Finally, I will present the last phase of the research under this grant which has supported a Ph.D. student. To that end, I will present the graduate student’s proposed research, a portion of which is completed and reflected in the paper nearing submission. This final work phase will be completed in the next 12 months. This final workphase will likely result in 1-2 additional publications and we consider the results (as exemplified by the current paper) high quality. The continuing results will acknowledge the funding provided by DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649.

  3. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeTar, Carleton [P.I.

    2012-12-10

    This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

  4. Status of Conceptual Design Progress for ITER Sector Sub-assembly Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Kyoung O; Park, Hyun Ki; Kim, Dong Jin [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Kyung Kyu [SFA Engineering Corp., Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Im, Ki Hak; Robert, Shaw [ITER Organization, Paul lez Durance (France)

    2010-05-15

    The ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) Tokamak assembly tools are purpose-built tools to complete the ITER Tokamak machine which includes the cryostat and the components contained therein. Based on the design description document prepared by the ITER organization, Korea has carried out the conceptual design of assembly tools. The 40 .deg. sector assemblies sub-assembled at assembly hall are transferred to Tokamak hall using the lifting tool operated by Tokamak main cranes. In-pit assembly tools are the purpose-built assembly tools for the completion of final sector assembly at Tokamak hall. The 40 .deg. sector sub-assembly tools are composed of the upending tool, the sector sub-assembly tool, the sector lifting tool and the vacuum vessel support and bracing tools. The process of the ITER sector sub-assembly at assembly hall and status of research and development are described in this paper. The ITER Tokamak device is composed of 9 vacuum vessel (VV)/toroidal field coils (TFCs)/vacuum vessel thermal shields (VVTS) 40 .deg. sectors. Each VV/TFCs/VVTS 40 .deg. sector is made up of one 40 .deg. VV, two 20 .deg. TFCs and associated VVTS segments. The 40 .deg. sectors are sub-assembled at assembly hall respectively and then 9 sectors which sub-assembled at assembly hall are finally assembled at Tokamak hall. As a basic assembly component, the assembly strategy and tools for the 40 .deg. sector sub-assembly and final assembly at inpit should be developed to satisfy the basic assembly requirements of the ITER Tokamak device. Accordingly, the purpose-built assembly tools should be designed and manufactured considering assembly plan, available space, safety, easy operation, efficient maintenance, and so on. The 40 .deg. sector assembly tools are classified into 2 groups. One group is the sub-assembly tools including upending tool, lifting tool, sub-assembly tool, VV supports and bracing tools used at assembly hall and the other group is the in

  5. NIF Target Assembly Metrology Methodology and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alger, E. T. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Kroll, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dzenitis, E. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Montesanti, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hughes, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Swisher, M. [IAP, Livermore, CA (United States); Taylor, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Segraves, K. [IAP, Livermore, CA (United States); Lord, D. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Castro, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Edwards, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    During our inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) we require cryogenic targets at the 1-cm scale to be fabricated, assembled, and metrologized to micron-level tolerances. During assembly of these ICF targets, there are physical dimensmetrology is completed using optical coordinate measurement machines that provide repeatable measurements with micron precision, while also allowing in-process data collection for absolute accuracy in assembly. To date, 51 targets have been assembled and metrologized, and 34 targets have been successfully fielded on NIF relying on these metrology data. In the near future, ignition experiments on NIF will require tighter tolerances and more demanding target assembly and metrology capability. Metrology methods, calculations, and uncertainty estimates will be discussed. Target diagnostic port alignment, target position, and capsule location results will be reviewed for the 2009 Energetics Campaign. The information is presented via control charts showing the effect of process improvements that were made during target production. Certain parameters, including capsule position, met the 2009 campaign specifications but will have much tighter requirements in the future. Finally, in order to meet these new requirements assembly process changes and metrology capability upgrades will be necessary.

  6. Terminating DNA Tile Assembly with Nanostructured Caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Deepak K; Jiang, Ruoyu; Reinhart, Seth; Mohammed, Abdul M; Jorgenson, Tyler D; Schulman, Rebecca

    2017-10-24

    Precise control over the nucleation, growth, and termination of self-assembly processes is a fundamental tool for controlling product yield and assembly dynamics. Mechanisms for altering these processes programmatically could allow the use of simple components to self-assemble complex final products or to design processes allowing for dynamic assembly or reconfiguration. Here we use DNA tile self-assembly to develop general design principles for building complexes that can bind to a growing biomolecular assembly and terminate its growth by systematically characterizing how different DNA origami nanostructures interact with the growing ends of DNA tile nanotubes. We find that nanostructures that present binding interfaces for all of the binding sites on a growing facet can bind selectively to growing ends and stop growth when these interfaces are presented on either a rigid or floppy scaffold. In contrast, nucleation of nanotubes requires the presentation of binding sites in an arrangement that matches the shape of the structure's facet. As a result, it is possible to build nanostructures that can terminate the growth of existing nanotubes but cannot nucleate a new structure. The resulting design principles for constructing structures that direct nucleation and termination of the growth of one-dimensional nanostructures can also serve as a starting point for programmatically directing two- and three-dimensional crystallization processes using nanostructure design.

  7. Narrative Finality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armine Kotin Mortimer

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available The cloturai device of narration as salvation represents the lack of finality in three novels. In De Beauvoir's Tous les hommes sont mortels an immortal character turns his story to account, but the novel makes a mockery of the historical sense by which men define themselves. In the closing pages of Butor's La Modification , the hero plans to write a book to save himself. Through the thrice-considered portrayal of the Paris-Rome relationship, the ending shows the reader how to bring about closure, but this collective critique written by readers will always be a future book. Simon's La Bataille de Pharsale , the most radical attempt to destroy finality, is an infinite text. No new text can be written. This extreme of perversion guarantees bliss (jouissance . If the ending of De Beauvoir's novel transfers the burden of non-final world onto a new victim, Butor's non-finality lies in the deferral to a future writing, while Simon's writer is stuck in a writing loop, in which writing has become its own end and hence can have no end. The deconstructive and tragic form of contemporary novels proclaims the loss of belief in a finality inherent in the written text, to the profit of writing itself.

  8. TPX assembly plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knutson, D.

    1993-01-01

    The TPX machine will be assembled in the TFTR Test Cell at the Plasma Physics Laboratory, utilizing the existing TFTR machine foundation. Preparation of the area for assembly will begin after completion of the decontamination and decommissioning phase on TFTR and certification that the radiation levels remaining, if any, are consistent with the types of operations planned. Assembly operations begin with the arrival of the first components, and conclude, approximately 24 months later, with the successful completion of the integrated systems tests and the achievement of a first plasma

  9. Nuclear reactor control assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negron, S.B.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an assembly for providing global power control in a nuclear reactor having the core split into two halves. It comprises a disk assembly formed from at least two disks each machined with an identical surface hole pattern such that rotation of one disk relative to the other causes the hole pattern to open or close, the disk assembly being positioned substantially at the longitudinal center of and coaxial with the core halves; and means for rotating at least one of the disks relative to the other

  10. Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter V.

    This final report for the Hybrid Ventilation Centre at Aalborg University describes the activities and research achievement in the project period from August 2001 to August 2006. The report summarises the work performed and the results achieved with reference to articles and reports published...

  11. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    A bimetallic spacer means is cooperatively associated with a nuclear fuel assembly and operative to resist the occurrence of in-reactor bowing of the nuclear fuel assembly. The bimetallic spacer means in one embodiment of the invention includes a space grid formed, at least principally, of zircaloy to the external surface of which are attached a plurality of stainless steel strips. In another embodiment the strips are attached to fuel pins. In each of the embodiments, the stainless steel strips during power production expand outwardly to a greater extent than do the members to which the stainless steel strips are attached, thereby forming stiff springs which abut against like bimetallic spacer means with which the other nuclear fuel assemblies are provided in a given nuclear reactor core to thus prevent the occurrence of in-reactor bowing of the nuclear fuel assemblies. (author)

  12. Fuel assembly spacer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakawa, Ken-etsu.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the pressure loss of coolants by fuel assembly spacers. Constitution: Spacers for supporting a fuel assembly are attached by means of a plurality of wires to an outer frame. The outer frame is made of shape memory alloy such that the wires are caused to slacken at normal temperature and the slacking of the wires is eliminated in excess of the transition temperature. Since the wires slacken at the normal temperature, fuel rods can be inserted easily. After the insertion of the fuel rods, when the entire portion or the outer frame is heated by water or gas at a predetermined temperature, the outer frame resumes its previously memorized shape to tighten the wires and, accordingly, the fuel rods can be supported firmly. In this way, since the fuel rods are inserted in the slacken state of the wires and, after the assembling, the outer frame resumes its memorized shape, the assembling work can be conducted efficiently. (Kamimura, M.)

  13. Nuclear reactor spacer assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.; Groves, M.D.

    1979-01-01

    A fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor is disclosed wherein the fuel element receiving and supporting grid is comprised of a first metal, the guide tubes which pass through the grid assembly are comprised of a second metal and the grid is supported on the guide tubes by means of expanded sleeves located intermediate the grid and guide tubes. The fuel assembly is fabricated by inserting the sleeves, of initial outer diameter commensurate with the guide tube outer diameters, through the holes in the grid assembly provided for the guide tubes and thereafter expanding the sleeves radially outwardly along their entire length such that the guide tubes can subsequently be passed through the sleeves. The step of radial expansion, as a result of windows provided in the sleeves having dimensions commensurate with the geometry of the grid, mechanically captures the grid and simultaneously preloads the sleeve against the grid whereby relative motion between the grid and guide tube will be precluded

  14. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikhorev, Yu.V.; Biryukov, G.I.; Kirilyuk, N.A.; Lobanov, V.N.

    1977-01-01

    A fuel assembly is proposed for nuclear reactors allowing remote replacement of control rod bundles or their shifting from one assembly to another, i.e., their multipurpose use. This leads to a significant increase in fuel assembly usability. In the fuel assembly the control rod bundle is placed in guide tube channels to which baffles are attached for fuel element spacing. The remote handling of control rods is provided by a hollow cylinder with openings in its lower bottom through which the control rods pass. All control rods in a bundle are mounted to a cross beam which in turn is mounted in the cylinder and is designed for grasping the whole rod bundle by a remotely controlled telescopic mechanism in bundle replacement or shifting. (Z.M.)

  15. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betten, P.R.

    1976-01-01

    Under the invention the fuel assembly is particularly suitable for liquid metal cooled fast neutron breeder reactors. Hence, according to the invention a fuel assembly cladding includes inward corrugations with respect to the remainder of the cladding according to a recurring pattern determined by the pitch of the metal wire helically wound round the fuel rods of the assembly. The parts of the cladding pressed inwards correspond to the areas in which the wire encircling the peripheral fuel rods is generally located apart from the cladding, thereby reducing the play between the cladding and the peripheral fuel rods situated in these areas. The reduction in the play in turn improves the coolant flow in the internal secondary channels of the fuel assembly to the detriment of the flow in the peripheral secondary channels and thereby establishes a better coolant fluid temperature profile [fr

  16. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Shungo; Ogiya, Shunsuke.

    1990-01-01

    In a fuel assembly, if the entire fuels comprise mixed oxide fuels, reactivity change in cold temperature-power operation is increased to worsen the reactor shutdown margin. The reactor shutdown margin has been improved by increasing the burnable poison concentration thereby reducing the reactivity of the fuel assembly. However, since unburnt poisons are present at the completion of the reactor operation, the reactivity can not be utilized effectively to bring about economical disadvantage. In view of the above, the reactivity change between lower temperature-power operations is reduced by providing a non-boiling range with more than 9.1% of cross sectional area at the inside of a channel at the central portion of the fuel assembly. As a result, the amount of the unburnt burnable poisons is decreased, the economy of fuel assembly is improved and the reactor shutdown margin can be increase. (N.H.)

  17. Fuel assembly reconstitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgado, Mario M.; Oliveira, Monica G.N.; Ferreira Junior, Decio B.M.; Santos, Barbara O. dos; Santos, Jorge E. dos

    2009-01-01

    Fuel failures have been happened in Nuclear Power Plants worldwide, without lost of integrity and safety, mainly for the public, environment and power plants workers. The most common causes of these events are corrosion (CRUD), fretting and pellet cladding interaction. These failures are identified by increasing the activity of fission products, verified by chemical analyses of reactor coolant. Through these analyses, during the fourth operation cycle of Angra 2 Nuclear Power Plant, was possible to observe fuel failure indication. This indication was confirmed in the end of the cycle during the unloading of reactor core through leakage tests of fuel assembly, using the equipment called 'In Mast Sipping' and 'Box Sipping'. After confirmed, the fuel assembly reconstitution was scheduled, and happened in April, 2007, where was identified the cause and the fuel rod failure, which was substitute by dummy rods (zircaloy). The cause was fretting by 'debris'. The actions to avoid and prevent fuel assemblies failures are important. The goals of this work are to describe the methodology of fuel assembly reconstitution using the FARE (Fuel Assembly Reconstitution Equipment) system, to describe the results of this task in economic and security factors of the company and show how the fuel assembly failures are identified during operation and during the outage. (author)

  18. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick van Rijn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e.g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is dictated by poly-nucleotides namely RNA or DNA. This “biopolymer” directs the proteins and imposes limitations on the structure like the length or diameter of the particle. Not only do these bionanoparticles use polymer-directed self-assembly, also processes like amyloid formation are in a way a result of directed protein assembly by partial unfolded/misfolded biopolymers namely, polypeptides. The combination of proteins and synthetic polymers, inspired by the natural processes, are therefore regarded as a highly promising area of research. Directed protein assembly is versatile with respect to the possible interactions which brings together the protein and polymer, e.g., electrostatic, v.d. Waals forces or covalent conjugation, and possible combinations are numerous due to the large amounts of different polymers and proteins available. The protein-polymer interacting behavior and overall morphology is envisioned to aid in clarifying protein-protein interactions and are thought to entail some interesting new functions and properties which will ultimately lead to novel bio-hybrid materials.

