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Sample records for assembly checkpoint protein

  1. Bub3 is a spindle assembly checkpoint protein regulating chromosome segregation during mouse oocyte meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Li

    Full Text Available In mitosis, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC prevents anaphase onset until all chromosomes have been attached to the spindle microtubules and aligned correctly at the equatorial metaphase plate. The major checkpoint proteins in mitosis consist of mitotic arrest-deficient (Mad1-3, budding uninhibited by benzimidazole (Bub1, Bub3, and monopolar spindle 1(Mps1. During meiosis, for the formation of a haploid gamete, two consecutive rounds of chromosome segregation occur with only one round of DNA replication. To pull homologous chromosomes to opposite spindle poles during meiosis I, both sister kinetochores of a homologue must face toward the same pole which is very different from mitosis and meiosis II. As a core member of checkpoint proteins, the individual role of Bub3 in mammalian oocyte meiosis is unclear. In this study, using overexpression and RNA interference (RNAi approaches, we analyzed the role of Bub3 in mouse oocyte meiosis. Our data showed that overexpressed Bub3 inhibited meiotic metaphase-anaphase transition by preventing homologous chromosome and sister chromatid segregations in meiosis I and II, respectively. Misaligned chromosomes, abnormal polar body and double polar bodies were observed in Bub3 knock-down oocytes, causing aneuploidy. Furthermore, through cold treatment combined with Bub3 overexpression, we found that overexpressed Bub3 affected the attachments of microtubules and kinetochores during metaphase-anaphase transition. We propose that as a member of SAC, Bub3 is required for regulation of both meiosis I and II, and is potentially involved in kinetochore-microtubule attachment in mammalian oocytes.

  2. Reduced ability to recover from spindle disruption and loss of kinetochore spindle assembly checkpoint proteins in oocytes from aged mice.

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    Yun, Yan; Holt, Janet E; Lane, Simon I R; McLaughlin, Eileen A; Merriman, Julie A; Jones, Keith T

    2014-01-01

    Currently, maternal aging in women, based on mouse models, is thought to raise oocyte aneuploidy rates, because chromosome cohesion deteriorates during prophase arrest, and Sgo2, a protector of centromeric cohesion, is lost. Here we show that the most common mouse strain, C57Bl6/J, is resistant to maternal aging, showing little increase in aneuploidy or Sgo2 loss. Instead it demonstrates significant kinetochore-associated loss in the spindle assembly checkpoint protein Mad2 and phosphorylated Aurora C, which is involved in microtubule-kinetochore error correction. Their loss affects the fidelity of bivalent segregation but only when spindle organization is impaired during oocyte maturation. These findings have an impact clinically regarding the handling of human oocytes ex vivo during assisted reproductive techniques and suggest there is a genetic basis to aneuploidy susceptibility.

  3. Slipping past the spindle assembly checkpoint.

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    Subramanian, Radhika; Kapoor, Tarun M

    2013-11-01

    Error-free genome segregation depends on the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), a signalling network that delays anaphase onset until chromosomes have established proper spindle attachments. Three reports now quantitatively examine the sensitivity and robustness of the SAC response.

  4. Spindle assembly checkpoint protein expression correlates with cellular proliferation and shorter time to recurrence in ovarian cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGrogan, Barbara

    2014-07-01

    Ovarian carcinoma (OC) is the most lethal of the gynecological malignancies, often presenting at an advanced stage. Treatment is hampered by high levels of drug resistance. The taxanes are microtubule stabilizing agents, used as first-line agents in the treatment of OC that exert their apoptotic effects through the spindle assembly checkpoint. BUB1-related protein kinase (BUBR1) and mitotic arrest deficient 2 (MAD2), essential spindle assembly checkpoint components, play a key role in response to taxanes. BUBR1, MAD2, and Ki-67 were assessed on an OC tissue microarray platform representing 72 OC tumors of varying histologic subtypes. Sixty-one of these patients received paclitaxel and platinum agents combined; 11 received platinum alone. Overall survival was available for all 72 patients, whereas recurrence-free survival (RFS) was available for 66 patients. Increased BUBR1 expression was seen in serous carcinomas, compared with other histologies (P = .03). Increased BUBR1 was significantly associated with tumors of advanced stage (P = .05). Increased MAD2 and BUBR1 expression also correlated with increased cellular proliferation (P < .0002 and P = .02, respectively). Reduced MAD2 nuclear intensity was associated with a shorter RFS (P = .03), in ovarian tumors of differing histologic subtype (n = 66). In this subgroup, for those women who received paclitaxel and platinum agents combined (n = 57), reduced MAD2 intensity also identified women with a shorter RFS (P < .007). For the entire cohort of patients, irrespective of histologic subtype or treatment, MAD2 nuclear intensity retained independent significance in a multivariate model, with tumors showing reduced nuclear MAD2 intensity identifying patients with a poorer RFS (P = .05).

  5. Constitutive Cdk2 activity promotes aneuploidy while altering the spindle assembly and tetraploidy checkpoints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahn, Stephan C; Corsino, Patrick E; Davis, Bradley J;

    2013-01-01

    instability. Expression of these complexes in the MCF10A cell line leads to retinoblastoma protein (Rb) hyperphosphorylation, a subsequent increase in proliferation rate, and increased expression of the spindle assembly checkpoint protein Mad2. This results in a strengthening of the spindle assembly...

  6. Spindle assembly checkpoint and its regulators in meiosis.

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    Sun, Shao-Chen; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Meiosis is a unique form of cell division in which cells divide twice but DNA is duplicated only once. Errors in chromosome segregation during meiosis will result in aneuploidy, followed by loss of the conceptus during pregnancy or birth defects. During mitosis, cells utilize a mechanism called the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) to ensure faithful chromosome segregation. A similar mechanism has been uncovered for meiosis in the last decade, especially in the past several years. METHODS For this review, we included data and relevant information obtained through a PubMed database search for all articles published in English from 1991 through 2011 which included the term 'meiosis', 'spindle assembly checkpoint', or 'SAC'. RESULTS There are 91 studies included. Evidence for the existence of SAC functions in meiosis is provided by studies on the SAC proteins mitotic-arrest deficient-1 (Mad1), Mad2, budding uninhibited by benzimidazole-1 (Bub1), Bub3, BubR1 and Mps1; microtubule-kinetochore attachment regulators Ndc80 complex, chromosomal passenger complex, mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK), kinetochore null 1 (KNL1) and Mis12 complex and spindle stability regulators. CONCLUSIONS SAC and its regulators exist and function in meiosis, and their malfunctions may cause germ cell aneuploidy. However, species and sexual differences exist. Moreover, interaction of SAC components with other regulators is still poorly understood, which needs further study.

  7. Sustained spindle-assembly checkpoint response requires de novo transcription and translation of cyclin B1.

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    Ana Lúcia Mena

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microtubule-targeting drugs induce mitotic delay at pro-metaphase by preventing the spindle assembly checkpoint to be satisfied. However, especially after prolonged treatments, cells can escape this arrest in a process called mitotic slippage. The mechanisms underlying the spindle assembly checkpoint and slippage are not fully understood. It has been generally accepted that during mitosis there is a temporary shutdown of high-energy-consuming processes, such as transcription and translation. However, the synthesis of specific proteins is maintained or up-regulated since protein synthesis is necessary for entry into and progression through mitosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work we investigated whether the mitotic arrest caused by the mitotic checkpoint is independent of transcription and translation. By using immunofluorescent microscopy and western blotting, we demonstrate that inhibition of either of these processes induces a shortening of the mitotic arrest caused by the nocodazole treatment, and ultimately leads to mitotic slippage. Our western blotting and RTQ-PCR results show that inhibition of transcription during mitotic arrest does not affect the expression of the spindle checkpoint proteins, whereas it induces a significant decrease in the mRNA and protein levels of Cyclin B1. The exogenous expression of Cyclin B1 substantially rescued the mitotic phenotype in nocodazole cells treated with the inhibitors of transcription and translation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work emphasizes the importance of transcription and translation for the maintenance of the spindle assembly checkpoint, suggesting the existence of a mechanism dependent on cyclin B1 gene regulation during mitosis. We propose that continuous transcription of mitotic regulators is required to sustain the activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint.

  8. Thyroid hormone receptor interacting protein 13 (TRIP13) AAA-ATPase is a novel mitotic checkpoint-silencing protein.

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    Wang, Kexi; Sturt-Gillespie, Brianne; Hittle, James C; Macdonald, Dawn; Chan, Gordon K; Yen, Tim J; Liu, Song-Tao

    2014-08-22

    The mitotic checkpoint (or spindle assembly checkpoint) is a fail-safe mechanism to prevent chromosome missegregation by delaying anaphase onset in the presence of defective kinetochore-microtubule attachment. The target of the checkpoint is the E3 ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome. Once all chromosomes are properly attached and bioriented at the metaphase plate, the checkpoint needs to be silenced. Previously, we and others have reported that TRIP13 AAA-ATPase binds to the mitotic checkpoint-silencing protein p31(comet). Here we show that endogenous TRIP13 localizes to kinetochores. TRIP13 knockdown delays metaphase-to-anaphase transition. The delay is caused by prolonged presence of the effector for the checkpoint, the mitotic checkpoint complex, and its association and inhibition of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome. These results suggest that TRIP13 is a novel mitotic checkpoint-silencing protein. The ATPase activity of TRIP13 is essential for its checkpoint function, and interference with TRIP13 abolished p31(comet)-mediated mitotic checkpoint silencing. TRIP13 overexpression is a hallmark of cancer cells showing chromosomal instability, particularly in certain breast cancers with poor prognosis. We suggest that premature mitotic checkpoint silencing triggered by TRIP13 overexpression may promote cancer development.

  9. bir1 deletion causes malfunction of the spindle assembly checkpoint and apoptosis in yeast

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    Qun eRen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Cell division in yeast is a highly regulated and well studied event. Various checkpoints are placed throughout the cell cycle to ensure faithful segregation of sister chromatids. Unexpected events, such as DNA damage or oxidative stress, cause the activation of checkpoint(s and cell cycle arrest. Malfunction of the checkpoints may induce cell death. We previously showed that under oxidative stress, the budding yeast cohesin Mcd1, a homolog of human Rad21, was cleaved by the caspase-like protease Esp1. The cleaved Mcd1 C-terminal fragment was then translocated to mitochondria, causing apoptotic cell death. In the present study, we demonstrated that Bir1 plays an important role in spindle assembly checkpoint and cell death. Similar to H2O2 treatment, deletion of BIR1 using a BIR1-degron strain caused degradation of the securin Pds1, which binds and inactivates Esp1 until metaphase-anaphase transition in a normal cell cycle. BIR1 deletion caused an increase level of ROS and mis-location of Bub1, a major protein for spindle assembly checkpoint. In wild type, Bub1 was located at the kinetochores, but was primarily in the cytoplasm in bir1 deletion strain. When BIR1 was deleted, addition of nocodazole was unable to retain the Bub1 localization on kietochores, further suggesting that Bir1 is required to activate and maintain the spindle assembly checkpoint. Our study suggests that the BIR1 function in cell cycle regulation works in concert with its anti-apoptosis function.

  10. Unprotected Drosophila melanogaster telomeres activate the spindle assembly checkpoint.

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    Musarò, Mariarosaria; Ciapponi, Laura; Fasulo, Barbara; Gatti, Maurizio; Cenci, Giovanni

    2008-03-01

    In both yeast and mammals, uncapped telomeres activate the DNA damage response (DDR) and undergo end-to-end fusion. Previous work has shown that the Drosophila HOAP protein, encoded by the caravaggio (cav) gene, is required to prevent telomeric fusions. Here we show that HOAP-depleted telomeres activate both the DDR and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). The cell cycle arrest elicited by the DDR was alleviated by mutations in mei-41 (encoding ATR), mus304 (ATRIP), grp (Chk1) and rad50 but not by mutations in tefu (ATM). The SAC was partially overridden by mutations in zw10 (also known as mit(1)15) and bubR1, and also by mutations in mei-41, mus304, rad50, grp and tefu. As expected from SAC activation, the SAC proteins Zw10, Zwilch, BubR1 and Cenp-meta (Cenp-E) accumulated at the kinetochores of cav mutant cells. Notably, BubR1 also accumulated at cav mutant telomeres in a mei-41-, mus304-, rad50-, grp- and tefu-dependent manner. Our results collectively suggest that recruitment of BubR1 by dysfunctional telomeres inhibits Cdc20-APC function, preventing the metaphase-to-anaphase transition.

  11. A direct role of Mad1 in the spindle assembly checkpoint beyond Mad2 kinetochore recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Thomas; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo; Sedgwick, Garry G;

    2014-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures accurate chromosome segregation by delaying entry into anaphase until all sister chromatids have become bi-oriented. A key component of the SAC is the Mad2 protein, which can adopt either an inactive open (O-Mad2) or active closed (C-Mad2) conformation...... in the SAC beyond recruitment of C-Mad2 to kinetochores has not yet been addressed. Here, we show that Mad1 is required for mitotic arrest even when C-Mad2 is artificially recruited to kinetochores, indicating that it has indeed an additional function in promoting the checkpoint. The C-terminal globular...

  12. Smurf2 as a novel mitotic regulator: From the spindle assembly checkpoint to tumorigenesis

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    Moore Finola E

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The execution of the mitotic program with high fidelity is dependent upon precise spatiotemporal regulation of posttranslational protein modifications. For example, the timely polyubiquitination of critical mitotic regulators by Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C is essential for the metaphase to anaphase transition and mitotic exit. The spindle assembly checkpoint prevents unscheduled activity of APC/C-Cdc20 in early mitosis, allowing bipolar attachment of kinetochores to mitotic spindle and facilitating equal segregation of sister chromatids. The critical effector of the spindle checkpoint, Mitotic arrest deficient 2 (Mad2, is recruited to unattached kinetochores forming a complex with other regulatory proteins to efficiently and cooperatively inhibit APC/C-Cdc20. A weakened and/or dysfunctional spindle checkpoint has been linked to the development of genomic instability in both cell culture and animal models, and evidence suggests that aberrant regulation of the spindle checkpoint plays a critical role in human carcinogenesis. Recent studies have illuminated a network of both degradative and non-degradative ubiquitination events that regulate the metaphase to anaphase transition and mitotic exit. Within this context, our recent work showed that the HECT (Homologous to E6-AP C-terminus-family E3 ligase Smurf2 (Smad specific ubiquitin regulatory factor 2, known as a negative regulator of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β signaling, is required for a functional spindle checkpoint by promoting the functional localization and stability of Mad2. Here we discuss putative models explaining the role of Smurf2 as a new regulator in the spindle checkpoint. The dynamic mitotic localization of Smurf2 to the centrosome and other critical mitotic structures provides implications about mitotic checkpoint control dependent on various ubiquitination events. Finally, deregulated Smurf2 activity may contribute to carcinogenesis by

  13. Sister chromatid tension and the spindle assembly checkpoint.

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    Nezi, Luigi; Musacchio, Andrea

    2009-12-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a feedback control system that monitors the state of kinetochore/microtubule attachment during mitosis and halts cell cycle progression until all chromosomes are properly aligned at the metaphase plate. The state of chromosome-microtubule attachment is implicated as a crucial factor in the checkpoint response. On the contrary, lack of tension in the centromere-kinetochore region of sister chromatids has been shown to regulate a pathway of correction of undesired chromosome-microtubule connections, while the presence of tension is believed to promote the stabilization of attachments. We discuss how tension-sensitive phenomena, such as attachment correction and stabilization, relate to the SAC and we speculate on the existence of a single pathway linking error correction and SAC activation.

  14. Tumor suppressor protein DAB2IP participates in chromosomal stability maintenance through activating spindle assembly checkpoint and stabilizing kinetochore-microtubule attachments

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    Yu, Lan; Shang, Zeng-Fu; Abdisalaam, Salim; Lee, Kyung-Jong; Gupta, Arun; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Chen, Benjamin P.C.; Saha, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    Defects in kinetochore-microtubule (KT-MT) attachment and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) during cell division are strongly associated with chromosomal instability (CIN). CIN has been linked to carcinogenesis, metastasis, poor prognosis and resistance to cancer therapy. We previously reported that the DAB2IP is a tumor suppressor, and that loss of DAB2IP is often detected in advanced prostate cancer (PCa) and is indicative of poor prognosis. Here, we report that the loss of DAB2IP results in impaired KT-MT attachment, compromised SAC and aberrant chromosomal segregation. We discovered that DAB2IP directly interacts with Plk1 and its loss inhibits Plk1 kinase activity, thereby impairing Plk1-mediated BubR1 phosphorylation. Loss of DAB2IP decreases the localization of BubR1 at the kinetochore during mitosis progression. In addition, the reconstitution of DAB2IP enhances the sensitivity of PCa cells to microtubule stabilizing drugs (paclitaxel, docetaxel) and Plk1 inhibitor (BI2536). Our findings demonstrate a novel function of DAB2IP in the maintenance of KT-MT structure and SAC regulation during mitosis which is essential for chromosomal stability. PMID:27568005

  15. The internal Cdc20 binding site in BubR1 facilitates both spindle assembly checkpoint signalling and silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lischetti, Tiziana; Zhang, Gang; Sedgwick, Garry G;

    2014-01-01

    Improperly attached kinetochores activate the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) and by an unknown mechanism catalyse the binding of two checkpoint proteins, Mad2 and BubR1, to Cdc20 forming the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC). Here, to address the functional role of Cdc20 kinetochore localization...... on the SAC because the IC20BD is also required for efficient SAC silencing. Indeed, the IC20BD can disrupt the MCC providing a mechanism for its role in SAC silencing. We thus uncover an unexpected dual function of the second Cdc20 binding site in BubR1 in promoting both efficient SAC signalling and SAC...

  16. Dynein Light Intermediate Chain 2 Facilitates the Metaphase to Anaphase Transition by Inactivating the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint.

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    Sagar P Mahale

    Full Text Available The multi-functional molecular motor cytoplasmic dynein performs diverse essential roles during mitosis. The mechanistic importance of the dynein Light Intermediate Chain homologs, LIC1 and LIC2 is unappreciated, especially in the context of mitosis. LIC1 and LIC2 are believed to exist in distinct cytoplasmic dynein complexes as obligate subunits. LIC1 had earlier been reported to be required for metaphase to anaphase progression by inactivating the kinetochore-microtubule attachment-sensing arm of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC. However, the functional importance of LIC2 during mitosis remains elusive. Here we report prominent novel roles for the LIC2 subunit of cytoplasmic dynein in regulating the spindle assembly checkpoint. LIC2 depletion in mammalian cells led to prolonged metaphase arrest in the presence of an active SAC and also to stretched kinetochores, thus implicating it in SAC inactivation. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy of SAC components revealed accumulation of both attachment- and tension-sensing checkpoint proteins at metaphase kinetochores upon LIC2 depletion. These observations support a stronger and more diverse role in checkpoint inactivation for LIC2 in comparison to its close homolog LIC1. Our study uncovers a novel functional hierarchy during mitotic checkpoint inactivation between the closely related but homologous LIC subunits of cytoplasmic dynein. These subtle functional distinctions between dynein subpopulations could be exploited to study specific aspects of the spindle assembly checkpoint, which is a key mediator of fidelity in eukaryotic cell division.

  17. MAP kinase meets mitosis: A role for Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein in spindle checkpoint regulation

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    Rosner Marsha

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein (RKIP is an evolutionarily conserved protein that functions as a modulator of signaling by the MAP kinase cascade. Implicated as a metastasis suppressor, Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein depletion correlates with poor prognosis for breast, prostate and melanoma tumors but the mechanism is unknown. Recent evidence indicates that Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein regulates the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint by controlling Aurora B Kinase activity, and the mechanism involves Raf/MEK/ERK signaling. In contrast to elevated MAP kinase signaling during the G1, S or G2 phases of the cell cycle that activates checkpoints and induces arrest or senescence, loss of RKIP during M phase leads to bypass of the spindle assembly checkpoint and the generation of chromosomal abnormalities. These results reveal a role for Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein and the MAP kinase cascade in ensuring the fidelity of chromosome segregation prior to cell division. Furthermore, these data highlight the need for precise titration of the MAP kinase signal to ensure the integrity of the spindle assembly process and provide a mechanism for generating genomic instability in tumors. Finally, these results raise the possibility that RKIP status in tumors could influence the efficacy of treatments such as poisons that stimulate the Aurora B-dependent spindle assembly checkpoint.

  18. Stable MCC binding to the APC/C is required for a functional spindle assembly checkpoint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein, Jamin B; Nilsson, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) delays progression into anaphase until all chromosomes have aligned on the metaphase plate by inhibiting Cdc20, the mitotic co-activator of the APC/C. Mad2 and BubR1 bind and inhibit Cdc20, thereby forming the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC), which can bind...

  19. Error-prone mammalian female meiosis from silencing the spindle assembly checkpoint without normal interkinetochore tension.

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    Kolano, Agnieszka; Brunet, Stéphane; Silk, Alain D; Cleveland, Don W; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène

    2012-07-03

    It is well established that chromosome segregation in female meiosis I (MI) is error-prone. The acentrosomal meiotic spindle poles do not have centrioles and are not anchored to the cortex via astral microtubules. By Cre recombinase-mediated removal in oocytes of the microtubule binding site of nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA), which is implicated in anchoring microtubules at poles, we determine that without functional NuMA, microtubules lose connection to MI spindle poles, resulting in highly disorganized early spindle assembly. Subsequently, very long spindles form with hyperfocused poles. The kinetochores of homologs make attachments to microtubules in these spindles but with reduced tension between them and accompanied by alignment defects. Despite this, the spindle assembly checkpoint is normally silenced and the advance to anaphase I and first polar body extrusion takes place without delay. Females without functional NuMA in oocytes are sterile, producing aneuploid eggs with altered chromosome number. These findings establish that in mammalian MI, the spindle assembly checkpoint is unable to sustain meiotic arrest in the presence of one or few misaligned and/or misattached kinetochores with reduced interkinetochore tension, thereby offering an explanation for why MI in mammals is so error-prone.

  20. The protein phosphatase 2A functions in the spindle position checkpoint by regulating the checkpoint kinase Kin4.

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    Chan, Leon Y; Amon, Angelika

    2009-07-15

    In budding yeast, a surveillance mechanism known as the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) ensures accurate genome partitioning. In the event of spindle misposition, the checkpoint delays exit from mitosis by restraining the activity of the mitotic exit network (MEN). To date, the only component of the checkpoint to be identified is the protein kinase Kin4. Furthermore, how the kinase is regulated by spindle position is not known. Here, we identify the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in complex with the regulatory subunit Rts1 as a component of the SPOC. Loss of PP2A-Rts1 function abrogates the SPOC but not other mitotic checkpoints. We further show that the protein phosphatase functions upstream of Kin4, regulating the kinase's phosphorylation and localization during an unperturbed cell cycle and during SPOC activation, thus defining the phosphatase as a key regulator of SPOC function.

  1. The chromosomal passenger complex and the spindle assembly checkpoint: kinetochore-microtubule error correction and beyond

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    Maia André F

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During mitosis, correct bipolar chromosome attachment to the mitotic spindle is an essential prerequisite for the equal segregation of chromosomes. The spindle assembly checkpoint can prevent chromosome segregation as long as not all chromosome pairs have obtained bipolar attachment to the spindle. The chromosomal passenger complex plays a crucial role during chromosome alignment by correcting faulty chromosome-spindle interactions (e.g. attachments that do not generate tension. In the process of doing so, the chromosomal passenger complex generates unattached chromosomes, a specific situation that is known to promote checkpoint activity. However, several studies have implicated an additional, more direct role for the chromosomal passenger complex in enforcing the mitotic arrest imposed by the spindle assembly checkpoint. In this review, we discuss the different roles played by the chromosomal passenger complex in ensuring proper mitotic checkpoint function. Additionally, we discuss the possibility that besides monitoring the presence of unattached kinetochores, the spindle assembly checkpoint may also be capable of responding to chromosome-microtubule interactions that do not generate tension and we propose experimental set-ups to study this.

  2. The chromosomal passenger complex and the spindle assembly checkpoint: kinetochore-microtubule error correction and beyond.

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    Vader, Gerben; Maia, André F; Lens, Susanne Ma

    2008-05-28

    During mitosis, correct bipolar chromosome attachment to the mitotic spindle is an essential prerequisite for the equal segregation of chromosomes. The spindle assembly checkpoint can prevent chromosome segregation as long as not all chromosome pairs have obtained bipolar attachment to the spindle. The chromosomal passenger complex plays a crucial role during chromosome alignment by correcting faulty chromosome-spindle interactions (e.g. attachments that do not generate tension). In the process of doing so, the chromosomal passenger complex generates unattached chromosomes, a specific situation that is known to promote checkpoint activity. However, several studies have implicated an additional, more direct role for the chromosomal passenger complex in enforcing the mitotic arrest imposed by the spindle assembly checkpoint. In this review, we discuss the different roles played by the chromosomal passenger complex in ensuring proper mitotic checkpoint function. Additionally, we discuss the possibility that besides monitoring the presence of unattached kinetochores, the spindle assembly checkpoint may also be capable of responding to chromosome-microtubule interactions that do not generate tension and we propose experimental set-ups to study this.

  3. Kinetochore-microtubule attachment is sufficient to satisfy the human spindle assembly checkpoint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etemad, Banafsheh; Kuijt, Timo E F; Kops, Geert J P L

    2015-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a genome surveillance mechanism that protects against aneuploidization. Despite profound progress on understanding mechanisms of its activation, it remains unknown what aspect of chromosome-spindle interactions is monitored by the SAC: kinetochore-microtubule

  4. Spindle assembly checkpoint robustness requires Tpr-mediated regulation of Mad1/Mad2 proteostasis.

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    Schweizer, Nina; Ferrás, Cristina; Kern, David M; Logarinho, Elsa; Cheeseman, Iain M; Maiato, Helder

    2013-12-23

    Tpr is a conserved nuclear pore complex (NPC) protein implicated in the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) by an unknown mechanism. Here, we show that Tpr is required for normal SAC response by stabilizing Mad1 and Mad2 before mitosis. Tpr coimmunoprecipitated with Mad1 and Mad2 (hereafter designated as Tpr/Mad1/Mad2 or TM2 complex) during interphase and mitosis, and is required for Mad1–c-Mad2 recruitment to NPCs. Interestingly, Tpr was normally undetectable at kinetochores and dispensable for Mad1, but not for Mad2, kinetochore localization, which suggests that SAC robustness depends on Mad2 levels at kinetochores. Protein half-life measurements demonstrate that Tpr stabilizes Mad1 and Mad2, ensuring normal Mad1–c-Mad2 production in an mRNA- and kinetochore-independent manner. Overexpression of GFP-Mad2 restored normal SAC response and Mad2 kinetochore levels in Tpr-depleted cells. Mechanistically, we provide evidence that Tpr might spatially regulate SAC proteostasis through the SUMO-isopeptidases SENP1 and SENP2 at NPCs. Thus, Tpr is a kinetochore-independent, rate-limiting factor required to mount and sustain a robust SAC response.

  5. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e. g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is

  6. The chromosomal passenger complex and the spindle assembly checkpoint: kinetochore-microtubule error correction and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Maia André F; Vader Gerben; Lens Susanne MA

    2008-01-01

    Abstract During mitosis, correct bipolar chromosome attachment to the mitotic spindle is an essential prerequisite for the equal segregation of chromosomes. The spindle assembly checkpoint can prevent chromosome segregation as long as not all chromosome pairs have obtained bipolar attachment to the spindle. The chromosomal passenger complex plays a crucial role during chromosome alignment by correcting faulty chromosome-spindle interactions (e.g. attachments that do not generate tension). In ...

  7. Kinetochore-microtubule attachment is sufficient to satisfy the human spindle assembly checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemad, Banafsheh; Kuijt, Timo E F; Kops, Geert J P L

    2015-12-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a genome surveillance mechanism that protects against aneuploidization. Despite profound progress on understanding mechanisms of its activation, it remains unknown what aspect of chromosome-spindle interactions is monitored by the SAC: kinetochore-microtubule attachment or the force generated by dynamic microtubules that signals stable biorientation of chromosomes? To answer this, we uncoupled these two processes by expressing a non-phosphorylatable version of the main microtubule-binding protein at kinetochores (HEC1-9A), causing stabilization of incorrect kinetochore-microtubule attachments despite persistent activity of the error-correction machinery. The SAC is fully functional in HEC1-9A-expressing cells, yet cells in which chromosomes cannot biorient but are stably attached to microtubules satisfy the SAC and exit mitosis. SAC satisfaction requires neither intra-kinetochore stretching nor dynamic microtubules. Our findings support the hypothesis that in human cells the end-on interactions of microtubules with kinetochores are sufficient to satisfy the SAC without the need for microtubule-based pulling forces.

  8. Choreography of the DNA damage response: spatiotemporal relationships among checkpoint and repair proteins.

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    Lisby, Michael; Barlow, Jacqueline H; Burgess, Rebecca C; Rothstein, Rodney

    2004-09-17

    DNA repair is an essential process for preserving genome integrity in all organisms. In eukaryotes, recombinational repair is choreographed by multiprotein complexes that are organized into centers (foci). Here, we analyze the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and replication stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Mre11 nuclease and the ATM-related Tel1 kinase are the first proteins detected at DSBs. Next, the Rfa1 single-strand DNA binding protein relocalizes to the break and recruits other key checkpoint proteins. Later and only in S and G2 phase, the homologous recombination machinery assembles at the site. Unlike the response to DSBs, Mre11 and recombination proteins are not recruited to hydroxyurea-stalled replication forks unless the forks collapse. The cellular response to DSBs and DNA replication stress is likely directed by the Mre11 complex detecting and processing DNA ends in conjunction with Sae2 and by RP-A recognizing single-stranded DNA and recruiting additional checkpoint and repair proteins.

  9. An Overview of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint Status in Oral Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Henrique Teixeira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal chromosome number, or aneuploidy, is a common feature of human solid tumors, including oral cancer. Deregulated spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC is thought as one of the mechanisms that drive aneuploidy. In normal cells, SAC prevents anaphase onset until all chromosomes are correctly aligned at the metaphase plate thereby ensuring genomic stability. Significantly, the activity of this checkpoint is compromised in many cancers. While mutations are rather rare, many tumors show altered expression levels of SAC components. Genomic alterations such as aneuploidy indicate a high risk of oral cancer and cancer-related mortality, and the molecular basis of these alterations is largely unknown. Yet, our knowledge on the status of SAC components in oral cancer remains sparse. In this review, we address the state of our knowledge regarding the SAC defects and the underlying molecular mechanisms in oral cancer, and discuss their therapeutic relevance, focusing our analysis on the core components of SAC and its target Cdc20.

  10. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein engages but does not abrogate the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yueyang [Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Biological and Biomedical Sciences Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Munger, Karl, E-mail: kmunger@rics.bwh.harvard.edu [Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Biological and Biomedical Sciences Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2012-10-10

    The mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis by censoring kinetochore-microtubule interactions. It is frequently rendered dysfunctional during carcinogenesis causing chromosome missegregation and genomic instability. There are conflicting reports whether the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein drives chromosomal instability by abolishing the SAC. Here we report that degradation of mitotic cyclins is impaired in cells with HPV16 E7 expression. RNAi-mediated depletion of Mad2 or BubR1 indicated the involvement of the SAC, suggesting that HPV16 E7 expression causes sustained SAC engagement. Mutational analyses revealed that HPV16 E7 sequences that are necessary for retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein binding as well as sequences previously implicated in binding the nuclear and mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein and in delocalizing dynein from the mitotic spindle contribute to SAC engagement. Importantly, however, HPV16 E7 does not markedly compromise the SAC response to microtubule poisons.

  11. Premature Sister Chromatid Separation Is Poorly Detected by the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint as a Result of System-Level Feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Mihailo Mirkovic; Lukas H. Hutter; Béla Novák; Raquel A. Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Sister chromatid cohesion, mediated by the cohesin complex, is essential for faithful mitosis. Nevertheless, evidence suggests that the surveillance mechanism that governs mitotic fidelity, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), is not robust enough to halt cell division when cohesion loss occurs prematurely. The mechanism behind this poor response is not properly understood. Using developing Drosophila brains, we show that full sister chromatid separation elicits a weak checkpoint response r...

  12. Premature Sister Chromatid Separation Is Poorly Detected by the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint as a Result of System-Level Feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Mirkovic, Mihailo; Hutter, Lukas H.; Novák, Béla; Oliveira, Raquel A.

    2015-01-01

    Sister chromatid cohesion, mediated by the cohesin complex, is essential for faithful mitosis. Nevertheless, evidence suggests that the surveillance mechanism that governs mitotic fidelity, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), is not robust enough to halt cell division when cohesion loss occurs prematurely. The mechanism behind this poor response is not properly understood. Using developing Drosophila brains, we show that full sister chromatid separation elicits a weak checkpoint response r...

  13. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick van Rijn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e.g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is dictated by poly-nucleotides namely RNA or DNA. This “biopolymer” directs the proteins and imposes limitations on the structure like the length or diameter of the particle. Not only do these bionanoparticles use polymer-directed self-assembly, also processes like amyloid formation are in a way a result of directed protein assembly by partial unfolded/misfolded biopolymers namely, polypeptides. The combination of proteins and synthetic polymers, inspired by the natural processes, are therefore regarded as a highly promising area of research. Directed protein assembly is versatile with respect to the possible interactions which brings together the protein and polymer, e.g., electrostatic, v.d. Waals forces or covalent conjugation, and possible combinations are numerous due to the large amounts of different polymers and proteins available. The protein-polymer interacting behavior and overall morphology is envisioned to aid in clarifying protein-protein interactions and are thought to entail some interesting new functions and properties which will ultimately lead to novel bio-hybrid materials.

  14. Anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome-dependent proteolysis of human cyclin A starts at the beginning of mitosis and is not subject to the spindle assembly checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geley, S; Kramer, E; Gieffers, C; Gannon, J; Peters, J M; Hunt, T

    2001-04-02

    Cyclin A is a stable protein in S and G2 phases, but is destabilized when cells enter mitosis and is almost completely degraded before the metaphase to anaphase transition. Microinjection of antibodies against subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) or against human Cdc20 (fizzy) arrested cells at metaphase and stabilized both cyclins A and B1. Cyclin A was efficiently polyubiquitylated by Cdc20 or Cdh1-activated APC/C in vitro, but in contrast to cyclin B1, the proteolysis of cyclin A was not delayed by the spindle assembly checkpoint. The degradation of cyclin B1 was accelerated by inhibition of the spindle assembly checkpoint. These data suggest that the APC/C is activated as cells enter mitosis and immediately targets cyclin A for degradation, whereas the spindle assembly checkpoint delays the degradation of cyclin B1 until the metaphase to anaphase transition. The "destruction box" (D-box) of cyclin A is 10-20 residues longer than that of cyclin B. Overexpression of wild-type cyclin A delayed the metaphase to anaphase transition, whereas expression of cyclin A mutants lacking a D-box arrested cells in anaphase.

  15. The checkpoint Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad9 protein contains a tandem tudor domain that recognizes DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Lancelot, Nathalie; Charier, Gaëlle; Couprie, Joël; Duband-Goulet, Isabelle; Alpha-Bazin, Béatrice; Quémeneur, Eric; Ma, Emilie; Marsolier-Kergoat, Marie-Claude; Ropars, Virginie; Charbonnier, Jean-Baptiste; Miron, Simona; Craescu, Constantin,; Callebaut, Isabelle; Gilquin, Bernard; Zinn-Justin, Sophie

    2007-01-01

    International audience; DNA damage checkpoints are signal transduction pathways that are activated after genotoxic insults to protect genomic integrity. At the site of DNA damage, 'mediator' proteins are in charge of recruiting 'signal transducers' to molecules 'sensing' the damage. Budding yeast Rad9, fission yeast Crb2 and metazoan 53BP1 are presented as mediators involved in the activation of checkpoint kinases. Here we show that, despite low sequence conservation, Rad9 exhibits a tandem t...

  16. Localization of checkpoint and repair proteins in eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2005-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the cellular response to DNA damage depends on the type of DNA structure being recognized by the checkpoint and repair machinery. DNA ends and single-stranded DNA are hallmarks of double-strand breaks and replication stress. These two structures are recognized by distinct sets of p...

  17. Meiosis I in Xenopus oocytes is not error-prone despite lacking spindle assembly checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dandan; Shao, Hua; Wang, Hongmei; Liu, X Johné

    2014-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint, SAC, is a surveillance mechanism to control the onset of anaphase during cell division. SAC prevents anaphase initiation until all chromosome pairs have achieved bipolar attachment and aligned at the metaphase plate of the spindle. In doing so, SAC is thought to be the key mechanism to prevent chromosome nondisjunction in mitosis and meiosis. We have recently demonstrated that Xenopus oocyte meiosis lacks SAC control. This prompted the question of whether Xenopus oocyte meiosis is particularly error-prone. In this study, we have karyotyped a total of 313 Xenopus eggs following in vitro oocyte maturation. We found no hyperploid egg, out of 204 metaphase II eggs with countable chromosome spreads. Therefore, chromosome nondisjunction is very rare during Xenopus oocyte meiosis I, despite the lack of SAC.

  18. Adapt or die: how eukaryotic cells respond to prolonged activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossio, Valentina; Galati, Elena; Piatti, Simonetta

    2010-12-01

    Many cancer-treating compounds used in chemotherapies, the so-called antimitotics, target the mitotic spindle. Spindle defects in turn trigger activation of the SAC (spindle assembly checkpoint), a surveillance mechanism that transiently arrests cells in mitosis to provide the time for error correction. When the SAC is satisfied, it is silenced. However, after a variable amount of time, cells escape from the mitotic arrest, even if the SAC is not satisfied, through a process called adaptation or mitotic slippage. Adaptation weakens the killing properties of antimitotics, ultimately giving rise to resistant cancer cells. We summarize here the mechanisms underlying this process and propose a strategy to identify the factors involved using budding yeast as a model system. Inhibition of factors involved in SAC adaptation could have important therapeutic applications by potentiating the ability of antimitotics to cause cell death.

  19. Joined at the hip: kinetochores, microtubules, and spindle assembly checkpoint signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacristan, Carlos; Kops, Geert J P L

    2015-01-01

    Error-free chromosome segregation relies on stable connections between kinetochores and spindle microtubules. The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) monitors such connections and relays their absence to the cell cycle machinery to delay cell division. The molecular network at kinetochores that is responsible for microtubule binding is integrated with the core components of the SAC signaling system. Molecular-mechanistic understanding of how the SAC is coupled to the kinetochore-microtubule interface has advanced significantly in recent years. The latest insights not only provide a striking view of the dynamics and regulation of SAC signaling events at the outer kinetochore but also create a framework for understanding how that signaling may be terminated when kinetochores and microtubules connect.

  20. Self assembling proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Todd O.; Padilla, Jennifer; Colovos, Chris

    2004-06-29

    Novel fusion proteins capable of self-assembling into regular structures, as well as nucleic acids encoding the same, are provided. The subject fusion proteins comprise at least two oligomerization domains rigidly linked together, e.g. through an alpha helical linking group. Also provided are regular structures comprising a plurality of self-assembled fusion proteins of the subject invention, and methods for producing the same. The subject fusion proteins find use in the preparation of a variety of nanostructures, where such structures include: cages, shells, double-layer rings, two-dimensional layers, three-dimensional crystals, filaments, and tubes.

  1. miR-125b promotes cell death by targeting spindle assembly checkpoint gene MAD1 and modulating mitotic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjya, S; Nath, S; Ghose, J; Maiti, G P; Biswas, N; Bandyopadhyay, S; Panda, C K; Bhattacharyya, N P; Roychoudhury, S

    2013-03-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a 'wait-anaphase' mechanism that has evolved in eukaryotic cells in response to the stochastic nature of chromosome-spindle attachments. In the recent past, different aspects of the SAC regulation have been described. However, the role of microRNAs in the SAC is vaguely understood. We report here that Mad1, a core SAC protein, is repressed by human miR-125b. Mad1 serves as an adaptor protein for Mad2 - which functions to inhibit anaphase entry till the chromosomal defects in metaphase are corrected. We show that exogenous expression of miR-125b, through downregulation of Mad1, delays cells at metaphase. As a result of this delay, cells proceed towards apoptotic death, which follows from elevated chromosomal abnormalities upon ectopic expression of miR-125b. Moreover, expressions of Mad1 and miR-125b are inversely correlated in a variety of cancer cell lines, as well as in primary head and neck tumour tissues. We conclude that increased expression of miR-125b inhibits cell proliferation by suppressing Mad1 and activating the SAC transiently. We hypothesize an optimum Mad1 level and thus, a properly scheduled SAC is maintained partly by miR-125b.

  2. Regulation of AURORA B function by mitotic checkpoint protein MAD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandilya, Jayasha; Medler, Kathryn F; Roberts, Stefan G E

    2016-08-17

    Cell cycle checkpoint signaling stringently regulates chromosome segregation during cell division. MAD2 is one of the key components of the spindle and mitotic checkpoint complex that regulates the fidelity of cell division along with MAD1, CDC20, BUBR1, BUB3 and MAD3. MAD2 ablation leads to erroneous attachment of kinetochore-spindle fibers and defective chromosome separation. A potential role for MAD2 in the regulation of events beyond the spindle and mitotic checkpoints is not clear. Together with active spindle assembly checkpoint signaling, AURORA B kinase activity is essential for chromosome condensation as cells enter mitosis. AURORA B phosphorylates histone H3 at serine 10 and serine 28 to facilitate the formation of condensed metaphase chromosomes. In the absence of functional AURORA B cells escape mitosis despite the presence of misaligned chromosomes. In this study we report that silencing of MAD2 results in a drastic reduction of metaphase-specific histone H3 phosphorylation at serine 10 and serine 28. We demonstrate that this is due to mislocalization of AURORA B in the absence of MAD2. Conversely, overexpression of MAD2 concentrated the localization of AURORA B at the metaphase plate and caused hyper-phosphorylation of histone H3. We find that MAD1 plays a minor role in influencing the MAD2-dependent regulation of AURORA B suggesting that the effects of MAD2 on AURORA B are independent of the spindle checkpoint complex. Our findings reveal that, in addition to its role in checkpoint signaling, MAD2 ensures chromosome stability through the regulation of AURORA B.

  3. The Spindle Assembly Checkpoint Safeguards Genomic Integrity of Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna Kollu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To ensure accurate genomic segregation, cells evolved the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC, whose role in adult stem cells remains unknown. Inducible perturbation of a SAC kinase, Mps1, and its downstream effector, Mad2, in skeletal muscle stem cells shows the SAC to be critical for normal muscle growth, repair, and self-renewal of the stem cell pool. SAC-deficient muscle stem cells arrest in G1 phase of the cell cycle with elevated aneuploidy, resisting differentiation even under inductive conditions. p21CIP1 is responsible for these SAC-deficient phenotypes. Despite aneuploidy’s correlation with aging, we find that aged proliferating muscle stem cells display robust SAC activity without elevated aneuploidy. Thus, muscle stem cells have a two-step mechanism to safeguard their genomic integrity. The SAC prevents chromosome missegregation and, if it fails, p21CIP1-dependent G1 arrest limits cellular propagation and tissue integration. These mechanisms ensure that muscle stem cells with compromised genomes do not contribute to tissue homeostasis.

  4. Tumor suppressor protein C53 antagonizes checkpoint kinases to promote cyclin-dependent kinase 1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hai; Wu, Jianchun; He, Chen; Yang, Wending; Li, Honglin

    2009-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)/cyclin B1 complex is the driving force for mitotic entry, and its activation is tightly regulated by the G2/M checkpoint. We originally reported that a novel protein C53 (also known as Cdk5rap3 and LZAP) potentiates DNA damage-induced cell death by modulating the G2/M checkpoint. More recently, Wang et al. (2007) found that C53/LZAP may function as a tumor suppressor by way of inhibiting NF-kappaB signaling. We report here the identification of C53 protein as a novel regulator of Cdk1 activation. We found that knockdown of C53 protein causes delayed Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry. During DNA damage response, activation of checkpoint kinase 1 and 2 (Chk1 and Chk2) is partially inhibited by C53 overexpression. Intriguingly, we found that C53 interacts with Chk1 and antagonizes its function. Moreover, a portion of C53 protein is localized at the centrosome, and centrosome-targeting C53 potently promotes local Cdk1 activation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that C53 is a novel negative regulator of checkpoint response. By counteracting Chk1, C53 promotes Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry in both unperturbed cell-cycle progression and DNA damage response.

  5. Tumor suppressor protein C53 antagonizes checkpoint kinases to promote cyclin-dependent kinase 1 activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Jiang; Jianchun Wu; Chen He; Wending Yang; Honglin Li

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)/cyclin B1 complex is the driving force for mitotic entry, and its activation is tightly regulated by the G2/M checkpoint. We originally reported that a novel protein C53 (also known as Cdk5rap3 and LZAP) potentiates DNA damage-induced cell death by modulating the G2/M checkpoint. More recently, Wang et al. (2007) found that C53/LZAP may function as a tumor suppressor by way of inhibiting NF-kB signaling. We report here the identification of C53 protein as a novel regulator of Cdk1 activation. We found that knockdown of C53 protein causes delayed Cdkl activation and mitotic entry. During DNA damage response, activation of checkpoint kinase 1 and 2 (Chk1 and Chk2) is partially inhibited by C53 overexpression. Intriguingly, we found that C53 interacts with Chkl and antagonizes its function. Moreover, a portion of C53 protein is localized at the centrosome, and centrosome-targeting C53 potently promotes local Cdk1 activation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that C53 is a novel negative regulator of checkpoint response. By counteracting Chk1, C53 promotes Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry in both unperturbed cell-cycle progression and DNA damage response.

  6. ECRG2基因缺失导致纺锤体检测点功能缺陷%Depletion of ECRG2 disrupts the spindle assembly checkpoint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔永萍; 成晓龙; 宋肖静; 陆士新

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of ECRG2,a novel tumor suppressor gene,in spindle assembly checkpoint. Methods Using siRNA approach to deplete the expression of ECRG2, using immunofluorescence to test the distribution of ECRG2,using Western blotting to examine the expression cell cycle proteins.Results ECRG2 localized to centrosomes during interphase and kinetochores during mitosis.Further analysis revealed that ECRG2 participates in the spindle assembly checkpoint.Depletion of ECRG2 abolished the spindle assembly checkpoint.Conclusion Our results indicated that ECRG2 is important for ensuring spindle assembly checkpoint,accurate chromosome segregation,and its depletion may contribute to chmmosome instability and aneuploidy in human cancers.%目的 观察ECRG2基因对纺锤体检测点功能的影响.方法 利用基因敲除和免疫荧光染色技术观察ECRG2基因在细胞内的定位及生物学功能.结果 ECRG2基因在有丝分裂间期分布于中心体、有丝分裂期分布于着丝粒处,可能参与中心体复制和纺锤体检测点功能.siRNA技术敲除ECBG2基因细胞导致纺锤体检测点功能丧失,在nocodazole处理时无法阻断细胞于有丝分裂期而进入下一细胞周期,最终导致染色体不稳定性和非整倍体细胞出现.结论 ECRG2在纺锤体检测点中起重要作用,对确保染色体稳定性必不可少;ECRG2基因的缺失可能是肿瘤细胞染色体不稳定性和非整倍体细胞产生的重要原因.

  7. Premature Sister Chromatid Separation Is Poorly Detected by the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint as a Result of System-Level Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihailo Mirkovic

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sister chromatid cohesion, mediated by the cohesin complex, is essential for faithful mitosis. Nevertheless, evidence suggests that the surveillance mechanism that governs mitotic fidelity, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC, is not robust enough to halt cell division when cohesion loss occurs prematurely. The mechanism behind this poor response is not properly understood. Using developing Drosophila brains, we show that full sister chromatid separation elicits a weak checkpoint response resulting in abnormal mitotic exit after a short delay. Quantitative live-cell imaging approaches combined with mathematical modeling indicate that weak SAC activation upon cohesion loss is caused by weak signal generation. This is further attenuated by several feedback loops in the mitotic signaling network. We propose that multiple feedback loops involving cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1 gradually impair error-correction efficiency and accelerate mitotic exit upon premature loss of cohesion. Our findings explain how cohesion defects may escape SAC surveillance.

  8. Spindle assembly checkpoint signalling is uncoupled from chromosomal position in mouse oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Liming; Homer, Hayden

    2012-06-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) averts aneuploidy by coordinating proper bipolar chromosomal attachment with anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C)-mediated securin and cyclin B1 destruction required for anaphase onset. The generation of a Mad2-based signal at kinetochores is central to current models of SAC-based APC/C inhibition. During mitosis, kinetochores of polar-displaced chromosomes, which are at greatest risk of mis-segregating, recruit the highest levels of Mad2, thereby ensuring that SAC activation is proportionate to aneuploidy risk. Paradoxically, although an SAC operates in mammalian oocytes, meiosis I (MI) is notoriously error prone and polar-displaced chromosomes do not prevent anaphase onset. Here we find that Mad2 is not preferentially recruited to the kinetochores of polar chromosomes of wild-type mouse oocytes, in which polar chromosomes are rare, or of oocytes depleted of the kinesin-7 motor CENP-E, in which polar chromosomes are more abundant. Furthermore, in CENP-E-depleted oocytes, although polar chromosomal displacement intensified during MI and the capacity to form stable end-on attachments was severely compromised, all kinetochores nevertheless became devoid of Mad2. Thus, it is possible that the ability of the SAC to robustly discriminate chromosomal position might be compromised by the propensity of oocyte kinetochores to become saturated with unproductive attachments, thereby predisposing to aneuploidy. Our data also reveal novel functions for CENP-E in oocytes: first, CENP-E stabilises BubR1, thereby impacting MI progression; and second, CENP-E mediates bi-orientation by promoting kinetochore reorientation and preventing chromosomal drift towards the poles.

  9. DNA damage response and spindle assembly checkpoint function throughout the cell cycle to ensure genomic integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine S Lawrence

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Errors in replication or segregation lead to DNA damage, mutations, and aneuploidies. Consequently, cells monitor these events and delay progression through the cell cycle so repair precedes division. The DNA damage response (DDR, which monitors DNA integrity, and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC, which responds to defects in spindle attachment/tension during metaphase of mitosis and meiosis, are critical for preventing genome instability. Here we show that the DDR and SAC function together throughout the cell cycle to ensure genome integrity in C. elegans germ cells. Metaphase defects result in enrichment of SAC and DDR components to chromatin, and both SAC and DDR are required for metaphase delays. During persistent metaphase arrest following establishment of bi-oriented chromosomes, stability of the metaphase plate is compromised in the absence of DDR kinases ATR or CHK1 or SAC components, MAD1/MAD2, suggesting SAC functions in metaphase beyond its interactions with APC activator CDC20. In response to DNA damage, MAD2 and the histone variant CENPA become enriched at the nuclear periphery in a DDR-dependent manner. Further, depletion of either MAD1 or CENPA results in loss of peripherally associated damaged DNA. In contrast to a SAC-insensitive CDC20 mutant, germ cells deficient for SAC or CENPA cannot efficiently repair DNA damage, suggesting that SAC mediates DNA repair through CENPA interactions with the nuclear periphery. We also show that replication perturbations result in relocalization of MAD1/MAD2 in human cells, suggesting that the role of SAC in DNA repair is conserved.

  10. A tumor suppressor C53 protein antagonizes checkpoint kinases to promote cyclin-dependent kinase 1 activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hai; Wu, Jianchun; He, Chen; Yang, Wending; Li, Honglin

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)/cyclin B1 complex is the driving force for mitotic entry, and its activation is tightly regulated by the G2/M checkpoint. We originally reported that a novel protein C53 (also known as Cdk5rap3 and LZAP) potentiates DNA damage-induced cell death by modulating the G2/M checkpoint (1). More recently, Wang et al (2007) found that C53/LZAP may function as a tumor suppressor via inhibiting NF-κB signaling (2). We report here identification of C53 protein as a novel regulator of Cdk1 activation. We found that knockdown of C53 protein causes delayed Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry. During DNA damage response, activation of checkpoint kinase 1 and 2 (Chk1 and Chk2) is partially inhibited by C53 overexrepsssion. Intriguingly, we found that C53 interacts with checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) and antagonizes its function. Moreover, a portion of C53 protein is localized at the centrosome, and centrosome-targeting C53 potently promotes local Cdk1 activation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that C53 is a novel negative regulator of checkpoint response. By counteracting Chk1, C53 promotes Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry in both unperturbed cell cycle progression and DNA damage response. PMID:19223857

  11. A tumor suppressor C53 protein antagonizes checkpoint kinases to promote cyclin-dependent kinase 1 activation

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Hai; Wu, Jianchun; He, Chen; Yang, Wending; Li, Honglin

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)/cyclin B1 complex is the driving force for mitotic entry, and its activation is tightly regulated by the G2/M checkpoint. We originally reported that a novel protein C53 (also known as Cdk5rap3 and LZAP) potentiates DNA damage-induced cell death by modulating the G2/M checkpoint (1). More recently, Wang et al (2007) found that C53/LZAP may function as a tumor suppressor via inhibiting NF-κB signaling (2). We report here identification of C53 protein as a novel...

  12. Conformation-specific anti-Mad2 monoclonal antibodies for the dissection of checkpoint signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sedgwick, Garry G; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo; Lischetti, Tiziana;

    2016-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures accurate chromosome segregation during mitosis by delaying the activation of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) in response to unattached kinetochores. The Mad2 protein is essential for a functional checkpoint because it binds directly...

  13. Differences in spindle association of the mitotic checkpoint protein Mad2 in mammalian spermatogenesis and oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallio, M; Eriksson, J E; Gorbsky, G J

    2000-09-01

    We have investigated expression and subcellular localization of the spindle checkpoint protein Mad2 during rat and mouse spermatogenesis and in superovulated mouse oocytes. Our immunofluorescence studies demonstrate substantial differences in the localization patterns of kinetochore-associated Mad2 in these meiotic systems compared with previous studies of mitosis. In addition, the association of Mad2 with second-division-metaphase kinetochores differed significantly in male versus female meiosis. In spermatogenesis, Mad2 remained at most kinetochores throughout the entire first meiotic division and was lost only at metaphase of the second meiotic division. This result indicates that loss of kinetochore-associated Mad2 is not essential for the metaphase-to-anaphase transition during the first meiotic division. Disruption of the male meiotic spindles with the microtubule depolymerizing agent nocodazole resulted in the appearance of Mad2 at nearly all kinetochores. In contrast, the microtubule stabilizer taxol induced the loss of Mad2 from the majority of the first-division-metaphase kinetochores in which it was normally present in untreated cells. In contrast to the situation in spermatogenesis, Mad2 persisted at the kinetochores of normal, second-division oocytes at metaphase. These findings suggest that the role of the kinetochore in signaling in the spindle checkpoint may differ markedly between mammalian mitosis and meiosis, between the two meiotic divisions, and between male and female meiosis.

  14. Zwint-1 is required for spindle assembly checkpoint function and kinetochore-microtubule attachment during oocyte meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo Seo, Dong; Yeop You, Seung; Chung, Woo-Jae; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Sung; Su Oh, Jeong

    2015-10-21

    The key step for faithful chromosome segregation during meiosis is kinetochore assembly. Defects in this process result in aneuploidy, leading to miscarriages, infertility and various birth defects. However, the roles of kinetochores in homologous chromosome segregation during meiosis are ill-defined. Here we found that Zwint-1 is required for homologous chromosome segregation during meiosis. Knockdown of Zwint-1 accelerated the first meiosis by abrogating the kinetochore recruitment of Mad2, leading to chromosome misalignment and a high incidence of aneuploidy. Although Zwint-1 knockdown did not affect Aurora C kinase activity, the meiotic defects following Zwint-1 knockdown were similar to those observed with ZM447439 treatment. Importantly, the chromosome misalignment following Aurora C kinase inhibition was not restored after removing the inhibitor in Zwint-1-knockdown oocytes, whereas the defect was rescued after the inhibitor washout in the control oocytes. These results suggest that Aurora C kinase-mediated correction of erroneous kinetochore-microtubule attachment is primarily regulated by Zwint-1. Our results provide the first evidence that Zwint-1 is required to correct erroneous kinetochore-microtubule attachment and regulate spindle checkpoint function during meiosis.

  15. Taxifolin enhances andrographolide-induced mitotic arrest and apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells via spindle assembly checkpoint activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Rong Zhang

    Full Text Available Andrographolide (Andro suppresses proliferation and triggers apoptosis in many types of cancer cells. Taxifolin (Taxi has been proposed to prevent cancer development similar to other dietary flavonoids. In the present study, the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of the addition of Andro alone and Andro and Taxi together on human prostate carcinoma DU145 cells were assessed. Andro inhibited prostate cancer cell proliferation by mitotic arrest and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Although the effect of Taxi alone on DU145 cell proliferation was not significant, the combined use of Taxi with Andro significantly potentiated the anti-proliferative effect of increased mitotic arrest and apoptosis by enhancing the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase, and caspases-7 and -9. Andro together with Taxi enhanced microtubule polymerization in vitro, and they induced the formation of twisted and elongated spindles in the cancer cells, thus leading to mitotic arrest. In addition, we showed that depletion of MAD2, a component in the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC, alleviated the mitotic block induced by the two compounds, suggesting that they trigger mitotic arrest by SAC activation. This study suggests that the anti-cancer activity of Andro can be significantly enhanced in combination with Taxi by disrupting microtubule dynamics and activating the SAC.

  16. Taxifolin enhances andrographolide-induced mitotic arrest and apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells via spindle assembly checkpoint activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhong Rong; Al Zaharna, Mazen; Wong, Matthew Man-Kin; Chiu, Sung-Kay; Cheung, Hon-Yeung

    2013-01-01

    Andrographolide (Andro) suppresses proliferation and triggers apoptosis in many types of cancer cells. Taxifolin (Taxi) has been proposed to prevent cancer development similar to other dietary flavonoids. In the present study, the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of the addition of Andro alone and Andro and Taxi together on human prostate carcinoma DU145 cells were assessed. Andro inhibited prostate cancer cell proliferation by mitotic arrest and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Although the effect of Taxi alone on DU145 cell proliferation was not significant, the combined use of Taxi with Andro significantly potentiated the anti-proliferative effect of increased mitotic arrest and apoptosis by enhancing the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and caspases-7 and -9. Andro together with Taxi enhanced microtubule polymerization in vitro, and they induced the formation of twisted and elongated spindles in the cancer cells, thus leading to mitotic arrest. In addition, we showed that depletion of MAD2, a component in the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), alleviated the mitotic block induced by the two compounds, suggesting that they trigger mitotic arrest by SAC activation. This study suggests that the anti-cancer activity of Andro can be significantly enhanced in combination with Taxi by disrupting microtubule dynamics and activating the SAC.

  17. The Spindle Assembly Checkpoint Is Not Essential for Viability of Human Cells with Genetically Lowered APC/C Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wild, Thomas; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo; Narita, Takeo;

    2016-01-01

    -conjugating enzymes-UBE2C and UBE2S. We show that APC/C activity in human cells is tuned by the combinatorial use of three E2s, namely UBE2C, UBE2S, and UBE2D. Genetic deletion of UBE2C and UBE2S, individually or in combination, leads to discriminative reduction in APC/C function and sensitizes cells to UBE2D......The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which inhibits the APC/C, are essential determinants of mitotic timing and faithful division of genetic material. Activation of the APC/C is known to depend on two APC/C-interacting E2 ubiquitin...... depletion. Reduction of APC/C activity results in loss of switch-like metaphase-to-anaphase transition and, strikingly, renders cells insensitive to chemical inhibition of MPS1 and genetic ablation of MAD2, both of which are essential for the SAC. These results provide insights into the regulation of APC...

  18. Compact modeling of allosteric multisite proteins: application to a cell size checkpoint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Enciso

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We explore a framework to model the dose response of allosteric multisite phosphorylation proteins using a single auxiliary variable. This reduction can closely replicate the steady state behavior of detailed multisite systems such as the Monod-Wyman-Changeux allosteric model or rule-based models. Optimal ultrasensitivity is obtained when the activation of an allosteric protein by its individual sites is concerted and redundant. The reduction makes this framework useful for modeling and analyzing biochemical systems in practical applications, where several multisite proteins may interact simultaneously. As an application we analyze a newly discovered checkpoint signaling pathway in budding yeast, which has been proposed to measure cell growth by monitoring signals generated at sites of plasma membrane growth. We show that the known components of this pathway can form a robust hysteretic switch. In particular, this system incorporates a signal proportional to bud growth or size, a mechanism to read the signal, and an all-or-none response triggered only when the signal reaches a threshold indicating that sufficient growth has occurred.

  19. The bacterial cell cycle checkpoint protein Obg and its role in programmed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liselot Dewachter

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of programmed cell death (PCD, in which cells initiate their own demise, is not restricted to multicellular organisms. Unicellular organisms, both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, also possess pathways that mediate PCD. We recently identified a PCD mechanism in Escherichia coli that is triggered by a mutant isoform of the essential GTPase ObgE (Obg of E. coli. Importantly, the PCD pathway mediated by mutant Obg (Obg* differs fundamentally from other previously described bacterial PCD pathways and thus constitutes a new mode of PCD. ObgE was previously proposed to act as a cell cycle checkpoint protein able to halt cell division. The implication of ObgE in the regulation of PCD further increases the similarity between this protein and eukaryotic cell cycle regulators that are capable of doing both. Moreover, since Obg is conserved in eukaryotes, the elucidation of this cell death mechanism might contribute to the understanding of PCD in higher organisms. Additionally, if Obg*-mediated PCD is conserved among different bacterial species, it will be a prime target for the development of innovative antibacterials that artificially induce this pathway.

  20. Budding yeast dma proteins control septin dynamics and the spindle position checkpoint by promoting the recruitment of the Elm1 kinase to the bud neck.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Merlini

    Full Text Available The first step towards cytokinesis in budding yeast is the assembly of a septin ring at the future site of bud emergence. Integrity of this ring is crucial for cytokinesis, proper spindle positioning, and the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC. This checkpoint delays mitotic exit and cytokinesis as long as the anaphase spindle does not properly align with the division axis. SPOC signalling requires the Kin4 protein kinase and the Kin4-regulating Elm1 kinase, which also controls septin dynamics. Here, we show that the two redundant ubiquitin-ligases Dma1 and Dma2 control septin dynamics and the SPOC by promoting the efficient recruitment of Elm1 to the bud neck. Indeed, dma1 dma2 mutant cells show reduced levels of Elm1 at the bud neck and Elm1-dependent activation of Kin4. Artificial recruitment of Elm1 to the bud neck of the same cells is sufficient to re-establish a normal septin ring, proper spindle positioning, and a proficient SPOC response in dma1 dma2 cells. Altogether, our data indicate that septin dynamics and SPOC function are intimately linked and support the idea that integrity of the bud neck is crucial for SPOC signalling.

  1. Budding yeast dma proteins control septin dynamics and the spindle position checkpoint by promoting the recruitment of the Elm1 kinase to the bud neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlini, Laura; Fraschini, Roberta; Boettcher, Barbara; Barral, Yves; Lucchini, Giovanna; Piatti, Simonetta

    2012-01-01

    The first step towards cytokinesis in budding yeast is the assembly of a septin ring at the future site of bud emergence. Integrity of this ring is crucial for cytokinesis, proper spindle positioning, and the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC). This checkpoint delays mitotic exit and cytokinesis as long as the anaphase spindle does not properly align with the division axis. SPOC signalling requires the Kin4 protein kinase and the Kin4-regulating Elm1 kinase, which also controls septin dynamics. Here, we show that the two redundant ubiquitin-ligases Dma1 and Dma2 control septin dynamics and the SPOC by promoting the efficient recruitment of Elm1 to the bud neck. Indeed, dma1 dma2 mutant cells show reduced levels of Elm1 at the bud neck and Elm1-dependent activation of Kin4. Artificial recruitment of Elm1 to the bud neck of the same cells is sufficient to re-establish a normal septin ring, proper spindle positioning, and a proficient SPOC response in dma1 dma2 cells. Altogether, our data indicate that septin dynamics and SPOC function are intimately linked and support the idea that integrity of the bud neck is crucial for SPOC signalling.

  2. Error-prone mammalian female meiosis from silencing the spindle assembly checkpoint without normal interkinetochore tension

    OpenAIRE

    Kolano, Agnieszka; Brunet, Stéphane; Silk, Alain D.; Cleveland, Don W.; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that chromosome segregation in female meiosis I (MI) is error-prone. The acentrosomal meiotic spindle poles do not have centrioles and are not anchored to the cortex via astral microtubules. By Cre recombinase-mediated removal in oocytes of the microtubule binding site of nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA), which is implicated in anchoring microtubules at poles, we determine that without functional NuMA, microtubules lose connection to MI spindle poles, resulting ...

  3. Multivalent Protein Assembly Using Monovalent Self-Assembling Building Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Petkau-Milroy

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Discotic molecules, which self-assemble in water into columnar supramolecular polymers, emerged as an alternative platform for the organization of proteins. Here, a monovalent discotic decorated with one single biotin was synthesized to study the self-assembling multivalency of this system in regard to streptavidin. Next to tetravalent streptavidin, monovalent streptavidin was used to study the protein assembly along the supramolecular polymer in detail without the interference of cross-linking. Upon self-assembly of the monovalent biotinylated discotics, multivalent proteins can be assembled along the supramolecular polymer. The concentration of discotics, which influences the length of the final polymers at the same time dictates the amount of assembled proteins.

  4. Determinants of mitotic catastrophe on abrogation of the G2 DNA damage checkpoint by UCN-01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    On, Kin Fan; Chen, Yue; Ma, Hoi Tang; Chow, Jeremy P H; Poon, Randy Y C

    2011-05-01

    Genotoxic stress such as ionizing radiation halts entry into mitosis by activation of the G(2) DNA damage checkpoint. The CHK1 inhibitor 7-hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01) can bypass the checkpoint and induce unscheduled mitosis in irradiated cells. Precisely, how cells behave following checkpoint abrogation remains to be defined. In this study, we tracked the fates of individual cells after checkpoint abrogation, focusing in particular on whether they undergo mitotic catastrophe. Surprisingly, while a subset of UCN-01-treated cells were immediately eliminated during the first mitosis after checkpoint abrogation, about half remained viable and progressed into G(1). Both the delay of mitotic entry and the level of mitotic catastrophe were dependent on the dose of radiation. Although the level of mitotic catastrophe was specific for different cell lines, it could be promoted by extending the mitosis. In supporting this idea, weakening of the spindle-assembly checkpoint, by either depleting MAD2 or overexpressing the MAD2-binding protein p31(comet), suppressed mitotic catastrophe. Conversely, delaying of mitotic exit by depleting either p31(comet) or CDC20 tipped the balance toward mitotic catastrophe. These results underscore the interplay between the level of DNA damage and the effectiveness of the spindle-assembly checkpoint in determining whether checkpoint-abrogated cells are eliminated during mitosis.

  5. Fibril assembly in whey protein mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolder, S.G.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to study fibril assembly in mixtures of whey proteins. The effect of the composition of the protein mixture on the structures and the resulting phase behaviour was investigated. The current work has shown that beta-lactoglobulin is responsible for the fibril assembly

  6. Expanding coordination chemistry from protein to protein assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghamitra, Nusrat J M; Ueno, Takafumi

    2013-05-14

    Bioinorganic chemistry is of growing importance in the fields of nanomaterial science and biotechnology. Coordination of metals by biological systems is a crucial step in intricate enzymatic reactions such as photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation and biomineralization. Although such systems employ protein assemblies as molecular scaffolds, the important roles of protein assemblies in coordination chemistry have not been systematically investigated and characterized. Many researchers are joining the field of bioinorganic chemistry to investigate the inorganic chemistry of protein assemblies. This area is emerging as an important next-generation research field in bioinorganic chemistry. This article reviews recent progress in rational design of protein assemblies in coordination chemistry for integration of catalytic reactions using metal complexes, preparation of mineral biomimetics, and mechanistic investigations of biomineralization processes with protein assemblies. The unique chemical properties of protein assemblies in the form of cages, tubes, and crystals are described in this review.

