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Sample records for assemble microfluidic perfusion

  1. The application of an optically switched dielectrophoretic (ODEP) force for the manipulation and assembly of cell-encapsulating alginate microbeads in a microfluidic perfusion cell culture system for bottom-up tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Heng; Yang, Ya-Wen; Chen, Yi-Dao; Wang, Shih-Siou; Chang, Yu-Han; Wu, Min-Hsien

    2012-03-21

    This study reports the utilisation of an optically switched dielectrophoretic (ODEP) force for the manipulation and assembly of cell-encapsulating alginate microbeads in a microfluidic perfusion cell culture system for bottom-up tissue engineering. One of the key features of this system is the ODEP force-based mechanism, which allows a commercial projector to be coupled with a computer to manipulate and assemble cell-encapsulating microbeads in an efficient, manageable, and user-friendly manner. Another distinctive feature is the design of the microfluidic cell culture chip, which allows the patterned cell-encapsulating microbeads to be cultivated on site under culture medium perfusion conditions. For demonstrating its application in bottom-up cartilage tissue engineering, chondrocyte-encapsulating alginate microbeads varying in encapsulated cell densities were generated. The manipulation forces associated with operating the alginate microbeads were experimentally evaluated. The results revealed that the measured manipulation forces increased with increases in both the applied electric voltage and the number of cells in the alginate microbeads. Nevertheless, the observed manipulation force was found to be independent of the size of the cell-free alginate microbeads. It can be speculated that the friction force may influence the estimation of the ODEP force within the experimental conditions investigated. In this study, chondrocyte-encapsulating alginate microbeads with three different cell densities were manipulated and assembled in the proposed microfluidic system to form a compact sheet-like cell culture construct that imitates the cell distribution in the cross-section of native articular cartilage. Moreover, the demonstration case also showed that the cell viability of the cultured cells in the microfluidic system remained as high as 96 ± 2%. In this study, four sheet-like cell culture constructs were stacked to create a larger assembled cell culture construct

  2. Microfluidic perfusion culture system for multilayer artery tissue models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Yuka; Masuda, Taisuke; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru; Yokoyama, Utako; Arai, Fumihito

    2014-11-01

    We described an assembly technique and perfusion culture system for constructing artery tissue models. This technique differed from previous studies in that it does not require a solid biodegradable scaffold; therefore, using sheet-like tissues, this technique allowed the facile fabrication of tubular tissues can be used as model. The fabricated artery tissue models had a multilayer structure. The assembly technique and perfusion culture system were applicable to many different sizes of fabricated arteries. The shape of the fabricated artery tissue models was maintained by the perfusion culture system; furthermore, the system reproduced the in vivo environment and allowed mechanical stimulation of the arteries. The multilayer structure of the artery tissue model was observed using fluorescent dyes. The equivalent Young's modulus was measured by applying internal pressure to the multilayer tubular tissues. The aim of this study was to determine whether fabricated artery tissue models maintained their mechanical properties with developing. We demonstrated both the rapid fabrication of multilayer tubular tissues that can be used as model arteries and the measurement of their equivalent Young's modulus in a suitable perfusion culture environment.

  3. A review on self-assembly in microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Yingying; Wang, Bingsheng; Jin, Mingliang; Yu, Ying; Zhou, Guofu; Shui, Lingling

    2017-11-01

    Self-assembly is a process that operates over a vast range of length and time scales. Microfluidic technology has been proven to be a powerful tool to manipulate micro- and nano-scale substrates with precise control over size and speed using various fluidic materials and properties. In this review, we discuss the current status of microfluidic technology in manipulating fluid dynamics and interfacial phenomena which influence self-assembly process and resulted structures. The self-assembled materials/structures were summarized and discussed as the sequence of the objective size at the micro-, nano- and molecular scale. Overall, microfluidics is becoming a useful tool to manipulate various fluids regarding to physical and chemical properties, being inherently suitable for self-assembly process control.

  4. Microfluidic device for the assembly and transport of microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Conrad D [Albuquerque, NM; Kumar, Anil [Framingham, MA; Khusid, Boris [New Providence, NJ; Acrivos, Andreas [Stanford, CA

    2010-06-29

    A microfluidic device comprising independently addressable arrays of interdigitated electrodes can be used to assembly and transport large-scale microparticle structures. The device and method uses collective phenomena in a negatively polarized suspension exposed to a high-gradient strong ac electric field to assemble the particles into predetermined locations and then transport them collectively to a work area for final assembly by sequentially energizing the electrode arrays.

  5. Optimal Homogenization of Perfusion Flows in Microfluidic Bio-Reactors: A Numerical Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, Fridolin; Dufva, Martin; Bruus, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    by introducing a specific type of perfusion inlet to the reaction area. The geometry of these inlets are found using the methods of topology optimization and shape optimization. The results are compared with two different analytic models, from which a general parametric description of the design is obtained...... and tested numerically. Such a parametric description will generally be beneficial for the design of a broad range of microfluidic bioreactors used for, e. g., cell culturing and analysis and in feeding bio-arrays....

  6. Multiphysics simulation of a microfluidic perfusion chamber for brain slice physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, Hector H.; Hernandez, Maximiliano; Fall, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding and optimizing fluid flows through in vitro microfluidic perfusion systems is essential in mimicking in vivo conditions for biological research. In a previous study a microfluidic brain slice device (μBSD) was developed for microscale electrophysiology investigations. The device consisted of a standard perfusion chamber bonded to a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel substrate. Our objective in this study is to characterize the flows through the μBSD by using multiphysics simulations of injections into a pourous matrix to identify optimal spacing of ports. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations are performed with CFD-ACE + software to model, simulate, and assess the transport of soluble factors through the perfusion bath, the microchannels, and a material that mimics the porosity, permeability and tortuosity of brain tissue. Additionally, experimental soluble factor transport through a brain slice is predicted by and compared to simulated fluid flow in a volume that represents a porous matrix material. The computational results are validated with fluorescent dye experiments. PMID:20464499

  7. Compartmentalized microfluidic perfusion system to culture human induced pluripotent stem cell aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yuki; Hattori, Koji; Tashiro, Shota; Nakatani, Eri; Yoshimitsu, Ryosuke; Satoh, Taku; Sugiura, Shinji; Kanamori, Toshiyuki; Ohnuma, Kiyoshi

    2017-08-01

    Microfluidic perfusion systems enable small-volume cell cultures under precisely controlled microenvironments, and are typically developed for cell-based high-throughput screening. However, most such systems are designed to manipulate dissociated single cells, not cell aggregates, and are thus unsuitable to induce differentiation in human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), which is conventionally achieved by using cell aggregates to increase cell-cell interactions. We have now developed a compartmentalized microfluidic perfusion system with large flow channels to load, culture, and observe cell aggregates. Homogeneously sized cell aggregates to be loaded into the device were prepared by shredding flat hiPSC colonies into squares. These aggregates were then seeded into microchambers coated with fibronectin and bovine serum albumin (BSA) to establish adherent and floating cultures, respectively, both of which are frequently used to differentiate hiPSCs. However, the number of aggregates loaded in fibronectin-coated microchambers was much lower than in BSA-coated microchambers, suggesting that fibronectin traps cell aggregates before they reach the chambers. Accordingly, hiPSCs that reached the microchambers subsequently adhered. In contrast, BSA-coated microchambers did not allow cell aggregates to adhere, but were sufficiently deep to prevent cell aggregates from flowing out during perfusion of media. Immunostaining for markers of undifferentiated cells showed that cultures on both fibronectin- and BSA-coated microchambers were successfully established. Notably, we found that floating aggregates eventually adhered to surfaces coated with BSA upon differentiation, and that differentiation depends on the initial size of aggregates. Collectively, these results suggest that the microfluidic system is suitable for manipulating hiPSC aggregates in compartmentalized microchambers. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  8. A polystyrene-based microfluidic device with three-dimensional interconnected microporous walls for perfusion cell culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chung Yu; Goral, Vasiliy N.; DeRosa, Michael E.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we present a simple, rapid prototyped polystyrene-based microfluidic device with three-dimensional (3D) interconnected microporous walls for long term perfusion cell culture. Patterned 3D interconnected microporous structures were created by a chemical treatment together with a protective mask and the native hydrophobic nature of the microporous structures were selectively made hydrophilic using oxygen plasma treatment together with a protective mask. Using this polystyrene-based cell culture microfluidic device, we successfully demonstrated the support of four days perfusion cell culture of hepatocytes (C3A cells). PMID:25379110

  9. Microfluidic culture chamber for the long-term perfusion and precise chemical stimulation of organotypic brain tissue slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caicedo, H. H.; Vignes, M.; Brugg, B.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a microfluidic perfusion-based culture system to study long-term in-vitro responses of organo-typic brain slices exposed to localized neurochemical stimulation. Using this microperfusion chamber we show that hip-pocampal organotypic brain slices cultures grown on nitrocellulose......-vitro micro environment, long-term culture of viable brain slices, and delivery of fluids to selected brain regions in a multiplexed and spatially defined manner....

  10. A pump-free microfluidic 3D perfusion platform for the efficient differentiation of human hepatocyte-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Louis Jun Ye; Chong, Lor Huai; Jin, Lin; Singh, Pawan Kumar; Lee, Poh Seng; Yu, Hanry; Ananthanarayanan, Abhishek; Leo, Hwa Liang; Toh, Yi-Chin

    2017-10-01

    The practical application of microfluidic liver models for in vitro drug testing is partly hampered by their reliance on human primary hepatocytes, which are limited in number and have batch-to-batch variation. Human stem cell-derived hepatocytes offer an attractive alternative cell source, although their 3D differentiation and maturation in a microfluidic platform have not yet been demonstrated. We develop a pump-free microfluidic 3D perfusion platform to achieve long-term and efficient differentiation of human liver progenitor cells into hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). The device contains a micropillar array to immobilize cells three-dimensionally in a central cell culture compartment flanked by two side perfusion channels. Constant pump-free medium perfusion is accomplished by controlling the differential heights of horizontally orientated inlet and outlet media reservoirs. Computational fluid dynamic simulation is used to estimate the hydrostatic pressure heads required to achieve different perfusion flow rates, which are experimentally validated by micro-particle image velocimetry, as well as viability and functional assessments in a primary rat hepatocyte model. We perform on-chip differentiation of HepaRG, a human bipotent progenitor cell, and discover that 3D microperfusion greatly enhances the hepatocyte differentiation efficiency over static 2D and 3D cultures. However, HepaRG progenitor cells are highly sensitive to the time-point at which microperfusion is applied. Isolated HepaRG cells that are primed as static 3D spheroids before being subjected to microperfusion yield a significantly higher proportion of HLCs (92%) than direct microperfusion of isolated HepaRG cells (62%). This platform potentially offers a simple and efficient means to develop highly functional microfluidic liver models incorporating human stem cell-derived HLCs. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 2360-2370. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Arrays of horizontally-oriented mini-reservoirs generate steady microfluidic flows for continuous perfusion cell culture and gradient generation.

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    Zhu, Xiaoyue; Yi Chu, Leonard; Chueh, Bor-han; Shen, Mingwu; Hazarika, Bhaskar; Phadke, Nandita; Takayama, Shuichi

    2004-11-01

    This paper describes the use of arrays of horizontally-oriented reservoirs to deliver liquids through microchannels at a constant flow rate over extended periods of time (hours to days). The horizontal orientation maintains a constant hydraulic pressure drop across microfluidic channels even as the volumes of liquids within the reservoirs change over time. For a given channel-reservoir system, the magnitude of the flow velocity depends linearly on the height difference between reservoirs. The simple structure and operation mechanism make this pumping system versatile. A one-inlet-one-outlet system was used to continuously deliver media for perfusion cell culture, and an array of inlet reservoirs coupled to an outlet reservoir via microchannels was used to drive flows of multiple laminar streams. The parallel pumping scheme conveniently generated various smooth and step concentration gradients, and allowed evaluation of the effect of colchicine on myoblasts. Since the reservoir arrays are configured to be compatible with commercialized multichannel pipettors designed for 96 well plate handling, this simple pumping scheme is envisioned to be broadly useful for medium to high throughput microfluidic perfusion cell culture assays, cell migration assays, multiple laminar flow drug tests, and any other applications needing multiple microfluidic streams.

  12. Noninvasive acoustic cell trapping in a microfluidic perfusion system for online bioassays.

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    Evander, Mikael; Johansson, Linda; Lilliehorn, Tobias; Piskur, Jure; Lindvall, Magnus; Johansson, Stefan; Almqvist, Monica; Laurell, Thomas; Nilsson, Johan

    2007-04-01

    Techniques for manipulating, separating, and trapping particles and cells are highly desired in today's bioanalytical and biomedical field. The microfluidic chip-based acoustic noncontact trapping method earlier developed within the group now provides a flexible platform for performing cell- and particle-based assays in continuous flow microsystems. An acoustic standing wave is generated in etched glass channels (600x61 microm2) by miniature ultrasonic transducers (550x550x200 microm3). Particles or cells passing the transducer will be retained and levitated in the center of the channel without any contact with the channel walls. The maximum trapping force was calculated to be 430+/-135 pN by measuring the drag force exerted on a single particle levitated in the standing wave. The temperature increase in the channel was characterized by fluorescence measurements using rhodamine B, and levels of moderate temperature increase were noted. Neural stem cells were acoustically trapped and shown to be viable after 15 min. Further evidence of the mild cell handling conditions was demonstrated as yeast cells were successfully cultured for 6 h in the acoustic trap while being perfused by the cell medium at a flowrate of 1 microL/min. The acoustic microchip method facilitates trapping of single cells as well as larger cell clusters. The noncontact mode of cell handling is especially important when studies on nonadherent cells are performed, e.g., stem cells, yeast cells, or blood cells, as mechanical stress and surface interaction are minimized. The demonstrated acoustic trapping of cells and particles enables cell- or particle-based bioassays to be performed in a continuous flow format.

  13. Sequential bottom-up assembly of mechanically stabilized synthetic cells by microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Marian; Frohnmayer, Johannes Patrick; Benk, Lucia Theresa; Haller, Barbara; Janiesch, Jan-Willi; Heitkamp, Thomas; Börsch, Michael; Lira, Rafael B.; Dimova, Rumiana; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Baret, Jean-Christophe; Vidakovic-Koch, Tanja; Sundmacher, Kai; Platzman, Ilia; Spatz, Joachim P.

    2018-01-01

    Compartments for the spatially and temporally controlled assembly of biological processes are essential towards cellular life. Synthetic mimics of cellular compartments based on lipid-based protocells lack the mechanical and chemical stability to allow their manipulation into a complex and fully functional synthetic cell. Here, we present a high-throughput microfluidic method to generate stable, defined sized liposomes termed `droplet-stabilized giant unilamellar vesicles (dsGUVs)’. The enhanced stability of dsGUVs enables the sequential loading of these compartments with biomolecules, namely purified transmembrane and cytoskeleton proteins by microfluidic pico-injection technology. This constitutes an experimental demonstration of a successful bottom-up assembly of a compartment with contents that would not self-assemble to full functionality when simply mixed together. Following assembly, the stabilizing oil phase and droplet shells are removed to release functional self-supporting protocells to an aqueous phase, enabling them to interact with physiologically relevant matrices.

  14. Sequential bottom-up assembly of mechanically stabilized synthetic cells by microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Marian; Frohnmayer, Johannes Patrick; Benk, Lucia Theresa; Haller, Barbara; Janiesch, Jan-Willi; Heitkamp, Thomas; Börsch, Michael; Lira, Rafael B; Dimova, Rumiana; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Baret, Jean-Christophe; Vidakovic-Koch, Tanja; Sundmacher, Kai; Platzman, Ilia; Spatz, Joachim P

    2017-10-16

    Compartments for the spatially and temporally controlled assembly of biological processes are essential towards cellular life. Synthetic mimics of cellular compartments based on lipid-based protocells lack the mechanical and chemical stability to allow their manipulation into a complex and fully functional synthetic cell. Here, we present a high-throughput microfluidic method to generate stable, defined sized liposomes termed 'droplet-stabilized giant unilamellar vesicles (dsGUVs)'. The enhanced stability of dsGUVs enables the sequential loading of these compartments with biomolecules, namely purified transmembrane and cytoskeleton proteins by microfluidic pico-injection technology. This constitutes an experimental demonstration of a successful bottom-up assembly of a compartment with contents that would not self-assemble to full functionality when simply mixed together. Following assembly, the stabilizing oil phase and droplet shells are removed to release functional self-supporting protocells to an aqueous phase, enabling them to interact with physiologically relevant matrices.

  15. Low cost fabrication and assembly process for re-usable 3D polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Kevin J; Mbanjwa, Mesuli B; Govindasamy, Klariska; Korvink, Jan G

    2011-09-01

    A method to easily manufacture and assemble a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based microfluidic device is described. The method uses low cost materials and re-usable laser cut polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) parts. In addition, the thickness of PDMS layers can be controlled and both PDMS layer surfaces are flat, which allows for multi-layer PDMS structures to be assembled. The use of mechanical clamping to seal the structure allows for easy cleaning and re-use of the manufactured part as it can be taken apart at any time. In this way, selected layers can be re-used or replaced. The process described can be easily adopted and utilised without the need for any costly clean room facilities or equipment such as oxygen bonders, making it ideal for laboratories, universities, and classrooms exploring microfluidics applications.

  16. A microfluidic approach to assembling ordered microsphere arrays

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    Xu, W.; Sur, K.; Zeng, H.; Feinerman, A.; Kelso, D.; Ketterson, J. B.

    2008-07-01

    Hydrodynamic flow through an array of channels has been utilized to assemble microspheres on a flat surface. The channels, about 6 µm in lateral size, were etched through a 60 µm thick silicon wafer using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). Droplets containing 6-8 µm fluorescent polystyrene microspheres were placed on the top side of the horizontally-oriented silicon wafer, while the bottom side was connected to a syringe that draws the fluid through the channels. In this way the microspheres are guided and secured at the inlets of the channels, and remain in place when the suction ceases. This technique, which combines favorable features such as high throughput, high resolution rate and reusability, can be a powerful platform for a new generation of protein microarrays. Antigens can be bound to the microspheres as 'targets', which can then be exposed to different fluorescence-tagged antibodies so that their binding can be confirmed. This system can also be used to study the functional roles of gene fragments and their relations to human diseases. The high throughput feature will make it possible to screen a large number of DNA fragments and identify the genetic basis of various diseases effectively.

  17. Microfluidic Impedimetric Cell Regeneration Assay to Monitor the Enhanced Cytotoxic Effect of Nanomaterial Perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Rothbauer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, the application of nanomaterials (NMs in technical products and biomedicine has become a rapidly increasing market trend. As the safety and efficacy of NMs are of utmost importance, new methods are needed to study the dynamic interactions of NMs at the nano-biointerface. However, evaluation of NMs based on standard and static cell culture end-point detection methods does not provide information on the dynamics of living biological systems, which is crucial for the understanding of physiological responses. To bridge this technological gap, we here present a microfluidic cell culture system containing embedded impedance microsensors to continuously and non-invasively monitor the effects of NMs on adherent cells under varying flow conditions. As a model, the impact of silica NMs on the vitality and regenerative capacity of human lung cells after acute and chronic exposure scenarios was studied over an 18-h period following a four-hour NM treatment. Results of the study demonstrated that the developed system is applicable to reliably analyze the consequences of dynamic NM exposure to physiological cell barriers in both nanotoxicology and nanomedicine.

  18. Manipulating fluids: Advances in micro-fluidics, opto-fluidics and fluidic self assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyawahare, Saurabh

    This dissertation describes work in three inter-related areas---micro-fluidics, opto-fluidics and fluidic self-assembly. Micro-fluidics has gotten a boost in recent years with the development of multilayered elastomeric devices made of poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), allowing active elements like valves and pumps. However, while PDMS has many advantages, it is not resistant to organic solvents. New materials and/or new designs are needed for solvent resistance. I describe how novel fluorinated elastomers can replace PDMS when combined with the three dimensional (3-D) solid printing. I also show how another 3-D fabrication method, multilayer photo-lithography, allows for fabrication of devices integrating filters. In general, 3-D fabrications allow new kinds of micro-fluidic devices to be made that would be impossible to emulate with two dimensional chips. In opto-fluidics, I describe a number of experiments with quantum dots both inside and outside chips. Inside chips, I manipulate quantum dots using hydrodynamic focusing to pattern fine lines, like a barcode. Outside chips, I describe our attempts to create quantum dot composites with micro-spheres. I also show how evaporated gold films and chemical passivation can then be used to enhance the emission of quantum dots. Finally, within fluids, self assembly is an attractive way to manipulate materials, and I provide two examples: first, a DNA-based energy transfer molecule that relies on quantum mechanics and self-assembles inside fluids. This kind of molecular photonics mimics parts of the photosynthetic apparatus of plants and bacteria. The second example of self-assembly in fluids describes a new phenomena---the surface tension mediated self assembly of particles like quantum dots and micro-spheres into fine lines. This self assembly by capillary flows can be combined with photo-lithography, and is expected to find use in future nano- and micro-fabrication schemes. In conclusion, advances in fludics, integrating

  19. Soft microfluidic assemblies of sensors, circuits, and radios for the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sheng; Zhang, Yihui; Jia, Lin; Mathewson, Kyle E; Jang, Kyung-In; Kim, Jeonghyun; Fu, Haoran; Huang, Xian; Chava, Pranav; Wang, Renhan; Bhole, Sanat; Wang, Lizhe; Na, Yoon Joo; Guan, Yue; Flavin, Matthew; Han, Zheshen; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2014-04-04

    When mounted on the skin, modern sensors, circuits, radios, and power supply systems have the potential to provide clinical-quality health monitoring capabilities for continuous use, beyond the confines of traditional hospital or laboratory facilities. The most well-developed component technologies are, however, broadly available only in hard, planar formats. As a result, existing options in system design are unable to effectively accommodate integration with the soft, textured, curvilinear, and time-dynamic surfaces of the skin. Here, we describe experimental and theoretical approaches for using ideas in soft microfluidics, structured adhesive surfaces, and controlled mechanical buckling to achieve ultralow modulus, highly stretchable systems that incorporate assemblies of high-modulus, rigid, state-of-the-art functional elements. The outcome is a thin, conformable device technology that can softly laminate onto the surface of the skin to enable advanced, multifunctional operation for physiological monitoring in a wireless mode.

  20. Engineering optical properties of a graphene oxide metamaterial assembled in microfluidic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravets, V G; Marshall, O P; Nair, R R; Thackray, B; Zhukov, A; Leng, J; Grigorenko, A N

    2015-01-26

    The dense packing of two dimensional flakes by van der Waals forces has enabled the creation of new metamaterials with desirable optical properties. Here we assemble graphene oxide sheets into a three dimensional metamaterial using a microfluidic technique and confirm their ordering via measurements of ellipsometric parameters, polarized optical microscopy, polarized transmission spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. We show that the produced metamaterials demonstrate strong in-plane optical anisotropy (Δn≈0.3 at n≈1.5-1.8) combined with low absorption (kgraphene oxide paper. Our results pave the way for engineered birefringent metamaterials on the basis of two dimensional atomic crystals including graphene and its derivatives.

  1. Controlled self-assembly of quantum dot-block copolymer colloids in multiphase microfluidic reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Wei; Oskooei, Ali; Sinton, David; Moffitt, Matthew G

    2010-01-19

    The controlled self-assembly of large compound quantum dot micelles (QDCMs), consisting of constituents of polymer-stabilized quantum dots (QDs) and amphiphilic polystyrene-b-poly(acrylic acid) stabilizing chains, in gas-liquid segmented microfluidic reactors is demonstrated. Self-assembly is initiated by fast mixing of water with the polymer constituents via chaotic advection, as liquid plugs containing reactants move through a sinusoidal mixing channel. The resulting QDCMs are then processed within a postformation channel, where circulating flow patterns develop within the liquid plugs, followed by off-chip quenching and analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Particle processing via circulating flow is found to involve a combination of particle growth via collision-induced coalescence and shear-induced particle breakup. The final mean QDCM sizes represent kinetic states arising from the competition between these two mechanisms, depending on tunable chemical and flow parameters. A systematic investigation of the experimental variables that influence particle size and polydispersity, including water concentration, flow rate, and the gas-to-liquid flow ratio, is conducted, demonstrating tunability of QDCM sizes in the range of approximately 40-140 nm. The importance of shear-induced particle breakup in the limit of high shear is illustrated by a common minimum particle size, 41 +/- 1 nm, which is achieved for all water contents by increasing the total flow rate to sufficiently high values.

  2. Magnetic self-assembly of microparticle clusters in an aqueous two-phase microfluidic cross-flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Niki; Jones, Steven G.; Moon, Byeong-Ui; Tsai, Scott S. H.

    2015-11-01

    We present a technique that self-assembles paramagnetic microparticles on the interface of aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) fluids in a microfluidic cross-flow. A co-flow of the ATPS is formed in the microfluidic cross channel as the flows of a dilute dextran (DEX) phase, along with a flow-focused particle suspension, converges with a dilute polyethylene glycol (PEG) phase. The microparticles arrive at the liquid-liquid interface and self-assemble into particle clusters due to forces on the particles from an applied external magnetic field gradient, and the interfacial tension of the ATPS. The microparticles form clusters at the interface, and once the cluster size grows to a critical value, the cluster passes through the interface. We control the size of the self-assembled clusters, as they pass through the interface, by varying the strength of the applied magnetic field gradient and the ATPS interfacial tension. We observe rich assembly dynamics, from the formation of Pickering emulsions to clusters that are completely encapsulated inside DEX phase droplets. We anticipate that this microparticle self-assembly method may have important biotechnological applications that require the controlled assembly of cells into clusters.

  3. Controlled evaporative self-assembly of confined microfluids: A route to complex ordered structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Myunghwan

    The evaporative self-assembly of nonvolatile solutes such as polymers, nanocrystals, and carbon nanotubes has been widely recognized as a non-lithographic means of producing a diverse range of intriguing complex structures. Due to the spatial variation of evaporative flux and possible convection, however, these non-equilibrium dissipative structures (e.g., fingering patterns and polygonal network structures) are often irregularly and stochastically organized. Yet for many applications in microelectronics, data storage devices, and biotechnology, it is highly desirable to achieve surface patterns having a well-controlled spatial arrangement. To date, only a few elegant studies have centered on precise control over the evaporation process to produce ordered structures. In a remarked comparison with conventional lithography techniques, surface patterning by controlled solvent evaporation is simple and cost-effective, offering a lithography- and external field-free means to organize nonvolatile materials into ordered microscopic structures over large surface areas. The ability to engineer an evaporative self-assembly process that yields a wide range of complex, self-organizing structures over large areas offers tremendous potential for applications in electronics, optoelectronics, and bio- or chemical sensors. We developed a facile, robust tool for evaporating polymer, nanoparticle, or DNA solutions in curve-on-flat geometries to create versatile, highly regular microstructures, including hierarchically structured polymer blend rings, conjugated polymer "snake-skins", block copolymer stripes, and punch-hole-like meshes, biomolecular microring arrays, etc. The mechanism of structure formation was elucidated both experimentally and theoretically. Our method further enhances current fabrication approaches to creating highly ordered structures in a simple and cost-effective manner, envisioning the potential to be tailored for use in photonics, optoelectronics, microfluidic

  4. DNA-library assembly programmed by on-demand nano-liter droplets from a custom microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangen, Uwe; Minero, Gabriel Antonio S; Sharma, Abhishek; Wagler, Patrick F; Cohen, Rafael; Raz, Ofir; Marx, Tzipy; Ben-Yehezkel, Tuval; McCaskill, John S

    2015-07-01

    Nanoscale synthetic biology can benefit from programmable nanoliter-scale processing of DNA in microfluidic chips if they are interfaced effectively to biochemical arrays such as microwell plates. Whereas active microvalve chips require complex fabrication and operation, we show here how a passive and readily fabricated microchip can be employed for customizable nanoliter scale pipetting and reaction control involving DNA. This recently developed passive microfluidic device, supporting nanoliter scale combinatorial droplet generation and mixing, is here used to generate a DNA test library with one member per droplet exported to addressed locations on microwell plates. Standard DNA assembly techniques, such as Gibson assembly, compatible with isothermal on-chip operation, are employed and checked using off-chip PCR and assembly PCR. The control of output droplet sequences and mixing performance was verified using dyes and fluorescently labeled DNA solutions, both on-chip and in external capillary channels. Gel electrophoresis of products and DNA sequencing were employed to further verify controlled combination and functional enzymatic assembly. The scalability of the results to larger DNA libraries is also addressed by combinatorial input expansion using sequential injection plugs from a multiwell plate. Hence, the paper establishes a proof of principle of the production of functional combinatorial mixtures at the nanoliter scale for one sequence per well DNA libraries.

  5. Fabrication and assembling of a microfluidic optical stretcher polymeric chip combining femtosecond laser and micro injection molding technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Annalisa; Ancona, Antonio; Trotta, Gianluca; Martínez Vázquez, Rebeca; Fassi, Irene; Osellame, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    Microfluidic optical stretchers are valuable optofluidic devices for studying single cell mechanical properties. These usually consist of a single microfluidic channel where cells, with dimensions ranging from 5 to 20 μm are trapped and manipulated through optical forces induced by two counter-propagating laser beams. Recently, monolithic optical stretchers have been directly fabricated in fused silica by femtosecond laser micromachining (FLM). Such a technology allows writing in a single step in the substrate volume both the microfluidic channel and the optical waveguides with a high degree of precision and flexibility. However, this method is very slow and cannot be applied to cheaper materials like polymers. Therefore, novel technological platforms are needed to boost the production of such devices on a mass scale. In this work, we propose integration of FLM with micro-injection moulding (μIM) as a novel route towards the cost-effective and flexible manufacturing of polymeric Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) devices. In particular, we have fabricated and assembled a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) microfluidic optical stretcher by exploiting firstly FLM to manufacture a metallic mould prototype with reconfigurable inserts. Afterwards, such mould was employed for the production, through μIM, of the two PMMA thin plates composing the device. The microchannel with reservoirs and lodgings for the optical fibers delivering the laser radiation for cell trapping were reproduced on one plate, while the other included access holes to the channel. The device was assembled by direct fs-laser welding, ensuring sealing of the channel and avoiding thermal deformation and/or contamination.

  6. Applying Microfluidics to Electrophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddington, David T.

    2007-01-01

    Microfluidics can be integrated with standard electrophysiology techniques to allow new experimental modalities. Specifically, the motivation for the microfluidic brain slice device is discussed including how the device docks to standard perfusion chambers and the technique of passive pumping which is used to deliver boluses of neuromodulators to the brain slice. By simplifying the device design, we are able to achieve a practical solution to the current unmet electrophysiology need of applying multiple neuromodulators across multiple regions of the brain slice. This is achieved by substituting the standard coverglass substrate of the perfusion chamber with a thin microfluidic device bonded to the coverglass substrate. This was then attached to the perfusion chamber and small holes connect the open-well of the perfusion chamber to the microfluidic channels buried within the microfluidic substrate. These microfluidic channels are interfaced with ports drilled into the edge of the perfusion chamber to access and deliver stimulants. This project represents how the field of microfluidics is transitioning away from proof-of concept device demonstrations and into practical solutions for unmet experimental and clinical needs. PMID:18989410

  7. Low cost fabrication and assembly process for re-usable 3D polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic networks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Land, K

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available ://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3641859 View Table of Contents: http://bmf.aip.org/resource/1/BIOMGB/v5/i3 Published by the American Institute of Physics. Related Articles Membrane-integrated microfluidic device for high-resolution live cell imaging Biomicrofluidics...

  8. Ultra-Portable Smartphone Controlled Integrated Digital Microfluidic System in a 3D-Printed Modular Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Yafia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Portable sensors and biomedical devices are influenced by the recent advances in microfluidics technologies, compact fabrication techniques, improved detection limits and enhanced analysis capabilities. This paper reports the development of an integrated ultraportable, low-cost, and modular digital microfluidic (DMF system and its successful integration with a smartphone used as a high-level controller and post processing station. Low power and cost effective electronic circuits are designed to generate the high voltages required for DMF operations in both open and closed configurations (from 100 to 800 V. The smartphone in turn commands a microcontroller that manipulate the voltage signals required for droplet actuation in the DMF chip and communicates wirelessly with the microcontroller via Bluetooth module. Moreover, the smartphone acts as a detection and image analysis station with an attached microscopic lens. The holder assembly is fabricated using three-dimensional (3D printing technology to facilitate rapid prototyping. The holder features a modular design that enables convenient attachment/detachment of a variety of DMF chips to/from an electrical busbar. The electrical circuits, controller and communication system are designed to minimize the power consumption in order to run the device on small lithium ion batteries. Successful controlled DMF operations and a basic colorimetric assay using the smartphone are demonstrated.

  9. The convergence of quantum-dot-mediated fluorescence resonance energy transfer and microfluidics for monitoring DNA polyplex self-assembly in real time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yi-Ping; Chen, Hunter H; Leong, Kam W; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel convergence of quantum-dot-mediated fluorescence resonance energy transfer (QD-FRET) and microfluidics, through which molecular interactions were precisely controlled and monitored using highly sensitive quantum-dot-mediated FRET. We demonstrate its potential in studying the kinetics of self-assembly of DNA polyplexes under laminar flow in real time with millisecond resolution. The integration of nanophotonics and microfluidics offers a powerful tool for elucidating the formation of polyelectrolyte polyplexes, which is expected to provide better control and synthesis of uniform and customizable polyplexes for future nucleic acid-based therapeutics. PMID:19417478

  10. The convergence of quantum-dot-mediated fluorescence resonance energy transfer and microfluidics for monitoring DNA polyplex self-assembly in real time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho Yiping; Wang, T-H [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University (United States); Chen, Hunter H; Leong, Kam W [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University (United States)], E-mail: thwang@jhu.edu

    2009-03-04

    We present a novel convergence of quantum-dot-mediated fluorescence resonance energy transfer (QD-FRET) and microfluidics, through which molecular interactions were precisely controlled and monitored using highly sensitive quantum-dot-mediated FRET. We demonstrate its potential in studying the kinetics of self-assembly of DNA polyplexes under laminar flow in real time with millisecond resolution. The integration of nanophotonics and microfluidics offers a powerful tool for elucidating the formation of polyelectrolyte polyplexes, which is expected to provide better control and synthesis of uniform and customizable polyplexes for future nucleic acid-based therapeutics.

  11. Robust Self-Assembly of Highly Ordered Complex Structures by Controlled Evaporation of Confined Microfluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhiqun; Byun, Myunghwan; Hong, Suck Won

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate a robust, one-step method of evaporating polymer solutions in curve-on-flat geometries to create versatile, highly regular microstructures in a precisely controlled environment, as well as offering a comprehensive study of the influence of different upper surfaces on complex structure formation via controlled evaporation. Our method further enhances current fabrication approaches to creating highly ordered structures in a simple and cost-effective manner, with the potential to be tailored for use in photonics, electronics, optoelectronics, microfluidic devices, nanotechnology, and biotechnology.

  12. Ultra-Portable Smartphone Controlled Integrated Digital Microfluidic System in a 3D-Printed Modular Assembly

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yafia, Mohamed; Ahmadi, Ali; Hoorfar, Mina; Najjaran, Homayoun

    2015-01-01

      Portable sensors and biomedical devices are influenced by the recent advances in microfluidics technologies, compact fabrication techniques, improved detection limits and enhanced analysis capabilities...

  13. Assembly-line manipulation of droplets in microfluidic platform for fluorescence encoding and simultaneous multiplexed DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinyang; Zhou, Guohua; Liu, Yufei; Ye, Tai; Xiang, Xia; Ji, Xinghu; He, Zhike

    2015-03-01

    In this article, a new mode of droplets manipulation is presented and applied for simultaneous multiplexed DNA detection. We call this droplets manipulation, "assembly-line manipulation of droplets (ALMD)". Firstly, multiple droplets containing the same target mixtures are generated in the microchannel, and then fused with later generated different droplets containing corresponding probes, respectively. Finally, all the fused droplets were fluorescence imaged on-line and real-time. The successful implementation of droplets fluorescence encoding based on ALMD shows the reproducibility and accuracy of this manipulation mode. As a proof-of-concept application, the simultaneous multiplexed DNA detection was carried out through the model of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gene sequence and variola virus (small pox, VV) gene sequence based on ALMD in the microfluidic system. It is proved that this method achieves simultaneous multiplexed DNA measurements with a significantly time-saving way and without different dye-labelled probes or complex operation procedures. In addition, it reveals the possibility of high-throughput biosensing with simple chip design and detection equipment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The nanostructure of silica microfibers fabricated by microfluidic self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, John; Ma, Miles; Gibson, Brant; Huyang, George; Beavis, Alison; Bishop, David; Cook, Kevin; McDonagh, Andrew; Shi, Jeffrey; Shi, Donqi; Peng, Gang-Ding; Crossley, Maxwell

    2013-09-01

    The porous properties of self-assembled waveguides made up of nanoparticles are characterised. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveals predominantly hcp or fcc packing suggesting a remarkably well ordered and distributed porous structure. N2 adsorption studies estimate a surface area SA ~ 101 m2/g, a total interstitial volume Vi ~ 1.7 mL/g and a pore size distribution of r ~ (2 - 6) nm. This distribution is in excellent agreement with the idealised values for identically sized particles obtained for the octahedral and tetrahedral pores of the hcp and fcc lattices, estimated to lie within and rtet ~ (2.2 - 3.3) nm and roct ~ (4.2 - 6.2) nm for particles varying in size over 20 to 30 nm. Optical transmission based percolation studies reveal rapid penetration of Rhodamine dye (molecules such as ZnTPP observed under similar loading conditions. In the latter case, laser ablation was used to determine the transport of hydrated Zn2+ to be D ~ 3 x 10-4 nm2s-1. By comparison, ZnTPP was not able to percolate into the wire over the time of exposure, t = 10 mins, effectively demonstrating the self-assembled structure acting as a molecular sieve. We discuss the potential of such structures more broadly and conclude that the controllable distribution of such nano-chambers offers the possibility of amplifying, or up-scaling, an otherwise local interaction or nanoreactions to make detection and diagnostics much simpler; it also opens up a new approach to material engineering making new composites with periodic nanoscale variability. These and other unique aspects of these structures are embodied in an overall concept of lab-in-wire, or similar self-assembled structures, extending our previous concept of lab-in-fibre from the micro domain into the nano domain.

  15. Suspended microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Casavant, Benjamin P.; Berthier, Erwin; Theberge, Ashleigh B.; Jean BERTHIER; Montanez-Sauri, Sara I.; Bischel, Lauren L.; Brakke, Kenneth; Hedman, Curtis J.; Bushman, Wade; Keller, Nancy P.; Beebe, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Although the field of microfluidics has made significant progress in bringing new tools to address biological questions, the accessibility and adoption of microfluidics within the life sciences are still limited. Open microfluidic systems have the potential to lower the barriers to adoption, but the absence of robust design rules has hindered their use. Here, we present an open microfluidic platform, suspended microfluidics, that uses surface tension to fill and maintain a fluid in microscale...

  16. Suspended microfluidics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benjamin P. Casavant; Erwin Berthier; Ashleigh B. Theberge; Jean Berthier; Sara I. Montanez-Sauri; Lauren L. Bischel; Kenneth Brakke; Curtis J. Hedman; Wade Bushman; Nancy P. Keller; David J. Beebe

    2013-01-01

    Although the field of microfluidics has made significant progress in bringing new tools to address biological questions, the accessibility and adoption of microfluidics within the life sciences are still limited...

  17. Oil-in-water microfluidics on the colloidal scale: new routes to self-assembly and glassy packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Max; Dong, Jun; Eggers, Jens; Seddon, Annela M.; Royall, C. Patrick

    We have developed Norland Optical Adhesive (NOA) flow focusing devices, making use of the excellent solvent compatibility and surface properties of NOA to generate micron scale oil-in-water emulsions with polydispersities as low as 5%. While current work on microfluidic oil-in-water emulsification largely concerns the production of droplets with sizes on the order of 10s of micrometres, large enough that Brownian motion is negligible, our NOA devices can produce droplets with radii ranging from 2 {\\mu}m to 12 {\\mu}m. To demonstrate the utility of these emulsions as colloidal model systems we produce fluorescently labelled polydimethylsiloxane droplets suitable for particle resolved studies with confocal microscopy. We analyse the structure of the resulting emulsion in 3D using coordinate tracking and the topological cluster classification and reveal a new mono-disperse thermal system.

  18. Microfluidic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2012-08-21

    Microfluidics, a field that has been well-established for several decades, has seen extensive applications in the areas of biology, chemistry, and medicine. However, it might be very hard to imagine how such soft microfluidic devices would be used in other areas, such as electronics, in which stiff, solid metals, insulators, and semiconductors have previously dominated. Very recently, things have radically changed. Taking advantage of native properties of microfluidics, advances in microfluidics-based electronics have shown great potential in numerous new appealing applications, e.g. bio-inspired devices, body-worn healthcare and medical sensing systems, and ergonomic units, in which conventional rigid, bulky electronics are facing insurmountable obstacles to fulfil the demand on comfortable user experience. Not only would the birth of microfluidic electronics contribute to both the microfluidics and electronics fields, but it may also shape the future of our daily life. Nevertheless, microfluidic electronics are still at a very early stage, and significant efforts in research and development are needed to advance this emerging field. The intention of this article is to review recent research outcomes in the field of microfluidic electronics, and address current technical challenges and issues. The outlook of future development in microfluidic electronic devices and systems, as well as new fabrication techniques, is also discussed. Moreover, the authors would like to inspire both the microfluidics and electronics communities to further exploit this newly-established field.

  19. Reversible Control of Anisotropic Electrical Conductivity using Colloidal Microfluidic Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beskok, Ali; Bevan, Michael; Lagoudas, Dimitris; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Bahukudumbi, Pradipkumar; Everett, William

    2007-01-01

    This research addresses the tunable assembly of reversible colloidal structures within microfluidic networks to engineer multifunctional materials that exhibit a wide range of electrical properties...

  20. Microfluidic system for enhanced cardiac tissue formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busek Mathias

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hereby a microfluidic system for cell cultivation is presented in which human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes were cultivated under perfusion. Besides micro-perfusion this system is also capable to produce well-defined oxygen contents, apply defined forces and has excellent imaging characteristics. Cardiomyocytes attach to the surface, start spontaneous beating and stay functional for up to 14 days under perfusion. The cell motion was subsequently analysed using an adapted video analysis script to calculate beating rate, beating direction and contraction or relaxation speed.

  1. Theoretical microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruus, Henrik

    Microfluidics is a young and rapidly expanding scientific discipline, which deals with fluids and solutions in miniaturized systems, the so-called lab-on-a-chip systems. It has applications in chemical engineering, pharmaceutics, biotechnology and medicine. As the lab-on-a-chip systems grow...... in complexity, a proper theoretical understanding becomes increasingly important. The basic idea of the book is to provide a self-contained formulation of the theoretical framework of microfluidics, and at the same time give physical motivation and examples from lab-on-a-chip technology. After three chapters...... introducing microfluidics, the governing equations for mass, momentum and energy, and some basic flow solutions, the following 14 chapters treat hydraulic resistance/compliance, diffusion/dispersion, time-dependent flow, capillarity, electro- and magneto-hydrodynamics, thermal transport, two-phase flow...

  2. A Reversibly Sealed, Easy Access, Modular (SEAM Microfluidic Architecture to Establish In Vitro Tissue Interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay V Abhyankar

    Full Text Available Microfluidic barrier tissue models have emerged as advanced in vitro tools to explore interactions with external stimuli such as drug candidates, pathogens, or toxins. However, the procedures required to establish and maintain these systems can be challenging to implement for end users, particularly those without significant in-house engineering expertise. Here we present a module-based approach that provides an easy-to-use workflow to establish, maintain, and analyze microscale tissue constructs. Our approach begins with a removable culture insert that is magnetically coupled, decoupled, and transferred between standalone, prefabricated microfluidic modules for simplified cell seeding, culture, and downstream analysis. The modular approach allows several options for perfusion including standard syringe pumps or integration with a self-contained gravity-fed module for simple cell maintenance. As proof of concept, we establish a culture of primary human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC and report combined surface protein imaging and gene expression after controlled apical stimulation with the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS. We also demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating hydrated biomaterial interfaces into the microfluidic architecture by integrating an ultra-thin (< 1 μm, self-assembled hyaluronic acid/peptide amphiphile culture membrane with brain-specific Young's modulus (~ 1kPa. To highlight the importance of including biomimetic interfaces into microscale models we report multi-tiered readouts from primary rat cortical cells cultured on the self-assembled membrane and compare a panel of mRNA targets with primary brain tissue signatures. We anticipate that the modular approach and simplified operational workflows presented here will enable a wide range of research groups to incorporate microfluidic barrier tissue models into their work.

  3. Digital Microfluidic Logic Gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Xu, Tao; Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    Microfluidic computing is an emerging application for microfluidics technology. We propose microfluidic logic gates based on digital microfluidics. Using the principle of electrowetting-on-dielectric, AND, OR, NOT and XOR gates are implemented through basic droplet-handling operations such as transporting, merging and splitting. The same input-output interpretation enables the cascading of gates to create nontrivial computing systems. We present a potential application for microfluidic logic gates by implementing microfluidic logic operations for on-chip HIV test.

  4. Bioinspired microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Diamond, Dermot; Dunne, Aishling; Bruen, Danielle; Delaney, Colm; McCluskey, Peter; McCaul, Margaret; Florea, Larisa

    2017-01-01

    Through developments in 3D fabrication technologies in recent years, it is now possible to build and characterize much more sophisticated 3D platforms than was formerly the case. Regions of differing polarity, binding behaviour, flexibility/rigidity, can be incorporated into these fluidic systems. Furthermore, materials that can switch these characteristics can be incorporated, enabling the creation of microfluidic building blocks that exhibit switchable characteristics such as programmed ...

  5. Multidimensional bioseparation with modular microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirica, Gabriela S.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2013-08-27

    A multidimensional chemical separation and analysis system is described including a prototyping platform and modular microfluidic components capable of rapid and convenient assembly, alteration and disassembly of numerous candidate separation systems. Partial or total computer control of the separation system is possible. Single or multiple alternative processing trains can be tested, optimized and/or run in parallel. Examples related to the separation and analysis of human bodily fluids are given.

  6. Microfluidics as a tool for micro-manipulation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Potgieter, S

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available times and process-specific designs. Another advantage of microfluidics is that micron-sizes particles can be manipulated with great precision. A microfluidic device is being designed to facilitate the sorting and self-assembly of components of a...

  7. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, Ralph G [Champaign, IL; Mitrovski, Svetlana M [Urbana, IL

    2011-03-22

    A microfluidic electrochemical reactor includes an electrode and one or more microfluidic channels on the electrode, where the microfluidic channels are covered with a membrane containing a gas permeable polymer. The distance between the electrode and the membrane is less than 500 micrometers. The microfluidic electrochemical reactor can provide for increased reaction rates in electrochemical reactions using a gaseous reactant, as compared to conventional electrochemical cells. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors can be incorporated into devices for applications such as fuel cells, electrochemical analysis, microfluidic actuation, pH gradient formation.

  8. Hyaluronic Acid-Based Nanogels Produced by Microfluidics-Facilitated Self-Assembly Improves the Safety Profile of the Cationic Host Defense Peptide Novicidin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Water, Jorrit J; Kim, YongTae; Maltesen, Morten J

    2015-01-01

    have hampered their commercial development. To overcome these challenges a novel nanogel-based drug delivery system was designed. METHOD: The peptide novicidin was self-assembled with an octenyl succinic anhydride-modified analogue of hyaluronic acid, and this formulation was optimized using...... peptide loading of 36 ± 4%. The nanogels exhibited good colloidal stability under different ionic strength conditions and allowed complete release of the peptide over 14 days. Furthermore, self-assembly of novicidin with hyaluronic acid into nanogels significantly improved the safety profile at least five...

  9. Droplet microfluidics for synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gach, Philip C; Iwai, Kosuke; Kim, Peter W; Hillson, Nathan J; Singh, Anup K

    2017-10-11

    Synthetic biology is an interdisciplinary field that aims to engineer biological systems for useful purposes. Organism engineering often requires the optimization of individual genes and/or entire biological pathways (consisting of multiple genes). Advances in DNA sequencing and synthesis have recently begun to enable the possibility of evaluating thousands of gene variants and hundreds of thousands of gene combinations. However, such large-scale optimization experiments remain cost-prohibitive to researchers following traditional molecular biology practices, which are frequently labor-intensive and suffer from poor reproducibility. Liquid handling robotics may reduce labor and improve reproducibility, but are themselves expensive and thus inaccessible to most researchers. Microfluidic platforms offer a lower entry price point alternative to robotics, and maintain high throughput and reproducibility while further reducing operating costs through diminished reagent volume requirements. Droplet microfluidics have shown exceptional promise for synthetic biology experiments, including DNA assembly, transformation/transfection, culturing, cell sorting, phenotypic assays, artificial cells and genetic circuits.

  10. Microfluidic Dye Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders; Balslev, Søren; Gersborg-Hansen, Morten

    2006-01-01

    A technology for miniaturized, polymer based lasers, suitable for integration with planar waveguides and microfluidic networks is presented. The microfluidic dye laser device consists of a microfluidic channel with an embedded optical resonator. The devices are fabricated in a thin polymer film...

  11. Desktop aligner for fabrication of multilayer microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Yu, Zeta Tak For; Geraldo, Dalton; Weng, Shinuo; Alve, Nitesh; Dun, Wu; Kini, Akshay; Patel, Karan; Shu, Roberto; Zhang, Feng; Li, Gang; Jin, Qinghui; Fu, Jianping

    2015-07-01

    Multilayer assembly is a commonly used technique to construct multilayer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic devices with complex 3D architecture and connectivity for large-scale microfluidic integration. Accurate alignment of structure features on different PDMS layers before their permanent bonding is critical in determining the yield and quality of assembled multilayer microfluidic devices. Herein, we report a custom-built desktop aligner capable of both local and global alignments of PDMS layers covering a broad size range. Two digital microscopes were incorporated into the aligner design to allow accurate global alignment of PDMS structures up to 4 in. in diameter. Both local and global alignment accuracies of the desktop aligner were determined to be about 20 μm cm-1. To demonstrate its utility for fabrication of integrated multilayer PDMS microfluidic devices, we applied the desktop aligner to achieve accurate alignment of different functional PDMS layers in multilayer microfluidics including an organs-on-chips device as well as a microfluidic device integrated with vertical passages connecting channels located in different PDMS layers. Owing to its convenient operation, high accuracy, low cost, light weight, and portability, the desktop aligner is useful for microfluidic researchers to achieve rapid and accurate alignment for generating multilayer PDMS microfluidic devices.

  12. Soft tubular microfluidics for 2D and 3D applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Wang; Kong, Fang; Yeo, Joo Chuan; Yu, Longteng; Sonam, Surabhi; Dao, Ming; Gong, Xiaobo; Teck Lim, Chwee

    2017-10-01

    Microfluidics has been the key component for many applications, including biomedical devices, chemical processors, microactuators, and even wearable devices. This technology relies on soft lithography fabrication which requires cleanroom facilities. Although popular, this method is expensive and labor-intensive. Furthermore, current conventional microfluidic chips precludes reconfiguration, making reiterations in design very time-consuming and costly. To address these intrinsic drawbacks of microfabrication, we present an alternative solution for the rapid prototyping of microfluidic elements such as microtubes, valves, and pumps. In addition, we demonstrate how microtubes with channels of various lengths and cross-sections can be attached modularly into 2D and 3D microfluidic systems for functional applications. We introduce a facile method of fabricating elastomeric microtubes as the basic building blocks for microfluidic devices. These microtubes are transparent, biocompatible, highly deformable, and customizable to various sizes and cross-sectional geometries. By configuring the microtubes into deterministic geometry, we enable rapid, low-cost formation of microfluidic assemblies without compromising their precision and functionality. We demonstrate configurable 2D and 3D microfluidic systems for applications in different domains. These include microparticle sorting, microdroplet generation, biocatalytic micromotor, triboelectric sensor, and even wearable sensing. Our approach, termed soft tubular microfluidics, provides a simple, cheaper, and faster solution for users lacking proficiency and access to cleanroom facilities to design and rapidly construct microfluidic devices for their various applications and needs.

  13. Soft tubular microfluidics for 2D and 3D applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Wang; Kong, Fang; Yeo, Joo Chuan; Yu, Longteng; Sonam, Surabhi; Dao, Ming; Gong, Xiaobo; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2017-10-03

    Microfluidics has been the key component for many applications, including biomedical devices, chemical processors, microactuators, and even wearable devices. This technology relies on soft lithography fabrication which requires cleanroom facilities. Although popular, this method is expensive and labor-intensive. Furthermore, current conventional microfluidic chips precludes reconfiguration, making reiterations in design very time-consuming and costly. To address these intrinsic drawbacks of microfabrication, we present an alternative solution for the rapid prototyping of microfluidic elements such as microtubes, valves, and pumps. In addition, we demonstrate how microtubes with channels of various lengths and cross-sections can be attached modularly into 2D and 3D microfluidic systems for functional applications. We introduce a facile method of fabricating elastomeric microtubes as the basic building blocks for microfluidic devices. These microtubes are transparent, biocompatible, highly deformable, and customizable to various sizes and cross-sectional geometries. By configuring the microtubes into deterministic geometry, we enable rapid, low-cost formation of microfluidic assemblies without compromising their precision and functionality. We demonstrate configurable 2D and 3D microfluidic systems for applications in different domains. These include microparticle sorting, microdroplet generation, biocatalytic micromotor, triboelectric sensor, and even wearable sensing. Our approach, termed soft tubular microfluidics, provides a simple, cheaper, and faster solution for users lacking proficiency and access to cleanroom facilities to design and rapidly construct microfluidic devices for their various applications and needs.

  14. Digital Microfluidics Sample Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Michael G.; Srinivasan, Vijay; Eckhardt, Allen; Paik, Philip Y.; Sudarsan, Arjun; Shenderov, Alex; Hua, Zhishan; Pamula, Vamsee K.

    2010-01-01

    Three innovations address the needs of the medical world with regard to microfluidic manipulation and testing of physiological samples in ways that can benefit point-of-care needs for patients such as premature infants, for which drawing of blood for continuous tests can be life-threatening in their own right, and for expedited results. A chip with sample injection elements, reservoirs (and waste), droplet formation structures, fluidic pathways, mixing areas, and optical detection sites, was fabricated to test the various components of the microfluidic platform, both individually and in integrated fashion. The droplet control system permits a user to control droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. Also, the programming system allows a user to develop software routines for controlling droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. A chip is incorporated into the system with a controller, a detector, input and output devices, and software. A novel filler fluid formulation is used for the transport of droplets with high protein concentrations. Novel assemblies for detection of photons from an on-chip droplet are present, as well as novel systems for conducting various assays, such as immunoassays and PCR (polymerase chain reaction). The lab-on-a-chip (a.k.a., lab-on-a-printed-circuit board) processes physiological samples and comprises a system for automated, multi-analyte measurements using sub-microliter samples of human serum. The invention also relates to a diagnostic chip and system including the chip that performs many of the routine operations of a central labbased chemistry analyzer, integrating, for example, colorimetric assays (e.g., for proteins), chemiluminescence/fluorescence assays (e.g., for enzymes, electrolytes, and gases), and/or conductometric assays (e.g., for hematocrit on plasma and whole blood) on a single chip platform.

  15. 3D-printed microfluidic automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Anthony K; Bhattacharjee, Nirveek; Horowitz, Lisa F; Chang, Tim C; Folch, Albert

    2015-04-21

    Microfluidic automation - the automated routing, dispensing, mixing, and/or separation of fluids through microchannels - generally remains a slowly-spreading technology because device fabrication requires sophisticated facilities and the technology's use demands expert operators. Integrating microfluidic automation in devices has involved specialized multi-layering and bonding approaches. Stereolithography is an assembly-free, 3D-printing technique that is emerging as an efficient alternative for rapid prototyping of biomedical devices. Here we describe fluidic valves and pumps that can be stereolithographically printed in optically-clear, biocompatible plastic and integrated within microfluidic devices at low cost. User-friendly fluid automation devices can be printed and used by non-engineers as replacement for costly robotic pipettors or tedious manual pipetting. Engineers can manipulate the designs as digital modules into new devices of expanded functionality. Printing these devices only requires the digital file and electronic access to a printer.

  16. Microfluidics in biotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanov Dimitri; Barry Richard

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Microfluidics enables biotechnological processes to proceed on a scale (microns) at which physical processes such as osmotic movement, electrophoretic-motility and surface interactions become enhanced. At the microscale sample volumes and assay times are reduced, and procedural costs are lowered. The versatility of microfluidic devices allows interfacing with current methods and technologies. Microfluidics has been applied to DNA analysis methods and shown to accelerate DNA microarra...