  19. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. K. Blasie; W.F. DeGrado; J.G. Saven; M.J. Therien

    2012-05-24

    The overall objective is to create robust artificial protein modules as scaffolds to control both (a) the conformation of novel cofactors incorporated into the modules thereby making the modules possess a desired functionality and (b) the organization of these functional modules into ordered macroscopic ensembles, whose macroscopic materials properties derive from the designed microscopic function of the modules. We focus on two specific types of cofactors for imparting functionality in this project; primarily nonlinear optical (NLO) chromophores designed to exhibit extraordinary molecular hyperpolarizabilities, as well as donor-bridge-acceptor cofactors designed to exhibit highly efficient, 'through-bonds' light-induced electron transfer (LIET) over nano-scale distances. The ensembles range from 2-D to 3-D, designed to possess the degree of orientational and positional order necessary to optimize their macroscopic response, the latter ranging from liquid-crystalline or glass-like to long-range periodic. Computational techniques, firmly based in statistical thermodynamics, are utilized for the design the artificial protein modules, based on robust {alpha}-helical bundle motifs, necessarily incorporating the desired conformation, location, and environment of the cofactor. Importantly, this design approach also includes optimization of the interactions between the modules to promote their organization into ordered macroscopic ensembles in 2-D and 3-D via either directed-assembly or self-assembly. When long-range periodic order is required, the design can be optimized to result a specified lattice symmetry. The structure and functionality of the individual modules are fully characterized at the microscopic level, as well as that of the ensembles at the macroscopic level, employing modern experimental physical-chemical and computational techniques. These include, for example, multi-dimensional NMR, various pump-probe transient spectroscopies to ultrafast time

  20. Human Assisted Assembly Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CALTON,TERRI L.; PETERS,RALPH R.

    2000-01-01

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be a perfectly valid operations, but in reality the operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications; however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning to allow engineers to verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. Factories will very likely put humans and robots together in cooperative environments to meet the demands for customized products, for purposes including robotic and automated assembly. For robots to work harmoniously within an integrated environment with humans the robots must have cooperative operational skills. For example, in a human only environment, humans may tolerate collisions with one another if they did not cause much pain. This level of tolerance may or may not apply to robot-human environments. Humans expect that robots will be able to operate and navigate in their environments without collisions or interference. The ability to accomplish this is linked to the sensing capabilities available. Current work in the field of cooperative

  1. Flexible Automation for Final Assembly of Blanket Arrays, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Topic Z1.01, NASA seeks advanced photovoltaic technologies that can deliver cost, reliability, mass, volume and efficiency gains over current solutions. Future...

  2. Wellhead deliverabilty of natural gas - assembling the evidence. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, W.R.

    1995-09-01

    This report presents information about the wellhead delivery of natural gas--the amount of gas the supply industry can produce and deliver to the pipeline. It is designed to help power industry planners evaluate essential aspects of gas supply as part of their overall assessment and utilization of gas-fired power generation. Low prices caused by excess deliverability have led to minimal exploration for new supplies, with the open-quotes bubbleclose quotes of excess deliverability ending. The report examines the facts pertinent to assessing the outlook for deliverability over the intermediate term. It develops deliverability concepts and relates deliverability to reserves and resources. It assesses the available information for measuring and monitoring availability and suggests improvements in available data. The regional outlook for deliverability growth in the Gulf of Mexico and other leading producing regions is also discussed. The report reviews the historical background of present deliverability trends and discusses the industry dynamics that affect development of future deliverability: lead times for increasing deliverability, the declining base of skilled exploration manpower, advancing gas supply technology, and prices required to encourage exploration and development

  3. Configuration management of TFTR during final fabrication/assembly/installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabado, M.; Rappe, G.H.; Stern, E.; Wexler, H.

    1983-01-01

    In essence, configuration management consists of the establishment of a Baseline definition for each project phase, well documented, so that all project participants are conversant with it and the disciplined redefinition of the baseline as the project matures. This paper describes the methods by which the Baseline design for each phase of the TFTR program was updated. Definition was initiated through informal controls which became more formal as the design progressed. At the point where the design was essentially frozen, that is, released for procurement and manufacturing, a configuration change control procedure was instituted to continue on a routine basis both engineering and management review of all changes. Since the TFTR program is experimental in nature it was understood from the outset that desirable changes based on new analytical results and experimental results from other fusion programs could be injected into the design. The problem was one of maintaining the flexibility of providing a reasonable baseline definition, in order to allow the design to proceed yet avoiding the premature freezing of the design, in order to incorporate required changes at lowest cost

  4. Selecting Superior De Novo Transcriptome Assemblies: Lessons Learned by Leveraging the Best Plant Genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loren A Honaas

    Full Text Available Whereas de novo assemblies of RNA-Seq data are being published for a growing number of species across the tree of life, there are currently no broadly accepted methods for evaluating such assemblies. Here we present a detailed comparison of 99 transcriptome assemblies, generated with 6 de novo assemblers including CLC, Trinity, SOAP, Oases, ABySS and NextGENe. Controlled analyses of de novo assemblies for Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa transcriptomes provide new insights into the strengths and limitations of transcriptome assembly strategies. We find that the leading assemblers generate reassuringly accurate assemblies for the majority of transcripts. At the same time, we find a propensity for assemblers to fail to fully assemble highly expressed genes. Surprisingly, the instance of true chimeric assemblies is very low for all assemblers. Normalized libraries are reduced in highly abundant transcripts, but they also lack 1000s of low abundance transcripts. We conclude that the quality of de novo transcriptome assemblies is best assessed through consideration of a combination of metrics: 1 proportion of reads mapping to an assembly 2 recovery of conserved, widely expressed genes, 3 N50 length statistics, and 4 the total number of unigenes. We provide benchmark Illumina transcriptome data and introduce SCERNA, a broadly applicable modular protocol for de novo assembly improvement. Finally, our de novo assembly of the Arabidopsis leaf transcriptome revealed ~20 putative Arabidopsis genes lacking in the current annotation.

  5. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinis, Panos [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-07

    This is the final report for the work conducted at the University of Minnesota (during the period 12/01/12-09/18/14) by PI Panos Stinis as part of the "Collaboratory on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials" (CM4). CM4 is a multi-institution DOE-funded project whose aim is to conduct basic and applied research in the emerging field of mesoscopic modeling of materials.

  6. A drying system for spent fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suikki, M.; Warinowski, M.; Nieminen, J.

    2007-06-01

    The report presents a proposed drying apparatus for spent fuel assemblies. The apparatus is used for removing the moisture left in fuel assemblies during intermediate storage and transport. The apparatus shall be installed in connection with the fuel handling cell of an encapsulation plant. The report presents basic requirements for and implementation of the drying system, calculation of the drying process, operation, service and maintenance of the equipment, as well as a cost estimate. Some aspects of the apparatus design are quite specified, but the actual detailed planning and final selection of components have not been included. The report also describes actions for possible malfunction and fault conditions. An objective of the drying system for fuel assemblies is to remove moisture from the assemblies prior to placing the same in a disposal canister for spent nuclear fuel. Drying is performed as a vacuum drying process for vaporizing and draining the moisture present on the surface of the assemblies. The apparatus comprises two pieces of drying equipment. One of the chambers is equipped to take up Lo1-2 fuel assemblies and the other OL1-2 fuel assemblies. The chambers have an internal space sufficient to accommodate also OL3 fuel assemblies, but this requires replacing the internal chamber structure for laying down the assemblies to be dried. The drying chambers can be closed with hatches facing the fuel handling cell. Water vapour pumped out of the chamber is collected in a controlled manner, first by condensing with a heat exchanger and further by freezing in a cold trap. For reasons of safety, the exhaust air of vacuum pumps is further delivered into the ventilation outlet duct of a controlled area. The adequate drying result is ascertained by a low final pressure of about 100 Pa, as well as by a sufficient holding time. The chamber is built for making its cleaning as easy as possible in the event of a fuel rod breaking during a drying, loading or unloading

  7. WHO: World Health Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, A

    1992-05-23

    1200 delegates from 175 member countries attended the 45th World Health Assembly in Geneva. Everyone at the Assembly ratified measures to prevent and control AIDS. 12 countries intended to do long term planning for community based care for AIDS patients. Further the Assembly denounced instances where countries and individuals denied the gravity of the AIDS pandemic. In fact, it expressed the importance for urgent and intensive action against HIV/AIDS. The assembly backed proposals to prevent and control sexually transmitted diseases that affect AIDS patients, especially hepatitis B. For example, in countries with hepatitis B prevalence 8% (many countries in Sub-Sahara Africa, Asia, the Pacific region, and South America), health officials should introduce hepatitis B vaccine into their existing immunization programs by 1995. By 1997, this vaccine should be part of all immunization programs. The Assembly was aware of the obstacles of establishing reliable cold chains for nationwide distribution, however. Delegates in Committee A objected to the fact that 50% of the populations of developing countries continued to have limited access to essential drugs. They also expressed disapproval in implementation of WHO's 1988 ethical criteria for promotion of drugs which WHO entrusted to the Council for International Organisations of Medical Sciences (CIOMS). CIOMS lacked WHO's status and thus could not effectively monitor drug advertising. In fact, the pharmaceutical industry as well as WHO provided the funds for a meeting of 25 experts to discuss principles included in the ethical criteria. At least 4 countries insisted that WHO have the ultimate authority in monitoring drug advertising. Delegates did adopt a compromise resolution on this topic which required that industry promotion methods be reported to the 1994 Assembly via the Executive Board. The Assembly requested WHO to establish an international advisory committee on nursing and midwifery and to improve the network of

  8. Dynamic behaviour of diagnostic assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecinka, L.

    1980-01-01

    The methodology is shown of calculating the frequency spectrum of a diagnostic assembly. The oscillations of the assembly as a whole, of a fuel rod bundle, the assembly jacket and of the individual rods in the bundle were considered. The manufacture is suggested of a model assembly which would be used for testing forced vibrations using an experimental water loop. (M.S.)

  9. Radiological characterization of spent control rod assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepel, E.A.; Robertson, D.E.; Thomas, C.W.; Pratt, S.L.; Haggard, D.L.

    1995-10-01

    This document represents the final report of an ongoing study to provide radiological characterizations, classifications, and assessments in support of the decommissioning of nuclear power stations. This report describes the results of non-destructive and laboratory radionuclide measurements, as well as waste classification assessments, of BWR and PWR spent control rod assemblies. The radionuclide inventories of these spent control rods were determined by three separate methodologies, including (1) direct assay techniques, (2) calculational techniques, and (3) by sampling and laboratory radiochemical analyses. For the BWR control rod blade (CRB) and PWR burnable poison rod assembly (BPRA), 60 Co and 63 Ni, present in the stainless steel cladding, were the most abundant neutron activation products. The most abundant radionuclide in the PWR rod cluster control assembly (RCCA) was 108m Ag (130 yr halflife) produced in the Ag-In-Cd alloy used as the neutron poison. This radionuclide will be the dominant contributor to the gamma dose rate for many hundreds of years. The results of the direct assay methods agree very well (±10%) with the sampling/radiochemical measurements. The results of the calculational methods agreed fairly well with the empirical measurements for the BPRA, but often varied by a factor of 5 to 10 for the CRB and the RCCA assemblies. If concentration averaging and encapsulation, as allowed by 10CFR61.55, is performed, then each of the entire control assemblies would be classified as Class C low-level radioactive waste

  10. Fuel assembly inspection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaginuma, Yoshitaka

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a device suitable to inspect appearance of fuel assemblies by photographing the appearance of fuel assemblies. Namely, the inspection device of the present invention measures bowing of fuel assembly or each of fuel rods or both of them based on the partially photographed images of fuel assembly. In this case, there is disposed a means which flashily projects images in the form of horizontal line from a direction intersecting obliquely relative to a horizontal cross section of the fuel assembly. A first image processing means separates the projected image pictures including projected images and calculates bowing. A second image processing means replaces the projected image pictures of the projected images based on projected images just before and after the photographing. Then, images for the measurement of bowing and images for inspection can be obtained simultaneously. As a result, the time required for the photographing can be shortened, the time for inspection can be shortened and an effect of preventing deterioration of photographing means by radiation rays can be provided. (I.S.)

  11. Self-assembly from milli- to nanoscales: methods and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastrangeli, M; Celis, J-P; Abbasi, S; Varel, C; Böhringer, K F; Van Hoof, C

    2009-01-01

    The design and fabrication techniques for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and nanodevices are progressing rapidly. However, due to material and process flow incompatibilities in the fabrication of sensors, actuators and electronic circuitry, a final packaging step is often necessary to integrate all components of a heterogeneous microsystem on a common substrate. Robotic pick-and-place, although accurate and reliable at larger scales, is a serial process that downscales unfavorably due to stiction problems, fragility and sheer number of components. Self-assembly, on the other hand, is parallel and can be used for device sizes ranging from millimeters to nanometers. In this review, the state-of-the-art in methods and applications for self-assembly is reviewed. Methods for assembling three-dimensional (3D) MEMS structures out of two-dimensional (2D) ones are described. The use of capillary forces for folding 2D plates into 3D structures, as well as assembling parts onto a common substrate or aggregating parts to each other into 2D or 3D structures, is discussed. Shape matching and guided assembly by magnetic forces and electric fields are also reviewed. Finally, colloidal self-assembly and DNA-based self-assembly, mainly used at the nanoscale, are surveyed, and aspects of theoretical modeling of stochastic assembly processes are discussed. (topical review)

  12. Blade attachment assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John McConnell; Miller, Diane Patricia

    2016-05-03

    An assembly and method for affixing a turbomachine rotor blade to a rotor wheel are disclosed. In an embodiment, an adaptor member is provided disposed between the blade and the rotor wheel, the adaptor member including an adaptor attachment slot that is complementary to the blade attachment member, and an adaptor attachment member that is complementary to the rotor wheel attachment slot. A coverplate is provided, having a coverplate attachment member that is complementary to the rotor wheel attachment slot, and a hook for engaging the adaptor member. When assembled, the coverplate member matingly engages with the adaptor member, and retains the blade in the adaptor member, and the assembly in the rotor wheel.

  13. Reactor and fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yoshihiko; Bessho, Yasunori; Sano, Hiroki; Yokomizo, Osamu; Yamashita, Jun-ichi.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention realizes an effective spectral operation by applying an optimum pressure loss coefficient while taking the characteristics of a lower tie plate into consideration. That is, the pressure loss coefficient of the lower tie plate is optimized by varying the cross sectional area of a fuel assembly flow channel in the lower tie plate or varying the surface roughness of a coolant flow channel in the lower tie plate. Since there is a pressure loss coefficient to optimize the moderator density over a flow rate change region, the effect of spectral shift rods can be improved by setting the optimum pressure loss coefficient of the lower tie plate. According to the present invention, existent fuel assemblies can easily be changed successively to fuel assemblies having spectral shift rods of a great spectral shift effect by using existent reactor facilities as they are. (I.S.)

  14. Power module assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jeremy B [Torrance, CA; Newson, Steve [Redondo Beach, CA

    2011-11-15

    A power module assembly of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicular power inverter, wherein the power inverter has a grounded chassis, is provided. The power module assembly comprises a conductive base layer electrically coupled to the chassis, an insulating layer disposed on the conductive base layer, a first conductive node disposed on the insulating layer, a second conductive node disposed on the insulating layer, wherein the first and second conductive nodes are electrically isolated from each other. The power module assembly also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the conductive base layer, and a second electrode electrically connected to the first conductive node, and further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the conductive base layer, and a second electrode electrically connected to the second conductive node.