  7. Structural and functional insights into the role of the N-terminal Mps1 TPR domain in the SAC (spindle assembly checkpoint).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thebault, Philippe; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y; Dou, Zhen; Blundell, Tom L; Elowe, Sabine; Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M

    2012-12-15

    The SAC (spindle assembly checkpoint) is a surveillance system that ensures the timely and accurate transmission of the genetic material to offspring. The process implies kinetochore targeting of the mitotic kinases Bub1 (budding uninhibited by benzamidine 1), BubR1 (Bub1 related) and Mps1 (monopolar spindle 1), which is mediated by the N-terminus of each kinase. In the present study we report the 1.8 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) crystal structure of the TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) domain in the N-terminal region of human Mps1. The structure reveals an overall high similarity to the TPR motif of the mitotic checkpoint kinases Bub1 and BubR1, and a number of unique features that include the absence of the binding site for the kinetochore structural component KNL1 (kinetochore-null 1; blinkin), and determinants of dimerization. Moreover, we show that a stretch of amino acids at the very N-terminus of Mps1 is required for dimer formation, and that interfering with dimerization results in mislocalization and misregulation of kinase activity. The results of the present study provide an important insight into the molecular details of the mitotic functions of Mps1 including features that dictate substrate selectivity and kinetochore docking.

  8. Drosophila MOF controls Checkpoint protein2 and regulates genomic stability during early embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpavalli Sreerangam NCVL

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Drosophila embryos, checkpoints maintain genome stability by delaying cell cycle progression that allows time for damage repair or to complete DNA synthesis. Drosophila MOF, a member of MYST histone acetyl transferase is an essential component of male X hyperactivation process. Until recently its involvement in G2/M cell cycle arrest and defects in ionizing radiation induced DNA damage pathways was not well established. Results Drosophila MOF is highly expressed during early embryogenesis. In the present study we show that haplo-insufficiency of maternal MOF leads to spontaneous mitotic defects like mitotic asynchrony, mitotic catastrophe and chromatid bridges in the syncytial embryos. Such abnormal nuclei are eliminated and digested in the yolk tissues by nuclear fall out mechanism. MOF negatively regulates Drosophila checkpoint kinase 2 tumor suppressor homologue. In response to DNA damage the checkpoint gene Chk2 (Drosophila mnk is activated in the mof mutants, there by causing centrosomal inactivation suggesting its role in response to genotoxic stress. A drastic decrease in the fall out nuclei in the syncytial embryos derived from mof1/+; mnkp6/+ females further confirms the role of DNA damage response gene Chk2 to ensure the removal of abnormal nuclei from the embryonic precursor pool and maintain genome stability. The fact that mof mutants undergo DNA damage has been further elucidated by the increased number of single and double stranded DNA breaks. Conclusion mof mutants exhibited genomic instability as evidenced by the occurance of frequent mitotic bridges in anaphase, asynchronous nuclear divisions, disruption of cytoskeleton, inactivation of centrosomes finally leading to DNA damage. Our findings are consistent to what has been reported earlier in mammals that; reduced levels of MOF resulted in increased genomic instability while total loss resulted in lethality. The study can be further extended using

  9. Inhibition of clathrin by pitstop 2 activates the spindle assembly checkpoint and induces cell death in dividing HeLa cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Charlotte M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During metaphase clathrin stabilises the mitotic spindle kinetochore(K-fibres. Many anti-mitotic compounds target microtubule dynamics. Pitstop 2™ is the first small molecule inhibitor of clathrin terminal domain and inhibits clathrin-mediated endocytosis. We investigated its effects on a second function for clathrin in mitosis. Results Pitstop 2 did not impair clathrin recruitment to the spindle but disrupted its function once stationed there. Pitstop 2 trapped HeLa cells in metaphase through loss of mitotic spindle integrity and activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint, phenocopying clathrin depletion and aurora A kinase inhibition. Conclusions Pitstop 2 is therefore a new tool for investigating clathrin spindle dynamics. Pitstop 2 reduced viability in dividing HeLa cells, without affecting dividing non-cancerous NIH3T3 cells, suggesting that clathrin is a possible novel anti-mitotic drug target.

  10. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Quinn, Caitlin M.; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates.

  11. S-layer protein self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pum, Dietmar; Toca-Herrera, Jose Luis; Sleytr, Uwe B

    2013-01-25

    Crystalline S(urface)-layers are the most commonly observed cell surface structures in prokaryotic organisms (bacteria and archaea). S-layers are highly porous protein meshworks with unit cell sizes in the range of 3 to 30 nm, and thicknesses of ~10 nm. One of the key features of S-layer proteins is their intrinsic capability to form self-assembled mono- or double layers in solution, and at interfaces. Basic research on S-layer proteins laid foundation to make use of the unique self-assembly properties of native and, in particular, genetically functionalized S-layer protein lattices, in a broad range of applications in the life and non-life sciences. This contribution briefly summarizes the knowledge about structure, genetics, chemistry, morphogenesis, and function of S-layer proteins and pays particular attention to the self-assembly in solution, and at differently functionalized solid supports.

  12. DNA damage checkpoint recovery and cancer development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haiyong [First affiliated hospital, Zhejiang University, School of medicine, Cancer Center, 79 Qingchun Road, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Zhang, Xiaoshan [Department of Genetics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Genetics Unit 1010, 1515 Holcombe Blvd. Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Teng, Lisong, E-mail: lsteng@zju.edu.cn [First affiliated hospital, Zhejiang University, School of medicine, Cancer Center, 79 Qingchun Road, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Legerski, Randy J., E-mail: rlegersk@mdanderson.org [Department of Genetics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Genetics Unit 1010, 1515 Holcombe Blvd. Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2015-06-10

    Cell cycle checkpoints were initially presumed to function as a regulator of cell cycle machinery in response to different genotoxic stresses, and later found to play an important role in the process of tumorigenesis by acting as a guard against DNA over-replication. As a counterpart of checkpoint activation, the checkpoint recovery machinery is working in opposition, aiming to reverse the checkpoint activation and resume the normal cell cycle. The DNA damage response (DDR) and oncogene induced senescence (OIS) are frequently found in precancerous lesions, and believed to constitute a barrier to tumorigenesis, however, the DDR and OIS have been observed to be diminished in advanced cancers of most tissue origins. These findings suggest that when progressing from pre-neoplastic lesions to cancer, DNA damage checkpoint barriers are overridden. How the DDR checkpoint is bypassed in this process remains largely unknown. Activated cytokine and growth factor-signaling pathways were very recently shown to suppress the DDR and to promote uncontrolled cell proliferation in the context of oncovirus infection. In recent decades, data from cell line and tumor models showed that a group of checkpoint recovery proteins function in promoting tumor progression; data from patient samples also showed overexpression of checkpoint recovery proteins in human cancer tissues and a correlation with patients' poor prognosis. In this review, the known cell cycle checkpoint recovery proteins and their roles in DNA damage checkpoint recovery are reviewed, as well as their implications in cancer development. This review also provides insight into the mechanism by which the DDR suppresses oncogene-driven tumorigenesis and tumor progression. - Highlights: • DNA damage checkpoint works as a barrier to cancer initiation. • DDR machinary response to genotoxic and oncogenic stress in similar way. • Checkpoint recovery pathways provide active signaling in cell cycle control. • Checkpoint

  13. Soft matter perspective on protein crystal assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Diana; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Crystallography may be the gold standard of protein structure determination, but obtaining the necessary high-quality crystals is also in some ways akin to prospecting for the precious metal. The tools and models developed in soft matter physics to understand colloidal assembly offer some insights into the problem of crystallizing proteins. This topical review describes the various analogies that have been made between proteins and colloids in that context. We highlight the explanatory power of patchy particle models, but also the challenges of providing guidance for crystallizing specific proteins. We conclude with a presentation of possible future research directions. This review is intended for soft matter scientists interested in protein crystallization as a self-assembly problem, and as an introduction to the pertinent physics literature for protein scientists more generally.

  14. Spindle alignment regulates the dynamic association of checkpoint proteins with yeast spindle pole bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caydasi, Ayse Koca; Pereira, Gislene

    2009-01-01

    In many polarized cells, the accuracy of chromosome segregation depends on the correct positioning of the mitotic spindle. In budding yeast, the spindle positioning checkpoint (SPOC) delays mitotic exit when the anaphase spindle fails to extend toward the mother-daughter axis. However it remains to be established how spindle orientation is translated to SPOC components at the yeast spindle pole bodies (SPB). Here, we used photobleaching techniques to show that the dynamics with which Bub2-Bfa1 turned over at SPBs significantly increased upon SPOC activation. A version of Bfa1 that was stably associated with SPBs rendered the cells SPOC deficient without affecting other Bub2-Bfa1 functions, demonstrating the functional importance of regulating the dynamics of Bfa1 SPB association. In addition, we established that the SPOC kinase Kin4 is the major regulator of Bfa1 residence time at SPBs. We suggest that upon SPOC activation Bfa1-Bub2 spreads throughout the cytoplasm, thereby inhibiting mitotic exit.

  15. Phosphorylation of the regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 by checkpoint kinase Chk1: identification of the in vitro CK2beta phosphorylation site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars P; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Højrup, Peter;

    2004-01-01

    The regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 mediates the formation of the CK2 tetrameric form and it has functions independent of CK2 catalytic subunit through interaction with several intracellular proteins. Recently, we have shown that CK2beta associates with the human checkpoint kinase Chk...... by the modification of Thr213 but it does require the presence of an active Chk1 kinase....

  16. A FRET-based study reveals site-specific regulation of spindle position checkpoint proteins at yeast centrosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryaznova, Yuliya; Koca Caydasi, Ayse; Malengo, Gabriele; Sourjik, Victor; Pereira, Gislene

    2016-05-09

    The spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) is a spindle pole body (SPB, equivalent of mammalian centrosome) associated surveillance mechanism that halts mitotic exit upon spindle mis-orientation. Here, we monitored the interaction between SPB proteins and the SPOC component Bfa1 by FRET microscopy. We show that Bfa1 binds to the scaffold-protein Nud1 and the γ-tubulin receptor Spc72. Spindle misalignment specifically disrupts Bfa1-Spc72 interaction by a mechanism that requires the 14-3-3-family protein Bmh1 and the MARK/PAR-kinase Kin4. Dissociation of Bfa1 from Spc72 prevents the inhibitory phosphorylation of Bfa1 by the polo-like kinase Cdc5. We propose Spc72 as a regulatory hub that coordinates the activity of Kin4 and Cdc5 towards Bfa1. In addition, analysis of spc72∆ cells shows that a mitotic-exit-promoting dominant signal, which is triggered upon elongation of the spindle into the bud, overrides the SPOC. Our data reinforce the importance of daughter-cell-associated factors and centrosome-based regulations in mitotic exit and SPOC control.

  17. Rationally engineering natural protein assemblies in nanobiotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howorka, Stefan

    2011-08-01

    Multimeric protein assemblies are essential components in viruses, bacteria, eukaryotic cells, and organisms where they act as cytoskeletal scaffold, storage containers, or for directional transport. The bottom-up structures can be exploited in nanobiotechnology by harnessing their built-in properties and combining them with new functional modules. This review summarizes the design principles of natural protein assemblies, highlights recent progress in their structural elucidation, and shows how rational engineering can create new biomaterials for applications in vaccine development, biocatalysis, materials science, and synthetic biology.

  18. Single-particle study of protein assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2001-10-01

    A study of protein assembly in solution with single-particle imaging and reconstruction techniques using cryoelectron microscopy is reported. The human glutamine synthetase enzyme, important in brain metabolism, and previously assumed to be assembled into a homogeneous quaternary structure, is found to be heterogeneous, with three oligomeric states that co-exist at room temperature. This result corrects an old structural and kinetic model determined by ensemble averaging techniques that assumed a homogeneous system. Unexpectedly fast protein dissociation kinetics results from a stabilized transition state.

  19. MITRAC7 Acts as a COX1-Specific Chaperone and Reveals a Checkpoint during Cytochrome c Oxidase Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennerlein, Sven; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Jans, Daniel; Hellwig, Christin; Bareth, Bettina; Jakobs, Stefan; Deckers, Markus; Warscheid, Bettina; Rehling, Peter

    2015-09-08

    Cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain, is assembled from mitochondria- and nuclear-encoded subunits. The MITRAC complex represents the central assembly intermediate during this process as it receives imported subunits and regulates mitochondrial translation of COX1 mRNA. The molecular processes that promote and regulate the progression of assembly downstream of MITRAC are still unknown. Here, we identify MITRAC7 as a constituent of a late form of MITRAC and as a COX1-specific chaperone. MITRAC7 is required for cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis. Surprisingly, loss of MITRAC7 or an increase in its amount causes selective cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in human cells. We demonstrate that increased MITRAC7 levels stabilize and trap COX1 in MITRAC, blocking progression in the assembly process. In contrast, MITRAC7 deficiency leads to turnover of newly synthesized COX1. Accordingly, MITRAC7 affects the biogenesis pathway by stabilizing newly synthesized COX1 in assembly intermediates, concomitantly preventing turnover.

  20. CLP-based protein fragment assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Palu', Alessandro Dal; Fogolari, Federico; Pontelli, Enrico; 10.1017/S1471068410000372

    2010-01-01

    The paper investigates a novel approach, based on Constraint Logic Programming (CLP), to predict the 3D conformation of a protein via fragments assembly. The fragments are extracted by a preprocessor-also developed for this work- from a database of known protein structures that clusters and classifies the fragments according to similarity and frequency. The problem of assembling fragments into a complete conformation is mapped to a constraint solving problem and solved using CLP. The constraint-based model uses a medium discretization degree Ca-side chain centroid protein model that offers efficiency and a good approximation for space filling. The approach adapts existing energy models to the protein representation used and applies a large neighboring search strategy. The results shows the feasibility and efficiency of the method. The declarative nature of the solution allows to include future extensions, e.g., different size fragments for better accuracy.

  1. Choreography of the 9-1-1 checkpoint complex: DDK puts a check on the checkpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Andrew L; Weinert, Ted

    2010-11-24

    Checkpoint proteins respond to DNA damage by halting the cell cycle until the damage is repaired. In this issue of Molecular Cell, Furuya et al. (2010) provide evidence that checkpoint proteins need to be removed from sites of damage in order to properly repair it.

  2. Constitutive Mad1 targeting to kinetochores uncouples checkpoint signalling from chromosome biorientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Maria; Kapoor, Tarun M

    2011-04-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation depends on biorientation, whereby sister chromatids attach to microtubules from opposite spindle poles. The spindle-assembly checkpoint is a surveillance mechanism in eukaryotes that inhibits anaphase until all chromosomes have bioriented. In present models, the recruitment of the spindle-assembly checkpoint protein Mad2, through Mad1, to non-bioriented kinetochores is needed to stop cell-cycle progression. However, it is unknown whether Mad1-Mad2 targeting to kinetochores is sufficient to block anaphase. Furthermore, it is unclear whether regulators of biorientation (for example, Aurora kinases) have checkpoint functions downstream of Mad1-Mad2 recruitment or whether they act upstream to quench the primary error signal. Here, we engineered a Mad1 construct that localizes to bioriented kinetochores. We show that the kinetochore localization of Mad1 is sufficient for a metaphase arrest that depends on Mad1-Mad2 binding. By uncoupling the checkpoint from its primary error signal, we show that Aurora, Mps1 and BubR1 kinases, but not Polo-like kinase, are needed to maintain checkpoint arrest when Mad1 is present on kinetochores. Together, our data suggest a model in which the biorientation errors, which recruit Mad1-Mad2 to kinetochores, may be signalled not only through Mad2 template dynamics, but also through the activity of widely conserved kinases, to ensure the fidelity of cell division.

  3. The architecture of the BubR1 tetratricopeptide tandem repeat defines a protein motif underlying mitotic checkpoint-kinetochore communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M; Nilsson, Jakob; Blundell, Tom L

    2012-01-01

    The accurate and timely transmission of the genetic material to progeny during successive rounds of cell division is sine qua non for the maintenance of genome stability. Eukaryotic cells have evolved a surveillance mechanism, the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), to prevent premature advance to anaphase before every chromosome is properly attached to microtubules of the mitotic spindle. The architecture of the KNL1-BubR1 complex reveals important features of the molecular recognition between SAC components and the kinetochore. The interaction is important for a functional SAC as substitution of BubR1 residues engaged in KNL1 binding impaired the SAC and BubR1 recruitment into checkpoint complexes in stable cell lines. Here we discuss the implications of the disorder-to-order transition of KNL1 upon BubR1 binding for SAC signaling and propose a mechanistic model of how BUBs binding may affect the recognition of KNL1 by its other interacting partners.

  4. Operon Gene Order Is Optimized for Ordered Protein Complex Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jonathan N; Bergendahl, L Therese; Marsh, Joseph A

    2016-02-02

    The assembly of heteromeric protein complexes is an inherently stochastic process in which multiple genes are expressed separately into proteins, which must then somehow find each other within the cell. Here, we considered one of the ways by which prokaryotic organisms have attempted to maximize the efficiency of protein complex assembly: the organization of subunit-encoding genes into operons. Using structure-based assembly predictions, we show that operon gene order has been optimized to match the order in which protein subunits assemble. Exceptions to this are almost entirely highly expressed proteins for which assembly is less stochastic and for which precisely ordered translation offers less benefit. Overall, these results show that ordered protein complex assembly pathways are of significant biological importance and represent a major evolutionary constraint on operon gene organization.

  5. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded latent membrane protein 1 impairs G2 checkpoint in human nasopharyngeal epithelial cells through defective Chk1 activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Deng

    Full Text Available Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is a common cancer in Southeast Asia, particularly in southern regions of China. EBV infection is closely associated with NPC and has long been postulated to play an etiological role in the development of NPC. However, the role of EBV in malignant transformation of nasopharyngeal epithelial cells remains enigmatic. The current hypothesis of NPC development is that premalignant nasopharyngeal epithelial cells harboring genetic alterations support EBV infection and expression of EBV genes induces further genomic instability to facilitate the development of NPC. The latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1 is a well-documented EBV-encoded oncogene. The involvement of LMP1 in human epithelial malignancies has been implicated, but the mechanisms of oncogenic actions of LMP1, particularly in nasopharyngeal cells, are unclear. Here we observed that LMP1 expression in nasopharyngeal epithelial cells impaired G2 checkpoint, leading to formation of unrepaired chromatid breaks in metaphases after γ-ray irradiation. We further found that defective Chk1 activation was involved in the induction of G2 checkpoint defect in LMP1-expressing nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. Impairment of G2 checkpoint could result in loss of the acentrically broken chromatids and propagation of broken centric chromatids in daughter cells exiting mitosis, which facilitates chromosome instability. Our findings suggest that LMP1 expression facilitates genomic instability in cells under genotoxic stress. Elucidation of the mechanisms involved in LMP1-induced genomic instability in nasopharyngeal epithelial cells will shed lights on the understanding of role of EBV infection in NPC development.

  6. The spindle checkpoint and chromosome segregation in meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbsky, Gary J

    2015-07-01

    The spindle checkpoint is a key regulator of chromosome segregation in mitosis and meiosis. Its function is to prevent precocious anaphase onset before chromosomes have achieved bipolar attachment to the spindle. The spindle checkpoint comprises a complex set of signaling pathways that integrate microtubule dynamics, biomechanical forces at the kinetochores, and intricate regulation of protein interactions and post-translational modifications. Historically, many key observations that gave rise to the initial concepts of the spindle checkpoint were made in meiotic systems. In contrast with mitosis, the two distinct chromosome segregation events of meiosis present a special challenge for the regulation of checkpoint signaling. Preservation of fidelity in chromosome segregation in meiosis, controlled by the spindle checkpoint, also has a significant impact in human health. This review highlights the contributions from meiotic systems in understanding the spindle checkpoint as well as the role of checkpoint signaling in controlling the complex divisions of meiosis.

  7. DNA origami as a nanoscale template for protein assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzyk, Anton; Laitinen, Kimmo T [Nanoscience Center, Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, PO Box 35, FIN-40014 (Finland); Toermae, Paeivi [Department of Applied Physics, Helsinki University of Technology, PO Box 5100, FIN-02015 (Finland)], E-mail: paivi.torma@hut.fi

    2009-06-10

    We describe two general approaches to the utilization of DNA origami structures for the assembly of materials. In one approach, DNA origami is used as a prefabricated template for subsequent assembly of materials. In the other, materials are assembled simultaneously with the DNA origami, i.e. the DNA origami technique is used to drive the assembly of materials. Fabrication of complex protein structures is demonstrated by these two approaches. The latter approach has the potential to be extended to the assembly of multiple materials with single attachment chemistry.

  8. Structure, dynamics, assembly, and evolution of protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Joseph A; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2015-01-01

    The assembly of individual proteins into functional complexes is fundamental to nearly all biological processes. In recent decades, many thousands of homomeric and heteromeric protein complex structures have been determined, greatly improving our understanding of the fundamental principles that control symmetric and asymmetric quaternary structure organization. Furthermore, our conception of protein complexes has moved beyond static representations to include dynamic aspects of quaternary structure, including conformational changes upon binding, multistep ordered assembly pathways, and structural fluctuations occurring within fully assembled complexes. Finally, major advances have been made in our understanding of protein complex evolution, both in reconstructing evolutionary histories of specific complexes and in elucidating general mechanisms that explain how quaternary structure tends to evolve. The evolution of quaternary structure occurs via changes in self-assembly state or through the gain or loss of protein subunits, and these processes can be driven by both adaptive and nonadaptive influences.

  9. Assembly of outer-membrane proteins in bacteria and mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommassen, Jan

    2010-09-01

    The cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria consists of two membranes separated by the periplasm. In contrast with most integral membrane proteins, which span the membrane in the form of hydrophobic alpha-helices, integral outer-membrane proteins (OMPs) form beta-barrels. Similar beta-barrel proteins are found in the outer membranes of mitochondria and chloroplasts, probably reflecting the endosymbiont origin of these eukaryotic cell organelles. How these beta-barrel proteins are assembled into the outer membrane has remained enigmatic for a long time. In recent years, much progress has been reached in this field by the identification of the components of the OMP assembly machinery. The central component of this machinery, called Omp85 or BamA, is an essential and highly conserved bacterial protein that recognizes a signature sequence at the C terminus of its substrate OMPs. A homologue of this protein is also found in mitochondria, where it is required for the assembly of beta-barrel proteins into the outer membrane as well. Although accessory components of the machineries are different between bacteria and mitochondria, a mitochondrial beta-barrel OMP can be assembled into the bacterial outer membrane and, vice versa, bacterial OMPs expressed in yeast are assembled into the mitochondrial outer membrane. These observations indicate that the basic mechanism of OMP assembly is evolutionarily highly conserved.

  10. Self-assembling peptides form nanodiscs that stabilize membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Pedersen, Martin Cramer; Kirkensgaard, Jacob Judas Kain;

    2014-01-01

    New methods to handle membrane bound proteins, e.g. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), are highly desirable. Recently, apoliprotein A1 (ApoA1) based lipoprotein particles have emerged as a new platform for studying membrane proteins, and it has been shown that they can self-assemble in combinat...

  11. Role of nonstructural protein NS2A in flavivirus assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leung, J.Y.; Pijlman, G.P.; Kondratieva, N.; Hyde, J.; Mackenzie, J.M.; Khromykh, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    Flavivirus nonstructural (NS) proteins are involved in RNA replication and modulation of the host antiviral response; however, evidence is mounting that some NS proteins also have essential roles in virus assembly. Kunjin virus (KUN) NS2A is a small, hydrophobic, transmembrane protein that is part o

  12. Geometrical assembly of ultrastable protein templates for nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Dominic J.; Giger, Lars; Kim, Steve S.; Naik, Rajesh R.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2016-06-01

    The fabrication of nanoscale devices requires architectural templates on which to position functional molecules in complex arrangements. Protein scaffolds are particularly promising templates for nanomaterials due to inherent molecular recognition and self-assembly capabilities combined with genetically encoded functionalities. However, difficulties in engineering protein quaternary structure into stable and well-ordered shapes have hampered progress. Here we report the development of an ultrastable biomolecular construction kit for the assembly of filamentous proteins into geometrically defined templates of controllable size and symmetry. The strategy combines redesign of protein-protein interaction specificity with the creation of tunable connector proteins that govern the assembly and projection angles of the filaments. The functionality of these nanoarchitectures is illustrated by incorporation of nanoparticles at specific locations and orientations to create hybrid materials such as conductive nanowires. These new structural components facilitate the manufacturing of nanomaterials with diverse shapes and functional properties over a wide range of processing conditions.

  13. Phosphorylation of microtubule-binding protein Hec1 by mitotic kinase Aurora B specifies spindle checkpoint kinase Mps1 signaling at the kinetochore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tongge; Dou, Zhen; Qin, Bo; Jin, Changjiang; Wang, Xinghui; Xu, Leilei; Wang, Zhaoyang; Zhu, Lijuan; Liu, Fusheng; Gao, Xinjiao; Ke, Yuwen; Wang, Zhiyong; Aikhionbare, Felix; Fu, Chuanhai; Ding, Xia; Yao, Xuebiao

    2013-12-13

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a quality control device to ensure accurate chromosome attachment to spindle microtubule for equal segregation of sister chromatid. Aurora B is essential for SAC function by sensing chromosome bi-orientation via spatial regulation of kinetochore substrates. However, it has remained elusive as to how Aurora B couples kinetochore-microtubule attachment to SAC signaling. Here, we show that Hec1 interacts with Mps1 and specifies its kinetochore localization via its calponin homology (CH) domain and N-terminal 80 amino acids. Interestingly, phosphorylation of the Hec1 by Aurora B weakens its interaction with microtubules but promotes Hec1 binding to Mps1. Significantly, the temporal regulation of Hec1 phosphorylation orchestrates kinetochore-microtubule attachment and Mps1 loading to the kinetochore. Persistent expression of phosphomimetic Hec1 mutant induces a hyperactivation of SAC, suggesting that phosphorylation-elicited Hec1 conformational change is used as a switch to orchestrate SAC activation to concurrent destabilization of aberrant kinetochore attachment. Taken together, these results define a novel role for Aurora B-Hec1-Mps1 signaling axis in governing accurate chromosome segregation in mitosis.

  14. Computational design of co-assembling protein-DNA nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Yun; Yu, Jiun-Yann; Wannier, Timothy M.; Guo, Chin-Lin; Mayo, Stephen L.

    2015-09-01

    Biomolecular self-assemblies are of great interest to nanotechnologists because of their functional versatility and their biocompatibility. Over the past decade, sophisticated single-component nanostructures composed exclusively of nucleic acids, peptides and proteins have been reported, and these nanostructures have been used in a wide range of applications, from drug delivery to molecular computing. Despite these successes, the development of hybrid co-assemblies of nucleic acids and proteins has remained elusive. Here we use computational protein design to create a protein-DNA co-assembling nanomaterial whose assembly is driven via non-covalent interactions. To achieve this, a homodimerization interface is engineered onto the Drosophila Engrailed homeodomain (ENH), allowing the dimerized protein complex to bind to two double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules. By varying the arrangement of protein-binding sites on the dsDNA, an irregular bulk nanoparticle or a nanowire with single-molecule width can be spontaneously formed by mixing the protein and dsDNA building blocks. We characterize the protein-DNA nanowire using fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray crystallography, confirming that the nanowire is formed via the proposed mechanism. This work lays the foundation for the development of new classes of protein-DNA hybrid materials. Further applications can be explored by incorporating DNA origami, DNA aptamers and/or peptide epitopes into the protein-DNA framework presented here.

  15. DNA-templated nickel nanostructures and protein assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Hector A; Ludtke, Paul; Willardson, Barry M; Woolley, Adam T

    2006-11-21

    We report a straightforward method for the fabrication of DNA-templated nickel nanostructures on surfaces. These nickel nanomaterials have potential to be applied as nanowires, as templated catalyst lines, as nanoscale magnetic domains, or in directed protein localization. Indeed, we show here that histidine-tagged phosducin-like protein (His-PhLP) binds with high selectivity to both Ni2+-treated surface DNA and DNA-templated nickel metal to create linear protein assemblies on surfaces. The association of His-PhLP with DNA-templated nickel ions or metal is reversible under appropriate rinsing conditions. Nanoscale DNA-templated protein assemblies might be useful in the construction of high-density protein lines for proteomic analysis, for example. Importantly, these nanofabrication procedures are not limited to linear DNA and can be applied readily to other self-assembled DNA topologies.

  16. Principles of assembly reveal a periodic table of protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnert, Sebastian E; Marsh, Joseph A; Hernández, Helena; Robinson, Carol V; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2015-12-11

    Structural insights into protein complexes have had a broad impact on our understanding of biological function and evolution. In this work, we sought a comprehensive understanding of the general principles underlying quaternary structure organization in protein complexes. We first examined the fundamental steps by which protein complexes can assemble, using experimental and structure-based characterization of assembly pathways. Most assembly transitions can be classified into three basic types, which can then be used to exhaustively enumerate a large set of possible quaternary structure topologies. These topologies, which include the vast majority of observed protein complex structures, enable a natural organization of protein complexes into a periodic table. On the basis of this table, we can accurately predict the expected frequencies of quaternary structure topologies, including those not yet observed. These results have important implications for quaternary structure prediction, modeling, and engineering.

  17. Artificial metalloenzymes constructed from hierarchically-assembled proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Takafumi; Tabe, Hiroyasu; Tanaka, Yuya

    2013-08-01

    The design of artificial metalloenzymes has become an important topic in biological chemistry and inorganic chemistry due to the potential applications of artificial metalloenzymes in nanoscience and biotechnology. One of the general methods used to produce artificially metalloenzymes involves the encapsulation of non-natural metal cofactors within protein scaffolds. This method has been used in the construction of small artificial metalloproteins with high activity and selectivity. However, the important roles of protein assemblies have not yet been systematically investigated in this field, even though natural enzymatic systems employ protein assemblies as molecular scaffolds for elaborate enzymatic reactions. In recent years, the above-mentioned general strategy has been applied to functionalize protein assemblies such as protein cages and protein crystals. These assembled structures form confined interior environments, which can be used to accommodate metal complex catalysts and to prepare metal nanoparticles. The development of artificial metalloenzymes with hierarchically-assembled proteins would enable us to provide powerful tools for industrial and biological applications. In this Focus Review, we discuss the most significant recent research in this field as well as future directions.

  18. Assembly of β-barrel proteins into bacterial outer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkrig, Joel; Leyton, Denisse L; Webb, Chaille T; Lithgow, Trevor

    2014-08-01

    Membrane proteins with a β-barrel topology are found in the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and in the plastids and mitochondria of eukaryotic cells. The assembly of these membrane proteins depends on a protein folding reaction (to create the barrel) and an insertion reaction (to integrate the barrel within the outer membrane). Experimental approaches using biophysics and biochemistry are detailing the steps in the assembly pathway, while genetics and bioinformatics have revealed a sophisticated production line of cellular components that catalyze the assembly pathway in vivo. This includes the modular BAM complex, several molecular chaperones and the translocation and assembly module (the TAM). Recent screens also suggest that further components of the pathway might remain to be discovered. We review what is known about the process of β-barrel protein assembly into membranes, and the components of the β-barrel assembly machinery. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein trafficking and secretion in bacteria. Guest Editors: Anastassios Economou and Ross Dalbey.

  19. Mitochondrial Band-7 family proteins: scaffolds for respiratory chain assembly?

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The band-7 protein family comprises a diverse set of membrane-bound proteins characterized by the presence of a conserved domain. The exact function of this band-7 domain remains elusive, but examples from animal and bacterial stomatin-type proteins demonstrate binding to lipids and the ability to assemble into membrane-bound oligomers that form putative scaffolds. Some members, such as prohibitins (PHB) and human stomatin-like protein 2 (HsSLP2), localize to the mitochondrial inner membrane ...

  20. Mitochondrial Machineries for Protein Import and Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Nils; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    2017-03-15

    Mitochondria are essential organelles with numerous functions in cellular metabolism and homeostasis. Most of the >1,000 different mitochondrial proteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytosol and are imported into mitochondria by five transport pathways. The protein import machineries of the mitochondrial membranes and aqueous compartments reveal a remarkable variability of mechanisms for protein recognition, translocation, and sorting. The protein translocases do not operate as separate entities but are connected to each other and to machineries with functions in energetics, membrane organization, and quality control. Here, we discuss the versatility and dynamic organization of the mitochondrial protein import machineries. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial protein translocation is crucial for understanding the integration of protein translocases into a large network that controls organelle biogenesis, function, and dynamics. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Biochemistry Volume 86 is June 20, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  1. Properties of Fibrillar Protein Assemblies and their Percolating Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, C.

    2004-01-01

    Properties of Fibrillar Protein Assemblies and their Percolating Networks. PhD thesis, Wageningen University, The Netherlands Keywords: bovine serum albumin, complex fluids, excluded volume, fibrils, gels, innovation, b-lactoglobulin, ovalbumin, percolation, proteins, rheology, rheo-optics, self-ass

  2. Cyclodextrin nanoaggregates and their assembly with protein: a spectroscopic investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micali, N [CNR-Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Via La Farina 237, I-98123, Messina (Italy); Villari, V [CNR-Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Via La Farina 237, I-98123, Messina (Italy); Mazzaglia, A [CNR-Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati, c/o Dipartimento di Chimica Inorganica, Chimica Analitica e Chimica Fisica, Universita di Messina, Contrada Papardo Salita Sperone 31, 98166, Messina (Italy); Scolaro, L Monsu [Dipartimento di Chimica Inorganica, Chimica Analitica e Chimica Fisica and CIRCMSB, Universita di Messina, Contrada Papardo Salita Sperone 31, 98166, Messina (Italy); Valerio, A [Dipartimento di Chimica Organica ed Industriale, Universita di Milano, Via G Venezian 21, 20133, Milan (Italy); Rencurosi, A [CNR-Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, Via C Golgi 19, 20133 Milan (Italy); Lay, L [Dipartimento di Chimica Organica ed Industriale, Universita di Milano, Via G Venezian 21, 20133, Milan (Italy)

    2006-07-14

    Light scattering and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy results showed that specially designed amphiphilic cyclodextrins are able to bind a specific protein, PA-I lectin. When containing a galactosyl group, the self-assembled cyclodextrins interact with the protein affecting the dynamical properties of the system and the fluorescence lifetimes (as well as the fluorescence anisotropy) of the protein itself. The self-assembled cyclodextrins containing a glucosyl group, on the other hand, do not induce any change in these measured quantities, suggesting no interaction with protein. This binding capability of galactosyl-modified cyclodextrins offers perspectives on exploiting self-assembled supramolecular structures as nano-carriers to deliver drugs to target tissues.

  3. DNA cross-link-dependent RAD50/MRE11/NBS1 subnuclear assembly requires the Fanconi anemia C protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichierri, Pietro; Averbeck, Dietrich; Rosselli, Filippo

    2002-10-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a cancer-predisposition syndrome characterized by hypersensitivity to interstrand-cross-link (ICL) inducers. FA hypersensitivity to ICL has been correlated with alterations in homologous recombination, non-homologous end-joining, telomere maintenance, DNA-damage assessment and checkpoint regulation, processes in which the components of the RAD50/MRE11/NBS1 (RMN) complex are involved. To better characterize the mechanisms by which ICL are processed in human cells and to gain insight into their toxicity in FA, we examined (i). the RMN complex assembling in response to the ICL inducers mitomycin C (MMC) and photoactivated 8-methoxypsoralen and (ii). the proficiency of FA cells to perform RMN activation in response to ICL inducers. We show here that ICL activates the assembly of the RMN proteins into subnuclear foci, and that their formation proceeds independently of ICL incision, a step mainly dependent on XP-F/ERCC1 heterodimer activity. Interestingly, FA cells were unable to form RMN foci in response to either ICL inducer. Analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and single-cell gel electrophoresis of MMC-treated cells showed that FA cells from complementation group C (FA-C cells, defective in the FANCC gene) form double-strand breaks and unhook MMC-induced ICL similarly to FANCC wild-type cells. These observations imply that the absence of RMN assembly in FA-C cells is not simply due to the absence of DNA ends produced as intermediates of ICL processing, and indicates a direct role for FANCC in RMN focus assembly in response to ICL inducers. Moreover, we show that the formation of foci, including BRCA1 and/or RAD51 proteins, is significantly delayed in FA cells. These alterations in the assembly of DNA-repair proteins in FA provide an interpretation for the DNA-damage processing anomalies observed in FA cells and for the genetic instability and the cancer predisposition of the syndrome.

  4. Cenp-meta is required for sustained spindle checkpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Rubin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cenp-E is a kinesin-like motor protein required for efficient end-on attachment of kinetochores to the spindle microtubules. Cenp-E immunodepletion in Xenopus mitotic extracts results in the loss of mitotic arrest and massive chromosome missegregation, whereas its depletion in mammalian cells leads to chromosome segregation defects despite the presence of a functional spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC. Cenp-meta has previously been reported to be the Drosophila homolog of vertebrate Cenp-E. In this study, we show that cenp-metaΔ mutant neuroblasts arrest in mitosis when treated with colchicine. cenp-metaΔ mutant cells display a mitotic delay. Yet, despite the persistence of the two checkpoint proteins Mad2 and BubR1 on unattached kinetochores, these cells eventually enter anaphase and give rise to highly aneuploid daughter cells. Indeed, we find that cenp-metaΔ mutant cells display a slow but continuous degradation of cyclin B, which eventually triggers the mitotic exit observed. Thus, our data provide evidence for a role of Cenp-meta in sustaining the SAC response.

  5. The assembly of papaya mosaic virus coat protein with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, J W; Bancroft, J B

    1980-01-01

    Products of specific (pH 8.0-8.5) and nonspecific (pH 6.0) assembly reactions of papaya mosaic virus (PMV) coat protein with DNA are described. The strandedness, topology, and sugar moiety of the nucleic acid are important parameters for assembly in nonspecific conditions. The linear, single-stranded form of lambda DNA, but not the double-stranded form, reacted with PMV protein to form multiply initiated particles whose helical segments apparently annealed to produce continuous tubular particles. With the circular, single-stranded DNA of phi X174, partially tubular, partially extended particles were made. Poly(dA), unlike poly(A) [Erickson JW, AbouHaidar M, Bancroft JB: Virology 90:60, 1978], was not encapsidated by PMV protein under specific assembly conditions. With all DNAs tested, extended particles were the only products formed in specific conditions at pH 8.5.

  6. The 14-3-3 protein Bmh1 functions in the spindle position checkpoint by breaking Bfa1 asymmetry at yeast centrosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caydasi, Ayse Koca; Micoogullari, Yagmur; Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar; Palani, Saravanan; Pereira, Gislene

    2014-07-15

    In addition to their well-known role in microtubule organization, centrosomes function as signaling platforms and regulate cell cycle events. An important example of such a function is the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) of budding yeast. SPOC is a surveillance mechanism that ensures alignment of the mitotic spindle along the cell polarity axis. Upon spindle misalignment, phosphorylation of the SPOC component Bfa1 by Kin4 kinase engages the SPOC by changing the centrosome localization of Bfa1 from asymmetric (one centrosome) to symmetric (both centrosomes). Here we show that, unexpectedly, Kin4 alone is unable to break Bfa1 asymmetry at yeast centrosomes. Instead, phosphorylation of Bfa1 by Kin4 creates a docking site on Bfa1 for the 14-3-3 family protein Bmh1, which in turn weakens Bfa1-centrosome association and promotes symmetric Bfa1 localization. Consistently, BMH1-null cells are SPOC deficient. Our work thus identifies Bmh1 as a new SPOC component and refines the molecular mechanism that breaks Bfa1 centrosome asymmetry upon SPOC activation.

  7. DNA topoisomerase 2 mutant allele mildly delays the mitotic progression and activates the checkpoint protein kinase Chk1 in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sudhanshu; Verma, Sumit Kumar; Ahmed, Shakil

    2011-08-01

    DNA topoisomerases are specialized nuclear enzymes that perform topological modifications on double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and hence are essential for DNA metabolism such as replication, transcription, recombination, condensation and segregation. In a genetic screen, we identified a temperature-sensitive mutant allele of topoisomerase 2 that exhibits conditional synthetic lethality with a chk1 knockout strain. The mutant allele of topoisomerase 2 is defective in chromosome segregation at a non-permissive temperature and there was increase in chromosome segregation defects in the double mutant of top2-10 and chk1 delete at a non-permissive temperature. More importantly, topoisomearse 2 mutant cells mildly delay the mitotic progression at non-permissive temperature that is mediated by checkpoint protein kinase Chk1. Additionally, top2-10 mutant cells also activate the Chk1 at a non-permissive temperature and this activation of Chk1 takes place at the time of mitosis. Interestingly, top2-10 mutant cells retain their viability at a non-permissive temperature if the cells are not allowed to enter into mitosis. Taking together our results, we speculate that in the top2-10 mutant, the segregation of entangled chromatids during mitosis could result in delaying the mitotic progression through the activation of Chk1 kinase.

  8. Spectromicroscopy of self-assembled protein clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schonschek, O.; Hormes, J.; Herzog, V. [Univ. of Bonn (Germany)

    1997-04-01

    The aim of this project is to use synchrotron radiation as a tool to study biomedical questions concerned with the thyroid glands. The biological background is outlined in a recent paper. In short, Thyroglobulin (TG), the precursor protein of the hormone thyroxine, forms large (20 - 500 microns in diameter) clusters in the extracellular lumen of thyrocytes. The process of the cluster formation is still not well understood but is thought to be a main storage mechanism of TG and therefore thyroxine inside the thyroid glands. For human thyroids, the interconnections of the proteins inside the clusters are mainly disulfide bondings. Normally, sulfur bridges are catalyzed by an enzyme called Protein Disulfide Bridge Isomerase (PDI). While this enzyme is supposed to be not present in any extracellular space, the cluster formation of TG takes place in the lumen between the thyrocytes. A possible explanation is the autocatalysis of TG.

  9. Structure and assembly of a paramyxovirus matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, Anthony J; Meng, Geng; Winkler, Dennis C; McGinnes, Lori W; Plevka, Pavel; Steven, Alasdair C; Morrison, Trudy G; Rossmann, Michael G

    2012-08-28

    Many pleomorphic, lipid-enveloped viruses encode matrix proteins that direct their assembly and budding, but the mechanism of this process is unclear. We have combined X-ray crystallography and cryoelectron tomography to show that the matrix protein of Newcastle disease virus, a paramyxovirus and relative of measles virus, forms dimers that assemble into pseudotetrameric arrays that generate the membrane curvature necessary for virus budding. We show that the glycoproteins are anchored in the gaps between the matrix proteins and that the helical nucleocapsids are associated in register with the matrix arrays. About 90% of virions lack matrix arrays, suggesting that, in agreement with previous biological observations, the matrix protein needs to dissociate from the viral membrane during maturation, as is required for fusion and release of the nucleocapsid into the host's cytoplasm. Structure and sequence conservation imply that other paramyxovirus matrix proteins function similarly.

  10. Coronavirus envelope (E) protein remains at the site of assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatagopalan, Pavithra [The Biodesign Institute, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Microbiology Graduate Program, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Daskalova, Sasha M. [The Biodesign Institute, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Chemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Lopez, Lisa A. [The Biodesign Institute, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Molecular and Cellular Biology Graduate Program, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Dolezal, Kelly A. [The Biodesign Institute, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Microbiology Graduate Program, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Hogue, Brenda G., E-mail: Brenda.Hogue@asu.edu [The Biodesign Institute, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) assemble at endoplasmic reticulum Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) membranes and egress from cells in cargo vesicles. Only a few molecules of the envelope (E) protein are assembled into virions. The role of E in morphogenesis is not fully understood. The cellular localization and dynamics of mouse hepatitis CoV A59 (MHV) E protein were investigated to further understanding of its role during infection. E protein localized in the ERGIC and Golgi with the amino and carboxy termini in the lumen and cytoplasm, respectively. E protein does not traffic to the cell surface. MHV was genetically engineered with a tetracysteine tag at the carboxy end of E. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) showed that E is mobile in ERGIC/Golgi membranes. Correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) confirmed the presence of E in Golgi cisternae. The results provide strong support that E proteins carry out their function(s) at the site of budding/assembly. - Highlights: • Mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV-CoV) E protein localizes in the ERGIC and Golgi. • MHV-CoV E does not transport to the cell surface. • MHV-CoV can be genetically engineered with a tetracysteine tag appended to E. • First FRAP and correlative light electron microscopy of a CoV E protein. • Live-cell imaging shows that E is mobile in ERGIC/Golgi membranes.

  11. Elongational Flow Assists with the Assembly of Protein Nanofibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Nitesh; Kamada, Ayaka; Lendel, Christofer; Lundell, Fredrik; Soderberg, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    Controlling the aggregation process of protein-based macromolecular structures in a confined environment using small-scale flow devices and understanding their assembly mechanisms is essential to develop bio-based materials. Whey protein, a protein mixture with β-lactoglobulin as main component, is able to self-assemble into amyloid-like protein nanofibers which are stabilized by hydrogen bonds. The conditions at which the fibrillation process occurs can affect the properties and morphology of the fibrils. Here, we show that the morphology of protein nanofibers greatly affects their assembly. We used elongational flow based double flow-focusing device for this study. In-situ behavior of the straight and flexible fibrils in the flow channel is determined using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) technique. Our process combines hydrodynamic alignment with dispersion to gel-transition that produces homogeneous and smooth fibers. Moreover, successful alignment before gelation demands a proper separation of the time-scales involved, which we tried to identify in the current study. The presented approach combining small scale flow devices with in-situ synchrotron X-ray studies and protein engineering is a promising route to design high performance protein-based materials with controlled physical and chemical properties. We acknowledge the support from Wallenberg Wood Science Center.

  12. Melanoma therapy: Check the checkpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furue, Masutaka; Kadono, Takafumi

    2016-02-01

    Recent mutational and translational studies have revealed that the Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway plays a key role in melanomagenesis. Mutations in NRAS and BRAF are found in the majority of melanomas resulting in the formation of constitutively active NRAS and BRAF molecules, which leads to the proliferation and survival of melanoma cells through the activation of MEK/ERK signals. Inhibitors of BRAF or MEK significantly extend the progression-free survival and overall survival of melanoma patients compared with conventional chemotherapies. Combining BRAF and MEK inhibitors further enhances the clinical effectiveness. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) is an immune checkpoint molecule that downregulates T-cell activation by binding to B7 (CD80/CD86) molecules on antigen-presenting cells. Programmed death receptor ligand 1 on melanoma cells negatively regulates T-cell function by binding to the programmed death-1 (PD-1) receptor on T cells. Antibodies against CTLA-4 and PD-1 also enhance the survival of melanoma patients. In this review, we summarize the clinical effectiveness and adverse events of the BRAF inhibitors, MEK inhibitors and anti-immune checkpoint antibodies in melanoma treatment.

  13. Structure and assembly of scalable porous protein cages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Eita; Böhringer, Daniel; van de Waterbeemd, Michiel; Leibundgut, Marc; Zschoche, Reinhard; Heck, Albert J. R.; Ban, Nenad; Hilvert, Donald

    2017-03-01

    Proteins that self-assemble into regular shell-like polyhedra are useful, both in nature and in the laboratory, as molecular containers. Here we describe cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structures of two versatile encapsulation systems that exploit engineered electrostatic interactions for cargo loading. We show that increasing the number of negative charges on the lumenal surface of lumazine synthase, a protein that naturally assembles into a ~1-MDa dodecahedron composed of 12 pentamers, induces stepwise expansion of the native protein shell, giving rise to thermostable ~3-MDa and ~6-MDa assemblies containing 180 and 360 subunits, respectively. Remarkably, these expanded particles assume unprecedented tetrahedrally and icosahedrally symmetric structures constructed entirely from pentameric units. Large keyhole-shaped pores in the shell, not present in the wild-type capsid, enable diffusion-limited encapsulation of complementarily charged guests. The structures of these supercharged assemblies demonstrate how programmed electrostatic effects can be effectively harnessed to tailor the architecture and properties of protein cages.

  14. Physical principles of filamentous protein self-assembly kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Liu, Lucie X.; Meisl, Georg; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2017-04-01

    The polymerization of proteins and peptides into filamentous supramolecular structures is an elementary form of self-organization of key importance to the functioning biological systems, as in the case of actin biofilaments that compose the cellular cytoskeleton. Aberrant filamentous protein self-assembly, however, is associated with undesired effects and severe clinical disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, which, at the molecular level, are associated with the formation of certain forms of filamentous protein aggregates known as amyloids. Moreover, due to their unique physicochemical properties, protein filaments are finding extensive applications as biomaterials for nanotechnology. With all these different factors at play, the field of filamentous protein self-assembly has experienced tremendous activity in recent years. A key question in this area has been to elucidate the microscopic mechanisms through which filamentous aggregates emerge from dispersed proteins with the goal of uncovering the underlying physical principles. With the latest developments in the mathematical modeling of protein aggregation kinetics as well as the improvement of the available experimental techniques it is now possible to tackle many of these complex systems and carry out detailed analyses of the underlying microscopic steps involved in protein filament formation. In this paper, we review some classical and modern kinetic theories of protein filament formation, highlighting their use as a general strategy for quantifying the molecular-level mechanisms and transition states involved in these processes.

  15. Self-assembly studies of native and recombinant fibrous proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Donna Lucille

    The structure of silk proteins consists of alternating amorphous (glycine-rich) and ordered crystalline regions (poly(alanine) and poly(glycine-alanine) repeats), where the organized regions are typically beta-sheet assemblies. In collagen, the basic helical repeat (glycine-proline-hydroxyproline and variants on this repeat) drives hierarchical assembly. Three polypeptide chains form left-handed poly-proline II-like helices, these three chains then self-assemble to form a right-handed triple helix. The focus of this thesis is on these proteins and defined variations thereof to reveal features of fibrous protein self-assembly. The amino acid sequences of native silk and collagen and their respective assembly environments have been systematically manipulated. Spider silk protein, based on the consensus sequence of Nephila clavipes dragline-silk, was genetically engineered to include methionines flanking the beta-sheet forming polyalanine regions. These methionines could be selectively oxidized and reduced, altering the bulkiness and charge of a methionine-based sulfoxide group to control beta-sheet formation by steric hindrance. A second version of the sterical trigger included a recognition site for Protein Kinase A allowing for the selective phosphorylation of a serine. Patterning a monolayer of precursor "director" molecules on length scales ranging from nanometer- to micrometer-length scales simplifies the interpretation of supramolecular assembly. Utilizing the atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based technique of dip-pen nanolithography, thiolated collagen and a collagen-like peptide were patterned at 30--50 nm line widths on evaporated gold surfaces. These are the largest molecules thus far positively printed on a surface at such small-length scales. The method preserved the triple helical structure and biological activity of collagen and even fostered the formation of characteristic higher-levels of structural organization. Nanopatterns were also achieved for

  16. A protein interaction map of the kalimantacin biosynthesis assembly line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Uytterhoeven

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial secondary metabolite kalimantacin is produced by a hybrid polyketide/ non-ribosomal peptide system in Pseudomonas fluorescens BCCM_ID9359. In this study, the kalimantacin biosynthesis gene cluster is analyzed by yeast two-hybrid analysis, creating a protein-protein interaction map of the entire assembly line. In total, 28 potential interactions were identified, of which 13 could be confirmed further. These interactions include the dimerization of ketosynthase domains, a link between assembly line modules 9 and 10, and a specific interaction between the trans-acting enoyl reductase BatK and the carrier proteins of modules 8 and 10. These interactions reveal fundamental insight into the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites.This study is the first to reveal interactions in a complete biosynthetic pathway. Similar future studies could build a strong basis for engineering strategies in such clusters.

  17. Identification of DSB-1, a protein required for initiation of meiotic recombination in Caenorhabditis elegans, illuminates a crossover assurance checkpoint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ericca L Stamper

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination, an essential aspect of sexual reproduction, is initiated by programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. DSBs are catalyzed by the widely-conserved Spo11 enzyme; however, the activity of Spo11 is regulated by additional factors that are poorly conserved through evolution. To expand our understanding of meiotic regulation, we have characterized a novel gene, dsb-1, that is specifically required for meiotic DSB formation in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. DSB-1 localizes to chromosomes during early meiotic prophase, coincident with the timing of DSB formation. DSB-1 also promotes normal protein levels and chromosome localization of DSB-2, a paralogous protein that plays a related role in initiating recombination. Mutations that disrupt crossover formation result in prolonged DSB-1 association with chromosomes, suggesting that nuclei may remain in a DSB-permissive state. Extended DSB-1 localization is seen even in mutants with defects in early recombination steps, including spo-11, suggesting that the absence of crossover precursors triggers the extension. Strikingly, failure to form a crossover precursor on a single chromosome pair is sufficient to extend the localization of DSB-1 on all chromosomes in the same nucleus. Based on these observations we propose a model for crossover assurance that acts through DSB-1 to maintain a DSB-permissive state until all chromosome pairs acquire crossover precursors. This work identifies a novel component of the DSB machinery in C. elegans, and sheds light on an important pathway that regulates DSB formation for crossover assurance.

  18. Identification of DSB-1, a protein required for initiation of meiotic recombination in Caenorhabditis elegans, illuminates a crossover assurance checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamper, Ericca L; Rodenbusch, Stacia E; Rosu, Simona; Ahringer, Julie; Villeneuve, Anne M; Dernburg, Abby F

    2013-01-01

    Meiotic recombination, an essential aspect of sexual reproduction, is initiated by programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). DSBs are catalyzed by the widely-conserved Spo11 enzyme; however, the activity of Spo11 is regulated by additional factors that are poorly conserved through evolution. To expand our understanding of meiotic regulation, we have characterized a novel gene, dsb-1, that is specifically required for meiotic DSB formation in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. DSB-1 localizes to chromosomes during early meiotic prophase, coincident with the timing of DSB formation. DSB-1 also promotes normal protein levels and chromosome localization of DSB-2, a paralogous protein that plays a related role in initiating recombination. Mutations that disrupt crossover formation result in prolonged DSB-1 association with chromosomes, suggesting that nuclei may remain in a DSB-permissive state. Extended DSB-1 localization is seen even in mutants with defects in early recombination steps, including spo-11, suggesting that the absence of crossover precursors triggers the extension. Strikingly, failure to form a crossover precursor on a single chromosome pair is sufficient to extend the localization of DSB-1 on all chromosomes in the same nucleus. Based on these observations we propose a model for crossover assurance that acts through DSB-1 to maintain a DSB-permissive state until all chromosome pairs acquire crossover precursors. This work identifies a novel component of the DSB machinery in C. elegans, and sheds light on an important pathway that regulates DSB formation for crossover assurance.

  19. Protein linguistics - a grammar for modular protein assembly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimona, Mario

    2006-01-01

    The correspondence between biology and linguistics at the level of sequence and lexical inventories, and of structure and syntax, has fuelled attempts to describe genome structure by the rules of formal linguistics. But how can we define protein linguistic rules? And how could compositional semantics improve our understanding of protein organization and functional plasticity?

  20. Interrogating the architecture of protein assemblies and protein interaction networks by cross-linking mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Fan; Heck, Albert J R

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are involved in almost all processes of the living cell. They are organized through extensive networks of interaction, by tightly bound macromolecular assemblies or more transiently via signaling nodes. Therefore, revealing the architecture of protein complexes and protein interaction netwo

  1. Predictive energy landscapes for folding membrane protein assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Ha H.; Kim, Bobby L.; Schafer, Nicholas P.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2015-12-01

    We study the energy landscapes for membrane protein oligomerization using the Associative memory, Water mediated, Structure and Energy Model with an implicit membrane potential (AWSEM-membrane), a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model previously optimized under the assumption that the energy landscapes for folding α-helical membrane protein monomers are funneled once their native topology within the membrane is established. In this study we show that the AWSEM-membrane force field is able to sample near native binding interfaces of several oligomeric systems. By predicting candidate structures using simulated annealing, we further show that degeneracies in predicting structures of membrane protein monomers are generally resolved in the folding of the higher order assemblies as is the case in the assemblies of both nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and V-type Na+-ATPase dimers. The physics of the phenomenon resembles domain swapping, which is consistent with the landscape following the principle of minimal frustration. We revisit also the classic Khorana study of the reconstitution of bacteriorhodopsin from its fragments, which is the close analogue of the early Anfinsen experiment on globular proteins. Here, we show the retinal cofactor likely plays a major role in selecting the final functional assembly.

  2. DNA-templated assembly of viral protein hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Tao, Ailin; Xu, Yun

    2014-11-01

    Hydrogels are a promising class of biomaterials that can be easily tailored to produce a native extracellular matrix that exhibits desirable mechanical and chemical properties. Here we report the construction of a hydrogel via the assembly of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) capsid protein and Y-shaped and cross-shaped DNAs.Hydrogels are a promising class of biomaterials that can be easily tailored to produce a native extracellular matrix that exhibits desirable mechanical and chemical properties. Here we report the construction of a hydrogel via the assembly of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) capsid protein and Y-shaped and cross-shaped DNAs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02414a

  3. Malaria vaccine based on Self-Assembling Protein Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Burkhard, Peter; David E Lanar

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent progress with GSK’s RTS’S malaria vaccine, there remains a desperate need for an efficient malaria vaccine. We have used a repetitive antigen display technology to display malaria specific B cell and T cell epitopes in an effort to design a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Our protein sequence when assembled into a nanoparticle induces strong, long-lived and protective immune responses against infection with the parasite. We are confident that the clinical trials ...

  4. Electron Microscopic Visualization of Protein Assemblies on Flattened DNA Origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Leena; Dhakal, Soma; Nichols, Joseph; Mahoney, Jacob; Dosey, Anne M; Jiang, Shuoxing; Sunahara, Roger K; Skiniotis, Georgios; Walter, Nils G

    2015-07-28

    DNA provides an ideal substrate for the engineering of versatile nanostructures due to its reliable Watson-Crick base pairing and well-characterized conformation. One of the most promising applications of DNA nanostructures arises from the site-directed spatial arrangement with nanometer precision of guest components such as proteins, metal nanoparticles, and small molecules. Two-dimensional DNA origami architectures, in particular, offer a simple design, high yield of assembly, and large surface area for use as a nanoplatform. However, such single-layer DNA origami were recently found to be structurally polymorphous due to their high flexibility, leading to the development of conformationally restrained multilayered origami that lack some of the advantages of the single-layer designs. Here we monitored single-layer DNA origami by transmission electron microscopy (EM) and discovered that their conformational heterogeneity is dramatically reduced in the presence of a low concentration of dimethyl sulfoxide, allowing for an efficient flattening onto the carbon support of an EM grid. We further demonstrated that streptavidin and a biotinylated target protein (cocaine esterase, CocE) can be captured at predesignated sites on these flattened origami while maintaining their functional integrity. Our demonstration that protein assemblies can be constructed with high spatial precision (within ∼2 nm of their predicted position on the platforms) by using strategically flattened single-layer origami paves the way for exploiting well-defined guest molecule assemblies for biochemistry and nanotechnology applications.

  5. Controlling the self-assembly of protein polymers via heterodimer-forming modules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Domeradzka, Natalia Eliza

    2016-01-01

    Supramolecular assemblies formed by protein polymers are attractive candidates for future biomaterials. Ideally, one would like to be able to define the nanostructure, in which the protein polymers should self-assemble, and then design protein polymer sequences that assemble exactly into such nanost

  6. Engineering self-assembled bioreactors from protein microcompartments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-10-12

    The goals of this research are to understand how organisms such as bacteria segregate certain metabolic processes inside of specific structures, or “microcompartments,” in the cell and apply this knowledge to develop novel engineered microcompartments for use in nanotechnology and metabolic engineering. For example, in some bacteria, self-assembling protein microcompartments called carboxysomes encapsulate the enzymes involved in carbon fixation, enabling the cell to utilize carbon dioxide more effectively than if the enzymes were free in the cell. The proposed research will determine how structures such as carboxysomes assemble and function in bacteria and develop a means for creating novel, synthetic microcompartments for optimizing production of specific energy-rich compounds.

  7. Design and construction of self-assembling supramolecular protein complexes using artificial and fusion proteins as nanoscale building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naoya; Arai, Ryoichi

    2017-02-01

    The central goal of nanobiotechnology is to design and construct novel biomaterials of nanometer sizes. In this short review, we describe recent progress of several approaches for designing and creating artificial self-assembling protein complexes and primarily focus on the following biotechnological strategies for using artificial and fusion proteins as nanoscale building blocks: fusion proteins designed for symmetrical self-assembly; three-dimensional domain-swapped oligomers; self-assembling designed coiled-coil peptide modules; metal-directed self-assembling engineered proteins; computationally designed self-assembling de novo proteins; and self-assembling protein nanobuilding blocks (PN-Blocks) using an intermolecularly folded dimeric de novo protein. These state-of-the-art nanobiotechnologies for designing supramolecular protein complexes will facilitate the development of novel functional nanobiomaterials.

  8. Targeting immune checkpoints in malignant glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tete; Liu, Yong-Jun; Chen, Wei; Chen, Jingtao

    2017-01-01

    Malignant glioma is the most common and a highly aggressive cancer in the central nervous system (CNS). Cancer immunotherapy, strategies to boost the bodys anti-cancer immune responses instead of directly targeting tumor cells, recently achieved great success in treating several human solid tumors. Although once considered immune privileged and devoid of normal immunological functions, CNS is now considered a promising target for cancer immunotherapy, featuring the recent progresses in neurobiology and neuroimmunology and a highly immunosuppressive state in malignant glioma. In this review, we focus on immune checkpoint inhibitors, specifically, antagonizing monoclonal antibodies for programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1), cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4), and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). We discuss advances in the working mechanisms of these immune checkpoint molecules, their status in malignant glioma, and current preclinical and clinical trials targeting these molecules in malignant glioma. PMID:27756892

  9. Renal effects of immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzedine, Hassan; Mateus, Christine; Boutros, Céline; Robert, Caroline; Rouvier, Philippe; Amoura, Zahir; Mathian, Alexis

    2016-12-26

    Recent advances in immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICPI) development have led to major improvements in oncology patient outcomes. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) are two essential immune checkpoint receptors. Ipilimumab and tremelimumab (anti-CTLA-4-blocking antibodies) and pembrolizumab and nivolumab (antibodies targeting PD-1 receptors) have already been approved by US Food and Drug Administration in several malignancies. Two different forms of ICPI-induced renal damage have been identified, including acute (granulomatous) tubulointerstitial nephritis and immune complex glomerulonephritis. The observed acute renal damage can be reversed upon ICPI drug discontinuation and renal function can recover back to normal following the introduction of systemic corticosteroid treatment. Any delay in treating this complication could result in definitive and irreversible renal injury.

  10. Malaria vaccine based on self-assembling protein nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhard, Peter; Lanar, David E

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent progress with GSK's RTS,S malaria vaccine, there remains a desperate need for an efficient malaria vaccine. We have used a repetitive antigen display technology to display malaria specific B cell and T cell epitopes in an effort to design a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Our protein sequence when assembled into a nanoparticle induces strong, long-lived and protective immune responses against infection with the parasite. We are confident that the clinical trials with our most developed vaccine candidate will show good protection in a controlled human malaria infection trial.

  11. Fission yeast cut5 links nuclear chromatin and M phase regulator in the replication checkpoint control.

    OpenAIRE

    Saka, Y.; Fantes, P; Sutani, T; McInerny, C; Creanor, J; Yanagida, M

    1994-01-01

    Fission yeast temperature-sensitive cut5 (cell untimely torn) mutants are defective in initiation and/or elongation of DNA replication but allow mitosis and cell division at a restrictive temperature. We show that the cut5 protein (identical to rad4) (i) is an essential component of the replication checkpoint system but not the DNA damage checkpoint, and (ii) negatively regulates the activation of M phase kinase at mitotic entry. Even if the replication checkpoint has been activated previousl...

  12. The vaccinia virus E6 protein influences virion protein localization during virus assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condit, Richard C., E-mail: condit@mgm.ufl.edu; Moussatche, Nissin

    2015-08-15

    Vaccinia virus mutants in which expression of the virion core protein gene E6R is repressed are defective in virion morphogenesis. E6 deficient infections fail to properly package viroplasm into viral membranes, resulting in an accumulation of empty immature virions and large aggregates of viroplasm. We have used immunogold electron microscopy and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy to assess the intracellular localization of several virion structural proteins and enzymes during E6R mutant infections. We find that during E6R mutant infections virion membrane proteins and virion transcription enzymes maintain a normal localization within viral factories while several major core and lateral body proteins accumulate in aggregated virosomes. The results support a model in which vaccinia virions are assembled from at least three substructures, the membrane, the viroplasm and a “pre-nucleocapsid”, and that the E6 protein is essential for maintaining proper localization of the seven-protein complex and the viroplasm during assembly. - Highlights: • Mutation of E6 disrupts association of viral membranes with viral core proteins • Mutation of E6 does not perturb viral membrane biosynthesis • Mutation of E6 does not perturb localization of viral transcription enzymes • Mutation of E6 causes mis-localization and aggregation of viral core proteins • Vaccinia assembly uses three subassemblies: membranes, viroplasm, prenucleocapsid.

  13. Checkpoint responses to replication stalling: inducing tolerance and preventing mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kai, Mihoko; Wang, Teresa S.-F

    2003-11-27

    Replication mutants often exhibit a mutator phenotype characterized by point mutations, single base frameshifts, and the deletion or duplication of sequences flanked by homologous repeats. Mutation in genes encoding checkpoint proteins can significantly affect the mutator phenotype. Here, we use fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) as a model system to discuss the checkpoint responses to replication perturbations induced by replication mutants. Checkpoint activation induced by a DNA polymerase mutant, aside from delay of mitotic entry, up-regulates the translesion polymerase DinB (Pol{kappa}). Checkpoint Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complex, which is loaded onto chromatin by the Rad17-Rfc2-5 checkpoint complex in response to replication perturbation, recruits DinB onto chromatin to generate the point mutations and single nucleotide frameshifts in the replication mutator. This chain of events reveals a novel checkpoint-induced tolerance mechanism that allows cells to cope with replication perturbation, presumably to make possible restarting stalled replication forks. Fission yeast Cds1 kinase plays an essential role in maintaining DNA replication fork stability in the face of DNA damage and replication fork stalling. Cds1 kinase is known to regulate three proteins that are implicated in maintaining replication fork stability: Mus81-Eme1, a hetero-dimeric structure-specific endonuclease complex; Rqh1, a RecQ-family helicase involved in suppressing inappropriate recombination during replication; and Rad60, a protein required for recombinational repair during replication. These Cds1-regulated proteins are thought to cooperatively prevent mutagenesis and maintain replication fork stability in cells under replication stress. These checkpoint-regulated processes allow cells to survive replication perturbation by preventing stalled replication forks from degenerating into deleterious DNA structures resulting in genomic instability and cancer development.

  14. Assembly and structure of protein phosphatase 2A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) represents a conserved family of important protein serine/threonine phosphatases in species ranging from yeast to human. The PP2A core enzyme comprises a scaffold subunit and a catalytic subunit. The heterotrimeric PP2A holoenzyme consists of the core enzyme and a variable regulatory subunit. The catalytic subunit of PP2A is subject to reversible methylation, medi-ated by two conserved enzymes. Both the PP2A core and holoenzymes are regulated through interac-tion with a large number of cellular cofactors. Recent biochemical and structural investigation reveals critical insights into the assembly and function of the PP2A core enzyme as well as two families of holoenzyme. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms revealed by these latest advances.