  17. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kenneth K Y; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P

    2016-09-09

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology.

  18. Tunable Microfluidic Dye Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Bilenberg; Helbo, Bjarne; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2003-01-01

    We present a tunable microfluidic dye laser fabricated in SU-8. The tunability is enabled by integrating a microfluidic diffusion mixer with an existing microfluidic dye laser design by Helbo et al. By controlling the relative flows in the mixer between a dye solution and a solvent......, the concentration of dye in the laser cavity can be adjusted, allowing the wavelength to be tuned. Wavelength tuning controlled by the dye concentration was demonstrated with macroscopic dye lasers already in 1971, but this principle only becomes practically applicable by the use of microfluidic mixing...

  19. Three-dimensional interconnected microporous poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Po Ki; Su, Hui; Goral, Vasiliy N; Fink, Katherine A

    2011-04-21

    This technical note presents a fabrication method and applications of three-dimensional (3D) interconnected microporous poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic devices. Based on soft lithography, the microporous PDMS microfluidic devices were fabricated by molding a mixture of PDMS pre-polymer and sugar particles in a microstructured mold. After curing and demolding, the sugar particles were dissolved and washed away from the microstructured PDMS replica revealing 3D interconnected microporous structures. Other than introducing microporous structures into the PDMS replica, different sizes of sugar particles can be used to alter the surface wettability of the microporous PDMS replica. Oxygen plasma assisted bonding was used to enclose the microstructured microporous PDMS replica using a non-porous PDMS with inlet and outlet holes. A gas absorption reaction using carbon dioxide (CO(2)) gas acidified water was used to demonstrate the advantages and potential applications of the microporous PDMS microfluidic devices. We demonstrated that the acidification rate in the microporous PDMS microfluidic device was approximately 10 times faster than the non-porous PDMS microfluidic device under similar experimental conditions. The microporous PDMS microfluidic devices can also be used in cell culture applications where gas perfusion can improve cell survival and functions.

  20. Microfluidic stretchable RF electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2010-12-07

    Stretchable electronics is a revolutionary technology that will potentially create a world of radically different electronic devices and systems that open up an entirely new spectrum of possibilities. This article proposes a microfluidic based solution for stretchable radio frequency (RF) electronics, using hybrid integration of active circuits assembled on flex foils and liquid alloy passive structures embedded in elastic substrates, e.g. polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This concept was employed to implement a 900 MHz stretchable RF radiation sensor, consisting of a large area elastic antenna and a cluster of conventional rigid components for RF power detection. The integrated radiation sensor except the power supply was fully embedded in a thin elastomeric substrate. Good electrical performance of the standalone stretchable antenna as well as the RF power detection sub-module was verified by experiments. The sensor successfully detected the RF radiation over 5 m distance in the system demonstration. Experiments on two-dimensional (2D) stretching up to 15%, folding and twisting of the demonstrated sensor were also carried out. Despite the integrated device was severely deformed, no failure in RF radiation sensing was observed in the tests. This technique illuminates a promising route of realizing stretchable and foldable large area integrated RF electronics that are of great interest to a variety of applications like wearable computing, health monitoring, medical diagnostics, and curvilinear electronics.

  1. Open-source, community-driven microfluidics with Metafluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, David S; Thorsen, Todd A; Babb, Jonathan; Wick, Scott T; Gam, Jeremy J; Weiss, Ron; Carr, Peter A

    2017-06-07

    Microfluidic devices have the potential to automate and miniaturize biological experiments, but open-source sharing of device designs has lagged behind sharing of other resources such as software. Synthetic biologists have used microfluidics for DNA assembly, cell-free expression, and cell culture, but a combination of expense, device complexity, and reliance on custom set-ups hampers their widespread adoption. We present Metafluidics, an open-source, community-driven repository that hosts digital design files, assembly specifications, and open-source software to enable users to build, configure, and operate a microfluidic device. We use Metafluidics to share designs and fabrication instructions for both a microfluidic ring-mixer device and a 32-channel tabletop microfluidic controller. This device and controller are applied to build genetic circuits using standard DNA assembly methods including ligation, Gateway, Gibson, and Golden Gate. Metafluidics is intended to enable a broad community of engineers, DIY enthusiasts, and other nontraditional participants with limited fabrication skills to contribute to microfluidic research.

  2. Microfluidic system for in-vitro hypoxia assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busek, M.; Grünzner, S.; Steege, T.; Steinfelder, C.; Schmieder, F.; Klotzbach, U.; Sonntag, F.

    2017-02-01

    Hereby presented is a microfluidic system, including a micro pump, an oxygenator and a cell culture chamber for perfusion controlled hypoxia assays. It consists of laser-structured polycarbonate (PC) foils and an elastomeric membrane which were joined together using thermal diffusion bonding. The elastomer forms an oxygenator element. The microfluidic system is characterized using non-invasive flow measurement based on micro-Particle-ImageVelocimetry (μPIV) and optical oxygen measurement utilizing the oxygen dependent fluorescence decay. Based on those experimental results and mathematical considerations, the oxygenator and mass transport phenomena within the microfluidic system can be described. This oxygen sensor, the micro pump, a controlling device and the gas mixture at the oxygenator forms a regulatory circuit to adjust the oxygen content in the cell culture chamber and helps to produce well-defined hypoxic conditions for the cells.

  3. Microfluidics for chemical processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.

    2006-01-01

    Microfluidic systems, and more specifically, microfluidic chips, have a number of features that make them particularly useful for the study of chemical reactions on-line. The present paper will discuss two examples, the study of fluidic behaviour at high pressures and the excitation and detection of

  4. Microfluidic fuel cell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Bernard; Kjeang, Erik

    2011-06-01

    A microfluidic fuel cell is a microfabricated device that produces electrical power through electrochemical reactions involving a fuel and an oxidant. Microfluidic fuel cell systems exploit co-laminar flow on the microscale to separate the fuel and oxidant species, in contrast to conventional fuel cells employing an ion exchange membrane for this function. Since 2002 when the first microfluidic fuel cell was invented, many different fuels, oxidants, and architectures have been investigated conceptually and experimentally. In this mini-review article, recent advancements in the field of microfluidic fuel cell systems are documented, with particular emphasis on design, operation, and performance. The present microfluidic fuel cell systems are categorized by the fluidic phases of the fuel and oxidant streams, featuring gaseous/gaseous, liquid/gaseous, and liquid/liquid systems. The typical cell configurations and recent contributions in each category are analyzed. Key research challenges and opportunities are highlighted and recommendations for further work are provided.

  5. Microfluidics in biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov Dimitri

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Microfluidics enables biotechnological processes to proceed on a scale (microns at which physical processes such as osmotic movement, electrophoretic-motility and surface interactions become enhanced. At the microscale sample volumes and assay times are reduced, and procedural costs are lowered. The versatility of microfluidic devices allows interfacing with current methods and technologies. Microfluidics has been applied to DNA analysis methods and shown to accelerate DNA microarray assay hybridisation times. The linking of microfluidics to protein analysis techologies, e.g. mass spectrometry, enables picomole amounts of peptide to be analysed within a controlled micro-environment. The flexibility of microfluidics will facilitate its exploitation in assay development across multiple biotechnological disciplines.

  6. Optimized fabrication protocols of microfluidic devices for X-ray analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Catalano, Rossella

    2014-07-01

    Microfluidics combined with X-ray scattering techniques allows probing conformational changes or assembly processes of biological materials. Our aim was to develop a highly X-ray transparent microfluidic cell for detecting small variations of X-ray scattering involved in such processes. We describe the fabrication of a polyimide microfluidic device based on a simple, reliable and inexpensive lamination process. The implemented microstructured features result in windows with optimized X-ray transmission. The microfluidic device was characterized by X-ray microbeam scattering at the ID13 beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Hyperuniform materials made with microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazhgur, Pavel; Ricouvier, Joshua; Pierrat, Romain; Carminati, RéMi; Tabeling, Patrick

    Hyperuniform materials, being disordered systems with suppressed long-scale fluctuations, now attract a significant scientific interest, especially due to their potential applications for disordered photonic materials production. In our project we study a jammed packing of oil droplets in water. The droplets are produced in a PDMS microfluidic chip and directly assembled in a microfluidic channel. By varying the fluid pressures we manage to sharply control the droplet production and thereby govern the structural properties of the obtained material. The pseudo-2D (a monolayer of droplets) and 3D systems are investigated. Our results show that at appropriate experimental conditions droplets self-organize in hyperuniform patterns. Our electromagnetic simulations also show that the obtained material can be transparent while staying optically dense. As far as we know, the proposed material is one of the first examples of experimentally made hyperuniform materials. We hope that our studies will help to establish a new way of disordered photonic materials production. The Microflusa project receives funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under Grant Agreement No. 664823.

  8. A truly Lego®-like modular microfluidics platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittayarukskul, Kevin; Lee, Abraham Phillip

    2017-03-01

    Ideally, a modular microfluidics platform should be simple to assemble and support 3D configurations for increased versatility. The modular building blocks should also be mass producible like electrical components. These are fundamental features of world-renowned Legos® and why Legos® inspire many existing modular microfluidics platforms. In this paper, a truly Lego®-like microfluidics platform is introduced, and its basic feasibility is demonstrated. Here, PDMS building blocks resembling 2  ×  2 Lego® bricks are cast from 3D-printed master molds. The blocks are pegged and stacked on a traditional Lego® plate to create simple, 3D microfluidic networks, such as a single basket weave. Characteristics of the platform, including reversible sealing and automatic alignment of channels, are also analyzed and discussed in detail.

  9. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-cheng [Irvine, CA; Sui, Guodong [Los Angeles, CA; Elizarov, Arkadij [Valley Village, CA; Kolb, Hartmuth C [Playa del Rey, CA; Huang, Jiang [San Jose, CA; Heath, James R [South Pasadena, CA; Phelps, Michael E [Los Angeles, CA; Quake, Stephen R [Stanford, CA; Tseng, Hsian-rong [Los Angeles, CA; Wyatt, Paul [Tipperary, IE; Daridon, Antoine [Mont-Sur-Rolle, CH

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  10. Droplet-based microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sanjiv; Srisa-Art, Monpichar; Scott, Steven; Asthana, Amit; Cass, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics or digital microfluidics is a subclass of microfluidic devices, wherein droplets are generated using active or passive methods. The active method for generation of droplets involves the use of an external factor such as an electric field for droplet generation. Two techniques that fall in this category are dielectrophoresis (DEP) and electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD). In passive methods, the droplet generation depends on the geometry and dimensions of the device. T-junction and flow focusing methods are examples of passive methods used for generation of droplets. In this chapter the methods used for droplet generation, mixing of contents of droplets, and the manipulation of droplets are described in brief. A review of the applications of digital microfluidics with emphasis on the last decade is presented.

  11. Microfluidics in inorganic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Hassan, Ali; Sandre, Olivier; Cabuil, Valérie

    2010-08-23

    The application of microfluidics in chemistry has gained significant importance in the recent years. Miniaturized chemistry platforms provide controlled fluid transport, rapid chemical reactions, and cost-saving advantages over conventional reactors. The advantages of microfluidics have been clearly established in the field of analytical and bioanalytical sciences and in the field of organic synthesis. It is less true in the field of inorganic chemistry and materials science; however in inorganic chemistry it has mostly been used for the separation and selective extraction of metal ions. Microfluidics has been used in materials science mainly for the improvement of nanoparticle synthesis, namely metal, metal oxide, and semiconductor nanoparticles. Microfluidic devices can also be used for the formulation of more advanced and sophisticated inorganic materials or hybrids.

  12. MEMS in microfluidic channels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, Carol Iris Hill; Okandan, Murat; Michalske, Terry A.; Sounart, Thomas L.; Matzke, Carolyn M.

    2004-03-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) comprise a new class of devices that include various forms of sensors and actuators. Recent studies have shown that microscale cantilever structures are able to detect a wide range of chemicals, biomolecules or even single bacterial cells. In this approach, cantilever deflection replaces optical fluorescence detection thereby eliminating complex chemical tagging steps that are difficult to achieve with chip-based architectures. A key challenge to utilizing this new detection scheme is the incorporation of functionalized MEMS structures within complex microfluidic channel architectures. The ability to accomplish this integration is currently limited by the processing approaches used to seal lids on pre-etched microfluidic channels. This report describes Sandia's first construction of MEMS instrumented microfluidic chips, which were fabricated by combining our leading capabilities in MEMS processing with our low-temperature photolithographic method for fabricating microfluidic channels. We have explored in-situ cantilevers and other similar passive MEMS devices as a new approach to directly sense fluid transport, and have successfully monitored local flow rates and viscosities within microfluidic channels. Actuated MEMS structures have also been incorporated into microfluidic channels, and the electrical requirements for actuation in liquids have been quantified with an elegant theory. Electrostatic actuation in water has been accomplished, and a novel technique for monitoring local electrical conductivities has been invented.

  13. Mobility-shift analysis with microfluidics chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jarrod; Shevchuk, Taras; Swiderski, Piotr M; Dabur, Rajesh; Crocitto, Laura E; Buryanov, Yaroslav I; Smith, Steven S

    2003-09-01

    Electrophoretic mobility shift analysis (EMSA) is a well-characterized and widely used technique for the analysis of proten-DNA interaction and the analysis of transcription factor combinatorics. Currently implemented EMSA generally involves the time-consuming use of radiolabeled DNA and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We are studying the bionanoscience of self-assembling supramolecular protein-nucleic nanostructures. We have undertaken these studies because they promise to enhance our understanding of assemblies formed during prebiotic evolution, provide tools for analysis of biological processes like DNA recombination, and may lead to the development of nanoscale biosensors designed for site-specific molecular targeting. During the course of that work, we noted that EMSA of these complex structures could be effectively implemented with microfluidics chips designed for the separation of DNA fragments. In this report we compare the two techniques and demonstrate that the microfluidics system is also capable of resolving complex mixtures produced by decorating DNA recombination intermediates with mixtures of DNA binding proteins. Moreover, the microfluidics chip system improves EMSA by permitting analysis with smaller samples, avoiding the use of radiolabeling, and reducing the time involved to a matter of minutes.

  14. Tissue culture on a chip: Developmental biology applications of self-organized capillary networks in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Takashi; Yokokawa, Ryuji

    2016-08-01

    Organ culture systems are used to elucidate the mechanisms of pattern formation in developmental biology. Various organ culture techniques have been used, but the lack of microcirculation in such cultures impedes the long-term maintenance of larger tissues. Recent advances in microfluidic devices now enable us to utilize self-organized perfusable capillary networks in organ cultures. In this review, we will overview past approaches to organ culture and current technical advances in microfluidic devices, and discuss possible applications of microfluidics towards the study of developmental biology. © 2016 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  15. 3D Printed Multimaterial Microfluidic Valve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J Keating

    Full Text Available We present a novel 3D printed multimaterial microfluidic proportional valve. The microfluidic valve is a fundamental primitive that enables the development of programmable, automated devices for controlling fluids in a precise manner. We discuss valve characterization results, as well as exploratory design variations in channel width, membrane thickness, and membrane stiffness. Compared to previous single material 3D printed valves that are stiff, these printed valves constrain fluidic deformation spatially, through combinations of stiff and flexible materials, to enable intricate geometries in an actuated, functionally graded device. Research presented marks a shift towards 3D printing multi-property programmable fluidic devices in a single step, in which integrated multimaterial valves can be used to control complex fluidic reactions for a variety of applications, including DNA assembly and analysis, continuous sampling and sensing, and soft robotics.

  16. 3D Printed Multimaterial Microfluidic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Steven J; Gariboldi, Maria Isabella; Patrick, William G; Sharma, Sunanda; Kong, David S; Oxman, Neri

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel 3D printed multimaterial microfluidic proportional valve. The microfluidic valve is a fundamental primitive that enables the development of programmable, automated devices for controlling fluids in a precise manner. We discuss valve characterization results, as well as exploratory design variations in channel width, membrane thickness, and membrane stiffness. Compared to previous single material 3D printed valves that are stiff, these printed valves constrain fluidic deformation spatially, through combinations of stiff and flexible materials, to enable intricate geometries in an actuated, functionally graded device. Research presented marks a shift towards 3D printing multi-property programmable fluidic devices in a single step, in which integrated multimaterial valves can be used to control complex fluidic reactions for a variety of applications, including DNA assembly and analysis, continuous sampling and sensing, and soft robotics.

  17. Plasmonic nanoshell synthesis in microfluidic composite foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duraiswamy, Suhanya; Khan, Saif A

    2010-09-08

    The availability of robust, scalable, and automated nanoparticle manufacturing processes is crucial for the viability of emerging nanotechnologies. Metallic nanoparticles of diverse shape and composition are commonly manufactured by solution-phase colloidal chemistry methods, where rapid reaction kinetics and physical processes such as mixing are inextricably coupled, and scale-up often poses insurmountable problems. Here we present the first continuous flow process to synthesize thin gold "nanoshells" and "nanoislands" on colloidal silica surfaces, which are nanoparticle motifs of considerable interest in plasmonics-based applications. We assemble an ordered, flowing composite foam lattice in a simple microfluidic device, where the lattice cells are alternately aqueous drops containing reagents for nanoparticle synthesis or gas bubbles. Microfluidic foam generation enables precisely controlled reagent dispensing and mixing, and the ordered foam structure facilitates compartmentalized nanoparticle growth. This is a general method for aqueous colloidal synthesis, enabling continuous, inherently digital, scalable, and automated production processes for plasmonic nanomaterials.

  18. Designing Polymeric Microfluidic Platforms for Biomedical Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedarethinam, Indumathi

    Cytogenetics laboratories. During the course of this project, initially the suitability of the polymeric chip substrate was tested and a microfluidic device was developed for performing interphase FISH analysis. With this device, the key factors involved in chromosome spreading crucial to FISH analysis were...... further investigated. Based on the insights gained, a micro splashing device was designed to achieve well-spread chromosomes and a rapidly assembled microFISH device was presented for metaphase analysis. Further, a single polymeric microfluidic device was developed to semi-automate the FISH analysis. ii......) Culturing brain slices and monitoring the integration of neuronal stem cells upon cultured brain slices. These studies will aid to design novel therapeutic approaches for neurodegenerative disease. The aim of this project was to create a microfludic cell culture chamber and keep a brain slice alive...

  19. Breaking new boundaries with microfluidics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Land, K

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidics is an important emerging research platform in South Africa. It deals with the control and manipulation of very small quantities of fluids (typically microlitre and smaller) inside micro-channels. Microfluidic-based devices show great...

  20. Punch card programmable microfluidics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Korir

    Full Text Available Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external components has remained elusive. Combining the idea of punch card programming with arbitrary fluid control, here we describe a self-contained, hand-crank powered, multiplex and robust programmable microfluidic platform. A paper tape encodes information as a series of punched holes. A mechanical reader/actuator reads these paper tapes and correspondingly executes operations onto a microfluidic chip coupled to the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. Enabled by the complexity of codes that can be represented by a series of holes in punched paper tapes, we demonstrate independent control of 15 on-chip pumps with enhanced mixing, normally-closed valves and a novel on-demand impact-based droplet generator. We demonstrate robustness of operation by encoding a string of characters representing the word "PUNCHCARD MICROFLUIDICS" using the droplet generator. Multiplexing is demonstrated by implementing an example colorimetric water quality assays for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate content in different water samples. With its portable and robust design, low cost and ease-of-use, we envision punch card programmable microfluidics will bring complex control of microfluidic chips into field-based applications in low-resource settings and in the hands of children around the world.

  1. Microporous Nanocomposite Enabled Microfluidic Biochip for Cardiac Biomarker Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nawab; Ali, Md Azahar; Rai, Prabhakar; Sharma, Ashutosh; Malhotra, B D; John, Renu

    2017-10-04

    This paper demonstrates an ultrasensitive microfluidic biochip nanoengineered with microporous manganese-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite for detection of cardiac biomarker, namely human cardiac troponin I. In this device, the troponin sensitive microfluidic electrode consisted of a thin layer of manganese-reduced graphene oxide (Mn3O4-RGO) nanocomposite material. This nanocomposite thin layer was formed on surface of a patterned indium tin oxide substrate after modification with 3-aminopropyletriethoxysilane and was assembled with a polydimethylsiloxane-based microfluidic system. The nanoengineered microelectrode was functionalized with antibodies specific to cardiac troponin I. The uniformly distributed flower-shaped nanostructured manganese oxide (nMn3O4) onto RGO nanosheets offered large surface area for enhanced loading of antibody molecules and improved electrochemical reaction at the sensor surface. This microfluidic device showed an excellent sensitivity of log [87.58] kΩ/(ng mL-1)/cm2 for quantification of human cardiac troponin I (cTnI) molecules in a wide detection range of 0.008-20 ng/mL. This device was found to have high stability, high reproducibility, and minimal interference with other biomarkers cardiac troponin C and T, myoglobin, and B-type natriuretic peptide. These advantageous features of the Mn3O4-RGO nanocomposite, in conjunction with microfluidic integration, enabled a promising microfluidic biochip platform for point-of-care detection of cardiac troponin.

  2. Microfluidic Synthesis of Nanohybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junmei; Song, Yujun

    2017-05-01

    Nanohybrids composed of two or more components exhibit many distinct physicochemical properties and hold great promise for applications in optics, electronics, magnetics, new energy, environment protection, and biomedical engineering. Microfluidic systems exhibit many advantages due to their unique characteristics of narrow channels, variable length, controllable number of channels and multiple integrations. Particularly their spatial-temporarily splitting of the formation stages during nanomaterials formation along the microfluidic channels favors the online control of the reaction kinetic parameters and in situ tuning of the product properties. This Review is focused on the features of the current types of microfluidic devices in the synthesis of different types of nanohybrids based on the classification of the four main kinds of materials: metal, nonmetal inorganic, polymer and composites. Their morphologies, compositions and properties can be adjusted conveniently in these synthesis systems. Synthesis advantages of varieties of microfluidic devices for specific nanohybrids of defined surfaces and interfaces are presented according to their process and microstructure features of devices as compared with conventional methods. A summary is presented, and challenges are put forward for the future development of the microfluidic synthesis of nanohybrids for advanced applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Micromixing within microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capretto, Lorenzo; Cheng, Wei; Hill, Martyn; Zhang, Xunli

    2011-01-01

    Micromixing is a crucial process within microfluidic systems such as micro total analysis systems (μTAS). A state-of-art review on microstructured mixing devices and their mixing phenomena is given. The review first presents an overview of the characteristics of fluidic behavior at the microscale and their implications in microfluidic mixing processes. According to the two basic principles exploited to induce mixing at the microscale, micromixers are generally classified as being passive or active. Passive mixers solely rely on pumping energy, whereas active mixers rely on an external energy source to achieve mixing. Typical types of passive micromixers are discussed, including T- or Y-shaped, parallel lamination, sequential, focusing enhanced mixers, and droplet micromixers. Examples of active mixers using external forces such as pressure field, electrokinetic, dielectrophoretic, electrowetting, magneto-hydrodynamic, and ultrasound to assist mixing are presented. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of mixing in a microfluidic environment are discussed.

  4. Paper microfluidics goes digital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fobel, Ryan; Kirby, Andrea E; Ng, Alphonsus H C; Farnood, Ramin R; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2014-05-01

    The first example of so-called "digital microfluidics" (DMF) implemented on paper by inkjet printing is reported. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is demonstrated as an example of a complex, multistep protocol that would be difficult to achieve with capillary-driven paper microfluidics. Furthermore, it is shown that paper-based DMF devices have comparable performance to traditional photolithographically patterned DMF devices at a fraction of the cost. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Enzyme detection by microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic-implemented methods of detecting an enzyme, in particular a DNA-modifying enzyme, are provided, as well as methods for detecting a cell, or a microorganism expressing said enzyme. The enzyme is detected by providing a nucleic acid substrate, which is specifically targeted by that enzyme......Microfluidic-implemented methods of detecting an enzyme, in particular a DNA-modifying enzyme, are provided, as well as methods for detecting a cell, or a microorganism expressing said enzyme. The enzyme is detected by providing a nucleic acid substrate, which is specifically targeted...

  6. Celloidosomes® via glass-based microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundabala, V. R.; Martinez-Escobar, S.; Marquez, S. M.; Marquez, M.; Fernandez-Nieves, A.

    2013-03-01

    We report a glass-based microfluidic route for the generation of a particular class of celloidosomes consisting of an assembly of yeast cells at the outskirts of liquid drops inside an also liquid continuous phase. This is the first demonstration of the encapsulation of cells into shells of alginate surrounding a liquid core. The microfluidic method based on double emulsion technology allows precise control on the size of the celloidosomes, thickness of the outer shell, and the cell density. In addition, this surface encapsulation technique can potentially overcome cell viability issues usually associated with bulk cell encapsulation techniques.

  7. Microfab-less Microfluidic Capillary Electrophoresis Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segato, Thiago P; Bhakta, Samir A; Gordon, Matthew; Carrilho, Emanuel; Willis, Peter A; Jiao, Hong; Garcia, Carlos D

    2013-04-07

    Compared to conventional bench-top instruments, microfluidic devices possess advantageous characteristics including great portability potential, reduced analysis time (minutes), and relatively inexpensive production, putting them on the forefront of modern analytical chemistry. Fabrication of these devices, however, often involves polymeric materials with less-than-ideal surface properties, specific instrumentation, and cumbersome fabrication procedures. In order to overcome such drawbacks, a new hybrid platform is proposed. The platform is centered on the use of 5 interconnecting microfluidic components that serve as the injector or reservoirs. These plastic units are interconnected using standard capillary tubing, enabling in-channel detection by a wide variety of standard techniques, including capacitively-coupled contactless conductivity detection (C(4)D). Due to the minimum impact on the separation efficiency, the plastic microfluidic components used for the experiments discussed herein were fabricated using an inexpensive engraving tool and standard Plexiglas. The presented approach (named 5(2)-platform) offers a previously unseen versatility: enabling the assembly of the platform within minutes using capillary tubing that differs in length, diameter, or material. The advantages of the proposed design are demonstrated by performing the analysis of inorganic cations by capillary electrophoresis on soil samples from the Atacama Desert.

  8. Rapid manufacturing for microfluidics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Land, K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available . Microfluidics is at the forefront of developing solutions for drug discovery, diagnostics (from glucose tests to malaria and TB testing) and environmental diagnostics (E-coli monitoring of drinking water). In order to quickly implement new designs, a rapid...

  9. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  10. Microfluidics for medical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Albert; van den Berg, A.; Segerink, L.I.; Segerink, Loes Irene; Unknown, [Unknown

    2015-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip devices for point of care diagnostics have been present in clinics for several years now. Alongside their continual development, research is underway to bring the organs and tissue on-a-chip to the patient, amongst other medical applications of microfluidics. This book provides the

  11. Basic Microfluidics Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2015-01-01

    ,000 m−1, which is a huge difference and has a large impact on flow behavior. In this chapter the basic microfluidic theory will be presented, enabling the reader to gain a comprehensive understanding of how liquids behave at the microscale, enough to be able to engage in design of micro systems...

  12. Numerical Optimization in Microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Ejlebjærg

    2017-01-01

    Numerical modelling can illuminate the working mechanism and limitations of microfluidic devices. Such insights are useful in their own right, but one can take advantage of numerical modelling in a systematic way using numerical optimization. In this chapter we will discuss when and how numerical...

  13. Microprocessor-based integration of microfluidic control for the implementation of automated sensor monitoring and multithreaded optimization algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezra, Elishai; Maor, Idan; Bavli, Danny; Shalom, Itai; Levy, Gahl; Prill, Sebastian; Jaeger, Magnus S; Nahmias, Yaakov

    2015-08-01

    Microfluidic applications range from combinatorial synthesis to high throughput screening, with platforms integrating analog perfusion components, digitally controlled micro-valves and a range of sensors that demand a variety of communication protocols. Currently, discrete control units are used to regulate and monitor each component, resulting in scattered control interfaces that limit data integration and synchronization. Here, we present a microprocessor-based control unit, utilizing the MS Gadgeteer open framework that integrates all aspects of microfluidics through a high-current electronic circuit that supports and synchronizes digital and analog signals for perfusion components, pressure elements, and arbitrary sensor communication protocols using a plug-and-play interface. The control unit supports an integrated touch screen and TCP/IP interface that provides local and remote control of flow and data acquisition. To establish the ability of our control unit to integrate and synchronize complex microfluidic circuits we developed an equi-pressure combinatorial mixer. We demonstrate the generation of complex perfusion sequences, allowing the automated sampling, washing, and calibrating of an electrochemical lactate sensor continuously monitoring hepatocyte viability following exposure to the pesticide rotenone. Importantly, integration of an optical sensor allowed us to implement automated optimization protocols that require different computational challenges including: prioritized data structures in a genetic algorithm, distributed computational efforts in multiple-hill climbing searches and real-time realization of probabilistic models in simulated annealing. Our system offers a comprehensive solution for establishing optimization protocols and perfusion sequences in complex microfluidic circuits.

  14. Isolated limb perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Kuhar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Isolated limb perfusion is a surgical procedure that can be used to treat an advanced malignant melanoma and soft tissue sarcomas, it is also effective in treating in-transit metastases of melanoma and local metastases of soft tissue sarcomas. With perfusion of the affected limb with cytostatic agents it is possible to avoid amputation and mutilating operations that significantly reduced the function of the limb. Since the procedure is isolated on a limb, it can be perfused with much higher doses of cytotoxic drugs, systemic toxicity is thus reduced or prevented. The most common side effects are erythema and edema.Cytotoxic drugs, that are manly used, are melphalan and tumor necrosis factor alpha. Efficient also proved to be simultaneous hyperthermia of the affected limb.

  15. Measuring myocardial perfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, A A; Kastrup, J

    2015-01-01

    Recently, focus has changed from anatomical assessment of coronary arteries towards functional testing to evaluate the effect of stenosis on the myocardium before intervention. Besides positron-emission tomography (PET), cardiac MRI (CMR), and cardiac CT are able to measure myocardial perfusion......-known and is used in routine clinical practice. However, PET uses radioactive tracers and has a lower spatial resolution compared to CMR and CT. CMR and CT are emerging techniques in the field of myocardial perfusion imaging. CMR uses magnetic resonance to obtain images, whereas CT uses x-rays during first...

  16. PREFACE: Nano- and microfluidics Nano- and microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Karin

    2011-05-01

    The field of nano- and microfluidics emerged at the end of the 1990s parallel to the demand for smaller and smaller containers and channels for chemical, biochemical and medical applications such as blood and DNS analysis [1], gene sequencing or proteomics [2, 3]. Since then, new journals and conferences have been launched and meanwhile, about two decades later, a variety of microfluidic applications are on the market. Briefly, 'the small flow becomes mainstream' [4]. Nevertheless, research in nano- and microfluidics is more than downsizing the spatial dimensions. For liquids on the nanoscale, surface and interface phenomena grow in importance and may even dominate the behavior in some systems. The studies collected in this special issue all concentrate on these type of systems and were part ot the priority programme SPP1164 'Nano- and Microfluidics' of the German Science Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG). The priority programme was initiated in 2002 by Hendrik Kuhlmann and myself and was launched in 2004. Friction between a moving liquid and a solid wall may, for instance, play an important role so that the usual assumption of a no-slip boundary condition is no longer valid. Likewise, the dynamic deformations of soft objects like polymers, vesicles or capsules in flow arise from the subtle interplay between the (visco-)elasticity of the object and the viscous stresses in the surrounding fluid and, potentially, the presence of structures confining the flow like channels. Consequently, new theories were developed ( see articles in this issue by Münch and Wagner, Falk and Mecke, Bonthuis et al, Finken et al, Almenar and Rauscher, Straube) and experiments were set up to unambiguously demonstrate deviations from bulk, or 'macro', behavior (see articles in this issue by Wolff et al, Vinogradova and Belyaev, Hahn et al, Seemann et al, Grüner and Huber, Müller-Buschbaum et al, Gutsche et al, Braunmüller et al, Laube et al, Brücker, Nottebrock et al

  17. Batch-reactor microfluidic device: first human use of a microfluidically produced PET radiotracer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, Artem; Miraghaie, Reza; Kotta, Kishore; Ball, Carroll E; Zhang, Jianzhong; Buchsbaum, Monte S; Kolb, Hartmuth C; Elizarov, Arkadij

    2013-01-07

    The very first microfluidic device used for the production of (18)F-labeled tracers for clinical research is reported along with the first human Positron Emission Tomography scan obtained with a microfluidically produced radiotracer. The system integrates all operations necessary for the transformation of [(18)F]fluoride in irradiated cyclotron target water to a dose of radiopharmaceutical suitable for use in clinical research. The key microfluidic technologies developed for the device are a fluoride concentration system and a microfluidic batch reactor assembly. Concentration of fluoride was achieved by means of absorption of the fluoride anion on a micro ion-exchange column (5 μL of resin) followed by release of the radioactivity with 45 μL of the release solution (95 ± 3% overall efficiency). The reactor assembly includes an injection-molded reactor chip and a transparent machined lid press-fitted together. The resulting 50 μL cavity has a unique shape designed to minimize losses of liquid during reactor filling and liquid evaporation. The cavity has 8 ports for gases and liquids, each equipped with a 2-way on-chip mechanical valve rated for pressure up to 20.68 bar (300 psi). The temperature is controlled by a thermoelectric heater capable of heating the reactor up to 180 °C from RT in 150 s. A camera captures live video of the processes in the reactor. HPLC-based purification and reformulation units are also integrated in the device. The system is based on "split-box architecture", with reagents loaded from outside of the radiation shielding. It can be installed either in a standard hot cell, or as a self-shielded unit. Along with a high level of integration and automation, split-box architecture allowed for multiple production runs without the user being exposed to radiation fields. The system was used to support clinical trials of [(18)F]fallypride, a neuroimaging radiopharmaceutical under IND Application #109,880.

  18. Microfluidic fuel cells: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeang, Erik; Djilali, Ned; Sinton, David

    A microfluidic fuel cell is defined as a fuel cell with fluid delivery and removal, reaction sites and electrode structures all confined to a microfluidic channel. Microfluidic fuel cells typically operate in a co-laminar flow configuration without a physical barrier, such as a membrane, to separate the anode and the cathode. This review article summarizes the development of microfluidic fuel cell technology, from the invention in 2002 until present, with emphasis on theory, fabrication, unit cell development, performance achievements, design considerations, and scale-up options. The main challenges associated with the current status of the technology are provided along with suggested directions for further research and development. Moreover, microfluidic fuel cell architectures show great potential for integration with biofuel cell technology. This review therefore includes microfluidic biofuel cell developments to date and presents opportunities for future work in this multi-disciplinary field.

  19. Brain perfusion in sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Scolletta, Sabino; Franchi, Federico; Donadello, Katia; Oddo, Mauro

    2013-03-01

    Brain dysfunction is a frequent complication of sepsis, usually defined as "sepsis-associated encephalopathy" (SAE). Its pathophysiology is complex and related to numerous processes and pathways, while the exact mechanisms producing neurological impairment in septic patients remain incompletely elucidated. Alterations of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) may represent a key component for the development of SAE. Reduction of CBF may be caused by cerebral vasoconstriction, either induced by inflammation or hypocapnia. Endothelial dysfunction associated with sepsis leads to impairment of microcirculation and cerebral metabolic uncoupling that may further reduce brain perfusion so that CBF becomes inadequate to satisfy brain cellular needs. The natural autoregulatory mechanisms that protect the brain from reduced/ inadequate CBF can be impaired in septic patients, especially in those with shock or delirium, and this further contributes to cerebral ischemia if blood pressure drops below critical thresholds. Sedative agents alter cerebro-vascular reactivity and may significantly reduce CBF. Although disorders of brain perfusion and alteration of CBF and cerebral autoregulation are frequently observed in humans with sepsis, their exact role in the pathogenesis of SAE remains unknown. Brain perfusion can further become inadequate due to cerebral microcirculatory dysfunction, as evidenced in the experimental setting. Microvascular alterations can be implicated in the development of electrophysiological abnormalities observed during sepsis and contribute to neurological alterations in septic animals. The aim of this review is to provide an update on the pathophysiology of brain perfusion in sepsis, with a particular focus on human clinical investigation and novel tools for CBF monitoring in septic patients.

  20. Microfluidic Chips for Semen Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerink, L.I.; Sprenkels, A.J.; Oosterhuis, G.J.E.; Vermes, I.; van den Berg, A.

    2012-01-01

    The gold standard of semen analysis is still an manual method, which is time-consuming, labour intensive and needs thorough quality control. Microfluidics can also offer advantages for this application. Therefore a first step in the development of a microfluidic chip has been made, which enables the man the semen analysis at home. In this article recent efforts to determine the concentration and motility using a microfluidic chip are summarized. PMID:27683417

  1. Microfluidic Circuitry via Additive Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Glick, Casey Carter

    2017-01-01

    Microfluidics, the science and engineering of fluid at small scales, affords numerous benefits for applications in chemistry and biology, including rapid reaction rates, reaction uniformity and precision, and reagent minimization but the technology remains limited by the availability of appropriate control mechanisms and related microfluidic components. Microfluidic devices have traditionally been fabricated using soft-lithography, which is time-consuming, costly, and reliant on extensive fac...

  2. Microfluidic Techniques for Analytes Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunlu Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidics has been undergoing fast development in the past two decades due to its promising applications in biotechnology, medicine, and chemistry. Towards these applications, enhancing concentration sensitivity and detection resolution are indispensable to meet the detection limits because of the dilute sample concentrations, ultra-small sample volumes and short detection lengths in microfluidic devices. A variety of microfluidic techniques for concentrating analytes have been developed. This article presents an overview of analyte concentration techniques in microfluidics. We focus on discussing the physical mechanism of each concentration technique with its representative advancements and applications. Finally, the article is concluded by highlighting and discussing advantages and disadvantages of the reviewed techniques.

  3. Methods of making microfluidic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Buttner, Ulrich

    2017-06-01

    Microfluidics has advanced in terms of designs and structures, however, fabrication methods are either time consuming or expensive to produce, in terms of the facilities and equipment needed. A fast and economically viable method is provided to allow, for example, research groups to have access to microfluidic fabrication. Unlike most fabrication methods, a method is provided to fabricate a microfluidic device in one step. In an embodiment, a resolution of 50 micrometers was achieved by using maskless high-resolution digital light projection (MDLP). Bonding and channel fabrication of complex or simple structures can be rapidly incorporated to fabricate the microfluidic devices.

  4. The Microfluidic Jukebox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Say Hwa; Maes, Florine; Semin, Benoît; Vrignon, Jérémy; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2014-04-01

    Music is a form of art interweaving people of all walks of life. Through subtle changes in frequencies, a succession of musical notes forms a melody which is capable of mesmerizing the minds of people. With the advances in technology, we are now able to generate music electronically without relying solely on physical instruments. Here, we demonstrate a musical interpretation of droplet-based microfluidics as a form of novel electronic musical instruments. Using the interplay of electric field and hydrodynamics in microfluidic devices, well controlled frequency patterns corresponding to musical tracks are generated in real time. This high-speed modulation of droplet frequency (and therefore of droplet sizes) may also provide solutions that reconciles high-throughput droplet production and the control of individual droplet at production which is needed for many biochemical or material synthesis applications.

  5. Microfluidic Biochip Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzarella, Charles

    2004-01-01

    As humans prepare for the exploration of our solar system, there is a growing need for miniaturized medical and environmental diagnostic devices for use on spacecrafts, especially during long-duration space missions where size and power requirements are critical. In recent years, the biochip (or Lab-on-a- Chip) has emerged as a technology that might be able to satisfy this need. In generic terms, a biochip is a miniaturized microfluidic device analogous to the electronic microchip that ushered in the digital age. It consists of tiny microfluidic channels, pumps and valves that transport small amounts of sample fluids to biosensors that can perform a variety of tests on those fluids in near real time. It has the obvious advantages of being small, lightweight, requiring less sample fluids and reagents and being more sensitive and efficient than larger devices currently in use. Some of the desired space-based applications would be to provide smaller, more robust devices for analyzing blood, saliva and urine and for testing water and food supplies for the presence of harmful contaminants and microorganisms. Our group has undertaken the goal of adapting as well as improving upon current biochip technology for use in long-duration microgravity environments. In addition to developing computational models of the microfluidic channels, valves and pumps that form the basis of every biochip, we are also trying to identify potential problems that could arise in reduced gravity and develop solutions to these problems. One such problem is due to the prevalence of bubbly sample fluids in microgravity. A bubble trapped in a microfluidic channel could be detrimental to the operation of a biochip. Therefore, the process of bubble formation in microgravity needs to be studied, and a model of this process has been developed and used to understand how bubbles develop and move through biochip components. It is clear that some type of bubble filter would be necessary in Space, and

  6. Tunable Microfluidic Microlasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Francesco Simoni Dipartimento di Fisica e Ingegneria dei Materiali e del Territorio Università Politecnica delle Marche Via Brecce Bianche, 60131...circuits, in order to point out advantages and drawbacks of different experimental techniques. The alignment of liquid crystal in microfluidic...Lasing was detected through an optical fiber connected to a spectrometer. A preliminary experimental result is reported in fig. 13 where the light

  7. Microfluidics realizes potential

    OpenAIRE

    Gould, Paula

    2004-01-01

    Advanced fabrication technologies are being used to make microscale tools for fluid manipulation. Interest in the development of microfluidic devices has been encouraged by the number of fluid-based processes that could benefit from miniaturization. A number of companies are now marketing fluidic ‘lab-on-a-chip’ systems for applications in biomedical research, environmental testing, and medical diagnostics. However, the full commercial potential of this technology has yet to be realized.

  8. Animal microsurgery using microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Stirman, Jeffrey N.; Harker, Bethany; Lu, Hang; Crane, Matthew M.

    2013-01-01

    Small multicellular genetic organisms form a central part of modern biological research. Using these small organisms provides significant advantages in genetic tractability, manipulation, lifespan and cost. Although the small size is generally advantageous, it can make procedures such as surgeries both time consuming and labor intensive. Over the past few years there have been dramatic improvements in microfluidic technologies that enable significant improvements in microsurgery and interroga...

  9. High-pressure microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjort, K.

    2015-03-01

    When using appropriate materials and microfabrication techniques, with the small dimensions the mechanical stability of microstructured devices allows for processes at high pressures without loss in safety. The largest area of applications has been demonstrated in green chemistry and bioprocesses, where extraction, synthesis and analyses often excel at high densities and high temperatures. This is accessible through high pressures. Capillary chemistry has been used since long but, just like in low-pressure applications, there are several potential advantages in using microfluidic platforms, e.g., planar isothermal set-ups, large local variations in geometries, dense form factors, small dead volumes and precisely positioned microstructures for control of reactions, catalysis, mixing and separation. Other potential applications are in, e.g., microhydraulics, exploration, gas driven vehicles, and high-pressure science. From a review of the state-of-art and frontiers of high pressure microfluidics, the focus will be on different solutions demonstrated for microfluidic handling at high pressures and challenges that remain.

  10. Energy: the microfluidic frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinton, David

    2014-09-07

    Global energy is largely a fluids problem. It is also large-scale, in stark contrast to microchannels. Microfluidic energy technologies must offer either massive scalability or direct relevance to energy processes already operating at scale. We have to pick our fights. Highlighted here are the exceptional opportunities I see, including some recent successes and areas where much more attention is needed. The most promising directions are those that leverage high surface-to-volume ratios, rapid diffusive transport, capacity for high temperature and high pressure experiments, and length scales characteristic of microbes and fluids (hydrocarbons, CO2) underground. The most immediate areas of application are where information is the product; either fluid sample analysis (e.g. oil analysis); or informing operations (e.g. CO2 transport in microporous media). I'll close with aspects that differentiate energy from traditional microfluidics applications, the uniquely important role of engineering in energy, and some thoughts for the research community forming at the nexus of lab-on-a-chip and energy--a microfluidic frontier.

  11. Microfluidics with fluid walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Edmond J; Feuerborn, Alexander; Wheeler, James H R; Tan, Ann Na; Durham, William M; Foster, Kevin R; Cook, Peter R

    2017-10-10

    Microfluidics has great potential, but the complexity of fabricating and operating devices has limited its use. Here we describe a method - Freestyle Fluidics - that overcomes many key limitations. In this method, liquids are confined by fluid (not solid) walls. Aqueous circuits with any 2D shape are printed in seconds on plastic or glass Petri dishes; then, interfacial forces pin liquids to substrates, and overlaying an immiscible liquid prevents evaporation. Confining fluid walls are pliant and resilient; they self-heal when liquids are pipetted through them. We drive flow through a wide range of circuits passively by manipulating surface tension and hydrostatic pressure, and actively using external pumps. Finally, we validate the technology with two challenging applications - triggering an inflammatory response in human cells and chemotaxis in bacterial biofilms. This approach provides a powerful and versatile alternative to traditional microfluidics.The complexity of fabricating and operating microfluidic devices limits their use. Walsh et al. describe a method in which circuits are printed as quickly and simply as writing with a pen, and liquids in them are confined by fluid instead of solid walls.

  12. Microfluidic desalination : capacitive deionization on chip for microfluidic sample preparation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, Susan Helena

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of the work described in this thesis is to implement the desalination technique capacitive deionization (CDI) on a microfluidic chip to improve the reproducibility in the analysis of biological samples for drug development. Secondly, microfluidic CDI allows for the in situ study of ion

  13. The perfused swine uterus model: long-term perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geisler Klaudija

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has previously been shown that the viability of swine uteri can be maintained within the physiological range in an open perfusion model for up to 8 hours. The aim of this study was to assess medium- to long-term perfusion of swine uteri using a modified Krebs–Ringer bicarbonate buffer solution (KRBB in the established open perfusion model. Methods In an experimental study at an infertility institute, 30 swine uteri were perfused: group 1: n = 11, KRBB; group 2: n = 8, modified KRBB with drainage of perfusate supernatant; group 3: n = 11, modified KRBB with drainage of perfusate every 2 h and substitution with fresh medium. Modified and conventional KRBB were compared with regard to survival and contraction parameters: intrauterine pressure (IUP, area under the curve (AUC, and frequency of contractions (F. Results Modified KRBB showed significantly higher IUP, AUC, and F values than perfusion with conventional KRBB. In group 3, the organ survival time of up to 17 h, with a 98% rate of effective contraction time, differed significantly from group 1 (P  Conclusions Using modified KRBB in combination with perfusate substitution improves the open model for perfusion of swine uteri with regard to survival time and quality of contraction parameters. This model can be used for medium- to long-term perfusion of swine uteri, allowing further metabolic ex vivo studies in a cost-effective way and with little logistic effort.

  14. A slice chamber for intracellular and extracellular recording during continuous perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, S R; Nelson, D O; Silva, N L; Boulant, J A

    1983-06-01

    The design of a tissue slice perfusion system is described, and examples are given showing the stability of this system for intracellular and extracellular recordings during changes in perfusion media. The stability of this system is attributed to several features. Mini-drips serve to cushion transient changes in flow rate when switching from one medium to another. Solenoid valves are used to quickly switch perfusion media with minimal mechanical movement. A finely-controlled adjustable flow valve provides a uniform flow rate for all media. Constant tissue temperature is maintained by media perfusion through a thermoelectric Peltier assembly. In addition, a filter paper wick insures that the perfusate is constantly removed without movement in the tissue slices. With this design, the slices are supported on a net at the interface between the perfusion medium and a humidified, oxygenated atmosphere. This arrangement appears to be conducive to tissue viability and facilitates the placement of microelectrodes in the slices.

  15. Continuous microfluidic reactors for polymer particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Minseok

    In this thesis, we present a versatile new method for preparing highly monodisperse droplets, polymer particles, double emulsions, and self-assemblies of droplets in continuous microfluidic reactors. Recently, microfluidic systems are significantly being used in many areas of chemistry and biotechnology to achieve improved performance. Microfluidics provides the ability to automate highly repetitive laboratory tasks by replacing huge cumbersome equipment with miniaturized and integrated systems, and it enables the handling of small amounts, e.g., from microliters to femtoliters of fluids, reactants and products. These methods have the following useful features: (1) the generation of extremely monodisperse droplets, (2) the generation and control of both the shape and the size of the droplets, (3) the use of a wide variety of materials, including: gels, monomers, polymers, copolymers, and polymers doped with functional additives, (4) a possibility of in situ solidification of the droplets by means of photopolymerization and/or thermopolymerization, and (5) the ability to scale up the production of large quantities of particles. We focus on the effect of the properties of the disperse and continuous phases on the emulsification process, the effect of the polymerization rate on the production of high-quality particles, the role of the material and geometry of the microfluidic device in droplet formation, and the synthesis of particles with different shapes and compositions. This thesis also describes emulsification in a microfluidic double droplet generator (DDR) comprising two consecutive flow-focusing devices with locally modified surface chemistry. We generated water-in-oil- in-water (W/O/W), oil-in-oil-in water (O/O/W) and oil-in-water-in-oil (O/W/O) double emulsions with precisely controlled sizes and morphology of droplets. Secondly, by combining two mechanisms of droplet formation (the flow-focusing mechanism and the break up of liquid threads at T-junction) we

  16. MICROFLUIDIC COMPONENT CAPABLE OF SELF-SEALING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A microfluidic component (100) for building a microfluidic system is provided. The microfluidic component (100) can be mounted on a microf luidic breadboard (202) in a manner that allows it to be connected to other microfluidic components (204, 206) without the requirement of additional devices. ...... (204, 206). Applying the pressure causes the two tubes to be fluidically sealed....

  17. Acoustofluidics 1: Governing equations in microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruus, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Governing equations for microfluidics and basic flow solutions are presented. Equivalent circuit modeling for determining flow rates in microfluidic networks is introduced.......Governing equations for microfluidics and basic flow solutions are presented. Equivalent circuit modeling for determining flow rates in microfluidic networks is introduced....

  18. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Microfluidic scintillation detectors are devices of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles, developed within the EP-DT group at CERN. Most of the interest for such technology comes from the use of liquid scintillators, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to an increased radiation resistance. This feature, together with the high spatial resolution and low thickness deriving from the microfabrication techniques used to manufacture such devices, is desirable not only in instrumentation for high energy physics experiments but also in medical detectors such as beam monitors for hadron therapy.

  19. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  20. Spatial manipulation with microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eLin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical gradients convey information through space, time, and concentration, and are ultimately capable of spatially resolving distinct cellular phenotypes, such as differentiation, proliferation, and migration. How these gradients develop, evolve, and function during development, homeostasis, and various disease states is a subject of intense interest across a variety of disciplines. Microfluidic technologies have become essential tools for investigating gradient sensing in vitro due to their ability to precisely manipulate fluids on demand in well controlled environments at cellular length scales. This minireview will highlight their utility for studying gradient sensing along with relevant applications to biology.

  1. Perfusion based cell culture chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiskanen, Arto; Emnéus, Jenny; Dufva, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Performing cell culture in miniaturized perfusion chambers gives possibilities to experiment with cells under near in vivo like conditions. In contrast to traditional batch cultures, miniaturized perfusion systems provide precise control of medium composition, long term unattended cultures...... and tissue like structuring of the cultures. However, as this chapter illustrates, many issues remain to be identified regarding perfusion cell culture such as design, material choice and how to use these systems before they will be widespread amongst biomedical researchers....

  2. Modular integration of electronics and microfluidic systems using flexible printed circuit boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Amy; Wang, Lisen; Jensen, Erik; Mathies, Richard; Boser, Bernhard

    2010-02-21

    Microfluidic systems offer an attractive alternative to conventional wet chemical methods with benefits including reduced sample and reagent volumes, shorter reaction times, high-throughput, automation, and low cost. However, most present microfluidic systems rely on external means to analyze reaction products. This substantially adds to the size, complexity, and cost of the overall system. Electronic detection based on sub-millimetre size integrated circuits (ICs) has been demonstrated for a wide range of targets including nucleic and amino acids, but deployment of this technology to date has been limited due to the lack of a flexible process to integrate these chips within microfluidic devices. This paper presents a modular and inexpensive process to integrate ICs with microfluidic systems based on standard printed circuit board (PCB) technology to assemble the independently designed microfluidic and electronic components. The integrated system can accommodate multiple chips of different sizes bonded to glass or PDMS microfluidic systems. Since IC chips and flex PCB manufacturing and assembly are industry standards with low cost, the integrated system is economical for both laboratory and point-of-care settings.

  3. Microfluidic fuel cells and batteries

    CERN Document Server

    Kjeang, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic fuel cells and batteries represent a special type of electrochemical power generators that can be miniaturized and integrated in a microfluidic chip. Summarizing the initial ten years of research and development in this emerging field, this SpringerBrief is the first book dedicated to microfluidic fuel cell and battery technology for electrochemical energy conversion and storage. Written at a critical juncture, where strategically applied research is urgently required to seize impending technology opportunities for commercial, analytical, and educational utility, the intention is

  4. The upcoming 3D-printing revolution in microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Nirveek; Urrios, Arturo; Kang, Shawn; Folch, Albert

    2016-01-01

    In the last two decades, the vast majority of microfluidic systems have been built in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) by soft lithography, a technique based on PDMS micromolding. A long list of key PDMS properties have contributed to the success of soft lithography: PDMS is biocompatible, elastomeric, transparent, gas-permeable, water-impermeable, fairly inexpensive, copyright-free, and rapidly prototyped with high precision using simple procedures. However, the fabrication process typically involves substantial human labor, which tends to make PDMS devices difficult to disseminate outside of research labs, and the layered molding limits the 3D complexity of the devices that can be produced. 3D-printing has recently attracted attention as a way to fabricate microfluidic systems due to its automated, assembly-free 3D fabrication, rapidly decreasing costs, and fast-improving resolution and throughput. Resins with properties approaching those of PDMS are being developed. Here we review past and recent efforts in 3D-printing of microfluidic systems. We compare the salient features of PDMS molding with those of 3D-printing and we give an overview of the critical barriers that have prevented the adoption of 3D-printing by microfluidic developers, namely resolution, throughput, and resin biocompatibility. We also evaluate the various forces that are persuading researchers to abandon PDMS molding in favor of 3D-printing in growing numbers. PMID:27101171

  5. A Droplet Microfluidic Platform for Automating Genetic Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gach, Philip C; Shih, Steve C C; Sustarich, Jess; Keasling, Jay D; Hillson, Nathan J; Adams, Paul D; Singh, Anup K

    2016-05-20

    We present a water-in-oil droplet microfluidic platform for transformation, culture and expression of recombinant proteins in multiple host organisms including bacteria, yeast and fungi. The platform consists of a hybrid digital microfluidic/channel-based droplet chip with integrated temperature control to allow complete automation and integration of plasmid addition, heat-shock transformation, addition of selection medium, culture, and protein expression. The microfluidic format permitted significant reduction in consumption (100-fold) of expensive reagents such as DNA and enzymes compared to the benchtop method. The chip contains a channel to continuously replenish oil to the culture chamber to provide a fresh supply of oxygen to the cells for long-term (∼5 days) cell culture. The flow channel also replenished oil lost to evaporation and increased the number of droplets that could be processed and cultured. The platform was validated by transforming several plasmids into Escherichia coli including plasmids containing genes for fluorescent proteins GFP, BFP and RFP; plasmids with selectable markers for ampicillin or kanamycin resistance; and a Golden Gate DNA assembly reaction. We also demonstrate the applicability of this platform for transformation in widely used eukaryotic organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus niger. Duration and temperatures of the microfluidic heat-shock procedures were optimized to yield transformation efficiencies comparable to those obtained by benchtop methods with a throughput up to 6 droplets/min. The proposed platform offers potential for automation of molecular biology experiments significantly reducing cost, time and variability while improving throughput.

  6. Myocardial perfusion modeling using MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Fritz-Hansen, T; Rostrup, Egill

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, it is shown that it is possible to quantify myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance imaging in combination with gadolinium diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Previously, a simple model and method for measuring myocardial perfusion using an inversion recovery...

  7. Kinetic ELISA in microfluidic channels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yanagisawa, Naoki; Dutta, Debashis

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we describe the kinetic ELISA of Blue Tongue and Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease viral antibodies in microfluidic channels by monitoring the rate of generation of the enzyme reaction...

  8. Microfluidic Multichannel Flow Cytometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a "Microfluidic Multichannel Flow Cytometer." Several novel concepts are integrated to produce the final design, which is compatible with...

  9. Whole-Teflon microfluidic chips

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kangning Ren; Wen Dai; Jianhua Zhou; Jing Su; Hongkai Wu

    2011-01-01

    ... them. In this work, we present a convenient strategy for fabricating whole-Teflon microfluidic chips with integrated valves that show outstanding inertness to various chemicals and extreme resistance against all solvents...

