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Sample records for assaying qualitative

  1. Application of statistical process control to qualitative molecular diagnostic assays

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Cathal P.

    2014-11-01

    Modern pathology laboratories and in particular high throughput laboratories such as clinical chemistry have developed a reliable system for statistical process control (SPC). Such a system is absent from the majority of molecular laboratories and where present is confined to quantitative assays. As the inability to apply SPC to an assay is an obvious disadvantage this study aimed to solve this problem by using a frequency estimate coupled with a confidence interval calculation to detect deviations from an expected mutation frequency. The results of this study demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of this approach and highlight minimum sample number requirements. Notably, assays with low mutation frequencies and detection of small deviations from an expected value require greater sample numbers to mitigate a protracted time to detection. Modeled laboratory data was also used to highlight how this approach might be applied in a routine molecular laboratory. This article is the first to describe the application of SPC to qualitative laboratory data.

  2. Application of statistical process control to qualitative molecular diagnostic assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathal P O'brien

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Modern pathology laboratories and in particular high throughput laboratories such as clinical chemistry have developed a reliable system for statistical process control. Such a system is absent from the majority of molecular laboratories and where present is confined to quantitative assays. As the inability to apply statistical process control to assay is an obvious disadvantage this study aimed to solve this problem by using a frequency estimate coupled with a confidence interval calculation to detect deviations from an expected mutation frequency. The results of this study demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of this approach and highlight minimum sample number requirements. Notably, assays with low mutation frequencies and detection of small deviations from an expected value require greater samples with a resultant protracted time to detection. Modelled laboratory data was also used to highlight how this approach might be applied in a routine molecular laboratory. This article is the first to describe the application of statistical process control to qualitative laboratory data.

  3. Restriction Inhibition Assay: A Qualitative and Quantitative Method to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rich fractions (PRFs) with high affinity for EcoRI and HindIII restriction .... DNA along with each restriction enzyme was kept to analyze the results of the ..... Puvvada MS, Hartley JA, Jenkins TC, Thurston DE. A quantitative assay to measure the ...

  4. HBsAg blood screening and diagnosis: performance evaluation of the ARCHITECT HBsAg qualitative and ARCHITECT HBsAg qualitative confirmatory assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Christian; Krams, Doris; Beckert, Christian; Buenning, Carsten; Queirós, Lucinda; Piro, Loredana; Luciani, Marina; Roebbecke, Markus; Kapprell, Hans-Peter

    2011-08-01

    A low initial reactive rate for screening assays is important for time- and cost-effective infectious disease testing. Therefore, the new ARCHITECT HBsAg Qualitative screening assay, in conjunction with the new ARCHITECT HBsAg Qualitative Confirmatory assay, was introduced. As the role of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) as surrogate marker for HBV resolution and the monitoring of drug effectiveness are becoming increasingly important, the established ARCHITECT HBsAg Quantitative assay remains available on the market. Precision, sensitivity, and specificity of the newly developed screening assay were in the range of established HBsAg assays. Seroconversion sensitivity was slightly superior compared to other commercially available assays. An initial reactive rate of 0.2% (without HBsAg-confirmed positive samples of 0.17%) for the ARCHITECT HBsAg Qualitative assay was observed. As the new screening assay is a 1-step assay format, the "high-dose hook effect" was investigated to assess the risk of false-negative results, but even very high positive HBsAg samples obtained signals clearly above the cutoff. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Real-time PCR assay for rapid qualitative and quantitative detection of Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosz, Erika; Perkátai, Katalin; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Farkas, Agnes; Kucsera, István

    2012-12-01

    Simple real-time PCR assay with one set of primer and probe for rapid, sensitive qualitative and quantitative detection of Entamoeba histolytica has been used. Consensus sequences were used to amplify a species-specific region of the 16S rRNA gene, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer hybridization probes were used for detection in a LightCycler platform (Roche). The anchor probe sequence was designed to be a perfect match for the 16S rRNA gene of Entamoeba species, while the acceptor probe sequence was designed for Entamoeba histolytica, which allowed differentiation. The performed characteristics of the real-time PCR assay were compared with ELISA antigen and microscopical detection from 77 samples of individuals with suspected clinical diagnosis of imported E. histolytica infection. Stool and liver abscess pus samples were examined with analytical sensitivity of 5 parasites per PCR reaction. The melting curve means Tms (standard deviation) in clinical isolates were 54°C. The real-time assay was 100% sensitive and specific for differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica, compared with conventional ELISA or microscopy. This real-time PCR assay with melting curve analysis is rapid, and specific for the detection and differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica. The suitability for routine use of this assay in clinical diagnostic laboratories is discussed.

  6. Identification of Acute HIV-1 Infection by Hologic Aptima HIV-1 RNA Qualitative Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, Leigh Anne; Malia, Jennifer; Jagodzinski, Linda L.; Trichavaroj, Rapee; Oundo, Joseph; Lueer, Cornelia; Cham, Fatim; de Souza, Mark; Michael, Nelson L.; Robb, Merlin L.; Peel, Sheila A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Hologic Aptima HIV-1 Qualitative RNA assay was used in a rigorous screening approach designed to identify individuals at the earliest stage of HIV-1 infection for enrollment into subsequent studies of cellular and viral events in early infection (RV 217/Early Capture HIV Cohort [ECHO] study). Volunteers at high risk for HIV-1 infection were recruited from study sites in Thailand, Tanzania, Uganda, and Kenya with high HIV-1 prevalence rates among the populations examined. Small-volume blood samples were collected by finger stick at twice-weekly intervals and tested with the Aptima assay. Participants with reactive Aptima test results were contacted immediately for entry into a more comprehensive follow-up schedule with frequent blood draws. Evaluation of the Aptima test prior to use in this study showed a detection sensitivity of 5.5 copies/ml (50%), with all major HIV-1 subtypes detected. A total of 54,306 specimens from 1,112 volunteers were examined during the initial study period (August 2009 to November 2010); 27 individuals were identified as converting from uninfected to infected status. A sporadic reactive Aptima signal was observed in HIV-1-infected individuals under antiretroviral therapy. Occasional false-reactive Aptima results in uninfected individuals, or nonreactive results in HIV-1-infected individuals not on therapy, were observed and used to calculate assay sensitivity and specificity. The sensitivity and specificity of the Aptima assay were 99.03% and 99.23%, respectively; positive and negative predictive values were 92.01% and 99.91%, respectively. Conversion from HIV-1-uninfected to -infected status was rapid, with no evidence of a prolonged period of intermittent low-level viremia. PMID:28424253

  7. The development of a qualitative real-time RT-PCR assay for the detection of hepatitis C virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clancy, A.; Crowley, B.; Niesters, H.; Herra, C.

    2008-01-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) represents a favourable option for the detection of hepatitis C virus (HCV). A real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) assay was developed as a qualitative diagnostic screening method for the detection of HCV using the ABI PRISM 7500 Sequence Detection

  8. A new TLC bioautographic assay for qualitative and quantitative estimation of lipase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jihe; Zhou, Jinge; Tang, Qingjiu; Wu, Tao; Cheng, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    Lipase inhibitory assays based on TLC bioautography have made recent progress; however, an assay with greater substrate specificity and quantitative capabilities would advance the efficacy of this particular bioassay. To address these limitations, a new TLC bioautographic assay for detecting lipase inhibitors was developed and validated in this study. The new TLC bioautographic assay was based on reaction of lipase with β-naphthyl myristate and the subsequent formation of the purple dye between β-naphthol and Fast Blue B salt (FBB). The relative lipase inhibitory capacity (RLIC) was determined by a TLC densitometry with fluorescence detection, expressed as orlistat equivalents in millimoles on a per sample weight basis. Six pure compounds and three natural extracts were evaluated for their potential lipase inhibitory activities by this TLC bioautographic assay. The β-naphthyl myristate as the substrate improved the detection sensitivity and specificity significantly. The limit of detection (LOD) of this assay was 0.01 ng for orlistat, the current treatment for obesity. This assay has acceptable accuracy (92.07-105.39%), intra-day and inter-day precisions [relative standard deviation (RSD), 2.64-4.40%], as well as intra-plate and inter-plate precisions (RSD, 1.8-4.9%). The developed method is rapid, simple, stable, and specific for screening and estimation of the potential lipase inhibitors. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Improved TLC Bioautographic Assay for Qualitative and Quantitative Estimation of Tyrosinase Inhibitors in Natural Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jinge; Tang, Qingjiu; Wu, Tao; Cheng, Zhihong

    2017-03-01

    TLC bioautography for tyrosinase inhibitors has made recent progress; however, an assay with a relative low consumption of enzyme and quantitative capability would greatly advance the efficacy of related TLC bioautographic assays. An improved TLC bioautographic assay for detecting tyrosinase inhibitors was developed and validated in this study. L-DOPA (better water-solubility than L-tyrosine) was used as the substrate instead of reported L-tyrosine. The effects of enzyme and substrate concentrations, reaction temperatures and times, and pH values of the reaction system as well as different plate types on the TLC bioautographic assay were optimised. The quantitative analysis was conducted by densitometric scanning of spot areas, and expressed as the relative tyrosinase inhibitory capacity (RTIC) using a positive control (kojic acid) equivalent. The limit of detection (LOD) of this assay was 1.0 ng for kojic acid. This assay has acceptable accuracy (101.73-102.90%), intra- and inter-day, and intra- and inter-plate precisions [relative standard deviation (RSD), less than 7.0%], and ruggedness (RSD, less than 3.5%). The consumption of enzyme (75 U/mL) is relatively low. Two tyrosinase inhibitory compounds including naringenin and 1-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-4-allylbenzene have been isolated from Rhodiola sacra guided by this TLC bioautographic assay. Our improved assay is a relatively low-cost, sensitive, and quantitative method compared to the reported TLC bioautographic assays. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. A Qualitative and Quantitative Assay to Study DNA/Drug Interaction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    247667, Uttaranchal, 3School of. Biotechnology ... Purpose: To explore the use of restriction inhibition assay (RIA) to study the binding specificity of some anticancer drugs. Methods: .... DNA along with each restriction enzyme alone was kept to ...

  11. A rapid qualitative assay for detection of Clostridium perfringens in canned food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Gayatri Ashwinkumar

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens (MTCC 1349) is a Gram-positive, anaerobic, endospore forming, and rod-shaped bacterium. This bacterium produces a variety of toxins under strict anaerobic environment. C. perfringens can grow at temperatures ranging between 20°C and 50°C. It is the major causetive agent for gas gangrene, cellulitis, septicemia, necrotic enteritis and food poisoning, which are common toxin induced conditions noted in human and animals. C. perfringens can produce produce four major types of toxins that are used for the classification of strains, classified under type A-E. Across the globe many countries, including the United States, are affected by C. perfringens food poisonings where it is ranked as one of the most common causes of food borne infections. To date, no direct one step assay for the detection of C. perfringens has been developed and only few methods are known for accurate detection of C. perfringens. Long detection and incubation time is the major consideration of these reporter assays. The prensent study proposes a rapid and reliable colorimetric assay for the detection of C. perfringens. In principale, this assay detects the para nitrophenyl (yellow colour end product) liberated due to the hydrolysis of paranitrophenyl phosphetidyl choline (PNPC) through phospholipase C (lecithinase). Constitutive secretion of phospholipase C is a charactristic feature of C. perfringens. This assay detects the presence of the extracellular lecithinse through the PNPC impragnated impregnated probe. The probe is impregnated with peranitrophenyl phosphotidyl choline ester, which is colourless substrate used by lecithinase. The designed assay is specific towards PNPC and detectes very small quantites of lecithinase under conditions used. The reaction is substrate specific, no cross reaction was observed upon incubation with other substrates. In addition, this assay gave negative results with other clostridium strains, no cross reactions were observed with other

  12. A Qualitative and Quantitative Assay to Study DNA/Drug Interaction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To explore the use of restriction inhibition assay (RIA) to study the binding specificity of some anticancer drugs. Methods: A 448 bp DNA fragment derived from pBCKS+ plasmid (harboring the polylinker region with multiple restriction endonuclease sites) was used as a template for sequence selective inhibition of ...

  13. Western blot assay for quantitative and qualitative antigen detection in vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjai; Zheng, Hong; Mahajan, Babita; Kozakai, Yukiko; Morin, Merribeth; Locke, Emily

    2014-05-01

    Immunological methods for quantitative measurement, antigenic characterization, and monitoring the stability of active immunogenic component(s) are a critical need in the vaccine development process. This unit describes an enhanced chemiluminescence-based western blot for quantitative detection of Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP), a major malaria candidate vaccine antigen. The most salient features of this assay are its high sensitivity and reproducibility; it can reliably detect ∼5 to 10 pg PfCSP expressed on native parasites or recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli. Although described for a specific vaccine antigen, this assay should be applicable for any antigen-antibody combination for which relevant detection reagents are available. Detailed stepwise experimental procedures and methods for data acquisition and analysis are described. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. Using the overlay assay to qualitatively measure bacterial production of and sensitivity to pneumococcal bacteriocins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricic, Natalie; Dawid, Suzanne

    2014-09-30

    Streptococcus pneumoniae colonizes the highly diverse polymicrobial community of the nasopharynx where it must compete with resident organisms. We have shown that bacterially produced antimicrobial peptides (bacteriocins) dictate the outcome of these competitive interactions. All fully-sequenced pneumococcal strains harbor a bacteriocin-like peptide (blp) locus. The blp locus encodes for a range of diverse bacteriocins and all of the highly conserved components needed for their regulation, processing, and secretion. The diversity of the bacteriocins found in the bacteriocin immunity region (BIR) of the locus is a major contributor of pneumococcal competition. Along with the bacteriocins, immunity genes are found in the BIR and are needed to protect the producer cell from the effects of its own bacteriocin. The overlay assay is a quick method for examining a large number of strains for competitive interactions mediated by bacteriocins. The overlay assay also allows for the characterization of bacteriocin-specific immunity, and detection of secreted quorum sensing peptides. The assay is performed by pre-inoculating an agar plate with a strain to be tested for bacteriocin production followed by application of a soft agar overlay containing a strain to be tested for bacteriocin sensitivity. A zone of clearance surrounding the stab indicates that the overlay strain is sensitive to the bacteriocins produced by the pre-inoculated strain. If no zone of clearance is observed, either the overlay strain is immune to the bacteriocins being produced or the pre-inoculated strain does not produce bacteriocins. To determine if the blp locus is functional in a given strain, the overlay assay can be adapted to evaluate for peptide pheromone secretion by the pre-inoculated strain. In this case, a series of four lacZ-reporter strains with different pheromone specificity are used in the overlay.

  15. A Novel Qualitative and Quantitative Biofilm Assay Based on 3D Soft Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodil Hakonen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lack of predictable in vitro methods to analyze antimicrobial activity could play a role in the development of resistance to antibiotics. Current used methods analyze planktonic cells but for the method to be clinically relevant, biofilm in in vivo like conditions ought to be studied. Hence, our group has developed a qualitative and quantitative method with in vivo like 3D tissue for prediction of antimicrobial activity in reality. Devices (wound dressings were applied on top of Pseudomonas aeruginosa inoculated Muller-Hinton (MH agar or 3D synthetic soft tissues (SST and incubated for 24 hours. The antibacterial activity was then analyzed visually and by viable counts. On MH agar two out of three silver containing devices showed zone of inhibitions (ZOI and on SST, ZOI were detected for all three. Corroborating results were found upon evaluating the bacterial load in SST and shown to be silver concentration dependent. In conclusion, a novel method was developed combining visual rapid screening and quantitative evaluation of the antimicrobial activity in both tissue and devices. It uses tissue allowing biofilm formation thus mimicking reality closely. These conditions are essential in order to predict antimicrobial activity of medical devices in the task to prevent device related infections.

  16. Improved bioautographic assay on TLC layers for qualitative and quantitative estimation of xanthine oxidase inhibitors and superoxide scavengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yao; Li, Xiangkun; Zhang, Na; Miao, Yu; Feng, Haiyan; Wu, Tao; Cheng, Zhihong

    2018-02-20

    A new agar-free bioautographic assay for xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitors and superoxide scavengers on TLC layers was developed and validated. Compared to the first version of TLC bioautographic agar overlay method, our bioautographic assay greatly improved the sensitivity and quantification ability. The limit of detection (LOD) of this assay was 0.017ng for allopurinol. Quantitative estimation of XO inhibitors and superoxide scavengers was achieved by densitometry scanning, expressed as allopurinol equivalents in millimoles on a per sample weight basis. This assay has acceptable accuracy (95.37-99.23%), intra-day and inter-day precisions (RSD, 2.56-6.69%), as well as intra-plate and inter-plate precisions (RSD, 2.93-9.62%). Six pure compounds and three herbal extracts were evaluated for their potential XO inhibitory and superoxide scavenging activity by this bioautographic assay on TLC layers. Four active components were separated, located and identified in Astragalus membranaceus var. mongholicus extract by the bioautographic assay after TLC separation. The developed method is rapid, simple, sensitive and stable for screening and estimation of the potential XO inhibitors and superoxide scavengers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Implementation of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay for tuberculosis in Mongolia: a qualitative exploration of barriers and enablers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendell, Nicole L; Bekhbat, Solongo; Ganbaatar, Gantungalag; Dorjravdan, Munkhjargal; Pai, Madhukar; Dobler, Claudia C

    2017-01-01

    The aim of our study was to identify barriers and enablers to implementation of the Xpert MTB/RIF test within Mongolia's National Tuberculosis Program. Twenty-foursemi-structured interviews were conducted between June and September 2015 with laboratory staff and tuberculosis physicians in Mongolia's capital Ulaanbaatar and regional towns where Xpert MTB/RIF testing had been implemented. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, translated and analysed thematically using NVIVO qualitative analysis software. Eight laboratory staff (five from the National Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory in Ulaanbaatar and three from provincial laboratories) and sixteen tuberculosis physicians (five from the Mongolian National Center for Communicable Diseases in Ulaanbaatar, four from district tuberculosis clinics in Ulaanbaatar and seven from provincial tuberculosis clinics) were interviewed. Major barriers to Xpert MTB/RIF implementation identified were: lack of awareness of program guidelines; inadequate staffing arrangements; problems with cartridge supply management; lack of local repair options for the Xpert machines; lack of regular formal training; paper based system; delayed treatment initiation due to consensus meeting and poor sample quality. Enablers to Xpert MTB/RIF implementation included availability of guidelines in the local language; provision of extra laboratory staff, shift working arrangements and additional modules; capacity for troubleshooting internally; access to experts; opportunities for peer learning; common understanding of diagnostic algorithms and decentralised testing. Our study identified a number of barriers and enablers to implementation of Xpert MTB/RIF in the Mongolian National Tuberculosis Program. Lessons learned from this study can help to facilitate implementation of Xpert MTB/RIF in other Mongolian locations as well as other low-and middle-income countries.

  18. Enhanced rapidity for qualitative detection of Listeria monocytogenes using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunochromatography strip test combined with immunomagnetic bead separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Won-Bo; Choi, Jin-Gil; Kim, Ji-Young; Yang, Zheng-You; Lee, Kyu-Ho; Kim, Min-Gon; Ha, Sang-Do; Kim, Keun-Sung; Kim, Kwang-Yup; Kim, Cheol-Ho; Eremin, Sergei A; Chung, Duck-Hwa

    2008-04-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunochromatography (ICG) strip test, and immunomagnetic bead separation (IMBS) system based on a monoclonal antibody were individually developed for the detection and isolation of Listeria monocytogenes in meat samples. The three methods showed a strong reaction with Listeria species and a weak reaction with Staphylococcus aureus. To increase the rapidity of L. monocytogenes detection, combinations of the ELISA and ICG strip test with the IMBS system (ELISA-IMBS and ICG-IMBS) were investigated. In comparative analyses of artificially inoculated meat and samples of processed meat, the ELISA and ICG strip test required 24 h of enrichment time to detect the inoculated meat samples with > or =1 X 10(2) CFU/10 g, whereas the ELISA-IMBS and ICG-IMBS required only 14 h of enrichment. Analyses of naturally contaminated meat samples (30 pork samples, 20 beef samples, 26 chicken samples, 20 fish samples, and 20 processed meat samples) performed by ELISA-IMBS, ICG-IMBS, and API kit produced similar results. The ELISA-IMBS and ICG-IMBS provide a more rapid assay than the individual ELISA and the ICG strip test and are appropriate for rapid and qualitative detection of L. monocytogenes (or Listeria species) in meat samples. With the ICG-IMBS, L. monocytogenes could be detected in meat samples within 15 h and the method has potential as a rapid, cost-effective on-site screening tool for the detection of L. monocytogenes in food samples and agricultural products at a minimum detection level of approximately 100 CFU/10 g.

  19. Development of three triplex real-time reverse transcription PCR assays for the qualitative molecular typing of the nine serotypes of African horse sickness virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, Camilla T; Joone, Christopher; Lourens, Carina W; Monyai, Mpho S; Koekemoer, Otto; Grewar, John D; van Schalkwyk, Antoinette; Majiwa, Phelix O A; MacLachlan, N James; Guthrie, Alan J

    2015-10-01

    Blood samples collected as part of routine diagnostic investigations from South African horses with clinical signs suggestive of African horse sickness (AHS) were subjected to analysis with an AHS virus (AHSV) group specific reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (AHSV RT-qPCR) assay and virus isolation (VI) with subsequent serotyping by plaque inhibition (PI) assays using AHSV serotype-specific antisera. Blood samples that tested positive by AHSV RT-qPCR were then selected for analysis using AHSV type specific RT-qPCR (AHSV TS RT-qPCR) assays. The TS RT-qPCR assays were evaluated using both historic stocks of the South African reference strains of each of the 9 AHSV serotypes, as well as recently derived stocks of these same viruses. Of the 503 horse blood samples tested, 156 were positive by both AHSV RT-qPCR and VI assays, whereas 135 samples that were VI negative were positive by AHSV RT-qPCR assay. The virus isolates made from the various blood samples included all 9 AHSV serotypes, and there was 100% agreement between the results of conventional serotyping of individual virus isolates by PI assay and AHSV TS RT-qPCR typing results. Results of the current study confirm that the AHSV TS RT-qPCR assays for the identification of individual AHSV serotypes are applicable and practicable and therefore are potentially highly useful and appropriate for virus typing in AHS outbreak situations in endemic or sporadic incursion areas, which can be crucial in determining appropriate and timely vaccination and control strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Qualitative detection of class IIa bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria from traditional Chinese fermented food using a YGNGV-motif-based assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenli; Zhang, Lanwei; Yi, Huaxi; Shi, John; Xue, Chaohui; Li, Hongbo; Jiao, Yuehua; Shigwedha, Nditange; Du, Ming; Han, Xue

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, a YGNGV-motif-based assay was developed and applied. Given that there is an increasing demand for natural preservatives, we set out to obtain lactic acid bacteria (LAB) that produce bacteriocins against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We here isolated 123 LAB strains from 5 types of traditional Chinese fermented food and screened them for the production of bacteriocins using the agar well diffusion assay (AWDA). Then, to acquire LAB producing class IIa bacteriocins, we used a YGNGV-motif-based assay that was based on 14 degenerate primers matching all class IIa bacteriocin-encoding genes currently deposited in NCBI. Eight of the LAB strains identified by AWDA could inhibit Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria; 5 of these were YGNGV-amplicon positive. Among these 5 isolates, amplicons from 2 strains (Y31 and Y33) matched class IIa bacteriocin genes. Strain Y31 demonstrated the highest inhibitory activity and the best match to a class IIa bacteriocin gene in NCBI, and was identified as Enterococcus faecium. The bacteriocin from Enterococcus avium Y33 was 100% identical to enterocin P. Both of these strains produced bacteriocins with strong antimicrobial activity against Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, and Bacillus subtilis, hence these bacteriocins hold promise as potential bio-preservatives in the food industry. These findings also indicated that the YGNGV-motif-based assay used in this study could identify novel class IIa bacteriocinogenic LAB, rapidly and specifically, saving time and labour by by-passing multiple separation and purification steps. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Field Evaluation of Performance of Alere and Cepheid Qualitative HIV Assays for Pediatric Point-of-Care Testing in an Academic Hospital in Soweto, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Tanya Y; Sherman, Gayle G; Nakwa, Firdose; MacLeod, William B; Sipambo, Nosisa; Velaphi, Sithembiso; Carmona, Sergio

    2017-11-01

    Point-of-care (POC) technologies for HIV diagnosis in infants have the potential to overcome logistical challenges that delay treatment initiation and prevent improvements in morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of two POC technologies against the current standard-of-care (SOC) laboratory-based assay in South Africa, when operated by nurses in a hospital environment. Children <18 months of age who were treatment naive (excluding prophylaxis) and in whom an HIV PCR test was indicated were eligible for the study. To increase the rate of enrollment of HIV PCR-positive children, HIV-exposed neonates at high risk of mother-to-child transmission and children requiring confirmatory HIV testing were preferentially enrolled. The two POC technologies demonstrated excellent concordance, with 315 (97.8%) results consistent with the SOC result. The POC technologies yielded 102 positive and 220 negative tests each. The SOC assay had 101 positive, 214 negative, 4 indeterminate, 1 invalid, and 2 specimen-rejected results. To include the indeterminate results in sensitivity/specificity calculations, a sensitivity analysis was performed, which yielded a simulated sensitivity of 0.9904 (interquartile range [IQR], 0.9808 to 0.9904) and a specificity of 0.9954 (IQR, 0.9954 to 1.0). This study confirmed that both POC technologies can be successfully used outside the laboratory environment to yield precise sensitivity/specificity values for pediatric, including neonatal, HIV testing. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Development and performance assessment of a qualitative SYBR® green real-time PCR assay for the detection of Aspergillus versicolor in indoor air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libert, X; Chasseur, C; Bladt, S; Packeu, A; Bureau, F; Roosens, N H; De Keersmaecker, S C J

    2015-09-01

    Currently, contamination of indoor environment by fungi and molds is considered as a public health problem. The monitoring of indoor airborne fungal contamination is a common tool to help understanding the link between fungi in houses and respiratory problems. Classical analytical monitoring methods, based on cultivation and microscopic identification, depend on the growth of the fungi. Consequently, they are biased by difficulties to grow some species on certain culture media and under certain conditions or by noncultivable or dead fungi that can consequently not be identified. However, they could have an impact on human health as they might be allergenic. Since molecular methods do not require a culture step, they seem an excellent alternative for the monitoring of indoor fungal contaminations. As a case study, we developed a SYBR® green real-time PCR-based assay for the specific detection and identification of Aspergillus versicolor, which is frequently observed in indoor environment and known to be allergenic. The developed primers amplify a short region of the internal transcribed spacer 1 from the 18S ribosomal DNA complex. Subsequently, the performance of this quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method was assessed using specific criteria, including an evaluation of the selectivity, PCR efficiency, dynamic range, and repeatability. The limit of detection was determined to be 1 or 2 copies of genomic DNA of A. versicolor. In order to demonstrate that this SYBR® green qPCR assay is a valuable alternative for monitoring indoor fungal contamination with A. versicolor, environmental samples collected in contaminated houses were analyzed and the results were compared to the ones obtained with the traditional methods.

  3. Comparison of a commercial qualitative real-time RT-PCR kit with direct immunofluorescence assay (DFA) and cell culture for detection of influenza A and B in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharabaghi, Farhad; Tellier, Raymond; Cheung, Rose; Collins, Carol; Broukhanski, George; Drews, Steven J; Richardson, Susan E

    2008-06-01

    Institutional pandemic planning prompted a study of the molecular detection of influenza virus from respiratory specimens in children, compared to conventional diagnostics. To evaluate the performance of a commercial qualitative real-time RT-PCR kit (rRT-PCR), the artus Influenza LC RT-PCR (Qiagen). STUDY DESIGN (METHODS): Specimens were pre-selected to include a high percentage of positives by direct immunofluorescence assay (DFA) or culture. The sensitivity and specificity of the kit for detection of influenza A and B in children were determined against the gold standard, DFA and culture. Specimens yielding discordant results between artus and the gold standard were tested against a reference rRT-PCR assay (Centers for Disease Control) to create an "expanded gold standard". When compared to DFA or cell culture, the sensitivity of the rRT-PCR artus kit was 96.2% and the specificity was 94%. It detected influenza RNA in 6.0% of clinical samples negative by DFA or culture. Using the expanded gold standard, the revised sensitivity was 98.7% (98.6% for influenza A and 97.6% for influenza B) and the specificity was 100%. The artus Influenza LC RT-PCR kit is an effective alternative to virus isolation and DFA for the detection of influenza A and B in pediatric clinical specimens.

  4. A Label-Free and Sensitive Fluorescent Qualitative Assay for Bisphenol A Based on Rolling Circle Amplification/Exonuclease III-Combined Cascade Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA detection in drinking water and food packaging materials has attracted much attention since the discovery that BPA can interfere with normal physiological processes and cause adverse health effects. Here, we constructed a label-free aptamer fluorescent assay for selective and sensitive detection of BPA based on the rolling circle amplification (RCA/Exonuclease III (Exo III-combined cascade amplification strategy. First, the duplex DNA probe (RP with anti-BPA aptamer and trigger sequence was designed for BPA recognition and signal amplification. Next, under the action of BPA, the trigger probe was liberated from RP to initiate RCA reaction as primary amplification. Subsequently, the RCA products were used to trigger Exo III assisted secondary amplification with the help of hairpin probes, producing plenty of “G-quadruplex” in lantern-like structures. Finally, the continuously enriched “G-quadruplex lanterns” were lightened by zinc(II-protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX generating enhanced fluorescence signals. By integrating the primary RCA and secondary Exo III mediated cascade amplification strategy, this method displayed an excellent sensitivity with the detection limits of 5.4 × 10−17 M. In addition, the anti-BPA aptamer exhibits high recognition ability with BPA, guaranteeing the specificity of detection. The reporter signal probe (G-quadruplex with ZnPPIX provides a label-free fluorescence signals readout without complicated labeling procedures, making the method simple in design and cost-effective in operation. Moreover, environmental samples analysis was also performed, suggesting that our strategy was reliable and had a great potential application in environmental monitoring.

  5. Evaluation of a rapid and simple fourth-generation HIV screening assay for qualitative detection of HIV p24 antigen and/or antibodies to HIV-1 and HIV-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beelaert, G; Fransen, K

    2010-09-01

    The performance was assessed of a new, rapid, visual and qualitative immunoassay for the detection of HIV p24 antigen (Ag) and antibodies (Ab) to HIV-1 and HIV-2. Characterised serum or plasma specimens from patients diagnosed with HIV infection were tested: 179 samples of known Ab-positive patients harbouring different subtypes of HIV-1 (n=154) and HIV-2 (n=25) and 200 samples from individuals not infected with HIV. The assay's Ag sensitivity was assessed by testing HIV seroconversion panels (n=10) and primary HIV infection specimens (n=57). In addition, the influence of the genetic variability of HIV-1 on Ag detection was evaluated using dilutions of culture supernatants infected with different subtypes (n=50). The performance of the rapid test was compared to a "gold standard" testing algorithm with the use of a single Ag ELISA and with the Vironostika((R)) HIV Uni-Form II Ag/Ab test, a fourth-generation ELISA. The new assay, the Determine HIV-1/2 Combo demonstrated 100% (98.2-100.0) Ab specificity (200/200) and 100% (98.0-100.0) Ab sensitivity (179/179). In these samples, the observed Ag sensitivity was 86.6% (58/67) with the Determine HIV-1/2 Combo test and 92.5% (62/67) with the Vironostika compared to the reference single Ag ELISA. The assay could not detect Ag in one group O, one subtype F and two subtype H cell supernatant isolates. None of the HIV-2 Ag could be detected. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of supplemental testing with the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 Rapid Test and APTIMA HIV-1 RNA Qualitative Assay to resolve specimens with indeterminate or negative HIV-1 Western blots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linley, Laurie; Ethridge, Steven F; Oraka, Emeka; Owen, S Michele; Wesolowski, Laura G; Wroblewski, Kelly; Landgraf, Kenneth M; Parker, Monica M; Brinson, Myra; Branson, Bernard M

    2013-12-01

    The use of Western blot (WB) as a supplemental test after reactive sensitive initial assays can lead to inconclusive or misclassified HIV test results, delaying diagnosis. To determine the proportion of specimens reactive by immunoassay (IA) but indeterminate or negative by WB that could be resolved by alternative supplemental tests recommended under a new HIV diagnostic testing algorithm. Remnant HIV diagnostic specimens that were reactive on 3rd generation HIV-1/2 IA and either negative or indeterminate by HIV-1 WB from 11 health departments were tested with the Bio-Rad Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 Rapid Test (Multispot) and the Gen-Probe APTIMA HIV-1 RNA Qualitative Assay (APTIMA). According to the new testing algorithm, 512 (89.8%) specimens were HIV-negative, 55 (9.6%) were HIV-1 positive (including 19 [3.3%] that were acute HIV-1 and 9 [1.6%] that were positive for HIV-1 by Multispot but APTIMA-negative), 2 (0.4%) were HIV-2 positive, and 1 (0.2%) was HIV-positive, type undifferentiated. 47 (21.4%) of the 220 WB-indeterminate and 8 (2.3%) of the 350 WB-negative specimens were HIV-1 positive. Applying the new HIV diagnostic algorithm retrospectively to WB-negative and indeterminate specimens, the HIV infection status could be established for nearly all of the specimens. IA-reactive HIV-infected persons with WB-negative results had been previously misclassified as uninfected, and HIV diagnosis was delayed for those with WB-indeterminate specimens. These findings underscore the limitations of the WB to confirm HIV infection after reactive results from contemporary 3rd or 4th generation IAs that can detect HIV antibodies several weeks sooner than the WB. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Enzyme assays

    OpenAIRE

    Bisswanger, Hans

    2014-01-01

    The essential requirements for enzyme assays are described and frequently occurring errors and pitfalls as well as their avoidance are discussed. The main factors, which must be considered for assaying enzymes, are temperature, pH, ionic strength and the proper concentrations of the essential components like substrates and enzymes. Standardization of these parameters would be desirable, but the diversity of the features of different enzymes prevents unification of assay conditions. Neverthele...

  8. Qualitative studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Qualitative Studies (QS) aims to become a central forum for discussions of qualitative research in psychology, education, communication, cultural studies, health sciences and social sciences in general...

  9. Evaluation of a new automated Abbott RealTime MTB RIF/INH assay for qualitative detection of rifampicin/isoniazid resistance in pulmonary and extra-pulmonary clinical samples ofMycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Pilar; Causse, Manuel; Vaquero, Manuel; Gutierrez, Juan Bautista; Casal, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    A new automated real-time PCR assay for the detection of rifampicin (RIF) and isoniazid (INH) resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) was evaluated. A total of 163 clinical samples (128 pulmonary and 35 extra-pulmonary) were processed using four PCR assay kits: Abbott RealTime MTB RIF/INH, Genotype MTBDRplus, Xpert/MTB RIF, and Anyplex MTB/MDR. The results of phenotypic drug-susceptibility testing using BACTECMGIT 960 were used as reference. The sensitivity and specificity of the new Abbott RealTime MTB RIF/INH assay in comparison with phenotypic testing was 96.3% (95%CI 87.32%-100%) for RIF and 100% (95%CI 99.3%-100%) for INH; the sensitivity was 78.8% (95%CI 66.8%-90.9%) and the specificity was 100% (95%CI 98.9%-100%). The Abbott RealTime MTB RIF/INH test could be a valid method for detecting the most common mutations in strains resistant to RIF and INH.

  10. The first detection of Toxoplasma gondii DNA in environmental air samples using gelatine filters, real-time PCR and loop-mediated isothermal (LAMP) assays: qualitative and quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass, Anna; Szostakowska, Beata; Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2017-11-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infections are acquired through the ingestion of oocysts present in the environment. However, there is no data about their occurrence in the air or about airborne transmission of these infections. In the present paper, we report on the identification of T. gondii using rapid molecular detection methods, supported by microscopic analysis, in environmental air samples. A total of 71 samples were collected, using gelatine filters, from kitchen gardens, recreational areas and sandpits located in northern and north-eastern Poland. Material recovered from the filters was analysed using real-time PCR and loop-mediated isothermal assays targeting the T. gondii B1 gene. Toxoplasma gondii DNA was found in two samples, as confirmed by both molecular assays. Genotyping at the SAG2 locus showed Toxoplasma SAG2 type I. Moreover, the presence of T. gondii oocysts was confirmed in one of the positive samples with the use of microscopy. The results showed that T. gondii may be present in environmental air samples and that respiratory tract infections may play a role in the high prevalence of toxoplasmosis in humans and animals. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first epidemiological evidence that oro-fecal and foodborne toxoplasmosis may be traceable to an airborne respiratory origin and that this may represent a new, previously unknown transmission route for this disease.

  11. Qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Lisa; Dertadian, George

    2017-08-07

    This narrative review aims to highlight key insights from qualitative research on drug use and drug users by profiling a selection of classic works. Consensus methods were used to identify and select four papers published in 1938, 1969, 1973 and 1984 considered to be classics. These landmark qualitative studies included the first account of addiction as a social process, demonstrating that people have meaningful responses to drug use that cannot be reduced to their pharmacological effects; the portrayal of inner-city heroin users as exacting, energetic and engaged social agents; identification of the interactive social learning processes involved in becoming a drug user; the application of the 'career' concept to understanding transitions and trajectories of drug use over time; and the articulation of a framework for understanding drug use that incorporates the interaction between pharmacology, psychology and social environments. These classic sociological and anthropological studies deployed qualitative research methods to show how drug use is shaped by complex sets of factors situated within social contexts, viewing drug users as agents engaged actively in social processes and worlds. Their findings have been used to challenge stereotypes about drug use and drug users, develop a deeper understanding of drug use among hidden, hard-to-research and under-studied populations, and provide the foundations for significant developments in scientific knowledge about the nature of drug use. They continue to retain their relevance, providing important correctives to biomedical and behaviourist paradigms, reminding us that drug use is a social process, and demonstrating how the inductive approach of qualitative research can strengthen the way we understand and respond to drug use and related harms. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  12. A qualitative study comparing the assay performance characteristics between the 2007 and the 2013 American Society for Clinical Oncology and College of American Pathologists HER2 scoring methods in mucinous epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Kuan; Lee, Ming-Yung; Lin, Wea-Lung; Wang, Yu-Ting; Han, Chih-Ping; Yu, Cheng-Ping; Chao, Wan-Ru

    2014-12-01

    The remarkable success of trastuzumab and other newly developed anti-HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) therapies in breast, gastric, or gastroesophageal junction cancer patients has supported us to investigate the HER2 status and its possible therapeutic implication in mucinous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). However, there is currently no standardization of HER2 scoring criteria in mucinous EOC. In this study, we aimed to compare both the assay performance characteristics of the 2007 and the 2013 American Society for Clinical Oncology and College of American Pathologists scoring methods. Forty-nine tissue microarray samples of mucinous EOC from Asian women were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) tests using the 2007 and the 2013 criteria, respectively. The overall concordance between IHC and FISH by the 2007 criteria was 97.92 % (kappa = 0.921), and that by the 2013 criteria was 100% (kappa = 1.000). The percentage of Her2 FISH-amplified cases showed an increasing trend significantly through their corresponding HER2 IHC ordinals by the 2007 and the 2013 criteria, respectively (P IHC were higher under the 2013 criteria than those (sensitivity 87.5%, NPV 97.6%, and accuracy 97.9%) under the 2007 criteria. Of the total 49 cases, the number (n = 4) of HER2 IHC equivocal results under the 2013 criteria was 4-fold higher than that (n = 1) under the 2007 criteria (8.16% vs 2.04%). Conclusively, if first tested by IHC, the 2013 criteria caused more equivocal HER2 IHC cases to be referred to Her2 FISH testing than the 2007 criteria. That decreased the false-negative rate of HER2 status and increased the detection rates of HER2 positivity in mucinous EOC.

  13. Qualitative Economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fast, Michael; Clark II, Woodrow W

                         This book is about science -- specifically, the science of economics. Or lack thereof is more accurate. The building of any science, let alone economics, is grounded in the understanding of what is beneath the "surface" of economics. Science, and hence economics, should...... be concerned with formulating ideas that express theories which produce descriptions of how to understand phenomenon and real world experiences.                       Economics must become a science, because the essence of economics in terms of human actions, group interactions and communities are in need...... of scientific inquiry. Academics and scholars need a scientific perspective that can hypothesize, theorize document, understand and analyze human dynamics from the individual to more societal interactions. And that is what qualitative economics does; it can make economics into becoming a science. The economic...