  15. Assembly and structure of protein phosphatase 2A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI YiGong

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) represents a conserved family of important protein serinetthreonine phosphatases in species ranging from yeast to human. The PP2A core enzyme comprises a scaffold subunit and a catalytic subunit. The heterotrimeric PP2A holoenzyme consists of the core enzyme and a variable regulatory subunit. The catalytic subunit of PP2A is subject to reversible methylation, mediated by two conserved enzymes. Both the PP2A core and holoenzymes are regulated through interaction with a large number of cellular cofactors. Recent biochemical and structural investigation reveals critical insights into the assembly and function of the PP2A core enzyme as well as two families of holoenzyme. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms revealed by these latest advances.

  16. Folding outer membrane proteins independently of the β-barrel assembly machinery: an assembly pathway for multimeric complexes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huysmans, Gerard H M

    2016-06-15

    Since the discovery of the essential role of the β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) for the membrane insertion of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) that are unrelated in sequence, members of this universally conserved family dominate discussions on OMP assembly in bacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts. However, several multimeric bacterial OMPs assemble independently of the catalyzing BAM-component BamA. Recent progress on this alternative pathway is reviewed here, and a model for BAM-independent assembly for multimeric OMPs is proposed in which monomer delivery to the membrane and stable prepore formation are key steps towards productive membrane insertion.

  17. 14-3-3 checkpoint regulatory proteins interact specifically with DNA repair protein human exonuclease 1 (hEXO1) via a semi-conserved motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sofie Dabros; Keijzers, Guido; Rampakakis, Emmanouil

    2012-01-01

    Human exonuclease 1 (hEXO1) acts directly in diverse DNA processing events, including replication, mismatch repair (MMR), and double strand break repair (DSBR), and it was also recently described to function as damage sensor and apoptosis inducer following DNA damage. In contrast, 14-3-3 proteins...... experiments reveal weak affinity of the more selective isoform 14-3-3s but both 14-3-3 isoforms ¿ and s significantly stimulate hEXO1 activity, indicating that these regulatory proteins exert a common regulation mode on hEXO1. Results demonstrate that binding involves the phosphorable amino acid S746 in hEXO1...... are specifically induced by replication inhibition leading to protein ubiquitination and degradation. We demonstrate direct and robust interaction between hEXO1 and six of the seven 14-3-3 isoforms in vitro, suggestive of a novel protein interaction network between DNA repair and cell cycle control. Binding...

  18. Assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit: positioning ribosomal protein S13 in the S7 assembly branch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondek, Joel F; Culver, Gloria M

    2004-12-01

    Studies of Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit assembly have revealed a hierarchical and cooperative association of ribosomal proteins with 16S ribosomal RNA; these results have been used to compile an in vitro 30S subunit assembly map. In single protein addition and omission studies, ribosomal protein S13 was shown to be dependent on the prior association of ribosomal protein S20 for binding to the ribonucleoprotein particle. While the overwhelming majority of interactions revealed in the assembly map are consistent with additional data, the dependency of S13 on S20 is not. Structural studies position S13 in the head of the 30S subunit > 100 A away from S20, which resides near the bottom of the body of the 30S subunit. All of the proteins that reside in the head of the 30S subunit, except S13, have been shown to be part of the S7 assembly branch, that is, they all depend on S7 for association with the assembling 30S subunit. Given these observations, the assembly requirements for S13 were investigated using base-specific chemical footprinting and primer extension analysis. These studies reveal that S13 can bind to 16S rRNA in the presence of S7, but not S20. Additionally, interaction between S13 and other members of the S7 assembly branch have been observed. These results link S13 to the 3' major domain family of proteins, and the S7 assembly branch, placing S13 in a new location in the 30S subunit assembly map where its position is in accordance with much biochemical and structural data.

  19. Bioinspired matrices assembled by polysaccharide-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Le

    Bioinspired matrices assembled on the basis of noncovalent interactions between proteins and polysaccharides have been proved suitable to deliver therapeutically relevant proteins or DNAs. Our initial efforts were dedicated to the relationship between mechanical properties of hydrogels assembled based on specific interactions between low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and heparin binding peptides (HBPs) such as HIP, ATIII, and PF4ZIP peptides. The measured differences in affinity and kinetics for LMWH-HBP binding likely lead to observed differences in the phase separation behavior of the poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG)-LMWH/PEG-HIP hydrogels versus the PEG-LMWH/PEG-ATIII hydrogels. More attention has been given to the PF4ZIP peptide employed for the noncovalent assembly of heparinized hydrogels. Multifunctional star PEG-PF4ZIP bioconjugates complexed with star PEG-LMWH form hydrogels that exhibit increasing elastic moduli with increasing mole ratio of PEG-PF4ZIP. The viscoelastic properties of the hydrogels can be controlled via alterations in the ratio between LMWH and PF4ZIP peptide, and comparisons with other PEG-LMWH/PEG-HBP hydrogels suggest the importance of both LMWH/HBP binding kinetics and the binding capacity of LMWH in determining rheological properties in these hydrogels. Characterization of the PEG-LMWH/PEG-PF4ZIP hydrogels suggests that useful moduli for soft tissue engineering applications are obtained at physiological temperatures and after applying high shear. Furthermore, in the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) release, bFGF/vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) co-release, and hydrogel erosion results, the combination of growth factor (GF) release profiles and hydrogel erosion profiles suggests that GF delivery from the assembled hydrogels is mainly an erosion-controlled process that may permit co-release of GF with PEG-LMWH and may therefore also improve the bioactivity of GF delivered from these matrices. Hydrogels with such engineered

  20. The architecture of the BubR1 tetratricopeptide tandem repeat defines a protein motif underlying mitotic checkpoint-kinetochore communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M; Nilsson, Jakob; Blundell, Tom L

    2012-01-01

    advance to anaphase before every chromosome is properly attached to microtubules of the mitotic spindle. The architecture of the KNL1-BubR1 complex reveals important features of the molecular recognition between SAC components and the kinetochore. The interaction is important for a functional SAC...... as substitution of BubR1 residues engaged in KNL1 binding impaired the SAC and BubR1 recruitment into checkpoint complexes in stable cell lines. Here we discuss the implications of the disorder-to-order transition of KNL1 upon BubR1 binding for SAC signaling and propose a mechanistic model of how BUBs binding may...

  1. Membrane protein architects: the role of the BAM complex in outer membrane protein assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Timothy J; Scott-Tucker, Anthony; Overduin, Michael; Henderson, Ian R

    2009-03-01

    The folding of transmembrane proteins into the outer membrane presents formidable challenges to Gram-negative bacteria. These proteins must migrate from the cytoplasm, through the inner membrane and into the periplasm, before being recognized by the beta-barrel assembly machinery, which mediates efficient insertion of folded beta-barrels into the outer membrane. Recent discoveries of component structures and accessory interactions of this complex are yielding insights into how cells fold membrane proteins. Here, we discuss how these structures illuminate the mechanisms responsible for the biogenesis of outer membrane proteins.

  2. Cambridge checkpoint English workbook 2

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, John

    2014-01-01

    Build confidence and understanding throughout the year with hundreds of additional practice questions. This Workbook supports our bestselling Checkpoint series, with exercises specifically matched to the Cambridge Progression tests and the Checkpoint tests. - Develops understanding and builds confidence ahead of assessment with exercises matched to the tests - Ensures a thorough understanding of all aspects of the course by following the structure of the relevant textbook - Saves planning time with exercises that are suitable for use in class or as homework This Workbook is

  3. Cambridge checkpoint English workbook 3

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, John

    2014-01-01

    Build confidence and understanding throughout the year with hundreds of additional practice questions. This Workbook supports our bestselling Checkpoint series, with exercises specifically matched to the Cambridge Progression tests and the Checkpoint tests. - Develops understanding and builds confidence ahead of assessment with exercises matched to the tests - Ensures a thorough understanding of all aspects of the course by following the structure of the relevant textbook - Saves planning time with exercises that are suitable for use in class or as homework This Workbook is

  4. Phosphorylation of Minichromosome Maintenance 3 (MCM3) by Checkpoint Kinase 1 (Chk1) Negatively Regulates DNA Replication and Checkpoint Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiangzi; Mayca Pozo, Franklin; Wisotsky, Jacob N; Wang, Benlian; Jacobberger, James W; Zhang, Youwei

    2015-05-08

    Mechanisms controlling DNA replication and replication checkpoint are critical for the maintenance of genome stability and the prevention or treatment of human cancers. Checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is a key effector protein kinase that regulates the DNA damage response and replication checkpoint. The heterohexameric minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex is the core component of mammalian DNA helicase and has been implicated in replication checkpoint activation. Here we report that Chk1 phosphorylates the MCM3 subunit of the MCM complex at Ser-205 under normal growth conditions. Mutating the Ser-205 of MCM3 to Ala increased the length of DNA replication track and shortened the S phase duration, indicating that Ser-205 phosphorylation negatively controls normal DNA replication. Upon replicative stress treatment, the inhibitory phosphorylation of MCM3 at Ser-205 was reduced, and this reduction was accompanied with the generation of single strand DNA, the key platform for ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) activation. As a result, the replication checkpoint is activated. Together, these data provide significant insights into the regulation of both normal DNA replication and replication checkpoint activation through the novel phosphorylation of MCM3 by Chk1.

  5. A genetic screen identifies BRCA2 and PALB2 as key regulators of G2 checkpoint maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menzel, Tobias; Nähse-Kumpf, Viola; Kousholt, Arne Nedergaard;

    2011-01-01

    To identify key connections between DNA-damage repair and checkpoint pathways, we performed RNA interference screens for regulators of the ionizing radiation-induced G2 checkpoint, and we identified the breast cancer gene BRCA2. The checkpoint was also abrogated following depletion of PALB2......, an interaction partner of BRCA2. BRCA2 and PALB2 depletion led to premature checkpoint abrogation and earlier activation of the AURORA A-PLK1 checkpoint-recovery pathway. These results indicate that the breast cancer tumour suppressors and homologous recombination repair proteins BRCA2 and PALB2 are main...

  6. Targeting checkpoint kinase 1 in cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Archie N; Carvajal, Richard; Schwartz, Gary K

    2007-04-01

    Progression through the cell cycle is monitored by surveillance mechanisms known as cell cycle checkpoints. Our knowledge of the biochemical nature of checkpoint regulation during an unperturbed cell cycle and following DNA damage has expanded tremendously over the past decade. We now know that dysfunction in cell cycle checkpoints leads to genomic instability and contributes to tumor progression, and most agents used for cancer therapy, such as cytotoxic chemotherapy and ionizing radiation, also activate cell cycle checkpoints. Understanding how checkpoints are regulated is therefore important from the points of view of both tumorigenesis and cancer treatment. In this review, we present an overview of the molecular hierarchy of the checkpoint signaling network and the emerging role of checkpoint targets, especially checkpoint kinase 1, in cancer therapy. Further, we discuss the results of recent clinical trials involving the nonspecific checkpoint kinase 1 inhibitor, UCN-01, and the challenges we face with this new therapeutic approach.

  7. Multiscale modeling and simulation of microtubule–motor-protein assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tong; Blackwell, Robert; Glaser, Matthew A.; Betterton, M. D.; Shelley, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules and motor proteins self-organize into biologically important assemblies including the mitotic spindle and the centrosomal microtubule array. Outside of cells, microtubule-motor mixtures can form novel active liquid-crystalline materials driven out of equilibrium by adenosine triphosphate–consuming motor proteins. Microscopic motor activity causes polarity-dependent interactions between motor proteins and microtubules, but how these interactions yield larger-scale dynamical behavior such as complex flows and defect dynamics is not well understood. We develop a multiscale theory for microtubule-motor systems in which Brownian dynamics simulations of polar microtubules driven by motors are used to study microscopic organization and stresses created by motor-mediated microtubule interactions. We identify polarity-sorting and crosslink tether relaxation as two polar-specific sources of active destabilizing stress. We then develop a continuum Doi-Onsager model that captures polarity sorting and the hydrodynamic flows generated by these polar-specific active stresses. In simulations of active nematic flows on immersed surfaces, the active stresses drive turbulent flow dynamics and continuous generation and annihilation of disclination defects. The dynamics follow from two instabilities, and accounting for the immersed nature of the experiment yields unambiguous characteristic length and time scales. When turning off the hydrodynamics in the Doi-Onsager model, we capture formation of polar lanes as observed in the Brownian dynamics simulation. PMID:26764729

  8. Self-assembling protein nanoparticles in the design of vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacinto López-Sagaseta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For over 100 years, vaccines have been one of the most effective medical interventions for reducing infectious disease, and are estimated to save millions of lives globally each year. Nevertheless, many diseases are not yet preventable by vaccination. This large unmet medical need demands further research and the development of novel vaccines with high efficacy and safety. Compared to the 19th and early 20th century vaccines that were made of killed, inactivated, or live-attenuated pathogens, modern vaccines containing isolated, highly purified antigenic protein subunits are safer but tend to induce lower levels of protective immunity. One strategy to overcome the latter is to design antigen nanoparticles: assemblies of polypeptides that present multiple copies of subunit antigens in well-ordered arrays with defined orientations that can potentially mimic the repetitiveness, geometry, size, and shape of the natural host-pathogen surface interactions. Such nanoparticles offer a collective strength of multiple binding sites (avidity and can provide improved antigen stability and immunogenicity. Several exciting advances have emerged lately, including preclinical evidence that this strategy may be applicable for the development of innovative new vaccines, for example, protecting against influenza, human immunodeficiency virus, and respiratory syncytial virus. Here, we provide a concise review of a critical selection of data that demonstrate the potential of this field. In addition, we highlight how the use of self-assembling protein nanoparticles can be effectively combined with the emerging discipline of structural vaccinology for maximum impact in the rational design of vaccine antigens.

  9. Cdc20 and Cks direct the spindle checkpoint-independent destruction of cyclin A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthuis, Rob; Clay-Farrace, Lori; van Zon, Wouter; Yekezare, Mona; Koop, Lars; Ogink, Janneke; Medema, Rene; Pines, Jonathon

    2008-01-01

    Successful mitosis requires the right protein be degraded at the right time. Central to this is the spindle checkpoint that prevents the destruction of securin and cyclin 131 when there are improperly attached chromosomes. The principal target of the checkpoint is Cdc20, which activates the anaphase

  10. Self-Assembled Peptide- and Protein-Based Nanomaterials for Antitumor Photodynamic and Photothermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Manzar; Zou, Qianli; Li, Shukun; Yan, Xuehai

    2017-01-06

    Tremendous interest in self-assembly of peptides and proteins towards functional nanomaterials has been inspired by naturally evolving self-assembly in biological construction of multiple and sophisticated protein architectures in organisms. Self-assembled peptide and protein nanoarchitectures are excellent promising candidates for facilitating biomedical applications due to their advantages of structural, mechanical, and functional diversity and high biocompability and biodegradability. Here, this review focuses on the self-assembly of peptides and proteins for fabrication of phototherapeutic nanomaterials for antitumor photodynamic and photothermal therapy, with emphasis on building blocks, non-covalent interactions, strategies, and the nanoarchitectures of self-assembly. The exciting antitumor activities achieved by these phototherapeutic nanomaterials are also discussed in-depth, along with the relationships between their specific nanoarchitectures and their unique properties, providing an increased understanding of the role of peptide and protein self-assembly in improving the efficiency of photodynamic and photothermal therapy.

  11. Compiler-assisted static checkpoint insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Junsheng; Fuchs, W. K.; Abraham, Jacob A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a compiler-assisted approach for static checkpoint insertion. Instead of fixing the checkpoint location before program execution, a compiler enhanced polling mechanism is utilized to maintain both the desired checkpoint intervals and reproducible checkpoint 1ocations. The technique has been implemented in a GNU CC compiler for Sun 3 and Sun 4 (Sparc) processors. Experiments demonstrate that the approach provides for stable checkpoint intervals and reproducible checkpoint placements with performance overhead comparable to a previously presented compiler assisted dynamic scheme (CATCH) utilizing the system clock.

  12. Checkpoint Blockade in Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Alan J.; Peggs, Karl S.; Allison, James P.

    2007-01-01

    The progression of a productive immune response requires that a number of immunological checkpoints be passed. Passage may require the presence of excitatory costimulatory signals or the avoidance of negative or coinhibitory signals, which act to dampen or terminate immune activity. The immunoglobulin superfamily occupies a central importance in this coordination of immune responses, and the CD28/cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4):B7.1/B7.2 receptor/ligand grouping represents the archetypal example of these immune regulators. In part the role of these checkpoints is to guard against the possibility of unwanted and harmful self-directed activities. While this is a necessary function, aiding in the prevention of autoimmunity, it may act as a barrier to successful immunotherapies aimed at targeting malignant self-cells that largely display the same array of surface molecules as the cells from which they derive. Therapies aimed at overcoming these mechanisms of peripheral tolerance, in particular by blocking the inhibitory checkpoints, offer the potential to generate antitumor activity, either as monotherapies or in synergism with other therapies that directly or indirectly enhance presentation of tumor epitopes to the immune system. Such immunological molecular adjuvants are showing promise in early clinical trials. This review focuses on the results of the archetypal example of checkpoint blockade, anti-CTLA-4, in preclinical tumor models and clinical trials, while also highlighting other possible targets for immunological checkpoint blockade. PMID:16730267

  13. Spindle formation, chromosome segregation and the spindle checkpoint in mammalian oocytes and susceptibility to meiotic error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, E; Kirsch-Volders, M; Parry, J; Eichenlaub-Ritter, U

    2008-03-12

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) monitors attachment to microtubules and tension on chromosomes in mitosis and meiosis. It represents a surveillance mechanism that halts cells in M-phase in the presence of unattached chromosomes, associated with accumulation of checkpoint components, in particular, Mad2, at the kinetochores. A complex between the anaphase promoting factor/cylosome (APC/C), its accessory protein Cdc20 and proteins of the SAC renders APC/C inactive, usually until all chromosomes are properly assembled at the spindle equator (chromosome congression) and under tension from spindle fibres. Upon release from the SAC the APC/C can target proteins like cyclin B and securin for degradation by the proteasome. Securin degradation causes activation of separase proteolytic enzyme, and in mitosis cleavage of cohesin proteins at the centromeres and arms of sister chromatids. In meiosis I only the cohesin proteins at the sister chromatid arms are cleaved. This requires meiosis specific components and tight regulation by kinase and phosphatase activities. There is no S-phase between meiotic divisions. Second meiosis resembles mitosis. Mammalian oocytes arrest constitutively at metaphase II in presence of aligned chromosomes, which is due to the activity of the cytostatic factor (CSF). The SAC has been identified in spermatogenesis and oogenesis, but gender-differences may contribute to sex-specific differential responses to aneugens. The age-related reduction in expression of components of the SAC in mammalian oocytes may act synergistically with spindle and other cell organelles' dysfunction, and a partial loss of cohesion between sister chromatids to predispose oocytes to errors in chromosome segregation. This might affect dose-response to aneugens. In view of the tendency to have children at advanced maternal ages it appears relevant to pursue studies on consequences of ageing on the susceptibility of human oocytes to the induction of meiotic error by

  14. Infrared light-induced protein crystallization. Structuring of protein interfacial water and periodic self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowacz, Magdalena; Marchel, Mateusz; Juknaité, Lina; Esperança, José M. S. S.; Romão, Maria João; Carvalho, Ana Luísa; Rebelo, Luís Paulo N.

    2017-01-01

    We show that a physical trigger, a non-ionizing infrared (IR) radiation at wavelengths strongly absorbed by liquid water, can be used to induce and kinetically control protein (periodic) self-assembly in solution. This phenomenon is explained by considering the effect of IR light on the structuring of protein interfacial water. Our results indicate that the IR radiation can promote enhanced mutual correlations of water molecules in the protein hydration shell. We report on the radiation-induced increase in both the strength and cooperativeness of H-bonds. The presence of a structured dipolar hydration layer can lead to attractive interactions between like-charged biomacromolecules in solution (and crystal nucleation events). Furthermore, our study suggests that enveloping the protein within a layer of structured solvent (an effect enhanced by IR light) can prevent the protein non-specific aggregation favoring periodic self-assembly. Recognizing the ability to affect protein-water interactions by means of IR radiation may have important implications for biological and bio-inspired systems.

  15. Assembling a Correctly Folded and Functional Heptahelical Membrane Protein by Protein Trans-splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehler, Michaela; Eckert, Carl Elias; Busche, Alena; Kulhei, Jennifer; Michaelis, Jonas; Becker-Baldus, Johanna; Wachtveitl, Josef; Dötsch, Volker; Glaubitz, Clemens

    2015-11-13

    Protein trans-splicing using split inteins is well established as a useful tool for protein engineering. Here we show, for the first time, that this method can be applied to a membrane protein under native conditions. We provide compelling evidence that the heptahelical proteorhodopsin can be assembled from two separate fragments consisting of helical bundles A and B and C, D, E, F, and G via a splicing site located in the BC loop. The procedure presented here is on the basis of dual expression and ligation in vivo. Global fold, stability, and photodynamics were analyzed in detergent by CD, stationary, as well as time-resolved optical spectroscopy. The fold within lipid bilayers has been probed by high field and dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced solid-state NMR utilizing a (13)C-labeled retinal cofactor and extensively (13)C-(15)N-labeled protein. Our data show unambiguously that the ligation product is identical to its non-ligated counterpart. Furthermore, our data highlight the effects of BC loop modifications onto the photocycle kinetics of proteorhodopsin. Our data demonstrate that a correctly folded and functionally intact protein can be produced in this artificial way. Our findings are of high relevance for a general understanding of the assembly of membrane proteins for elucidating intramolecular interactions, and they offer the possibility of developing novel labeling schemes for spectroscopic applications.

  16. Efficient Incremental Checkpointing of Java Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawall, Julia Laetitia; Muller, Gilles

    2000-01-01

    This paper investigates the optimization of language-level checkpointing of Java programs. First, we describe how to systematically associate incremental checkpoints with Java classes. While being safe, the genericness of this solution induces substantial execution overhead. Second, to solve...

  17. Greatwall and Polo-like Kinase 1 Coordinate to Promote Checkpoint Recovery*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Aimin; Wang, Ling; Fisher, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    Checkpoint recovery upon completion of DNA repair allows the cell to return to normal cell cycle progression and is thus a crucial process that determines cell fate after DNA damage. We previously studied this process in Xenopus egg extracts and established Greatwall (Gwl) as an important regulator. Here we show that preactivated Gwl kinase can promote checkpoint recovery independently of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) or Plx1 (Xenopus polo-like kinase 1), whereas depletion of Gwl from extracts exhibits no synergy with that of Plx1 in delaying checkpoint recovery, suggesting a distinct but related relationship between Gwl and Plx1. In further revealing their functional relationship, we found mutual dependence for activation of Gwl and Plx1 during checkpoint recovery, as well as their direct association. We characterized the protein association in detail and recapitulated it in vitro with purified proteins, which suggests direct interaction. Interestingly, Gwl interaction with Plx1 and its phosphorylation by Plx1 both increase at the stage of checkpoint recovery. More importantly, Plx1-mediated phosphorylation renders Gwl more efficient in promoting checkpoint recovery, suggesting a functional involvement of such regulation in the recovery process. Finally, we report an indirect regulatory mechanism involving Aurora A that may account for Gwl-dependent regulation of Plx1 during checkpoint recovery. Our results thus reveal novel mechanisms underlying the involvement of Gwl in checkpoint recovery, in particular, its functional relationship with Plx1, a well characterized regulator of checkpoint recovery. Coordinated interplays between Plx1 and Gwl are required for reactivation of these kinases from the G2/M DNA damage checkpoint and efficient checkpoint recovery. PMID:21708943

  18. Evidence that Aurora B is implicated in spindle checkpoint signalling independently of error correction

    OpenAIRE

    Santaguida, Stefano; Vernieri, Claudio; Villa, Fabrizio; Ciliberto, Andrea; Musacchio, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Fidelity of chromosome segregation is ensured by a tension-dependent error correction system that prevents stabilization of incorrect chromosome–microtubule attachments. Unattached or incorrectly attached chromosomes also activate the spindle assembly checkpoint, thus delaying mitotic exit until all chromosomes are bioriented. The Aurora B kinase is widely recognized as a component of error correction. Conversely, its role in the checkpoint is controversial. Here, we report an analysis of the...

  19. Cambridge checkpoint English workbook 1

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, John

    2013-01-01

    This Workbook supports our bestselling Checkpoint English series, with exercises specifically matched to the Cambridge Progression tests and the Checkpoint English tests. - Offers plenty of additional questions for use in class or as homework. - Includes clearly identified questions on grammar and punctuation, comprehension, use of language and essay planning. - Follows the structure of the relevant textbook to ensure a thorough understanding of all aspects of the course. - Provides a space for Students to write their answers. This Workbook is matched to the Cambridge Secondary 1 Curriculum Fr

  20. Network support for system initiated checkpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip

    2013-01-29

    A system, method and computer program product for supporting system initiated checkpoints in parallel computing systems. The system and method generates selective control signals to perform checkpointing of system related data in presence of messaging activity associated with a user application running at the node. The checkpointing is initiated by the system such that checkpoint data of a plurality of network nodes may be obtained even in the presence of user applications running on highly parallel computers that include ongoing user messaging activity.

  1. Unique self-assembly properties of a bridge-shaped protein dimer with quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jianhao; Jiang, Pengju [Changzhou University, School of Pharmaceutical Engineering and Life Science (China); Gao, Liqian; Yu, Yongsheng; Lu, Yao [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Chemistry (Hong Kong, China) (China); Qiu, Lin; Wang, Cheli [Changzhou University, School of Pharmaceutical Engineering and Life Science (China); Xia, Jiang, E-mail: jiangxia@cuhk.edu.hk [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Chemistry (Hong Kong, China) (China)

    2013-09-15

    How protein-protein interaction affects protein-nanoparticle self-assembly is the key to the understanding of biomolecular coating of nanoparticle in biological fluids. However, the relationship between protein shape and its interaction with nanoparticles is still under-exploited because of lack of a well-conceived binding system and a method to detect the subtle change in the protein-nanoparticle assemblies. Noticing this unresolved need, we cloned and expressed a His-tagged SpeA protein that adopts a bridge-shaped dimer structure, and utilized a high-resolution capillary electrophoresis method to monitor assembly formation between the protein and quantum dots (QDs, 5 nm in diameter). We observed that the bridge-shaped structure rendered a low SpeA:QD stoichiometry at saturation. Also, close monitoring of imidazole (Im) displacement of surface-bound protein revealed a unique two-step process. High-concentration Im could displace surface-bound SpeA protein and form a transient QD-protein intermediate, through a kinetically controlled displacement process. An affinity-driven equilibrium step then followed, resulting in re-assembling of the QD-protein complex in about 1 h. Through a temporarily formed intermediate, Im causes a rearrangement of His-tagged proteins on the surface. Thus, our work showcases that the synergistic interplay between QD-His-tag interaction and protein-protein interaction can result in unique properties of protein-nanoparticle assembly for the first time.

  2. Physical mechanisms and biological significance of supramolecular protein self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentsis, Alex; Borden, Katherine L B

    2004-04-01

    In living cells, chemical reactions of metabolism, information processing, growth and development are organized in a complex network of interactions. At least in part, the organization of this network is accomplished as a result of physical assembly by supramolecular scaffolds. Indeed, most proteins function in cells within the context of multimeric or supramolecular assemblies. With the increasing availability of atomic structures and molecular thermodynamics, it is possible to recast the problem of non-covalent molecular self-assembly from a unified perspective of structural thermodynamics and kinetics. Here, we present a generalized theory of self-assembly based on Wegner's kinetic model and use it to delineate three physical mechanisms of self-assembly: as limited by association of assembly units (nucleation), by association of monomers (isodesmic), and by conformational reorganization of monomers that is coupled to assembly (conformational). Thus, we discuss actin, tubulin, clathrin, and the capsid of icosahedral cowpea chlorotic mottle virus with respect to assembly of architectural scaffolds that perform largely mechanical functions, and pyruvate dehydrogenase, and RING domain proteins PML, arenaviral Z, and BRCA1:BARD1 with regard to assembly of supramolecular enzymes with metabolic and chemically directive functions. In addition to the biological functions made possible by supramolecular self-assembly, such as mesoscale mechanics of architectural scaffolds and metabolic coupling of supramolecular enzymes, we show that the physical mechanisms of self-assembly and their structural bases are biologically significant as well, having regulatory roles in both formation and function of the assembled structures in health and disease.

  3. Correlation between centromere protein-F autoantibodies and cancer analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welner, Simon; Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Morten Frisch, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Centromere protein-F (CENP-F) is a large nuclear protein of 367 kDa, which is involved in multiple mitosis-related events such as proper assembly of the kinetochores, stabilization of heterochromatin, chromosome alignment and mitotic checkpoint signaling. Several studies have shown a correlation...

  4. Checkpointing for a hybrid computing node

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cher, Chen-Yong

    2016-03-08

    According to an aspect, a method for checkpointing in a hybrid computing node includes executing a task in a processing accelerator of the hybrid computing node. A checkpoint is created in a local memory of the processing accelerator. The checkpoint includes state data to restart execution of the task in the processing accelerator upon a restart operation. Execution of the task is resumed in the processing accelerator after creating the checkpoint. The state data of the checkpoint are transferred from the processing accelerator to a main processor of the hybrid computing node while the processing accelerator is executing the task.

  5. Evidence that Aurora B is implicated in spindle checkpoint signalling independently of error correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santaguida, Stefano; Vernieri, Claudio; Villa, Fabrizio; Ciliberto, Andrea; Musacchio, Andrea

    2011-04-20

    Fidelity of chromosome segregation is ensured by a tension-dependent error correction system that prevents stabilization of incorrect chromosome-microtubule attachments. Unattached or incorrectly attached chromosomes also activate the spindle assembly checkpoint, thus delaying mitotic exit until all chromosomes are bioriented. The Aurora B kinase is widely recognized as a component of error correction. Conversely, its role in the checkpoint is controversial. Here, we report an analysis of the role of Aurora B in the spindle checkpoint under conditions believed to uncouple the effects of Aurora B inhibition on the checkpoint from those on error correction. Partial inhibition of several checkpoint and kinetochore components, including Mps1 and Ndc80, strongly synergizes with inhibition of Aurora B activity and dramatically affects the ability of cells to arrest in mitosis in the presence of spindle poisons. Thus, Aurora B might contribute to spindle checkpoint signalling independently of error correction. Our results support a model in which Aurora B is at the apex of a signalling pyramid whose sensory apparatus promotes the concomitant activation of error correction and checkpoint signalling pathways.

  6. PNA-induced assembly of fluorescent proteins using DNA as a framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Zahra; Brunsveld, Luc; Hanley, Quentin

    2013-08-21

    Controlled alignment of proteins on molecular frameworks requires the development of facile and orthogonal chemical approaches and molecular scaffolds. In this work, protein-PNA conjugates are brought forward as new chemical components allowing efficient assembly and alignment on DNA scaffolds. Site-selective monomeric teal fluorescent protein (mTFP)-peptide nucleic acid (PNA) (mTFP-PNA) conjugation was achieved by covalent linkage of the PNA to the protein through expressed protein ligation (EPL). A DNA beacon, with 6-Fam and Dabcyl at its ends, acts as a framework to create an assembled hetero-FRET system with the mTFP-PNA conjugate. Using fluorescence intensity, frequency domain lifetime measurements, and anisotropy measurements, the system was shown to produce FRET as indicated by decreased donor intensity, decreased donor lifetime, and increased donor anisotropy. Extension of the DNA scaffold allowed for the assembly of multiple mTFP-PNA constructs. Efficient formation of protein dimers and oligomers on the DNA-PNA frameworks could be shown, as visualized via size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Assembly of multiple proteins in a row induced homo-FRET for the mTFP-PNA's assembled on the DNA scaffolds. The oligonucleotide framework allows an induced and controllable assembly of proteins by fusing them to PNAs directed to align on DNA scaffolds.

  7. The Aurora B kinase in chromosome biorientation and spindle checkpoint signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica eKrenn

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aurora B, a member of the Aurora family of serine/threonine protein kinases, is a key player in chromosome segregation. As part of a macromolecular complex known as the chromosome passenger complex, Aurora B concentrates early during mitosis in the proximity of centromeres and kinetochores, the sites of attachment of chromosomes to spindle microtubules. There, it contributes to a number of processes that impart fidelity to cell division, including kinetochore stabilization, kinetochore-microtubule attachment, and the regulation of a surveillance mechanism named the spindle assembly checkpoint. In the regulation of these processes, Aurora B is the fulcrum of a remarkably complex network of interactions that feed back on its localization and activation state. In this review we discuss the multiple roles of Aurora B during mitosis, focusing in particular on its role at centromeres and kinetochores. Many details of the network of interactions at these locations remain poorly understood, and we focus here on several crucial outstanding questions.

  8. Harnessing the Power of Onco-Immunotherapy with Checkpoint Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karishma R. Rajani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses represent a diverse class of replication competent viruses that curtail tumor growth. These viruses, through their natural ability or through genetic modifications, can selectively replicate within tumor cells and induce cell death while leaving normal cells intact. Apart from the direct oncolytic activity, these viruses mediate tumor cell death via the induction of innate and adaptive immune responses. The field of oncolytic viruses has seen substantial advancement with the progression of numerous oncolytic viruses in various phases of clinical trials. Tumors employ a plethora of mechanisms to establish growth and subsequently metastasize. These include evasion of immune surveillance by inducing up-regulation of checkpoint proteins which function to abrogate T cell effector functions. Currently, antibodies blocking checkpoint proteins such as anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4 and anti-programmed cell death-1 (PD-1 have been approved to treat cancer and shown to impart durable clinical responses. These antibodies typically need pre-existing active immune tumor microenvironment to establish durable clinical outcomes and not every patient responds to these therapies. This review provides an overview of published pre-clinical studies demonstrating superior therapeutic efficacy of combining oncolytic viruses with checkpoint blockade compared to monotherapies. These studies provide compelling evidence that oncolytic therapy can be potentiated by coupling it with checkpoint therapies.

  9. Phenotypic checkpoints regulate neuronal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Spitzer, Nicholas C

    2010-11-01

    Nervous system development proceeds by sequential gene expression mediated by cascades of transcription factors in parallel with sequences of patterned network activity driven by receptors and ion channels. These sequences are cell type- and developmental stage-dependent and modulated by paracrine actions of substances released by neurons and glia. How and to what extent these sequences interact to enable neuronal network development is not understood. Recent evidence demonstrates that CNS development requires intermediate stages of differentiation providing functional feedback that influences gene expression. We suggest that embryonic neuronal functions constitute a series of phenotypic checkpoint signatures; neurons failing to express these functions are delayed or developmentally arrested. Such checkpoints are likely to be a general feature of neuronal development and constitute presymptomatic signatures of neurological disorders when they go awry.

  10. Direct interactions of early and late assembling division proteins in Escherichia coli cells resolved by FRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeeva, Svetlana; Gadella, Theodorus W J; Verheul, Jolanda; Verhoeven, Gertjan S; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2010-07-01

    The bacterial cell division machinery is organized in the so-called divisome composed of highly dynamic but low abundant interacting (membrane-bound) proteins. In order to elucidate the molecular interactions between these proteins, we developed a robust background-insensitive quantitative spectral unmixing method for estimating FRET efficiencies at near endogenous protein levels using fluorescent protein fusions. The assembly of the division machinery of Escherichia coli occurs in two steps that are discrete in time: first the FtsZ-ring and the so-called early localizing proteins that together seem to prepare the division assembly at midcell. Subsequently, the late localizing protein complexes that contain the peptidoglycan-synthesizing proteins PBP1B and FtsI (PBP3) are recruited to the division site, which initiates septation. Physical interactions were observed between members within each group but also between the early and late localizing proteins strongly suggesting that these proteins despite their differential localization in time are linked at the molecular and functional level. Interestingly, we find FtsN, one of the latest proteins in the divisome assembly, interacting with late assembling proteins FtsI and FtsW, but also with early (proto-ring) protein ZapA. This is in line with the recently described role of FtsN in divisome stabilization including the proto-ring elements.

  11. A Robust Workflow for Native Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Affinity-Isolated Endogenous Protein Assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olinares, Paul Dominic B; Dunn, Amelia D; Padovan, Júlio C; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Rout, Michael P; Chait, Brian T

    2016-03-01

    The central players in most cellular events are assemblies of macromolecules. Structural and functional characterization of these assemblies requires knowledge of their subunit stoichiometry and intersubunit connectivity. One of the most direct means for acquiring such information is so-called "native mass spectrometry (MS)", wherein the masses of the intact assemblies and parts thereof are accurately determined. It is of particular interest to apply native MS to the study of endogenous protein assemblies-i.e., those wherein the component proteins are expressed at endogenous levels in their natural functional states, rather than the overexpressed (sometimes partial) constructs commonly employed in classical structural studies, whose assembly can introduce stoichiometry artifacts and other unwanted effects. To date, the application of native MS to the elucidation of endogenous protein complexes has been limited by the difficulty in obtaining pristine cell-derived assemblies at sufficiently high concentrations for effective analysis. Here, to address this challenge, we present a robust workflow that couples rapid and efficient affinity isolation of endogenous protein complexes with a sensitive native MS readout. The resulting workflow has the potential to provide a wealth of data on the stoichiometry and intersubunit connectivity of endogenous protein assemblies-information that is key to successful integrative structural elucidation of biological systems.

  12. Expression, purification and refolding of a self-assembling protein nanoparticle (SAPN) malaria vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qin; Dasgupta, Debleena; Doll, Tais A P F; Burkhard, Peter; Lanar, David E

    2013-05-01

    There are many ways to present antigens to the immune system. We have used a repetitive antigen display technology that relies on the self-assembly of 60 protein chains into a spherical self-assembling protein nanoparticle (SAPN) to develop a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The protein sequence contains selected B- and T-cell epitopes of the circumsporozoite protein of P. falciparum (PfCSP) and, when assembled into a nanoparticle induces strong, long-lived and protective immune responses against the PfCSP. Here we describe the conditions needed for promoting self-assembly of a P. falciparum vaccine nanoparticle, PfCSP-KMY-SAPN, and note pitfalls that may occur when determining conditions for other SAPN vaccines. Attention was paid to selecting processes that were amenable to scale up and cGMP manufacturing.

  13. Interfacial interactions involved in the biological assembly of Chandipura virus nucleocapsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreejith, R; Gulati, Sahil; Gupta, Sanjay

    2013-06-01

    The biological assembly of Chandipura virus nucleocapsid (N) protein has been modeled and the amino acid residues involved in specific intermolecular interactions among N monomers during oligomerisation have been predicted.

  14. Phosphorylation-induced mechanical regulation of intrinsically disordered neurofilament protein assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    Malka-Gibor, Eti; Laser-Azogui, Adi; Doron, Ofer; Zingerman-Koladko, Irena; Medalia, Ohad; Beck, Roy

    2016-01-01

    The biological function of protein assemblies was conventionally equated with a unique three-dimensional protein structure and protein-specific interactions. However, in the past 20 years it was found that some assemblies contain long flexible regions that adopt multiple structural conformations. These include neurofilament (NF) proteins that constitute the stress-responsive supportive network of neurons. Herein, we show that NF networks macroscopic properties are tuned by enzymatic regulation of the charge found on the flexible protein regions. The results reveal an enzymatic (phosphorylation) regulation of macroscopic properties such as orientation, stress-response and expansion in flexible protein assemblies. Together with a model explaining the attractive electrostatic interactions induced by enzymatically added charges, we demonstrate that phosphorylation-regulation is far richer and versatile than previously considered.

  15. Accurate design of co-assembling multi-component protein nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Neil P; Bale, Jacob B; Sheffler, William; McNamara, Dan E; Gonen, Shane; Gonen, Tamir; Yeates, Todd O; Baker, David

    2014-06-05

    The self-assembly of proteins into highly ordered nanoscale architectures is a hallmark of biological systems. The sophisticated functions of these molecular machines have inspired the development of methods to engineer self-assembling protein nanostructures; however, the design of multi-component protein nanomaterials with high accuracy remains an outstanding challenge. Here we report a computational method for designing protein nanomaterials in which multiple copies of two distinct subunits co-assemble into a specific architecture. We use the method to design five 24-subunit cage-like protein nanomaterials in two distinct symmetric architectures and experimentally demonstrate that their structures are in close agreement with the computational design models. The accuracy of the method and the number and variety of two-component materials that it makes accessible suggest a route to the construction of functional protein nanomaterials tailored to specific applications.

  16. Protein Viability on Au Nanoparticles during an Electrospray and Electrostatic-Force-Directed Assembly Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Mao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the protein viability on Au nanoparticles during an electrospray and electrostatic-force-directed assembly process, through which Au nanoparticle-antibody conjugates are assembled onto the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs to fabricate carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET biosensors. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and field-effect transistor (FET measurements have been used to investigate the antibody activity after the nanoparticle assembly. Upon the introduction of matching antigens, the colored reaction from the ELISA and the change in the electrical characteristic of the CNTFET device confirm that the antibody activity is preserved during the assembly process.

  17. Monte Carlo study of the molecular mechanisms of surface-layer protein self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horejs, Christine; Mitra, Mithun K.; Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2011-03-01

    The molecular mechanisms guiding the self-assembly of proteins into functional or pathogenic large-scale structures can be only understood by studying the correlation between the structural details of the monomer and the eventual mesoscopic morphologies. Among the myriad structural details of protein monomers and their manifestations in the self-assembled morphologies, we seek to identify the most crucial set of structural features necessary for the spontaneous selection of desired morphologies. Using a combination of the structural information and a Monte Carlo method with a coarse-grained model, we have studied the functional protein self-assembly into S(surface)-layers, which constitute the crystallized outer most cell envelope of a great variety of bacterial cells. We discover that only few and mainly hydrophobic amino acids, located on the surface of the monomer, are responsible for the formation of a highly ordered anisotropic protein lattice. The coarse-grained model presented here reproduces accurately many experimentally observed features including the pore formation, chemical description of the pore structure, location of specific amino acid residues at the protein-protein interfaces, and surface accessibility of specific amino acid residues. In addition to elucidating the molecular mechanisms and explaining experimental findings in the S-layer assembly, the present work offers a tool, which is chemical enough to capture details of primary sequences and coarse-grained enough to explore morphological structures with thousands of protein monomers, to promulgate design rules for spontaneous formation of specific protein assemblies.

  18. Deacetylation of the mitotic checkpoint protein BubR1 at lysine 250 by SIRT2 and subsequent effects on BubR1 degradation during the prometaphase/anaphase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suematsu, Tomohisa; Li, Yanze; Kojima, Hirotada; Nakajima, Koichi; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Inoue, Toshiaki

    2014-10-24

    Mitotic catastrophe, a form of cell death that occurs during mitosis and after mitotic slippage to a tetraploid state, plays an important role in the efficacy of cancer cell killing by microtubule inhibitors. Prolonged mitotic arrest at the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a well-known requirement for mitotic catastrophe and, thus, for conferring sensitivity to microtubule inhibitors. We previously reported that downregulation of SIRT2, a member of the sirtuin family of NAD+-dependent deacetylases, confers resistance to microtubule inhibitors by abnormally prolonging mitotic arrest and thus compromising the cell death pathway after mitotic slippage. Thus, turning off SAC activation after a defined period is an additional requirement for efficient post-slippage death. Here, we investigated whether SIRT2 deacetylates BubR1, which is a core component of the SAC; acetylation of BubR1 at lysine 250 (K250) during prometaphase inhibits its APC/C-dependent proteolysis and thus regulates timing in anaphase entry. We showed that SIRT2 deacetylates BubR1 K250 both in vitro and in vivo. We also found that SIRT2 knockdown leads to increased levels of BubR1 acetylation at prometaphase; however, this increase is not substantial to elevate the levels of total BubR1 or delay the transition from prometaphase to anaphase. The present study shows that SIRT2 is a deacetylase for BubR1 K250, although the abnormally prolonged SAC activation observed in SIRT2 knockdown cells is not accompanied by a change in BubR1 levels or by delayed progression from prometaphase to anaphase.

  19. Solid-State NMR Studies of HIV-1 Capsid Protein Assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    HAN, YUN; Ahn, Jinwoo; Concel, Jason; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; YANG, Jun; Polenova, Tatyana

    2010-01-01

    In mature HIV-1 virions, a 26.6 kDa CA protein is assembled into a characteristic cone shaped core (capsid) that encloses the RNA viral genome. The assembled capsid structure is best described by a fullerene cone model that is made up from a hexameric lattice containing a variable number of CA pentamers, thus allowing for closure of tubular or conical structures. In this report, we present a solid-state NMR analysis of the wild type HIV-1 CA protein, prepared as conical and spherical assembli...

  20. Biotin-Streptavidin Affinity Purification of RNA-Protein Complexes Assembled In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shuai; Shi, Lei; Lei, Haixin

    2016-01-01

    RNA-protein complexes are essential for the function of different RNAs, yet purification of specific RNA-protein complexes can be complicated and is a major obstacle in understanding the mechanism of regulatory RNAs. Here we present a protocol to purify RNA-protein complexes assembled in vitro based on biotin-streptavidin affinity. In vitro transcribed RNA is labeled with (32)P and biotin, ribonucleoprotein particles or RNPs are assembled by incubation of RNA in nuclear extract and fractionated using gel filtration, and RNP fractions are pooled for biotin-streptavidin affinity purification. The amount of RNA-protein complexes purified following this protocol is sufficient for mass spectrometry.

  1. Phase transition of spindle-associated protein regulate spindle apparatus assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Wang, Shusheng; Huang, Yuejia; He, Xiaonan; Cui, Honggang; Zhu, Xueliang; Zheng, Yixian

    2015-09-24

    Spindle assembly required during mitosis depends on microtubule polymerization. We demonstrate that the evolutionarily conserved low-complexity protein, BuGZ, undergoes phase transition or coacervation to promote assembly of both spindles and their associated components. BuGZ forms temperature-dependent liquid droplets alone or on microtubules in physiological buffers. Coacervation in vitro or in spindle and spindle matrix depends on hydrophobic residues in BuGZ. BuGZ coacervation and its binding to microtubules and tubulin are required to promote assembly of spindle and spindle matrix in Xenopus egg extract and in mammalian cells. Since several previously identified spindle-associated components also contain low-complexity regions, we propose that coacervating proteins may be a hallmark of proteins that comprise a spindle matrix that functions to promote assembly of spindles by concentrating its building blocks.

  2. A computational investigation on the connection between dynamics properties of ribosomal proteins and ribosome assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Burton

    Full Text Available Assembly of the ribosome from its protein and RNA constituents has been studied extensively over the past 50 years, and experimental evidence suggests that prokaryotic ribosomal proteins undergo conformational changes during assembly. However, to date, no studies have attempted to elucidate these conformational changes. The present work utilizes computational methods to analyze protein dynamics and to investigate the linkage between dynamics and binding of these proteins during the assembly of the ribosome. Ribosomal proteins are known to be positively charged and we find the percentage of positive residues in r-proteins to be about twice that of the average protein: Lys+Arg is 18.7% for E. coli and 21.2% for T. thermophilus. Also, positive residues constitute a large proportion of RNA contacting residues: 39% for E. coli and 46% for T. thermophilus. This affirms the known importance of charge-charge interactions in the assembly of the ribosome. We studied the dynamics of three primary proteins from E. coli and T. thermophilus 30S subunits that bind early in the assembly (S15, S17, and S20 with atomic molecular dynamic simulations, followed by a study of all r-proteins using elastic network models. Molecular dynamics simulations show that solvent-exposed proteins (S15 and S17 tend to adopt more stable solution conformations than an RNA-embedded protein (S20. We also find protein residues that contact the 16S rRNA are generally more mobile in comparison with the other residues. This is because there is a larger proportion of contacting residues located in flexible loop regions. By the use of elastic network models, which are computationally more efficient, we show that this trend holds for most of the 30S r-proteins.

  3. Respiratory syncytial virus assembles into structured filamentous virion particles independently of host cytoskeleton and related proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fyza Y Shaikh

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a single-stranded RNA virus that assembles into viral filaments at the cell surface. Virus assembly often depends on the ability of a virus to use host proteins to accomplish viral tasks. Since the fusion protein cytoplasmic tail (FCT is critical for viral filamentous assembly, we hypothesized that host proteins important for viral assembly may be recruited by the FCT. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that filamin A interacted with FCT, and mammalian cell experiments showed it localized to viral filaments but did not affect viral replication. Furthermore, we found that a number of actin-associated proteins also were excluded from viral filaments. Actin or tubulin cytoskeletal rearrangement was not necessary for F trafficking to the cell surface or for viral assembly into filaments, but was necessary for optimal viral replication and may be important for anchoring viral filaments. These findings suggest that RSV assembly into filaments occurs independently of actin polymerization and that viral proteins are the principal drivers for the mechanical tasks involved with formation of complex, structured RSV filaments at the host cell plasma membrane.

  4. Self-assembling protein arrays on DNA chips by auto-labeling fusion proteins with a single DNA address

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, M.A.; Litjens, R.H.G.M.

    2006-01-01

    The high-throughput deposition of recombinant proteins on chips, beads or biosensor devices would be greatly facilitated by the implementation of self-assembly concepts. DNA-directed immobilization via conjugation of proteins to an oligonucleotide would be preeminently suited for this purpose. Here,

  5. PNA-induced assembly of fluorescent proteins using DNA as a framework

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Controlled alignment of proteins on molecular frameworks requires the development of facile and orthogonal chemical approaches and molecular scaffolds. In this work, protein−PNA conjugates are brought forward as new chemical components allowing efficient assembly and alignment on DNA scaffolds. Site-selective monomeric teal fluorescent protein (mTFP)−peptide nucleic acid (PNA) (mTFP-PNA) conjugation was achieved by covalent linkage of the PNA to the protein through expressed protein ligation ...

  6. From structure to function : Protein assemblies dissected by mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorenzen, K.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis demonstrates some of the possibilities mass spectrometry can provide to gain new insight into structure and function of protein complexes. While technologies in native mass spectrometry are still under development, it already allows research on complete proteins and protein complexes up

  7. A mitotic phosphorylation feedback network connects Cdk1, Plk1, 53BP1, and Chk2 to inactivate the G(2)/M DNA damage checkpoint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Vugt, Marcel A T M; Gardino, Alexandra K; Linding, Rune;

    2010-01-01

    the DNA damage response. We demonstrate that the non-enzymatic checkpoint adaptor protein 53BP1 is an in vivo target of the cell cycle kinases Cyclin-dependent kinase-1 and Polo-like kinase-1 (Plk1). We show that Plk1 binds 53BP1 during mitosis and that this interaction is required for proper inactivation......DNA damage checkpoints arrest cell cycle progression to facilitate DNA repair. The ability to survive genotoxic insults depends not only on the initiation of cell cycle checkpoints but also on checkpoint maintenance. While activation of DNA damage checkpoints has been studied extensively, molecular...... of the DNA damage checkpoint. 53BP1 mutants that are unable to bind Plk1 fail to restart the cell cycle after ionizing radiation-mediated cell cycle arrest. Importantly, we show that Plk1 also phosphorylates the 53BP1-binding checkpoint kinase Chk2 to inactivate its FHA domain and inhibit its kinase activity...

  8. GRID COMPUTING AND CHECKPOINT APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj gupta

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Grid computing is a means of allocating the computational power of alarge number of computers to complex difficult computation or problem. Grid computing is a distributed computing paradigm thatdiffers from traditional distributed computing in that it is aimed toward large scale systems that even span organizational boundaries. In this paper we investigate the different techniques of fault tolerance which are used in many real time distributed systems. The main focus is on types of fault occurring in the system, fault detection techniques and the recovery techniques used. A fault can occur due to link failure, resource failure or by any other reason is to be tolerated for working the system smoothly and accurately. These faults can be detected and recovered by many techniques used accordingly. An appropriate fault detector can avoid loss due to system crash and reliable fault tolerance technique can save from system failure. This paper provides how these methods are applied to detect and tolerate faults from various Real Time Distributed Systems. The advantages of utilizing the check pointing functionality are obvious; however so far the Grid community has notdeveloped a widely accepted standard that would allow the Gridenvironment to consciously utilize low level check pointing packages.Therefore, such a standard named Grid Check pointing Architecture isbeing designed. The fault tolerance mechanism used here sets the jobcheckpoints based on the resource failure rate. If resource failureoccurs, the job is restarted from its last successful state using acheckpoint file from another grid resource. A critical aspect for anautomatic recovery is the availability of checkpoint files. A strategy to increase the availability of checkpoints is replication. Grid is a form distributed computing mainly to virtualizes and utilize geographically distributed idle resources. A grid is a distributed computational and storage environment often composed of

  9. Co-operative mineralization and protein self-assembly in amelogenesis: silica mineralization and assembly of recombinant amelogenins in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Christabel E; Beniash, Elia; Yamakoshi, Yasuo; Simmer, James P; Margolis, Henry C

    2006-05-01

    An amorphous silica mineralization technique was used to produce inorganic/protein composites to elucidate the structure and mechanism of formation of amelogenin assemblies, which may play an important role in regulating enamel structure during the initial stages of amelogenesis. Full-length recombinant amelogenins from mouse (rM179) and pig (rP172) were investigated along with key degradation products (rM166 and native P148) lacking the hydrophilic C terminus found in parent molecules. The resulting products were examined using transmission electron microscopy and/or small-angle X-ray scattering. Using protein concentrations of 0.1-3 mg ml-1, large monodisperse spheres of remarkably similar mean diameters were observed using rM179 (124+/-4 nm) and rP172 (126+/-7 nm). These spheres also exhibited 'internal structure', comprising nearly spherical monodisperse particles of approximately 20 nm in diameter. In the presence of rM166, P148, and bovine serum albumin (control), large unstructured and randomly shaped particles (250-1000 nm) were observed. Without added protein, large dense spherical particles of silica (mean approximately 500 nm) lacking internal structure were produced. These findings demonstrate that full-length amelogenins have the ability to form higher-order structures, whereas amelogenins that lack the hydrophilic C terminus do not. The results also suggest that full-length amelogenin can guide the formation of organized mineralized structures through co-operative interactions between assembling protein and forming mineral.

  10. Prions and Protein Assemblies that Convey Biological Information in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, David W; Kaufman, Sarah K; Holmes, Brandon B; Diamond, Marc I

    2016-02-03

    Prions derived from the prion protein (PrP) were first characterized as infectious agents that transmit pathology between individuals. However, the majority of cases of neurodegeneration caused by PrP prions occur sporadically. Proteins that self-assemble as cross-beta sheet amyloids are a defining pathological feature of infectious prion disorders and all major age-associated neurodegenerative diseases. In fact, multiple non-infectious proteins exhibit properties of template-driven self-assembly that are strikingly similar to PrP. Evidence suggests that like PrP, many proteins form aggregates that propagate between cells and convert cognate monomer into ordered assemblies. We now recognize that numerous proteins assemble into macromolecular complexes as part of normal physiology, some of which are self-amplifying. This review highlights similarities among infectious and non-infectious neurodegenerative diseases associated with prions, emphasizing the normal and pathogenic roles of higher-order protein assemblies. We propose that studies of the structural and cellular biology of pathological versus physiological aggregates will be mutually informative.

  11. Light-activated control of protein channel assembly mediated by membrane mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David M.; Findlay, Heather E.; Ces, Oscar; Templer, Richard H.; Booth, Paula J.

    2016-12-01

    Photochemical processes provide versatile triggers of chemical reactions. Here, we use a photoactivated lipid switch to modulate the folding and assembly of a protein channel within a model biological membrane. In contrast to the information rich field of water-soluble protein folding, there is only a limited understanding of the assembly of proteins that are integral to biological membranes. It is however possible to exploit the foreboding hydrophobic lipid environment and control membrane protein folding via lipid bilayer mechanics. Mechanical properties such as lipid chain lateral pressure influence the insertion and folding of proteins in membranes, with different stages of folding having contrasting sensitivities to the bilayer properties. Studies to date have relied on altering bilayer properties through lipid compositional changes made at equilibrium, and thus can only be made before or after folding. We show that light-activation of photoisomerisable di-(5-[[4-(4-butylphenyl)azo]phenoxy]pentyl)phosphate (4-Azo-5P) lipids influences the folding and assembly of the pentameric bacterial mechanosensitive channel MscL. The use of a photochemical reaction enables the bilayer properties to be altered during folding, which is unprecedented. This mechanical manipulation during folding, allows for optimisation of different stages of the component insertion, folding and assembly steps within the same lipid system. The photochemical approach offers the potential to control channel assembly when generating synthetic devices that exploit the mechanosensitive protein as a nanovalve.

  12. Parallel dynamics and evolution: Protein conformational fluctuations and assembly reflect evolutionary changes in sequence and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Joseph A; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2014-02-01

    Protein structure is dynamic: the intrinsic flexibility of polypeptides facilitates a range of conformational fluctuations, and individual protein chains can assemble into complexes. Proteins are also dynamic in evolution: significant variations in secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure can be observed among divergent members of a protein family. Recent work has highlighted intriguing similarities between these structural and evolutionary dynamics occurring at various levels. Here we review evidence showing how evolutionary changes in protein sequence and structure are often closely related to local protein flexibility and disorder, large-scale motions and quaternary structure assembly. We suggest that these correspondences can be largely explained by neutral evolution, while deviations between structural and evolutionary dynamics can provide valuable functional insights. Finally, we address future prospects for the field and practical applications that arise from a deeper understanding of the intimate relationship between protein structure, dynamics, function and evolution.

  13. Higher-order assemblies of BAR domain proteins for shaping membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Shiro

    2016-06-01

    Most cellular organelles contain lipid bilayer membranes. The earliest characterization of cellular organelles was performed by electron microscopy observation of such membranes. However, the precise mechanisms for shaping the membrane in particular subcellular organelles is poorly understood. Classically, the overall cellular shape, i.e. the shape of the plasma membrane, was thought to be governed by the reorganization of cytoskeletal components such as actin and microtubules. The plasma membrane contains various submicron structures such as clathrin-coated pits, caveolae, filopodia and lamellipodia. These subcellular structures are either invaginations or protrusions and are associated with the cytoskeleton. Therefore, it could be hypothesized that there are membrane-binding proteins that cooperates with cytoskeleton in shaping of plasma membrane organelles. Proteins with the Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain connect a variety of membrane shapes to actin filaments. The BAR domains themselves bend the membranes by their rigidity and then mold the membranes into tubules through their assembly as spiral polymers, which are thought to be involved in the various submicron structures. Membrane tubulation by polymeric assembly of the BAR domains is supposed to be regulated by binding proteins, binding lipids and the mechanical properties of the membrane. This review gives an overview of BAR protein assembly, describes the significance of the assembly and discusses how to study the assembly in the context of membrane and cellular morphology. The technical problems encountered in microscopic observation of BAR domain assembly are also discussed.

  14. The hepatitis B virus core protein intradimer interface modulates capsid assembly and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selzer, Lisa; Katen, Sarah P; Zlotnick, Adam

    2014-09-02

    During the hepatitis B virus (HBV) life cycle, capsid assembly and disassembly must ensure correct packaging and release of the viral genome. Here we show that changes in the dynamics of the core protein play an important role in regulating these processes. The HBV capsid assembles from 120 copies of the core protein homodimer. Each monomer contains a conserved cysteine at position 61 that can form an intradimer disulfide that we use as a marker for dimer conformational states. We show that dimers in the context of capsids form intradimer disulfides relatively rapidly. Surprisingly, compared to reduced dimers, fully oxidized dimers assembled slower and into capsids that were morphologically similar but less stable. We hypothesize that oxidized protein adopts a geometry (or constellation of geometries) that is unfavorable for capsid assembly, resulting in weaker dimer-dimer interactions as well as slower assembly kinetics. Our results suggest that structural flexibility at the core protein intradimer interface is essential for regulating capsid assembly and stability. We further suggest that capsid destabilization by the C61-C61 disulfide has a regulatory function to support capsid disassembly and release of the viral genome.

  15. Structure of a designed protein cage that self-assembles into a highly porous cube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yen-Ting; Reading, Eamonn; Hura, Greg L.; Tsai, Kuang-Lei; Laganowsky, Arthur; Asturias, Francisco J.; Tainer, John A.; Robinson, Carol V.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2014-12-01

    Natural proteins can be versatile building blocks for multimeric, self-assembling structures. Yet, creating protein-based assemblies with specific geometries and chemical properties remains challenging. Highly porous materials represent particularly interesting targets for designed assembly. Here, we utilize a strategy of fusing two natural protein oligomers using a continuous alpha-helical linker to design a novel protein that self assembles into a 750 kDa, 225 Å diameter, cube-shaped cage with large openings into a 130 Å diameter inner cavity. A crystal structure of the cage showed atomic-level agreement with the designed model, while electron microscopy, native mass spectrometry and small angle X-ray scattering revealed alternative assembly forms in solution. These studies show that accurate design of large porous assemblies with specific shapes is feasible, while further specificity improvements will probably require limiting flexibility to select against alternative forms. These results provide a foundation for the design of advanced materials with applications in bionanotechnology, nanomedicine and material sciences.

  16. The beta-barrel outer membrane protein assembly complex of Neisseria meningitidis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volokhina, E.B.; Beckers, F.; Tommassen, J.; Bos, M.P.

    2009-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved protein Omp85 is required for outer membrane protein (OMP) assembly in gram-negative bacteria and in mitochondria. Its Escherichia coli homolog, designated BamA, functions with four accessory lipoproteins, BamB, BamC, BamD, and BamE, together forming the beta-barrel asse

  17. Bacillus anthracis SlaQ Promotes S-Layer Protein Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen-Mau, Sao-Mai; Oh, So-Young; Schneewind, Daphne I.; Missiakas, Dominique; Schneewind, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis vegetative forms assemble an S-layer comprised of two S-layer proteins, Sap and EA1. A hallmark of S-layer proteins are their C-terminal crystallization domains, which assemble into a crystalline lattice once these polypeptides are deposited on the bacterial surface via association between their N-terminal S-layer homology domains and the secondary cell wall polysaccharide. Here we show that slaQ, encoding a small cytoplasmic protein conserved among pathogenic bacilli elabo...

  18. Trafficking of hepatitis C virus core protein during virus particle assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie A Counihan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV core protein is directed to the surface of lipid droplets (LD, a step that is essential for infectious virus production. However, the process by which core is recruited from LD into nascent virus particles is not well understood. To investigate the kinetics of core trafficking, we developed methods to image functional core protein in live, virus-producing cells. During the peak of virus assembly, core formed polarized caps on large, immotile LDs, adjacent to putative sites of assembly. In addition, LD-independent, motile puncta of core were found to traffic along microtubules. Importantly, core was recruited from LDs into these puncta, and interaction between the viral NS2 and NS3-4A proteins was essential for this recruitment process. These data reveal new aspects of core trafficking and identify a novel role for viral nonstructural proteins in virus particle assembly.

  19. Validate Mitotic Checkpoint and Kinetochore Motor Proteins in Breast Cancer Cells as Targets for the Development of Novel Anti-Mitotic Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    of the Human Kinetochore Protein CENP-E Isabel Garcia-Saez’, Tim Yen 2, Richard H. Wade’ and Frank Kozielskil* ’Laboratoire de Microscopic The human...kinetochore is a highly complex macromolecular structure Electronique Structurale that connects chromosomes to spindle microtubules (MTs) in order to

  20. Overlapped checkpointing with hardware assist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Christopher J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nunez, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Jun [U. OF CENTRAL FLORIDA (UCF)

    2009-01-01

    We present a new approach to handling the demanding I/O workload incurred during checkpoint writes encountered in High Performance Computing. Prior efforts to improve performance have been primarily bound by mechanical limitations of the hard drive. Our research surpasses this limitation by providing a method to: (1) write checkpoint data to a high-speed, non-volatile buffer, and (2) asynchronously write this data to permanent storage while resuming computation. This removes the hard drive from the critical data path because our I/O node based buffers isolate the compute nodes from the storage servers. This solution is feasible because of industry declines in cost for high-capacity, non-volatile storage technologies. Testing was conducted on a small-scale cluster to prove the design, and then scaled at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Results show a definitive speedup factor for select workloads over writing directly to a typical global parallel file system; the Panasas ActiveScale File System.

  1. Protein-DNA computation by stochastic assembly cascade

    CERN Document Server

    Bar-Ziv, Roy; Libchaber, Albert; 10.1073/pnas.162369099

    2010-01-01

    The assembly of RecA on single-stranded DNA is measured and interpreted as a stochastic finite-state machine that is able to discriminate fine differences between sequences, a basic computational operation. RecA filaments efficiently scan DNA sequence through a cascade of random nucleation and disassembly events that is mechanistically similar to the dynamic instability of microtubules. This iterative cascade is a multistage kinetic proofreading process that amplifies minute differences, even a single base change. Our measurements suggest that this stochastic Turing-like machine can compute certain integral transforms.

  2. Conformational Changes in the Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Are Consistent with a Role for Allostery in Virus Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Packianathan, Charles; Katen, Sarah P.; Dann, III, Charles E.; Zlotnick, Adam (Indiana)

    2010-01-12

    In infected cells, virus components must be organized at the right place and time to ensure assembly of infectious virions. From a different perspective, assembly must be prevented until all components are available. Hypothetically, this can be achieved by allosterically controlling assembly. Consistent with this hypothesis, here we show that the structure of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein dimer, which can spontaneously self-assemble, is incompatible with capsid assembly. Systematic differences between core protein dimer and capsid conformations demonstrate linkage between the intradimer interface and interdimer contact surface. These structures also provide explanations for the capsid-dimer selectivity of some antibodies and the activities of assembly effectors. Solution studies suggest that the assembly-inactive state is more accurately an ensemble of conformations. Simulations show that allostery supports controlled assembly and results in capsids that are resistant to dissociation. We propose that allostery, as demonstrated in HBV, is common to most self-assembling viruses.

  3. Mechanism-driven biomarkers to guide immune checkpoint blockade in cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topalian, Suzanne L.; Taube, Janis M.; Anders, Robert A.; Pardoll, Drew M.

    2017-01-01

    With recent approvals for multiple therapeutic antibodies that block cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen 4 (CTLA4) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1) in melanoma, non-small-cell lung cancer and kidney cancer, and additional immune checkpoints being targeted clinically, many questions still remain regarding the optimal use of drugs that block these checkpoint pathways. Defining biomarkers that predict therapeutic effects and adverse events is a crucial mandate, highlighted by recent approvals for two PDL1 diagnostic tests. Here, we discuss biomarkers for anti-PD1 therapy based on immunological, genetic and virological criteria. The unique biology of the CTLA4 immune checkpoint, compared with PD1, requires a different approach to biomarker development. Mechanism-based insights from such studies may guide the design of synergistic treatment combinations based on immune checkpoint blockade. PMID:27079802

  4. Fluorescent Ensemble Based on Bispyrene Fluorophore and Surfactant Assemblies: Sensing and Discriminating Proteins in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Junmei; Ding, Liping; Bo, Yu; Fang, Yu

    2015-10-14

    A particular bispyrene fluorophore (1) with two pyrene moieties covalently linked via a hydrophilic spacer was synthesized. Fluorescence measurements reveal that the fluorescence emission of 1 could be well modulated by a cationic surfactant, dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB). Protein sensing studies illustrate that the selected ensemble based on 1/DTAB assemblies exhibits ratiometric responses to nonmetalloproteins and turn-off responses to metalloproteins, which can be used to differentiate the two types of proteins. Moreover, negatively charged nonmetalloproteins can be discriminated from the positively charged ones according to the difference in ratiometric responses. Fluorescence sensing studies with control bispyrenes indicate that the polarity of the spacer connecting two pyrene moieties plays an important role in locating bispyrene fluorophore in DTAB assemblies, which further influences its sensing behaviors to noncovalent interacting proteins. This study sheds light on the influence of the probe structure on the sensing performance of a fluorescent ensemble based on probe and surfactant assemblies.