  10. Microfluidics - Sorting particles with light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, J.

    2004-01-01

    Microfluidic systems have great potential to perform complex chemical and biological processing and analysis on a single disposable chip. That goal is now a step closer with the demonstration of an efficient all-optical particle sorter.......Microfluidic systems have great potential to perform complex chemical and biological processing and analysis on a single disposable chip. That goal is now a step closer with the demonstration of an efficient all-optical particle sorter....

  11. Towards printable open air microfluidics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collord, Andrew; Cook, Adam W.; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Fenton, Kyle Ross (University of New Mexico); Apblett, Christopher Alan; Branson, Eric D.

    2010-04-01

    We have demonstrated a novel microfluidic technique for aqueous media, which uses super-hydrophobic materials to create microfluidic channels that are open to the atmosphere. We have demonstrated the ability to perform traditional electrokinetic operations such as ionic separations and electrophoresis using these devices. The rate of evaporation was studied and found to increase with decreasing channel size, which places a limitation on the minimum size of channel that could be used for such a device.

  12. Digital Microfluidic Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Alphonsus H C; Li, Bingyu Betty; Chamberlain, M Dean; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2015-01-01

    Digital microfluidics (DMF) is a droplet-based liquid-handling technology that has recently become popular for cell culture and analysis. In DMF, picoliter- to microliter-sized droplets are manipulated on a planar surface using electric fields, thus enabling software-reconfigurable operations on individual droplets, such as move, merge, split, and dispense from reservoirs. Using this technique, multistep cell-based processes can be carried out using simple and compact instrumentation, making DMF an attractive platform for eventual integration into routine biology workflows. In this review, we summarize the state-of-the-art in DMF cell culture, and describe design considerations, types of DMF cell culture, and cell-based applications of DMF.

  13. Interplay between materials and microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xu; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Santiago, Grissel Trujillo-De; Alvarez, Mario Moisés; Ribas, João; Jonas, Steven J.; Weiss, Paul S.; Andrews, Anne M.; Aizenberg, Joanna; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Developments in the field of microfluidics have triggered technological revolutions in many disciplines, including chemical synthesis, electronics, diagnostics, single-cell analysis, micro- and nanofabrication, and pharmaceutics. In many of these areas, rapid growth is driven by the increasing synergy between fundamental materials development and new microfluidic capabilities. In this Review, we critically evaluate both how recent advances in materials fabrication have expanded the frontiers of microfluidic platforms and how the improved microfluidic capabilities are, in turn, furthering materials design. We discuss how various inorganic and organic materials enable the fabrication of systems with advanced mechanical, optical, chemical, electrical and biointerfacial properties — in particular, when these materials are combined into new hybrids and modular configurations. The increasing sophistication of microfluidic techniques has also expanded the range of resources available for the fabrication of new materials, including particles and fibres with specific functionalities, 3D (bio)printed composites and organoids. Together, these advances lead to complex, multifunctional systems, which have many interesting potential applications, especially in the biomedical and bioengineering domains. Future exploration of the interactions between materials science and microfluidics will continue to enrich the diversity of applications across engineering as well as the physical and biomedical sciences.

  14. Image-guided precision manipulation of cells and nanoparticles in microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Zachary

    Manipulation of single cells and particles is important to biology and nanotechnology. Our electrokinetic (EK) tweezers manipulate objects in simple microfluidic devices using gentle fluid and electric forces under vision-based feedback control. In this dissertation, I detail a user-friendly implementation of EK tweezers that allows users to select, position, and assemble cells and nanoparticles. This EK system was used to measure attachment forces between living breast cancer cells, trap single quantum dots with 45 nm accuracy, build nanophotonic circuits, and scan optical properties of nanowires. With a novel multi-layer microfluidic device, EK was also used to guide single microspheres along complex 3D trajectories. The schemes, software, and methods developed here can be used in many settings to precisely manipulate most visible objects, assemble objects into useful structures, and improve the function of lab-on-a-chip microfluidic systems.

  15. Microfluidics-Assisted TIRF Imaging to Study Single Actin Filament Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Shashank

    2017-12-11

    Dynamic assembly of actin filaments is essential for many cellular processes. The rates of assembly and disassembly of actin filaments are intricately controlled by regulatory proteins that interact with the ends and the sides of filaments and with actin monomers. TIRF-based single-filament imaging techniques have proven instrumental in uncovering mechanisms of actin regulation. In this unit, novel single-filament approaches using microfluidics-assisted TIRF imaging are described. These methods can be used to grow anchored actin filaments aligned in a flow, thus making the analysis much easier as compared to open flow cell approaches. The microfluidic nature of the system also enables rapid change of biochemical conditions and allows simultaneous imaging of a large number of actin filaments. Support protocols for preparing microfluidic chambers and purifying spectrin-actin seeds used for nucleating anchored filaments are also described. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Batch-reactor microfluidic device: first human use of a microfluidically produced PET radiotracer†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraghaie, Reza; Kotta, Kishore; Ball, Carroll E.; Zhang, Jianzhong; Buchsbaum, Monte S.; Kolb, Hartmuth C.; Elizarov, Arkadij

    2013-01-01

    The very first microfluidic device used for the production of 18F-labeled tracers for clinical research is reported along with the first human Positron Emission Tomography scan obtained with a microfluidically produced radiotracer. The system integrates all operations necessary for the transformation of [18F]fluoride in irradiated cyclotron target water to a dose of radiopharmaceutical suitable for use in clinical research. The key microfluidic technologies developed for the device are a fluoride concentration system and a microfluidic batch reactor assembly. Concentration of fluoride was achieved by means of absorption of the fluoride anion on a micro ion-exchange column (5 μL of resin) followed by release of the radioactivity with 45 μL of the release solution (95 ± 3% overall efficiency). The reactor assembly includes an injection-molded reactor chip and a transparent machined lid press-fitted together. The resulting 50 μL cavity has a unique shape designed to minimize losses of liquid during reactor filling and liquid evaporation. The cavity has 8 ports for gases and liquids, each equipped with a 2-way on-chip mechanical valve rated for pressure up to 20.68 bar (300 psi). The temperature is controlled by a thermoelectric heater capable of heating the reactor up to 180 °C from RT in 150 s. A camera captures live video of the processes in the reactor. HPLC-based purification and reformulation units are also integrated in the device. The system is based on “split-box architecture”, with reagents loaded from outside of the radiation shielding. It can be installed either in a standard hot cell, or as a self-shielded unit. Along with a high level of integration and automation, split-box architecture allowed for multiple production runs without the user being exposed to radiation fields. The system was used to support clinical trials of [18F]fallypride, a neuroimaging radiopharmaceutical under IND Application #109,880. PMID:23135409

  17. [Ventilation-perfusion ratios].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffartzik, W

    1994-10-01

    Knowledge of normal and impaired pulmonary gas exchange is essential to the anaesthesiologist. Analysis of an arterial blood sample allows evaluation of whether or not pulmonary gas exchange is normal. For this purpose comparison with the oxygenation index or the alveolar-arterial PO2 difference is helpful. Pathological changes of these variables are mainly caused by ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) mismatch. In daily practice, venous admixture or intrapulmonary shunt can be calculated using arterial and mixed-venous blood. By analysing arterial and expired PCO2, dead-space ventilation can be determined, but extended analyses of VA/Q distribution are not possible in daily practice. However, knowledge of the principles of typical disturbances of pulmonary gas exchange in acute and chronic lung disease allows the use of therapeutic strategies based on the pathophysiological changes.

  18. Myocardial perfusion after marathon running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliokoski, Kari K; Laaksonen, Marko S; Luotolahti, Matti; Laine, Hanna; Takala, Teemu O; Nuutila, Pirjo; Knuuti, Juhani

    2004-08-01

    We investigated the effects of acute prolonged exercise (marathon running) on cardiac function and myocardial perfusion. Cardiac dimensions and function were measured in seven endurance-trained men using echocardiography before and repeatedly after marathon (42.2 km) running (at 10 min, 150 min, and 20 h). Myocardial perfusion and perfusion resistance were measured using positron emission tomography and 15O-H2O before and 85-115 min after running. Echocardiographic indices showed only mild and clinically non-significant changes in cardiac function after running. Rate-pressure-corrected basal myocardial perfusion (0.89+/-0.13 vs. 1.20+/-0.32 mL min(-1) g(-1), P=0.04) was increased after running. Also, adenosine-stimulated perfusion tended to be higher (3.67+/-0.81 vs. 4.47+/-0.52 mL min(-1) g(-1), P=0.12) and perfusion resistance during adenosine stimulation was significantly lower after running (26+/-6 vs. 18+/-3 mmHg min g mL(-1), P=0.03). Plasma free fatty acid (FFA) concentration was significantly increased after running. These results show that marathon running does not cause marked changes in cardiac function in healthy men. Basal perfusion was increased after exercise, probably reflecting changes in fuel preferences to increased use of FFAs. Strenuous exercise also seems to enhance coronary reactivity, which could thereby serve as a protective mechanism to vascular events after exercise.

  19. Rapid, low-cost prototyping of centrifugal microfluidic devices for effective implementation of various microfluidic components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith, Suzanne

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A centrifugal microfluidic platform to develop various microfluidic operations – the first of its kind in South Africa – is presented. Rapid and low-cost prototyping of centrifugal microfluidic disc devices, as well as a set-up to test the devices using centrifugal forces, is described. Preliminary results show that various microfluidic operations such as fluidic valving, transportation, and microfluidic droplet generation can be achieved. This work provides a complete centrifugal microfluidic platform and the building blocks on which to develop a variety of microfluidic applications and potential products rapidly and at a low cost.

  20. Perfusion defects in pulmonary perfusion iodine maps: causes and semiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos Fiore, A; González Vázquez, M; Trinidad López, C; Mera Fernández, D; Costas Álvarez, M

    2017-12-14

    to describe the usefulness of dual-energy CT for obtaining pulmonary perfusion maps to provide morphological and functional information in patients with pulmonary embolisms. To review the semiology of perfusion defects due to pulmonary embolism so they can be differentiated from perfusion defects due to other causes: alterations outside the range used in the iodine map caused by other diseases of the lung parenchyma or artifacts. CT angiography of the pulmonary arteries is the technique of choice for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolisms. New dual-energy CT scanners are useful for detecting perfusion defects secondary to complete or partial obstruction of pulmonary arteries and is most useful for detecting pulmonary embolisms in subsegmental branches. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Perfusion measurement in acute pancreatitis using dynamic perfusion MDCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bize, Pierre E; Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Christoph D; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2006-01-01

    Our objective was to determine whether MDCT with perfusion imaging could help in assessing the severity of acute pancreatitis in the initial phase of the disease. One hundred six patients with abdominal pain were prospectively enrolled in this study. Patients were separated into two groups: P1 (severe) and P2 (mild) acute pancreatitis. Mean perfusion value was 24.8 mL/100 mL/min in the P1 group and 50.5 mL/100 mL/min in the P2 group (p = 0.0016, significant). Our preliminary data suggest that pancreatic perfusion measurement using MDCT with perfusion imaging could help in assessing the severity of acute pancreatitis.

  2. Flexible packaging and interconnect scheme for microfluidic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1999-06-01

    A slide-together compression package and microfluidic interconnects for microfabricated devices requiring fluidic and electrical connections is presented. The package assembles without tools, is reusable, and requires no epoxy, wirebonds, or solder, making chip replacement fast and easy. The microfluidic interconnects use standard HPLC PEEK tubing, with the tip machined to accept either an o-ring or custom molded ring which serves the dual function of forming the seal and providing mechanical retention strength. One design uses a screw to compress the o-ring, while others are simply plugged into a cartridge retained in the package. The connectors are helium leak-tight, can withstand hundreds of psi, are easy to connect and disconnect, are low dead volume, have a small footprint, and are adaptable to a broad range of microfabricated devices.

  3. Paper based microfluidic devices for environmental diagnostics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govindasamy, K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidics has found widespread application in the fields of molecular biology, DNA analysis and most recently, point of care diagnostics. We present a paper based microfluidic device for rapid, in-the-field detection of pathogenic bacteria...

  4. Microfluidics to define leukocyte migration patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boneschansker, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Leukocyte migration into tissues is characteristic of inflammation. In this thesis, we design and validate microfluidic devices that allow for precise quantification of leukocyte migration patterns. Our microfluidic platform can quantify migration patterns using single-cell quantitative metrics that

  5. Microfluidic tools for cell biological research

    OpenAIRE

    Velve-Casquillas, Guilhem; Le Berre, Maël; Piel, Matthieu; Tran, Phong T.

    2010-01-01

    Microfluidic technology is creating powerful tools for cell biologists to control the complete cellular microenvironment, leading to new questions and new discoveries. We review here the basic concepts and methodologies in designing microfluidic devices, and their diverse cell biological applications.

  6. Quantitative lung perfusion evaluation using Fourier decomposition perfusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjørstad, Åsmund; Corteville, Dominique M R; Fischer, Andre; Henzler, Thomas; Schmid-Bindert, Gerald; Zöllner, Frank G; Schad, Lothar R

    2014-08-01

    To quantitatively evaluate lung perfusion using Fourier decomposition perfusion MRI. The Fourier decomposition (FD) method is a noninvasive method for assessing ventilation- and perfusion-related information in the lungs, where the perfusion maps in particular have shown promise for clinical use. However, the perfusion maps are nonquantitative and dimensionless, making follow-ups and direct comparisons between patients difficult. We present an approach to obtain physically meaningful and quantifiable perfusion maps using the FD method. The standard FD perfusion images are quantified by comparing the partially blood-filled pixels in the lung parenchyma with the fully blood-filled pixels in the aorta. The percentage of blood in a pixel is then combined with the temporal information, yielding quantitative blood flow values. The values of 10 healthy volunteers are compared with SEEPAGE measurements which have shown high consistency with dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI. All pulmonary blood flow (PBF) values are within the expected range. The two methods are in good agreement (mean difference = 0.2 mL/min/100 mL, mean absolute difference = 11 mL/min/100 mL, mean PBF-FD = 150 mL/min/100 mL, mean PBF-SEEPAGE = 151 mL/min/100 mL). The Bland-Altman plot shows a good spread of values, indicating no systematic bias between the methods. Quantitative lung perfusion can be obtained using the Fourier Decomposition method combined with a small amount of postprocessing. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A Supramolecular Sensing Platform for Phosphate Anions and an Anthrax Biomarker in a Microfluidic Device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eker, B.; Yilmaz, M.D.; Schlautmann, Stefan; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2011-01-01

    A supramolecular platform based on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) has been implemented in a microfluidic device. The system has been applied for the sensing of two different analyte types: biologically relevant phosphate anions and aromatic carboxylic acids, which are important for anthrax

  8. Stereolithographic hydrogel printing of 3D culture chips with biofunctionalized complex 3D perfusion networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rujing; Larsen, Niels B

    2017-12-05

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models capturing both the structural and dynamic complexity of the in vivo situation are in great demand as an alternative to animal models. Despite tremendous progress in engineering complex tissue/organ models in the past decade, approaches that support the required freedom in design, detail and chemistry for fabricating truly 3D constructs have remained limited. Here, we report a stereolithographic high-resolution 3D printing technique utilizing poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA, MW 700) to manufacture diffusion-open and mechanically stable hydrogel constructs as self-contained chips, where confined culture volumes are traversed and surrounded by perfusable vascular-like networks. An optimized resin formulation enables printing of hydrogel chips holding perfusable microchannels with a cross-section as small as 100 μm × 100 μm, and the printed microchannels can be steadily perfused for at least one week. In addition, the integration of multiple independently perfusable and structurally stable channel systems further allows for easy combination of different bulk material volumes at exact relative spatial positions. We demonstrate this structural and material flexibility by embedding a highly compliant cell-laden gelatin hydrogel within the confines of a 3D printed resilient PEGDA hydrogel chip of intermediate compliance. Overall, our proposed strategy represents an automated, cost-effective and high resolution technique to manufacture complex 3D constructs containing microfluidic perfusion networks for advanced in vitro models.

  9. Fabrication of circular microfluidic network in enzymatically-crosslinked gelatin hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiankang; Chen, Ruomeng; Lu, Yongjie; Zhan, Li; Liu, Yaxiong; Li, Dichen; Jin, Zhongmin

    2016-02-01

    It is a huge challenge to engineer vascular networks in vital organ tissue engineering. Although the incorporation of artificial microfluidic network into thick tissue-engineered constructs has shown great promise, most of the existing microfluidic strategies are limited to generate rectangle cross-sectional channels rather than circular vessels in soft hydrogels. Here we present a facile approach to fabricate branched microfluidic network with circular cross-sections in gelatin hydrogels by combining micromolding and enzymatically-crosslinking mechanism. Partially crosslinked hydrogel slides with predefined semi-circular channels were molded, assembled and in situ fully crosslinked to form a seamless and circular microfluidic network. The bonding strength of the resultant gelatin hydrogels was investigated. The morphology and the dimension of the resultant circular channels were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and micro-computerized tomography (μCT). Computational fluid dynamic simulation shows that the fabrication error had little effect on the distribution of flow field but affected the maximum velocity in comparison with designed models. The microfluidic gelatin hydrogel facilitates the attachment and spreading of human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs) to form a uniform endothelialized layer around the circular channel surface, which successfully exhibited barrier functions. The presented method might provide a simple way to fabricate circular microfluidic networks in biologically-relevant hydrogels to advance various applications of in vitro tissue models, organ-on-a-chip systems and tissue engineering. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Stereolithographic hydrogel printing of 3D microfluidic cell culture chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Rujing

    that support the required freedom in design, detail and chemistry for fabricating truly 3D constructs have remained limited. Here, we report a stereolithographic high-resolution 3D printing technique utilizing poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA, MW 700) to manufacture diffusion-open and mechanically...... and material flexibility by embedding a highly compliant cell-laden gelatin hydrogel within the confines of a 3D printed resilient PEGDA hydrogel chip of intermediate compliance. Overall, our proposed strategy represents an automated, cost-effective and high resolution technique to manufacture complex 3D...... epoxy component as structural supports interfacing the external world as well as compliant PEGDA component as microfluidic channels have been manufactured and perfused. Although still in the preliminary stage, this dual-material printing approach shows the potential for constructing complex 3D...

  11. Nifedipine increases fetoplacental perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahanoglu, Ertugrul; Altinboga, Orhan; Akpinar, Funda; Demirdag, Erhan; Ozdemirci, Safak; Akyol, Aysegul; Yalvac, Serdar

    2017-01-01

    Our aim is to evaluate the effect of nifedipine on fetoplacental hemodynamic parameters. A retrospective study was conducted at a tertiary center with 30 patients for whom nifedipine treatment was used as a tocolytic therapy for preterm labor. Initiation of this treatment was at 31.6±2.5 weeks of gestation. We combined the pulse Doppler imaging parameters with grayscale imaging via the Bernoulli theorem, which is called the "continuity equation", to get the fetoplacental perfusion (FPP). Evaluated parameters were the resistance index (RI), the pulsatility index (PI), systole/diastole ratios (S/D), the velocity-time integral of the umbilical artery (VTI), the radius of the umbilical artery, the peak systolic velocity and the mean pressure gradient in the umbilical artery. From these parameters, the FPP was acquired. We found that the RI, the PI and the S/D ratio did not change after treatment with nifedipine. The mean pressure gradient, the VTI and the peak systolic velocity increased after treatment with nifedipine. Nifedipine increases FPP from 166±73.81 beat.cm3/min to 220±83.3 beat.cm3/min. Although nifedipine had no effect on the PI, the RI or the S/D, it increased the mean pressure gradient, the VTI and FPP.

  12. Magnetic separation in microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smistrup, Kristian

    2007-01-01

    , and it is argued that it is a good measure, when comparing the performance of magnetic bead separators. It is described how numeric modelling is used to aid the design of microfluidic magnetic separation systems. An example of a design optimization study is given. A robust fabrication scheme has been developed...... for fabrication of silicon based systems. This fabrication scheme is explained, and it is shown how, it is applied with variations for several designs of magnetic separators. An experimental setup for magnetic separation experiments has been developed. It has been coupled with an image analysis program......This Ph.D. thesis presents theory, modeling, design, fabrication, experiments and results for microfluidic magnetic separators. A model for magnetic bead movement in a microfluidic channel is presented, and the limits of the model are discussed. The effective magnetic field gradient is defined...

  13. Microfluidic Technologies for Synthetic Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Kuk Lee

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic technologies have shown powerful abilities for reducing cost, time, and labor, and at the same time, for increasing accuracy, throughput, and performance in the analysis of biological and biochemical samples compared with the conventional, macroscale instruments. Synthetic biology is an emerging field of biology and has drawn much attraction due to its potential to create novel, functional biological parts and systems for special purposes. Since it is believed that the development of synthetic biology can be accelerated through the use of microfluidic technology, in this review work we focus our discussion on the latest microfluidic technologies that can provide unprecedented means in synthetic biology for dynamic profiling of gene expression/regulation with high resolution, highly sensitive on-chip and off-chip detection of metabolites, and whole-cell analysis.

  14. Microfluidics for Combating Antimicrobial Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengzhi; Banaei, Niaz; Ren, Kangning

    2017-08-08

    The ever-growing threat of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) demands immediate countermeasures. With its novelty and enabling features including downscaled analysis, precisely controlled local environment, and enhanced speed, accuracy, and cost-efficiency, microfluidics has demonstrated potential in several key areas, including furthering our understanding of bacteria, developing better susceptibility testing tools, and overcoming obstacles in discovery and research of new antibiotics. While ample research results in the field of microfluidics are available, their transformation into practical application is still lagging far behind. We believe that the challenge of AMR will give microfluidics a much-needed opportunity to leap from research papers to true productivity, and gain wider acceptance as a mature technology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Microfluidics Device Simulation in MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Michael; Shirk, Kathryn

    Microfluidics fluid channels have different dominant properties of flow than do macrofluidic channels. At small channel sizes, the calculations that model the fluid flow need to include slip velocity at the walls of the channel, the mean free path of particles, and other factors that can be difficult to compute. In order to reduce the potential for error and provide meaningful graphical representations of the computations, a computer program can be implemented. We are creating a MATLAB program suite to perform the relevant calculations quickly and accurately. Additionally, by building on this program, the potential for testing new ideas for microfluidic devices can be realized. This would reduce the costs associated with prototyping microfluidic devices as devices can be modeled in software without the need for creating physical devices until the concepts are shown to be viable.

  16. Transparent polymeric cell culture chip with integrated temperature control and uniform media perfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petronis, Sarunas; Stangegaard, Michael; Christensen, C.

    2006-01-01

    Modern microfabrication and microfluidic technologies offer new opportunities in the design and fabrication of miniaturized cell culture systems for online monitoring of living cells. We used laser micromachining and thermal bonding to fabricate an optically transparent, low-cost polymeric chip...... for long-term online cell culture observation under controlled conditions. The chip incorporated a microfluidic flow equalization system, assuring uniform perfusion of the cell culture media throughout the cell culture chamber. The integrated indium-tin-oxide heater and miniature temperature probe linked...... to an electronic feedback system created steady and spatially uniform thermal conditions with minimal interference to the optical transparency of the chip. The fluidic and thermal performance of the chip was verified by finite element modeling and by operation tests under fluctuating ambient temperature conditions...

  17. Bead-Based Assays for Biodetection: From Flow-Cytometry to Microfluidics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozanich, Richard M.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Grate, Jay W.; Nash, Michael A.; Tyler, Abby J.

    2009-05-04

    ABSTRACT The potential for the use of biological agents by terrorists is a real threat. Two approaches for detection of biological species will be described: 1) The use of microbead arrays for multiplexed flow cytometry detection of cytokines and botulinum neurotoxin simulant, and 2) a microfluidic platform for capture and separation of different size superparamagnetic nanoparticles followed by on-chip fluorescence detection of the sandwich complex. The methods and automated fluidic systems used for trapping functionalized microbeads will be described. This approach allows sample, assay reagents, and wash solutions to be perfused over a micro-column of beads, resulting in faster and more sensitive assays. The automated fluidic approach resulted in up to five-fold improvements in assay sensitivity/speed as compared to identical assays performed in a typical manual batch mode. A second approach for implementing multiplexed bead-based assays without using flow cytometry detection is currently under development. The goal of the microfluidic-based approach is to achieve rapid (<20 minutes), multiplexed (> 3 bioagents) detection using a simple and low-cost, integrated microfluidic/optical detection platform. Using fiber-optic guided laser-induced fluorescence, assay detection limits were shown to be in the 100’s of picomolar range (10’s of micrograms per liter) for botulinum neurotoxin simulant without any optimization of the microfluidic device or optical detection approach. Video taping magnetic nanoparticle capture and release was used to improve understanding of the process and revealed interesting behavior.

  18. Flexible microfluidic devices with three-dimensional interconnected microporous walls for gas and liquid applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Po Ki; DeRosa, Michael E

    2011-10-07

    This article presents a simple, low-cost method of fabrication and the applications of flexible polystyrene microfluidic devices with three-dimensional (3D) interconnected microporous walls based on treatment using a solvent/non-solvent mixture at room temperature. The complete fabrication process from device design concept to working device can be completed in less than an hour in a regular laboratory setting, without the need for expensive equipment. Microfluidic devices were used to demonstrate gas generation and absorption reactions by acidifying water with carbon dioxide (CO(2)) gas. By selectively treating the microporous structures with oxygen plasma, acidification of water by acetic acid (distilled white vinegar) perfusion was also demonstrated with the same device design.

  19. Tuneable optical waveguide based on dielectrophoresis and microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayani, Aminuddin A.; Chrimes, Adam F.; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh; Mitchell, Arnan

    2011-06-01

    In this work, an array of dielectrophoretic curved microelectrodes patterned in a microfluidic channel and integrated with a multimode rib polymeric waveguide is demonstrated. The microfluidic channel is infiltrated with suspended silica (SiO2) and tungsten trioxide (WO3) nanoparticles. The optofluidic system is found to be sensitive and responds not only to the infiltration of nanoparticle suspensions in the microfluidic channel, but also to the magnitude and frequencies of dielectrophoretic forces applied on the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles can be uniformly concentrated or repelled from the region between the curved microelectrode tips forming either a dense stream of flowing nanoparticles or a region void of nanoparticles in the evanescent sensitive region of the polymeric waveguide. The concentration and repulsion of nanoparticles from this region creates a refractive index gradient in the upper cladding of the polymeric waveguide. These conditions made it possible for light to either remain guided or be scattered as a function of dielectrophoretic settings applied on the nanoparticles. The results demonstrate that we successfully developed a novel tuneable polymeric waveguide based on dielectrophoretic assembly of nanoparticles suspended in fluids.

  20. Microfluidic strategy to investigate dynamics of small blood vessel function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasotharan, Sanjesh; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian; Guenther, Axel

    2010-11-01

    Resistance arteries (RAs, 30-300 microns in diameter) that are located within the terminal part of the vascular tree regulate the laminar perfusion of tissue with blood, via the peripheral vascular resistance, and hence controls the systemic blood pressure. The structure of RAs is adapted to actively controlling flow resistance by dynamically changing their diameter, which is non-linearly dependent on the temporal variation of the transmural pressure, perfusion flow rate and spatiotemporal changes in the chemical environment. Increases in systemic blood pressure (hypertension) resulting from pathologic changes in the RA response represent the primary risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We use a microfluidic strategy to investigate small blood vessels by quantifying structural variations within the arterial wall, RA outer contour and diameter over time. First, we document the artery response to vasomotor drugs that were homogeneously applied at step-wise increasing concentration. Second, we investigate the response in the presence of well-defined axial and circumferential heterogeneities. Artery per- and superfusion is discussed based on microscale PIV measurements of the fluid velocity on both sides of the arterial wall. Structural changes in the arterial wall are quantified using cross-correlation and proper orthogonal decomposition analyses of bright-field micrographs.

  1. Application of an acoustofluidic perfusion bioreactor for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siwei; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Andriotis, Orestis G; Ching, Kuan Y; Jonnalagadda, Umesh S; Oreffo, Richard O C; Hill, Martyn; Tare, Rahul S

    2014-12-07

    Cartilage grafts generated using conventional static tissue engineering strategies are characterised by low cell viability, suboptimal hyaline cartilage formation and, critically, inferior mechanical competency, which limit their application for resurfacing articular cartilage defects. To address the limitations of conventional static cartilage bioengineering strategies and generate robust, scaffold-free neocartilage grafts of human articular chondrocytes, the present study utilised custom-built microfluidic perfusion bioreactors with integrated ultrasound standing wave traps. The system employed sweeping acoustic drive frequencies over the range of 890 to 910 kHz and continuous perfusion of the chondrogenic culture medium at a low-shear flow rate to promote the generation of three-dimensional agglomerates of human articular chondrocytes, and enhance cartilage formation by cells of the agglomerates via improved mechanical stimulation and mass transfer rates. Histological examination and assessment of micromechanical properties using indentation-type atomic force microscopy confirmed that the neocartilage grafts were analogous to native hyaline cartilage. Furthermore, in the ex vivo organ culture partial thickness cartilage defect model, implantation of the neocartilage grafts into defects for 16 weeks resulted in the formation of hyaline cartilage-like repair tissue that adhered to the host cartilage and contributed to significant improvements to the tissue architecture within the defects, compared to the empty defects. The study has demonstrated the first successful application of the acoustofluidic perfusion bioreactors to bioengineer scaffold-free neocartilage grafts of human articular chondrocytes that have the potential for subsequent use in second generation autologous chondrocyte implantation procedures for the repair of partial thickness cartilage defects.

  2. Microfluidic fabrication of plasmonic microcapsules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Jin, Mingliang; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; van den Berg, Albert; Zhou, G.F.; Shui, L.L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the plasmonic microcapsules with well-ordered nanoparticles embedded in polymer network fabricated by using a microfluidic device. The well-ordered nanoparticle arrays on the microcapsule form high-density uniform “hot-spots‿ with a deposited metal film, on which the localized

  3. Topology optimization of microfluidic mixers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Casper Schousboe; Gersborg, Allan Roulund; Sigmund, Ole

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the application of the topology optimization method as a general and systematic approach for microfluidic mixer design. The mixing process is modeled as convection dominated transport in low Reynolds number incompressible flow. The mixer performance is maximized by altering...

  4. Optical detection in microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2009-01-01

    Optical detection schemes continue to be favoured for measurements in microfluidic systems. A selection of the latest progress mainly within the last two years is critically reviewed. Emphasis is on integrated solutions, such as planar waveguides, coupling schemes to the outside world, evanescent...

  5. Mixing in a Microfluid Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Deryabin, Mikhail

    Mixing of fluids in microchannels cannot rely on turbulence since the flow takes place at extremly low Reynolds numbers. Various active and passive devices have been developed to induce mixing in microfluid flow devices. We describe here a model of an active mixer where a transverse periodic flow...

  6. A microfluidic device with pillars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The invention provides a microfluidic device for mixing liquid reagents, the device comprises, a chip forming at least one reaction chamber between a bottom and a top and extending between an inlet and an outlet. To enable manufacturing from less rigid materials, the device comprises pillars...

  7. Microfluidic Liquid-Liquid Contactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcculloch, Quinn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-25

    This report describes progress made on the microfluidic contactor. A model was developed to predict its failure, a surrogate chemical system was selected to demonstrate mass transfer, and an all-optical system has been invented and implemented to monitor carryover and flowrates.

  8. Synthesizing artificial cells from giant unilamellar vesicles: state-of-the art in the development of microfluidic technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matosevic, Sandro

    2012-11-01

    Microfluidic technology - the manipulation of fluids at micrometer scales - has revolutionized many areas of synthetic biology. The bottom-up synthesis of "minimal" cell models has traditionally suffered from poor control of assembly conditions. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) are good models of living cells on account of their size and unilamellar membrane structure. In recent years, a number of microfluidic approaches for constructing GUVs has emerged. These provide control over traditionally elusive parameters of vesicular structure, such as size, lamellarity, membrane composition, and internal contents. They also address sophisticated cellular functions such as division and protein synthesis. Microfluidic techniques for GUV synthesis can broadly be categorized as continuous-flow based approaches and droplet-based approaches. This review presents the state-of-the-art of microfluidic technology, a robust platform for recapitulating complex cellular structure and function in synthetic models of biological cells. Copyright © 2012 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caruso, Damiano [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Latina (Italy); Eid, Marwen [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Jin, Kwang Nam [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Radiology, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Varga-Szemes, Akos [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Tesche, Christian [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Munich (Germany); Mangold, Stefanie [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); and others

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • CT myocardial perfusion provides functional assessment of the myocardium. • CCTA is limited in determining the hemodynamic significance of coronary stenosis. • CT-MPI can accurately detect hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenosis. - Abstract: Non-invasive cardiac imaging has rapidly evolved during the last decade due to advancements in CT based technologies. Coronary CT angiography has been shown to reliably assess coronary anatomy and detect high risk coronary artery disease. However, this technique is limited to anatomical assessment, thus non-invasive techniques for functional assessment of the heart are necessary. CT myocardial perfusion is a new CT based technique that provides functional assessment of the myocardium and allows for a comprehensive assessment of coronary artery disease with a single modality when combined with CTA. This review aims to discuss dynamic CT myocardial perfusion as a new technique in the assessment of CAD.

  10. Localized surface plasmon resonance biosensor integrated with microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chengjun; Bonroy, Kristien; Reekmans, Gunter; Laureyn, Wim; Verhaegen, Katarina; De Vlaminck, Iwijn; Lagae, Liesbet; Borghs, Gustaaf

    2009-08-01

    A sensitive and low-cost microfluidic integrated biosensor is developed based on the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties of gold nanoparticles, which allows label-free monitoring of biomolecular interactions in real-time. A novel quadrant detection scheme is introduced which continuously measures the change of the light transmitted through the nanoparticle-coated sensor surface. Using a green light emitting diode (LED) as a light source in combination with the quadrant detection scheme, a resolution of 10(-4) in refractive index units (RIU) is determined. This performance is comparable to conventional LSPR-based biosensors. The biological sensing is demonstrated using an antigen/antibody (biotin/anti-biotin) system with an optimized gold nanoparticle film. The immobilization of biotin on a thiol-based self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and the subsequent affinity binding of anti-biotin are quantitatively detected by the microfluidic integrated biosensor and a detection limit of 270 ng/mL of anti-biotin was achieved. The microfluidic chip is capable of transporting a precise amount of biological samples to the detection areas to achieve highly sensitive and specific biosensing with decreased reaction time and less reagent consumption. The obtained results are compared with those measured by a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based Biacore system for the same binding event. This study demonstrates the feasibility of the integration of LSPR-based biosensing with microfluidic technologies, resulting in a low-cost and portable biosensor candidate compared to the larger and more expensive commercial instruments.

  11. Myocardial perfusion modeling using MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Fritz-Hansen, T; Rostrup, Egill

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, it is shown that it is possible to quantify myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance imaging in combination with gadolinium diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Previously, a simple model and method for measuring myocardial perfusion using an inversion recovery...... in the anterior myocardial wall were (mean +/- SD) Ki = 54 +/- 10 ml/100 g/min, lambda = 30 +/- 3 ml/100 g, Vb = 9 +/- 2 ml/100 g, delta T = 3.2 +/- 1.1 s. These results are in good agreement with similar results obtained by other methods....

  12. Biofabrication of Tobacco mosaic virus-nanoscaffolded supercapacitors via temporal capillary microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Faheng; Chu, Sangwook; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Culver, James N.; Ghodssi, Reza

    2017-06-01

    This paper reports the implementation of temporal capillary microfluidic patterns and biological nanoscaffolds in autonomous microfabrication of nanostructured symmetric electrochemical supercapacitors. A photoresist layer was first patterned on the substrate, forming a capillary microfluidics layer with two separated interdigitated microchannels. Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) macromolecules suspended in solution are autonomously delivered into the microfluidics, and form a dense bio-nanoscaffolds layer within an hour. This TMV layer is utilized in the electroless plating and thermal oxidation for creating nanostructured NiO supercapacitor. The galvanostatic charge/discharge cycle showed a 3.6-fold increase in areal capacitance for the nanostructured electrode compared to planar structures. The rapid creation of nanostructure-textured microdevices with only simple photolithography and bionanostructure self-assembly can completely eliminate the needs for sophisticated synthesis or deposition processes. This method will contribute to rapid prototyping of wide range of nano-/micro-devices with enhanced performance.

  13. Modular microfluidic system for emulation of human phase I/phase II metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampe, Thomas; König, Anna; Schroeder, Hendrik; Hengstler, Jan G; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2014-03-18

    We present a microfluidic device for coupled phase I/phase II metabolic reactions in vitro. The chip consists of microchannels, which are used as packed bed reactor compartments, filled with superparamagnetic microparticles bearing recombinant microsomal phase I cytochrome P450 or phase II conjugating enzymes (UDP-glucuronosyltransferase). Online coupling of the microfluidic device with LC/MS enabled the quantitative assessment of coupled phase I/phase II transformations, as demonstrated for two different substrates, 7-benzyloxy-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin (BFC) and dextromethorphan (DEX). In contrast, conventional sequential one-pot incubations did not generate measurable amounts of phase II metabolites. Because the microfluidic device is readily assembled from standard parts and can be equipped with a variety of recombinant enzymes, it provides a modular platform to emulate and investigate hepatic metabolism processes, with particular potential for targeted small-scale synthesis and identification of metabolites formed by sequential action of specific enzymes.

  14. Microfluidic biofunctionalisation protocols to form multi-valent interactions for cell rolling and phenotype modification investigations

    KAUST Repository

    Perozziello, Gerardo

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we propose a fast, simple method to biofunctionalise microfluidic systems for cellomic investigations based on micro-fluidic protocols. Many available processes either require expensive and time-consuming protocols or are incompatible with the fabrication of microfluidic systems. Our method differs from the existing since it is applicable to an assembled system, uses few microlitres of reagents and it is based on the use of microbeads. The microbeads have specific surface moieties to link the biomolecules and couple cell receptors. Furthermore, the microbeads serve as arm spacer and offer the benefit of the multi-valent interaction. Microfluidics was adapted together with topology and biochemistry surface modifications to offer the microenvironment for cellomic studies. Based on this principle, we exploit the streptavidin-biotin interaction to couple antibodies to the biofunctionalised microfluidic environment within 5 h using 200 μL of reagents and biomolecules. We selected the antibodies able to form complexes with the MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules present on the cell membrane and involved in the immune surveillance. To test the microfluidic system, tumour cell lines (RMA) were rolled across the coupled antibodies to recognise and strip MHC-I molecules. As result, we show that cell rolling performed inside a microfluidic chamber functionalised with beads and the opportune antibody facilitate the removal of MHC class I molecules. We showed that the level of median fluorescent intensity of the MHC-I molecules is 300 for cells treated in a not biofunctionalised surface. It decreased to 275 for cells treated in a flat biofunctionalised surface and to 250 for cells treated on a surface where biofunctionalised microbeads were immobilised. The cells with reduced expression of MHC-I molecules showed, after cytotoxicity tests, susceptibility 3.5 times higher than normal cells. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Automatic assessment of cardiac perfusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Larsson, Henrik B.W.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a method based on Active Appearance Models (AAM) is applied for automatic registration of myocardial perfusion MRI. A semi-quantitative perfusion assessment of the registered image sequences is presented. This includes the formation of perfusion maps for three parameters; maximum up...

  16. Nanostructures for all-polymer microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matschuk, Maria; Bruus, Henrik; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2010-01-01

    antistiction coating was found to improve the replication fidelity (shape and depth) of nanoscale features substantially. Arrays of holes of 50 nm diameter/35 nm depth and 100 nm/100 nm diameter, respectively, were mass-produced in cyclic olefin copolymer (Topas 5013) by injection molding. Polymer microfluidic...... channel chip parts resulted from a separate injection molding process. The microfluidic chip part and the nanostructured chip part were successfully bonded to form a sealed microfluidic system using air plasma assisted thermal bonding....

  17. Hyperventilation, cerebral perfusion, and syncope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Immink, R V; Pott, F C; Secher, N H

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes evidence in humans for an association between hyperventilation (HV)-induced hypocapnia and a reduction in cerebral perfusion leading to syncope defined as transient loss of consciousness (TLOC). The cerebral vasculature is sensitive to changes in both the arterial carbon...

  18. [IV drug perfusions: safety principles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelieur, Florence; Cabelguenne, Delphine; Marcel, Marie; Favier, Claudine; Piriou, Vincent

    2017-05-01

    An intravenous perfusion is a procedure which comprises infection and medication risks. To manage these risks, caregivers must respect, in addition to the usual hygiene rules, a series of best practices, ensuring the proper use and management of the medical devices and administered drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Ex vivo recapitulation of trauma-induced coagulopathy and assessment of trauma patient platelet function under flow using microfluidic technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruizhi; Elmongy, Hanna; Sims, Carrie; Diamond, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Relevant to trauma induced coagulopathy (TIC) diagnostics, microfluidic assays allow controlled hemodynamics for testing of platelet and coagulation function using whole blood. Methods Hemodilution or hyperfibrinolysis was studied under flow with modified healthy whole blood. Furthermore, platelet function was also measured using whole blood from trauma patients admitted to a Level 1 Trauma center. Platelet deposition was measured with PPACK-inhibited blood perfused over collagen surfaces at a wall shear rate of 200 s−1, while platelet/fibrin deposition was measured with corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI)-treated blood perfused over TF/collagen. Results In hemodilution studies, PPACK-treated blood displayed almost no platelet deposition when diluted to 10% Hct with saline, platelet poor plasma (PPP), or platelet rich plasma (PRP). Using similar dilutions, platelet/fibrin deposition was essentially absent for CTI-treated blood perfused over TF/collagen. To mimic hyperfibrinolysis during trauma, exogenous tPA (50 nM) was added to blood prior to perfusion over TF/collagen. At both venous and arterial flows, the generation and subsequent lysis of fibrin was detectable within 6 min, with lysis blocked by addition of the plasmin inhibitor, ε-aminocaproic acid. Microfluidic assay of PPACK-inhibited whole blood from trauma patients revealed striking defects in collagen response and secondary platelet aggregation in 14 of 21 patients, while platelet hyperfunction was detected in 3 of 20 patients. Conclusions Rapid microfluidic detection of (i) hemodilution-dependent impairment of clotting, (ii) clot instability due to lysis, (iii) blockade of fibrinolysis, or (iv) platelet dysfunction during trauma may provide novel diagnostic opportunities to predict TIC risk. Level of Evidence Level IV Study type Diagnostic Test PMID:27082706

  20. Integrated lenses in polystyrene microfluidic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Yiqiang

    2013-04-01

    This paper reports a new method for integrating microlenses into microfluidic devices for improved observation. Two demonstration microfluidic devices were provided which were fabricated using this new technique. The integrated microlenses were fabricated using a free-surface thermo-compression molding method on a polystyrene (PS) sheet which was then bonded on top of microfluidic channels as a cover plate, with the convex microlenses providing a magnified image of the channel for the easier observation of the flow in the microchannels. This approach for fabricating the integrated microlens in microfluidic devices is rapid, low cost and without the requirement of cleanroom facilities. © 2013 IEEE.

  1. Microfluidic approach of Sickled Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkarian, Manouk; Loiseau, Etienne; Massiera, Gladys

    2012-11-01

    Sickle Cell Anemia is a disorder of the microcirculation caused by a genetic point mutation that produces an altered hemoglobin protein called HbS. HbS self-assembles reversibly into long rope like fibers inside the red blood cells. The resulting distorded sickled red blood cells are believed to block the smallest capillaries of the tissues producing anemia. Despite the large amount of work that provided a thorough understanding of HbS polymerization in bulk as well as in intact red blood cells at rest, no consequent cellular scale approaches of the study of polymerization and its link to the capillary obstruction have been proposed in microflow, although the problem of obstruction is in essence a circulatory problem. Here, we use microfluidic channels, designed to mimic physiological conditions (flow velocity, oxygen concentration, hematocrit...) of the microcirculation to carry out a biomimetic study at the cellular scale of sickled cell vaso-occlusion. We show that flow geometry, oxygen concentration, white blood cells and free hemoglobin S are essential in the formation of original cell aggregates which could play a role in the vaso-occlusion events.

  2. Polymeric microbead arrays for microfluidic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jason A.; Du, Xiaoguang; Grogan, Joseph M.; Schrlau, Michael G.; Bau, Haim H.

    2010-11-01

    Microbeads offer a convenient and efficient means of immobilizing biomolecules and capturing target molecules of interest in microfluidic immunoassay devices. In this study, hot embossing is used to form wells enabling the direct incorporation of a microbead array in a plastic substrate. We demonstrate two techniques to populate the well array with beads. In the first case, encoded beads with various functionalizations are distributed randomly among the wells and their position is registered by reading their encoding. Alternatively, beads are controllably placed at predetermined positions and decoding is not required. The random placement technique is demonstrated with two functionalized bead types that are distributed among the wells and then decoded to register their locations. The alternative, deliberate placement technique is demonstrated by controllably placing magnetic beads at selected locations in the array using a magnetic probe. As a proof of concept to illustrate the biosensing capability of the randomly assembled array, an on-chip, bead-based immunoassay is employed to detect the inflammatory protein Interleukin-8. The principle of the assay, however, can be extended to detect multiple targets simultaneously. Our method eliminates the need to interface silicon components with plastic devices to form microarrays containing individually addressable beads. This has the potential to reduce the cost and complexity of lab-on-chip devices for medical diagnosis, food and water quality inspection, and environmental monitoring.

  3. Integrated Microfluidic Variable Optical Attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-11-28

    indices , the optical output power is gradually attenuated. We obtain a maximum attenuation of 28 dB when the fluid refractive index changes from 1.557 to...Electron. 23, pp. 1348-1354 (2005). 14. J. M. Ruano, V. Benoit, J. S. Aitchison , and J. M. Cooper, “Flame hydrolysis deposition of glass on silicon for...different refractive indices flowing in a microfluidic channel as the cladding for a segment of straight optical waveguide. Recently, the integration of

  4. Dielectric Elastomer Actuators for Microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Maffli, Luc; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    One of the goals of microfluidics is to bring a whole laboratory processing chain on a few square centimeters, Lab-On-Chips (LOC). But current LOCs require many heavy and power-consuming off-chip controls like pneumatics, pumps and valves, which keep the small chip bound to the lab. Miniaturized Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEA) are excellent candidates to make LOC truly portable, since they combine electrical actuation, large stroke volumes and high output forces. We report on the use of ...

  5. Microfluidic polymer multilayer adsorption on liquid crystal droplets for microcapsule synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Craig; Quinn, Anthony; Postma, Almar; Zelikin, Alexander N; Ralston, John; Caruso, Frank

    2008-12-01

    Exploiting microfluidic principles, the potential for chip-based multilayer assembly for the synthesis of polymer microcapsules was investigated. We demonstrate that continuous flow microfluidic multilayer synthesis is a fast, efficient, automated alternative to conventional batch synthesis. In this work, we dispersed liquid crystal (LC) molecules (organic phase) as monodisperse droplets in an aqueous continuous phase containing the primary polymer and a suitable surfactant. The primary polymer was coadsorbed with the surfactant at the organic/aqueous interface, stabilizing the LC droplets against coalescence and providing a template for subsequent polymer adsorption. As the droplet templates are transported through the microfluidic channel, the polymer-containing aqueous continuous phase is selectively withdrawn and replaced with rinse solution, and then with an alternative polymer solution. This selective withdrawal and infusion cycle was repeated to assemble polymer multilayers onto the emulsion droplets. The process was followed using fluorescence microscopy of the fluorescently-labelled polymers at the LC interface and of the flowing polymer solutions during the sequential rinse stages. Cross-linking of the multilayers and removal of the dispersed LC phase resulted in polymer capsules retaining the high monodispersity of the droplet templates. This microfluidic approach significantly reduces the multilayer formation time (to <2 min for 3-layer capsules) of well-defined capsules that are envisaged to have benefits in biomedical applications, including drug delivery and encapsulated biochemical reactions.

  6. Microfluidic Devices for Blood Fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chwee Teck Lim

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Blood, a complex biological fluid, comprises 45% cellular components suspended in protein rich plasma. These different hematologic components perform distinct functions in vivo and thus the ability to efficiently fractionate blood into its individual components has innumerable applications in both clinical diagnosis and biological research. Yet, processing blood is not trivial. In the past decade, a flurry of new microfluidic based technologies has emerged to address this compelling problem. Microfluidics is an attractive solution for this application leveraging its numerous advantages to process clinical blood samples. This paper reviews the various microfluidic approaches realized to successfully fractionate one or more blood components. Techniques to separate plasma from hematologic cellular components as well as isolating blood cells of interest including certain rare cells are discussed. Comparisons based on common separation metrics including efficiency (sensitivity, purity (selectivity, and throughput will be presented. Finally, we will provide insights into the challenges associated with blood-based separation systems towards realizing true point-of-care (POC devices and provide future perspectives.

  7. Bubbles and foams in microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerre, Axel; Miralles, Vincent; Jullien, Marie-Caroline

    2014-09-28

    Microfluidics offers great tools to produce highly-controlled dispersions of gas into liquid, from isolated bubbles to organized microfoams. Potential technological applications are manifold, from novel materials to scaffolds for tissue engineering or enhanced oil recovery. More fundamentally, microfluidics makes it possible to investigate the physics of complex systems such as foams at scales where the capillary forces become dominant, in model experiments involving few well-controlled parameters. In this context, this review does not have the ambition to detail in a comprehensive manner all the techniques and applications involving bubbles and foams in microfluidics. Rather, it focuses on particular consequences of working at the microscale, under confinement, and hopes to provide insight into the physics of such systems. The first part of this work focuses on bubbles, and more precisely on (i) bubble generation, where the confinement can suppress capillary instabilities while inertial effects may play a role, and (ii) bubble dynamics, paying special attention to the lubrication film between bubble and wall and the influence of confinement. The second part addresses the formation and dynamics of microfoams, emphasizing structural differences from macroscopic foams and the influence of the confinement.

  8. Whole-Teflon microfluidic chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Kangning; Dai, Wen; Zhou, Jianhua; Su, Jing; Wu, Hongkai

    2011-05-17

    Although microfluidics has shown exciting potential, its broad applications are significantly limited by drawbacks of the materials used to make them. In this work, we present a convenient strategy for fabricating whole-Teflon microfluidic chips with integrated valves that show outstanding inertness to various chemicals and extreme resistance against all solvents. Compared with other microfluidic materials [e.g., poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)] the whole-Teflon chip has a few more advantages, such as no absorption of small molecules, little adsorption of biomolecules onto channel walls, and no leaching of residue molecules from the material bulk into the solution in the channel. Various biological cells have been cultured in the whole-Teflon channel. Adherent cells can attach to the channel bottom, spread, and proliferate well in the channels (with similar proliferation rate to the cells in PDMS channels with the same dimensions). The moderately good gas permeability of the Teflon materials makes it suitable to culture cells inside the microchannels for a long time.

  9. Microfluidic preparation and self diffusion PFG-NMR analysis of monodisperse water-in-oil-in-water double emulsions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hughes, E.; Maan, A.A.; Acquistapace, S.; Burbidge, J.A.; Johns, M.L.; Gunes, D.Z.; Clausen, P.; Syrbe, A.; Hugo, J.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.

    2013-01-01

    Monodisperse water-in-oil-in-water (WOW) double emulsions have been prepared using microfluidic glass devices designed and built primarily from off the shelf components. The systems were easy to assemble and use. They were capable of producing double emulsions with an outer droplet size from 100 to

  10. Open-Source Wax RepRap 3-D Printer for Rapid Prototyping Paper-Based Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, J M; Anzalone, N C; Heldt, C L

    2016-08-01

    The open-source release of self-replicating rapid prototypers (RepRaps) has created a rich opportunity for low-cost distributed digital fabrication of complex 3-D objects such as scientific equipment. For example, 3-D printable reactionware devices offer the opportunity to combine open hardware microfluidic handling with lab-on-a-chip reactionware to radically reduce costs and increase the number and complexity of microfluidic applications. To further drive down the cost while improving the performance of lab-on-a-chip paper-based microfluidic prototyping, this study reports on the development of a RepRap upgrade capable of converting a Prusa Mendel RepRap into a wax 3-D printer for paper-based microfluidic applications. An open-source hardware approach is used to demonstrate a 3-D printable upgrade for the 3-D printer, which combines a heated syringe pump with the RepRap/Arduino 3-D control. The bill of materials, designs, basic assembly, and use instructions are provided, along with a completely free and open-source software tool chain. The open-source hardware device described here accelerates the potential of the nascent field of electrochemical detection combined with paper-based microfluidics by dropping the marginal cost of prototyping to nearly zero while accelerating the turnover between paper-based microfluidic designs. © 2016 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  11. The impact of microfluidic mixing of triblock micelleplexes on in vitro / in vivo gene silencing and intracellular trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Daniel P.; Xie, Yuran; Jones, Steven K.; Yu, Dongyue; Moszczynska, Anna; Merkel, Olivia M.

    2017-06-01

    The triblock copolymer polyethylenimine-polycaprolactone-polyethylene glycol (PEI-PCL-PEG) has been shown to spontaneously assemble into nano-sized particulate carriers capable of complexing with nucleic acids for gene delivery. The objective of this study was to investigate micelleplex characteristics, their in vitro and in vivo fate following microfluidic preparation of siRNA nanoparticles compared to the routinely used batch reactor mixing technique. Herein, PEI-PCL-PEG nanoparticles were prepared with batch reactor or microfluidic mixing techniques and characterized by various biochemical assays and in cell culture. Microfluidic nanoparticles showed a reduction of overall particle size as well as a more uniform size distribution when compared to batch reactor pipette mixing. Confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and qRT-PCR displayed the subcellular delivery of the microfluidic formulation and confirmed the ability to achieve mRNA knockdown. Intratracheal instillation of microfluidic formulation resulted in a significantly more efficient (p batch reactor formulation. The use of microfluidic mixing techniques yields an overall smaller and more uniform PEG-PCL-PEI nanoparticle that is able to more efficiently deliver siRNA in vivo. This preparation method may prove to be useful when a scaled up production of well-defined polyplexes is required.

  12. Cell Culture Microfluidic Biochips: Experimental Throughput Maximization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minhass, Wajid Hassan; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic biochips offer a promising alternative to a conventional biochemical laboratory, integrating all necessary functionalities on-chip in order to perform biochemical applications. Researchers have started to propose computer-aided design tools for the synthesis of such biochips. Our foc...... metaheuristic for experimental design generation for the cell culture microfluidic biochips, and we have evaluated our approach using multiple experimental setups....

  13. Microfluidic tools for cell biological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velve-Casquillas, Guilhem; Le Berre, Maël; Piel, Matthieu; Tran, Phong T.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Microfluidic technology is creating powerful tools for cell biologists to control the complete cellular microenvironment, leading to new questions and new discoveries. We review here the basic concepts and methodologies in designing microfluidic devices, and their diverse cell biological applications. PMID:21152269

  14. A microfluidic method to study demulsification kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krebs, T.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of experiments studying droplet coalescence in a dense layer of emulsion droplets using microfluidic circuits. The microfluidic structure allows direct observation of collisions and coalescence events between oil droplets dispersed in water. The coalescence rate of a flowing

  15. Integrating Electronics and Microfluidics on Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi, Mahiar M; Ainla, Alar; Güder, Firat; Christodouleas, Dionysios C; Fernández-Abedul, M Teresa; Whitesides, George M

    2016-07-01

    Paper microfluidics and printed electronics have developed independently, and are incompatible in many aspects. Monolithic integration of microfluidics and electronics on paper is demonstrated. This integration makes it possible to print 2D and 3D fluidic, electrofluidic, and electrical components on paper, and to fabricate devices using them. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Microfluidic flow driven by electric fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mampallil Augustine, Dileep

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidics or lab on chip technology, has developed itself significantly during the past 25 years. Now it has become a robust tool to manipu- late tiny amounts of fluid or gas for various applications. Microfluidics is the process of transporting, mixing, separating small amounts of fluid in

  17. Principles, Techniques, and Applications of Tissue Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Lawrence A.; Kartalov, Emil P.; Shibata, Darryl; Taylor, Clive

    2011-01-01

    The principle of tissue microfluidics and its resultant techniques has been applied to cell analysis. Building microfluidics to suit a particular tissue sample would allow the rapid, reliable, inexpensive, highly parallelized, selective extraction of chosen regions of tissue for purposes of further biochemical analysis. Furthermore, the applicability of the techniques ranges beyond the described pathology application. For example, they would also allow the posing and successful answering of new sets of questions in many areas of fundamental research. The proposed integration of microfluidic techniques and tissue slice samples is called "tissue microfluidics" because it molds the microfluidic architectures in accordance with each particular structure of each specific tissue sample. Thus, microfluidics can be built around the tissues, following the tissue structure, or alternatively, the microfluidics can be adapted to the specific geometry of particular tissues. By contrast, the traditional approach is that microfluidic devices are structured in accordance with engineering considerations, while the biological components in applied devices are forced to comply with these engineering presets.