  15. Magnetic nanoparticle assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    Trohidou, Kalliopi N

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles with diameters in the range of a few nanometers are today at the cutting edge of modern technology and innovation because of their use in numerous applications ranging from engineering to biomedicine. A great deal of scientific interest has been focused on the functionalization of magnetic nanoparticle assemblies. The understanding of interparticle interactions is necessary to clarify the physics of these assemblies and their use in the development of high-performance magnetic materials. This book reviews prominent research studies on the static and dynamic magnetic properties of nanoparticle assemblies, gathering together experimental and computational techniques in an effort to reveal their optimized magnetic properties for biomedical use and as ultra-high magnetic recording media.

  16. Reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.; Groves, M.D.

    1980-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel assembly having a lower end fitting and actuating means interacting therewith for holding the assembly down on the core support stand against the upward flow of coolant. Locking means for interacting with projections on the support stand are carried by the lower end fitting and are actuated by the movement of an actuating rod operated from above the top of the assembly. In one embodiment of the invention the downward movement of the actuating rod forces a latched spring to move outward into locking engagement with a shoulder on the support stand projections. In another embodiment, the actuating rod is rotated to effect the locking between the end fitting and the projection. (author)

  17. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Hiroshi; Watari, Yoshio; Hizahara, Hiroshi; Masuoka, Ryuzo.

    1970-01-01

    When exchanging nuclear fuel assemblies during the operation of a nuclear reactor, melting of fuel bodies, and severence of tubular claddings is halted at the time of insertion by furnishing a neutron absorbing material such as B 10 , Cd, Gd or the like at the forward end of the fuel assembly to thereby lower the power peak at the forward ends of the fuel elements to within tolerable levels and thus prevent both fuel liquification and excessive expansion. The neutron absorbing material may be attached in the form of a plate to the fuel assembly forward tie plate, or may be inserted as a pellet into the front end of the tubular cladding. (Owens, K.J.)

  18. Liaison based assembly design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, A.; Kholwadwala, D.; Wilson, R.H.

    1996-12-01

    Liaison Based Assembly Design extends the current information infrastructure to support design in terms of kinematic relationships between parts, or liaisons. These liaisons capture information regarding contact, degrees-of-freedom constraints and containment relationships between parts in an assembly. The project involved defining a useful collection of liaison representations, investigating their properties, and providing for maximum use of the data in downstream applications. We tested our ideas by implementing a prototype system involving extensions to Pro/Engineer and the Archimedes assembly planner. With an expanded product model, the design system is more able to capture design intent. When a product update is attempted, increased knowledge availability improves our ability to understand the effect of design changes. Manufacturing and analysis disciplines benefit from having liaison information available, so less time is wasted arguing over incomplete design specifications and our enterprise can be more completely integrated.

  19. Integrated magnetic transformer assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to an integrated magnetics transformer assembly comprising a first magnetically permeable core forming a first substantially closed magnetic flux path and a second magnetically permeable core forming a second substantially closed magnetic flux path. A first input...... inductor winding is wound around a first predetermined segment of the first magnetically permeable core and a second input inductor winding is wound around a first predetermined segment of the second magnetically permeable core. The integrated magnetics transformer assembly further comprises a first output......-winding of the first output inductor winding and the first half-winding of the second output inductor winding are configured to produce aligned, i.e. in the same direction, magnetic fluxes through the first substantially closed magnetic flux path. The integrated magnetics transformer assembly is well- suited for use...

  20. Surface Assembly of the End Cap Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    S. Palestini

    Before the final installation in the ATLAS detector, the chambers of the inner and middle forward stations of the Muon spectrometer are integrated and assembled on large support structures. Work on the sectors of the Thin Gap Chamber (TGC) Big Wheels (trigger chambers) and of the Muon Drift Tube (MDT) Big Wheels (precision tracking chambers) started early this year, and has recently expanded to all the foreseen working areas, covering most the surface of building 180. Several operations are performed, often in parallel, by different teams: final integration of the detectors, assembly of the support structures, installation and test of services, installation of chambers, and final tests. Control of the geometry is performed frequently both on assembly tooling and on complete sectors. The final tests verify the response of the detectors and of the electronics, including read-out and trigger electronics, the alignment system, and the detector control. The sectors are designed as a unit that can be fully commis...

  1. Transfer of fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuckovich, M.; Burkett, J. P.; Sallustio, J.

    1984-01-01

    Fuel assemblies of a nuclear reactor are transferred during fueling or refueling or the like by a crane. The work-engaging fixture of the crane picks up an assembly, removes it from this slot, transfers it to the deposit site and deposits it in its slot at the deposit site. The control for the crane includes a strain gauge connected to the crane line which raises and lowers the load. The strain gauge senses the load on the crane. The signal from the strain gauge is compared with setpoints; a high-level setpoint, a low-level setpoint and a slack-line setpoint. If the strain gauge signal exceeds the high-level setpoint, the line drive is disabled. This event may occur during raising of a fuel assembly which encounters resistance. The high-level setpoint may be overridden under proper precautions. The line drive is also disabled if the strain gauge signal is less than the low-level setpoint. This event occurs when a fuel assembly being deposited contacts the bottom of its slot or an obstruction in, or at the entry to the slot. To preclude lateral movement and possible damage to a fuel assembly suspended from the crane line, the traverse drive of the crane is disabled once the strain-gauge exceets the lov-level setpoint. The traverse drive can only be enabled after the strain-gauge signal is less than the slack-line set-point. This occurs when the lines has been set in slack-line setting. When the line is tensioned after slack-li ne setting, the traverse drive remains enabled only if the line has been disconnected from the fuel assembly

  2. Neutron detector assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanai, Koi; Shirayama, Shinpei.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent gamma-ray from leaking externally passing through the inside of a neutron detector assembly. Constitution: In a neutron detector assembly having a protection pipe formed with an enlarged diameter portion which serves also as a spacer, partition plates with predetermined width are disposed at the upper and the lower portions in this expanded portion. A lot of metal particles are filled into spaces formed by the partition plates. In such a structure, the metal particles well-absorb the gamma-rays from above and convert them into heat to provide shielding for the gamma-rays. (Horiuchi, T.)

  3. Assembling RNA Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shou-Jun

    2017-01-01

    RNA nanoparticles are designed and self-assembled according to noncanonical interactions of naturally conserved RNA motifs and/or canonical Watson-Crick base-pairing interactions, which have potential applications in gene therapy and nanomedicine. These artificially engineered nanoparticles are mainly synthesized from in vitro transcribed RNAs, purified by denaturing and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), and characterized with native PAGE, AFM, and TEM technologies. The protocols of in vitro transcription, denaturing and native PAGE, and RNA nanoparticle self-assembly are described in detail.

  4. Assembling an aesthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Emily

    2012-12-01

    Recent research informing and related to the study of three-dimensional scientific models is assembled here in a way that explores an aesthetic, specifically, of touch. I concentrate on the materiality of models, drawing on insights from the history and philosophy of science, design and metaphysics. This article chronicles the ways in which touch, or material interactions, operate in the world of 3D models, and its role in what models mean and do. I end with a call for greater attention to scientific process, described as assembly of and within science, which is revealed by this focus on touch. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The nuclear fuel assembly described includes a cluster of fuel elements supported at a distance from each other so that their axes are parallel in order to establish secondary channels between them reserved for the coolant. Several ducts for an auxiliary cooling fluid are arranged in the cluster. The wall of each duct is pierced with coolant ejection holes which are placed circumferentially to a pre-determined pattern established according to the position of the duct in the cluster and by the axial distance of the ejection hole along the duct. This assembly is intended for reactors cooled by light or heavy water [fr

  6. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-02-07

    This is the final report of our research program on electronic transport experiments on Topological Insulator (TI) devices, funded by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences. TI-based electronic devices are attractive as platforms for spintronic applications, and for detection of emergent properties such as Majorana excitations , electron-hole condensates , and the topological magneto-electric effect . Most theoretical proposals envision geometries consisting of a planar TI device integrated with materials of distinctly different physical phases (such as ferromagnets and superconductors). Experimental realization of physics tied to the surface states is a challenge due to the ubiquitous presence of bulk carriers in most TI compounds as well as degradation during device fabrication.

  7. Sensitivity Analysis of Deviation Source for Fast Assembly Precision Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Tang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Assembly precision optimization of complex product has a huge benefit in improving the quality of our products. Due to the impact of a variety of deviation source coupling phenomena, the goal of assembly precision optimization is difficult to be confirmed accurately. In order to achieve optimization of assembly precision accurately and rapidly, sensitivity analysis of deviation source is proposed. First, deviation source sensitivity is defined as the ratio of assembly dimension variation and deviation source dimension variation. Second, according to assembly constraint relations, assembly sequences and locating, deviation transmission paths are established by locating the joints between the adjacent parts, and establishing each part’s datum reference frame. Third, assembly multidimensional vector loops are created using deviation transmission paths, and the corresponding scalar equations of each dimension are established. Then, assembly deviation source sensitivity is calculated by using a first-order Taylor expansion and matrix transformation method. Finally, taking assembly precision optimization of wing flap rocker as an example, the effectiveness and efficiency of the deviation source sensitivity analysis method are verified.

  8. Fire resistant PV shingle assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenox, Carl J.

    2012-10-02

    A fire resistant PV shingle assembly includes a PV assembly, including PV body, a fire shield and a connection member connecting the fire shield below the PV body, and a support and inter-engagement assembly. The support and inter-engagement assembly is mounted to the PV assembly and comprises a vertical support element, supporting the PV assembly above a support surface, an upper interlock element, positioned towards the upper PV edge, and a lower interlock element, positioned towards the lower PV edge. The upper interlock element of one PV shingle assembly is inter-engageable with the lower interlock element of an adjacent PV shingle assembly. In some embodiments the PV shingle assembly may comprise a ventilation path below the PV body. The PV body may be slidably mounted to the connection member to facilitate removal of the PV body.

  9. Turbomachine blade assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Crespo, Andres Jose

    2016-11-01

    Embodiments of the present disclosure include a system comprising a turbomachine blade assembly having a blade portion, a shank portion, and a mounting portion, wherein the blade portion, the shank portion, and the mounting portion comprise a first plurality of plies extending from a tip of the airfoil to a base of the dovetail.

  10. Fuel sub-assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolly, R.

    1982-01-01

    A fuel sub-assembly for a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor is described in which the bundle of fuel pins are braced apart by a series of spaced grids. The grids at the lower end are capable of yielding, thus allowing pins swollen by irradiation to be withdrawn with a reduced risk of damage. (U.K.)

  11. Nanoparticle assemblies and superstructures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kotov, Nicholas A

    2006-01-01

    ... building blocks of larger and more complex systems. Therefore, the present challenge of nanoscale science is to shift from making certain building blocks to organizing them in one-, two-, and three-dimensional structures. Such assemblies and superstructures are the next logical step in the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology. In this re...

  12. Spool assembly support analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, B.F.

    1994-01-01

    This document provides the wind/seismic analysis and evaluation for the pump pit spool assemblies. Hand calculations were used for the analysis. UBC, AISC, and load factors were used in this evaluation. The results show that the actual loads are under the allowable loads and all requirements are met

  13. Nanotechnology: A molecular assembler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, T. Ross; Snapper, Marc L.

    2017-09-01

    The idea of nanometre-scale machines that can assemble molecules has long been thought of as the stuff of science fiction. Such a machine has now been built -- and might herald a new model for organic synthesis. See Letter p.374

  14. Macroscopic magnetic Self assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löthman, Per Arvid

    2018-01-01

    Exploring the macroscopic scale's similarities to the microscale is part and parcel of this thesis as reflected in the research question: what can we learn about the microscopic scale by studying the macroscale? Investigations of the environment in which the self-assembly takes place, and the

  15. Assembling Sustainable Territories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandergeest, Peter; Ponte, Stefano; Bush, Simon

    2015-01-01

    that territorialisation is accomplished not just through (re)defining bounded space, but more broadly through the assembling of four elements: space, subjects, objects, and expertise. Four case studies of sustainability certification in seafood are analyzed to show that ‘green gabbing’ is not necessarily the central...

  16. Assembling sustainable territories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandergeest, Peter; Ponte, Stefano; Bush, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The authors show how certification assembles ‘sustainable’ territories through a complex layering of regulatory authority in which both government and nongovernment entities claim rule-making authority, sometimes working together, sometimes in parallel, sometimes competitively. It is argued that

  17. Turneri preemia 2015: Assemble

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2015-01-01

    Turneri 2015. aasta preemia pälvis radikaalne noorte arhitektide kollektiiv Assemble. Rühmitus on 18-liikmeline ja baseerub Ida-Londonis ning selle tegevust võib üldistatult nimetada hüljatud ruumide taaselustamiseks kogukondlike aktsioonide kaudu

  18. Industrial Assembly Cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellekilde, Lars-Peter; Buch, Jacob Pørksen; Iversen, Thorbjørn Mosekjær

    This technical report presents 13 different industrial assembly tasks, which are composed of 70 different operations. The report is written to provide an overview and do as such not contain product specific information such as object weights, dimensions etc. The operations are classified into a set...

  19. Biosynthesis: Reprogramming assembly lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Binuraj R. K.; Jenner, Matthew

    2018-03-01

    Rational engineering of biosynthetic assembly lines for production of new compounds is an attractive prospect, yet it presents many challenges. Learning from biology, some of the rules for expanding the chemical diversity of non-ribosomal peptides have been uncovered in two recent studies.

  20. Ordinary General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Tuesday 12 April at 14.00 Council Chamber, Bldg 503 In conformity with the Statutes of the Staff Association, an ordinary General Assembly is organized once a year (article IV.2.1). Agenda   Adoption of the Agenda Approval of the Draft Minutes of the Ordinary General Assembly of 20 April 2010 Presentation and approval of the Activity Report 2010 Presentation and approval of the Financial Report 2010 Presentation and approval of the Auditors Report 2010 Programme for 2011 Presentation et and approval of the draft budget and subscription rate 2012 Election of the Election Committee Election of the Board of Auditors Miscellaneous We remind members of article IV.3.4 in the Statutes of the Association which reads: “After having dealt with all the items on the agenda, the members may, with the consent of the Assembly, have other matters discussed, but decisions may be taken only on the items listed on the agenda. Nevertheless, the Assembly ma...

  1. Ordinary General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Tuesday 12 April at 14.00 Council Chamber, Bldg 503 In conformity with the Statutes of the Staff Association, an ordinary General Assembly is organized once a year (article IV.2.1). Agenda   Adoption of the Agenda Approval of the Draft Minutes of the Ordinary General Assembly of 20 April 2010 Presentation and approval of the Activity Report 2010 Presentation and approval of the Financial Report 2010 Presentation and approval of the Auditors Report 2010 Programme for 2011 Presentation and approval of the draft budget and subscription rate 2012 Election of the Election Committee Election of the Board of Auditors Miscellaneous We remind members of article IV.3.4 in the Statutes of the Association which reads: “After having dealt with all the items on the agenda, the members may, with the consent of the Assembly, have other matters discussed, but decisions may be taken only on the items listed on the agenda. Nevertheless, the Assembly may r...