  14. Restriction Inhibition Assay: A Qualitative and Quantitative Method to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rich fractions (PRFs) with high affinity for EcoRI and HindIII restriction sequences and correlate their interaction to an anticancer activity. Methods: pBR322 linear plasmid DNA was used as a template to screen the sequence-selective inhibition of ...

  15. Microbead agglutination based assays

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2013-01-21

    We report a simple and rapid room temperature assay for point-of-care (POC) testing that is based on specific agglutination. Agglutination tests are based on aggregation of microbeads in the presence of a specific analyte thus enabling the macroscopic observation. Such tests are most often used to explore antibody-antigen reactions. Agglutination has been used for protein assays using a biotin/streptavidin system as well as a hybridization based assay. The agglutination systems are prone to selftermination of the linking analyte, prone to active site saturation and loss of agglomeration at high analyte concentrations. We investigated the molecular target/ligand interaction, explaining the common agglutination problems related to analyte self-termination, linkage of the analyte to the same bead instead of different microbeads. We classified the agglutination process into three kinds of assays: a two- component assay, a three-component assay and a stepped three- component assay. Although we compared these three kinds of assays for recognizing DNA and protein molecules, the assay can be used for virtually any molecule, including ions and metabolites. In total, the optimized assay permits detecting analytes with high sensitivity in a short time, 5 min, at room temperature. Such a system is appropriate for POC testing.

  16. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  17. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  18. Thread as a matrix for biomedical assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reches, Meital; Mirica, Katherine A; Dasgupta, Rohit; Dickey, Michael D; Butte, Manish J; Whitesides, George M

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes the use of thread as a matrix for the fabrication of diagnostic assay systems. The kinds of thread used for this study are inexpensive, broadly available, and lightweight; some of them are already familiar materials in healthcare. Fluids wick along these threads by capillary action; no external power source is necessary for pumping. This paper demonstrates three designs for diagnostic assays that use different characteristics of the thread. The first two designs-the "woven array" and the "branching design"-take advantage of the ease with which thread can be woven on a loom to generate fluidic pathways that enable multiple assays to be performed in parallel. The third design-the "sewn array"-takes advantage of the ease with which thread can be sewn through a hydrophobic polymer sheet to incorporate assays into bandages, diapers and similar systems. These designs lead to microfluidic devices that may be useful in performing simple colorimetric assays that require qualitative results. We demonstrate the function of thread-based microfluidic devices in the context of five different colorimetric assays: detection of ketones, nitrite, protein, and glucose in artificial urine, and detection of alkaline phosphatase in artificial plasma.

  19. Qualitative Research Process

    OpenAIRE

    Dewan Mahboob HOSSAIN

    2011-01-01

    This article provides with an overview of the qualitative research methods. Over last few decades, qualitative research is getting very popular in the fields of business, sociology, psychology and others. This article, in its introduction, gives a general idea about the qualitative research. Then it discusses the main differences between qualitative and quantitative research methods. The article also discusses about the ethical issues important for qualitative research. Lastly it discusses ab...

  20. Lateral flow assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczula, Katarzyna M; Gallotta, Andrea

    2016-06-30

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) are the technology behind low-cost, simple, rapid and portable detection devices popular in biomedicine, agriculture, food and environmental sciences. This review presents an overview of the principle of the method and the critical components of the assay, focusing on lateral flow immunoassays. This type of assay has recently attracted considerable interest because of its potential to provide instantaneous diagnosis directly to patients. The range and interpretation of results and parameters used for evaluation of the assay will also be discussed. The main advantages and disadvantages of LFAs will be summarized and relevant future improvements to testing devices and strategies will be proposed. Finally, the major recent advances and future diagnostic applications in the LFA field will be explored. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  1. Lateral flow assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczula, Katarzyna M.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) are the technology behind low-cost, simple, rapid and portable detection devices popular in biomedicine, agriculture, food and environmental sciences. This review presents an overview of the principle of the method and the critical components of the assay, focusing on lateral flow immunoassays. This type of assay has recently attracted considerable interest because of its potential to provide instantaneous diagnosis directly to patients. The range and interpretation of results and parameters used for evaluation of the assay will also be discussed. The main advantages and disadvantages of LFAs will be summarized and relevant future improvements to testing devices and strategies will be proposed. Finally, the major recent advances and future diagnostic applications in the LFA field will be explored. PMID:27365041

  2. Tube-Forming Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ryan M; Meah, Christopher J; Heath, Victoria L; Styles, Iain B; Bicknell, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis involves the generation of new blood vessels from the existing vasculature and is dependent on many growth factors and signaling events. In vivo angiogenesis is dynamic and complex, meaning assays are commonly utilized to explore specific targets for research into this area. Tube-forming assays offer an excellent overview of the molecular processes in angiogenesis. The Matrigel tube forming assay is a simple-to-implement but powerful tool for identifying biomolecules involved in angiogenesis. A detailed experimental protocol on the implementation of the assay is described in conjunction with an in-depth review of methods that can be applied to the analysis of the tube formation. In addition, an ImageJ plug-in is presented which allows automatic quantification of tube images reducing analysis times while removing user bias and subjectivity.

  3. Modelling the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArt, Darragh G; McKerr, George; Howard, C Vyvyan; Saetzler, Kurt; Wasson, Gillian R

    2009-08-01

    The single-cell gel electrophoresis technique or comet assay is widely regarded as a quick and reliable method of analysing DNA damage in individual cells. It has a proven track record from the fields of biomonitoring to nutritional studies. The assay operates by subjecting cells that are fixed in agarose to high salt and detergent lysis, thus removing all the cellular content except the DNA. By relaxing the DNA in an alkaline buffer, strands containing breaks are released from supercoiling. Upon electrophoresis, these strands are pulled out into the agarose, forming a tail which, when stained with a fluorescent dye, can be analysed by fluorescence microscopy. The intensity of this tail reflects the amount of DNA damage sustained. Despite being such an established and widely used assay, there are still many aspects of the comet assay which are not fully understood. The present review looks at how the comet assay is being used, and highlights some of its limitations. The protocol itself varies among laboratories, so results from similar studies may vary. Given such discrepancies, it would be attractive to break the assay into components to generate a mathematical model to investigate specific parameters.

  4. Qualitative Tourism Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buda, Dorina; Martini, Annaclaudia; Garcia, Luis-Manuel; Lowry, Linda

    Conducting qualitative research in tourism studies entails engaging with an entire approach, a set of methods that shape project design, conceptual frameworks, data analysis, and anticipated outcomes. Standard qualitative methods are individual interviews, focus groups and ethnography. Solicited

  5. Qualitative Data Analysis Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Greaves, Kristoffer

    2014-01-01

    A set of concept maps for qualitative data analysis strategies, inspired by Corbin, JM & Strauss, AL 2008, Basics of qualitative research: Techniques and procedures for developing grounded theory, 3rd edn, Sage Publications, Inc, Thousand Oaks, California.

  6. HCG blood test - qualitative

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003509.htm HCG blood test - qualitative To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A qualitative HCG blood test checks if there is a hormone called human ...

  7. The qualitative research proposal

    OpenAIRE

    Klopper, Hester

    2008-01-01

    Qualitative research in the health sciences has had to overcome many prejudices and a number of misunderstandings, but today qualitative research is as acceptable as quantitative research designs and is widely funded and published. Writing the proposal of a qualitative study, however, can be a challenging feat, due to the emergent nature of the qualitative research design and the description of the methodology as a process. Even today, many sub-standard proposals at post-graduate evaluation c...

  8. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  9. Rover waste assay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akers, D.W.; Stoots, C.M.; Kraft, N.C.; Marts, D.J. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-11-01

    The Rover Waste Assay System (RWAS) is a nondestructive assay system designed for the rapid assay of highly-enriched {sup 235}U contaminated piping, tank sections, and debris from the Rover nuclear rocket fuel processing facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. A scanning system translates a NaI(Tl) detector/collimator system over the structural components where both relative and calibrated measurements for {sup 137}Cs are made. Uranium-235 concentrations are in operation and is sufficiently automated that most functions are performed by the computer system. These functions include system calibration, problem identification, collimator control, data analysis, and reporting. Calibration of the system was done through a combination of measurements on calibration standards and benchmarked modeling. A description of the system is presented along with the methods and uncertainties associated with the calibration and analysis of the system for components from the Rover facility. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Lateral flow strip assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Robin R [Danville, CA; Benett, William J [Livermore, CA; Coleman, Matthew A [Oakland, CA; Pearson, Francesca S [Livermore, CA; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L [Livermore, CA

    2011-03-08

    A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

  11. Computer supported qualitative research

    CERN Document Server

    Reis, Luís; Sousa, Francislê; Moreira, António; Lamas, David

    2017-01-01

    This book contains an edited selection of the papers accepted for presentation and discussion at the first International Symposium on Qualitative Research (ISQR2016), held in Porto, Portugal, July 12th-14th, 2016. The book and the symposium features the four main application fields Education, Health, Social Sciences and Engineering and Technology and seven main subjects: Rationale and Paradigms of Qualitative Research (theoretical studies, critical reflection about epistemological dimensions, ontological and axiological); Systematization of approaches with Qualitative Studies (literature review, integrating results, aggregation studies, meta -analysis, meta- analysis of qualitative meta- synthesis, meta- ethnography); Qualitative and Mixed Methods Research (emphasis in research processes that build on mixed methodologies but with priority to qualitative approaches); Data Analysis Types (content analysis , discourse analysis , thematic analysis , narrative analysis , etc.); Innovative processes of Qualitative ...

  12. (MTT) dye reduction assay.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to inhibit proliferation of HeLa cells was determined using the 3443- dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) dye reduction assay. Extracts from roots of Agathisanthemum bojeri, Synaptolepis kirkii and Zanha africana and the leaf extract of Physalis peruviana at a concentration of 10 pg/ml inhibited cell ...

  13. Hyaluronic Acid Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itenov, Theis S; Kirkby, Nikolai S; Bestle, Morten H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUD: Hyaluronic acid (HA) is proposed as a marker of functional liver capacity. The aim of the present study was to compare a new turbidimetric assay for measuring HA with the current standard method. METHODS: HA was measured by a particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (PETIA) and enzyme...

  14. Identification of irradiated pepper with comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieto Miranda, Enrique Fco.; Moreno Alvarez, Damaris L.; Carro Palacio, Sandra [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnologicas y Desarrollo Nuclear. (CEADEN), Ciudad de La Habana (Cuba)]. E-mail: efprieto@ceaden.edu.cu; damaris@ceaden.edu.cu; Iglesia Enriquez, Isora [Instituto de Investigacion para la Industria Alimenticia (IIIA), Ciudad de La Habana (Cuba)

    2007-07-01

    The treatment of foods with ionizing radiations is a technological process utilized in order to increase the hygienic quality and the storage time of the foods. Several methods of detection of irradiated foods have been recommended. The comet assay of DNA is one fast and economical technique for the qualitative identification of irradiated foods. The objective of the present paper was to identify with the comet assay technique the modifications of the DNA molecule of irradiated pepper storage at environment and refrigeration temperatures and different post-irradiation times for different absorbed dose values, (0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 kGy). It was demonstrated that for the high absorbed dose values was observed a greater break into fragments of the DNA molecule, which shows the application of this technique for the identification of irradiated foods. (author)

  15. Evaluation of boron neutron capture effects in cell culture using sulforhodamine-B assay and a colony assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittig, A; Sauerwein, W; Pöller, F; Fuhrmann, C; Hideghéty, K; Streffer, C

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to find an in vitro method for determining the cytotoxicity of boronated drugs as well as their potential suitability for neutron capture therapy. The survival of human melanoma cells has been determined by a colony assay and the sulforhodamine-B assay after X-irradiation and irradiation with fast d(14) + Be-neutrons using the boronated compound borocaptate sodium (BSH). The cytotoxic effects of BSH have been studied using both methods. Under well-defined experimental conditions, and after a sufficient amount of time for the expression of radiation damage, the results of the sulforhodamine-B assay are qualitatively comparable with the results of the colony assay. The sulforhodamine-B assay is suitable for the screening of compounds for potential use in neutron capture therapy because it is a fast and efficient method that is reproducible and technically advantageous.

  16. Qualitative data in demography

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Qualitative methods and insights from other disciplines are increasingly integrated into demography’s traditionally quantitative toolkit. Whereas this is not problematic for multi-disciplinary research projects difficulties may arise when quantitatively trained demographers diversify to use less familiar data collection tools. We review the scale of this recent trend and the choice of qualitative methods typically employed by demographic researchers. Using insights from a comparative qualit...

  17. What Is Qualitative Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    The article is an in-depth explanation of qualitative research, an approach increasingly prevalent among today's research communities. After discussing its present spread within the health sciences, the author addresses: 1. Its definition. 2. Its characteristics, as well as its theoretical and procedural background. 3. Its procedures. 4. Differences between qualitative and quantitative approaches. 5. Mixed methods incorporating quantitative research. And in conclusion: 6. The importance of establishing an epistemological perspective in qualitative research.

  18. Global assays of fibrinolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilich, A; Bokarev, I; Key, N S

    2017-10-01

    Fibrinolysis is an important and integral part of the hemostatic system. Acting as a balance to blood coagulation, the fibrinolytic system protects the body from unwanted thrombus formation and occlusion of blood vessels. As long as blood coagulation and fibrinolysis remain in equilibrium, response to injury, such as vessel damage, is appropriately regulated. However, alterations in this balance may lead to thrombosis or bleeding. A variety of methods have been proposed to assess fibrinolytic activity in blood or its components, but due to the complexity of the system, the design of a "gold standard" assay that reflects overall fibrinolysis has remained an elusive goal. In this review, we describe the most commonly used methods that have been described, such as thromboelastography (TEG and ROTEM), global fibrinolytic capacity in plasma and whole blood, plasma turbidity methods, simultaneous thrombin and plasmin generation assays, euglobulin clot lysis time and fibrin plate methods. All of these assays have strengths and limitations. We suggest that some methods may be preferable for detecting hypofibrinolytic conditions, whereas others may be better for detecting hyperfibrinolytic states. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Qualitative research methods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sofaer, Shoshanna

    2002-01-01

    The use of rigorous qualitative research methods can enhance the development of quality measures, the development and dissemination of comparative quality reports, as well as quality improvement efforts...

  20. Overview of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossoehme, Daniel H

    2014-01-01

    Qualitative research methods are a robust tool for chaplaincy research questions. Similar to much of chaplaincy clinical care, qualitative research generally works with written texts, often transcriptions of individual interviews or focus group conversations and seeks to understand the meaning of experience in a study sample. This article describes three common methodologies: ethnography, grounded theory, and phenomenology. Issues to consider relating to the study sample, design, and analysis are discussed. Enhancing the validity of the data, as well reliability and ethical issues in qualitative research are described. Qualitative research is an accessible way for chaplains to contribute new knowledge about the sacred dimension of people's lived experience.

  1. A qualitative study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods. We conducted a cross-sectional qualitative study using .... qualitative data analysis. .... there was research being done on a new diagnostic test for ... understanding of the cultural and social issues affecting patients ... shared her sentiment that expatriate physicians are too ... they help Malawian students to network.

  2. Visualizing Qualitative Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slone, Debra J.

    2009-01-01

    The abundance of qualitative data in today's society and the need to easily scrutinize, digest, and share this information calls for effective visualization and analysis tools. Yet, no existing qualitative tools have the analytic power, visual effectiveness, and universality of familiar quantitative instruments like bar charts, scatter-plots, and…

  3. Radon assay for SNO+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumleskie, Janet [Laurentian University, Greater Sudbury, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-12-31

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

  4. Validity in Qualitative Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco Lub

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a discussion on the question of validity in qualitative evaluation. Although validity in qualitative inquiry has been widely reflected upon in the methodological literature (and is still often subject of debate, the link with evaluation research is underexplored. Elaborating on epistemological and theoretical conceptualizations by Guba and Lincoln and Creswell and Miller, the article explores aspects of validity of qualitative research with the explicit objective of connecting them with aspects of evaluation in social policy. It argues that different purposes of qualitative evaluations can be linked with different scientific paradigms and perspectives, thus transcending unproductive paradigmatic divisions as well as providing a flexible yet rigorous validity framework for researchers and reviewers of qualitative evaluations.

  5. 21 CFR 866.3980 - Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents... panel multiplex nucleic acid assay is a qualitative in vitro diagnostic device intended to...: Respiratory Viral Panel Multiplex Nucleic Acid Assay;” (2) For a device that detects and identifies Human...

  6. New Application of the Comet Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I.; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I.; Fernández, José Luís; López-Fernández, Carmen; Gosálbez, Altea; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    The comet assay is a well-established, simple, versatile, visual, rapid, and sensitive tool used extensively to assess DNA damage and DNA repair quantitatively and qualitatively in single cells. The comet assay is most frequently used to analyze white blood cells or lymphocytes in human biomonitoring studies, although other cell types have been examined, including buccal, nasal, epithelial, and placental cells and even spermatozoa. This study was conducted to design a protocol that can be used to generate comets in subnuclear units, such as chromosomes. The new technique is based on the chromosome isolation protocols currently used for whole chromosome mounting in electron microscopy, coupled to the alkaline variant of the comet assay, to detect DNA damage. The results show that migrant DNA fragments can be visualized in whole nuclei and isolated chromosomes and that they exhibit patterns of DNA migration that depend on the level of DNA damage produced. This protocol has great potential for the highly reproducible study of DNA damage and repair in specific chromosomal domains. PMID:21540337

  7. Evaluation of the IMMULITE® 2000 CMV IgM assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Tricia A; Armstrong, Glenn; Han, Xiang Y

    2012-02-29

    Diagnosis of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is challenging because of the high rate of asymptomatic infection and the low specificity of associated symptoms and signs. As a result, laboratory testing is an essential aid in making an accurate diagnosis. The presence of CMV IgM is indicative of primary CMV infection. In pregnancy, diagnosis of primary infection is important because primary maternal infection increases fetal infection risk substantially. Fetal infection can result in serious sequelae ranging from neurological deficits to death. Diagnosis among the immunocompromised is also critical for the timely initiation of therapy that can reduce morbidity and mortality risk. The IMMULITE® 2000 CMV IgM assay qualitatively detects CMV IgM antibodies in human serum or plasma to aid in the diagnosis of current or recent CMV infection. To determine expected values in apparently healthy subjects, 136 samples were tested. Reproducibility, normal range, and method comparison studies were also performed to evaluate the assay's performance. The assay's reproducibility was evaluated across three sites. Seven hundred and eighteen (n = 718) individual patient serum samples, which included samples from CMV IgM-positive (n = 109, determined by the Abbott IMx CMV or the Diamedix CMV IgM assays), pregnant (n = 210), HIV-positive (n = 30), immunosuppressed (n = 102), and transplant patients (n = 17) and from patients with potentially cross-reacting conditions (n = 136) were evaluated in the method comparison study. The positive, negative, and overall agreement between the IMMULITE 2000 CMV IgM assay and the VIDAS CMV IgM assay (predicate assay) were determined. The assay demonstrated excellent reproducibility with a total CV of less than 10%. The positive, negative, and overall agreement between the IMMULITE 2000 assay and the VIDAS assay were > 95% for the method comparison samples. Among potentially cross-reactive samples, the overall agreement between the two assays was 96

  8. Qualitative research in thanatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carverhill, Philip A

    2002-04-01

    A new research paradigm has been emerging which holds significant potential for the field of death studies. The qualitative project is a diverse collection of methodologies that focuses its interests on the words, narratives, and stories of individuals and groups. Part of its appeal may lie in the inherent closeness of fit between qualitative inquiry and applied work with the dying and the bereaved. The author introduces the individual articles in this special issue and outlines the development of the project as well as some current issues in qualitative research in thanatology.

  9. FLUIDICS DEVICE FOR ASSAY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device for use in performing assays on standard laboratory solid supports whereon chemical entities are attached. The invention furthermore relates to the use of such a device and a kit comprising such a device. The device according to the present invention...... is adapted to receive one or more replaceable solid support(s) (40) onto which chemical entities (41) are attached, said device comprising a base (1, 60, 80, 300, 400, 10, 70, 140, 20, 90, 120, 150, 30, 100), one or more inlet(s) (5), one or more outlet(s) (6). The base and the solid support (40) defines......, when operatively connected, one or more chambers (21) comprising the chemical entities (41), the inlet(s) (5) and outlet(s) (6) and chambers (21) being in fluid connection. The device further comprise means for providing differing chemical conditions in each chamber (21)....

  10. Survival assays using Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Eun H; Jung, Yoonji; Lee, Seung-Jae V

    2017-02-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is an important model organism with many useful features, including rapid development and aging, easy cultivation, and genetic tractability. Survival assays using C. elegans are powerful methods for studying physiological processes. In this review, we describe diverse types of C. elegans survival assays and discuss the aims, uses, and advantages of specific assays. C. elegans survival assays have played key roles in identifying novel genetic factors that regulate many aspects of animal physiology, such as aging and lifespan, stress response, and immunity against pathogens. Because many genetic factors discovered using C. elegans are evolutionarily conserved, survival assays can provide insights into mechanisms underlying physiological processes in mammals, including humans.

  11. Cell Proliferation and Cytotoxicity Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adan, Aysun; Kiraz, Yağmur; Baran, Yusuf

    Cell viability is defined as the number of healthy cells in a sample and proliferation of cells is a vital indicator for understanding the mechanisms in action of certain genes, proteins and pathways involved cell survival or death after exposing to toxic agents. Generally, methods used to determine viability are also common for the detection of cell proliferation. Cell cytotoxicity and proliferation assays are generally used for drug screening to detect whether the test molecules have effects on cell proliferation or display direct cytotoxic effects. Regardless of the type of cell-based assay being used, it is important to know how many viable cells are remaining at the end of the experiment. There are a variety of assay methods based on various cell functions such as enzyme activity, cell membrane permeability, cell adherence, ATP production, co-enzyme production, and nucleotide uptake activity. These methods could be basically classified into different categories: (I) dye exclusion methods such as trypan blue dye exclusion assay, (II) methods based on metabolic activity, (III) ATP assay, (IV) sulforhodamine B assay, (V) protease viability marker assay, (VI) clonogenic cell survival assay, (VII) DNA synthesis cell proliferation assays and (V) raman micro-spectroscopy. In order to choose the optimal viability assay, the cell type, applied culture conditions, and the specific questions being asked should be considered in detail. This particular review aims to provide an overview of common cell proliferation and cytotoxicity assays together with their own advantages and disadvantages, their methodologies, comparisons and intended purposes.

  12. Modelling qualitative Change

    OpenAIRE

    Pyka, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Modelling qualitative Change. - In: Handbook of research on nature-inspired computing for economics and management / Jean-Philippe Rennard. - Hershey, Pa [u.a.] : Idea Group Reference. - 1. (2007). - S. 211-224

  13. Qualitative Case Study Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    methods in public relations and marketing communications. New York, Routledge 166-185 13. Denzin , N. K. (1978) The Research Act: A Theoretical...Introduction to Sociological Methods. 2nd ed. New York, McGraw-Hill 14. Denzin , N. K. and Lincoln, Y. S. (2011) The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative...The Art of Science. In: Denzin , N. K. and Lincoln, Y. S. (eds.) Handbook of Qualitative Research. Thousand Oaks, Sage 19. GAO (1990) Case Study

  14. Qualitative Methods Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Moriarty, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    The social care evidence base reveals a distinct preference for qualitative methods covering a broad range of social care topics. This review provides an introduction to the different ways in which qualitative research has been used in social care and some of the reasons why it has been successful in identifying under-researched areas, in documenting the experiences of people using services, carers, and practitioners, and in evaluating new types of service or intervention. Examples of complet...

  15. Scaling Qualitative Probability

    OpenAIRE

    Burgin, Mark

    2017-01-01

    There are different approaches to qualitative probability, which includes subjective probability. We developed a representation of qualitative probability based on relational systems, which allows modeling uncertainty by probability structures and is more coherent than existing approaches. This setting makes it possible proving that any comparative probability is induced by some probability structure (Theorem 2.1), that classical probability is a probability structure (Theorem 2.2) and that i...

  16. Assay for calcium channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glossmann, H.; Ferry, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter focuses on biochemical assays for Ca/sup 2 +/-selective channels in electrically excitable membranes which are blocked in electrophysiological and pharmacological experiments by verapamil, 1,4-dihydropyridines, diltiazen (and various other drugs), as well as inorganic di- or trivalent cations. The strategy employed is to use radiolabeled 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives which block calcium channels with ED/sub 50/ values in the nanomolar range. Although tritiated d-cis-diltiazem and verapamil can be used to label calcium channels, the 1,4-dihydropyridines offer numerous advantages. The various sections cover tissue specificity of channel labeling, the complex interactions of divalent cations with the (/sup 3/H)nimodipine-labeled calcium channels, and the allosteric regulation of (/sup 3/H)nimodipine binding by the optically pure enantiomers of phenylalkylamine and benzothiazepine calcium channel blockers. A comparison of the properties of different tritiated 1,4-dihydropyridine radioligands and the iodinated channel probe (/sup 125/I)iodipine is given.

  17. Detection of Giardia lamblia Antigens in Human Fecal Specimens by a Solid-Phase Qualitative Immunochromatographic Assay▿

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Lynne S.; Garcia, John Paul

    2006-01-01

    The SIMPLE-READ Giardia rapid assay (Medical Chemical Corporation) is a solid-phase qualitative immunochromatographic assay that detects Giardia lamblia in aqueous extracts of human fecal specimens. Testing 106 Giardia-positive and 104 Giardia-negative stool specimens yielded a sensitivity of 97.2% and a specificity of 100% for the SIMPLE-READ Giardia rapid assay.

  18. Qualitative Assertions as Prescriptive Statements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolen, Amanda; Talbert, Tony

    2011-01-01

    The primary question regarding prescriptive appropriateness is a difficult one to answer for the qualitative researcher. While there are certainly qualitative researchers who have offered prescriptive protocols to better define and describe the terrain of qualitative research design and there are qualitative researchers who offer research…

  19. [Qualitative methods in psychiatric research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorski, Claudia; Glaesmer, Heide

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the usage of qualitative methods in psychiatric research and presents the qualitative approach in more detail. Recent original empirical work of a German psychiatric journal was systematically reviewed. Methods used to collect and analyse the information are detailed. One third of the articles used a solely qualitative research design. One further article applied a combination of quantitative and qualitative approaches. Three kinds of the qualitative interviews were used (in depth, narrative and problem-focussed interview). Additionally, focus groups (group discussions) and qualitative content analysis were applied by studies. Qualitative approaches are an integral part of psychiatric research. Further work should assure to use adequate sampling strategies.

  20. Sulforhodamine B assay and chemosensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Wieland

    2005-01-01

    The sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay was developed by Skehan and colleagues to measure drug-induced cytotoxicity and cell proliferation for large-scale drug-screening applications. Its principle is based on the ability of the protein dye sulforhodamine B to bind electrostatically and pH dependent on protein basic amino acid residues of trichloroacetic acid-fixed cells. Under mild acidic conditions it binds to and under mild basic conditions it can be extracted from cells and solubilized for measurement. Results of the SRB assay were linear with cell number and cellular protein measured at cellular densities ranging from 1 to 200% of confluence. Its sensitivity is comparable with that of several fluorescence assays and superior to that of Lowry or Bradford. The signal-to-noise ratio is favorable and the resolution is 1000-2000 cells/well. It performed similarly compared to other cytotoxicity assays such as MTT or clonogenic assay. The SRB assay possesses a colorimetric end point and is nondestructive and indefinitely stable. These practical advances make the SRB assay an appropriate and sensitive assay to measure drug-induced cytotoxicity even at large-scale application.

  1. Digital Assays Part II: Digital Protein and Cell Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Amar S

    2017-08-01

    A digital assay is one in which the sample is partitioned into many containers such that each partition contains a discrete number of biological entities (0, 1, 2, 3, . . .). A powerful technique in the biologist's toolkit, digital assays bring a new level of precision in quantifying nucleic acids, measuring proteins and their enzymatic activity, and probing single-cell genotype and phenotype. Where part I of this review focused on the fundamentals of partitioning and digital PCR, part II turns its attention to digital protein and cell assays. Digital enzyme assays measure the kinetics of single proteins with enzymatic activity. Digital enzyme-linked immunoassays (ELISAs) quantify antigenic proteins with 2 to 3 log lower detection limit than conventional ELISA, making them well suited for low-abundance biomarkers. Digital cell assays probe single-cell genotype and phenotype, including gene expression, intracellular and surface proteins, metabolic activity, cytotoxicity, and transcriptomes (scRNA-seq). These methods exploit partitioning to 1) isolate single cells or proteins, 2) detect their activity via enzymatic amplification, and 3) tag them individually by coencapsulating them with molecular barcodes. When scaled, digital assays reveal stochastic differences between proteins or cells within a population, a key to understanding biological heterogeneity. This review is intended to give a broad perspective to scientists interested in adopting digital assays into their workflows.

  2. Disagreement between Human Papillomavirus Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Preisler, Sarah; Ejegod, Ditte Møller

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the disagreement in primary cervical screening between four human papillomavirus assays: Hybrid Capture 2, cobas, CLART, and APTIMA. Material from 5,064 SurePath samples of women participating in routine cervical screening in Copenhagen, Denmark, was tested with the four...... of considerable disagreement between human papillomavirus assays. This suggested that the extent of disagreement in primary screening is neither population- nor storage media-specific, leaving assay design differences as the most probable cause. The substantially different selection of women testing positive...... on the various human papillomavirus assays represents an unexpected challenge for the choice of an assay in primary cervical screening, and for follow up of in particular HPV positive/cytology normal women....

  3. A Simple Assay for Measuring Catalase Activity: A Visual Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Tadayuki; Tajima, Akiko; Sugimoto, Shinya; Okuda, Ken-ichi; Hironaka, Ippei; Kamata, Yuko; Takada, Koji; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu

    2013-01-01

    In this study, an assay that combines the ease and simplicity of the qualitative approach for measuring catalase activity was developed. The assay reagents comprised only hydrogen peroxide and Triton X-100. The enzyme-generated oxygen bubbles trapped by Triton X-100 were visualized as foam, whose height was estimated. A calibration plot using the defined unit of catalase activity yielded the best linear fit over a range of 20–300 units (U) (y = 0.3794x − 2.0909, r2 = 0.993). The assay precision and reproducibility at 100 U were 4.6% and 4.8%, respectively. The applicability of the assay for measuring the catalase activity of various samples was assessed using laboratory strains of Escherichia coli, catalase-deficient isogenic mutants, clinically isolated Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, and human cells. The assay generated reproducible results. In conclusion, this new assay can be used to measure the catalase activity of bacterial isolates and human cells. PMID:24170119

  4. Disciplining Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzin, Norman K.; Lincoln, Yvonna S.; Giardina, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    Qualitative research exists in a time of global uncertainty. Around the world, governments are attempting to regulate scientific inquiry by defining what counts as "good" science. These regulatory activities raise fundamental, philosophical epistemological, political and pedagogical issues for scholarship and freedom of speech in the…

  5. A Qualitative Study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Henry D. Mason is a registered Research Psychologist and a social science researcher at the Tshwane. University of Technology ... Keywords academic stress; coping; meaning; psychological stress; qualitative research. Introduction ...... The happiness hypothesis: Finding modern truth in ancient wisdom. New York, N.Y.: ...

  6. A qualitative study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    feedback were positive motivators at community and individual levels. “We also feel well appreciated by the people we help, and this encourages us to continue doing our work. This appreciation makes us feel proud that we are doing a good job.” (FGD, male HSA, Mchinji). Discussion. This is the first study to use qualitative ...

  7. Qualitative Research in Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fattah Hanurawan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Qualitative  research  is  a  research  method    studying  subjective meaning of participant’s world about  an object researched. Steps of qualitative research  in  psychology  are:  researchers  select  research  topic,  researchers formulate  research  questions,  researchers  design  the  study,  researchers  collect data, researchers analyses  data,  researchers  generate  findings,  researchers validate findings, and researchers write research report. Some of the qualitative research  designs  are  grounded  research,  phenomenology  research,  case  study research,  and  ethnography  research.  In  some  situations,  researchers  often  meet questions  that  reach  beyond  the  prescription  of  the  APA  ethical  guidelines concerning  human  participants.  Researchers  of  qualitative  research  in psychology  can  generalize  their  research  findings  to  other  people,  times,  or treatments  to  the  degree  to  which  they  are  similar to  other  people,  times,  or treatments in the original research (naturalistic generalization. There are some strategies  for  expanding  qualitative  research  as  a research  approach  so  the methodology  can  be  accepted  as  one  significant  method  in  understanding psychological phenomena. Keywords:qualitative research, psychology.

  8. Biological assays in microfabricated structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Daniel M.; Fare, Thomas L.; Dong, Qianping; Fan, Z. Hugh; Davis, Timothy J.; Kumar, Rajan

    1999-04-01

    Microfluidic control in microfabricated glass channels enables miniaturized, fast, and multianalyte assays. We are applying this technology in several areas, including real- time environmental monitoring for airborne biological agents. Two complementary approaches are being used in parallel. the first is assaying for the presence of nucleotide sequences that are markers for specific hazardous, engineered bacteria. The second is an assay that monitors the functionality of an in vitro biochemical pathway, in which the pathway that is chosen is sensitive to the presence of the class of toxins to be detected. The first approach is discussed here. The detected signal from the nucleic-acid-based assay is from fluorescently labeled probes that hybridize to bead-bound amplified DNA sequences. Detection approaches and their benefits will be discussed.

  9. Qualitative Value Profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus, Henrik Johannsen; Bjerre, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative value profiling (QVP) is a relatively unknown method of strategic analysis for companies in international business-to-business settings. The purpose of QVP is to reduce the information complexity that is faced by international companies in dealing with business partners. The QVP method...... and consequently, for the advancement of international development. Further use of QVP is recommended and suggestions for future research are provided....

  10. Microtiter dish biofilm formation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, George A

    2011-01-30

    Biofilms are communities of microbes attached to surfaces, which can be found in medical, industrial and natural settings. In fact, life in a biofilm probably represents the predominate mode of growth for microbes in most environments. Mature biofilms have a few distinct characteristics. Biofilm microbes are typically surrounded by an extracellular matrix that provides structure and protection to the community. Microbes growing in a biofilm also have a characteristic architecture generally comprised of macrocolonies (containing thousands of cells) surrounded by fluid-filled channels. Biofilm-grown microbes are also notorious for their resistance to a range of antimicrobial agents including clinically relevant antibiotics. The microtiter dish assay is an important tool for the study of the early stages in biofilm formation, and has been applied primarily for the study of bacterial biofilms, although this assay has also been used to study fungal biofilm formation. Because this assay uses static, batch-growth conditions, it does not allow for the formation of the mature biofilms typically associated with flow cell systems. However, the assay has been effective at identifying many factors required for initiation of biofilm formation (i.e, flagella, pili, adhesins, enzymes involved in cyclic-di-GMP binding and metabolism) and well as genes involved in extracellular polysaccharide production. Furthermore, published work indicates that biofilms grown in microtiter dishes do develop some properties of mature biofilms, such a antibiotic tolerance and resistance to immune system effectors. This simple microtiter dish assay allows for the formation of a biofilm on the wall and/or bottom of a microtiter dish. The high throughput nature of the assay makes it useful for genetic screens, as well as testing biofilm formation by multiple strains under various growth conditions. Variants of this assay have been used to assess early biofilm formation for a wide variety of microbes

  11. Qualitative methodology in developmental psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demuth, Carolin; Mey, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative methodology presently is gaining increasing recognition in developmental psychology. Although the founders of developmental psychology to a large extent already used qualitative procedures, the field was long dominated by a (post) positivistic quantitative paradigm. The increasing...

  12. Qualitative Studies in Information Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarker, Suprateek; Xiao, Xiao; Beaulieu, Tanya

    2013-01-01

    The authors discuss a review of qualitative papers on information systems (IS) published in various journals between 2001 and 2012. They explain trends related to qualitative research in the chosen journals and the key anatomical components of a qualitative research manuscript, including...

  13. Correlation between the genotoxicity endpoints measured by two different genotoxicity assays: comet assay and CBMN assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Ladeira

    2015-06-01

    The results concerning of positive findings by micronuclei and non significant ones by comet assay, are corroborated by Deng et al. (2005 study performed in workers occupationally exposed to methotrexate, also a cytostatic drug. According to Cavallo et al. (2009, the comet assay seems to be more suitable for the prompt evaluation of the genotoxic effects, for instance, of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons mixtures containing volatile substances, whereas the micronucleus test seems more appropriate to evaluate the effects of exposure to antineoplastic agents. However, there are studies that observed an increase in both the comet assay and the micronucleus test in nurses handling antineoplastic drugs, although statistical significance was only seen in the comet assay, quite the opposite of our results (Maluf & Erdtmann, 2000; Laffon et al. 2005.

  14. The Qualitative Expectations Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydman, Roman; Johansen, Søren; Rahbek, Anders

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the Qualitative Expectations Hypothesis (QEH) as a new approach to modeling macroeconomic and financial outcomes. Building on John Muth's seminal insight underpinning the Rational Expectations Hypothesis (REH), QEH represents the market's forecasts to be consistent with the predictions...... of an economistís model. However, by assuming that outcomes lie within stochastic intervals, QEH, unlike REH, recognizes the ambiguity faced by an economist and market participants alike. Moreover, QEH leaves the model open to ambiguity by not specifying a mechanism determining specific values that outcomes take...

  15. The Qualitative Expectations Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydman, Roman; Johansen, Søren; Rahbek, Anders

    We introduce the Qualitative Expectations Hypothesis (QEH) as a new approach to modeling macroeconomic and financial outcomes. Building on John Muth's seminal insight underpinning the Rational Expectations Hypothesis (REH), QEH represents the market's forecasts to be consistent with the predictions...... of an economist's model. However, by assuming that outcomes lie within stochastic intervals, QEH, unlike REH, recognizes the ambiguity faced by an economist and market participants alike. Moreover, QEH leaves the model open to ambiguity by not specifying a mechanism determining specific values that outcomes take...

  16. Activity Assays for Rhomboid Proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunova, E; Strisovsky, K; Lemieux, M J

    2017-01-01

    Rhomboids are ubiquitous intramembrane serine proteases that are involved in various signaling pathways. This fascinating class of proteases harbors an active site buried within the lipid milieu. High-resolution structures of the Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG with various inhibitors revealed the catalytic mechanism for rhomboid-mediated proteolysis; however, a quantitative characterization was lacking. Assessing an enzyme's catalytic parameters is important for understanding the details of its proteolytic reaction and regulatory mechanisms. To assay rhomboid protease activity, many challenges exist such as the lipid environment and lack of known substrates. Here, we summarize various enzymatic assays developed over the last decade to study rhomboid protease activity. We present detailed protocols for gel-shift and FRET-based assays, and calculation of KM and Vmax to measure catalytic parameters, using detergent solubilized rhomboids with TatA, the only known substrate for bacterial rhomboids, and the model substrate fluorescently labeled casein. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Entropy Is Simple, Qualitatively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Frank L.

    2002-10-01

    Qualitatively, entropy is simple. What it is, why it is useful in understanding the behavior of macro systems or of molecular systems is easy to state: Entropy increase from a macro viewpoint is a measure of the dispersal of energy from localized to spread out at a temperature T. The conventional q in qrev/T is the energy dispersed to or from a substance or a system. On a molecular basis, entropy increase means that a system changes from having fewer accessible microstates to having a larger number of accessible microstates. Fundamentally based on statistical and quantum mechanics, this approach is superior to the non-fundamental "disorder" as a descriptor of entropy change. The foregoing in no way denies the subtlety or the difficulty presented by entropy in thermodynamics—to first-year students or to professionals. However, as an aid to beginners in their quantitative study of thermodynamics, the qualitative conclusions in this article give students the advantage of a clear bird’s-eye view of why entropy increases in a wide variety of basic cases: a substance going from 0 K to T, phase change, gas expansion, mixing of ideal gases or liquids, colligative effects, and the Gibbs equation. See Letter re: this article.

  18. A Qualitative Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L. Ackerman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. No in-depth qualitative research exists about the effects of therapeutic massage with children hospitalized to undergo hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT. The objective of this study is to describe parent caregivers' experience of the effects of massage/acupressure for their children undergoing HCT. Methods. We conducted a qualitative analysis of open-ended interviews with 15 parents of children in the intervention arm of a massage/acupressure trial. Children received both practitioner and parent-provided massage/acupressure. Results. Parents reported that their child experienced relief from pain and nausea, relaxation, and greater ease falling asleep. They also reported increased caregiver competence and closeness with their child as a result of learning and performing massage/acupressure. Parents supported a semistandardized massage protocol. Conclusion. Massage/acupressure may support symptom relief and promote relaxation and sleep among pediatric HCT patients if administered with attention to individual patients' needs and hospital routines and may relieve stress among parents, improve caregiver competence, and enhance the sense of connection between parent and child.