  5. Nuclear actin and protein 4.1: Essential interactions during nuclear assembly in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Chen, Cynthia; Penman, Sheldon; Heald, Rebecca

    2003-06-11

    Structural protein 4.1, which has crucial interactions within the spectin-actin lattice of the human red cell membrane skeleton, also is widely distributed at diverse intracellular sites in nucleated cells. We previously showed that 4.1 is essential for assembly of functional nuclei in vitro and that the capacity of 4.1 to bind actin is required. Here we report that 4.1 and actin colocalize in mammalian cell nuclei using fluorescence microscopy and, by higher resolution cell whole mount electron microscopy, are associated on nuclear filaments. We also devised a cell-free assay using Xenopus egg extract containing fluorescent actin to follow actin during nuclear assembly. By directly imaging actin under non-perturbing conditions, the total nuclear actin population is retained and is visualized in situ relative to intact chromatin. We detected actin initially when chromatin and nuclear pores began assembling. As the nuclear lamina assembled, but preceding DNA synthesis, a discrete actin network formed throughout the nucleus. Protein 4.1 epitopes also were detected when actin began to accumulate in nuclei, producing a diffuse coincident pattern. As nuclei matured, actin was detected both coincident with and also independent of 4.1 epitopes. To test whether acquisition of nuclear actin is required for nuclear assembly, the actin inhibitor latrunculin A was added to Xenopus egg extracts during nuclear assembly. Latrunculin A strongly perturbed nuclear assembly and produced distorted nuclear structures containing neither actin nor protein 4.1. Our results suggest that actin as well as 4.1 is necessary for nuclear assembly and that 4.1-actin interactions may be critical.

  6. S-Layer Architectures: Extending the Morphogenetic Potential of S-Layer Protein Self Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    architectures :  Extending  the  morphogenetic  potential  of   S-­‐layer  protein  self...ray  scattering  and   a   fractal  mean  force  concept:  From  protein  structure  to  nano-­‐disc  assemblies  ...  39...developed   a   broad   range   of   nanometer   scale   architectures   based   on   the   self-­‐ assembly   of  

  7. Prediction of phenotypes of missense mutations in human proteins from biological assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qiong; Xu, Qifang; Dunbrack, Roland L

    2013-02-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most frequent variation in the human genome. Nonsynonymous SNPs that lead to missense mutations can be neutral or deleterious, and several computational methods have been presented that predict the phenotype of human missense mutations. These methods use sequence-based and structure-based features in various combinations, relying on different statistical distributions of these features for deleterious and neutral mutations. One structure-based feature that has not been studied significantly is the accessible surface area within biologically relevant oligomeric assemblies. These assemblies are different from the crystallographic asymmetric unit for more than half of X-ray crystal structures. We find that mutations in the core of proteins or in the interfaces in biological assemblies are significantly more likely to be disease-associated than those on the surface of the biological assemblies. For structures with more than one protein in the biological assembly (whether the same sequence or different), we find the accessible surface area from biological assemblies provides a statistically significant improvement in prediction over the accessible surface area of monomers from protein crystal structures (P = 6e-5). When adding this information to sequence-based features such as the difference between wildtype and mutant position-specific profile scores, the improvement from biological assemblies is statistically significant but much smaller (P = 0.018). Combining this information with sequence-based features in a support vector machine leads to 82% accuracy on a balanced dataset of 50% disease-associated mutations from SwissVar and 50% neutral mutations from human/primate sequence differences in orthologous proteins.

  8. Self-Assembly of Protein Monolayers Engineered for Improved Monoclonal Immunoglobulin G Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy H. Lakey

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial outer membrane proteins, along with a filling lipid molecule can be modified to form stable self-assembled monolayers on gold. The transmembrane domain of Escherichia coli outer membrane protein A has been engineered to create a scaffold protein to which functional motifs can be fused. In earlier work we described the assembly and structure of an antibody-binding array where the Z domain of Staphylococcus aureus protein A was fused to the scaffold protein. Whilst the binding of rabbit polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG to the array is very strong, mouse monoclonal IgG dissociates from the array easily. This is a problem since many immunodiagnostic tests rely upon the use of mouse monoclonal antibodies. Here we describe a strategy to develop an antibody-binding array that will bind mouse monoclonal IgG with lowered dissociation from the array. A novel protein consisting of the scaffold protein fused to two pairs of Z domains separated by a long flexible linker was manufactured. Using surface plasmon resonance the self-assembly of the new protein on gold and the improved binding of mouse monoclonal IgG were demonstrated.

  9. Identifying assembly-inhibiting and assembly-tolerant sites in the SbsB S-layer protein from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinns, Helen; Badelt-Lichtblau, Helga; Egelseer, Eva Maria; Sleytr, Uwe B; Howorka, Stefan

    2010-01-29

    Surface layer (S-layer) proteins self-assemble into two-dimensional crystalline lattices that cover the cell wall of all archaea and many bacteria. We have generated assembly-negative protein variants of high solubility that will facilitate high-resolution structure determination. Assembly-negative versions of the S-layer protein SbsB from Geobacillus stearothermophilus PV72/p2 were obtained using an insertion mutagenesis screen. The haemagglutinin epitope tag was inserted at 23 amino acid positions known to be located on the monomer protein surface from a previous cysteine accessibility screen. Limited proteolysis, circular dichroism, and fluorescence were used to probe whether the epitope insertion affected the secondary and tertiary structures of the monomer, while electron microscopy and size-exclusion chromatography were employed to examine proteins' ability to self-assemble. The screen not only identified assembly-compromised mutants with native fold but also yielded correctly folded, self-assembling mutants suitable for displaying epitopes for biomedical and biophysical applications, as well as cryo-electron microscopy imaging. Our study marks an important step in the analysis of the S-layer structure. In addition, the approach of concerted insertion and cysteine mutagenesis can likely be applied for other supramolecular assemblies.

  10. Bottom-up Assembly of Engineered Protein Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-15

    magnetite  templating   peptide ,   CMms6,  was   attached.   Alkyne-­‐functionalized   CMms6  was   attached   to   the   AHA...bearing   proteins   through   a   copper   catalyzed   click   chemistry   reaction   and   monitored  molecular  weight

  11. SERF Protein Is a Direct Modifier of Amyloid Fiber Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fabio Falsone

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The inherent cytotoxicity of aberrantly folded protein aggregates contributes substantially to the pathogenesis of amyloid diseases. It was recently shown that a class of evolutionary conserved proteins, called MOAG-4/SERF, profoundly alter amyloid toxicity via an autonomous but yet unexplained mode. We show that the biological function of human SERF1a originates from its atypical ability to specifically distinguish between amyloid and nonamyloid aggregation. This inherently unstructured protein directly affected the aggregation kinetics of a broad range of amyloidogenic proteins in vitro, while being inactive against nonamyloid aggregation. A representative biophysical analysis of the SERF1a:α-synuclein (aSyn complex revealed that the amyloid-promoting activity resulted from an early and transient interaction, which was sufficient to provoke a massive increase of soluble aSyn amyloid nucleation templates. Therefore, the autonomous amyloid-modifying activity of SERF1a observed in living organisms relies on a direct and dedicated manipulation of the early stages in the amyloid aggregation pathway.

  12. Ral A, via activating the mitotic checkpoint, sensitizes cells lacking a functional Nf1 to apoptosis in the absence of protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathy, Suthakar; Fagman, Johan B; Shen, Ling; Yu, Tianqi; Zhou, Xiaodong; Dai, Wei; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Chen, Changyan

    2016-12-20

    Nf1 mutations or deletions are suggested to underlie the tumor predisposition of NF1 (neurofibromatosis type 1) and few treatments are available for treating NF1 patients with advanced malignant tumors. Aberrant activation of Ras in Nf1-deficient conditions is responsible for the promotion of tumorigenesis in NF1. PKC is proven to be an important factor in supporting the viability of Nf1-defected cells, but the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrate that the inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) by 1-O-Hexadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycerol (HMG, a PKC inhibitor) preferentially sensitizes Nf1-defected cells to apoptosis, via triggering a persistent mitotic arrest. In this process, Ral A is activated. Subsequently, Chk1 is phosphorylated and translocated to the nucleus. Silencing Ral A significantly blocks Chk1 nuclear translocation and releases HMG-treated Nf1-deficient cells from mitotic arrest, resulting in the reduction of the magnitude of apoptosis. Thus, our study reveals that PKC is able to maintain the homeostasis or viability of Nf1-defected cells and may serve as a potential target for developing new therapeutic strategies.

  13. Engineering the assembly of heme cofactors in man-made proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Lee A; Kodali, Goutham; Moser, Christopher C; Dutton, P Leslie

    2014-02-26

    Timely ligation of one or more chemical cofactors at preselected locations in proteins is a critical preamble for catalysis in many natural enzymes, including the oxidoreductases and allied transport and signaling proteins. Likewise, ligation strategies must be directly addressed when designing oxidoreductase and molecular transport functions in man-made, first-principle protein constructs intended to operate in vitro or in vivo. As one of the most common catalytic cofactors in biology, we have chosen heme B, along with its chemical analogues, to determine the kinetics and barriers to cofactor incorporation and bishistidine ligation in a range of 4-α-helix proteins. We compare five elementary synthetic designs (maquettes) and the natural cytochrome b562 that differ in oligomeric forms, apo- and holo-tertiary structural stability; qualities that we show can either assist or hinder assembly. The cofactor itself also imposes an assembly barrier if amphiphilicity ranges toward too hydrophobic or hydrophilic. With progressive removal of identified barriers, we achieve maquette assembly rates as fast as native cytochrome b562, paving the way to in vivo assembly of man-made hemoprotein maquettes and integration of artificial proteins into enzymatic pathways.

  14. Titantium Dioxide Nanoparticles Assembled by DNA Molecules Hybridization and Loading of DNA Interacting Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Aiguo; Paunesku, Tatjana; Brown, Eric M B; Babbo, Angela; Cruz, Cecille; Aslam, Mohamed; Dravid, Vinayak; Woloschak, Gayle E

    2008-02-01

    This work demonstrates the assembly of TiO(2) nanoparticles with attached DNA oligonucleotides into a 3D mesh structure by allowing base pairing between oligonucleotides. A change of the ratio of DNA oligonucleotide molecules and TiO(2) nanoparticles regulates the size of the mesh as characterized by UV-visible light spectra, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images. This type of 3D mesh, based on TiO(2)-DNA oligonucleotide nanoconjugates, can be used for studies of nanoparticle assemblies in material science, energy science related to dye-sensitized solar cells, environmental science as well as characterization of DNA interacting proteins in the field of molecular biology. As an example of one such assembly, proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein (PCNA) was cloned, its activity verified, and the protein was purified, loaded onto double strand DNA oligonucleotide-TiO(2) nanoconjugates, and imaged by atomic force microscopy. This type of approach may be used to sample and perhaps quantify and/or extract specific cellular proteins from complex cellular protein mixtures affinity based on their affinity for chosen DNA segments assembled into the 3D matrix.

  15. The effect of zinc on amyloid β-protein assembly and toxicity: A mechanistic investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonov, Inna; Sagi, Irit

    2014-10-01

    Neurotoxic assemblies of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) are widely believed to be the cause for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, understanding the factors and mechanisms that control, modulate, and inhibit formation of these assemblies is crucial for the development of therapeutic intervention of AD. This information also can contribute significantly to our understanding of the mechanisms of other amyloidosis diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, type 2 diabetes, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease) and prion diseases (e.g. Mad Cow disease). We have developed a multidisciplinary experimental strategy to study structural and dynamic mechanistic aspects that underlie the Aβ assembly process. Utilizing this strategy, we explored the molecular basis leading to the perturbation of the Aβ assembly process by divalent metal ions, mainly Zn2+ ions. Using Zn2+ as reaction physiological relevant probes, it was demonstrated that Zn2+ rapidly (milliseconds) induce self-assembly of Aβ aggregates and stabilize them in a manner that prevents formation of Aβ fibrils. Importantly, the early-formed intermediates are substantially more neurotoxic than fibrils. Our results suggest that relevant Aβ modulators should be targeted against the rapidly evolved intermediate states of Aβ assembly. The design of such modulators is challenging, as they have to compete with different natural mediators (such as Zn2+) of Aβ aggregation, which diverse Aβ assemblies in both specific and nonspecific manners.

  16. Genetic polymorphisms of immune checkpoint proteins PD-1 and TIM-3 are associated with survival of patients with hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhu; Li, Na; Li, Fang; Zhou, Zhihua; Sang, Jiao; Jin, Zhao; Liu, Huihui; Han, Qunying; Lv, Yi; Liu, Zhengwen

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) and T-cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain containing molecule 3 (TIM-3) are involved in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study examined the associations of PD1 and TIM3 polymorphisms with the overall survival (OS) of a prospective cohort of 258 HBV-related HCC patients. Results showed that PD1 +8669 G allele-containing genotypes or TIM3 −1516 genotype GG were significantly associated with longer OS (P < 0.001 and P = 0.001, respectively). In multivariate analysis, PD1 +8669 G allele-containing genotypes and TIM3 −1516 genotype GG were independently associated with longer OS (hazard ratio (HR), 1.835; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.342–2.509; P < 0.001 and HR, 2.070; 95%CI, 1.428–3.002; P < 0.001, respectively). PD1 +8669 G allele-containing genotypes were significantly associated with longer OS in patients receiving surgical (resection or radiofrequency) treatment, transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) or supportive and symptomatic treatment. TIM3 −1516 genotype GG was significantly associated with longer OS in TACE patients. In multivariate analysis, PD1 +8669 G allele-containing genotypes were independently associated with longer OS in each treatment population. TIM3 −1516 genotype GG was independently associated with longer OS in patients receiving surgical treatment or TACE. These findings suggest that PD1 +8669 A/G and TIM3 −1516 G/T polymorphisms may affect the prognosis of HBV-related HCC and may be new predictors of prognosis for HCC patients. PMID:27034168

  17. Multiscale Polar Theory of Microtubule and Motor-Protein Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tong; Blackwell, Robert; Glaser, Matthew A.; Betterton, M. D.; Shelley, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules and motor proteins are building blocks of self-organized subcellular biological structures such as the mitotic spindle and the centrosomal microtubule array. These same ingredients can form new “bioactive” liquid-crystalline fluids that are intrinsically out of equilibrium and which display complex flows and defect dynamics. It is not yet well understood how microscopic activity, which involves polarity-dependent interactions between motor proteins and microtubules, yields such larger-scale dynamical structures. In our multiscale theory, Brownian dynamics simulations of polar microtubule ensembles driven by cross-linking motors allow us to study microscopic organization and stresses. Polarity sorting and cross-link relaxation emerge as two polar-specific sources of active destabilizing stress. On larger length scales, our continuum Doi-Onsager theory captures the hydrodynamic flows generated by polarity-dependent active stresses. The results connect local polar structure to flow structures and defect dynamics. PMID:25679909

  18. Self-assembled bionanostructures: proteins following the lead of DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradišar, Helena; Jerala, Roman

    2014-02-03

    Natural polymers are able to self-assemble into versatile nanostructures based on the information encoded into their primary structure. The structural richness of biopolymer-based nanostructures depends on the information content of building blocks and the available biological machinery to assemble and decode polymers with a defined sequence. Natural polypeptides comprise 20 amino acids with very different properties in comparison to only 4 structurally similar nucleotides, building elements of nucleic acids. Nevertheless the ease of synthesizing polynucleotides with selected sequence and the ability to encode the nanostructural assembly based on the two specific nucleotide pairs underlay the development of techniques to self-assemble almost any selected three-dimensional nanostructure from polynucleotides. Despite more complex design rules, peptides were successfully used to assemble symmetric nanostructures, such as fibrils and spheres. While earlier designed protein-based nanostructures used linked natural oligomerizing domains, recent design of new oligomerizing interaction surfaces and introduction of the platform for topologically designed protein fold may enable polypeptide-based design to follow the track of DNA nanostructures. The advantages of protein-based nanostructures, such as the functional versatility and cost effective and sustainable production methods provide strong incentive for further development in this direction.

  19. Protein-responsive assemblies from catechol-metal ion supramolecular coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, C; Chen, J; Yu, S; Chang, Y; Mao, J; Xu, Y; Luo, W; Zeng, B; Dai, L

    2015-03-21

    Supramolecular self-assembly driven by catechol-metal ion coordination has gained great success in the fabrication of functional materials including adhesives, capsules, coatings and hydrogels. However, this route has encountered a great challenge in the construction of nanoarchitectures in the absence of removable templates, because of the uncontrollable crosslinking of catechol-metal ion coordination. Herein, we show that a supramolecular approach, combining both catechol-metal ion coordination and polymer self-assembly together, can organize polymers into hybrid nanoassemblies ranging from solid particles, homogeneous vesicles to Janus vesicles. Without the introduction of a specific binding ligand or complicated molecular design, these assemblies can totally disassemble in response to proteins. UV/vis absorption, fluorescence quenching and recovery investigations have confirmed that proteins can seize metal ions from the hybrid nanoassemblies, thus causing the degradation of catechol-metal ion coordination networks.

  20. Lamellipodin promotes actin assembly by clustering Ena/VASP proteins and tethering them to actin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott D; Mullins, R Dyche

    2015-01-01

    Enabled/Vasodilator (Ena/VASP) proteins promote actin filament assembly at multiple locations, including: leading edge membranes, focal adhesions, and the surface of intracellular pathogens. One important Ena/VASP regulator is the mig-10/Lamellipodin/RIAM family of adaptors that promote lamellipod formation in fibroblasts and drive neurite outgrowth and axon guidance in neurons. To better understand how MRL proteins promote actin network formation we studied the interactions between Lamellipodin (Lpd), actin, and VASP, both in vivo and in vitro. We find that Lpd binds directly to actin filaments and that this interaction regulates its subcellular localization and enhances its effect on VASP polymerase activity. We propose that Lpd delivers Ena/VASP proteins to growing barbed ends and increases their polymerase activity by tethering them to filaments. This interaction represents one more pathway by which growing actin filaments produce positive feedback to control localization and activity of proteins that regulate their assembly.

  1. Reconstitution of a nanomachine driving the assembly of proteins into bacterial outer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hsin-Hui; Belousoff, Matthew J.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Lu, Jingxiong; Holt, Stephen A.; Tan, Khershing; Selkrig, Joel; Webb, Chaille T.; Buchanan, Susan K.; Martin, Lisandra L.; Lithgow, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    In biological membranes, various protein secretion devices function as nanomachines, and measuring the internal movements of their component parts is a major technological challenge. The translocation assembly module (the TAM) is a nanomachine required for virulence of bacterial pathogens. We have reconstituted a membrane containing the TAM onto a gold surface for characterization by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) and Magnetic Contrast Neutron Reflectrometry (MCNR). The MCNR studies provided structural resolution down to 1Å, enabling accurate measurement of protein domains projecting from the membrane layer. Here, we show that dynamic movements within the TamA component of the TAM are initiated in the presence of a substrate protein, Ag43, and that these movements recapitulate an initial stage in membrane protein assembly. The reconstituted system provides a powerful new means to study molecular movements in biological membranes, and the technology is widely applicable to studying the dynamics of diverse cellular nanomachines. PMID:25341963

  2. Negative regulation of active zone assembly by a newly identified SR protein kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ervin L Johnson

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Presynaptic, electron-dense, cytoplasmic protrusions such as the T-bar (Drosophila or ribbon (vertebrates are believed to facilitate vesicle movement to the active zone (AZ of synapses throughout the nervous system. The molecular composition of these structures including the T-bar and ribbon are largely unknown, as are the mechanisms that specify their synapse-specific assembly and distribution. In a large-scale, forward genetic screen, we have identified a mutation termed air traffic controller (atc that causes T-bar-like protein aggregates to form abnormally in motoneuron axons. This mutation disrupts a gene that encodes for a serine-arginine protein kinase (SRPK79D. This mutant phenotype is specific to SRPK79D and is not secondary to impaired kinesin-dependent axonal transport. The srpk79D gene is neuronally expressed, and transgenic rescue experiments are consistent with SRPK79D kinase activity being necessary in neurons. The SRPK79D protein colocalizes with the T-bar-associated protein Bruchpilot (Brp in both the axon and synapse. We propose that SRPK79D is a novel T-bar-associated protein kinase that represses T-bar assembly in peripheral axons, and that SRPK79D-dependent repression must be relieved to facilitate site-specific AZ assembly. Consistent with this model, overexpression of SRPK79D disrupts AZ-specific Brp organization and significantly impairs presynaptic neurotransmitter release. These data identify a novel AZ-associated protein kinase and reveal a new mechanism of negative regulation involved in AZ assembly. This mechanism could contribute to the speed and specificity with which AZs are assembled throughout the nervous system.

  3. Physical modeling of geometrically confined disordered protein assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, David

    2015-08-01

    The transport of cargo across the nuclear membrane is highly selective and accomplished by a poorly understood mechanism involving hundreds of nucleoporins lining the inside of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Currently, there is no clear picture of the overall structure formed by this collection of proteins within the pore, primarily due to their disordered nature and uncertainty regarding the properties of individual nucleoporins. We first study the defining characteristics of the amino acid sequences of nucleoporins through bioinformatics techniques, although bioinformatics of disordered proteins is especially challenging given high mutation rates for homologous proteins and that functionality may not be strongly related to sequence. Here we have performed a novel bioinformatic analysis, based on the spatial clustering of physically relevant features such as binding motifs and charges within disordered proteins, on thousands of FG motif containing nucleoporins (FG nups). The biophysical mechanism by which the critical FG nups regulate nucleocytoplasmic transport has remained elusive, yet our analysis revealed a set of highly conserved spatial features in the sequence structure of individual FG nups, such as the separation, localization, and ordering of FG motifs and charged residues along the protein chain. These sequence features are likely conserved due to a common functionality between species regarding how FG nups functionally regulate traffic, therefore these results constrain current models and eliminate proposed biophysical mechanisms responsible for regulation of nucleocytoplasmic traffic in the NPC which would not result in such a conserved amino acid sequence structure. Additionally, this method allows us to identify potentially functionally analogous disordered proteins across distantly related species. To understand the physical implications of the sequence features on structure and dynamics of the nucleoporins, we performed coarse-grained simulations

  4. Enhanced protein digestion through the confinement of nanozeolite-assembled microchip reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ji; Zhang, Yahong; Zhou, Xiaoqin; Kong, Jilie; Tang, Yi; Liu, Baohong

    2008-04-01

    An on-chip microreactor was proposed toward the acceleration of protein digestion through the construction of a nanozeolite-assembled network. The nanozeolite microstructure was assembled using a layer-by-layer technique based on poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) and zeolite nanocrystals. The adsorption of trypsin in the nanozeolite network was theoretically studied based on the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. It was found that the controlled trypsin-containing nanozeolite networks assembled within a microchannel could act as a stationary phase with a large surface-to-volume ratio for the highly efficient proteolysis of both proteins at low levels and with complex extracts. The maximum proteolytic rate of the adsorbed trypsin was measured to be 350 mM min-1 microg-1, much faster than that in solution. Moreover, due the large surface-to-volume ratio and biocompatible microenvironment provided by the nanozeolite-assembled films as well as the microfluidic confinement effect, the low-level proteins down to 16 fmol per analysis were confidently identified using the as-prepared microreactor within a very short residence time coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The on-chip approach was further demonstrated in the identification of the complex extracts from mouse macrophages integrated with two-dimensional liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. This microchip reactor is promising for the development of a facile means for protein identification.

  5. A Structural analysis of M protein in coronavirus assembly and morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    W. Neuman, Benjamin; Kiss, Gabriella; H. Kunding, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The M protein of coronavirus plays a central role in virus assembly, turning cellular membranes into workshops where virus and host factors come together to make new virus particles. We investigated how M structure and organization is related to virus shape and size using cryo-electron microscopy...

  6. Molecular design, self-assembly, and material properties of silk-like protein polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beun, L.H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary In this thesis we present the design and characterization of bio-inspired hybrid protein polymers. All polymers are composed of two distinct types of building blocks. The first type is a silk-inspired block that is pH-responsive and can fold and self-assemble into highly ordered structures.

  7. REVIEW OF CHECKPOINTING ALGORITHMS IN DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Gahlan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Checkpointing is the process of saving the status information. Checkpoint is defined as a designated place in a program at which normal processing is interrupted specifically to preserve the status information necessary to allow resumption of processing at a later time. Mobile computing raises many new issues such as lack of stablestorage, low bandwidth of wireless channel, high mobility, and limited battery life. Coordinated checkpointing is an attractive approach for transparently adding fault tolerance to distributed applications since it avoids domino effects and minimizes the stable storage requirement. This paper presents the review of the algorithms,which have been reported in the literature for checkpointing. This paper also covers backward error recovery techniques for distributed systems specially the distributed mobile systems.

  8. The DEAD box protein Mrh4 functions in the assembly of the mitochondrial large ribosomal subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Dasmanthie; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni

    2013-11-01

    Proteins in a cell are universally synthesized by ribosomes. Mitochondria contain their own ribosomes, which specialize in the synthesis of a handful of proteins required for oxidative phosphorylation. The pathway of mitoribosomal biogenesis and factors involved are poorly characterized. An example is the DEAD box proteins, widely known to participate in the biogenesis of bacterial and cytoplasmic eukaryotic ribosomes as either RNA helicases or RNA chaperones, whose mitochondrial counterparts remain completely unknown. Here, we have identified the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial DEAD box protein Mrh4 as essential for large mitoribosome subunit biogenesis. Mrh4 interacts with the 21S rRNA, mitoribosome subassemblies, and fully assembled mitoribosomes. In the absence of Mrh4, the 21S rRNA is matured and forms part of a large on-pathway assembly intermediate missing proteins Mrpl16 and Mrpl39. We conclude that Mrh4 plays an essential role during the late stages of mitoribosome assembly by promoting remodeling of the 21S rRNA-protein interactions.

  9. Self-assembling of amyloid-like proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sales, E.M.; Barbosa, L.R.S.; Itri, R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil); Damalio, J.C.P.; Araujo, A.P.U. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP-SC), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Spinozzi, F.; Mariani, P. [Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Septins are proteins from the GTP-binding family and participate in cell division cycle performing functions such as secretion and cytoskeletal division. They can also be found in neurodegenerative conditions as Alzheimers and Parkinson's diseases, forming highly organized fiber-like aggregates known as amyloids. In this work, we used small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) to investigate the formation and time evolution of septins aggregates under the influence of temperature and concentration. The SAXS measurements were performed with the GTPase domain of human Septin 2 (SEPT2G) at 0.5 and 1 mg/mL and temperatures between 4 and 45 deg C. At 0.5 mg/mL and 4 deg C, the protein self-aggregates as a dimer, being stable over one hour of observation. When the temperature was increased to 15 deg C, the results demonstrate that cylinder-like aggregates are formed and coexist with some dimer population and a small amount of larger aggregates. However, the number of very large aggregates increases with time concomitantly with the decrease of cylinder amount in the solution. At 37 deg C cylinder-like aggregates are not longer present in solution, whereas a significant amount of dimers decreases from 50% to 20% in less than 1 hour. At 45 deg C such an effect is even more accentuated: the percentage of dimers is only 6% in solution into a favor of 94% of very larger aggregates. When we analyze the protein at 1 mg/mL, at 4 deg C cylinder-like aggregates (36 nm-long and 12 nm-cross section) are already formed, coexisting with dimers and, as occurred for lower concentration, the two populations remained unchanged over one hour of observation. Out results also indicate that the dimensions of these cylinders increase with the concentration and the percentage of cylinders and larger aggregates are higher than those found for 0.5 mg/mL. In conclusion, our results showed the coexistence of dimers of SEPT2G with small fibers and larger aggregates in solution that evolve

  10. Emerging role of checkpoint blockade therapy in lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanina, Natalie; Kline, Justin; Bishop, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    Following the successful application of immune checkpoint blockade therapy (CBT) in refractory solid tumors, it has recently gained momentum as a promising modality in the treatment of relapsed lymphoma. This significant therapeutic advance stems from decades of research that elucidated the role of immune regulation pathways and the mechanisms by which tumors can engage these critical pathways to escape immune detection. To date, two main pathways, the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 (PD-1), have emerged as key targets of CBT demonstrating unprecedented activity particularly in heavily pretreated relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma and some forms of non-Hodgkin disease. Herein we provide a brief discussion of checkpoint blockade in the context of lymphoma biology with a specific focus on novel checkpoint inhibitors and their therapeutic activity. We discuss current clinical trials and the landscape of CBT to underscore both the remarkable progress and foreseeable limitations of this novel treatment strategy. In particular, we build upon state-of-the-art knowledge and clinical insights gained from the early trials to review potential approaches to how CBT may be integrated with other treatment modalities, including chemoimmunotherapy to improve patient outcomes in the future. Finally, as the role of CBT evolves to potentially become a cornerstone of therapy in refractory/relapsed lymphoma, we briefly emphasize the importance of predictive biomarkers in an effort to select appropriate patients who are most likely to derive benefit from CBT. PMID:28203344

  11. Self-assembly of a filament by curvature-inducing proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiecinski, James; Chapman, S. Jonathan; Goriely, Alain

    2017-04-01

    We explore a simplified macroscopic model of membrane shaping by means of curvature-sensing BAR proteins. Equations describing the interplay between the shape of a freely floating filament in a fluid and the adhesion kinetics of proteins are derived from mechanical principles. The constant curvature solutions that arise from this system are studied using weakly nonlinear analysis. We show that the stability of the filament's shape is completely characterized by the parameters associated with protein recruitment and establish that in the bistable regime, proteins aggregate on the filament forming regions of high and low curvatures. This pattern formation is then followed by phase-coarsening that resolves on a time-scale dependent on protein diffusion and drift across the filament, which contend to smooth and maintain the pattern respectively. The model is generalized for multiple species of BAR proteins and we show that the stability of the assembled shape is determined by a competition between proteins attaching on opposing sides.

  12. Peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates as nanoscale building blocks for assembly of an artificial three-helix protein mimic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Chenguang; Martos-Maldonado, Manuel C.; Madsen, Charlotte Stahl;

    2016-01-01

    formation have never been realized for de novo protein design. Here, we show the applicability of peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates for self-assembly of higher-ordered protein-like structures. The resulting nano-assemblies were characterized by ultraviolet-melting, gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism...

  13. Skp2 is required for Aurora B activation in cell mitosis and spindle checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juan; Huang, Yu-Fan; Zhou, Xin-Ke; Zhang, Wei; Lian, Yi-Fan; Lv, Xiao-Bin; Gao, Xiu-Rong; Lin, Hui-Kuan; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Huang, Jian-Qing

    2015-01-01

    The Aurora B kinase plays a critical role in cell mitosis and spindle checkpoint. Here, we showed that the ubiquitin E3-ligase protein Skp2, also as a cell-cycle regulatory protein, was required for the activation of Aurora B and its downstream protein. When we restored Skp2 knockdown Hela cells with Skp2 and Skp2-LRR E3 ligase dead mutant we found that Skp2 could rescue the defect in the activation of Aurora B, but the mutant failed to do so. Furthermore, we discovered that Skp2 could interact with Aurora B and trigger Aurora B Lysine (K) 63-linked ubiquitination. Finally, we demonstrated the essential role of Skp2 in cell mitosis progression and spindle checkpoint, which was Aurora B dependent. Our results identified a novel ubiquitinated substrate of Skp2, and also indicated that Aurora B ubiquitination might serve as an important event for Aurora B activation in cell mitosis and spindle checkpoint.

  14. Reactive oxygen species promote heat shock protein 90-mediated HBV capsid assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoon Sik, E-mail: yumshak@naver.com; Seo, Hyun Wook, E-mail: suruk@naver.com; Jung, Guhung, E-mail: drjung@snu.ac.kr

    2015-02-13

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and has been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). ROS are also an important factor in HCC because the accumulated ROS leads to abnormal cell proliferation and chromosome mutation. In oxidative stress, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and glutathione (GSH) function as part of the defense mechanism. Hsp90 prevents cellular component from oxidative stress, and GSH acts as antioxidants scavenging ROS in the cell. However, it is not known whether molecules regulated by oxidative stress are involved in HBV capsid assembly. Based on the previous study that Hsp90 facilitates HBV capsid assembly, which is an important step for the packing of viral particles, here, we show that ROS enrich Hsp90-driven HBV capsid formation. In cell-free system, HBV capsid assembly was facilitated by ROS with Hsp90, whereas it was decreased without Hsp90. In addition, GSH inhibited the function of Hsp90 to decrease HBV capsid assembly. Consistent with the result of cell-free system, ROS and buthionine sulfoximine (BS), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis, increased HBV capsid formation in HepG2.2.15 cells. Thus, our study uncovers the interplay between ROS and Hsp90 during HBV capsid assembly. - Highlights: • We examined H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH modulate HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} facilitates HBV capsid assembly in the presence of Hsp90. • GSH inhibits function of Hsp90 in facilitating HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH induce conformation change of Hsp90.

  15. Protein trafficking at the crossroads to mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, Michal; Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are central power stations in the cell, which additionally serve as metabolic hubs for a plethora of anabolic and catabolic processes. The sustained function of mitochondria requires the precisely controlled biogenesis and expression coordination of proteins that originate from the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Accuracy of targeting, transport and assembly of mitochondrial proteins is also needed to avoid deleterious effects on protein homeostasis in the cell. Checkpoints of mitochondrial protein transport can serve as signals that provide information about the functional status of the organelles. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of mitochondrial protein transport and discuss examples that involve communication with the nucleus and cytosol.

  16. Protein Structure Determination by Assembling Super-Secondary Structure Motifs Using Pseudocontact Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilla, Kala Bharath; Otting, Gottfried; Huber, Thomas

    2017-03-07

    Computational and nuclear magnetic resonance hybrid approaches provide efficient tools for 3D structure determination of small proteins, but currently available algorithms struggle to perform with larger proteins. Here we demonstrate a new computational algorithm that assembles the 3D structure of a protein from its constituent super-secondary structural motifs (Smotifs) with the help of pseudocontact shift (PCS) restraints for backbone amide protons, where the PCSs are produced from different metal centers. The algorithm, DINGO-PCS (3D assembly of Individual Smotifs to Near-native Geometry as Orchestrated by PCSs), employs the PCSs to recognize, orient, and assemble the constituent Smotifs of the target protein without any other experimental data or computational force fields. Using a universal Smotif database, the DINGO-PCS algorithm exhaustively enumerates any given Smotif. We benchmarked the program against ten different protein targets ranging from 100 to 220 residues with different topologies. For nine of these targets, the method was able to identify near-native Smotifs.

  17. Nucleation of apatite crystals in vitro by self-assembled dentin matrix protein 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Gen; Dahl, Tom; Veis, Arthur; George, Anne

    2003-08-01

    Bones and teeth are biocomposites that require controlled mineral deposition during their self-assembly to form tissues with unique mechanical properties. Acidic extracellular matrix proteins play a pivotal role during biomineral formation. However, the mechanisms of protein-mediated mineral initiation are far from understood. Here we report that dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1), an acidic protein, can nucleate the formation of hydroxyapatite in vitro in a multistep process that begins by DMP1 binding calcium ions and initiating mineral deposition. The nucleated amorphous calcium phosphate precipitates ripen and nanocrystals form. Subsequently, these expand and coalesce into microscale crystals elongated in the c-axis direction. Characterization of the functional domains in DMP1 demonstrated that intermolecular assembly of acidic clusters into a β-sheet template was essential for the observed mineral nucleation. Protein-mediated initiation of nanocrystals, as discussed here, might provide a new methodology for constructing nanoscale composites by self-assembly of polypeptides with tailor-made peptide sequences.

  18. The Survival of Motor Neuron Protein Acts as a Molecular Chaperone for mRNP Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul G. Donlin-Asp

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a motor neuron disease caused by reduced levels of the survival of motor neuron (SMN protein. SMN is part of a multiprotein complex that facilitates the assembly of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs. SMN has also been found to associate with mRNA-binding proteins, but the nature of this association was unknown. Here, we have employed a combination of biochemical and advanced imaging methods to demonstrate that SMN promotes the molecular interaction between IMP1 protein and the 3′ UTR zipcode region of β-actin mRNA, leading to assembly of messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP complexes that associate with the cytoskeleton to facilitate trafficking. We have identified defects in mRNP assembly in cells and tissues from SMA disease models and patients that depend on the SMN Tudor domain and explain the observed deficiency in mRNA localization and local translation, providing insight into SMA pathogenesis as a ribonucleoprotein (RNP-assembly disorder.

  19. Structural basis for self-assembly of a cytolytic pore lined by protein and lipid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Koji; Caaveiro, Jose M. M.; Morante, Koldo; González-Mañas, Juan Manuel; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-02-01

    Pore-forming toxins (PFT) are water-soluble proteins that possess the remarkable ability to self-assemble on the membrane of target cells, where they form pores causing cell damage. Here, we elucidate the mechanism of action of the haemolytic protein fragaceatoxin C (FraC), a α-barrel PFT, by determining the crystal structures of FraC at four different stages of the lytic mechanism, namely the water-soluble state, the monomeric lipid-bound form, an assembly intermediate and the fully assembled transmembrane pore. The structure of the transmembrane pore exhibits a unique architecture composed of both protein and lipids, with some of the lipids lining the pore wall, acting as assembly cofactors. The pore also exhibits lateral fenestrations that expose the hydrophobic core of the membrane to the aqueous environment. The incorporation of lipids from the target membrane within the structure of the pore provides a membrane-specific trigger for the activation of a haemolytic toxin.

  20. Tpr directly binds to Mad1 and Mad2 and is important for the Mad1-Mad2-mediated mitotic spindle checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Hyun; Sterling, Harry; Burlingame, Alma; McCormick, Frank

    2008-11-01

    The mitotic arrest-deficient protein Mad1 forms a complex with Mad2, which is required for imposing mitotic arrest on cells in which the spindle assembly is perturbed. By mass spectrometry of affinity-purified Mad2-associated factors, we identified the translocated promoter region (Tpr), a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), as a novel Mad2-interacting protein. Tpr directly binds to Mad1 and Mad2. Depletion of Tpr in HeLa cells disrupts the NPC localization of Mad1 and Mad2 during interphase and decreases the levels of Mad1-bound Mad2. Furthermore, depletion of Tpr decreases the levels of Mad1 at kinetochores during prometaphase, correlating with the inability of Mad1 to activate Mad2, which is required for inhibiting APC(Cdc20). These findings reveal an important role for Tpr in which Mad1-Mad2 proteins are regulated during the cell cycle and mitotic spindle checkpoint signaling.

  1. Active protein aggregates induced by terminally attached self-assembling peptide ELK16 in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Bihong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, it has been gradually realized that bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs could be biologically active. In particular, several proteins including green fluorescent protein, β-galactosidase, β-lactamase, alkaline phosphatase, D-amino acid oxidase, polyphosphate kinase 3, maltodextrin phosphorylase, and sialic acid aldolase have been successfully produced as active IBs when fused to an appropriate partner such as the foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid protein VP1, or the human β-amyloid peptide Aβ42(F19D. As active IBs may have many attractive advantages in enzyme production and industrial applications, it is of considerable interest to explore them further. Results In this paper, we report that an ionic self-assembling peptide ELK16 (LELELKLK2 was able to effectively induce the formation of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli (E. coli when attached to the carboxyl termini of four model proteins including lipase A, amadoriase II, β-xylosidase, and green fluorescent protein. These aggregates had a general appearance similar to the usually reported cytoplasmic inclusion bodies (IBs under transmission electron microscopy or fluorescence confocal microscopy. Except for lipase A-ELK16 fusion, the three other fusion protein aggregates retained comparable specific activities with the native counterparts. Conformational analyses by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the existence of newly formed antiparallel beta-sheet structures in these ELK16 peptide-induced inclusion bodies, which is consistent with the reported assembly of the ELK16 peptide. Conclusions This has been the first report where a terminally attached self-assembling β peptide ELK16 can promote the formation of active inclusion bodies or active protein aggregates in E. coli. It has the potential to render E. coli and other recombinant hosts more efficient as microbial cell factories for protein production. Our observation might

  2. Engineered Bacterial Metal-binding Proteins for Nanoscale Self-assembly and heavy Metal Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall Sedlak, Ruth Amanda

    Implementing biological principles in material synthesis and assembly is one way to expand our abilities to efficiently assemble nanoscale materials and devices. Specifically, recent advances in identifying peptides that bind inorganic materials with high affinity and specificity has spurred investigation of protein models for nanoscale inorganic assembly. This dissertation presents the results of my studies of several E. coli proteins engineered to bind inorganic materials through simple peptide motifs. I demonstrate that these proteins modulate the self-assembly of DNA-based nanostructures and can introduce heavy metal tolerance into metal-sensitive bacteria. Chapter 2 explores use of the engineered F plasmid DNA relaxase/helicase TraI for the self-assembly of complex DNA-protein-gold nanostructures. The full-length protein is engineered with a gold binding motif at an internal permissive site (TraI369GBP1-7x), while a truncated version of TraI is engineered with the same gold binding motif at the C-terminus (TraI361GBP1-7x). Both constructs bind gold nanoparticles while maintaining their DNA binding activity, and transmission electron microscopy reveals TraI369GBP1-7x utilizes its non-specific DNA binding activity to decorate single-stranded and double-stranded DNA with gold nanoparticles. The self assembly principles demonstrated in this work will be fundamental to constructing higher ordered hybrid nanostructures through DNA-protein-nanoparticle interactions. Chapter 3 studies the effects of expressing inorganic binding peptides within cells. I identified a silver binding peptide that, when fused to the periplasmic maltose binding protein, protects E. coli from silver toxicity in batch culture and reduces silver ions to silver nanoparticles within the bacterial periplasm. Engineered metal-ion tolerant microorganisms such as this E. coli could potentially be used in applications ranging from remediation to interrogation of biomolecule-metal interactions in vivo

  3. Monitoring the spatiotemporal dynamics of proteins at replication forks and in assembled chromatin using isolation of proteins on nascent DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirbu, Bianca M; Couch, Frank B; Cortez, David

    2012-03-01

    Understanding the processes of DNA replication, chromatin assembly and maturation, and the replication stress response requires the ability to monitor protein dynamics at active and damaged replication forks. Detecting protein accumulation at replication forks or damaged sites has primarily relied on immunofluorescence imaging, which is limited in resolution and antibody sensitivity. Here we describe a procedure to isolate proteins on nascent DNA (iPOND) that permits a high-resolution spatiotemporal analysis of proteins at replication forks or on chromatin following DNA replication in cultured cells. iPOND relies on labeling of nascent DNA with the nucleoside analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). Biotin conjugation to EdU-labeled DNA using click chemistry facilitates a single-step streptavidin purification of proteins bound to the nascent DNA. iPOND permits an interrogation of any cellular process linked to DNA synthesis using a 3- to 4-d protocol.

  4. Cyclin F suppresses B-Myb activity to promote cell cycle checkpoint control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Ditte Kjærsgaard; Hoffmann, Saskia; Ahlskog, Johanna K

    2015-01-01

    an important role in checkpoint control following ionizing radiation. Cyclin F-depleted cells initiate checkpoint signalling after ionizing radiation, but fail to maintain G2 phase arrest and progress into mitosis prematurely. Importantly, cyclin F suppresses the B-Myb-driven transcriptional programme...... that promotes accumulation of crucial mitosis-promoting proteins. Cyclin F interacts with B-Myb via the cyclin box domain. This interaction is important to suppress cyclin A-mediated phosphorylation of B-Myb, a key step in B-Myb activation. In summary, we uncover a regulatory mechanism linking the F-box protein...

  5. Asynchronous Checkpoint Migration with MRNet in the Scalable Checkpoint / Restart Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohror, K; Moody, A; de Supinski, B R

    2012-03-20

    Applications running on today's supercomputers tolerate failures by periodically saving their state in checkpoint files on stable storage, such as a parallel file system. Although this approach is simple, the overhead of writing the checkpoints can be prohibitive, especially for large-scale jobs. In this paper, we present initial results of an enhancement to our Scalable Checkpoint/Restart Library (SCR). We employ MRNet, a tree-based overlay network library, to transfer checkpoints from the compute nodes to the parallel file system asynchronously. This enhancement increases application efficiency by removing the need for an application to block while checkpoints are transferred to the parallel file system. We show that the integration of SCR with MRNet can reduce the time spent in I/O operations by as much as 15x. However, our experiments exposed new scalability issues with our initial implementation. We discuss the sources of the scalability problems and our plans to address them.

  6. Super-resolution imaging of ESCRT-proteins at HIV-1 assembly sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Prescher

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The cellular endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT machinery is involved in membrane budding processes, such as multivesicular biogenesis and cytokinesis. In HIV-infected cells, HIV-1 hijacks the ESCRT machinery to drive HIV release. Early in the HIV-1 assembly process, the ESCRT-I protein Tsg101 and the ESCRT-related protein ALIX are recruited to the assembly site. Further downstream, components such as the ESCRT-III proteins CHMP4 and CHMP2 form transient membrane associated lattices, which are involved in virus-host membrane fission. Although various geometries of ESCRT-III assemblies could be observed, the actual membrane constriction and fission mechanism is not fully understood. Fission might be driven from inside the HIV-1 budding neck by narrowing the membranes from the outside by larger lattices surrounding the neck, or from within the bud. Here, we use super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to elucidate the size and structure of the ESCRT components Tsg101, ALIX, CHMP4B and CHMP2A during HIV-1 budding below the diffraction limit. To avoid the deleterious effects of using fusion proteins attached to ESCRT components, we performed measurements on the endogenous protein or, in the case of CHMP4B, constructs modified with the small HA tag. Due to the transient nature of the ESCRT interactions, the fraction of HIV-1 assembly sites with colocalizing ESCRT complexes was low (1.5%-3.4%. All colocalizing ESCRT clusters exhibited closed, circular structures with an average size (full-width at half-maximum between 45 and 60 nm or a diameter (determined using a Ripley's L-function analysis of roughly 60 to 100 nm. The size distributions for colocalizing clusters were narrower than for non-colocalizing clusters, and significantly smaller than the HIV-1 bud. Hence, our results support a membrane scission process driven by ESCRT protein assemblies inside a confined structure, such as the bud neck, rather than by large lattices

  7. Self-assembling peptide inspired by a barnacle underwater adhesive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Masahiro; Shen, Jian-Ren; Kamino, Kei

    2007-06-01

    An underwater bioadhesive generally comprises a multiprotein complex that provides a molecular basis for self-assembly. We report here a new class of self-assembling peptide inspired by a 20 kDa barnacle cement protein. Studies on the chemically synthesized 24-residue peptide have revealed that (1) it underwent irreversible self-assembly upon the addition of salt, (2) the self-assembly was started at a salt concentration close to that of seawater with noncovalent intermolecular interactions, (3) the self-assembled material resembled a macroscopic membrane of interwoven nanofilaments, (4) incubation in an alkaline pH range formed the intramolecular disulfide bond of a peptide molecule, thus triggering a conformation change of the molecule, and (5) conformational change of the building block promoted the formation of a nanofiber, resulting in the display of a three-dimensional meshlike mesoscopic structure with defined pores having a diameter of approximately 200 nm. The peptide is likely to provide a suitable basis for further development of peptide-based materials.

  8. Differential effect of schisandrin B stereoisomers on ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatewaki, Naoto; Nishida, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Masaaki; Ando, Hidehiro; Kondo, Seizo; Sakamaki, Toshiyuki; Konishi, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported that schisandrin B (SchB) is a specific inhibitor of ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and Rad-3-related) protein kinase. Since SchB consists of a mixture of its diastereomers gomisin N (GN) and γ-schisandrin (γ-Sch), the inhibitory action of SchB might result from a stereospecific interaction between one of the stereoisomers of SchB and ATR. Therefore, we investigated the effect of GN and γ-Sch on UV (UVC at 254 nm)-induced activation of DNA damage checkpoint signaling in A549 cells. UV-induced cell death (25 - 75 J/m(2)) was amplified by the presence of the diastereomers, especially GN. At the same time, GN, but not γ-Sch, inhibited the phosphorylation of checkpoint proteins such as p53, structural maintenance of chromosomes 1, and checkpoint kinase 1 in UV-irradiated cells. Moreover, GN inhibited the G2/M checkpoint during UV-induced DNA damage. The in vitro kinase activity of immunoaffinity-purified ATR was dose-dependently inhibited by GN (IC50: 7.28 μM) but not by γ-Sch. These results indicate that GN is the active component of SchB and suggest that GN inhibits the DNA damage checkpoint signaling by stereospecifically interacting with ATR.

  9. Moderate cyclic tensile strain alters the assembly of cartilage extracellular matrix proteins in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleuel, Judith; Zaucke, Frank; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Heilig, Juliane; Wolter, Marie-Louise; Hamann, Nina; Firner, Sara; Niehoff, Anja

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical loading influences the structural and mechanical properties of articular cartilage. The cartilage matrix protein collagen II essentially determines the tensile properties of the tissue and is adapted in response to loading. The collagen II network is stabilized by the collagen II-binding cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), collagen IX, and matrilin-3. However, the effect of mechanical loading on these extracellular matrix proteins is not yet understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if and how chondrocytes assemble the extracellular matrix proteins collagen II, COMP, collagen IX, and matrilin-3 in response to mechanical loading. Primary murine chondrocytes were applied to cyclic tensile strain (6%, 0.5 Hz, 30 min per day at three consecutive days). The localization of collagen II, COMP, collagen IX, and matrilin-3 in loaded and unloaded cells was determined by immunofluorescence staining. The messenger ribo nucleic acid (mRNA) expression levels and synthesis of the proteins were analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blots. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the pattern of collagen II distribution was altered by loading. In loaded chondrocytes, collagen II containing fibrils appeared thicker and strongly co-stained for COMP and collagen IX, whereas the collagen network from unloaded cells was more diffuse and showed minor costaining. Further, the applied load led to a higher amount of COMP in the matrix, determined by western blot analysis. Our results show that moderate cyclic tensile strain altered the assembly of the extracellular collagen network. However, changes in protein amount were only observed for COMP, but not for collagen II, collagen IX, or matrilin-3. The data suggest that the adaptation to mechanical loading is not always the result of changes in RNA and/or protein expression but might also be the result of changes in matrix assembly and structure.

  10. Diverse supramolecular structures formed by self‐assembling proteins of the B acillus subtilis spore coat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shuo; Wan, Qiang; Krajcikova, Daniela; Tang, Jilin; Tzokov, Svetomir B.; Barak, Imrich

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bacterial spores (endospores), such as those of the pathogens C lostridium difficile and B acillus anthracis, are uniquely stable cell forms, highly resistant to harsh environmental insults. B acillus subtilis is the best studied spore‐former and we have used it to address the question of how the spore coat is assembled from multiple components to form a robust, protective superstructure. B . subtilis coat proteins (CotY, CotE, CotV and CotW) expressed in E scherichia coli can arrange intracellularly into highly stable macro‐structures through processes of self‐assembly. Using electron microscopy, we demonstrate the capacity of these proteins to generate ordered one‐dimensional fibres, two‐dimensional sheets and three‐dimensional stacks. In one case (CotY), the high degree of order favours strong, cooperative intracellular disulfide cross‐linking. Assemblies of this kind could form exquisitely adapted building blocks for higher‐order assembly across all spore‐formers. These physically robust arrayed units could also have novel applications in nano‐biotechnology processes. PMID:25872412

  11. A pH-regulated quality control cycle for surveillance of secretory protein assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavassori, Stefano; Cortini, Margherita; Masui, Shoji; Sannino, Sara; Anelli, Tiziana; Caserta, Imma R; Fagioli, Claudio; Mossuto, Maria F; Fornili, Arianna; van Anken, Eelco; Degano, Massimo; Inaba, Kenji; Sitia, Roberto

    2013-06-27

    To warrant the quality of the secretory proteome, stringent control systems operate at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi interface, preventing the release of nonnative products. Incompletely assembled oligomeric proteins that are deemed correctly folded must rely on additional quality control mechanisms dedicated to proper assembly. Here we unveil how ERp44 cycles between cisGolgi and ER in a pH-regulated manner, patrolling assembly of disulfide-linked oligomers such as IgM and adiponectin. At neutral, ER-equivalent pH, the ERp44 carboxy-terminal tail occludes the substrate-binding site. At the lower pH of the cisGolgi, conformational rearrangements of this peptide, likely involving protonation of ERp44's active cysteine, simultaneously unmask the substrate binding site and -RDEL motif, allowing capture of orphan secretory protein subunits and ER retrieval via KDEL receptors. The ERp44 assembly control cycle couples secretion fidelity and efficiency downstream of the calnexin/calreticulin and BiP-dependent quality control cycles.

  12. Self-assembled multicompartment liquid crystalline lipid carriers for protein, peptide, and nucleic acid drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Angelina; Angelov, Borislav; Mutafchieva, Rada; Lesieur, Sylviane; Couvreur, Patrick

    2011-02-15

    Lipids and lipopolymers self-assembled into biocompatible nano- and mesostructured functional materials offer many potential applications in medicine and diagnostics. In this Account, we demonstrate how high-resolution structural investigations of bicontinuous cubic templates made from lyotropic thermosensitive liquid-crystalline (LC) materials have initiated the development of innovative lipidopolymeric self-assembled nanocarriers. Such structures have tunable nanochannel sizes, morphologies, and hierarchical inner organizations and provide potential vehicles for the predictable loading and release of therapeutic proteins, peptides, or nucleic acids. This Account shows that structural studies of swelling of bicontinuous cubic lipid/water phases are essential for overcoming the nanoscale constraints for encapsulation of large therapeutic molecules in multicompartment lipid carriers. For the systems described here, we have employed time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and high-resolution freeze-fracture electronic microscopy (FF-EM) to study the morphology and the dynamic topological transitions of these nanostructured multicomponent amphiphilic assemblies. Quasi-elastic light scattering and circular dichroism spectroscopy can provide additional information at the nanoscale about the behavior of lipid/protein self-assemblies under conditions that approximate physiological hydration. We wanted to generalize these findings to control the stability and the hydration of the water nanochannels in liquid-crystalline lipid nanovehicles and confine therapeutic biomolecules within these structures. Therefore we analyzed the influence of amphiphilic and soluble additives (e.g. poly(ethylene glycol)monooleate (MO-PEG), octyl glucoside (OG), proteins) on the nanochannels' size in a diamond (D)-type bicontinuous cubic phase of the lipid glycerol monooleate (MO). At body temperature, we can stabilize long-living swollen states, corresponding to a diamond cubic phase

  13. Towards understanding of Nipah virus attachment protein assembly and the role of protein affinity and crowding for membrane curvature events.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stachowiak, Jeanne C.; Hayden, Carl C.; Negrete, Oscar.; Davis, Ryan Wesley; Sasaki, Darryl Y

    2013-10-01

    Pathogenic viruses are a primary threat to our national security and to the health and economy of our world. Effective defense strategies to combat viral infection and spread require the development of understanding of the mechanisms that these pathogens use to invade the host cell. We present in this report results of our research into viral particle recognition and fusion to cell membranes and the role that protein affinity and confinement in lipid domains plays in membrane curvature in cellular fusion and fission events. Herein, we describe 1) the assembly of the G attachment protein of Nipah virus using point mutation studies to define its role in viral particle fusion to the cell membrane, 2) how lateral pressure of membrane bound proteins induce curvature in model membrane systems, and 3) the role of membrane curvature in the selective partitioning of molecular receptors and specific affinity of associated proteins.

  14. Monitoring spindle orientation: Spindle position checkpoint in charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Gislene

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Every cell division in budding yeast is inherently asymmetric and counts on the correct positioning of the mitotic spindle along the mother-daughter polarity axis for faithful chromosome segregation. A surveillance mechanism named the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC, monitors the orientation of the mitotic spindle and prevents cells from exiting mitosis when the spindle fails to align along the mother-daughter axis. SPOC is essential for maintenance of ploidy in budding yeast and similar mechanisms might exist in higher eukaryotes to ensure faithful asymmetric cell division. Here, we review the current model of SPOC activation and highlight the importance of protein localization and phosphorylation for SPOC function.

  15. Monitoring spindle orientation: Spindle position checkpoint in charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caydasi, Ayse K; Ibrahim, Bashar; Pereira, Gislene

    2010-12-11

    Every cell division in budding yeast is inherently asymmetric and counts on the correct positioning of the mitotic spindle along the mother-daughter polarity axis for faithful chromosome segregation. A surveillance mechanism named the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC), monitors the orientation of the mitotic spindle and prevents cells from exiting mitosis when the spindle fails to align along the mother-daughter axis. SPOC is essential for maintenance of ploidy in budding yeast and similar mechanisms might exist in higher eukaryotes to ensure faithful asymmetric cell division. Here, we review the current model of SPOC activation and highlight the importance of protein localization and phosphorylation for SPOC function.

  16. Immune-Related Adverse Events Associated with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Daphne; Hansen, Aaron R

    2016-12-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), including antibodies targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1), have shown durable treatment responses in multiple tumor types by enhancing antitumor immunity. However, removal of self-tolerance can induce autoimmunity and produce a unique immune-driven toxicity profile, termed immune-related adverse events (irAEs). As ICIs gain approval for a growing number of indications, it is imperative clinicians increase their knowledge of and ability to manage irAEs. This review examines the etiology, presentation, kinetics, and treatment of irAEs and aims to provide practical guidance for clinicians.

  17. Scaffold-forming and Adhesive Contributions of Synthetic Laminin-binding Proteins to Basement Membrane Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Karen K; Capizzi, Stephanie; Yurchenco, Peter D

    2009-03-27

    Laminins that possess three short arms contribute to basement membrane assembly by anchoring to cell surfaces, polymerizing, and binding to nidogen and collagen IV. Although laminins containing the alpha4 and alpha5 subunits are expressed in alpha2-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy, they may be ineffective substitutes because they bind weakly to cell surfaces and/or because they lack the third arm needed for polymerization. We asked whether linker proteins engineered to bind to deficient laminins that provide such missing activities would promote basement membrane assembly in a Schwann cell model. A chimeric fusion protein (alphaLNNd) that adds a short arm terminus to laminin through the nidogen binding locus was generated and compared with the dystrophy-ameliorating protein miniagrin (mAgrin) that binds to the laminin coiled-coil dystroglycan and sulfatides. alphaLNNd was found to mediate laminin binding to collagen IV, to bind to galactosyl sulfatide, and to selectively convert alpha-short arm deletion-mutant laminins LmDeltaalphaLN and LmDeltaalphaLN-L4b into polymerizing laminins. This protein enabled polymerization-deficient laminin but not an adhesion-deficient laminin lacking LG domains (LmDeltaLG) to assemble an extracellular matrix on Schwann cell surfaces. mAgrin, on the other hand, enabled LmDeltaLG to form an extracellular matrix on cell surfaces without increasing accumulation of non-polymerizing laminins. These gain-of-function studies reveal distinct polymerization and anchorage contributions to basement membrane assembly in which the three different LN domains mediate the former, and the LG domains provide primary anchorage with secondary contributions from the alphaLN domain. These findings may be relevant for an understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of laminin deficiency states.

  18. The impact of conformational fluctuations on self-assembly: Cooperative aggregation of archaeal chaperonin proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelam, Stephen; Rogers, Carl; Pasqua, Andrea; Paavola, Chad; Trent, Jonathan; Geissler, Phillip L.

    2009-01-01

    Protein complexes called rosettasomes self-assemble in solution to form large-scale filamentous and planar structures. The relative abundance of these aggregates varies abruptly with environmental conditions and sample composition. Our simulations of a model of patchy nanoparticles can reproduce this sharp crossover, but only if particles are allowed to switch between two internal states favoring different geometries of local binding. These results demonstrate how local conformational adaptivity can fundamentally influence the cooperativity of pattern-forming dynamics. PMID:19072304

  19. Caenorhabditis elegans histone methyltransferase MET-2 shields the male X chromosome from checkpoint machinery and mediates meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula M Checchi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Meiosis is a specialized form of cellular division that results in the precise halving of the genome to produce gametes for sexual reproduction. Checkpoints function during meiosis to detect errors and subsequently to activate a signaling cascade that prevents the formation of aneuploid gametes. Indeed, asynapsis of a homologous chromosome pair elicits a checkpoint response that can in turn trigger germline apoptosis. In a heterogametic germ line, however, sex chromosomes proceed through meiosis with unsynapsed regions and are not recognized by checkpoint machinery. We conducted a directed RNAi screen in Caenorhabditis elegans to identify regulatory factors that prevent recognition of heteromorphic sex chromosomes as unpaired and uncovered a role for the SET domain histone H3 lysine 9 histone methyltransferase (HMTase MET-2 and two additional HMTases in shielding the male X from checkpoint machinery. We found that MET-2 also mediates the transcriptional silencing program of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI but not meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin (MSUC, suggesting that these processes are distinct. Further, MSCI and checkpoint shielding can be uncoupled, as double-strand breaks targeted to an unpaired, transcriptionally silenced extra-chromosomal array induce checkpoint activation in germ lines depleted for met-2. In summary, our data uncover a mechanism by which repressive chromatin architecture enables checkpoint proteins to distinguish between the partnerless male X chromosome and asynapsed chromosomes thereby shielding the lone X from inappropriate activation of an apoptotic program.

  20. Caenorhabditis elegans histone methyltransferase MET-2 shields the male X chromosome from checkpoint machinery and mediates meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checchi, Paula M; Engebrecht, JoAnne

    2011-09-01

    Meiosis is a specialized form of cellular division that results in the precise halving of the genome to produce gametes for sexual reproduction. Checkpoints function during meiosis to detect errors and subsequently to activate a signaling cascade that prevents the formation of aneuploid gametes. Indeed, asynapsis of a homologous chromosome pair elicits a checkpoint response that can in turn trigger germline apoptosis. In a heterogametic germ line, however, sex chromosomes proceed through meiosis with unsynapsed regions and are not recognized by checkpoint machinery. We conducted a directed RNAi screen in Caenorhabditis elegans to identify regulatory factors that prevent recognition of heteromorphic sex chromosomes as unpaired and uncovered a role for the SET domain histone H3 lysine 9 histone methyltransferase (HMTase) MET-2 and two additional HMTases in shielding the male X from checkpoint machinery. We found that MET-2 also mediates the transcriptional silencing program of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) but not meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin (MSUC), suggesting that these processes are distinct. Further, MSCI and checkpoint shielding can be uncoupled, as double-strand breaks targeted to an unpaired, transcriptionally silenced extra-chromosomal array induce checkpoint activation in germ lines depleted for met-2. In summary, our data uncover a mechanism by which repressive chromatin architecture enables checkpoint proteins to distinguish between the partnerless male X chromosome and asynapsed chromosomes thereby shielding the lone X from inappropriate activation of an apoptotic program.

  1. The Pch2 AAA+ ATPase promotes phosphorylation of the Hop1 meiotic checkpoint adaptor in response to synaptonemal complex defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herruzo, Esther; Ontoso, David; González-Arranz, Sara; Cavero, Santiago; Lechuga, Ana; San-Segundo, Pedro A

    2016-09-19

    Meiotic cells possess surveillance mechanisms that monitor critical events such as recombination and chromosome synapsis. Meiotic defects resulting from the absence of the synaptonemal complex component Zip1 activate a meiosis-specific checkpoint network resulting in delayed or arrested meiotic progression. Pch2 is an evolutionarily conserved AAA+ ATPase required for the checkpoint-induced meiotic block in the zip1 mutant, where Pch2 is only detectable at the ribosomal DNA array (nucleolus). We describe here that high levels of the Hop1 protein, a checkpoint adaptor that localizes to chromosome axes, suppress the checkpoint defect of a zip1 pch2 mutant restoring Mek1 activity and meiotic cell cycle delay. We demonstrate that the critical role of Pch2 in this synapsis checkpoint is to sustain Mec1-dependent phosphorylation of Hop1 at threonine 318. We also show that the ATPase activity of Pch2 is essential for its checkpoint function and that ATP binding to Pch2 is required for its localization. Previous work has shown that Pch2 negatively regulates Hop1 chromosome abundance during unchallenged meiosis. Based on our results, we propose that, under checkpoint-inducing conditions, Pch2 also possesses a positive action on Hop1 promoting its phosphorylation and its proper distribution on unsynapsed chromosome axes.

  2. Strong underwater adhesives made by self-assembling multi-protein nanofibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chao; Gurry, Thomas; Cheng, Allen A.; Downey, Jordan; Deng, Zhengtao; Stultz, Collin M.; Lu, Timothy K.

    2014-10-01

    Many natural underwater adhesives harness hierarchically assembled amyloid nanostructures to achieve strong and robust interfacial adhesion under dynamic and turbulent environments. Despite recent advances, our understanding of the molecular design, self-assembly and structure-function relationships of these natural amyloid fibres remains limited. Thus, designing biomimetic amyloid-based adhesives remains challenging. Here, we report strong and multi-functional underwater adhesives obtained from fusing mussel foot proteins (Mfps) of Mytilus galloprovincialis with CsgA proteins, the major subunit of Escherichia coli amyloid curli fibres. These hybrid molecular materials hierarchically self-assemble into higher-order structures, in which, according to molecular dynamics simulations, disordered adhesive Mfp domains are exposed on the exterior of amyloid cores formed by CsgA. Our fibres have an underwater adhesion energy approaching 20.9 mJ m-2, which is 1.5 times greater than the maximum of bio-inspired and bio-derived protein-based underwater adhesives reported thus far. Moreover, they outperform Mfps or curli fibres taken on their own and exhibit better tolerance to auto-oxidation than Mfps at pH ≥ 7.0.

  3. Strong underwater adhesives made by self-assembling multi-protein nanofibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chao; Gurry, Thomas; Cheng, Allen A; Downey, Jordan; Deng, Zhengtao; Stultz, Collin M; Lu, Timothy K

    2014-10-01

    Many natural underwater adhesives harness hierarchically assembled amyloid nanostructures to achieve strong and robust interfacial adhesion under dynamic and turbulent environments. Despite recent advances, our understanding of the molecular design, self-assembly and structure-function relationships of these natural amyloid fibres remains limited. Thus, designing biomimetic amyloid-based adhesives remains challenging. Here, we report strong and multi-functional underwater adhesives obtained from fusing mussel foot proteins (Mfps) of Mytilus galloprovincialis with CsgA proteins, the major subunit of Escherichia coli amyloid curli fibres. These hybrid molecular materials hierarchically self-assemble into higher-order structures, in which, according to molecular dynamics simulations, disordered adhesive Mfp domains are exposed on the exterior of amyloid cores formed by CsgA. Our fibres have an underwater adhesion energy approaching 20.9 mJ m(-2), which is 1.5 times greater than the maximum of bio-inspired and bio-derived protein-based underwater adhesives reported thus far. Moreover, they outperform Mfps or curli fibres taken on their own and exhibit better tolerance to auto-oxidation than Mfps at pH ≥ 7.0.

  4. Architects of assembly: roles of Flaviviridae non-structural proteins in virion morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Catherine L; Jones, Christopher T; Rice, Charles M

    2008-09-01

    Viruses of the Flaviviridae family, including hepatitis C, dengue and bovine viral diarrhoea, are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent advances in our understanding of virion assembly have uncovered commonalities among distantly related members of this family. We discuss the emerging hypothesis that physical virion components are not alone in forming the infectious particle, but that non-structural proteins are intimately involved in orchestrating morphogenesis. Pinpointing the roles of Flaviviridae proteins in virion production could reveal new avenues for antiviral therapeutics.

  5. Checkpoint triggering in a computer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cher, Chen-Yong

    2016-09-06

    According to an aspect, a method for triggering creation of a checkpoint in a computer system includes executing a task in a processing node of the computer system and determining whether it is time to read a monitor associated with a metric of the task. The monitor is read to determine a value of the metric based on determining that it is time to read the monitor. A threshold for triggering creation of the checkpoint is determined based on the value of the metric. Based on determining that the value of the metric has crossed the threshold, the checkpoint including state data of the task is created to enable restarting execution of the task upon a restart operation.