  2. Ordinary General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2010-01-01

    Tuesday 20 April at 10.00 Council Chamber, Bldg 503 In conformity with the Statutes of the Staff Association, an ordinary General Assembly is organized once a year (article IV.2.1). Agenda   Adoption of the Agenda Approval of the Draft Minutes of the Ordinary General Assembly of 12 May 2009 Presentation and approval of the Activity Report 2009 Presentation and approval of the Financial Report 2009 Presentation and approval of the Auditors Report 2009 Programme for 2010 Presentation et and approval of the draft budget and subscription rate 2010 Election of the Election Committee Election of the Board of Auditors Miscellaneous We remind members of article IV.3.4 in the Statutes of the Association which reads: “After having dealt with all the items on the agenda, the members may, with the consent of the Assembly, have other matters discussed, but decisions may be taken only on the items listed on the agenda. Nevertheless, the Assembly may require t...

  3. Lageos assembly operation plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueger, J.

    1975-01-01

    Guidelines and constraints procedures for LAGEOS assembly, operation, and design performance are given. Special attention was given to thermal, optical, and dynamic analysis and testing. The operation procedures illustrate the interrelation and sequence of tasks in a flow diagram. The diagram also includes quality assurance functions for verification of operation tasks.

  4. Assembly of primary cilia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lotte B; Veland, Iben R; Schrøder, Jacob M

    2008-01-01

    knowledge about IFT is based on studies performed in Chlamydomonas and Caenorhabditis elegans. Therefore, our review of the IFT literature includes studies performed in these two model organisms. The role of several non-IFT proteins (e.g., centrosomal proteins) in the ciliary assembly process is also...... discussed. Developmental Dynamics, 2008. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc....

  5. Toward a molecular programming language for algorithmic self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patitz, Matthew John

    Self-assembly is the process whereby relatively simple components autonomously combine to form more complex objects. Nature exhibits self-assembly to form everything from microscopic crystals to living cells to galaxies. With a desire to both form increasingly sophisticated products and to understand the basic components of living systems, scientists have developed and studied artificial self-assembling systems. One such framework is the Tile Assembly Model introduced by Erik Winfree in 1998. In this model, simple two-dimensional square 'tiles' are designed so that they self-assemble into desired shapes. The work in this thesis consists of a series of results which build toward the future goal of designing an abstracted, high-level programming language for designing the molecular components of self-assembling systems which can perform powerful computations and form into intricate structures. The first two sets of results demonstrate self-assembling systems which perform infinite series of computations that characterize computably enumerable and decidable languages, and exhibit tools for algorithmically generating the necessary sets of tiles. In the next chapter, methods for generating tile sets which self-assemble into complicated shapes, namely a class of discrete self-similar fractal structures, are presented. Next, a software package for graphically designing tile sets, simulating their self-assembly, and debugging designed systems is discussed. Finally, a high-level programming language which abstracts much of the complexity and tedium of designing such systems, while preventing many of the common errors, is presented. The summation of this body of work presents a broad coverage of the spectrum of desired outputs from artificial self-assembling systems and a progression in the sophistication of tools used to design them. By creating a broader and deeper set of modular tools for designing self-assembling systems, we hope to increase the complexity which is

  6. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Robert C. [Texas A& M University; Kamon, Teruki [Texas A& M University; Toback, David [Texas A& M University; Safonov, Alexei [Texas A& M University; Dutta, Bhaskar [Texas A& M University; Dimitri, Nanopoulos [Texas A& M University; Pope, Christopher [Texas A& M University; White, James [Texas A& M University

    2013-11-18

    Overview The High Energy Physics Group at Texas A&M University is submitting this final report for our grant number DE-FG02-95ER40917. This grant has supported our wide range of research activities for over a decade. The reports contained here summarize the latest work done by our research team. Task A (Collider Physics Program): CMS & CDF Profs. T. Kamon, A. Safonov, and D. Toback co-lead the Texas A&M (TAMU) collider program focusing on CDF and CMS experiments. Task D: Particle Physics Theory Our particle physics theory task is the combined effort of Profs. B. Dutta, D. Nanopoulos, and C. Pope. Task E (Underground Physics): LUX & NEXT Profs. R. Webb and J. White(deceased) lead the Xenon-based underground research program consisting of two main thrusts: the first, participation in the LUX two-phase xenon dark matter search experiment and the second, detector R&D primarily aimed at developing future detectors for underground physics (e.g. NEXT and LZ).

  7. Batch Scheduling for Hybrid Assembly Differentiation Flow Shop to Minimize Total Actual Flow Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulidya, R.; Suprayogi; Wangsaputra, R.; Halim, A. H.

    2018-03-01

    A hybrid assembly differentiation flow shop is a three-stage flow shop consisting of Machining, Assembly and Differentiation Stages and producing different types of products. In the machining stage, parts are processed in batches on different (unrelated) machines. In the assembly stage, each part of the different parts is assembled into an assembly product. Finally, the assembled products will further be processed into different types of final products in the differentiation stage. In this paper, we develop a batch scheduling model for a hybrid assembly differentiation flow shop to minimize the total actual flow time defined as the total times part spent in the shop floor from the arrival times until its due date. We also proposed a heuristic algorithm for solving the problems. The proposed algorithm is tested using a set of hypothetic data. The solution shows that the algorithm can solve the problems effectively.

  8. IMPROVEMENT FOR AN ASSEMBLY FLOW FOR A GIVEN COMPONENT (1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ancuţa BĂLTEANU,

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study is carried out in a line of assembly of a finite wiring product. The assembly of this finished product is done in two specific sections. For the analysis of the activities in the assembly section, the timing method of the work stations was used. On the basis of the work times obtained and their centralization, the Keizen method was subsequently applied to obtain an improvement in the installation flow. Finally, a reduction in working times was achieved, as well as a more ergonomic arrangement of jobs. This paper is the first in a series of 3 papers to deal with this subject.

  9. Self-assembly of active amphiphilic Janus particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallory, S. A.; Alarcon, F.; Cacciuto, A.; Valeriani, C.

    2017-12-01

    In this article, we study the phenomenology of a two dimensional dilute suspension of active amphiphilic Janus particles. We analyze how the morphology of the aggregates emerging from their self-assembly depends on the strength and the direction of the active forces. We systematically explore and contrast the phenomenologies resulting from particles with a range of attractive patch coverages. Finally, we illustrate how the geometry of the colloids and the directionality of their interactions can be used to control the physical properties of the assembled active aggregates and suggest possible strategies to exploit self-propulsion as a tunable driving force for self-assembly.

  10. Synthesis and Self-Assembly of Triangulenium Salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Dong

    in influencing the assembling process and morphology of the assembled nanostructures. Tailoring the ATOTA+ system with alkyl chains of different length showed large effect on the final morphology of assembled supramolecular structures. The first two chapters give a brief introduction to molecular self....... Addition of soft counter ion into the nanosheets solution could induce gluing of the nanosheets. The solid thin film formed from the formed nanosheets after water evaporation showed crystalline patterning order as revealed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Chpater 5 reports the counter ion effect...

  11. School Assemblies: The Lost Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Daniel R.

    1979-01-01

    Guidelines and suggestions are offered for successful school assemblies. The school assembly should be a positive event; an occasion for developing unity, group loyalty, and desirable audience habits. (Author/MLF)

  12. Assembling large, complex environmental metagenomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, A. C. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Plant Soil and Microbial Sciences; Jansson, J. [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Division; Malfatti, S. A. [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Tringe, S. G. [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Tiedje, J. M. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Plant Soil and Microbial Sciences; Brown, C. T. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Computer Science and Engineering

    2012-12-28

    The large volumes of sequencing data required to sample complex environments deeply pose new challenges to sequence analysis approaches. De novo metagenomic assembly effectively reduces the total amount of data to be analyzed but requires significant computational resources. We apply two pre-assembly filtering approaches, digital normalization and partitioning, to make large metagenome assemblies more computationaly tractable. Using a human gut mock community dataset, we demonstrate that these methods result in assemblies nearly identical to assemblies from unprocessed data. We then assemble two large soil metagenomes from matched Iowa corn and native prairie soils. The predicted functional content and phylogenetic origin of the assembled contigs indicate significant taxonomic differences despite similar function. The assembly strategies presented are generic and can be extended to any metagenome; full source code is freely available under a BSD license.

  13. X-Ray Assembler Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Federal regulations require that an assembler who installs one or more certified components of a diagnostic x-ray system submit a report of assembly. This database...

  14. Welding facilities for NPP assembling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojtenberg, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    Recommendations concerning the choice of equipment for welding in pre-assembling work shops, in the enlarging assembling shops and at the assembling site, are given. Advanced production automatic welders and semiautomatic machines, applied during the NPP equipment assembling as well as automatic machines specially produced for welding the main reactor components and pipelines are described. Automatic and semiautomatic machine and manual welding post supply sources are considered

  15. Reflector-moderated critical assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paxton, H.C.; Jarvis, G.A.; Byers, C.C.

    1975-07-01

    Experiments with reflector-moderated critical assemblies were part of the Rover Program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL). These assemblies were characterized by thick D 2 O or beryllium reflectors surrounding large cavities that contained highly enriched uranium at low average densities. Because interest in this type of system has been revived by LASL Plasma Cavity Assembly studies, more detailed descriptions of the early assemblies than had been available in the unclassified literature are provided. (U.S.)

  16. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Tadashi; Sato, Kenji; Goto, Masakazu.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate identification of a fuel assembly upon fuel exchange in BWR type reactors. Constitution: Fluorescent material is coated or metal plating is applied to the impressed portion of a upper tie plate handle of a fuel assembly, and the fluorescent material or the metal plating surface is covered with a protective membrane made of transparent material. This enables to distinguish the impressed surface from a distant place and chemical reaction between the impressed surface and the reactor water can be prevented. Furthermore, since the protective membrane is formed such that it protrudes toward the upper side relative to the impressed surface, there is no risk of depositions of claddings thereover. (Moriyama, K.)

  17. Fuel nozzle assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas Edward [Greer, SC; Ziminsky, Willy Steve [Simpsonville, SC; Lacey, Benjamin Paul [Greer, SC; York, William David [Greer, SC; Stevenson, Christian Xavier [Inman, SC

    2011-08-30

    A fuel nozzle assembly is provided. The assembly includes an outer nozzle body having a first end and a second end and at least one inner nozzle tube having a first end and a second end. One of the nozzle body or nozzle tube includes a fuel plenum and a fuel passage extending therefrom, while the other of the nozzle body or nozzle tube includes a fuel injection hole slidably aligned with the fuel passage to form a fuel flow path therebetween at an interface between the body and the tube. The nozzle body and the nozzle tube are fixed against relative movement at the first ends of the nozzle body and nozzle tube, enabling the fuel flow path to close at the interface due to thermal growth after a flame enters the nozzle tube.

  18. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Arata; Wakamatsu, Mitsuo.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To permit the coolant in an FBR type reactor to enter from the entrance nozzle into a nuclear fuel assembly without causing cavitation. Structure: In a nuclear fuel assembly, which comprises a number of thin fuel pines bundled together at a uniform spacing and enclosed within an outer cylinder, with a handling head connected to an upper portion of the outer cylinder and an entrance nozzle connected to a lower portion of the cylinder, the inner surface of the entrance nozzle is provided with a buffer member and an orifice successively in the direction of flow of the coolant. The coolant entering from a low pressure coolant chamber into the entrance nozzle strikes the buffer member and is attenuated, and thereafter flows through an orifice into the outer cylinder. (Horiuchi, T.)

  19. Molten core retention assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampe, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    Molten fuel produced in a core overheating accident is caught by a molten core retention assembly consisting of a horizontal baffle plate having a plurality of openings therein, heat exchange tubes having flow holes near the top thereof mounted in the openings, and a cylindrical imperforate baffle attached to the plate and surrounding the tubes. The baffle assembly is supported from the core support plate of the reactor by a plurality of hanger rods which are welded to radial beams passing under the baffle plate and intermittently welded thereto. Preferably the upper end of the cylindrical baffle terminates in an outwardly facing lip to which are welded a plurality of bearings having slots therein adapted to accept the hanger rods

  20. Nuclear fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterfield, R.S.; Garner, D.L.M.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to nuclear fuel assemblies designed for cooling on the 'tube-in-shell' principle in which the fuel is contained by a shell and is cooled by coolant passed through tubes extending through the shell. It has been proposed to employ coated particle fuel as a porous bed on the tube side and the bleed coolant from the tubes into direct contact with the fuel particles. In this way heat is extracted both by direct contact with the fuel and by heat transfer through the coolant tube walls. The system described aims to provide an improved structure of tube and shell for a fuel assembly of this kind and is particularly suitable for use in a gas cooled fast reactor, being able to withstand the neutron flux and high temperature conditions in these reactors. Constructional details are given. (U.K.)

  1. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly comprising a cluster of fuel elements supported by transversal grids so that their axes are parallel to and at a distance from each other, in order to establish interstices for the axial flow of a coolant. At least one of the interstices is occupied by an axial duct reserved for an auxiliary cooling fluid and is fitted with side holes through which the auxiliary cooling fluid is sprayed into the cluster. Deflectors extend as from a transversal grid in a position opposite the holes to deflect the cooling fluid jet towards those parts of the fuel elements that are not accessible to the auxiliary coolant. This assembly is intended for reactors cooled by light or heavy water [fr

  2. Gamma counter shutter assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aday, R.W. Jr.; Barber, D.G.

    1976-01-01

    A shutter assembly for a radioactivity measuring apparatus is described having a sample counting chamber, the assembly having a bulky solid lead cylinder with a sample access port extending therethrough for alignment with the sample chamber. The cylinder is rotated by a Geneva wheel arrangement having a drive wheel with a plurality of equi-angularly disposed pins perpendicular to the surface thereof engaging radially extending open-ended slots in a driven wheel secured to the lead cylinder for concurrent rotation therewith. The drive wheel is rotated at a constant speed with the driven wheel accelerating as a pin traverses the slot from the open end toward the driven wheel center and then decelerating as the pin traverses the reverse direction to provide precise positioning with adjacent pins engaging the open ends of adjacent slots in the stop position of the cylinder. 8 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures

  3. Mechanical seal assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.

    2001-01-01

    An improved mechanical seal assembly is provided for sealing rotating shafts with respect to their shaft housings, wherein the rotating shafts are subject to substantial axial vibrations. The mechanical seal assembly generally includes a rotating sealing ring fixed to the shaft, a non-rotating sealing ring adjacent to and in close contact with the rotating sealing ring for forming an annular seal about the shaft, and a mechanical diode element that applies a biasing force to the non-rotating sealing ring by means of hemispherical joint. The alignment of the mechanical diode with respect to the sealing rings is maintained by a series of linear bearings positioned axially along a desired length of the mechanical diode. Alternative embodiments include mechanical or hydraulic amplification components for amplifying axial displacement of the non-rotating sealing ring and transferring it to the mechanical diode.