  19. Ethics and the practice of qualitative research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, Ian Frank

    2016-01-01

    Ethics and the practice of qualitative research? Qualitative Social Work 7 (4): 400-414. Reprinted......Ethics and the practice of qualitative research? Qualitative Social Work 7 (4): 400-414. Reprinted...

  20. Chromosome aberration assays in Allium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, W.F.

    1982-01-01

    The common onion (Allium cepa) is an excellent plant for the assay of chromosome aberrations after chemical treatment. Other species of Allium (A. cepa var. proliferum, A. carinatum, A. fistulosum and A. sativum) have also been used but to a much lesser extent. Protocols have been given for using root tips from either bulbs or seeds of Allium cepa to study the cytological end-points, such as chromosome breaks and exchanges, which follow the testing of chemicals in somatic cells. It is considered that both mitotic and meiotic end-points should be used to a greater extent in assaying the cytogenetic effects of a chemical. From a literature survey, 148 chemicals are tabulated that have been assayed in 164 Allium tests for their clastogenic effect. Of the 164 assays which have been carried out, 75 are reported as giving a positive reaction, 49 positive and with a dose response, 1 positive and temperature-related, 9 borderline positive, and 30 negative; 76% of the chemicals gave a definite positive response. It is proposed that the Allium test be included among those tests routinely used for assessing chromosomal damage induced by chemicals.

  1. Qualitative experiments in psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagoner, Brady

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I explore the meaning of experiments in early twentieth century psychology, focusing on the qualitative experimental methodology of psychologist Frederic BARTLETT. I begin by contextualizing BARTLETT's experiments within the continental research tradition of his time, which...... was in a state of transition from a focus on elements (the concern of psychophysics) to a focus on wholes (the concern of Gestalt psychology). The defining feature of BARTLETT's early experiments is his holistic treatment of human responses, in which the basic unit of analysis is the active person relating...... to some material within the constraints of a social and material context. This manifests itself in a number of methodological principles that contrast with contemporary understandings of experimentation in psychology. The contrast is further explored by reviewing the history of "replications...

  2. Situating methodology within qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer-Kile, Marnie L

    2012-01-01

    Qualitative nurse researchers are required to make deliberate and sometimes complex methodological decisions about their work. Methodology in qualitative research is a comprehensive approach in which theory (ideas) and method (doing) are brought into close alignment. It can be difficult, at times, to understand the concept of methodology. The purpose of this research column is to: (1) define qualitative methodology; (2) illuminate the relationship between epistemology, ontology and methodology; (3) explicate the connection between theory and method in qualitative research design; and 4) highlight relevant examples of methodological decisions made within cardiovascular nursing research. Although there is no "one set way" to do qualitative research, all qualitative researchers should account for the choices they make throughout the research process and articulate their methodological decision-making along the way.

  3. Definition of human rotavirus serotypes by plaque reduction assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, R G; Greenberg, H B; James, W D; Pittman, A L; Kalica, A R; Flores, J; Chanock, R M; Kapikian, A Z

    1982-07-01

    Twenty different human rotavirus reassortants were characterized serologically by a plaque reduction assay as belonging to one of three distinct serotypes. Fourteen were similar if not identical to our prototype Wa strain; two were like the prototype DS-1 strain, and four belonged to a third serotype for which a prototype has not yet been selected. Hyperimmune sera raised against the three serotypes were required to distinguish among them, since postinfection sera had lower titers and were more cross-reactive than hyperimmune sera. These results confirmed the ability of a qualitative cytopathic neutralization test to predict correctly the Wa or DS-1 serotype. A strain of rhesus rotavirus (MMU 18006) was identified as belonging to the newly defined third serotype. Finally, an attempt was made to correlate previously published serotype analysis by neutralization of fluorescent cell-forming units with the results determined by the plaque reduction neutralization assay.

  4. Qualitative methods in travel surveys

    OpenAIRE

    HANNES, Els; Janssens, Davy; Wets, Geert

    2009-01-01

    This chapter explains the added value of integrating qualitative methods in travel surveys. The introduction briefly frames some general aspects of qualitative research. Distinct steps in a research process structure the remainder of this chapter. First, questions and contexts most applicable for qualitative methods are addressed. Next, its actual use, role and timing in travel surveys are discussed. Sampling and data collection issues are treated subsequently, followed by a brief account on ...

  5. CAQDAS and Qualitative Research Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Grzegorz Bryda

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is methodological reflection on dialectical relationship between the qualitative research process and the process of computer-assisted qualitative data analysis. Basing on many years of experience in the work with various CAQDAS tools, the author tries to show the impact they have on shifting the way of thinking on methodology, the process of data analysis and conducting qualitative research. The specificity of CAQDAS usage in research practice requires methodologi...

  6. Common Perspectives in Qualitative Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Marie

    2016-07-01

    The primary purpose of this column is to focus on several common core concepts that are foundational to qualitative research. Discussion of these concepts is at an introductory level and is designed to raise awareness and understanding of several conceptual foundations that undergird qualitative research. Because of the variety of qualitative approaches, not all concepts are relevant to every design and tradition. However, foundational aspects were selected for highlighting.

  7. Detection and identification of aquatic birnaviruses by PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, S L; Schill, W B; McAllister, P E; Lee, M K; Singer, J T; Nicholson, B L

    1995-04-01

    A reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was developed for the detection and identification of aquatic birnaviruses. The four sets of primers (PrA, PrB, PrC, and PrD) that we used are specific for regions of cDNA coded by genome segment A of aquatic birnaviruses. PrA identifies a large fragment (1,180 bp) within the pVP2-coding region, and PrB identifies a 524-bp fragment within the sequence amplified by PrA. Primer set PrC frames a genome fragment (339 bp) within the NS-VP3-coding region, and PrD identifies a 174-bp sequence within the fragment identified by PrC. PrB and PrD amplified cDNAs from all nine recognized serotypes of aquatic birnavirus serogroup A as well as the N1 isolate that may represent a 10th serotype. These results indicate that these three primer sequences are highly conserved and can be used in PCR assays for group identification of these viruses. PrA routinely produced amplification products from eight serotypes but exhibited variable results with one serotype, and primer PrC identified 6 of the 11 virus isolates tested. The qualitative sensitivity of the RT-PCR assay was evaluated by comparison of the results with those of cell culture isolation assays. With the exception of one sample, the RT-PCR assay with primer PrD was as accurate as cell culture isolation for detecting virus in kidney and spleen tissues from naturally infected, asymptomatic carrier fish. These results indicate that the RT-PCR assay can be a rapid and reliable substitute for cell culture methods for the detection of aquatic birnaviruses.

  8. Lateral flow (immuno) assay : its strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. A literature survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posthuma-Trumpie, Geertruida A.; Korf, Jakob; van Amerongen, Aart

    Lateral flow (immuno) assays are currently used for qualitative, semiquantitative and to some extent quantitative monitoring in resource-poor or non-laboratory environments. Applications include tests on pathogens, drugs, hormones and metabolites in biomedical, phytosanitary, veterinary, feed/food

  9. Lateral flow (immuno)assay: its strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. A literature survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posthuma-Trumpie, G.A.; Korf, J.; Amerongen, van A.

    2009-01-01

    Lateral flow (immuno)assays are currently used for qualitative, semiquantitative and to some extent quantitative monitoring in resource-poor or non-laboratory environments. Applications include tests on pathogens, drugs, hormones and metabolites in biomedical, phytosanitary, veterinary, feed/food

  10. Mentoring Qualitative Research Authors Globally: "The Qualitative Report" Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenail, Ronald J.; St. George, Sally; Wulff, Dan; Duffy, Maureen; Laughlin, Martha; Warner, Kate; Sahni, Tarmeen

    2007-01-01

    Authoring quality qualitative inquiry is a challenge for most researchers. A lack of local mentors can make writing even more difficult. To meet this need, The "Qualitative Report (TQR)" has helped authors from around the world develop their papers into published articles. "TQR" editorial team members will discuss the history of the journal, their…

  11. Analytical and Clinical Validation of the Immulite 1000 hCG Assay for Quantitative Analysis in Urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cate, Frances L.; Moffett, Courtney; Gronowski, Ann M.; Grenache, David G.; Hartmann, Katherine E.; Woodworth, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Background The Siemens Immulite hCG assay detects all major hCG variants in serum. Currently, this assay is only FDA approved for qualitative measurement of hCG in urine. Methods Complete validation of the hCG assay in urine was performed on the Siemens Immulite 1000 immunoassay platform. Reference intervals were established for females hCG assay was precise for measuring hCG in urine from pregnant patients with intra- and inter-assay imprecision of hCG and hCGβ respectively. The assay was non-linear for hCGβcf. No hook effect was observed at concentrations up to 1,200,000 pmol/l, for hCGβ or hCGβcf. The reference intervals were hCG assay can accurately quantify hCG in urine. PMID:23470427

  12. Comet Assay in Cancer Chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Raffaela; Ferraiuolo, Maria; Morgano, Gian Paolo; Muti, Paola; Strano, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    The comet assay can be useful in monitoring DNA damage in single cells caused by exposure to genotoxic agents, such as those causing air, water, and soil pollution (e.g., pesticides, dioxins, electromagnetic fields) and chemo- and radiotherapy in cancer patients, or in the assessment of genoprotective effects of chemopreventive molecules. Therefore, it has particular importance in the fields of pharmacology and toxicology, and in both environmental and human biomonitoring. It allows the detection of single strand breaks as well as double-strand breaks and can be used in both normal and cancer cells. Here we describe the alkali method for comet assay, which allows to detect both single- and double-strand DNA breaks.

  13. Protein binding assay for hyaluronate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, B.E.; Underhill, C.B.

    1986-11-01

    A relatively quick and simple assay for hyaluronate was developed using the specific binding protein, hyaluronectin. The hyaluronectin was obtained by homogenizing the brains of Sprague-Dawley rats, and then centrifuging the homogenate. The resulting supernatant was used as a source of crude hyaluronectin. In the binding assay, the hyaluronectin was mixed with (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate, followed by an equal volume of saturated (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, which precipitated the hyaluronectin and any (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate associated with it, but left free (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in solution. The mixture was then centrifuged, and the amount of bound (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in the precipitate was determined. Using this assay, the authors found that hyaluronectin specifically bound hyaluronate, since other glycosaminoglycans failed to compete for the binding protein. In addition, the interaction between hyaluronectin and hyaluronate was of relatively high affinity, and the size of the hyaluronate did not appear to substantially alter the amount of binding. To determine the amount of hyaluronate in an unknown sample, they used a competition assay in which the binding of a set amount of (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate was blocked by the addition of unlabeled hyaluronate. By comparing the degree of competition of the unknown samples with that of known amounts of hyaluronate, it was possible to determine the amount of hyaluronate in the unknowns. They have found that this method is sensitive to 1 ..mu..g or less of hyaluronate, and is unaffected by the presence of proteins.

  14. World Health Organization International Standard To Harmonize Assays for Detection of Mycoplasma DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nübling, C Micha; Baylis, Sally A; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Montag-Lessing, Thomas; Chudy, Michael; Kreß, Julia; Ulrych, Ursula; Czurda, Stefan; Rosengarten, Renate

    2015-09-01

    Nucleic acid amplification technique (NAT)-based assays (referred to here as NAT assays) are increasingly used as an alternative to culture-based approaches for the detection of mycoplasma contamination of cell cultures. Assay features, like the limit of detection or quantification, vary widely between different mycoplasma NAT assays. Biological reference materials may be useful for harmonization of mycoplasma NAT assays. An international feasibility study included lyophilized preparations of four distantly related mycoplasma species (Acholeplasma laidlawii, Mycoplasma fermentans, M. orale, M. pneumoniae) at different concentrations which were analyzed by 21 laboratories using 26 NAT assays with a qualitative, semiquantitative, or quantitative design. An M. fermentans preparation was shown to decrease the interassay variation when used as a common reference material. The preparation was remanufactured and characterized in a comparability study, and its potency (in NAT-detectable units) across different NATs was determined. The World Health Organization (WHO) Expert Committee on Biological Standardization (ECBS) established this preparation to be the "1st World Health Organization international standard for mycoplasma DNA for nucleic acid amplification technique-based assays designed for generic mycoplasma detection" (WHO Tech Rep Ser 987:42, 2014) with a potency of 200,000 IU/ml. This WHO international standard is now available as a reference preparation for characterization of NAT assays, e.g., for determination of analytic sensitivity, for calibration of quantitative assays in a common unitage, and for defining regulatory requirements in the field of mycoplasma testing. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Qualitative data collection with children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratling, Regena; Coke, Sallie; Minick, Ptlene

    2012-02-01

    Qualitative researchers have clear methods to guide them in data collection with adult participants, but little is known about effective interview techniques with children. The findings from this methodological study on qualitative interviews with children indicate that children are able to articulate their experiences in interviews. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Qualitative Analysis of Somitogenesis Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maschke-Dutz E.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Although recently the properties of a single somite cell oscillator have been intensively investigated, the system-level nature of the segmentation clock remains largely unknown. To elaborate qualitatively this question, we examine the possibility to transform a well-known time delay somite cell oscillator to dynamical system of differential equations allowing qualitative analysis.

  17. CAQDAS and Qualitative Research Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Bryda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is methodological reflection on dialectical relationship between the qualitative research process and the process of computer-assisted qualitative data analysis. Basing on many years of experience in the work with various CAQDAS tools, the author tries to show the impact they have on shifting the way of thinking on methodology, the process of data analysis and conducting qualitative research. The specificity of CAQDAS usage in research practice requires methodological rigor in the process of collection and archiving of data, as well as the accuracy and precision in the process of coding, analyzing, and visualizing data. The use of computer-aided analysis of qualitative data in research practice not only shapes a framework for the sociological interpretation but also changes the way of perceiving research problems. The essence of this process is a specific interaction between new technologies and traditional methodology, data analysis, and qualitative research. In this sense, the use of CAQDAS in qualitative research practice is shaping the personality and identity of qualitative researcher, his/her style of work, data analysis, and conducting the fieldwork; it develops his or her new analytical and computer skills without which it is difficult to imagine a modern qualitative sociological research.

  18. Development of a Fibrinogen-Specific Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Microarray Assay for Distinguishing Between Blood Plasma and Serum Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzales, Rachel M.; Zhang, Qibin; Zangar, Richard C.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2011-07-01

    We have developed a fibrinogen-specific sandwich ELISA microarray assay for use in qualitatively distinguishing between blood plasma and serum samples. Three capture antibodies, 49D2, HPA001900, and F8512, were evaluated in conjunction with 1D6 as detection antibody, and the data show that 49D2 and, to a lesser extent, F8512 successfully identify previously unknown plasma and serum samples based upon a ~28-fold difference in signal intensity between the sample types. This assay has utility in rapidly identifying previously archived clinical samples with incomplete annotation in a high throughput manner prior to proteomics analyses.

  19. Positivism and qualitative nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, J

    2001-01-01

    Despite the hostility to positivism shown by qualitative methodologists in nursing, as in other disciplines, the epistemological and ontological instincts of qualitative researchers seem to coincide with those of the positivists, especially Bayesian positivists. This article suggests that positivists and qualitative researchers alike are pro-observation, proinduction, pro-plausibility and pro-subjectivity. They are also anti-cause, anti-realist, anti-explanation, anti-correspondence, anti-truth. In only one respect is there a significant difference between positivist and qualitative methodologists: most positivists have believed that, methodologically, the natural sciences and the social sciences are the same; most qualitative researchers are adamant that they are not. However, if positivism fails as a philosophy of the natural sciences (which it probably does), it might well succeed as a philosophy of the social sciences, just because there is a methodological watershed between the two. Reflex antagonism to positivism might therefore be a major obstacle to understanding the real reasons why qualitative research and the natural sciences are methodologically divergent; and less hostility on the part of qualitative nurse researchers might bring certain advantages in its wake.

  20. Quality assurance of qualitative analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ríos, Ángel; Barceló, Damiá; Buydens, Lutgarde

    2003-01-01

    The European Commission has supported the G6MA-CT-2000-01012 project on "Metrology of Qualitative Chemical Analysis" (MEQUALAN), which was developed during 2000-2002. The final result is a document produced by a group of scientists with expertise in different areas of chemical analysis, metrology...... and quality assurance. One important part of this document deals, therefore, with aspects involved in analytical quality assurance of qualitative analysis. This article shows the main conclusions reported in the document referring to the implementation of quality principles in qualitative analysis...

  1. Qualitative tools and experimental philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andow, James

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Experimental philosophy brings empirical methods to philosophy. These methods are used to probe how people think about philosophically interesting things such as knowledge, morality, and freedom. This paper explores the contribution that qualitative methods have to make in this enterprise. I argue that qualitative methods have the potential to make a much greater contribution than they have so far. Along the way, I acknowledge a few types of resistance that proponents of qualitative methods in experimental philosophy might encounter, and provide reasons to think they are ill-founded. PMID:28392629

  2. Introduction: Qualitative Research in Criminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Meuser

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper begins with a brief overview of research traditions that paved the way for qualitative methods in criminological research (labeling approach and critical criminology. In addition, it outlines recent trends in qualitative criminology. The potentials and the limits of a perspective of "understanding from within" ("Verstehen" on deviance and social control are discussed. The contributions to the volume—examples of qualitative criminological research from German speaking countries—are introduced in reference to some current trends of conceptual and methodological discussions in criminology. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0201129

  3. Mixing quantitative with qualitative methods:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Ann; Viller, Stephen; Heck, Tamara

    2017-01-01

    with or are considering, researching, or working with both quantitative and qualitative evaluation methods (in academia or industry), join us in this workshop. In particular, we look at adding quantitative to qualitative methods to build a whole picture of user experience. We see a need to discuss both quantitative...... and qualitative research because there is often a perceived lack of understanding of the rigor involved in each. The workshop will result in a White Paper on the latest developments in this field, within Australia and comparative with international work. We anticipate sharing submissions and workshop outcomes...

  4. Qualitative Methodology in Unfamiliar Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Christian Franklin

    2014-01-01

    This case study discusses qualitative fieldwork in Malaysia. The trends in higher education led to investigating how and why young Indians and Chinese in Malaysia are using the university to pursue a life strategy. Given the importance of field context in designing and analysing research based...... on a qualitative methodology, conscious reflection on research design and objectivity is important when doing fieldwork. This case study discusses such reflections. Emphasis throughout is given to applied qualitative methodology and its contributions to the social sciences, in particular having to do...

  5. Antioxidants and the Comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cemeli, Eduardo; Baumgartner, Adolf; Anderson, Diana

    2009-01-01

    It is widely accepted that antioxidants, either endogenous or from the diet, play a key role in preserving health. They are able to quench radical species generated in situations of oxidative stress, either triggered by pathologies or xenobiotics, and they protect the integrity of DNA from genotoxicants. Nevertheless, there are still many compounds with unclear or unidentified prooxidant/antioxidant activities. This is of concern since there is an increase in the number of compounds synthesized or extracted from vegetables to which humans might be exposed. Despite the well-established protective effects of fruit and vegetables, the antioxidant(s) responsible have not all been clearly identified. There might also be alternative mechanisms contributing to the protective effects for which a comprehensive description is lacking. In the last two decades, the Comet assay has been extensively used for the investigation of the effects of antioxidants and many reports can be found in the literature. The Comet assay, a relatively fast, simple, and sensitive technique for the analysis of DNA damage in all cell types, has been applied for the screening of chemicals, biomonitoring and intervention studies. In the present review, several of the most well-known antioxidants are considered. These include: catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, selenium, iron chelators, melatonin, melanin, vitamins (A, B, C and E), carotenes, flavonoids, isoflavones, tea polyphenols, wine polyphenols and synthetic antioxidants. Investigations showing beneficial as well as non-beneficial properties of the antioxidants selected, either at the in vitro, ex vivo or in vivo level are discussed.

  6. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, R.; Chen, M.; Chkvorets, O.; Hallman, D.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.

    2011-04-01

    We describe the R&D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O2, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed "natural" radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.

  7. Reporter Gene Assays in Ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elad, Tal; Belkin, Shimshon

    The need for simple and rapid means for evaluating the potential toxic effects of environmental samples has prompted the development of reporter gene assays, based on tester cells (bioreporters) genetically engineered to report on sample toxicity by producing a readily quantifiable signal. Bacteria are especially suitable to serve as bioreporters owing to their fast responses, low cost, convenient preservation, ease of handling, and amenability to genetic manipulations. Various bacterial bioreporters have been introduced for general toxicity and genotoxicity assessment, and the monitoring of endocrine disrupting and dioxin-like compounds has been mostly covered by similarly engineered eukaryotic cells. Some reporter gene assays have been validated, standardized, and accredited, and many others are under constant development. Efforts are aimed at broadening detection spectra, lowering detection thresholds, and combining toxicity identification capabilities with characterization of the toxic effects. Taking advantage of bacterial robustness, attempts are also being made to incorporate bacterial bioreporters into field instrumentation for online continuous monitoring or on-site spot checks. However, key hurdles concerning test validation, cell preservation, and regulatory issues related to the use of genetically modified organisms still remain to be overcome.

  8. A comparison of quantitative and qualitative superoxide dismutase assays for application to low temperature microalgae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janknegt, P.J.; Rijstenbil, J.W.; van de Poll, W.H.; Gechev, T.S.; Buma, A.G.J.

    2007-01-01

    Antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) play a key role in the removal of reactive oxygen species produced during visible and ultraviolet irradiance stress in microalgae and plants. However, little is known about the enzymatic antioxidative stress responses in ecologically important

  9. Development of a Rapid Qualitative Assay for Determining Elevated Antibody Levels to Periodontopathic Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    antibody to several species of Nocardia in an attempt to ease diagnosis of the disease. They found that 100% of sera from patients with confirmed...Identification of a common immunodominant protein in culture filtrates of.hree Nocardia species and use in etiologic diagnosis of mycetoma. J. Clin

  10. Fuzzy-logic based strategy for validation of multiplex methods: example with qualitative GMO assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellocchi, Gianni; Bertholet, Vincent; Hamels, Sandrine; Moens, W; Remacle, José; Van den Eede, Guy

    2010-02-01

    This paper illustrates the advantages that a fuzzy-based aggregation method could bring into the validation of a multiplex method for GMO detection (DualChip GMO kit, Eppendorf). Guidelines for validation of chemical, bio-chemical, pharmaceutical and genetic methods have been developed and ad hoc validation statistics are available and routinely used, for in-house and inter-laboratory testing, and decision-making. Fuzzy logic allows summarising the information obtained by independent validation statistics into one synthetic indicator of overall method performance. The microarray technology, introduced for simultaneous identification of multiple GMOs, poses specific validation issues (patterns of performance for a variety of GMOs at different concentrations). A fuzzy-based indicator for overall evaluation is illustrated in this paper, and applied to validation data for different genetically modified elements. Remarks were drawn on the analytical results. The fuzzy-logic based rules were shown to be applicable to improve interpretation of results and facilitate overall evaluation of the multiplex method.

  11. Teaching Qualitative Geography: A JGHE Written Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Roger

    1992-01-01

    Reviews the recent growth of interest in qualitative geography. Discusses whether or not qualitative research can be accepted on the same scholarly level as quantitative research. Contends that qualitative methodology has much to offer geography and geography instruction. (CFR)

  12. THE RIVALRY BETWEEN QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Rivarly, Quantitative, Qualitative, Research, Mutual co-existence,. Complementary .... feelings and actions. Researchers. Nwankwo, I. U. – The Rivalry Between Quuantitative and Qualitative Techniques in Sociological Research: ... The features of qualitative design derive from its aims, supporting arguments and.

  13. Qualitative Forschung in der Technikpsychologie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schraube, Ernst; Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Die qualitative Erforschung der Beziehungen zwischen Mensch und Technik wird zunehmend ein Thema in der Psychologie. Das Kapitel beschreibt die Entstehung psychologischer Technikforschung, den Stellenwert qualitativer Forschung in deren Entwicklung, sowie unterschiedliche theoretische und...

  14. Collective Analysis of Qualitative Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper; Friberg, Karin

    2014-01-01

    What. Many students and practitioners do not know how to systematically process qualitative data once it is gathered—at least not as a collective effort. This chapter presents two workshop techniques, affinity diagramming and diagnostic mapping, that support collective analysis of large amounts...... of qualitative data. Affinity diagramming is used to make collective analysis and interpretations of qualitative data to identify core problems that need to be addressed in the design process. Diagnostic mapping supports collective interpretation and description of these problems and how to intervene in them. We....... In particular, collective analysis can be used to identify, understand, and act on complex design problems that emerge, for example, after the introduction of new tech- nologies. Such problems might be hard to clarify, and the basis for the analysis often involves large amounts of unstructured qualitative data...

  15. In vivo transgenic mutation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thybaud, Véronique; Dean, Stephen; Nohmi, Takehiko; de Boer, Johan; Douglas, George R; Glickman, Barry W; Gorelick, Nancy J; Heddle, John A; Heflich, Robert H; Lambert, Iain; Martus, Hans-Jörg; Mirsalis, Jon C; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Yajima, Nobuhiro

    2003-10-07

    Transgenic rodent gene-mutation models provide relatively quick and statistically reliable assays for gene mutations in the DNA from any tissue. This report summarizes those issues that have been agreed upon at a previous IWGT meeting [Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 35 (2000) 253], and discusses in depth those issues for which no consensus was reached before. It was previously agreed that for regulatory applications, assays should be based upon neutral genes, be generally available in several laboratories, and be readily transferable. For phage-based assays, five to ten animals per group should be analyzed, assuming a spontaneous mutant frequency (MF) of approximately 3x10(-5) mutants/locus and 125,000-300,000 plaque or colony forming units (pfu or cfu) per tissue per animal. A full set of data should be generated for a vehicle control and two dose groups. Concurrent positive control animals are only necessary during validation, but positive control DNA must be included in each plating. Tissues should be processed and analyzed in a blocked design, where samples from negative control, positive control and each treatment group are processed together. The total number of pfus or cfus and the MF for each tissue and animal are reported. Statistical tests should consider the animal as the experimental unit. Nonparametric statistical tests are recommended. A positive result is a statistically significant dose-response and/or statistically significant increase in any dose group compared to concurrent negative controls using an appropriate statistical model. A negative result is a statistically non-significant change, with all mean MFs within two standard deviations of the control. During the current workshop, a general protocol was agreed in which animals are treated daily for 28 consecutive days and tissues sampled 3 days after the final treatment. This recommendation could be modified by reducing or increasing the number of treatments or the length of the treatment period, when

  16. Predictive Assay For Cancer Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suess, A; Nguyen, C; Sorensen, K; Montgomery, J; Souza, B; Kulp, K; Dugan, L; Christian, A

    2005-09-19

    Early detection of cancer is a key element in successful treatment of the disease. Understanding the particular type of cancer involved, its origins and probable course, is also important. PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6 phenylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine), a heterocyclic amine produced during the cooking of meat at elevated temperatures, has been shown to induce mammary cancer in female, Sprague-Dawley rats. Tumors induced by PhIP have been shown to contain discreet cytogenetic signature patterns of gains and losses using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). To determine if a protein signature exists for these tumors, we are analyzing expression levels of the protein products of the above-mentioned tumors in combination with a new bulk protein subtractive assay. This assay produces a panel of antibodies against proteins that are either on or off in the tumor. Hybridization of the antibody panel onto a 2-D gel of tumor or control protein will allow for identification of a distinct protein signature in the tumor. Analysis of several gene databases has identified a number of rat homologs of human cancer genes located in these regions of gain and loss. These genes include the oncogenes c-MYK, ERBB2/NEU, THRA and tumor suppressor genes EGR1 and HDAC3. The listed genes have been shown to be estrogen-responsive, suggesting a possible link between delivery of bio-activated PhIP to the cell nucleus via estrogen receptors and gene-specific PhIP-induced DNA damage, leading to cell transformation. All three tumors showed similar silver staining patterns compared to each other, while they all were different than the control tissue. Subsequent screening of these genes against those from tumors know to be caused by other agents may produce a protein signature unique to PhIP, which can be used as a diagnostic to augment optical and radiation-based detection schemes.

  17. Predictive assay for cancer targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, Amanda; Nguyen, Christine; Sorensen, Karen; Montgomery, Jennifer; Souza, Brian; Kulp, Kris; Dugan, Larry; Christian, Allen

    2005-11-01

    Early detection of cancer is a key element in successful treatment of the disease. Understanding the particular type of cancer involved, its origins and probable course, is also important. PhIP (2-amino-1- methyl-6 phenylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine), a heterocyclic amine produced during the cooking of meat at elevated temperatures, has been shown to induce mammary cancer in female, Sprague-Dawley rats. Tumors induced by PhIP have been shown to contain discreet cytogenetic signature patterns of gains and losses using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). To determine if a protein signature exists for these tumors, we are analyzing expression levels of the protein products of the above-mentioned tumors in combination with a new bulk protein subtractive assay. This assay produces a panel of antibodies against proteins that are either on or off in the tumor. Hybridization of the antibody panel onto a 2-D gel of tumor or control protein will allow for identification of a distinct protein signature in the tumor. Analysis of several gene databases has identified a number of rat homologs of human cancer genes located in these regions of gain and loss. These genes include the oncogenes c-MYK, ERBB2/NEU, THRA and tumor suppressor genes EGR1 and HDAC3. The listed genes have been shown to be estrogen-responsive, suggesting a possible link between delivery of bio-activated PhIP to the cell nucleus via estrogen receptors and gene-specific PhIP-induced DNA damage, leading to cell transformation. All three tumors showed similar silver staining patterns compared to each other, while they all were different than the control tissue. Subsequent screening of these genes against those from tumors know to be caused by other agents may produce a protein signature unique to PhIP, which can be used as a diagnostic to augment optical and radiation-based detection schemes.

  18. Correlation between the Elecsys HBsAg II assay and the Architect assay for the quantification of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in the serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wursthorn, Karsten; Jaroszewicz, Jerzy; Zacher, Behrend J; Darnedde, Martina; Raupach, Regina; Mederacke, Ingmar; Cornberg, Markus; Manns, Michael P; Wedemeyer, Heiner

    2011-04-01

    Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) clearance during chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection is associated with improved long-term clinical outcome, so is considered an important therapeutic goal in CHB. Studies have shown that serum HBsAg quantification during, and at end of, treatment may predict long-term HBsAg loss. Performance comparison of the qualitative Elecsys HBsAg II assay using a quantitative research protocol and an established quantitative HBsAg assay. A dilution algorithm was developed for the Elecsys HBsAg II assay to allow quantification of HBsAg levels; this was used to measure HBsAg levels in a range of samples including sera from patients infected with different HBV genotypes, HBV mutants, and longitudinal samples from patients undergoing antiviral treatment. Results were compared with those from the quantitative Architect HBsAg assay. There was significant overall correlation between Elecsys and Architect assays (correlation coefficient [r]=0.97; pArchitect HBsAg assay. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical utility of automated chemiluminescent antiphospholipid antibody assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaniec, Teresa; Kaczor, Marcin P; Celińska-Löwenhoff, Magdalena; Polański, Stanisław; Musiał, Jacek

    2015-11-01

    The threshold for clinically relevant levels of antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies for the diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) remains a matter of debate. As new technologies for antibody detection are introduced, their performance characteristics must be clearly understood and compared to traditional assays. To assess the analytical performance and clinical utility of fully automated anticardiolipin (aCL) and anti-β2 glycoprotein I (aβ2GPI) chemiluminescent immunoassays (CIA) in comparison to the traditional ELISA tests. Samples from 220 autoimmune patients were studied (primary APS - 74; secondary APS - 47, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) without APS - 99). All samples were tested for IgG and IgM aCL and β2GPI antibodies using both CIA and ELISA, and for lupus anticoagulant (LAC). Good qualitative agreement and quantitative correlation were found between methods in regard to individual antibodies and their categories (profiles). All assays showed good clinical performance in APS, and strong correlation with APS-related clinical symptoms. Importance of determining individual laboratory 99 percentile values for a healthy population as normal cut-off values was shown. Additionally, based on a clinical approach, this study has established the low/medium threshold for QUANTA Flash aCL IgG and IgM assays. This study showed good clinical performance and strong correlation of the new automated CIA aPL assays with APS clinical symptoms. It also enabled us to determine the corresponding low/medium antibody threshold for the aCL antibody methods with different unit types. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A naked-eye based strategy for semiquantitative immunochromatographic assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daohong; Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Qi; Li, Ran; Zhang, Wen; Ding, Xiaoxia; Li, Chang Ming

    2012-08-31

    It is critical to develop a cost-effective quantitative/semiquantitative assay for rapid diagnosis and on-site detection of toxic or harmful substances. Here, a naked-eye based semiquantitative immunochromatographic strip (NSI-strip) was developed, on which three test lines (TLs, TL-I, TL-II and TL-III) were dispensed on a nitrocellulose membrane to form the test zone. Similar as the traditional strip assay for small molecule, the NSI-strip assay was also based on the competitive theory, difference was that the analyte competed three times with the capture reagent for the limited number of antibody binding sites. After the assay, the number of TLs developed in the test zone was inversely proportional to the analyte concentration, thus analyte content levels could be determined by observing the appeared number of TLs. Taking aflatoxin B(1) as the model analyte, visual detection limit of the NSI-strip was 0.06 ng mL(-1) and threshold concentrations for TL-I-III were 0.125, 0.5, and 2.0 ng mL(-1), respectively. Therefore, according to the appeared number of TLs, the following concentration ranges would be detectable by visual examination: 0-0.06 ng mL(-1) (negative samples), and 0.06-0.125 ng mL(-1), 0.125-0.5 ng mL(-1), 0.5-2.0 ng mL(-1) and >2.0 ng mL(-1) (positive samples). That was to say, compared to traditional strips the NSI-strip could offer more parameter information of the target analyte content. In this way, the NSI-strip improved the qualitative presence/absence detection of traditional strips by measuring the content (range) of target analytes semiquantitatively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Qualitative research: a valid alternative].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, J J; Pérez-Jover, V; Lorenzo, S; Aranaz, J; Vitaller, J

    2004-09-15

    To describe the main qualitative research techniques through systematic review of Spanish studies published during the previous 5 years. Systematic review. The Indice Médico Español (bibliographic database of items published in Spanish health sciences journals) was searched, and systematic searches of the journals Atención Primaria, Gaceta Sanitaria, and Revista de Calidad Asistencial were done. Study selection. We included studies carried out with any type of qualitative research technique. Also included were studies that reviewed qualitative research techniques. We excluded studies that used a qualitative technique but were based mainly on quantitative research techniques. The review was done during the period from April 1997 to April 2002. Most of the studies we reviewed used only one technique (80.5%). When more than one technique was used in combination (19.5% of the articles we reviewed), focus groups and interviews were usually used. The techniques identified were focus group (used in 34% of the articles reviewed), interview (24%), the Delphi technique (10%), content analysis (8%), nominal group (8%), metaplan (2%), and Philips 6/6 (2%). Qualitative research is a valid alternative, and if used with appropriate methodological rigor it can be of considerable use to health care professionals.

  2. Designs, formats and applications of lateral flow assay: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Sajid

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript provides a brief overview of latest research involving the use of lateral flow assay for qualitative and quantitative analysis in different areas. The excellent features and versatility of detection formats make these strips an ideal choice for point of care applications. We outline and critically discuss detection formats, molecular recognition probes, labels, and detection systems used in lateral flow assay. Applications in different fields along with selected examples from the literature have been included to show analytical performance of these devices. At the end, we summarize accomplishments, weaknesses and future challenges in the area of lateral flow strips.

  3. Detailed review of transgenic rodent mutation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Iain B; Singer, Timothy M; Boucher, Sherri E; Douglas, George R

    2005-09-01

    Induced chromosomal and gene mutations play a role in carcinogenesis and may be involved in the production of birth defects and other disease conditions. While it is widely accepted that in vivo mutation assays are more relevant to the human condition than are in vitro assays, our ability to evaluate mutagenesis in vivo in a broad range of tissues has historically been quite limited. The development of transgenic rodent (TGR) mutation models has given us the ability to detect, quantify, and sequence mutations in a range of somatic and germ cells. This document provides a comprehensive review of the TGR mutation assay literature and assesses the potential use of these assays in a regulatory context. The information is arranged as follows. (1) TGR mutagenicity models and their use for the analysis of gene and chromosomal mutation are fully described. (2) The principles underlying current OECD tests for the assessment of genotoxicity in vitro and in vivo, and also nontransgenic assays available for assessment of gene mutation, are described. (3) All available information pertaining to the conduct of TGR assays and important parameters of assay performance have been tabulated and analyzed. (4) The performance of TGR assays, both in isolation and as part of a battery of in vitro and in vivo short-term genotoxicity tests, in predicting carcinogenicity is described. (5) Recommendations are made regarding the experimental parameters for TGR assays, and the use of TGR assays in a regulatory context.

  4. Commentary: Writing and evaluating qualitative research reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    An overview of qualitative methods is provided, particularly for reviewers and authors who may be less familiar with qualitative research. A question and answer format is used to address considerations for writing and evaluating qualitative research. When producing qualitative research, individuals ...

  5. Qualitative Research Articles: Guidelines, Suggestions and Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescentini, Alberto; Mainardi, Giuditta

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to give ideas and suggestions to avoid some typical problems of qualitative articles. The aim is not to debate quality in qualitative research but to indicate some practical solutions. Design/methodology/approach: The paper discusses the design of qualitative research and the structure of a qualitative article…

  6. Qualitative Inquiry in Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmann, Svend

    helps its reader develop a disciplined and analytic awareness informed by theory, and shows how less can be more in qualitative research. Each chapter introduces theoretical tools to think with, and demonstrates how they can be put to use in working concretely with everyday life materials.......This book is a 'survival guide' for students and researchers who would like to conduct a qualitative study with limited resources. Brinkmann shows how everyday life materials such as books, television, the internet, the media and everyday conversations and interactions can help us to understand...... larger social issues. As living human beings in cultural worlds, we are constantly surrounded by 'data' that call for analysis, and as we cope with the different situations and episodes of our lives, we are engaged in understanding and interpreting the world as a form of qualitative inquiry. The book...

  7. The Epistemology of Qualitative Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard S. Becker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses questions that are relevant to the epistemology of qualitative research. In order to do so, the presumed dichotomy between qualitative and quantitative research is discussed and challenged. According to the author, the similarities between these methods are more relevant than its differences. Both methods strive to describe the social reality and thus have the same epistemological basis, even though they emphasize different questions. To shed light in such dichotomy, the author explores the origins of epistemology as a discipline and its philosophical character. Finally, the particularities and advantages of qualitative research are discussed, especially ethnography and field research, through an analysis of some of its main aspects for observing social reality: its focus on the point of view of the actor; the observation of the everyday world and the full and thick description. 

  8. An ultrafiltration assay for lysyl oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shackleton, D.R.; Hulmes, D.J. (Univ. of Edinburgh Medical School (England))

    1990-03-01

    A modification of the original microdistillation assay for lysyl oxidase is described in which Amicon C-10 microconcentrators are used to separate, by ultrafiltration, the 3H-labeled products released from a (4,5-3H)-lysine-labeled elastin substrate. Enzyme activity is determined by scintillation counting of the ultrafiltrate, after subtraction of radioactivity released in the presence of beta-aminopropionitrile, a specific inhibitor of the enzyme. Conditions are described which optimize both the sensitivity and the efficient use of substrate. The assay shows linear inhibition of activity in up to 1 M urea; hence, as the enzyme is normally diluted in the assay, samples in 6 M urea can be assayed directly, without prior dialysis, and corrected for partial inhibition. Comparable results are obtained when enzyme activity is assayed by ultrafiltration or microdistillation. The assay is simple and convenient and, by using disposable containers throughout, it eliminates the need for time-consuming decontamination of radioactive glassware.

  9. Development and application of assays for serotonin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gow, I.F.

    1987-01-01

    In this thesis, two assays for serotonin were developed, validated, and used to investigate the relationship between platelet aggregation, serotonin levels and sodium status and serotonin levels and platelet function in patients with cardiovascular disease. A radioimmunoassay (RIA) using an (/sup 125/I)-labelled tracer was developed and validated for the measurement of serotonin in human platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and rat serum. Antisera were raised against N-succinamylserotonin conjugated to bovine albumin and, to improve assay sensitivity, the analyte was made chemically similar to the immunogen by conversion to N-acetylserotonin prior to assay, using the specific amino reagent N-acetoxysuccinimide. An assay for serotonin using high-pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD) was developed, and used to validate the RIA. The RIA can be used to assay up to 100 samples/day compared with 10-20/day by the HPLC-ECD assay.