  6. Heat shock protein-90-beta facilitates enterovirus 71 viral particles assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Robert Y.L., E-mail: yuwang@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Research Center for Emerging Viral Infections, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Kuo, Rei-Lin [Research Center for Emerging Viral Infections, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Biotechnology and Laboratory Science and Graduate Program of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Ma, Wei-Chieh [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Huang, Hsing-I [Research Center for Emerging Viral Infections, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Biotechnology and Laboratory Science and Graduate Program of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Yu, Jau-Song [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Molecular Medicine Research Center, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Yen, Sih-Min [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Huang, Chi-Ruei [Research Center for Emerging Viral Infections, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Shih, Shin-Ru [Research Center for Emerging Viral Infections, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Biotechnology and Laboratory Science and Graduate Program of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2013-09-01

    Molecular chaperones are reported to be crucial for virus propagation, but are not yet addressed in Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71). Here we describe the specific association of heat shock protein-90-beta (Hsp90β), but not alpha form (Hsp90α), with EV71 viral particles by the co-purification with virions using sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, and by the colocalization with viral particles, as assessed by immunogold electron microscopy. The reduction of the Hsp90β protein using RNA interference decreased the correct assembly of viral particles, without affecting EV71 replication levels. Tracking ectopically expressed Hsp90β protein associated with EV71 virions revealed that Hsp90β protein was transmitted to new host cells through its direct association with infectious viral particles. Our findings suggest a new antiviral strategy in which extracellular Hsp90β protein is targeted to decrease the infectivity of EV71 and other enteroviruses, without affecting the broader functions of this constitutively expressed molecular chaperone. - Highlights: • Hsp90β is associated with EV71 virion and is secreted with the release virus. • Hsp90β effects on the correct assembly of viral particles. • Viral titer of cultured medium was reduced in the presence of geldanamycin. • Viral titer was also reduced when Hsp90β was suppressed by siRNA treatment. • The extracellular Hsp90β was also observed in other RNA viruses-infected cells.

  7. Actin-Interacting Protein 1 Contributes to Intranuclear Rod Assembly in Dictyostelium discoideum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa-Ankerhold, Hellen C.; Daszkiewicz, Wioleta; Schleicher, Michael; Müller-Taubenberger, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Intranuclear rods are aggregates consisting of actin and cofilin that are formed in the nucleus in consequence of chemical or mechanical stress conditions. The formation of rods is implicated in a variety of pathological conditions, such as certain myopathies and some neurological disorders. It is still not well understood what exactly triggers the formation of intranuclear rods, whether other proteins are involved, and what the underlying mechanisms of rod assembly or disassembly are. In this study, Dictyostelium discoideum was used to examine appearance, stages of assembly, composition, stability, and dismantling of rods. Our data show that intranuclear rods, in addition to actin and cofilin, are composed of a distinct set of other proteins comprising actin-interacting protein 1 (Aip1), coronin (CorA), filactin (Fia), and the 34 kDa actin-bundling protein B (AbpB). A finely tuned spatio-temporal pattern of protein recruitment was found during formation of rods. Aip1 is important for the final state of rod compaction indicating that Aip1 plays a major role in shaping the intranuclear rods. In the absence of both Aip1 and CorA, rods are not formed in the nucleus, suggesting that a sufficient supply of monomeric actin is a prerequisite for rod formation. PMID:28074884

  8. RECOVERY ACT - Thylakoid Assembly and Folded Protein Transport by the Tat Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabney-Smith, Carole [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States)

    2016-07-18

    Assembly of functional photosystems complete with necessary intrinsic (membrane-bound) and extrinsic proteins requires the function of at least 3 protein transport pathways in thylakoid membranes. Our research focuses on one of those pathways, a unique and essential protein transport pathway found in the chloroplasts of plants, bacteria, and some archaebacteria, the Twin arginine translocation (Tat) system. The chloroplast Tat (cpTat) system is thought to be responsible for the proper location of ~50% of thylakoid lumen proteins, several of which are necessary for proper photosystem assembly, maintenance, and function. Specifically, cpTat systems are unique because they transport fully folded and assembled proteins across ion tight membranes using only three membrane components, Tha4, Hcf106, and cpTatC, and the protonmotive force generated by photosynthesis. Despite the importance of the cpTat system in plants, the mechanism of transport of a folded precursor is not well known. Our long-term goal is to investigate the role protein transport systems have on organelle biogenesis, particularly the assembly of membrane protein complexes in thylakoids of chloroplasts. The objective of this proposal is to correlate structural changes in the membrane-bound cpTat component, Tha4, to the mechanism of translocation of folded-precursor substrates across the membrane bilayer by using a cysteine accessibility and crosslinking approach. Our central hypothesis is that the precursor passes through a proteinaceous pore of assembled Tha4 protomers that have undergone a conformational or topological change in response to transport. This research is predicated upon the observations that Tha4 exists in molar excess in the membrane relative to the other cpTat components; its regulated assembly to the precursor-bound receptor; and our data showing oligomerization of Tha4 into very large complexes in response to transport. Our rationale for these studies is that understanding cp

  9. Nanoparticle self-assembly by a highly stable recombinant spider wrapping silk protein subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lingling; Tremblay, Marie-Laurence; Orrell, Kathleen E; Leclerc, Jérémie; Meng, Qing; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Rainey, Jan K

    2013-10-01

    Artificial spider silk proteins may form fibers with exceptional strength and elasticity. Wrapping silk, or aciniform silk, is the toughest of the spider silks, and has a very different protein composition than other spider silks. Here, we present the characterization of an aciniform protein (AcSp1) subunit named W1, consisting of one AcSp1 199 residue repeat unit from Argiope trifasciata. The structural integrity of recombinant W1 is demonstrated in a variety of buffer conditions and time points. Furthermore, we show that W1 has a high thermal stability with reversible denaturation at ∼71°C and forms self-assembled nanoparticle in near-physiological conditions. W1 therefore represents a highly stable and structurally robust module for protein-based nanoparticle formation.

  10. Cooperative folding of intrinsically disordered domains drives assembly of a strong elongated protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruszka, Dominika T.; Whelan, Fiona; Farrance, Oliver E.; Fung, Herman K. H.; Paci, Emanuele; Jeffries, Cy M.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Baldock, Clair; Baumann, Christoph G.; Brockwell, David J.; Potts, Jennifer R.; Clarke, Jane

    2015-06-01

    Bacteria exploit surface proteins to adhere to other bacteria, surfaces and host cells. Such proteins need to project away from the bacterial surface and resist significant mechanical forces. SasG is a protein that forms extended fibrils on the surface of Staphylococcus aureus and promotes host adherence and biofilm formation. Here we show that although monomeric and lacking covalent cross-links, SasG maintains a highly extended conformation in solution. This extension is mediated through obligate folding cooperativity of the intrinsically disordered E domains that couple non-adjacent G5 domains thermodynamically, forming interfaces that are more stable than the domains themselves. Thus, counterintuitively, the elongation of the protein appears to be dependent on the inherent instability of its domains. The remarkable mechanical strength of SasG arises from tandemly arrayed `clamp' motifs within the folded domains. Our findings reveal an elegant minimal solution for the assembly of monomeric mechano-resistant tethers of variable length.

  11. Self-assembling peptide and protein nanodiscs for studies of membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Søren Roi

    of proteins encoded by the human genome. G-protein coupled receptors mediate the majority of hormone and neurotransmitter signals as well as being responsible for perception of light, smell and taste in the human body, and a number of Nobel prizes has been awarded based on their study. Structural...... membrane proteins. A minimalistic approach was tested where the ApoA1 protein was mimicked my small amphipathic helical peptides. The resulting discs were very similar to ApoA1 based discs in size and in their ability to stabilize incorporated membrane proteins. Furthermore, due to their enhanced dynamical...

  12. A Checkpoint Storage System for Desktop Grid Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Kiswany, Samer Al; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S

    2007-01-01

    Checkpointing is an indispensable technique to provide fault tolerance for long-running high-throughput applications like those running on desktop grids. In these environments, a checkpoint storage system can offer multiple benefits: reduce the load on a traditional file system, offer high-performance through specialization, and, finally, optimize checkpoint data management by taking into account application semantics. Such a storage system can present a unifying abstraction to checkpoint operations, while hiding the fact that there are no dedicated resources to store the checkpoint data. This paper presents a dedicated checkpoint storage system for desktop grid environments. Our solution uses scavenged disk space from participating desktops to build an inexpensive storage space, offering a traditional file system interface for easy integration with checkpointing applications. This paper presents the architecture of our checkpoint storage system, key write optimizations for high-speed I/O, support for increme...

  13. Expression and cytosolic assembly of the S-layer fusion protein mSbsC-EGFP in eukaryotic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blecha, Andreas; Zarschler, Kristof; Sjollema, Klaas A.; Veenhuis, Marten; Rödel, Gerhard; Rodel, G.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Native as well as recombinant bacterial cell surface layer (S-layer) protein of Geobacillus (G.) stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 assembles to supramolecular structures with an oblique symmetry. Upon expression in E. coli, S-layer self assembly products are formed in the cytosol. We tested

  14. Nucleocapsid-independent assembly of coronavirus-like particles by co-expression of viral envelope protein genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vennema, H; Godeke, G J; Rossen, J W; Voorhout, W F; Horzinek, M C; Opstelten, D J; Rottier, P J

    1996-01-01

    Budding of enveloped viruses has been shown to be driven by interactions between a nucleocapsid and a proteolipid membrane. By contrast, we here describe the assembly of viral envelopes independent of a nucleocapsid. Membrane particles containing coronaviral envelope proteins were assembled in and r

  15. Aurora B kinase and protein phosphatase 1 have opposing roles in modulating kinetochore assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuele, Michael J; Lan, Weijie; Jwa, Miri; Miller, Stephanie A; Chan, Clarence S M; Stukenberg, P Todd

    2008-04-21

    The outer kinetochore binds microtubules to control chromosome movement. Outer kinetochore assembly is restricted to mitosis, whereas the inner kinetochore remains tethered to centromeres throughout the cell cycle. The cues that regulate this transient assembly are unknown. We find that inhibition of Aurora B kinase significantly reduces outer kinetochore assembly in Xenopus laevis and human tissue culture cells, frog egg extracts, and budding yeast. In X. leavis M phase extracts, preassembled kinetochores disassemble after inhibiting Aurora B activity with either drugs or antibodies. Kinetochore disassembly, induced by Aurora B inhibition, is rescued by restraining protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) activity. PP1 is necessary for kinetochores to disassemble at the exit from M phase, and purified enzyme is sufficient to cause disassembly on isolated mitotic nuclei. These data demonstrate that Aurora B activity is required for kinetochore maintenance and that PP1 is necessary and sufficient to disassemble kinetochores. We suggest that Aurora B and PP1 coordinate cell cycle-dependent changes in kinetochore assembly though phosphorylation of kinetochore substrates.

  16. Insights into the variability of nucleated amyloid polymerization by a minimalistic model of stochastic protein assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugène, Sarah; Xue, Wei-Feng; Robert, Philippe; Doumic, Marie

    2016-05-01

    Self-assembly of proteins into amyloid aggregates is an important biological phenomenon associated with human diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid fibrils also have potential applications in nano-engineering of biomaterials. The kinetics of amyloid assembly show an exponential growth phase preceded by a lag phase, variable in duration as seen in bulk experiments and experiments that mimic the small volumes of cells. Here, to investigate the origins and the properties of the observed variability in the lag phase of amyloid assembly currently not accounted for by deterministic nucleation dependent mechanisms, we formulate a new stochastic minimal model that is capable of describing the characteristics of amyloid growth curves despite its simplicity. We then solve the stochastic differential equations of our model and give mathematical proof of a central limit theorem for the sample growth trajectories of the nucleated aggregation process. These results give an asymptotic description for our simple model, from which closed form analytical results capable of describing and predicting the variability of nucleated amyloid assembly were derived. We also demonstrate the application of our results to inform experiments in a conceptually friendly and clear fashion. Our model offers a new perspective and paves the way for a new and efficient approach on extracting vital information regarding the key initial events of amyloid formation.

  17. Functions of spindle check-point and its relationship to chromosome instability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    It is generally believed that the equal distribution of genetic materials to two daughter cells during mitosis is the key to cell health and development. During the dynamic process, spindle checkpoint plays a very important role in chromosome movements and final sister chromatid separation. The equal and precise segregation of chromosomes contributes to the genomic stability while aberrant separations result in chromosome instability that causes pathogenesis of certain diseases such as Down's syndrome and cancers. Kinetochore and its regulatory proteins consist of the spindle checkpoint and determine the spatial and temporal orders of chromosome segregation.

  18. Characterizing the Escherichia coli O157:H7 proteome including protein associations with higher order assemblies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rembert Pieper

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The recent outbreak of severe infections with Shiga toxin (Stx producing Escherichia coli (STEC serotype O104:H4 highlights the need to understand horizontal gene transfer among E. coli strains, identify novel virulence factors and elucidate their pathogenesis. Quantitative shotgun proteomics can contribute to such objectives, allowing insights into the part of the genome translated into proteins and the connectivity of biochemical pathways and higher order assemblies of proteins at the subcellular level. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined protein profiles in cell lysate fractions of STEC strain 86-24 (serotype O157:H7, following growth in cell culture or bacterial isolation from intestines of infected piglets, in the context of functionally and structurally characterized biochemical pathways of E. coli. Protein solubilization in the presence of Triton X-100, EDTA and high salt was followed by size exclusion chromatography into the approximate M(r ranges greater than 280 kDa, 280-80 kDa and 80-10 kDa. Peptide mixtures resulting from these and the insoluble fraction were analyzed by quantitative 2D-LC-nESI-MS/MS. Of the 2521 proteins identified at a 1% false discovery rate, representing 47% of all predicted E. coli O157:H7 gene products, the majority of integral membrane proteins were enriched in the high M(r fraction. Hundreds of proteins were enriched in a M(r range higher than that predicted for a monomer supporting their participation in protein complexes. The insoluble STEC fraction revealed enrichment of aggregation-prone proteins, including many that are part of large structure/function entities such as the ribosome, cytoskeleton and O-antigen biosynthesis cluster. SIGNIFICANCE: Nearly all E. coli O157:H7 proteins encoded by prophage regions were expressed at low abundance levels or not detected. Comparative quantitative analyses of proteins from distinct cell lysate fractions allowed us to associate uncharacterized

  19. Planar cell polarity proteins differentially regulate extracellular matrix organization and assembly during zebrafish gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohn, Michael R; Mundell, Nathan A; Sawyer, Leah M; Dunlap, Julie A; Jessen, Jason R

    2013-11-01

    Zebrafish gastrulation cell movements occur in the context of dynamic changes in extracellular matrix (ECM) organization and require the concerted action of planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins that regulate cell elongation and mediolateral alignment. Data obtained using Xenopus laevis gastrulae have shown that integrin-fibronectin interactions underlie the formation of polarized cell protrusions necessary for PCP and have implicated PCP proteins themselves as regulators of ECM. By contrast, the relationship between establishment of PCP and ECM assembly/remodeling during zebrafish gastrulation is unclear. We previously showed that zebrafish embryos carrying a null mutation in the four-pass transmembrane PCP protein vang-like 2 (vangl2) exhibit increased matrix metalloproteinase activity and decreased immunolabeling of fibronectin. These data implicated for the first time a core PCP protein in the regulation of pericellular proteolysis of ECM substrates and raised the question of whether other zebrafish PCP proteins also impact ECM organization. In Drosophila melanogaster, the cytoplasmic PCP protein Prickle binds Van Gogh and regulates its function. Here we report that similar to vangl2, loss of zebrafish prickle1a decreases fibronectin protein levels in gastrula embryos. We further show that Prickle1a physically binds Vangl2 and regulates both the subcellular distribution and total protein level of Vangl2. These data suggest that the ability of Prickle1a to impact fibronectin organization is at least partly due to effects on Vangl2. In contrast to loss of either Vangl2 or Prickle1a function, we find that glypican4 (a Wnt co-receptor) and frizzled7 mutant gastrula embryos with disrupted non-canonical Wnt signaling exhibit the opposite phenotype, namely increased fibronectin assembly. Our data show that glypican4 mutants do not have decreased proteolysis of ECM substrates, but instead have increased cell surface cadherin protein expression and increased intercellular

  20. Checkpointing and Recovery in Distributed and Database Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiang

    2011-01-01

    A transaction-consistent global checkpoint of a database records a state of the database which reflects the effect of only completed transactions and not the results of any partially executed transactions. This thesis establishes the necessary and sufficient conditions for a checkpoint of a data item (or the checkpoints of a set of data items) to…

  1. User Process Checkpoint/Restart. Revision 1.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    This document describes the design of the Tera user process checkpoint facility. Checkpoint is a means for saving the state of an executing process...or group of processes and restarting them later on demand. The motivation for providing checkpoint on the Tera is to allow long running computationally

  2. A tractable genotype-phenotype map modelling the self-assembly of protein quaternary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbury, Sam F; Johnston, Iain G; Louis, Ard A; Ahnert, Sebastian E

    2014-06-01

    The mapping between biological genotypes and phenotypes is central to the study of biological evolution. Here, we introduce a rich, intuitive and biologically realistic genotype-phenotype (GP) map that serves as a model of self-assembling biological structures, such as protein complexes, and remains computationally and analytically tractable. Our GP map arises naturally from the self-assembly of polyomino structures on a two-dimensional lattice and exhibits a number of properties: redundancy (genotypes vastly outnumber phenotypes), phenotype bias (genotypic redundancy varies greatly between phenotypes), genotype component disconnectivity (phenotypes consist of disconnected mutational networks) and shape space covering (most phenotypes can be reached in a small number of mutations). We also show that the mutational robustness of phenotypes scales very roughly logarithmically with phenotype redundancy and is positively correlated with phenotypic evolvability. Although our GP map describes the assembly of disconnected objects, it shares many properties with other popular GP maps for connected units, such as models for RNA secondary structure or the hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice model for protein tertiary structure. The remarkable fact that these important properties similarly emerge from such different models suggests the possibility that universal features underlie a much wider class of biologically realistic GP maps.

  3. A tractable genotype–phenotype map modelling the self-assembly of protein quaternary structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbury, Sam F.; Johnston, Iain G.; Louis, Ard A.; Ahnert, Sebastian E.

    2014-01-01

    The mapping between biological genotypes and phenotypes is central to the study of biological evolution. Here, we introduce a rich, intuitive and biologically realistic genotype–phenotype (GP) map that serves as a model of self-assembling biological structures, such as protein complexes, and remains computationally and analytically tractable. Our GP map arises naturally from the self-assembly of polyomino structures on a two-dimensional lattice and exhibits a number of properties: redundancy (genotypes vastly outnumber phenotypes), phenotype bias (genotypic redundancy varies greatly between phenotypes), genotype component disconnectivity (phenotypes consist of disconnected mutational networks) and shape space covering (most phenotypes can be reached in a small number of mutations). We also show that the mutational robustness of phenotypes scales very roughly logarithmically with phenotype redundancy and is positively correlated with phenotypic evolvability. Although our GP map describes the assembly of disconnected objects, it shares many properties with other popular GP maps for connected units, such as models for RNA secondary structure or the hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice model for protein tertiary structure. The remarkable fact that these important properties similarly emerge from such different models suggests the possibility that universal features underlie a much wider class of biologically realistic GP maps. PMID:24718456

  4. Maize rayado fino virus capsid proteins assemble into virus-like particles in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Rosemarie W; Hammond, John

    2010-02-01

    Maize rayado fino virus (MRFV; genus Marafivirus; family Tymoviridae) is an isometric plant virus of 30 nm containing two components: empty shells and complete virus particles (encapsidating the 6.3 kb genomic RNA). Both particles are composed of two serologically related, carboxy co-terminal, coat proteins (CP) of apparent molecular mass 21-22 kDa (CP2) and 24-28 kDa (CP1) in a molar ratio of 3:1, respectively; CP1 contains a 37 amino acid amino terminal extension of CP2. In our study, expression of CP1 or CP2 in Escherichia coli resulted in assembly of each capsid protein into virus-like particles (VLPs), appearing in electron microscopy as stain-permeable (CP2) or stain-impermeable particles (CP1). CP1 VLPs encapsidated bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA, but not CP mRNA, while CP2 VLPs encapsidated neither CP mRNA nor 16S ribosomal RNA. Expression of CP1 and CP2 in E. coli using a co-expression vector resulted in the assembly of VLPs which were stain-impermeable and encapsidated CP mRNA. These results suggest that the N-terminal 37 amino acid residues of CP1, although not required for particle formation, may be involved in the assembly of complete virions and that the presence of both CP1 and CP2 in the particle is required for specific encapsidation of MRFV CP mRNA.

  5. Symmetry versus Asymmetry in the Molecules of Life: Homomeric Protein Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biserka Kojić-Prodić

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The essay is dedicated to the relation of symmetry and asymmetry-chirality in Nature. The Introduction defines symmetry and its impact on basic definitions in science and human activities. The following section Chirality of molecules reveals breifly development of notion of chirality and its significance in living organisms and science. Homochirality is a characteristic hallmark of life and its significance is presented in the section Homochirality of Life. Proteins, important constituents of living cells performing versatile functions are chiral macromolecules composed of L-amino acids. In particular, the protein assemblies are of a great importance in functions of a cell. Therefore, they have attracted researches to examine them from different points of view. Among proteins of known three-dimensional structures about 50–80% of them exist as homomeric protein complexes. Protein monomers lack any intrinsic, underlying symmetry, i.e. enantiomorphic protein molecules involve left-handed amino acids but their asymmetry does not appear to extend to the level of quaternary structures (homomeric complexes as observed by Chothia in 1991. In the section Homomeric assemblies we performed our analysis of very special cases of homomers revealing non-crystallographic symmetry in crystals. Homochiral proteins can crystallize only in enantiomorphic space groups. Among 230 existing space groups 65 are enantiomorphic containing limited symmetry elements that are rotation and screw-rotation axes. Any axis of rotation symmetry of a crystal lattice must be two-fold, three-fold, four-fold, or six-fold. Five-fold, seven-fold, and higher-fold rotation symmetry axes are incompatible with the symmetry under spatial displacement of the three-dimensional crystal lattice.

  6. Adaptive Assembly: Maximizing the Potential of a Given Functional Peptide with a Tailor-Made Protein Scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hideki; Honda, Shinya

    2015-09-17

    Protein engineering that exploits known functional peptides holds great promise for generating novel functional proteins. Here we propose a combinatorial approach, termed adaptive assembly, which provides a tailor-made protein scaffold for a given functional peptide. A combinatorial library was designed to create a tailor-made scaffold, which was generated from β hairpins derived from a 10-residue minimal protein "chignolin" and randomized amino acid sequences. We applied adaptive assembly to a peptide with low affinity for the Fc region of human immunoglobulin G, generating a 54-residue protein AF.p17 with a 40,600-fold enhanced affinity. The crystal structure of AF.p17 complexed with the Fc region revealed that the scaffold fixed the active conformation with a unique structure composed of a short α helix, β hairpins, and a loop-like structure. Adaptive assembly can take full advantage of known peptides as assets for generating novel functional proteins.

  7. Selection of checkpoints provided by the ergonomic checkpoints in agriculture tool for mechanized sugarcane harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lucy Rodrigues Ferreira

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The changing work dynamics of sugarcane harvesting owing to increasing mechanization has submitted workers to new working conditions, including interaction with machinery and equipment, thereby changing the profile of work-related diseases and injuries. One of the ways to solve problems resulting from the impact of mechanization on working conditions is the use of instruments that allow risk identification from man-labor ratio. This study aimed at selecting checkpoints applicable to mechanized sugarcane harvesting provided by the Ergonomic Checkpoints in Agriculture tool. A literature review of the mechanical sugarcane harvesting stages was conducted and, in light of its particularities, checkpoints provided by the aforementioned tool were analyzed. As a result, there were identified thirty-four checkpoints with potential application to mechanical sugarcane harvesting.

  8. Amino acids and mTOR mediate distinct metabolic checkpoints in mammalian G1 cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Saqcena

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In multicellular organisms, cell division is regulated by growth factors (GFs. In the absence of GFs, cells exit the cell cycle at a site in G1 referred to as the restriction point (R and enter a state of quiescence known as G0. Additionally, nutrient availability impacts on G1 cell cycle progression. While there is a vast literature on G1 cell cycle progression, confusion remains - especially with regard to the temporal location of R relative to nutrient-mediated checkpoints. In this report, we have investigated the relationship between R and a series of metabolic cell cycle checkpoints that regulate passage into S-phase. METHODS: We used double-block experiments to order G1 checkpoints that monitor the presence of GFs, essential amino acids (EEAs, the conditionally essential amino acid glutamine, and inhibition of mTOR. Cell cycle progression was monitored by uptake of [(3H]-thymidine and flow cytometry, and analysis of cell cycle regulatory proteins was by Western-blot. RESULTS: We report here that the GF-mediated R can be temporally distinguished from a series of late G1 metabolic checkpoints mediated by EAAs, glutamine, and mTOR - the mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin. R is clearly upstream from an EAA checkpoint, which is upstream from a glutamine checkpoint. mTOR is downstream from both the amino acid checkpoints, close to S-phase. Significantly, in addition to GF autonomy, we find human cancer cells also have dysregulated metabolic checkpoints. CONCLUSION: The data provided here are consistent with a GF-dependent mid-G1 R where cells determine whether it is appropriate to divide, followed by a series of late-G1 metabolic checkpoints mediated by amino acids and mTOR where cells determine whether they have sufficient nutrients to accomplish the task. Since mTOR inhibition arrests cells the latest in G1, it is likely the final arbiter for nutrient sufficiency prior to committing to replicating the genome.

  9. Absence of a conventional spindle mitotic checkpoint in the binucleated single-celled parasite Giardia intestinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markova, Kristyna; Uzlikova, Magdalena; Tumova, Pavla; Jirakova, Klara; Hagen, Guy; Kulda, Jaroslav; Nohynkova, Eva

    2016-10-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) joins the machinery of chromosome-to-spindle microtubule attachment with that of the cell cycle to prevent missegregation of chromosomes during mitosis. Although a functioning SAC has been verified in a limited number of organisms, it is regarded as an evolutionarily conserved safeguard mechanism. In this report, we focus on the existence of the SAC in a single-celled parasitic eukaryote, Giardia intestinalis. Giardia belongs to Excavata, a large and diverse supergroup of unicellular eukaryotes in which SAC control has been nearly unexplored. We show that Giardia cells with absent or defective mitotic spindles due to the inhibitory effects of microtubule poisons do not arrest in mitosis; instead, they divide without any delay, enter the subsequent cell cycle and even reduplicate DNA before dying. We identified a limited repertoire of kinetochore and SAC components in the Giardia genome, indicating that this parasite is ill equipped to halt mitosis before the onset of anaphase via SAC control of chromosome-spindle microtubule attachment. Finally, based on overexpression, we show that Giardia Mad2, a core SAC protein in other eukaryotes, localizes along intracytoplasmic portions of caudal flagellar axonemes, but never within nuclei, even in mitotic cells with blocked spindles, where the SAC should be active. These findings are consistent with the absence of a conventional SAC, known from yeast and metazoans, in the parasitic protist Giardia.

  10. Co-assembly, spatiotemporal control and morphogenesis of a hybrid protein-peptide system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inostroza-Brito, Karla E.; Collin, Estelle; Siton-Mendelson, Orit; Smith, Katherine H.; Monge-Marcet, Amàlia; Ferreira, Daniela S.; Rodríguez, Raúl Pérez; Alonso, Matilde; Rodríguez-Cabello, José Carlos; Reis, Rui L.; Sagués, Francesc; Botto, Lorenzo; Bitton, Ronit; Azevedo, Helena S.; Mata, Alvaro

    2015-11-01

    Controlling molecular interactions between bioinspired molecules can enable the development of new materials with higher complexity and innovative properties. Here we report on a dynamic system that emerges from the conformational modification of an elastin-like protein by peptide amphiphiles and with the capacity to access, and be maintained in, non-equilibrium for substantial periods of time. The system enables the formation of a robust membrane that displays controlled assembly and disassembly capabilities, adhesion and sealing to surfaces, self-healing and the capability to undergo morphogenesis into tubular structures with high spatiotemporal control. We use advanced microscopy along with turbidity and spectroscopic measurements to investigate the mechanism of assembly and its relation to the distinctive membrane architecture and the resulting dynamic properties. Using cell-culture experiments with endothelial and adipose-derived stem cells, we demonstrate the potential of this system to generate complex bioactive scaffolds for applications such as tissue engineering.

  11. Lymphocytes accelerate epithelial tight junction assembly: role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Xiao Tang

    Full Text Available The tight junctions (TJs, characteristically located at the apicolateral borders of adjacent epithelial cells, are required for the proper formation of epithelial cell polarity as well as for sustaining the mucosal barrier to the external environment. The observation that lymphocytes are recruited by epithelial cells to the sites of infection [1] suggests that they may play a role in the modulation of epithelial barrier function and thus contribute to host defense. To test the ability of lymphocytes to modulate tight junction assembly in epithelial cells, we set up a lymphocyte-epithelial cell co-culture system, in which Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells, a well-established model cell line for studying epithelial TJ assembly [2], were co-cultured with mouse lymphocytes to mimic an infection state. In a typical calcium switch experiment, the TJ assembly in co-culture was found to be accelerated compared to that in MDCK cells alone. This accelaration was found to be mediated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK. AMPK activation was independent of changes in cellular ATP levels but it was found to be activated by the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha. Forced suppression of AMPK, either with a chemical inhibitor or by knockdown, abrogated the accelerating effect of lymphocytes on TJ formation. Similar results were also observed in a co-culture with lymphocytes and Calu-3 human airway epithelial cells, suggesting that the activation of AMPK may be a general mechanism underlying lymphocyte-accelerated TJ assembly in different epithelia. These results suggest that signals from lymphocytes, such as cytokines, facilitate TJ assembly in epithelial cells via the activation of AMPK.

  12. Chromatin-bound NLS proteins recruit membrane vesicles and nucleoporins for nuclear envelope assembly via importin-α/β

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quanlong Lu; Zhigang Lu; Qinying Liu; Li Guo; He Ren; Jingyan Fu; Qing Jiang; Paul R Clarke; Chuanmao Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism for nuclear envelope (NE) assembly is not fully understood.Importin-β and the small GTPase Ran have been implicated in the spatial regulation of NE assembly process.Here we report that chromatin-bound NLS (nuclear localization sequence) proteins provide docking sites for the NE precursor membrane vesicles and nucleoporins via importin-α and -β during NE assembly in Xenopus egg extracts.We show that along with the fast recruitment of the abundant NLS proteins such as nucleoplasmin and histones to the demembranated sperm chromatin in the extracts,importin-α binds the chromatin NLS proteins rapidly.Meanwhile,importin-β binds cytoplasmic NE precursor membrane vesicles and nucleoporins.Through interacting with importin-α on the chromatin NLS proteins,importin-β targets the membrane vesicles and nucleoporins to the chromatin surface.Once encountering RanGTP on the chromatin generated by RCC1,importin-β preferentially binds Ran-GTP and releases the membrane vesicles and nucleoporins for NE assembly.NE assembly is disrupted by blocking the interaction between importin-α and NLS proteins with excess soluble NLS proteins or by depletion of importin-β from the extract.Our findings reveal a novel molecular mechanism for NE assembly in Xenopus egg extracts.

  13. Interaction of bovine serum albumin protein with self assembled monolayer of mercaptoundecanoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poonia, Monika; Agarwal, Hitesh; Manjuladevi, V.; Gupta, R. K.

    2016-05-01

    Detection of proteins and other biomolecules in liquid phase is the essence for the design of a biosensor. The sensitivity of a sensor can be enhanced by the appropriate functionalization of the sensing area so as to establish the molecular specific interaction. In the present work, we have studied the interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein with a chemically functionalized surface using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The gold-coated quartz crystals (AT-cut/5 MHz) were functionalized by forming self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 11-Mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA). The adsorption characteristics of BSA onto SAM of MUA on quartz crystal are reported. BSA showed the highest affinity for SAM of MUA as compared to pure gold surface. The SAM of MUA provides carboxylated surface which enhances not only the adsorption of the BSA protein but also a very stable BSA-MUA complex in the liquid phase.

  14. Protein structure prediction: assembly of secondary structure elements by basin-hopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Falk; Vancea, Ioan; Kamat, Sanjay G; Strodel, Birgit

    2014-10-20

    The prediction of protein tertiary structure from primary structure remains a challenging task. One possible approach to this problem is the application of basin-hopping global optimization combined with an all-atom force field. In this work, the efficiency of basin-hopping is improved by introducing an approach that derives tertiary structures from the secondary structure assignments of individual residues. This approach is termed secondary-to-tertiary basin-hopping and benchmarked for three miniproteins: trpzip, trp-cage and ER-10. For each of the three miniproteins, the secondary-to-tertiary basin-hopping approach successfully and reliably predicts their three-dimensional structure. When it is applied to larger proteins, correctly folded structures are obtained. It can be concluded that the assembly of secondary structure elements using basin-hopping is a promising tool for de novo protein structure prediction.

  15. Three-dimensional protein networks assembled by two-photon activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatterdam, Volker; Ramadass, Radhan; Stoess, Tatjana; Fichte, Manuela A H; Wachtveitl, Josef; Heckel, Alexander; Tampé, Robert

    2014-05-26

    Spatial and temporal control over chemical and biological processes plays a key role in life and material sciences. Here we synthesized a two-photon-activatable glutathione (GSH) to trigger the interaction with glutathione S-transferase (GST) by light at superior spatiotemporal resolution. The compound shows fast and well-confined photoconversion into the bioactive GSH, which is free to interact with GST-tagged proteins. The GSH/GST interaction can be phototriggered, changing its affinity over several orders of magnitude into the nanomolar range. Multiplexed three-dimensional (3D) protein networks are simultaneously generated in situ through two-photon fs-pulsed laser-scanning excitation. The two-photon activation facilitates the three-dimensional assembly of protein structures in real time at hitherto unseen resolution in time and space, thus opening up new applications far beyond the presented examples.

  16. Assembly of protein complexes by coexpression in prokaryotic and eukaryotic hosts: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrakis, Anastassis; Romier, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Most functional entities within cells are composed of protein complexes. The actual challenge for structural biologists is to purify these complexes, or at least functional subcomplexes, in sufficiently large amounts for structural characterization. One major technique for assembling complexes is coexpression of complex components in the same host cell, as it combines the advantages of in vivo and in vitro techniques. Several hosts can be used for coexpression, including Escherichia coli, insect and mammalian cells. Strategies that enable high throughput combinatorial coexpression of many proteins are discussed. The simplicity, versatility, cost effectiveness and success of E. coli can only be rivalled by the sophistication of the eukaryotic cells, providing more complicated posttranslational processing of the complex components sometimes required for complex formation. The technique of coexpression can easily be integrated in semiautomated approaches for the high throughput characterization and structure determination of protein complexes.

  17. Templated self-assembly of quantum dots from aqueous solution using protein scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, Amy Szuchmacher [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Soto, Carissa M [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Wilson, Charmaine D [Geo-Centers, Incorporated, Newton, MA 02459 (United States); Whitley, Jessica L [Geo-Centers, Incorporated, Newton, MA 02459 (United States); Moore, Martin H [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Sapsford, Kim E [George Mason University, 10910 University Boulevard, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Lin, Tianwei [Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Chatterji, Anju [Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Johnson, John E [Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Ratna, Banahalli R [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2006-10-28

    Short, histidine-containing peptides can be conjugated to lysine-containing protein scaffolds to controllably attach quantum dots (QDs) to the scaffold, allowing for generic attachment of quantum dots to any protein without the use of specially engineered domains. This technique was used to bind quantum dots from aqueous solution to both chicken IgG and cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), a 30 nm viral particle. These quantum dot-protein assemblies were studied in detail. The IgG-QD complexes were shown to retain binding specificity to their antigen after modification. The CPMV-QD complexes have a local concentration of quantum dots greater than 3000 nmol ml{sup -1}, and show a 15% increase in fluorescence quantum yield over free quantum dots in solution.

  18. Effect of uncoupler on assembly pathway for pigment-binding protein of bacterial photosynthetic membranes. [Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierstein, R.; Drews, G.

    1986-10-01

    The uncoupler carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) was used to investigate membrane protein assembly in the phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus. As found for Escherichia coli and mitochondrial proteins, assembly across the bacterial photosynthetic membranes was sensitive to CCCP. At uncoupler concentrations which were sufficient to block the export of the periplasmic cytochrome c/sub 2/ and an outer membrane protein, the integration of pigment-binding protein into the photosynthetic apparatus was abolished. The unassembled protein was detected on the inner surface of the intracytoplasmic membrane. After inactivation of CCCP, accumulated protein continued insertion into the membrane. The data suggest that after binding to the cytoplasmic face of the membrane (i), translocation of protein into a transmembrane orientation takes place (ii), which is a prerequisite for the formation of a functional pigment-protein complex (iii).

  19. Assembly of the Complex between Archaeal RNase P Proteins RPP30 and Pop5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon L. Crowe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available RNase P is a highly conserved ribonucleoprotein enzyme that represents a model complex for understanding macromolecular RNA-protein interactions. Archaeal RNase P consists of one RNA and up to five proteins (Pop5, RPP30, RPP21, RPP29, and RPP38/L7Ae. Four of these proteins function in pairs (Pop5-RPP30 and RPP21–RPP29. We have used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC to characterize the interaction between Pop5 and RPP30 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu. NMR backbone resonance assignments of free RPP30 (25 kDa indicate that the protein is well structured in solution, with a secondary structure matching that observed in a closely related crystal structure. Chemical shift perturbations upon the addition of Pop5 (14 kDa reveal its binding surface on RPP30. ITC experiments confirm a net 1 : 1 stoichiometry for this tight protein-protein interaction and exhibit complex isotherms, indicative of higher-order binding. Indeed, light scattering and size exclusion chromatography data reveal the complex to exist as a 78 kDa heterotetramer with two copies each of Pop5 and RPP30. These results will inform future efforts to elucidate the functional role of the Pop5-RPP30 complex in RNase P assembly and catalysis.

  20. Detailed Modeling and Evaluation of a Scalable Multilevel Checkpointing System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohror, Kathryn [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moody, Adam [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bronevetsky, Greg [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); de Supinski, Bronis R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    High-performance computing (HPC) systems are growing more powerful by utilizing more components. As the system mean time before failure correspondingly drops, applications must checkpoint frequently to make progress. But, at scale, the cost of checkpointing becomes prohibitive. A solution to this problem is multilevel checkpointing, which employs multiple types of checkpoints in a single run. Moreover, lightweight checkpoints can handle the most common failure modes, while more expensive checkpoints can handle severe failures. We designed a multilevel checkpointing library, the Scalable Checkpoint/Restart (SCR) library, that writes lightweight checkpoints to node-local storage in addition to the parallel file system. We present probabilistic Markov models of SCR's performance. We show that on future large-scale systems, SCR can lead to a gain in machine efficiency of up to 35 percent, and reduce the load on the parallel file system by a factor of two. In addition, we predict that checkpoint scavenging, or only writing checkpoints to the parallel file system on application termination, can reduce the load on the parallel file system by 20 × on today's systems and still maintain high application efficiency.

  1. Design and characterization of self-assembled fish sarcoplasmic protein-alginate nanocomplexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boutrup Stephansen, Karen; Mattebjerg, Maria Ahlm; Wattjes, Jasper;

    2015-01-01

    Macrostructures based on natural polymers are subject to large attention, as the application range is wide within the food and pharmaceutical industries. In this study we present nanocomplexes (NCXs) made from electrostatic self-assembly between negatively charged alginate and positively charged...... fish sarcoplasmic proteins (FSP), prepared by bulk mixing. A concentration screening revealed that there was a range of alginate and FSP concentrations where stable NCXs with similar properties were formed, rather than two exact concentrations. The size of the NCXs was 293 +/- 3 nm, and the zeta...

  2. Diverse supramolecular structures formed by self-assembling proteins of the B acillus subtilis spore coat

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bacterial spores (endospores), such as those of the pathogens C lostridium difficile and B acillus anthracis, are uniquely stable cell forms, highly resistant to harsh environmental insults. B acillus subtilis is the best studied spore‐former and we have used it to address the question of how the spore coat is assembled from multiple components to form a robust, protective superstructure. B . subtilis coat proteins (CotY, CotE, CotV and CotW) expressed in E scherichia coli can arrange...

  3. The Arabidopsis Thylakoid Protein PAM68 Is Required for Efficient D1 Biogenesis and Photosystem II Assembly[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, Ute; Zühlke, Jessica; Rengstl, Birgit; Kreller, Renate; Makarenko, Elina; Rühle, Thilo; Schünemann, Danja; Jahns, Peter; Weisshaar, Bernd; Nickelsen, Jörg; Leister, Dario

    2010-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a multiprotein complex that functions as a light-driven water:plastoquinone oxidoreductase in photosynthesis. Assembly of PSII proceeds through a number of distinct intermediate states and requires auxiliary proteins. The photosynthesis affected mutant 68 (pam68) of Arabidopsis thaliana displays drastically altered chlorophyll fluorescence and abnormally low levels of the PSII core subunits D1, D2, CP43, and CP47. We show that these phenotypes result from a specific decrease in the stability and maturation of D1. This is associated with a marked increase in the synthesis of RC (the PSII reaction center-like assembly complex) at the expense of PSII dimers and supercomplexes. PAM68 is a conserved integral membrane protein found in cyanobacterial and eukaryotic thylakoids and interacts in split-ubiquitin assays with several PSII core proteins and known PSII assembly factors. Biochemical analyses of thylakoids from Arabidopsis and Synechocystis sp PCC 6803 suggest that, during PSII assembly, PAM68 proteins associate with an early intermediate complex that might contain D1 and the assembly factor LPA1. Inactivation of cyanobacterial PAM68 destabilizes RC but does not affect larger PSII assembly complexes. Our data imply that PAM68 proteins promote early steps in PSII biogenesis in cyanobacteria and plants, but their inactivation is differently compensated for in the two classes of organisms. PMID:20923938

  4. The Arabidopsis thylakoid protein PAM68 is required for efficient D1 biogenesis and photosystem II assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, Ute; Zühlke, Jessica; Rengstl, Birgit; Kreller, Renate; Makarenko, Elina; Rühle, Thilo; Schünemann, Danja; Jahns, Peter; Weisshaar, Bernd; Nickelsen, Jörg; Leister, Dario

    2010-10-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a multiprotein complex that functions as a light-driven water:plastoquinone oxidoreductase in photosynthesis. Assembly of PSII proceeds through a number of distinct intermediate states and requires auxiliary proteins. The photosynthesis affected mutant 68 (pam68) of Arabidopsis thaliana displays drastically altered chlorophyll fluorescence and abnormally low levels of the PSII core subunits D1, D2, CP43, and CP47. We show that these phenotypes result from a specific decrease in the stability and maturation of D1. This is associated with a marked increase in the synthesis of RC (the PSII reaction center-like assembly complex) at the expense of PSII dimers and supercomplexes. PAM68 is a conserved integral membrane protein found in cyanobacterial and eukaryotic thylakoids and interacts in split-ubiquitin assays with several PSII core proteins and known PSII assembly factors. Biochemical analyses of thylakoids from Arabidopsis and Synechocystis sp PCC 6803 suggest that, during PSII assembly, PAM68 proteins associate with an early intermediate complex that might contain D1 and the assembly factor LPA1. Inactivation of cyanobacterial PAM68 destabilizes RC but does not affect larger PSII assembly complexes. Our data imply that PAM68 proteins promote early steps in PSII biogenesis in cyanobacteria and plants, but their inactivation is differently compensated for in the two classes of organisms.

  5. Peptide–oligonucleotide conjugates as nanoscale building blocks for assembly of an artificial three-helix protein mimic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Chenguang; Martos-Maldonado, Manuel C.; Madsen, Charlotte S.; Thomsen, Rasmus P.; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Christensen, Niels Johan; Kjems, Jørgen; Thulstrup, Peter W.; Wengel, Jesper; Jensen, Knud J.

    2016-01-01

    Peptide-based structures can be designed to yield artificial proteins with specific folding patterns and functions. Template-based assembly of peptide units is one design option, but the use of two orthogonal self-assembly principles, oligonucleotide triple helix and a coiled coil protein domain formation have never been realized for de novo protein design. Here, we show the applicability of peptide–oligonucleotide conjugates for self-assembly of higher-ordered protein-like structures. The resulting nano-assemblies were characterized by ultraviolet-melting, gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy. These studies revealed the formation of the desired triple helix and coiled coil domains at low concentrations, while a dimer of trimers was dominating at high concentration. CD spectroscopy showed an extraordinarily high degree of α-helicity for the peptide moieties in the assemblies. The results validate the use of orthogonal self-assembly principles as a paradigm for de novo protein design. PMID:27464951

  6. Chl12 (Ctf18) Forms a Novel Replication Factor C-Related Complex and Functions Redundantly with Rad24 in the DNA Replication Checkpoint Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Naiki, Takahiro; Kondo, Tae; Nakada, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Kunihiro; Sugimoto, Katsunori

    2001-01-01

    RAD24 has been identified as a gene essential for the DNA damage checkpoint in budding yeast. Rad24 is structurally related to subunits of the replication factor C (RFC) complex, and forms an RFC-related complex with Rfc2, Rfc3, Rfc4, and Rfc5. The rad24Δ mutation enhances the defect of rfc5-1 in the DNA replication block checkpoint, implicating RAD24 in this checkpoint. CHL12 (also called CTF18) encodes a protein that is structurally related to the Rad24 and RFC proteins. We show here that a...

  7. Fragile X mental retardation protein stimulates ribonucleoprotein assembly of influenza A virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhuo; Cao, Mengmeng; Guo, Yang; Zhao, Lili; Wang, Jingfeng; Jia, Xue; Li, Jianguo; Wang, Conghui; Gabriel, Gülsah; Xue, Qinghua; Yi, Yonghong; Cui, Sheng; Jin, Qi; Wang, Jianwei; Deng, Tao

    2014-02-01

    The ribonucleoprotein (RNP) of the influenza A virus is responsible for the transcription and replication of viral RNA in the nucleus. These processes require interplay between host factors and RNP components. Here, we report that the Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) targets influenza virus RNA synthesis machinery and facilitates virus replication both in cell culture and in mice. We demonstrate that FMRP transiently associates with viral RNP and stimulates viral RNP assembly through RNA-mediated interaction with the nucleoprotein. Furthermore, the KH2 domain of FMRP mediates its association with the nucleoprotein. A point mutation (I304N) in the KH2 domain, identified from a Fragile X syndrome patient, disrupts the FMRP-nucleoprotein association and abolishes the ability of FMRP to participate in viral RNP assembly. We conclude that FMRP is a critical host factor used by influenza viruses to facilitate viral RNP assembly. Our observation reveals a mechanism of influenza virus RNA synthesis and provides insights into FMRP functions.

  8. Human surfactant protein A2 gene mutations impair dimmer/trimer assembly leading to deficiency in protein sialylation and secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Song

    Full Text Available Surfactant protein A2 (SP-A2 plays an essential role in surfactant metabolism and lung host defense. SP-A2 mutations in the carbohydrate recognition domain have been related to familial pulmonary fibrosis and can lead to a recombinant protein secretion deficiency in vitro. In this study, we explored the molecular mechanism of protein secretion deficiency and the subsequent biological effects in CHO-K1 cells expressing both wild-type and several different mutant forms of SP-A2. We demonstrate that the SP-A2 G231V and F198S mutants impair the formation of dimmer/trimer SP-A2 which contributes to the protein secretion defect. A deficiency in sialylation, but not N-linked glycosylation, is critical to the observed dimmer/trimer impairment-induced secretion defect. Furthermore, both mutant forms accumulate in the ER and form NP-40-insoluble aggregates. In addition, the soluble mutant SP-A2 could be partially degraded through the proteasome pathway but not the lysosome or autophagy pathway. Intriguingly, 4-phenylbutyrate acid (4-PBA, a chemical chaperone, alleviates aggregate formation and partially rescued the protein secretion of SP-A2 mutants. In conclusion, SP-A2 G231V and F198S mutants impair the dimmer/trimer assembly, which contributes to the protein sialylation and secretion deficiency. The intracellular protein mutants could be partially degraded through the proteasome pathway and also formed aggregates. The treatment of the cells with 4-PBA resulted in reduced aggregation and rescued the secretion of mutant SP-A2.

  9. Complex Assembly Behavior During the Encapsulation of Green Fluorescent Protein Analogs in Virus Derived Protein Capsules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minten, Inge J.; Nolte, Roeland J.M.; Cornelissen, Jeroen J.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    Enzymes encapsulated in nanocontainers are a better model of the conditions inside a living cell than free enzymes in solution. In a first step toward the encapsulation of multiple enzymes inside the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) capsid, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was attached

  10. Heat shock protein-90-beta facilitates enterovirus 71 viral particles assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Robert Y L; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Ma, Wei-Chieh; Huang, Hsing-I; Yu, Jau-Song; Yen, Sih-Min; Huang, Chi-Ruei; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2013-09-01

    Molecular chaperones are reported to be crucial for virus propagation, but are not yet addressed in Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71). Here we describe the specific association of heat shock protein-90-beta (Hsp90β), but not alpha form (Hsp90α), with EV71 viral particles by the co-purification with virions using sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, and by the colocalization with viral particles, as assessed by immunogold electron microscopy. The reduction of the Hsp90β protein using RNA interference decreased the correct assembly of viral particles, without affecting EV71 replication levels. Tracking ectopically expressed Hsp90β protein associated with EV71 virions revealed that Hsp90β protein was transmitted to new host cells through its direct association with infectious viral particles. Our findings suggest a new antiviral strategy in which extracellular Hsp90β protein is targeted to decrease the infectivity of EV71 and other enteroviruses, without affecting the broader functions of this constitutively expressed molecular chaperone.

  11. Differential activation of intra-S-phase checkpoint in response to tripchlorolide and its effects on DNA replication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan REN; Jia Rui WU

    2004-01-01

    DNA replication is tightly regulated during the S phase of the cell cycle, and the activation of the intra-S-phase checkpoint due to DNA damage usually results in arrest of DNA synthesis. However, the molecular details about the correlation between the checkpoint and regulation of DNA replication are still unclear. To investigate the connections between DNA replication and DNA damage checkpoint, a DNA-damage reagent, tripchlorolide, was applied to CHO (Chinese ovary hamster) cells at early- or middle-stages of the S phase. The early-S-phase treatment with TC significantly delayed the progression of the S phase and caused the phosphorylation of the Chk1 checkpoint protein, whereas the middle-S-phase treatment only slightly slowed down the progression of the S phase. Furthermore, the analysis of DNA replication patterns revealed that replication pattern Ⅱ was greatly prolonged in the cells treated with the drug during the early-S phase, whereas the late-replication patterns of these cells were hardly detected, suggesting that the activation of the intra-S-phase checkpoint inhibits the late-origin firing of DNA replication. We conclude that cells at different stages of the S phase are differentially sensitive to the DNA-damage reagent, and the activation of the intra-Sphase checkpoint blocks the DNA replication progression in the late stage of S phase.

  12. DTL/CDT2 is essential for both CDT1 regulation and the early G2/M checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansam, Christopher L; Shepard, Jennifer L; Lai, Kevin; Ianari, Alessandra; Danielian, Paul S; Amsterdam, Adam; Hopkins, Nancy; Lees, Jacqueline A

    2006-11-15

    Checkpoint genes maintain genomic stability by arresting cells after DNA damage. Many of these genes also control cell cycle events in unperturbed cells. By conducting a screen for checkpoint genes in zebrafish, we found that dtl/cdt2 is an essential component of the early, radiation-induced G2/M checkpoint. We subsequently found that dtl/cdt2 is required for normal cell cycle control, primarily to prevent rereplication. Both the checkpoint and replication roles are conserved in human DTL. Our data indicate that the rereplication reflects a requirement for DTL in regulating CDT1, a protein required for prereplication complex formation. CDT1 is degraded in S phase to prevent rereplication, and following DNA damage to prevent origin firing. We show that DTL associates with the CUL4-DDB1 E3 ubiquitin ligase and is required for CDT1 down-regulation in unperturbed cells and following DNA damage. The cell cycle defects of Dtl-deficient zebrafish are suppressed by reducing Cdt1 levels. In contrast, the early G2/M checkpoint defect appears to be Cdt1-independent. Thus, DTL promotes genomic stability through two distinct mechanisms. First, it is an essential component of the CUL4-DDB1 complex that controls CDT1 levels, thereby preventing rereplication. Second, it is required for the early G2/M checkpoint.

  13. RNA interference regulates the cell cycle checkpoint through the RNA export factor, Ptr1, in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iida, Tetsushi, E-mail: tiida@nig.ac.jp [Division of Cytogenetics, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Sokendai, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan); Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology (PRESTO), Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 4-1-8, Honcho, Kawaguchi-shi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Iida, Naoko [Division of Mutagenesis, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan); Tsutsui, Yasuhiro [Department of Life Science, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuda-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Yamao, Fumiaki [Division of Mutagenesis, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Sokendai, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan); Kobayashi, Takehiko [Division of Cytogenetics, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Sokendai, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RNAi is linked to the cell cycle checkpoint in fission yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ptr1 co-purifies with Ago1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ptr1-1 mutation impairs the checkpoint but does not affect gene silencing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ago1{sup +} and ptr1{sup +} regulate the cell cycle checkpoint via the same pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutations in ago1{sup +} and ptr1{sup +} lead to the nuclear accumulation of poly(A){sup +} RNAs. -- Abstract: Ago1, an effector protein of RNA interference (RNAi), regulates heterochromatin silencing and cell cycle arrest in fission yeast. However, the mechanism by which Ago1 controls cell cycle checkpoint following hydroxyurea (HU) treatment has not been elucidated. In this study, we show that Ago1 and other RNAi factors control cell cycle checkpoint following HU treatment via a mechanism independent of silencing. While silencing requires dcr1{sup +}, the overexpression of ago1{sup +} alleviated the cell cycle defect in dcr1{Delta}. Ago1 interacted with the mRNA export factor, Ptr1. The ptr1-1 mutation impaired cell cycle checkpoint but gene silencing was unaffected. Genetic analysis revealed that the regulation of cell cycle checkpoint by ago1{sup +} is dependent on ptr1{sup +}. Nuclear accumulation of poly(A){sup +} RNAs was detected in mutants of ago1{sup +} and ptr1{sup +}, suggesting there is a functional link between the cell cycle checkpoint and RNAi-mediated RNA quality control.

  14. Unraveling protein-protein interactions in clathrin assemblies via atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Albert J; Lafer, Eileen M; Peng, Jennifer Q; Smith, Paul D; Nossal, Ralph

    2013-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM), single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), and single particle force spectroscopy (SPFS) are used to characterize intermolecular interactions and domain structures of clathrin triskelia and clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs). The latter are involved in receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME) and other trafficking pathways. Here, we subject individual triskelia, bovine-brain CCVs, and reconstituted clathrin-AP180 coats to AFM-SMFS and AFM-SPFS pulling experiments and apply novel analytics to extract force-extension relations from very large data sets. The spectroscopic fingerprints of these samples differ markedly, providing important new information about the mechanism of CCV uncoating. For individual triskelia, SMFS reveals a series of events associated with heavy chain alpha-helix hairpin unfolding, as well as cooperative unraveling of several hairpin domains. SPFS of clathrin assemblies exposes weaker clathrin-clathrin interactions that are indicative of inter-leg association essential for RME and intracellular trafficking. Clathrin-AP180 coats are energetically easier to unravel than the coats of CCVs, with a non-trivial dependence on force-loading rate.

  15. Self-assembly of coherently dynamic, auxetic, two-dimensional protein crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuta; Cardone, Giovanni; Restrepo, David; Zavattieri, Pablo D; Baker, Timothy S; Tezcan, F Akif

    2016-05-19

    Two-dimensional (2D) crystalline materials possess unique structural, mechanical and electronic properties that make them highly attractive in many applications. Although there have been advances in preparing 2D materials that consist of one or a few atomic or molecular layers, bottom-up assembly of 2D crystalline materials remains a challenge and an active area of development. More challenging is the design of dynamic 2D lattices that can undergo large-scale motions without loss of crystallinity. Dynamic behaviour in porous three-dimensional (3D) crystalline solids has been exploited for stimuli-responsive functions and adaptive behaviour. As in such 3D materials, integrating flexibility and adaptiveness into crystalline 2D lattices would greatly broaden the functional scope of 2D materials. Here we report the self-assembly of unsupported, 2D protein lattices with precise spatial arrangements and patterns using a readily accessible design strategy. Three single- or double-point mutants of the C4-symmetric protein RhuA were designed to assemble via different modes of intermolecular interactions (single-disulfide, double-disulfide and metal-coordination) into crystalline 2D arrays. Owing to the flexibility of the single-disulfide interactions, the lattices of one of the variants ((C98)RhuA) are essentially defect-free and undergo substantial, but fully correlated, changes in molecular arrangement, yielding coherently dynamic 2D molecular lattices. (C98)RhuA lattices display a Poisson's ratio of -1-the lowest thermodynamically possible value for an isotropic material-making them auxetic.

  16. Structure and self-assembly of the calcium binding matrix protein of human metapneumovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyrat, Cedric; Renner, Max; Harlos, Karl; Huiskonen, Juha T; Grimes, Jonathan M

    2014-01-07

    The matrix protein (M) of paramyxoviruses plays a key role in determining virion morphology by directing viral assembly and budding. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human metapneumovirus M at 2.8 Å resolution in its native dimeric state. The structure reveals the presence of a high-affinity Ca²⁺ binding site. Molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) predict a secondary lower-affinity site that correlates well with data from fluorescence-based thermal shift assays. By combining small-angle X-ray scattering with MDS and ensemble analysis, we captured the structure and dynamics of M in solution. Our analysis reveals a large positively charged patch on the protein surface that is involved in membrane interaction. Structural analysis of DOPC-induced polymerization of M into helical filaments using electron microscopy leads to a model of M self-assembly. The conservation of the Ca²⁺ binding sites suggests a role for calcium in the replication and morphogenesis of pneumoviruses.

  17. Enhanced PC12 cells proliferation with self-assembled S-layer proteins scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babolmorad, Ghazal; Emtiazi, Giti; Ghaedi, Kamran; Jodeiri, Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Finding 3D biocompatible and biodegradable scaffold is important in tissue engineering which plays a critical role in transplanting methods. Several biomaterials, such as poly-L-lactide, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), poly(L-lactic acid)/poly(lactide-co-glycolide), alginate, collagen gel, and so on, have been applied as scaffold to culture cells in 3D environment. The most significant problem of the synthetic materials is lack of biocompatibility and bioactivity. Herein, self assemble S-layer proteins are used as a scaffold for PC12 cells culturing. For this purpose, S-layer protein was extracted from Bacillus coagulans HN68. Then, extracted S-layer was studied by SDS page and AFM. Using MTS test and Immunochemistry staining methods, the effect of self assembled S-layer scaffold on proliferation of PC12 cells was assayed. This study provides that S-layer could be an appropriate scaffold for PC12 cells culturing. Even though poly-L-ornithine is a common scaffold in PC12 cells culturing, the results show that (PLO)/S-layer is more protective.

  18. INTERFACIAL SELF-ASSEMBLY OF A HYDROPHOBIN INTO AN AMPHIPATHIC PROTEIN MEMBRANE MEDIATES FUNGAL ATTACHMENT TO HYDROPHOBIC SURFACES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOSTEN, HAB; SCHUREN, FHJ; WESSELS, JGH

    1994-01-01

    The SC3p hydrophobin of Schizophyllum commune is a small hydrophobic protein (100-101 amino acids with eight cysteine residues) that self-assembles at a water/air interface and coats aerial hyphae with an SDS-insoluble protein membrane, at the outer side highly hydrophobic and with a typical rodlet

  19. Preserved DNA Damage Checkpoint Pathway Protects against Complications in Long-Standing Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Shweta; Gupta, Manoj K; Khamaisi, Mogher; Martinez, Rachael; Gritsenko, Marina A; Wagner, Bridget K; Guye, Patrick; Busskamp, Volker; Shirakawa, Jun; Wu, Gongxiong; Liew, Chong Wee; Clauss, Therese R; Valdez, Ivan; El Ouaamari, Abdelfattah; Dirice, Ercument; Takatani, Tomozumi; Keenan, Hillary A; Smith, Richard D; Church, George; Weiss, Ron; Wagers, Amy J; Qian, Wei-Jun; King, George L; Kulkarni, Rohit N

    2015-08-04

    The mechanisms underlying the development of complications in type 1 diabetes (T1D) are poorly understood. Disease modeling of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients with longstanding T1D (disease duration ≥ 50 years) with severe (Medalist +C) or absent to mild complications (Medalist -C) revealed impaired growth, reprogramming, and differentiation in Medalist +C. Genomics and proteomics analyses suggested differential regulation of DNA damage checkpoint proteins favoring protection from cellular apoptosis in Medalist -C. In silico analyses showed altered expression patterns of DNA damage checkpoint factors among the Medalist groups to be targets of miR200, whose expression was significantly elevated in Medalist +C serum. Notably, neurons differentiated from Medalist +C iPSCs exhibited enhanced susceptibility to genotoxic stress that worsened upon miR200 overexpression. Furthermore, knockdown of miR200 in Medalist +C fibroblasts and iPSCs rescued checkpoint protein expression and reduced DNA damage. We propose miR200-regulated DNA damage checkpoint pathway as a potential therapeutic target for treating complications of diabetes.

  20. Membrane protein resistance of oligo(ethylene oxide) self-assembled monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaish, Amit; Vanderah, David J; Vierling, Ryan; Crawshaw, Fay; Gallagher, D Travis; Walker, Marlon L

    2014-10-01

    As part of an effort to develop biointerfaces for structure-function studies of integral membrane proteins (IMPs) a series of oligo(ethylene oxide) self-assembled monolayers (OEO-SAMs) were evaluated for their resistance to protein adsorption (RPA) of IMPs on Au and Pt. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) was used to determine SAM thicknesses and compare the RPA of HS(CH2)3O(CH2CH2O)6CH3 (1), HS(CH2)3O(CH2CH2O)6H (2), [HS(CH2)3]2CHO(CH2CH2O)6CH3 (3) and [HS(CH2)3]2CHO(CH2CH2O)6H (4), assembled from water. For both substrates, SAM thicknesses for 1 to 4 were found to be comparable indicating SAMs with similar surface coverages and OEO chain order and packing densities. Fibrinogen (Fb), a soluble plasma protein, and rhodopsin (Rd), an integral membrane G-protein coupled receptor, adsorbed to the SAMs of 1, as expected from previous reports, but not to the hydroxy-terminated SAMs of 2 and 4. The methoxy-terminated SAMs of 3 were resistant to Fb but, surprisingly, not to Rd. The stark difference between the adsorption of Rd to the SAMs of 3 and 4 clearly indicate that a hydroxy-terminus of the OEO chain is essential for high RPA of IMPs. The similar thicknesses and high RPA of the SAMs of 2 and 4 show the conditions of protein resistance (screening the underlying substrate, packing densities, SAM order, and conformational mobility of the OEO chains) defined from previous studies on Au are applicable to Pt. In addition, the SAMs of 4, exhibiting the highest resistance to Fb and Rd, were placed in contact with undiluted fetal bovine serum for 2h. Low protein adsorption (≈12.4ng/cm(2)), obtained under these more challenging conditions, denote a high potential of the SAMs of 4 for various applications requiring the suppression of non-specific protein adsorption.

  1. [Cancer immunotherapy by immuno-checkpoint blockade].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    As cancer immunotherapies utilizing anti-tumor T-cell responses, immuno-checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell immunotherapy have recently achieved durable responses even in advanced cancer patients with metastases. Administration of antibodies on the T-cell surface, CTLA-4 and PD-1 (or PD-1 ligand PD-L1), resulted in tumor regression of not only melanoma and renal cell cancer which were known to be relatively sensitive to immunotherapy, but also various malignancies including lung, bladder, ovarian, gastric, and head and neck cancers, as well as hematological malignancies such as Hodgkin and B-cell malignant lymphomas. These findings have changed the status of immunotherapy in the development of cancer treatments. Currently, development of combinations employing cancer immunotherapy with immuno-checkpoint blockade, as well as personalized cancer immunotherapy based on the evaluation of pretreatment immune status, are in progress.

  2. Phosphorylation-dependent interactions between Crb2 and Chk1 are essential for DNA damage checkpoint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Qu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In response to DNA damage, the eukaryotic genome surveillance system activates a checkpoint kinase cascade. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, checkpoint protein Crb2 is essential for DNA damage-induced activation of downstream effector kinase Chk1. The mechanism by which Crb2 mediates Chk1 activation is unknown. Here, we show that Crb2 recruits Chk1 to double-strand breaks (DSBs through a direct physical interaction. A pair of conserved SQ/TQ motifs in Crb2, which are consensus phosphorylation sites of upstream kinase Rad3, is required for Chk1 recruitment and activation. Mutating both of these motifs renders Crb2 defective in activating Chk1. Tethering Crb2 and Chk1 together can rescue the SQ/TQ mutations, suggesting that the main function of these phosphorylation sites is promoting interactions between Crb2 and Chk1. A 19-amino-acid peptide containing these SQ/TQ motifs is sufficient for Chk1 binding in vitro when one of the motifs is phosphorylated. Remarkably, the same peptide, when tethered to DSBs by fusing with either recombination protein Rad22/Rad52 or multi-functional scaffolding protein Rad4/Cut5, can rescue the checkpoint defect of crb2Δ. The Rad22 fusion can even bypass the need for Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1 complex in checkpoint activation. These results suggest that the main role of Crb2 and 9-1-1 in DNA damage checkpoint signaling is recruiting Chk1 to sites of DNA lesions.

  3. Truncation Derivatives of the S-Layer Protein of Sporosarcina ureae ATCC 13881 (SslA: Towards Elucidation of the Protein Domain Responsible for Self-Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda Varga

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The cell surface of Sporosarcina ureae ATCC 13881 is covered by an S-layer (SslA consisting of identical protein subunits that assemble into lattices exhibiting square symmetry. In this work the self-assembly properties of the recombinant SslA were characterised with an emphasis on the identification of protein regions responsible for self-assembly. To this end, recombinant mature SslA (aa 31-1097 and three SslA truncation derivatives (one N-terminal, one C-terminal and one CN-terminal were produced in a heterologous expression system, isolated, purified and their properties analysed by in vitro recrystallisation experiments on a functionalised silicon wafer. As a result, recombinant mature SslA self-assembled into crystalline monolayers with lattices resembling the one of the wild-type SslA. The study identifies the central protein domain consisting of amino acids 341-925 self-sufficient for self-assembly. Neither the first 341 amino acids nor the last 172 amino acids of the protein sequence are required to self-assemble into lattices.

  4. Truncation Derivatives of the S-Layer Protein of Sporosarcina ureae ATCC 13881 (SslA): Towards Elucidation of the Protein Domain Responsible for Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Melinda

    2016-08-24

    The cell surface of Sporosarcina ureae ATCC 13881 is covered by an S-layer (SslA) consisting of identical protein subunits that assemble into lattices exhibiting square symmetry. In this work the self-assembly properties of the recombinant SslA were characterised with an emphasis on the identification of protein regions responsible for self-assembly. To this end, recombinant mature SslA (aa 31-1097) and three SslA truncation derivatives (one N-terminal, one C-terminal and one CN-terminal) were produced in a heterologous expression system, isolated, purified and their properties analysed by in vitro recrystallisation experiments on a functionalised silicon wafer. As a result, recombinant mature SslA self-assembled into crystalline monolayers with lattices resembling the one of the wild-type SslA. The study identifies the central protein domain consisting of amino acids 341-925 self-sufficient for self-assembly. Neither the first 341 amino acids nor the last 172 amino acids of the protein sequence are required to self-assemble into lattices.