  4. Mechanical Seal Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.

    1999-06-18

    An improved mechanical seal assembly is provided for sealing rotating shafts with respect to their shaft housings, wherein the rotating shafts are subject to substantial axial vibrations. The mechanical seal assembly generally includes a rotating sealing ring fixed to the shaft, a non-rotating sealing ring adjacent to and in close contact with the rotating sealing ring for forming an annular seal about the shaft, and a mechanical diode element that applies a biasing force to the non-rotating sealing ring by means of hemispherical joint. The alignment of the mechanical diode with respect to the sealing rings is maintained by a series of linear bearings positioned axially along a desired length of the mechanical diode. Alternative embodiments include mechanical or hydraulic amplification components for amplifying axial displacement of the non-rotating sealing ring and transferring it to the mechanical diode.

  5. Nuclear fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natori, Hisahide; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the fuel safety by decreasing the gap conductance between fuels and cladding tubes, as well as improve the reactor core controllability by rendering the void coefficient negative. Constitution: Fuel assemblies in a pressure tube comprise a tie-rod, fuel rods in a central region, and fuel rods with burnable poison in the outer circumference region. Here, B 4 C is used as the burnable poison by 1.17 % by weight ratio. The degrees of enrichment for the fissile plutonium as PuO 2 -UO 2 fuel used in the assemblies are 2.7 %, 2.7 % and 1.5 % respectively in the innermost layer, the intermediate layer and the outermost layer. This increases the burn-up degree to improve the plant utilizability, whereby the void coefficient is rendered negative to improve the reactor core controllability. (Horiuchi, T.)

  6. Heterogeneous MEMS device assembly and integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topart, Patrice; Picard, Francis; Ilias, Samir; Alain, Christine; Chevalier, Claude; Fisette, Bruno; Paultre, Jacques E.; Généreux, Francis; Legros, Mathieu; Lepage, Jean-François; Laverdière, Christian; Ngo Phong, Linh; Caron, Jean-Sol; Desroches, Yan

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, smart phone applications have both raised the pressure for cost and time to market reduction, and the need for high performance MEMS devices. This trend has led the MEMS community to develop multi-die packaging of different functionalities or multi-technology (i.e. wafer) approaches to fabricate and assemble devices respectively. This paper reports on the fabrication, assembly and packaging at INO of various MEMS devices using heterogeneous assembly at chip and package-level. First, the performance of a giant (e.g. about 3 mm in diameter), electrostatically actuated beam steering mirror is presented. It can be rotated about two perpendicular axes to steer an optical beam within an angular cone of up to 60° in vector scan mode with an angular resolution of 1 mrad and a response time of 300 ms. To achieve such angular performance relative to mirror size, the microassembly was performed from sub-components fabricated from 4 different wafers. To combine infrared detection with inertial sensing, an electroplated proof mass was flip-chipped onto a 256×1 pixel uncooled bolometric FPA and released using laser ablation. In addition to the microassembly technology, performance results of packaged devices are presented. Finally, to simulate a 3072×3 pixel uncooled detector for cloud and fire imaging in mid and long-wave IR, the staggered assembly of six 512×3 pixel FPAs with a less than 50 micron pixel co-registration is reported.

  7. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Tomihiro.

    1970-01-01

    The present invention relates to fuel assemblies employing wire wrap spacers for retaining uniform spatial distribution between fuel elements. Clad fuel elements are helically wound in the oxial direction with a wave-formed wire strand. The strand is therefore provided with spring action which permits the fuel elements to expand freely in the axial and radial directions so as to retain proper spacing and reduce stresses due to thermal deformation. (Ownes, K.J.)

  8. Assembling Toyota in Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, Tiago; Moniz, António

    2003-01-01

    A lot has been written over the last decade with regard to Toyota and the productive model associated to it (toyota-ism). And more specifically concerning the "(…) best-seller that changed the... sociological world" (Castillo, 1998: 31). But the case of Salvador Caetano’s Ovar Industrial Division (OID), that assembles Toyota light commercial vehicles in Portugal, allows us to put forward a sub-hypothesis that fits into the analysis schema proposed in the First GERPISA International Program – ...

  9. Fuel assembly manufacturing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picard, P.; Villaeys, R.

    1995-01-01

    The device comprises a central support on which the frame is mounted, a magazine which supports the fuel rods in passages aligned with those in the frame and a traction assembly on the opposite side of the magazine and including an array of pull rods designed to be advanced through the passages in the frame, to grip respective fuel rods in magazine and to pull those rods into the passages on the return stroke. 13 figs

  10. Composite airfoil assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-03-03

    A composite blade assembly for mounting on a turbine wheel includes a ceramic airfoil and an airfoil platform. The ceramic airfoil is formed with an airfoil portion, a blade shank portion and a blade dovetail tang. The metal platform includes a platform shank and a radially inner platform dovetail. The ceramic airfoil is captured within the metal platform, such that in use, the ceramic airfoil is held within the turbine wheel independent of the metal platform.

  11. Fourth Doctoral Student Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Ingrid Haug

    2016-01-01

    On 10 May, over 130 PhD students and their supervisors, from both CERN and partner universities, gathered for the 4th Doctoral Student Assembly in the Council Chamber.   The assembly was followed by a poster session, at which eighteen doctoral students presented the outcome of their scientific work. The CERN Doctoral Student Programme currently hosts just over 200 students in applied physics, engineering, computing and science communication/education. The programme has been in place since 1985. It enables students to do their research at CERN for a maximum of three years and to work on a PhD thesis, which they defend at their University. The programme is steered by the TSC committee, which holds two selection committees per year, in June and December. The Doctoral Student Assembly was opened by the Director-General, Fabiola Gianotti, who stressed the importance of the programme in the scientific environment at CERN, emphasising that there is no more rewarding activity than lear...

  12. Metrology for ITER Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogusch, E.

    2006-01-01

    The overall dimensions of the ITER Tokamak and the particular assembly sequence preclude the use of conventional optical metrology, mechanical jigs and traditional dimensional control equipment, as used for the assembly of smaller, previous generation, fusion devices. This paper describes the state of the art of the capabilities of available metrology systems, with reference to the previous experience in Fusion engineering and in other industries. Two complementary procedures of transferring datum from the primary datum network on the bioshield to the secondary datum s inside the VV with the desired accuracy of about 0.1 mm is described, one method using the access directly through the ports and the other using transfer techniques, developed during the co-operation with ITER/EFDA. Another important task described is the development of a method for the rapid and easy measurement of the gaps between sectors, required for the production of the customised splice plates between them. The scope of the paper includes the evaluation of the composition and cost of the systems and team of technical staff required to meet the requirements of the assembly procedure. The results from a practical, full-scale demonstration of the methodologies used, using the proposed equipment, is described. This work has demonstrated the feasibility of achieving the necessary accuracies for the successful building of ITER. (author)

  13. Ordinary General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2010-01-01

    Tuesday 20 April at 10.00 Council Chamber, Bldg 503 In conformity with the Statutes of the Staff Association, an ordinary General Assembly is organized once a year (article IV.2.1). Agenda Adoption of the Agenda Approval of the Draft Minutes of the Ordinary General Assembly of 12 May 2009 Presentation and approval of the Activity Report 2009 Presentation and approval of the Financial Report 2009 Presentation and approval of the Auditors Report 2009 Programme for 2010 Presentation et and approval of the draft budget and subscription rate 2010 Modifications to the statutes of the association Election of the Election Committee Election of the Board of Auditors Miscellaneous We remind members of article IV.3.4 in the Statutes of the Association which reads: “After having dealt with all the items on the agenda, the members may, with the consent of the Assembly, have other matters discussed, but decisions may be taken only on the items listed on the agenda...

  14. SCT Barrel Assembly Complete

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Batchelor

    As reported in the April 2005 issue of the ATLAS eNews, the first of the four Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) barrels, complete with modules and services, arrived safely at CERN in January of 2005. In the months since January, the other three completed barrels arrived as well, and integration of the four barrels into the entire barrel assembly commenced at CERN, in the SR1 building on the ATLAS experimental site, in July. Assembly was completed on schedule in September, with the addition of the innermost layer to the 4-barrel assembly. Work is now underway to seal the barrel thermal enclosure. This is necessary in order to enclose the silicon tracker in a nitrogen atmosphere and provide it with faraday-cage protection, and is a delicate and complicated task: 352 silicon module powertapes, 352 readout-fibre bundles, and over 400 Detector Control System sensors must be carefully sealed into the thermal enclosure bulkhead. The team is currently verifying the integrity of the low mass cooling system, which must be d...

  15. Status of Preliminary Design on the Assembly Tools for ITER Tokamak Machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Kyoung O; Park, Hyun Ki; Kim, Dong Jin; Moon, Jae Hwan; Kim, Byung Seok; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Shaw, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The ITER Tokamak device is principally composed of nine 40 .deg. sectors. Each 40 .deg. sector is made up of one 40 .deg. vacuum vessel (VV), two 20 .deg. toroidal filed coils (TFC) and associated vacuum vessel thermal shield (VVTS) segments which consist of one inboard and two outboard vacuum vessel thermal shields. Based on the design description document and final report prepared by the ITER organization (IO) and conceptual design, Korea has carried out the preliminary design of these assembly tools. The assembly strategy and relevant tools for the 40 .deg. sector sub-assembly and sector assembly at in-pit should be developed to satisfy the basic assembly requirements of the ITER Tokamak machine. Assembly strategy, preliminary design of the sector sub-assembly and assembly tools are described in this paper

  16. Performance of 9 x 9 demonstration assemblies in Dresden-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bain, G.M.

    1992-06-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute, Empire State Electric energy Research Corporation and Siemens Nuclear Power corporation jointly sponsored a program to monitor the in-reactor performance of 9x9 BWR fuel. The program was conducted in Dresden-2, with four 9x9 lead assemblies and one 8x8 reference assembly. These assemblies were loaded at the beginning of reactor Cycle 9 and completed four cycles of operation. All five assemblies were discharged after reactor Cycle 12 (EOC12) in September 1990. the 9x9 assemblies reached an average exposure of 35.7 GWd/MTU and the 8x8 reference assembly reached a burnup of 34.2 GWd/MTU. This final program report evaluates the performance of the 9x9 and 8x8 fuel assemblies, based on results from all four poolside examinations, analysis of the operating histories, and ramp tests conducted on rod segments under another program. Overall, both 9x9 and 8x assemblies performed well during the four cycles of irradiation

  17. Test of GERDA Phase II detector assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bode, Tobias; Gusev, Konstantin [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Schwingenheuer, Bernhard; Wagner, Victoria [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The GERDA experiment searches for the lepton number violating neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) of {sup 76}Ge. The experiment uses HPGe detectors enriched in {sup 76}Ge as source and detection material. In GERDA Phase I five BEGe detectors were operated successfully. These detectors are distinguished for improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination (PSD) against background events. In Phase II additional 25 BEGe detectors will be installed. New electronics and radio-pure low-mass holders were specially designed for Phase II. Prior to the installation in GERDA all BEGe detectors are tested in their final assembly in the LNGS underground laboratory. This talk presents the mechanics and performance of the GERDA Phase II detector assembly.

  18. Assembly, commissioning and first operation of JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguet, M.

    1983-01-01

    A brief summary of the work carried out during the construction phase of JET is first given. This period was successfully concluded due to the well timed delivery by industry of all the major parts of the machine and power supplies. This could be achieved because of the excellent technical co-operation between the JET team and the firms involved in construction work. The assembly of the JET machine started on site in January 1982 immediately after civil engineering work was completed. Great attention was devoted to the preparation of the vacuum vessel octants. After delivery, they were carefully cleaned, baked and leak tested at 500 0 C, and then fitted with instrumentation, electrical heater cables and thermal insulation, in view of the bake-out of the complete vessel after final assembly

  19. Variation simulation for compliant sheet metal assemblies with applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yufeng

    architectures, and some useful guidelines for selection of assembly architectures are summarized. In addition, to enhance the fault diagnosis, a systematic methodology is proposed for selection of measurement configurations. Specifically, principles involved in selecting measurements are generalized first; then, the corresponding quantitative indices are developed to evaluate the measurement configurations, and finally, examples are present.

  20. Liner mounting assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halila, Ely E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A mounting assembly includes an annular supporting flange disposed coaxially about a centerline axis which has a plurality of circumferentially spaced apart supporting holes therethrough. An annular liner is disposed coaxially with the supporting flange and includes a plurality of circumferentially spaced apart mounting holes aligned with respective ones of the supporting holes. Each of a plurality of mounting pins includes a proximal end fixedly joined to the supporting flange through a respective one of the supporting holes, and a distal end disposed through a respective one of the liner mounting holes for supporting the liner to the supporting flange while unrestrained differential thermal movement of the liner relative to the supporting flange.

  1. Modelling Polar Self Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olvera de La Cruz, Monica; Sayar, Mehmet; Solis, Francisco J.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2001-03-01

    Recent experimental studies in our group have shown that self assembled thin films of noncentrosymmetric supramolecular objects composed of triblock rodcoil molecules exhibit finite polar order. These aggregates have both long range dipolar and short range Ising-like interactions. We study the ground state of a simple model with these competing interactions. We find that the competition between Ising-like and dipolar forces yield a periodic domain structure, which can be controlled by adjusting the force constants and film thickness. When the surface forces are included in the potential, the system exhibits a finite macroscopic polar order.

  2. Nuclear reactor core assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxi, C.B.

    1978-01-01

    The object of the present invention is to provide a fast reactor core assembly design for use with a fluid coolant such as liquid sodium or carbon monoxide incorporating a method of increasing the percentage of coolant flow though the blanket elements relative to the total coolant flow through the blanket and fuel elements during shutdown conditions without using moving parts. It is claimed that deterioration due to reactor radiation or temperature conditions is avoided and ready modification or replacement is possible. (U.K.)

  3. Progress of EMBarrel assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Chalifour, M

    2002-01-01

    The assembly of the sixteen "M" modules into a vertical axis cylinder has been achieved last Friday, completing the first wheel of the Electromagnetic Barrel Calorimeter (see picture). With this, an important milestone in the construction of the ATLAS detector has been reached. Future steps are the rotation of the cylinder axis into horizontal position, in order to integrate the presamplers and heat exchangers by the end of October. The transportation of the wheel and its insertion into the cryostat is the next major milestone, and is planned for the beginning of 2003. The construction of the modules (the so-called "P" modules) of the second wheel is ongoing at Saclay, Annecy and CERN, and will be completed in the coming months. The assembly of the second wheel should start at CERN in February, and its insertion in the cryostat is scheduled for June 2003. This achievement is the result of a successful collaboration of all institutes involved in the construction of the EM Barrel, namely Annecy, Saclay and CE...