  10. Multicentre comparison of a diagnostic assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waters, Patrick; Reindl, Markus; Saiz, Albert

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Antibodies to cell surface central nervous system proteins help to diagnose conditions which often respond to immunotherapies. The assessment of antibody assays needs to reflect their clinical utility. We report the results of a multicentre study of aquaporin (AQP) 4 antibody (AQP4-Ab......) assays in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD). METHODS: Coded samples from patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) or NMOSD (101) and controls (92) were tested at 15 European diagnostic centres using 21 assays including live (n=3) or fixed cell-based assays (n=10), flow cytometry (n=4...... with seronegative NMO/spectrum disorder (SD). On the basis of a combination of clinical phenotype and the highly specific assays, 66 AQP4-Ab seropositive samples were used to establish the sensitivities (51.5-100%) of all 21 assays. The specificities (85.8-100%) were based on 92 control samples and 35 seronegative...

  11. A lateral electrophoretic flow diagnostic assay

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, R; Skandarajah, A; Gerver, RE; Neira, HD; Fletcher, DA; Herr, AE

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 The Royal Society of Chemistry. Immunochromatographic assays are a cornerstone tool in disease screening. To complement existing lateral flow assays (based on wicking flow) we introduce a lateral flow format that employs directed electrophoretic transport. The format is termed a "lateral e-flow assay" and is designed to support multiplexed detection using immobilized reaction volumes of capture antigen. To fabricate the lateral e-flow device, we employ mask-based UV photopatterning to ...

  12. Toward qualitative growth in Seoul

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, M.; Lee, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Today, Seoul is looking back at its revolutionary development during the last 40 years, and is exploring the potential of an evolutionary, qualitative growth for the future. Atlantis interviewed Seog-Jeong Lee, who recently completed a project on the future form of Seoul. She has a multi-faceted

  13. THE FUNCTION OF QUALITATIVE RESEARCH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HEYINK, JW; TYMSTRA, T

    Due to the prevailing positivistic view on science, qualitative research has only a modest place within the social sciences. There is, however, a growing awareness that a purely quantitative approach is not always satisfactory. This is for instance the case in the field of research into the quality

  14. Determining Validity in Qualitative Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.; Miller, Dana L.

    2000-01-01

    Suggests that the choice of validity procedures in qualitative inquiry is governed by two perspectives: the lens researchers choose to validate their studies and the researchers' paradigm assumptions. The article advances a two-dimensional framework to help researchers identify appropriate validity procedures for their studies. Nine validity…

  15. Contradictions in qualitative management research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Richard; Dorland, Jens

    2016-01-01

    and remove them from the analytical work. The purpose of this paper is to re-visit and re-introduce a dissensus-based management research strategy in order to analytically be able to work with what appear to be contradictions and misinformation in qualitative research accounts, and give them a more profound...

  16. Reconsidering Constructivism in Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheu-Jey George

    2012-01-01

    This article examines constructivism, a paradigm in qualitative research that has been propagated by Egon Guba, Yvonna Lincoln, and Norman Denzin. A distinction is made between whether the basic presuppositions of constructivism are credible compared to those of a competing paradigm and whether constructivism's beliefs are internally consistent.…

  17. Planetary protection - assaying new methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellen, J.; Rettberg, P.; Horneck, G.

    Space age began in 1957 when the USSR launched the first satellite into earth orbit. In response to this new challenge the International Council for Science, formerly know as International Council of Scientific Unions (ICSU), established the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) in 1958. The role of COSPAR was to channel the international scientific research in space and establish an international forum. Through COSPAR the scientific community agreed on the need for screening interplanetary probes for forward (contamination of foreign planets) and backward (contamination of earth by returned samples/probes) contamination. To prevent both forms of contamination a set of rules, as a guideline was established. Nowadays the standard implementation of the planetary protection rules is based on the experience gained during NASA's Viking project in 1975/76. Since then the evaluation-methods for microbial contamination of spacecrafts have been changed or updated just slowly. In this study the standard method of sample taking will be evaluated. New methods for examination of those samples, based on the identification of life on the molecular level, will be reviewed and checked for their feasibility as microbial detection systems. The methods will be examined for their qualitative (detection and verification of different organisms) and quantitative (detection limit and concentration verification) qualities. Amongst the methods analyzed will be i.e. real-time / PCR (poly-chain-reaction), using specific primer-sets for the amplification of highly conserved rRNA or DNA regions. Measurement of intrinsic fluorescence, i.e ATP using luciferin-luciferase reagents. The use of FAME (fatty acid methyl esters) and microchips for microbial identification purposes. The methods will be chosen to give a good overall coverage of different possible molecular markers and approaches. The most promising methods shall then be lab-tested and evaluated for their use under spacecraft assembly

  18. Optimization of killer assays for yeast selection protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, C A; Sangorrín, M P

    2010-01-01

    A new optimized semiquantitative yeast killer assay is reported for the first time. The killer activity of 36 yeast isolates belonging to three species, namely, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Wickerhamomyces anomala and Torulaspora delbrueckii, was tested with a view to potentially using these yeasts as biocontrol agents against the wine spoilage species Pichia guilliermondii and Pichia membranifaciens. The effectiveness of the classical streak-based (qualitative method) and the new semiquantitative techniques was compared. The percentage of yeasts showing killer activity was found to be higher by the semiquantitative technique (60%) than by the qualitative method (45%). In all cases, the addition of 1% NaCl into the medium allowed a better observation of the killer phenomenon. Important differences were observed in the killer capacity of different isolates belonging to a same killer species. The broadest spectrum of action was detected in isolates of W. anomala NPCC 1023 and 1025, and M. pulcherrima NPCC 1009 and 1013. We also brought experimental evidence supporting the importance of the adequate selection of the sensitive isolate to be used in killer evaluation. The new semiquantitative method proposed in this work enables to visualize the relationship between the number of yeasts tested and the growth of the inhibition halo (specific productivity). Hence, this experimental approach could become an interesting tool to be taken into account for killer yeast selection protocols.

  19. Flow cytometric immunobead assay for quantitative detection of platelet autoantibodies in immune thrombocytopenia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Juping; Ding, Mengyuan; Yang, Tianjie; Zuo, Bin; Weng, Zhen; Zhao, Yunxiao; He, Jun; Wu, Qingyu; Ruan, Changgeng; He, Yang

    2017-10-23

    Platelet autoantibody detection is critical for immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) diagnosis and prognosis. Therefore, we aimed to establish a quantitative flow cytometric immunobead assay (FCIA) for ITP platelet autoantibodies evaluation. Capture microbeads coupled with anti-GPIX, -GPIb, -GPIIb, -GPIIIa and P-selectin antibodies were used to bind the platelet-bound autoantibodies complex generated from plasma samples of 250 ITP patients, 163 non-ITP patients and 243 healthy controls, a fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated secondary antibody was the detector reagent and mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) signals were recorded by flow cytometry. Intra- and inter-assay variations of the quantitative FCIA assay were assessed. Comparisons of the specificity, sensitivity and accuracy between quantitative and qualitative FCIA or monoclonal antibody immobilization of platelet antigen (MAIPA) assay were performed. Finally, treatment process was monitored by our quantitative FCIA in 8 newly diagnosed ITPs. The coefficient of variations (CV) of the quantitative FCIA assay were respectively 9.4, 3.8, 5.4, 5.1 and 5.8% for anti-GPIX, -GPIb, -GPIIIa, -GPIIb and -P-selectin autoantibodies. Elevated levels of autoantibodies against platelet glycoproteins GPIX, GPIb, GPIIIa, GPIIb and P-selectin were detected by our quantitative FCIA in ITP patients compared to non-ITP patients or healthy controls. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of our quantitative assay were respectively 73.13, 81.98 and 78.65% when combining all 5 autoantibodies, while the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MAIPA assay were respectively 41.46, 90.41 and 72.81%. A quantitative FCIA assay was established. Reduced levels of platelet autoantibodies could be confirmed by our quantitative FCIA in ITP patients after corticosteroid treatment. Our quantitative assay is not only good for ITP diagnosis but also for ITP treatment monitoring.

  20. Identification of irradiated refrigerated pork with the DNA comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, M.M. E-mail: villavic@net.ipen.br; Marin-Huachaca, N.S.; Mancini-Filho, J. E-mail: jmancini@usp.br; Delincee, H.; Villavicencio, A.L.C.H. E-mail: henry.delincee@bfe.uni-karlsruhe.de

    2004-10-01

    Food irradiation can contribute to a safer and more plentiful food supply by inactivating pathogens, eradicating pests and by extending shelf-life. Particularly in the case of pork meat, this process could be a useful way to inactivate harmful parasites such as Trichinella and Taenia solium. Ionizing radiation causes damage to the DNA of the cells (e.g. strand breaks), which can be used to detect irradiated food. Microelectrophoresis of single cells ('Comet Assay') is a simple and rapid test for DNA damage and can be used over a wide dose range and for a variety of products. Refrigerated pork meat was irradiated with a {sup 60}Co source, Gammacell 220 (A.E.C.L.) installed in IPEN (Sao Paulo, Brazil). The doses given were 0, 1.5, 3.0 and 4.5 kGy for refrigerated samples. Immediately after irradiation the samples were returned to the refrigerator (6 deg. C). Samples were kept in the refrigerator after irradiation. Pork meat was analyzed 1, 8 and 10 days after irradiation using the DNA 'Comet Assay'. This method showed to be an inexpensive and rapid technique for qualitative detection of irradiation treatment.

  1. METHODOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF QUANTITATIVE RECEPTOR ASSAYS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SMISTEROVA, J; ENSING, K; DEZEEUW, RA

    Receptor assays occupy a particular position in the methods used in bioanalysis, as they do not exploit the physico-chemical properties of the analyte. These assays make use of the property of the analyte to bind to the specific binding site (receptor) and to competitively replace a labelled ligand

  2. A lateral electrophoretic flow diagnostic assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Robert; Skandarajah, Arunan; Gerver, Rachel E; Neira, Hector D; Fletcher, Daniel A; Herr, Amy E

    2015-03-21

    Immunochromatographic assays are a cornerstone tool in disease screening. To complement existing lateral flow assays (based on wicking flow) we introduce a lateral flow format that employs directed electrophoretic transport. The format is termed a "lateral e-flow assay" and is designed to support multiplexed detection using immobilized reaction volumes of capture antigen. To fabricate the lateral e-flow device, we employ mask-based UV photopatterning to selectively immobilize unmodified capture antigen along the microchannel in a barcode-like pattern. The channel-filling polyacrylamide hydrogel incorporates a photoactive moiety (benzophenone) to immobilize capture antigen to the hydrogel without a priori antigen modification. We report a heterogeneous sandwich assay using low-power electrophoresis to drive biospecimen through the capture antigen barcode. Fluorescence barcode readout is collected via a low-resource appropriate imaging system (CellScope). We characterize lateral e-flow assay performance and demonstrate a serum assay for antibodies to the hepatitis C virus (HCV). In a pilot study, the lateral e-flow assay positively identifies HCV+ human sera in 60 min. The lateral e-flow assay provides a flexible format for conducting multiplexed immunoassays relevant to confirmatory diagnosis in near-patient settings.

  3. Assessing sediment contamination using six toxicity assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen G. BURTON Jr.

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of sediment toxicity at Lake Orta, Italy was conducted to compare a toxicity test battery of 6 assays and to evaluate the extent of sediment contamination at various sediment depths. Lake Orta received excessive loadings of copper and ammonia during the 1900’s until a large remediation effort was conducted in 1989-90 using lime addition. Since that time, the lake has shown signs of a steady recovery of biological communities. The study results showed acute toxicity still exists in sediments at a depth of 5 cm and greater. Assays that detected the highest levels of toxicity were two whole sediment exposures (7 d using Hyalella azteca and Ceriodaphnia dubia. The MicrotoxR assay using pore water was the third most sensitive assay. The Thamnotox, Rototox, Microtox solid phase, and Seed Germination-Root Elongation (pore and solid phase assays showed occasional to no toxicity. Based on similarity of responses and assay sensitivity, the two most useful assays were the C. dubia (or H. azteca and Microtox pore water. These assays were effective at describing sediment toxicity in a weight-of-evidence approach.

  4. A Continuous, Fluorogenic Sirtuin 2 Deacylase Assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galleano, Iacopo; Schiedel, Matthias; Jung, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    and kinetic insight regarding sirtuin inhibitors, it is important to have access to efficient assays. In this work, we report readily synthesized fluorogenic substrates enabling enzyme-economical evaluation of SIRT2 inhibitors in a continuous assay format as well as evaluation of the properties of SIRT2...

  5. Towards a systematic assessment of assay interference: Identification of extensively tested compounds with high assay promiscuity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gilberg Erik; Stumpfe Dagmar; Bajorath Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    A large-scale statistical analysis of hit rates of extensively assayed compounds is presented to provide a basis for a further assessment of assay interference potential and multi-target activities...

  6. Comet assay on mice testicular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anoop Kumar

    2015-01-01

    for germ cell mutagens (Speit et al., 2009). The in vivo Comet assay is considered a useful tool for investigating germ cell genotoxicity. In the present study DNA strand breaks in testicular cells of mice were investigated. Different classes of chemicals were tested in order to evaluate the sensitivity...... of the comet assay in testicular cells. The chemicals included environmentally relevant substances such as Bisphenol A, PFOS and Tetrabrombisphenol A. Statistical power calculations will be presented to aid in the design of future Comet assay studies on testicular cells. Power curves were provided...... with different fold changes in % tail DNA, different number of cells scored and different number of gels (Hansen et al., 2014). An example is shown in Figure 1. A high throughput version of the Comet assay was used. Samples were scored with a fully automatic comet assay scoring system that provided faster...

  7. Capillary Electrophoresis Analysis of Conventional Splicing Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Garibay, Gorka Ruiz; Acedo, Alberto; García-Casado, Zaida

    2014-01-01

    Rare sequence variants in "high-risk" disease genes, often referred as unclassified variants (UVs), pose a serious challenge to genetic testing. However, UVs resulting in splicing alterations can be readily assessed by in vitro assays. Unfortunately, analytical and clinical interpretation...... of these assays is often challenging. Here, we explore this issue by conducting splicing assays in 31 BRCA2 genetic variants. All variants were assessed by RT-PCR followed by capillary electrophoresis and direct sequencing. If assays did not produce clear-cut outputs (Class-2 or Class-5 according to analytical...... International Agency for Research on Cancer guidelines), we performed qPCR and/or minigene assays. The latter were performed with a new splicing vector (pSAD) developed by authors of the present manuscript (patent #P201231427 CSIC). We have identified three clinically relevant Class-5 variants (c.682-2A>G, c...

  8. Detection of irradiated onion by means of the comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno Alvarez, Damaris L.; Prieto Miranda, Enrique Fco.; Carro Palacio, Sandra [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnologicas y Desarrollo Nuclear. (CEADEN), Ciudad de La Habana (Cuba)]. E-mail: damaris@ceaden.edu.cu; efprieto@ceaden.edu.cu; Iglesia Enriquez, Isora [Instituto de Investigacion para la Industria Alimenticia (IIIA), Ciudad de La Habana (Cuba)

    2007-07-01

    The ionizing radiations are used as a harmless alternative treatment that it substitutes the employment of chemical treatments, which after their application in the food products can remain residuals not desired that they come to be carcinogenic. With the food irradiation is eliminated microorganisms and the storage time is prolonged, which produces benefits for the Food Industry and the consumers. In many countries the search of sensitive detecting methods of irradiated foods is promoted by the necessity of the assurance of the consumption of foods with nutritional quality and to test directly the radiation processing, for which several techniques have been developed, these are based on the changes that induce the ionizing radiations in the food products. A recommended method is the Comet Assay of DNA, it is approved by the European Committee of Standardization (EN 13784). The DNA molecule is very sensitive to gamma radiations even at low radiation dose, where the modifications produced in the molecule can be monitored for this analytical technique well-known as Comet Assay of DNA or Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis. The objective of the present paper was to evaluate the modifications of the DNA molecule of irradiated onions with the Comet Assay for several dose values, the onions were conserved at environment and refrigeration temperatures. The samples were irradiated in a self-shielding irradiator with {sup 60}Co source, dose rate of 20.45 Gy/min and absorbed dose values of 0.5; 0.6; 0.8 and 1.0 kGy. This detection method demonstrates to be one sensitive and quick technique for the qualitative detection of irradiated onions. (author)

  9. Writing a qualitative research report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnard, Philip

    2004-07-01

    A research project in nursing or nursing education is probably only complete once the findings have been published. This paper offers a format for writing a qualitative research report for publication. It suggests, at least, the following sections: introduction, aims of the study, review of the literature, sample, data collection methods, data analysis methods, findings, discussion, conclusion, abstract. Each of these sections is addressed along with many written-out examples. In some sections, alternative approaches are suggested. The aim of the paper is to help the neophyte researcher to structure his or her report and for the experienced researcher to reflect on his or her current practice. References to other source material on qualitative research are given.

  10. Qualitative Research Methods in Psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Biggerstaff, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    In the scientific community, and particularly in psychology and health, there has been an active and ongoing debate on the relative merits of adopting either quantitative or qualitative methods, especially when researching into human behaviour (Bowling, 2009; Oakley, 2000; Smith, 1995a, 1995b; Smith, 1998). In part, this debate formed a component of the development in the 1970s of our thinking about science. Andrew Pickering has described this movement as the "sociology of scientific knowledg...

  11. Development of an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and an immunochromatographic assay for detection of organophosphorus pesticides in different agricultural products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiude Hua

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Organophosphorus (OP pesticides are considered hazardous substances because of their high toxicity to nontarget species and their persistence in the environment and agricultural products. Therefore, it is important to develop a rapid, sensitive, and economical method for detecting OP pesticides and their residues in food and the environment. METHODS: A broad, selective monoclonal antibody (MAb for organophosphorus pesticides was produced. Based on the MAb, an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and an immunochromatography assay (ICA for detecting OP pesticides in different agricultural products were developed using a binding inhibition format on microtiter plates and a membrane strip, respectively. RESULTS: Under the optimized conditions, the IC(50 values of the ELISA ranged from 3.7 to 162.2 ng mL(-1 for the 8 OP pesticides. The matrix interferences of Apple, Chinese cabbage, and greengrocery were removed by 40-fold dilution, the recoveries from spiked samples ranged from 79.1% to 118.1%. The IC(50 values of ICA for the 8 OP pesticides ranged from 11.8 to 470.4 ng mL(-1. The matrix interference was removed from the Chinese cabbage and Apple samples with 5-fold dilution, and the interference was removed from the greengrocery samples with 20-fold dilution. The recoveries from the spiked samples ranged between 70.6 and 131.9%. The established ELISA and ICA were specific selectivity for the 8 OP pesticides. CONCLUSIONS: The established ELISA is a sensitive screening method for the detection of OP pesticides, but the ELISA detection method depends on a laboratory platform and requires a relative long assay time and several steps operation. The established ICA is very useful as a screening method for the quantitative, semi-quantitative or qualitative detection of OP pesticides in agricultural products, and it has advantages over ELISA methods with regard to factors such as the testing procedure, testing time, and matrix interferences

  12. Conducting qualitative research in audiology: A tutorial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knudsen, L.V.; Laplante-Levesque, A.; Jones, L.; Preminger, J.E.; Nielsen, C.; Lunner, T.; Hickson, L.; Naylor, G.; Kramer, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Qualitative research methodologies are being used more frequently in audiology as it allows for a better understanding of the perspectives of people with hearing impairment. This article describes why and how international interdisciplinary qualitative research can be conducted. Design:

  13. DNA Methyltransferase Activity Assays: Advances and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Wan Jun; Wee, Cayden Pang Pee; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (MTases), a family of enzymes that catalyse the methylation of DNA, have a profound effect on gene regulation. A large body of evidence has indicated that DNA MTase is potentially a predictive biomarker closely associated with genetic disorders and genetic diseases like cancer. Given the attention bestowed onto DNA MTases in molecular biology and medicine, highly sensitive detection of DNA MTase activity is essential in determining gene regulation, epigenetic modification, clinical diagnosis and therapeutics. Conventional techniques such as isotope labelling are effective, but they often require laborious sample preparation, isotope labelling, sophisticated equipment and large amounts of DNA, rendering them unsuitable for uses at point-of-care. Simple, portable, highly sensitive and low-cost assays are urgently needed for DNA MTase activity screening. In most recent technological advances, many alternative DNA MTase activity assays such as fluorescent, electrochemical, colorimetric and chemiluminescent assays have been proposed. In addition, many of them are coupled with nanomaterials and/or enzymes to significantly enhance their sensitivity. Herein we review the progress in the development of DNA MTase activity assays with an emphasis on assay mechanism and performance with some discussion on challenges and perspectives. It is hoped that this article will provide a broad coverage of DNA MTase activity assays and their latest developments and open new perspectives toward the development of DNA MTase activity assays with much improved performance for uses in molecular biology and clinical practice.

  14. Automation of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauchereau, A; Astinotti, D; Bouton, M M

    1990-08-01

    Accurate quantification of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) enzyme activity in a large number of samples has been achieved through robotization of a CAT assay on a laboratory workstation (Biomek 1000). The basic principle of this CAT assay relies on the selective diffusion of [3H]acetylchloramphenicol into a water-immiscible liquid scintillation cocktail. This methodology gives unique characteristics to this robotized protocol by allowing complete control over the kinetics of the CAT enzymatic reaction which is a critical parameter in the CAT assay. Thus it has been possible to optimize the CAT assay for every processed sample, through real time monitoring of the enzymatic reaction, and to achieve maximum accuracy in CAT quantification. Moreover the sensitivity of this automated assay is high (detection threshold; 10(-4) CAT unit), and the sample processing is fast (approximately 125 samples per hour). Compared to other CAT assay protocols currently used, our robotized technique offers major advantages in terms of CAT quantification, and sets new standards for CAT assay productivity.

  15. Nano-immunosafety: issues in assay validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boraschi, Diana; Italiani, Paola [Institute of Biomedical Technologies, National Research Council, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Oostingh, Gertie J; Duschl, Albert [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Casals, Eudald; Puntes, Victor F [Institut Catala de Nanotecnologia, Campus de la UAB - Facultat de Ciencies, Edifici CM7, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Nelissen, Inge, E-mail: diana.boraschi@itb.cnr.it [VITO NV, Boeretang 200, BE-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2011-07-06

    Assessing the safety of engineered nanomaterials for human health must include a thorough evaluation of their effects on the immune system, which is responsible for defending the integrity of our body from damage and disease. An array of robust and representative assays should be set up and validated, which could be predictive of the effects of nanomaterials on immune responses. In a trans-European collaborative work, in vitro assays have been developed to this end. In vitro tests have been preferred for their suitability to standardisation and easier applicability. Adapting classical assays to testing the immunotoxicological effects of nanoparticulate materials has raised a series of issues that needed to be appropriately addressed in order to ensure reliability of results. Besides the exquisitely immunological problem of selecting representative endpoints predictive of the risk of developing disease, assay results turned out to be significantly biased by artefactual interference of the nanomaterials or contaminating agents with the assay protocol. Having addressed such problems, a series of robust and representative assays have been developed that describe the effects of engineered nanoparticles on professional and non-professional human defence cells. Two of such assays are described here, one based on primary human monocytes and the other employing human lung epithelial cells transfected with a reporter gene.

  16. The comet assay in nanotoxicology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Hanna L

    2010-09-01

    Nanoscale particles can have impressive and useful characteristics, but the same properties may be problematic for human health. From this perspective it is critical to assess the ability of nanoparticles to cause DNA damage. This review focuses on the use of the comet assay in nanotoxicology research. In the alkaline version of the assay, DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites are detected and oxidatively damaged DNA can be analyzed using the enzyme formamidopyrimidine glycosylase. The article reviews studies that have used the comet assay to investigate the toxicity of manufactured nanoparticles. It is shown that at least 46 cellular in vitro studies and several in vivo studies have used the comet assay and that the majority of the nanoparticles tested cause DNA strand breaks or oxidative DNA lesions. This is not surprising considering the sensitivity of the method and the reactivity of many nanomaterials. Interactions between the particles and the assay cannot be totally excluded and need further consideration. It is concluded that studies including several particle types, to enable the assessment of their relative potency, are valuable as are studies focusing both on comet assay end points and mutagenicity. Finally, the article discusses the potential future use of the comet assay in human biomonitoring studies, which could provide valuable information for hazard identification of nanoparticles.

  17. A bioluminescence assay for aldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duellman, Sarah J; Valley, Michael P; Kotraiah, Vinayaka; Vidugiriene, Jolanta; Zhou, Wenhui; Bernad, Laurent; Osterman, Jean; Kimball, Joshua J; Meisenheimer, Poncho; Cali, James J

    2013-03-15

    The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) family of enzymes is critical for cell survival and adaptation to cellular and environmental stress. These enzymes are of interest as therapeutic targets and as biomarkers of stem cells. This article describes a novel, homogeneous bioluminescence assay to study the activity of the ALDH enzymes. The assay is based on a proluciferin-aldehyde substrate that is recognized and utilized by multiple ALDH enzyme isoforms to generate luciferin. A detection reagent is added to inactivate ALDH and generate light from the luciferin product. The luminescent signal is dependent on the ALDH enzyme concentration and the incubation time in the ALDH reaction; moreover, the luminescent signal generated with the detection reagent is stable for greater than 2 h. This assay provides many advantages over standard NADH fluorescence assays. It is more sensitive and the signal stability provided allows convenient assay setup in batch mode-based high-throughput screens. The assay also shows an accurate pharmacological response for a common ALDH inhibitor and is robust, with a large assay window (S/B=64) and Z'=0.75. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Bacterial mutagenicity assays: Vehicle and positive control results from the standard Ames assay, the 6- and 24-well miniaturized plate incorporation assays and the Ames II™ assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Kamala; Bruce, Shannon; Sly, Jamie; Klug Laforce, Michelle; Springer, Sandra; Cecil, Mark; Andrus, Edgar; Dakoulas, Emily; Wagner, Valentine O; Hewitt, Nicola J; Kulkarni, Rohan

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial mutation assays are conducted routinely as part of the safety assessment of new chemicals. The OECD Test Guideline (TG) 471 describes the conduct of the standard agar plate Ames assay, required for regulatory submissions. Higher throughput non-OECD 471 TG assays, such as the miniaturized plate incorporation and Ames II™ assays, can be used for prescreening purposes. We have compiled historical vehicle and positive control data generated using these methods. The historical database is comprised from experiments spanning 9 years and includes >1000 experiments from the standard Ames assay using the plate incorporation and pre-incubation methods (TA98, TA100, TA1535, TA1537, and WP2 uvrA), >50 experiments from the 6-well (TA98, TA100, TA1535, TA97a, and WP2 uvrA) and >100 experiments from the 24-well (TA98, TA100, TA102, TA1535, TA1537, and TA97a) plate incorporation assays, and >1000 experiments from the Ames II™ assay (TA98 and TAMix). Although miniaturization to a 24-well format made the measurement of control revertant colonies in TA1537 and TA1535 more difficult; this can be overcome by using an alternative strain with a higher spontaneous reversion rate (i.e., using TA97a instead of TA1537) or by increasing the number of replicate wells to 12 (for TA1535). All three miniaturized methods, including the Ames II™ assay, were responsive to known mutagens and the responses were reproducible over years of use. These data demonstrate the excellent reproducibility of the standard and miniaturized bacterial mutation assays using positive control chemicals. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:483-496, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Reporter gene assays for investigating GPCR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimzadeh, Pedram; Olson, John A; Balenga, Nariman

    2017-01-01

    Luciferase-based assays are applied to evaluate various cellular processes due to their sensitivity and feasibility. The field of GPCR research has also benefited from this enzymatic reaction both in deorphanization campaigns and in delineation of the signaling pathways. Here, we describe the details of this assay in GPCR studies in 96-well format and will provide examples where the assay can show constitutive activity of an orphan GPCR and demonstrate the impact of cell type on the efficacy and potency of ligands. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Passive neutron assay of irradiated nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsue, S.T.; Stewart, J.E.; Kaieda, K.; Halbig, J.K.; Phillips, J.R.; Lee, D.M.; Hatcher, C.R.

    1979-02-01

    Passive neutron assay of irradiated nuclear fuel has been investigated by calculations and experiments as a simple, complementary technique to the gamma assay. From the calculations it was found that the neutron emission arises mainly from the curium isotopes, the neutrons exhibit very good penetrability of the assemblies, and the neutron multiplication is not affected by the burnup. From the experiments on BWR and PWR assemblies, the neutron emission rate is proportional to burnup raised to 3.4 power. The investigations indicate that the passive neutron assay is a simple and useful technique to determine the consistency of burnups between assemblies.

  1. Quantifying Qualitative Data Using Cognitive Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherp, Hans-Ake

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the article is to show how substantial qualitative material consisting of graphic cognitive maps can be analysed by using digital CmapTools, Excel and SPSS. Evidence is provided of how qualitative and quantitative methods can be combined in educational research by transforming qualitative data into quantitative data to facilitate…

  2. Strategies of Qualitative Inquiry. Third Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzin, Norman K., Ed.; Lincoln, Yvonna S., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Strategies of Qualitative Inquiry, Third Edition," the second volume in the paperback version of "The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Research, 3rd Edition," consists of Part III of the handbook ("Strategies of Inquiry"). "Strategies of Qualitative Inquiry, Third Edition" presents the major tactics--historically, the research methods--that…

  3. Infusing Qualitative Traditions in Counseling Research Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Danica G.; Wood, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Research traditions serve as a blueprint or guide for a variety of design decisions throughout qualitative inquiry. This article presents 6 qualitative research traditions: grounded theory, phenomenology, consensual qualitative research, ethnography, narratology, and participatory action research. For each tradition, the authors describe its…

  4. Teaching Qualitative Research Methods Using "Undercover Boss"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, LaKresha; Schuwerk, Tara J.

    2017-01-01

    Course(s): Research Methods, Qualitative Research Methods, Organizational Communication, Business Communication. Objectives: After completing this class exercise, students should be able to identify the major components of a qualitative research study, along with the ethical dilemmas that come with doing qualitative research.

  5. Teaching Qualitative Research to Practitioner-Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Rebecca D.

    2012-01-01

    Practitioner-researchers are well-positioned to apply qualitative methods to the study of significant problems of educational practice. However, while learning the skills of qualitative inquiry, practitioners may be compelled by forces outside of qualitative research classrooms to think quantitatively. In this article, the author considers two…

  6. Publishing Qualitative Research in Counseling Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the essential elements to be included when developing a qualitative study and preparing the findings for publication. Using the sections typically found in a qualitative article, the author describes content relevant to each section, with additional suggestions for publishing qualitative research.

  7. Performance of the Elecsys Rubella IgG Assay in the Diagnostic Laboratory Setting for Assessment of Immune Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelt, Uwe; Knotek, Frank; Bunn, Kristina; Strobel, Sirpa; Dietz, Klaus; Enders, Gisela

    2013-01-01

    Rubella in early pregnancy bears a high risk for congenital defects (e.g., cataracts, hearing loss, and heart disease) and for long-term sequelae in the newborn. Despite implementation of vaccination programs in many regions, the threat of devastating consequences from congenital rubella virus infection remains and careful screening of maternal immune status before and during pregnancy helps to reduce the risk. This study compared the performance of the Elecsys Rubella IgG assay with that of other assays routinely used for screening. Samples from 1,090 women undergoing routine antenatal care were tested using the Elecsys and Enzygnost Rubella IgG assays and the hemagglutination inhibition test. Samples with hemagglutination inhibition titers of Rubella IgG assays. Agreement of qualitative results from the Elecsys, Enzygnost, and hemagglutination inhibition assays was good in all samples. All assays showed 100.0% specificity. In samples with hemagglutination inhibition titers of 90.0%) than the other immunoassays (78.6 to 82.4%). The Elecsys assay reported significantly higher rubella virus IgG levels than the other immunoassays across the whole set of 1,090 samples, with the largest bias and deviation from limits of agreement in Bland-Altman analysis. In conclusion, the Elecsys assay is highly sensitive and specific with regard to qualitative results and suitable for routine automated screening. However, given the considerable variation between quantitative results from different immunoassays, testing methods should be documented and the same assay used throughout an individual's antenatal follow-up wherever possible. PMID:23345585

  8. Multicenter Evaluation of the Cepheid Xpert Hepatitis C Virus Viral Load Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, M P; Wu, A H B; Chevaliez, S; Pawlotsky, J M; Hallin, M; Templeton, K E

    2017-05-01

    Viral load monitoring for hepatitis C virus (HCV) is necessary to diagnose infection and monitor response to therapy, but the tests involved are currently confined to specialist institutions. There is a need for a fast, accurate assay with limited operator input to enhance the access to viral load monitoring. We evaluated the quantification of HCV RNA in serum and plasma by the Cepheid Xpert HCV Viral Load assay in comparison to the Abbott RealTi m e HCV assay. Serum and plasma samples were gathered from HCV-infected individuals at four international sites. These were tested with the Xpert HCV Viral Load assay, and results were compared to quantification by the Abbott RealTi m e HCV assay. An external quality assessment panel of eight samples was also tested. In total, 614 samples were analyzed in the study, and the qualitative results agreed on the two platforms for 588 (95.8%) samples. Further analysis of 396 samples quantified by both tests showed strong correlation (correlation coefficient r = 0.99) across the quantifiable range, with Bland-Altman plot data showing a mean difference (±1.96 standard deviation) of 0.03 ± 0.44 log 10 IU/ml. In the external quality assessment panel, the Xpert HCV Viral Load assay results (quantified in log 10 IU per milliliter) were within 1 standard deviation of the target value for all but one sample, which was also similarly misquantified by the Abbott RealTime HCV assay. The Xpert HCV Viral Load assay performs well compared to a market-leading HCV viral load test and should be considered for instances where rapid near-to-patient testing is required. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. 21 CFR 866.3210 - Endotoxin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3210 Endotoxin assay. (a... intended for use in conjunction with other laboratory findings and clinical assessment of the patient to...

  10. NEW INDIRECT IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE ASSAY AS A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2004-05-05

    HIV-1) infection is based on the detection of antibodies to HIV-1 in plasma or serum. Antibodies against various viral structure proteins are measured by a number of simple and sensitive screening tests. These assays include ...

  11. Validation of a new automated renin assay.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, R.A. de; Bouhuizen, A.; Diederich, S.; Perschel, F.H.; Boomsma, F.; Deinum, J.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Measurement of plasma renin is important for the treatment of patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) and in the evaluation of patients with suspected hyperaldosteronism. Immunologic assays for plasma renin offer easier implementation and standardization than enzyme-kinetic

  12. LINE-1 Cultured Cell Retrotransposition Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopera, Huira C.; Larson, Peter A.; Moldovan, John B.; Richardson, Sandra R.; Liu, Ying; Moran, John V.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) retrotransposition assay has facilitated the discovery and characterization of active (i.e., retrotransposition-competent) LINE-1 sequences from mammalian genomes. In this assay, an engineered LINE-1 containing a retrotransposition reporter cassette is transiently transfected into a cultured cell line. Expression of the reporter cassette, which occurs only after a successful round of retrotransposition, allows the detection and quantification of the LINE-1 retrotransposition efficiency. This assay has yielded insight into the mechanism of LINE-1 retrotransposition. It also has provided a greater understanding of how the cell regulates LINE-1 retrotransposition and how LINE-1 retrotransposition impacts the structure of mammalian genomes. Below, we provide a brief introduction to LINE-1 biology and then detail how the LINE-1 retrotransposition assay is performed in cultured mammalian cells. PMID:26895052

  13. Automated optical sensing system for biochemical assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroszlan, Peter; Duveneck, Gert L.; Ehrat, Markus; Widmer, H. M.

    1994-03-01

    In this paper, we present a new system called FOBIA that was developed and optimized with respect to automated operation of repetitive assay cycles with regenerable bioaffinity sensors. The reliability and precision of the new system is demonstrated by an application in a competitive assay for the detection of the triazine herbicide Atrazine. Using one sensor in more than 300 repetitive cycles, a signal precision better than 5% was achieved.

  14. The comet assay in nanotoxicology research

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Hanna L

    2010-01-01

    Nanoscale particles can have impressive and useful characteristics, but the same properties may be problematic for human health. From this perspective it is critical to assess the ability of nanoparticles to cause DNA damage. This review focuses on the use of the comet assay in nanotoxicology research. In the alkaline version of the assay, DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites are detected and oxidatively damaged DNA can be analyzed using the enzyme formamidopyrimidine glycosylase. The ar...

  15. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Quiter, Brian

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) techniques for the isotopic and quantitative assaying of radioactive material. Potential applications include age-dating of an unknown radioactive source, pre- and post-detonation nuclear forensics, and safeguards for nuclear fuel cycles Examples of age-dating a strong radioactive source and assaying a spent fuel pin are discussed. The modeling work has ben performed with the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code M...

  16. Growing Quality in Qualitative Health Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Ellen Macdonald PhD

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative methodologies are growing in popularity in health research; however, the integration of these methodologies into the clinical context is not always straightforward. In this article the author discusses some of the paradigmatic and methodological tensions that characterize the use of qualitative methodologies in clinical health research and showcase one solution to these tensions. The McGill Qualitative Health Research Group is a scholarly group of qualitative health researchers working together to advance a qualitative research agenda in clinical disciplines.

  17. Nondestructive assay methods for irradiated nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsue, S.T.; Crane, T.W.; Talbert, W.L. Jr.; Lee, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    This report is a review of the status of nondestructive assay (NDA) methods used to determine burnup and fissile content of irradiated nuclear fuels. The gamma-spectroscopy method measures gamma activities of certain fission products that are proportional to the burnup. Problems associated with this method are migration of the fission products and gamma-ray attenuation through the relatively dense fuel material. The attenuation correction is complicated by generally unknown activity distributions within the assemblies. The neutron methods, which usually involve active interrogation and prompt or delayed signal counting, are designed to assay the fissile content of the spent-fuel elements. Systems to assay highly enriched spent-fuel assemblies have been tested extensively. Feasibility studies have been reported of systems to assay light-water reactor spent-fuel assemblies. The slowing-down spectrometer and neutron resonance absorption methods can distinguish between the uranium and plutonium fissile contents, but they are limited to the assay of individual rods. We have summarized the status of NDA techniques for spent-fuel assay and present some subjects in need of further investigation. Accuracy of the burnup calculations for power reactors is also reviewed.

  18. Quantum dot-based cell motility assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Teresa; Parak, Wolfgang J; Boudreau, Rosanne; Le Gros, Mark A; Gerion, Daniele; Alivisatos, A Paul; Larabell, Carolyn A

    2003-12-01

    Motility and migration are measurable characteristics of cells that are classically associated with the invasive potential of cancer cells, but in vitro assays of invasiveness have been less than perfect. We previously developed an assay to monitor cell motility and migration using water-soluble CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals; cells engulf the fluorescent nanocrystals as they crawl across them and leave behind a fluorescent-free trail. We show here that semiconductor nanocrystals can also be used as a sensitive two-dimensional in vitro invasion assay. We used this assay to compare the behavior of seven different adherent human cell lines, including breast epithelial MCF 10A, breast tumor MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-435S, MCF 7, colon tumor SW480, lung tumor NCI H1299, and bone tumor Saos-2, and observed two distinct behaviors of cancer cells that can be used to further categorize these cells. Some cancer cell lines demonstrate fibroblastic behaviors and leave long fluorescent-free trails as they migrate across the dish, whereas other cancer cells leave clear zones of varying sizes around their periphery. This assay uses fluorescence detection, requires no processing, and can be used in live cell studies. These features contribute to the increased sensitivity of this assay and make it a powerful new tool for discriminating between non-invasive and invasive cancer cell lines.

  19. Comparison of the sulforhodamine B assay and the clonogenic assay for in vitro chemoradiation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Bea; Korst, Annelies E C; de Pooter, Christel M J; Pattyn, Greet G O; Lambrechts, Hilde A J; Baay, Marc F D; Lardon, Filip; Vermorken, Jan B

    2003-03-01

    Since there is a growing interest in preclinical research on interactions between radiation and cytotoxic agents, this study focused on the development of an alternative to the very laborious clonogenic assay (CA). The colorimetric sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay was compared to the clonogenic assay for radiosensitivity testing in two lung cancer cell lines (A549, H292), one colon cancer cell line (HT-29) and one breast cancer cell line (MCF-7). In addition, the combination of the radiosensitizing agent gemcitabine and radiation was investigated with both assays. The dose-response curves obtained with the SRB assay and the CA were very similar up to 6 Gy. The radiosensitivity parameters (SF(2), alpha, beta, MID and ID(50)) obtained from the SRB assay and the CA were not significantly different between H292, A549 and MCF-7 cells. The radiation dose-response curves for A549 and H292 cells pretreated with 4 n M gemcitabine for 24 h clearly showed a radiosensitizing effect with both assays. The dose-enhancement factors obtained with the SRB assay and the CA were 1.80 and 1.76, respectively, for A549 cells, and 1.52 and 1.41 for H292 cells. The SRB assay was shown to be as useful as the more traditional CA for research on chemotherapy/radiotherapy interactions in cell lines with moderate radiosensitivity. This assay will be used for more extensive in vitro research on radiosensitizing compounds in these cell lines.