  5. Self-assembling polymeric nanoparticles for enhanced intra-articular anti-inflammatory protein delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmire, Rachel Elisabeth

    Osteoarthritis (OA) affects 26 million Americans, or approximately 14% of the adult population. The incidence of OA is predicted to dramatically increase in the next 20 years as the US grows older and the rate of obesity continues to increase. There are currently no clinical interventions that cure OA. Current biomaterial delivery systems exhibit several limitations. First, most drug-delivery particles are hydrophobic, which is not optimal for hydrophilic protein encapsulation. Second, hydrophobic particles, such as PLGA, could cause wear damage to the already-fragile OA cartilage structure. Additionally, these particles usually suffer from non-specific protein adsorption, which causes increased phagocytosis and can lead to increased inflammation. New therapies that increase the effectiveness of OA treatments or reverse OA disease progression will greatly decrease the economic costs and individual pain associated with this disease. The goal of this thesis was to develop a new drug-delivering material to deliver anti-inflammatory protein for treating OA. Our central hypothesis for this work is that a controlled release/presentation system will more effectively deliver anti-inflammatory protein therapies to the OA joint. The primary goal of this work was to synthesize a block copolymer that could self-assemble into injectable, sub-micron-scale particles and would allow an anti-inflammatory protein, IL-1ra, to be tethered to its surface for efficient protein delivery. The block copolymer incorporated an oligo-ethylene monomer for tissue compatibility and non-fouling behavior, a 4-nitrophenol group for efficient protein tethering, and cyclohexyl methacrylate, a hydrophobic monomer, for particle stability. We engineered the copolymer and tested it in both in vitro culture experiments and an in vivo model to evaluate protein retention in the knee joint. The rationale for this project was that the rational design and synthesis of a new drug- and protein

  6. The Nicastrin-like protein Nicalin regulates assembly and stability of the Nicalin-nodal modulator (NOMO) membrane protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffner, Christof; Dettmer, Ulf; Weiler, Timotheus; Haass, Christian

    2007-04-06

    The assembly of the gamma-secretase complex, an Alzheimer disease-related protease required for beta-amyloid generation, is tightly regulated and predominantly limited by the stoichiometrical availability of its components. We have identified a novel endoplasmic reticulum-located protein complex that is regulated in a similar fashion. It contains the recently identified Nodal signaling antagonists Nicalin (a distant homolog of the gamma-secretase component Nicastrin) and NOMO (Nodal modulator). Using an RNA interference approach, we found that Nicalin and NOMO became unstable in the absence of the respective binding partner, suggesting that complex formation has a stabilizing effect. Overexpression of Nicalin resulted in an increase in NOMO, whereas endogenous Nicalin was reduced below the detection limit. Both effects were shown to occur at a post-transcriptional level. Thus, NOMO is most likely produced in excess amounts and either stabilized by Nicalin or rapidly degraded. In contrast, Nicalin levels are limited independently of NOMO. We, therefore, propose that Nicalin controls the assembly and stability of the Nicalin-NOMO complex.

  7. An Investigation of the Effects of Self-Assembled Monolayers on Protein Crystallisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Chuan Yin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Most protein crystallisation begins from heterogeneous nucleation; in practice, crystallisation typically occurs in the presence of a solid surface in the solution. The solid surface provides a nucleation site such that the energy barrier for nucleation is lower on the surface than in the bulk solution. Different types of solid surfaces exhibit different surface energies, and the nucleation barriers depend on the characteristics of the solid surfaces. Therefore, treatment of the solid surface may alter the surface properties to increase the chance to obtain protein crystals. In this paper, we propose a method to modify the glass cover slip using a self-assembled monolayer (SAM of functional groups (methyl, sulfydryl and amino, and we investigated the effect of each SAM on protein crystallisation. The results indicated that both crystallisation success rate in a reproducibility study, and crystallisation hits in a crystallisation screening study, were increased using the SAMs, among which, the methyl-modified SAM demonstrated the most significant improvement. These results illustrated that directly modifying the crystallisation plates or glass cover slips to create surfaces that favour heterogeneous nucleation can be potentially useful in practical protein crystallisation, and the utilisation of a SAM containing a functional group can be considered a promising technique for the treatment of the surfaces that will directly contact the crystallisation solution.

  8. The biotin repressor: thermodynamic coupling of corepressor binding, protein assembly, and sequence-specific DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streaker, Emily D; Gupta, Aditi; Beckett, Dorothy

    2002-12-03

    The Escherichia coli biotin repressor, an allosteric transcriptional regulator, is activated for binding to the biotin operator by the small molecule biotinyl-5'-AMP. Results of combined thermodynamic, kinetic, and structural studies of the protein have revealed that corepressor binding results in disorder to order transitions in the protein monomer that facilitate tighter dimerization. The enhanced stability of the dimer leads to stabilization of the resulting biotin repressor-biotin operator complex. It is not clear, however, that the allosteric response in the system is transmitted solely through the protein-protein interface. In this work, the allosteric mechanism has been quantitatively probed by measuring the biotin operator binding and dimerization properties of three biotin repressor species: the apo or unliganded form, the biotin-bound form, and the holo or bio-5'-AMP-bound form. Comparisons of the pairwise differences in the bioO binding and dimerization energetics for the apo and holo species reveal that the enhanced DNA binding energetics resulting from adenylate binding track closely with the enhanced assembly energetics. However, when the results for repressor pairs that include the biotin-bound species are compared, no such equivalence is observed.

  9. Structure and assembly of group B streptococcus pilus 2b backbone protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Roberta; Malito, Enrico; Lazzarin, Maddalena; Nuccitelli, Annalisa; Castagnetti, Andrea; Bottomley, Matthew J; Margarit, Immaculada; Maione, Domenico; Rinaudo, C Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a major cause of invasive disease in infants. Like other Gram-positive bacteria, GBS uses a sortase C-catalyzed transpeptidation mechanism to generate cell surface pili from backbone and ancillary pilin precursor substrates. The three pilus types identified in GBS contain structural subunits that are highly immunogenic and are promising candidates for the development of a broadly-protective vaccine. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of the backbone protein of pilus 2b (BP-2b) at 1.06Å resolution. The structure reveals a classical IgG-like fold typical of the pilin subunits of other Gram-positive bacteria. The crystallized portion of the protein (residues 185-468) encompasses domains D2 and D3 that together confer high stability to the protein due to the presence of an internal isopeptide bond within each domain. The D2+D3 region, lacking the N-terminal D1 domain, was as potent as the entire protein in conferring protection against GBS challenge in a well-established mouse model. By site-directed mutagenesis and complementation studies in GBS knock-out strains we identified the residues and motives essential for assembly of the BP-2b monomers into high-molecular weight complexes, thus providing new insights into pilus 2b polymerization.

  10. Structure and assembly of group B streptococcus pilus 2b backbone protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Cozzi

    Full Text Available Group B Streptococcus (GBS is a major cause of invasive disease in infants. Like other Gram-positive bacteria, GBS uses a sortase C-catalyzed transpeptidation mechanism to generate cell surface pili from backbone and ancillary pilin precursor substrates. The three pilus types identified in GBS contain structural subunits that are highly immunogenic and are promising candidates for the development of a broadly-protective vaccine. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of the backbone protein of pilus 2b (BP-2b at 1.06Å resolution. The structure reveals a classical IgG-like fold typical of the pilin subunits of other Gram-positive bacteria. The crystallized portion of the protein (residues 185-468 encompasses domains D2 and D3 that together confer high stability to the protein due to the presence of an internal isopeptide bond within each domain. The D2+D3 region, lacking the N-terminal D1 domain, was as potent as the entire protein in conferring protection against GBS challenge in a well-established mouse model. By site-directed mutagenesis and complementation studies in GBS knock-out strains we identified the residues and motives essential for assembly of the BP-2b monomers into high-molecular weight complexes, thus providing new insights into pilus 2b polymerization.

  11. YsxC, an essential protein in Staphylococcus aureus crucial for ribosome assembly/stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Lara Jorge

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial growth and division requires a core set of essential proteins, several of which are still of unknown function. They are also attractive targets for the development of new antibiotics. YsxC is a member of a family of GTPases highly conserved across eubacteria with a possible ribosome associated function. Results Here, we demonstrate by the creation of a conditional lethal mutant that ysxC is apparently essential for growth in S. aureus. To begin to elucidate YsxC function, a translational fusion of YsxC to the CBP-ProteinA tag in the staphylococcal chromosome was made, enabling Tandem Affinity Purification (TAP of YsxC-interacting partners. These included the ribosomal proteins S2, S10 and L17, as well as the β' subunit of the RNA polymerase. YsxC was then shown to copurify with ribosomes as an accessory protein specifically localizing to the 50 S subunit. YsxC depletion led to a decrease in the presence of mature ribosomes, indicating a role in ribosome assembly and/or stability in S. aureus. Conclusions In this study we demonstrate that YsxC of S. aureus localizes to the ribosomes, is crucial for ribosomal stability and is apparently essential for the life of S. aureus.

  12. CAS-1, a C. elegans cyclase-associated protein, is required for sarcomeric actin assembly in striated muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Nomura, Kazumi; Ono, Kanako; Ono, Shoichiro

    2012-01-01

    Assembly of contractile apparatuses in striated muscle requires precisely regulated reorganization of the actin cytoskeletal proteins into sarcomeric organization. Regulation of actin filament dynamics is one of the essential processes of myofibril assembly, but the mechanism of actin regulation in striated muscle is not clearly understood. Actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin is a key enhancer of actin filament dynamics in striated muscle in both vertebrates and nematodes. Here, we repo...

  13. Social and ethical checkpoints for bottom-up synthetic biology, or protocells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedau, Mark A; Parke, Emily C; Tangen, Uwe; Hantsche-Tangen, Brigitte

    2009-12-01

    An alternative to creating novel organisms through the traditional "top-down" approach to synthetic biology involves creating them from the "bottom up" by assembling them from non-living components; the products of this approach are called "protocells." In this paper we describe how bottom-up and top-down synthetic biology differ, review the current state of protocell research and development, and examine the unique ethical, social, and regulatory issues raised by bottom-up synthetic biology. Protocells have not yet been developed, but many expect this to happen within the next five to ten years. Accordingly, we identify six key checkpoints in protocell development at which particular attention should be given to specific ethical, social and regulatory issues concerning bottom-up synthetic biology, and make ten recommendations for responsible protocell science that are tied to the achievement of these checkpoints.

  14. Foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid proteins; analysis of protein processing, assembly and utility as vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belsham, Graham

    precursor enhances the yield of processed capsid proteins and their assembly into empty capsid particles within mammalian cells. Such particles can potentially form the basis of a vaccine but they may only have the same properties as the current inactivated vaccines. We have expressed the FMDV P1-2A alone...... or with FMDV 3Cpro using a “single cycle” alphavirus vector based on Semliki Forest virus (SFV). Cattle vaccinated with these rSFV-FMDV vectors alone, produced anti-FMDV antibodies but the immune response was insufficient to give protection against FMDV challenge. However, vaccination with these vectors primed...... a much stronger immune response against FMDV post-challenge. In subsequent experiments, cattle were sequentially vaccinated with a rSFV-FMDV followed by recombinant FMDV empty capsid particles, or vice versa, prior to challenge. Animals given a primary vaccination with the rSFV-FMDV vector...

  15. Co-evolution of transcriptional silencing proteins and the DNA elements specifying their assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver A Zill

    Full Text Available Co-evolution of transcriptional regulatory proteins and their sites of action has been often hypothesized but rarely demonstrated. Here we provide experimental evidence of such co-evolution in yeast silent chromatin, a finding that emerged from studies of hybrids formed between two closely related Saccharomyces species. A unidirectional silencing incompatibility between S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus led to a key discovery: asymmetrical complementation of divergent orthologs of the silent chromatin component Sir4. In S. cerevisiae/S. bayanus interspecies hybrids, ChIP-Seq analysis revealed a restriction against S. cerevisiae Sir4 associating with most S. bayanus silenced regions; in contrast, S. bayanus Sir4 associated with S. cerevisiae silenced loci to an even greater degree than did S. cerevisiae's own Sir4. Functional changes in silencer sequences paralleled changes in Sir4 sequence and a reduction in Sir1 family members in S. cerevisiae. Critically, species-specific silencing of the S. bayanus HMR locus could be reconstituted in S. cerevisiae by co-transfer of the S. bayanus Sir4 and Kos3 (the ancestral relative of Sir1 proteins. As Sir1/Kos3 and Sir4 bind conserved silencer-binding proteins, but not specific DNA sequences, these rapidly evolving proteins served to interpret differences in the two species' silencers presumably involving emergent features created by the regulatory proteins that bind sequences within silencers. The results presented here, and in particular the high resolution ChIP-Seq localization of the Sir4 protein, provided unanticipated insights into the mechanism of silent chromatin assembly in yeast.

  16. Co-evolution of transcriptional silencing proteins and the DNA elements specifying their assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zill, Oliver A; Scannell, Devin; Teytelman, Leonid; Rine, Jasper

    2010-11-30

    Co-evolution of transcriptional regulatory proteins and their sites of action has been often hypothesized but rarely demonstrated. Here we provide experimental evidence of such co-evolution in yeast silent chromatin, a finding that emerged from studies of hybrids formed between two closely related Saccharomyces species. A unidirectional silencing incompatibility between S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus led to a key discovery: asymmetrical complementation of divergent orthologs of the silent chromatin component Sir4. In S. cerevisiae/S. bayanus interspecies hybrids, ChIP-Seq analysis revealed a restriction against S. cerevisiae Sir4 associating with most S. bayanus silenced regions; in contrast, S. bayanus Sir4 associated with S. cerevisiae silenced loci to an even greater degree than did S. cerevisiae's own Sir4. Functional changes in silencer sequences paralleled changes in Sir4 sequence and a reduction in Sir1 family members in S. cerevisiae. Critically, species-specific silencing of the S. bayanus HMR locus could be reconstituted in S. cerevisiae by co-transfer of the S. bayanus Sir4 and Kos3 (the ancestral relative of Sir1) proteins. As Sir1/Kos3 and Sir4 bind conserved silencer-binding proteins, but not specific DNA sequences, these rapidly evolving proteins served to interpret differences in the two species' silencers presumably involving emergent features created by the regulatory proteins that bind sequences within silencers. The results presented here, and in particular the high resolution ChIP-Seq localization of the Sir4 protein, provided unanticipated insights into the mechanism of silent chromatin assembly in yeast.

  17. Protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions in domain-assembly : Lessons from giant unilamellar vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kahya, Nicoletta

    2010-01-01

    Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) provide a key model membrane system to study lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions, which are relevant to vital cellular processes, by (single-molecule) optical microscopy. Here, we review the work on reconstitution techniques for membrane proteins and other pr

  18. M protein is sufficient for assembly and release of Peste des petits ruminants virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiuxia; Ou, Changbo; Dou, Yongxi; Chen, Lei; Meng, Xuelian; Liu, Xingyou; Yu, Yan; Jiang, Jinqing; Ma, Jinyou; Zhang, Zhidong; Hu, Jianhe; Cai, Xuepeng

    2017-03-19

    Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV), belonging to paramyxoviruses, has six structure proteins (such as matrix protein (M), nucleocapsid proteins (N), fusion protein (F) and hemagglutinin protein (H)) and could cause high morbidity and mortality in sheep and goats. Although a vaccine strain of PPRV has been rescued and co-expression of M and N could yield PPRV-like particles, the roles of structure proteins in virion assembly and release have not been investigated in detail. In this study, plasmids carrying PPRV cDNA sequences encoding the N, M, H, and F proteins were expressed in Vero cells. The co-expression of all four proteins resulted in the release of virus-like particles (VLPs) with similar release efficiency to that of authentic virions. Moreover, the co-expression of M together with F also resulted in efficient VLPs release. In the absence of M protein, the expression of no combination of the other proteins resulted in particle release. In summary, a VLPs production system for PPRV has been established and M protein is necessary for promoting the assembly and release of VLPs, of which the predominant protein is M protein. Further study will be focused on the immunogenicity of the VLPs.

  19. Template based parallel checkpointing in a massively parallel computer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles Jens; Inglett, Todd Alan

    2009-01-13

    A method and apparatus for a template based parallel checkpoint save for a massively parallel super computer system using a parallel variation of the rsync protocol, and network broadcast. In preferred embodiments, the checkpoint data for each node is compared to a template checkpoint file that resides in the storage and that was previously produced. Embodiments herein greatly decrease the amount of data that must be transmitted and stored for faster checkpointing and increased efficiency of the computer system. Embodiments are directed to a parallel computer system with nodes arranged in a cluster with a high speed interconnect that can perform broadcast communication. The checkpoint contains a set of actual small data blocks with their corresponding checksums from all nodes in the system. The data blocks may be compressed using conventional non-lossy data compression algorithms to further reduce the overall checkpoint size.

  20. Checkpoint Blockade in Cancer Immunotherapy: Squaring the Circle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A.V. Marzolini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Manipulating the complex interaction between the immune system and tumour cells has been the focus of cancer research for many years, but it is only in the past decade that significant progress has been made in the field of cancer immunotherapy resulting in clinically effective treatments. The blockade of co-inhibitory immune checkpoints, essential for maintaining lymphocyte homeostasis and self-tolerance, by immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies has resulted in the augmentation of anti-tumour responses. The greatest successes so far have been seen with the blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen-4, which has resulted in the first Phase III clinical trial showing an overall survival benefit in metastatic melanoma, and in the blockade of the programmed cell death protein-1 axis. This concise review will focus on the clinical advances made by the blockade of these two pathways and their role in current cancer treatment strategies.

  1. Expression and cytosolic assembly of the S-layer fusion protein mSbsC-EGFP in eukaryotic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veenhuis Marten

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Native as well as recombinant bacterial cell surface layer (S-layer protein of Geobacillus (G. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 assembles to supramolecular structures with an oblique symmetry. Upon expression in E. coli, S-layer self assembly products are formed in the cytosol. We tested the expression and assembly of a fusion protein, consisting of the mature part (aa 31–1099 of the S-layer protein and EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein, in eukaryotic host cells, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human HeLa cells. Results Upon expression in E. coli the recombinant mSbsC-EGFP fusion protein was recovered from the insoluble fraction. After denaturation by Guanidine (Gua-HCl treatment and subsequent dialysis the fusion protein assembled in solution and yielded green fluorescent cylindric structures with regular symmetry comparable to that of the authentic SbsC. For expression in the eukaryotic host Saccharomyces (S. cerevisiae mSbsC-EGFP was cloned in a multi-copy expression vector bearing the strong constitutive GPD1 (glyceraldehyde-3-phosophate-dehydrogenase promoter. The respective yeast transfomants were only slightly impaired in growth and exhibited a needle-like green fluorescent pattern. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM studies revealed the presence of closely packed cylindrical structures in the cytosol with regular symmetry comparable to those obtained after in vitro recrystallization. Similar structures are observed in HeLa cells expressing mSbsC-EGFP from the Cytomegalovirus (CMV IE promoter. Conclusion The mSbsC-EGFP fusion protein is stably expressed both in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and in HeLa cells. Recombinant mSbsC-EGFP combines properties of both fusion partners: it assembles both in vitro and in vivo to cylindrical structures that show an intensive green fluorescence. Fusion of proteins to S-layer proteins may be a useful tool for high level expression in yeast and HeLa cells of

  2. Insights into Hemoglobin Assembly through in Vivo Mutagenesis of α-Hemoglobin Stabilizing Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandros, Eugene; Mollan, Todd L.; Yu, Xiang; Wang, Xiaomei; Yao, Yu; D'Souza, Janine; Gell, David A.; Olson, John S.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2012-01-01

    α-Hemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) is believed to facilitate adult Hemoglobin A assembly and protect against toxic free α-globin subunits. Recombinant AHSP binds multiple forms of free α-globin to stabilize their structures and inhibit precipitation. However, AHSP also stimulates autooxidation of αO2 subunit and its rapid conversion to a partially unfolded bishistidyl hemichrome structure. To investigate these biochemical properties, we altered the evolutionarily conserved AHSP proline 30 in recombinantly expressed proteins and introduced identical mutations into the endogenous murine Ahsp gene. In vitro, the P30W AHSP variant bound oxygenated α chains with 30-fold increased affinity. Both P30W and P30A mutant proteins also caused decreased rates of αO2 autooxidation as compared with wild-type AHSP. Despite these abnormalities, mice harboring P30A or P30W Ahsp mutations exhibited no detectable defects in erythropoiesis at steady state or during induced stresses. Further biochemical studies revealed that the AHSP P30A and P30W substitutions had minimal effects on AHSP interactions with ferric α subunits. Together, our findings indicate that the ability of AHSP to stabilize nascent α chain folding intermediates prior to hemin reduction and incorporation into adult Hemoglobin A is physiologically more important than AHSP interactions with ferrous αO2 subunits. PMID:22287545

  3. Insights into hemoglobin assembly through in vivo mutagenesis of α-hemoglobin stabilizing protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandros, Eugene; Mollan, Todd L; Yu, Xiang; Wang, Xiaomei; Yao, Yu; D'Souza, Janine; Gell, David A; Olson, John S; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2012-03-30

    α-Hemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) is believed to facilitate adult Hemoglobin A assembly and protect against toxic free α-globin subunits. Recombinant AHSP binds multiple forms of free α-globin to stabilize their structures and inhibit precipitation. However, AHSP also stimulates autooxidation of αO(2) subunit and its rapid conversion to a partially unfolded bishistidyl hemichrome structure. To investigate these biochemical properties, we altered the evolutionarily conserved AHSP proline 30 in recombinantly expressed proteins and introduced identical mutations into the endogenous murine Ahsp gene. In vitro, the P30W AHSP variant bound oxygenated α chains with 30-fold increased affinity. Both P30W and P30A mutant proteins also caused decreased rates of αO(2) autooxidation as compared with wild-type AHSP. Despite these abnormalities, mice harboring P30A or P30W Ahsp mutations exhibited no detectable defects in erythropoiesis at steady state or during induced stresses. Further biochemical studies revealed that the AHSP P30A and P30W substitutions had minimal effects on AHSP interactions with ferric α subunits. Together, our findings indicate that the ability of AHSP to stabilize nascent α chain folding intermediates prior to hemin reduction and incorporation into adult Hemoglobin A is physiologically more important than AHSP interactions with ferrous αO(2) subunits.

  4. Multi-colored fibers by self-assembly of DNA, histone proteins, and cationic conjugated polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengyan; Liu, Zhang; Wang, Bing; Feng, Liheng; Liu, Libing; Lv, Fengting; Wang, Yilin; Wang, Shu

    2014-01-01

    The development of biomolecular fiber materials with imaging ability has become more and more useful for biological applications. In this work, cationic conjugated polymers (CCPs) were used to construct inherent fluorescent microfibers with natural biological macromolecules (DNA and histone proteins) through the interfacial polyelectrolyte complexation (IPC) procedure. Isothermal titration microcalorimetry results show that the driving forces for fiber formation are electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, as well as the release of counterions and bound water molecules. Color-encoded IPC fibers were also obtained based on the co-assembly of DNA, histone proteins, and blue-, green-, or red- (RGB-) emissive CCPs by tuning the fluorescence resonance energy-transfer among the CCPs at a single excitation wavelength. The fibers could encapsulate GFP-coded Escherichia coli BL21, and the expression of GFP proteins was successfully regulated by the external environment of the fibers. These multi-colored fibers show a great potential in biomedical applications, such as biosensor, delivery, and release of biological molecules and tissue engineering.

  5. Host ESCRT proteins are required for bromovirus RNA replication compartment assembly and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Diaz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA viruses genome replication invariably is associated with vesicles or other rearranged cellular membranes. Brome mosaic virus (BMV RNA replication occurs on perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes in ~70 nm vesicular invaginations (spherules. BMV RNA replication vesicles show multiple parallels with membrane-enveloped, budding retrovirus virions, whose envelopment and release depend on the host ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport membrane-remodeling machinery. We now find that deleting components of the ESCRT pathway results in at least two distinct BMV phenotypes. One group of genes regulate RNA replication and the frequency of viral replication complex formation, but had no effect on spherule size, while a second group of genes regulate RNA replication in a way or ways independent of spherule formation. In particular, deleting SNF7 inhibits BMV RNA replication > 25-fold and abolishes detectable BMV spherule formation, even though the BMV RNA replication proteins accumulate and localize normally on perinuclear ER membranes. Moreover, BMV ESCRT recruitment and spherule assembly depend on different sets of protein-protein interactions from those used by multivesicular body vesicles, HIV-1 virion budding, or tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV spherule formation. These and other data demonstrate that BMV requires cellular ESCRT components for proper formation and function of its vesicular RNA replication compartments. The results highlight growing but diverse interactions of ESCRT factors with many viruses and viral processes, and potential value of the ESCRT pathway as a target for broad-spectrum antiviral resistance.

  6. Host ESCRT proteins are required for bromovirus RNA replication compartment assembly and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Arturo; Zhang, Jiantao; Ollwerther, Abigail; Wang, Xiaofeng; Ahlquist, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Positive-strand RNA viruses genome replication invariably is associated with vesicles or other rearranged cellular membranes. Brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNA replication occurs on perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes in ~70 nm vesicular invaginations (spherules). BMV RNA replication vesicles show multiple parallels with membrane-enveloped, budding retrovirus virions, whose envelopment and release depend on the host ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport) membrane-remodeling machinery. We now find that deleting components of the ESCRT pathway results in at least two distinct BMV phenotypes. One group of genes regulate RNA replication and the frequency of viral replication complex formation, but had no effect on spherule size, while a second group of genes regulate RNA replication in a way or ways independent of spherule formation. In particular, deleting SNF7 inhibits BMV RNA replication > 25-fold and abolishes detectable BMV spherule formation, even though the BMV RNA replication proteins accumulate and localize normally on perinuclear ER membranes. Moreover, BMV ESCRT recruitment and spherule assembly depend on different sets of protein-protein interactions from those used by multivesicular body vesicles, HIV-1 virion budding, or tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) spherule formation. These and other data demonstrate that BMV requires cellular ESCRT components for proper formation and function of its vesicular RNA replication compartments. The results highlight growing but diverse interactions of ESCRT factors with many viruses and viral processes, and potential value of the ESCRT pathway as a target for broad-spectrum antiviral resistance.

  7. Collagen peptide-based biomaterials for protein delivery and peptide-promoted self-assembly of gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernenwein, Dawn M.

    2011-12-01

    Bottom-up self-assembly of peptides has driven the research progress for the following two projects: protein delivery vehicles of collagen microflorettes and the assembly of gold nanoparticles with coiled-coil peptides. Collagen is the most abundant protein in the mammals yet due to immunogenic responses, batch-to-batch variability and lack of sequence modifications, synthetic collagen has been designed to self-assemble into native collagen-like structures. In particular with this research, metal binding ligands were incorporated on the termini of collagen-like peptides to generate micron-sized particles, microflorettes. The over-arching goal of the first research project is to engineer MRI-active microflorettes, loaded with His-tagged growth factors with differential release rates while bound to stem cells that can be implemented toward regenerative cell-based therapies. His-tagged proteins, such as green fluorescent protein, have successfully been incorporated on the surface and throughout the microflorettes. Protein release was monitored under physiological conditions and was related to particle degradation. In human plasma full release was obtained within six days. Stability of the microflorettes under physiological conditions was also examined for the development of a therapeutically relevant delivery agent. Additionally, MRI active microflorettes have been generated through the incorporation of a gadolinium binding ligand, DOTA within the collagen-based peptide sequence. To probe peptide-promoted self-assemblies of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) by non-covalent, charge complementary interactions, a highly anionic coiled-coil peptide was designed and synthesized. Upon formation of peptide-GNP interactions, the hydrophobic domain of the coiled-coil were shown to promote the self-assembly of peptide-GNPs clustering. Hydrophobic forces were found to play an important role in the assembly process, as a peptide with an equally overall negative charge, but lacking an

  8. Dissecting the role of MPS1 in chromosome biorientation and the spindle checkpoint through the small molecule inhibitor reversine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santaguida, Stefano; Tighe, Anthony; D'Alise, Anna Morena; Taylor, Stephen S; Musacchio, Andrea

    2010-07-12

    The catalytic activity of the MPS1 kinase is crucial for the spindle assembly checkpoint and for chromosome biorientation on the mitotic spindle. We report that the small molecule reversine is a potent mitotic inhibitor of MPS1. Reversine inhibits the spindle assembly checkpoint in a dose-dependent manner. Its addition to mitotic HeLa cells causes the ejection of Mad1 and the ROD-ZWILCH-ZW10 complex, both of which are important for the spindle checkpoint, from unattached kinetochores. By using reversine, we also demonstrate that MPS1 is required for the correction of improper chromosome-microtubule attachments. We provide evidence that MPS1 acts downstream from the AURORA B kinase, another crucial component of the error correction pathway. Our experiments describe a very useful tool to interfere with MPS1 activity in human cells. They also shed light on the relationship between the error correction pathway and the spindle checkpoint and suggest that these processes are coregulated and are likely to share at least a subset of their catalytic machinery.

  9. Assembly of the intrinsic factor domains and oligomerization of the protein in the presence of cobalamin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedosov, Sergey N; Fedosova, Natalya U; Berglund, Lars;

    2004-01-01

    oligomerized. A mixture of two fragments IF(30) + IF(20) and Cbl produced a firm complex, IF(30+20).Cbl, which could not associate to dimers. In contrast to IF(30+20).Cbl, the saturated full-length monomers IF(50).Cbl dimerized with K(d) approximately 1 microM. We suggest a two-domain organization of the full......-length protein, where two distant units, IF(30) and IF(20), can be assembled only by Cbl. They are connected by a protease-sensitive link, whose native structure is likely to be important for dimerization. However, linkage between two domains is not compulsory for Cbl binding. Advantages of the two...

  10. Assembly of Modified Ferritin Proteins on Carbon Nanotubes and its Electrocatalytic Activity for Oxygen Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Lillehei, Peter T.; Park, Cheol

    2012-01-01

    Highly effective dispersions of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be made using a commercially available buffer solution. Buffer solutions of 3-(N-morpholino)-propanesulfonic acid (MOPS), which consists of a cyclic ring with nitrogen and oxygen heteroatoms, a charged group, and an alkyl chain greatly enhance the dispersibility and stability of CNTs in aqueous solutions. Additionally, the ability of biomolecules, especially cationized Pt-cored ferritins, to adhere onto the well-dispersed CNTs in the aqueous buffer solution is also improved. This was accomplished without the use of surfactant molecules, which are detrimental to the electrical, mechanical, and other physical properties of the resulting products. The assembled Pt-cored ferritin proteins on the CNTs were used as an electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction

  11. Theoretical aspects of self-assembly of proteins: A Kirkwood-Buff-theory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Naim, Arieh

    2013-06-01

    A new approach to the problem of self-assembly of proteins induced by temperature, pressure, or changes in solute concentration is presented. The problem is formulated in terms of Le Chatelier principle, and a solution is sought in terms of the Kirkwood-Buff theory of solutions. In this article we focus on the pressure and solute effects on the association-dissociation equilibrium. We examine the role of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic effects. We argue that the latter are more important than the former. The solute effect, on the other hand, depends on the preferential solvation of the monomer and the aggregate with respect to solvent and co-solvent molecules. An experimental approach based on model compounds to study these effects is suggested.

  12. Protein self-assembly onto nanodots leads to formation of conductive bio-based hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao; Dong, Chenbo; Su, Rigu; Xu, Quan; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica

    2016-12-01

    The next generation of nanowires that could advance the integration of functional nanosystems into synthetic applications from photocatalysis to optical devices need to demonstrate increased ability to promote electron transfer at their interfaces while ensuring optimum quantum confinement. Herein we used the biological recognition and the self-assembly properties of tubulin, a protein involved in building the filaments of cellular microtubules, to create stable, free standing and conductive sulfur-doped carbon nanodots-based conductive bio-hybrids. The physical and chemical properties (e.g., composition, morphology, diameter etc.) of such user-synthesized hybrids were investigated using atomic and spectroscopic techniques, while the electron transfer rate was estimated using peak currents formed during voltammetry scanning. Our results demonstrate the ability to create individually hybrid nanowires capable to reduce energy losses; such hybrids could possibly be used in the future for the advancement and implementation into nanometer-scale functional devices.

  13. The Caenorhabditis elegans protein SAS-5 forms large oligomeric assemblies critical for centriole formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogala, Kacper B; Dynes, Nicola J; Hatzopoulos, Georgios N; Yan, Jun; Pong, Sheng Kai; Robinson, Carol V; Deane, Charlotte M; Gönczy, Pierre; Vakonakis, Ioannis

    2015-05-29

    Centrioles are microtubule-based organelles crucial for cell division, sensing and motility. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the onset of centriole formation requires notably the proteins SAS-5 and SAS-6, which have functional equivalents across eukaryotic evolution. Whereas the molecular architecture of SAS-6 and its role in initiating centriole formation are well understood, the mechanisms by which SAS-5 and its relatives function is unclear. Here, we combine biophysical and structural analysis to uncover the architecture of SAS-5 and examine its functional implications in vivo. Our work reveals that two distinct self-associating domains are necessary to form higher-order oligomers of SAS-5: a trimeric coiled coil and a novel globular dimeric Implico domain. Disruption of either domain leads to centriole duplication failure in worm embryos, indicating that large SAS-5 assemblies are necessary for function in vivo.

  14. Checkpointing and rollback recovery for network of workstations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪东升; 郑纬民; 王鼎兴; 沈美明

    1999-01-01

    Network of workstations (NOW) now becomes one of the main trends of parallel computing. But for long-running scientific programs, it needs effective fault tolerance for its changing property. Checkpointing and rollback recovery is a solution to this problem. First the main problems upon rollback recovery are discussed, the different checkpointing techniques for NOW are analyzed, and then the design and implementation of ChaRM (checkpoint-based rollback recovery and process migration) system are described. The comparison of three coordinated checkpointing systems is given.

  15. Construction of an S-layer protein exhibiting modified self-assembling properties and enhanced metal binding capacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollmann, Katrin; Matys, Sabine

    2007-07-01

    The functional S-layer protein gene slfB of the uranium mining waste pile isolate Bacillus sphaericus JG-A12 was cloned as a polymerase chain reaction product into the expression vector pET Lic/Ek 30 and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli Bl21(DE3). The addition of His tags to the N and C termini enabled the purification of the recombinant protein by Ni-chelating chromatography. The Ni binding capacity of the His-tagged recombinant S-layer protein was compared with that of the wild-type S layer. The inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analyses demonstrate a significantly enhanced Ni binding capability of the recombinant protein. In addition, the self-assembling properties of the purified modified S-layer proteins were studied by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Whereas the wild-type S-layer proteins re-assembled into regular cylindric structures, the recombinant S-layer proteins reassembled into regular sheets that formed globular agglomerating structures. The nanoporous structure of the protein meshwork, together with its enhanced Ni binding capacity, makes the recombinant S-layer attractive as a novel self-assembling biological template for the fabrication of metal nanoclusters and construction of nanomaterials that are of technical interest.

  16. EMODnet MedSea Checkpoint for sustainable Blue Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussat, Eric; Pinardi, Nadia; Manzella, Giuseppe; Blanc, Frederique

    2016-04-01

    The EMODNET checkpoint is a wide monitoring system assessment activity aiming to support the sustainable Blue Growth at the scale of the European Sea Basins by: 1) Clarifying the observation landscape of all compartments of the marine environment including Air, Water, Seabed, Biota and Human activities, pointing out to the existing programs, national, European and international 2) Evaluating fitness for use indicators that will show the accessibility and usability of observation and modeling data sets and their roles and synergies based upon selected applications by the European Marine Environment Strategy 3) Prioritizing the needs to optimize the overall monitoring Infrastructure (in situ and satellite data collection and assembling, data management and networking, modeling and forecasting, geo-infrastructure) and release recommendations for evolutions to better meet the application requirements in view of sustainable Blue Growth The assessment is designed for : - Institutional stakeholders for decision making on observation and monitoring systems - Data providers and producers to know how their data collected once for a given purpose could fit other user needs - End-users interested in a regional status and possible uses of existing monitoring data Selected end-user applications are of paramount importance for: (i) the blue economy sector (offshore industries, fisheries); (ii) marine environment variability and change (eutrophication, river inputs and ocean climate change impacts); (iii) emergency management (oil spills); and (iv) preservation of natural resources and biodiversity (Marine Protected Areas). End-user applications generate innovative products based on the existing observation landscape. The fitness for use assessment is made thanks to the comparison of the expected product specifications with the quality of the product derived from the selected data. This involves the development of checkpoint information and indicators based on Data quality and

  17. Surface layer protein characterization by small angle x-ray scattering and a fractal mean force concept: From protein structure to nanodisk assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horejs, Christine; Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Peterlik, Herwig; Jungbauer, Alois; Tscheliessnig, Rupert

    2010-11-01

    Surface layers (S-layers) are the most commonly observed cell surface structure of prokaryotic organisms. They are made up of proteins that spontaneously self-assemble into functional crystalline lattices in solution, on various solid surfaces, and interfaces. While classical experimental techniques failed to recover a complete structural model of an unmodified S-layer protein, small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) provides an opportunity to study the structure of S-layer monomers in solution and of self-assembled two-dimensional sheets. For the protein under investigation we recently suggested an atomistic structural model by the use of molecular dynamics simulations. This structural model is now refined on the basis of SAXS data together with a fractal assembly approach. Here we show that a nondiluted critical system of proteins, which crystallize into monomolecular structures, might be analyzed by SAXS if protein-protein interactions are taken into account by relating a fractal local density distribution to a fractal local mean potential, which has to fulfill the Poisson equation. The present work demonstrates an important step into the elucidation of the structure of S-layers and offers a tool to analyze the structure of self-assembling systems in solution by means of SAXS and computer simulations.

  18. A DNA damage checkpoint in Caulobacter crescentus inhibits cell division through a direct interaction with FtsW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, Joshua W; Hopkins, Alexander C; Laub, Michael T

    2011-06-15

    Following DNA damage, cells typically delay cell cycle progression and inhibit cell division until their chromosomes have been repaired. The bacterial checkpoint systems responsible for these DNA damage responses are incompletely understood. Here, we show that Caulobacter crescentus responds to DNA damage by coordinately inducing an SOS regulon and inhibiting the master regulator CtrA. Included in the SOS regulon is sidA (SOS-induced inhibitor of cell division A), a membrane protein of only 29 amino acids that helps to delay cell division following DNA damage, but is dispensable in undamaged cells. SidA is sufficient, when overproduced, to block cell division. However, unlike many other regulators of bacterial cell division, SidA does not directly disrupt the assembly or stability of the cytokinetic ring protein FtsZ, nor does it affect the recruitment of other components of the cell division machinery. Instead, we provide evidence that SidA inhibits division by binding directly to FtsW to prevent the final constriction of the cytokinetic ring.

  19. Investigate the Effect of Thawing Process on the Self-Assembly of Silk Protein for Tissue Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Hien Anh; Huynh, Khon Chan; Vo, Toi Van

    2017-01-01

    Biological self-assembly is a process in which building blocks autonomously organize to form stable supermolecules of higher order and complexity through domination of weak, noncovalent interactions. For silk protein, the effect of high incubating temperature on the induction of secondary structure and self-assembly was well investigated. However, the effect of freezing and thawing on silk solution has not been studied. The present work aimed to investigate a new all-aqueous process to form 3D porous silk fibroin matrices using a freezing-assisted self-assembly method. This study proposes an experimental investigation and optimization of environmental parameters for the self-assembly process such as freezing temperature, thawing process, and concentration of silk solution. The optical images demonstrated the possibility and potential of −80ST48 treatment to initialize the self-assembly of silk fibroin as well as controllably fabricate a porous scaffold. Moreover, the micrograph images illustrate the assembly of silk protein chain in 7 days under the treatment of −80ST48 process. The surface morphology characterization proved that this method could control the pore size of porous scaffolds by control of the concentration of silk solution. The animal test showed the support of silk scaffold for cell adhesion and proliferation, as well as the cell migration process in the 3D implantable scaffold.

  20. A Cytoplasmic Protein Ssl3829 Is Important for NDH-1 Hydrophilic Arm Assembly in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaozhuo; Gao, Fudan; Zhang, Jingsong; Zhao, Jiaohong; Ogawa, Teruo; Ma, Weimin

    2016-06-01

    Despite significant progress in clarifying the subunit compositions and functions of the multiple NDH-1 complexes in cyanobacteria, the assembly factors and their roles in assembling these NDH-1 complexes remain elusive. Two mutants sensitive to high light for growth and impaired in NDH-1-dependent cyclic electron transport around photosystem I were isolated from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 transformed with a transposon-tagged library. Both mutants were tagged in the ssl3829 gene encoding an unknown protein, which shares significant similarity with Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CHLORORESPIRATORY REDUCTION7. The ssl3829 product was localized in the cytoplasm and associates with an NDH-1 hydrophilic arm assembly intermediate (NAI) of about 300 kD (NAI300) and an NdhI maturation factor, Slr1097. Upon deletion of Ssl3829, the NAI300 complex was no longer visible on gels, thereby impeding the assembly of the NDH-1 hydrophilic arm. The deletion also abolished Slr1097 and consequently reduced the amount of mature NdhI in the cytoplasm, which repressed the dynamic assembly process of the NDH-1 hydrophilic arm because mature NdhI was essential to stabilize all functional NAIs. Therefore, Ssl3829 plays an important role in the assembly of the NDH-1 hydrophilic arm by accumulating the NAI300 complex and Slr1097 protein in the cytoplasm.

  1. An E2 enzyme Ubc11 is required for ubiquitination of Slp1/Cdc20 and spindle checkpoint silencing in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikoshi, Yasunori; Habu, Toshiyuki; Matsumoto, Tomohiro

    2013-03-15

    For ordered mitotic progression, various proteins have to be regulated by an ubiquitin ligase, the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C) with appropriate timing. Recent studies have implied that the activity of APC/C also contributes to release of mitotic checkpoint complexes (MCCs) from its target Cdc20 in the process of silencing the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Here we describe a temperature-sensitive mutant (ubc11-P93L) in which cell cycle progression is arrested at mitosis. The mutant grows normally at the restrictive temperature when SAC is inactivated, suggesting that the arrest is not due to abnormal spindle assembly, but rather due to prolonged activation of SAC. Supporting this notion, MCCs remain bound to APC/C even when SAC is satisfied. The ubc11 (+) gene encodes one of the two E2 enzymes required for progression through mitosis in fission yeast. Remarkably, Slp1 (a fission yeast homolog of Cdc20), which is degraded in an APC/C-dependent manner, stays stable throughout the cell cycle in the ubc11-P93L mutant lacking the functional SAC. Other APC/C substrates, in contrast, were degraded on schedule. We have also found that a loss of Ubc4, the other E2 required for progression through mitosis, does not affect the stability of Slp1. We propose that each of the two E2 enzymes is responsible for collaborating with APC/C for a specific set of substrates, and that Ubc11 is responsible for regulating Slp1 with APC/C for silencing the SAC.

  2. Investigation of cellular and protein interactions with model self-assembled monolayer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegoulia, Vassiliki Apostolou

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiolates on gold have been used to investigate the effect of substrate surface properties on bacterial and blood cell adhesion in the presence and absence of blood proteins. Protein adsorption and binding strength on SAMs as well as complement activation by these model surfaces were also studied. It is hoped that information gained, regarding factors that influence biological processes, will lead to strategies for designing materials and surfaces that specifically inhibit cell adhesion and protein adsorption. Single component SAMs of the general formula HS(CH2) 10X, where X = CH3, CH2OH. COOH and CH2(OCH 2CH2)3OH, and two component mixed SAMs created from binary solutions of HS(CH2), OCH3 and HS(CH 2)10CH2OH, were used. Adhesion was investigated under well-defined flow conditions. Adhesion was found to be higher for the hydrophobic methyl and minimal for the tri(ethyleneoxide) terminated SAM. Preincubation of the SAMs with fibrinogen led to an increase in cell adhesion for bacteria and a decrease for leukocyte adhesion. The effect of surface chemistry on protein adsorption was studied for three blood proteins, fibrinogen, fibronectin and albumin. Adsorption was found to be higher on the hydrophobic CH3 surface and lower but comparable for the other surfaces while proteins adsorbed strongly on all surfaces. SAMs were also used to evaluate complement activation by foreign surfaces. The hydroxyl rich SAMs were found to activate complement more significantly than the anionic carboxyl and the hydrophobic methyl terminated SAMs. A surface modification was introduced to incorporate a zwitterionic phosphorylcholine (PC) group on a hydroxyl monolayer in an effort to create a biomimetic surface that could minimize cell adhesion and protein adsorption. The good antifouling properties of the phosphorylcholine modified surface led to the synthesis of a novel phosphorylcholine functionalized thiol. Single component and two component

  3. Nitric oxide and zinc-mediated protein assemblies involved in mu opioid receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, María; Garzón, Javier

    2013-12-01

    Opioids are among the most effective analgesics in controlling the perception of intense pain, although their continuous use decreases their potency due to the development of tolerance. The glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor system is currently considered to be the most relevant functional antagonist of morphine analgesia. In the postsynapse of different brain regions the C terminus of the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) associates with NR1 subunits of NMDARs, as well as with a series of signaling proteins, such as neural nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)/nitric oxide (NO), protein kinase C (PKC), calcium and calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) and the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). NO is implicated in redox signaling and PKC falls under the regulation of zinc metabolism, suggesting that these signaling elements might participate in the regulation of MOR activity by the NMDAR. In this review, we discuss the influence of redox signaling in the mechanisms whose plasticity triggers opioid tolerance. Thus, the MOR C terminus assembles a series of signaling proteins around the homodimeric histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (HINT1). The NMDAR NR1 subunit and the regulator of G protein signaling RGSZ2 bind HINT1 in a zinc-independent manner, with RGSZ2 associating with nNOS and regulating MOR-induced production of NO. This NO acts on the RGSZ2 zinc finger, providing the zinc ions that are required for PKC/Raf-1 cysteine-rich domains to simultaneously bind to the histidines present in the HINT1 homodimer. The MOR-induced activation of phospholipase β (PLCβ) regulates PKC, which increases the reactive oxygen species (ROS) by acting on NOX/NADPH, consolidating the long-term PKC activation required to regulate the Raf-1/MAPK cascade and enhancing NMDAR function. Thus, RGSZ2 serves as a Redox Zinc Switch that converts NO signals into Zinc signals, thereby modulating Redox Sensor Proteins like PKCγ and Raf-1. Accordingly, redox-dependent and

  4. Assembly of transmembrane helices of simple polytopic membrane proteins from sequence conservation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yungki; Helms, Volkhard

    2006-09-01

    The transmembrane (TM) domains of most membrane proteins consist of helix bundles. The seemingly simple task of TM helix bundle assembly has turned out to be extremely difficult. This is true even for simple TM helix bundle proteins, i.e., those that have the simple form of compact TM helix bundles. Herein, we present a computational method that is capable of generating native-like structural models for simple TM helix bundle proteins having modest numbers of TM helices based on sequence conservation patterns. Thus, the only requirement for our method is the presence of more than 30 homologous sequences for an accurate extraction of sequence conservation patterns. The prediction method first computes a number of representative well-packed conformations for each pair of contacting TM helices, and then a library of tertiary folds is generated by overlaying overlapping TM helices of the representative conformations. This library is scored using sequence conservation patterns, and a subsequent clustering analysis yields five final models. Assuming that neighboring TM helices in the sequence contact each other (but not that TM helices A and G contact each other), the method produced structural models of Calpha atom root-mean-square deviation (CA RMSD) of 3-5 A from corresponding crystal structures for bacteriorhodopsin, halorhodopsin, sensory rhodopsin II, and rhodopsin. In blind predictions, this type of contact knowledge is not available. Mimicking this, predictions were made for the rotor of the V-type Na(+)-adenosine triphosphatase without such knowledge. The CA RMSD between the best model and its crystal structure is only 3.4 A, and its contact accuracy reaches 55%. Furthermore, the model correctly identifies the binding pocket for sodium ion. These results demonstrate that the method can be readily applied to ab initio structure prediction of simple TM helix bundle proteins having modest numbers of TM helices.

  5. Protein adsorption on polyanion/polycation layer-by-layer assembled polyelectrolyte films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jen Ming; Tsai, Rong-Ze; Hsu, Chih-Chin

    2016-06-01

    As layer-by-layer self-assembly deposition (LbL) is a versatile technique for surface modification, protein adsorption on the LbL modified glass is evaluated in this study. At the beginning, glass slides was silanized by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). Sodium alginate (Alg), poly(γ-glutamic acid) (PGA) and poly(aspartic acid) (PAsp) were selected as polyanion electrolytes and chitosan (CS) was used as the polycation electrolyte. Both polyanion and polycation electrolytes alternately deposited on the silanized glass slide surface by the LbL technique to get three different polyanion/chitosan series of LbL films ([Alg/CS], [PGA/CS], and [PAsp/CS]). Three kinds of kinetic model including pseudo-first-order, second-order kinetic and intraparticle diffusion model were used to evaluate the adsorption of albumin on the three different polyanion/chitosan series of LbL films. It is found that the adsorption of albumin on the polyanion/chitosan series of LbL films can be described well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic mechanism. To make sure if the pseudo-second-order kinetic mechanism of protein adsorbed on the other polyanion/polycation LbL films is also suitable, poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly(L-lysine) (PLL) are used as two other polycations. The [polyanion/PAH] and [polyanion/PLL] series of LbL films were prepared with the same LbL technique for albumin, fibrinogen, and fibronectin adsorption. From the results, it is found that albumin, fibrinogen, and fibronectin adsorption on the various polyanion/polycation LbL films can be described well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic mechanism. The protein adsorbed at equilibrium and rate constant of protein adsorbed on the various LbL films can be determined.

  6. Assembly of water-soluble chlorophyll-binding proteins with native hydrophobic chlorophylls in water-in-oil emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarczyk, Dominika; Takahashi, Shigekazu; Satoh, Hiroyuki; Noy, Dror

    2015-03-01

    The challenges involved in studying cofactor binding and assembly, as well as energy- and electron transfer mechanisms in the large and elaborate transmembrane protein complexes of photosynthesis and respiration have prompted considerable interest in constructing simplified model systems based on their water-soluble protein analogs. Such analogs are also promising templates and building blocks for artificial bioinspired energy conversion systems. Yet, development is limited by the challenge of introducing the essential cofactors of natural proteins that are highly water-insoluble into the water-soluble protein analogs. Here we introduce a new efficient method based on water-in-oil emulsions for overcoming this challenge. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method in the assembly of native chlorophylls with four recombinant variants of the water-soluble chlorophyll-binding protein of Brassicaceae plants. We use the method to gain new insights into the protein-chlorophyll assembly process, and demonstrate its potential as a fast screening system for developing novel chlorophyll-protein complexes.

  7. Self-assembled near-infrared dye nanoparticles as a selective protein sensor by activation of a dormant fluorophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anees, Palapuravan; Sreejith, Sivaramapanicker; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai

    2014-09-24

    Design of selective sensors for a specific analyte in blood serum, which contains a large number of proteins, small molecules, and ions, is important in clinical diagnostics. While metal and polymeric nanoparticle conjugates have been used as sensors, small molecular assemblies have rarely been exploited for the selective sensing of a protein in blood serum. Herein we demonstrate how a nonspecific small molecular fluorescent dye can be empowered to form a selective protein sensor as illustrated with a thiol-sensitive near-IR squaraine (Sq) dye (λabs= 670 nm, λem= 700 nm). The dye self-assembles to form nonfluorescent nanoparticles (Dh = 200 nm) which selectively respond to human serum albumin (HSA) in the presence of other thiol-containing molecules and proteins by triggering a green fluorescence. This selective response of the dye nanoparticles allowed detection and quantification of HSA in blood serum with a sensitivity limit of 3 nM. Notably, the Sq dye in solution state is nonselective and responds to any thiol-containing proteins and small molecules. The sensing mechanism involves HSA specific controlled disassembly of the Sq nanoparticles to the molecular dye by a noncovalent binding process and its subsequent reaction with the thiol moiety of the protein, triggering the green emission of a dormant fluorophore present in the dye. This study demonstrates the power of a self-assembled small molecular fluorophore for protein sensing and is a simple chemical tool for the clinical diagnosis of blood serum.

  8. Assembly and Immunogenicity of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Major Capsid Protein ( HPV16 L1 ) in Pichia pastoris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this study, a recombinant Pichia pastoris expression system was developed to express HPV16 L1 protein that was driven by a strong AOX1 promoter. HPV16L1 gene was cloned into vector pPICZαB. HPV16 L1 protein expression induced by methanol was screened by using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis ( SDSPAGE) and Western blotting. The results indicate that the HPV16 L1 protein is secreted by the recombinant P. pastotis, and the purified HPV16 L1 protein can self-assemble into virus-like particles(VLPs), which show a good immunogenicity and induces high-titer antibody in mice.

  9. Entropically driven self-assembly of Lysinibacillus sphaericus S-layer proteins analyzed under various environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Leonardo Maestri; Strickland, Aaron; Mark, Sonny S; Bergkvist, Magnus; Sierra-Sastre, Yajaira; Batt, Carl A

    2010-02-11

    S-Layer proteins are an example of bionanostructures that can be exploited in nanofabrication. In addition to their ordered structure, the ability to self-assembly is a key feature that makes them a promising technological tool. Here, in vitro self-assembly kinetics of SpbA was investigated, and found that it occurs at a rate that is dependent on temperature, its concentration, and the concentration of calcium ions and sodium chloride. The activation enthalpy (120.81 kJ . mol(-1)) and entropy (129.34 J . mol(-1) . K(-1)) obtained infers that the incorporation of monomers incurs in a net loss of hydrophobic surface. By understanding how the protein monomers drive the self-assembly at different conditions, the rational optimization of this process was feasible.

  10. Actin-interacting protein 1 controls assembly and permeability of intestinal epithelial apical junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Susana; Baranwal, Somesh; Ivanov, Andrei I

    2015-05-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and tight junctions (TJs) are crucial regulators of the integrity and restitution of the intestinal epithelial barrier. The structure and function of epithelial junctions depend on their association with the cortical actin cytoskeleton that, in polarized epithelial cells, is represented by a prominent perijunctional actomyosin belt. The assembly and stability of the perijunctional cytoskeleton is controlled by constant turnover (disassembly and reassembly) of actin filaments. Actin-interacting protein (Aip) 1 is an emerging regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, playing a critical role in filament disassembly. In this study, we examined the roles of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of AJs and TJs in human intestinal epithelium. Aip1 was enriched at apical junctions in polarized human intestinal epithelial cells and normal mouse colonic mucosa. Knockdown of Aip1 by RNA interference increased the paracellular permeability of epithelial cell monolayers, decreased recruitment of AJ/TJ proteins to steady-state intercellular contacts, and attenuated junctional reassembly in a calcium-switch model. The observed defects of AJ/TJ structure and functions were accompanied by abnormal organization and dynamics of the perijunctional F-actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, loss of Aip1 impaired the apico-basal polarity of intestinal epithelial cell monolayers and inhibited formation of polarized epithelial cysts in 3-D Matrigel. Our findings demonstrate a previously unanticipated role of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of intestinal epithelial junctions and early steps of epithelial morphogenesis.

  11. Structure, Function, Self-Assembly and Origin of Simple Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins perform such essential cellular functions as transport of ions, nutrients and waste products across cell walls, transduction of environmental signals, regulation of cell fusion, recognition of other cells, energy capture and its conversion into high-energy compounds. In fact, 30-40% of genes in modem organisms codes for membrane proteins. Although contemporary membrane proteins or their functional assemblies can be quite complex, their transmembrane fragments are usually remarkably simple. The most common structural motif for these fragments is a bundle of alpha-helices, but occasionally it could be a beta-barrel. In a series of molecular dynamics computer simulations we investigated self-organizing properties of simple membrane proteins based on these structural motifs. Specifically, we studied folding and insertion into membranes of short, nonpolar or amphiphatic peptides. We also investigated glycophorin A, a peptide that forms sequence-specific dimers, and a transmembrane aggregate of four identical alpha-helices that forms an efficient and selective voltage-gated proton channel was investigated. Many peptides are attracted to water-membrane interfaces. Once at the interface, nonpolar peptides spontaneously fold to a-helices. Whenever the sequence permits, peptides that contain both polar and nonpolar amino also adopt helical structures, in which polar and nonpolar amino acid side chains are immersed in water and membrane, respectively. Specific identity of side chains is less important. Helical peptides at the interface could insert into the membrane and adopt a transmembrane conformation. However, insertion of a single helix is unfavorable because polar groups in the peptide become completely dehydrated upon insertion. The unfavorable free energy of insertion can be regained by spontaneous association of peptides in the membrane. The first step in this process is the formation of dimers, although the most common are aggregates of 4

  12. Interrelationships between yeast ribosomal protein assembly events and transient ribosome biogenesis factors interactions in early pre-ribosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Jakob

    Full Text Available Early steps of eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis require a large set of ribosome biogenesis factors which transiently interact with nascent rRNA precursors (pre-rRNA. Most likely, concomitant with that initial contacts between ribosomal proteins (r-proteins and ribosome precursors (pre-ribosomes are established which are converted into robust interactions between pre-rRNA and r-proteins during the course of ribosome maturation. Here we analysed the interrelationship between r-protein assembly events and the transient interactions of ribosome biogenesis factors with early pre-ribosomal intermediates termed 90S pre-ribosomes or small ribosomal subunit (SSU processome in yeast cells. We observed that components of the SSU processome UTP-A and UTP-B sub-modules were recruited to early pre-ribosomes independently of all tested r-proteins. On the other hand, groups of SSU processome components were identified whose association with early pre-ribosomes was affected by specific r-protein assembly events in the head-platform interface of the SSU. One of these components, Noc4p, appeared to be itself required for robust incorporation of r-proteins into the SSU head domain. Altogether, the data reveal an emerging network of specific interrelationships between local r-protein assembly events and the functional interactions of SSU processome components with early pre-ribosomes. They point towards some of these components being transient primary pre-rRNA in vivo binders and towards a role for others in coordinating the assembly of major SSU domains.

  13. In-capillary self-assembly study of quantum dots and protein using fluorescence coupled capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhao; Li, Jingyan; Li, Jinchen; Qin, Yuqin; Wang, Cheli; Qiu, Lin; Jiang, Pengju

    2015-07-01

    As a vast number of novel materials in particular inorganic nanoparticles have been invented and introduced to all aspects of life, public concerns about how they might affect our ecosystem and human life continue to arise. Such incertitude roots at a fundamental question of how inorganic nanoparticles self-assemble with biomolecules in solution. Various techniques have been developed to probe the interaction between particles and biomolecules, but very few if any can provide advantages of both rapid and convenient. Herein, we report a systematic investigation on quantum dots (QDs) and protein self-assembly inside a capillary. QDs and protein were injected to a capillary one after another. They were mixed inside the capillary when a high voltage was applied. Online separation and detection were then achieved. This new method can also be used to study the self-assembly kinetics of QDs and protein using the Hill equation, the KD value for the self-assembly of QDs and protein was calculated to be 8.8 μM. The obtained results were compared with the previous out of-capillary method and confirmed the effectiveness of the present method.

  14. INTERFACIAL SELF-ASSEMBLY OF A SCHIZOPHYLLUM-COMMUNE HYDROPHOBIN INTO AN INSOLUBLE AMPHIPATHIC PROTEIN MEMBRANE DEPENDS ON SURFACE HYDROPHOBICITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOSTEN, HAB; RUARDY, TG; VANDERMEI, HC; BUSSCHER, HJ; WESSELS, JGH

    1995-01-01

    Hydrophobins are small secreted fungal proteins rich in hydrophobic amino acids with a characteristic hydropathy pattern and conserved location of eight cysteine residues. It was previously shown that purified SC3p hydrophobin of Schizophyllum commune self-assembles at hydrophilic/hydrophobic interf

  15. The dynamics of signal amplification by macromolecular assemblies for the control of chromosome segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semin eLee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The control of chromosome segregation relies on the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC, a complex regulatory system that ensures the high fidelity of chromosome segregation in higher organisms by delaying the onset of anaphase until each chromosome is properly bi-oriented on the mitotic spindle. Central to this process is the establishment of multiple yet specific protein-protein interactions in a narrow time-space window. Here we discuss the highly dynamic nature of multi-protein complexes that control chromosome segregation in which an intricate network of weak but cooperative interactions modulate signal amplification to ensure a proper SAC response. We also discuss the current structural understanding of the communication between the SAC and the kinetochore; how transient interactions can regulate the assembly and disassembly of the SAC as well as the challenges and opportunities for the definition and the manipulation of the flow of information in SAC signaling.

  16. p53 activates G₁ checkpoint following DNA damage by doxorubicin during transient mitotic arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Sun-Yi; Jang, Young-Joo

    2015-03-10

    Recovery from DNA damage is critical for cell survival. The serious damage is not able to be repaired during checkpoint and finally induces cell death to prevent abnormal cell growth. In this study, we demonstrated that 8N-DNA contents are accumulated via re-replication during prolonged recovery period containing serious DNA damage in mitotic cells. During the incubation for recovery, a mitotic delay and initiation of an abnormal interphase without cytokinesis were detected. Whereas a failure of cytokinesis occurred in cells with no relation with p53/p21, re-replication is an anomalous phenomenon in the mitotic DNA damage response in p53/p21 negative cells. Cells with wild-type p53 are accumulated just prior to the initiation of DNA replication through a G₁ checkpoint after mitotic DNA damage, even though p53 does not interrupt pre-RC assembly. Finally, these cells undergo cell death by apoptosis. These data suggest that p53 activates G₁ checkpoint in response to mitotic DNA damage. Without p53, cells with mitotic DNA damage undergo re-replication leading to accumulation of damage.

  17. The β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) is required for the assembly of a primitive S-layer protein in the ancient outer membrane of Thermus thermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Federico; Ferreras, Eloy; Berenguer, José

    2012-11-01

    The ancient bacterial lineage Thermus spp has a primitive form of outer membrane attached to the cell wall through SlpA, a protein that shows intermediate properties between S-layer proteins and outer membrane (OM) porins. In E. coli and related Proteobacteria, porins are secreted through the BAM (β-barrel assembly machinery) pathway, whose main component is BamA. A homologue to this protein is encoded in all the Thermus spp so far sequenced, so we wondered if this pathway could be responsible for SlpA secretion in this ancient bacterial model. To analyse this hypothesis, we attempted to get mutants on this BamA(th) of T. thermophilus HB27. Knockout and deletion mutants lacking the last 10 amino acids were not viable, whereas its depletion by means of a BamA antisense RNA lead defective attachment to the cell wall of its OM-like envelope. Such defects were related to defective folding of the SlpA protein that was more sensitive to proteases than in a wild-type strain. A similar phenotype was found in mutants lacking the terminal Phe of SlpA. Further protein-protein interaction assays confirmed the existence of specific binding between SlpA and BamA(th). Taking together, these data suggest that SlpA is secreted through a BAM-like pathway in this ancestral bacterial lineage, supporting an ancient origin of this pathway before the evolution of the Proteobacteria.

  18. Tactical Checkpoint: Hail/Warn Suppress/Stop (Poster)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    distractor , optical suppression , human behavior, checkpoint, ambient light, driver suppression , human experimentation, light, paintball, obscuration...HAIL/WARN AND - SUPPRESS /STOP Poster Presented at the 2010 Directed Energies Professional Society Meeting, 15-19 November 2010. 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...warning to a driver that is approaching a checkpoint. The laser, MCNC light, and the windshield obscuration were evaluated for their suppression

  19. Anaphase onset before complete DNA replication with intact checkpoint responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torres-Rosell, Jordi; De Piccoli, Giacomo; Cordon-Preciado, Violeta

    2007-01-01

    Cellular checkpoints prevent mitosis in the presence of stalled replication forks. Whether checkpoints also ensure the completion of DNA replication before mitosis is unknown. Here, we show that in yeast smc5-smc6 mutants, which are related to cohesin and condensin, replication is delayed, most...

  20. Immune checkpoints in cancer clinical trials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elad Sharon; Howard Streicher; Priscila Goncalves; Helen XChen

    2014-01-01

    Immunology-based therapy is rapidly developing into an effective treatment option for a surprising range of cancers. We have learned over the last decade that powerful immunologic effector cells may be blocked by inhibitory regulatory pathways controlled by specific molecules often called“immune checkpoints.” These checkpoints serve to control or turn off the immune response when it is no longer needed to prevent tissue injury and autoimmunity. Cancer cells have learned or evolved to use these mechanisms to evade immune control and elimination. The development of a new therapeutic class of drugs that inhibit these inhibitory pathways has recently emerged as a potent strategy in oncology. Three sets of agents have emerged in clinical trials exploiting this strategy. These agents are antibody-based therapies targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen4 (CTLA4), programmed cell death1 (PD-1), and programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1). These inhibitors of immune inhibition have demonstrated extensive activity as single agents and in combinations. Clinical responses have been seen in melanoma, renal cellcarcinoma, non-smal celllung cancer, and several other tumor types. Despite the autoimmune or inflammatory immune-mediated adverse effects which have been seen, the responses and overall survival benefits exhibited thus far warrant further clinical development.

  1. ATR- and ATM-Mediated DNA Damage Response Is Dependent on Excision Repair Assembly during G1 but Not in S Phase of Cell Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Alo; Blevins, Chessica; Wani, Gulzar; Wani, Altaf A

    2016-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoint is mediated by ATR and ATM kinases, as a prompt early response to a variety of DNA insults, and culminates in a highly orchestrated signal transduction cascade. Previously, we defined the regulatory role of nucleotide excision repair (NER) factors, DDB2 and XPC, in checkpoint and ATR/ATM-dependent repair pathway via ATR and ATM phosphorylation and recruitment to ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced damage sites. Here, we have dissected the molecular mechanisms of DDB2- and XPC- mediated regulation of ATR and ATM recruitment and activation upon UVR exposures. We show that the ATR and ATM activation and accumulation to UVR-induced damage not only depends on DDB2 and XPC, but also on the NER protein XPA, suggesting that the assembly of an active NER complex is essential for ATR and ATM recruitment. ATR and ATM localization and H2AX phosphorylation at the lesion sites occur as early as ten minutes in asynchronous as well as G1 arrested cells, showing that repair and checkpoint-mediated by ATR and ATM starts early upon UV irradiation. Moreover, our results demonstrated that ATR and ATM recruitment and H2AX phosphorylation are dependent on NER proteins in G1 phase, but not in S phase. We reasoned that in G1 the UVR-induced ssDNA gaps or processed ssDNA, and the bound NER complex promote ATR and ATM recruitment. In S phase, when the UV lesions result in stalled replication forks with long single-stranded DNA, ATR and ATM recruitment to these sites is regulated by different sets of proteins. Taken together, these results provide evidence that UVR-induced ATR and ATM recruitment and activation differ in G1 and S phases due to the existence of distinct types of DNA lesions, which promote assembly of different proteins involved in the process of DNA repair and checkpoint activation.

  2. The Role of Disordered Ribosomal Protein Extensions in the Early Steps of Eubacterial 50 S Ribosomal Subunit Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youri Timsit

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Although during the past decade research has shown the functional importance of disorder in proteins, many of the structural and dynamics properties of intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUPs remain to be elucidated. This review is focused on the role of the extensions of the ribosomal proteins in the early steps of the assembly of the eubacterial 50 S subunit. The recent crystallographic structures of the ribosomal particles have revealed the picture of a complex assembly pathway that condenses the rRNA and the ribosomal proteins into active ribosomes. However, little is know about the molecular mechanisms of this process. It is thought that the long basic r-protein extensions that penetrate deeply into the subunit cores play a key role through disorder-order transitions and/or co-folding mechanisms. A current view is that such structural transitions may facilitate the proper rRNA folding. In this paper, the structures of the proteins L3, L4, L13, L20, L22 and L24 that have been experimentally found to be essential for the first steps of ribosome assembly have been compared. On the basis of their structural and dynamics properties, three categories of extensions have been identified. Each of them seems to play a distinct function. Among them, only the coil-helix transition that occurs in a phylogenetically conserved cluster of basic residues of the L20 extension appears to be strictly required for the large subunit assembly in eubacteria. The role of a helix-coil transitions in 23 S RNA folding is discussed in the light of the calcium binding protein calmodulin that shares many structural and dynamics properties with L20.