  18. Preface book Microfluidics for medical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Albert; Segerink, Loes Irene

    2015-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the major microfluidics techniques and platforms used for medicine and medical applications, providing the reader with an overview of the recent developments in this field. It is divided in three parts: (1) tissue and organs on-chip, (2) microfluidics for medicine

  19. Applications of Microfluidics in Quantitative Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Gao, Meng; Wen, Lingling; He, Caiyun; Chen, Yuan; Liu, Chenli; Fu, Xiongfei; Huang, Shuqiang

    2017-10-04

    Quantitative biology is dedicated to taking advantage of quantitative reasoning and advanced engineering technologies to make biology more predictable. Microfluidics, as an emerging technique, provides new approaches to precisely control fluidic conditions on small scales and collect data in high-throughput and quantitative manners. In this review, the authors present the relevant applications of microfluidics to quantitative biology based on two major categories (channel-based microfluidics and droplet-based microfluidics), and their typical features. We also envision some other microfluidic techniques that may not be employed in quantitative biology right now, but have great potential in the near future. © 2017 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  20. Microfluidic desalination techniques and their potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, S H; van den Berg, A; Odijk, M

    2015-09-07

    In this review we discuss recent developments in the emerging research field of miniaturized desalination. Traditionally desalination is performed to convert salt water into potable water and research is focused on improving performance of large-scale desalination plants. Microfluidic desalination offers several new opportunities in comparison to macro-scale desalination, such as providing a platform to increase fundamental knowledge of ion transport on the nano- and microfluidic scale and new microfluidic sample preparation methods. This approach has also lead to the development of new desalination techniques, based on micro/nanofluidic ion-transport phenomena, which are potential candidates for up-scaling to (portable) drinking water devices. This review assesses microfluidic desalination techniques on their applications and is meant to contribute to further implementation of microfluidic desalination techniques in the lab-on-chip community.

  1. Manipulation of microfluidic droplets by electrorheological fluid

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Menying

    2009-09-01

    Microfluidics, especially droplet microfluidics, attracts more and more researchers from diverse fields, because it requires fewer materials and less time, produces less waste and has the potential of highly integrated and computer-controlled reaction processes for chemistry and biology. Electrorheological fluid, especially giant electrorheological fluid (GERF), which is considered as a kind of smart material, has been applied to the microfluidic systems to achieve active and precise control of fluid by electrical signal. In this review article, we will introduce recent results of microfluidic droplet manipulation, GERF and some pertinent achievements by introducing GERF into microfluidic system: digital generation, manipulation of "smart droplets" and droplet manipulation by GERF. Once it is combined with real-time detection, integrated chip with multiple functions can be realized. © 2009 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  2. Dosimetry in myocardial perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toledo, Janine M.; Trindade, Bruno; Ribeiro, Tarcisio P.C. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (DEN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares

    2011-07-01

    This paper conducts a dosimetric investigation on the myocardial perfusion image protocol, together with a literature reviewing, motivated by the significant statistic increasing on mortality, morbidity and disability associated with cardiovascular disease, surpassing infectious diseases. Nuclear Cardiology plays a role n the diagnostic functional evaluation of the heart and in the prognostic of patients with suspected or known cardiac ischemia. In the context of unstable myocardial ischemic syndrome, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy is a non-invasive procedure performed by administering a radiopharmaceutical targeted to the heart. As tool for this study are that the images obtained by thoracic angiotomography and abdominal aorta as a anatomic and functional information for model reproduction in SISCODES - System of Codes for Absorbed Dose Calculations based on Stochastic Methods. Data were manipulated in order to create a voxel computational model of the heart to be running in MCNP - Monte Carlo Neutron Particle Code. . It was assumed a homogeneous distribution of Tl-201 in cardiac muscle. Simulations of the transport of particles through the voxel and the interaction with the heart tissue were performed. As a result, the isodose curves in the heart model are displayed as well as the dose versus volume histogram of the heart muscle. We conclude that the present computational tools can generate doses distributed in myocardial perfusion. (author)

  3. Hyperventilation, cerebral perfusion, and syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immink, R V; Pott, F C; Secher, N H; van Lieshout, J J

    2014-04-01

    This review summarizes evidence in humans for an association between hyperventilation (HV)-induced hypocapnia and a reduction in cerebral perfusion leading to syncope defined as transient loss of consciousness (TLOC). The cerebral vasculature is sensitive to changes in both the arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2) and oxygen (PaO2) partial pressures so that hypercapnia/hypoxia increases and hypocapnia/hyperoxia reduces global cerebral blood flow. Cerebral hypoperfusion and TLOC have been associated with hypocapnia related to HV. Notwithstanding pronounced cerebrovascular effects of PaCO2 the contribution of a low PaCO2 to the early postural reduction in middle cerebral artery blood velocity is transient. HV together with postural stress does not reduce cerebral perfusion to such an extent that TLOC develops. However when HV is combined with cardiovascular stressors like cold immersion or reduced cardiac output brain perfusion becomes jeopardized. Whether, in patients with cardiovascular disease and/or defect, cerebral blood flow cerebral control HV-induced hypocapnia elicits cerebral hypoperfusion, leading to TLOC, remains to be established.

  4. A microfluidic platform for controlled biochemical stimulation of twin neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, Emilia; Piraino, Francesco; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Fiore, Gianfranco B; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Redaelli, Alberto; Menegon, Andrea; Rasponi, Marco

    2012-06-01

    Spatially and temporally resolved delivery of soluble factors is a key feature for pharmacological applications. In this framework, microfluidics coupled to multisite electrophysiology offers great advantages in neuropharmacology and toxicology. In this work, a microfluidic device for biochemical stimulation of neuronal networks was developed. A micro-chamber for cell culturing, previously developed and tested for long term neuronal growth by our group, was provided with a thin wall, which partially divided the cell culture region in two sub-compartments. The device was reversibly coupled to a flat micro electrode array and used to culture primary neurons in the same microenvironment. We demonstrated that the two fluidically connected compartments were able to originate two parallel neuronal networks with similar electrophysiological activity but functionally independent. Furthermore, the device allowed to connect the outlet port to a syringe pump and to transform the static culture chamber in a perfused one. At 14 days invitro, sub-networks were independently stimulated with a test molecule, tetrodotoxin, a neurotoxin known to block action potentials, by means of continuous delivery. Electrical activity recordings proved the ability of the device configuration to selectively stimulate each neuronal network individually. The proposed microfluidic approach represents an innovative methodology to perform biological, pharmacological, and electrophysiological experiments on neuronal networks. Indeed, it allows for controlled delivery of substances to cells, and it overcomes the limitations due to standard drug stimulation techniques. Finally, the twin network configuration reduces biological variability, which has important outcomes on pharmacological and drug screening.

  5. Integration of microcolumns and microfluidic fractionators on multitasking centrifugal microfluidic platforms for the analysis of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschou, Elizabeth A; Nicholson, Adrianne D; Jia, Guangyao; Zoval, Jim V; Madou, Marc J; Bachas, Leonidas G; Daunert, Sylvia

    2006-06-01

    This work demonstrates the development of microfluidic compact discs (CDs) for protein purification and fractionation integrating a series of microfluidic features, such as microreservoirs, microchannels, and microfluidic fractionators. The CDs were fabricated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and each device contained multiple identical microfluidic patterns. Each pattern employed a microfluidic fractionation feature with operation that was based on the redirection of fluid into an isolation chamber as a result of an overflow. This feature offers the advantage of automated operation without the need for any external manipulation, which is independent of the size and the charge of the fractionated molecules. The performance of the microfluidic fractionator was evaluated by its integration into a protein purification microfluidic architecture. The microfluidic architecture employed a microchamber that accommodated a monolithic microcolumn, the fractionator, and an isolation chamber, which was also utilized for the optical detection of the purified protein. The monolithic microcolumn was polymerized "in situ" on the CD from a monolith precursor solution by microwave-initiated polymerization. This technique enabled the fast, efficient, and simultaneous polymerization of monoliths on disposable CD microfluidic platforms. The design of the CD employed allows the integration of various processes on a single microfluidic device, including protein purification, fractionation, isolation, and detection.

  6. Microfluidic platforms for lab-on-a-chip applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeberle, Stefan; Zengerle, Roland

    2007-09-01

    We review microfluidic platforms that enable the miniaturization, integration and automation of biochemical assays. Nowadays nearly an unmanageable variety of alternative approaches exists that can do this in principle. Here we focus on those kinds of platforms only that allow performance of a set of microfluidic functions--defined as microfluidic unit operations-which can be easily combined within a well defined and consistent fabrication technology to implement application specific biochemical assays in an easy, flexible and ideally monolithically way. The microfluidic platforms discussed in the following are capillary test strips, also known as lateral flow assays, the "microfluidic large scale integration" approach, centrifugal microfluidics, the electrokinetic platform, pressure driven droplet based microfluidics, electrowetting based microfluidics, SAW driven microfluidics and, last but not least, "free scalable non-contact dispensing". The microfluidic unit operations discussed within those platforms are fluid transport, metering, mixing, switching, incubation, separation, droplet formation, droplet splitting, nL and pL dispensing, and detection.

  7. Kinetic ELISA in Microfluidic Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashis Dutta

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe the kinetic ELISA of Blue Tongue and Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease viral antibodies in microfluidic channels by monitoring the rate of generation of the enzyme reaction product under static conditions. It has been shown that this format of the immunoassay allows very reliable quantitation of the target species using inexpensive glass microchips and a standard epifluorescence microscope system coupled to a CCD camera. For the viral antibodies assayed here, the limit of detection (LOD for the analyte concentration in our microchips was established to be 3–5 times lower than that obtained on commercial microwell plates using a fiftieth of the sample volume and less than a third of the incubation time. Our analyses further show that when compared to the end-point ELISA format, the kinetic mode of this assay yields an improvement in the LOD by over an order of magnitude in microfluidic devices. This benefit is primarily realized as the observed variation in the background fluorescence (signal at the start of the enzyme reaction period was significantly larger than that in the rate of signal generation upon repeating these assays in different microchannels/microchips. Because the kinetic ELISA results depend only on the latter quantity, the noise level in them was substantially lower compared to that in its end-point counterpart in which the absolute fluorescence measurements are of greater significance. While a similar benefit was also recorded through implementation of kinetic ELISAs on the microwell platform, the improvement in LOD registered in that system was not as significant as was observed in the case of microfluidic assays.

  8. Fabrication of circular microfluidic network in enzymatically-crosslinked gelatin hydrogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Jiankang, E-mail: jiankanghe@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Chen, Ruomeng; Lu, Yongjie; Zhan, Li; Liu, Yaxiong; Li, Dichen; Jin, Zhongmin

    2016-02-01

    It is a huge challenge to engineer vascular networks in vital organ tissue engineering. Although the incorporation of artificial microfluidic network into thick tissue-engineered constructs has shown great promise, most of the existing microfluidic strategies are limited to generate rectangle cross-sectional channels rather than circular vessels in soft hydrogels. Here we present a facile approach to fabricate branched microfluidic network with circular cross-sections in gelatin hydrogels by combining micromolding and enzymatically-crosslinking mechanism. Partially crosslinked hydrogel slides with predefined semi-circular channels were molded, assembled and in situ fully crosslinked to form a seamless and circular microfluidic network. The bonding strength of the resultant gelatin hydrogels was investigated. The morphology and the dimension of the resultant circular channels were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and micro-computerized tomography (μCT). Computational fluid dynamic simulation shows that the fabrication error had little effect on the distribution of flow field but affected the maximum velocity in comparison with designed models. The microfluidic gelatin hydrogel facilitates the attachment and spreading of human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs) to form a uniform endothelialized layer around the circular channel surface, which successfully exhibited barrier functions. The presented method might provide a simple way to fabricate circular microfluidic networks in biologically-relevant hydrogels to advance various applications of in vitro tissue models, organ-on-a-chip systems and tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A facile method was proposed to build a circular fluidic network in gelatin hydrogel. • The fluidic network is mechanically robust and supports physiological flow. • HUVECs formed endothelialized layer around the channel to express barrier function.

  9. A small-scale, rolled-membrane microfluidic artificial lung designed towards future large area manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A J; Marks, L H; Goudie, M J; Rojas-Pena, A; Handa, H; Potkay, J A

    2017-03-01

    Artificial lungs have been used in the clinic for multiple decades to supplement patient pulmonary function. Recently, small-scale microfluidic artificial lungs (μAL) have been demonstrated with large surface area to blood volume ratios, biomimetic blood flow paths, and pressure drops compatible with pumpless operation. Initial small-scale microfluidic devices with blood flow rates in the μl/min to ml/min range have exhibited excellent gas transfer efficiencies; however, current manufacturing techniques may not be suitable for scaling up to human applications. Here, we present a new manufacturing technology for a microfluidic artificial lung in which the structure is assembled via a continuous "rolling" and bonding procedure from a single, patterned layer of polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS). This method is demonstrated in a small-scale four-layer device, but is expected to easily scale to larger area devices. The presented devices have a biomimetic branching blood flow network, 10 μm tall artificial capillaries, and a 66 μm thick gas transfer membrane. Gas transfer efficiency in blood was evaluated over a range of blood flow rates (0.1-1.25 ml/min) for two different sweep gases (pure O2, atmospheric air). The achieved gas transfer data closely follow predicted theoretical values for oxygenation and CO2 removal, while pressure drop is marginally higher than predicted. This work is the first step in developing a scalable method for creating large area microfluidic artificial lungs. Although designed for microfluidic artificial lungs, the presented technique is expected to result in the first manufacturing method capable of simply and easily creating large area microfluidic devices from PDMS.

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) Perfusion in Abdominal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Lundsgaard; Norling, Rikke; Lauridsen, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    on the market today based on different perfusion algorithms. However, there is no consensus on which protocol and algorithm to use for specific organs. In this article, the authors give an introduction to CT perfusion in abdominal imaging introducing technical aspects for calculation of perfusion parameters......Computed Tomography (CT) Perfusion is an evolving method to visualize perfusion in organs and tissue. With the introduction of multidetector CT scanners, it is now possible to cover up to 16 cm in one rotation, and thereby making it possible to scan entire organs such as the liver with a fixed...... table position. Advances in reconstruction algorithms make it possible to reduce the radiation dose for each examination to acceptable levels. Regarding abdominal imaging, CT perfusion is still considered a research tool, but several studies have proven it as a reliable non-invasive technique...

  11. Microfluidic Approach to Cell Microencapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Varna; Hunckler, Michael; Ramasubramanian, Melur K; Opara, Emmanuel C; Katuri, Kalyan C

    2017-01-01

    Bioartificial pancreas made of insulin-secreting islets cells holds great promise in the treatment of individuals with Type-1 diabetes. Successful islet cell microencapsulation in biopolymers is a key step for providing immunoisolation of transplanted islet cells. Because of the variability in the size and shape of pancreatic islets, one of the main obstacles in their microencapsulation is the inability to consistently control shape, size, and microstructure of the encapsulating biopolymer capsule. In this chapter, we provide a detailed description of a microfluidic approach to islet cell encapsulation in alginate that might address the microencapsulation challenges.

  12. Microfluidics and microscale transport processes

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Suman

    2012-01-01

    With an intense focus on micro- and nanotechnology from a fluidic perspective, this book details the research activities in key directions on both the theoretical and experimental fronts. As part of the IIT Kharagpur Research Monograph series, the text discusses topics such as capillary transport in microchannels, fluid friction and heat transfer in microchannels, electrokinetics, and interfacial transport in nanochannels. It also covers nanoparticle transport in colloidal suspensions, bubble generation in microfluidic channels, micro-heat pipe, the lattice Boltzmann method for phase changing

  13. Pulmonary artery perfusion versus no pulmonary perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buggeskov, Katrine B; Sundskard, Martin M; Jonassen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Absence of pulmonary perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) may be associated with reduced postoperative oxygenation. Effects of active pulmonary artery perfusion were explored in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) undergoing cardiac surgery. METHODS: 90...... perfusion with normothermic oxygenated blood during cardiopulmonary bypass appears to improve postoperative oxygenation in patients with COPD undergoing cardiac surgery. Pulmonary artery perfusion with hypothermic HTK solution does not seem to improve postoperative oxygenation. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER...

  14. Microfluidic Devices: Useful Tools for Bioprocess Intensification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Fernandes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The dawn of the new millennium saw a trend towards the dedicated use of microfluidic devices for process intensification in biotechnology. As the last decade went by, it became evident that this pattern was not a short-lived fad, since the deliverables related to this field of research have been consistently piling-up. The application of process intensification in biotechnology is therefore seemingly catching up with the trend already observed in the chemical engineering area, where the use of microfluidic devices has already been upgraded to production scale. The goal of the present work is therefore to provide an updated overview of the developments centered on the use of microfluidic devices for process intensification in biotechnology. Within such scope, particular focus will be given to different designs, configurations and modes of operation of microreactors, but reference to similar features regarding microfluidic devices in downstream processing will not be overlooked. Engineering considerations and fluid dynamics issues, namely related to the characterization of flow in microchannels, promotion of micromixing and predictive tools, will also be addressed, as well as reflection on the analytics required to take full advantage of the possibilities provided by microfluidic devices in process intensification. Strategies developed to ease the implementation of experimental set-ups anchored in the use of microfluidic devices will be briefly tackled. Finally, realistic considerations on the current advantages and limitation on the use of microfluidic devices for process intensification, as well as prospective near future developments in the field, will be presented.

  15. Layer-by-layer cell membrane assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matosevic, Sandro; Paegel, Brian M.

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic subcellular membrane systems, such as the nuclear envelope or endoplasmic reticulum, present a rich array of architecturally and compositionally complex supramolecular targets that are as yet inaccessible. Here we describe layer-by-layer phospholipid membrane assembly on microfluidic droplets, a route to structures with defined compositional asymmetry and lamellarity. Starting with phospholipid-stabilized water-in-oil droplets trapped in a static droplet array, lipid monolayer deposition proceeds as oil/water-phase boundaries pass over the droplets. Unilamellar vesicles assembled layer-by-layer support functional insertion both of purified and of in situ expressed membrane proteins. Synthesis and chemical probing of asymmetric unilamellar and double-bilayer vesicles demonstrate the programmability of both membrane lamellarity and lipid-leaflet composition during assembly. The immobilized vesicle arrays are a pragmatic experimental platform for biophysical studies of membranes and their associated proteins, particularly complexes that assemble and function in multilamellar contexts in vivo.

  16. Sequence assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Hoffmann, S.; Frankel, Annett Maria

    2009-01-01

    Despite the rapidly increasing number of sequenced and re-sequenced genomes, many issues regarding the computational assembly of large-scale sequencing data have remain unresolved. Computational assembly is crucial in large genome projects as well for the evolving high-throughput technologies...... and plays an important role in processing the information generated by these methods. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the current publicly available sequence assembly programs. We describe the basic principles of computational assembly along with the main concerns, such as repetitive sequences...... in genomic DNA, highly expressed genes and alternative transcripts in EST sequences. We summarize existing comparisons of different assemblers and provide a detailed descriptions and directions for download of assembly programs at: http://genome.ku.dk/resources/assembly/methods.html....

  17. Microfluidic ion-sensing devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R Daniel; Gavalas, Vasilis G; Daunert, Sylvia; Bachas, Leonidas G

    2008-04-14

    Quantitative determinations of ions in a variety of media have been performed traditionally via one of three approaches: optical instrumental methods (e.g., atomic absorption, and inductively-coupled plasma-optical emission or mass spectrometry), "wet" methods, or ion-selective sensors. Each of the approaches, though, possesses limitations including: power/reagent consumption and lack of portability for instrumental techniques; laborious sample-treatment steps for wet methods; and lack of selectivity and sensitivity with sensors when employed with complex samples. Microfluidic device have emerged as a solution to some of these challenges associated with ion analysis. Such systems can integrate multiple sample handling, calibration, and detection steps ("lab-on-a-chip" concept) into a footprint amenable to portability, while requiring small amounts of sample and power. Furthermore, devices can be constructed for multi-analyte detection, either through multiple parallel fluidic architectures or by using arrays of detection elements. This paper reviews recent progress in the development of total-analysis systems for ionic species. Fabrication techniques and various fluid-handling operations are discussed briefly, followed by a number of more mature strategies for microfluidic ion analysis. A variety of approaches expected to comprise the next generation of devices are also presented.

  18. Microfluidic ion-sensing devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R. Daniel [Department of Chemistry, Murray State University, Murray, KY 42071-3346 (United States)], E-mail: daniel.johnson@murraystate.edu; Gavalas, Vasilis G.; Daunert, Sylvia [Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0055 (United States); Bachas, Leonidas G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0055 (United States)], E-mail: bachas@uky.edu

    2008-04-14

    Quantitative determinations of ions in a variety of media have been performed traditionally via one of three approaches: optical instrumental methods (e.g., atomic absorption, and inductively-coupled plasma-optical emission or mass spectrometry), 'wet' methods, or ion-selective sensors. Each of the approaches, though, possesses limitations including: power/reagent consumption and lack of portability for instrumental techniques; laborious sample-treatment steps for wet methods; and lack of selectivity and sensitivity with sensors when employed with complex samples. Microfluidic device have emerged as a solution to some of these challenges associated with ion analysis. Such systems can integrate multiple sample handling, calibration, and detection steps ('lab-on-a-chip' concept) into a footprint amenable to portability, while requiring small amounts of sample and power. Furthermore, devices can be constructed for multi-analyte detection, either through multiple parallel fluidic architectures or by using arrays of detection elements. This paper reviews recent progress in the development of total-analysis systems for ionic species. Fabrication techniques and various fluid-handling operations are discussed briefly, followed by a number of more mature strategies for microfluidic ion analysis. A variety of approaches expected to comprise the next generation of devices are also presented.

  19. Frontal photopolymerization for microfluidic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, João T; Hudson, Steven D; Harrison, Christopher; Douglas, Jack F

    2004-11-09

    Frontal photopolymerization (FPP) offers numerous advantages for the rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices. Quantitative utilization of this method, however, requires a control of the vertical dimensions of the patterned resist material. To address this fundamental problem, we study the ultraviolet (UV) photopolymerization of a series of multifunctional thiolene resists through a combination of experiments and analytical modeling of the polymerization fronts. We describe this nonlinear spatio-temporal growth process in terms of a "minimal" model involving an order parameter phi(x, t) characterizing the extent of monomer-to-polymer conversion, the optical attenuation T(x, t), and the solid front position h(t). The latter exhibits an induction time (or equivalent critical UV dose) characterizing the onset of frontal propagation. We also observe a novel transition between two logarithmic rates of growth, determined by the Beer-Lambert attenuation constants mu(0) and mu(infinity) of the monomer and fully polymerized material, respectively. The measured frontal kinetics and optical transmission of the thiolene resist materials are consistent with our photopolymerization model, exhibiting both "photodarkening" and "photoinvariant" polymerization. This is apparently the first observation of photodarkening reported in FPP. On the basis of these results, multilevel fluidic devices with controlled height are readily fabricated with modulated illumination. A representative two-level microfluidic device, incorporating a chaotic mixer, a T junction, and a series of controlled flow constrictions, illustrates the practical versatility of this fabrication method.

  20. Regadenoson for myocardial perfusion scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Eliana; Pennell, Dudley J

    2010-09-01

    Stress myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) plays a major role in the detection of obstructive coronary artery disease and provides valuable diagnostic and prognostic information to guide clinical decision-making with regard to medical therapy and coronary revascularisation. Current stress techniques for MPS are effective but their use may be limited by reduced tolerability, contraindications and untoward side effects. The recently developed selective adenosine A2A receptor agonists have the potential for improving stress tolerability, hence expanding the indications for functional imaging in the assessment of coronary artery disease. This article reviews the basic principles underlying activation of coronary arteriolar adenosine A2A receptors. It describes the benefits and limitations of current vasodilator stress agents and highlights the effectiveness, side effect profile and tolerability of regadenoson, the only selective adenosine A2A receptor agonist available at present for clinical use. The reader will gain an understanding of the pharmacokinetics and mechanism of action of regadenoson for the assessment of coronary artery disease when combined with myocardial perfusion imaging. The reader will also become aware of the available evidence on the clinical usefulness of regadenoson MPS and its future applications. Selective activation of coronary arteriolar adenosine A2A receptors by regadenoson provides an effective modality of stress for the detection of inducible perfusion abnormality in patients with known or suspected coronary disease. The effectiveness of regadenoson is similar to that of adenosine, but test tolerability is improved with regadenoson. The use of this agent simplifies stress testing and has the potential for expanding the applications of functional imaging to patient populations unsuitable for conventional vasodilator stress with adenosine or dipyridamole.

  1. Probing circulating tumor cells in microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Stratton, Zackary S; Dao, Ming; Ritz, Jerome; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-02-21

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are important targets for study as we strive to better understand, diagnose, and treat cancers. However, CTCs are found in blood at extremely low concentrations; this makes isolation, enrichment, and characterization of CTCs technically challenging. Recently, the development of CTC separation devices has grown rapidly in both academia and industry. Part of this development effort centered on microfluidic platforms, exploiting the advantages of microfluidics to improve CTC separation performance and device integration. In this Focus article, we highlight some of the recent work in microfluidic CTC separation and detection systems and discuss our appraisal of what the field should do next.

  2. Microfluidic Systems for Pathogen Sensing: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Ertl

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Rapid pathogen sensing remains a pressing issue today since conventional identification methodsare tedious, cost intensive and time consuming, typically requiring from 48 to 72 h. In turn, chip based technologies, such as microarrays and microfluidic biochips, offer real alternatives capable of filling this technological gap. In particular microfluidic biochips make the development of fast, sensitive and portable diagnostic tools possible, thus promising rapid and accurate detection of a variety of pathogens. This paper will provide a broad overview of the novel achievements in the field of pathogen sensing by focusing on methods and devices that compliment microfluidics.

  3. Protocols of myocardial perfusion SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Min [College of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-02-15

    In myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, the results of this evaluation now confront the practitioner of nuclear medicine with methodological options. Most nuclear cardiologic studies are performed using thallium-201, Tc-99m sestamibi and Tc-99m tertrofosmin. Some part of these studies use some form of pharmacologic stress test. While tailoring each test to the individual is ideal, this may be impractical for a busy department. Accordingly, established protocols to be used for patients with similar clinical presentations will be helpful. The following review presents methodology of various imaging protocols mainly according to the guidelines of nuclear cardiology procedures in American Society of Nuclear Cardiology.

  4. Pulsatile microfluidics as an analytical tool for determining the dynamic characteristics of microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Søren; Olesen, Laurits Højgaard; Bruus, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of all fluid dynamic time scales is needed to fully understand and hence exploit the capabilities of fluid flow in microfluidic systems. We propose the use of harmonically oscillating microfluidics as an analytical tool for the deduction of these time scales. Furthermore, we......-filled interconnected elastic microfluidic tubes containing a large, trapped air bubble and driven by a pulsatile pressure difference. We demonstrate good agreement between the system-level model and the experimental results, allowing us to determine the dynamic time scales of the system. However, the generic analysis...... can be applied to all microfluidic systems, both ac and dc....

  5. Native extracellular matrix-derived semipermeable, optically transparent, and inexpensive membrane inserts for microfluidic cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondrinos, Mark J; Yi, Yoon-Suk; Wu, Nan-Kun; Ding, Xueting; Huh, Dongeun

    2017-09-12

    Semipermeable cell culture membranes are commonly used in multilayered microfluidic devices to mimic the basement membrane in vivo and to create compartmentalized microenvironments for physiological cell growth and differentiation. However, existing membranes are predominantly made up of synthetic polymers, providing limited capacity to replicate cellular interactions with native extracellular matrices that play a crucial role in the induction of physiological phenotypes. Here we describe a new type of cell culture membranes engineered from native extracellular matrix (ECM) materials that are thin, semipermeable, optically transparent, and amenable to integration into microfluidic cell culture devices. Facile and cost-effective fabrication of these membranes was achieved by controlled sequential steps of vitrification that transformed three-dimensional (3D) ECM hydrogels into structurally stable thin films. By modulating the composition of the ECM, our technique provided a means to tune key membrane properties such as optical transparency, stiffness, and porosity. For microfluidic cell culture, we constructed a multilayered microdevice consisting of two parallel chambers separated by a thin membrane insert derived from different types of ECM. This study showed that our ECM membranes supported attachment and growth of various types of cells (epithelial, endothelial, and mesenchymal cells) under perfusion culture conditions. Our data also revealed the promotive effects of the membranes on adhesion-associated intracellular signaling that mediates cell-ECM interactions. Moreover, we demonstrated the use of these membranes for constructing compartmentalized microfluidic cell culture systems to induce physiological tissue differentiation or to replicate interfaces between different tissue types. Our approach provides a robust platform to produce and engineer biologically active cell culture substrates that serve as promising alternatives to conventional synthetic

  6. Batch fabrication of polymer microfluidic cartridges for QCM sensor packaging by direct bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandström, Niklas; Zandi Shafagh, Reza; Gylfason, Kristinn B.; Haraldsson, Tommy; van der Wijngaart, Wouter

    2017-12-01

    Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensing is an established technique commonly used in laboratory based life-science applications. However, the relatively complex, multi-part design and multi-step fabrication and assembly of state-of-the-art QCM cartridges make them unsuited for disposable applications such as point-of-care (PoC) diagnostics. In this work, we present the uncomplicated manufacturing of QCMs in polymer microfluidic cartridges. Our novel approach comprises two key innovations: the batch reaction injection molding of microfluidic parts; and the integration of the cartridge components by direct, unassisted bonding. We demonstrate molding of batches of 12 off-stoichiometry thiol-ene epoxy polymer (OSTE+) polymer parts in a single molding cycle using an adapted reaction injection molding process; and the direct bonding of the OSTE+  parts to other OSTE+  substrates, to printed circuit boards, and to QCMs. The microfluidic QCM OSTE+  cartridges were successfully evaluated in terms of liquid sealing as well as electrical properties, and the sensor performance characteristics are on par with those of a commercially available QCM biosensor cartridge. The simplified manufacturing of QCM sensors with maintained performance potentializes novel application areas, e.g. as disposable devices in a point of care setting. Moreover, our results can be extended to simplifying the fabrication of other microfluidic devices with multiple heterogeneously integrated components.

  7. Developing a protocol for creating microfluidic devices with a 3D printer, PDMS, and glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collette, Robyn; Novak, Eric; Shirk, Kathryn

    2015-03-01

    Microfluidics research requires the design and fabrication of devices that have the ability to manipulate small volumes of fluid, typically ranging from microliters to picoliters. These devices are used for a wide range of applications including the assembly of materials and testing of biological samples. Many methods have been previously developed to create microfluidic devices, including traditional nanolithography techniques. However, these traditional techniques are cost-prohibitive for many small-scale laboratories. This research explores a relatively low-cost technique using a 3D printed master, which is used as a template for the fabrication of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices. The masters are designed using computer aided design (CAD) software and can be printed and modified relatively quickly. We have developed a protocol for creating simple microfluidic devices using a 3D printer and PDMS adhered to glass. This relatively simple and lower-cost technique can now be scaled to more complicated device designs and applications. Funding provided by the Undergraduate Research Grant Program at Shippensburg University and the Student/Faculty Research Engagement Grants from the College of Arts and Sciences at Shippensburg University.

  8. Implementation of an optimized microfluidic mixer in alumina employing femtosecond laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juodėnas, M.; Tamulevičius, T.; Ulčinas, O.; Tamulevičius, S.

    2018-01-01

    Manipulation of liquids at the lowest levels of volume and dimension is at the forefront of materials science, chemistry and medicine, offering important time and resource saving applications. However, manipulation by mixing is troublesome at the microliter and lower scales. One approach to overcome this problem is to use passive mixers, which exploit structural obstacles within microfluidic channels or the geometry of channels themselves to enforce and enhance fluid mixing. Some applications require the manipulation and mixing of aggressive substances, which makes conventional microfluidic materials, along with their fabrication methods, inappropriate. In this work, implementation of an optimized full scale three port microfluidic mixer is presented in a slide of a material that is very hard to process but possesses extreme chemical and physical resistance—alumina. The viability of the selected femtosecond laser fabrication method as an alternative to conventional lithography methods, which are unable to process this material, is demonstrated. For the validation and optimization of the microfluidic mixer, a finite element method (FEM) based numerical modeling of the influence of the mixer geometry on its mixing performance is completed. Experimental investigation of the laminar flow geometry demonstrated very good agreement with the numerical simulation results. Such a laser ablation microfabricated passive mixer structure is intended for use in a capillary force assisted nanoparticle assembly setup (CAPA).

  9. Regional Cerebral Perfusion in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Yong; Lee, Ki Hyeong; Yoon, Byung Woo; Lee, Sang Bok; Jeon, Beom S. [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Han; Lee, Myung Chul [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-03-15

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a Parkinson-plus syndrome characterized clinically by supranuclear ophthalmoplegia, pseudobulbar palsy, axial rigidity, bradykinesia, postural instability and dementia. Presence of dementia and lack of cortical histopathology suggest the derangement of cortical function by pathological changes in subcortical structures in PSP, which is supported by the pattern of behavioral changes and measurement of brain metabolism using positron emission tomography. This study was done to examine whether there are specific changes of regional cerebral perfusion in PSP and whether there is a correlation between severity of motor abnormaility and degree of changes in cerebral perfusion. We measured regional cerebral perfusion indices in 5 cortical and 2 subcortical areas in 6 patients with a clinical diagnosis of PSP and 6 healthy age and sex matched controls using Tc-99m-HMPAO SPECT. Compared with age and sex matched controls, only superior frontal regional perfusion index was significantly decreased in PSP (p<0.05). There was no correlation between the severity of the motor abnormality and any of the regional cerebral perfusion indices (p>0.05). We affirm the previous reports that perfusion in superior frontal cortex is decreased in PSP. Based on our results that there was no correlation between severity of motor abnormality and cerebral perfusion in the superior frontal cortex, nonmotoric symptoms including dementia needs to be looked at whether there is a correlation with the perfusion abnormality in superior frontal cortex

  10. Oral alprazolam acutely increases nucleus accumbens perfusion

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Daniel H.; Pinkham, Amy E.; Satterthwaite, Theodore D.; Ruparel, Kosha; Elliott, Mark A.; Valdez, Jeffrey; Smith, Mark A.; Detre, John A.; Gur, Ruben C.; Gur, Raquel E.

    2012-01-01

    Benzodiazepines treat anxiety, but can also produce euphoric effects, contributing to abuse. Using perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, we provide the first direct evidence in humans that alprazolam (Xanax) acutely increases perfusion in the nucleus accumbens, a key reward-processing region linked to addiction.

  11. The Use of Nanomaterials and Microfluidics in Medical Diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashley, Jon; Sun, Yi

    2018-01-01

    and manipulation of materials, systems, and devices at the nanometer scale. The development of nanomaterials and nano-devices can be classified into two general approaches. The top down approach deals exclusively with developing nanostructures through machining, templating and lithographic techniques and refers...... to the fabrication and development of microfluidic and nanofluidic devices. The bottom-up approach focuses on the synthesis of nanomaterials from a single atom or molecule and relies on self-assembly or self-organization to produce particles with uniform size and shape. These micro/nanofluidic devices...... and nanomaterials display extraordinary physical and chemical properties which have been exploited for a large number of different novel nanodiagnostic applications. In this chapter, a general overview of nanotechnology for medical diagnostic applications will be given. The chapter will firstly define...

  12. Microfluidic Analytical Separator for Proteomics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a microfluidic device designed to effect a 2-dimensional resolution of a mixture of proteins based on isoelectric point (pI) and molecular...

  13. A Microfluidics Approach to Investigate Axon Guidance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sohn, Lydia L

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this STR project was to demonstrate and explore the capabilities of a novel microfluidic concentration-gradient generator, as it relates to developmental and regenerative neurobiology...

  14. Microfluidic chip based microfiber/nanofiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Tong, Limin

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate three microfluidic chip based microfiber/nanofiber sensors for ultra-sensitive absorption, fluorescence, and femtoliter-scale sensing, respectively. The sensors shown here may open up new opportunities for ultra-sensitive biosensing and single molecule analysis.

  15. Microfluidic Analytical Separator for Proteomics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SHOT proposes an innovative microfluidic device designed to effect a 2-dimensional resolution of a mixture of proteins based on isoelectric point (pI) and molecular...

  16. Microfluidics technology for drug delivery: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancera-Andrade, Elena I; Parsaeimehr, Ali; Arevalo-Gallegos, Alejandra; Ascencio-Favela, Guadalupe; Parra Saldivar, Roberto

    2018-01-01

    Microfluidics is undoubtedly an influential technology that is currently revolutionizing the chemical and biological studies by replicating laboratory bench-top technology on a miniature chip-scale device. In the area of drug delivery science, microfluidics offers advantages, such as precise dosage, ideal delivery, target-precise delivery, sustainable and controlled release, multiple dosing, and slight side effects. These advantages bring significant assets to the drug delivery systems. Microfluidic technology has been progressively used for fabrication of drug carriers, direct drug delivery systems, high-throughput screening, and formulation and immobilization of drugs. This review discusses the recent technological progress, outcomes and available opportunities for the usage of microfluidics systems in drug delivery systems.

  17. Microfluidics for sperm analysis and selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrati, Reza; Graham, Percival J; Zhang, Biao; Riordon, Jason; Lagunov, Alexander; Hannam, Thomas G; Escobedo, Carlos; Jarvi, Keith; Sinton, David

    2017-12-01

    Infertility is a growing global health issue with far-reaching socioeconomic implications. A downward trend in male fertility highlights the acute need for affordable and accessible diagnosis and treatment. Assisted reproductive technologies are effective in treating male infertility, but their success rate has plateaued at ∼33% per cycle. Many emerging opportunities exist for microfluidics - a mature technology in other biomedical areas - in male infertility diagnosis and treatment, and promising microfluidic approaches are under investigation for addressing male infertility. Microfluidic approaches can improve our fundamental understanding of sperm motion, and developments in microfluidic devices that use microfabrication and sperm behaviour can aid semen analysis and sperm selection. Many burgeoning possibilities exist for engineers, biologists, and clinicians to improve current practices for infertility diagnosis and treatment. The most promising avenues have the potential to improve medical practice, moving innovations from research laboratories to clinics and patients in the near future.

  18. Methodology for ventilation/perfusion SPECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajc, Marika; Neilly, Brian; Miniati, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Ventilation/perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (V/Q SPECT) is the scintigraphic technique of choice for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and many other disorders that affect lung function. Data from recent ventilation studies show that the theoretic advantages of Technegas over...... radiolabeled liquid aerosols are not restricted to the presence of obstructive lung disease. Radiolabeled macroaggregated human albumin is the imaging agent of choice for perfusion scintigraphy. An optimal combination of nuclide activities and acquisition times for ventilation and perfusion, collimators......, and imaging matrix yields an adequate V/Q SPECT study in approximately 20 minutes of imaging time. The recommended protocol based on the patient remaining in an unchanged position during the initial ventilation study and the perfusion study allows presentation of matching ventilation and perfusion slices...

  19. Microfluidics for investigating single-cell biodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Cookson, Scott Warren

    2008-01-01

    Progress in synthetic biology requires the development of novel techniques for investigating long-term dynamics in single cells. Here, we demonstrate the utility of microfluidics for investigating single-cell biodynamics within tightly-controlled environments in the model organisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli. First, we develop a microfluidic chemostat for monitoring single-cell gene expression within large populations of S. cerevisiae over many cellular generations. We over...

  20. 3D Printed Multimaterial Microfluidic Valve

    OpenAIRE

    Keating, Steven J.; Gariboldi, Maria Isabella; Patrick, William G.; Sharma, Sunanda; Kong, David S.; Oxman, Neri

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel 3D printed multimaterial microfluidic proportional valve. The microfluidic valve is a fundamental primitive that enables the development of programmable, automated devices for controlling fluids in a precise manner. We discuss valve characterization results, as well as exploratory design variations in channel width, membrane thickness, and membrane stiffness. Compared to previous single material 3D printed valves that are stiff, these printed valves constrain fluidic deform...

  1. Microfluidic Sample Preparation for Immunoassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visuri, S; Benett, W; Bettencourt, K; Chang, J; Fisher, K; Hamilton, J; Krulevitch, P; Park, C; Stockton, C; Tarte, L; Wang, A; Wilson, T

    2001-08-09

    Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are developing means to collect and identify fluid-based biological pathogens in the forms of proteins, viruses, and bacteria. to support detection instruments, they are developing a flexible fluidic sample preparation unit. The overall goal of this Microfluidic Module is to input a fluid sample, containing background particulates and potentially target compounds, and deliver a processed sample for detection. They are developing techniques for sample purification, mixing, and filtration that would be useful to many applications including immunologic and nucleic acid assays. Many of these fluidic functions are accomplished with acoustic radiation pressure or dielectrophoresis. They are integrating these technologies into packaged systems with pumps and valves to control fluid flow through the fluidic circuit.

  2. Microfluidics for single cell analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie Pødenphant

    Isolation and manipulation of single cells have gained an increasing interest from researchers because of the heterogeneity of cells from the same cell culture. Single cell analysis can ensure a better understanding of differences between individual cells and potentially solve a variety of clinical...... problems. In this thesis lab on a chip systems for rare single cell analysis are investigated. The focus was to develop a commercial, disposable device for circulating tumour cell (CTC) analysis. Such a device must be able to separate rare cells from blood samples and subsequently capture the specific...... cells, and simultaneously be fabricated and operated at low costs and be user-friendly. These challenges were addressed through development of two microfluidic devices, one for rare cell isolation based on pinched flow fractionation (PFF) and one for single cell capture based on hydrodynamic trapping...

  3. Sampling by Fluidics and Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Tesař

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Selecting one from several available fluid samples is a procedure often performed especially in chemical engineering. It is usually done by an array of valves sequentially opened and closed. Not generally known is an advantageous alternative: fluidic sampling units without moving parts. In the absence of complete pipe closure, cross-contamination between samples cannot be ruled out. This is eliminated by arranging for small protective flows that clear the cavities and remove any contaminated fluid. Although this complicates the overall circuit layout, fluidic sampling units with these "guard" flows were successfully built and tested. Recent interest in microchemistry leads to additional problems due very low operating Reynolds numbers. This necessitated the design of microfluidic sampling units based on new operating principles.

  4. Solution landscapes in nematic microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, M.; Majumdar, A.; Ramos, A. M.; Griffiths, I. M.

    2017-08-01

    We study the static equilibria of a simplified Leslie-Ericksen model for a unidirectional uniaxial nematic flow in a prototype microfluidic channel, as a function of the pressure gradient G and inverse anchoring strength, B. We numerically find multiple static equilibria for admissible pairs (G , B) and classify them according to their winding numbers and stability. The case G = 0 is analytically tractable and we numerically study how the solution landscape is transformed as G increases. We study the one-dimensional dynamical model, the sensitivity of the dynamic solutions to initial conditions and the rate of change of G and B. We provide a physically interesting example of how the time delay between the applications of G and B can determine the selection of the final steady state.

  5. Finger-Powered Electro-Digital-Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng; Ju, Y Sungtaek

    2017-01-01

    Portable microfluidic devices are promising for point-of-care (POC) diagnosis and bio- and environmental surveillance in resource-constrained or non-laboratory environments. Lateral-flow devices, some built off paper or strings, have been widely developed but the fixed layouts of their underlying wicking/microchannel structures limit their flexibility and present challenges in implementing multistep reactions. Digital microfluidics can circumvent these difficulties by addressing discrete droplets individually. Existing approaches to digital microfluidics, however, often require bulky power supplies/batteries and high voltage circuits. We present a scheme to drive digital microfluidic devices by converting mechanical energy of human fingers to electrical energy using an array of piezoelectric elements. We describe the integration our scheme into two promising digital microfluidics platforms: one based on the electro-wetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) phenomenon and the other on the electrophoretic control of droplet (EPD). Basic operations of droplet manipulations, such as droplet transport, merging and splitting, are demonstrated using the finger-powered digital-microfluidics.

  6. Microfluidic Devices in Advanced Caenorhabditis elegans Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muniesh Muthaiyan Shanmugam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of model organisms is very important in view of their potential for application to human therapeutic uses. One such model organism is the nematode worm, Caenorhabditis elegans. As a nematode, C. elegans have ~65% similarity with human disease genes and, therefore, studies on C. elegans can be translated to human, as well as, C. elegans can be used in the study of different types of parasitic worms that infect other living organisms. In the past decade, many efforts have been undertaken to establish interdisciplinary research collaborations between biologists, physicists and engineers in order to develop microfluidic devices to study the biology of C. elegans. Microfluidic devices with the power to manipulate and detect bio-samples, regents or biomolecules in micro-scale environments can well fulfill the requirement to handle worms under proper laboratory conditions, thereby significantly increasing research productivity and knowledge. The recent development of different kinds of microfluidic devices with ultra-high throughput platforms has enabled researchers to carry out worm population studies. Microfluidic devices primarily comprises of chambers, channels and valves, wherein worms can be cultured, immobilized, imaged, etc. Microfluidic devices have been adapted to study various worm behaviors, including that deepen our understanding of neuromuscular connectivity and functions. This review will provide a clear account of the vital involvement of microfluidic devices in worm biology.

  7. Dynamics of Microvalve Operations in Integrated Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan T. H. Lau

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Pneumatic microvalves are widely used key components for automating liquid manipulation and flow control in microfluidics for more than one decade. Due to their robust operations and the ease of fabrication, tremendous microfluidic systems have been developed with the multiple microvalves for higher throughput and extended functionalities. Therefore, operation performance of the microvalves in the integrated microfluidic devices is crucial to the related applications, in fields such as micro-flows, cell analyses, drug discovery, and physical/chemical detections. It has been reported that operation performance of the microvalves are highly sensitive to the device configuration and pressurization scheme. This implies the further development of integrated microfluidics with a larger number of the valves may suffer the problems of undetermined microvalve behaviors during operations, which can become an unavoidable hurdle in the device design and optimization processes. Herein, we characterize responses of the individual microvalves for different operation configurations, e.g., membrane thicknesses and driving pressures. We investigate also the effects in microfluidics integrated with the more valves, through experiments, modeling and simulations. We show that dynamics of the microvalves is indeed influenced by the configurations, levels of design complexity and positions in the devices. Overall, taken dynamics of the microvalve responses into considerations, this work provides insights and guidelines for better designs of integrated microfluidics for the future applications requiring higher throughput and improved operation performance.

  8. Acoustic Microfluidics for Bioanalytical Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Gabriel

    2013-03-01

    This talk will present new methods the use of ultrasonic standing waves in microfluidic systems to manipulate microparticles for the purpose of bioassays and bioseparations. We have recently developed multi-node acoustic focusing flow cells that can position particles into many parallel flow streams and have demonstrated the potential of such flow cells in the development of high throughput, parallel flow cytometers. These experiments show the potential for the creation of high throughput flow cytometers in applications requiring high flow rates and rapid detection of rare cells. This talk will also present the development of elastomeric capture microparticles and their use in acoustophoretic separations. We have developed simple methods to form elastomeric particles that are surface functionalized with biomolecular recognition reagents. These compressible particles exhibit negative acoustic contrast in ultrasound when suspended in aqueous media, blood serum or diluted blood. These particles can be continuously separated from cells by flowing them through a microfluidic device that uses an ultrasonic standing wave to align the blood cells, which exhibit positive acoustic contrast, at a node in the acoustic pressure distribution while aligning the negative acoustic contrast elastomeric particles at the antinodes. Laminar flow of the separated particles to downstream collection ports allows for collection of the separated negative contrast particles and cells. Separated elastomeric particles were analyzed via flow cytometry to demonstrate nanomolar detection for prostate specific antigen in aqueous buffer and picomolar detection for IgG in plasma and diluted blood samples. This approach has potential applications in the development of rapid assays that detect the presence of low concentrations of biomarkers (including biomolecules and cells) in a number of biological sample types. We acknowledge support through the NSF Research Triangle MRSEC.

  9. Biobased High-Performance Rotary Micromotors for Individually Reconfigurable Micromachine Arrays and Microfluidic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwanoh; Liang, Zexi; Liu, Minliang; Fan, Donglei Emma

    2017-02-22

    In this work, we report an innovative type of rotary biomicromachines by using diatom frustules as integrated active components, including the assembling, operation, and performance characterization. We further investigate and demonstrate unique applications of the biomicromachines in achieving individually reconfigurable micromachine arrays and microfluidic mixing. Diatom frustules are porous cell walls of diatoms made of silica. We assembled rotary micromachines consisting of diatom frustules serving as rotors and patterned magnets serving as bearings in electric fields. Ordered arrays of micromotors can be integrated and rotated with controlled orientation and a speed up to ∼3000 rpm, one of the highest rotational speeds in biomaterial-based rotary micromachines. Moreover, by exploiting the distinct electromechanical properties of diatom frustules and metallic nanowires, we realized the first reconfigurable rotary micro/nanomachine arrays with controllability in individual motors. Finally, the diatom micromachines are successfully integrated in microfluidic channels and operated as mixers. This work demonstrated the high-performance rotary micromachines by using bioinspired diatom frustules and their applications, which are essential for low-cost bio-microelectromechanical system/nanoelectromechanical system (bio-MEMS/NEMS) devices and relevant to microfluidics.

  10. Ex vivo recapitulation of trauma-induced coagulopathy and preliminary assessment of trauma patient platelet function under flow using microfluidic technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruizhi; Elmongy, Hanna; Sims, Carrie; Diamond, Scott L

    2016-03-01

    Relevant to trauma-induced coagulopathy diagnostics, microfluidic assays allow controlled hemodynamics for testing of platelet and coagulation function using whole blood. Hemodilution or hyperfibrinolysis was studied under flow with modified healthy whole blood. Furthermore, platelet function was also measured using whole blood from trauma patients admitted to a Level I trauma center. Platelet deposition was measured with PPACK-inhibited blood perfused over collagen surfaces at a wall shear rate of 200 s, whereas platelet/fibrin deposition was measured with corn trypsin inhibitor-treated blood perfused over tissue factor (TF)/collagen. In hemodilution studies, PPACK-treated blood displayed almost no platelet deposition when diluted to 10% hematocrit with saline, platelet-poor plasma, or platelet-rich plasma. Using similar dilutions, platelet/fibrin deposition was essentially absent for corn trypsin inhibitor-treated blood perfused over TF/collagen. To mimic hyperfibrinolysis during trauma, exogenous tissue plasminogen activator (50 nM) was added to blood before perfusion over TF/collagen. At both venous and arterial flows, the generation and subsequent lysis of fibrin were detectable within 6 minutes, with lysis blocked by addition of the plasmin inhibitor, ε-aminocaproic acid. Microfluidic assay of PPACK-inhibited whole blood from trauma patients revealed striking defects in collagen response and secondary platelet aggregation in 14 of 21 patients, whereas platelet hyperfunction was detected in three of 20 patients. Rapid microfluidic detection of (1) hemodilution-dependent impairment of clotting, (2) clot instability because of lysis, (3) blockade of fibrinolysis, or (4) platelet dysfunction during trauma may provide novel diagnostic opportunities to predict trauma-induced coagulopathy risk.

  11. Rapid fabrication of microfluidic polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell in PDMS by surface patterning of perfluorinated ion-exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yong-Ak; Han, Jongyoon [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Batista, Candy [Roxbury Community College, 1234 Columbus Ave., Roxbury Crossing, MA 02120 (United States); Sarpeshkar, Rahul [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a simple and rapid fabrication method for a microfluidic polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which has become the de facto standard material in BioMEMS. Instead of integrating a Nafion sheet film between two layers of a PDMS device in a traditional ''sandwich format,'' we pattern a perfluorinated ion-exchange resin such as a Nafion resin on a glass substrate using a reversibly bonded PDMS microchannel to generate an ion-selective membrane between the fuel-cell electrodes. After this patterning step, the assembly of the microfluidic fuel cell is accomplished by simple oxygen plasma bonding between the PDMS chip and the glass substrate. In an example implementation, the planar PEM microfluidic fuel cell generates an open circuit voltage of 600-800 mV and delivers a maximum current output of nearly 4 {mu}A. To enhance the power output of the fuel cell we utilize self-assembled colloidal arrays as a support matrix for the Nafion resin. Such arrays allow us to increase the thickness of the ion-selective membrane to 20 {mu}m and increase the current output by 166%. Our novel fabrication method enables rapid prototyping of microfluidic fuel cells to study various ion-exchange resins for the polymer electrolyte membrane. Our work will facilitate the development of miniature, implantable, on-chip power sources for biomedical applications. (author)

  12. Integration and detection of biochemical assays in digital microfluidic LOC devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malic, Lidija; Brassard, Daniel; Veres, Teodor; Tabrizian, Maryam

    2010-02-21

    The ambition of lab-on-a-chip (LOC) systems to achieve chip-level integration of a complete analytical process capable of performing a complex set of biomedical protocols is hindered by the absence of standard fluidic components able to be assembled. As a result, most microfluidic platforms built to date are highly specialized and designed to fulfill the requirements of a single particular application within a limited set of operations. Electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) digital microfluidic technology has been recently introduced as a new methodology in the quest for LOC systems. Herein, unit volume droplets are manipulated along electrode arrays, allowing a microfluidic function to be reduced to a set of basic operations. The highly reprogrammable architecture of these systems can satisfy the needs of a diverse set of biochemical assays and ensure reconfigurability, flexibility and portability between different categories of applications and requirements. While important progress was made over past years in the fabrication, miniaturization and function programming of the basic EWOD fluidic operations, the success of this technology will in great part depend on the ability of researchers to couple or integrate digital microfluidics to detection approaches that can make the system competitive for LOC applications. The detection techniques should be able to circumvent the limitations of hydrophobic surfaces and exploit the advantages of the array format, high droplet transport speeds and rapid mixing schemes. This review provides an in-depth look at recent developments for the coupling and integration of detection techniques with digital microfluidic platforms for bio-chemical applications.

  13. Fluid Mixing for Low-Power 'Digital Microfluidics' Using Electroactive Molecular Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Maria Serena; Casalini, Stefano; Georgakopoulos, Stamatis; Barbalinardo, Marianna; Parkula, Vitaliy; Crivillers, Núria; Rovira, Concepció; Greco, Pierpaolo; Mas-Torrent, Marta

    2017-12-27

    A switchable electrode, which relies on an indium-tin oxide conductive substrate coated with a self-assembled monolayer terminated with an anthraquinone group (AQ), is reported as an electrowetting system. AQ electrochemical features confer the capability of yielding a significant modulation of surface wettability as high as 26° when its redox state is switched. Hence, an array of planar electrodes for droplets actuation is fabricated and integrated in a microfluidic device to perform mixing and dispensing on sub-nanoliter scale. Vehiculation of cells across microfluidic compartments is made possible by taking full advantage of surface electrowetting in culture medium. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Review of Microfluidic Photobioreactor Technology for Metabolic Engineering and Synthetic Biology of Cyanobacteria and Microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Tang Yang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available One goal of metabolic engineering and synthetic biology for cyanobacteria and microalgae is to engineer strains that can optimally produce biofuels and commodity chemicals. However, the current workflow is slow and labor intensive with respect to assembly of genetic parts and characterization of production yields because of the slow growth rates of these organisms. Here, we review recent progress in the microfluidic photobioreactors and identify opportunities and unmet needs in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. Because of the unprecedented experimental resolution down to the single cell level, long-term real-time monitoring capability, and high throughput with low cost, microfluidic photobioreactor technology will be an indispensible tool to speed up the development process, advance fundamental knowledge, and realize the full potential of metabolic engineering and synthetic biology for cyanobacteria and microalgae.

  15. Development and multiplexed control of latching pneumatic valves using microfluidic logical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, William H; Ivester, Robin H C; Jensen, Erik C; Mathies, Richard A

    2006-05-01

    Novel latching microfluidic valve structures are developed, characterized, and controlled independently using an on-chip pneumatic demultiplexer. These structures are based on pneumatic monolithic membrane valves and depend upon their normally-closed nature. Latching valves consisting of both three- and four-valve circuits are demonstrated. Vacuum or pressure pulses as short as 120 ms are adequate to hold these latching valves open or closed for several minutes. In addition, an on-chip demultiplexer is demonstrated that requires only n pneumatic inputs to control 2(n-1) independent latching valves. These structures can reduce the size, power consumption, and cost of microfluidic analysis devices by decreasing the number of off-chip controllers. Since these valve assemblies can form the standard logic gates familiar in electronic circuit design, they should be useful in developing complex pneumatic circuits.