  20. Qualitative insights on fundamental mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardari, Ghenadie N.

    2007-05-01

    The gap between classical mechanics and quantum mechanics has an important interpretive implication: the Universe must have an irreducible fundamental level, which determines the properties of matter at higher levels of organization. We show that the main parameters of any fundamental model must be theory-independent. Moreover, such models must also contain discrete identical entities with constant properties. These conclusions appear to support the work of Kaniadakis on subquantum mechanics. A qualitative analysis is offered to suggest compatibility with relevant phenomena, as well as to propose new means for verification.

  1. Qualitative insights on fundamental mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardari, Ghenadie N [Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2007-05-15

    The gap between classical mechanics and quantum mechanics has an important interpretive implication: the Universe must have an irreducible fundamental level, which determines the properties of matter at higher levels of organization. We show that the main parameters of any fundamental model must be theory-independent. Moreover, such models must also contain discrete identical entities with constant properties. These conclusions appear to support the work of Kaniadakis on subquantum mechanics. A qualitative analysis is offered to suggest compatibility with relevant phenomena, as well as to propose new means for verification.

  2. QUALITATIVE METHODS IN CREATIVITY STUDIES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    In this article we will focus on developing a qualitative research design suitable for conducting case study in creativity. The case is a team of workers (See Hertel, 2015) doing industrial cleaning in the Danish food industry. The hypothesis is that these workers are both participating in......-specific methods, involving a discussion of creativity test, divergent and convergent thinking, for studying creativity in this specific setting. Beside from that we will develop a research design involving a combination of methods necessary for conducting a case study in the setting mentioned....

  3. Conducting qualitative research in audiology: a tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Line V; Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane; Jones, Lesley; Preminger, Jill E; Nielsen, Claus; Lunner, Thomas; Hickson, Louise; Naylor, Graham; Kramer, Sophia E

    2012-02-01

    Qualitative research methodologies are being used more frequently in audiology as it allows for a better understanding of the perspectives of people with hearing impairment. This article describes why and how international interdisciplinary qualitative research can be conducted. This paper is based on a literature review and our recent experience with the conduction of an international interdisciplinary qualitative study in audiology. We describe some available qualitative methods for sampling, data collection, and analysis and we discuss the rationale for choosing particular methods. The focus is on four approaches which have all previously been applied to audiologic research: grounded theory, interpretative phenomenological analysis, conversational analysis, and qualitative content analysis. This article provides a review of methodological issues useful for those designing qualitative research projects in audiology or needing assistance in the interpretation of qualitative literature.

  4. A multi-centre evaluation of the intra-assay and inter-assay variation of commercial and in-house anti-cardiolipin antibody assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Richard; Favaloro, Emmanuel; Pollock, Wendy; Wilson, Robert; Hendle, Michelle; Adelstein, Stephen; Baumgart, Karl; Homes, Paul; Smith, Stuart; Steele, Richard; Sturgess, Allan; Gillis, David

    2004-04-01

    To assess the intra-assay (intra-run) and inter-assay (inter-run) variation of commercial and in-house IgG and IgM anti-cardiolipin antibody (aCL) assays/kits, and to determine an appropriate maximum value for inclusion in consensus guidelines. Frozen aliquots of two patient specimens and one commercial control were sent to nine laboratories for the evaluation of eight commercial kits and one in-house assay. Intra-assay and inter-assay evaluations were performed with all three samples for IgG aCL, and one patient specimen for IgM aCL. The IgG and IgM aCL values varied considerably between the nine assays/kits. The majority of assays/kits demonstrated less than 20% intra-assay and inter-assay variation, with lower intra-assay and inter-assay variation observed with the commercial control. Single calibrator assays were not consistently associated with higher inter-assay variation than multi-point calibrator assays. An inter-assay coefficient of variation of 20% was determined to be an appropriate maximum value for inclusion in the Australasian aCL Working Party consensus guidelines. Improved standardisation between different assay/kits is still required.

  5. System monitoring and diagnosis with qualitative models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, Benjamin

    1991-01-01

    A substantial foundation of tools for model-based reasoning with incomplete knowledge was developed: QSIM (a qualitative simulation program) and its extensions for qualitative simulation; Q2, Q3 and their successors for quantitative reasoning on a qualitative framework; and the CC (component-connection) and QPC (Qualitative Process Theory) model compilers for building QSIM QDE (qualitative differential equation) models starting from different ontological assumptions. Other model-compilers for QDE's, e.g., using bond graphs or compartmental models, have been developed elsewhere. These model-building tools will support automatic construction of qualitative models from physical specifications, and further research into selection of appropriate modeling viewpoints. For monitoring and diagnosis, plausible hypotheses are unified against observations to strengthen or refute the predicted behaviors. In MIMIC (Model Integration via Mesh Interpolation Coefficients), multiple hypothesized models of the system are tracked in parallel in order to reduce the 'missing model' problem. Each model begins as a qualitative model, and is unified with a priori quantitative knowledge and with the stream of incoming observational data. When the model/data unification yields a contradiction, the model is refuted. When there is no contradiction, the predictions of the model are progressively strengthened, for use in procedure planning and differential diagnosis. Only under a qualitative level of description can a finite set of models guarantee the complete coverage necessary for this performance. The results of this research are presented in several publications. Abstracts of these published papers are presented along with abtracts of papers representing work that was synergistic with the NASA grant but funded otherwise. These 28 papers include but are not limited to: 'Combined qualitative and numerical simulation with Q3'; 'Comparative analysis and qualitative integral representations

  6. Role of receptor occupancy assays by flow cytometry in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jennifer J; Green, Cherie L; Jones, Nicholas; Liang, Meina; Xu, Yuanxin; Wilkins, Danice E C; Moulard, Maxime; Czechowska, Kamila; Lanham, David; McCloskey, Thomas W; Ferbas, John; van der Strate, Barry W A; Högerkorp, Carl-Magnus; Wyant, Timothy; Lackey, Alan; Litwin, Virginia

    2016-03-01

    The measurement of the binding of a biotherapeutic to its cellular target, receptor occupancy (RO), is increasingly important in development of biologically-based therapeutic agents. Receptor occupancy (RO) assays by flow cytometry describe the qualitative and/or quantitative assessment of the binding of a therapeutic agent to its cell surface target. Such RO assays can be as simple as measuring the number of cell surface receptors bound by an antireceptor therapeutic agent or can be designed to address more complicated scenarios such as internalization or shedding events once a receptor engages the administered therapeutic agent. Data generated from RO assays can also be used to model whether given doses of an experimental therapeutic agent and their administration schedules lead to predicted levels of receptor occupancy and whether the receptor is modulated (up or down) on cells engaged by the therapeutic agent. There are a variety of approaches that can be used when undertaking RO assays and with the ability to measure distinct subsets in heterogeneous populations, flow cytometry is ideally suited to RO measurements. This article highlights the importance of RO assays on the flow cytometric platform in the development of biotherapeutic agents. © 2016 The Authors Cytometry Part B: Clinical Cytometry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A follow up study of cytomegalovirus infection in a group of Turkish renal transplant recipients using molecular assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem Yalinay Cirak

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The clinical value of an in-house cytomegalovirus nested polymerase chain reaction (CMV-PCR and a commercial molecular assay hybrid capture CMV DNA assay (HCA was evaluated in monitoring a group of renal transplant patients for six months follow up. In this study, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of nested CMV DNA PCR assay and HCA at the beginning of the study were 70, 42.9, 46.7, 66.7, and 60, 78.6, 66.7, and 73.3% respectively. After six months, they were 80, 66.7, 80, 66.7 for CMV PCR and 73.3, 88.9, 91.7, 66.7% for HCA respectively. These results indicate that in monitoring and predicting CMV infections in renal transplant recipients, not only qualitative but also quantitative assays must be used together in order to decide the preemptive strategies.

  8. [Feminism and qualitative nursing research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Myungsun; Yih, Bong-Sook

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe feminism and to propose the integration of a feminist method into qualitative nursing methodology in order to expand the body of nursing knowledge. The world view of feminism including philosophy, epistemology and methodology was outlined, and a feminist grounded theory and feminist ethnography were suggested as a way of strengthening nursing research methodology using literature review. Four different philosophical perspectives of feminism, that is, liberal feminism, radical feminism, Marxist feminism, and social feminism were described. Also epistemological perspectives including feminist empiricism, feminist standpoint, and postmodern feminism, were explained and were related to the methodology and methods of feminism. To enhance the strengths of nursing research within the feminist perspectives, feminist grounded theory and feminist ethnography were exemplified in the paradigm of qualitative nursing research. This paper suggested that incorporation of feminist approaches within nursing is a valuable attempt to expand the body of nursing knowledge and to enhance the quality of nursing care services by rectifying male-oriented knowledge and by empowering women in the care of other people as well as themselves.

  9. The comet assay in male reproductive toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, A; Cemeli, E; Anderson, D

    2009-02-01

    Due to our lifestyle and the environment we live in, we are constantly confronted with genotoxic or potentially genotoxic compounds. These toxins can cause DNA damage to our cells, leading to an increase in mutations. Sometimes such mutations could give rise to cancer in somatic cells. However, when germ cells are affected, then the damage could also have an effect on the next and successive generations. A rapid, sensitive and reliable method to detect DNA damage and assess the integrity of the genome within single cells is that of the comet or single-cell gel electrophoresis assay. The present communication gives an overview of the use of the comet assay utilising sperm or testicular cells in reproductive toxicology. This includes consideration of damage assessed by protocol modification, cryopreservation vs the use of fresh sperm, viability and statistics. It further focuses on in vivo and in vitro comet assay studies with sperm and a comparison of this assay with other assays measuring germ cell genotoxicity. As most of the de novo structural aberrations occur in sperm and spermatogenesis is functional from puberty to old age, whereas female germ cells are more complicated to obtain, the examination of male germ cells seems to be an easier and logical choice for research and testing in reproductive toxicology. In addition, the importance of such an assay for the paternal impact of genetic damage in offspring is undisputed. As there is a growing interest in the evaluation of genotoxins in male germ cells, the comet assay allows in vitro and in vivo assessments of various environmental and lifestyle genotoxins to be reliably determined.

  10. Controlling variation in the comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Richard Collins

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Variability of the comet assay is a serious issue, whether it occurs from experiment to experiment in the same laboratory, or between different laboratories analysing identical samples. Do we have to live with high variability, just because the comet assay is a biological assay rather than analytical chemistry? Numerous attempts have been made to limit variability by standardising the assay protocol, and the critical steps in the assay have been identified; agarose concentration, duration of alkaline incubation, and electrophoresis conditions (time, temperature and voltage gradient are particularly important. Even when these are controlled, variation seems to be inevitable. It is helpful to include in experiments reference standards, i.e. cells with a known amount of specific damage to the DNA. They can be aliquots frozen from a single large batch of cells, either untreated (negative controls or treated with, for example, H2O2 or X-rays to induce strand breaks (positive control for the basic assay, or photosensitiser plus light to oxidise guanine (positive control for Fpg- or OGG1-sensitive sites. Reference standards are especially valuable when performing a series of experiments over a long period - for example, analysing samples of white blood cells from a large human biomonitoring trial - to check that the assay is performing consistently, and to identify anomalous results necessitating a repeat experiment. The reference values of tail intensity can also be used to iron out small variations occurring from day to day. We present examples of the use of reference standards in human trials, both within one laboratory and between different laboratories, and describe procedures that can be used to control variation.

  11. The Comet Assay: Tails of the (Unexpected. Use of the comet assay in pharmaceutical development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas-jan Van Der Leede

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In genotoxicity testing of pharmaceuticals the rodent alkaline comet assay is being increasingly used as a second in vivo assay in addition to the in vivo micronucleus assay to mitigate in vitro positive results as recommended by regulatory guidance. In this presentation we want to give insight into the circumstances in vivo comet assay is deployed in a Genetic Toxicology Department of a pharmaceutical company. As the in vivo comet assay is a salvage assay, it means that some events have occurred in an in vitro assay and that the compound (or metabolite responsible for this signal is potentially deselected for further development. More than often the decision to perform an in vivo comet assay is at a very early stage in development and the first time that the compound will be tested in vivo at high/toxic dose levels. As almost no toxicokinetic data and tissue distribution data are available a careful design with maximizes the chances for successful mitigation is necessary. Decisions on acute or repeated dosing need to be made and arrangements for combining the in vivo comet assay with the in vivo micronucleus assay are to be considered. Often synthesis methods need to be scaled up fast to provide the required amount of compound and information on suitable formulations needs to be in place. As exposure data is crucial for interpretation of results, analytical methods need to be brought in place rapidly. An experienced multi skilled and communicative team needs to be available to deploy successfully this kind of assays at an early stage of development. We will present a few scenarios on study conduct and demonstrate how this assay can make a difference for the further development of a new drug.

  12. Comparison of Elecsys Anti-HCV II Assay With Other HCV Screening Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongdong; Zhu, Siyuan; Wang, Tingting; An, Jingna; Wang, Lanlan; Tao, Chuanmin

    2016-09-01

    Early detection of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important step in preventing progression to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Serologic assays for anti-HCV antibody are valuable first-line tests in the screening and diagnosis of HCV infection. This study's aim was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of Elecsys Anti-HCV II assay for HCV screening. A total of 1,044 routine sera, 20 known HCV-positive samples, plus 54 preselected weakly positive samples were tested for anti-HCV with Elecsys Anti-HCV II assay, Elecsys Anti-HCV assays, InTec HCV enzymoimmunoassay (EIA), and Livzon Anti-HCV EIA. Interference test was assessed with additional 423 specimens without clinical evidence of HCV infection: preselected HCV weak reactive samples; dialysis samples; anti-HBc (antibody to HBV core antigen) (+), anti-Treponema pallidum (+), and anti-HIV (+) sera; and samples form autoimmune/alcoholic hepatitis or systemic Lupus erythematosus (SLE). Discrepant results were evaluated with recombinant immunoblot assay. The seroconversion panels were evaluated to assess how early each assay could detect HCV infection. The specificity (99.81%) of the Elecsys Anti-HCV II assay was less than that with the two EIA comparison methods. However, false-negative results were easily seen in the EIA assays. When serial bleeds of HCV panels were compared with the above-mentioned methods, the assay detected acute HCV infection only 3.5 days after a positive HCV-RNA nucleic acid test and earlier than the comparator assays. Sensitivities and specificities of the anti-HCV assays were sufficiently high for use in this study. The Elecsys Anti-HCV II assay is suitable for screening and reliable early detection of HCV infection. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Using the CPTAC Assay Portal to identify and implement highly characterized targeted proteomics assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Halusa, Goran; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Sharma, Vagisha; MacLean, Brendan; Yan, Ping; Wrobel, John; Kennedy, Jacob; Mani, DR; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Meyer, Matthew R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Boja, Emily; Carr, Steven A.; Chan, Daniel W.; Chen, Xian; Chen, Jing; Davies, Sherri; Ellis, Matthew; Fenyo, David; Hiltket, Tara; Ketchum, Karen; Kinsinger, Christopher; Kuhn, Eric; Liebler, Daniel; Liu, Tao; Loss, Michael; MacCoss, Michael; Qian, Weijun; Rivers, Robert; Rodland, Karin D.; Ruggles, Kelly; Scott, Mitchell; Smith, Richard D.; Thomas, Stefani N.; Townsend, Reid; Whiteley, Gordon; Wu, Chaochao; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Rodriguez, Henry; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2016-02-12

    The Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched an Assay Portal (http://assays.cancer.gov) to serve as an open-source repository of well-characterized targeted proteomic assays. The portal is designed to curate and disseminate highly characterized, targeted mass spectrometry (MS)-based assays by providing detailed assay performance characterization data, standard operating procedures, and access to reagents. Assay content is accessed via the portal through queries to find assays targeting proteins associated with specific cellular pathways, protein complexes, or specific chromosomal regions. The position of the peptide analytes for which there are available assays are mapped relative to other features of interest in the protein, such as sequence domains, isoforms, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and post-translational modifications. The overarching goals are to enable robust quantification of all human proteins and to standardize the quantification of targeted MS-based assays to ultimately enable harmonization of results over time and across laboratories.

  14. Random assay in radioimmunoassay: Feasibility and application compared with batch assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Min; Lee, Hwan Hee; Park, Sohyun; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Seok Ki [Dept. of Nuclear MedicineNational Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The batch assay has been conventionally used for radioimmunoassay (RIA) because of its technical robustness and practical convenience. However, it has limitations in terms of the relative lag of report time due to the necessity of multiple assays in a small number of samples compared with the random assay technique. In this study, we aimed to verify whether the random assay technique can be applied in RIA and is feasible in daily practice. The coefficients of variation (CVs) of eight standard curves within a single kit were calculated in a CA-125 immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for the reference of the practically ideal CV of the CA-125 kit. Ten standard curves of 10 kits from 2 prospectively collected lots (pLot) and 85 standard curves of 85 kits from 3 retrospectively collected lots (Lot) were obtained. Additionally, the raw measurement data of both 170 control references and 1123 patients' sera were collected retrospectively between December 2015 and January 2016. A standard curve of the first kit of each lot was used as a master standard curve for a random assay. The CVs of inter-kits were analyzed in each lot, respectively. All raw measurements were normalized by decay and radioactivity. The CA-125 values from control samples and patients' sera were compared using the original batch assay and random assay. In standard curve analysis, the CVs of inter-kits in pLots and Lots were comparable to those within a single kit. The CVs from the random assay with normalization were similar to those from the batch assay in the control samples (CVs % of low/high concentration; Lot1 2.71/1.91, Lot2 2.35/1.83, Lot3 2.83/2.08 vs. Lot1 2.05/1.21, Lot2 1.66/1.48, Lot3 2.41/2.14). The ICCs between the batch assay and random assay using patients' sera were satisfactory (Lot1 1.00, Lot2 0.999, Lot3 1.00). The random assay technique could be successfully applied to the conventional CA-125 IRMA kits. The random assay showed strong agreement with the batch assay. The

  15. Qualitative research methods for medical educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Janice L; Balmer, Dorene F; Giardino, Angelo P

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a primer for qualitative research in medical education. Our aim is to equip readers with a basic understanding of qualitative research and prepare them to judge the goodness of fit between qualitative research and their own research questions. We provide an overview of the reasons for choosing a qualitative research approach and potential benefits of using these methods for systematic investigation. We discuss developing qualitative research questions, grounding research in a philosophical framework, and applying rigorous methods of data collection, sampling, and analysis. We also address methods to establish the trustworthiness of a qualitative study and introduce the reader to ethical concerns that warrant special attention when planning qualitative research. We conclude with a worksheet that readers may use for designing a qualitative study. Medical educators ask many questions that carefully designed qualitative research would address effectively. Careful attention to the design of qualitative studies will help to ensure credible answers that will illuminate many of the issues, challenges, and quandaries that arise while doing the work of medical education. Copyright © 2011 Academic Pediatric Association. All rights reserved.

  16. The qualitative orientation in medical education research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Anne Cleland

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative research is very important in educational research as it addresses the “how” and “why” research questions and enables deeper understanding of experiences, phenomena and context. Qualitative research allows you to ask questions that cannot be easily put into numbers to understand human experience. Getting at the everyday realities of some social phenomenon and studying important questions as they are really practiced helps extend knowledge and understanding. To do so, you need to understand the philosophical stance of qualitative research and work from this to develop the research question, study design, data collection methods and data analysis. In this article, I provide an overview of the assumptions underlying qualitative research and the role of the researcher in the qualitative process. I then go on to discuss the type of research objectives which are common in qualitative research, then introduce the main qualitative designs, data collection tools, and finally the basics of qualitative analysis. I introduce the criteria by which you can judge the quality of qualitative research. Many classic references are cited in this article, and I urge you to seek out some of these further reading to inform your qualitative research program.

  17. Qualitative Descriptive Methods in Health Science Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorafi, Karen Jiggins; Evans, Bronwynne

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this methodology paper is to describe an approach to qualitative design known as qualitative descriptive that is well suited to junior health sciences researchers because it can be used with a variety of theoretical approaches, sampling techniques, and data collection strategies. It is often difficult for junior qualitative researchers to pull together the tools and resources they need to embark on a high-quality qualitative research study and to manage the volumes of data they collect during qualitative studies. This paper seeks to pull together much needed resources and provide an overview of methods. A step-by-step guide to planning a qualitative descriptive study and analyzing the data is provided, utilizing exemplars from the authors' research. This paper presents steps to conducting a qualitative descriptive study under the following headings: describing the qualitative descriptive approach, designing a qualitative descriptive study, steps to data analysis, and ensuring rigor of findings. The qualitative descriptive approach results in a summary in everyday, factual language that facilitates understanding of a selected phenomenon across disciplines of health science researchers. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. The qualitative orientation in medical education research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Jennifer Anne

    2017-06-01

    Qualitative research is very important in educational research as it addresses the "how" and "why" research questions and enables deeper understanding of experiences, phenomena and context. Qualitative research allows you to ask questions that cannot be easily put into numbers to understand human experience. Getting at the everyday realities of some social phenomenon and studying important questions as they are really practiced helps extend knowledge and understanding. To do so, you need to understand the philosophical stance of qualitative research and work from this to develop the research question, study design, data collection methods and data analysis. In this article, I provide an overview of the assumptions underlying qualitative research and the role of the researcher in the qualitative process. I then go on to discuss the type of research objectives which are common in qualitative research, then introduce the main qualitative designs, data collection tools, and finally the basics of qualitative analysis. I introduce the criteria by which you can judge the quality of qualitative research. Many classic references are cited in this article, and I urge you to seek out some of these further reading to inform your qualitative research program.

  19. Comet assay on mice testicular cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Kumar Sharma

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Heritable mutations may result in a variety of adverse outcomes including genetic disease in the offspring. In recent years the focus on germ cell mutagenicity has increased and the “Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS” has published classification criteria for germ cell mutagens (Speit et al., 2009. The in vivo Comet assay is considered a useful tool for investigating germ cell genotoxicity. In the present study DNA strand breaks in testicular cells of mice were investigated. Different classes of chemicals were tested in order to evaluate the sensitivity of the comet assay in testicular cells. The chemicals included environmentally relevant substances such as Bisphenol A, PFOS and Tetrabrombisphenol A. Statistical power calculations will be presented to aid in the design of future Comet assay studies on testicular cells. Power curves were provided with different fold changes in % tail DNA, different number of cells scored and different number of gels (Hansen et al., 2014. An example is shown in Figure 1. A high throughput version of the Comet assay was used. Samples were scored with a fully automatic comet assay scoring system that provided faster scoring of randomly selected cells.

  20. Comet assay in genetic ecotoxicology: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotelle, S; Férard, J F

    1999-01-01

    The Comet assay, also called the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay or microgel electrophoresis (MGE) assay, primarily measures DNA strand breakage in single cells. Since the protocol was published by Singh et al. [1988], its use has increased in different topic areas: clinical applications, human monitoring, radiation biology, genetic toxicology, and genetic ecotoxicology. This study is a review of the investigations that have involved the alkaline version of the Comet assay in genetic ecotoxicology. It focuses mainly on the type of organisms (plants, worms, molluscs, fish, amphibians, and mammalians) but also on the type of cells that have been used for ecotoxicological studies. In the 23 papers published since 1993 and presented here, the original test procedure may have been slightly modified according to the cell type. In vitro and in vivo experiments as well as in situ studies have been carried out in various environments (water, soil, and air). Although the Comet assay is able to detect genotoxic effects of chemical and physical agents, only chemical substances and environmental complex mixtures will be considered in this review. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. A smartphone-readable barcode assay for the detection and quantitation of pesticide residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Juan; Wong, Jessica X H; Cui, Caie; Li, Xiaochun; Yu, Hua-Zhong

    2015-08-21

    In this paper, we present a smartphone-readable barcode assay for the qualitative detection of methyl parathion residues, a toxic organophosphorus pesticide that is popularly used in agriculture worldwide. The detection principle is based on the irreversible inhibition of the enzymatic activity of acetylcholinesterase (AchE) by methyl parathion; AchE catalytically hydrolyzes acetylthiocholine iodine to thiocholine that in turn dissociates dithiobis-nitrobenzoate to produce a yellow product (deprotonated thio-nitrobenzoate). The yellow intensity of the product was confirmed to be inversely dependent on the concentration of the pesticide. We have designed a barcode-formatted assay chip by using a PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) channel plate (as the reaction reservoir), situated under a printed partial barcode, to complete the whole barcode such that it can be directly read by a barcode scanning app installed on a smartphone. The app is able to qualitatively present the result of the pesticide test; the absence or a low concentration of methyl parathion results in the barcode reading as "-", identifying the test as negative for pesticides. Upon obtaining a positive result (the app reads a "+" character), the captured image can be further analyzed to quantitate the methyl parathion concentration in the sample. Besides the portability and simplicity, this mobile-app based colorimetric barcode assay compares favorably with the standard spectrophotometric method.

  2. Hepatitis C virus: Screening, diagnosis, and interpretation of laboratory assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekta Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An estimated 3% of the world population is infected with Hepatitis C virus (HCV, a hepatotropic RNA virus, transmitted primarily via the blood route. The major modes of transmission of the virus include injection drug use, unsafe injection practices, blood transfusion etc. HCV causes chronic hepatitis in about 80% of those infected by it. The mainstay in diagnosing infection with HCV is to initially screen high risk groups for antibodies to HCV (anti-HCV. The inclusion of serum to cut-off ratio (S/CO in recent guidelines is helpful in deciding the supplemental assay to be used to confirm initially reactive screening results. Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAT are used as confirmatory tools, and also to determine viral load prior to initiating treatment. Quantitative NAT has replaced qualitative assays. Genotyping is an important tool in clinical management to predict the likelihood of response and determine the optimal duration of therapy. The impact of this infection has begun to emerge in India. The problem of professional blood donation despite an existing law against it, and flourishing unsafe injection practices, are potential sources for the spread of hepatitis C in our country. All health care practitioners need to understand how to establish or exclude a diagnosis of HCV infection and to interpret the tests correctly. In the absence of a preventive or therapeutic vaccine, and also of post-exposure prophylaxis against the virus, it is imperative to diagnose infection by HCV so as to prevent hepatic insult and the ensuing complications that follow, including primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. This review aims to help blood bank staff regarding options for diagnosis and management of donors positive for HCV.

  3. Assay Portal | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CPTAC Assay Portal serves as a centralized public repository of "fit-for-purpose," multiplexed quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomic targeted assays. Targeted proteomic assays eliminate issues that are commonly observed using conventional protein detection systems.

  4. Assay Characterization Guidance Documents | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    CPTAC characterized assays are defined as those that meet the criteria described in the Assay Characterization Guidance Document. This guidance document aligns with recommendations by the research community as “fit-for-purpose” validation requirements of targeted proteomics assays.

  5. Competitive protein binding assay for piritrexim

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolley, J.L. Jr.; Ringstad, J.L.; Sigel, C.W. (Wellcome Research Laboratories, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA))

    1989-09-01

    A competitive protein binding assay for piritrexim (PTX, 1) that makes use of a commercially available radioassay kit for methotrexate has been developed. After it is selectively extracted from plasma, PTX competes with ({sup 125}I)methotrexate for binding to dihydrofolate reductase isolated from Lactobacillus casei. Free drug is separated from bound drug by adsorption to dextran-coated charcoal. Piritrexim is measurable over a range of 0.01 to 10.0 micrograms/mL in plasma with a coefficient of variation less than 15%. The limit of sensitivity of the assay is approximately 2 ng/mL. An excellent correlation between this assay and a previously published HPLC method was found.

  6. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiter, Brian J.; Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Prussin, Stanley G.

    2011-04-01

    This paper discusses the use of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) techniques for the isotopic and quantitative assaying of radioactive material. Potential applications include age-dating of an unknown radioactive source, pre- and post-detonation nuclear forensics and safeguards for nuclear fuel cycles Examples of age-dating a strong radioactive source and assaying a spent fuel pin are discussed. The modeling work has ben performed with the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNPX and the capability to simulate NRF has bee added to the code. Discussed are the limitations in MCNPX's photon transport physics for accurately describing photon scattering processes that are important contributions to the background and impact the applicability of the NRF assay technique.

  7. Progetto QUADIS (Qualit di Servizio)

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrari, T; Vistoli, C

    1999-01-01

    Le applicazioni distribuite di nuova generazione richiedono servizi di rete garantiti. La rete Internet fornisce tuttora un servizio di tipo ³best effort² e perciò non adatto a soddisfare le nuove esigenze che provengono dalle $9 applicazioni. E' necessario studiare nuove architetture che facciano interagire applicazioni e rete in modo più stretto per ottenere più garanzie di affidabilit ed efficienza.Questo documento introduce i concetti base della qualit di $9 servizio sulla rete e i meccanismi in fase di studio o di sperimentazione finora esistenti. Definisce inoltre un programma di lavoro che prevede l'analisi di alcune applicazioni specifiche dell'INFN e la sperimentazione di servizi di $9 rete QoS adatti all'applicazione in esame.Questo documento è allegato al progetto "QUAdiS" di Gruppo V.

  8. Making Qualitative Studies Talk back

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wentzer, Helle

    2006-01-01

    that qualitative studies of user-reception can inform system design and IT-development in health care. Method: The framework of analysing user-reception of IT-systems was developed on the background of an evaluation study of ICT-implementation in primary health care (Wentzer, Bygholm 2001). High standardisation...... care services. Visions of shared use of (electronic) data for administrative purposes, for research purposes and for performing daily health care services push the IT-development and challenges the understanding of what health care work actually is. The Achilles of ICT-mediated health care...... to communicate with IT. A proper articulation of users experiences can explain problems of continuity of work practice with ICT - and inform further system design from a user-centred perspective....

  9. The use of saturation in qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Janiece L

    2012-01-01

    Understanding qualitative research is an important component of cardiovascular nurses' practice and allows them to understand the experiences, stories, and perceptions of patients with cardiovascular conditions. In understanding qualitative research methods, it is essential that the cardiovascular nurse understands the process of saturation within qualitative methods. Saturation is a tool used for ensuring that adequate and quality data are collected to support the study. Saturation is frequently reported in qualitative research and may be the gold standard. However, the use of saturation within methods has varied. Hence, the purpose of this column is to provide insight for the cardiovascular nurse regarding the use of saturation by reviewing the recommendations for which qualitative research methods it is appropriate to use and how to know when saturation is achieved. In understanding saturation, the cardiovascular nurse can be a better consumer of qualitative research.

  10. Commentary: Writing and Evaluating Qualitative Research Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yelena P; Thompson, Deborah; Aroian, Karen J; McQuaid, Elizabeth L; Deatrick, Janet A

    2016-06-01

    To provide an overview of qualitative methods, particularly for reviewers and authors who may be less familiar with qualitative research. A question and answer format is used to address considerations for writing and evaluating qualitative research. When producing qualitative research, individuals are encouraged to address the qualitative research considerations raised and to explicitly identify the systematic strategies used to ensure rigor in study design and methods, analysis, and presentation of findings. Increasing capacity for review and publication of qualitative research within pediatric psychology will advance the field's ability to gain a better understanding of the specific needs of pediatric populations, tailor interventions more effectively, and promote optimal health. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. QUALITATIVE INTERPRETATION OF GALAXY SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Almeida, J.; Morales-Luis, A. B. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Terlevich, R.; Terlevich, E. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico); Cid Fernandes, R., E-mail: jos@iac.es, E-mail: abml@iac.es, E-mail: rjt@ast.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: eterlevi@inaoep.mx, E-mail: cid@astro.ufsc.br [Departamento de Fisica-CFM, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, P.O. Box 476, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2012-09-10

    We describe a simple step-by-step guide to qualitative interpretation of galaxy spectra. Rather than an alternative to existing automated tools, it is put forward as an instrument for quick-look analysis and for gaining physical insight when interpreting the outputs provided by automated tools. Though the recipe is for general application, it was developed for understanding the nature of the Automatic Spectroscopic K-means-based (ASK) template spectra. They resulted from the classification of all the galaxy spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7, thus being a comprehensive representation of the galaxy spectra in the local universe. Using the recipe, we give a description of the properties of the gas and the stars that characterize the ASK classes, from those corresponding to passively evolving galaxies, to H II galaxies undergoing a galaxy-wide starburst. The qualitative analysis is found to be in excellent agreement with quantitative analyses of the same spectra. We compare the mean ages of the stellar populations with those inferred using the code STARLIGHT. We also examine the estimated gas-phase metallicity with the metallicities obtained using electron-temperature-based methods. A number of byproducts follow from the analysis. There is a tight correlation between the age of the stellar population and the metallicity of the gas, which is stronger than the correlations between galaxy mass and stellar age, and galaxy mass and gas metallicity. The galaxy spectra are known to follow a one-dimensional sequence, and we identify the luminosity-weighted mean stellar age as the affine parameter that describes the sequence. All ASK classes happen to have a significant fraction of old stars, although spectrum-wise they are outshined by the youngest populations. Old stars are metal-rich or metal-poor depending on whether they reside in passive galaxies or in star-forming galaxies.

  12. Fibromyalgia Flares: A Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Ann; Whipple, Mary O; Rhudy, Lori M

    2016-03-01

    Patients with fibromyalgia report periods of symptom exacerbation, colloquially referred to as "flares" and despite clinical observation of flares, no research has purposefully evaluated the presence and characteristics of flares in fibromyalgia. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe fibromyalgia flares in a sample of patients with fibromyalgia. Using seven open-ended questions, patients were asked to describe how they perceived fibromyalgia flares and triggers and alleviating factors associated with flares. Patients were also asked to describe how a flare differs from their typical fibromyalgia symptoms and how they cope with fibromyalgia flares. Content analysis was used to analyze the text. A total of 44 participants completed the survey. Responses to the seven open-ended questions revealed three main content areas: causes of flares, flare symptoms, and dealing with a flare. Participants identified stress, overdoing it, poor sleep, and weather changes as primary causes of flares. Symptoms characteristic of flares included flu-like body aches/exhaustion, pain, fatigue, and variety of other symptoms. Participants reported using medical treatments, rest, activity and stress avoidance, and waiting it out to cope with flares. Our results demonstrate that periods of symptom exacerbation (i.e., flares) are commonly experienced by patients with fibromyalgia and symptoms of flares can be differentiated from every day or typical symptoms of fibromyalgia. Our study is the first of its kind to qualitatively explore characteristics, causes, and management strategies of fibromyalgia flares. Future studies are needed to quantitatively characterize fibromyalgia flares and evaluate mechanisms of flares. © 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Mathematical Model of Serodiagnostic Immunochromatographic Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotnikov, Dmitriy V; Zherdev, Anatoly V; Dzantiev, Boris B

    2017-04-18

    This article describes the mathematical model for an immunochromatographic assay for the detection of specific immunoglobulins against a target antigen (antibodies) in blood/serum (serodiagnosis). The model utilizes an analytical (non-numerical) approach and allows the calculation of the kinetics of immune complexes' formation in a continuous-flow system using commonly available software, such as Microsoft Excel. The developed model could identify the nature of the influence of immunochemical interaction constants and reagent concentrations on the kinetics of the formation of the detected target complex. On the basis of the model, recommendations are developed to decrease the detection limit for an immunochromatographic assay of specific immunoglobulins.

  14. A new fluorescent assay for enalapril maleate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de los A Oliva, María; Sombra, Lorena L; Olsina, Roberto A; Masi, Adriana N

    2005-09-01

    A new spectrofluorimetric method for the enalapril maleate monitoring was studied. Enalapril maleate was found to be highly photolabile. This drug was evaluated according to photodegradation assay at pH 2.5 and 6. Enalapril maleate was exposed to UVA-UVB radiations. Under these specific conditions was found as degradation product, the diketopiperazine. The modification of the fluorescent properties of enalapril maleate in solution after exposure UV-radiation and the degradation mechanisms were studied. The photodegradation was followed by the developed spectrofluorimetric assay.

  15. Analysing qualitative research data using computer software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLafferty, Ella; Farley, Alistair H

    An increasing number of clinical nurses are choosing to undertake qualitative research. A number of computer software packages are available designed for the management and analysis of qualitative data. However, while it is claimed that the use of these programs is also increasing, this claim is not supported by a search of recent publications. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of using computer software packages to manage and analyse qualitative data.

  16. THE DURATION AND PHASES OF QUALITATIVE RESEARCH

    OpenAIRE

    Natasha ANGELOSKA-GALEVSKA

    1998-01-01

    Text points to the main characteristics of the research process when we use qualitative approach. Qualitative research design differs from the conventional linear model, which is typical for quantitative research. Qualitative research begins with selection of a research problem and then follows a cyclical pattern in which changes can be made in any phase of the research. New questions, tasks and hypotheses generate during the research and collection and analysis of data can be done in success...

  17. Qualitative and Mixed Methods Social Media Research

    OpenAIRE

    Chareen L. Snelson

    2016-01-01

    Social media technologies have attracted substantial attention among many types of users including researchers who have published studies for several years. This article presents an overview of trends in qualitative and mixed methods social media research literature published from 2007 through 2013. A collection of 229 qualitative studies were identified through a systematic literature review process. A subset of 55 of these articles report studies involving a combination of qualitative and q...

  18. USING QUALITATIVE APPROACH IN SPECIAL EDUCATION RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasa GALEVSKA

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The text deals with some methodological problems in special education research. The limits of purely positivistic, quantitative, experimental research in the area of special education lately are overcome with the use of qualitative approach. Qualitative research are flexibly designed. The data are descriptive and collected in natural setting. Characteristics of the qualitative research make them more appropriate for investigation of the phenomena in special education, considering the small numbers of available subjects, heterogeneity, ethical and moral problems, etc.

  19. Performance of a Multiplex Serological Helicobacter pylori Assay on a Novel Microfluidic Assay Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Filomena

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori occurs in 50% of the world population, and is associated with the development of ulcer and gastric cancer. Serological diagnostic tests indicate an H. pylori infection by detecting antibodies directed against H. pylori proteins. In addition to line blots, multiplex assay platforms provide smart solutions for the simultaneous analysis of antibody responses towards several H. pylori proteins. We used seven H. pylori proteins (FliD, gGT, GroEL, HpaA, CagA, VacA, and HP0231 and an H. pylori lysate for the development of a multiplex serological assay on a novel microfluidic platform. The reaction limited binding regime in the microfluidic channels allows for a short incubation time of 35 min. The developed assay showed very high sensitivity (99% and specificity (100%. Besides sensitivity and specificity, the technical validation (intra-assay CV = 3.7 ± 1.2% and inter-assay CV = 5.5 ± 1.2% demonstrates that our assay is also a robust tool for the analysis of the H. pylori-specific antibody response. The integration of the virulence factors CagA and VacA allow for the assessment of the risk for gastric cancer development. The short assay time and the performance of the platform shows the potential for implementation of such assays in a clinical setting.

  20. Qualitative versus quantitative methods in psychiatric research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razafsha, Mahdi; Behforuzi, Hura; Azari, Hassan; Zhang, Zhiqun; Wang, Kevin K; Kobeissy, Firas H; Gold, Mark S

    2012-01-01

    Qualitative studies are gaining their credibility after a period of being misinterpreted as "not being quantitative." Qualitative method is a broad umbrella term for research methodologies that describe and explain individuals' experiences, behaviors, interactions, and social contexts. In-depth interview, focus groups, and participant observation are among the qualitative methods of inquiry commonly used in psychiatry. Researchers measure the frequency of occurring events using quantitative methods; however, qualitative methods provide a broader understanding and a more thorough reasoning behind the event. Hence, it is considered to be of special importance in psychiatry. Besides hypothesis generation in earlier phases of the research, qualitative methods can be employed in questionnaire design, diagnostic criteria establishment, feasibility studies, as well as studies of attitude and beliefs. Animal models are another area that qualitative methods can be employed, especially when naturalistic observation of animal behavior is important. However, since qualitative results can be researcher's own view, they need to be statistically confirmed, quantitative methods. The tendency to combine both qualitative and quantitative methods as complementary methods has emerged over recent years. By applying both methods of research, scientists can take advantage of interpretative characteristics of qualitative methods as well as experimental dimensions of quantitative methods.