  3. Cryo-EM structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal protein assembly at near-atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lei; Zhang, Xinzheng; Gao, Song; Rao, Prashant A; Padilla-Sanchez, Victor; Chen, Zhenguo; Sun, Siyang; Xiang, Ye; Subramaniam, Sriram; Rao, Venigalla B; Rossmann, Michael G

    2015-07-06

    The structure and assembly of bacteriophage T4 has been extensively studied. However, the detailed structure of the portal protein remained unknown. Here we report the structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal assembly, gene product 20 (gp20), determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to 3.6 Å resolution. In addition, analysis of a 10 Å resolution cryo-EM map of an empty prolate T4 head shows how the dodecameric portal assembly interacts with the capsid protein gp23 at the special pentameric vertex. The gp20 structure also verifies that the portal assembly is required for initiating head assembly, for attachment of the packaging motor, and for participation in DNA packaging. Comparison of the Myoviridae T4 portal structure with the known portal structures of φ29, SPP1 and P22, representing Podo- and Siphoviridae, shows that the portal structure probably dates back to a time when self-replicating microorganisms were being established on Earth.

  4. The Centriole Cartwheel Protein SAS-6 in Trypanosoma brucei Is Required for Probasal Body Biogenesis and Flagellum Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huiqing; Liu, Yi; Zhou, Qing; Siegel, Sara; Li, Ziyin

    2015-09-01

    The centriole in eukaryotes functions as the cell's microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) to nucleate spindle assembly, and its biogenesis requires an evolutionarily conserved protein, SAS-6, which assembles the centriole cartwheel. Trypanosoma brucei, an early branching protozoan, possesses the basal body as its MTOC to nucleate flagellum biogenesis. However, little is known about the components of the basal body and their roles in basal body biogenesis and flagellum assembly. Here, we report that the T. brucei SAS-6 homolog, TbSAS-6, is localized to the mature basal body and the probasal body throughout the cell cycle. RNA interference (RNAi) of TbSAS-6 inhibited probasal body biogenesis, compromised flagellum assembly, and caused cytokinesis arrest. Surprisingly, overexpression of TbSAS-6 in T. brucei also impaired probasal body duplication and flagellum assembly, contrary to SAS-6 overexpression in humans, which produces supernumerary centrioles. Furthermore, we showed that depletion of T. brucei Polo-like kinase, TbPLK, or inhibition of TbPLK activity did not abolish TbSAS-6 localization to the basal body, in contrast to the essential role of Polo-like kinase in recruiting SAS-6 to centrioles in animals. Altogether, these results identified the essential role of TbSAS-6 in probasal body biogenesis and flagellum assembly and suggest the presence of a TbPLK-independent pathway governing basal body duplication in T. brucei.

  5. WSV399, a viral tegument protein, interacts with the shrimp protein PmVRP15 to facilitate viral trafficking and assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaree, Phattarunda; Senapin, Saengchan; Hirono, Ikuo; Lo, Chu-Fang; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Somboonwiwat, Kunlaya

    2016-06-01

    Viral responsive protein 15 (PmVRP15) has been identified as a highly up-regulated gene in the hemocyte of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)-infected shrimp Penaeus monodon. However, the function of PmVRP15 in host-viral interaction was still unclear. To elucidate PmVRP15 function, the interacting partner of PmVRP15 from WSSV was screened by yeast two-hybrid assay and then confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP). Only WSV399 protein was identified as a PmVRP15 binding protein; however, the function of WSV399 has not been characterized. Localization of WSV399 on the WSSV virion was revealed by immunoblotting analysis (in vitro) and immunoelectron microscopy (in vivo). The results showed that WSV399 is a structural protein of the WSSV virion and is particularly located on the tegument. Gene silencing of wsv399 in WSSV-infected shrimp reduced the percentage of cumulative mortality by 74%, although the expression level of a viral replication marker gene, vp28, was not changed suggesting that WSV399 might not involved in viral replication but viral assembly. Because it has already been known that tegument proteins function in capsid transport during viral trafficking and assembly, interaction between PmVRP15 on hemocyte nuclear membrane and the WSV399 viral tegument protein suggests that PmVRP15 might be required for trafficking and assembly of WSSV during infection.

  6. Structure of a Blinkin-BUBR1 complex reveals an interaction crucial for kinetochore-mitotic checkpoint regulation via an unanticipated binding Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M; Lischetti, Tiziana; Matak-Vinković, Dijana

    2011-01-01

    The maintenance of genomic stability relies on the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which ensures accurate chromosome segregation by delaying the onset of anaphase until all chromosomes are properly bioriented and attached to the mitotic spindle. BUB1 and BUBR1 kinases are central for this proc...

  7. Structure and dynamics of a protein-surfactant assembly studied by ion-mobility mass spectrometry and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borysik, Antoni J

    2015-09-01

    The structure and dynamics of a protein-surfactant assembly studied by ion-mobility mass spectrometry (IMS) and vacuum molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is reported. Direct evidence is provided for the ability of the surfactant dodecyl-β-D-maltoside (DDM) to prevent charge-induced unfolding of the membrane protein (PagP) in the gas-phase. Restraints obtained by IMS are used to map the surfactant positions onto the protein surface. Surfactants occupying more exposed positions at the apexes of the β-barrel structure are most in-line with the experimental observations. MD simulations provide additional evidence for this assembly organization through surfactant inversion and migration on the protein structure in the absence of solvent. Surfactant migration entails a net shift from apolar membrane spanning regions to more polar regions of the protein structure with the DDM molecule remaining attached to the protein via headgroup interactions. These data provide evidence for the role of protein-DDM headgroup interactions in stabilizing membrane protein structure from gas-phase unfolding.

  8. The West Nile virus assembly process evades the conserved antiviral mechanism of the interferon-induced MxA protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoenen, Antje [School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Gillespie, Leah [Department of Microbiology, La Trobe University, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Morgan, Garry; Heide, Peter van der [Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Khromykh, Alexander [School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Australian Infectious Diseases Research Centre, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Mackenzie, Jason, E-mail: jason.mackenzie@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Microbiology, La Trobe University, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

    2014-01-05

    Flaviviruses have evolved means to evade host innate immune responses. Recent evidence suggests this is due to prevention of interferon production and signaling in flavivirus-infected cells. Here we show that the interferon-induced MxA protein can sequester the West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNV{sub KUN}) capsid protein in cytoplasmic tubular structures in an expression-replication system. This sequestering resulted in reduced titers of secreted WNV{sub KUN} particles. We show by electron microscopy, tomography and 3D modeling that these cytoplasmic tubular structures form organized bundles. Additionally we show that recombinant ER-targeted MxA can restrict production of infectious WNV{sub KUN} under conditions of virus infection. Our results indicate a co-ordinated and compartmentalized WNV{sub KUN} assembly process may prevent recognition of viral components by MxA, particularly the capsid protein. This recognition can be exploited if MxA is targeted to intracellular sites of WNV{sub KUN} assembly. This results in further understanding of the mechanisms of flavivirus evasion from the immune system. - Highlights: • We show that the ISG MxA can recognize the West Nile virus capsid protein. • Interaction between WNV C protein and MxA induces cytoplasmic fibrils. • MxA can be retargeted to the ER to restrict WNV particle release. • WNV assembly process is a strategy to avoid MxA recognition.

  9. A conserved region in the prM protein is a critical determinant in the assembly of flavivirus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, Kentaro; Igarashi, Manabu; Ichii, Osamu; Yokozawa, Kana; Ito, Kimihito; Kariwa, Hiroaki; Takashima, Ikuo

    2012-01-01

    Flaviviruses are assembled to bud into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are secreted through the vesicle transport pathway, but the details of the molecular mechanism of virion assembly remain largely unknown. In this study, a highly conserved region in the prM protein was identified among flaviviruses. In the subviral particle (SP) system of tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) and Japanese encephalitis virus, secretion of SPs was impaired by a mutation in the conserved region in the prM protein. Viral proteins were sparse in the Golgi complex and accumulated in the ER. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that long filamentous structures, rather than spherical SPs, were observed in the lumen of the ER as a result of the mutation. The production of infectious virions derived from infectious cDNA of TBEV was also reduced by mutations in the conserved region. Molecular modelling analysis suggested that the conserved region is important for the association of prM-envelope protein heterodimers in the formation of a spike of immature virion. These results are the first demonstration that the conserved region in the prM protein is a molecular determinant for the flavivirus assembly process.

  10. Kinetic Effects on Self-Assembly and Function of Protein-Polymer Bioconjugates in Thin Films Prepared by Flow Coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Dongsook [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave Cambridge MA 02142 USA; Huang, Aaron [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave Cambridge MA 02142 USA; Olsen, Bradley D. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave Cambridge MA 02142 USA

    2016-11-04

    The self-assembly of nanostructured globular protein arrays in thin films is demonstrated using protein–polymer block copolymers based on a model protein mCherry and the polymer poly(oligoethylene glycol acrylate) (POEGA). Conjugates are flow coated into thin films on a poly(ethylene oxide) grafted Si surface, forming self-assembled cylindrical nanostructures with POEGA domains selectively segregating to the air–film interface. Long-range order and preferential arrangement of parallel cylinders templated by selective surfaces are demonstrated by controlling relative humidity. Long-range order increases with coating speed when the film thicknesses are kept constant, due to reduced nucleation per unit area of drying film. Fluorescence emission spectra of mCherry in films prepared at <25% relative humidity shows a small shift suggesting that proteins are more perturbed at low humidity than high humidity or the solution state.

  11. Targeting and assembly of components of the TOC protein import complex at the chloroplast outer envelope membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Lynn G L; Paila, Yamuna D; Siman, Steven R; Chen, Yi; Smith, Matthew D; Schnell, Danny J

    2014-01-01

    The translocon at the outer envelope membrane of chloroplasts (TOC) initiates the import of thousands of nuclear encoded preproteins required for chloroplast biogenesis and function. The multimeric TOC complex contains two GTP-regulated receptors, Toc34 and Toc159, which recognize the transit peptides of preproteins and initiate protein import through a β-barrel membrane channel, Toc75. Different isoforms of Toc34 and Toc159 assemble with Toc75 to form structurally and functionally diverse translocons, and the composition and levels of TOC translocons is required for the import of specific subsets of coordinately expressed proteins during plant growth and development. Consequently, the proper assembly of the TOC complexes is key to ensuring organelle homeostasis. This review will focus on our current knowledge of the targeting and assembly of TOC components to form functional translocons at the outer membrane. Our analyses reveal that the targeting of TOC components involves elements common to the targeting of other outer membrane proteins, but also include unique features that appear to have evolved to specifically facilitate assembly of the import apparatus.

  12. Targeting and Assembly of Components of the TOC Protein Import Complex at the Chloroplast Outer Envelope Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn G.L. Richardson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The translocon at the outer envelope membrane of chloroplasts (TOC initiates the import of thousands of nuclear encoded preproteins required for chloroplast biogenesis and function. The multimeric TOC complex contains two GTP-regulated receptors, Toc34 and Toc159, which recognize the transit peptides of preproteins and initiate protein import through a β–barrel membrane channel, Toc75. Different isoforms of Toc34 and Toc159 assemble with Toc75 to form structurally and functionally diverse translocons, and the composition and levels of TOC translocons is required for the import of specific subsets of coordinately expressed proteins during plant growth and development. Consequently, the proper assembly of the TOC complexes is key to ensuring organelle homeostasis. This review will focus on our current knowledge of the targeting and assembly of TOC components to form functional translocons at the outer membrane. Our analyses reveal that the targeting of TOC components involves elements common to the targeting of other outer membrane proteins, but also include unique features that appear to have evolved to specifically facilitate assembly of the import apparatus.

  13. Vipp1 is required for basic thylakoid membrane formation but not for the assembly of thylakoid protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseeva, Elena; Ossenbühl, Friederich; Sippel, Claudia; Cho, Won K; Stein, Bernhard; Eichacker, Lutz A; Meurer, Jörg; Wanner, Gerhard; Westhoff, Peter; Soll, Jürgen; Vothknecht, Ute C

    2007-02-01

    Vipp1 (vesicle inducing protein in plastids 1) is found in cyanobacteria and chloroplasts where it is essential for thylakoid formation. Arabidopsis thaliana mutant plants with a reduction of Vipp1 to about 20% of wild type content become albinotic at an early stage. We propose that this drastic phenotype results from an inability of the remaining Vipp1 protein to assemble into a homo-oligomeric complex, indicating that oligomerization is a prerequisite for Vipp1 function. A Vipp1-ProteinA fusion protein, expressed in the Deltavipp1 mutant background, is able to reinstate oligomerization and restore photoautotrophic growth. Plants containing Vipp1-ProteinA in amounts comparable to Vipp1 in the wild type exhibit a wild type phenotype. However, plants with a reduced amount of Vipp1-ProteinA protein are growth-retarded and significantly paler than the wild type. This phenotype is caused by a decrease in thylakoid membrane content and a concomitant reduction in photosynthetic activity. To the extent that thylakoid membranes are made in these plants they are properly assembled with protein-pigment complexes and are photosynthetically active. This strongly supports a function of Vipp1 in basic thylakoid membrane formation and not in the functional assembly of thylakoid protein complexes. Intriguingly, electron microscopic analysis shows that chloroplasts in the mutant plants are not equally affected by the Vipp1 shortage. Indeed, a wide range of different stages of thylakoid development ranging from wild-type-like chloroplasts to plastids nearly devoid of thylakoids can be observed in organelles of one and the same cell.

  14. Structural and functional characterization of an iron-sulfur cluster assembly scaffold protein-SufA from Plasmodium vivax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pala, Zarna Rajeshkumar; Saxena, Vishal; Saggu, Gagandeep Singh; Yadav, Sushil Kumar; Pareek, R P; Kochar, Sanjay Kumar; Kochar, Dhanpat Kumar; Garg, Shilpi

    2016-07-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are utilized as prosthetic groups in all living organisms for diverse range of cellular processes including electron transport in respiration and photosynthesis, sensing of ambient conditions, regulation of gene expression and catalysis. In Plasmodium, two Fe-S cluster biogenesis pathways are reported, of which the Suf pathway in the apicoplast has been shown essential for the erythrocytic stages of the parasite. While the initial components of this pathway detailing the sulfur mobilization have been elucidated, the components required for the assembly and transfer of Fe-S clusters are not reported from the parasite. In Escherichia coli, SufB acts as a scaffold protein and SufA traffics the assembled Fe-S cluster from SufB to target apo-proteins. However, in Plasmodium, the homologs of these proteins are yet to be characterized for their function. Here, we report a putative SufA protein from Plasmodium vivax with signature motifs of A-type scaffold proteins, which is evolutionarily conserved. The presence of the [Fe4S4](3+) cluster under reduced conditions was confirmed by UV-visible and EPR spectroscopy and the interaction of these clusters with the conserved cysteine residues of chains A and B of PvSufA, validates its existence as a dimer, similar to that in E. coli. The H-bond interactions at the PvSufA-SufB interface demonstrate SufA as a scaffold protein in conjunction with SufB for the pre-assembly of Fe-S clusters and their transfer to the target proteins. Co-localization of the protein to the apicoplast further provides an experimental evidence of a functional scaffold protein SufA for the biogenesis of Fe-S clusters in apicoplast of Plasmodium.

  15. RNA-binding Domain of the Key Structural Protein P7 for the Rice dwarf virus Particle Assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo-Xiong ZHONG; Yan-Wei SHEN; Toshihiro OMURA

    2005-01-01

    The Rice dwarf virus (RDV) P7 structural protein is the key protein in the RDV particle assembly. The P7 protein was digested partially or completely by Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease and/or Pseudomonas fragi Asp-N protease. The molecular mass and the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the polypeptide fragments of the P7 protein were determined by SDS-PAGE and the Edman degradation method,respectively. Then the polypeptides were located in the deduced amino acid sequence of the RDV P7 protein based on the nucleotide sequence information, with the knowledge of the specific cleavage sites of the Staphylococcus aureus V8 and Pseudomonasfragi Asp-N protease, and the two RNA-binding domains in the P7 protein were identified. Domain 1 was located in the residue 128-249 containing 122 amino acids and domain 2 was located in the residue 325-355 containing 31 amino acids. Thus, these two domains may play an important role in the virus particle assembly by contributing to the packaging of viral dsRNAs inside the particles. The two domains may be novel RNA-binding domains, because no amino acid sequences highly similar to the conservative sequences of known dsRNA-binding domains reported so far. The similarity between the motif of domain 1 and the motif of the DNA-binding protein suggests that the DNA-binding activity of the RDV P7 protein may be due to this sequence. The similarity between the motif of domain 1 and the motif of the RNA polymerase domain suggests that the P7 protein may also play a role in RNA synthesis,besides its function in the assembly and subsequent packaging of viral dsRNA into core particles.

  16. Hierarchical self-assembly of designed 2x2-alpha-helix bundle proteins on Au(111) surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wackerbarth, Hainer; Tofteng, A.P.; Jensen, K.J.

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayers of biomolecules on atomically planar surfaces offer the prospect of complex combinations of controlled properties, e. g., for bioelectronics. We have prepared a novel hemi-4-alpha-helix bundle protein by attaching two alpha-helical peptides to a cyclo-dithiothreitol (cyclo...... proteins retained. The surface properties of the DTT and 2 x 2- R-helix bundle protein adlayer were characterized by interfacial capacitance and impedance techniques. Reductive desorption was used to determine the coverage of the adlayers, giving values of 65 and 16 mu C cm(-2) for DTT and 2 x 2-helix...

  17. Brittle Culm1, a COBRA-like protein, functions in cellulose assembly through binding cellulose microfibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lifeng; Shang-Guan, Keke; Zhang, Baocai; Liu, Xiangling; Yan, Meixian; Zhang, Lanjun; Shi, Yanyun; Zhang, Mu; Qian, Qian; Li, Jiayang; Zhou, Yihua

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose represents the most abundant biopolymer in nature and has great economic importance. Cellulose chains pack laterally into crystalline forms, stacking into a complicated crystallographic structure. However, the mechanism of cellulose crystallization is poorly understood. Here, via functional characterization, we report that Brittle Culm1 (BC1), a COBRA-like protein in rice, modifies cellulose crystallinity. BC1 was demonstrated to be a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored protein and can be released into cell walls by removal of the GPI anchor. BC1 possesses a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) at its N-terminus. In vitro binding assays showed that this CBM interacts specifically with crystalline cellulose, and several aromatic residues in this domain are essential for binding. It was further demonstrated that cell wall-localized BC1 via the CBM and GPI anchor is one functional form of BC1. X-ray diffraction (XRD) assays revealed that mutations in BC1 and knockdown of BC1 expression decrease the crystallite width of cellulose; overexpression of BC1 and the CBM-mutated BC1s caused varied crystallinity with results that were consistent with the in vitro binding assay. Moreover, interaction between the CBM and cellulose microfibrils was largely repressed when the cell wall residues were pre-stained with two cellulose dyes. Treating wild-type and bc1 seedlings with the dyes resulted in insensitive root growth responses in bc1 plants. Combined with the evidence that BC1 and three secondary wall cellulose synthases (CESAs) function in different steps of cellulose production as revealed by genetic analysis, we conclude that BC1 modulates cellulose assembly by interacting with cellulose and affecting microfibril crystallinity.

  18. Brittle Culm1, a COBRA-like protein, functions in cellulose assembly through binding cellulose microfibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifeng Liu

    Full Text Available Cellulose represents the most abundant biopolymer in nature and has great economic importance. Cellulose chains pack laterally into crystalline forms, stacking into a complicated crystallographic structure. However, the mechanism of cellulose crystallization is poorly understood. Here, via functional characterization, we report that Brittle Culm1 (BC1, a COBRA-like protein in rice, modifies cellulose crystallinity. BC1 was demonstrated to be a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored protein and can be released into cell walls by removal of the GPI anchor. BC1 possesses a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM at its N-terminus. In vitro binding assays showed that this CBM interacts specifically with crystalline cellulose, and several aromatic residues in this domain are essential for binding. It was further demonstrated that cell wall-localized BC1 via the CBM and GPI anchor is one functional form of BC1. X-ray diffraction (XRD assays revealed that mutations in BC1 and knockdown of BC1 expression decrease the crystallite width of cellulose; overexpression of BC1 and the CBM-mutated BC1s caused varied crystallinity with results that were consistent with the in vitro binding assay. Moreover, interaction between the CBM and cellulose microfibrils was largely repressed when the cell wall residues were pre-stained with two cellulose dyes. Treating wild-type and bc1 seedlings with the dyes resulted in insensitive root growth responses in bc1 plants. Combined with the evidence that BC1 and three secondary wall cellulose synthases (CESAs function in different steps of cellulose production as revealed by genetic analysis, we conclude that BC1 modulates cellulose assembly by interacting with cellulose and affecting microfibril crystallinity.

  19. Modulation of enamel matrix proteins on the formation and nano-assembly of hydroxyapatite in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hong, E-mail: tlihong@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630 (China); Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Huang Weiya [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Taizhou, Taizhou University, Zhejiang 317000 (China); Zhang Yuanming [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630 (China); Xue Bo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630 (China); Wen Xuejun [Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Natural enamel has a hierarchically nanoassembled architecture that is regulated by enamel matrix proteins (EMPs) during the formation of enamel crystals. To understand the role of EMPs on enamel mineralization, calcium phosphate (CaP) growth experiments in both the presence and absence of native rat EMPs in a single diffusion system were conducted. The morphology and organization of formed CaP crystals were examined by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), High-Resolution Transmission Microscopy (HRTEM) and Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED). In the system containing the EMPs, hydroxyapatite (HAP) with hierarchical lamellar nanostructure can be formed and the aligned HAP assembly tightly bundled by 3-4 rod-like nanocrystals like an enamel prism. However, in the absence of EMPs, only a sheet-like structure of octacalcium phosphate (OCP) phase was presented. EMPs promote HAP formation and inhibit the growth of OCP on the (010) plane. It is discussed that the organized Amelogenin/Amorphous Calcium Phosphate might be the precursor to the bundled HAP crystal prism. The study benefits the understanding of biomineralization of tooth enamel. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An aligned hydroxyapatite crystal bundled by rod-like nanosize crystals was obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An organized Amel/ACP would be the precursor of the bundled hydroxyapatite crystal prism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EMPs inhibit the growth of octacalcium phosphate in a defined plane.

  20. Expression, stabilization and purification of membrane proteins via diverse protein synthesis systems and detergents involving cell-free associated with self-assembly peptide surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xuan; Dong, Shuangshuang; Zheng, Jie; Li, Duanhua; Li, Feng; Luo, Zhongli

    2014-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are involved in regulating most of physiological actions and metabolism in the bodies, which have become most frequently addressed therapeutic targets for various disorders and diseases. Purified GPCR-based drug discoveries have become routine that approaches to structural study, novel biophysical and biochemical function analyses. However, several bottlenecks that GPCR-directed drugs need to conquer the problems including overexpression, solubilization, and purification as well as stabilization. The breakthroughs are to obtain efficient protein yield and stabilize their functional conformation which are both urgently requiring of effective protein synthesis system methods and optimal surfactants. Cell-free protein synthesis system is superior to the high yields and post-translation modifications, and early signs of self-assembly peptide detergents also emerged to superiority in purification of membrane proteins. We herein focus several predominant protein synthesis systems and surfactants involving the novel peptide detergents, and uncover the advantages of cell-free protein synthesis system with self-assembling peptide detergents in purification of functional GPCRs. This review is useful to further study in membrane proteins as well as the new drug exploration.

  1. Self-recognition mechanism of MamA, a magnetosome-associated TPR-containing protein, promotes complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeytuni, Natalie; Ozyamak, Ertan; Ben-Harush, Kfir; Davidov, Geula; Levin, Maxim; Gat, Yair; Moyal, Tal; Brik, Ashraf; Komeili, Arash; Zarivach, Raz

    2011-08-16

    The magnetosome, a biomineralizing organelle within magnetotactic bacteria, allows their navigation along geomagnetic fields. Magnetosomes are membrane-bound compartments containing magnetic nanoparticles and organized into a chain within the cell, the assembly and biomineralization of magnetosomes are controlled by magnetosome-associated proteins. Here, we describe the crystal structures of the magnetosome-associated protein, MamA, from Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 and Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1. MamA folds as a sequential tetra-trico-peptide repeat (TPR) protein with a unique hook-like shape. Analysis of the MamA structures indicates two distinct domains that can undergo conformational changes. Furthermore, structural analysis of seven crystal forms verified that the core of MamA is not affected by crystallization conditions and identified three protein-protein interaction sites, namely a concave site, a convex site, and a putative TPR repeat. Additionally, relying on transmission electron microscopy and size exclusion chromatography, we show that highly stable complexes form upon MamA homooligomerization. Disruption of the MamA putative TPR motif or N-terminal domain led to protein mislocalization in vivo and prevented MamA oligomerization in vitro. We, therefore, propose that MamA self-assembles through its putative TPR motif and its concave site to create a large homooligomeric scaffold which can interact with other magnetosome-associated proteins via the MamA convex site. We discuss the structural basis for TPR homooligomerization that allows the proper function of a prokaryotic organelle.

  2. A family of intermediate filament-like proteins is sequentially assembled into the cytoskeleton of Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-White, Brooke R; Ivey, F Douglas; Cheng, Katherine; Szatanek, Tomasz; Lorestani, Alexander; Beckers, Con J; Ferguson, David J P; Sahoo, Nivedita; Gubbels, Marc-Jan

    2011-01-01

    The intracellular protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii divides by a unique process of internal budding that involves the assembly of two daughter cells within the mother. The cytoskeleton of Toxoplasma, which is composed of microtubules associated with an inner membrane complex (IMC), has an important role in this process. The IMC, which is directly under the plasma membrane, contains a set of flattened membranous sacs lined on the cytoplasmic side by a network of filamentous proteins. This network contains a family of intermediate filament-like proteins or IMC proteins. In order to elucidate the division process, we have characterized a 14-member subfamily of Toxoplasma IMC proteins that share a repeat motif found in proteins associated with the cortical alveoli in all alveolates. By creating fluorescent protein fusion reporters for the family members we determined the spatiotemporal patterns of all 14 IMC proteins through tachyzoite development. This revealed several distinct distribution patterns and some provide the basis for novel structural models such as the assembly of certain family members into the basal complex. Furthermore we identified IMC15 as an early marker of budding and, lastly, the dynamic patterns observed throughout cytokinesis provide a timeline for daughter parasite development and division.

  3. The role of Slr0151, a tetratricopeptide repeat protein from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, during Photosystem II assembly and repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eRast

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The assembly and repair of photosystem II (PSII is facilitated by a variety of assembly factors. Among those, the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR protein Slr0151 from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (hereafter Synechocystis has previously been assigned a repair function under high light conditions (Yang et al., 2014, J. Integr. Plant Biol. 56, 1136-50. Here, we show that inactivation of Slr0151 affects thylakoid membrane ultrastructure even under normal light conditions. Moreover, the level and localization of Slr0151 are affected in a variety of PSII-related mutants. In particular, the data suggest a close functional relationship between Slr0151 and Sll0933, which interacts with Ycf48 during PSII assembly and is homologous to PAM68 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed a punctate distribution of Slr0151 within several different membrane types in Synechocystis cells.

  4. Overview and management of toxicities of immune checkpoint-blocking drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Economopoulou Panagiota

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy is considered to be the most important breakthrough in cancer management in the past few years. This success was based on the scientific understanding of immune mechanisms due to improvement in preclinical science and the introduction of new methods of investigation. Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs are among the most promising drugs in the field of immune-oncology; they represent monoclonal antibodies that modulate the effects of immune checkpoints, such as cytotoxic T lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA-4 and Programmed Cell Death protein 1 (PD-1, which are co-inhibitory signals responsible for immune suppression. Despite clinical benefits, ICIs are immune activating agents that are associated with a number of important side effects (immune-related adverse events-irAEs, attributed to organ-specific inflammation. Herein, we review the toxicities of ICIs, highlighting the importance of early identification and management.

  5. Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors: A New Opportunity in the Treatment of Ovarian Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Mittica

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC is the leading cause of death for gynecological cancer. The standard treatment for advanced stage is the combination of optimal debulking surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. Nevertheless, recurrence is frequent (around 70% and prognosis is globally poor. New therapeutic agents are needed to improve survival. Since EOC is strongly immunogenic, immune checkpoint inhibitors are under evaluation for their capacity to contrast the “turn off” signals expressed by the tumor to escape the immune system and usually responsible for self-tolerance maintenance. This article reviews the literature on anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4, anti-PD-1, anti-PD-L1, and anti-PD-L2 antibodies in EOC and highlights their possible lines of development. Further studies are needed to better define the prognostic role of the immune checkpoint inhibitors, to identify predictors of response and the optimal clinical setting in EOC.

  6. Self-Assembling Peptide Amphiphiles for Therapeutic Delivery of Proteins, Drugs, and Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungsoo Seth

    Biomaterials are used to help regenerate or replace the structure and function of damaged tissues. In order to elicit desired therapeutic responses in vivo, biomaterials are often functionalized with bioactive agents, such as growth factors, small molecule drugs, or even stem cells. Therefore, the strategies used to incorporate these bioactive agents in the microstructures and nanostructures of biomaterials can strongly influence the their therapeutic efficacy. Using self-assembling peptide amphiphiles (PAs), this work has investigated supramolecular nanostructures with improved interaction with three types of therapeutic agents: bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) which promotes osteogenic differentiation and bone growth, anti-inflammatory drug naproxen which is used to treat osteo- and rheumatoid arthritis, and neural stem cells that could differentiate into neurons to treat neurodegenerative diseases. For BMP-2 delivery, two specific systems were investigated with affinity for BMP-2: 1) heparin-binding nanofibers that display the natural ligand of the osteogenic protein, and 2) nanofibers that display a synthetic peptide ligand discovered in our laboratory through phage display to directly bind BMP-2. Both systems promoted enhanced osteoblast differentiation of pluripotent C2C12 cells and augmented bone regeneration in two in vivo models, a rat critical-size femur defect model and spinal arthrodesis model. The thesis also describes the use of PA nanofibers to improve the delivery of the anti-inflammatory drug naproxen. To promote a controlled release, naproxen was chemically conjugated to the nanofiber surface via an ester bond that would only be cleaved by esterases, which are enzymes found naturally in the body. In the absence of esterases, the naproxen remained conjugated to the nanofibers and was non-bioactive. On the other hand, in the presence of esterases, naproxen was slowly released and inhibited cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity, an enzyme responsible

  7. Keeping checkpoint/restart viable for exascale systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riesen, Rolf E.; Bridges, Patrick G. (IBM Research, Ireland, Mulhuddart, Dublin); Stearley, Jon R.; Laros, James H., III; Oldfield, Ron A.; Arnold, Dorian (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Ferreira, Kurt Brian; Brightwell, Ronald Brian

    2011-09-01

    Next-generation exascale systems, those capable of performing a quintillion (10{sup 18}) operations per second, are expected to be delivered in the next 8-10 years. These systems, which will be 1,000 times faster than current systems, will be of unprecedented scale. As these systems continue to grow in size, faults will become increasingly common, even over the course of small calculations. Therefore, issues such as fault tolerance and reliability will limit application scalability. Current techniques to ensure progress across faults like checkpoint/restart, the dominant fault tolerance mechanism for the last 25 years, are increasingly problematic at the scales of future systems due to their excessive overheads. In this work, we evaluate a number of techniques to decrease the overhead of checkpoint/restart and keep this method viable for future exascale systems. More specifically, this work evaluates state-machine replication to dramatically increase the checkpoint interval (the time between successive checkpoint) and hash-based, probabilistic incremental checkpointing using graphics processing units to decrease the checkpoint commit time (the time to save one checkpoint). Using a combination of empirical analysis, modeling, and simulation, we study the costs and benefits of these approaches on a wide range of parameters. These results, which cover of number of high-performance computing capability workloads, different failure distributions, hardware mean time to failures, and I/O bandwidths, show the potential benefits of these techniques for meeting the reliability demands of future exascale platforms.

  8. Using the Sirocco File System for high-bandwidth checkpoints.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klundt, Ruth Ann; Curry, Matthew L.; Ward, H. Lee

    2012-02-01

    The Sirocco File System, a file system for exascale under active development, is designed to allow the storage software to maximize quality of service through increased flexibility and local decision-making. By allowing the storage system to manage a range of storage targets that have varying speeds and capacities, the system can increase the speed and surety of storage to the application. We instrument CTH to use a group of RAM-based Sirocco storage servers allocated within the job as a high-performance storage tier to accept checkpoints, allowing computation to potentially continue asynchronously of checkpoint migration to slower, more permanent storage. The result is a 10-60x speedup in constructing and moving checkpoint data from the compute nodes. This demonstration of early Sirocco functionality shows a significant benefit for a real I/O workload, checkpointing, in a real application, CTH. By running Sirocco storage servers within a job as RAM-only stores, CTH was able to store checkpoints 10-60x faster than storing to PanFS, allowing the job to continue computing sooner. While this prototype did not include automatic data migration, the checkpoint was available to be pushed or pulled to disk-based storage as needed after the compute nodes continued computing. Future developments include the ability to dynamically spawn Sirocco nodes to absorb checkpoints, expanding this mechanism to other fast tiers of storage like flash memory, and sharing of dynamic Sirocco nodes between multiple jobs as needed.

  9. Calcium dependent formation of tubular assemblies by recombinant S-layer proteins in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkmaz, Nuriye; Ostermann, Kai; Roedel, Gerhard, E-mail: nuriye_korkmaz@yahoo.com, E-mail: kai.ostermann@tu-dresden.de, E-mail: gerhard.roedel@tu-dresden.de [Institut fuer Genetik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Zellescher Weg 20b, 01217 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-03-04

    Surface layer proteins have the appealing property to self-assemble in nanosized arrays in solution and on solid substrates. In this work, we characterize the formation of assembly structures of the recombinant surface layer protein SbsC of Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATTC 12980, which was tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein and expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The tubular structures formed by the protein in vivo are retained upon bursting the cells by osmotic shock; however, their average length is decreased. During dialysis, monomers obtained by treatment with chaotropic chemicals recrystallize again to form tube-like structures. This process is strictly dependent on calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) ions, with an optimal concentration of 10 mM. Further increase of the Ca{sup 2+} concentration results in multiple non-productive nucleation points. We further show that the lengths of the S-layer assemblies increase with time and can be controlled by pH. After 48 h, the average length at pH 9.0 is 4.13 {mu}m compared to 2.69 {mu}m at pH 5.5. Successful chemical deposition of platinum indicates the potential of recrystallized mSbsC-eGFP structures for nanobiotechnological applications.

  10. Calcium dependent formation of tubular assemblies by recombinant S-layer proteins in vivo and in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Nuriye; Ostermann, Kai; Rödel, Gerhard

    2011-03-01

    Surface layer proteins have the appealing property to self-assemble in nanosized arrays in solution and on solid substrates. In this work, we characterize the formation of assembly structures of the recombinant surface layer protein SbsC of Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATTC 12980, which was tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein and expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The tubular structures formed by the protein in vivo are retained upon bursting the cells by osmotic shock; however, their average length is decreased. During dialysis, monomers obtained by treatment with chaotropic chemicals recrystallize again to form tube-like structures. This process is strictly dependent on calcium (Ca2 + ) ions, with an optimal concentration of 10 mM. Further increase of the Ca2 + concentration results in multiple non-productive nucleation points. We further show that the lengths of the S-layer assemblies increase with time and can be controlled by pH. After 48 h, the average length at pH 9.0 is 4.13 µm compared to 2.69 µm at pH 5.5. Successful chemical deposition of platinum indicates the potential of recrystallized mSbsC-eGFP structures for nanobiotechnological applications.

  11. Lysosome-associated membrane proteins-1 and -2 (LAMP-1 and LAMP-2) assemble via distinct modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, Kazue; Tomabechi, Yuri; Ikeda, Mariko; Ehara, Haruhiko; Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Wakiyama, Motoaki; Podyma-Inoue, Katarzyna A; Rajapakshe, Anupama R; Watabe, Tetsuro; Shirouzu, Mikako; Hara-Yokoyama, Miki

    2016-10-21

    Lysosome-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2 (LAMP-1 and LAMP-2) have a large, heavily glycosylated luminal domain composed of two subdomains, and are the most abundant protein components in lysosome membranes. LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 have distinct functions, and the presence of both proteins together is required for the essential regulation of autophagy to avoid embryonic lethality. However, the structural aspects of LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 have not been elucidated. In the present study, we demonstrated that the subdomains of LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 adopt the unique β-prism fold, similar to the domain structure of the dendritic cell-specific-LAMP (DC-LAMP, LAMP-3), confirming the conserved aspect of this family of lysosome-associated membrane proteins. Furthermore, we evaluated the effects of the N-domain truncation of LAMP-1 or LAMP-2 on the assembly of LAMPs, based on immunoprecipitation experiments. We found that the N-domain of LAMP-1 is necessary, whereas that of LAMP-2 is repressive, for the organization of a multimeric assembly of LAMPs. Accordingly, the present study suggests for the first time that the assembly modes of LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 are different, which may underlie their distinct functions.

  12. KSHV encoded LANA recruits Nucleosome Assembly Protein NAP1L1 for regulating viral DNA replication and transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Namrata; Thakker, Suhani; Verma, Subhash C.

    2016-09-01

    The establishment of latency is an essential for lifelong persistence and pathogenesis of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is the most abundantly expressed protein during latency and is important for viral genome replication and transcription. Replication-coupled nucleosome assembly is a major step in packaging the newly synthesized DNA into chromatin, but the mechanism of KSHV genome chromatinization post-replication is not understood. Here, we show that nucleosome assembly protein 1-like protein 1 (NAP1L1) associates with LANA. Our binding assays revealed an association of LANA with NAP1L1 in KSHV-infected cells, which binds through its amino terminal domain. Association of these proteins confirmed their localization in specific nuclear compartments of the infected cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays from NAP1L1-depleted cells showed LANA-mediated recruitment of NAP1L1 at the terminal repeat (TR) region of the viral genome. Presence of NAP1L1 stimulated LANA-mediated DNA replication and persistence of a TR-containing plasmid. Depletion of NAP1L1 led to a reduced nucleosome positioning on the viral genome. Furthermore, depletion of NAP1L1 increased the transcription of viral lytic genes and overexpression decreased the promoter activities of LANA-regulated genes. These results confirmed that LANA recruitment of NAP1L1 helps in assembling nucleosome for the chromatinization of newly synthesized viral DNA.

  13. Analysis of self-assembly of S-layer protein slp-B53 from Lysinibacillus sphaericus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Falke, Sven; Drobot, Bjoern; Oberthuer, Dominik; Kikhney, Alexey; Guenther, Tobias; Fahmy, Karim; Svergun, Dmitri; Betzel, Christian; Raff, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    The formation of stable and functional surface layers (S-layers) via self-assembly of surface-layer proteins on the cell surface is a dynamic and complex process. S-layers facilitate a number of important biological functions, e.g., providing protection and mediating selective exchange of molecules and thereby functioning as molecular sieves. Furthermore, S-layers selectively bind several metal ions including uranium, palladium, gold, and europium, some of them with high affinity. Most current research on surface layers focuses on investigating crystalline arrays of protein subunits in Archaea and bacteria. In this work, several complementary analytical techniques and methods have been applied to examine structure-function relationships and dynamics for assembly of S-layer protein slp-B53 from Lysinibacillus sphaericus: (1) The secondary structure of the S-layer protein was analyzed by circular dichroism spectroscopy; (2) Small-angle X-ray scattering was applied to gain insights into the three-dimensional structure in solution; (3) The interaction with bivalent cations was followed by differential scanning calorimetry; (4) The dynamics and time-dependent assembly of S-layers were followed by applying dynamic light scattering; (5) The two-dimensional structure of the paracrystalline S-layer lattice was examined by atomic force microscopy. The data obtained provide essential structural insights into the mechanism of S-layer self-assembly, particularly with respect to binding of bivalent cations, i.e., Mg(2+) and Ca(2+). Furthermore, the results obtained highlight potential applications of S-layers in the fields of micromaterials and nanobiotechnology by providing engineered or individual symmetric thin protein layers, e.g., for protective, antimicrobial, or otherwise functionalized surfaces.

  14. NifS-directed assembly of a transient [2Fe-2S] cluster within the NifU protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuvaniyama, P; Agar, J N; Cash, V L; Johnson, M K; Dean, D R

    2000-01-18

    The NifS and NifU proteins from Azotobacter vinelandii are required for the full activation of nitrogenase. NifS is a homodimeric cysteine desulfurase that supplies the inorganic sulfide necessary for formation of the Fe-S clusters contained within the nitrogenase component proteins. NifU has been suggested to complement NifS either by mobilizing the Fe necessary for nitrogenase Fe-S cluster formation or by providing an intermediate Fe-S cluster assembly site. As isolated, the homodimeric NifU protein contains one [2Fe-2S](2+, +) cluster per subunit, which is referred to as the permanent cluster. In this report, we show that NifU is able to interact with NifS and that a second, transient [2Fe-2S] cluster can be assembled within NifU in vitro when incubated in the presence of ferric ion, L-cysteine, and catalytic amounts of NifS. Approximately one transient [2Fe-2S] cluster is assembled per homodimer. The transient [2Fe-2S] cluster species is labile and rapidly released on reduction. We propose that transient [2Fe-2S] cluster units are formed on NifU and then released to supply the inorganic iron and sulfur necessary for maturation of the nitrogenase component proteins. The role of the permanent [2Fe-2S] clusters contained within NifU is not yet known, but they could have a redox function involving either the formation or release of transient [2Fe-2S] cluster units assembled on NifU. Because homologs to both NifU and NifS, respectively designated IscU and IscS, are found in non-nitrogen fixing organisms, it is possible that the function of NifU proposed here could represent a general mechanism for the maturation of Fe-S cluster-containing proteins.

  15. Mapping Flexibility and the Assembly Switch of Cell Division Protein FtsZ by Computational and Mutational Approaches*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Galiano, Antonio J.; Buey, Rubén M.; Cabezas, Marta; Andreu, José M.

    2010-01-01

    The molecular switch for nucleotide-regulated assembly and disassembly of the main prokaryotic cell division protein FtsZ is unknown despite the numerous crystal structures that are available. We have characterized the functional motions in FtsZ with a computational consensus of essential dynamics, structural comparisons, sequence conservation, and networks of co-evolving residues. Employing this information, we have constructed 17 mutants, which alter the FtsZ functional cycle at different stages, to modify FtsZ flexibility. The mutant phenotypes ranged from benign to total inactivation and included increased GTPase, reduced assembly, and stabilized assembly. Six mutations clustering at the long cleft between the C-terminal β-sheet and core helix H7 deviated FtsZ assembly into curved filaments with inhibited GTPase, which still polymerize cooperatively. These mutations may perturb the predicted closure of the C-terminal domain onto H7 required for switching between curved and straight association modes and for GTPase activation. By mapping the FtsZ assembly switch, this work also gives insight into FtsZ druggability because the curved mutations delineate the putative binding site of the promising antibacterial FtsZ inhibitor PC190723. PMID:20472561

  16. Ultra-Thin Self-Assembled Protein-Polymer Membranes : A New Pore Forming Strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Patrick; Tutus, Murat; Kathrein, Christine; Mougin, Nathalie C.; Park, Hyunji; Hein, Christopher; Schuerings, Marco P.; Boeker, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembled membranes offer a promising alternative for conventional membrane fabrication, especially in the field of ultrafiltration. Here, a new pore-making strategy is introduced involving stimuli responsive proteinpolymer conjugates self-assembled across a large surface area using dryingmedia

  17. Combination approaches with immune checkpoint blockade in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Swart

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In healthy individuals, immune checkpoint molecules prevent autoimmune responses and limit immune cell-mediated tissue damage. Tumors frequently exploit these molecules to evade eradication by the immune system. Over the past years, immune checkpoint blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4 and programmed death-1 (PD-1 emerged as promising strategies to activate anti-tumor cytotoxic T cell responses. Although complete regression and long-term survival is achieved in some patients, not all patients respond. This review describes promising, novel combination approaches involving immune checkpoint blockade, aimed at increasing response-rates to the single treatments.

  18. Engineering the Controlled Assembly of Filamentous Injectisomes in E. coli K-12 for Protein Translocation into Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano-Gallego, David; Álvarez, Beatriz; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2015-09-18

    Bacterial pathogens containing type III protein secretion systems (T3SS) assemble large needle-like protein complexes in the bacterial envelope, called injectisomes, for translocation of protein effectors into host cells. The application of these "molecular syringes" for the injection of proteins into mammalian cells is hindered by their structural and genomic complexity, requiring multiple polypeptides encoded along with effectors in various transcriptional units (TUs) with intricate regulation. In this work, we have rationally designed the controlled expression of the filamentous injectisomes found in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) in the nonpathogenic strain E. coli K-12. All structural components of EPEC injectisomes, encoded in a genomic island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), were engineered in five TUs (eLEEs) excluding effectors, promoters and transcriptional regulators. These eLEEs were placed under the control of the IPTG-inducible promoter Ptac and integrated into specific chromosomal sites of E. coli K-12 using a marker-less strategy. The resulting strain, named synthetic injector E. coli (SIEC), assembles filamentous injectisomes similar to those in EPEC. SIEC injectisomes form pores in the host plasma membrane and are able to translocate T3-substrate proteins (e.g., translocated intimin receptor, Tir) into the cytoplasm of HeLa cells reproducing the phenotypes of intimate attachment and polymerization of actin-pedestals elicited by EPEC bacteria. Hence, SIEC strain allows the controlled expression of functional filamentous injectisomes for efficient translocation of proteins with T3S-signals into mammalian cells.

  19. Rab18 is required for viral assembly of hepatitis C virus through trafficking of the core protein to lipid droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dansako, Hiromichi; Hiramoto, Hiroki; Ikeda, Masanori; Wakita, Takaji; Kato, Nobuyuki

    2014-08-01

    During persistent infection of HCV, the HCV core protein (HCV-JFH-1 strain of genotype 2a) is recruited to lipid droplets (LDs) for viral assembly, but the mechanism of recruitment of the HCV core protein is uncertain. Here, we demonstrated that one of the Ras-related small GTPases, Rab18, was required for trafficking of the core protein around LDs. The knockdown of Rab18 reduced intracellular and extracellular viral infectivity, but not intracellular viral replication in HCV-JFH-1-infected RSc cells (an HuH-7-derived cell line). Exogenous expression of Rab18 increased extracellular viral infectivity almost two-fold. Furthermore, Rab18 was co-localized with the core protein in HCV-JFH-1-infected RSc cells, and the knockdown of Rab18 blocked recruitment of the HCV-JFH-1 core protein to LDs. These results suggest that Rab18 has an important role in viral assembly through the trafficking of the core protein to LDs.

  20. A divergent role of the SIRT1-TopBP1 axis in regulating metabolic checkpoint and DNA damage checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tongzheng; Lin, Yi-Hui; Leng, Wenchuan; Jung, Sung Yun; Zhang, Haoxing; Deng, Min; Evans, Debra; Li, Yunhui; Luo, Kuntian; Qin, Bo; Qin, Jun; Yuan, Jian; Lou, Zhenkun

    2014-12-04

    DNA replication is executed only when cells have sufficient metabolic resources and undamaged DNA. Nutrient limitation and DNA damage cause a metabolic checkpoint and DNA damage checkpoint, respectively. Although SIRT1 activity is regulated by metabolic stress and DNA damage, its function in these stress-mediated checkpoints remains elusive. Here we report that the SIRT1-TopBP1 axis functions as a switch for both checkpoints. With glucose deprivation, SIRT1 is activated and deacetylates TopBP1, resulting in TopBP1-Treslin disassociation and DNA replication inhibition. Conversely, SIRT1 activity is inhibited under genotoxic stress, resulting in increased TopBP1 acetylation that is important for the TopBP1-Rad9 interaction and activation of the ATR-Chk1 pathway. Mechanistically, we showed that acetylation of TopBP1 changes the conformation of TopBP1, thereby facilitating its interaction with distinct partners in DNA replication and checkpoint activation. Taken together, our studies identify the SIRT1-TopBP1 axis as a key signaling mode in the regulation of the metabolic checkpoint and the DNA damage checkpoint.

  1. A nacre protein, n16.3, self-assembles to form protein oligomers that dimensionally limit and organize mineral deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovic, Iva; Chang, Eric P; Lui, Michael; Rao, Ashit; Cölfen, Helmut; Evans, John Spencer

    2014-04-29

    The mollusk shell is a complex biological material that integrates mineral phases with organic macromolecular components such as proteins. The role of proteins in the formation of the nacre layer (aragonite mineral phase) is poorly understood, particularly with regard to the organization of mineral deposits within the protein extracellular matrix and the identification of which proteins are responsible for this task. We report new experiments that provide insight into the role of the framework nacre protein, n16.3 (Pinctada fucata), as an organizer or assembler of calcium carbonate mineral clusters. Using a combination of biophysical techniques, we find that recombinant n16.3 (r-n16.3) oligomerizes to form amorphous protein films and particles that possess regions of disorder and mobility. These supramolecular assemblies possess an intrinsically disordered C-terminal region (T64-W98) and reorganize in the presence of Ca(2+) ions to form clustered protein oligomers. This Ca(2+)-induced reorganization leads to alterations in the molecular environments of Trp residues, the majority of which reside in putative aggregation-prone cross-β strand regions. Potentiometric Ca(2+) titrations reveal that r-n16.3 does not significantly affect the formation of prenucleation clusters in solution, and this suggests a role for this protein in postnucleation mineralization events. This is verified in subsequent in vitro mineralization assays in which r-n16.3 demonstrates its ability to form gel-like protein phases that organize and cluster nanometer-sized single-crystal calcite relative to protein-deficient controls. We conclude that the n16 nacre framework proteome creates a protein gel matrix that organizes and dimensionally limits mineral deposits. This process is highly relevant to the formation of ordered, nanometer-sized nacre tablets in the mollusk shell.

  2. Assembling of redox proteins on Au(111) surfaces: A scanning probe microscopy investigation for application in bio-nanodevices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andolfi, L. [Biophysics and Nanoscience Centre, INFM-CNISM, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Universita della Tuscia, Viterbo, I-01100 (Italy); Bizzarri, A.R. [Biophysics and Nanoscience Centre, INFM-CNISM, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Universita della Tuscia, Viterbo, I-01100 (Italy); Cannistraro, S. [Biophysics and Nanoscience Centre, INFM-CNISM, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Universita della Tuscia, Viterbo, I-01100 (Italy)]. E-mail: cannistr@unitus.it

    2006-09-25

    The morphology and conductive properties of azurin molecules, chemically attached to sulfhydryl terminated alkanethiol monolayer assembled on Au(111) surface, are mapped at single molecule level and compared with those observed for the same molecule immobilised on bare Au(111). High-resolution Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy shows that the protein molecules immobilised on modified gold, better reproduces the crystallographic height of the protein, than that immobilised on bare gold. Such a height recovering is also found in the Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy images. Consistently, a good tunnelling conduction of azurins on the modified gold electrode is demonstrated by Tunnelling Spectroscopy. Cyclic voltammetry measurements show, in addition, that the redox activity of azurin molecules covalently immobilised on sulfhydryl functionalised Au(111) surface is retained. These results are discussed in connection with possible use of this linker in the assembling of nano-hybrid systems.

  3. Scaffold-forming and Adhesive Contributions of Synthetic Laminin-binding Proteins to Basement Membrane Assembly*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    McKee, Karen K.; Capizzi, Stephanie; Yurchenco, Peter D.

    2009-01-01

    Laminins that possess three short arms contribute to basement membrane assembly by anchoring to cell surfaces, polymerizing, and binding to nidogen and collagen IV. Although laminins containing the α4 and α5 subunits are expressed in α2-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy, they may be ineffective substitutes because they bind weakly to cell surfaces and/or because they lack the third arm needed for polymerization. We asked whether linker proteins engineered to bind...

  4. An improved design of spiral tube assembly for separation of proteins by high-speed counter-current chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasarathy, Dhweeja; Ito, Yoichiro

    2015-10-30

    A new spiral tube assembly was designed to improve the column capacity and partition efficiency for protein separation. This spiral tube assembly has greater column capacity than the original tubing because of an increase in radial grooves from 4 to 12 to accommodate more spiral layers and 12 narrow spots instead of 4 in each circular loop to interrupt the laminar flow that causes sample band broadening. Standard PTFE tubing (1.6mm ID) and the modified flat-twisted tubing were used as the separation column. The performances of both assemblies were compared for separating three stable test proteins including cytochrome c, myoglobin, and lysozyme using a two phase aqueous-aqueous solvent system composed of polyethylene glycol 1000 (12.5% w/w) and dibasic potassium phosphate (12.5% w/w). All samples were run at 1, 2, 3, and 5mL/min at both 800rpm and 1000rpm. The separation of these three protein samples produced high stationary phase retentions at 1, 2, and 3mL/min, yet separated efficiently at 5mL/min in 40min. After comparing the separation efficiency in terms of the peak resolutions, theoretical plate numbers, and separation times, it was determined that the flat-twisted tubing was more effective in separating these protein samples. In order to validate the efficacy of this novel assembly, a mixture of five protein samples (cytochrome c, myoglobin, ovalbumin, lysozyme, and hemoglobin) were separated, under the optimal conditions established with these three protein samples, at 1mL/min with a revolution speed of 1000rpm. There were high stationary phase retentions of around 60%, with effective separations, demonstrating the efficiency of the flat-twisted spiral tube assembly. The separation time of 6h was a limitation but can potentially be shortened by improving the strength of the column that will permit an increase in revolution speed and flow rate. This novel spiral separation column will allow rapid and efficient separation of mixtures with high yield of the

  5. Anti-fouling surfaces by combined molecular self-assembly and surface-initiated ATRP for micropatterning active proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, K M; Cai, Q; Li, J S; Yang, X P; Yang, W T; Xu, F J

    2012-02-01

    A simple method by combined molecular self assembly and surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) was proposed to prepare a biologically inert surface for micropatterning active proteins. The MPEG microdomains having a short terminal poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) unit were prepared by self assembly of 2-(methyoxy(polyethylenoxy) propyl)trimethoxy silane (MPEG-silane). The remaining local regions or poly(poly(ethylene glycol)methyl ether methacrylate-co-glycidyl methacrylate) (P(PEGMEMA-co-GMA)) microdomains were produced via SI-ATRP of PEGMEMA and GMA comonomers. The epoxy groups of the P(PEGMEMA-co-GMA) microdomains were used directly for covalent coupling of an active protein (human immunoglobulin or IgG) via the ring-opening reaction to produce the IgG-coupled microdomains. The IgG-coupled microdomains interact only and specifically with target anti-IgG, while the other antifouling microregions from self-assembled monolayers with short terminal PEG units effectively prevent specific and non-specific protein fouling. When extended to other active biomolecules, microarrays for specific and non-specific analyte interactions with a high signal-to-noise ratio could be readily tailored.

  6. Crystallization of domains involved in self-assembly of the S-layer protein SbsC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ðordić, Anđela; Egelseer, Eva M; Tesarz, Manfred; Sleytr, Uwe B; Keller, Walter; Pavkov-Keller, Tea

    2012-12-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 is completely covered with a two-dimensional crystalline monolayer composed of the S-layer protein SbsC. In order to complete the structure of the full-length protein, additional soluble constructs containing the crucial domains for self-assembly have been successfully cloned, expressed and purified. Crystals obtained from three different recombinant constructs yielded diffraction to 3.4, 2.8 and 1.5 Å resolution. Native data have been collected.

  7. Protein-based multi-bit biomemory device consisting of various metalloproteins on self-assembled 11-MUA layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taek; Min, Junhong; Lee, Jin-Ho; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2011-01-01

    A multi-bit biomemory device was devised by introducing 4 different metalloproteins (azurin, cytochrome c, ferredoxin, myoglobin) to an electronic device using 11-MUA (11-mercapto-undecanoic acid) as the chemical linker. The immobilization of the 4 different self-assembled protein layers on a Au substrate via 11-MUA were confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The redox properties of these 4 different protein layers immobilized onto Au surface were assessed by cyclic voltammetry (CV). In addition, their memory functions were verified by chronoamperometry (CA). Based on these results, we demonstrated that a multi-bit biomemory concept could be realized using various metalloproteins as active materials.

  8. Identifying SARS-CoV membrane protein amino acid residues linked to virus-like particle assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Tzu Tseng

    Full Text Available Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV membrane (M proteins are capable of self-assembly and release in the form of membrane-enveloped vesicles, and of forming virus-like particles (VLPs when coexpressed with SARS-CoV nucleocapsid (N protein. According to previous deletion analyses, M self-assembly involves multiple M sequence regions. To identify important M amino acid residues for VLP assembly, we coexpressed N with multiple M mutants containing substitution mutations at the amino-terminal ectodomain, carboxyl-terminal endodomain, or transmembrane segments. Our results indicate that a dileucine motif in the endodomain tail (218LL219 is required for efficient N packaging into VLPs. Results from cross-linking VLP analyses suggest that the cysteine residues 63, 85 and 158 are not in close proximity to the M dimer interface. We noted a significant reduction in M secretion due to serine replacement for C158, but not for C63 or C85. Further analysis suggests that C158 is involved in M-N interaction. In addition to mutations of the highly conserved 107-SWWSFNPE-114 motif, substitutions at codons W19, W57, P58, W91, Y94 or F95 all resulted in significantly reduced VLP yields, largely due to defective M secretion. VLP production was not significantly affected by a tryptophan replacement of Y94 or F95 or a phenylalanine replacement of W19, W57 or W91. Combined, these results indicate the involvement of specific M amino acids during SARS-CoV virus assembly, and suggest that aromatic residue retention at specific positions is critical for M function in terms of directing virus assembly.

  9. Tagging ribosomal protein S7 allows rapid identification of mutants defective in assembly and function of 30 S subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrick, K; Dunny, G M; Noller, H F

    2000-05-01

    Ribosomal protein S7 nucleates folding of the 16 S rRNA 3' major domain, which ultimately forms the head of the 30 S ribosomal subunit. Recent crystal structures indicate that S7 lies on the interface side of the 30 S subunit, near the tRNA binding sites of the ribosome. To map the functional surface of S7, we have tagged the protein with a Protein Kinase A recognition site and engineered alanine substitutions that target each exposed, conserved residue. We have also deleted conserved features of S7, using its structure to guide our design. By radiolabeling the tag sequence using Protein Kinase A, we are able to track the partitioning of each mutant protein into 30 S, 70 S, and polyribosome fractions in vivo. Overexpression of S7 confers a growth defect, and we observe a striking correlation between this phenotype and proficiency in 30 S subunit assembly among our collection of mutants. We find that the side chain of K35 is required for efficient assembly of S7 into 30 S subunits in vivo, whereas those of at least 17 other conserved exposed residues are not required. In addition, an S7 derivative lacking the N-terminal 17 residues causes ribosomes to accumulate on mRNA to abnormally high levels, indicating that our approach can yield interesting mutant ribosomes.

  10. Expression and localization of VCX/Y proteins and their possible involvement in regulation of ribosome assembly during spermatogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENG WEI ZOU; JIAN CHAO ZHANG; XIAO DONG ZHANG; SHI YING MIAO; SHU DONG ZONG; QI SHENG; LIN FANG WANG

    2003-01-01

    Variable Charge X/Y (VCX/Y) is a human testis-specific gene family that localized on X and Y chromo-somes. In this study, VCY protein was expressed in E. coli in the form of glutathione-S-transferase (GST)fusion protein. With the purified fusion protein as antigen, the anti-GST-VCY antibody was generated andthe localization of VCY protein in human testis was determined by immunohistochemistry. In the testisseminiferous epithelium, VCY proteins were highly expressed in nuclei of germ cells. Using propidium io-dide staining and green fluorescent protein (GFP) tag technologies, VCY and VCX-8r proteins were mainlylocalized in the nucleoli of COS7 cells. In addition, the colocalization for VCY and VCX-8r in COS7 cellswas also observed. With VCY cDNA as bait, a cDNA fragment of acidic ribosomal protein PO was obtainedusing yeast two-hybrid system. All the information above indicates that VCX/Y protein family might beinvolved in the regulation of ribosome assembly during spermatogenesis.

  11. Immune checkpoint blockade therapy: The 2014 Tang prize in biopharmaceutical science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Shan Chen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The first Tang Prize for Biopharmaceutical Science has been awarded to Prof. James P. Allison and Prof. Tasuku Honjo for their contributions leading to an entirely new way to treat cancer by blocking the molecules cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4 and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1 that turn off immune response. The treatment, called "immune checkpoint blockade therapy," has opened a new therapeutic era. Here the discoveries of the immune checkpoints and how they contribute to the maintenance of self-tolerance, as well as how to protect tissues from the excess immune responses causing damage are reviewed. The efforts made by Prof. Allison and Prof. Honjo for developing the most promising approaches to activate therapeutic antitumor immunity are also summarized. Since these certain immune checkpoint pathways appear to be one of the major mechanisms resulting in immune escape of tumors, the presence of anti-CTLA-4 and/or anti-PD-1 should contribute to removal of the inhibition signals for T cell activation. Subsequently, it will enhance specific T cell activation and, therefore, strengthen antitumor immunity.

  12. Immunologic checkpoints in cancer therapy: focus on the programmed death-1 (PD-1 receptor pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momtaz P

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Parisa Momtaz,1,2 Michael A Postow1,2 1Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA; 2Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA Abstract: T-lymphocytes have the potential to recognize cancer antigens as foreign and therefore eliminate them. However, immune checkpoints such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen (CTLA-4 and programmed cell death (PD-1 receptor and its ligands (PD-L1, PD-L2 suppress the activity of T-lymphocytes. Advances in the understanding of immunology and its role in cancer have led to the development of immune checkpoint inhibitors that block CTLA-4 and PD-1 and result in durable responses in patients with a wide range of cancers. PD-1 and PD-L1 inhibitors are currently in many stages of clinical investigation, and the anti-PD-1 antibody, pembrolizumab, was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Many questions remain to be answered, such as the optimal administration schedule, biomarkers that associate with benefit, and potential for use of PD-1 agents in combination approaches. Nonetheless, immunotherapy with PD-1 blocking antibodies is now becoming an integral part in the management of cancer. Keyword: immune checkpoints, immunotherapy, programmed cell death protein-1, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4

  13. A New Adaptive Checkpointing Strategy for Mobile Computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENChaoguang; ZUODecheng; YANGXiaozong

    2005-01-01

    Adaptive checkpointing strategy is an efficient recovery scheme, which is suitable for mobile computing system. However, all existing adaptive checkpointing schemes are not correct to recover system when failure occurs in some special period. In this paper, the issues that will lead to system inconsistency are first discussed and then a new adaptive strategy that can recover system to correct consistent state is proposed. Our algorithm improves system recovery performance because only failure process needs rollback through logging.

  14. Immune checkpoint receptors in regulating immune reactivity in rheumatic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ceeraz, Sabrina; Nowak, Elizabeth C.; Burns, Christopher M.; Noelle, Randolph J.

    2014-01-01

    Immune checkpoint regulators are critical modulators of the immune system, allowing the initiation of a productive immune response and preventing the onset of autoimmunity. Co-inhibitory and co-stimulatory immune checkpoint receptors are required for full T-cell activation and effector functions such as the production of cytokines. In autoimmune rheumatic diseases, impaired tolerance leads to the development of diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and Sjogren’s...

  15. Self-assembled bionanostructures: proteins following the lead of DNA nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Gradišar, Helena; Jerala, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Natural polymers are able to self-assemble into versatile nanostructures based on the information encoded into their primary structure. The structural richness of biopolymer-based nanostructures depends on the information content of building blocks and the available biological machinery to assemble and decode polymers with a defined sequence. Natural polypeptides comprise 20 amino acids with very different properties in comparison to only 4 structurally similar nucleotides, building elements ...

  16. Species-specificity of the BamA component of the bacterial outer membrane protein-assembly machinery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena B Volokhina

    Full Text Available The BamA protein is the key component of the Bam complex, the assembly machinery for outer membrane proteins (OMP in gram-negative bacteria. We previously demonstrated that BamA recognizes its OMP substrates in a species-specific manner in vitro. In this work, we further studied species specificity in vivo by testing the functioning of BamA homologs of the proteobacteria Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Bordetella pertussis, Burkholderia mallei, and Escherichia coli in E. coli and in N. meningitidis. We found that no BamA functioned in another species than the authentic one, except for N. gonorrhoeae BamA, which fully complemented a N. meningitidis bamA mutant. E. coli BamA was not assembled into the N. meningitidis outer membrane. In contrast, the N. meningitidis BamA protein was assembled into the outer membrane of E. coli to a significant extent and also associated with BamD, an essential accessory lipoprotein of the Bam complex.Various chimeras comprising swapped N-terminal periplasmic and C-terminal membrane-embedded domains of N. meningitidis and E. coli BamA proteins were also not functional in either host, although some of them were inserted in the OM suggesting that the two domains of BamA need to be compatible in order to function. Furthermore, conformational analysis of chimeric proteins provided evidence for a 16-stranded β-barrel conformation of the membrane-embedded domain of BamA.

  17. A survey of checkpointing algorithms for parallel and distributed computers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Kalaiselvi; V Rajaraman

    2000-10-01

    Checkpoint is defined as a designated place in a program at which normal processing is interrupted specifically to preserve the status information necessary to allow resumption of processing at a later time. Checkpointing is the process of saving the status information. This paper surveysthe algorithms which have been reported in the literature for checkpointing parallel/distributed systems. It has been observed that most of the algorithms published for checkpointing in message passing systems are based on the seminal article by Chandy and Lamport. A large number of articles have been published in this area by relaxing the assumptions made in this paper and by extending it to minimise the overheads of coordination and context saving. Checkpointing for sharedmemory systems primarily extend cache coherence protocolstomaintain a consistent memory. All of them assume that the main memory is safe for storing the context. Recently algorithms have been published for distributed shared memory systems, which extend the cache coherence protocols used in shared memory systems. They however also include methods for storing the status of distributed memory in stable storage. Most of the algorithms assume that there is no knowledge about the programs being executed.It is howeverfelt that in development of parallel programs the user has to do a fair amount of work in distributing tasks and this information can be effectively used to simplify checkpointing and rollback recovery.

  18. An Analysis of Checkpointing Algorithms for Distributed Mobile Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Khunteta

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Distributed snapshots are an important building block for distributed systems, and are useful for constructing efficient checkpointing protocols, among other uses. Direct application of these algorithms to mobile systems is not easible, however, due to differences in the environment in which mobile systems operate, relative to general distributed systems. The mobile computing environment introduces newchallenges in the area of fault-tolerant computing. Compared to traditional distributed environments, wireless networks are typically slower, providing lower throughput and latency, comparing to wireline networks. In addition, the mobile hosts have limited computation esources, are often exposed to harsh operating environment that makes them more likely to fail, and can roam while operating. Over the past two decades, intensive research work has been carried out on providing efficient checkpointing protocols in traditional distributed computing. Recently, more attention has been paid to providing checkpointing protocols for mobile systems. Some of these protocols have been adapted from the traditional distributed environment; others have been created from scratch for mobile systems. Checkpoint is defined as a designated place in a program at which normal processing is interrupted specifically to preserve the status information necessary to allow resumption of processing at alater time. Checkpointing is the process of saving the status information. This paper surveys the algorithms which have been reported in the literature for checkpointing in Mobile Distributed systems.