  4. Fuel assembly supporting structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aisch, F.W.; Fuchs, H.P.; Knoedler, D.; Steinke, A.; Steven, J.

    1976-01-01

    For use in forming the core of a pressurized-water reactor, a fuel assembly supporting structure for holding a bundle of interspaced fuel rods, is formed by interspaced end pieces having holes in which the end portions of control rod guide tubes are inserted, fuel rod spacer grids being positioned by these guide tubes between the end pieces. The end pieces are fastened to the end portions of the guide tubes, to integrate the supporting structure, and in the case of at least one of the end pieces, this is done by means which releases that end piece from the guide tubes when the end pieces receive an abnormal thrust force directed towards each other and which would otherwise place the guide tubes under a compressive stress that would cause them to buckle. The spacer grids normally hold the fuel rods interspaced by distances determined by nuclear physics, and buckling of the control rod guide tubes can distort the fuel rod spacer grids with consequent dearrangement of the fuel rod interspacing. A sudden loss of pressure in a pressurized-water reactor pressure vessel can result in the pressurized coolant in the vessel discharging from the vessel at such high velocity as to result in the abnormal thrust force on the end pieces of each fuel assembly, which could cause buckling of the control rod guide tubes when the end pieces are fixed to them in the normal rigid and unyielding manner

  5. ANNUAL GENERAL ASSEMBLY

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    All members and beneficiaries of the Pension Fund are invited to attend the Annual General Asssembly to be held in the CERN Auditorium on Wednesday 3 October 2001 at 14.30 hrs The Agenda comprises:   Opening Remarks (P. Levaux) Some aspects of risk in a pension fund (C. Cuénoud) Annual Report 2000: Presentation and results (C. Cuénoud) Copies of the Report are available from divisional secretariats. Results of the actuarial reviews (G. Maurin) Questions from members and beneficiaries Persons wishing to ask questions are encouraged to submit them, where possible, in writing in advance, addressed to Mr C. Cuénoud, Administrator of the Fund. Conclusions (P. Levaux) As usual, participants are invited to drinks after the assembly. NB The minutes of the 2000 General Assembly are available from the Administration of the Fund (tel. + 41 22 767 91 94; e-mail Graziella.Praire@cern.ch) The English version will be published next week.

  6. Bottom head assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fife, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    A bottom head dome assembly is described which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending there through. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending there through, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending there through, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore there through, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. 2 figs

  7. ULTRASONIC ASSEMBLY [REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PORAV Viorica

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper exposes the possibility of machine producesers to optimize the costs of clothes assembling. Ultrasonic systems being frequently utilized have many advantages on semi products of synthetic textile and technical textile. First of all, sewing – cutting process can be accomplished under high speeds and rate of losses can be minimized. Cutting seal applications are frequently used for underwear and sportswear. Slicing and unit cutting machines, as well as portable sealing machines are available for labeling sector. Products such as bag, pocket and cover can be sewed in a seamless manner for promotion purposes. All objects in terms of accessories are obtained in same standard. Our quilting machines are preferred in worldwide due to its threadless, high quality sealing. An alternative to the classic sewing assembly, with thread and needles is ultrasonic seaming. In ultrasonic welding, there are no connective bolts, nails, soldering materials, or adhesives necessary to bind the materials together. Ultrasonic is defined as acoustic frequencies above the range audible to the human ear. Ultrasonic frequencies are administered to the fabric from the sonotrode of bonding machine. The high frequency and powerful energy produced, when is release in one special environment, the ultrasound heating this environment. The ability to ultrasonic weld textiles and films depend on their thermoplastic contents and the desired end results. The paper defines the weld ability of more common textiles and films. The welding refers to all types of bonding and sealing, as in point bonding of fabric, or continuous sealing of film.

  8. PWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Yuji.

    1995-01-01

    A lower end plug is secured to a lower end of a thimble tube. A bolt-like thimble screw is screw-coupled and fastened to a female screw disposed to the end plug by way of a bushing screw-coupled to a lower nozzle. Then, the thimble screw and the lower nozzle are welded to secure the thimble tube and the lower nozzle. The lower portion of the bushing extends near the lower surface of the lower nozzle. The extended portion is provided with a recess to which a bolt head of the thimble screw is tightly inserted and a seating-face portion against which a seating-face of the bolt head abuts. Then, the extended portion of the bushing and the lower nozzle are spot-welded on the side of the lower surface of the nozzle, to prevent rotation of the bushing. This can easily prevent the rotation of the bushing after adjustment, to simplify the assembling of the fuel assembly. (I.N.)

  9. Selecting Operations for Assembler Encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Praczyk

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Assembler Encoding is a neuro-evolutionary method in which a neural network is represented in the form of a simple program called Assembler Encoding Program. The task of the program is to create the so-called Network Definition Matrix which maintains all the information necessary to construct the network. To generate Assembler Encoding Programs and the subsequent neural networks evolutionary techniques are used.
    The performance of Assembler Encoding strongly depends on operations used in Assembler Encoding Programs. To select the most effective operations, experiments in the optimization and the predator-prey problem were carried out. In the experiments, Assembler Encoding Programs equipped with different types of operations were tested. The results of the tests are presented at the end of the paper.

  10. Directed Assembly of Janus Cylinders by Controlling the Solvent Polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongmin; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Yeom, Su-Jin; Eom, Naye; Kang, Kyoung-Ku; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2017-08-01

    This study demonstrates the possibility of controlling the directed self-assembly of microsized Janus cylinders by changing the solvent polarity of the assembly media. Experimental results are analyzed and theoretical calculations of the free energy of adhesion (ΔG ad ) are performed to elucidate the underlying basic principles and investigate the effects of the solvent on the self-assembled structures. This approach will pave a predictive route for controlling the structures of assembly depending on the solvent polarity. In particular, we find that a binary solvent system with precisely controlled polarity induces directional assembly of the microsized Janus cylinders. Thus, the formation of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) assembled clusters can be reliably tuned by controlling the numbers of constituent Janus cylinders in a binary solvent system. Finally, this approach is expanded to stepwise assembly, which forms unique microstructures via secondary growth of primary seed clusters formed by the Janus cylinders. We envision that this investigation is highly promising for the construction of desired superstructures using a wide variety of polymeric Janus microparticles with chemical and physical multicompartments.

  11. Improved de novo genomic assembly for the domestic donkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Richard; Paillot, Romain; Bryant, Neil; Vaudin, Mark

    2018-01-01

    Donkeys and horses share a common ancestor dating back to about 4 million years ago. Although a high-quality genome assembly at the chromosomal level is available for the horse, current assemblies available for the donkey are limited to moderately sized scaffolds. The absence of a better-quality assembly for the donkey has hampered studies involving the characterization of patterns of genetic variation at the genome-wide scale. These range from the application of genomic tools to selective breeding and conservation to the more fundamental characterization of the genomic loci underlying speciation and domestication. We present a new high-quality donkey genome assembly obtained using the Chicago HiRise assembly technology, providing scaffolds of subchromosomal size. We make use of this new assembly to obtain more accurate measures of heterozygosity for equine species other than the horse, both genome-wide and locally, and to detect runs of homozygosity potentially pertaining to positive selection in domestic donkeys. Finally, this new assembly allowed us to identify fine-scale chromosomal rearrangements between the horse and the donkey that likely played an active role in their divergence and, ultimately, speciation. PMID:29740610

  12. Improved de novo genomic assembly for the domestic donkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Gabriel; Petersen, Bent; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Waller, Andrew; Newton, Richard; Paillot, Romain; Bryant, Neil; Vaudin, Mark; Librado, Pablo; Orlando, Ludovic

    2018-04-01

    Donkeys and horses share a common ancestor dating back to about 4 million years ago. Although a high-quality genome assembly at the chromosomal level is available for the horse, current assemblies available for the donkey are limited to moderately sized scaffolds. The absence of a better-quality assembly for the donkey has hampered studies involving the characterization of patterns of genetic variation at the genome-wide scale. These range from the application of genomic tools to selective breeding and conservation to the more fundamental characterization of the genomic loci underlying speciation and domestication. We present a new high-quality donkey genome assembly obtained using the Chicago HiRise assembly technology, providing scaffolds of subchromosomal size. We make use of this new assembly to obtain more accurate measures of heterozygosity for equine species other than the horse, both genome-wide and locally, and to detect runs of homozygosity potentially pertaining to positive selection in domestic donkeys. Finally, this new assembly allowed us to identify fine-scale chromosomal rearrangements between the horse and the donkey that likely played an active role in their divergence and, ultimately, speciation.

  13. CRADA/NFE-15-05761 Report: Additive Manufacturing of Isotropic NdFeB Bonded Permanent Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paranthaman, M Parans [ORNL

    2016-07-18

    The technical objective of this technical collaboration phase I proposal is to fabricate net shape isotropic NdFeB bonded magnets utilizing additive manufacturing technologies at the ORNL MDF. The goal is to form complex shapes of thermoplastic and/or thermoset bonded magnets without expensive tooling and with minimal wasted material. Two additive manufacturing methods; the binder jet process; and big area additive manufacturing (BAAM) were used. Binder jetting produced magnets with the measured density of the magnet of 3.47 g/cm3, close to 46% relative to the NdFeB single crystal density of 7.6 g/cm3 were demonstrated. Magnetic measurements indicate that there is no degradation in the magnetic properties. In addition, BAAM was used to fabricate isotropic near-net-shape NdFeB bonded magnets with magnetic and mechanical properties comparable or better than those of traditional injection molded magnets. The starting polymer magnet composite pellets consist of 65 vol% isotropic NdFeB powder and 35 vol% polyamide (Nylon-12). The density of the final BAAM magnet product reached 4.8 g/cm3, and the room temperature magnetic properties are: Intrinsic coercivity Hci = 8.65 kOe, Remanence Br = 5.07 kG, and energy product (BH)max = 5.47 MGOe (43.50 kJ/m3). This study provides a new pathway for preparing near-net shape bonded magnets for various magnetic applications.

  14. Gas separation membrane module assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Nicholas P [Palo Alto, CA; Fulton, Donald A [Fairfield, CA

    2009-03-31

    A gas-separation membrane module assembly and a gas-separation process using the assembly. The assembly includes a set of tubes, each containing gas-separation membranes, arranged within a housing. The housing contains a tube sheet that divides the space within the housing into two gas-tight spaces. A permeate collection system within the housing gathers permeate gas from the tubes for discharge from the housing.

  15. Integral nuclear fuel element assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schluderberg, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    An integral nuclear fuel element assembly utilizes longitudinally finned fuel pins. The continuous or interrupted fins of the fuel pins are brazed to fins of juxtaposed fuel pins or directly to the juxtaposed fuel pins or both. The integrally brazed fuel assembly is designed to satisfy the thermal and hydraulic requirements of a fuel assembly lattice having moderator to fuel atom ratios required to achieve high conversion and breeding ratios

  16. Fuel assembly and reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Motoo; Koyama, Jun-ichi; Uchikawa, Sadao; Bessho, Yasunori; Nakajima, Akiyoshi; Maruyama, Hiromi; Ozawa, Michihiro; Nakamura, Mitsuya.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns fuel assemblies charged in a BWR type reactor and the reactor core. The fuel assembly comprises fuel rods containing burnable poisons and fuel rods not containing burnable poisons. Both of the highest and the lowest gadolinia concentrations of the fuel rods containing gadolinia as burnable poisons are present in the lower region of the fuel assembly. This can increase the spectral shift effect without increasing the maximum linear power density. (I.N.)

  17. 77 FR 25729 - Notice of Issuance of Final Determination Concerning Certain Agilent Oscilloscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ..., CBP has concluded in the final determination that for each scenario the assembly and programming... final determination, CBP concluded that, based upon the assembly and programming operations in Singapore... Protection (``CBP'') Regulations (19 C.F.R. Part 177). Under these regulations, which implement Title III of...

  18. Final report on reliability and lifetime prediction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillen, Kenneth T; Wise, Jonathan; Jones, Gary D.; Causa, Al G.; Terrill, Edward R.; Borowczak, Marc

    2012-12-01

    This document highlights the important results obtained from the subtask of the Goodyear CRADA devoted to better understanding reliability of tires and to developing better lifetime prediction methods. The overall objective was to establish the chemical and physical basis for the degradation of tires using standard as well as unique models and experimental techniques. Of particular interest was the potential application of our unique modulus profiling apparatus for assessing tire properties and for following tire degradation. During the course of this complex investigation, extensive relevant information was generated, including experimental results, data analyses and development of models and instruments. Detailed descriptions of the findings are included in this report.

  19. Rocket Assembly and Checkout Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Integrates, tests, and calibrates scientific instruments flown on sounding rocket payloads. The scientific instruments are assembled on an optical bench;...

  20. Next-generation transcriptome assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Zhong

    2011-09-01

    Transcriptomics studies often rely on partial reference transcriptomes that fail to capture the full catalog of transcripts and their variations. Recent advances in sequencing technologies and assembly algorithms have facilitated the reconstruction of the entire transcriptome by deep RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), even without a reference genome. However, transcriptome assembly from billions of RNA-seq reads, which are often very short, poses a significant informatics challenge. This Review summarizes the recent developments in transcriptome assembly approaches - reference-based, de novo and combined strategies-along with some perspectives on transcriptome assembly in the near future.

  1. Seismic behaviour of fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Heuy Gap; Jhung, Myung Jo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-11-01

    A general approach for the dynamic time-history analysis of the reactor core is presented in this paper as a part of the fuel assembly qualification program. Several detailed core models are set up to reflect the placement of the fuel assemblies within the core shroud. Peak horizontal responses are obtained for each model for the motions induced from earthquake. The dynamic responses such as fuel assembly shear force, bending moment and displacement, and spacer grid impact loads are carefully investigated. Also, the sensitivity responses are obtained for the earthquake motions and the fuel assembly non-linear response characteristics are discussed. (Author) 9 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Airfoil nozzle and shroud assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, J.E.; Norton, P.F.

    1997-06-03

    An airfoil and nozzle assembly are disclosed including an outer shroud having a plurality of vane members attached to an inner surface and having a cantilevered end. The assembly further includes a inner shroud being formed by a plurality of segments. Each of the segments having a first end and a second end and having a recess positioned in each of the ends. The cantilevered end of the vane member being positioned in the recess. The airfoil and nozzle assembly being made from a material having a lower rate of thermal expansion than that of the components to which the airfoil and nozzle assembly is attached. 5 figs.