  1. Qualitative research in travel behavior studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mars Aicart, M.L.; Ruiz Sanchez, T.; Arroyo Lopez, M.R.

    2016-07-01

    Qualitative methodology is extensively used in a wide range of scientific areas, such as Sociology and Psychology, and it is been used to study individual and household decision making processes. However, in the Transportation Planning and Engineering domain it is still infrequent to find in the travel behavior literature studies using qualitative techniques to explore activity-travel decisions. The aim of this paper is first, to provide an overview of the types of qualitative techniques available and to explore how to correctly implement them. Secondly, to highlight the special characteristics of qualitative methods that make them appropriate to study activity-travel decision processes. Far from been an unempirical or intuitive methodology, using qualitative methods properly implies a strong foundation on theoretical frameworks, a careful design of data collection and a deep data analysis. For such a purpose, a review of the scarce activity-travel behavior literature using qualitative methods, or a combination of qualitative and quantitative approaches, is presented. The use of qualitative techniques can play a role of being a supplementary way of obtaining information related to activity-travel decisions which otherwise it would be extremely difficult to find. This work ends with some conclusions about how qualitative research could help in making progress on activity-travel behavior studies. (Author)

  2. New directions in qualitative research in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuth, Carolin

    2015-06-01

    Qualitative Research gains increasing popularity in the field of Psychology. With the renewed interest, there are, however, also some risks related to the overhomogenization and increasing standardization of qualitative methods. This special issue is dedicated to clarify some of the existing misconceptions of qualitative research and to discuss its potentials for the field of psychology in light of recent endeavors to overcome paradigmatic battles and a re-orientation to the specifities of psychology. The issue comprises a discussion from workshop on the future of qualitative research in psychology organized at Aalborg University, and several contributions that resulted from it.

  3. New Directions in Qualitative Research in Psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demuth, Carolin

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative Research gains increasing popularity in the field of Psychology. With the renewed interest, there are, however, also some risks related to the overhomogenization and increasing standardization of qualitative methods. This special issue is dedicated to clarify some of the existing...... misconceptions of qualitative research and to discuss its potentials for the field of psychology in light of recent endeavors to overcome paradigmatic battles and a re-orientation to the specifities of psychology. The issue comprises a discussion from workshop on the future of qualitative research in psychology...

  4. [A call for qualitative research in Orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yitschaky, O; Hofnung, T; Zini, A

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative research is an umbrella term for an array of attitudes and strategies for conducting inquiries that are aimed at discerning how human beings understand, experience, and interpret the social world. It is employed in many different academic disciplines most particularly in the social sciences and humanities, however recently more and more qualitative research is being conducted under the medical sciences including dentistry and orthodontics. This is due to its nature of in-depth investigation, which can provide answers to questions that cannot be satisfactorily answered using quantitative methods alone. The aims of this article are to discuss the characteristics of qualitative research, to review the orthodontic English literature, and to highlight the advantages of qualitative research in orthodontics. The literature review yielded several important conclusions regarding qualitative research in orthodontics: 1. most of the qualitative research done in orthodontics chose to use semi structured in-depth interviews for data collection; 2. qualitative research highlights aspects that are very important, and sometimes crucial to everyday practice and long term treatment; 3. there is a lack of qualitative studies in the field of orthodontics. Taking into account the nature of the orthodontic treatment, which is a prolonged one, demanding of a good orthodontist-patient rapport, and a wide perspective on behalf of the clinician, filling the gap in the discipline through conducting more qualitative studies aimed at understanding the point of view of the patient, as well as that of the clinician, may be beneficial for the improvement of the treatment.

  5. Theoretical versus pragmatic design in qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joanna; Bekker, Hilary; Cheater, Francine

    2011-01-01

    For many years, discussions of the relative merits of generic and theoretical approaches to qualitative research have divided researchers while overshadowing the need to focus on addressing clinical questions. Drawing on the challenges of designing a study that explored parents' experiences of living with children with hydrocephalus, the authors of this paper argue that over-adherence to, and deliberations about, the philosophical origins of qualitative methods is undermining the contributions qualitative research could make to evidence-based health care and suggest qualitative methods should stand alone.

  6. Multicenter evaluation of the Elecsys® anti-HCV II assay for the diagnosis of hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Juan I; van Helden, Josef; Alborino, Flora; Bürgisser, Philippe; Cellerai, Cristina; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Eiras, Adolfo; Rodriguez, Maria I; Ghisetti, Valeria; Gleich, Michael; Imdahl, Roland; Kaiser, Claudia; Möller, Petra; Wetlitzky, Olaf; Segovia, Manuel; Schennach, Harald; Mühlbacher, Annelies

    2013-08-01

    Routine screening of patients at risk of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has become a priority given recent improvements in therapeutic options and the asymptomatic nature of most chronic infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the Elecsys® Anti-HCV II assay, a new qualitative antibody immunoassay, compared with currently available assays, and assess its suitability for routine diagnostic testing. The sensitivity of the Elecsys® Anti-HCV II, ARCHITECT® Anti-HCV, AxSYM® HCV 3.0, PRISM® HCV, Vitros® ECi Anti-HCV, Elecsys® Anti-HCV, and ADVIA Centaur® HCV assays was compared using commercially available seroconversion panels and samples from patients known to be HCV positive and infected with HCV genotypes 1-6. Specificity was investigated using samples from blood donors, unselected hospitalized patients, and patients with potential cross-reacting factors or from high-risk groups. The Elecsys® Anti-HCV II assay detected more positive bleeds than the comparator assays, was more sensitive in recognizing early HCV infection, and correctly identified all 765 samples known to be HCV positive, regardless of genotype. The overall specificity of the Elecsys(®) Anti-HCV II assay was 99.84% (n=6,850) using blood donor samples, 99.66% (n=3,922) using samples from unselected hospitalized patients, and 99.66% (n=2,397) using samples from patients with potentially cross-reacting factors or from high-risk groups. The specificity of the Elecsys® Anti-HCV II assay was superior or equal to the comparator assays. In conclusion, the Elecsys® Anti-HCV II assay is a sensitive and specific assay suitable for routine use in the reliable detection of anti-HCV antibodies. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Increased sensitivity of SPR assays in plasma through efficient parallel assay optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Anna; Lager, Anna; Hämäläinen, Markku D; Jarhede, Tanja

    2013-05-05

    The sensitivity of biosensor assays in complex media such as plasma or serum is often limited by non-specific binding. The degree of binding often varies between individuals and therefore a large number of different plasma samples have to be used during assay development. Some surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors allow for parallel screening of several running buffer compositions, with a number of different immobilization levels for each buffer. These technical possibilities combined with statistical design of experiments (DoE) enable efficient parallel optimization of multiple assay conditions. In this paper we outline how to increase the sensitivity in SPR-based assays by minimizing background binding and variability from negative control plasma while retaining high signals from positive samples. To mimic immunogenicity studies of biotherapeutics we have used a model assay with anti-rituximab as an anti-drug antibody to be detected in plasma by binding to immobilized rituximab. Immobilization level and sodium chloride concentration were found to be the most important factors to optimize. There were also a number of significant interaction effects and strong non-linearites between the buffer composition/immobilization level and the assay performance, which necessitated DoE based optimization strategies. The applicability of the optimized conditions was verified with several assays (anti-erythropoietin, omalizumab, anti-IgE and anti-myoglobin) in spiked plasma samples resulting in detection levels in the range of 80-170 ng ml(-1). The buffer conditions presented in this paper can be used for other immunogenicity assays on biosensor platforms or as a good starting point for further assay development for new immunogenicity assays. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Benzodiazepine Synthesis and Rapid Toxicity Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, James T.; Boriraj, Grit

    2010-01-01

    A second-year organic chemistry laboratory experiment to introduce students to general concepts of medicinal chemistry is described. Within a single three-hour time window, students experience the synthesis of a biologically active small molecule and the assaying of its biological toxicity. Benzodiazepine rings are commonly found in antidepressant…

  9. Development and validation of ultraviolet spectrophotometric assay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to validate the method, the timeabsorbance relationship, optical characteristics (limit of detection, limit of quantitation, wavelength of maximum absorption, slope, linearity, intercept and Beer's law limits), accuracy, inter-day precision and intra-day precision of the assay method were studied. The absorbance of ...

  10. A novel fluorescent assay for sucrose transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gora Peter J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have developed a novel assay based on the ability of type I sucrose uptake transporters (SUTs to transport the fluorescent coumarin β-glucoside, esculin. Budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae is routinely used for the heterologous expression of SUTs and does not take up esculin. Results When type I sucrose transporters StSUT1 from potato or AtSUC2 from Arabidopsis were expressed in yeast, the cells were able to take up esculin and became brightly fluorescent. We tested a variety of incubation times, esculin concentrations, and buffer pH values and found that for these transporters, a 1 hr incubation at 0.1 to 1 mM esculin at pH 4.0 produced fluorescent cells that were easily distinguished from vector controls. Esculin uptake was assayed by several methods including fluorescence microscopy, spectrofluorometry and fluorescence-activiated cell sorting (FACS. Expression of the type II sucrose transporter OsSUT1 from rice did not result in increased esculin uptake under any conditions tested. Results were reproduced successfully in two distinct yeast strains, SEY6210 (an invertase mutant and BY4742. Conclusions The esculin uptake assay is rapid and sensitive and should be generally useful for preliminary tests of sucrose transporter function by heterologous expression in yeast. This assay is also suitable for selection of yeast showing esculin uptake activity using FACS.

  11. Assay for Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Salvatore F.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a three-hour experiment designed to introduce students to chemistry of the angiotensis-converting enzyme, illustrate design of a quenched fluorescence substrate, and examine considerations necessary in designing a clinical assay. Includes background information on the biochemistry of hypertension, reagents/materials needed, procedures…

  12. Optimization of the sulforhodamine B colorimetric assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazisis, K T; Geromichalos, G D; Dimitriadis, K A; Kortsaris, A H

    1997-10-27

    Sulforhodamine B (SRB) protein staining has been widely used for cell proliferation and chemosensitivity testing, substituting for tetrazolium-based assays. However, the cell fixation step in the original assay is subject to error. We tested whether aspiration of medium with an automatic microplate multiwash device prior to fixation improves the method for adherent cells. A panel of adherent cell lines was used. Signal-to-noise ratios were significantly increased in the new assay. Coefficients of variation (CV) between replicate wells were significantly lower especially at lower cell densities. The linearity of the method improved, with absolute linearity over the whole range of cell densities. The aspiration procedure dislodged only negligible numbers of cells. Cytotoxicity testing using the cytotoxic agent paclitaxel showed no IC50 (50% inhibitory concentration) differences between the new and original methods but a better CV was associated with the optimized protocol. We conclude that aspiration of the growth medium prior to fixing comprises a safe and reliable practice which improves CV, linearity and the signal-to-noise ratio of the SRB assay.

  13. Relationships between ytterbium precipitation assay, colorimetric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vitro biological activities of tannins and the commonly used, rapid colorimetric and gravimetric assays of phenolic concentration was of interest. An in vitro gas production bioassay was used to assess the potential biological effect of tannins by incubating tree fruits with and without tannin-binding PEG. Material and Methods.

  14. Wafer-scale Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Tae-Sun; Davila, Antonio; Zand, Katayoun; Douglas, Wallace C.; Burke, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    It has been reported that mitochondrial metabolic and biophysical parameters are associated with degenerative diseases and the aging process. To evaluate these biochemical parameters, current technology requires several hundred milligrams of isolated mitochondria for functional assays. Here, we demonstrate manufacturable wafer-scale mitochondrial functional assay lab-on-a-chip devices, which require mitochondrial protein quantities three orders of magnitude less than current assays, integrated onto 4” standard silicon wafer with new fabrication processes and materials. Membrane potential changes of isolated mitochondria from various well-established cell lines such as human HeLa cell line (Heb7A), human osteosarcoma cell line (143b) and mouse skeletal muscle tissue were investigated and compared. This second generation integrated lab-on-a-chip system developed here shows enhanced structural durability and reproducibility while increasing the sensitivity to changes in mitochondrial membrane potential by an order of magnitude as compared to first generation technologies. We envision this system to be a great candidate to substitute current mitochondrial assay systems. PMID:22627274

  15. Endoproteolytic activity assay in malting barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Gómez Guerrero

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrolysis of barley proteins into peptides and amino acids is one of the most important processes during barley germination.The degradation of the endosperm stored proteins facilitates water and enzyme movements, enhances modification, liberates starch granules and increases soluble amino nitrogen. Protease activity is the result of the activities of a mixture of exo- and endo-proteases. The barley proteins are initially solubilized by endo-proteases and the further by exo-proteases. Four classes of endo-proteases have been described: serine-proteases, cysteine-proteases, aspartic-proteases and metallo-proteases. The objective of this work was to develop a rapid and colorimetric enzymatic assay to determine the endo-proteolytic activity of the four endo-protease classes using two different substrates: azo-gelatin and azo-casein. Optimum conditions for the assays such as: pH,reaction time and temperature and absorbance scale were determined. Azo-gelatin presented several difficulties in standardizing an “in solution” assay. On the other hand, azo-casein allowed standardization of the assay for the four enzyme classes to produce consistent results. The endo-proteoteolytic method developed was applied to determine the endo-protease activity in barley, malt and wort.

  16. Protein biomarker validation via proximity ligation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokzijl, A; Nong, R; Darmanis, S; Hertz, E; Landegren, U; Kamali-Moghaddam, M

    2014-05-01

    The ability to detect minute amounts of specific proteins or protein modifications in blood as biomarkers for a plethora of human pathological conditions holds great promise for future medicine. Despite a large number of plausible candidate protein biomarkers published annually, the translation to clinical use is impeded by factors such as the required size of the initial studies, and limitations of the technologies used. The proximity ligation assay (PLA) is a versatile molecular tool that has the potential to address some obstacles, both in validation of biomarkers previously discovered using other techniques, and for future routine clinical diagnostic needs. The enhanced specificity of PLA extends the opportunities for large-scale, high-performance analyses of proteins. Besides advantages in the form of minimal sample consumption and an extended dynamic range, the PLA technique allows flexible assay reconfiguration. The technology can be adapted for detecting protein complexes, proximity between proteins in extracellular vesicles or in circulating tumor cells, and to address multiple post-translational modifications in the same protein molecule. We discuss herein requirements for biomarker validation, and how PLA may play an increasing role in this regard. We describe some recent developments of the technology, including proximity extension assays, the use of recombinant affinity reagents suitable for use in proximity assays, and the potential for single cell proteomics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge. © 2013.

  17. Paraprotein interference with turbidimetric gentamicin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimeski, Goce; Bassett, Kendra; Brown, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Gentamicin due to its low level of resistance and rapid bactericidal activity is commonly used to treat gram-negative bacteria. However, due to its toxic effects it needs to be monitored. To date, no interference has been reported with gentamicin assays. A patient with leg cellulitis and sepsis received a single dose of gentamicin and a sample was sent for gentamicin analysis. The sample showed high blank absorbance readings on Beckman DxC800 and DC800 analysers with various dilutions. A second sample was received and analysed on a Roche Cobas system to obtain a result. A third sample was received 107 hours later with the same results and this sample was then analysed neat and post ethanol precipitation on all the turbidimetric assays available on the DxC800 analyser. The high blank absorbance was observed upon addition of the reactive reagents due to protein precipitation. Although not obvious from the patient protein results, it was shown the presence of high IgM paraprotein, 18.9 g/L (reference range 0.4-2.3 g/L) was the cause of precipitation, giving high blank readings. Of all the other turbidimetric assays, only vancomicin and valproate showed similar high blank absorbance readings. To be able to provide more rapid results it was shown ethanol could be used as a precipitant of proteins in both calibrators and patient samples with acceptable recovery. IgM paraprotein was identified as the cause of interference with the gentamicin, vancomicin and valproate assays. Protein interference in these assays can be overcome by precipitation with ethanol.

  18. Is Qualitative Research Second Class Science? A Quantitative Longitudinal Examination of Qualitative Research in Medical Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuval, Kerem; Harker, Karen; Roudsari, Bahman; Groce, Nora E.; Mills, Britain; Siddiqi, Zoveen; Shachak, Aviv

    2011-01-01

    Background Qualitative research appears to be gaining acceptability in medical journals. Yet, little is actually known about the proportion of qualitative research and factors affecting its publication. This study describes the proportion of qualitative research over a 10 year period and correlates associated with its publication. Design A quantitative longitudinal examination of the proportion of original qualitative research in 67 journals of general medicine during a 10 year period (1998–2007). The proportion of qualitative research was determined by dividing original qualitative studies published (numerator) by all original research articles published (denominator). We used a generalized estimating equations approach to assess the longitudinal association between the proportion of qualitative studies and independent variables (i.e. journals' country of publication and impact factor; editorial/methodological papers discussing qualitative research; and specific journal guidelines pertaining to qualitative research). Findings A 2.9% absolute increase and 3.4-fold relative increase in qualitative research publications occurred over a 10 year period (1.2% in 1998 vs. 4.1% in 2007). The proportion of original qualitative research was independently and significantly associated with the publication of editorial/methodological papers in the journal (b = 3.688, P = 0.012); and with qualitative research specifically mentioned in guidelines for authors (b = 6.847, Pqualitative research was associated only with journals published in the UK in comparison to other countries, yet with borderline statistical significance (b = 1.776, P = 0.075). The journals' impact factor was not associated with the publication of qualitative research. Conclusions Despite an increase in the proportion of qualitative research in medical journals over a 10 year period, the proportion remains low. Journals' policies pertaining to qualitative research, as expressed by the

  19. Generic qualitative research: a design for qualitative research in emergency care?

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, S; Endacott, R

    2007-01-01

    The frequency of qualitative studies in the Emergency Medicine Journal, while still low, has increased over the last few years. All take a generic approach and rarely conform to established qualitative approaches such as phenomenology, ethnography and grounded theory. This generic approach is no doubt selected for pragmatic reasons but can be weakened by a lack of rigor and understanding of qualitative research. This paper explores qualitative approaches and then focuses on “best practice” fo...

  20. Design and analysis of Q-RT-PCR assays for haematological malignancies using mixed effects models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgsted, Martin; Mandrup, Charlotte; Petersen, Anders

    research use and needs qualit control for accuracy and precision. Especially the identification of experimental variations and statistical analysis has recently created discussions. The standard analytical technique is to use the Delta-Delta-Ct method. Although this method accounts for sample specific...... variations such as RNA purification, it does not account for other experimental effects as variations in cDNA synthesis, amplification efficiency and assay variations. To obtain an assessment of the accuracy and precision of the assays a novel approach for the statistical analysis of Q-RT-PCR has been...... variance, repeated measures correlation and experimental variations. The modelling approach has been used to conduct fold change analysis on microRNA (miRNA) expressions in Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL). In particular it was demonstrated that results obtained from global miR expression arrays...

  1. Enhanced detection of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae by an optimized phenol red assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surre, Jeremy; Canard, Isabelle; Bourne-Branchu, Pierrot; Courbiere, Estelle; Franceschi, Christine; Chatellier, Sonia; van Belkum, Alex; Ramjeet, Mahendrasingh

    2018-01-01

    Screening for the detection of carbapenemase-producing bacteria still encounters issues related to workflow, limit of detection, or qualitative interpretation. We developed a spectrophotometry-based version of the Carba NP phenol red assay (Nordmann et al., 2012) in a microtiter plate format, compatible with low bacterial cell counts. We were able to detect highly active carbapenemases such as KPC and IMP in 30min. A wider range of carbapenemases including OXA-48 were detected using higher inocula, still being competitive compared with currently available phenol red assays. Validation experiments of our test with a panel of 81 Enterobacteriaceae showed good performance with 93% of sensitivity and 92% of specificity. The compatibility of our routine-friendly protocol with automation offers great perspectives for high throughput screening in outbreak situations and/or in big laboratories. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Qualitative "trial-sibling" studies and "unrelated" qualitative studies contributed to complex intervention reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Jane; Hendry, Margaret; Lewin, Simon; Glenton, Claire; Chandler, Jackie; Rashidian, Arash

    2016-06-01

    To compare the contribution of "trial-sibling" and "unrelated" qualitative studies in complex intervention reviews. Researchers are using qualitative "trial-sibling" studies undertaken alongside trials to provide explanations to understand complex interventions. In the absence of qualitative "trial-sibling" studies, it is not known if qualitative studies "unrelated" to trials are helpful. Trials, "trial-sibling," and "unrelated" qualitative studies looking at three health system interventions were identified. We looked for similarities and differences between the two types of qualitative studies, such as participants, intervention delivery, context, study quality and reporting, and contribution to understanding trial results. Reporting was generally poor in both qualitative study types. We detected no substantial differences in participant characteristics. Interventions in qualitative "trial-sibling" studies were delivered using standardized protocols, whereas interventions in "unrelated" qualitative studies were delivered in routine care. Qualitative "trial-sibling" studies alone provided insufficient data to develop meaningful transferrable explanations beyond the trial context, and their limited focus on immediate implementation did not address all phenomena of interest. Together, "trial-sibling" and "unrelated" qualitative studies provided larger, richer data sets across contexts to better understand the phenomena of interest. Findings support inclusion of "trial-sibling" and "unrelated" qualitative studies to explore complexity in complex intervention reviews. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Qualitative interpretation of high resolution aeromagnetic (HRAM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Qualitative interpretation of high resolution aeromagnetic (HRAM) data from some parts of offshore Niger delta, Nigeria. ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... The original raster map, obtained from the Nigeria Geological Survey Agency (NGSA) in half degree sheet, was subjected to qualitative data analysis using the ...

  4. Qualitative methods: a research approach worth considering

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    has no explanation for. He/she observes the phenomenon and collects data about it to describe it-this is qualitative research. With enough information about the phenomenon the researcher can now formulate a hypothesis or hypotheses that can be tested through quantitative research. Qualitative research developed in the ...

  5. The Landscape of Qualitative Research. Third Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzin, Norman K., Ed.; Lincoln, Yvonna, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This book, the first volume of the paperback versions of the "The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Research, Third Edition," takes a look at the field from a broadly theoretical perspective, and is composed of the Handbook's Parts I ("Locating the Field"), II ("Major Paradigms and Perspectives"), and VI ("The Future of Qualitative Research"). "The…

  6. Validity in Qualitative Research: Application of Safeguards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daytner, Katrina M.

    2006-01-01

    The construct of validity has received considerable attention in qualitative methods literature (Denzin, 1989; Erickson, 1986; Geertz, 1973; Goetz & LeCompte, 1984; Howe & Eisenhart, 1990; Maxwell, 1992; Smith & Glass, 1987). Much of the attention has been focused upon the issue of whether qualitative results and interpretations accurately reflect…

  7. Qualitative Clinical Research with Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Mary Lee; Quintana, Stephen M.

    2005-01-01

    This article provides an overview of how qualitative research methods (QRMs) can augment the literature in child and adolescent clinical psychology by contributing to theory and hypothesis building. We discuss the utility of qualitative methods in examining the nature of clinical processes and obtaining deeper understandings about quantitative…

  8. Qualitative Research in Counseling Psychology: Conceptual Foundations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Susan L.

    2007-01-01

    Beginning with calls for methodological diversity in counseling psychology, this article addresses the history and current state of qualitative research in counseling psychology. It identifies the historical and disciplinary origins as well as basic assumptions and underpinnings of qualitative research in general, as well as within counseling…

  9. THE RIVALRY BETWEEN QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Researchers. Nwankwo, I. U. – The Rivalry Between Quuantitative and Qualitative Techniques in Sociological Research: ... applicable to the three levels - preliminary, principal and evaluation or validation levels of scientific research. ... the researcher as the tool or instrument of research, qualitative technique guards against.

  10. Handbook of Qualitative Research in Communication Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Martin J., Ed.; Müller, Nicole, Ed.; Nelson, Ryan L., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    This volume provides a comprehensive and in-depth handbook of qualitative research in the field of communication disorders. It introduces and illustrates the wide range of qualitative paradigms that have been used in recent years to investigate various aspects of communication disorders. The first part of the Handbook introduces in some detail the…

  11. Qualitative Research Designs: Selection and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.; Hanson, William E.; Plano Clark, Vicki L.; Morales, Alejandro

    2007-01-01

    Counseling psychologists face many approaches from which to choose when they conduct a qualitative research study. This article focuses on the processes of selecting, contrasting, and implementing five different qualitative approaches. Based on an extended example related to test interpretation by counselors, clients, and communities, this article…

  12. Musical Cognition at Birth: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefer, Michal; Weintraub, Zalman; Cohen, Veronika

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes research on newborns' responses to music. Video observation and electroencephalogram (EEG) were collected to see whether newborns' responses to random sounds differed from their responses to music. The data collected were subjected to both qualitative and quantitative analysis. This paper will focus on the qualitative study,…

  13. Qualitative Parameters of Practice during University Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiunaitiene, Egle; Norkute, Odeta

    2011-01-01

    In this article, relevance of practice during university studies is highlighted, as well as the main stages of its organisation, qualitative parameters, as well as criteria and indicators that validate them are defined. Discussion on the idea that taking into consideration qualitative parameters of organising practice as a component of studies…

  14. Talking and Thinking about Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Carolyn; Bochner, Arthur; Denzin, Norman; Lincoln, Yvonna; Morse, Janice; Pelias, Ronald; Richardson, Laurel

    2008-01-01

    This script comes from an edited transcript of a session titled "Talking and Thinking About Qualitative Research," which was part of the 2006 International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, held at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign on May 4-6, 2006. This special session featured scholars informally responding to questions about their…

  15. Getting Specific about Qualitative Research Generalizability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenail, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    The question of generalizability or the usefulness of qualitative research results beyond the confines of the primary site, sample, and study has been hotly debated by qualitative researchers for decades. When examining this question of generalization the first surprising finding is there appears to be no general consensus about the definition,…

  16. Ensuring validity in qualitative International Business Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Houman

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an account for how the validity issue may be gasped within a qualitative apporach to the IB field......The purpose of this paper is to provide an account for how the validity issue may be gasped within a qualitative apporach to the IB field...

  17. Perils and potentials in qualitative psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmann, Svend

    2015-01-01

    of psychology, we find an even shorter history of qualitative psychology specifically. Although most founding fathers (Freud, Piaget, Bartlett etc.) worked as “qualitative psychologists”, they found no need to thematize their methods of inquiry in this manner. Since around 1980, however, a field has established...

  18. Qualitative Case Study Research as Empirical Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellinger, Andrea D.; McWhorter, Rochell

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces the concept of qualitative case study research as empirical inquiry. It defines and distinguishes what a case study is, the purposes, intentions, and types of case studies. It then describes how to determine if a qualitative case study is the preferred approach for conducting research. It overviews the essential steps in…

  19. Applying Knowledge of Qualitative Design and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskas, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    This study compared and contrasted two qualitative scholarly articles in relation to their research designs. Their designs were analyzed by the comparison of research references and research specific vocabulary to describe how various research methods were used. When researching and analyzing qualitative scholarly articles, it is imperative to…

  20. Qualitative Dermatoglyphics In Idiopathic Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranganath Priya

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic aetiology has been proposed for both idiopathic epilepsy and dermatoglyphics. Hence, the present study has been undertaken to find out the existence of any correlation between dermatoglyphics and idiopathic epilepsy. Material consisted of 100 patients (58 males and 42 females and 100 controls (52 males and 48 females. Patient′s age ranged from 5 to 40 years and controls were between 18 and 25 years. Dermatoglyphics were obtained by painting method. Qualitative parameters observed were percentage frequency of fingerprint patterns (loops, whorls and arches,, patterns in hypothenar area/ interdigital are and flexion creases (Simian crease, sydney line. On comparison with controls, in males, with hands combined, loops (52.24% and arches (7.93% were increased and whorls (39.83% were decreased (p<0.05. In females, with hands combined, arches (13.1% and whorls (36.43% were increased and loops (50.48% were decreased (p< 0.03. Significant differences have not been observed for the patterns in hypothenar area /interdigital area and flexion creases. These dermatoglyphics features could be used as additional markers to evaluate patients of epilepsy.

  1. Fluorescence-based assay as a new screening tool for toxic chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moczko, Ewa; Mirkes, Evgeny M.; Cáceres, César; Gorban, Alexander N.; Piletsky, Sergey

    2016-09-01

    Our study involves development of fluorescent cell-based diagnostic assay as a new approach in high-throughput screening method. This highly sensitive optical assay operates similarly to e-noses and e-tongues which combine semi-specific sensors and multivariate data analysis for monitoring biochemical processes. The optical assay consists of a mixture of environmental-sensitive fluorescent dyes and human skin cells that generate fluorescence spectra patterns distinctive for particular physico-chemical and physiological conditions. Using chemometric techniques the optical signal is processed providing qualitative information about analytical characteristics of the samples. This integrated approach has been successfully applied (with sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 97%) in assessing whether particular chemical agents are irritating or not for human skin. It has several advantages compared with traditional biochemical or biological assays and can impact the new way of high-throughput screening and understanding cell activity. It also can provide reliable and reproducible method for assessing a risk of exposing people to different harmful substances, identification active compounds in toxicity screening and safety assessment of drugs, cosmetic or their specific ingredients.

  2. Evaluation of four commercial virological assays for early infant HIV-1 diagnosis using dried blood specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Patricia; Prieto, Luis; Martín, Leticia; Obiang, Jacinta; Avedillo, Pedro; Vargas, Antonio; Rojo, Pablo; Fernández McPhee, Carolina; Sanz Canalejas, Leticia; Benito, Agustín; Ramos, José Tomás; Holguín, África

    2017-01-01

    Early infant diagnosis (EID) of HIV-1 is necessary to reduce HIV-related mortality. As maternal antibodies transferred across the placenta may persist up to 18 mo, commercial virological assays (CVAs) are needed. This study compares four CVAs for EID using dried blood specimens (DBS) from HIV-1-exposed infants. DBS from 68 infants born to HIV-1-infected women were collected from November 2012 to December 2013 in Equatorial Guinea. Four CVAs were performed: Siemens VERSANT HIV-1 RNA 1.0 kPCR assay, Roche CAP/CTM Quantitative Test v2.0, CAP/CTM Qualitative Tests v1.0 and v2.0. Definitive diagnosis was established following World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations. Two HIV-1-infected infants (2.9%) were detected by the four CVAs while 49 (72%) resulted negative. Discordant results were observed in 17 (25%) infants and HIV-1 infection was excluded in 14 patients when virological and serological testing was performed in additional DBS. Different false-positive rates HIV-1 were observed with Roche assays. CVAs using DBS were useful for EID, although discrepant results were common. Further research is required to reduce false-positive results that could result in wrong diagnosis and unneeded treatment. We propose caution with low viral load (VL) values when using VL assays. Clear guidelines are required for EID of HIV-exposed infants with discrepant virological results.

  3. [Application of FilmArray assay for detection of respiratory tract infections in immunocompromised persons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzieciatkowski, Tomasz; Przybylski, Maciej; Sulowska, Agata; Rynans, Sylwia; Mlynarczyk, Grazyna; Swoboda-Kopec, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    A variety of viruses and bacteria are responsible for acute upper and lower respiratory tract infections worldwide. Severe and even fatal disease can occur especially in group ofimmunocompromised individuals. Accurate pathogen identification allows clinicians to determine the need for ancillary diagnostic testing, antibacterial and/or antiviral therapy and can motivate decisions regarding hospitalization and infection control measures. We compared the diagnostic performance of FilmArray Respiratory Panel highly multiplexed nucleic acid amplification test with previous used direct immunofluorescence assay. Both assays were performed on a panel of 6 nasopharyngeal-secretion specimens and 6 BALF samples, collected from 12 patients, subjected to allogeneic haematological stem cells transplantation, with lower respiratory tract symptoms. Among viruses detectable by both assays were especially influenzaA virus, parainfluenza viruses type 3 and respiratory syncytial virus. In conclusion, the FilmArray assay is rapid and extremely user-friendly system, with results available in just over one hour with almost no labor involved. In few laboratories its low throughput and qualitative results may be a disadvantage in some clinical settings.

  4. Bioprocess monitoring: minimizing sample matrix effects for total protein quantification with bicinchoninic acid assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichelt, Wieland N; Waldschitz, Daniel; Herwig, Christoph; Neutsch, Lukas

    2016-09-01

    Determining total protein content is a routine operation in many laboratories. Despite substantial work on assay optimization interferences, the widely used bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay remains widely recognized for its robustness. Especially in the field of bioprocess engineering the inaccuracy caused by interfering substances remains hardly predictable and not well understood. Since the introduction of the assay, sample pre-treatment by trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation has been indicated as necessary and sufficient to minimize interferences. However, the sample matrix in cultivation media is not only highly complex but also dynamically changing over process time in terms of qualitative and quantitative composition. A significant misestimation of the total protein concentration of bioprocess samples is often observed when following standard work-up schemes such as TCA precipitation, indicating that this step alone is not an adequate means to avoid measurement bias. Here, we propose a modification of the BCA assay, which is less influenced by sample complexity. The dynamically changing sample matrix composition of bioprocessing samples impairs the conventional approach of compensating for interfering substances via a static offset. Hence, we evaluated the use of a correction factor based on an internal spike measurement for the respective samples. Using protein spikes, the accuracy of the BCA protein quantification could be improved fivefold, taking the BCA protein quantification to a level of accuracy comparable to other, more expensive methods. This will allow reducing expensive iterations in bioprocess development to due inaccurate total protein analytics.

  5. Assay optimization for molecular detection of Zika virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corman, Victor M.; Rasche, Andrea; Baronti, Cecile; Aldabbagh, Souhaib; Cadar, Daniel; Reusken, Chantal Bem; Pas, Suzan D.; Goorhuis, Abraham; Schinkel, Janke; Molenkamp, Richard; Kümmerer, Beate M.; Bleicker, Tobias; Brünink, Sebastian; Eschbach-Bludau, Monika; Eis-Hübinger, Anna M.; Koopmans, Marion P.; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Grobusch, Martin P.; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Drosten, Christian; Drexler, Jan Felix

    2016-01-01

    To examine the diagnostic performance of real-time reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for Zika virus detection. We compared seven published real-time RT-PCR assays and two new assays that we have developed. To determine the analytical sensitivity of each assay, we

  6. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Herpes simplex virus serological assays. 866.3305... simplex virus serological assays. (a) Identification. Herpes simplex virus serological assays are devices... herpes simplex virus in serum. Additionally, some of the assays consist of herpes simplex virus antisera...

  7. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864... enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in... kinase or 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. A red blood cell enzyme assay is used to determine the enzyme defects...

  8. The Futures of Qualitative Social Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiner Keller

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution I begin by reviewing past views on the future of qualitative social research. In different ways, all of these views give the same account of a problematic present state which must be overcome by following their own particular "mandatory directives" for future developments. I then discuss four structural mechanisms from which current problems in the transmission of qualitative and interpretative designs or approaches originate. Recently, supporters of "post-qualitative research" have addressed such problems by arguing for a form of strong theorism in qualitative social research. However, this type of response can lead back to an outdated dominance of theory over research and empirical substance. In conclusion, some alternative options for navigating qualitative and interpretative research through post-positivist waters are discussed. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1401165

  9. Qualitative data analysis a methods sourcebook

    CERN Document Server

    Miles, Matthew B; Saldana, Johnny

    2014-01-01

    The Third Edition of Miles & Huberman's classic research methods text is updated and streamlined by Johnny SaldaNa, author of The Coding Manual for Qualitative Researchers. Several of the data display strategies from previous editions are now presented in re-envisioned and reorganized formats to enhance reader accessibility and comprehension. The Third Edition's presentation of the fundamentals of research design and data management is followed by five distinct methods of analysis: exploring, describing, ordering, explaining, and predicting. Miles and Huberman's original research studies are profiled and accompanied with new examples from SaldaNa's recent qualitative work. The book's most celebrated chapter, "Drawing and Verifying Conclusions," is retained and revised, and the chapter on report writing has been greatly expanded, and is now called "Writing About Qualitative Research." Comprehensive and authoritative, Qualitative Data Analysis has been elegantly revised for a new generation of qualitative r...

  10. Further exploration of dissemination bias in qualitative research required to facilitate assessment within qualitative evidence syntheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toews, Ingrid; Booth, Andrew; Berg, Rigmor C; Lewin, Simon; Glenton, Claire; Munthe-Kaas, Heather M; Noyes, Jane; Schroter, Sara; Meerpohl, Joerg J

    2017-08-01

    To conceptualise and discuss dissemination bias in qualitative research. It is likely that the mechanisms leading to dissemination bias in quantitative research, including time lag, language, gray literature, and truncation bias also contribute to dissemination bias in qualitative research. These conceptual considerations have informed the development of a research agenda. Further exploration of dissemination bias in qualitative research is needed, including the extent of non-dissemination and related dissemination bias, and how to assess dissemination bias within qualitative evidence syntheses. We also need to consider the mechanisms through which dissemination bias in qualitative research could occur to explore approaches for reducing it. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Quantitative Fluorescence-Based Lipase Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Lomolino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An easy and fast gel diffusion assay for detecting and monitoring lipase activity by quantification of fluorescein is described. By measuring the intensity of fluorescein, it is possible to obtain a calibration curve with a regression coefficient better than by using the radius of fluorescent haloes. Through the quantification of fluorescence intensity of fluorescein released after the hydrolysis of a fluorescent ester, fluorescein dibutyrate, used as substrate in agar plates, commercial and skimmed milk lipase activity were studied. Moreover, with this method, lipase activity can be monitored in reaction medium that contains compounds which are affected by turbidity or cause measurement interference for UV-spectrophotometer and fluorimeter. In this experiment, boiled skimmed milk was dispersed in the agar gel with fluorescein dibutyrate, and it was used as a reaction medium to mimic natural conditions. The development of such an assay has a potential for applications in industries ranging from pharmaceuticals to food production and monitoring.

  12. Delayed gamma technique for fissile material assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozin, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vujie, Jasmina [UC BERKELEY; Hunt, Alan [IDAHO ACCELERATOR CENTER

    2010-01-01

    Research sponsored by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative are investigating several non-destructive assay techniques for the quantification of fissile plutonium mass in spent nuclear fuel assemblies. AppHcation of the delayed gamma signatures is investigated in this context. The objective of the research is to assess whether the delayed gamma assay instrument can provide sufficient sensitivity, isotope specificity and accuracy as required in nuclear material safeguards. This effort includes theoretical and experimental components for the optimal combination of interrogation parameters. A new modeling algorithm offering a high level of detail was developed specifically for this purpose and was validated in series of benchmark experiments. Preliminary modeling of the delayed gamma response from spent fuel assemblies was accomplished offering a future direction for the design process.

  13. DNA Origami Seesaws as Comparative Binding Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Philipp C; Høiberg, Hans C; Simmel, Stephanie S; Holzmeister, Phil; Tinnefeld, Philip; Liedl, Tim

    2016-06-16

    The application of commonly used force spectroscopy in biological systems is often limited by the need for an invasive tether connecting the molecules of interest to a bead or cantilever tip. Here we present a DNA origami-based prototype in a comparative binding assay. It has the advantage of in situ readout without any physical connection to the macroscopic world. The seesaw-like structure has a lever that is able to move freely relative to its base. Binding partners on each side force the structure into discrete and distinguishable conformations. Model experiments with competing DNA hybridisation reactions yielded a drastic shift towards the conformation with the stronger binding interaction. With reference DNA duplexes of tuneable length on one side, this device can be used to measure ligand interactions in comparative assays. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  14. Quantifiable Lateral Flow Assay Test Strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    As easy to read as a home pregnancy test, three Quantifiable Lateral Flow Assay (QLFA) strips used to test water for E. coli show different results. The brightly glowing control line on the far right of each strip indicates that all three tests ran successfully. But the glowing test line on the middle left and bottom strips reveal their samples were contaminated with E. coli bacteria at two different concentrations. The color intensity correlates with concentration of contamination.

  15. Carbohydrate microarrays for assaying galactosyltransferase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungjin; Shin, Injae

    2007-04-26

    [reaction: see text] Carbohydrate microarrays have been used recently for the rapid analysis of glycan-protein or glycan-cell interactions and for the detection of pathogens. As a demonstration of its significance and versatility, the microarray technology has been applied in this effort to assay glycosyltransferase activities. In addition, carbohydrate microarray based methods have been employed to quantitatively determine binding affinities between lectins and carbohydrates.