  19. A Tunable Checkpointing Algorithm for Distributed Mobile Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungchae Lim

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of a distributed checkpointing algorithm is to efficiently restore the execution state of distributed applications in face of hardware or software failures. Originally, such algorithms were devised for fixed networking systems, of which computing components communicate with each other via wired networks. Therefore, those algorithms usually suffer from heavy networking costs coming from frequent data transits over wireless networks, if they are used in the wireless computing environment. In this paper, to reduce usage of wireless communications, our checkpointing algorithm allows the distributed mobile application to tune the level of its checkpointing strictness. The strictness is defined by the maximum rollback distance (MRD that says how many recent local checkpoints can be rolled back in the worst case. Since our algorithm have more flexibility in checkpointing schedule due to the use of MRD, it is possible to reduce the number of enforced local checkpointing. In particular, the amount of data transited on wirelesses networks becomes smaller than in earlier methods; thus, our algorithm provides less communication cost and shortened blocking time.

  20. A S-Layer Protein of Bacillus anthracis as a Building Block for Functional Protein Arrays by In Vitro Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu-Ying; Wang, Dian-Bing; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Bi, Li-Jun; Zhang, Ji-Bin; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Xian-En

    2015-11-18

    S-layer proteins create a cell-surface layer architecture in both bacteria and archaea. Because S-layer proteins self-assemble into a native-like S-layer crystalline structure in vitro, they are attractive building blocks in nanotechnology. Here, the potential use of the S-layer protein EA1 from Bacillus anthracis in constructing a functional nanostructure is investigated, and apply this nanostructure in a proof-of-principle study for serological diagnosis of anthrax. EA1 is genetically fused with methyl parathion hydrolase (MPH), to degrade methyl parathion and provide a label for signal amplification. EA1 not only serves as a nanocarrier, but also as a specific antigen to capture anthrax-specific antibodies. As results, purified EA1-MPH forms a single layer of crystalline nanostructure through self-assembly. Our chimeric nanocatalyst greatly improves enzymatic stability of MPH. When applied to the detection of anthrax-specific antibodies in serum samples, the detection of our EA1-MPH nanostructure is nearly 300 times more sensitive than that of the unassembled complex. Together, it is shown that it is possible to build a functional and highly sensitive nanosensor based on S-layer protein. In conclusion, our present study should serve as a model for the development of other multifunctional nanomaterials using S-layer proteins.

  1. Selective protein immobilization onto gold nanoparticles deposited under vacuum on a protein-repellent self-assembled monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peissker, Tobias; Deschaume, Olivier; Rand, Danielle R; Boyen, Hans-Gerd; Conard, Thierry; Van Bael, Margriet J; Bartic, Carmen

    2013-12-10

    The immobilization of proteins on flat substrates plays an important role for a wide spectrum of applications in the fields of biology, medicine, and biochemistry, among others. An essential prerequisite for the use of proteins (e.g., in biosensors) is the conservation of their biological activity. Losses in activity upon protein immobilization can largely be attributed to a random attachment of the proteins to the surface. In this study, we present an approach for the immobilization of proteins onto a chemically heterogeneous surface, namely a surface consisting of protein-permissive and protein-repellent areas, which allows for significant reduction of random protein attachment. As protein-permissive, i.e., as protein-binding sites, ultra pure metallic nanoparticles are deposited under vacuum onto a protein-repellent PEG-silane polymer layer. Using complementary surface characterization techniques (atomic force microscopy, quartz crystal microbalance, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) we demonstrate that the Au nanoparticles remain accessible for protein attachment without compromising the protein-repellency of the PEG-silane background. Moreover, we show that the amount of immobilized protein can be controlled by tuning the Au nanoparticle coverage. This method shows potential for applications requiring the control of protein immobilization down to the single molecule level.

  2. Analysis of mutations in Neurospora crassa ERMES components reveals specific functions related to β-barrel protein assembly and maintenance of mitochondrial morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wideman, Jeremy G; Lackey, Sebastian W K; Srayko, Martin A; Norton, Kacie A; Nargang, Frank E

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) tethers the er to mitochondria and contains four structural components: Mmm1, Mdm12, Mdm10, and Mmm2 (Mdm34). The Gem1 protein may play a role in regulating ERMES function. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Neurospora crassa strains lacking any of Mmm1, Mdm12, or Mdm10 are known to show a variety of phenotypic defects including altered mitochondrial morphology and defects in the assembly of β-barrel proteins into the mitochondrial outer membrane. Here we examine ERMES complex components in N. crassa and show that Mmm1 is an ER membrane protein containing a Cys residue near its N-terminus that is conserved in the class Sordariomycetes. The residue occurs in the ER-lumen domain of the protein and is involved in the formation of disulphide bonds that give rise to Mmm1 dimers. Dimer formation is required for efficient assembly of Tom40 into the TOM complex. However, no effects are seen on porin assembly or mitochondrial morphology. This demonstrates a specificity of function and suggests a direct role for Mmm1 in Tom40 assembly. Mutation of a highly conserved region in the cytosolic domain of Mmm1 results in moderate defects in Tom40 and porin assembly, as well as a slight morphological phenotype. Previous reports have not examined the role of Mmm2 with respect to mitochondrial protein import and assembly. Here we show that absence of Mmm2 affects assembly of β-barrel proteins and that lack of any ERMES structural component results in defects in Tom22 assembly. Loss of N. crassa Gem1 has no effect on the assembly of these proteins but does affect mitochondrial morphology.

  3. The meiosis-specific nuclear passenger protein is required for proper assembly of forespore membrane in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaine, Masak; Imada, Kazuki; Numata, Osamu; Nakamura, Taro; Nakano, Kentaro

    2014-10-15

    Sporulation, gametogenesis in yeast, consists of meiotic nuclear division and spore morphogenesis. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the four haploid nuclei produced after meiosis II are encapsulated by the forespore membrane (FSM), which is newly synthesized from spindle pole bodies (SPBs) in the cytoplasm of the mother cell as spore precursors. Although the coordination between meiosis and FSM assembly is vital for proper sporulation, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we identified a new meiosis-specific protein Npg1, and found that it was involved in the efficient formation of spores and spore viability. The accumulation and organization of the FSM was compromised in npg1-null cells, leading to the error-prone envelopment of nuclei. Npg1 was first seen as internuclear dots and translocated to the SPBs before the FSM assembled. Genetic analysis revealed that Npg1 worked in conjunction with the FSM proteins Spo3 and Meu14. These results suggest a possible signaling link from the nucleus to the meiotic SPBs in order to associate the onset of FSM assembly with meiosis II, which ensures the successful partitioning of gametic nuclei.

  4. An essential requirement for β1 integrin in the assembly of extracellular matrix proteins within the vascular wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlo, Kirsten A; Noel, Onika D V; Vora, Roshni; LaRussa, Marie; Fassler, Reinhard; Hall-Glenn, Faith; Iruela-Arispe, M Luisa

    2012-05-01

    β1 integrin has been shown to contribute to vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation, adhesion and mechanosensation in vitro. Here we showed that deletion of β1 integrin at the onset of smooth muscle differentiation resulted in interrupted aortic arch, aneurysms and failure to assemble extracellular matrix proteins. These defects result in lethality prior to birth. Our data indicates that β1 integrin is not required for the acquisition, but it is essential for the maintenance of the smooth muscle cell phenotype, as levels of critical smooth muscle proteins are gradually reduced in mutant mice. Furthermore, while deposition of extracellular matrix was not affected, its structure was disrupted. Interestingly, defects in extracellular matrix and vascular wall assembly, were restricted to the aortic arch and its branches, compromising the brachiocephalic and carotid arteries and to the exclusion of the descending aorta. Additional analysis of β1 integrin in the pharyngeal arch smooth muscle progenitors was performed using wnt1Cre. Neural crest cells deleted for β1 integrin were able to migrate to the pharyngeal arches and associate with endothelial lined arteries; but exhibited vascular remodeling defects and early lethality. This work demonstrates that β1 integrin is dispensable for migration and initiation of the smooth muscle differentiation program, however, it is essential for remodeling of the pharyngeal arch arteries and for the assembly of the vessel wall of their derivatives. It further establishes a critical role of β1 integrin in the protection against aneurysms that is particularly confined to the ascending aorta and its branches.

  5. Inositol phosphates compete with nucleic acids for binding to bovine leukemia virus matrix protein: implications for deltaretroviral assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualley, Dominic F; Lackey, Crystal M; Paterson, Justin P

    2013-08-01

    The matrix (MA) domain of retroviral Gag proteins plays a crucial role in virion assembly. In human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), a lentivirus, the presence of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate triggers a conformational change allowing the MA domain to bind the plasma membrane (PM). In this study, the MA protein from bovine leukemia virus (BLV) was used to investigate the mechanism of viral Gag binding to the membrane during replication of a deltaretrovirus. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to measure the binding affinity of MA for two RNA constructs derived from the BLV genome as well as for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The importance of electrostatic interactions and the ability of inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) to compete with nucleic acids for binding to MA were also investigated. Our data show that IP6 effectively competes with RNA and DNA for BLV MA binding, while [NaCl] of greater than 100 mM is required to produce any observable effect on DNA-MA binding. These results suggest that BLV assembly may be highly dependent on the specific interaction of the MA domain with components of the PM, as observed previously with HIV-1. The mode of MA binding to nucleic acids and the implications for BLV assembly are discussed.

  6. CAS-1, a C. elegans cyclase-associated protein, is required for sarcomeric actin assembly in striated muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kazumi; Ono, Kanako; Ono, Shoichiro

    2012-09-01

    Assembly of contractile apparatuses in striated muscle requires precisely regulated reorganization of the actin cytoskeletal proteins into sarcomeric organization. Regulation of actin filament dynamics is one of the essential processes of myofibril assembly, but the mechanism of actin regulation in striated muscle is not clearly understood. Actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin is a key enhancer of actin filament dynamics in striated muscle in both vertebrates and nematodes. Here, we report that CAS-1, a cyclase-associated protein in Caenorhabditis elegans, promotes ADF/cofilin-dependent actin filament turnover in vitro and is required for sarcomeric actin organization in striated muscle. CAS-1 is predominantly expressed in striated muscle from embryos to adults. In vitro, CAS-1 binds to actin monomers and enhances exchange of actin-bound ATP/ADP even in the presence of UNC-60B, a muscle-specific ADF/cofilin that inhibits the nucleotide exchange. As a result, CAS-1 and UNC-60B cooperatively enhance actin filament turnover. The two proteins also cooperate to shorten actin filaments. A cas-1 mutation is homozygous lethal with defects in sarcomeric actin organization. cas-1-mutant embryos and worms have aggregates of actin in muscle cells, and UNC-60B is mislocalized to the aggregates. These results provide genetic and biochemical evidence that cyclase-associated protein is a critical regulator of sarcomeric actin organization in striated muscle.

  7. Spontaneous surface self-assembly in protein-surfactant mixtures: interactions between hydrophobin and ethoxylated polysorbate surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Ian M; Petkov, Jordan T; Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Li, Peixun; Cox, Andrew R; Hedges, Nick; Webster, John R P

    2014-05-01

    The synergistic interactions between certain ethoxylated polysorbate nonionic surfactants and the protein hydrophobin result in spontaneous self-assembly at the air-water interface to form layered surface structures. The surface structures are characterized using neutron reflectivity. The formation of the layered surface structures is promoted by the hydrophobic interaction between the polysorbate alkyl chain and the hydrophobic patch on the surface of the globular hydrophobin and the interaction between the ethoxylated sorbitan headgroup and hydrophilic regions of the protein. The range of the ethoxylated polysorbate concentrations over which the surface ordering occurs is a maximum for the more hydrophobic surfactant polyoxyethylene(8) sorbitan monostearate. The structures at the air-water interface are accompanied by a profound change in the wetting properties of the solution on hydrophobic substrates. In the absence of the polysorbate surfactant, hydrophobin wets a hydrophobic surface, whereas the hydrophobin/ethoxylated polysorbate mixtures where multilayer formation occurs result in a significant dewetting of hydrophobic surfaces. The spontaneous surface self-assembly for hydrophobin/ethoxylated polysorbate surfactant mixtures and the changes in surface wetting properties provide a different insight into protein-surfactant interactions and potential for manipulating surface and interfacial properties and protein surface behavior.

  8. Self-assembly of silk-elastinlike protein polymers into three-dimensional scaffolds for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Like

    Production of brand new protein-based materials with precise control over the amino acid sequences at single residue level has been made possible by genetic engineering, through which artificial genes can be developed that encode protein-based materials with desired features. As an example, silk-elastinlike protein polymers (SELPs), composed of tandem repeats of amino acid sequence motifs from Bombyx mori (silkworm) silk and mammalian elastin, have been produced in this approach. SELPs have been studied extensively in the past two decades, however, the fundamental mechanism governing the self-assembly process to date still remains largely unresolved. Further, regardless of the unprecedented success when exploited in areas including drug delivery, gene therapy, and tissue augmentation, SELPs scaffolds as a three-dimensional cell culture model system are complicated by the inability of SELPs to provide the embedded tissue cells with appropriate biochemical stimuli essential for cell survival and function. In this dissertation, it is reported that the self-assembly of silk-elastinlike protein polymers (SELPs) into nanofibers in aqueous solutions can be modulated by tuning the curing temperature, the size of the silk blocks, and the charge of the elastin blocks. A core-sheath model was proposed for nanofiber formation, with the silk blocks in the cores and the hydrated elastin blocks in the sheaths. The folding of the silk blocks into stable cores -- affected by the size of the silk blocks and the charge of the elastin blocks -- plays a critical role in the assembly of silk-elastin nanofibers. The assembled nanofibers further form nanofiber clusters on the microscale, and the nanofiber clusters then coalesce into nanofiber micro-assemblies, interconnection of which eventually leads to the formation of three-dimensional scaffolds with distinct nanoscale and microscale features. SELP-Collagen hybrid scaffolds were also fabricated to enable independent control over the

  9. Assembly of proteins and 5 S rRNA to transcripts of the major structural domains of 23 S rRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, P; Phan, H; Johansen, L B

    1998-01-01

    The six major structural domains of 23 S rRNA from Escherichia coli, and all combinations thereof, were synthesized as separate T7 transcripts and reconstituted with total 50 S subunit proteins. Analysis by one and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis demonstrated the presence of at least one......+VI. This indicates that there are two major protein assembly centres located at the ends of the 23 S rRNA, which is consistent with an earlier view that in vitro protein assembly nucleates around proteins L24 and L3. Although similar protein assembly patterns were observed over a range of temperature and magnesium...... approach was used to map the putative binding regions on domain V of protein L9 and the 5 S RNA-L5-L18 complex....

  10. VESICULAR TRANSPORT. A structure of the COPI coat and the role of coat proteins in membrane vesicle assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodonova, S O; Diestelkoetter-Bachert, P; von Appen, A; Hagen, W J H; Beck, R; Beck, M; Wieland, F; Briggs, J A G

    2015-07-10

    Transport of material within cells is mediated by trafficking vesicles that bud from one cellular compartment and fuse with another. Formation of a trafficking vesicle is driven by membrane coats that localize cargo and polymerize into cages to bend the membrane. Although extensive structural information is available for components of these coats, the heterogeneity of trafficking vesicles has prevented an understanding of how complete membrane coats assemble on the membrane. We combined cryo-electron tomography, subtomogram averaging, and cross-linking mass spectrometry to derive a complete model of the assembled coat protein complex I (COPI) coat involved in traffic between the Golgi and the endoplasmic reticulum. The highly interconnected COPI coat structure contradicted the current "adaptor-and-cage" understanding of coated vesicle formation.

  11. Translation and Assembly of Radiolabeled Mitochondrial DNA-Encoded Protein Subunits from Cultured Cells and Isolated Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formosa, Luke E; Hofer, Annette; Tischner, Christin; Wenz, Tina; Ryan, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the mitochondrial electron transport chain consists of five multi-subunit membrane complexes responsible for the generation of cellular ATP. Of these, four complexes are under dual genetic control as they contain subunits encoded by both the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, thereby adding another layer of complexity to the puzzle of respiratory complex biogenesis. These subunits must be synthesized and assembled in a coordinated manner in order to ensure correct biogenesis of different respiratory complexes. Here, we describe techniques to (1) specifically radiolabel proteins encoded by mtDNA to monitor the rate of synthesis using pulse labeling methods, and (2) analyze the stability, assembly, and turnover of subunits using pulse-chase methods in cultured cells and isolated mitochondria.

  12. Ca(2+) Mediates the Self-Assembly of the Foot Proteins of Pinctada fucata from the Nanoscale to the Microscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuang; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2016-10-10

    Bivalve animals such as mussels and pearl oysters secrete proteinaceous byssus from the foot to attach themselves to solid surfaces under seawater. Although the biomolecules of mussel byssus have been extensively studied, how they form insoluble threads underwater from soluble protein precursors and how they produce hierarchical microscale threads from biomolecules remains unclear. Here, using the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata as a model, metal ions rather than pH are found to play critical roles in the solidification process of the byssus. Particularly, Ca(2+) can induce self-assembly of the foot proteins and the byssal proteins, resulting in aggregate formation. At a concentration of 10 mM, protein fibers with a diameter of approximately 26 μm and a length ranging from 50 to 400 μm were formed. Moreover, the fibers are composed of 60-90 nm nanospheres, reminiscent of the ultrastructure sizes of threads. It is proposed that Ca(2+) can interact with byssal proteins such as thrombospondin-1 containing protein through phosphorylated serine and/or von Willebrand factor type A domains. This study provides insight into how the byssus forms from the soluble protein molecules into insoluble threads underwater and may inspire further biomaterial design for underwater use.

  13. Selective Protein Immobilization onto Gold Nanoparticles Deposited under Vacuum on a Protein-Repellent Self-Assembled Mono layer

    OpenAIRE

    Peissker, Tobias; Deschaume, Olivier; Rand, Danielle R.; BOYEN, Hans-Gerhard; CONARD, Thierry; Van Bael, Margriet J; Bartic, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    The immobilization of proteins on flat substrates plays an important role for a wide spectrum of applications in the fields of biology, medicine, and biochemistry, among others. An essential prerequisite for the use of proteins (e.g., in biosensors) is the conservation of their biological activity. Losses in activity upon protein immobilization can largely be attributed to a random attachment of the proteins to the surface. In this study, we present an approach for the immobilization of prote...

  14. On the lipid head group hydration of floating surface monolayers bound to self-assembled molecular protein layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lösche, M.; Erdelen, C.; Rump, E.

    1994-01-01

    with molecular resolution. Emphasis here is placed on the hydration of the lipid head groups in the bound state. For three functionalized lipids with spacers of different lengths between the biotin and their chains it was observed that the head groups were dehydrated in monolayers of the pure lipids, which were...... kept at low surface pressure before protein adsorption. The introduction of dipole moments at the interface by the admixture of phospholipids or the application of lateral pressure on the lipid monolayer before protein adsorption were found to impose an extension of the spacer moieties. The biotin...... groups were thus presented further away from the interface, and a hydration layer between the protein and the functionalized interface was observed in the self-assembled supramolecular structures....

  15. Role of the HIV-1 Matrix Protein in Gag Intracellular Trafficking and Targeting to the Plasma Membrane for Virus Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruba H Ghanam

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 encodes a polypeptide called Gag that is able to form virus-like particles (VLPs in vitro in the absence of any cellular or viral constituents. During the late phase of the HIV-1 infection, Gag polyproteins are transported to the plasma membrane (PM for assembly. In the past two decades, in vivo, in vitro and structural studies have shown that Gag trafficking and targeting to the PM are orchestrated events that are dependent on multiple factors including cellular proteins and specific membrane lipids. The matrix (MA domain of Gag has been the focus of these studies as it appears to be engaged in multiple intracellular interactions that are suggested to be critical for virus assembly and replication. The interaction between Gag and the PM is perhaps the most understood. It is now established that the ultimate localization of Gag on punctate sites on the PM is mediated by specific interactions between the MA domain of Gag and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5P2, a minor lipid localized on the inner leaflet of the PM. Structure-based studies revealed that binding of PI(4,5P2 to MA induces minor conformational changes, leading to exposure of the myristyl (myr group. Exposure of the myr group is also triggered by binding of calmodulin, enhanced by factors that promote protein self-association like the capsid domain of Gag, and is modulated by pH. Despite the steady progress in defining both the viral and cellular determinants of retroviral assembly and release, Gag’s intracellular interactions and trafficking to its assembly sites in the infected cell are poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the structural and functional role of MA in HIV replication.

  16. Effects of grape seed-derived polyphenols on amyloid beta-protein self-assembly and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Kenjiro; Condron, Margaret M; Ho, Lap; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Wei; Pasinetti, Giulio M; Teplow, David B

    2008-11-21

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that moderate consumption of red wine reduces the incidence of Alzheimer disease (AD). To study the protective effects of red wine, experiments recently were executed in the Tg2576 mouse model of AD. These studies showed that a commercially available grape seed polyphenolic extract, MegaNatural-AZ (MN), significantly attenuated AD-type cognitive deterioration and reduced cerebral amyloid deposition (Wang, J., Ho, L., Zhao, W., Ono, K., Rosensweig, C., Chen, L., Humala, N., Teplow, D. B., and Pasinetti, G. M. (2008) J. Neurosci. 28, 6388-6392). To elucidate the mechanistic bases for these observations, here we used CD spectroscopy, photo-induced cross-linking of unmodified proteins, thioflavin T fluorescence, size exclusion chromatography, and electron microscopy to examine the effects of MN on the assembly of the two predominant disease-related amyloid beta-protein alloforms, Abeta40 and Abeta42. We also examined the effects of MN on Abeta-induced cytotoxicity by assaying 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide metabolism and lactate dehydrogenase activity in Abeta-treated, differentiated pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Initial studies revealed that MN blocked Abeta fibril formation. Subsequent evaluation of the assembly stage specificity of the effect showed that MN was able to inhibit protofibril formation, pre-protofibrillar oligomerization, and initial coil --> alpha-helix/beta-sheet secondary structure transitions. Importantly, MN had protective effects in assays of cytotoxicity in which MN was mixed with Abeta prior to peptide assembly or following assembly and just prior to peptide addition to cells. These data suggest that MN is worthy of consideration as a therapeutic agent for AD.

  17. DNA topoisomerase II is a determinant of the tensile properties of yeast centromeric chromatin and the tension checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsi, Tariq H; Navarro, Michelle S; Bachant, Jeff

    2008-10-01

    Centromeric (CEN) chromatin is placed under mechanical tension and stretches as kinetochores biorient on the mitotic spindle. This deformation could conceivably provide a readout of biorientation to error correction mechanisms that monitor kinetochore-spindle interactions, but whether CEN chromatin acts in a tensiometer capacity is unresolved. Here, we report observations linking yeast Topoisomerase II (Top2) to both CEN mechanics and assessment of interkinetochore tension. First, in top2-4 and sumoylation-resistant top2-SNM mutants CEN chromatin stretches extensively during biorientation, resulting in increased sister kinetochore separation and preanaphase spindle extension. Our data indicate increased CEN stretching corresponds with alterations to CEN topology induced in response to tension. Second, Top2 potentiates aspects of the tension checkpoint. Mutations affecting the Mtw1 kinetochore protein activate Ipl1 kinase to detach kinetochores and induce spindle checkpoint arrest. In mtw1top2-4 and mtw1top2-SNM mutants, however, kinetochores are resistant to detachment and checkpoint arrest is attenuated. For top2-SNM cells, CEN stretching and checkpoint attenuation occur even in the absence of catenation linking sister chromatids. In sum, Top2 seems to play a novel role in CEN compaction that is distinct from decatenation. Perturbations to this function may allow weakened kinetochores to stretch CENs in a manner that mimics tension or evades Ipl1 surveillance.

  18. Drosophila brca2 is required for mitotic and meiotic DNA repair and efficient activation of the meiotic recombination checkpoint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Klovstad

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Heterozygous mutations in the tumor suppressor BRCA2 confer a high risk of breast and other cancers in humans. BRCA2 maintains genome stability in part through the regulation of Rad51-dependent homologous recombination. Much about its precise function in the DNA damage responses is, however, not yet known. We have made null mutations in the Drosophila homolog of BRCA2 and measured the levels of homologous recombination, non-homologous end-joining, and single-strand annealing in the pre-meiotic germline of Drosophila males. We show that repair by homologous recombination is dramatically decreased in Drosophila brca2 mutants. Instead, large flanking deletions are formed, and repair by the non-conservative single-strand annealing pathway predominates. We further show that during meiosis, Drosophila Brca2 has a dual role in the repair of meiotic double-stranded breaks and the efficient activation of the meiotic recombination checkpoint. The eggshell patterning defects that result from activation of the meiotic recombination checkpoint in other meiotic DNA repair mutants can be strongly suppressed by mutations in brca2. In addition, Brca2 co-immunoprecipitates with the checkpoint protein Rad9, suggesting a direct role for Brca2 in the transduction of the meiotic recombination checkpoint signal.

  19. Controlled-release and preserved bioactivity of proteins from (self-assembled core-shell double-walled microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan W

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Weien Yuan1,2, Zhenguo Liu11Department of Neurology, Xinhua Hospital, affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 2School of Pharmacy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: In order to address preserved protein bioactivities and protein sustained-release problems, a method for preparing double-walled microspheres with a core (protein-loaded nanoparticles with a polymer-suspended granule system-formed core and a second shell (a polymer-formed shell for controlled drug release and preserved protein bioactivities has been developed using (solid-in-oil phase-in-hydrophilic oil-in-water (S/O/Oh/W phases. The method, based on our previous microsphere preparation method (solid-in-oil phase-in-hydrophilic oil-in-water (S/O/Oh/W, employs different concentric poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide, poly(D,L-lactide, and protein-loaded nanoparticles to produce a suspended liquid which then self-assembles to form shell-core microspheres in the hydrophilic oil phase, which are then solidified in the water phase. Variations in the preparation parameters allowed complete encapsulation by the shell phase, including the efficient formation of a poly(D,L-lactide shell encapsulating a protein-loaded nanoparticle-based poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide core. This method produces core-shell double-walled microspheres that show controlled protein release and preserved protein bioactivities for 60 days. Based upon these results, we concluded that the core-shell double-walled microspheres might be applied for tissue engineering and therapy for chronic diseases, etc.Keywords: protein delivery, protein stability, core-shell microspheres, dextran nanoparticles

  20. Footprints of Optimal Protein Assembly Strategies in the Operonic Structure of Prokaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Ewald

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we investigate optimality principles behind synthesis strategies for protein complexes using a dynamic optimization approach. We show that the cellular capacity of protein synthesis has a strong influence on optimal synthesis strategies reaching from a simultaneous to a sequential synthesis of the subunits of a protein complex. Sequential synthesis is preferred if protein synthesis is strongly limited, whereas a simultaneous synthesis is optimal in situations with a high protein synthesis capacity. We confirm the predictions of our optimization approach through the analysis of the operonic organization of protein complexes in several hundred prokaryotes. Thereby, we are able to show that cellular protein synthesis capacity is a driving force in the dissolution of operons comprising the subunits of a protein complex. Thus, we also provide a tested hypothesis explaining why the subunits of many prokaryotic protein complexes are distributed across several operons despite the presumably less precise co-regulation.

  1. Programmable Self-Assembly of DNA-Protein Hybrid Hydrogel for Enzyme Encapsulation with Enhanced Biological Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Lan; Chen, Qiaoshu; Liu, Jianbo; Yang, Xiaohai; Huang, Jin; Li, Li; Guo, Xi; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Kemin

    2016-04-11

    A DNA-protein hybrid hydrogel was constructed based on a programmable assembly approach, which served as a biomimetic physiologic matrix for efficient enzyme encapsulation. A dsDNA building block tailored with precise biotin residues was fabricated based on supersandwich hybridization, and then the addition of streptavidin triggered the formation of the DNA-protein hybrid hydrogel. The biocompatible hydrogel, which formed a flower-like porous structure that was 6.7 ± 2.1 μm in size, served as a reservoir system for enzyme encapsulation. Alcohol oxidase (AOx), which served as a representative enzyme, was encapsulated in the hybrid hydrogel using a synchronous assembly approach. The enzyme-encapsulated hydrogel was utilized to extend the duration time for ethanol removal in serum plasma and the enzyme retained 78% activity after incubation with human serum for 24 h. The DNA-protein hybrid hydrogel can mediate the intact immobilization on a streptavidin-modified and positively charged substrate, which is very beneficial to solid-phase biosensing applications. The hydrogel-encapsulated enzyme exhibited improved stability in the presence of various denaturants. For example, the encapsulated enzyme retained 60% activity after incubation at 55 °C for 30 min. The encapsulated enzyme also retains its total activity after five freeze-thaw cycles and even suspended in solution containing organic solvents.

  2. The West Nile virus assembly process evades the conserved antiviral mechanism of the interferon-induced MxA protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenen, Antje; Gillespie, Leah; Morgan, Garry; van der Heide, Peter; Khromykh, Alexander; Mackenzie, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Flaviviruses have evolved means to evade host innate immune responses. Recent evidence suggests this is due to prevention of interferon production and signaling in flavivirus-infected cells. Here we show that the interferon-induced MxA protein can sequester the West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNVKUN) capsid protein in cytoplasmic tubular structures in an expression-replication system. This sequestering resulted in reduced titers of secreted WNVKUN particles. We show by electron microscopy, tomography and 3D modeling that these cytoplasmic tubular structures form organized bundles. Additionally we show that recombinant ER-targeted MxA can restrict production of infectious WNVKUN under conditions of virus infection. Our results indicate a co-ordinated and compartmentalized WNVKUN assembly process may prevent recognition of viral components by MxA, particularly the capsid protein. This recognition can be exploited if MxA is targeted to intracellular sites of WNVKUN assembly. This results in further understanding of the mechanisms of flavivirus evasion from the immune system.

  3. Structural Basis for Telomerase RNA Recognition and RNP Assembly by the Holoenzyme La Family Protein p65

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Mahavir; Wang, Zhonghua; Koo, Bon-Kyung; Patel, Anooj; Cascio, Duilio; Collins, Kathleen; Feigon, Juli (UCLA); (UCB)

    2012-07-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex essential for maintenance of telomere DNA at linear chromosome ends. The catalytic core of Tetrahymena telomerase comprises a ternary complex of telomerase RNA (TER), telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), and the essential La family protein p65. NMR and crystal structures of p65 C-terminal domain and its complex with stem IV of TER reveal that RNA recognition is achieved by a combination of single- and double-stranded RNA binding, which induces a 105{sup o} bend in TER. The domain is a cryptic, atypical RNA recognition motif with a disordered C-terminal extension that forms an {alpha} helix in the complex necessary for hierarchical assembly of TERT with p65-TER. This work provides the first structural insight into biogenesis and assembly of TER with a telomerase-specific protein. Additionally, our studies define a structurally homologous domain (xRRM) in genuine La and LARP7 proteins and suggest a general mode of RNA binding for biogenesis of their diverse RNA targets.

  4. Multiple Defects of Cell Cycle Checkpoints in U937-ASPI3K, an U937 Cell Mutant Stably Expressing Anti-Sense ATM Gene cDNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    (Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene (ATM) functions in control of cell cycle checkpoints in responding to DNA damage and protects cells from undergoing apoptosis. Knock-out within tumor cells of endogenous ATM will achieve therapeutic benefits and nable a better understanding of the decisive mechanisms of cell death or survival in response to DNA damaging agents. ) In present paper, we sought to characterize the cell cycle checkpoint profiles in U937-ASPI3K, a U937 cell mutant that was previously established with endogenous ATM knock-out phenotype. Synchronized U937-ASPI3K was exposed to 137Cs irradiation, G1, S, G2/M cell cycle checkpoint profiles were evaluated by determining cell cycle kinetics, p53/p21 protein, cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and p34CDC2 kinase activity in response to irradiation. U937-ASPI3K exhibited multiple defects in cell cycle checkpoints as defined by failing to arrest cells upon irradiation. The accumulation of cellular p53/p21 protein and inhibition of CDK kinase was also abolished in U937-ASPI3K. It was concluded that the stable expression of anti-sense PI3K cDNA fragment completely abolished multiple cell cycle checkpoints in U937-ASPI3K, and hence U937-ASPI3K with an AT-like phenotype could serves as a valuable model system for investigating the signal transduction pathway in responding to DNA damaging-based cancer therapy.

  5. Predicting the right spacing between protein immobilization sites on self-assembled monolayers to optimize ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Javier Batista; Tyagi, Deependra; Yang, Mo; Calvo, Loany; Perez, Rolando; Moreno, Ernesto; Zhu, Jinsong

    2015-09-01

    Self-assembled monolayers designed to immobilize capture antibodies are usually prepared using a mixture of functional and inactive linkers. Here, using low molar ratios (1:1 to 1:100) of the two linkers resulted in loss of binding capability of the anti-EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) antibody nimotuzumab, as assessed by surface plasmon resonance imaging. We then developed a simple theoretical model to predict the optimal surface density of the functional linker, taking into account the antibody size and linker diameter. A high (1:1000) dilution of the functional linker yielded the best results. As an advantage, this approach does not require chemical modification of the protein.

  6. Truncated forms of viral VP2 proteins fused to EGFP assemble into fluorescent parvovirus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Leona; Toivola, Jouni; Välilehto, Outi; Saloniemi, Taija; Cunningham, Claire; White, Daniel; Mäkelä, Anna R; Korhonen, Eila; Vuento, Matti; Oker-Blom, Christian

    2006-12-08

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) monitors random movements of fluorescent molecules in solution, giving information about the number and the size of for example nano-particles. The canine parvovirus VP2 structural protein as well as N-terminal deletion mutants of VP2 (-14, -23, and -40 amino acids) were fused to the C-terminus of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The proteins were produced in insect cells, purified, and analyzed by western blotting, confocal and electron microscopy as well as FCS. The non-truncated form, EGFP-VP2, diffused with a hydrodynamic radius of 17 nm, whereas the fluorescent mutants truncated by 14, 23 and 40 amino acids showed hydrodynamic radii of 7, 20 and 14 nm, respectively. These results show that the non-truncated EGFP-VP2 fusion protein and the EGFP-VP2 constructs truncated by 23 and by as much as 40 amino acids were able to form virus-like particles (VLPs). The fluorescent VLP, harbouring VP2 truncated by 23 amino acids, showed a somewhat larger hydrodynamic radius compared to the non-truncated EGFP-VP2. In contrast, the construct containing EGFP-VP2 truncated by 14 amino acids was not able to assemble into VLP-resembling structures. Formation of capsid structures was confirmed by confocal and electron microscopy. The number of fluorescent fusion protein molecules present within the different VLPs was determined by FCS. In conclusion, FCS provides a novel strategy to analyze virus assembly and gives valuable structural information for strategic development of parvovirus-like particles.

  7. Truncated forms of viral VP2 proteins fused to EGFP assemble into fluorescent parvovirus-like particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuento Matti

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS monitors random movements of fluorescent molecules in solution, giving information about the number and the size of for example nano-particles. The canine parvovirus VP2 structural protein as well as N-terminal deletion mutants of VP2 (-14, -23, and -40 amino acids were fused to the C-terminus of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP. The proteins were produced in insect cells, purified, and analyzed by western blotting, confocal and electron microscopy as well as FCS. The non-truncated form, EGFP-VP2, diffused with a hydrodynamic radius of 17 nm, whereas the fluorescent mutants truncated by 14, 23 and 40 amino acids showed hydrodynamic radii of 7, 20 and 14 nm, respectively. These results show that the non-truncated EGFP-VP2 fusion protein and the EGFP-VP2 constructs truncated by 23 and by as much as 40 amino acids were able to form virus-like particles (VLPs. The fluorescent VLP, harbouring VP2 truncated by 23 amino acids, showed a somewhat larger hydrodynamic radius compared to the non-truncated EGFP-VP2. In contrast, the construct containing EGFP-VP2 truncated by 14 amino acids was not able to assemble into VLP-resembling structures. Formation of capsid structures was confirmed by confocal and electron microscopy. The number of fluorescent fusion protein molecules present within the different VLPs was determined by FCS. In conclusion, FCS provides a novel strategy to analyze virus assembly and gives valuable structural information for strategic development of parvovirus-like particles.

  8. Immune checkpoint inhibitors and prostate cancer: a new frontier?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Modena

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in the treatment of metastatic castrationresistant prostate cancer (mCRPC, agents that provide durable disease control and long-term survival are still needed. It is a fact that a tumor-induced immunosuppressive status (mediated by aberrant activation of inhibitory immune checkpoint pathways as a mechanism to evade host immune surveillance plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of cancer, including prostate cancer (PC, making CRPC patients suitable candidates for immunotherapy. Therefore, growing interest of anticancer research aims at blocking immune checkpoints (mainly targeting CTLA-4 and PD1/PD-L1 pathways to restore and enhance cellular-mediated antitumor immunity and achieve durable tumor regression. In this review, we describe the current knowledge regarding the role of immune checkpoints in mediating PC progression, focusing on CTLA-4 and PD1 pathways. We also provide current clinical data available, an update on ongoing trials of immune checkpoint inhibitors in PC. Finally, we discuss the necessity to identify prognostic and predictive biomarkers of immune activity, and we analyze new immune checkpoints with a role as promising targets for PC therapy.

  9. Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors and Prostate Cancer: A New Frontier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modena, Alessandra; Ciccarese, Chiara; Iacovelli, Roberto; Brunelli, Matteo; Montironi, Rodolfo; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Massari, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), agents that provide durable disease control and long-term survival are still needed. It is a fact that a tumor-induced immunosuppressive status (mediated by aberrant activation of inhibitory immune checkpoint pathways as a mechanism to evade host immune surveillance) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of cancer, including prostate cancer (PC), making CRPC patients suitable candidates for immunotherapy. Therefore, growing interest of anticancer research aims at blocking immune checkpoints (mainly targeting CTLA-4 and PD1/PD-L1 pathways) to restore and enhance cellular-mediated antitumor immunity and achieve durable tumor regression. In this review, we describe the current knowledge regarding the role of immune checkpoints in mediating PC progression, focusing on CTLA-4 and PD1 pathways. We also provide current clinical data available, an update on ongoing trials of immune checkpoint inhibitors in PC. Finally, we discuss the necessity to identify prognostic and predictive biomarkers of immune activity, and we analyze new immune checkpoints with a role as promising targets for PC therapy. PMID:27471580

  10. Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors and Prostate Cancer: A New Frontier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modena, Alessandra; Ciccarese, Chiara; Iacovelli, Roberto; Brunelli, Matteo; Montironi, Rodolfo; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Massari, Francesco

    2016-04-15

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), agents that provide durable disease control and long-term survival are still needed. It is a fact that a tumor-induced immunosuppressive status (mediated by aberrant activation of inhibitory immune checkpoint pathways as a mechanism to evade host immune surveillance) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of cancer, including prostate cancer (PC), making CRPC patients suitable candidates for immunotherapy. Therefore, growing interest of anticancer research aims at blocking immune checkpoints (mainly targeting CTLA-4 and PD1/PD-L1 pathways) to restore and enhance cellular-mediated antitumor immunity and achieve durable tumor regression. In this review, we describe the current knowledge regarding the role of immune checkpoints in mediating PC progression, focusing on CTLA-4 and PD1 pathways. We also provide current clinical data available, an update on ongoing trials of immune checkpoint inhibitors in PC. Finally, we discuss the necessity to identify prognostic and predictive biomarkers of immune activity, and we analyze new immune checkpoints with a role as promising targets for PC therapy.

  11. Berkeley lab checkpoint/restart (BLCR) for Linux clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Paul H.; Duell, Jason C.

    2006-09-01

    This article describes the motivation, design and implementation of Berkeley Lab Checkpoint/Restart (BLCR), a system-level checkpoint/restart implementation for Linux clusters that targets the space of typical High Performance Computing applications, including MPI. Application-level solutions, including both checkpointing and fault-tolerant algorithms, are recognized as more time and space efficient than system-level checkpoints, which cannot make use of any application-specific knowledge. However, system-level checkpointing allows for preemption, making it suitable for responding to ''fault precursors'' (for instance, elevated error rates from ECC memory or network CRCs, or elevated temperature from sensors). Preemption can also increase the efficiency of batch scheduling; for instance reducing idle cycles (by allowing for shutdown without any queue draining period or reallocation of resources to eliminate idle nodes when better fitting jobs are queued), and reducing the average queued time (by limiting large jobs to running during off-peak hours, without the need to limit the length of such jobs). Each of these potential uses makes BLCR a valuable tool for efficient resource management in Linux clusters.

  12. Message Efficient Checkpointing and Rollback Recovery in Heterogeneous Mobile Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggi, Parmeet Kaur; Singh, Awadhesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Heterogeneous networks provide an appealing way of expanding the computing capability of mobile networks by combining infrastructure-less mobile ad-hoc networks with the infrastructure-based cellular mobile networks. The nodes in such a network range from low-power nodes to macro base stations and thus, vary greatly in their capabilities such as computation power and battery power. The nodes are susceptible to different types of transient and permanent failures and therefore, the algorithms designed for such networks need to be fault-tolerant. The article presents a checkpointing algorithm for the rollback recovery of mobile hosts in a heterogeneous mobile network. Checkpointing is a well established approach to provide fault tolerance in static and cellular mobile distributed systems. However, the use of checkpointing for fault tolerance in a heterogeneous environment remains to be explored. The proposed protocol is based on the results of zigzag paths and zigzag cycles by Netzer-Xu. Considering the heterogeneity prevalent in the network, an uncoordinated checkpointing technique is employed. Yet, useless checkpoints are avoided without causing a high message overhead.

  13. Regular Nanoscale Protein Patterns via Directed Adsorption through Self-Assembled DNA Origami Masks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Saminathan; Subramaniam, Sivaraman; Stewart, A Francis; Grundmeier, Guido; Keller, Adrian

    2016-11-16

    DNA origami has become a widely used method for synthesizing well-defined nanostructures with promising applications in various areas of nanotechnology, biophysics, and medicine. Recently, the possibility to transfer the shape of single DNA origami nanostructures into different materials via molecular lithography approaches has received growing interest due to the great structural control provided by the DNA origami technique. Here, we use ordered monolayers of DNA origami nanostructures with internal cavities on mica surfaces as molecular lithography masks for the fabrication of regular protein patterns over large surface areas. Exposure of the masked sample surface to negatively charged proteins results in the directed adsorption of the proteins onto the exposed surface areas in the holes of the mask. By controlling the buffer and adsorption conditions, the protein coverage of the exposed areas can be varied from single proteins to densely packed monolayers. To demonstrate the versatility of this approach, regular nanopatterns of four different proteins are fabricated: the single-strand annealing proteins Redβ and Sak, the iron-storage protein ferritin, and the blood protein bovine serum albumin (BSA). We furthermore demonstrate the desorption of the DNA origami mask after directed protein adsorption, which may enable the fabrication of hierarchical patterns composed of different protein species. Because selectivity in adsorption is achieved by electrostatic interactions between the proteins and the exposed surface areas, this approach may enable also the large-scale patterning of other charged molecular species or even nanoparticles.

  14. Role of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Factors in the Regulation of the Mitotic Checkpoint Kinase Bub1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Breit

    Full Text Available The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC monitors microtubule attachment to kinetochores to ensure accurate sister chromatid segregation during mitosis. The SAC members Bub1 and BubR1 are paralogs that underwent significant functional specializations during evolution. We report an in-depth characterization of the kinase domains of Bub1 and BubR1. BubR1 kinase domain binds nucleotides but is unable to deliver catalytic activity in vitro. Conversely, Bub1 is an active kinase regulated by intra-molecular phosphorylation at the P+1 loop. The crystal structure of the phosphorylated Bub1 kinase domain illustrates a hitherto unknown conformation of the P+1 loop docked into the active site of the Bub1 kinase. Both Bub1 and BubR1 bind Bub3 constitutively. A hydrodynamic characterization of Bub1:Bub3 and BubR1:Bub3 demonstrates both complexes to have 1:1 stoichiometry, with no additional oligomerization. Conversely, Bub1:Bub3 and BubR1:Bub3 combine to form a heterotetramer. Neither BubR1:Bub3 nor Knl1, the kinetochore receptor of Bub1:Bub3, modulate the kinase activity of Bub1 in vitro, suggesting autonomous regulation of the Bub1 kinase domain. We complement our study with an analysis of the Bub1 substrates. Our results contribute to the mechanistic characterization of a crucial cell cycle checkpoint.

  15. DNA replication and spindle checkpoints cooperate during S phase to delay mitosis and preserve genome integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magiera, Maria M; Gueydon, Elisabeth; Schwob, Etienne

    2014-01-20

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) replication and chromosome segregation must occur in ordered sequence to maintain genome integrity during cell proliferation. Checkpoint mechanisms delay mitosis when DNA is damaged or upon replication stress, but little is known on the coupling of S and M phases in unperturbed conditions. To address this issue, we postponed replication onset in budding yeast so that DNA synthesis is still underway when cells should enter mitosis. This delayed mitotic entry and progression by transient activation of the S phase, G2/M, and spindle assembly checkpoints. Disabling both Mec1/ATR- and Mad2-dependent controls caused lethality in cells with deferred S phase, accompanied by Rad52 foci and chromosome missegregation. Thus, in contrast to acute replication stress that triggers a sustained Mec1/ATR response, multiple pathways cooperate to restrain mitosis transiently when replication forks progress unhindered. We suggest that these surveillance mechanisms arose when both S and M phases were coincidently set into motion by a unique ancestral cyclin-Cdk1 complex.

  16. Small Molecule-Induced Domain Swapping as a Mechanism for Controlling Protein Function and Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karchin, Joshua M.; Ha, Jeung-Hoi; Namitz, Kevin E.; Cosgrove, Michael S.; Loh, Stewart N.

    2017-01-01

    Domain swapping is the process by which identical proteins exchange reciprocal segments to generate dimers. Here we introduce induced domain swapping (INDOS) as a mechanism for regulating protein function. INDOS employs a modular design consisting of the fusion of two proteins: a recognition protein that binds a triggering molecule, and a target protein that undergoes a domain swap in response to binding of the triggering ligand. The recognition protein (FK506 binding protein) is inserted into functionally-inactivated point mutants of two target proteins (staphylococcal nuclease and ribose binding protein). Binding of FK506 to the FKBP domain causes the target domain to first unfold, then refold via domain swap. The inactivating mutations become ‘swapped out’ in the dimer, increasing nuclease and ribose binding activities by 100-fold and 15-fold, respectively, restoring them to near wild-type values. INDOS is intended to convert an arbitrary protein into a functional switch, and is the first example of rational design in which a small molecule is used to trigger protein domain swapping and subsequent activation of biological function. PMID:28287617

  17. The conserved protein Dre2 uses essential [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters for its function in cytosolic iron-sulfur protein assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netz, Daili J A; Genau, Heide M; Weiler, Benjamin D; Bill, Eckhard; Pierik, Antonio J; Lill, Roland

    2016-07-15

    The cytosolic iron-sulfur (Fe-S) protein assembly (CIA) machinery comprises 11 essential components and matures Fe-S proteins involved in translation and genome maintenance. Maturation is initiated by the electron transfer chain NADPH-diflavin reductase Tah18-Fe-S protein Dre2 that facilitates the de novo assembly of a [4Fe-4S] cluster on the scaffold complex Cfd1-Nbp35. Tah18-Dre2 also play a critical role in the assembly of the diferric tyrosyl radical cofactor of ribonucleotide reductase. Dre2 contains eight conserved cysteine residues as potential co-ordinating ligands for Fe-S clusters but their functional importance and the type of bound clusters is unclear. In the present study, we use a combination of mutagenesis, cell biological and biochemical as well as UV-visible, EPR and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches to show that the yeast Dre2 cysteine residues Cys(252), Cys(263), Cys(266) and Cys(268) (motif I) bind a [2Fe-2S] cluster, whereas cysteine residues Cys(311), Cys(314), Cys(322) and Cys(325) (motif II) co-ordinate a [4Fe-4S] cluster. All of these residues with the exception of Cys(252) are essential for cell viability, cytosolic Fe-S protein activity and in vivo (55)Fe-S cluster incorporation. The N-terminal methyltransferase-like domain of Dre2 is important for proper Fe-S cluster assembly at motifs I and II, which occurs in an interdependent fashion. Our findings further resolve why recombinant Dre2 from Arabidopsis, Trypanosoma or humans has previously been isolated with a single [2Fe-2S] instead of native [2Fe-2S] plus [4Fe-4S] clusters. In the presence of oxygen, the motif I-bound [2Fe-2S] cluster is labile and the motif II-bound [4Fe-4S] cluster is readily converted into a [2Fe-2S] cluster.

  18. Studies on multivalent interactions of quantum dots-protein self-assemble using fluorescence coupled capillary electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhao; Li, Jingyan; Teng, Yiwan; Hu, Wei; Chai, Hong; Li, Jinchen; Wang, Cheli; Qiu, Lin; Jiang, Pengju

    2014-07-01

    Nanoparticle-biomolecules self-assembly is the key to the understanding of biomolecular coating of nanoparticle. However, the self-assembly of biomolecules with nanoparticles is still under-exploited because of the lack of an efficient method to detect the subtle changes in the surface of nanoparticles. In this study, we utilized fluorescence coupled capillary electrophoresis (CE-FL) to probe the binding interaction between a multivalent ligand (dBSA, denatured bovine serum albumin which contains multiple thiol groups) and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs, 5 nm in diameter). The yield of QDs-dBSA complex increased with increasing molar ratio of dBSA to QDs, which plateaued at a ratio of 8:1. Besides, QDs-dBSA complex showed good stability due to the multivalent interaction, revealing that dBSA is a superior ligand for QDs. The self-assembly kinetics of QDs with dBSA manifested a bi-phasic kinetics with a linear initial stage followed by a saturating stage. This work revealed for the first time that there exist two types of binding sites on the surface of QDs for dBSA: one type termed "high priority" binding sites, which preferentially bind to the protein, whereas the "low priority" sites are occupied only after the first-type binding sites are fully bound. Our work thereby represents the first example of systematic investigation on the details of the metal-affinity driven self-assembly between QDs and dBSA utilizing the high-resolution CE-FL. It also expanded the application of CE-FL in the study of nanoparticle-biomolecule interaction and kinetics analysis.

  19. Structural Basis for Fe-S Cluster Assembly and tRNA Thiolation Mediated by IscS Protein-Protein Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Rong; Proteau, Ariane; Villarroya, Magda; Moukadiri, Ismaïl; Zhang, Linhua; Trempe, Jean-François; Matte, Allan; Armengod, M Eugenia; Cygler, Miroslaw [McGill; (LGM-Spain); (Biotech Res.)

    2010-05-04

    The cysteine desulfurase IscS is a highly conserved master enzyme initiating sulfur transfer via persulfide to a range of acceptor proteins involved in Fe-S cluster assembly, tRNA modifications, and sulfur-containing cofactor biosynthesis. Several IscS-interacting partners including IscU, a scaffold for Fe-S cluster assembly; TusA, the first member of a sulfur relay leading to sulfur incorporation into the wobble uridine of several tRNAs; ThiI, involved in tRNA modification and thiamine biosynthesis; and rhodanese RhdA are sulfur acceptors. Other proteins, such as CyaY/frataxin and IscX, also bind to IscS, but their functional roles are not directly related to sulfur transfer. We have determined the crystal structures of IscS-IscU and IscS-TusA complexes providing the first insight into their different modes of binding and the mechanism of sulfur transfer. Exhaustive mutational analysis of the IscS surface allowed us to map the binding sites of various partner proteins and to determine the functional and biochemical role of selected IscS and TusA residues. IscS interacts with its partners through an extensive surface area centered on the active site Cys328. The structures indicate that the acceptor proteins approach Cys328 from different directions and suggest that the conformational plasticity of a long loop containing this cysteine is essential for the ability of IscS to transfer sulfur to multiple acceptor proteins. The sulfur acceptors can only bind to IscS one at a time, while frataxin and IscX can form a ternary complex with IscU and IscS. Our data support the role of frataxin as an iron donor for IscU to form the Fe-S clusters.

  20. Assembly of alphavirus replication complexes from RNA and protein components in a novel trans-replication system in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuul, Pirjo; Balistreri, Giuseppe; Hellström, Kirsi; Golubtsov, Andrey V; Jokitalo, Eija; Ahola, Tero

    2011-05-01

    For positive-strand RNA viruses, the viral genomic RNA also acts as an mRNA directing the translation of the replicase proteins of the virus. Replication takes place in association with cytoplasmic membranes, which are heavily modified to create specific replication compartments. Here we have expressed by plasmid DNA transfection the large replicase polyprotein of Semliki Forest virus (SFV) in mammalian cells from a nonreplicating mRNA and provided a separate RNA containing the replication signals. The replicase proteins were able to efficiently and specifically replicate the template in trans, leading to accumulation of RNA and marker gene products expressed from the template RNA. The replicase proteins and double-stranded RNA replication intermediates localized to structures similar to those seen in SFV-infected cells. Using correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) with fluorescent marker proteins to relocate those transfected cells, in which active replication was ongoing, abundant membrane modifications, representing the replication complex spherules, were observed both at the plasma membrane and in intracellular endolysosomes. Thus, replication complexes are faithfully assembled and localized in the trans-replication system. We demonstrated, using CLEM, that the replication proteins alone or a polymerase-negative polyprotein mutant together with the template did not give rise to spherule formation. Thus, the trans-replication system is suitable for cell biological dissection and examination in a mammalian cell environment, and similar systems may be possible for other positive-strand RNA viruses.

  1. Use of self-assembling GFP to determine protein topology and compartmentalisation in the Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Külzer, Simone; Petersen, Wiebke; Baser, Avni; Mandel, Katharina; Przyborski, Jude M

    2013-02-01

    In recent years, and largely supported by the increasing use of transfection technology, much research attention has been given to protein trafficking in the Plasmodium falciparum infected red blood cell. By expression of fluorescent reporter proteins, much information has been gained on both the signals and mechanisms directing proteins to their correct sub-cellular localisation within the parasite and infected host cell. Generally however, verification of the observed fluorescent phenotype is carried out using more traditional techniques such as co-immunofluorescence, protease protection, and cell fractionation followed by Western blot. Here we apply a self-assembling split GFP (saGFP) system and show that this can be used to determine both membrane topology and compartmentalisation using transfection technology alone. As an example, we verify the topology of an ER membrane protein, hDer1-1, and of an exported parasite Hsp40 co-chaperone, PFE55. Additionally, we can demonstrate that this system has the potential to be applied to analysis of organellar proteins.

  2. Gold nanoparticle assisted assembly of a heme protein for enhancement of long-range interfacial electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Palle Skovhus; Chi, Qijin; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg

    2007-01-01

    of bioelectronics. A key challenge in molecular bioelectronics is to improve the efficiency of long-range charge transfer. The present work shows that this can be achieved by nanoparticle (NP) assisted assembly of cytochrome c (cyt c) on macroscopic single-crystalline electrode surfaces. We present the synthesis...... and characterization of water-soluble gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with core diameter 3-4 nm and their application for the enhancement of long-range interfacial ET of a heme protein. Gold nanoparticles were electrostatically conjugated with cyt c to form nanoparticle-protein hybrid ET systems with well......-defined stoichiometry. The systems were investigated in homogeneous solution and at liquid/solid interface. Conjugation of cyt c results in a small but consistent broadening of the nanoparticle plasmon band. This phenomenon can be explained in terms of long-range electronic interactions between the gold nanoparticle...

  3. Combination Approaches with Immune-Checkpoint Blockade in Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Maarten; Verbrugge, Inge; Beltman, Joost B.

    2016-01-01

    In healthy individuals, immune-checkpoint molecules prevent autoimmune responses and limit immune cell-mediated tissue damage. Tumors frequently exploit these molecules to evade eradication by the immune system. Over the past years, immune-checkpoint blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 and programed death-1 emerged as promising strategies to activate antitumor cytotoxic T cell responses. Although complete regression and long-term survival is achieved in some patients, not all patients respond. This review describes promising, novel combination approaches involving immune-checkpoint blockade in the context of the cancer-immunity cycle, aimed at increasing response rates to the single treatments. Specifically, we discuss combinations that promote antigen release and presentation, that further amplify T cell activation, that inhibit trafficking of regulatory T cells or MSDCs, that stimulate intratumoral T cell infiltration, that increase cancer recognition by T cells, and that stimulate tumor killing. PMID:27847783

  4. Combination Approaches with Immune-Checkpoint Blockade in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Maarten; Verbrugge, Inge; Beltman, Joost B

    2016-01-01

    In healthy individuals, immune-checkpoint molecules prevent autoimmune responses and limit immune cell-mediated tissue damage. Tumors frequently exploit these molecules to evade eradication by the immune system. Over the past years, immune-checkpoint blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 and programed death-1 emerged as promising strategies to activate antitumor cytotoxic T cell responses. Although complete regression and long-term survival is achieved in some patients, not all patients respond. This review describes promising, novel combination approaches involving immune-checkpoint blockade in the context of the cancer-immunity cycle, aimed at increasing response rates to the single treatments. Specifically, we discuss combinations that promote antigen release and presentation, that further amplify T cell activation, that inhibit trafficking of regulatory T cells or MSDCs, that stimulate intratumoral T cell infiltration, that increase cancer recognition by T cells, and that stimulate tumor killing.

  5. The impact of conformational transformations on the pathways and kinetics of protein self-assembly into extended matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Yoreo, Jim

    2012-02-01

    The concept of a folding funnel with kinetic traps is used to describe folding of individual proteins. Using in situ AFM to investigate both collagen fibril and S-layer membrane assembly on mica, we show this concept is equally valid during self-assembly of proteins into extended matrices. Moreover, considering the conformational changes required to achieve the ordered structure is critical to understanding the pathway to the final state and the kinetics of assembly. In the collagen system, both the pathway and the final conformational state can be finely tuned by varying the ionic strength. This alters the relative strengths of the collagen-collagen and collagen-mica binding free energy, which we quantify using dynamic force spectroscopy. Moreover, when conditions result in the ordered D-band structure of collagen, the emergence of order catalyzes the further transformation leading to non-linear attachment kinetics. In the S-layer system, there is a kinetic trap associated with conformational differences between a long-lived transient state and the final stable state. Both ordered tetrameric states emerge from clusters of an amorphous precursor phase, however, they then track along two different pathways. One leads directly to the final low-energy state and the other to the kinetic trap. Over time, the trapped state transforms into the stable state. By analyzing the time and temperature dependencies of formation and transformation we find the energy barriers to formation of either state to be nearly identical, but once the high-energy state forms, the barrier to transformation to the low-energy state is large. Thus the transient state exhibits the characteristics of a kinetic trap in a folding funnel.

  6. Canine parvovirus VP2 protein expressed in silkworm pupae self-assembles into virus-like particles with high immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hao; Hu, Gui-qiu; Wang, Hua-lei; Liang, Meng; Liang, Hongru; Guo, He; Zhao, Pingsen; Yang, Yu-jiao; Zheng, Xue-xing; Zhang, Zhi-fang; Zhao, Yong-kun; Gao, Yu-wei; Yang, Song-tao; Xia, Xian-zhu

    2014-01-01

    The VP2 structural protein of parvovirus can produce virus-like particles (VLPs) by a self-assembly process in vitro, making VLPs attractive vaccine candidates. In this study, the VP2 protein of canine parvovirus (CPV) was expressed using a baculovirus expression system and assembled into parvovirus-like particles in insect cells and pupae. Electron micrographs of VLPs showed that they were very similar in size and morphology when compared to the wild-type parvovirus. The immunogenicity of the VLPs was investigated in mice and dogs. Mice immunized intramuscularly with purified VLPs, in the absence of an adjuvant, elicited CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses and were able to elicit a neutralizing antibody response against CPV, while the oral administration of raw homogenates containing VLPs to the dogs resulted in a systemic immune response and long-lasting immunity. These results demonstrate that the CPV-VLPs stimulate both cellular and humoral immune responses, and so CPV-VLPs may be a promising candidate vaccine for the prevention of CPV-associated disease.

  7. WO3 Nanofiber-Based Biomarker Detectors Enabled by Protein-Encapsulated Catalyst Self-Assembled on Polystyrene Colloid Templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seon-Jin; Kim, Sang-Joon; Cho, Hee-Jin; Jang, Ji-Soo; Lin, Yi-Min; Tuller, Harry L; Rutledge, Gregory C; Kim, Il-Doo

    2016-02-17

    A novel catalyst functionalization method, based on protein-encapsulated metallic nanoparticles (NPs) and their self-assembly on polystyrene (PS) colloid templates, is used to form catalyst-loaded porous WO3 nanofibers (NFs). The metallic NPs, composed of Au, Pd, or Pt, are encapsulated within a protein cage, i.e., apoferritin, to form unagglomerated monodispersed particles with diameters of less than 5 nm. The catalytic NPs maintain their nanoscale size, even following high-temperature heat-treatment during synthesis, which is attributed to the discrete self-assembly of NPs on PS colloid templates. In addition, the PS templates generate open pores on the electrospun WO3 NFs, facilitating gas molecule transport into the sensing layers and promoting active surface reactions. As a result, the Au and Pd NP-loaded porous WO3 NFs show superior sensitivity toward hydrogen sulfide, as evidenced by responses (R(air)/R(gas)) of 11.1 and 43.5 at 350 °C, respectively. These responses represent 1.8- and 7.1-fold improvements compared to that of dense WO3 NFs (R(air)/R(gas) = 6.1). Moreover, Pt NP-loaded porous WO3 NFs exhibit high acetone sensitivity with response of 28.9. These results demonstrate a novel catalyst loading method, in which small NPs are well-dispersed within the pores of WO3 NFs, that is applicable to high sensitivity breath sensors.

  8. Canine parvovirus VP2 protein expressed in silkworm pupae self-assembles into virus-like particles with high immunogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Feng

    Full Text Available The VP2 structural protein of parvovirus can produce virus-like particles (VLPs by a self-assembly process in vitro, making VLPs attractive vaccine candidates. In this study, the VP2 protein of canine parvovirus (CPV was expressed using a baculovirus expression system and assembled into parvovirus-like particles in insect cells and pupae. Electron micrographs of VLPs showed that they were very similar in size and morphology when compared to the wild-type parvovirus. The immunogenicity of the VLPs was investigated in mice and dogs. Mice immunized intramuscularly with purified VLPs, in the absence of an adjuvant, elicited CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell responses and were able to elicit a neutralizing antibody response against CPV, while the oral administration of raw homogenates containing VLPs to the dogs resulted in a systemic immune response and long-lasting immunity. These results demonstrate that the CPV-VLPs stimulate both cellular and humoral immune responses, and so CPV-VLPs may be a promising candidate vaccine for the prevention of CPV-associated disease.

  9. Aggregation and network formation in self-assembly of protein (H3.1) by a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, R. B.; Farmer, B. L.

    2014-11-01

    Multi-scale aggregation to network formation of interacting proteins (H3.1) are examined by a knowledge-based coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation as a function of temperature and the number of protein chains, i.e., the concentration of the protein. Self-assembly of corresponding homo-polymers of constitutive residues (Cys, Thr, and Glu) with extreme residue-residue interactions, i.e., attractive (Cys-Cys), neutral (Thr-Thr), and repulsive (Glu-Glu), are also studied for comparison with the native protein. Visual inspections show contrast and similarity in morphological evolutions of protein assembly, aggregation of small aggregates to a ramified network from low to high temperature with the aggregation of a Cys-polymer, and an entangled network of Glu and Thr polymers. Variations in mobility profiles of residues with the concentration of the protein suggest that the segmental characteristic of proteins is altered considerably by the self-assembly from that in its isolated state. The global motion of proteins and Cys polymer chains is enhanced by their interacting network at the low temperature where isolated chains remain quasi-static. Transition from globular to random coil transition, evidenced by the sharp variation in the radius of gyration, of an isolated protein is smeared due to self-assembly of interacting networks of many proteins. Scaling of the structure factor S(q) with the wave vector q provides estimates of effective dimension D of the mass distribution at multiple length scales in self-assembly. Crossover from solid aggregates (D ˜ 3) at low temperature to a ramified fibrous network (D ˜ 2) at high temperature is observed for the protein H3.1 and Cys polymers in contrast to little changes in mass distribution (D ˜ 1.6) of fibrous Glu- and Thr-chain configurations.

  10. Structural Requirements for Membrane Assembly of Proteins Spanning the Membrane Several Times

    OpenAIRE

    Lipp, Joachim; Flint, Nicholas; Haeuptle, Marie-Theres; Dobberstein, Bernhard

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the structural requirements for the biogenesis of proteins spanning the membrane several times. Proteins containing various combinations of topological signals (signal anchor and stop transfer sequences) were synthesized in a cell-free translation system and their membrane topology was determined. Proteins spanning the membrane twice were obtained when a signal anchor sequence was followed by either a stop transfer sequence or a second signal anchor sequence. Thus, a sig...

  11. Signal peptide peptidase (SPP) assembles with substrates and misfolded membrane proteins into distinct oligomeric complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrul, Bianca; Kapp, Katja; Sinning, Irmgard; Dobberstein, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    SPP (signal peptide peptidase) is an aspartyl intramembrane cleaving protease, which processes a subset of signal peptides, and is linked to the quality control of ER (endoplasmic reticulum) membrane proteins. We analysed SPP interactions with signal peptides and other membrane proteins by co-immunoprecipitation assays. We found that SPP interacts specifically and tightly with a large range of newly synthesized membrane proteins, including signal peptides, preproteins and misfolded membrane proteins, but not with all co-expressed type II membrane proteins. Signal peptides are trapped by the catalytically inactive SPP mutant SPPD/A. Preproteins and misfolded membrane proteins interact with both SPP and the SPPD/A mutant, and are not substrates for SPP-mediated intramembrane proteolysis. Proteins interacting with SPP are found in distinct complexes of different sizes. A signal peptide is mainly trapped in a 200 kDa SPP complex, whereas a preprotein is predominantly found in a 600 kDa SPP complex. A misfolded membrane protein is detected in 200, 400 and 600 kDa SPP complexes. We conclude that SPP not only processes signal peptides, but also collects preproteins and misfolded membrane proteins that are destined for disposal. PMID:20196774

  12. Mechanisms and Components of the DNA Damage Checkpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA damage checkpoint. Molecular Cell 9: 1055-1065. (reprint included as Appendix 2) "* Schwartz, M.F., Duong, J.K., Sun, Z., Pradhan...phosphorylation sites couple Rad53 to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA damage checkpoint. Molecular Cell 9, 1055-1065. 13 Molecular Cell , Vol. 9,1055-1065...Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139. 1999), and mutation of conserved amino acids in the Molecular Cell 1056 A Rad9 B ,•o 0, 1 sitesN NC -T6 RVTQSA o- 0~ --T240

  13. Myelin membrane assembly is driven by a phase transition of myelin basic proteins into a cohesive protein meshwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Shweta; Snaidero, Nicolas; Pähler, Gesa; Frey, Steffen; Sánchez, Paula; Zweckstetter, Markus; Janshoff, Andreas; Schneider, Anja; Weil, Marie-Theres; Schaap, Iwan A T; Görlich, Dirk; Simons, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Rapid conduction of nerve impulses requires coating of axons by myelin. To function as an electrical insulator, myelin is generated as a tightly packed, lipid-rich multilayered membrane sheath. Knowledge about the mechanisms that govern myelin membrane biogenesis is required to understand myelin disassembly as it occurs in diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Here, we show that myelin basic protein drives myelin biogenesis using weak forces arising from its inherent capacity to phase separate. The association of myelin basic protein molecules to the inner leaflet of the membrane bilayer induces a phase transition into a cohesive mesh-like protein network. The formation of this protein network shares features with amyloid fibril formation. The process is driven by phenylalanine-mediated hydrophobic and amyloid-like interactions that provide the molecular basis for protein extrusion and myelin membrane zippering. These findings uncover a physicochemical mechani