  16. Compartmentalized 3D Tissue Culture Arrays under Controlled Microfluidic Delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gümüscü, B.; Albers, Hugo J.; Van Den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Van Der Meer, Andries D.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate an in vitro microfluidic cell culture platform that consists of periodic 3D hydrogel compartments with controllable shapes. The microchip is composed of approximately 500 discontinuous collagen gel compartments locally patterned in between PDMS pillars, separated by microfluidic

  17. Field-free particle focusing in microfluidic plugs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kurup, G. K; Basu, Amar S

    2012-01-01

    Particle concentration is a key unit operation in biochemical assays. Although there are many techniques for particle concentration in continuous-phase microfluidics, relatively few are available in multiphase (plug-based) microfluidic...

  18. Unilamellar Vesicle Formation and Encapsulation by Microfluidic Jetting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jeanne C. Stachowiak; David L. Richmond; Thomas H. Li; Allen P. Liu; Sapun H. Parekh; Daniel A. Fletcher

    2008-01-01

    ...) using a pulsed microfluidic jet. Akin to blowing a bubble, the microfluidic jet deforms a planar lipid bilayer into a vesicle that is filled with solution from the jet and separates from the planar bilayer...

  19. Myocardial perfusion abnormalities in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Al-Humaidi

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: We found a high prevalence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients. Perfusion abnormalities on myocardial perfusion SPECT images were associated with disease duration, insulin use, nephropathy, and neuropathy. Asymptomatic diabetic patients might be candidates with CAD abnormalities that can be studied using myocardial perfusion SPECT.

  20. An easy-to-use microfluidic interconnection system to create quick and reversibly interfaced simple microfluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfreundt, Andrea; Andersen, Karsten Brandt; Dimaki, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The presented microfluidic interconnection system provides an alternative for the individual interfacing of simple microfluidic devices fabricated in polymers such as polymethylmethacrylate, polycarbonate and cyclic olefin polymer. A modification of the device inlet enables the direct attachment...

  1. Isolation of cancer cells by "in situ" microfluidic biofunctionalization protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Vitis, Stefania; Matarise, Giuseppina; Pardeo, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is the development of a microfluidic immunosensor for the immobilization of cancer cells and their separation from healthy cells by using "in situ" microfluidic biofunctionalization protocols. These protocols allow to link antibodies on microfluidic device surfaces and can be...

  2. Controlling two-phase flow in microfluidic systems using electrowetting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, H.

    2011-01-01

    Electrowetting (EW)-based digital microfluidic systems (DMF) and droplet-based two-phase flow microfluidic systems (TPF) with closed channels are the most widely used microfluidic platforms. In general, these two approaches have been considered independently. However, integrating the two

  3. New microfluidic platform for life sciences in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hugo, S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available : Components of the lab-on-a disc platform: microfluidic device and control and testing system Microfluidic device The microfluidic discs are made from polycarbonate and pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) layers. The channels and chambers of the device...

  4. Mapping of enzyme kinetics on a microfluidic device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rho, Hoon Suk; Hanke, Alexander Thomas; Ottens, Marcel; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.

    2016-01-01

    A microfluidic platform or “microfluidic mapper” is demonstrated, which in a single experiment performs 36 parallel biochemical reactions with 36 different combinations of two reagents in stepwise concentration gradients. The volume used in each individual reaction was 36 nl. With the microfluidic

  5. Feasibility of simultaneous PET-MR perfusion using a novel cardiac perfusion phantom

    OpenAIRE

    O'Doherty, James; SAMMUT, EVA; Schleyer, Paul; Stirling, James; Nazir, Muhummad Sohaib; Marsden, Paul K.; Chiribiri, Amedeo

    2017-01-01

    Background: PET-MR scanners are beginning to be employed for quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging. In order to examine simultaneous perfusion calculations, this work describes a feasibility study of simultaneous PET-MR of gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) and PET radiotracer in a novel cardiac perfusion phantom. Results: [18F]F- and GBCA were injected simultaneously into a cardiac phantom using a range of ground-truth myocardial perfusion rates of 1 to 5 ml/g/min. PET quantification...

  6. Pharmacokinetic profile that reduces nephrotoxicity of gentamicin in a perfused kidney-on-a-chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sejoong; LesherPerez, Sasha Cai; Kim, Byoung Choul C; Yamanishi, Cameron; Labuz, Joseph M; Leung, Brendan; Takayama, Shuichi

    2016-03-24

    Nephrotoxicity is often underestimated because renal clearance in animals is higher compared to in humans. This paper aims to illustrate the potential to fill in such pharmacokinetic gaps between animals and humans using a microfluidic kidney model. As an initial demonstration, we compare nephrotoxicity of a drug, administered at the same total dosage, but using different pharmacokinetic regimens. Kidney epithelial cell, cultured under physiological shear stress conditions, are exposed to gentamicin using regimens that mimic the pharmacokinetics of bolus injection or continuous infusion in humans. The perfusion culture utilized is important both for controlling drug exposure and for providing cells with physiological shear stress (1.0 dyn cm(-2)). Compared to static cultures, perfusion culture improves epithelial barrier function. We tested two drug treatment regimens that give the same gentamycin dose over a 24 h period. In one regimen, we mimicked drug clearance profiles for human bolus injection by starting cell exposure at 19.2 mM of gentamicin and reducing the dosage level by half every 2 h over a 24 h period. In the other regimen, we continuously infused gentamicin (3 mM for 24 h). Although junctional protein immunoreactivity was decreased with both regimens, ZO-1 and occludin fluorescence decreased less with the bolus injection mimicking regimen. The bolus injection mimicking regimen also led to less cytotoxicity and allowed the epithelium to maintain low permeability, while continuous infusion led to an increase in cytotoxicity and permeability. These data show that gentamicin disrupts cell-cell junctions, increases membrane permeability, and decreases cell viability particularly with prolonged low-level exposure. Importantly a bolus injection mimicking regimen alleviates much of the nephrotoxicity compared to the continuous infused regimen. In addition to potential relevance to clinical gentamicin administration regimens, the results are important in

  7. Valve Concepts for Microfluidic Cell Handling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grabowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present various pneumatically actuated microfluidic valves to enable user-defined fluid management within a microfluidic chip. To identify a feasible valve design, certain valve concepts are simulated in ANSYS to investigate the pressure dependent opening and closing characteristics of each design. The results are verified in a series of tests. Both the microfluidic layer and the pneumatic layer are realized by means of soft-lithographic techniques. In this way, a network of channels is fabricated in photoresist as a molding master. By casting these masters with PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane we get polymeric replicas containing the channel network. After a plasma-enhanced bonding process, the two layers are irreversibly bonded to each other. The bonding is tight for pressures up to 2 bar. The valves are integrated into a microfluidic cell handling system that is designed to manipulate cells in the presence of a liquid reagent (e.g. PEG – polyethylene glycol, for cell fusion. For this purpose a user-defined fluid management system is developed. The first test series with human cell lines show that the microfluidic chip is suitable for accumulating cells within a reaction chamber, where they can be flushed by a liquid medium.

  8. Material Biocompatibility for PCR Microfluidic Chips

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2010-04-23

    As part of the current miniaturization trend, biological reactions and processes are being adapted to microfluidics devices. PCR is the primary method employed in DNA amplification, its miniaturization is central to efforts to develop portable devices for diagnostics and testing purposes. A problem is the PCR-inhibitory effect due to interaction between PCR reagents and the surrounding environment, which effect is increased in high-surface-are-to-volume ration microfluidics. In this study, we evaluated the biocompatibility of various common materials employed in the fabrication of microfluidic chips, including silicon, several kinds of silicon oxide, glasses, plastics, wax, and adhesives. Two-temperature PCR was performed with these materials to determine their PCR-inhibitory effect. In most of the cases, addition of bovine serum albumin effectively improved the reaction yield. We also studied the individual PCR components from the standpoint of adsorption. Most of the materials did not inhibit the DNA, whereas they did show noticeable interaction with the DNA polymerase. Our test, instead of using microfluidic devices, can be easily conducted in common PCR tubes using a standard bench thermocycler. Our data supports an overview of the means by which the materials most bio-friendly to microfluidics can be selected.

  9. A novel microfluidic model to mimic the turbid nature and microvasculature of cutaneous tissue for optical imaging experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Ahmed, Midhat; Klämpfl, Florian; Stelzle, Florian; Schmidt, Michael

    2015-12-01

    To provide clinically relevant insights into the device performance of an optical imaging approach to reconstruct the superficial cutaneous micro-circulation (skin angiography), a phantom device with turbid matrix and perfusable micro-vessels is essential. In this work, we describe a novel microfluidic-based device to mimic the micro-vessels and the turbid nature of the epidermis and dermis. This phantom device contains a hollow assay with a diameter of the channels of 50 μm. The hollow assay includes the geometry of the inlet, the river-like assay, and the outlet, which can be perfused by e.g. meta-hemoglobin solution. This imitates the superficial micro-circulation in the skin. The absorption coefficient μa and the reduced scattering coefficient μs' are adjusted to match those of skin. As an application case, we attempt to reconstruct a 2-D velocity field of the hemoglobin flow in the scattering microfluidic device via the Doppler-mode of an OCT.

  10. MRI of pulmonary perfusion; MRT der Lungenperfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, C. [Klinikum Grosshadern der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (Germany). Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Abteilung Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Risse, F.; Semmler, W. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Abteilung Medizinische Physik in der Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Schoenberg, S.O.; Reiser, M.F. [Klinikum Grosshadern der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (Germany). Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie; Kauczor, H.-U. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Abteilung Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-04-15

    Lung perfusion is a crucial prerequisite for effective gas exchange. Quantification of pulmonary perfusion is important for diagnostic considerations and treatment planning in various diseases of the lungs. Besides disorders of pulmonary vessels such as acute pulmonary embolism and pulmonary hypertension, these also include diseases of the respiratory tract and lung tissue as well as pulmonary tumors. This contribution presents the possibilities and technical requirements of MRI for diagnostic work-up of pulmonary perfusion. (orig.) [German] Die Perfusion der Lunge ist eine entscheidende Voraussetzung fuer einen effektiven Gasaustausch. Die Bestimmung der Lungenperfusion ist bei verschiedenen Erkrankungen der Lunge fuer Diagnostik und Therapieplanung bedeutsam. Hierzu zaehlen neben Erkrankungen der Lungengefaesse wie akute Lungenembolie und pulmonale Hypertension ebenso Erkrankungen der Atemwege, des Lungengeruests und Lungentumoren. In diesem Beitrag werden die Moeglichkeiten und technischen Voraussetzungen der MRT zur Diagnostik der Lungenperfusion dargestellt. (orig.)

  11. Quality assessment of a placental perfusion protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Line; Mose, Tina; Mørck, Thit Juul

    2010-01-01

    Validation of in vitro test systems using the modular approach with steps addressing reliability and relevance is an important aim when developing in vitro tests in e.g. reproductive toxicology. The ex vivo human placental perfusion system may be used for such validation, here presenting the plac......Validation of in vitro test systems using the modular approach with steps addressing reliability and relevance is an important aim when developing in vitro tests in e.g. reproductive toxicology. The ex vivo human placental perfusion system may be used for such validation, here presenting...... the placental perfusion model in Copenhagen including control substances. The positive control substance antipyrine shows no difference in transport regardless of perfusion media used or of terms of delivery (n=59, p

  12. Multimodal microfluidic platform for controlled culture and analysis of unicellular organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Tao; Smallwood, Chuck R.; Bredeweg, Erin L.; Pomraning, Kyle R.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Baker, Scott E.; Evans, James E.; Kelly, Ryan T.

    2017-09-01

    Modern live-cell imaging approaches permit real-time visualization of biological processes, yet limitations exist for unicellular organism isolation, culturing and long-term imaging that preclude fully understanding how cells sense and respond to environmental perturbations and the link between single-cell variability and whole-population dynamics. Here we present a microfluidic platform that provides fine control over the local environment with the capacity to replace media components at any experimental time point, and provides both perfused and compartmentalized cultivation conditions depending on the valve configuration. The functionality and flexibility of the platform were validated using both bacteria and yeast having different sizes, motility and growth media. The demonstrated ability to track the growth and dynamics of both motile and non-motile prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms emphasizes the versatility of the devices, which with further scale-up should enable studies in bioenergy and environmental research.

  13. Electrowetting dynamics of microfluidic actuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K-L; Jones, T B

    2005-04-26

    When voltage is suddenly applied to vertical, parallel dielectric-coated electrodes dipped into a liquid with finite conductivity, the liquid responds by rising up to reach a new hydrostatic equilibrium height. On the microfluidic scale, the dominating mechanism impeding this electromechanically induced actuation appears to be a dynamic friction force that is directly proportional to the velocity of the contact line moving along the solid surface. This mechanism has its origin in the molecular dynamics of the liquid coming into contact with the solid surface. A simple reduced-order model for the rising column of liquid is used to quantify the magnitude of this frictional effect by providing estimates for the contact line friction coefficient. Above some critical threshold of voltage, the electromechanical force is clamped, presumably by the same mechanism responsible for contact angle saturation and previously reported static height-of-rise limits. The important distinction for the dynamic case is that the onset of the saturation effect is delayed in time until the column has risen more than about halfway to its static equilibrium height.

  14. Compact dynamic microfluidic iris array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmle, Christina; Doering, Christoph; Steuer, Anna; Fouckhardt, Henning

    2011-09-01

    A dynamic microfluidic iris is realized. Light attenuation is achieved by absorption of an opaque liquid (e.g. black ink). The adjustment of the iris diameter is achieved by fluid displacement via a transparent elastomer (silicone) half-sphere. This silicone calotte is hydraulically pressed against a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrate as the bottom window, such that the opaque liquid is squeezed away, this way opening the iris. With this approach a dynamic range of more than 60 dB can be achieved with response times in the ms to s regime. The design allows the realization of a single iris as well as an iris array. So far the master for the molded silicone structure was fabricated by precision mechanics. The aperture diameter was changed continuously from 0 to 8 mm for a single iris and 0 to 4 mm in case of a 3 x 3 iris array. Moreover, an iris array was combined with a PMMA lens array into a compact module, the distance of both arrays equaling the focal length of the lenses. This way e.g. spatial frequency filter arrays can be realized. The possibility to extend the iris array concept to an array with many elements is demonstrated. Such arrays could be applied e.g. in light-field cameras.

  15. Fabrication of microfluidic integrated biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Tijjani; Dhahi, Th S.; Mohammed, Mohammed; Hashim, U.; Noriman, N. Z.; Dahham, Omar S.

    2017-09-01

    An event of miniaturizing for sensor systems to carry out biological diagnostics are gaining wade spread acceptance. The system may contain several different sensor units for the detection of specific analyte, the analyte to be detected might be any kind of biological molecules (DNA, mRNA or proteins) or chemical substances. In most cases, the detection is based on receptor-ligand binding like DNA hybridization or antibody-antigen interaction, achieving this on a nanostructure. DNA or protein must be attached to certain locations within the structure. Critical for this is to have a robust binding chemistry to the surface in the microstructure. Here we successfully designed and fabricated microfluidics element for passive fluid delivery into polysilicon Nanowire sensing domain, we further demonstrated a very simple and effective way of integrating the two devices to give full functionalities of laboratory on a single chip. The sensing element was successfully surface modified and tested on real biomedical clinical sample for evaluation and validation.

  16. Droplet Microfluidics for Virus Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotem, Assaf; Cockrell, Shelley; Guo, Mira; Pipas, James; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    The ability to detect, isolate, and characterize an infectious agent is important for diagnosing and curing infectious diseases. Detecting new viral diseases is a challenge because the number of virus particles is often low and/or localized to a small subset of cells. Even if a new virus is detected, it is difficult to isolate it from clinical or environmental samples where multiple viruses are present each with very different properties. Isolation is crucial for whole genome sequencing because reconstructing a genome from fragments of many different genomes is practically impossible. We present a Droplet Microfluidics platform that can detect, isolate and sequence single viral genomes from complex samples containing mixtures of many viruses. We use metagenomic information about the sample of mixed viruses to select a short genomic sequence whose genome we are interested in characterizing. We then encapsulate single virions from the same sample in picoliter volume droplets and screen for successful PCR amplification of the sequence of interest. The selected drops are pooled and their contents sequenced to reconstruct the genome of interest. This method provides a general tool for detecting, isolating and sequencing genetic elements in clinical and environmental samples.

  17. Particle Image Velocimetry for Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhart, Carl; Chiu, Richard; Santiago, Juan

    1997-11-01

    A micro PIV system is being developed to measure velocity vectors with spatial resolutions of the order of several microns. Advancements in microfabrication technologies have facilitated the development of many new microfluidic devices. These devices present new and challenging fluid problems at the micro-scale, which are not present at the macro-scale. In general, analysis of fluid problems at the micron-scale have often been limited to measuring only bulk properties of the flow field. Lanzillotto et al. (1996) have used x-ray tomography to obtain whole-field velocity measurements in 500 - 1000 micron diameter tubes. They report velocity-vector spacings of roughly 40 microns. The current research is an attempt to extend the super-resolution PIV technique of Keane et al. (1995), to address fluid mechanics problems in microfabricated devices. Here, 50 - 200 nm diameter particles are imaged using an epi-fluorescent microscope and a scientific-grade CCD camera. Particles are illuminated by a continuously emitting Mercury arc lamp or by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The spatial resolution of optical techniques are fundamentally limited by the diffraction of light. We will discuss the ultimate spatial and temporal resolution limits of PIV for micro-flows, and report recent experimental.

  18. Microfluidics of soft granular gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Ryan; Bhattacharjee, Tapomoy; Sawyer, W. Gregory; Angelini, Thomas E.

    Microfluidic methods for encapsulating cells and particles typically involve drop making with two immiscible fluids. The main materials constraint in this approach is surface tension, creating inherent instability between the two fluids. We can eliminate this instability by using miscible inner and outer phases. This is achieved by using granular micro gels which are chemically miscible but physically do not mix. These microgels are yield stress materials, so they flow as solid plugs far from shear gradients, and fluidize where gradients are generated - near an injection nozzle for example. We have found that tuning the yield stress of the material by varying polymer concentration, device performance can be controlled. The solid like behavior of the gel allows us to produces infinitely stable jets that maintain their integrity and configuration over long distances and times. These properties can be combined and manipulated to produce discrete particulate bunches of an inner phase, flowing inside of an outer phase, well enough even to print a Morse code message suspended within flow chambers about a millimeter in diameter moving at millimeters a second.

  19. Microfluidic Pumps Containing Teflon [Trademark] AF Diaphragms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Peter; White, Victor; Grunthaner, Frank; Ikeda, Mike; Mathies, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Microfluidic pumps and valves based on pneumatically actuated diaphragms made of Teflon AF polymers are being developed for incorporation into laboratory-on-a-chip devices that must perform well over temperature ranges wider than those of prior diaphragm-based microfluidic pumps and valves. Other potential applications include implanted biomedical microfluidic devices, wherein the biocompatability of Teflon AF polymers would be highly advantageous. These pumps and valves have been demonstrated to function stably after cycling through temperatures from -125 to 120 C. These pumps and valves are intended to be successors to similar prior pumps and valves containing diaphragms made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) [commonly known as silicone rubber]. The PDMS-containing valves ae designed to function stably only within the temperature range from 5 to 80 C. Undesirably, PDMS membranes are somwehat porous and retain water. PDMS is especially unsuitable for use at temperatures below 0 C because the formation of ice crystals increases porosity and introduces microshear.

  20. Design and Testing of Digital Microfluidic Biochips

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Yang

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive methodology for automated design, test and diagnosis, and use of robust, low-cost, and manufacturable digital microfluidic systems. It focuses on the development of a comprehensive CAD optimization framework for digital microfluidic biochips that unifies different design problems. With the increase in system complexity and integration levels, biochip designers can utilize the design methods described in this book to evaluate different design alternatives, and carry out design-space exploration to obtain the best design point. Describes practical design automation tools that address different design problems (e.g., synthesis, droplet routing, control-pin mapping, testing and diagnosis, and error recovery) in a unified manner; Applies test pattern generation and error-recovery techniques for digital microfluidics-based biochips; Uses real bioassays as evaluation examples, e.g., multiplexed in vitro human physiological fluids diagnostics, PCR, protein crystallization.  

  1. Bridging Flows: Microfluidic End‐User Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabourin, David

    . A second practical challenge users face stems from the peripheral equipment, e.g. pumps, required to drive microfluidic devices. This equipment is often costly and bulky and results in limitations and restrictions on microfluidic device operation, such as the number of channels or devices which can...... be actuated or microscopic observation. To address the above issues interconnection and pumping solutions were developed. Methods for creating multiple, aligned, parallel and planar interconnections well suited to microscopy are described. Both reusable, non‐integrated, and permanent, integrated...... interconnection solutions are presented. The construction of twelve and eight channel miniaturized, mechanically actuated peristaltic pumps is also described. The small footprint of the pumps allows their placement adjacent to microfluidic devices and on microscope stages. The reusable, non...

  2. Molecular Imaging Probe Development using Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kan; Wang, Ming-Wei; Lin, Wei-Yu; Phung, Duy Linh; Girgis, Mark D.; Wu, Anna M.; Tomlinson, James S.; Shen, Clifton K.-F.

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, we review the latest advancement of microfluidics in molecular imaging probe development. Due to increasing needs for medical imaging, high demand for many types of molecular imaging probes will have to be met by exploiting novel chemistry/radiochemistry and engineering technologies to improve the production and development of suitable probes. The microfluidic-based probe synthesis is currently attracting a great deal of interest because of their potential to deliver many advantages over conventional systems. Numerous chemical reactions have been successfully performed in micro-reactors and the results convincingly demonstrate with great benefits to aid synthetic procedures, such as purer products, higher yields, shorter reaction times compared to the corresponding batch/macroscale reactions, and more benign reaction conditions. Several ‘proof-of-principle’ examples of molecular imaging probe syntheses using microfluidics, along with basics of device architecture and operation, and their potential limitations are discussed here. PMID:22977436

  3. Temperature Sensing in Modular Microfluidic Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisna C. Bhargava

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A discrete microfluidic element with integrated thermal sensor was fabricated and demonstrated as an effective probe for process monitoring and prototyping. Elements were constructed using stereolithography and market-available glass-bodied thermistors within the modular, standardized framework of previous discrete microfluidic elements demonstrated in the literature. Flow rate-dependent response due to sensor self-heating and microchannel heating and cooling was characterized and shown to be linear in typical laboratory conditions. An acid-base neutralization reaction was performed in a continuous flow setting to demonstrate applicability in process management: the ratio of solution flow rates was varied to locate the equivalence point in a titration, closely matching expected results. This element potentially enables complex, three-dimensional microfluidic architectures with real-time temperature feedback and flow rate sensing, without application specificity or restriction to planar channel routing formats.

  4. Recent Advancements towards Full-Systems Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Miled

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidics is quickly becoming a key technology in an expanding range of fields, such as medical sciences, biosensing, bioactuation, chemical synthesis, and more. This is helping its transformation from a promising R&D tool to commercially viable technology. Fuelling this expansion is the intensified focus on automation and enhanced functionality through integration of complex electrical control, mechanical properties, in situ sensing and flow control. Here we highlight recent contributions to the Sensors Special Issue series called “Microfluidics-Based Microsystem Integration Research” under the following categories: (i Device fabrication to support complex functionality; (ii New methods for flow control and mixing; (iii Towards routine analysis and point of care applications; (iv In situ characterization; and (v Plug and play microfluidics.

  5. A self-triggered picoinjector in microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiming Yang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Droplet-based microfluidics has recently emerged as a potential platform for studies of single-cell, directed evolution, and genetic sequencing. In droplet-based microfluidics, adding reagents into drops is one of the most important functions. In this paper, we develop a new self-triggered picoinjector to add controlled volumes of reagent into droplets at kilohertz rates. In the picoinjector, the reagent injecting is triggered by the coming droplet itself, without needing a droplet detection module. Meanwhile, the dosing volume can be precisely controlled. These features make the system more practical and reliable. We expect the new picoinjector will find important applications of droplet-based microfluidics in automated biological assay, directed evolution, enzyme assay, and so on.

  6. A self-triggered picoinjector in microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yiming; Liu, Songsheng; Jia, Chunping; Mao, Hongju; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong; Zhou, Hongbo

    2016-12-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics has recently emerged as a potential platform for studies of single-cell, directed evolution, and genetic sequencing. In droplet-based microfluidics, adding reagents into drops is one of the most important functions. In this paper, we develop a new self-triggered picoinjector to add controlled volumes of reagent into droplets at kilohertz rates. In the picoinjector, the reagent injecting is triggered by the coming droplet itself, without needing a droplet detection module. Meanwhile, the dosing volume can be precisely controlled. These features make the system more practical and reliable. We expect the new picoinjector will find important applications of droplet-based microfluidics in automated biological assay, directed evolution, enzyme assay, and so on.

  7. Recent Advancements towards Full-System Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miled, Amine; Greener, Jesse

    2017-07-25

    Microfluidics is quickly becoming a key technology in an expanding range of fields, such as medical sciences, biosensing, bioactuation, chemical synthesis, and more. This is helping its transformation from a promising R&D tool to commercially viable technology. Fuelling this expansion is the intensified focus on automation and enhanced functionality through integration of complex electrical control, mechanical properties, in situ sensing and flow control. Here we highlight recent contributions to the Sensors Special Issue series called "Microfluidics-Based Microsystem Integration Research" under the following categories: (i) Device fabrication to support complex functionality; (ii) New methods for flow control and mixing; (iii) Towards routine analysis and point of care applications; (iv) In situ characterization; and (v) Plug and play microfluidics.

  8. Preparation of nanoparticles by continuous-flow microfluidics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahn, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.jahn@nist.gov; Reiner, Joseph E.; Vreeland, Wyatt N. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States); DeVoe, Don L. [University of Maryland (United States); Locascio, Laurie E.; Gaitan, Michael [National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States)

    2008-08-15

    We review a variety of micro- and nanoparticle formulations produced with microfluidic methods. A diverse variety of approaches to generate microscale and nanoscale particles has been reported. Here we emphasize the use of microfluidics, specifically microfluidic systems that operate in a continuous flow mode, thereby allowing continuous generation of desired particle formulations. The generation of semiconductor quantum dots, metal colloids, emulsions, and liposomes is considered. To emphasize the potential benefits of the continuous-flow microfluidic methodology for nanoparticle generation, preliminary data on the size distribution of liposomes formed using the microfluidic approach is compared to the traditional bulk alcohol injection method.

  9. Microfluidic Platform with In-Chip Electrophoresis Coupled to Mass Spectrometry for Monitoring Neurochemical Release from Nerve Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangtang; Hu, Hankun; Zhao, Shulin; Liu, Yi-Ming

    2016-05-17

    Chemical stimulus-induced neurotransmitter release from neuronal cells is well-documented. However, the dynamic changes in neurochemical release remain to be fully explored. In this work, a three-layered microfluidic chip was fabricated and evaluated for studying the dynamics of neurotransmitter release from PC-12 cells. The chip features integration of a nanoliter sized chamber for cell perfusion, pneumatic pressure valves for fluidic control, a microfluidic channel for electrophoretic separation, and a nanoelectrospray emitter for ionization in MS detection. Deploying this platform, a microchip electrophoresis-mass spectrometric method (MCE-MS) was developed to simultaneously quantify important neurotransmitters, including dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), aspartic acid (Asp), and glutamic acid (Glu) without need for labeling or enrichment. Monitoring neurotransmitter release from PC-12 cells exposed to KCl (or alcohol) revealed that all four neurotransmitters investigated were released. Two release patterns were observed, one for the two monoamine neurotransmitters (i.e., DA and 5-HT) and another for the two amino acid neurotransmitters. Release dynamics for the two monoamine neurotransmitters was significantly different. The cells released DA most quickly and heavily in response to the stimulation. After exposure to the chemical stimulus for 4 min, the DA level in the perfusate from the cells was 86% lower than that at the beginning. Very interestingly, the cells started to release 5-HT in large quantities when they stopped releasing DA. These results suggest that DA and 5-HT are packaged into different vesicle pools and they are mobilized differently in response to chemical stimuli. The microfluidic platform proposed is proven useful for monitoring cellular release in biological studies.

  10. Microfluidic cell microarray platform for high throughput analysis of particle-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Ziqiu; Rajeev, Gayathri; Guo, Keying; Ivask, Angela; McCormick, Scott; Lombi, Enzo; Priest, Craig; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2018-03-02

    With the advances in nanotechnology, particles with various size, shape, surface chemistry and composition can be easily produced. Nano- and microparticles have been extensively explored in many industrial and clinical applications. Ensuring that the particles themselves are not possessing any toxic effects to the biological system is of paramount importance. This paper describes a proof of concept method in which a microfluidic system is used in conjunction with a cell microarray technique aiming to streamline the analysis of particle-cell interaction in a high throughput manner. Polymeric microparticles, with different particle surface functionalities, were firstly used to investigate the efficiency of particle-cell adhesion under dynamic flow. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs,10 nm in diameter) perfused at different concentrations (0 to 20 μg/ml) in parallel streams over the cells in the microchannel exhibited higher toxicity compared to the static culture in the 96 well plate format. This developed microfluidic system can be easily scaled up to accommodate larger number of microchannels for high throughput analysis of potential toxicity of a wide range of particles in a single experiment.

  11. Determination of glucose flux in live myoblasts by microfluidic nanosensing and mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambon, Alessandro; Zoso, Alice; Luni, Camilla; Frommer, Wolf B; Elvassore, Nicola

    2014-03-01

    Glucose is the main energy source for cells in an organism and its blood concentration is tightly regulated in healthy individuals. However, impaired blood glucose control has been found in diseases such as metabolic syndrome and diabetes, and anomalous glucose utilization in cancer tissues. Dissecting the dynamics of the different phenomena involved in glucose handling (extracellular mass transport, membrane diffusion, and intracellular phosphorylation) is very relevant to identify which mechanisms are disrupted under disease conditions. In this work, we developed an effective methodology for quantitatively analyzing these phenomena in living cells. A measurement of steady-state glucose uptake is, by itself, insufficient to determine the dynamics of intracellular glucose. For this purpose, we integrated two types of measurements: cytosolic glucose concentration at the single-cell level, obtained using a cytosolic FRET nanosensor, and cell population glucose uptake, obtained without perturbing culture conditions using a microfluidic perfusion system. Microfluidics enabled accurate temporal stimulation of cells through cyclic pulses of glucose concentration at defined flow rates. We found that both, glucose uptake and phosphorylation, are linearly dependent on glucose concentration in the physiological range. Mathematical modeling enabled precise determination of the kinetic constants of membrane transport (0.27 s(-1)) and intracellular phosphorylation (2.01 s(-1)).

  12. A High-Throughput Automated Microfluidic Platform for Calcium Imaging of Taste Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsing Hsiao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The human enteroendocrine L cell line NCI-H716, expressing taste receptors and taste signaling elements, constitutes a unique model for the studies of cellular responses to glucose, appetite regulation, gastrointestinal motility, and insulin secretion. Targeting these gut taste receptors may provide novel treatments for diabetes and obesity. However, NCI-H716 cells are cultured in suspension and tend to form multicellular aggregates, preventing high-throughput calcium imaging due to interferences caused by laborious immobilization and stimulus delivery procedures. Here, we have developed an automated microfluidic platform that is capable of trapping more than 500 single cells into microwells with a loading efficiency of 77% within two minutes, delivering multiple chemical stimuli and performing calcium imaging with enhanced spatial and temporal resolutions when compared to bath perfusion systems. Results revealed the presence of heterogeneity in cellular responses to the type, concentration, and order of applied sweet and bitter stimuli. Sucralose and denatonium benzoate elicited robust increases in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. However, glucose evoked a rapid elevation of intracellular Ca2+ followed by reduced responses to subsequent glucose stimulation. Using Gymnema sylvestre as a blocking agent for the sweet taste receptor confirmed that different taste receptors were utilized for sweet and bitter tastes. This automated microfluidic platform is cost-effective, easy to fabricate and operate, and may be generally applicable for high-throughput and high-content single-cell analysis and drug screening.

  13. Integrated Microfluidic Sensor System with Magnetostrictive Resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Cai

    2011-12-08

    The present embodiments describe a method that integrates a magnetostrictive sensor with driving and detecting elements into a microfluidic chip to detect a chemical, biochemical or biomedical species. These embodiments may also measure the properties of a fluid such as viscosity, pH values. The whole system can be referred to lab-on-a-chip (LOC) or micro-total-analysis-systems (.mu.TAS). In particular, this present embodiments include three units, including a microfluidics unit, a magnetostrictive sensor, and driving/detecting elements. An analyzer may also be provided to analyze an electrical signal associated with a feature of a target specimen.

  14. Recent Advances in Applications of Droplet Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Lung Chou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Droplet-based microfluidics is a colloidal and interfacial system that has rapidly progressed in the past decade because of the advantages of low fabrication costs, small sample volumes, reduced analysis durations, high-throughput analysis with exceptional sensitivity, enhanced operational flexibility, and facile automation. This technology has emerged as a new tool for many recently used applications in molecular detection, imaging, drug delivery, diagnostics, cell biology and other fields. Herein, we review recent applications of droplet microfluidics proposed since 2013.

  15. Diffusion dynamics in microfluidic dye lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersborg-Hansen, Morten; Balslev, Søren; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the bleaching dynamics that occur in opto-fluidic dye lasers, where the liquid laser dye in a channel is locally bleached due to optical pumping. Our studies suggest that for micro-fluidic devices, the dye bleaching may be compensated through diffusion of dye molecules alone....... By relying on diffusion rather than convection to generate the necessary dye replenishment, our observation potentially allows for a significant simplification of opto-fluidic dye laser device layouts, omitting the need for cumbersome and costly external fluidic handling or on-chip micro-fluidic pumping...

  16. From Single Microparticles to Microfluidic Emulsification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinoshita, K.; Ortiz, Elisa Parra; Hussein, Abdirazak

    2016-01-01

    The micropipette manipulation technique is capable of making fundamental single particle measurements and analyses. This information is critical for establishing processing parameters in systems such as microfluidics and homogenization. To demonstrate what can be achieved at the single particle......) micelles was directly visualized microscopically for the first time by the micropipette technique, showing that such micellization could increase the solubility of Ibp from 4 to 80 mM at 100 mM SDS. We also introduce a particular microfluidic device that has recently been used to make PLGA microspheres...

  17. Investigating Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in a Liver-on-a-Chip Microfluidic Device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuele Gori

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a chronic liver disease worldwide, ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, which may progress to cirrhosis, eventually leading to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. HCC ranks as the third highest cause of cancer-related death globally, requiring an early diagnosis of NAFLD as a potential risk factor. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying NAFLD are still under investigation. So far, many in vitro studies on NAFLD have been hampered by the limitations of 2D culture systems, in which cells rapidly lose tissue-specific functions. The present liver-on-a-chip approach aims at filling the gap between conventional in vitro models, often scarcely predictive of in vivo conditions, and animal models, potentially biased by their xenogeneic nature.HepG2 cells were cultured into a microfluidically perfused device under free fatty acid (FFA supplementation, namely palmitic and oleic acid, for 24h and 48h. The device mimicked the endothelial-parenchymal interface of a liver sinusoid, allowing the diffusion of nutrients and removal of waste products similar to the hepatic microvasculature. Assessment of intracellular lipid accumulation, cell viability/cytotoxicity and oxidative stress due to the FFA overload, was performed by high-content analysis methodologies using fluorescence-based functional probes.The chip enables gradual and lower intracellular lipid accumulation, higher hepatic cell viability and minimal oxidative stress in microfluidic dynamic vs. 2D static cultures, thus mimicking the chronic condition of steatosis observed in vivo more closely.Overall, the liver-on-a-chip system provides a suitable culture microenvironment, representing a more reliable model compared to 2D cultures for investigating NAFLD pathogenesis. Hence, our system is amongst the first in vitro models of human NAFLD developed within a microfluidic device in a sinusoid-like fashion, endowing a more permissive

  18. Microfluidic Apps for off-the-shelf instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Daniel; von Stetten, Felix; Zengerle, Roland

    2012-07-21

    Within the last decade a huge increase in research activity in microfluidics could be observed. However, despite several commercial success stories, microfluidic chips are still not sold in high numbers in mass markets so far. Here we promote a new concept that could be an alternative approach to commercialization: designing microfluidic chips for existing off-the-shelf instruments. Such "Microfluidic Apps" could significantly lower market entry barriers and provide many advantages: developers of microfluidic chips make use of existing equipment or platforms and do not have to develop instruments from scratch; end-users can profit from microfluidics without the need to invest in new equipment; instrument manufacturers benefit from an expanded customer base due to the new applications that can be implemented in their instruments. Microfluidic Apps could be considered as low-cost disposables which can easily be distributed globally via web-shops. Therefore they could be a door-opener for high-volume mass markets.

  19. Regional cortical hyper perfusion on perfusion CT during postical motor deficit: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, Hye Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    Postictal neurologic deficit is a well-known complication mimicking the manifestation of a stroke. We present a case of a patient with clinical evidence of Todd's paralysis correlating with reversible postictal parenchymal changes on perfusion CT and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In this case, perfusion CT and MR imaging were helpful in the differential diagnosis of stroke-mimicking conditions.

  20. Thermoplastic elastomer with advanced hydrophilization and bonding performances for rapid (30 s) and easy molding of microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachaux, Julie; Alcaine, Clara; Gómez-Escoda, Blanca; Perrault, Cécile M; Duplan, David Olea; Wu, Pei-Yun Jenny; Ochoa, Iñaki; Fernandez, Luis; Mercier, Olaf; Coudreuse, Damien; Roy, Emmanuel

    2017-07-25

    One of the most important areas of research on microfluidic technologies focuses on the identification and characterisation of novel materials with enhanced properties and versatility. Here we present a fast, easy and inexpensive microstructuration method for the fabrication of novel, flexible, transparent and biocompatible microfluidic devices. Using a simple hot press, we demonstrate the rapid (30 s) production of various microfluidic prototypes embossed in a commercially available soft thermoplastic elastomer (sTPE). This styrenic block copolymer (BCP) material is as flexible as PDMS and as thermoformable as classical thermoplastics. It exhibits high fidelity of replication using SU-8 and epoxy master molds in a highly convenient low-isobar (0.4 bar) and iso-thermal process. Microfluidic devices can then be easily sealed using either a simple hot plate or even a room-temperature assembly, allowing them to sustain liquid pressures of 2 and 0.6 bar, respectively. The excellent sorption and biocompatibility properties of the microchips were validated via a standard rhodamine dye assay as well as a sensitive yeast cell-based assay. The morphology and composition of the surface area after plasma treatment for hydrophilization purposes are stable and show constant and homogenous distribution of block nanodomains (∼22° after 4 days). These domains, which are evenly distributed on the nanoscale, therefore account for the uniform and convenient surface of a "microfluidic scale device". To our knowledge, this is the first thermoplastic elastomer material that can be used for fast and reliable fabrication and assembly of microdevices while maintaining a high and stable hydrophilicity.

  1. On-chip bioassay using immobilized sensing bacteria in three-dimensional microfluidic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Hirofumi; Maehana, Koji; Kamidate, Tamio

    2007-01-01

    An on-chip whole-cell bioassay has been carried out using Escherichia coli tester strains for genotoxicity. In this assay format, the mutagen-responsive bioluminescence (BL) strains are immobilized in a chip assembly in which a silicon chip is placed between two poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) chips. In the chip assembly, microchannels fabricated on the two separate PDMS layers are connected via perforated microwells on the Si chip, and thus a three-dimensional microfluidic network is constructed. The strains mixed with agarose are loaded from the channels on one of the two PDMS layers into the wells on Si chip, followed by gelation. Induction of the expression of firefly luciferase in the tester strains and BL reaction are successively carried out by filling the channels on another PDMS layer with samples containing inducer (genotoxic substance) and then adenosine triphosphate/luciferin mixture, respectively. BL emission from each of the wells can be monitored by using a charge-coupled device camera to obtain an overall picture of the chip. The on-chip format based on a three-dimensional microfluidic network provides a combinatorial bioassay for multiple samples with multiple tester strains in a simple chip assembly. Thus, the presented method could be applied not only to various microbial sensing applications but also to other (bio)chemical analyses.

  2. Rapid, low-cost prototyping of centrifugal microfluidic devices for effective implementation of various microfluidic operations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hugo, S

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available particularly attractive solution for implementing microfluidic operations, as pumps, valves and other fluidic operations can be achieved primarily using centrifugal forces, with only a small motor required to power the system. Numerous devices can...

  3. Microfluidics' great promise for Biology - Microfluidics as a new engine for the molecular sciences

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2010-06-04

    History of the Life Sciences Origins of life Discoveries and instrumentation The power of genetic variation Diagnostics based on DNA/ protein variation Genomic scanning providers DNA sequencing companies Microfluidics story Commercial products available P

  4. Development & Characterization of Multifunctional Microfluidic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucar, Ahmet Burak

    The field of microfluidics has been mostly investigated for miniaturized lab on a chip devices for analytical and clinical applications. However, there is an emerging class of "smart" microfluidic materials, combining microfluidics with soft polymers to yield new functionalities. The best inspiration for such materials found in nature is skin, whose functions are maintained and controlled by a vascular "microfluidic" network. We report here the development and characterization of a few new classes of microfluidic materials. First, we introduced microfluidic materials that can change their stiffness on demand. These materials were based on an engineered microchannel network embedded into a matrix of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), whose channels were filled with a liquid photoresist (SU- 8). The elastomer filled with the photoresist was initially soft. The materials were shaped into a desired geometry and then exposed to UV-light. Once photocured, the material preserved the defined shape and it could be bent, twisted or stretched with a very high recoverable strain. As soon as the external force was removed the material returned back to its predefined shape. Thus, the polymerized SU-8 acted as the 'endoskeleton' of the microfluidic network, which drastically increased the composite's elastic and bending moduli. Second, we demonstrated a class of simple and versatile soft microfluidic materials that can be turned optically transparent or colored on demand. These materials were made in the form of flexible sheets containing a microchannel network embedded in PDMS, similar to the photocurable materials. However, this time the channels were filled with a glycerolwater mixture, whose refractive index was matched with that of the PDMS matrix. By pumping such dye solutions into the channel network and consecutively replacing the medium, we showed that we can control the material's color and light transmittance in the visible and near-infrared regions, which can be used for

  5. GPU-accelerated voxelwise hepatic perfusion quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Cao, Y

    2012-09-07

    Voxelwise quantification of hepatic perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging greatly contributes to assessment of liver function in response to radiation therapy. However, the efficiency of the estimation of hepatic perfusion parameters voxel-by-voxel in the whole liver using a dual-input single-compartment model requires substantial improvement for routine clinical applications. In this paper, we utilize the parallel computation power of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate the computation, while maintaining the same accuracy as the conventional method. Using compute unified device architecture-GPU, the hepatic perfusion computations over multiple voxels are run across the GPU blocks concurrently but independently. At each voxel, nonlinear least-squares fitting the time series of the liver DCE data to the compartmental model is distributed to multiple threads in a block, and the computations of different time points are performed simultaneously and synchronically. An efficient fast Fourier transform in a block is also developed for the convolution computation in the model. The GPU computations of the voxel-by-voxel hepatic perfusion images are compared with ones by the CPU using the simulated DCE data and the experimental DCE MR images from patients. The computation speed is improved by 30 times using a NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU compared to a 2.67 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. To obtain liver perfusion maps with 626 400 voxels in a patient's liver, it takes 0.9 min with the GPU-accelerated voxelwise computation, compared to 110 min with the CPU, while both methods result in perfusion parameters differences less than 10(-6). The method will be useful for generating liver perfusion images in clinical settings.

  6. Simple perfusion apparatus for manipulation, tracking, and study of oocytes and embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angione, Stephanie L; Oulhen, Nathalie; Brayboy, Lynae M; Tripathi, Anubhav; Wessel, Gary M

    2015-01-01

    To develop and implement a device and protocol for oocyte analysis at a single cell level. The device must be capable of high resolution imaging, temperature control, perfusion of media, drugs, sperm, and immunolabeling reagents all at defined flow rates. Each oocyte and resultant embryo must remain spatially separated and defined. Experimental laboratory study. University and academic center for reproductive medicine. Women with eggs retrieved for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles, adult female FVBN and B6C3F1 mouse strains, sea stars. Real-time, longitudinal imaging of oocytes after fluorescent labeling, insemination, and viability tests. Cell and embryo viability, immunolabeling efficiency, live cell endocytosis quantification, precise metrics of fertilization, and embryonic development. Single oocytes were longitudinally imaged after significant changes in media, markers, endocytosis quantification, and development, all with supreme control by microfluidics. Cells remained viable, enclosed, and separate for precision measurements, repeatability, and imaging. We engineered a simple device to load, visualize, experiment, and effectively record individual oocytes and embryos without loss of cells. Prolonged incubation capabilities provide longitudinal studies without need for transfer and potential loss of cells. This simple perfusion apparatus provides for careful, precise, and flexible handling of precious samples facilitating clinical IVF approaches. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Microfluidic Impedance Flow Cytometry Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Electrical Property Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Jian Chen; Chengcheng Xue; Yang Zhao; Deyong Chen; Min-Hsien Wu; Junbo Wang

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for high-throughput electrical property characterization of single cells. Four major perspectives of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell characterization are included in this review: (1) early developments of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell electrical property characterization; (2) microfluidic impedance flow cytometry with enhanced sensitivity; (3) microfluidic impedance ...

  8. Microfluidic actuation of insulating liquid droplets in a parallel-plate device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Jones, T. B.

    2011-06-01

    In droplet-based microfluidics, the simultaneous movement and manipulation of dielectric and aqueous droplets on a single platform is important. The actuation forces on both dielectric and aqueous droplets can be calculated with an electromechanical model using an equivalent RC circuit. This model predicts that dielectric droplet actuation can be made compatible with electrowetting-based water droplet manipulation if the oil droplet is immersed in water. Operations such as transporting, splitting, merging, and dispensing of dielectric droplets at voltages less than 100 V are demonstrated in a parallel-plate structure. Such capability opens the way to fully automated assembly line formation of single-emulsion droplets.

  9. [An automatic system controlled by microcontroller for carotid sinus perfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, X L; Wang, M Y; Fan, Z Z; He, R R

    2001-08-01

    To establish a new method for controlling automatically the carotid perfusion pressure. A cheap practical automatic perfusion unit based on AT89C2051 micro controller was designed. The unit, LDB-M perfusion pump and the carotid sinus of an animal constituted an automatic perfusion system. This system was able to provide ramp and stepwise updown perfusion pattern and has been used in the research of baroreflex. It can insure the precision and reproducibility of perfusion pressure curve, and improve the technical level in corresponding medical field.

  10. A microfluidic device integrating plasmonic nanodevices for Raman spectroscopy analysis on trapped single living cells

    KAUST Repository

    Perozziello, Gerardo

    2013-11-01

    In this work we developed a microfluidic device integrating nanoplasmonic devices combined with fluidic trapping regions. The microfuidic traps allow to capture single cells in areas where plasmonic sensors are placed. In this way it is possible to perform Enhanced Raman analysis on the cell membranes. Moreover, by changing direction of the flux it is possible to change the orientation of the cell in the trap, so that it is possible to analyze different points of the membrane of the same cell. We shows an innovative procedure to fabricate and assembly the microfluidic device which combine photolithography, focused ion beam machining, and hybrid bonding between a polymer substrate and lid of Calcium fluoride. This procedure is compatible with the fabrication of the plasmonic sensors in close proximity of the microfluidic traps. Moreover, the use of Calcium fluoride as lid allows full compatibility with Raman measurements producing negligible Raman background signal and avoids Raman artifacts. Finally, we performed Raman analysis on cells to monitor their oxidative stress under particular non physiological conditions. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Spatial height directed microfluidic synthesis of transparent inorganic upconversion nano film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Zhu, Cheng; Liao, Wei; Jin, Junyang; Ni, Yaru; Lu, Chunhua; Xu, Zhongzi

    2017-11-01

    A microfluidic-based synthesis of an inorganic upconversion nano film has been developed with a large area of dense-distributed NaYF4 crystal grains in a silica glass micro-reactor and the film exhibits high transparence, strong upconversion luminescence and robust adhesion with the substrate. The spatial heights of micro-reactors are tuned between 31 and 227 mm, which can regulate flow regimes. The synergistic effect of spatial height and fluid regime is put forward, which influences diffusion paths and assembly ways of different precursor molecules and consequently directs final distributions and morphologies of crystal grains, as well as optical properties due to diversity of surface and thickness of films. The spatial height of 110 mm is advantageous for high transmittance of upconversion film due to the flat surface and appropriate film thickness of 67 nm. The height of 150 mm is in favor of uniform distribution of upconversion fluorescence and achieving the strongest fluorescence due to minimized optical loss. Such a transparent upconversion film with a large area of uniform distribution is promising to promote the application of upconversion materials and spatial height directed microfluidic regime have a certain significance on many microfluidic synthesis.

  12. Myocardial perfusion imaging with dual energy CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Kwang Nam [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Radiology, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); De Cecco, Carlo N. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Caruso, Damiano [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Rome (Italy); Tesche, Christian [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Munich (Germany); Spandorfer, Adam; Varga-Szemes, Akos [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Stress dual-energy sCTMPI offers the possibility to directly detect the presence of myocardial perfusion defects. • Stress dual-energy sCTMPI allows differentiating between reversible and fixed myocardial perfusion defects. • The combination of coronary CT angiography and dual-energy sCTMPI can improve the ability of CT to detect hemodynamically relevant coronary artery disease. - Abstract: Dual-energy CT (DECT) enables simultaneous use of two different tube voltages, thus different x-ray absorption characteristics are acquired in the same anatomic location with two different X-ray spectra. The various DECT techniques allow material decomposition and mapping of the iodine distribution within the myocardium. Static dual-energy myocardial perfusion imaging (sCTMPI) using pharmacological stress agents demonstrate myocardial ischemia by single snapshot images of myocardial iodine distribution. sCTMPI gives incremental values to coronary artery stenosis detected on coronary CT angiography (CCTA) by showing consequent reversible or fixed myocardial perfusion defects. The comprehensive acquisition of CCTA and sCTMPI offers extensive morphological and functional evaluation of coronary artery disease. Recent studies have revealed that dual-energy sCTMPI shows promising diagnostic accuracy for the detection of hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease compared to single-photon emission computed tomography, invasive coronary angiography, and cardiac MRI. The aim of this review is to present currently available DECT techniques for static myocardial perfusion imaging and recent clinical applications and ongoing investigations.

  13. Microfluidic desalination techniques and their potential applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, Susan Helena; van den Berg, Albert; Odijk, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    In this review we discuss recent developments in the emerging research field of miniaturized desalination. Traditionally desalination is performed to convert salt water into potable water and research is focused on improving performance of large-scale desalination plants. Microfluidic desalination

  14. Differential white cell count by centrifugal microfluidics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, Gregory Jon; Tentori, Augusto M.; Schaff, Ulrich Y.

    2010-07-01

    We present a method for counting white blood cells that is uniquely compatible with centrifugation based microfluidics. Blood is deposited on top of one or more layers of density media within a microfluidic disk. Spinning the disk causes the cell populations within whole blood to settle through the media, reaching an equilibrium based on the density of each cell type. Separation and fluorescence measurement of cell types stained with a DNA dye is demonstrated using this technique. The integrated signal from bands of fluorescent microspheres is shown to be proportional to their initial concentration in suspension. Among the current generation of medical diagnostics are devices based on the principle of centrifuging a CD sized disk functionalized with microfluidics. These portable 'lab on a disk' devices are capable of conducting multiple assays directly from a blood sample, embodied by platforms developed by Gyros, Samsung, and Abaxis. [1,2] However, no centrifugal platform to date includes a differential white blood cell count, which is an important metric complimentary to diagnostic assays. Measuring the differential white blood cell count (the relative fraction of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes) is a standard medical diagnostic technique useful for identifying sepsis, leukemia, AIDS, radiation exposure, and a host of other conditions that affect the immune system. Several methods exist for measuring the relative white blood cell count including flow cytometry, electrical impedance, and visual identification from a stained drop of blood under a microscope. However, none of these methods is easily incorporated into a centrifugal microfluidic diagnostic platform.

  15. Porous Microfluidic Devices - Fabrication adn Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, J.; Geerken, M.J.; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Wessling, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    The major part of microfluidic devices nowadays consists of a dense material that defines the fluidic structure. A generic fabrication method enabling the production of completely porous micro devices with user-defined channel networks is developed. The channel walls can be used as a (selective)

  16. Integrated microfluidic biochips for DNA microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Robin Hui; Dill, Kilian; Fuji, H Sho; McShea, Andy

    2006-03-01

    A fully integrated and self-contained microfluidic biochip device has been developed to automate the fluidic handling steps required to perform a gene expression study of the human leukemia cell line (K-562). The device consists of a DNA microarray semiconductor chip with 12,000 features and a microfluidic cartridge that consists of microfluidic pumps, mixers, valves, fluid channels and reagent storage chambers. Microarray hybridization and subsequent fluidic handling and reactions (including a number of washing and labeling steps) were performed in this fully automated and miniature device before fluorescent image scanning of the microarray chip. Electrochemical micropumps were integrated in the cartridge to provide pumping of liquid solutions. A micromixing technique based on gas bubbling generated by electrochemical micropumps was developed. Low-cost check valves were implemented in the cartridge to prevent cross-talk of the stored reagents. A single-color transcriptional analysis of K-562 cells with a series of calibration controls (spiked-in controls) was performed to characterize this new platform with regard to sensitivity, specificity and dynamic range. The device detected sample RNAs with a concentration as low as 0.375 pM. Detection was quantitative over more than 3 orders of magnitude. Experiments also demonstrated that chip-to-chip variability was low, indicating that the integrated microfluidic devices eliminate manual fluidic handling steps that can be a significant source of variability in genomic analysis.

  17. Inventions Utilizing Microfluidics and Colloidal Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, David W.; Gong, Tieying; Oakey, John; Terray, Alexander V.; Wu, David T.

    2009-01-01

    Several related inventions pertain to families of devices that utilize microfluidics and/or colloidal particles to obtain useful physical effects. The families of devices can be summarized as follows: (1) Microfluidic pumps and/or valves wherein colloidal-size particles driven by electrical, magnetic, or optical fields serve as the principal moving parts that propel and/or direct the affected flows. (2) Devices that are similar to the aforementioned pumps and/or valves except that they are used to manipulate light instead of fluids. The colloidal particles in these devices are substantially constrained to move in a plane and are driven to spatially order them into arrays that function, variously, as waveguides, filters, or switches for optical signals. (3) Devices wherein the ultra-laminar nature of microfluidic flows is exploited to effect separation, sorting, or filtering of colloidal particles or biological cells in suspension. (4) Devices wherein a combination of confinement and applied electrical and/or optical fields forces the colloidal particles to become arranged into three-dimensional crystal lattices. Control of the colloidal crystalline structures could be exploited to control diffraction of light. (5) Microfluidic devices, incorporating fluid waveguides, wherein switching of flows among different paths would be accompanied by switching of optical signals.

  18. Microfluidic manipulation with artificial/bioinspired cilia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Toonder, Jaap M. J.; Onck, Patrick R.

    A recent development, inspired by nature, is the use of 'artificial cilia' to create pumping and/or mixing in microfluidic devices. Cilia are small hairs that can be found in biology and are used for (fluid) actuation and sensing. Microscopic actuators resembling cilia, actuated to move under the

  19. Microfluidics with ultrasound-driven bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marmottant, P.; Marmottant, P.G.M.; Raven, J.P.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Bomer, Johan G.; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Hilgenfeldt, S.

    2006-01-01

    Microstreaming from oscillating bubbles is known to induce vigorous vortex flow. Here we show how to harness the power of bubble streaming in an experiment to achieve directed transport flow of high velocity, allowing design and manufacture of microfluidic MEMS devices. By combining oscillating

  20. Review of Recent Metamaterial Microfluidic Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Ahmed; Lim, Sungjoon

    2018-01-15

    Metamaterial elements/arrays exhibit a sensitive response to fluids yet with a small footprint, therefore, they have been an attractive choice to realize various sensing devices when integrated with microfluidic technology. Micro-channels made from inexpensive biocompatible materials avoid any contamination from environment and require only microliter-nanoliter sample for sensing. Simple design, easy fabrication process, light weight prototype, and instant measurements are advantages as compared to conventional (optical, electrochemical and biological) sensing systems. Inkjet-printed flexible sensors find their utilization in rapidly growing wearable electronics and health-monitoring flexible devices. Adequate sensitivity and repeatability of these low profile microfluidic sensors make them a potential candidate for point-of-care testing which novice patients can use reliably. Aside from degraded sensitivity and lack of selectivity in all practical microwave chemical sensors, they require an instrument, such as vector network analyzer for measurements and not readily available as a self-sustained portable sensor. This review article presents state-of-the-art metamaterial inspired microfluidic bio/chemical sensors (passive devices ranging from gigahertz to terahertz range) with an emphasis on metamaterial sensing circuit and microfluidic detection. We also highlight challenges and strategies to cope these issues which set future directions.