  16. Clinical mutation assay of tumors: new developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starostik, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Mutation detection in tumors started with classical cytogenetics as the method of choice more than 50 years ago. Karyotyping proved to be sensitive enough to detect deletions or duplications of large chromosome segments, and translocations. Over time, new techniques were developed to detect mutations that are much smaller in scope. The availability of Sanger sequencing and the invention of the PCR improved the discriminatory power of mutation detection to just one base change in the genomic DNA sequence. Techniques derived from PCR (allele-specific PCR, qPCR) and improved or modified sequencing methods (capillary electrophoresis, pyrosequencing) considerably increased the efficiency and sample throughput of mutation detection assays. With the advent of massive parallel sequencing [also called next-generation sequencing (NGS)] in the past decade, a major shift to even higher sample throughput and a significant decrease in cost per sequenced base occurred. The application of the new technology provided a whole slew of novel biomarkers and potential therapy targets to improve diagnosis and treatment. It even led to changes in cancer classification as new information on the mutation profile of tumors became available that characterizes some disease entities better than morphology. NGS, which usually interrogates multiple genes at once and is a prime example of a multianalyte assay, started to replace older single analyte assays focused on analysis of one target, one gene. However, the transition to these extremely complex NGS-based assays is associated with multiple challenges. There are issues with adequate tissue source of nucleic acids, sequencing library preparation, bioinformatics, government regulations and oversight, reimbursement, and electronic medical records that need to be resolved to successfully implement the new technology in a clinical laboratory.

  17. Methods and devices for protein assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Swapnil [San Jose, CA; Cintron, Jose M [Indianapolis, IN; Shediac, Renee [Oakland, CA

    2009-11-03

    Methods and devices for protein assays based on Edman degradation in microfluidic channels are disclosed herein. As disclosed, the cleaved amino acid residues may be immobilized in an array format and identified by detectable labels, such as antibodies, which specifically bind given amino acid residues. Alternatively, the antibodies are immobilized in an array format and the cleaved amino acids are labeled identified by being bound by the antibodies in the array.

  18. Radon assay and radioactivity database in Kamioka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yasuo; Tasaka, Shigeki; Nakano, Yuuki

    2017-09-01

    A new cooperative program among underground experiments, theorists, and low-background researchers was started in 2014 in Japan. The purpose of this program is to achieve technical and scientific synergies among underground researchers. In this report, the R&D of radon assay technique as an activity in this program is shown. The current status of the radioactivity database system in Kamioka is also shown.

  19. Qualitative Computing and Qualitative Research: Addressing the Challenges of Technology and Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César A. Cisneros Puebla

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative computing has been part of our lives for thirty years. Today, we urgently call for an evaluation of its international impact on qualitative research. Evaluating the international impact of qualitative research and qualitative computing requires a consideration of the vast amount of qualitative research over the last decades, as well as thoughtfulness about the uneven and unequal way in which qualitative research and qualitative computing are present in different fields of study and geographical regions. To understand the international impact of qualitative computing requires evaluation of the digital divide and the huge differences between center and peripheries. The international impact of qualitative research, and, in particular qualitative computing, is the question at the heart of this array of selected papers from the "Qualitative Computing: Diverse Worlds and Research Practices Conference." In this article, we introduce the reader to the goals, motivation, and atmosphere at the conference, taking place in Istanbul, Turkey, in 2011. The dialogue generated there is still in the air, and this introduction is a call to spread that voice. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1202285

  20. Comparison of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, an immunofluorescence assay and a hemagglutination inhibition assay for detection of antibodies to K-papovavirus in mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Groen (Jan); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); H.W.J. Broeders; H.E.M. Spijkers (Ine)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractThe sensitivity of a newly developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of antibody to K virus was compared with the sensitivities of an immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and a hemagglutination inhibition assay (HIA). Specific pathogen-free BALB/c RIVM mice, 5 weeks

  1. Hyperpolarized NMR Probes for Biological Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Meier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments.

  2. The Engineered SVA Trans-mobilization Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Anja; Schumann, Gerald G

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian genomes harbor autonomous retrotransposons coding for the proteins required for their own mobilization, and nonautonomous retrotransposons, such as the human SVA element, which are transcribed but do not have any coding capacity. Mobilization of nonautonomous retrotransposons depends on the recruitment of the protein machinery encoded by autonomous retrotransposons. Here, we summarize the experimental details of SVA trans-mobilization assays which address multiple questions regarding the biology of both nonautonomous SVA elements and autonomous LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposons. The assay evaluates if and to what extent a noncoding SVA element is mobilized in trans by the L1-encoded protein machinery, the structural organization of the resulting marked de novo insertions, if they mimic endogenous SVA insertions and what the roles of individual domains of the nonautonomous retrotransposon for SVA mobilization are. Furthermore, the highly sensitive trans-mobilization assay can be used to verify the presence of otherwise barely detectable endogenously expressed functional L1 proteins via their marked SVA trans-mobilizing activity.

  3. Screening of fullerene toxicity by hemolysis assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramer, Federica; Da Ros, Tatiana; Passamonti, Sabina

    2012-01-01

    Fullerene is a compound formed during carbon burst that has been produced synthetically starting from the 1990s. The spherical shape and the characteristic carbon bonds of this allotrope (C(60)) have made it a suitable molecule for many applications. During the last decade, the low aqueous solubility of this molecule has been improved by chemical functionalization allowing the use of fullerene derivatives in biological fluids. The characterization of the toxicity potential of fullerenes is therefore of growing interest for any biomedical application. Intravenous injection is one of the possible routes of their administrations and therefore red blood cells are among the first targets of fullerene cytotoxicity. Human red blood cells are easily available and separated from plasma. Membrane disruption by toxic compounds is easily detected in red blood cells as release of hemoglobin in the cell medium, which can be assayed spectrophotometrically at λ = 415 nm. Due to the high molar extinction coefficient of hemoglobin, the assay can be performed on a small amount of both red blood cells and the test compounds, which might be available only in small quantities. So, the hemolysis assay is a simple screening test, whose results can guide further investigations on cytotoxicity in more complex experimental models.

  4. Variant Interpretation: Functional Assays to the Rescue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starita, Lea M; Ahituv, Nadav; Dunham, Maitreya J; Kitzman, Jacob O; Roth, Frederick P; Seelig, Georg; Shendure, Jay; Fowler, Douglas M

    2017-09-07

    Classical genetic approaches for interpreting variants, such as case-control or co-segregation studies, require finding many individuals with each variant. Because the overwhelming majority of variants are present in only a few living humans, this strategy has clear limits. Fully realizing the clinical potential of genetics requires that we accurately infer pathogenicity even for rare or private variation. Many computational approaches to predicting variant effects have been developed, but they can identify only a small fraction of pathogenic variants with the high confidence that is required in the clinic. Experimentally measuring a variant's functional consequences can provide clearer guidance, but individual assays performed only after the discovery of the variant are both time and resource intensive. Here, we discuss how multiplex assays of variant effect (MAVEs) can be used to measure the functional consequences of all possible variants in disease-relevant loci for a variety of molecular and cellular phenotypes. The resulting large-scale functional data can be combined with machine learning and clinical knowledge for the development of "lookup tables" of accurate pathogenicity predictions. A coordinated effort to produce, analyze, and disseminate large-scale functional data generated by multiplex assays could be essential to addressing the variant-interpretation crisis. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Methodology series module 10: Qualitative health research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maninder Singh Setia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Although quantitative designs are commonly used in clinical research, some studies require qualitative methods. These designs are different from quantitative methods; thus, researchers should be aware of data collection methods and analyses for qualitative research. Qualitative methods are particularly useful to understand patient experiences with the treatment or new methods of management or to explore issues in detail. These methods are useful in social and behavioral research. In qualitative research, often, the main focus is to understand the issue in detail rather than generalizability; thus, the sampling methods commonly used are purposive sampling; quota sampling; and snowball sampling (for hard to reach groups. Data can be collected using in-depth interviews (IDIs or focus group discussions (FGDs. IDI is a one-to-one interview with the participant. FGD is a method of group interview or discussion, in which more than one participant is interviewed at the same time and is usually led by a facilitator. The commonly used methods for data analysis are: thematic analysis; grounded theory analysis; and framework analysis. Qualitative data collection and analysis require special expertise. Hence, if the reader plans to conduct qualitative research, they should team up with a qualitative researcher.

  6. Methodology Series Module 10: Qualitative Health Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Maninder Singh

    2017-01-01

    Although quantitative designs are commonly used in clinical research, some studies require qualitative methods. These designs are different from quantitative methods; thus, researchers should be aware of data collection methods and analyses for qualitative research. Qualitative methods are particularly useful to understand patient experiences with the treatment or new methods of management or to explore issues in detail. These methods are useful in social and behavioral research. In qualitative research, often, the main focus is to understand the issue in detail rather than generalizability; thus, the sampling methods commonly used are purposive sampling; quota sampling; and snowball sampling (for hard to reach groups). Data can be collected using in-depth interviews (IDIs) or focus group discussions (FGDs). IDI is a one-to-one interview with the participant. FGD is a method of group interview or discussion, in which more than one participant is interviewed at the same time and is usually led by a facilitator. The commonly used methods for data analysis are: thematic analysis; grounded theory analysis; and framework analysis. Qualitative data collection and analysis require special expertise. Hence, if the reader plans to conduct qualitative research, they should team up with a qualitative researcher.

  7. Establishing rigour in qualitative radiography research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, F.J. [School of Healthcare Professions, University of Salford, Salford M6 6PU (United Kingdom)], E-mail: f.j.murphy@salford.ac.uk; Yielder, J. [Medical Imaging, School of Health Sciences, Unitec, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2010-02-15

    The vast majority of radiography research is subject to critique and evaluation from peers in order to justify the method and the outcome of the study. Within the quantitative domain, which the majority of medical imaging publications tend to fall into, there are prescribed methods for establishing scientific rigour and quality in order to critique a study. However, researchers within the qualitative paradigm, which is a developing area of radiography research, are often unclear about the most appropriate methods to measure the rigour (standards and quality) of a research study. This article considers the issues related to rigour, reliability and validity within qualitative research. The concepts of reliability and validity are briefly discussed within traditional positivism and then the attempts to use these terms as a measure of quality within qualitative research are explored. Alternative methods for research rigour in interpretive research (meanings and emotions) are suggested in order to compliment the existing radiography framework that exists for qualitative studies. The authors propose the use of an established model that is adapted to reflect the iterative process of qualitative research. Although a mechanistic approach to establishing rigour is rejected by many qualitative researchers, it is argued that a guide for novice researchers within a developing research base such as radiography is appropriate in order to establish the credibility and trustworthiness of a qualitative study.

  8. Qualitative models for space system engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbus, Kenneth D.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this project were: (1) to investigate the implications of qualitative modeling techniques for problems arising in the monitoring, diagnosis, and design of Space Station subsystems and procedures; (2) to identify the issues involved in using qualitative models to enhance and automate engineering functions. These issues include representing operational criteria, fault models, alternate ontologies, and modeling continuous signals at a functional level of description; and (3) to develop a prototype collection of qualitative models for fluid and thermal systems commonly found in Space Station subsystems. Potential applications of qualitative modeling to space-systems engineering, including the notion of intelligent computer-aided engineering are summarized. Emphasis is given to determining which systems of the proposed Space Station provide the most leverage for study, given the current state of the art. Progress on using qualitative models, including development of the molecular collection ontology for reasoning about fluids, the interaction of qualitative and quantitative knowledge in analyzing thermodynamic cycles, and an experiment on building a natural language interface to qualitative reasoning is reported. Finally, some recommendations are made for future research.

  9. Evaluation of four endogenous reference genes and their real-time PCR assays for common wheat quantification in GMOs detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huali Huang

    Full Text Available Proper selection of endogenous reference genes and their real-time PCR assays is quite important in genetically modified organisms (GMOs detection. To find a suitable endogenous reference gene and its real-time PCR assay for common wheat (Triticum aestivum L. DNA content or copy number quantification, four previously reported wheat endogenous reference genes and their real-time PCR assays were comprehensively evaluated for the target gene sequence variation and their real-time PCR performance among 37 common wheat lines. Three SNPs were observed in the PKABA1 and ALMT1 genes, and these SNPs significantly decreased the efficiency of real-time PCR amplification. GeNorm analysis of the real-time PCR performance of each gene among common wheat lines showed that the Waxy-D1 assay had the lowest M values with the best stability among all tested lines. All results indicated that the Waxy-D1 gene and its real-time PCR assay were most suitable to be used as an endogenous reference gene for common wheat DNA content quantification. The validated Waxy-D1 gene assay will be useful in establishing accurate and creditable qualitative and quantitative PCR analysis of GM wheat.

  10. Evaluation of four endogenous reference genes and their real-time PCR assays for common wheat quantification in GMOs detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huali; Cheng, Fang; Wang, Ruoan; Zhang, Dabing; Yang, Litao

    2013-01-01

    Proper selection of endogenous reference genes and their real-time PCR assays is quite important in genetically modified organisms (GMOs) detection. To find a suitable endogenous reference gene and its real-time PCR assay for common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) DNA content or copy number quantification, four previously reported wheat endogenous reference genes and their real-time PCR assays were comprehensively evaluated for the target gene sequence variation and their real-time PCR performance among 37 common wheat lines. Three SNPs were observed in the PKABA1 and ALMT1 genes, and these SNPs significantly decreased the efficiency of real-time PCR amplification. GeNorm analysis of the real-time PCR performance of each gene among common wheat lines showed that the Waxy-D1 assay had the lowest M values with the best stability among all tested lines. All results indicated that the Waxy-D1 gene and its real-time PCR assay were most suitable to be used as an endogenous reference gene for common wheat DNA content quantification. The validated Waxy-D1 gene assay will be useful in establishing accurate and creditable qualitative and quantitative PCR analysis of GM wheat.

  11. Analytical and clinical performance of Abbott RealTime MTB, an assay for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in pulmonary specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ning; Frank, Andrea; Pahalawatta, Vihanga; Lampinen, John; Coblenz-Korte, Anke; Dunn, Chad; Li, Cheng; Cloherty, Gavin; Abravaya, Klara; Leckie, Gregor

    2015-09-01

    Nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT)-based assays provide fast and sensitive results compared to conventional TB tests. The performance of the new Abbott Molecular MTB assay for the qualitative detection of MTB complex using the automated m2000™ system or manual sample preparation is summarized in this paper. The assay detects eight MTB complex subspecies. The observed limit of detection (LOD) when used to test an MTB H37Rv panel was 2.45 colony forming units (cfu)/mL, while the claimed assay LOD with this MTB strain is 17 cfu/mL. No cross reactivity, or carryover were observed in the study. The clinical sensitivity of the assay was 93% overall; 99% in smear positive, culture positive specimens, and 81% in smear negative, culture positive samples. The clinical specificity was 97%. The inhibition rate in the study was 0.34%. The data suggest that Abbott RealTime MTB is a reliable, robust and sensitive assay for the molecular detection of MTB. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of Four Endogenous Reference Genes and Their Real-Time PCR Assays for Common Wheat Quantification in GMOs Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huali; Cheng, Fang; Wang, Ruoan; Zhang, Dabing; Yang, Litao

    2013-01-01

    Proper selection of endogenous reference genes and their real-time PCR assays is quite important in genetically modified organisms (GMOs) detection. To find a suitable endogenous reference gene and its real-time PCR assay for common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) DNA content or copy number quantification, four previously reported wheat endogenous reference genes and their real-time PCR assays were comprehensively evaluated for the target gene sequence variation and their real-time PCR performance among 37 common wheat lines. Three SNPs were observed in the PKABA1 and ALMT1 genes, and these SNPs significantly decreased the efficiency of real-time PCR amplification. GeNorm analysis of the real-time PCR performance of each gene among common wheat lines showed that the Waxy-D1 assay had the lowest M values with the best stability among all tested lines. All results indicated that the Waxy-D1 gene and its real-time PCR assay were most suitable to be used as an endogenous reference gene for common wheat DNA content quantification. The validated Waxy-D1 gene assay will be useful in establishing accurate and creditable qualitative and quantitative PCR analysis of GM wheat. PMID:24098735

  13. Colloidal Gold Probe-Based Immunochromatographic Strip Assay for the Rapid Detection of Microbial Transglutaminase in Frozen Surimi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daming Fan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adding microbial transglutaminase (MTGase to frozen surimi to enable the surimi to be sold as a higher-grade product at a higher price defrauds surimi product manufacturers and undercuts legitimate industry prices. Therefore, it is important to develop an accurate method of detecting the presence of MTGase in surimi. In this study, an immunochromatographic strip assay with a colloidal gold antibody probe was successfully developed and used to rapidly and qualitatively detect MTGase in surimi samples. The results were obtained in less than 10 min. The limit for the qualitative detection of MTGase using the immunochromatographic strip assay was identified as 1.0 μg/mL. The results of the immunochromatographic strip analysis of frozen surimi samples were verified by comparison with the results of a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The colloidal gold probe-based immunochromatographic strip assay was thus found to be a rapid, economical, and user friendly method of detecting MTGase in surimi.

  14. Qualitative knowledge engineering for nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae H.; Kim, Ko R.; Lee, Jae C.

    1996-01-01

    After the TMI nuclear power plant accident, the two topics of plant safety and operational efficiency became more important areas of artificial intelligence, which have difference characteristics. Qualitative deep model is the recently prospective technology of AI, that can overcome several handicaps of the existing expert systems such as lack of common sense reasoning. The application of AI to the large and complex system like nuclear power plants is typically and effectively done through a module-based hierarchical system. As each module has to be built with suitable AI system. Through the experiences of hierarchical system construction, we aimed to develop basic AI application schemes for the power plant safety and operational efficiency as well as basic technologies for autonomous power plants. The goal of the research is to develop qualitative reasoning technologies for nuclear power plants. For this purpose, the development of qualitative modeling technologies and qualitative behaviour prediction technologies of the power plant are accomplished. In addition, the feasibility of application of typical qualitative reasoning technologies to power plants is studied . The goal of the application is to develop intelligent control technologies of power plants, support technologies. For these purposes, we analyzed the operation of power plants according to its operation purpose: power generation operation, shut-down and start-up operation. As a result, qualitative model of basic components were sketched, including pipes, valves, pumps and heat exchangers. Finally, plant behaviour prediction technologies through qualitative plant heat transfer model and design support technologies through 2nd-order differential equation were developed. For the construction of AI system of power plants, we have studied on the mixed module based hierarchical software. As a testbed, we have considered the spent fuel system and the feedwater system. We also studied the integration

  15. The agar diffusion scratch assay - A novel method to assess the bioactive and cytotoxic potential of new materials and compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusnik, Mascha; Imeri, Minire; Deppierraz, Grégoire; Bruinink, Arie; Zinn, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    A profound in vitro evaluation not only of the cytotoxic but also of bioactive potential of a given compound or material is crucial for predicting potential effects in the in vivo situation. However, most of the current methods have weaknesses in either the quantitative or qualitative assessment of cytotoxicity and/or bioactivity of the test compound. Here we describe a novel assay combining the ISO 10993-5 agar diffusion test and the scratch also termed wound healing assay. In contrast to these original tests this assay is able to detect and distinguish between cytotoxic, cell migration modifying and cytotoxic plus cell migration modifying compounds, and this at higher sensitivity and in a quantitative way. PMID:26861591

  16. The use of triangulation in qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Nancy; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; DiCenso, Alba; Blythe, Jennifer; Neville, Alan J

    2014-09-01

    Triangulation refers to the use of multiple methods or data sources in qualitative research to develop a comprehensive understanding of phenomena (Patton, 1999). Triangulation also has been viewed as a qualitative research strategy to test validity through the convergence of information from different sources. Denzin (1978) and Patton (1999) identified four types of triangulation: (a) method triangulation, (b) investigator triangulation, (c) theory triangulation, and (d) data source triangulation. The current article will present the four types of triangulation followed by a discussion of the use of focus groups (FGs) and in-depth individual (IDI) interviews as an example of data source triangulation in qualitative inquiry.

  17. Qualitative and quantitative reasoning about thermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skorstad, G.; Forbus, K.

    1989-11-01

    One goal of qualitative physics is to capture the tacit knowledge of engineers and scientists. It is shown how Qualitative Process theory can be used to express concepts of engineering thermodynamics. In particular, it is shown how to integrate qualitative and quantitative knowledge to solve textbook problems involving thermodynamic cycles, such as gas turbine plants and steam power plants. These ideas were implemented in a program called SCHISM. Its analysis of a sample textbook problem is described and plans for future work are discussed.

  18. Qualitative methods in pharmacy practice research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaae, Susanne; Traulsen, Janine Marie

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative research within pharmacy practice is concerned with understanding the behavior of actors such as pharmacy staff, pharmacy owners, patients, other healthcare professionals, and politicians to explore various types of existing practices and beliefs in order to improve them. As qualitative...... research attempts to answer the “why” questions, it is useful for describing, in rich detail, complex phenomena that are situated and embedded in local contexts. Typical methods include interviews, observation, document analysis, and netnography. Qualitative research has to live up to a set of rigid...... quality criteria of research conduct to provide trustworthy results that contribute to the further development of the area....

  19. Editorial: Qualitative Research and Intercultural Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Otten

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces to the thematic scope and the articles of this special issue and it explains some important terminological distinctions of the intercultural research field. The overall aim of this issue is to explore the manifold ways to apply and to reflect upon qualitative research methods in the context of intercultural communication. This implies both a discussion of genuine characteristics of intercultural qualitative research as well as attempts to identify common features and linkages of this special area with more general interpretative research traditions under the "umbrella" of qualitative social research. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0901342

  20. Comparative Evaluation of Various Total Antioxidant Capacity Assays Applied to Phenolic Compounds with the CUPRAC Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Özyurt

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available It would be desirable to establish and standardize methods that can measure the total antioxidant capacity level directly from vegetable extracts containing phenolics. Antioxidant capacity assays may be broadly classified as electron transfer (ET− and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT−based assays. The majority of HAT assays are kinetics-based, and involve a competitive reaction scheme in which antioxidant and substrate compete for peroxyl radicals thermally generated through the decomposition of azo compounds. ET−based assays measure the capacity of an antioxidant in the reduction of an oxidant, which changes colour when reduced. ET assays include the ABTS/TEAC, CUPRAC, DPPH, Folin-Ciocalteu and FRAP methods, each using different chromogenic redox reagents with different standard potentials. This review intends to offer a critical evaluation of existing antioxidant assays applied to phenolics, and reports the development by our research group of a simple and low-cost antioxidant capacity assay for dietary polyphenols, vitamins C and E, and human serum antioxidants, utilizing the copper(II-neocuproine reagent as the chromogenic oxidizing agent, which we haved named the CUPRAC (cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity method. This method offers distinct advantages over other ET−based assays, namely the selection of working pH at physiological pH (as opposed to the Folin and FRAP methods, which work at alkaline and acidic pHs, respectively, applicability to both hydrophilic and lipophilic antioxidants (unlike Folin and DPPH, completion of the redox reactions for most common flavonoids (unlike FRAP, selective oxidation of antioxidant compounds without affecting sugars and citric acid commonly contained in foodstuffs and the capability to assay –SH bearing antioxidants (unlike FRAP. Other similar ET–based antioxidant assays that we have developed or modified for phenolics are the Fe

  1. The in vitro and in vivo comet assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlinson, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The strategy for testing for genotoxicity covers three main areas, namely gene mutation, chromosome aberration or breakage (clastogenicity), and chromosome loss or gain (aneuploidy). The current generalized strategy consists of assays capable of detecting all of these endpoints using in vitro assays such as the Ames test for detecting gene mutations in bacteria, the human peripheral lymphocyte chromosome aberration (CA) test for detecting clastogenicity, and the in vitro micronucleus test for clastogenicity and aneuploidy. The primary in vivo assay, and generally the only in vivo assay required, is the in vivo rodent bone marrow micronucleus assay. However, there are instances when these assays alone are inadequate and further testing is required, especially in vivo. Historically, the preferred second assay has been the rodent liver unscheduled DNA synthesis assay but recently this has been superseded by the rodent single cell gel electrophoresis or Comet assay. This assay has numerous advantages especially in vivo, where virtually any tissue can be examined. The status of the in vitro comet assay in regulatory testing is much less clear although a preliminary review of data from the assay has shown it to be more specific than other in vitro genotoxicity tests and less prone to false positives.Detailed here are general protocols for both the in vitro and in vivo comet assays which will form the basis of the pending OECD guideline for the assay.

  2. Writing usable qualitative health research findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandelowski, Margarete; Leeman, Jennifer

    2012-10-01

    Scholars in diverse health-related disciplines and specialty fields of practice routinely promote qualitative research as an essential component of intervention and implementation programs of research and of a comprehensive evidence base for practice. Remarkably little attention, however, has been paid to the most important element of qualitative studies--the findings in reports of those studies--and specifically to enhancing the accessibility and utilization value of these findings for diverse audiences of users. The findings in reports of qualitative health research are too often difficult to understand and even to find owing to the way they are presented. A basic strategy for enhancing the presentation of these findings is to translate them into thematic statements, which can then in turn be translated into the language of intervention and implementation. Writers of qualitative health research reports might consider these strategies better to showcase the significance and actionability of findings to a wider audience.

  3. Perils and potentials in qualitative psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Svend

    2015-06-01

    Famously, Ebbinghaus declared that psychology has a long past, but only a short history. Psychology, as something implicit to human conduct, is as old as the human race, but the science, as an explicit investigative reflection upon that conduct, is a recent invention. Within the short history of psychology, we find an even shorter history of qualitative psychology specifically. Although most founding fathers (Freud, Piaget, Bartlett etc.) worked as "qualitative psychologists", they found no need to thematize their methods of inquiry in this manner. Since around 1980, however, a field has established itself that can be called qualitative psychology. In this paper, I discuss how this field can move sensibly into the future, and I highlight two perils and two potentials. The perils stem from neo-positivism and a threatening "McDonaldization" of qualitative research, while the potentials are related to proliferation of new forms of inquiry and a transcending of disciplinary boundaries.

  4. The Future of Qualitative Research in Psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demuth, Carolin; Terkildsen, Thomas Schjødt

    2015-01-01

    In May 2014, a workshop on ”The future of qualitative research in psychology” took place at Aalborg University, Department of Communication & Psychology organized by Carolin Demuth. Participants from Aalborg University engaged in a lively exchange with the two invited discussants Svend Brinkmann...... (Aalborg University) and Günter Mey (Stendal University of Applied Science). The discussion started out by addressing the specifics of qualitative research in the field of psychology, its historical development and the perils of recent trends of standardization and neo-positivistic orientations. In light...... of the discrepancy of what could be potentially achieved with qualitative methods for psychological research and how they are actually currently applied, the need was stressed to return to an understanding of qualitative methods as a craft skill and to take into account the subjectivity of the researcher...

  5. Contemporary Discourses in Qualitative Research: Lessons for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    knowledge, at- titude and practice) ... the questionnaire instrument as method of data collection from 556 randomly selected subjects. .... Qualitative Research: a Guide for Researchers in Education and the Social Sciences”,. Seidman (2006) makes ...

  6. Quantitative/Qualitative: The Paleozoic Debate

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Javier Bassi Follari

    2014-01-01

    .... From post-Frankfurt School and Latin American critical approaches, I argue that research practices--either based on quantitative or qualitative methods--often derive from a self-centered and elitist...

  7. Qualitative and mixed methods in public health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Padgett, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    "This text has a large emphasis on mixed methods, examples relating to health research, new exercises pertaining to health research, and an introduction on qualitative and mixed methods in public health...

  8. Represented Speech in Qualitative Health Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Represented speech refers to speech where we reference somebody. Represented speech is an important phenomenon in everyday conversation, health care communication, and qualitative research. This case will draw first from a case study on physicians’ workplace learning and second from a case study...... on nurses’ apprenticeship learning. The aim of the case is to guide the qualitative researcher to use own and others’ voices in the interview and to be sensitive to represented speech in everyday conversation. Moreover, reported speech matters to health professionals who aim to represent the voice...... of their patients. Qualitative researchers and students might learn to encourage interviewees to elaborate different voices or perspectives. Qualitative researchers working with natural speech might pay attention to how people talk and use represented speech. Finally, represented speech might be relevant...

  9. Qualitative Carbohydrate Analysis using Alkaline Potassium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 3. Qualitative Carbohydrate Analysis using Alkaline Potassium Ferricyanide. Sangeeta Pandita Saral Baweja. Classroom Volume 21 Issue 3 March 2016 pp 285-288 ...

  10. Prospects for cellular mutational assays in human populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1984-06-29

    Practical, sensitive, and effective human cellular assays for detecting somatic and germinal mutations would have great value in environmental mutagenesis and carcinogenesis studies. Such assays would fill the void between human mutagenicity and the data that exist from short-term tests and from mutagenicity in other species. This paper discusses the following possible human cellular assays: (1) HPRT (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase) somatic cell mutation based on 6-thioguanine resistance; (2) hemoglobin somatic cell mutation assay; (3) glycophorin somatic cell mutation assay; and (4) LDH-X sperm cell mutation assay. 18 references.

  11. Protecting Respondent Confidentiality in Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Karen

    2009-01-01

    For qualitative researchers, maintaining respondent confidentiality while presenting rich, detailed accounts of social life presents unique challenges. These challenges are not adequately addressed in the literature on research ethics and research methods. Using an example from a study of breast cancer survivors, I argue that by carefully considering the audience for one’s research and by re-envisioning the informed consent process, qualitative researchers can avoid confidentiality dilemmas that might otherwise lead them not to report rich, detailed data. PMID:19843971

  12. Qualitative and quantitative reasoning about thermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skorstad, G.; Forbus, K. (Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL (US))

    1989-01-01

    This paper shows how qualitative process theory can be used to express concepts of engineering thermodynamics. In particular, the authors describe how to integrate qualitative and quantitative knowledge to solve textbook problems involving thermodynamic cycles, such as gas turbine plants and steam power plants. These ideas have been implemented in a program called SCHISM. The authors describe its analysis of a sample textbook problem and discuss plans for future work.

  13. Membrane Insertion for the Detection of Lipopolysaccharides: Exploring the Dynamics of Amphiphile-in-Lipid Assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreen R Stromberg

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli is an important cause of foodborne illness, with cases attributable to beef, fresh produce and other sources. Many serotypes of the pathogen cause disease, and differentiating one serotype from another requires specific identification of the O antigen located on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS molecule. The amphiphilic structure of LPS poses a challenge when using classical detection methods, which do not take into account its lipoglycan biochemistry. Typically, detection of LPS requires heat or chemical treatment of samples and relies on bioactivity assays for the conserved lipid A portion of the molecule. Our goal was to develop assays to facilitate the direct and discriminative detection of the entire LPS molecule and its O antigen in complex matrices using minimal sample processing. To perform serogroup identification of LPS, we used a method called membrane insertion on a waveguide biosensor, and tested three serogroups of LPS. The membrane insertion technique allows for the hydrophobic association of LPS with a lipid bilayer, where the exposed O antigen can be targeted for specific detection. Samples of beef lysate were spiked with LPS to perform O antigen specific detection of LPS from E. coli O157. To validate assay performance, we evaluated the biophysical interactions of LPS with lipid bilayers both in- and outside of a flow cell using fluorescence microscopy and fluorescently doped lipids. Our results indicate that membrane insertion allows for the qualitative and reliable identification of amphiphilic LPS in complex samples like beef homogenates. We also demonstrated that LPS-induced hole formation does not occur under the conditions of the membrane insertion assays. Together, these findings describe for the first time the serogroup-specific detection of amphiphilic LPS in complex samples using a membrane insertion assay, and highlight the importance of LPS molecular conformations in detection

  14. Doing qualitative research in dentistry and dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, S; Brown, G

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assist dental researchers to develop their expertise in qualitative research. It sketches the key characteristics of qualitative research; summarises theoretical perspectives; outlines the core skills of qualitative data collection and the procedures which underlie three methods of qualitative research: interviewing, focus groups and concept maps. The paper offers some guidance on writing qualitative research and provides examples of qualitative research drawn from dentistry and dental education. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Getting added value from using qualitative research with randomized controlled trials: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Cathain, Alicia; Goode, Jackie; Drabble, Sarah J; Thomas, Kate J; Rudolph, Anne; Hewison, Jenny

    2014-06-09

    Qualitative research is undertaken with randomized controlled trials of health interventions. Our aim was to explore the perceptions of researchers with experience of this endeavour to understand the added value of qualitative research to the trial in practice. A telephone semi-structured interview study with 18 researchers with experience of undertaking the trial and/or the qualitative research. Interviewees described the added value of qualitative research for the trial, explaining how it solved problems at the pretrial stage, explained findings, and helped to increase the utility of the evidence generated by the trial. From the interviews, we identified three models of relationship of the qualitative research to the trial. In 'the peripheral' model, the trial was an opportunity to undertake qualitative research, with no intention that it would add value to the trial. In 'the add-on' model, the qualitative researcher understood the potential value of the qualitative research but it was viewed as a separate and complementary endeavour by the trial lead investigator and wider team. Interviewees described how this could limit the value of the qualitative research to the trial. Finally 'the integral' model played out in two ways. In 'integral-in-theory' studies, the lead investigator viewed the qualitative research as essential to the trial. However, in practice the qualitative research was under-resourced relative to the trial, potentially limiting its ability to add value to the trial. In 'integral-in-practice' studies, interviewees described how the qualitative research was planned from the beginning of the study, senior qualitative expertise was on the team from beginning to end, and staff and time were dedicated to the qualitative research. In these studies interviewees described the qualitative research adding value to the trial although this value was not necessarily visible beyond the original research team due to the challenges of publishing this research

  16. Getting added value from using qualitative research with randomized controlled trials: a qualitative interview study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Qualitative research is undertaken with randomized controlled trials of health interventions. Our aim was to explore the perceptions of researchers with experience of this endeavour to understand the added value of qualitative research to the trial in practice. Methods A telephone semi-structured interview study with 18 researchers with experience of undertaking the trial and/or the qualitative research. Results Interviewees described the added value of qualitative research for the trial, explaining how it solved problems at the pretrial stage, explained findings, and helped to increase the utility of the evidence generated by the trial. From the interviews, we identified three models of relationship of the qualitative research to the trial. In ‘the peripheral’ model, the trial was an opportunity to undertake qualitative research, with no intention that it would add value to the trial. In ‘the add-on’ model, the qualitative researcher understood the potential value of the qualitative research but it was viewed as a separate and complementary endeavour by the trial lead investigator and wider team. Interviewees described how this could limit the value of the qualitative research to the trial. Finally ‘the integral’ model played out in two ways. In ‘integral-in-theory’ studies, the lead investigator viewed the qualitative research as essential to the trial. However, in practice the qualitative research was under-resourced relative to the trial, potentially limiting its ability to add value to the trial. In ‘integral-in-practice’ studies, interviewees described how the qualitative research was planned from the beginning of the study, senior qualitative expertise was on the team from beginning to end, and staff and time were dedicated to the qualitative research. In these studies interviewees described the qualitative research adding value to the trial although this value was not necessarily visible beyond the original research team due

  17. Assaying the Potency of Influenza Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip D. Minor

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The potency of vaccines must be determined to ensure that the appropriate dose is given. The manufacture and assessment of influenza vaccines are complicated by the continuously changing nature of the pathogen, which makes efficacy estimates difficult but also confounds attempts to produce a well-validated, consistent potency assay. Single radial diffusion has been used for decades and provides a relatively simple way to measure the amount of biologically active materials present in the vaccine. It requires reagents, which are updated on a regular, frequently yearly, basis and alternative methods continue to be sought.

  18. Bicarbonate alters cellular responses in respiration assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krycer, James R; Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H; Fazakerley, Daniel J; Muoio, Deborah M; James, David E

    2017-08-05

    Metabolic assay buffers often omit bicarbonate, which is susceptible to alkalinisation in an open environment. Here, we assessed the effect of including bicarbonate in respirometry experiments. By supplementing HEPES-buffered media with low concentrations of bicarbonate, we found increased respiration in adipocytes and hepatocytes, but not myotubes. This was observed across multiple respirometry platforms and was independent of effects on enhanced insulin sensitivity, pH drift, or mitochondrial function. Permeabilised cell experiments suggest that bicarbonate increases substrate availability, likely by acting as a cofactor for carboxylase enzymes. This emphasises the importance of buffer choice in experimental biology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of quantitative and qualitative tests for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRue, Nicole; Kahn, Maria; Murray, Marjorie; Leader, Brandon T; Bansil, Pooja; McGray, Sarah; Kalnoky, Michael; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Huiqiang; Jiang, Hui; Domingo, Gonzalo J

    2014-10-01

    A barrier to eliminating Plasmodium vivax malaria is inadequate treatment of infected patients. 8-Aminoquinoline-based drugs clear the parasite; however, people with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency are at risk for hemolysis from these drugs. Understanding the performance of G6PD deficiency tests is critical for patient safety. Two quantitative assays and two qualitative tests were evaluated. The comparison of quantitative assays gave a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.7585 with significant difference in mean G6PD activity, highlighting the need to adhere to a single reference assay. Both qualitative tests had high sensitivity and negative predictive value at a cutoff G6PD value of 40% of normal activity if interpreted conservatively and performed under laboratory conditions. The performance of both tests dropped at a cutoff level of 45%. Cytochemical staining of specimens confirmed that heterozygous females with > 50% G6PD-deficient cells can seem normal by phenotypic tests. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  20. Sperm DNA damage measured by comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Luke; Carrell, Douglas T

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of sperm DNA damage is a useful tool in the evaluation of male infertility, as the sperm nucleus lacks protection against oxidative stress and is vulnerable to oxidation-mediated DNA damage. The Comet assay or single-cell gel electrophoresis is a relatively simple and sensitive method for measuring strand breaks in DNA in individual sperm. During this procedure, sperm cells are embedded in a thin layer of agarose on a microscope slide and lysed with detergent under high salt conditions. This process removes protamines and histones allowing the nucleus to form a nucleoid-like structure containing supercoiled loops of DNA. Alkaline pH conditions result in unwinding of double-stranded DNA, and subsequent electrophoresis results in the migration of broken strands towards the anode, forming a comet tail, when observed under fluorescence microscope. The amount of DNA in the head and tail is reflected by its fluorescent intensity. The relative fluorescence in the tail compared with its head serves as a measure of the level of DNA damage. In this chapter, we describe the alkaline version of the Comet assay, which is highly sensitive for measuring single- and double-strand DNA breaks.

  1. Sulforhodamine B colorimetric assay for cytotoxicity screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichai, Vanicha; Kirtikara, Kanyawim

    2006-01-01

    The sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay is used for cell density determination, based on the measurement of cellular protein content. The method described here has been optimized for the toxicity screening of compounds to adherent cells in a 96-well format. After an incubation period, cell monolayers are fixed with 10% (wt/vol) trichloroacetic acid and stained for 30 min, after which the excess dye is removed by washing repeatedly with 1% (vol/vol) acetic acid. The protein-bound dye is dissolved in 10 mM Tris base solution for OD determination at 510 nm using a microplate reader. The results are linear over a 20-fold range of cell numbers and the sensitivity is comparable to those of fluorometric methods. The method not only allows a large number of samples to be tested within a few days, but also requires only simple equipment and inexpensive reagents. The SRB assay is therefore an efficient and highly cost-effective method for screening.

  2. Genotoxicity evaluation of water soil leachates by Ames test, comet assay, and preliminary Tradescantia micronucleus assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lah, B; Vidic, T; Glasencnik, E; Cepeljnik, T; Gorjanc, G; Marinsek-Logar, Romana

    2008-04-01

    Combining genotoxicity/mutagenicity tests and physico-chemical methodologies can be useful for determining the potential genotoxic contaminants in soil samples. The aim of our study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of soil by applying an integrated physico-chemical-biological approach. Soil samples were collected at six sampling points in a Slovenian industrial and agricultural region where contamination by heavy metals and sulphur dioxide (SO(2)) are primarily caused by a nearby power plant. The in vitro alkaline version of the comet assay on water soil leachates was performed with Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. A parallel genotoxicity evaluation of the samples was performed by Ames test using Salmonella typhimurium and the Tradescantia micronucleus test. Pedological analyses, heavy metal content determination, and different physico-chemical analyses, were also performed utilizing standard methodology. Water leachates of soil samples were prepared according to standard methods. Since only a battery of biotests with prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms or cells can accurately estimate the effects of (geno)toxicants in soil samples and water soil leachates, a combination of three bioassays, with cells or organisms belonging to different trophic levels, was used. Genotoxicity of all six water soil leachates was proven by the comet assay on both human cell lines, however no positive results were detected by bacterial assay, Ames test. The Tradescantia micronucleus assay showed increase in micronuclei formation for three samples. According to these results we can assume that the comet assay was the most sensitive assay, followed by the micronucleus test. The Ames test does not appear to be sensitive enough for water soil leachates genotoxicity evaluations where heavy metal contamination is anticipated.