  3. Research advances in theories and methods of community assembly and succession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WenJun Zhang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Community succession refers to the regular and predictable process of species replacement in the environment that all species had been eliminated or that had been disturbed. Community assembly is the process that species growth and interact to establish a community. Community assembly stresses the change of community over a single phase. So far a lot of theories and methods have been proposed for community assembly and succession. In present article I introduced research advances in theories and methods of community assembly and succession. Finally, continuing my past propositions, I further proposed the unified theory and methodology on community assembly and succession. I suggested that community assembly and succession is a process of self-organization. It follows the major principles and mechanisms of self-organization. Agentbased modeling was suggested being used to describe the dynamics of community assembly and succession.

  4. Automated optical assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, John L.

    1995-08-01

    Automation and polymer science represent fundamental new technologies which can be directed toward realizing the goal of establishing a domestic, world-class, commercial optics business. Use of innovative optical designs using precision polymer optics will enable the US to play a vital role in the next generation of commercial optical products. The increased cost savings inherent in the utilization of optical-grade polymers outweighs almost every advantage of using glass for high volume situations. Optical designers must gain experience with combined refractive/diffractive designs and broaden their knowledge base regarding polymer technology beyond a cursory intellectual exercise. Implementation of a fully automated assembly system, combined with utilization of polymer optics, constitutes the type of integrated manufacturing process which will enable the US to successfully compete with the low-cost labor employed in the Far East, as well as to produce an equivalent product.

  5. Fuel sub-assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolly, R.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear fuel sub-assembly includes a hexagonal bundle of parallel, spaced apart fuel pins coupled at one end to an end-holding grid comprising a number of transverse spaced apart rails to each of which is connected a series of pin-receiving cells which render the pins axially captive with the rails. The series of cells are defined by a pair of metal strips each of which has a series of pocket formations such that when the pocket formations are in registry they define cylindrical shaped cells provided with internal projections which engage annular recesses in the end caps of the fuel pins to effect axial constraint of the pins. (author)

  6. Ultrasonic calibration assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Ultrasonic transducers for in-service inspection of nuclear reactor vessels have several problems associated with them which this invention seeks to overcome. The first is that of calibration or referencing a zero start point for the vertical axis of transducer movement to locate a weld defect. The second is that of verifying the positioning (vertically or at a predetermined angle). Thirdly there is the problem of ascertaining the speed per unit distance in the operating medium of the transducer beam prior to the actual inspection. The apparatus described is a calibration assembly which includes a fixed, generally spherical body having a surface for reflecting an ultrasonic beam from one of the transducers which can be moved until the reflection from the spherical body is the highest amplitude return signal indicating radial alignment from the body. (U.K.)

  7. Rotatable seal assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garibaldi, J.L.; Logan, C.M.

    1982-01-01

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an oring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers

  8. Reactor fuel assembly fastening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formanek, F.J.; Schukei, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    A nuclear fuel assembly is described, adapted to be locked into first mating surfaces on a core support stand, comprising a lower end fitting having posts for resting on the stand; elongated hook members pivotally connected at one end to the lower end fitting and having a second mating surface at the other end to engage the first mating surfaces; actuating means located between the posts on the lower end fitting and being vertically movable relative to the end fitting; and rigid links pivotally attached at one end to the hook members intermediate the connection of the hook members to the end fitting and the second mating surface and pivotally attached at the other end to the actuating means, the link having a length between the pivoted connections such that the second mating surface on the hook members locks into engagement with the first mating surfaces on the stand as the links approach the horizontal. (author)

  9. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrman, B.; Nylund, O.

    1984-01-01

    A fuel assembly with a fuel channel which surrounds a plurality of fuel rods and which is divided, by means of a stiffening device of cruciform cross-section and four wings, into four sub-channels each of which comprises a bundle of fuel rods. Each fuel channel side has a plurality of stamped, inwardly-directed projections, arranged vertically one after the other, aid projections being welded to one and the same stiffening wing. Each one of the wall portions located between the projections defines, together with two adjacently positioned projections and a portion of the stiffening wing, a communiation opening between two bundles located on on one side each of the stiffening wing. (Author)

  10. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakamatsu, Mitsuo.

    1974-01-01

    Object: To improve a circulating flow passage of coolant so as to be able to accurately detect the temperature of coolant, rare gases contained, and the like. Structure: A fuel assembly comprising a flow regulating lattice provided with a plurality of communication holes in an axial direction, said lattice being positioned at the upper end of an outer tube in which nuclear fuel elements are received, and a neutron shielding body having a plurality of spiral coolant flow passages disposed between the lattice and the nuclear fuel elements, whereby a coolant comprised of liquid sodium or the like, which moves up passing through the coolant flow passages and the flow regulating passage, is regulated and passed through a detector mounted at the upper part of the flow regulating lattice to detect coolant temperature, flow rate, and rare gases or the like as the origin of nuclear fission contained in the coolant due to breakage of fuel elements. (Kamimura, M.)

  11. Nuclear reactor assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorner, H.; Scholz, M.; Jungmann, A.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear reactor assembly includes a reactor pressure tank having a substantially cylindrical side wall surrounded by the wall of a cylindrical cavity formed by a biological shield. A rotative cylindrical wall is interposed between the walls and has means for rotating it from outside of the shield, and a probe is carried by the rotative wall for monitoring the pressure tank's wall. The probe is vertically movable relative to the rotative cylindrical wall, so that by the probe's vertical movement and rotation of the rotative cylinder, the reactor's wall can be very extensively monitored. If the reactor pressure tank's wall fails, it is contained by the rotative wall which is backed-up by the shield cavity wall. (Official Gazette)

  12. Subcritical nuclear assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H. R.

    2014-08-01

    A Subcritical Nuclear Assembly is a device where the nuclear-fission chain reaction is initiated and maintained using an external neutron source. It is a valuable educational and research tool where in a safe way many reactor parameters can be measured. Here, we have used the Wigner-Seitz method in the six-factor formula to calculate the effective multiplication factor of a subcritical nuclear reactor Nuclear Chicago model 9000. This reactor has approximately 2500 kg of natural uranium heterogeneously distributed in slugs. The reactor uses a 239 PuBe neutron source that is located in the center of an hexagonal array. Using Monte Carlo methods, with the MCNP5 code, a three-dimensional model of the subcritical reactor was designed to estimate the effective multiplication factor, the neutron spectra, the total and thermal neutron fluences along the radial and axial axis. With the neutron spectra in two locations outside the reactor the ambient dose equivalent were estimated. (Author)

  13. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domoto, Noboru; Masuda, Hiroyuki

    1989-01-01

    In a nuclear fuel assembly loaded with a plurality of fuel rods, the inside of a fuel rod disposed at a high neutron flux region is divided into an inner region and an outer region, and more burnable poisons are mixed in the inner region than in the outer region. Alternatively, the central portion of a pellet disposed in a high neutron flux region is made hollow, in which burnable poisons are charged. This can prevent neutron infinite multiplication factor from decreasing extremely at the initial burning stage. Further, the burnable poisons are not rapidly burnt completely and local peaking coefficient can be controlled. Accordingly, in a case of suppressing a predetermined excess reactivity by using a fuel rod incorporated with the burnable poison, the fuel economy can be improved more and the reactor core controllability can also be improved as compared with the usual case. (T.M.)

  14. Reconfigurable assembly work station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yhu-Tin; Abell, Jeffrey A.; Spicer, John Patrick

    2017-11-14

    A reconfigurable autonomous workstation includes a multi-faced superstructure including a horizontally-arranged frame section supported on a plurality of posts. The posts form a plurality of vertical faces arranged between adjacent pairs of the posts, the faces including first and second faces and a power distribution and position reference face. A controllable robotic arm suspends from the rectangular frame section, and a work table fixedly couples to the power distribution and position reference face. A plurality of conveyor tables are fixedly coupled to the work table including a first conveyor table through the first face and a second conveyor table through the second face. A vision system monitors the work table and each of the conveyor tables. A programmable controller monitors signal inputs from the vision system to identify and determine orientation of the component on the first conveyor table and control the robotic arm to execute an assembly task.

  15. Multivalent protein assembly using monovalent self-assembling building blocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petkau - Milroy, K.; Sonntag, M.H.; Colditz, A.; Brunsveld, L.

    2013-01-01

    Discotic molecules, which self-assemble in water into columnar supramolecular polymers, emerged as an alternative platform for the organization of proteins. Here, a monovalent discotic decorated with one single biotin was synthesized to study the self-assembling multivalency of this system in regard

  16. Method and apparatus for assembling a permanent magnet pole assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, Jr., Ralph James; Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran [Niskayuna, NY; Jansen, Patrick Lee [Scotia, NY; Dawson, Richard Nils [Voorheesville, NY; Qu, Ronghai [Clifton Park, NY; Avanesov, Mikhail Avramovich [Moscow, RU

    2009-08-11

    A pole assembly for a rotor, the pole assembly includes a permanent magnet pole including at least one permanent magnet block, a plurality of laminations including a pole cap mechanically coupled to the pole, and a plurality of laminations including a base plate mechanically coupled to the pole.

  17. Self-assembly of self-assembled molecular triangles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    While the solution state structure of 1 can be best described as a trinuclear complex, in the solidstate well-fashioned intermolecular - and CH- interactions are observed. Thus, in the solid-state further self-assembly of already self-assembled molecular triangle is witnessed. The triangular panels are arranged in a linear ...

  18. Photovoltaic Assemblies for the Power Generation of the Exomars Missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrando Emanuele

    2017-01-01

    Finally the bio burden and planetary protection requirements are also not a standard in SA field. A special manufacturing, assembly and test sequence will be implemented to capitalize our previous experience on the Mars drill tool development. For both the arrays European PVA technology was exclusively used: more specifically high efficiency III-V compounds solar cells and a new glass grounding network.

  19. Oxide nanostructures through self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, S.; Ogale, S. B.; Ganpule, C. S.; Shinde, S. R.; Novikov, V. A.; Monga, A. P.; Burr, M. R.; Ramesh, R.; Ballarotto, V.; Williams, E. D.

    2001-03-01

    A prominent theme in inorganic materials research is the creation of uniformly flat thin films and heterostructures over large wafers, which can subsequently be lithographically processed into functional devices. This letter proposes an approach that will lead to thin film topographies that are directly counter to the above-mentioned philosophy. Recent years have witnessed considerable research activity in the area of self-assembly of materials, stimulated by observations of self-organized behavior in biological systems. We have fabricated uniform arrays of nonplanar surface features by a spontaneous assembly process involving the oxidation of simple metals, especially under constrained conditions on a variety of substrates, including glass and Si. In this letter we demonstrate the pervasiveness of this process through examples involving the oxidation of Pd, Cu, Fe, and In. The feature sizes can be controlled through the grain size and thickness of the starting metal thin film. Finally, we demonstrate how such submicron scale arrays can serve as templates for the design and development of self-assembled, nanoelectronic devices.

  20. Self-assembled biomimetic superhydrophobic hierarchical arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongta; Dou, Xuan; Fang, Yin; Jiang, Peng

    2013-09-01

    Here, we report a simple and inexpensive bottom-up technology for fabricating superhydrophobic coatings with hierarchical micro-/nano-structures, which are inspired by the binary periodic structure found on the superhydrophobic compound eyes of some insects (e.g., mosquitoes and moths). Binary colloidal arrays consisting of exemplary large (4 and 30 μm) and small (300 nm) silica spheres are first assembled by a scalable Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technology in a layer-by-layer manner. After surface modification with fluorosilanes, the self-assembled hierarchical particle arrays become superhydrophobic with an apparent water contact angle (CA) larger than 150°. The throughput of the resulting superhydrophobic coatings with hierarchical structures can be significantly improved by templating the binary periodic structures of the LB-assembled colloidal arrays into UV-curable fluoropolymers by a soft lithography approach. Superhydrophobic perfluoroether acrylate hierarchical arrays with large CAs and small CA hysteresis can be faithfully replicated onto various substrates. Both experiments and theoretical calculations based on the Cassie's dewetting model demonstrate the importance of the hierarchical structure in achieving the final superhydrophobic surface states. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Proposed method of assembly for the BCD silicon strip vertex detector modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindenmeyer, C.

    1989-01-01

    The BCD Silicon strip Vertex Detector is constructed of 10 identical central region modules and 18 similar forward region modules. This memo describes a method of assembling these modules from individual silicon wafers. Each wafer is fitted with associated front end electronics and cables and has been tested to insure that only good wafers reach the final assembly stage. 5 figs

  2. The connection between galaxy formation and the assembly of stellar halos in the Local Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmi, Amina

    I will review our current understanding of the assembly of stellar halos from a theoretical perspective. I will place particular emphasis on how observations of Local Group galaxies can be used to constrain the assembly history of both their stellar and dark matter halos. Finally I will focus on

  3. Assembly Test of Elastic Averaging Technique to Improve Mechanical Alignment for Accelerating Structure Assemblies in CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Huopana, J

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact LInear Collider) is being studied at CERN as a potential multi-TeV e+e- collider [1]. The manufacturing and assembly tolerances for the required RF-components are important for the final efficiency and for the operation of CLIC. The proper function of an accelerating structure is very sensitive to errors in shape and location of the accelerating cavity. This causes considerable issues in the field of mechanical design and manufacturing. Currently the design of the accelerating structures is a disk design. Alternatively it is possible to create the accelerating assembly from quadrants, which favour the mass manufacturing. The functional shape inside of the accelerating structure remains the same and a single assembly uses less parts. The alignment of these quadrants has been previously made kinematic by using steel pins or spheres to align the pieces together. This method proved to be a quite tedious and time consuming method of assembly. To limit the number of different error sources, a meth...

  4. A consensus approach to vertebrate de novo transcriptome assembly from RNA-seq data: Assembly of the duck (Anas platyrhynchos transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna eMoreton

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available For vertebrate organisms where a reference genome is not available, de novo transcriptome assembly enables a cost effective insight into the identification of tissue specific or differentially expressed genes and variation of the coding part of the genome. However, since there are a number of different tools and parameters that can be used to reconstruct transcripts, it is difficult to determine an optimal method. Here we suggest a pipeline based on (1 assessing the performance of three different assembly tools (2 using both single and multiple k-mer approaches (3 examining the influence of the number of reads used in the assembly (4 merging assemblies from different tools. We use an example dataset from the vertebrate Anas platyrhynchos domestica (Pekin duck. We find that taking a subset of data enables a robust assembly to be produced by multiple methods without the need for very high memory capacity. The use of reads mapped back to transcripts (RMBT and CEGMA (Core Eukaryotic Genes Mapping Approach provides useful metrics to determine the completeness of assembly obtained. For this dataset the use of multiple k-mers in the assembly generated a more complete assembly as measured by greater number of RMBT and CEGMA score. Merged single k-mer assemblies are generally smaller but consist of longer transcripts, suggesting an assembly consisting of fewer fragmented transcripts. We suggest that the use of a subset of reads during assembly allows the relatively rapid investigation of assembly characteristics and can guide the user to the most appropriate transcriptome for particular downstream use. Transcriptomes generated by the compared assembly methods and the final merged assembly are freely available for download at http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1032613.