  1. Droplet Manipulations in Two Phase Flow Microfluidics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pit, Arjen; Duits, Michael H.G.; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther

    2015-01-01

    Even though droplet microfluidics has been developed since the early 1980s, the number of applications that have resulted in commercial products is still relatively small. This is partly due to an ongoing maturation and integration of existing methods, but possibly also because of the emergence of

  2. Biodegradable Microfluidic Scaffolds for Vascular Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    bonding multiple microfluidic layers. Introduction Overcoming the problems of nutrient transport is critical in the design of tissue engineering...an intrinsic vascular network within these scaffolds. More specifically, the application of microfabrication and BioMEMS technology has been focused

  3. A Centrifugal Microfluidic Platform Using SLM Extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Sune Zoëga; Burger, Robert; Emnéus, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a pump-less microfluidic pla>orm which performs sample clean-up and enrichment in a single step, by integraAng Supported Liquid Membrane (SLM) extracAon. Our pla>orm offers a simple, yet very efficient, method for achieving sample pre-treatment and enrichment of rare analytes...

  4. Droplet microfluidics in (bio) chemical analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Basova, E. Y.; Foret, František

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 140, č. 1 (2015), s. 22-38 ISSN 0003-2654 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP206/12/G014 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : droplet chemistry * bioanalysis * microfluidics * protein Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.033, year: 2015

  5. Recent Advances in Magnetic Microfluidic Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioanna Giouroudi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of portable biosening devices for the detection of biological entities such as biomolecules, pathogens, and cells has become extremely significant over the past years. Scientific research, driven by the promise for miniaturization and integration of complex laboratory equipment on inexpensive, reliable, and accurate devices, has successfully shifted several analytical and diagnostic methods to the submillimeter scale. The miniaturization process was made possible with the birth of microfluidics, a technology that could confine, manipulate, and mix very small volumes of liquids on devices integrated on standard silicon technology chips. Such devices are then directly translating the presence of these entities into an electronic signal that can be read out with a portable instrumentation. For the aforementioned tasks, the use of magnetic markers (magnetic particles—MPs—functionalized with ligands in combination with the application of magnetic fields is being strongly investigated by research groups worldwide. The greatest merits of using magnetic fields are that they can be applied either externally or from integrated microconductors and they can be well-tuned by adjusting the applied current on the microconductors. Moreover, the magnetic markers can be manipulated inside microfluidic channels by high gradient magnetic fields that can in turn be detected by magnetic sensors. All the above make this technology an ideal candidate for the development of such microfluidic biosensors. In this review, focus is given only to very recent advances in biosensors that use microfluidics in combination with magnetic sensors and magnetic markers/nanoparticles.

  6. Wax-bonding 3D microfluidic chips

    KAUST Repository

    Gong, Xiuqing

    2013-10-10

    We report a simple, low-cost and detachable microfluidic chip incorporating easily accessible paper, glass slides or other polymer films as the chip materials along with adhesive wax as the recycling bonding material. We use a laser to cut through the paper or film to form patterns and then sandwich the paper and film between glass sheets or polymer membranes . The hot-melt adhesive wax can realize bridge bonding between various materials, for example, paper, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) film, glass sheets, or metal plate. The bonding process is reversible and the wax is reusable through a melting and cooling process. With this process, a three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic chip is achievable by vacuating and venting the chip in a hot-water bath. To study the biocompatibility and applicability of the wax-based microfluidic chip, we tested the PCR compatibility with the chip materials first. Then we applied the wax-paper based microfluidic chip to HeLa cell electroporation (EP ). Subsequently, a prototype of a 5-layer 3D chip was fabricated by multilayer wax bonding. To check the sealing ability and the durability of the chip, green fluorescence protein (GFP) recombinant Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria were cultured, with which the chemotaxis of E. coli was studied in order to determine the influence of antibiotic ciprofloxacin concentration on the E. coli migration.

  7. Ceramic microfluidic monoliths by ice templating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, Jumeng; Salamon, David; Lefferts, Leonardus; Wessling, Matthias; Winnubst, Aloysius J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Meso/macro-porous alumina microfluidic monoliths were fabricated by an ice-templating (or freeze-casting) technique. A (green) compact with sufficient strength is obtained after controlled freezing and simple drying under ambient conditions by starting with an aqueous suspension of a mixture of

  8. Particle manipulation methods in droplet microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenje, Maria; Fornell, Anna; Ohlin, Mathias; Nilsson, Johan

    2017-11-30

    This Feature article describes the different particle manipulation techniques available in the droplet microfluidics tool-box to handle particles encapsulated inside droplets and to manipulate whole droplets. We address the advantages and disadvantages of the different techniques to guide new users.

  9. Microfluidics for Antibiotic Susceptibility and Toxicity Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Dai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The recent emergence of antimicrobial resistance has become a major concern for worldwide policy makers as very few new antibiotics have been developed in the last twenty-five years. To prevent the death of millions of people worldwide, there is an urgent need for a cheap, fast and accurate set of tools and techniques that can help to discover and develop new antimicrobial drugs. In the past decade, microfluidic platforms have emerged as potential systems for conducting pharmacological studies. Recent studies have demonstrated that microfluidic platforms can perform rapid antibiotic susceptibility tests to evaluate antimicrobial drugs’ efficacy. In addition, the development of cell-on-a-chip and organ-on-a-chip platforms have enabled the early drug testing, providing more accurate insights into conventional cell cultures on the drug pharmacokinetics and toxicity, at the early and cheaper stage of drug development, i.e., prior to animal and human testing. In this review, we focus on the recent developments of microfluidic platforms for rapid antibiotics susceptibility testing, investigating bacterial persistence and non-growing but metabolically active (NGMA bacteria, evaluating antibiotic effectiveness on biofilms and combinatorial effect of antibiotics, as well as microfluidic platforms that can be used for in vitro antibiotic toxicity testing.

  10. DNA and microfluidics: Building molecular electronics systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye Yun [Chemical Sensors Group, Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto at Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road North, Mississauga, Ont., L5L 1C6 (Canada); Chen Lu [Chemical Sensors Group, Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto at Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road North, Mississauga, Ont., L5L 1C6 (Canada); Liu Xuezhu [Chemical Sensors Group, Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto at Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road North, Mississauga, Ont., L5L 1C6 (Canada); Krull, Ulrich J. [Chemical Sensors Group, Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto at Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road North, Mississauga, Ont., L5L 1C6 (Canada)]. E-mail: ukrull@utm.utoronto.ca

    2006-05-24

    The development of molecular electronics using DNA molecules as the building blocks and using microfluidics to build nanowire arrays is reviewed. Applications of DNA conductivity to build sensors and nanowire arrays, and DNA conjugation with other nanostructures, offers an exciting opportunity to build extremely small analytical devices that are suitable for single-molecule detection and also target screening.

  11. Understanding cell passage through constricted microfluidic channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartas-Ayala, Marco A.; Karnik, Rohit

    2012-11-01

    Recently, several microfluidic platforms have been proposed to characterize cells based on their behaviour during cell passage through constricted channels. Variables like transit time have been analyzed in disease states like sickle cell anemia, malaria and sepsis. Nevertheless, it is hard to make direct comparisons between different platforms and cell types. We present experimental results of the relationship between solid deformable particle properties, i.e. stiffness and relative particle size, and flow properties, i.e. particle's velocity. We measured the hydrodynamic variables during the flow of HL-60 cells, a white myeloid cell type, in narrow microfluidic square channels using a microfluidic differential manometer. We measured the flow force required to move cells of different sizes through microchannels and quantified friction forces opposing cell passage. We determined the non-dimensional parameters that influence the flow of cells and we used them to obtain a non dimensional expression that can be used to predict the forces needed to drive cells through microchannels. We found that the friction force needed to flow HL-60 through a microfluidic channel is the sum of two parts. The first part is a static friction force that is proportional to the force needed to keep the force compressed. The second part is a factor that is proportional to the cell velocity, hence a dynamic term, and slightly sensitive to the compressive force. We thank CONACYT (Mexican Science and Technology Council) for supporting this project, grant 205899.

  12. Design of microfluidic bioreactors using topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, Fridolin; Bruus, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    We address the design of optimal reactors for supporting biological cultures using the method of topology optimization. For some years this method have been used to design various optimal microfluidic devices.1-4 We apply this method to distribute optimally biologic cultures within a flow...

  13. Standardized perfusion value of the esophageal carcinoma and its correlation with quantitative CT perfusion parameter values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djuric-Stefanovic, A., E-mail: avstefan@eunet.rs [Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Unit of Digestive Radiology (First University Surgical Clinic), Center of Radiology and MR, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade (Serbia); Saranovic, Dj., E-mail: crvzve4@gmail.com [Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Unit of Digestive Radiology (First University Surgical Clinic), Center of Radiology and MR, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade (Serbia); Sobic-Saranovic, D., E-mail: dsobic2@gmail.com [Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Center of Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade (Serbia); Masulovic, D., E-mail: draganmasulovic@yahoo.com [Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Unit of Digestive Radiology (First University Surgical Clinic), Center of Radiology and MR, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade (Serbia); Artiko, V., E-mail: veraart@beotel.rs [Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Center of Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Standardized perfusion value (SPV) is a universal indicator of tissue perfusion, normalized to the whole-body perfusion, which was proposed to simplify, unify and allow the interchangeability among the perfusion measurements and comparison between the tumor perfusion and metabolism. The aims of our study were to assess the standardized perfusion value (SPV) of the esophageal carcinoma, and its correlation with quantitative CT perfusion measurements: blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT) and permeability surface area product (PS) of the same tumor volume samples, which were obtained by deconvolution-based CT perfusion analysis. Methods: Forty CT perfusion studies of the esophageal cancer were analyzed, using the commercial deconvolution-based CT perfusion software (Perfusion 3.0, GE Healthcare). The SPV of the esophageal tumor and neighboring skeletal muscle were correlated with the corresponding mean tumor and muscle quantitative CT perfusion parameter values, using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (r{sub S}). Results: Median SPV of the esophageal carcinoma (7.1; range: 2.8–13.4) significantly differed from the SPV of the skeletal muscle (median: 1.0; range: 0.4–2.4), (Z = −5.511, p < 0.001). The cut-off value of the SPV of 2.5 enabled discrimination of esophageal cancer from the skeletal muscle with sensitivity and specificity of 100%. SPV of the esophageal carcinoma significantly correlated with corresponding tumor BF (r{sub S} = 0.484, p = 0.002), BV (r{sub S} = 0.637, p < 0.001) and PS (r{sub S} = 0.432, p = 0.005), and SPV of the skeletal muscle significantly correlated with corresponding muscle BF (r{sub S} = 0.573, p < 0.001), BV (r{sub S} = 0.849, p < 0.001) and PS (r{sub S} = 0.761, p < 0.001). Conclusions: We presented a database of the SPV for the esophageal cancer and proved that SPV of the esophageal neoplasm significantly differs from the SPV of the skeletal muscle, which represented a sample of healthy

  14. Whole-body imaging of whole-organ, subresolution, basic functional unit (BFU) perfusion characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yue; Ritman, Erik L.

    2008-08-01

    A BFU is an organ's smallest assembly of diverse cells that functions like the organ, such as the liver's hepatic lobules. There are approximately 107 BFUs in a human organ. These 100-200 μm structures are perfused by capillaries fed by a terminal arteriole (15μm diameter). BFU sizes, function and number per organ vary with disease, either by loss of BFUs and/or their decrease in function. The BFU is the upper limit of a spherical assembly of cells, immersed in a suitably nutrient medium, which can survive without its own blood supply. However, each BFU has its own blood supply to support the extra energy and/or solutes needed for providing its physiological function (e.g., contraction or secretion). A BFU function is best evaluated by its micro-perfusion, which can be readily evaluated with whole-body CT. Resolution of individual BFUs within in-situ organs, using clinical imaging devices, would require high radiation doses and/or the intolerably long scan-durations needed for suitable signal-to-noise image-data. However, it is possible to obtain a statistical description of the BFU number, size and function from wholebody CT by way of a model. In this study we demonstrate this capability by using the distribution of myocardial terminal arteriolar perfusion territories by way of a nested, multiple, regions-of-interest analysis of the heart wall imaged during transient opacification of its blood supply.

  15. Generation of emulsion droplets and micro-bubbles in microfluidic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Jiaming

    2016-04-01

    Droplet-based microfluidic devices have become a preferred versatile platform for various fields in physics, chemistry and biology to manipulate small amounts of liquid samples. In addition to microdroplets, microbubbles are also needed for various pro- cesses in the food, healthcare and cosmetic industries. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography, the mainstay for fabricating microfluidic devices, usually requires the usage of expensive apparatus and a complex manufacturing procedure. In ad- dition, current methods have the limited capabilities for fabrication of microfluidic devices within three dimensional (3D) structures. Novel methods for fabrication of droplet-based microfluidic devices for the generation microdroplets and microbubbles are therefore of great interest in current research. In this thesis, we have developed several simple, rapid and low-cost methods for fabrication of microfluidic devices, especially for generation of microdroplets and mi- crobubbles. We first report an inexpensive full-glass microfluidic devices with as- sembly of glass capillaries, for generating monodisperse multiple emulsions. Different types of devices have been designed and tested and the experimental results demon- strated the robust capability of preparing monodisperse single, double, triple and multi-component emulsions. Second, we propose a similar full-glass device for generation of microbubbles, but with assembly of a much smaller nozzle of a glass capillary. Highly monodisperse microbubbles with diameter range from 3.5 to 60 microns have been successfully produced, at rates up to 40 kHz. A simple scaling law based on the capillary number and liquid-to-gas flow rate ratio, successfully predicts the bubble size. Recently, the emergent 3D printing technology provides an attractive fabrication technique, due to its simplicity and low cost. A handful of studies have already demonstrated droplet production through 3D-printed microfluidic devices. However, two

  16. Mixing in polymeric microfluidic devices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunk, Peter Randall; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Davis, Robert H. (University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO); Brotherton, Christopher M. (University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO)

    2006-04-01

    This SAND report describes progress made during a Sandia National Laboratories sponsored graduate fellowship. The fellowship was funded through an LDRD proposal. The goal of this project is development and characterization of mixing strategies for polymeric microfluidic devices. The mixing strategies under investigation include electroosmotic flow focusing, hydrodynamic focusing, physical constrictions and porous polymer monoliths. For electroosmotic flow focusing, simulations were performed to determine the effect of electroosmotic flow in a microchannel with heterogeneous surface potential. The heterogeneous surface potential caused recirculations to form within the microchannel. These recirculations could then be used to restrict two mixing streams and reduce the characteristic diffusion length. Maximum mixing occurred when the ratio of the mixing region surface potential to the average channel surface potential was made large in magnitude and negative in sign, and when the ratio of the characteristic convection time to the characteristic diffusion time was minimized. Based on these results, experiments were performed to evaluate the manipulation of surface potential using living-radical photopolymerization. The material chosen to manipulate typically exhibits a negative surface potential. Using living-radical surface grafting, a positive surface potential was produced using 2-(Dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate and a neutral surface was produced using a poly(ethylene glycol) surface graft. Simulations investigating hydrodynamic focusing were also performed. For this technique, mixing is enhanced by using a tertiary fluid stream to constrict the two mixing streams and reduce the characteristic diffusion length. Maximum mixing occurred when the ratio of the tertiary flow stream flow-rate to the mixing streams flow-rate was maximized. Also, like the electroosmotic focusing mixer, mixing was also maximized when the ratio of the characteristic convection time to the

  17. Digital microfluidic operations on micro-electrode dot array architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G; Teng, D; Fan, S-K

    2011-12-01

    As digital microfluidics-based biochips find more applications, their complexity is expected to increase significantly owing to the trend of multiple and concurrent assays on the chip. There is a pressing need to deliver a top-down design methodology that the biochip designer can leverage the same level of computer-aided design support as the semi-conductor industry now does. Moreover, as microelectronics fabrication technology is scaling up and integrated device performance is improving, it is expected that these microfluidic biochips will be integrated with microelectronic components in next-generation system-on-chip designs. This study presents the analysis and experiments of digital microfluidic operations on a novel electrowetting-on-dielectric-based 'micro-electrode dot array architecture' that fosters a development path for hierarchical top-down design approach for digital microfluidics. The proposed architecture allows dynamic configurations and activations of identical basic microfluidic unit called 'micro-electrode cells' to design microfluidic components, layouts, routing, microfluidic operations and applications of the biochip hierarchically. Fundamental microfluidic operations have been successfully performed by the architecture. In addition, this novel architecture demonstrates a number of advantages and flexibilities over the conventional digital microfluidics in performing advanced microfluidic operations.

  18. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy: the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, S R; Anagnostopoulos, C; Cerqueira, M; Ell, P J; Flint, E J; Harbinson, M; Kelion, A D; Al-Mohammad, A; Prvulovich, E M; Shaw, L J; Tweddel, A C

    2004-02-01

    This review summarises the evidence for the role of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. It is the product of a consensus conference organised by the British Cardiac Society, the British Nuclear Cardiology Society and the British Nuclear Medicine Society and is endorsed by the Royal College of Physicians of London and the Royal College of Radiologists. It was used to inform the UK National Institute of Clinical Excellence in their appraisal of MPS in patients with chest pain and myocardial infarction. MPS is a well-established, non-invasive imaging technique with a large body of evidence to support its effectiveness in the diagnosis and management of angina and myocardial infarction. It is more accurate than the exercise ECG in detecting myocardial ischaemia and it is the single most powerful technique for predicting future coronary events. The high diagnostic accuracy of MPS allows reliable risk stratification and guides the selection of patients for further interventions, such as revascularisation. This in turn allows more appropriate utilisation of resources, with the potential for both improved clinical outcomes and greater cost-effectiveness. Evidence from modelling and observational studies supports the enhanced cost-effectiveness associated with MPS use. In patients presenting with stable or acute chest pain, strategies of investigation involving MPS are more cost-effective than those not using the technique. MPS also has particular advantages over alternative techniques in the management of a number of patient subgroups, including women, the elderly and those with diabetes, and its use will have a favourable impact on cost-effectiveness in these groups. MPS is already an integral part of many clinical guidelines for the investigation and management of angina and myocardial infarction. However, the technique is underutilised in the UK, as judged by the inappropriately long waiting times and by

  19. From microfluidic modules to an integrated Lab-on-a-chip system for the detection of Francisella tularensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlawatsch, Nadine; Krumbholz, Marco; Prüfer, Anna; Moche, Christian; Becker, Holger; Gärtner, Claudia

    2013-05-01

    Lab-on-a-chip (LoC) systems translating the whole process of pathogen analysis to an integrated, miniaturized, and automatically functioning microfluidic platform are generally expected to be very promising future diagnostic approaches. The development of such a LoC system for the detection of bacterial pathogens applied to the example pathogen Francisella tularensis is described in this report. To allow functional testing of the whole process cascade before final device integration, various bio-analytical steps such as cell lysis, DNA extraction and purification, continuous-flow PCR and analyte detection have been adapted to unique functional microfluidic modules. As a successive step, positively tested modules for pathogen detection have been successfully assembled to an integrated chip. Moreover, technical solutions for a smooth interaction between sample input from the outer world as well as microfluidic chip and chip driving instrument have been developed. In conclusion, a full repertoire of analytical tools have been developed and successfully tested in the concerted manner of a functionally integrated microfluidic device representing a tool for future diagnostic approaches.

  20. Dynamic perfusion patterns in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupont, Patrick; Paesschen, Wim van [KU Leuven/UZ Gasthuisberg, Nuclear Medicine, Medical Imaging Center and Neurology, Leuven (Belgium); Zaknun, John J. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Wagramer Strasse 5, PO BOX 200, Vienna (Austria); University Hospital of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Maes, Alex [KU Leuven/UZ Gasthuisberg, Nuclear Medicine, Medical Imaging Center and Neurology, Leuven (Belgium); AZ Groeninge, Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); Tepmongkol, Supatporn; Locharernkul, Chaichon [Chulalongkorn University, Nuclear Medicine and Neurology, Bangkok (Thailand); Vasquez, Silvia; Carpintiero, Silvina [Fleni Instituto de Investigaciones Neurologicas, Nuclear Medicine, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bal, C.S. [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Nuclear Medicine, New Delhi (India); Dondi, Maurizio [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Wagramer Strasse 5, PO BOX 200, Vienna (Austria); Ospedale Maggiore, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy)

    2009-05-15

    To investigate dynamic ictal perfusion changes during temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We investigated 37 patients with TLE by ictal and interictal SPECT. All ictal injections were performed within 60 s of seizure onset. Statistical parametric mapping was used to analyse brain perfusion changes and temporal relationships with injection time and seizure duration as covariates. The analysis revealed significant ictal hyperperfusion in the ipsilateral temporal lobe extending to subcortical regions. Hypoperfusion was observed in large extratemporal areas. There were also significant dynamic changes in several extratemporal regions: ipsilateral orbitofrontal and bilateral superior frontal gyri and the contralateral cerebellum and ipsilateral striatum. The study demonstrated early dynamic perfusion changes in extratemporal regions probably involved in both propagation of epileptic activity and initiation of inhibitory mechanisms. (orig.)

  1. Simultaneous Multiagent Hyperpolarized 13C Perfusion Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Morze, Cornelius; Bok, Robert A.; Reed, Galen D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate simultaneous hyperpolarization and imaging of three 13C-labeled perfusion MRI contrast agents with dissimilar molecular structures ([13C]urea, [13C]hydroxymethyl cyclopropane, and [13C]t-butanol) and correspondingly variable chemical shifts and physiological characteristics......, and to exploit their varying diffusibility for simultaneous measurement of vascular permeability and perfusion in initial preclinical studies. Methods: Rapid and efficient dynamic multislice imaging was enabled by a novel pulse sequence incorporating balanced steady state free precession excitation and spectral...... in simulations. "Tripolarized" perfusion MRI methods were applied to initial preclinical studies with differential conditions of vascular permeability, in normal mouse tissues and advanced transgenic mouse prostate tumors. Results: Dynamic imaging revealed clear differences among the individual tracer...

  2. A self-loading microfluidic device for determining the minimum inhibitory concentration of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cira, Nate J; Ho, Jack Y; Dueck, Megan E; Weibel, Douglas B

    2012-03-21

    This article describes a portable microfluidic technology for determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of antibiotics against bacteria. The microfluidic platform consists of a set of chambers molded in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) that are preloaded with antibiotic, dried, and reversibly sealed to a second layer of PDMS containing channels that connect the chambers. The assembled device is degassed via vacuum prior to its use, and the absorption of gas by PDMS provides the mechanism for actuating and metering the flow of fluid in the microfluidic channels and chambers. During the operation of the device, degas driven flow introduces a suspension of bacterial cells, dissolves the antibiotic, and isolates cells in individual chambers without cross contamination. The growth of bacteria in the chambers in the presence of a pH indicator produces a colorimetric change that can be detected visually using ambient light. Using this device we measured the MIC of vancomycin, tetracycline, and kanamycin against Enterococcus faecalis 1131, Proteus mirabilis HI4320, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli MG1655 and report values that are comparable to standard liquid broth dilution measurements. The device provides a simple method for MIC determination of individual antibiotics against human pathogens that will have applications for clinical and point-of-care medicine. Importantly, this device is designed around simplicity: it requires a single pipetting step to introduce the sample, no additional components or external equipment for its operation, and provides a straightforward visual measurement of cell growth. As the device introduces a novel approach for filling and isolating dead-end microfluidic chambers that does not require valves and actuators, this technology should find applications in other portable assays and devices.

  3. Chemiluminescence generation and detection in a capillary-driven microfluidic chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramon, Charlotte; Temiz, Yuksel; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2017-02-01

    The use of microfluidic technology represents a strong opportunity for providing sensitive, low-cost and rapid diagnosis at the point-of-care and such a technology might therefore support better, faster and more efficient diagnosis and treatment of patients at home and in healthcare settings both in developed and developing countries. In this work, we consider luminescence-based assays as an alternative to well-established fluorescence-based systems because luminescence does not require a light source or expensive optical components and is therefore a promising detection method for point-of-care applications. Here, we show a proof-of-concept of chemiluminescence (CL) generation and detection in a capillary-driven microfluidic chip for potential immunoassay applications. We employed a commercial acridan-based reaction, which is catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). We investigated CL generation under flow conditions using a simplified immunoassay model where HRP is used instead of the complete sandwich immunocomplex. First, CL signals were generated in a capillary microfluidic chip by immobilizing HRP on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) sealing layer using stencil deposition and flowing CL substrate through the hydrophilic channels. CL signals were detected using a compact (only 5×5×2.5 cm3) and custom-designed scanner, which was assembled for less than $30 and comprised a 128×1 photodiode array, a mini stepper motor, an Arduino microcontroller, and a 3D-printed housing. In addition, microfluidic chips having specific 30-μm-deep structures were fabricated and used to immobilize ensembles of 4.50 μm beads functionalized with HRP so as to generate high CL signals from capillary-driven chips.

  4. Right Ventricular Perfusion: Physiology and Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crystal, George J; Pagel, Paul S

    2018-01-01

    Regulation of blood flow to the right ventricle differs significantly from that to the left ventricle. The right ventricle develops a lower systolic pressure than the left ventricle, resulting in reduced extravascular compressive forces and myocardial oxygen demand. Right ventricular perfusion has eight major characteristics that distinguish it from left ventricular perfusion: (1) appreciable perfusion throughout the entire cardiac cycle; (2) reduced myocardial oxygen uptake, blood flow, and oxygen extraction; (3) an oxygen extraction reserve that can be recruited to at least partially offset a reduction in coronary blood flow; (4) less effective pressure-flow autoregulation; (5) the ability to downregulate its metabolic demand during coronary hypoperfusion and thereby maintain contractile function and energy stores; (6) a transmurally uniform reduction in myocardial perfusion in the presence of a hemodynamically significant epicardial coronary stenosis; (7) extensive collateral connections from the left coronary circulation; and (8) possible retrograde perfusion from the right ventricular cavity through the Thebesian veins. These differences promote the maintenance of right ventricular oxygen supply-demand balance and provide relative resistance to ischemia-induced contractile dysfunction and infarction, but they may be compromised during acute or chronic increases in right ventricle afterload resulting from pulmonary arterial hypertension. Contractile function of the thin-walled right ventricle is exquisitely sensitive to afterload. Acute increases in pulmonary arterial pressure reduce right ventricular stroke volume and, if sufficiently large and prolonged, result in right ventricular failure. Right ventricular ischemia plays a prominent role in these effects. The risk of right ventricular ischemia is also heightened during chronic elevations in right ventricular afterload because microvascular growth fails to match myocyte hypertrophy and because microvascular

  5. Perfusion CT in acute stroke; Stellenwert der CT-Perfusion fuer die Therapie des Schlaganfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckert, Bernd [Asklepios Klinik Altona (Germany). Radiologie und Neuroradiologie; Roether, Joachim [Asklepios Klinik Altona (Germany). Neurologische Abt.; Fiehler, Jens [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neuroradiologische Diagnostik und Intervention; Thomalla, Goetz [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurologie, Kopf- und Neurozentrum

    2015-06-15

    Modern multislice CT scanners enable multimodal protocols including non-enhanced CT, CT angiography, and CT perfusion. A 64-slice CT scanner provides 4-cm coverage. To cover the whole brain, a 128 - 256-slice scanner is needed. The use of perfusion CT requires an optimized scan protocol in order to reduce exposure to radiation. As compared to non-enhanced CT and CT angiography, the use of CT perfusion increases detection rates of cerebral ischemia, especially small cortical ischemic lesions, while the detection of lacunar and infratentorial stroke lesions remains limited. Perfusion CT enables estimation of collateral flow in acute occlusion of large intra- or extracranial arteries. Currently, no established reliable thresholds are available for determining infarct core and penumbral tissue by CT perfusion. Moreover, perfusion parameters depend on the processing algorithms and the software used for calculation. However, a number of studies point towards a reduction of cerebral blood volume (CBV) below 2 ml/100 g as a critical threshold that identifies infarct core. Large CBV lesions are associated with poor outcome even in the context of recanalization. The extent of early ischemic signs on non-enhanced CT remains the main parameter from CT imaging to guide acute reperfusion treatment. Nevertheless, perfusion CT increases diagnostic and therapeutic certainty in the acute setting. Similar to stroke MRI, perfusion CT enables the identification of tissue at risk of infarction by the mismatch between infarct core and the larger area of critical hypoperfusion. Further insights into the validity of perfusion parameters are expected from ongoing trials of mechanical thrombectomy in stroke.

  6. DNA Assembly in 3D Printed Fluidics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G Patrick

    Full Text Available The process of connecting genetic parts-DNA assembly-is a foundational technology for synthetic biology. Microfluidics present an attractive solution for minimizing use of costly reagents, enabling multiplexed reactions, and automating protocols by integrating multiple protocol steps. However, microfluidics fabrication and operation can be expensive and requires expertise, limiting access to the technology. With advances in commodity digital fabrication tools, it is now possible to directly print fluidic devices and supporting hardware. 3D printed micro- and millifluidic devices are inexpensive, easy to make and quick to produce. We demonstrate Golden Gate DNA assembly in 3D-printed fluidics with reaction volumes as small as 490 nL, channel widths as fine as 220 microns, and per unit part costs ranging from $0.61 to $5.71. A 3D-printed syringe pump with an accompanying programmable software interface was designed and fabricated to operate the devices. Quick turnaround and inexpensive materials allowed for rapid exploration of device parameters, demonstrating a manufacturing paradigm for designing and fabricating hardware for synthetic biology.

  7. Regional ischemia in hypertrophic Langendorff-perfused rat hearts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F. Ashruf; C. Ince (Can); H.A. Bruining (Hajo)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractMyocardial hypertrophy decreases the muscle mass-to-vascularization ratio, thereby changing myocardial perfusion. The effect of these changes on myocardial oxygenation in hypertrophic Langendorff-perfused rat hearts was measured using epimyocardial NADH

  8. Meta-Analysis of Stress Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-06

    Coronary Disease; Echocardiography; Fractional Flow Reserve, Myocardial; Hemodynamics; Humans; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Myocardial Perfusion Imaging; Perfusion; Predictive Value of Tests; Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography; Positron Emission Tomography; Multidetector Computed Tomography; Echocardiography, Stress; Coronary Angiography

  9. A novel microthermal probe for the measurement of perfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ming; Kausik, Aditya; Podhajsky, Ronald J.; Mahajan, Roop L.

    2009-02-01

    Using micro-fabrication techniques a micro thermal probe has been developed in our laboratory to measure the thermal conductivity of biological tissues. This paper presents our latest experimental results which demonstrate the usefulness of the micro thermal probe in mapping the complicated perfusion field inside biological tissues. A perfused pig liver model has been constructed to simulate in vivo conditions. The portal vein and hepatic artery of a porcine liver were intubated and connected to a perfusion circuit. Saline water was perfused through the liver driven by a peristaltic pump. By varying the pumping rate of the perfused model, we measured the effective thermal conductivity at different perfusion rates in different locations. The results show that the effective thermal conductivity varies with the square root of the perfusion rate. Also, by rotating the micro probes, we observed a strong directional dependence of the effective thermal conductivity, revealing that perfusion is not a scalar but a vector field.

  10. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    5th April, 2016 – Ordinary General Assembly of the Staff Association! In the first semester of each year, the Staff Association (SA) invites its members to attend and participate in the Ordinary General Assembly (OGA). This year the OGA will be held on Tuesday, April 5th 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00 in BE Auditorium, Meyrin (6-2-024). During the Ordinary General Assembly, the activity and financial reports of the SA are presented and submitted for approval to the members. This is the occasion to get a global view on the activities of the SA, its financial management, and an opportunity to express one’s opinion, including taking part in the votes. Other points are listed on the agenda, as proposed by the Staff Council. Who can vote? Only “ordinary” members (MPE) of the SA can vote. Associated members (MPA) of the SA and/or affiliated pensioners have a right to vote on those topics that are of direct interest to them. Who can give his/her opinion? The Ordinary General Asse...

  11. Microfluidics as a tool for C. elegans research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Miguel, Adriana; Lu, Hang

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidics has emerged as a set of powerful tools that have greatly advanced some areas of biological research, including research using C. elegans. The use of microfluidics has enabled many experiments that are otherwise impossible with conventional methods. Today there are many examples that demonstrate the main advantages of using microfluidics for C. elegans research, achieving precise environmental conditions and facilitating worm handling. Examples range from behavioral analysis under precise chemical or odor stimulation, locomotion studies in well-defined structural surroundings, and even long-term culture on chip. Moreover, microfluidics has enabled coupling worm handling and imaging thus facilitating genetic screens, optogenetic studies, and laser ablation experiments. In this article, we review some of the applications of microfluidics for C. elegans research and provide guides for the design, fabrication, and use of microfluidic devices for C. elegans research studies. PMID:24065448

  12. Integrated microfluidic platforms for investigating neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Joon

    This dissertation describes the development and application of integrated microfluidics-based assay platforms to study neuronal activities in the nervous system in-vitro. The assay platforms were fabricated using soft lithography and micro/nano fabrication including microfluidics, surface patterning, and nanomaterial synthesis. The use of integrated microfluidics-based assay platform allows culturing and manipulating many types of neuronal tissues in precisely controlled microenvironment. Furthermore, they provide organized multi-cellular in-vitro model, long-term monitoring with live cell imaging, and compatibility with molecular biology techniques and electrophysiology experiment. In this dissertation, the integrated microfluidics-based assay platforms are developed for investigation of neuronal activities such as local protein synthesis, impairment of axonal transport by chemical/physical variants, growth cone path finding under chemical/physical cues, and synaptic transmission in neuronal circuit. Chapter 1 describes the motivation, objectives, and scope for developing in-vitro platform to study various neuronal activities. Chapter 2 introduces microfluidic culture platform for biochemical assay with large-scale neuronal tissues that are utilized as model system in neuroscience research. Chapter 3 focuses on the investigation of impaired axonal transport by beta-Amyloid and oxidative stress. The platform allows to control neuronal processes and to quantify mitochondrial movement in various regions of axons away from applied drugs. Chapter 4 demonstrates the development of microfluidics-based growth cone turning assay to elucidate the mechanism underlying axon guidance under soluble factors and shear flow. Using this platform, the behaviors of growth cone of mammalian neurons are verified under the gradient of inhibitory molecules and also shear flow in well-controlled manner. In Chapter 5, I combine in-vitro multicellular model with microfabricated MEA

  13. Heat-Induced Changes in Perfused Rat Liver,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-28

    Hepatic injury resulting from heatstroke (1,6,7,8) or occurring with thermotherapy for cancer (9) has stimulated the use of the isolated perfused liver...liver perfusion. Int Bartosek 1, Guaitani At Miller Li#ed s. Isolated Liver Perfusion and its Applications . Now York: Raven Press, 19731 11-51. 12

  14. An alternative method for neonatal cerebro-myocardial perfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciani, Giovanni Battista; De Rita, Fabrizio; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Several techniques have already been described for selective cerebral perfusion during repair of aortic arch pathology in children. One method combining cerebral with myocardial perfusion has also been proposed. A novel technique is reported here for selective and independent cerebro-myocardial perfusion for neonatal and infant arch surgery. Technical aspects and potential advantages are discussed. PMID:22307393

  15. Computed tomography perfusion evaluation after extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Pieter C.; Riordan, Alan J.; Smit, Ewoud J.; de Jong, Hugo W. A. M.; van der Zwan, Albert; Velthuis, BK; Viergever, Max A.; Dankbaar, Jan Willem

    Objective: Perfusion imaging is increasingly used for postoperative evaluation of extracranial to intracranial (EC-IC) bypass surgery. Altered hemodynamics and delayed arrival of the contrast agent in the area fed by the bypass can influence perfusion measurement. We compared perfusion asymmetry

  16. Using microfluidics to study programmed cell death: A new approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina; Zor, Kinga; Heiskanen, Arto

    This project focuses on applying microfluidic tissue culture for electrochemical or optical measurements during programmed cell death (PCD) in barley aleurone layer to increase understanding of the underlying mechanisms of PCD in plants. Microfluidic tissue culture enables in vitro experiments...... a double-fluorescent probe-system also used by Fath et al5. Future challenges include integrating both these systems into a microfluidic device for plant tissue culture....

  17. Tetra-Responsive Grafted Hydrogels for Flow Control in Microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Gräfe, David

    2017-01-01

    Microfluidics covers the science of manipulating small quantities of fluids using microscale devices with great potential in analysis, multiplexing, automation and high-throughput screening. Compared to conventional systems, microfluidics benefits from miniaturization resulting in shortened time of experiments, decreased sample and reagent consumptions as well as reduced overall costs. For microfluidic devices where further weight and cost reduction is additionally required, stimuli-responsiv...

  18. A microfluidic gas damper for stabilizing gas pressure in portable microfluidic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinjie; Zhu, Zhixian; Xiang, Nan; Ni, Zhonghua

    2016-09-01

    Pressure fluctuations, which invariably occur in microfluidic systems, usually result in the unstable fluid delivery in microfluidic channels. In this work, a novel microfluidic gas damper is proposed and applied for providing stable fluid-driving pressures. Then, a pressure-driven flow setup is constructed to investigate the gas damping characteristics of our damper. Since the pressure-driven flow setup functions as a resistor-capacitor low-pass filter, the damper significantly decreases the amplitude of the input pressures via self-regulating its pneumatic resistance. In addition, the gas volume and pressure frequency are found to have direct effects on the pressure fluctuations. The practical application of the gas damper is examined through a portable pressure-driven system, which consists of an air blower, a gas damper, and a centrifuge tube. By periodically pressing the air blower, precise flow rates with low throughput (∼9.64  μ l min -1 ) and high throughput (∼1367.15  μ l min -1 ) are successfully delivered. Future integration of our microfluidic gas damper with miniaturized pressure generators (e.g., peristaltic or pressure-driven micropumps) can fully exploit the potential of the gas damper for low-cost, portable microfluidics where stable pressures or flow rates are required.

  19. Expanding imaging capabilities for microfluidics: applicability of darkfield internal reflection illumination (DIRI to observations in microfluidics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Kawano

    Full Text Available Microfluidics is used increasingly for engineering and biomedical applications due to recent advances in microfabrication technologies. Visualization of bubbles, tracer particles, and cells in a microfluidic device is important for designing a device and analyzing results. However, with conventional methods, it is difficult to observe the channel geometry and such particles simultaneously. To overcome this limitation, we developed a Darkfield Internal Reflection Illumination (DIRI system that improved the drawbacks of a conventional darkfield illuminator. This study was performed to investigate its utility in the field of microfluidics. The results showed that the developed system could clearly visualize both microbubbles and the channel wall by utilizing brightfield and DIRI illumination simultaneously. The methodology is useful not only for static phenomena, such as clogging, but also for dynamic phenomena, such as the detection of bubbles flowing in a channel. The system was also applied to simultaneous fluorescence and DIRI imaging. Fluorescent tracer beads and channel walls were observed clearly, which may be an advantage for future microparticle image velocimetry (μPIV analysis, especially near a wall. Two types of cell stained with different colors, and the channel wall, can be recognized using the combined confocal and DIRI system. Whole-slide imaging was also conducted successfully using this system. The tiling function significantly expands the observing area of microfluidics. The developed system will be useful for a wide variety of engineering and biomedical applications for the growing field of microfluidics.

  20. Assembling particle clusters with incoherent 3D magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soheilian, Rasam; Abdi, Hamed; Maloney, Craig E; Erb, Randall M

    2017-11-13

    Directed assembly of particle suspensions in massively parallel formats, such as with magnetic fields, has application in rheological control, smart drug delivery, and active colloidal devices from optical materials to microfluidics. At the heart of these applications lies a control optimization problem for driving the assembly and dissolution of highly monodisperse particle clusters. For magnetic field control, most attention to-date has been centered around in-phase coherent magnetic fields. Instead, we investigate a family of incoherent 3D magnetic fields that are capable of creating controlled and tunable particle assemblies such as dimers, trimers, and quadramers. These field functions can be tuned to assemble monodisperse clusters with long term stability and can quickly switch the clusters between different states. This subset of three-dimensional field functions that we have studied demonstrates the rich phase space available to tune colloidal suspensions with magnetic fields. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hypothermic machine perfusion in kidney transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Deken, Julie; Kocabayoglu, Peri; Moers, Cyril

    Purpose of reviewThis article summarizes novel developments in hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) as an organ preservation modality for kidneys recovered from deceased donors.Recent findingsHMP has undergone a renaissance in recent years. This renewed interest has arisen parallel to a shift in

  2. Nonrigid registration of myocardial perfusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ólafsdóttir, Hildur

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a fully automatic registration of 10 multi-slice myocardial perfusion magnetic resonance image sequences. The registration of these sequences is crucial for the clinical interpretation, which currently is subjected to manual labour. The approach used in this study is a nonrig...

  3. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI for perfusion quantification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Irene Klærke

    2002-01-01

    the contrastagent concentration, [Ca], and the changes in R2 or R 2 has been questioned. In this thesis, an MRI scanner sequence for detection of the longitudinal relaxation rate, R1 during bolus passage was modied for brain perfusion measurements, since the linearity between the changes in R1 and [Ca] is expected...

  4. Fast Registration of Cardiac Perfusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Larsson, Henrik B. W.

    2003-01-01

    This abstract presents a novel method for registration of cardiac perfusion MRI sequences. By performing complex analyses of variance and clustering in an annotated training set off-line, our method provides real-time segmentation in an on-line setting. This renders the method feasible for live...

  5. Methodology for ventilation/perfusion SPECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajc, Marika; Neilly, Brian; Miniati, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Ventilation/perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (V/Q SPECT) is the scintigraphic technique of choice for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and many other disorders that affect lung function. Data from recent ventilation studies show that the theoretic advantages of Technegas ov...

  6. Measurement of myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T.; Jensen, L.T.; Larsson, H.B.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper reviews...

  7. Stress-only myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejlersen, June A; May, Ole; Mortensen, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with normal stress perfusion have an excellent prognosis. Prospective studies on the diagnostic accuracy of stress-only scans with contemporary, independent examinations as gold standards are lacking. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 109 patients with typical angina and no pre...

  8. Digital microfluidics and delivery of molecular payloads with magnetic porous silicon chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorvee, Jason R; Sailor, Michael J; Miskelly, Gordon M

    2008-02-14

    Digital microfluidics involves the manipulation of molecules and materials in discrete packages. This paper reviews our work using amphiphilic magnetic microparticles constructed from porous silicon. An individual porous particle can be used to carry a nanomole or smaller quantities of a reagent, and assemblies of the particles can encapsulate and transport microliter droplets of liquid containing inorganic, organic, or biological molecules. The tracking and identification of each particle can be accomplished with spectral labels that are encoded into the particles during their synthesis. When used to chaperone liquid droplets, the labels can identify the separate droplets prior to mixing and also the combined droplets after mixing. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles encapsulated in the porous matrix allow the manipulation of the particles or whole droplet assemblies with a magnetic field, and they also allow heating of the particle's payload by means of an externally applied RF field. Examples of organic, inorganic, and biomolecular addition reactions, catalytic reactions, and thermolysis reactions are described.

  9. Recent Advances and Future Perspectives on Microfluidic Liquid Handling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam-Trung Nguyen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The interdisciplinary research field of microfluidics has the potential to revolutionize current technologies that require the handling of a small amount of fluid, a fast response, low costs and automation. Microfluidic platforms that handle small amounts of liquid have been categorised as continuous-flow microfluidics and digital microfluidics. The first part of this paper discusses the recent advances of the two main and opposing applications of liquid handling in continuous-flow microfluidics: mixing and separation. Mixing and separation are essential steps in most lab-on-a-chip platforms, as sample preparation and detection are required for a variety of biological and chemical assays. The second part discusses the various digital microfluidic strategies, based on droplets and liquid marbles, for the manipulation of discrete microdroplets. More advanced digital microfluidic devices combining electrowetting with other techniques are also introduced. The applications of the emerging field of liquid-marble-based digital microfluidics are also highlighted. Finally, future perspectives on microfluidic liquid handling are discussed.

  10. Novel Polymer Microfluidics Technology for In Situ Planetary Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Los Gatos Research proposes to develop a novel microfluidic device that combines rigid monolithic porous polymer based micro-capillary electrochromatography...

  11. Microfluidic-Based Robotic Sampling System for Radioactive Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack D. Law; Julia L. Tripp; Tara E. Smith; Veronica J. Rutledge; Troy G. Garn; John Svoboda; Larry Macaluso

    2014-02-01

    A novel microfluidic based robotic sampling system has been developed for sampling and analysis of liquid solutions in nuclear processes. This system couples the use of a microfluidic sample chip with a robotic system designed to allow remote, automated sampling of process solutions in-cell and facilitates direct coupling of the microfluidic sample chip with analytical instrumentation. This system provides the capability for near real time analysis, reduces analytical waste, and minimizes the potential for personnel exposure associated with traditional sampling methods. A prototype sampling system was designed, built and tested. System testing demonstrated operability of the microfluidic based sample system and identified system modifications to optimize performance.

  12. Microfluidic schemes using electrical and capillary forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, T. B.

    2008-12-01

    The laboratory-on-a-chip (LOC) and indeed virtually all the technology of microTAS (micro-total-analysis systems) rely upon some microfluidic subsystem to control, transport, and manipulate small liquid masses. The most promising of these subsystems use electrical forces, which have the advantages of voltage-based control and dominance over gravity and capillarity in the 10 to 103 micron diameter range. Gravity is usually ignorable on this scale, but the interactions of electrical and capillary forces are more complex. In particular, microstructures can be designed to exploit this interplay for the cases of electrowetting on dielectric-coated electrodes (EWOD) and liquid dielectrophoresis (DEP). The complementary nature of the two effects explains the operation of droplet-based microfluidic systems in general, and the so-called DEP droplet dispenser in particular.

  13. Microfluidics for electronic paper-like displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Lingling; Hayes, Robert A; Jin, Mingliang; Zhang, Xiao; Bai, Pengfei; van den Berg, Albert; Zhou, Guofu

    2014-07-21

    Displays are ubiquitous in modern life, and there is a growing need to develop active, full color, video-rate reflective displays that perform well in high-light conditions. The core of display technology is to generate or manipulate light in the visible wavelength. Colored fluids or fluids with particles can be used to tune the light intensity (greyscale) or wavelength (colors) of reflective displays by different actuation methods. Microfluidic technology plays an increasing role in fluidic manipulation in microscale devices used in display areas. In this article, we will review microfluidic technologies based on different actuation methods used for display applications: pressure-driven flow, electrophoresis, electroosmosis, electrowetting, magnetic-driven flow, and cell-actuation principles.

  14. Capacitive coupling synchronizes autonomous microfluidic oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesher-Perez, Sasha Cai; Zhang, Chao; Takayama, Shuichi

    2018-01-31

    Even identically-designed autonomous microfluidic oscillators have device-to-device oscillation variability that arises due to inconsistencies in fabrication, materials, and operation conditions. This work demonstrates, experimentally and theoretically, that with appropriate capacitive coupling these microfluidic oscillators can be synchronized. The size and characteristics of the capacitive coupling needed and the range of input flow rate differences that can be synchronized are also characterized. In addition to device-to-device variability, there is also within-device oscillation noise that arises. An additional advantage of coupling multiple fluidic oscillators together is that the oscillation noise decreases. The ability to synchronize multiple autonomous oscillators is also a first step towards enhancing their usefulness as tools for biochemical research applications where multiplicate experiments with identical temporal-stimulation conditions are required. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Bonding PMMA microfluidics using commercial microwave ovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toossi, A.; Moghadas, H.; Daneshmand, M.; Sameoto, D.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a novel low-cost, rapid substrate-bonding technique is successfully applied to polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) microfluidics bonding for the first time. This technique uses a thin intermediate metallic microwave susceptor layer at the interface of the bonding site (microchannels) which produces localized heating required for bonding during microwave irradiation. The metallic susceptor pattern is designed using a multiphysics simulation model developed in ANSYS Multiphysics software (high-frequency structural simulation (HFSS) coupled with ANSYS-Thermal). In our experiments, the required microwave energy for bonding is delivered using a relatively inexpensive, widely accessible commercial microwave oven. Using this technique, simple PMMA microfluidics prototypes are successfully bonded and sealed in less than 35 seconds with a minimum measured bond strength of 1.375 MPa.

  16. Microfluidic device for unidirectional axon growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malishev, E.; Pimashkin, A.; Gladkov, A.; Pigareva, Y.; Bukatin, A.; Kazantsev, V.; Mukhina, I.; Dubina, M.

    2015-11-01

    In order to better understand the communication and connectivity development of neuron networks, we designed microfluidic devices with several chambers for growing dissociated neuronal cultures from mice fetal hippocampus (E18). The chambers were connected with microchannels providing unidirectional axonal growth between “Source” and “Target” neural sub-networks. Experiments were performed in a hippocampal cultures plated in a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic chip, aligned with a 60 microelectrode array (MEA). Axonal growth through microchannels was observed with brightfield, phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy, and after 7 days in vitro electrical activity was recorded. Visual inspection and spike propagation analysis showed the predominant axonal growth in microchannels in a direction from “Source” to “Target”.

  17. Droplet Manipulations in Two Phase Flow Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjen M. Pit

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Even though droplet microfluidics has been developed since the early 1980s, the number of applications that have resulted in commercial products is still relatively small. This is partly due to an ongoing maturation and integration of existing methods, but possibly also because of the emergence of new techniques, whose potential has not been fully realized. This review summarizes the currently existing techniques for manipulating droplets in two-phase flow microfluidics. Specifically, very recent developments like the use of acoustic waves, magnetic fields, surface energy wells, and electrostatic traps and rails are discussed. The physical principles are explained, and (potential advantages and drawbacks of different methods in the sense of versatility, flexibility, tunability and durability are discussed, where possible, per technique and per droplet operation: generation, transport, sorting, coalescence and splitting.

  18. Nanoplasmonic and Microfluidic Devices for Biological Sensing

    KAUST Repository

    Perozziello, G.

    2017-02-16

    In this chapter we report about recent advances on the development and application of 2D and 3D plasmonic nanostructures used for sensing of biological samples by Raman spectroscopy at unprecedented resolution of analysis. Besides, we explain how the integration of these nanodevices in a microfluidic apparatus can simplify the analysis of biological samples. In the first part we introduce and motivate the convenience of using nanoplasmonic enhancers and Raman spectroscopy for biological sensing, describing the phenomena and the current approaches to fabricate nanoplasmonic structures. In the second part, we explain how specific multi-element devices produce the optimal enhancement of the Raman scattering. We report cases where biological sensing of DNA was performed at few molecules level with nanometer spatial resolutions. Finally, we show an example of microfluidic device integrating plasmonic nanodevices to sort and drive biological samples, like living cells, towards the optical probe in order to obtain optimal conditions of analysis.

  19. Microfluidic Wheatstone bridge for rapid sample analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyeri, Melikhan; Ranka, Mikhil; Sittipolkul, Natawan; Schroeder, Charles M

    2011-12-21

    We developed a microfluidic analogue of the classic Wheatstone bridge circuit for automated, real-time sampling of solutions in a flow-through device format. We demonstrate precise control of flow rate and flow direction in the "bridge" microchannel using an on-chip membrane valve, which functions as an integrated "variable resistor". We implement an automated feedback control mechanism in order to dynamically adjust valve opening, thereby manipulating the pressure drop across the bridge and precisely controlling fluid flow in the bridge channel. At a critical valve opening, the flow in the bridge channel can be completely stopped by balancing the flow resistances in the Wheatstone bridge device, which facilitates rapid, on-demand fluid sampling in the bridge channel. In this article, we present the underlying mechanism for device operation and report key design parameters that determine device performance. Overall, the microfluidic Wheatstone bridge represents a new and versatile method for on-chip flow control and sample manipulation.

  20. Tuning Fluidic Resistance via Liquid Crystal Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Sengupta

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Flow of molecularly ordered fluids, like liquid crystals, is inherently coupled with the average local orientation of the molecules, or the director. The anisotropic coupling—typically absent in isotropic fluids—bestows unique functionalities to the flowing matrix. In this work, we harness this anisotropy to pattern different pathways to tunable fluidic resistance within microfluidic devices. We use a nematic liquid crystalline material flowing in microchannels to demonstrate passive and active modulation of the flow resistance. While appropriate surface anchoring conditions—which imprint distinct fluidic resistances within microchannels under similar hydrodynamic parameters—act as passive cues, an external field, e.g., temperature, is used to actively modulate the flow resistance in the microfluidic device. We apply this simple concept to fabricate basic fluidic circuits, which can be hierarchically extended to create complex resistance networks, without any additional design or morphological patterning of the microchannels.

  1. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors for High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Maoddi, Pietro; Mapelli, Alessandro

    This thesis deals with the development and study of microfluidic scintillation detectors, a technology of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles. Most of the interest for such devices comes from the use of a liquid scintillator, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to increased radiation resistance. A first part of the thesis focuses on the work performed in terms of design and modelling studies of novel prototype devices, hinting to new possibilities and applications. In this framework, the simulations performed to validate selected designs and the main technological choices made in view of their fabrication are addressed. The second part of this thesis deals with the microfabrication of several prototype devices. Two different materials were studied for the manufacturing of microfluidic scintillation detectors, namely the SU-8 photosensitive epoxy and monocrystalline silicon. For what concerns the former, an original fabrication appro...

  2. Nucleic acid amplification of individual molecules in a microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettloff, Roger; Yang, Esther; Rulison, Aaron; Chow, Andrea; Farinas, Javier

    2008-06-01

    A microfluidic device was developed that enabled rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of individual DNA molecules. The device combined a means for accessing samples serially from a microtiter plate, channels for assembling eight parallel PCR reactions, and integrated resistive heaters for rapid thermocycling (>5 degrees C/s heating, >7 degrees C/s cooling) of samples as they flowed continuously through PCR channels. Amplification was monitored by fluorescence detection of Taqman probes. The long, narrow channels (10 microm x 180 microm x 40 mm) allowed sufficient separation between neighboring DNA templates to enable amplification of discreet DNA molecules. The functionality of the device was demonstrated by reproducibly amplifying a 2D6.6 CYP450 template and distinguishing between wild-type and mutant sequences using Taqman probes. A comparison of the rate of individual amplification events to the expected Poisson distribution confirmed that the device could reliably analyze individual DNA molecules. This work establishes the feasibility of rapid, single-molecule interrogation of nucleic acids.

  3. Microfluidic Fabrication Solutions for Tailor-Designed Fiber Suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Berthet

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fibers are widely used in different industrial processes, for example in paper manufacturing or lost circulation problems in the oil industry. Recently, interest towards the use of fibers at the microscale has grown, driven by research in bio-medical applications or drug delivery systems. Microfluidic systems are not only directly relevant for lab-on-chip applications, but have also proven to be good model systems to tackle fundamental questions about the flow of fiber suspensions. It has therefore become necessary to provide fiber-like particles with an excellent control of their properties. We present here two complementary in situ methods to fabricate controlled micro-fibers allowing for an embedded fabrication and flow-on-a-chip platform. The first one, based on a photo-lithography principle, can be used to make isolated fibers and dilute fiber suspensions at specific locations of interest inside a microchannel. The self-assembly property of super-paramagnetic colloids is the principle of the second fabrication method, which enables the fabrication of concentrated suspensions of more flexible fibers. We propose a flow gallery with several examples of fiber flow illustrating the two methods’ capabilities and a range of recent laminar flow results.

  4. Fluid control structures in microfluidic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathies, Richard A.; Grover, William H.; Skelley, Alison; Lagally, Eric; Liu, Chung N.

    2017-05-09

    Methods and apparatus for implementing microfluidic analysis devices are provided. A monolithic elastomer membrane associated with an integrated pneumatic manifold allows the placement and actuation of a variety of fluid control structures, such as structures for pumping, isolating, mixing, routing, merging, splitting, preparing, and storing volumes of fluid. The fluid control structures can be used to implement a variety of sample introduction, preparation, processing, and storage techniques.

  5. Structural Optimization of non-Newtonian Microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Ejlebjærg; Okkels, Fridolin

    2011-01-01

    We present results for topology optimization of a non-Newtonian rectifier described with a differential constitutive model. The results are novel in the sense that a differential constitutive model has not been combined with topology optimization previously. We find that it is necessary to apply ...... optimization of fluids. We test the method on a microfluidic rectifier and find solutions topologically different from experimentally realized designs....

  6. Biofunctionalization of PDMS-based microfluidic systems

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Bergoi Ibarlucea, Cesar Fernández-Sánchez, Stefanie Demming, Stephanus Büttgenbach & Andreu Llobera ### Abstract Three simple approaches for the selective immobilization of biomolecules on the surface of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic systems that do not require any specific instrumentation, are described and compared. They are based in the introduction of hydroxyl groups on the PDMS surface by direct adsorption of either polyethylene glycol (PEG) or polyvinyl...

  7. Fluid delivery manifolds and microfluidic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzi, Ronald F.; Sommer, Gregory J.; Singh, Anup K.; Hatch, Anson V.; Claudnic, Mark R.; Wang, Ying-Chih; Van de Vreugde, James L.

    2017-02-28

    Embodiments of fluid distribution manifolds, cartridges, and microfluidic systems are described herein. Fluid distribution manifolds may include an insert member and a manifold base and may define a substantially closed channel within the manifold when the insert member is press-fit into the base. Cartridges described herein may allow for simultaneous electrical and fluidic interconnection with an electrical multiplex board and may be held in place using magnetic attraction.

  8. Fabrication of paper based microfluidic devices

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govindasamy, K

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available flow tests) which operate on a similar principal, are an example of point of care diagnostics. Paper based microfluidics aims to address the inherent inadequacies of standard lateral flow tests. This includes improving the sensitivity...@uj.ac.za). maintaining low cost and simplicity. Development of low cost diagnostics is vital for developing countries like South Africa, where rural communities lack access to basic health care and clean drinking water. These tests provide a rapid alternative...

  9. Microfluidics apparatus and methods for use thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeters, John P.; Wiggins, Thomas; Ghosh, Madhushree; Bottomley, Lawrence A.; Seminara, Salvatore; Hu, Zhiyu; Seeley, Timothy; Kossek, Sebastian

    2005-08-09

    A microfluidics device includes a plurality of interaction cells and fluid control means including i) means for providing to the interaction cells a preparation fluid, and ii) means for providing to the interaction cells a sample fluid, wherein each interaction cell receives a different sample fluid. A plurality of microcantilevers may be disposed in each of the interaction cells, wherein each of the plurality of microcantilevers configured to deflect in response to an interaction involving a component of the sample fluid.

  10. Assembling consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assembling Consumption marks a definitive step in the institutionalisation of qualitative business research. By gathering leading scholars and educators who study markets, marketing and consumption through the lenses of philosophy, sociology and anthropology, this book clarifies and applies...... the investigative tools offered by assemblage theory, actor-network theory and non-representational theory. Clear theoretical explanation and methodological innovation, alongside empirical applications of these emerging frameworks will offer readers new and refreshing perspectives on consumer culture and market...... societies. This is an essential reading for both seasoned scholars and advanced students of markets, economies and social forms of consumption....

  11. A new approach to in-situ "micromanufacturing": microfluidic fabrication of magnetic and fluorescent chains using chitosan microparticles as building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Kunqiang; Xue, Chao; Arya, Chanda; Shao, Chenren; George, Elijah O; DeVoe, Don L; Raghavan, Srinivasa R

    2011-09-05

    An in situ microfluidic assembly approach is described that can both produce microsized building blocks and assemble them into complex multiparticle configurations in the same microfluidic device. The building blocks are microparticles of the biopolymer chitosan, which is intentionally selected because its chemistry allows for simultaneous intraparticle and interparticle linking. Monodisperse chitosan-bearing droplets are created by shearing off a chitosan solution at a microfluidic T-junction with a stream of hexadecane containing a nonionic detergent. These droplets are then interfacially crosslinked into stable microparticles by a downstream flow of glutaraldehyde (GA). The functional properties of these robust microparticles can be easily varied by introducing various payloads, such as magnetic nanoparticles and/or fluorescent dyes, into the chitosan solution. The on-chip connection of such individual particles into well-defined microchains is demonstrated using GA again as the chemical "glue" and microchannel confinement as the spatial template. Chain flexibility can be tuned by adjusting the crosslinking conditions: both rigid chains and semiflexible chains are created. Additionally, the arrangement of particles within a chain can also be controlled, for example, to generate chains with alternating fluorescent and nonfluorescent microparticles. Such microassembled chains could find applications as microfluidic mixers, delivery vehicles, microscale sensors, or miniature biomimetic robots. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Research highlights: microfluidically-fabricated materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Jaekyung; Wu, Chueh-Yu; Kittur, Harsha; Di Carlo, Dino

    2015-10-07

    Polymer particles with precise shapes or chemistries are finding unique uses in a variety of applications, including tissue engineering, drug delivery, barcoding, and diagnostic imaging. Microfluidic systems have been and are continuing to play a large role in enabling the precision synthesis of designer particles in a uniform manner. To expand the impact of these microfluidic-fabricated materials additional fundamental capabilities should still be developed. The capability to fabricate microparticles with complex three-dimensional shapes and increase the production rate of particles to an industrial scale will allow evaluation of shaped particles in a range of new applications to enhance biological, magnetic, optical, surface wetting, as well as other interfacial or mechanical properties of materials. Here we highlight work applying large collections of simple spherical microgels, with unique surface chemistry that allows in situ particle-particle annealing, to form microporous injectable scaffolds for accelerated tissue regeneration. We also report on two other techniques that are addressing the ability to create 3D-shaped microparticles by first sculpting a fluid precursor stream, and increasing the rate of production of particles using contact lithography to millions of particles per hour. The combination of these capabilities and the applications they will enable suggest a bright future for microfluidics in making the next materials.

  13. Microfluidics for High School Chemistry Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemling, Melissa; Crooks, John A; Oliver, Piercen M; Brenner, Katie; Gilbertson, Jennifer; Lisensky, George C; Weibel, Douglas B

    2014-01-14

    We present a laboratory experiment that introduces high school chemistry students to microfluidics while teaching fundamental properties of acid-base chemistry. The procedure enables students to create microfluidic systems using nonspecialized equipment that is available in high school classrooms and reagents that are safe, inexpensive, and commercially available. The experiment is designed to ignite creativity and confidence about experimental design in a high school chemistry class. This experiment requires a computer program (e.g., PowerPoint), Shrinky Dink film, a readily available silicone polymer, weak acids, bases, and a colorimetric pH indicator. Over the span of five 45-min class periods, teams of students design and prepare devices in which two different pH solutions mix in a predictable way to create five different pH solutions. Initial device designs are instructive but rarely optimal. During two additional half-class periods, students have the opportunity to use their initial observations to redesign their microfluidic systems to optimize the outcome. The experiment exposes students to cutting-edge science and the design process, and solidifies introductory chemistry concepts including laminar flow, neutralization of weak acids-bases, and polymers.

  14. Smartphones & microfluidics: marriage for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hárendarčíková, Lenka; Petr, Jan

    2018-02-27

    Smartphones have become widely recognized as a very interesting detection and controlling tool in microfluidics. They are portable devices with built-in cameras and internal microprocessors which carry out image processing. In this case, the external computers are not needed and phones can provide fast and accurate results. Moreover, the connectivity of smartphones gives the possibility to share and provide real-time results when needed, whether in health diagnostics, environmental monitoring, immunoassays or food safety. Undoubtedly, the marriage of smartphones and microfluidics has a brilliant future in building low-cost and easily operable systems for analysis in the field, realizing the idea of people's "smartlife". The aim of this review is to present and summarize the main advantages and disadvantages of the use of smartphones as well as to take a closer look at some novel achievements published during the last couple of years. In the next paragraphs, readers will find specific uses of a combination of smartphones and microfluidics such as water analysis, health analysis (virus and bacteria detection), and measurement of physical properties or smartphone liquid control in polymer devices. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Microfluidic biosensing systems using magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giouroudi, Ioanna; Keplinger, Franz

    2013-09-09

    In recent years, there has been rapidly growing interest in developing hand held, sensitive and cost-effective on-chip biosensing systems that directly translate the presence of certain bioanalytes (e.g., biomolecules, cells and viruses) into an electronic signal. The impressive and rapid progress in micro- and nanotechnology as well as in biotechnology enables the integration of a variety of analytical functions in a single chip. All necessary sample handling and analysis steps are then performed within the chip. Microfluidic systems for biomedical analysis usually consist of a set of units, which guarantees the manipulation, detection and recognition of bioanalytes in a reliable and flexible manner. Additionally, the use of magnetic fields for performing the aforementioned tasks has been steadily gaining interest. This is because magnetic fields can be well tuned and applied either externally or from a directly integrated solution in the biosensing system. In combination with these applied magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles are utilized. Some of the merits of magnetic nanoparticles are the possibility of manipulating them inside microfluidic channels by utilizing high gradient magnetic fields, their detection by integrated magnetic microsensors, and their flexibility due to functionalization by means of surface modification and specific binding. Their multi-functionality is what makes them ideal candidates as the active component in miniaturized on-chip biosensing systems. In this review, focus will be given to the type of biosening systems that use microfluidics in combination with magnetoresistive sensors and detect the presence of bioanalyte tagged with magnetic nanoparticles.

  16. Manufacturable plastic microfluidic valves using thermal actuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchaimani, Karthik; Sapp, Brian C; Winter, Adam; Gispanski, Austin; Nishida, Toshikazu; Hugh Fan, Z

    2009-11-07

    A low-cost, manufacturable, thermally actuated, plastic microfluidic valve has been developed. The valve contains an encapsulated, temperature-sensitive fluid, which expands, deflecting a thin elastomeric film into a fluidic channel to control fluid flow. The power input for thermal expansion of each microfluidic valve can be controlled using a printed circuit board (PCB)-based controller, which is suitable for mass production and large-scale integration. A plastic microfluidic device with such valves was fabricated using compression molding and thermal lamination. The operation of the valves was investigated by measuring a change in the microchannel's ionic conduction current mediated by the resistance variation corresponding to the deflection of the microvalve. Valve closing was also confirmed by the disappearance of fluorescence when a fluorescent solution was displaced in the valve region. Valve operation was characterized for heater power ranging from 36 mW to 80 mW. When the valve was actuating, the local channel temperature was 10 to 19 degrees C above the ambient temperature depending on the heater power used. Repetitive valve operations (up to 50 times) have been demonstrated with a flow resulting from a hydrostatic head. Valve operation was tested for a flow rate of 0.33-4.7 microL/min.

  17. Microfluidic extensional rheometry using stagnation point flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haward, S J

    2016-07-01

    Characterization of the extensional rheometry of fluids with complex microstructures is of great relevance to the optimization of a wide range of industrial applications and for understanding various natural processes, biological functions, and diseases. However, quantitative measurement of the extensional properties of complex fluids has proven elusive to researchers, particularly in the case of low viscosity, weakly elastic fluids. For some time, microfluidic platforms have been recognized as having the potential to fill this gap and various approaches have been proposed. This review begins with a general discussion of extensional viscosity and the requirements of an extensional rheometer, before various types of extensional rheometers (particularly those of microfluidic design) are critically discussed. A specific focus is placed on microfluidic stagnation point extensional flows generated by cross-slot type devices, for which some important developments have been reported during the last 10 years. Additional emphasis is placed on measurements made on relevant biological fluids. Finally, the operating limits of the cross-slot extensional rheometer (chiefly imposed by the onset of elastic and inertial flow instabilities) are discussed.

  18. Logic control of microfluidics with smart colloid

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Limu

    2010-01-01

    We report the successful realization of a microfluidic chip with switching and corresponding inverting functionalities. The chips are identical logic control components incorporating a type of smart colloid, giant electrorheological fluid (GERF), which possesses reversible characteristics via a liquid-solid phase transition under external electric field. Two pairs of electrodes embedded on the sides of two microfluidic channels serve as signal input and output, respectively. One, located in the GERF micro-channel is used to control the flow status of GERF, while another one in the ither micro-fluidic channel is used to detect the signal generated with a passing-by droplet (defined as a signal droplet). Switching of the GERF from the suspended state (off-state) to the flowing state (on-state) or vice versa in the micro-channel is controlled by the appearance of signal droplets whenever they pass through the detection electrode. The output on-off signals can be easily demonstrated, clearly matching with GERF flow status. Our results show that such a logic switch is also a logic IF gate, while its inverter functions as a NOT gate. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2010.

  19. Orientation-Based Control of Microfluidics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazila Norouzi

    Full Text Available Most microfluidic chips utilize off-chip hardware (syringe pumps, computer-controlled solenoid valves, pressure regulators, etc. to control fluid flow on-chip. This expensive, bulky, and power-consuming hardware severely limits the utility of microfluidic instruments in resource-limited or point-of-care contexts, where the cost, size, and power consumption of the instrument must be limited. In this work, we present a technique for on-chip fluid control that requires no off-chip hardware. We accomplish this by using inert compounds to change the density of one fluid in the chip. If one fluid is made 2% more dense than a second fluid, when the fluids flow together under laminar flow the interface between the fluids quickly reorients to be orthogonal to Earth's gravitational force. If the channel containing the fluids then splits into two channels, the amount of each fluid flowing into each channel is precisely determined by the angle of the channels relative to gravity. Thus, any fluid can be routed in any direction and mixed in any desired ratio on-chip simply by holding the chip at a certain angle. This approach allows for sophisticated control of on-chip fluids with no off-chip control hardware, significantly reducing the cost of microfluidic instruments in point-of-care or resource-limited settings.

  20. A Review on Mixing in Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangmo Kang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Small-scale mixing is of uttermost importance in bio- and chemical analyses using micro TAS (total analysis systems or lab-on-chips. Many microfluidic applications involve chemical reactions where, most often, the fluid diffusivity is very low so that without the help of chaotic advection the reaction time can be extremely long. In this article, we will review various kinds of mixers developed for use in microfluidic devices. Our review starts by defining the terminology necessary to understand the fundamental concept of mixing and by introducing quantities for evaluating the mixing performance, such as mixing index and residence time. In particular, we will review the concept of chaotic advection and the mathematical terms, Poincare section and Lyapunov exponent. Since these concepts are developed from nonlinear dynamical systems, they should play important roles in devising microfluidic devices with enhanced mixing performance. Following, we review the various designs of mixers that are employed in applications. We will classify the designs in terms of the driving forces, including mechanical, electrical and magnetic forces, used to control fluid flow upon mixing. The advantages and disadvantages of each design will also be addressed. Finally, we will briefly touch on the expected future development regarding mixer design and related issues for the further enhancement of mixing performance.

  1. Microfluidics for Positron Emission Tomography Probe Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Wei Wang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Owing to increased needs for positron emission tomography (PET, high demands for a wide variety of radiolabeled compounds will have to be met by exploiting novel radiochemistry and engineering technologies to improve the production and development of PET probes. The application of microfluidic reactors to perform radiosyntheses is currently attracting a great deal of interest because of their potential to deliver many advantages over conventional labeling systems. Microfluidics-based radiochemistry can lead to the use of smaller quantities of precursors, accelerated reaction rates, and easier purification processes with greater yield and higher specific activity of desired probes. Several proof-of-principle examples along with the basics of device architecture and operation and the potential limitations of each design are discussed. Along with the concept of radioisotope distribution from centralized cyclotron facilities to individual imaging centers and laboratories (“decentralized model”, an easy-to-use, stand-alone, flexible, fully automated, radiochemical microfluidic platform can provide simpler and more cost-effective procedures for molecular imaging using PET.

  2. Paper-Based Digital Microfluidic Chip for Multiple Electrochemical Assay Operated by a Wireless Portable Control System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruecha, Nipapan; Lee, Jumi; Chae, Heedo

    2017-01-01

    The printing and modular fabrication of a paper-based active microfluidic lab on a chip implemented with electrochemical sensors (ECSs) is developed and integrated on a portable electrical control system. The electrodes of a chip plate for active electrowetting actuation of digital drops and an ECS...... designed portable power supply and wireless control system, the active paper-based chip platform can be utilized as an advanced point-of-care device for multiple assays in digital microfluidics....... modules are assembled modularly on an open chip plate, forming various novel hybridized open–closed chip formats. By varying the coupled or decoupled sensor modules, excellent detection of three diagnostic biological molecules is demonstrated (glucose, dopamine, and uric acid in human serum). With a newly...

  3. Non-contrast MRI perfusion angiosome in diabetic feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jie; Hastings, Mary K; Muccigross, David; Fan, Zhaoyang; Gao, Fabao; Curci, John; Hildebolt, Charles F; Mueller, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approach to evaluate skeletal muscle perfusion in the diabetic foot based on the concept of angiosomes of the foot. Five healthy volunteers and five participants with diabetes (HbA1c = 7.2 ± 1.8%) without a history of peripheral artery disease were examined. The non-contrast perfusion measurements were performed during a toe flexion challenge. Absolute perfusion maps were created and two regions (medial and lateral) on the maps were segmented based on angiosomes. Regional difference in the perfusion of foot muscle was readily visualized in the MRI perfusion angiosomes during the challenge. In the participants with diabetes, the perfusion during toe flexion challenge was significantly lower than in healthy volunteers (P feet. • Non-contrast MRI perfusion angiosome maps measure regional perfusion in foot muscles non-invasively. • Foot perfusion response to challenge is reduced in persons with diabetes. • MRI perfusion angiosome maps may help evaluation of regional foot muscle perfusion.

  4. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : 1- Adoption de l’ordre du jour. 2- Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. 3- Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. 4- Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. 5- Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. 6- Programme 2015. 7- Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. 8- Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. 9- Élections des membres de la Commission é...

  5. General assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. Programme 2015. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commission électorale. &am...

  6. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Mardi 5 avril à 11 h 00 BE Auditorium Meyrin (6-2-024) Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 5 mai 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2015. Programme de travail 2016. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2016 Approbation du taux de cotisation pour 2017. Modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commissio...

  7. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 5 avril 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2016. Programme de travail 2017. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2017 Approbation du taux de cotisation pour 2018. Modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposées. Élections des membres de la Commission électorale. Élections des vérifica...

  8. Hepatic Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in a Perfused 3D Porous Polymer Scaffold for Liver Tissue Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Mette; Muhammad, Haseena Bashir; Mohanty, Soumyaranjan

    to limitations of primary hepatocytes regarding availability and maintenance of functionality, stem cells and especially human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPS cells) are an attractive cell source for liver tissue engineering. The aim of this part of NanoBio4Trans is to optimize culture and hepatic......A huge shortage of liver organs for transplantation has motivated the research field of tissue engineering to develop bioartificial liver tissue and even a whole liver. The goal of NanoBio4Trans is to create a vascularized bioartificial liver tissue, initially as a liver-support system. Due...... differentiation of hIPS-derived definitive endoderm (DE) cells in a 3D porous polymer scaffold built-in a perfusable bioreactor. The use of a microfluidic bioreactor array enables the culture of 16 independent tissues in one experimental run and thereby an optimization study to be performed....

  9. Hepatic perfusion changes in an experimental model of acute pancreatitis: Evaluation by perfusion CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tutcu, Semra [Department of Surgery, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey); Serter, Selim, E-mail: serterselim@gmail.co [Department of Radiology, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey); Kaya, Yavuz; Kara, Eray [Department of Surgery, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey); Nese, Nalan [Department of Pathology, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey); Pekindil, Goekhan [Department of Radiology, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey); Coskun, Teoman [Department of Surgery, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: It is known that acute pancreatitis may cause secondary changes in several organs. Liver is one of these involved organs. In different experimental studies hepatic damages were shown histopathologically in acute pancreatitis but there are a few studies about perfusion disorders that accompany these histopathologic changes. Perfusion CT (pCT) provides the ability to detect regional and global alterations in organ blood flow. The purpose of the study was to describe hepatic perfusion changes in experimental acute pancreatitis model with pCT. Materials and methods: Forty Sprague-Dawley rats of both genders with average weights of 250 g were used. Rats were randomized into two groups. Twenty rats were in control group and 20 in acute pancreatitis group. pCT was performed. Perfusion maps were formed by processing the obtained images with perfusion CT software. Blood flow (BF) and blood volume (BV) values were obtained from these maps. All pancreatic and liver tissues were taken off with laparotomy and histopathologic investigation was performed. Student's t test was used for statistical analyses. Results: In pCT we found statistically significant increase in blood volume in both lobes of liver and in blood flow in right lobe of the liver (p < 0.01). Although blood flow in left lobe of the liver increased, it did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion: The quantitative analysis of liver parenchyma with pCT showed that acute pancreatitis causes a significant perfusion changes in the hepatic tissue. Systemic mediators seem to be effective as well as local inflammatory changes in perfusion changes.

  10. Patient satisfaction with coronary CT angiography, myocardial CT perfusion, myocardial perfusion MRI, SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging and conventional coronary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feger, S.; Rief, M.; Zimmermann, E.; Richter, F.; Roehle, R. [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Department of Radiology, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Dewey, M. [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Department of Radiology, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Institut fuer Radiologie, Berlin (Germany); Schoenenberger, E. [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Department of Medicine, Hannover (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate patient acceptance of noninvasive imaging tests for detection of coronary artery disease (CAD), including single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI), stress perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), coronary CT angiography (CTA) in combination with CT myocardial stress perfusion (CTP), and conventional coronary angiography (CCA). Intraindividual comparison of perception of 48 patients from the CORE320 multicentre multinational study who underwent rest and stress SPECT-MPI with a technetium-based tracer, combined CTA and CTP (both with contrast agent, CTP with adenosine), MRI, and CCA. The analysis was performed by using a validated questionnaire. Patients had significantly more concern prior to CCA than before CTA/CTP (p < 0.001). CTA/CTP was also rated as more comfortable than SPECT-MPI (p = 0.001). Overall satisfaction with CT was superior to that of MRI (p = 0.007). More patients preferred CT (46 %; p < 0.001) as a future diagnostic test. Regarding combined CTA/CTP, CTP was characterised by higher pain levels and an increased frequency of angina pectoris during the examination (p < 0.001). Subgroup analysis showed a higher degree of pain during SPECT-MPI with adenosine stress compared to physical exercise (p = 0.016). All noninvasive cardiac imaging tests are well accepted by patients, with CT being the preferred examination. (orig.)

  11. Dynamic behaviour of fungi in microfluidics: a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Marie; Binz, Marie; Edwards, Clive; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2009-02-01

    All multi-cellular living organisms are very complex microfluidics systems, which are assembled 'inside-out', as the result of a complex 'tug-of-war' process comprising both feed-forward modules, in particular the program embedded in the species' DNA, and feed-back processes, in particular the response to external environmental conditions. Living organisms have to solve a perennial problem: for an environment with limited resources (finite and spatial distribution of nutrients, geometrical limitations, competition from other species, etc.), finite growth rate and penalties applied to nonoptimal behaviour, what is the best strategy that will maximise growth and survival of the individual and the species? Identifying how organisms resolve this problem is very difficult due to the high complexity involved. However, filamentous fungi and other simple organisms, provide a means to address these issues due to the availability of microscopic imaging and microfabricated geometries in which the behaviour can be tested. Semiconductor fabrication (photolithography, RIE etching, and soft lithography techniques) was used here to produce artificial micro-networks, which are physically and chemically structured 3D microenvironments. Continuous imaging of fungal behaviour in microfluidics networks required the use of PDMS, which is transparent and O2-permeable. Using these structures, the dynamic growth behaviour of two fungal species Neurospora crassa and Armillaria mellea was observed microscopically in real-time. Growth parameters such as the tip extension velocities, branching angles and branching distances on plain surfaces differed vastly between the species. Features in the micronetworks of a size similar to the hyphal diameter induced the largest change in growth parameters such as, the largest decrease in branching distances in N. crassa and a near complete suppression for A. mellea. Despite these fundamental differences, both species negotiated the structures

  12. Embossed Teflon AF Laminate Membrane Microfluidic Diaphragm Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Peter; Hunt, Brian; White,Victor; Grunthaner, Frank

    2008-01-01

    A microfluidic system has been designed to survive spaceflight and to function autonomously on the Martian surface. It manipulates microscopic quantities of liquid water and performs chemical analyses on these samples to assay for the presence of molecules associated with past or present living processes. This technology lies at the core of the Urey Instrument, which is scheduled for inclusion on the Pasteur Payload of the ESA ExoMars rover mission in 2013. Fabrication processes have been developed to make the microfabricated Teflon-AF microfluidic diaphragm pumps capable of surviving extreme temperature excursions before and after exposure to liquid water. Two glass wafers are etched with features and a continuous Teflon membrane is sandwiched between them (see figure). Single valves are constructed using this geometry. The microfabricated devices are then post processed by heating the assembled device while applying pneumatic pressure to force the Teflon diaphragm against the valve seat while it is softened. After cooling the device, the embossed membrane retains this new shape. This solves previous problems with bubble introduction into the fluid flow where deformations of the membrane at the valve seat occurred during device bonding at elevated temperatures (100-150 C). The use of laminated membranes containing commercial Teflon AF 2400 sheet sandwiched between spun Teflon AF 1600 layers performed best, and were less gas permeable than Teflon AF 1600 membranes on their own. Spinning Teflon AF 1600 solution (6 percent in FLOURINERT(Registered TradeMark) FC40 solvent, 3M Company) at 500 rpm for 1.5 seconds, followed by 1,000 rpm for 3 seconds onto Borofloat glass wafers, results in a 10-micron-thick film of extremely smooth Teflon AF. This spinning process is repeated several times on flat, blank, glass wafers in order to gradually build a thick, smooth membrane. After running this process at least five times, the wafer and Teflon coating are heated under vacuum

  13. Optical manipulation with two beam traps in microfluidic polymer systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khoury Arvelo, Maria; Matteucci, Marco; Sørensen, Kristian Tølbøl

    2015-01-01

    An optical trapping system with two opposing laser beams, also known as the optical stretcher, are naturally constructed inside a microfluidic lab-on-chip system. We present and compare two approaches to combine a simple microfluidic system with either waveguides directly written in the microflui...

  14. A microfluidic device based on an evaporation-driven micropump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nie, C.; Frijns, A.J.H.; Mandamparambil, R.; Toonder, J.M.J. den

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a microfluidic device ultimately to be applied as a wearable sweat sensor. We show proof-of-principle of the microfluidic functions of the device, namely fluid collection and continuous fluid flow pumping. A filter-paper based layer, that eventually will form the interface

  15. Multi-layer microfluidic glass chips for microanalytical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daridon, Antoine; Fascio, Valia; Lichtenberg, Jan; Wütrich, Rolf; Langen, Hans; Verpoorte, Elisabeth; De Rooij, Nico F.

    2001-01-01

    A new, versatile architecture is presented for microfluidic devices made entirely from glass, for use with reagents which would prove highly corrosive for silicon. Chips consist of three layers of glass wafers bonded together by fusion bonding. On the inside wafer faces a network of microfluidic

  16. Microfluidic devices for forensic DNA analysis: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijns, Brigitte Bibiche; van Asten, A.; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices may offer various advantages for forensic DNA analysis, such as reduced risk of contamination, shorter analysis time and direct application at the crime scene. Microfluidic chip technology has already proven to be functional and effective within medical applications, such as for

  17. Microfluidics and Microfabrication in a Chemical Engineering Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Shivaun D.

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidics, the manipulation of fluids in channels with micron dimensions, has emerged as an exciting new field that impacts the broad area of nano/microtechnology. This is an important area to train the next generation of chemical engineers. This paper describes an experiment where students are given a problem to design a microfluidic mixer…

  18. Immuno-capture and in situ detection of Salmonella typhimurium on a novel microfluidic chip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Renjie, E-mail: 1058464972@qq.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, No. 174, St. Shazheng, Shapingba District, Chongqing (China); Ni, Yanan, E-mail: 468885029@qq.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, No. 174, St. Shazheng, Shapingba District, Chongqing (China); Xu, Yi, E-mail: xuyibbd@sina.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, No. 174, St. Shazheng, Shapingba District, Chongqing (China); National Center for International Research of Micro/Nano-System and New Material Technology, No. 174, St. Shazhengjie, Shapingba District, Chongqing (China); Key Laboratory of Fundamental Science of Micro/Nano-Device and System Technology for National Defense, Chongqing (China); Jiang, Yan, E-mail: 919865356@qq.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, No. 174, St. Shazheng, Shapingba District, Chongqing (China); Dong, Chunyan, E-mail: 774176325@qq.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, No. 174, St. Shazheng, Shapingba District, Chongqing (China); Chuan, Na, E-mail: 814859441@qq.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, No. 174, St. Shazheng, Shapingba District, Chongqing (China)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel microfluidic chip and a LIF microsystem were designed and fabricated. • Salmonella typhimurium was captured and labeled by specific immuno-capture on chip. • CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled bacteria were detected by in situ analysis using LIF microsystem. • The proposed method has potential application in practice. - Abstract: The new method presented in this article achieved the goal of capturing Salmonella typhimurium via immunoreaction and rapid in situ detection of the CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) labeled S. typhimurium by self-assembly light-emitting diode-induced fluorescence detection (LIF) microsystem on a specially designed multichannel microfluidic chip. CdSe/ZnS QDs were used as fluorescent markers improving detection sensitivity. The microfluidic chip developed in this study was composed of 12 sample channels, 3 mixing zones, and 6 immune reaction zones, which also acted as fluorescence detection zones. QDs–IgG–primary antibody complexes were generated by mixing CdSe/ZnS QDs conjugated secondary antibody (QDs–IgG) and S. typhimurium antibody (primary antibody) in mixing zones. Then, the complexes went into immune reaction zones to label previously captured S. typhimurium in the sandwich mode. The capture rate of S. typhimurium in each detection zone was up to 70%. The enriched QDs-labeled S. typhimurium was detected using a self-assembly LIF microsystem. A good linear relationship was obtained in the range from 3.7 × 10 to 3.7 × 10{sup 5} cfu mL{sup −1} using the equation I = 0.1739 log (C) − 0.1889 with R{sup 2} = 0.9907, and the detection limit was down to 37 cfu mL{sup −1}. The proposed method of online immunolabeling with QDs for in situ fluorescence detection on the designed multichannel microfluidic chip had been successfully used to detect S. typhimurium in pork sample, and it has shown potential advantages in practice.

  19. Myocardial perfusion imaging in hyperthrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moorin, B. [Southland Hospital, Invercargill, (New Zealand). Department of Nuclear Medicine

    1998-06-01

    Full text: Patients with Hyperthrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) frequently suffer from syncope and cardiac arrest which may lead to sudden death. This is most often caused by ventricular arrhythmia`s in adults, however in young patients the mechanisms are thought to be different. Ischaemia may play a significant role even in young asymptomatic HCM patients. The mechanisms of ischaemic development in HCM differ from those in the `normal` myocardium (Due to intramural small vessel abnormalities and abnormal myocellular architecture). In HCM the coronary microcirculation is most often affected and massive hypertrophy means more energy is required to promote contraction thus increasing oxygen demand and compounding the effects of any ischaemic changes. A case of a 12 year old HCM patient is presented who has symptoms of syncope associated with exercise whose mother died suddenly of cardiac arrest developed from HCM. A myocardial perfusion rest/stress study was undertaken to detect any underlying myocardial ischaemia. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy demonstrates any reduction in the microcirculation in addition to that present in the macrocirculation, unlike angiography which will only detect the latter. In this case the scan clearly showed evidence of ischaemia in the lateral wall and this may be an explanation for her episodes of syncope. We suggest an algorithm or the routine work-up of young patients with HCM which makes aggressive use of myocardial perfusion imaging to detect ischaemic changes. This may identify patients who are at higher risk and will assist with treatment decisions. We feel myocardial perfusion scintigraphy is a sensitive non-invasive accurate method of detecting microcirculatory ischaemia and is thus invaluable in HCM patients

  20. Staging of moyamoya disease by perfusion SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwabara, Yasuo [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Hospital; Matsushima, Toshio; Fukui, Masashi

    2001-04-01

    Staging of moyamoya disease, based on angiography and PET have already been established. The authors have established staging of moyamoya disease based on perfusion SPECT, that can be summarized as follows: Stage I, no abnormality is seen at rest or after acetazolamide loading; Stage II, no abnormality is seen at rest, however, a decreased response (blood flow increase rate: <15%) is seen to acetazolamide loading (a, a decreased response is seen only in the frontal lobe; b, a decreased response is seen in regions other than the frontal lobe; and c, a decreased response is seen throughout the cerebrum); Stage III, localized decrease in blood flow (blood flow decrease compared with peripheral tissue: {>=}15%) and marked decrease in response to acetazolamide (blood flow increase rate: <5%) are seen at rest. In Stage III, CT and MRI show no abnormal findings or only mild lesions of the white matter; and Stage IV, multiple decreases in blood flow are seen at rest, and CT and MRI reveal infarctions and severe atrophy at the same sites. The above staging does not require determination of cerebral blood flow, and thus it can be used in children, in whom cerebral blood flow determination is difficult. The authors performed 99m-Tc ECD perfusion SPECT in 25 patients with moyamoya disease for the staging, and compared staging based on angiography with staging based on perfusion SPECT. The results did not show a correlation between the 2 staging methods. A problem inherent in the staging of moyamoya disease based on perfusion SPECT is that the relationship between cerebral blood flow and cerebral radioactivity concentrations may differ depending on the drug used to determine cerebral blood flow. Thus, although the present staging system does not depend on any specific radioactive drug to determine cerebral blood flow, further investigation is necessary to identify a more appropriate drug than those in current use. (K.H.)

  1. Diffusion phenomena of cells and biomolecules in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz-Ozturk, Ece; Yesil-Celiktas, Ozlem

    2015-09-01

    Biomicrofluidics is an emerging field at the cross roads of microfluidics and life sciences which requires intensive research efforts in terms of introducing appropriate designs, production techniques, and analysis. The ultimate goal is to deliver innovative and cost-effective microfluidic devices to biotech, biomedical, and pharmaceutical industries. Therefore, creating an in-depth understanding of the transport phenomena of cells and biomolecules becomes vital and concurrently poses significant challenges. The present article outlines the recent advancements in diffusion phenomena of cells and biomolecules by highlighting transport principles from an engineering perspective, cell responses in microfluidic devices with emphases on diffusion- and flow-based microfluidic gradient platforms, macroscopic and microscopic approaches for investigating the diffusion phenomena of biomolecules, microfluidic platforms for the delivery of these molecules, as well as the state of the art in biological applications of mammalian cell responses and diffusion of biomolecules.

  2. Microfluidic tunable inkjet-printed metamaterial absorber on paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Kenyu; Yoo, Minyeong; Su, Wenjing; Kim, Kyeongseob; Cook, Benjamin; Tentzeris, Manos M; Lim, Sungjoon

    2015-01-12

    In this paper, we propose a novel microfluidic tunable metamaterial (MM) absorber printed on a paper substrate in silver nanoparticle ink. The metamaterial is designed using a periodic array consisting of square patches. The conductive patterns are inkjet-printed on paper using silver nanoparticle inks. The microfluidic channels are laser-etched on polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). The conductive patterns on paper and the microfluidic channels on PMMA are bonded by an SU-8 layer that is also inkjet-printed on the conductive patterns. The proposed MM absorber provides frequency-tuning capability for different fluids in the microfluidic channels. We performed full-wave simulations and measurements that confirmed that the resonant frequency decreased from 4.42 GHz to 3.97 GHz after the injection of distilled water into the microfluidic channels. For both empty and water-filled channels, the absorptivity is higher than 90% at horizontal and vertical polarizations.

  3. Microfluidic process monitor for industrial solvent extraction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelis, Artem; Pereira, Candido; Nichols, Kevin Paul Flood

    2016-01-12

    The present invention provides a system for solvent extraction utilizing a first electrode with a raised area formed on its surface, which defines a portion of a microfluidic channel; a second electrode with a flat surface, defining another portion of the microfluidic channel that opposes the raised area of the first electrode; a reversibly deformable substrate disposed between the first electrode and second electrode, adapted to accommodate the raised area of the first electrode and having a portion that extends beyond the raised area of the first electrode, that portion defining the remaining portions of the microfluidic channel; and an electrolyte of at least two immiscible liquids that flows through the microfluidic channel. Also provided is a system for performing multiple solvent extractions utilizing several microfluidic chips or unit operations connected in series.

  4. Microfluidics for rapid cytokeratin immunohistochemical staining in frozen sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brajkovic, Saska; Dupouy, Diego G; de Leval, Laurence; Gijs, Martin Am

    2017-08-01

    Frozen sections (FS) of tumor samples represent a cornerstone of pathological intraoperative consultation and have an important role in the microscopic analysis of specimens during surgery. So far, immunohistochemical (IHC) stainings on FS have been demonstrated for a few markers using manual methods. Microfluidic technologies have proven to bring substantial improvement in many fields of diagnostics, though only a few microfluidic devices have been designed to improve the performance of IHC assays. In this work, we show optimization of a complete pan-cytokeratin chromogenic immunostaining protocol on FS using a microfluidic tissue processor into a protocol taking <12 min. Our results showed specificity and low levels of background. The dimensions of the microfluidic prototype device are compatible with the space constraints of an intraoperative pathology laboratory. We therefore anticipate that the adoption of microfluidic technologies in the field of surgical pathology can significantly improve the way FSs influence surgical procedures.

  5. Microfluidics-Nano-Integration for Synthesis and Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukumaran Packirisamy

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent progress and achievements in the development of preparation of nano and microparticles in a microfluidic environment is reviewed. Microfluidics exploit fluid mechanics to create particles with a narrow range of sizes and offers a finely controllable route to tune the shape and composition of nanomaterials. The advantages of both continuous flow- and droplet-based synthesis of polymers and nanoparticles, in comparison with the traditional stirred flasks methods are discussed in detail by using numerous recent examples from the literature as well as from the authors’ work. The controllability of the size distribution of the particles is discussed in terms of the fabrication approach and the characteristics of the microfluidic reactors. A special attention is paid to metal-polymer nanocomposites prepared through microfluidic routes and their application in bio-sensing. Directions for future development of microfluidic synthesis of high quality nanoparticles are discussed.

  6. Hemocompatibility improvement of perfusion-decellularized clinical-scale liver scaffold through heparin immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ji; Wu, Qiong; Sun, Jiu; Zhou, Yongjie; Wang, Yujia; Jiang, Xin; Li, Li; Shi, Yujun; Bu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Whole-liver perfusion-decellularization is an attractive scaffold–preparation technique for producing clinical transplantable liver tissue. However, the scaffold’s poor hemocompatibility poses a major obstacle. This study was intended to improve the hemocompatibility of perfusion-decellularized porcine liver scaffold via immobilization of heparin. Heparin was immobilized on decellularized liver scaffolds (DLSs) by electrostatic binding using a layer-by-layer self-assembly technique (/h-LBL scaffold), covalent binding via multi-point attachment (/h-MPA scaffold), or end-point attachment (/h-EPA scaffold). The effect of heparinization on anticoagulant ability and cytocompatibility were investigated. The result of heparin content and release tests revealed EPA technique performed higher efficiency of heparin immobilization than other two methods. Then, systematic in vitro investigation of prothrombin time (PT), thrombin time (TT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), platelet adhesion and human platelet factor 4 (PF4, indicates platelet activation) confirmed the heparinized scaffolds, especially the /h-EPA counterparts, exhibited ultralow blood component activations and excellent hemocompatibility. Furthermore, heparin treatments prevented thrombosis successfully in DLSs with blood perfusion after implanted in vivo. Meanwhile, after heparin processes, both primary hepatocyte and endothelial cell viability were also well-maintained, which indicated that heparin treatments with improved biocompatibility might extend to various hemoperfusable whole-organ scaffolds’ preparation. PMID:26030843

  7. Design and Functional Testing of a Multichamber Perfusion Platform for Three-Dimensional Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Piola

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Perfusion culture systems are widely used in tissue engineering applications for enhancing cell culture viability in the core of three-dimensional scaffolds. In this work, we present a multichamber confined-flow perfusion system, designed to provide a straightforward platform for three-dimensional dynamic cell cultures. The device comprises 6 culture chambers allowing independent and simultaneous experiments in controlled conditions. Each chamber consists of three parts: a housing, a deformable scaffold-holder cartridge, and a 7 mL reservoir, which couples water-tightly with the housing compressing the cartridge. Short-term dynamic cell seeding experiments were carried out with MC3T3-E1 cells seeded into polycaprolactone porous scaffolds. Preliminary results revealed that the application of flow perfusion through the scaffold favored the penetration of the cells to its interior, producing a more homogeneous distribution of cells with respect to dropwise or injection seeding methods. The culture chamber layout was conceived with the aim of simplifying the user operations under laminar flow hood and minimizing the risks for contamination during handling and operation. Furthermore, a compact size, a small number of components, and the use of bayonet couplings ensured a simple, fast, and sterility-promoting assembling. Finally, preliminary in vitro tests proved the efficacy of the system in enhancing cell seeding efficiency, opening the way for further studies addressing long-term scaffold colonization.

  8. A device for long-term perfusion, imaging, and electrical interfacing of brain tissue in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel J Killian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Distributed microelectrode array (MEA recordings from consistent, viable, ≥ 500 µm thick tissue preparations over time periods from days to weeks may aid in studying a wide range of problems in neurobiology that require in vivo-like organotypic morphology. Existing tools for electrically interfacing with organotypic slices do not address necrosis that inevitably occurs within thick slices with limited diffusion of nutrients and gas, and limited removal of waste. We developed an integrated device that enables long-term maintenance of thick, functionally active, brain tissue models using interstitial perfusion and distributed recordings from thick sections of explanted tissue on a perforated multi-electrode array. This novel device allows for automated culturing, in situ imaging, and extracellular multi-electrode interfacing with brain slices, 3 D cell cultures, and potentially other tissue culture models. The device is economical, easy to assemble, and integrable with standard electrophysiology tools. We found that convective perfusion through the culture thickness provided a functional benefit to the preparations as firing rates were generally higher in perfused cultures compared to their respective unperfused controls. This work is a step towards the development of integrated tools for days-long experiments with more consistent, healthier, thicker, and functionally more active tissue cultures with built-in distributed electrophysiological recording and stimulation functionality. The results may be useful for the study of normal processes, pathological conditions, and drug screening strategies currently hindered by the limitations of acute (a few hours long brain slice preparations.

  9. Design and functional testing of a multichamber perfusion platform for three-dimensional scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piola, Marco; Soncini, Monica; Cantini, Marco; Sadr, Nasser; Ferrario, Giulio; Fiore, Gianfranco B

    2013-01-01

    Perfusion culture systems are widely used in tissue engineering applications for enhancing cell culture viability in the core of three-dimensional scaffolds. In this work, we present a multichamber confined-flow perfusion system, designed to provide a straightforward platform for three-dimensional dynamic cell cultures. The device comprises 6 culture chambers allowing independent and simultaneous experiments in controlled conditions. Each chamber consists of three parts: a housing, a deformable scaffold-holder cartridge, and a 7 mL reservoir, which couples water-tightly with the housing compressing the cartridge. Short-term dynamic cell seeding experiments were carried out with MC3T3-E1 cells seeded into polycaprolactone porous scaffolds. Preliminary results revealed that the application of flow perfusion through the scaffold favored the penetration of the cells to its interior, producing a more homogeneous distribution of cells with respect to dropwise or injection seeding methods. The culture chamber layout was conceived with the aim of simplifying the user operations under laminar flow hood and minimizing the risks for contamination during handling and operation. Furthermore, a compact size, a small number of components, and the use of bayonet couplings ensured a simple, fast, and sterility-promoting assembling. Finally, preliminary in vitro tests proved the efficacy of the system in enhancing cell seeding efficiency, opening the way for further studies addressing long-term scaffold colonization.

  10. Non-contrast MRI perfusion angiosome in diabetic feet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Jie [Cardiovascular Imaging Lab, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Hastings, Mary K.; Mueller, Michael J. [Washington University School of Medicine, The Program in Physical Therapy, St. Louis, MO (United States); Muccigross, David; Hildebolt, Charles F. [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Fan, Zhaoyang [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Biomedical Imaging Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Gao, Fabao [West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Department of Radiology, Chengdu (China); Curci, John [Washington University School of Medicine, The Department of Surgery, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The purpose of this study is to develop a non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approach to evaluate skeletal muscle perfusion in the diabetic foot based on the concept of angiosomes of the foot. Five healthy volunteers and five participants with diabetes (HbA1c = 7.2 ± 1.8 %) without a history of peripheral artery disease were examined. The non-contrast perfusion measurements were performed during a toe flexion challenge. Absolute perfusion maps were created and two regions (medial and lateral) on the maps were segmented based on angiosomes. Regional difference in the perfusion of foot muscle was readily visualized in the MRI perfusion angiosomes during the challenge. In the participants with diabetes, the perfusion during toe flexion challenge was significantly lower than in healthy volunteers (P < 0.01). The average perfusion for the medial plantar region of the right foot was lower in subjects with diabetes (38 ± 9 ml/min/100 g) than in healthy subjects (93 ± 33 ml/min/100 g). Non-contrast MRI perfusion angiosome maps demonstrate the feasibility of determining regional perfusion in foot muscles during toe challenge and may facilitate evaluation of muscle perfusion in diabetic feet. (orig.)

  11. Microfluidics @ the Beach: Introduction of Microfluidics Technology to the ChE Curriculum at Cal State Long Beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Roger C.; Bhatia, Hina; Venkatraman, Rahul; Jang, Larry K.

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidics involves the study of the behavior of fluids at microscale, fluid manipulations, and the design of the devices that can effectively perform such manipulations. We are developing two new elective courses to include microfluidics in our curriculum at CSULB. Herein, we present the results of the first course, Microfabrication and…

  12. Recent advances of controlled drug delivery using microfluidic platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjay, Sharma T; Zhou, Wan; Dou, Maowei; Tavakoli, Hamed; Ma, Lei; Xu, Feng; Li, XiuJun

    2017-09-15

    Conventional systematically-administered drugs distribute evenly throughout the body, get degraded and excreted rapidly while crossing many biological barriers, leaving minimum amounts of the drugs at pathological sites. Controlled drug delivery aims to deliver drugs to the target sites at desired rates and time, thus enhancing the drug efficacy, pharmacokinetics, and bioavailability while maintaining minimal side effects. Due to a number of unique advantages of the recent microfluidic lab-on-a-chip technology, microfluidic lab-on-a-chip has provided unprecedented opportunities for controlled drug delivery. Drugs can be efficiently delivered to the target sites at desired rates in a well-controlled manner by microfluidic platforms via integration, implantation, localization, automation, and precise control of various microdevice parameters. These features accordingly make reproducible, on-demand, and tunable drug delivery become feasible. On-demand self-tuning dynamic drug delivery systems have shown great potential for personalized drug delivery. This review presents an overview of recent advances in controlled drug delivery using microfluidic platforms. The review first briefly introduces microfabrication techniques of microfluidic platforms, followed by detailed descriptions of numerous microfluidic drug delivery systems that have significantly advanced the field of controlled drug delivery. Those microfluidic systems can be separated into four major categories, namely drug carrier-free micro-reservoir-based drug delivery systems, highly integrated carrier-free microfluidic lab-on-a-chip systems, drug carrier-integrated microfluidic systems, and microneedles. Microneedles can be further categorized into five different types, i.e. solid, porous, hollow, coated, and biodegradable microneedles, for controlled transdermal drug delivery. At the end, we discuss current limitations and future prospects of microfluidic platforms for controlled drug delivery. Copyright

  13. Design and Simulation of a Fused Silica Space Cell Culture and Observation Cavity with Microfluidic and Temperature Controlling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangchun Fan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a principle prototype of space animal cell perfusion culture and observation. Unlike previous work, our cell culture system cannot only realize microfluidic and temperature controlling, automatic observation, and recording but also meet an increasing cell culture at large scale operation and overcome shear force for animal cells. A key component in the system is ingenious structural fused silica cell culture cavity with the wedge-shaped connection. Finite volume method (FVM is applied to calculate its multipoint flow field, pressure field, axial velocity, tangential velocity, and radial velocity. In order to provide appropriate flow rate, temperature, and shear force for space animal cell culture, a closed-loop microfluidic circuit and proportional, integrating, and differentiation (PID algorithm are employed. This paper also illustrates system architecture and operating method of the principle prototype. The dynamic culture, autofocus observation, and recording of M763 cells are performed successfully within 72 h in the laboratory environment. This research can provide a reference for space flight mission that carries an apparatus with similar functions.

  14. Hydrophilic PEO-PDMS for microfluidic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Mingjin; Fang, Ji

    2012-02-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a popularly used nontoxic and biocompatible material in microfluidic systems, which is relatively cheap and does not break easily like glass. The simple fabrication, optical transparency and elastomeric property make PDMS a handy material to work with. In order to develop different applications of PDMS in microfluidics and bioengineering, it is necessary to modify the PDMS surface nature to improve wetting characteristics, and to have a better control in nonspecific binding of proteins and cells, as well as to increase adhesion. At the moment, the hydrophilic surface modification performance of PDMS is known to recover its hydrophobicity shortly after oxidation modification, which is not stable in the long term (Owen and Smith 1994 J. Adhes. Sci. Technol. 8 1063-75). This paper presents a long-term stable hydrophilic surface modification processing of PDMS. The poly(dimethylsiloxane-ethylene oxide polymeric) (PDMS-b-PEO) is used in this project as a surfactant additive to be added into the PDMS base and the curing agent mixture during polymerization and to create hydrophilic PEO-PDMS. The contact angle can be controlled at 21.5-80.9° with the different mixing ratios and the hydrophilicity will remain stable for two months and then slightly varied later. We also investigate the bonding conditions of the modified PDMS to a silicon wafer and a glass wafer. To demonstrate its applications, we designed a device which consists of microchannels on a silicon wafer, and PEO-PDMS is utilized as a cover sheet. The capillary function was investigated under the different contact angles of PED-PDMS and with different aspect ratios of microchannels. All of the processes and testing data are presented in detail. This easy and cost-effective modified PDMS with a good bonding property can be widely used in the capillary device and systems, and microfluidic devices for fluid flow control of the microchannels in biological, chemical, medical

  15. Pulmonary Perfusion in Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Agreement of MRI and SPECT for Lobar, Segmental and Subsegmental Perfusion Defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kluge, A.; Gerriets, T.; Stolz, E.; Dill, T.; Mueller, K.D.; Mueller, C.; Bachmann, G. [Pius-Hospital, Oldenburg (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To assess prospectively the agreement of magnetic resonance (MR) pulmonary perfusion with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion for perfusion defects down to the subsegmental level in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). Material and Methods: In 41 patients with suspected PE, contrast-enhanced MR pulmonary perfusion (3D-FLASH, TR/TE 1.6/0.6 ms) was compared to SPECT perfusion on a per-examination basis as well as at the lobar, segmental, and subsegmental level. Results: The MRI protocol was completed in all patients, and mean examination time was 3 min 56 s. MR perfusion showed a very high agreement with SPECT (kappa value per examination 0.98, and 0.98, 0.83, and 0.69 for lobar, segmental, and subsegmental perfusion defects, respectively). Of 15 patients with PE, MR perfusion detected 14 cases. Conclusion: The very high agreement of MR perfusion with SPECT perfusion enables the detection of subtle findings in suspected PE.

  16. Universal lab-on-a-chip platform for complex, perfused 3D cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, F.; Schmieder, F.; Ströbel, J.; Grünzner, S.; Busek, M.; Günther, K.; Steege, T.; Polk, C.; Klotzbach, U.

    2016-03-01

    The miniaturization, rapid prototyping and automation of lab-on-a-chip technology play nowadays a very important role. Lab-on-a-chip technology is successfully implemented not only for environmental analysis and medical diagnostics, but also as replacement of animals used for the testing of substances in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries. For that purpose the Fraunhofer IWS and partners developed a lab-on-a-chip platform for perfused cell-based assays in the last years, which includes different micropumps, valves, channels, reservoirs and customized cell culture modules. This technology is already implemented for the characterization of different human cell cultures and organoids, like skin, liver, endothelium, hair follicle and nephron. The advanced universal lab-on-a-chip platform for complex, perfused 3D cell cultures is divided into a multilayer basic chip with integrated micropump and application-specific 3D printed cell culture modules. Moreover a technology for surface modification of the printed cell culture modules by laser micro structuring and a complex and flexibly programmable controlling device based on an embedded Linux system was developed. A universal lab-on-a-chip platform with an optional oxygenator and a cell culture module for cubic scaffolds as well as first cell culture experiments within the cell culture device will be presented. The module is designed for direct interaction with robotic dispenser systems. This offers the opportunity to combine direct organ printing of cells and scaffolds with the microfluidic cell culture module. The characterization of the developed system was done by means of Micro-Particle Image Velocimetry (μPIV) and an optical oxygen measuring system.

  17. Developing a Benchmarking Process in Perfusion: A Report of the Perfusion Downunder Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert A.; Newland, Richard F.; Fenton, Carmel; McDonald, Michael; Willcox, Timothy W.; Merry, Alan F.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Improving and understanding clinical practice is an appropriate goal for the perfusion community. The Perfusion Downunder Collaboration has established a multi-center perfusion focused database aimed at achieving these goals through the development of quantitative quality indicators for clinical improvement through benchmarking. Data were collected using the Perfusion Downunder Collaboration database from procedures performed in eight Australian and New Zealand cardiac centers between March 2007 and February 2011. At the Perfusion Downunder Meeting in 2010, it was agreed by consensus, to report quality indicators (QI) for glucose level, arterial outlet temperature, and pCO2 management during cardiopulmonary bypass. The values chosen for each QI were: blood glucose ≥4 mmol/L and ≤10 mmol/L; arterial outlet temperature ≤37°C; and arterial blood gas pCO2 ≥ 35 and ≤45 mmHg. The QI data were used to derive benchmarks using the Achievable Benchmark of Care (ABC™) methodology to identify the incidence of QIs at the best performing centers. Five thousand four hundred and sixty-five procedures were evaluated to derive QI and benchmark data. The incidence of the blood glucose QI ranged from 37–96% of procedures, with a benchmark value of 90%. The arterial outlet temperature QI occurred in 16–98% of procedures with the benchmark of 94%; while the arterial pCO2 QI occurred in 21–91%, with the benchmark value of 80%. We have derived QIs and benchmark calculations for the management of several key aspects of cardiopulmonary bypass to provide a platform for improving the quality of perfusion practice. PMID:22730861

  18. Scintillation particle detection based on microfluidics

    CERN Document Server

    Mapelli, A; Renaud, P; Gorini, B; Trivino, N Vico; Jiguet, S; Vandelli, W; Haguenauer, M

    2010-01-01

    A novel type of particle detector based on scintillation, with precise spatial resolution and high radiation hardness, is being studied. It consists of a single microfluidic channel filled with a liquid scintillator and is designed to define an array of scintillating waveguides each independently coupled to a photodetector. Prototype detectors built using an SU-8 epoxy resin have been tested with electrons from a radioactive source. The experimental results show a light yield compatible with the theoretical expectations and confirm the validity of the approach. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. An automated Teflon microfluidic peptide synthesizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hui; Wang, Weizhi; Li, Xiaojun; Wang, Zihua; Hood, Leroy; Lausted, Christopher; Hu, Zhiyuan

    2013-09-07

    We present a microfluidic synthesizer made entirely of Teflon material for solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). Solvent-resistant perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) was used to construct chip-sized devices featuring multiple tri-layer pneumatic microvalves. Using these devices, model peptides were automatically synthesized and cleaved in situ in a continuous-flow manner. The total coupling and cleavage time was significantly reduced compared to conventional bulk reactors. The synthesis of a decapeptide, for instance, took less than 6 h using our device while it usually takes more than three days using conventional reactors.

  20. Absorption of charged particulate surfactants in microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Tiantian; Liu, Zhou; Yao, Xiaoxue; Liu, Yaming

    2017-11-01

    We use microfluidics to uncouple the generation of Pickering emulsion droplets and stability analysis against coalescence. By designing the microchannels, we control the packing time for charged particles arriving at the droplet interfaces, and subsequently test the droplet stability in a coalescence chamber. The critical particle coverage on interfaces that prevents coalescence are estimated by an adsorption model. We further investigate the dependence of the critical particle coverage on its properties such as particle sizes, surface charge densities, and bulk concentrations. Our studies are potentially beneficial to the applications involving particle-stabilized droplets including cosmetics, food products, and oil recovery. NSFC 11504238,JCYJ20160308092144035,2016A050503048.