  5. De novo assembly of highly diverse viral populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extensive genetic diversity in viral populations within infected hosts and the divergence of variants from existing reference genomes impede the analysis of deep viral sequencing data. A de novo population consensus assembly is valuable both as a single linear representation of the population and as a backbone on which intra-host variants can be accurately mapped. The availability of consensus assemblies and robustly mapped variants are crucial to the genetic study of viral disease progression, transmission dynamics, and viral evolution. Existing de novo assembly techniques fail to robustly assemble ultra-deep sequence data from genetically heterogeneous populations such as viruses into full-length genomes due to the presence of extensive genetic variability, contaminants, and variable sequence coverage. Results We present VICUNA, a de novo assembly algorithm suitable for generating consensus assemblies from genetically heterogeneous populations. We demonstrate its effectiveness on Dengue, Human Immunodeficiency and West Nile viral populations, representing a range of intra-host diversity. Compared to state-of-the-art assemblers designed for haploid or diploid systems, VICUNA recovers full-length consensus and captures insertion/deletion polymorphisms in diverse samples. Final assemblies maintain a high base calling accuracy. VICUNA program is publicly available at: http://www.broadinstitute.org/scientific-community/science/projects/viral-genomics/ viral-genomics-analysis-software. Conclusions We developed VICUNA, a publicly available software tool, that enables consensus assembly of ultra-deep sequence derived from diverse viral populations. While VICUNA was developed for the analysis of viral populations, its application to other heterogeneous sequence data sets such as metagenomic or tumor cell population samples may prove beneficial in these fields of research.

  6. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

    2013-05-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

  7. Fuel cell sub-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chang V.

    1983-01-01

    A fuel cell sub-assembly comprising a plurality of fuel cells, a first section of a cooling means disposed at an end of the assembly and means for connecting the fuel cells and first section together to form a unitary structure.

  8. Newnes electronics assembly pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    Brindley, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Produced in association with the Engineering Training Authority with contributions from dozens of people in the electronics industry. The material covers common skills in electrical and electronic engineering and concentrates mainly on wiring and assembly. 'Newnes Electronics Assembly Pocket Book' is for electronics technicians, students and apprentices.

  9. Advanced gray rod control assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drudy, Keith J; Carlson, William R; Conner, Michael E; Goldenfield, Mark; Hone, Michael J; Long, Jr., Carroll J; Parkinson, Jerod; Pomirleanu, Radu O

    2013-09-17

    An advanced gray rod control assembly (GRCA) for a nuclear reactor. The GRCA provides controlled insertion of gray rod assemblies into the reactor, thereby controlling the rate of power produced by the reactor and providing reactivity control at full power. Each gray rod assembly includes an elongated tubular member, a primary neutron-absorber disposed within the tubular member said neutron-absorber comprising an absorber material, preferably tungsten, having a 2200 m/s neutron absorption microscopic capture cross-section of from 10 to 30 barns. An internal support tube can be positioned between the primary absorber and the tubular member as a secondary absorber to enhance neutron absorption, absorber depletion, assembly weight, and assembly heat transfer characteristics.

  10. Method of transporting fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Katsutoshi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To enable safety transportation of fuel assemblies for FBR type reactors by surrounding each of fuel elements in a wrapper tube by a rubbery, hollow cylindrical container and by sealing medium such as air to the inside of the container. Method: A fuel element is contained in a hollow cylindrical rubber-like tube. The fuel element has an upper end plug, a lower end plug and a wire spirally wound around the outer periphery. Upon transportation of the fuel assemblies, each of the fuel elements is covered with the container and arranged in the wrapper tube and then the fuel assemblies are assembled. Then, medium such as air is sealed for each of the fuel elements by way of an opening and then the opening is tightly closed. Before loading the transported fuel assemblies in the reactor, the medium is discharged through the opening and the container is completely extracted and removed from the inside of the wrapper tube. (Seki, T.)

  11. Biomolecular Assembly of Gold Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micheel, Christine Marya [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-05-20

    Over the past ten years, methods have been developed to construct discrete nanostructures using nanocrystals and biomolecules. While these frequently consist of gold nanocrystals and DNA, semiconductor nanocrystals as well as antibodies and enzymes have also been used. One example of discrete nanostructures is dimers of gold nanocrystals linked together with complementary DNA. This type of nanostructure is also known as a nanocrystal molecule. Discrete nanostructures of this kind have a number of potential applications, from highly parallel self-assembly of electronics components and rapid read-out of DNA computations to biological imaging and a variety of bioassays. My research focused in three main areas. The first area, the refinement of electrophoresis as a purification and characterization method, included application of agarose gel electrophoresis to the purification of discrete gold nanocrystal/DNA conjugates and nanocrystal molecules, as well as development of a more detailed understanding of the hydrodynamic behavior of these materials in gels. The second area, the development of methods for quantitative analysis of transmission electron microscope data, used computer programs written to find pair correlations as well as higher order correlations. With these programs, it is possible to reliably locate and measure nanocrystal molecules in TEM images. The final area of research explored the use of DNA ligase in the formation of nanocrystal molecules. Synthesis of dimers of gold particles linked with a single strand of DNA possible through the use of DNA ligase opens the possibility for amplification of nanostructures in a manner similar to polymerase chain reaction. These three areas are discussed in the context of the work in the Alivisatos group, as well as the field as a whole.

  12. ASSEMBLY TRANSFER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorpani, B.

    2000-01-01

    The Assembly Transfer System (ATS) receives, cools, and opens rail and truck transportation casks from the Carrier/Cask Handling System (CCHS). The system unloads transportation casks consisting of bare Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) assemblies, single element canisters, and Dual Purpose Canisters (DPCs). For casks containing DPCs, the system opens the DPCs and unloads the SNF. The system stages the assemblies, transfer assemblies to and from fuel-blending inventory pools, loads them into Disposal Containers (DCs), temporarily seals and inerts the DC, decontaminates the DC and transfers it to the Disposal Container Handling System. The system also prepares empty casks and DPCs for off-site shipment. Two identical Assembly Transfer System lines are provided in the Waste Handling Building (WHB). Each line operates independently to handle the waste transfer throughput and to support maintenance operations. Each system line primarily consists of wet and dry handling areas. The wet handling area includes a cask transport system, cask and DPC preparation system, and a wet assembly handling system. The basket transport system forms the transition between the wet and dry handling areas. The dry handling area includes the dry assembly handling system, assembly drying system, DC preparation system, and DC transport system. Both the wet and dry handling areas are controlled by the control and tracking system. The system operating sequence begins with moving transportation casks to the cask preparation area. The cask preparation operations consist of cask cavity gas sampling, cask venting, cask cool-down, outer lid removal, and inner shield plug lifting fixture attachment. Casks containing bare SNF (no DPC) are filled with water and placed in the cask unloading pool. The inner shield plugs are removed underwater. For casks containing a DPC, the cask lid(s) is removed, and the DPC is penetrated, sampled, vented, and cooled. A DPC lifting fixture is attached and the cask is placed

  13. Nuclear fuel assemblies and fuel pins usable in such assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolly, R.

    1982-01-01

    A novel end cap for a nuclear fuel assembly is described in detail. It consists of a trisection arrangement which is received within a cell of a cellular grid. The cell contains abutment means with which the trisection comes into abutment. The grid also contains an abutment means for preventing the trisections from being inserted into the cell in an incorrect orientation. The present design allows fuel pins to be securely held in a hold-down grid of a sub-assembly. The design also allows easier dis-assembly of the swollen and embrittled fuel pins prior to reprocessing. (U.K.)

  14. ITER assembly and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, T.; Davis, F.; Lousteau, D.

    1991-01-01

    This document is intended to describe the work conducted by the ITER Assembly and Maintenance (A and M) Design Unit and the supporting home teams during the ITER Conceptual Design Activities, carried out from 1988 through 1990. Its content consists of two main sections, i.e., Chapter III, which describes the identified tasks to be performed by the A and M system and a general description of the required equipment; and Chapter IV, which provides a more detailed description of the equipment proposed to perform the assigned tasks. A two-stage R and D program is now planned, i.e., (1) a prototype equipment functional tests using full scale mock-ups and (2) a full scale integration demonstration test facility with real components (vacuum vessel with ports, blanket modules, divertor modules, armor tiles, etc.). Crucial in-vessel and ex-vessel operations and the associated remote handling equipment, including handling of divertor plates and blanket modules will be demonstrated in the first phase, whereby the database needed to proceed with the engineering phase will be acquired. The second phase will demonstrate the ability of the overall system to execute the required maintenance procedures and evaluate the performance of the prototype equipment

  15. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Yasushi; Hirukawa, Koji; Sakurada, Koichi.

    1994-01-01

    A bundle of fuel rods is divided into four fuel rod group regions of small fuel rod bundles by a cross-shaped partitioning structure consisting of paired plate-like structures which connect two opposing surfaces of a channel box. A water removing material with less neutron absorption (for example, Zr or a Zr alloy) or a solid moderator is inserted and secured to a portion of a non-boiling water region interposed between the paired plate-like structure. It has a structure that light water flows to the region in the plate-like structure. The volume, density or composition of the water removing material is controlled depending on the composition of the fuels, to change the moderating characteristics of neutrons in the non-boiling water region. This can easily moderate the difference of nuclear characteristics between each of fuel assemblies using fuel materials of different fuel compositions. Further, the reactivity control effect of the burnable poisons can be enhanced without worsening fuel economy or linear power density. (I.N.)

  16. Subcritical nuclear assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    A Subcritical Nuclear Assembly is a device where the nuclear-fission chain reaction is initiated and maintained using an external neutron source. It is a valuable educational and research tool where in a safe way many reactor parameters can be measured. Here, we have used the Wigner-Seitz method in the six-factor formula to calculate the effective multiplication factor of a subcritical nuclear reactor Nuclear Chicago model 9000. This reactor has approximately 2500 kg of natural uranium heterogeneously distributed in slugs. The reactor uses a {sup 239}PuBe neutron source that is located in the center of an hexagonal array. Using Monte Carlo methods, with the MCNP5 code, a three-dimensional model of the subcritical reactor was designed to estimate the effective multiplication factor, the neutron spectra, the total and thermal neutron fluences along the radial and axial axis. With the neutron spectra in two locations outside the reactor the ambient dose equivalent were estimated. (Author)

  17. Comparing Memory-Efficient Genome Assemblers on Stand-Alone and Cloud Infrastructures

    KAUST Repository

    Kleftogiannis, Dimitrios A.

    2013-09-27

    A fundamental problem in bioinformatics is genome assembly. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies produce large volumes of fragmented genome reads, which require large amounts of memory to assemble the complete genome efficiently. With recent improvements in DNA sequencing technologies, it is expected that the memory footprint required for the assembly process will increase dramatically and will emerge as a limiting factor in processing widely available NGS-generated reads. In this report, we compare current memory-efficient techniques for genome assembly with respect to quality, memory consumption and execution time. Our experiments prove that it is possible to generate draft assemblies of reasonable quality on conventional multi-purpose computers with very limited available memory by choosing suitable assembly methods. Our study reveals the minimum memory requirements for different assembly programs even when data volume exceeds memory capacity by orders of magnitude. By combining existing methodologies, we propose two general assembly strategies that can improve short-read assembly approaches and result in reduction of the memory footprint. Finally, we discuss the possibility of utilizing cloud infrastructures for genome assembly and we comment on some findings regarding suitable computational resources for assembly.

  18. Comparing memory-efficient genome assemblers on stand-alone and cloud infrastructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleftogiannis, Dimitrios; Kalnis, Panos; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental problem in bioinformatics is genome assembly. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies produce large volumes of fragmented genome reads, which require large amounts of memory to assemble the complete genome efficiently. With recent improvements in DNA sequencing technologies, it is expected that the memory footprint required for the assembly process will increase dramatically and will emerge as a limiting factor in processing widely available NGS-generated reads. In this report, we compare current memory-efficient techniques for genome assembly with respect to quality, memory consumption and execution time. Our experiments prove that it is possible to generate draft assemblies of reasonable quality on conventional multi-purpose computers with very limited available memory by choosing suitable assembly methods. Our study reveals the minimum memory requirements for different assembly programs even when data volume exceeds memory capacity by orders of magnitude. By combining existing methodologies, we propose two general assembly strategies that can improve short-read assembly approaches and result in reduction of the memory footprint. Finally, we discuss the possibility of utilizing cloud infrastructures for genome assembly and we comment on some findings regarding suitable computational resources for assembly.

  19. The Self- and Directed Assembly of Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Benjamin David

    nanowires rapidly sedimented due to gravity onto a glass cover slip to concentrate and form a dense film. Particles and assemblies were imaged using inverted optical microscopy. We quantitatively analyzed the images and movies captured in order to track and classify particles and classify the overall arrays formed. We then correlated how particle characteristics, e.g., materials, size, segmentation, etc. changed the ordering and alignment observed. With that knowledge, we hope to be able to form new and interesting structures. We began our studies by examining the assembly of single component nanowires. Chapter 2 describes this work, in which solid Au nanowires measuring 2-7 mum in length and 290 nm in diameter self-assembled into smectic rows. By both experiment and theory, we determined that these rows formed due to a balance of electrostatic repulsions and van der Waals attractions. Final assemblies were stable for at least several days. Monte Carlo methods were used to simulate assemblies and showed structures that mirrored those experimentally observed. Simulations indicated that the smectic phase was preferred over others, i.e., nematic, when an additional small charge was added to the ends of the nanowires. Our particles have rough tips, which might create these additional electrostatic repulsions. To increase the particle and array complexity, two-component, metallic nanowire assembly was explored in Chapter 3. We examined numerous types of nanowires by changing the segment length, ratio, and material, the nanowire length, the surface coating, and the presence of small third segments. These segmented nanowires were generally Au-Ag and also ordered into smectic rows. Segmented wires arranged in rows, however, can be aligned in two possible ways with respect to a neighboring particle. The Au segments on neighboring particles can be oriented in the same direction or opposed to each other. Orientation was quantified in terms of an order parameter that took into account

  20. Drive piston assembly for a valve actuator assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zongxuan

    2010-02-23

    A drive piston assembly is provided that is operable to selectively open a poppet valve. The drive piston assembly includes a cartridge defining a generally stepped bore. A drive piston is movable within the generally stepped bore and a boost sleeve is coaxially disposed with respect to the drive piston. A main fluid chamber is at least partially defined by the generally stepped bore, drive piston, and boost sleeve. First and second feedback chambers are at least partially defined by the drive piston and each are disposed at opposite ends of the drive piston. At least one of the drive piston and the boost sleeve is sufficiently configured to move within the generally stepped bore in response to fluid pressure within the main fluid chamber to selectively open the poppet valve. A valve actuator assembly and engine are also provided incorporating the disclosed drive piston assembly.