  1. Nanostructured surfaces for microfluidics and sensing applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picraux, Samuel Thomas (Arizona State University); Piech, Marcin (United Technologies Corp.); Schneider, John F.; Vail, Sean (Arizona State University); Hayes, Mark A. (Arizona State University); Garcia, Anthony A.; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Gust, D (Arizona State University); Yang, Dongqing (Arizona State University)

    2007-01-01

    The present work demonstrates the use of light to move liquids on a photoresponsive monolayer, providing a new method for delivering analyses in lab-on-chip environments for microfluidic systems. The light-driven motion of liquids was achieved on photoresponsive azobenzene modified surfaces. The surface energy components of azobenzene modified surfaces were calculated by Van Oss theory. The motion of the liquid was achieved by generation of a surface tension gradient by isomerization of azobenzene monolayers using UV and Visible light, thereby establishing a surface energy heterogeneity on the edge of the droplet. Contact angle measurements of various solvents were used to demonstrate the requirement for fluid motion.

  2. Photonic integration platform with pump free microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R; Harrison, A; Barrow, D; Smowton, P M

    2017-10-02

    Chip based particle sensing using 3D capillary fill microfluidics integrated with monolithically integrated lasers and photodetectors is used to demonstrate the feasibility of true chip scale photonic measurements of fluids. The approach is scalable and manufactured using industry standard compound semiconductor fabrication tools. The need for fluid speed regulation via external pumps is removed by measuring local particle velocity at the point of interrogation and particle position within the fluid flow is derived from multiple time resolved forward scattered light signals. Particle size discrimination of 10 and 15 μm polystyrene microbeads is used as an example.

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Ventilation and Perfusion in the Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisk, Gordon Kim (Inventor); Hopkins, Susan Roberta (Inventor); Buxton, Richard Bruce (Inventor); Pereira De Sa, Rui Carlos (Inventor); Theilmann, Rebecca Jean (Inventor); Cronin, Matthew Vincent (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Methods, devices, and systems are disclosed for implementing a fully quantitative non-injectable contrast proton MRI technique to measure spatial ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) matching and spatial distribution of ventilation and perfusion. In one aspect, a method using MRI to characterize ventilation and perfusion in a lung includes acquiring an MR image of the lung having MR data in a voxel and obtaining a breathing frequency parameter, determining a water density value, a specific ventilation value, and a perfusion value in at least one voxel of the MR image based on the MR data and using the water density value to determine an air content value, and determining a ventilation-perfusion ratio value that is the product of the specific ventilation value, the air content value, the inverse of the perfusion value, and the breathing frequency.

  4. Reversible ventilation and perfusion abnormalities in unilateral obstructed lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, H.E.; Jones, R.L.; King, E.G.; Sproule, B.J.; Fortune, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    An intraluminal carcinoid tumor obstructing the left mainstem bronchus produced hypoxemia through alteration in ventilation/perfusion matching. Studies of regional lung function using 133-xenon (/sup 133/Xe) and a multiprobe computerized instrumentation system documented a reduction of perfusion to 22 percent and ventilation to 6 percent of the total. There was negligible washout of intravenously injected /sup 133/Xe from the left lung consistent with air trapping. Four days after left mainstem bronchial sleeve resection, perfusion, ventilation and washout of injected xenon had significantly improved and by four months postresection, all measurements were virtually normal, although complete restoration of perfusion in relation to ventilation was delayed. Regional lung function studied with a multiprobe system in this patient provided a clinical model for the study of ventilation and perfusion inter-relationships in large airway obstruction and demonstrated that a prolonged time may be required for return of perfusion to normal.

  5. Substrate-driven chemotactic assembly in an enzyme cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xi; Palacci, Henri; Yadav, Vinita; Spiering, Michelle M.; Gilson, Michael K.; Butler, Peter J.; Hess, Henry; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Sen, Ayusman

    2018-03-01

    Enzymatic catalysis is essential to cell survival. In many instances, enzymes that participate in reaction cascades have been shown to assemble into metabolons in response to the presence of the substrate for the first enzyme. However, what triggers metabolon formation has remained an open question. Through a combination of theory and experiments, we show that enzymes in a cascade can assemble via chemotaxis. We apply microfluidic and fluorescent spectroscopy techniques to study the coordinated movement of the first four enzymes of the glycolysis cascade: hexokinase, phosphoglucose isomerase, phosphofructokinase and aldolase. We show that each enzyme independently follows its own specific substrate gradient, which in turn is produced by the preceding enzymatic reaction. Furthermore, we find that the chemotactic assembly of enzymes occurs even under cytosolic crowding conditions.

  6. Whole-brain dynamic CT angiography and perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orrison, W.W. [CHW Nevada Imaging Company, Nevada Imaging Centers, Spring Valley, Las Vegas, NV (United States); College of Osteopathic Medicine, Touro University Nevada, Henderson, NV (United States); Department of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Department of Medical Education, University of Nevada School of Medicine, Reno, NV (United States); Snyder, K.V.; Hopkins, L.N. [Department of Neurosurgery, Millard Fillmore Gates Circle Hospital, Buffalo, NY (United States); Roach, C.J. [School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Advanced Medical Imaging and Genetics (Amigenics), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Ringdahl, E.N. [Department of Psychology, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Nazir, R. [Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad (Pakistan); Hanson, E.H., E-mail: eric.hanson@amigenics.co [College of Osteopathic Medicine, Touro University Nevada, Henderson, NV (United States); Department of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Advanced Medical Imaging and Genetics (Amigenics), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2011-06-15

    The availability of whole brain computed tomography (CT) perfusion has expanded the opportunities for analysing the haemodynamic parameters associated with varied neurological conditions. Examples demonstrating the clinical utility of whole-brain CT perfusion imaging in selected acute and chronic ischaemic arterial neurovascular conditions are presented. Whole-brain CT perfusion enables the detection and focused haemodynamic analyses of acute and chronic arterial conditions in the central nervous system without the limitation of partial anatomical coverage of the brain.

  7. Shrinking microbubbles with microfluidics: mathematical modelling to control microbubble sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salari, A; Gnyawali, V; Griffiths, I M; Karshafian, R; Kolios, M C; Tsai, S S H

    2017-11-29

    Microbubbles have applications in industry and life-sciences. In medicine, small encapsulated bubbles (<10 μm) are desirable because of their utility in drug/oxygen delivery, sonoporation, and ultrasound diagnostics. While there are various techniques for generating microbubbles, microfluidic methods are distinguished due to their precise control and ease-of-fabrication. Nevertheless, sub-10 μm diameter bubble generation using microfluidics remains challenging, and typically requires expensive equipment and cumbersome setups. Recently, our group reported a microfluidic platform that shrinks microbubbles to sub-10 μm diameters. The microfluidic platform utilizes a simple microbubble-generating flow-focusing geometry, integrated with a vacuum shrinkage system, to achieve microbubble sizes that are desirable in medicine, and pave the way to eventual clinical uptake of microfluidically generated microbubbles. A theoretical framework is now needed to relate the size of the microbubbles produced and the system's input parameters. In this manuscript, we characterize microbubbles made with various lipid concentrations flowing in solutions that have different interfacial tensions, and monitor the changes in bubble size along the microfluidic channel under various vacuum pressures. We use the physics governing the shrinkage mechanism to develop a mathematical model that predicts the resulting bubble sizes and elucidates the dominant parameters controlling bubble sizes. The model shows a good agreement with the experimental data, predicting the resulting microbubble sizes under different experimental input conditions. We anticipate that the model will find utility in enabling users of the microfluidic platform to engineer bubbles of specific sizes.

  8. Effect of Defocused CO2 Laser on Equine Tissue Perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergh A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Treatment with defocused CO2 laser can have a therapeutic effect on equine injuries, but the mechanisms involved are unclear. A recent study has shown that laser causes an increase in equine superficial tissue temperature, which may result in an increase in blood perfusion and a stimulating effect on tissue regeneration. However, no studies have described the effects on equine tissue perfusion. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of defocused CO2 laser on blood perfusion and to correlate it with temperature in skin and underlying muscle in anaesthetized horses. Differences between clipped and unclipped haircoat were also assessed. Eight horses and two controls received CO2 laser treatment (91 J/cm2 in a randomised order, on a clipped and unclipped area of the hamstring muscles, respectively. The significant increase in clipped skin perfusion and temperature was on average 146.3 ± 33.4 perfusion units (334% and 5.5 ± 1.5°C, respectively. The significant increase in perfusion and temperature in unclipped skin were 80.6 ± 20.4 perfusion units (264% and 4.8 ± 1.4°C. No significant changes were seen in muscle perfusion or temperature. In conclusion, treatment with defocused CO2 laser causes a significant increase in skin perfusion, which is correlated to an increase in skin temperature.

  9. Path-length-resolved optical Doppler perfusion monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Babu; Rajan, Vinayakrishnan; Van Leeuwen, Ton G; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2007-01-01

    We report the first path-length-resolved perfusion measurements on human skin measured with a phase-modulated low-coherence Mach-Zehnder interferometer with spatially separated fibers for illumination and detection. Optical path lengths of Doppler shifted and unshifted light and path-length-dependent Doppler broadening of multiply scattered light from skin are measured from the Doppler broadened interference peaks appearing in the power spectrum. Perfusion and its variations during occlusion are measured in real time for a given optical path length, and the results are compared with the perfusion signal obtained with a conventional laser Doppler perfusion monitor.

  10. Myocardial Perfusion Spect Imaging in Dextrocardia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Özdemir

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The myocardial perfusion scintigraphy acquisition and analysis present some technical differences in the rare dextrocardia cases. Here we report a case of a 38 year-old woman with dextrocardia who had been applied myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. Presented case showed that the thoracic and abdominal organs had a mirror image with situs inversus totalis type dextrocardia. The incidence of coronary heart disease and life span of people with situs inversus totalis are the same as the normal population. So we may apply myocardial perfusion scintigraphy to this patient group. The current case is presented in order to remind the special applications of myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging in patients with dextrocardia.

  11. Microfluidic one-way streets for algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkel, Jorn; Kantsler, Vasily; Polin, Marco; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2012-02-01

    Controlling locomotion and transport of microorganisms is a key challenge in the development of future biotechnological applications. Here, we demonstrate the use of optimized microfluidic ratchets to rectify the mean swimming direction in suspensions of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which is a promising candidate for the photosynthetic production of hydrogen. To assess the potential of microfluidic barriers for the manipulation of algal swimming, we studied first the scattering of individual C. reinhardtii from solid boundaries. High-speed imaging reveals the surprising result that these quasi-spherical ``puller''-type microswimmers primarily interact with surfaces via direct flagellar contact, whereas hydrodynamic effects play a subordinate role. A minimal theoretical model, based on run-and-turn motion and the experimentally measured surface-scattering law, predicts the existence of optimal wedge-shaped ratchets that maximize rectification of initially uniform suspensions. We confirm this prediction in experimental measurements with different geometries. Since the mechano-elastic properties of eukaryotic flagella are conserved across many genera, we expect that our results and methods are applicable to a broad class of biflagellate microorganisms.

  12. Connecting interface for modularization of digital microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hanping; Fan, Shih-Kang; Hsu, Wensyang

    2008-02-01

    Here, interconnection technique to link digital microfluidic chips is proposed. Three kinds of digital microfluidic modules with connecting interface, including flexible module and two types of connector modules, are designed and fabricated. Since these modules are fabricated on a compliant polymer-based substrate (ITO PET), chip-to-chip droplet transportation even at different planes can be achieved by the proposed technique. A low-temperature fabrication process is developed for the polymer substrates, where the SU-8 acts as the insulator. Droplet transportation through electrowetting on curved surface is confirmed by testing on the bended flexible modules with different curvatures from 0 to 0.06 mm -1 at around 70 V AC. Then the droplet transportations between flexible and connector modules are investigated. It is found that the gap size between two modules and the sidewall profiles at interface affect the droplet transportation directly. For the gap size around 50μm with a smooth perpendicular sidewall profile, 80 V AC is shown to actuate droplet of 1.5 μl, 2.5 μl, or 3.5 μl to cross over the interface successfully.

  13. Microfluidic Screening of Electric Fields for Electroporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Paulo A.; Ge, Zhifei; Moran, Jeffrey L.; Buie, Cullen R.

    2016-01-01

    Electroporation is commonly used to deliver molecules such as drugs, proteins, and/or DNA into cells, but the mechanism remains poorly understood. In this work a rapid microfluidic assay was developed to determine the critical electric field threshold required for inducing bacterial electroporation. The microfluidic device was designed to have a bilaterally converging channel to amplify the electric field to magnitudes sufficient to induce electroporation. The bacterial cells are introduced into the channel in the presence of SYTOX®, which fluorescently labels cells with compromised membranes. Upon delivery of an electric pulse, the cells fluoresce due to transmembrane influx of SYTOX® after disruption of the cell membranes. We calculate the critical electric field by capturing the location within the channel of the increase in fluorescence intensity after electroporation. Bacterial strains with industrial and therapeutic relevance such as Escherichia coli BL21 (3.65 ± 0.09 kV/cm), Corynebacterium glutamicum (5.20 ± 0.20 kV/cm), and Mycobacterium smegmatis (5.56 ± 0.08 kV/cm) have been successfully characterized. Determining the critical electric field for electroporation facilitates the development of electroporation protocols that minimize Joule heating and maximize cell viability. This assay will ultimately enable the genetic transformation of bacteria and archaea considered intractable and difficult-to-transfect, while facilitating fundamental genetic studies on numerous diverse microbes. PMID:26893024

  14. Microfluidic Radiometal Labeling Systems for Biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichert, D E; Kenis, P J. A.

    2011-12-29

    In a typical labeling procedure with radiometals, such as Cu-64 and Ga-68; a very large (~ 100-fold) excess of the non-radioactive reactant (precursor) is used to promote rapid and efficient incorporation of the radioisotope into the PET imaging agent. In order to achieve high specific activities, careful control of reaction conditions and extensive chromatographic purifications are required in order to separate the labeled compounds from the cold precursors. Here we propose a microfluidic approach to overcome these problems, and achieve high specific activities in a more convenient, semi-automated fashion and faster time frame. Microfluidic reactors, consisting of a network of micron-sized channels (typical dimensions in the range 10 - 300¼m), filters, separation columns, electrodes and reaction loops/chambers etched onto a solid substrate, are now emerging as an extremely useful technology for the intensification and miniaturization of chemical processes. The ability to manipulate, process and analyze reagent concentrations and reaction interfaces in both space and time within the channel network of a microreactor provides the fine level of reaction control that is desirable in PET radiochemistry practice. These factors can bring radiometal labeling, specifically the preparation of radio-labeled biomolecules such as antibodies, much closer to their theoretical maximum specific activities.

  15. Security Assessment of Cyberphysical Digital Microfluidic Biochips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sk Subidh; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Sinanoglu, Ozgur; Chakrabarty, Krishnendu; Karri, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    A digital microfluidic biochip (DMFB) is an emerging technology that enables miniaturized analysis systems for point-of-care clinical diagnostics, DNA sequencing, and environmental monitoring. A DMFB reduces the rate of sample and reagent consumption, and automates the analysis of assays. In this paper, we provide the first assessment of the security vulnerabilities of DMFBs. We identify result-manipulation attacks on a DMFB that maliciously alter the assay outcomes. Two practical result-manipulation attacks are shown on a DMFB platform performing enzymatic glucose assay on serum. In the first attack, the attacker adjusts the concentration of the glucose sample and thereby modifies the final result. In the second attack, the attacker tampers with the calibration curve of the assay operation. We then identify denial-of-service attacks, where the attacker can disrupt the assay operation by tampering either with the droplet-routing algorithm or with the actuation sequence. We demonstrate these attacks using a digital microfluidic synthesis simulator. The results show that the attacks are easy to implement and hard to detect. Therefore, this work highlights the need for effective protections against malicious modifications in DMFBs.

  16. Rapid contrast matching by microfluidic SANS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Marco; Poulos, Andreas S; Miller, Ruhina M; Lopez, Carlos G; Martel, Anne; Porcar, Lionel; Cabral, João T

    2017-05-02

    We report a microfluidic approach to perform small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements of contrast variation and matching, extensively employed in soft and biological matter research. We integrate a low scattering background microfluidic mixer and serpentine channel in a SANS beamline to yield a single phase, continuous flow, reconfigurable liquid cell. By contrast with conventional, sequential measurements of discrete (typically 4-6) solutions of varying isotopic solvent composition, our approach continually varies solution composition during SANS acquisition. We experimentally and computationally determine the effects of flow dispersion and neutron beam overillumination of microchannels in terms of the composition resolution and precision. The approach is demonstrated with model systems: H2O/D2O mixtures, a surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS), a triblock copolymer (pluronic F127), and silica nanoparticles (Ludox) in isotopic aqueous mixtures. The system is able to zoom into a composition window to refine contrast matching conditions, and robustly resolve solute structure and form factors by simultaneous fitting of scattering data with continuously varying contrast. We conclude by benchmarking our microflow-SANS with the discrete approach, in terms of volume required, composition resolution and (preparation and measurement) time required, proposing a leap forward in equilibrium, liquid solution phase mapping and contrast variation by SANS.

  17. Selective droplet coalescence using microfluidic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazutis, Linas; Griffiths, Andrew D

    2012-04-24

    We report a microfluidic approach, which allows selective and controlled 1 : 1, 2 : 1 or 3 : 1 droplet fusion. A surfactant-stabilized droplet with an interfacial surfactant coverage, Γ, of >98% will fuse spontaneously with a second droplet when Γ of the latter droplet is droplet is ~66%, the two droplets will not fuse, unless they have previously been brought into contact for critical time τ. Therefore, controlling the number of droplets in contact for time τ allows precise control over the number of fused droplets. We have demonstrated efficient (proportion of droplets coalesced p(c) = 1.0, n > 1000) and selective 1 : 1, 2 : 1 or 3 : 1 droplet fusion (proportion of correctly fused droplets p(s) > 0.99, n > 1000). Coalescence in this regime is induced by hydrodynamic flow causing interface separation and is efficient at different Ca numbers and using different dispersed phases, continuous phases and surfactants. However, when Γ of the second droplet is ~96% coalescence is no longer observed. Droplet-based microfluidic systems, in which each droplet functions as an independent microreactor, are proving a promising tool for a wide range of ultrahigh-throughput applications in biology and chemistry. The addition of new reagents to pre-formed droplets is critical to many of these applications and we believe the system described here is a simple and flexible method to do so, as well as a new tool to study interfacial stability phenomena.

  18. Accelerating Yeast Prion Biology using Droplet Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Lloyd; Rotem, Assaf; Jarosz, Daniel; Datta, Manoshi; Lindquist, Susan; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    Prions are infectious proteins in a misfolded form, that can induce normal proteins to take the misfolded state. Yeast prions are relevant, as a model of human prion diseases, and interesting from an evolutionary standpoint. Prions may also be a form of epigenetic inheritance, which allow yeast to adapt to stressful conditions at rates exceeding those of random mutations and propagate that adaptation to their offspring. Encapsulation of yeast in droplet microfluidic devices enables high-throughput measurements with single cell resolution, which would not be feasible using bulk methods. Millions of populations of yeast can be screened to obtain reliable measurements of prion induction and loss rates. The population dynamics of clonal yeast, when a fraction of the cells are prion expressing, can be elucidated. Furthermore, the mechanism by which certain strains of bacteria induce yeast to express prions in the wild can be deduced. Integrating the disparate fields of prion biology and droplet microfluidics reveals a more complete picture of how prions may be more than just diseases and play a functional role in yeast.

  19. Macromolecular Crystal Growth by Means of Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWoerd, Mark; Ferree, Darren; Spearing, Scott; Monaco, Lisa; Molho, Josh; Spaid, Michael; Brasseur, Mike; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have performed a feasibility study in which we show that chip-based, microfluidic (LabChip(TM)) technology is suitable for protein crystal growth. This technology allows for accurate and reliable dispensing and mixing of very small volumes while minimizing bubble formation in the crystallization mixture. The amount of (protein) solution remaining after completion of an experiment is minimal, which makes this technique efficient and attractive for use with proteins, which are difficult or expensive to obtain. The nature of LabChip(TM) technology renders it highly amenable to automation. Protein crystals obtained in our initial feasibility studies were of excellent quality as determined by X-ray diffraction. Subsequent to the feasibility study, we designed and produced the first LabChip(TM) device specifically for protein crystallization in batch mode. It can reliably dispense and mix from a range of solution constituents into two independent growth wells. We are currently testing this design to prove its efficacy for protein crystallization optimization experiments. In the near future we will expand our design to incorporate up to 10 growth wells per LabChip(TM) device. Upon completion, additional crystallization techniques such as vapor diffusion and liquid-liquid diffusion will be accommodated. Macromolecular crystallization using microfluidic technology is envisioned as a fully automated system, which will use the 'tele-science' concept of remote operation and will be developed into a research facility for the International Space Station as well as on the ground.

  20. Microfluidics, Chromatography, and Atomic-Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark

    2008-01-01

    A Raman-and-atomic-force microscope (RAFM) has been shown to be capable of performing several liquid-transfer and sensory functions essential for the operation of a microfluidic laboratory on a chip that would be used to perform rapid, sensitive chromatographic and spectro-chemical analyses of unprecedentedly small quantities of liquids. The most novel aspect of this development lies in the exploitation of capillary and shear effects at the atomic-force-microscope (AFM) tip to produce shear-driven flow of liquids along open microchannels of a microfluidic device. The RAFM can also be used to perform such functions as imaging liquids in microchannels; removing liquid samples from channels for very sensitive, tip-localized spectrochemical analyses; measuring a quantity of liquid adhering to the tip; and dip-pen deposition from a chromatographic device. A commercial Raman-spectroscopy system and a commercial AFM were integrated to make the RAFM so as to be able to perform simultaneous topographical AFM imaging and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) at the AFM tip. The Raman-spectroscopy system includes a Raman microprobe attached to an optical microscope, the translation stage of which is modified to accommodate the AFM head. The Raman laser excitation beam, which is aimed at the AFM tip, has a wavelength of 785 nm and a diameter of about 5 m, and its power is adjustable up to 10 mW. The AFM is coated with gold to enable tip-localized SERS.

  1. Hot embossing and thermal bonding of poly(methyl methacrylate) microfluidic chips using positive temperature coefficient ceramic heater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Zhang, Luyan; Chen, Gang

    2011-11-01

    As a self-regulating heating device, positive temperature coefficient ceramic heater was employed for hot embossing and thermal bonding of poly(methyl methacrylate) microfluidic chip because it supplied constant-temperature heating without electrical control circuits. To emboss a channel plate, a piece of poly(methyl methacrylate) plate was sandwiched between a template and a microscopic glass slide on a positive temperature coefficient ceramic heater. All the assembled components were pressed between two elastic press heads of a spring-driven press while a voltage was applied to the heater for 10 min. Subsequently, the embossed poly(methyl methacrylate) plate bearing negative relief of channel networks was bonded with a piece of poly(methyl methacrylate) cover sheet to obtain a complete microchip using a positive temperature coefficient ceramic heater and a spring-driven press. High quality microfluidic chips fabricated by using the novel embossing/bonding device were successfully applied in the electrophoretic separation of three cations. Positive temperature coefficient ceramic heater indicates great promise for the low-cost production of poly(methyl methacrylate) microchips and should find wide applications in the fabrication of other thermoplastic polymer microfluidic devices.

  2. Research of bubble flow characteristics in microfluidic chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chao; Cheng, Han; Chen, Shuxian

    2017-04-01

    Bubble is the heart of the microfluidic chip, which takes a significant role in drug release, biological detection and so on. In this case, bubble flow characteristics in microfluidic chip are the key to realize its function. In this paper, bubble flow characteristics in the microfluidic chip have been studied with high speed photography system by controlling the wettability and the heat flux of the microelectrode surface. The result shows that bubble flows faster on the electrode with hydrophobic surface. In addition, loading current to the electrode with hydrophilic surface could also speed up the movement of bubble, and the flow rate of bubble increases with the increasing heat flux of the electrode.

  3. Selective distribution of enzymes in a microfluidic reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Anders Egede; Pereira Rosinha Grundtvig, Ines; Krühne, Ulrich

    Off stoichiometric thiol-ene mixtures are well suited for preparation of microfluidic devices with highly functional surfaces. Here a two stage process employing first thiol-ene chemistry (TEC) to prepare two opposite parts of a microfluidic system with a 30x30 mm reactor and subsequently a thiol......-epoxy bonding was used to prepare a fully sealed microfluidic system. The reactor was surface functionalized in-situ with allyl glycidyl ether in different patterns (half-reactor, full-reactor, checkerboard structures) on the surface to provide a controlled distribution of epoxides. The method additionally...

  4. Incubator-independent cell-culture perfusion platform for continuous long-term microelectrode array electrophysiology and time-lapse imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saalfrank, Dirk; Konduri, Anil Krishna; Latifi, Shahrzad; Habibey, Rouhollah; Golabchi, Asiyeh; Martiniuc, Aurel Vasile; Knoll, Alois; Ingebrandt, Sven; Blau, Axel

    2015-06-01

    Most in vitro electrophysiology studies extract information and draw conclusions from representative, temporally limited snapshot experiments. This approach bears the risk of missing decisive moments that may make a difference in our understanding of physiological events. This feasibility study presents a simple benchtop cell-culture perfusion system adapted to commercial microelectrode arrays (MEAs), multichannel electrophysiology equipment and common inverted microscopy stages for simultaneous and uninterrupted extracellular electrophysiology and time-lapse imaging at ambient CO2 levels. The concept relies on a transparent, replica-casted polydimethylsiloxane perfusion cap, gravity- or syringe-pump-driven perfusion and preconditioning of pH-buffered serum-free cell-culture medium to ambient CO2 levels at physiological temperatures. The low-cost microfluidic in vitro enabling platform, which allows us to image cultures immediately after cell plating, is easy to reproduce and is adaptable to the geometries of different cell-culture containers. It permits the continuous and simultaneous multimodal long-term acquisition or manipulation of optical and electrophysiological parameter sets, thereby considerably widening the range of experimental possibilities. Two exemplary proof-of-concept long-term MEA studies on hippocampal networks illustrate system performance. Continuous extracellular recordings over a period of up to 70 days revealed details on both sudden and gradual neural activity changes in maturing cell ensembles with large intra-day fluctuations. Correlated time-lapse imaging unveiled rather static macroscopic network architectures with previously unreported local morphological oscillations on the timescale of minutes.

  5. Gentamicin perfusion vestibular response and hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Joshua P; Silverstein, Herbert; Jackson, Lance E

    2003-03-01

    To compare hearing results as a function of vestibular ablation in the treatment of Ménière's Disease, using gentamicin perfusion. A retrospective review of patients with Ménière's Disease treated by gentamicin perfusion of the inner ear via the MicroWick device. A tertiary otologic referral center. The charts of patients treated with gentamicin perfusion via the MicroWick between the years 1998 and 2000 were reviewed. The results for patients with functional hearing in the affected ear were analyzed and were compared with the results in patients without functional hearing. Audiologic and vestibular test results as well as subjective symptoms. There were 45 patients who met the inclusion criteria. The averages for speech discrimination score and pure tone average before treatment were 92% and 38 dB, and after treatment were 82% and 47 dB. Patients were divided into two groups: Group 1 (20 patients), less than 75% ice air caloric reduced vestibular response (RVR); Group 2 (25 patients), those who reached greater than 75% ice air caloric RVR. There were 8 patients (17.6%) with persistent vertigo; 7 were from Group 1, and 1 was from Group 2, which was statistically significant (p = 0.007)wwww. The pure tone average dropped an average of 3 dB for Group 1 and 15 dB for Group 2. The difference in hearing loss between the two groups was statistically significant (p = 0.01). This study suggests that there is a correlation between the degree of vestibular ablation, the control of vertigo, and the risk of hearing loss. Patients with functional hearing seem to have a similar success rate for vertigo control, compared with patients who already had lost functional hearing before treatment. Future investigation may determine if less than 100% RVR, but greater than 75% RVR, is an alternative end point with adequate vertigo control and reduced risk of hearing loss.

  6. Metabolomic perfusate analysis during kidney machine perfusion: the pig provides an appropriate model for human studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Nath

    Full Text Available Hypothermic machine perfusion offers great promise in kidney transplantation and experimental studies are needed to establish the optimal conditions for this to occur. Pig kidneys are considered to be a good model for this purpose and share many properties with human organs. However it is not established whether the metabolism of pig kidneys in such hypothermic hypoxic conditions is comparable to human organs.Standard criteria human (n = 12 and porcine (n = 10 kidneys underwent HMP using the LifePort Kidney Transporter 1.0 (Organ Recovery Systems using KPS-1 solution. Perfusate was sampled at 45 minutes and 4 hours of perfusion and metabolomic analysis performed using 1-D 1H-NMR spectroscopy.There was no inter-species difference in the number of metabolites identified. Of the 30 metabolites analysed, 16 (53.3% were present in comparable concentrations in the pig and human kidney perfusates. The rate of change of concentration for 3-Hydroxybutyrate was greater for human kidneys (p<0.001. For the other 29 metabolites (96.7%, there was no difference in the rate of change of concentration between pig and human samples.Whilst there are some differences between pig and human kidneys during HMP they appear to be metabolically similar and the pig seems to be a valid model for human studies.

  7. Hypothermic machine perfusion of the liver and the critical balance between perfusion pressures and endothelial injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    't Hart, NA; van der Plaats, A; Leuvenink, HGD; van Goor, H; Wiersema-Buist, J; Verkerke, GJ; Rakhorst, G; Ploeg, RJ

    2005-01-01

    Hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) provides better protection against cold ischemic injury than cold storage in marginal donor kidneys. Also, in liver transplantation a switch from static cold storage to HMP could be beneficial as it would allow longer preservation times and the use of marginal

  8. The Value of Machine Perfusion Perfusate Biomarkers for Predicting Kidney Transplant Outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moers, Cyril; Varnav, Oana C.; van Heurn, Ernest; Jochmans, Ina; Kirste, Guenter R.; Rahmel, Axel; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.; Squifflet, Jean-Paul; Paul, Andreas; Pirenne, Jacques; van Oeveren, Wim; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Ploeg, Rutger J.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Retrospective evidence suggests that lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, total glutathione-S-transferase (GST), alanine-aminopeptidase, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), and heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) measured during kidney machine perfusion (MP)

  9. Demonstration of cerebral perfusion abnormalities in moyamoya disease using susceptibility perfusion- and diffusion-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, W.M.; Laitt, R.D. [Department of Neuroradiology, Central Manchester Healthcare Trust, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9WL (United Kingdom); Li, K.L.; Jackson, A. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Sherrington, C.R.; Talbot, P. [Department of Neurology, Central Manchester Healthcare Trust, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9WL (United Kingdom)

    1999-02-01

    We describe the use of diffusion-weighted imaging and perfusion MRI using a contrast-medium bolus in the preoperative investigation for young man presenting with a cerebral ischaemic episode as a manifestation of moyamoya disease. (orig.) With 6 figs., 21 refs.

  10. Xeno- and auto-perfusion of rabbit kidney. Machine perfusion with blood at 37 degrees C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, K A; Kemp, E; Barfort, P

    1985-01-01

    Five rabbit kidneys were perfused with human blood and another five with their own blood in a re-circulating oxygenated system at 37 degrees C. The flow decreased to 2 ml/min. within 30 min. in all xenoperfusions, while none of the autoperfused had decreased to this level by 60 min. Endothelial...

  11. Rapid Fabrication of Electrophoretic Microfluidic Devices from Polyester, Adhesives and Gold Leaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Birch

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, the microfluidic community has witnessed an evolution in fabrication methodologies that deviate from using conventional glass and polymer-based materials. A leading example within this group is the print, cut and laminate (PCL approach, which entails the laser cutting of microfluidic architecture into ink toner-laden polyester sheets, followed by the lamination of these layers for device assembly. Recent success when applying this method to human genetic fingerprinting has highlighted that it is now ripe for the refinements necessary to render it amenable to mass-manufacture. In this communication, we detail those modifications by identifying and implementing a suitable heat-sensitive adhesive (HSA material to equip the devices with the durability and resilience required for commercialization and fieldwork. Importantly, this augmentation is achieved without sacrificing any of the characteristics which make the PCL approach attractive for prototyping. Exemplary HSA-devices performed DNA extraction, amplification and separation which, when combined, constitute the complete sequence necessary for human profiling and other DNA-based analyses.

  12. Fabrication of poly(methyl methacrylate) microfluidic chips by redox-initiated polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang; Lin, Yuehe; Chen, Gang

    2007-08-01

    In this report, a method based on the redox-initiated polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) has been developed for the rapid fabrication of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microfluidic chips. MMA containing 2-2'-azo-bis-isobutyronitrile was allowed to prepolymerize in a water bath to form a viscous prepolymer solution that was subsequently mixed with MMA containing a redox-initiation couple of benzoyl peroxide/N,N-dimethylaniline. The dense molding solution was sandwiched between a silicon template and a piece of 1-mm-thick PMMA plate. The polymerization could complete within 50 min under ambient temperature. The images of raised microfluidic structures on the silicon template were precisely replicated into the synthesized PMMA substrate during the redox-initiated polymerization of the molding solution. The chips were subsequently assembled by the thermal bonding of the channel plates and the covers. The new fabrication approach obviates the need for special equipment and significantly simplifies the process of fabricating PMMA microdevices. The attractive performance of the novel PMMA microchips has been demonstrated in connection with contactless conductivity detection for the separation and detection of ionic species.

  13. Investigation of injection molding of orthogonal fluidic connector for microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zheng; Cao, Dong; Zhao, Wei; Song, Man-cang; Liu, Jun-shan

    2017-02-01

    Orthogonal fluidic connections are essential for developing multilayered microfluidic devices. At present, most orthogonal connectors are realized by a horizontal channel and a vertical channel in different plates. Therefore, some extra alignment and adhesion processes for precise plate assembly are required. In this paper, the method of injection molding is proposed to make a one-body-type orthogonal connector in a single plastic plate. The connector was composed of a cantilevered tube and the other in the substrate. An injection mold was developed in which a side core-pulling mechanism and an ejection mechanism of push-pipes were combined to form the mold for an orthogonal connector. Both the type and the location of gate were optimized for the mold. The results showed that the fan gate in the middle position of the plate was the most suitable in term of both defect control and practicability. The effect of melt temperature was numerically investigated and then verified experimentally. With the optimized parameters, the relative length and the relative wall thickness of a cantilevered tube in the plastic part can reach 98.89% and 99.80%, respectively. Furthermore, using the plastic part as a cover plate, a three-layer plastic microfluidic device was conveniently fabricated for electrochemical detection.

  14. Streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase nanocomplex-amplified microfluidics immunoassays for simultaneous detection of inflammatory biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Chen, Yiping; Yang, Mingzhu; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Cheng; Yang, Mo; Sun, Jiashu; Xie, Mengxia; Jiang, Xingyu

    2017-08-22

    Simultaneous, sensitive and quantitative detection of biomarkers in infectious disease is crucial for guiding antimicrobial treatment and predicting prognosis. This work reported an ultrasensitive and quantitative microfluidic immunoassay combined with the streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase (SA-B-HRP) nanocomplex-signal amplification system (MIS) to detect two inflammatory biomarkers, procalcitonin (PCT, for discriminating bacterial infections from nonbacterial infections) and interleukin-6 (IL-6, for monitoring the kinetics of infectious disease) simultaneously. The amplification system was based on the one step self-assembly of SA and B-HRP to form the SA-B-HRP nanocomplex, which effectively amplified the chemiluminescent signals. The linear ranges for PCT and IL-6 detections by MIS were 250-1.28 × 105 pg mL-1 and 5-1280 pg mL-1, and the limit of detection (LOD) were 48.9 pg mL-1 and 1.0 pg mL-1, respectively, both of which were significantly improved compared with microfluidic immunoassays without amplification system (MI). More importantly, PCT and IL-6 in human serum could be simultaneously detected in the same run by MIS, which could greatly improve the detection efficiency and reduce the cost. Given the advantages of high sensitivity, multiplex and quantitative detection, MIS could be potentially applied for detection of biomarkers at low concentration in clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The effects of perfusion conditions on melphalan distribution in the isolated perfused rat hindlimb bearing a human melanoma xenograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z. Y.; Smithers, B. M.; Parsons, P. G.; Roberts, M. S.

    1997-01-01

    An isolated rat hindlimb perfusion model carrying xenografts of the human melanoma cell line MM96 was used to study the effects of perfusion conditions on melphalan distribution. Krebs-Henseleit buffer and Hartmann's solution containing 4.7% bovine serum albumin (BSA) or 2.8% dextran 40 were used as perfusates. Melphalan concentrations in perfusate, tumour nodules and normal tissues were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Increasing the perfusion flow rates (from 4 to 8 ml min(-1)) resulted in higher tissue blood flow (determined with 51Cr-labelled microspheres) and melphalan uptake by tumour and normal tissues. The distribution of melphalan within tumour nodules and normal tissues was similar for both Krebs-Henseleit buffer and Hartmann's solution; however, tissue concentrations of melphalan were significantly higher for a perfusate containing 2.8% dextran 40 than for one containing 4.7% BSA. The melphalan concentration in the tumour was one-third of that found in the skin if the perfusate contained 4.7% BSA. In conclusion, this study has shown that a high perfusion flow enhances the delivery of melphalan into implanted tumour nodules and normal tissues, and a perfusate with low melphalan binding (no albumin) is preferred for maximum uptake of drug by the tumour. PMID:9099965

  16. Multi-delay arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI in moyamoya disease-comparison with CT perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Rui [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Beijing MRI Center for Brain Research, Institute of Biophysics, Beijing (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Graduate School, Beijing (China); UCLA-Beijing Joint Center for Advanced Brain Imaging, Beijing (China); UCLA-Beijing Joint Center for Advanced Brain Imaging, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Yu, Songlin [Capital Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Beijing (China); University of California Los Angeles, Department of Neurology, Los Angeles (United States); Alger, Jeffry R.; Wang, Danny J.J. [University of California Los Angeles, Department of Neurology, Los Angeles (United States); UCLA-Beijing Joint Center for Advanced Brain Imaging, Beijing (China); UCLA-Beijing Joint Center for Advanced Brain Imaging, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zuo, Zhentao; Wang, Bo [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Beijing MRI Center for Brain Research, Institute of Biophysics, Beijing (China); Chen, Juan [Beijing Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Wang, Rong; Zhao, Jizong [Capital Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Beijing (China); An, Jing [Siemens Shenzhen Magnetic Resonance Ltd, Shenzhen (China); Xue, Rong [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Beijing MRI Center for Brain Research, Institute of Biophysics, Beijing (China); UCLA-Beijing Joint Center for Advanced Brain Imaging, Beijing (China); UCLA-Beijing Joint Center for Advanced Brain Imaging, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    To present a multi-delay pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) protocol that offers simultaneous measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and arterial transit time (ATT), and to study correlations between multi-delay pCASL and CT perfusion in moyamoya disease. A 4 post-labeling delay (PLD) pCASL protocol was applied on 17 patients with moyamoya disease who also underwent CT perfusion imaging. ATT was estimated using the multi-delay protocol and included in the calculation of CBF. ASL and CT perfusion images were rated for lesion severity/conspicuity. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated across voxels between the two modalities in grey and white matter of each subject respectively and between normalized mean values of ASL and CT perfusion measures in major vascular territories. Significant associations between ASL and CT perfusion were detected using subjective ratings, voxel-wise analysis in grey and white matter and region of interest (ROI)-based analysis of normalized mean perfusion. The correlation between ASL CBF and CT perfusion was improved using the multi-delay pCASL protocol compared to CBF acquired at a single PLD of 2 s (P < 0.05). There is a correlation between perfusion data from ASL and CT perfusion imaging in patients with moyamoya disease. Multi-delay ASL can improve CBF quantification, which could be a prognostic imaging biomarker in patients with moyamoya disease. (orig.)

  17. Perfusion Quantification Using Gaussian Process Deconvolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Irene Klærke; Have, Anna Szynkowiak; Rasmussen, Carl Edward

    2002-01-01

    The quantification of perfusion using dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC-MRI) requires deconvolution to obtain the residual impulse response function (IRF). In this work, a method using the Gaussian process for deconvolution (GPD) is proposed. The fact that the IRF is smooth is incorporated....... GPD provides a better estimate of the entire IRF. As the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) increases or the time resolution of the measurements increases, GPD is shown to be superior to SVD. This is also found for large distribution volumes....

  18. Bos taurus genome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yue; Qin, Xiang; Song, Xing-Zhi Henry; Jiang, Huaiyang; Shen, Yufeng; Durbin, K James; Lien, Sigbjørn; Kent, Matthew Peter; Sodeland, Marte; Ren, Yanru; Zhang, Lan; Sodergren, Erica; Havlak, Paul; Worley, Kim C; Weinstock, George M; Gibbs, Richard A

    2009-04-24

    We present here the assembly of the bovine genome. The assembly method combines the BAC plus WGS local assembly used for the rat and sea urchin with the whole genome shotgun (WGS) only assembly used for many other animal genomes including the rhesus macaque. The assembly process consisted of multiple phases: First, BACs were assembled with BAC generated sequence, then subsequently in combination with the individual overlapping WGS reads. Different assembly parameters were tested to separately optimize the performance for each BAC assembly of the BAC and WGS reads. In parallel, a second assembly was produced using only the WGS sequences and a global whole genome assembly method. The two assemblies were combined to create a more complete genome representation that retained the high quality BAC-based local assembly information, but with gaps between BACs filled in with the WGS-only assembly. Finally, the entire assembly was placed on chromosomes using the available map information.Over 90% of the assembly is now placed on chromosomes. The estimated genome size is 2.87 Gb which represents a high degree of completeness, with 95% of the available EST sequences found in assembled contigs. The quality of the assembly was evaluated by comparison to 73 finished BACs, where the draft assembly covers between 92.5 and 100% (average 98.5%) of the finished BACs. The assembly contigs and scaffolds align linearly to the finished BACs, suggesting that misassemblies are rare. Genotyping and genetic mapping of 17,482 SNPs revealed that more than 99.2% were correctly positioned within the Btau_4.0 assembly, confirming the accuracy of the assembly. The biological analysis of this bovine genome assembly is being published, and the sequence data is available to support future bovine research.

  19. Bos taurus genome assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sodergren Erica

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present here the assembly of the bovine genome. The assembly method combines the BAC plus WGS local assembly used for the rat and sea urchin with the whole genome shotgun (WGS only assembly used for many other animal genomes including the rhesus macaque. Results The assembly process consisted of multiple phases: First, BACs were assembled with BAC generated sequence, then subsequently in combination with the individual overlapping WGS reads. Different assembly parameters were tested to separately optimize the performance for each BAC assembly of the BAC and WGS reads. In parallel, a second assembly was produced using only the WGS sequences and a global whole genome assembly method. The two assemblies were combined to create a more complete genome representation that retained the high quality BAC-based local assembly information, but with gaps between BACs filled in with the WGS-only assembly. Finally, the entire assembly was placed on chromosomes using the available map information. Over 90% of the assembly is now placed on chromosomes. The estimated genome size is 2.87 Gb which represents a high degree of completeness, with 95% of the available EST sequences found in assembled contigs. The quality of the assembly was evaluated by comparison to 73 finished BACs, where the draft assembly covers between 92.5 and 100% (average 98.5% of the finished BACs. The assembly contigs and scaffolds align linearly to the finished BACs, suggesting that misassemblies are rare. Genotyping and genetic mapping of 17,482 SNPs revealed that more than 99.2% were correctly positioned within the Btau_4.0 assembly, confirming the accuracy of the assembly. Conclusion The biological analysis of this bovine genome assembly is being published, and the sequence data is available to support future bovine research.

  20. Microfluidic pneumatic logic circuits and digital pneumatic microprocessors for integrated microfluidic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Minsoung; Burns, Mark A

    2009-11-07

    We have developed pneumatic logic circuits and microprocessors built with microfluidic channels and valves in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The pneumatic logic circuits perform various combinational and sequential logic calculations with binary pneumatic signals (atmosphere and vacuum), producing cascadable outputs based on Boolean operations. A complex microprocessor is constructed from combinations of various logic circuits and receives pneumatically encoded serial commands at a single input line. The device then decodes the temporal command sequence by spatial parallelization, computes necessary logic calculations between parallelized command bits, stores command information for signal transportation and maintenance, and finally executes the command for the target devices. Thus, such pneumatic microprocessors will function as a universal on-chip control platform to perform complex parallel operations for large-scale integrated microfluidic devices. To demonstrate the working principles, we have built 2-bit, 3-bit, 4-bit, and 8-bit microprocessors to control various target devices for applications such as four color dye mixing, and multiplexed channel fluidic control. By significantly reducing the need for external controllers, the digital pneumatic microprocessor can be used as a universal on-chip platform to autonomously manipulate microfluids in a high throughput manner.

  1. Stereolithographic printing of ionically-crosslinked alginate hydrogels for degradable biomaterials and microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin, Thomas M; Leggett, Susan E; Chen, Po-Yen; Sodhi, Jaskiranjeet K; Stephens, Lauren H; McClintock, Hayley D; Sim, Jea Yun; Wong, Ian Y

    2017-10-11

    3D printed biomaterials with spatial and temporal functionality could enable interfacial manipulation of fluid flows and motile cells. However, such dynamic biomaterials are challenging to implement since they must be responsive to multiple, biocompatible stimuli. Here, we show stereolithographic printing of hydrogels using noncovalent (ionic) crosslinking, which enables reversible patterning with controlled degradation. We demonstrate this approach using sodium alginate, photoacid generators and various combinations of divalent cation salts, which can be used to tune the hydrogel degradation kinetics, pattern fidelity, and mechanical properties. This approach is first utilized to template perfusable microfluidic channels within a second encapsulating hydrogel for T-junction and gradient devices. The presence and degradation of printed alginate microstructures were further verified to have minimal toxicity on epithelial cells. Degradable alginate barriers were used to direct collective cell migration from different initial geometries, revealing differences in front speed and leader cell formation. Overall, this demonstration of light-based 3D printing using non-covalent crosslinking may enable adaptive and stimuli-responsive biomaterials, which could be utilized for bio-inspired sensing, actuation, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  2. Isolated limb perfusion with cytostatic drug leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarazua, M; Paredes, P; Gahete-Santiago, F; Rull, R; Blasi, A; Balust, J

    2017-07-25

    Isolated limb perfusion is the treatment of stage III melanoma with in-transit metastasis. This technique allows the administration of cytostatics at an effective concentration and temperature, which could not be administered systemically because of their toxicity. The toxicity due to leakage of the chemotherapy agent from the limb into the systemic circulation is the most serious short-term complication, and is manifested by a systemic inflammatory response syndrome in the immediate post-intervention period. Early detection of this complication and its peri-operative management requires a multidisciplinary approach, in which the anaesthesiologist plays a key role. A case of isolated lower limb perfusion is reported in which the procedure had to be interrupted due to the passage of tumour necrosis factor into the systemic circulation, with severe intra-operative haemodynamic repercussions. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Applications of electrowetting-based digital microfluidics in clinical diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Michael G; Pamula, Vamsee K; Srinivasan, Vijay; Eckhardt, Allen E

    2011-05-01

    Digital microfluidics based on electrowetting is a type of microfluidic platform in which liquids are processed as individual unit-sized droplets that are dispensed from a source, merged together, split apart or transported between locations on demand. These devices are implemented using arrays of surface electrodes to control the shape and position of droplets through the electrowetting effect. A major thrust of digital microfluidics research has been the development of integrated lab-on-a-chip devices to perform clinical in vitro diagnostic assays. A variety of preparatory and analytical processes have been implemented and feasibility has been demonstrated for test types ranging from clinical chemistries to immunoassays, nucleic acid tests and cell-based assays. In this article, the current state and future potential of digital microfluidics for clinical diagnostic testing is reviewed and evaluated.

  4. CMOS Enabled Microfluidic Systems for Healthcare Based Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Sherjeel M.

    2018-02-27

    With the increased global population, it is more important than ever to expand accessibility to affordable personalized healthcare. In this context, a seamless integration of microfluidic technology for bioanalysis and drug delivery and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology enabled data-management circuitry is critical. Therefore, here, the fundamentals, integration aspects, and applications of CMOS-enabled microfluidic systems for affordable personalized healthcare systems are presented. Critical components, like sensors, actuators, and their fabrication and packaging, are discussed and reviewed in detail. With the emergence of the Internet-of-Things and the upcoming Internet-of-Everything for a people-process-data-device connected world, now is the time to take CMOS-enabled microfluidics technology to as many people as possible. There is enormous potential for microfluidic technologies in affordable healthcare for everyone, and CMOS technology will play a major role in making that happen.

  5. Synergy of Microfluidics and Ultrasound: Process Intensification Challenges and Opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez Rivas, David; Kuhn, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A compact snapshot of the current convergence of novel developments relevant to chemical engineering is given. Process intensification concepts are analysed through the lens of microfluidics and sonochemistry. Economical drivers and their influence on scientific activities are mentioned, including

  6. Microfluidic Cytometer for Complete Blood Count Analysis Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We will fabricate and test microfluidic designs for a micro-electromechanical system based complete blood count (CBC) analysis in separate modules and integrate them...

  7. Opto-Microfluidic Immunosensors: From Colorimetric to Plasmonic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie-Long He

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Optical detection has long been the most popular technique in immunosensing. Recent developments in the synthesis of luminescent probes and the fabrication of novel nanostructures enable more sensitive and efficient optical detection, which can be miniaturized and integrated with microfluidics to realize compact lab-on-a-chip immunosensors. These immunosensors are portable, economical and automated, but their sensitivity is not compromised. This review focuses on the incorporation and implementation of optical detection and microfluidics in immunosensors; it introduces the working principles of each optical detection technique and how it can be exploited in immunosensing. The recent progress in various opto-microfluidic immunosensor designs is described. Instead of being comprehensive to include all opto-microfluidic platforms, the report centers on the designs that are promising for point-of-care immunosensing diagnostics, in which ease of use, stability and cost-effective fabrication are emphasized.

  8. Optical sensing for on-chip digital microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Jacqueline; Landry, Emily L.; Born, Brandon; Wiltshire, Michael; Collier, Christopher M.; Holzman, Jonathan F.

    2012-03-01

    A digital microfluidic architecture is introduced for micron-scale localized fluid actuation and in in-situ optical sensing. Contemporary device integration challenges related to localization and device scalability are overcome through the introduction of a bi-layered digital microfluidic multiplexer. Trinary inputs are applied through differential combinations of voltage signals between upper (column) electrodes and lower (row) electrodes. The ultimate layout provides increased scalability for massively parallel microfluidic actuation applications with a minimal number of inputs. The on-chip sensing technique employed here incorporates a microlens in a folded-cavity arrangement (fabricated by a new voltage-tuned polymer electro-dispensing technique). Such a geometry heightens the sensitivity between the optical probe and fluid refractive properties and allows the device to probe the refractive index of the internal fluid. This optical refractometry sensing technique is merged with the actuation capabilities of the digital microfluidic multiplexer on a single lab-on-a-chip device.

  9. Four Thruster Microfluidic Electrospray Propulsion (MEP) Cubesat Board Demonstration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cubesat Microfluidic Electrospray Propulsion (MEP) system module prototype will be designed, built and tested to demonstrate that a four MEP thruster system can...

  10. Liquid density effect on burst frequency in centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Faqheri, Wisam; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Thio, Tzer Hwai Gilbert; Joseph, Karunan; Mohktar, Mas S; Madou, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Centrifugal microfluidic platforms are widely used in various advanced processes such as biomedical diagnostics, chemical analysis and drug screening. This paper investigates the effect of liquid density on the burst frequency of the centrifugal microfluidic platform. This effect is experimentally investigated and compared to theoretical values. It is found that increasing the liquid density results in lower burst frequency and it is in agreement with theoretical calculations. Moreover, in this study we proposed the use of the microfluidic CD platform as an inexpensive and simple sensor for liquid density measurements. The proposed liquid sensor requires much less liquid volume (in the range of microliters) compared to conventional density meters. This study presents fundamental work which allows for future advance studies with the aim of designing and fabricating centrifugal microfluidic platforms for more complex tasks such as blood analysis.

  11. Using microfluidics to study programmed cell death: A new approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina; Zor, Kinga; Heiskanen, Arto

    This project focuses on applying microfluidic tissue culture for electrochemical or optical measurements during programmed cell death (PCD) in barley aleurone layer to increase understanding of the underlying mechanisms of PCD in plants. Microfluidic tissue culture enables in vitro experiments...... to approach in vivo conditions. Microfluidics also allow implementation of a wide range of electrochemical or optical assays for online, real-time, parallel analysis of important parameters such as redox activity, O2 and H2O2 concentration, extracellular pH, cell viability and enzyme activity1,2. Currently...... a double-fluorescent probe-system also used by Fath et al5. Future challenges include integrating both these systems into a microfluidic device for plant tissue culture....

  12. Interface of nanocatalysis and microfluidic reactors for green chemistry methods

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Makgwane, PR

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of green catalytic methods for chemical synthesis and energy generation based on nanocoated catalyst microfluidic systems is a growing area of innovative research. The interface between heterogeneous catalysis and microchannel...

  13. Microfluidic Cytometer for Complete Blood Count Analysis Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — RMD proposes to develop a MEMS based complete blood count (CBC) instrument that can be used aboard a spacecraft. We will produce a microfluidic scale combination...

  14. Integration of Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasound Transducers to Microfluidic Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Viržonis, Darius

    2013-10-22

    The design and manufacturing flexibility of capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducers (CMUT) makes them attractive option for integration with microfluidic devices both for sensing and fluid manipulation. CMUT concept is introduced here by presentin

  15. Novel Polymer Microfluidics Technology for In Situ Planetary Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Los Gatos Research proposes to develop a new polymer based microfluidics technology for NASA planetary science applications. In particular, we will design, build and...

  16. Surface Micromachine Microfluidics: Design, Fabrication, Packaging, and Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galambos, Paul; Eaton, William P.; Shul, Randy; Willison, Christi Gober; Sniegowski, Jeffrey J.; Miller, Samuel L.; Guttierez, Daniel

    1999-06-30

    The field of microfluidics is undergoing rapid growth in terms of new device and system development. Among the many methods of fabricating microfluidic devices and systems, surface micromachining is relatively underrepresented due to difficulties in the introduction of fluids into the very small channels produced, packaging problems, and difficulties in device and system characterization. The potential advantages of using surface micromachining including compatibility with the existing integrated circuit tool set, integration of electronic sensing and actuation with microfluidics, and fluid volume minimization. In order to explore these potential advantages we have developed first generation surface micromachined microfluidic devices (channels) using an adapted pressure sensor fabrication process to produce silicon nitride channels, and the SUMMiT process to produce polysilicon channels. The channels were characterized by leak testing and flow rate vs. pressure measurements. The fabrication processes used and results of these tests are reported in this paper.

  17. Collective waves in dense and confined microfluidic droplet arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Ulf D; Fleury, Jean-Baptiste; Seemann, Ralf; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-08-07

    Excitation mechanisms for collective waves in confined dense one-dimensional microfluidic droplet arrays are investigated by experiments and computer simulations. We demonstrate that distinct modes can be excited by creating specific 'defect' patterns in flowing droplet trains. Excited longitudinal modes exhibit a short-lived cascade of pairs of laterally displacing droplets. Transversely excited modes obey the dispersion relation of microfluidic phonons and induce a coupling between longitudinal and transverse modes, whose origin is the hydrodynamic interaction of the droplets with the confining walls. Moreover, we investigate the long-time behaviour of the oscillations and discuss possible mechanisms for the onset of instabilities. Our findings demonstrate that the collective dynamics of microfluidic droplet ensembles can be studied particularly well in dense and confined systems. Experimentally, the ability to control microfluidic droplets may allow the modulation of the refractive index of optofluidic crystals, which is a promising approach for the production of dynamically programmable metamaterials.

  18. Lipid peroxidation products in machine perfusion of older donor kidneys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagelschmidt, Manfred; Minor, Thomas; Gallinat, Anja; Moers, Cyril; Jochmans, Ina; Pirenne, Jacques; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Paul, Andreas; Treckmann, Juergen

    Background: Owing to the shortage of donors, organs with an increased risk potential such as grafts recovered from expanded criteria donors are increasingly being used in transplants. Machine perfusion (MP) technology offers the possibility of determining the biomarkers in the perfusion solution so

  19. A model system for perfusion quantification using FAIR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, I.K.; Sidaros, Karam; Gesmar, H

    2000-01-01

    Flow-sensitive experiments (FAIR) have been performed on a tube-flow phantom in order to validate quantitative perfusion measurements on humans. A straight-forward correspondence between perfusion and bulk-flow is found. It is shown that the flow phantom model only holds when the slice profiles...

  20. Principles and practice of the laser-Doppler perfusion technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leahy, M.J.; de Mul, F.F.M.; Nilsson, G.E.; Maniewski, R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the development and use of laser‐Doppler perfusion monitors and imagers over the past two decades. The enormous interest in microvascular blood perfusion coupled with the ‘ease of use’ of the technique has led to [TeX:] 1500+ publications citing its use. However, useful results