  3. A Spectrophotometric Assay Optimizing Conditions for Pepsin Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Ethelynda E.; Kimsey, R. Scott

    1998-01-01

    Describes a laboratory protocol optimizing the conditions for the assay of pepsin activity using the Coomasie Blue dye binding assay of protein concentration. The dye bonds through strong, noncovalent interactions to basic and aromatic amino acid residues. (DDR)

  4. Evaluation of an immunoradiometric assay protocol for determining ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BDL) for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) by an assay system are essential for successful prediction of recurrent disease after radical prostatectomy. A study was conducted to evaluate an Immunoradiometric Assay (IRMA) system to establish the ...

  5. The Statistics of wood assays for preservative retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia K. Lebow; Scott W. Conklin

    2011-01-01

    This paper covers general statistical concepts that apply to interpreting wood assay retention values. In particular, since wood assays are typically obtained from a single composited sample, the statistical aspects, including advantages and disadvantages, of simple compositing are covered.

  6. a positive control plasmid for reporter gene assay

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-04

    903 for ... qualification as a positive control for luciferase reporter gene assays. Key words: Reporter gene plasmid, luciferase assay, .... tissue-specific promoters by gene gun. Br. J. Dermatol. 144: 34-39. Naylor LH (1999).

  7. Identifying the predator complex of Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae): a comparative study of the efficacy of an ELISA and PCR gut content assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Valerie; Hagler, James; Daane, Kent; de León, Jesse; Groves, Russell

    2008-10-01

    A growing number of ecologists are using molecular gut content assays to qualitatively measure predation. The two most popular gut content assays are immunoassays employing pest-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays employing pest-specific DNA. Here, we present results from the first study to simultaneously use both methods to identify predators of the glassy winged sharpshooter (GWSS), Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae). A total of 1,229 arthropod predators, representing 30 taxa, were collected from urban landscapes in central California and assayed first by means of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a GWSS egg-specific mAb and then by PCR using a GWSS-specific DNA marker that amplifies a 197-base pair fragment of its cytochrome oxidase gene (subunit I). The gut content analyses revealed that GWSS remains were present in 15.5% of the predators examined, with 18% of the spiders and 11% of the insect predators testing positive. Common spider predators included members of the Salticidae, Clubionidae, Anyphaenidae, Miturgidae, and Corinnidae families. Common insect predators included lacewings (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), praying mantis (Mantodea: Mantidae), ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), assassin bugs (Hemiptera: Reduviidae), and damsel bugs (Hemiptera: Nabidae). Comparison of the two assays indicated that they were not equally effective at detecting GWSS remains in predator guts. The advantages of combining the attributes of both types of assays to more precisely assess field predation and the pros and cons of each assay for mass-screening predators are discussed.

  8. Is the Comet Assay a Sensitive Procedure for Detecting Genotoxicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Satomi; Nakamura, Takanori; Yamamoto, Ayumi; Honda, Gisho; Sasaki, Yu F.

    2010-01-01

    Although the Comet assay, a procedure for quantitating DNA damage in mammalian cells, is considered sensitive, it has never been ascertained that its sensitivity is higher than the sensitivity of other genotoxicity assays in mammalian cells. To determine whether the power of the Comet assay to detect a low level of genotoxic potential is superior to those of other genotoxicity assays in mammalian cells, we compared the results of Comet assay with those of micronucleus test (MN test). WTK1 human lymphoblastoid cells were exposed to methyl nitrosourea (MNU), ethyl nitrosourea (ENU), methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), bleomycin (BLM), or UVC. In Comet assay, cells were exposed to each mutagen with (Comet assay/araC) and without (Comet assay) DNA repair inhibitors (araC and hydroxyurea). Furthermore, acellular Comet assay (acellular assay) was performed to determine how single-strand breaks (SSBs) as the initial damage contributes to DNA migration and/or to micronucleus formation. The lowest genotoxic dose (LGD), which is defined as the lowest dose at which each mutagen causes a positive response on each genotoxicity assay, was used to compare the power of the Comet assay to detect a low level of genotoxic potential and that of MN test; that is, a low LGD indicates a high power. Results are summarized as follows: (1) for all mutagens studied, LGDs were MN test ≦ Comet assay; (2) except for BLM, LGDs were Comet assay/araC ≦ MN test; (3) except for UVC and MNU, LGDs were acellular assay ≦ Comet assay/araC ≦ MN test ≦ Comet assay. The following is suggested by the present findings: (1) LGD in the Comet assay is higher than that in MN test, which suggests that the power of the MN test to detect a low level of genotoxic potential is superior to that of the Comet assay; (2) for the studied mutagens, all assays were able to detect all mutagens correctly, which suggests that the sensitivity of the Comet assay and that of the MN test were

  9. Analytical evaluation of nine serological assays for diagnosis of syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, K; Andersson, S; Fredlund, H; Norrgren, H; Biague, A; Månsson, F; Ballard, R; Unemo, M

    2015-12-01

    The diagnosis of syphilis is most frequently dependent on antibody detection with serological assays. Assays for both treponemal and non-treponemal antibodies are needed to provide a sensitive and specific diagnosis. For decades, a first screening has been done with non-treponemal assays, followed by treponemal. However, in recent years, following laboratory automation, the reverse sequence screening algorithms have been developed, using a treponemal assay as the initial screening test. To evaluate serological assays for treponemal and non-treponemal antibodies, to use in reverse algorithm screening of syphilis. Six treponemal assays (one IgM-specific assay), two non-treponemal assays and one novel dual point-of-care (POC) assay for serological diagnosis of syphilis were evaluated. Serum samples from Guinea-Bissau and Sweden were examined, as well as two performance panels and samples from blood donors. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each assay, using different assays as gold standard test. The Macro-Vue RPR Card test was the most sensitive non-treponemal test and the TrepSure Anti-Treponema EIA Screen and the SeroDia TP-PA were the most sensitive and specific treponemal assays. Among the automated assays, both the Liaison Treponema Screen and Architect Syphilis TP showed high sensitivity, however, the former had clearly higher specificity. In resourced settings, where the reverse sequence algorithm is preferred for screening, an automated treponemal immunoassay for initial screening subsequently followed by the TrepSure test or TP-PA assay as a second treponemal assay appear highly effective. Finally, a quantitative highly sensitive non-treponemal assay, e.g. the Macro-Vue RPR Card test, could then be used as a supplementary test to evaluate activity of the syphilis infection. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  10. Qualitative Methods in Mental Health Services Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palinkas, Lawrence A.

    2014-01-01

    Qualitative and mixed methods play a prominent role in mental health services research. However, the standards for their use are not always evident, especially for those not trained in such methods. This paper reviews the rationale and common approaches to using qualitative and mixed methods in mental health services and implementation research based on a review of the papers included in this special series along with representative examples from the literature. Qualitative methods are used to provide a “thick description” or depth of understanding to complement breadth of understanding afforded by quantitative methods, elicit the perspective of those being studied, explore issues that have not been well studied, develop conceptual theories or test hypotheses, or evaluate the process of a phenomenon or intervention. Qualitative methods adhere to many of the same principles of scientific rigor as quantitative methods, but often differ with respect to study design, data collection and data analysis strategies. For instance, participants for qualitative studies are usually sampled purposefully rather than at random and the design usually reflects an iterative process alternating between data collection and analysis. The most common techniques for data collection are individual semi-structured interviews, focus groups, document reviews, and participant observation. Strategies for analysis are usually inductive, based on principles of grounded theory or phenomenology. Qualitative methods are also used in combination with quantitative methods in mixed method designs for convergence, complementarity, expansion, development, and sampling. Rigorously applied qualitative methods offer great potential in contributing to the scientific foundation of mental health services research. PMID:25350675

  11. Comparison of two rapid assays for Clostridium difficile Common antigen and a C difficile toxin A/B assay with the cell culture neutralization assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reller, Megan E; Alcabasa, Romina C; Lema, Clara A; Carroll, Karen C

    2010-01-01

    We compared 3 rapid assays for Clostridium difficile with a cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA). Of 600 stool samples, 46 were positive for toxigenic C difficile. Both rapid common antigen assays were highly sensitive (91.3%-100%) and, therefore, were appropriate screening tests. The rapid toxin assay had poor sensitivity (61%) but excellent specificity (99.3%). Testing stools for glutamate dehydrogenase (step 1) and those positive with a rapid toxin assay (step 2) would correctly classify 81% of submitted specimens within 2 hours, including during periods of limited staffing (evenings, nights, and weekends). CCNA could then be used as a third step to test rapid toxin-negative samples, thereby providing a final result for the remaining 19% of samples by 48 to 72 hours. The use of rapid assays as outlined could enhance timely diagnosis of C difficile.

  12. Multipath colourimetric assay for copper(II) ions utilizing MarR functionalized gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yulong; Wang, Limin; Su, Zhenhe; Xue, Juanjuan; Dong, Jinbo; Zhang, Cunzheng; Hua, Xiude; Wang, Minghua; Liu, Fengquan

    2017-02-01

    We use the multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR), as a highly selective biorecognition elements in a multipath colourimetric sensing strategy for the fast detection of Cu2+ in water samples. The colourimetric assay is based on the aggregation of MarR-coated gold nanoparticles in the presence of Cu2+ ions, which induces a red-to-purple colour change of the solution. The colour variation in the gold nanoparticle aggregation process can be used for qualitative and quantitative detection of Cu2+ by the naked eye, and with UV-vis and smartphone-based approaches. The three analysis techniques used in the multipath colourimetric assay complement each other and provide greater flexibility for differing requirements and conditions, making the assay highly applicable for Cu2+ detection. Under optimal conditions, the Cu2+ concentration was quantified in less than 5 min with limits of detection for the naked eye, UV-vis and smartphone-based approaches of 1 μM, 405 nM and 61 nM, respectively. Moreover, the sensing system exhibited excellent selectivity and practical application for Cu2+ detection in real water samples. Thus, our strategy has great potential for application in on-site monitoring of Cu2+, and the unique response of MarR towards copper ions may provide a new approach to Cu2+ sensing.

  13. 21 CFR 864.7415 - Abnormal hemoglobin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Abnormal hemoglobin assay. 864.7415 Section 864... hemoglobin assay. (a) Identification. An abnormal hemoglobin assay is a device consisting of the reagents... hemoglobin types. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). [45 FR 60618, Sept. 12, 1980] ...

  14. 21 CFR 864.7470 - Glycosylated hemoglobin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glycosylated hemoglobin assay. 864.7470 Section... Glycosylated hemoglobin assay. (a) Identification. A glycosylated hemoglobin assay is a device used to measure the glycosylated hemoglobins (A1a, A1b, and A1c) in a patient's blood by a column chromatographic...

  15. Systems, devices, and methods for agglutination assays using sedimentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaff, Ulrich Y.; Sommer, Gregory J.; Singh, Anup K.

    2016-01-26

    Embodiments of the present invention include methods for conducting agglutination assays using sedimentation. Aggregates may be exposed to sedimentation forces and travel through a density medium to a detection area. Microfluidic devices, such as microfluidic disks, are described for conducting the agglutination assays, as are systems for conducting the assays.

  16. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040... Adenosine triphosphate release assay. (a) Identification. An adenosine triphosphate release assay is a device that measures the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from platelets following aggregation...

  17. Assay for mutagenesis in heterozygous diploid human lymphoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skopek, Thomas R. (Somerville, MA); Liber, Howard L. (Brookline, MA); Penman, Bruce W. (Cambridge, MA); Thilly, William G. (Cambridge, MA); Hoppe, IV, Henry (Arlington, MA)

    1981-01-01

    An assay is disclosed for determining mutagenic damage caused by the administration of a known or suspected mutagen to diploid human lymphoblastoid cell lines. The gene locus employed for this assay is the gene for thymidine kinase, uridine kinase, or cytidine deaminase. Since human lymphoblastoid cells contain two genes for these enzymes, heterozygotes of human lymphoblastoid cells are used in this assay.

  18. Assay for mutagenesis in heterozygous diploid human lymphoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skopek, T.R.; Liber, H.L.; Penman, B.W.; Thilly, W.G.; Hoppe, H. IV.

    1981-11-24

    An assay is disclosed for determining mutagenic damage caused by the administration of a known or suspected mutagen to diploid human lymphoblastoid cell lines. The gene locus employed for this assay is the gene for thymidine kinase, uridine kinase, or cytidine deaminase. Since human lymphoblastoid cells contain two genes for these enzymes, heterozygotes of human lymphoblastoid cells are used in this assay. 7 figs.

  19. 40 CFR 79.67 - Glial fibrillary acidic protein assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Glial fibrillary acidic protein assay... Glial fibrillary acidic protein assay. (a) Purpose. Chemical-induced injury of the nervous system, i.e... paragraph (e)(3) in this section). Assays of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), the major intermediate...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866... Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. (a) Identification. A Plasmodium species antigen detection assay... malaria caused by the four malaria species capable of infecting humans: Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium...

  1. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375 Glutathione reductase assay. (a) Identification. A glutathione reductase assay is a device used to determine the...

  2. Assay optimization for molecular detection of Zika virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corman, Victor M.; Rasche, Andrea; Baronti, Cecile; Aldabbagh, Souhaib; Cadar, Daniel; Reusken, Chantal Bem; Pas, Suzan D.; Goorhuis, Abraham; Schinkel, Janke; Molenkamp, Richard; Kümmerer, Beate M.; Bleicker, Tobias; Brünink, Sebastian; Eschbach-Bludau, Monika; Eis-Hübinger, Anna M.; Koopmans, Marion P.; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Grobusch, Martin P.; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Drosten, Christian; Drexler, Jan Felix

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the diagnostic performance of real-time reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for Zika virus detection. Methods We compared seven published real-time RT PCR assays and two new assays that we have developed. To determine the analytical sensitivity of

  3. Detection of induced male germline mutation: Correlations and comparisons between traditional germline mutation assays, transgenic rodent assays and expanded simple tandem repeat instability assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Timothy M. [Mutagenesis Section, Environmental and Occupational Toxicology Division, Safe Environments Programme, 0803A, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ont., K1A 0K9 (Canada); Department of Biology, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ont., K1S 5B6 (Canada); Lambert, Iain B. [Department of Biology, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ont., K1S 5B6 (Canada); Williams, Andrew [Biostatistics and Epidemiology Division, Safe Environments Programme, 6604B, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ont., K1A 0K9 (Canada); Douglas, George R. [Mutagenesis Section, Environmental and Occupational Toxicology Division, Safe Environments Programme, 0803A, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ont., K1A 0K9 (Canada); Yauk, Carole L. [Mutagenesis Section, Environmental and Occupational Toxicology Division, Safe Environments Programme, 0803A, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ont., K1A 0K9 (Canada)]. E-mail: carole_yauk@hc-sc.gc.ca

    2006-06-25

    Several rodent assays are capable of monitoring germline mutation. These include traditional assays, such as the dominant lethal (DL) assay, the morphological specific locus (SL) test and the heritable translocation (HT) assay, and two assays that have been developed more recently-the expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) and transgenic rodent (TGR) mutation assays. In this paper, we have compiled the limited amount of experimental data that are currently available to make conclusions regarding the comparative ability of the more recently developed assays to detect germline mutations induced by chemical and radiological agents. The data suggest that ESTR and TGR assays are generally comparable with SL in detecting germline mutagenicity induced by alkylating agents and radiation, though TGR offered less sensitivity than ESTR in some cases. The DL and HT assays detect clastogenic events and are most susceptible to mutations arising in post-spermatogonial cells, and they may not provide the best comparisons with TGR and ESTR instability. The measurement of induced ESTR instability represents a relatively sensitive method of identifying agents causing germline mutation in rodents, and may also be useful for bio-monitoring exposed individuals in the human population. Any future use of the TGR and ESTR germline mutation assays in a regulatory testing context will entail more robust and extensive characterization of assay performance. This will require substantially more data, including experiments measuring multiple endpoints, a greatly expanded database of chemical agents and a focus on characterizing stage-specific activity of mutagens in these assays, preferably by sampling epididymal sperm exposed at defined pre-meiotic, meiotic and post-meiotic stages of development.

  4. Detection of induced male germline mutation: correlations and comparisons between traditional germline mutation assays, transgenic rodent assays and expanded simple tandem repeat instability assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Timothy M; Lambert, Iain B; Williams, Andrew; Douglas, George R; Yauk, Carole L

    2006-06-25

    Several rodent assays are capable of monitoring germline mutation. These include traditional assays, such as the dominant lethal (DL) assay, the morphological specific locus (SL) test and the heritable translocation (HT) assay, and two assays that have been developed more recently--the expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) and transgenic rodent (TGR) mutation assays. In this paper, we have compiled the limited amount of experimental data that are currently available to make conclusions regarding the comparative ability of the more recently developed assays to detect germline mutations induced by chemical and radiological agents. The data suggest that ESTR and TGR assays are generally comparable with SL in detecting germline mutagenicity induced by alkylating agents and radiation, though TGR offered less sensitivity than ESTR in some cases. The DL and HT assays detect clastogenic events and are most susceptible to mutations arising in post-spermatogonial cells, and they may not provide the best comparisons with TGR and ESTR instability. The measurement of induced ESTR instability represents a relatively sensitive method of identifying agents causing germline mutation in rodents, and may also be useful for bio-monitoring exposed individuals in the human population. Any future use of the TGR and ESTR germline mutation assays in a regulatory testing context will entail more robust and extensive characterization of assay performance. This will require substantially more data, including experiments measuring multiple endpoints, a greatly expanded database of chemical agents and a focus on characterizing stage-specific activity of mutagens in these assays, preferably by sampling epididymal sperm exposed at defined pre-meiotic, meiotic and post-meiotic stages of development.

  5. Comparison of the performance of IFA, CFA, and ELISA assays for the serodiagnosis of acute Q fever by quality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herremans, Tineke; Hogema, Boris M; Nabuurs, Marrigje; Peeters, Marcel; Wegdam-Blans, Marjolijn; Schneeberger, Peter; Nijhuis, Carla; Notermans, Daan W; Galama, Joep; Horrevorts, Anton; van Loo, Inge H M; Vlaminckx, Bart; Zaaijer, Hans L; Koopmans, Marion P; Berkhout, Hanneke; Socolovschi, Cristina; Raoult, Didier; Stenos, John; Nicholson, William; Bijlmer, Henk

    2013-01-01

    The indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) is considered the reference method for diagnosing Q fever, but serology is also performed by complement fixation assay (CFA) or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). However, comparability between these assays is not clear, and therefore a quality assessment was performed. A total of 25 serum samples from negative controls, Q fever patients, and a serial diluted high-positive sample were analyzed in 10 Dutch laboratories. Six laboratories performed CFA, 5 performed IFA, and 5 performed ELISAs. Three international reference laboratories from Australia, France, and the USA also participated in this study. Qualitative values between laboratories using the same methods were within close range, and all 3 methods correctly identified acute Q fever patients. The IFA, ELISA, and CFA are all suitable serodiagnostic assays to diagnose acute Q fever, but the IFA remains an important tool in the follow-up of patients and in identifying patients at risk for developing chronic Q fever. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Abbott ARCHITECT iPhenytoin assay versus similar assays for measuring free phenytoin concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacker, Danyel Hermes; Robinson, Randy; Perrotta, Peter L

    2014-01-01

    To measure free phenytoin (FP) concentrations in filtered specimens using the Abbott ARCHITECT iPhenytoin assay and to compare results from this method with results from the Abbott TDx/FLx assays. We verified accuracy, analytic measurement range, and precision for FP measurements. For correlation and therapeutic interval studies, we used filtered calibrators, controls, proficiency-testing materials, and surplus clinical samples. After implementation, we determined proficiency testing results. The analytic measurement range was 2.0 to 25.0 micromol/L. Quality control materials (6.1, 12.6, and 20.1 micromol/L) provided mean (SD) recoveries of 96.1 (5.0%), 99.2 (5.0%), and 99.3 (5.7%), respectively, and coefficients of variation of 5.2%, 5.0%, and 5.8%, respectively. Clinical specimens produced mean (SD) FP recovery levels of 103.7 (10.6%) (bias, 0.1 [0.3] micromol/L). Altering the FP therapeutic range (4.0-8.0 micromol/L) was unnecessary. Proficiency testing yielded consistently acceptable results. Our accuracy, precision, and correlation results were similar for the TDx/FLx and ARCHITECT assays, which demonstrates that the ARCHITECT iPhenytoin assay is acceptable for clinical FP measurements.

  7. [Qualitative research methodology in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedregal, Paula; Besoain, Carolina; Reinoso, Alejandro; Zubarew, Tamara

    2017-03-01

    Health care research requires different methodological approaches such as qualitative and quantitative analyzes to understand the phenomena under study. Qualitative research is usually the least considered. Central elements of the qualitative method are that the object of study is constituted by perceptions, emotions and beliefs, non-random sampling by purpose, circular process of knowledge construction, and methodological rigor throughout the research process, from quality design to the consistency of results. The objective of this work is to contribute to the methodological knowledge about qualitative research in health services, based on the implementation of the study, “The transition process from pediatric to adult services: perspectives from adolescents with chronic diseases, caregivers and health professionals”. The information gathered through the qualitative methodology facilitated the understanding of critical points, barriers and facilitators of the transition process of adolescents with chronic diseases, considering the perspective of users and the health team. This study allowed the design of a transition services model from pediatric to adult health services based on the needs of adolescents with chronic diseases, their caregivers and the health team.

  8. Qualitative and Mixed Methods Social Media Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chareen L. Snelson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Social media technologies have attracted substantial attention among many types of users including researchers who have published studies for several years. This article presents an overview of trends in qualitative and mixed methods social media research literature published from 2007 through 2013. A collection of 229 qualitative studies were identified through a systematic literature review process. A subset of 55 of these articles report studies involving a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods. Articles were reviewed, analyzed, and coded through a qualitative content analysis approach. Overall trends are presented with respect to the entire collection of articles followed by an analysis of mixed methods research approaches identified in the subset of 55 studies. The most commonly used research approaches involved collecting data from people through interview, focus group, and survey methodologies. Content analysis was the second most commonly used approach whereby researchers use Facebook posts, Tweets (Twitter posts, YouTube videos, or other social media content as a data source. Many of the studies involving combinations of quantitative and qualitative data followed a design resembling Creswell and Plano Clark’s basic mixed methods typology (e.g., convergent parallel, explanatory sequential, and exploratory sequential.

  9. Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of the Assayed Quality Control Material for Clinical Microbiology Assays. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-27

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA, Agency, or we) is classifying the assayed quality control material for clinical microbiology assays into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the assayed quality control material for clinical microbiology assays' classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  10. High throughput assays for analyzing transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianqiang; Jiang, Xin; Yaoi, Takuro

    2006-06-01

    Transcription factors are a group of proteins that modulate the expression of genes involved in many biological processes, such as cell growth and differentiation. Alterations in transcription factor function are associated with many human diseases, and therefore these proteins are attractive potential drug targets. A key issue in the development of such therapeutics is the generation of effective tools that can be used for high throughput discovery of the critical transcription factors involved in human diseases, and the measurement of their activities in a variety of disease or compound-treated samples. Here, a number of innovative arrays and 96-well format assays for profiling and measuring the activities of transcription factors will be discussed.

  11. Lab-on-a-Chip Multiplex Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Harald; Wienke, Julia; Bier, Frank F

    2017-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip multiplex assays allow a rapid identification of multiple parameters in an automated manner. Here we describe a lab-based preparation followed by a rapid and fully automated DNA microarray hybridization and readout in less than 10 min using the Fraunhofer in vitro diagnostics (ivD) platform to enable rapid identification of bacterial species and detection of antibiotic resistance. The use of DNA microarrays allows a fast adaptation of new biomarkers enabling the identification of different genes as well as single-nucleotide-polymorphisms (SNPs) within these genes. In this protocol we describe a DNA microarray developed for identification of Staphylococcus aureus and the mecA resistance gene.

  12. Stable isotope dilution assays in mycotoxin analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychlik, Michael; Asam, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    The principle and applications of stable isotope dilution assays (SIDAs) in mycotoxin analysis are critically reviewed. The general section includes historical aspects of SIDAs, the prerequisites and limitations of the use of stable isotopically labelled internal standards, and possible calibration procedures. In the application section actual SIDAs for the analysis of trichothecenes, zearalenone, fumonisins, patulin, and ochratoxin A are presented. The syntheses and availability of labelled mycotoxins for use as internal standards is reviewed and specific advances in food analysis and toxicology are demonstrated. The review indicates that LC-MS applications, in particular, require the use of stable isotopically labelled standards to compensate for losses during clean-up and for discrimination due to ion suppression. As the commercial availability of these compounds continues to increase, SIDAs can be expected to find expanding use in mycotoxin analysis.

  13. COMPARATIVE STUDY ON MILK CASEIN ASSAY METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RODICA CĂPRIłĂ

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Casein, the main milk protein was determined by different assay methods: the gravimetric method, the method based on the neutralization of the NaOH excess used for the casein precipitate solving and the method based on the titration of the acetic acid used for the casein precipitation. The last method is the simplest one, with the fewer steps, and also with the lowest error degree. The results of the experiment revealed that the percentage of casein from the whole milk protein represents between 72.6–81.3% in experiment 1, between 73.6–81.3% in experiment 2 and between 74.3–81% in experiment 3.

  14. Rapid Automated Sample Preparation for Biological Assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shusteff, M

    2011-03-04

    Our technology utilizes acoustic, thermal, and electric fields to separate out contaminants such as debris or pollen from environmental samples, lyse open cells, and extract the DNA from the lysate. The objective of the project is to optimize the system described for a forensic sample, and demonstrate its performance for integration with downstream assay platforms (e.g. MIT-LL's ANDE). We intend to increase the quantity of DNA recovered from the sample beyond the current {approx}80% achieved using solid phase extraction methods. Task 1: Develop and test an acoustic filter for cell extraction. Task 2: Develop and test lysis chip. Task 3: Develop and test DNA extraction chip. All chips have been fabricated based on the designs laid out in last month's report.

  15. Nondestructive Assay Options for Spent Fuel Encapsulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jansson, Peter [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    2014-10-02

    This report describes the role that nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques and systems of NDA techniques may have in the context of an encapsulation and deep geological repository. The potential NDA needs of an encapsulation and repository facility include safeguards, heat content, and criticality. Some discussion of the facility needs is given, with the majority of the report concentrating on the capability and characteristics of individual NDA instruments and techniques currently available or under development. Particular emphasis is given to how the NDA techniques can be used to determine the heat production of an assembly, as well as meet the dual safeguards needs of 1) determining the declared parameters of initial enrichment, burn-up, and cooling time and 2) detecting defects (total, partial, and bias). The report concludes with the recommendation of three integrated systems that might meet the combined NDA needs of the encapsulation/repository facility.

  16. Stable isotope dilution assays in mycotoxin analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rychlik, Michael; Asam, Stefan [Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Lebensmittelchemie der Technischen, Garching (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    The principle and applications of stable isotope dilution assays (SIDAs) in mycotoxin analysis are critically reviewed. The general section includes historical aspects of SIDAs, the prerequisites and limitations of the use of stable isotopically labelled internal standards, and possible calibration procedures. In the application section actual SIDAs for the analysis of trichothecenes, zearalenone, fumonisins, patulin, and ochratoxin A are presented. The syntheses and availability of labelled mycotoxins for use as internal standards is reviewed and specific advances in food analysis and toxicology are demonstrated. The review indicates that LC-MS applications, in particular, require the use of stable isotopically labelled standards to compensate for losses during clean-up and for discrimination due to ion suppression. As the commercial availability of these compounds continues to increase, SIDAs can be expected to find expanding use in mycotoxin analysis. (orig.)

  17. Development of a Radioactive Waste Assay System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Duck Won; Song, Myung Jae; Shin, Sang Woon; Sung, Kee Bang; Ko, Dae Hach [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kil Jeong; Park, Jong Mook; Jee, Kwang Yoong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    Nuclear Act of Korea requires the manifest of low and intermediate level radioactive waste generated at nuclear power plants prior to disposal sites.Individual history records of the radioactive waste should be contained the information about the activity of nuclides in the drum, total activity, weight, the type of waste. A fully automated nuclide analysis assay system, non-destructive analysis and evaluation system of the radioactive waste, was developed through this research project. For the nuclides that could not be analysis directly by MCA, the activities of the representative {gamma}-emitters(Cs-137, Co-60) contained in the drum were measured by using that system. Then scaling factors were used to calculate the activities of {alpha}, {beta}-emitters. Furthermore, this system can automatically mark the analysis results onto the drum surface. An automated drum handling system developed through this research project can reduce the radiation exposure to workers. (author). 41 refs., figs.

  18. Universal fieldable assay with unassisted visual detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelyapov, Nicolas (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A universal detection system based on allosteric aptamers, signal amplification cascade, and eye-detectable phrase transition. A broadly applicable homogeneous detection system is provided. It utilizes components of the blood coagulation cascade in the presence of polystyrene microspheres (MS) as a signal amplifier. Russell's viper venom factor X activator (RVV-X) triggers the cascade, which results in an eye-visible phase transition--precipitation of MS bound to clotted fibrin. An allosteric RNA aptamer, RNA132, with affinity for RVV-X and human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF.sub.165) was created. RNA132 inhibits enzymatic activity of RVV-X. The effector molecule, VEGF.sub.165, reverses the inhibitory activity of RNA132 on RVV-X and restores its enzymatic activity, thus triggering the cascade and enabling the phase transition. Similar results were obtained for another allosteric aptamer modulated by a protein tyrosine phosphatase. The assay is instrumentation-free for both processing and readout.

  19. Enzymatic assay for methotrexate in erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H; Heinsvig, E M

    1985-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) accumulates in erythrocytes in MTX-treated patients. We present a modified enzymatic assay measuring MTX concentrations between 10 and 60 nmol/l in erythrocytes, adapted for a centrifugal analyser (Cobas Bio). About 40 patient's samples could be analysed within 1 h. The detection...... limit was 3 nmol/l. Within run and between-run precision was 7.4% and 13.5% for control 10 nmol/l and 1.2% and 3.2% for control 50 nmol/l. Recovery was 85-115% of MTX added to haemolysed erythrocytes. We found the method useful for pharmacokinetic studies of MTX in erythrocytes in MTX-treated patients...

  20. Die Sulforhodamien B Seltellingsmetode in vergelyking met drie algemene seltellingsmetodes vir sitotoksisiteitstoetse/The Sulforhodamine B Assay in comparison with three commonly used cytotoxicity assays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A van Tonder; A Joubert; A D Cromarty

    2014-01-01

      The sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay was compared to the MTT assay, the neutral red uptake assay and the resazurin reduction assay with regards to sensitivity, interference with glycolysis inhibitors, reproducibility and cost-effectiveness...

  1. Turning Points in Qualitative Research: Tying Knots in a Handkerchief. Crossroads in Qualitative Inquiry Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Yvonna S., Ed.; Denzin, Norman K., Ed.

    The chapters of this volume traces the changes in the discipline of qualitative inquiry over the last five decades. The collection serves as a textbook for training scholars in the history and trajectory of qualitative research. The chapters of part 1, The Revolution of Representation: Feminist and Race/Ethnic Studies Discourses, are: (1) Situated…

  2. Conducting Qualitative Data Analysis: Reading Line-by-Line, but Analyzing by Meaningful Qualitative Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenail, Ronald J.

    2012-01-01

    In the first of a series of "how-to" essays on conducting qualitative data analysis, Ron Chenail points out the challenges of determining units to analyze qualitatively when dealing with text. He acknowledges that although we may read a document word-by-word or line-by-line, we need to adjust our focus when processing the text for purposes of…

  3. Conducting Qualitative Data Analysis: Qualitative Data Analysis as a Metaphoric Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenail, Ronald J.

    2012-01-01

    In the second of a series of "how-to" essays on conducting qualitative data analysis, Ron Chenail argues the process can best be understood as a metaphoric process. From this orientation he suggests researchers follow Kenneth Burke's notion of metaphor and see qualitative data analysis as the analyst systematically considering the "this-ness" of…

  4. Building Interdisciplinary Qualitative Research Networks: Reflections on Qualitative Research Group (QRG) at the University of Manitoba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Kerstin Stieber; Halas, Gayle

    2012-01-01

    As qualitative research methodologies continue to evolve and develop, both students and experienced researchers are showing greater interest in learning about and developing new approaches. To meet this need, faculty at the University of Manitoba created the Qualitative Research Group (QRG), a community of practice that utilizes experiential…

  5. Disrupting Qualitative Inquiry: Possibilities and Tensions in Educational Research. Critical Qualitative Research. Volume 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ruth Nicole, Ed.; Carducci, Rozana, Ed.; Kuby, Candace R., Ed.

    2014-01-01

    "Disrupting Qualitative Inquiry" is an edited volume that examines the possibilities and tensions encountered by scholars who adopt disruptive qualitative approaches to the study of educational contexts, issues, and phenomena. It presents a collection of innovative and intellectually stimulating chapters which illustrate the potential…

  6. [Qualitative Research in Health Services Research - Discussion Paper, Part 3: Quality of Qualitative Research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamer, M; Güthlin, C; Holmberg, C; Karbach, U; Patzelt, C; Meyer, T

    2015-12-01

    The third and final discussion paper of the German Network of Health Services Research's (DNVF) "Qualitative Methods Working Group" demonstrates methods for the evaluation and quality of qualitative research in health services research. In this paper we discuss approaches described in evaluating qualitative studies, including: an orientation to the general principles of empirical research, an approach-specific course of action, as well as procedures based on the research-process and criteria-oriented approaches. Divided into general and specific aspects to be considered in a qualitative study quality evaluation, the central focus of the discussion paper undertakes an extensive examination of the process and criteria-oriented approaches. The general aspects include the participation of relevant groups in the research process as well as ethical aspects of the research and data protection issues. The more specific aspects in evaluating the quality of qualitative research include considerations about the research interest, research questions, and the selection of data collection methods and types of analyses. The formulated questions are intended to guide reviewers and researchers to evaluate and to develop qualitative research projects appropriately. The intention of this discussion paper is to ensure a transparent research culture, and to reflect on and discuss the methodological and research approach of qualitative studies in health services research. With this paper we aim to initiate a discussion on high quality evaluation of qualitative health services research. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Addressing the challenges in using qualitative data in qualitative comparative analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Block, Debora; Vis, B.

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses an issue that so far has received relatively little attention in methodological discussions about Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA), namely the challenges researchers face when using qualitative data in QCA analyses. Building on a literature review of 22 empirical studies

  8. A thin layer angiogenesis assay: a modified basement matrix assay for assessment of endothelial cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Ashton; Purcell, Robert; Hibbert, Andrew; Latham, Sally; Thomson, Scott; Hall, Wendy L; Wheeler-Jones, Caroline; Bishop-Bailey, David

    2014-12-05

    Basement matrices such as Matrigel™ and Geltrex™ are used in a variety of cell culture assays of anchorage-dependent differentiation including endothelial cell tube formation assays. The volumes of matrix recommended for these assays (approximately 150 μl/cm(2)) are costly, limit working distances for microscopy, and require cell detachment for subsequent molecular analysis. Here we describe the development and validation of a thin-layer angiogenesis (TLA) assay for assessing the angiogenic potential of endothelial cells that overcomes these limitations. Geltrex™ basement matrix at 5 μl/cm(2) in 24-well (10 μl) or 96-well (2 μl) plates supports endothelial cell differentiation into tube-like structures in a comparable manner to the standard larger volumes of matrix. Since working distances are reduced, high-resolution single cell microscopy, including DIC and confocal imaging, can be used readily. Using MitoTracker dye we now demonstrate, for the first time, live mitochondrial dynamics and visualise the 3-dimensional network of mitochondria present in differentiated endothelial cells. Using a standard commercial total RNA extraction kit (Qiagen) we also show direct RNA extraction and RT-qPCR from differentiated endothelial cells without the need to initially detach cells from their supporting matrix. We present here a new thin-layer assay (TLA) for measuring the anchorage-dependent differentiation of endothelial cells into tube-like structures which retains all the characteristics of the traditional approach but with the added benefit of a greatly lowered cost and better compatibility with other techniques, including RT-qPCR and high-resolution microscopy.

  9. Development of a quantitative real-time detection assay for hepatitis B virus DNA and comparison with two commercial assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, S D; Fries, E; De Man, R A; Osterhaus, A D; Niesters, H G

    A highly reproducible and sensitive real-time detection assay based on TaqMan technology was developed for the detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA and compared with two commercially available assays. The assay was validated with the Viral Quality Control panel, which also includes EUROHEP HBV

  10. Development of a quantitative real-time detection assay for hepatitis B virus DNA and comparison with two commercial assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.D. Pas (Suzan); E. Fries; H.G.M. Niesters (Bert); R.A. de Man (Robert); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractA highly reproducible and sensitive real-time detection assay based on TaqMan technology was developed for the detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA and compared with two commercially available assays. The assay was validated with the Viral Quality Control panel,

  11. Spectrophotometric Enzyme Assays for High-Throughput Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Louis Reymond

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews high-throughput screening enzyme assays developed in our laboratory over the last ten years. These enzyme assays were initially developed for the purpose of discovering catalytic antibodies by screening cell culture supernatants, but have proved generally useful for testing enzyme activities. Examples include TLC-based screening using acridone-labeled substrates, fluorogenic assays based on the β-elimination of umbelliferone or nitrophenol, and indirect assays such as the back-titration method with adrenaline and the copper-calcein fluorescence assay for aminoacids.

  12. Conducting Qualitative Data Analysis: Managing Dynamic Tensions within

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenail, Ronald J.

    2012-01-01

    In the third of a series of "how-to" essays on conducting qualitative data analysis, Ron Chenail examines the dynamic tensions within the process of qualitative data analysis that qualitative researchers must manage in order to produce credible and creative results. These tensions include (a) the qualities of the data and the qualitative data…

  13. Understanding Participatory Action Research: A Qualitative Research Methodology Option

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    Participatory Action Research (PAR) is a qualitative research methodology option that requires further understanding and consideration. PAR is considered democratic, equitable, liberating, and life-enhancing qualitative inquiry that remains distinct from other qualitative methodologies (Kach & Kralik, 2006). Using PAR, qualitative features of an…

  14. Employing a Qualitative Description Approach in Health Care Research

    OpenAIRE

    Bradshaw, Carmel; Atkinson, Sandra; Doody, Owen

    2017-01-01

    A qualitative description design is particularly relevant where information is required directly from those experiencing the phenomenon under investigation and where time and resources are limited. Nurses and midwives often have clinical questions suitable to a qualitative approach but little time to develop an exhaustive comprehension of qualitative methodological approaches. Qualitative description research is sometimes considered a less sophisticated approach for epistemological reasons. A...

  15. Leveraging Qualitative Reasoning to Learning Manipulation Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diedrich Wolter

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Learning and planning are powerful AI methods that exhibit complementary strengths. While planning allows goal-directed actions to be computed when a reliable forward model is known, learning allows such models to be obtained autonomously. In this paper we describe how both methods can be combined using an expressive qualitative knowledge representation. We argue that the crucial step in this integration is to employ a representation based on a well-defined semantics. This article proposes the qualitative spatial logic QSL, a representation that combines qualitative abstraction with linear temporal logic, allowing us to represent relevant information about the learning task, possible actions, and their consequences. Doing so, we empower reasoning processes to enhance learning performance beyond the positive effects of learning in abstract state spaces. Proof-of-concept experiments in two simulation environments show that this approach can help to improve learning-based robotics by quicker convergence and leads to more reliable action planning.

  16. Qualitative research ethics on the spot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Nelli Øvre; Øye, Christine; Glasdam, Stinne

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The increase in medical ethical regulations and bureaucracy handled by institutional review boards and healthcare institutions puts the researchers using qualitative methods in a challenging position. Method: Based on three different cases from three different research studies...... research ethical guidelines related to informed consent and doing no harm. Third, the article argues for the importance of having research ethical guidelines and review boards to question and discuss the possible ethical dilemmas that occur in qualitative research. Discussion and conclusion: Research...... ethics must be understood in qualitative research as relational, situational, and emerging. That is, that focus on ethical issues and dilemmas has to be paid attention on the spot and not only at the desktop....

  17. Ontological and Epistemological Foundations of Qualitative Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Vasilachis de Gialdino

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to describe the most relevant features of qualitative research in order to show how, from the Epistemology of the Known Subject perspective I propose, it is necessary to review first the ontological and then the epistemological grounds of this type of inquiry. I begin by following the path that leads from the Epistemology of the Knowing Subject to the Epistemology of the Known Subject, proposed as a new and non exclusive way of knowing. I pass on to describe the primary and secondary characteristics of qualitative research, expressing the need for an ontological rupture. Finally, cognitive interaction and cooperative knowledge construction are considered as two fundamental features in the process of qualitative research grounded on the Epistemology of the Known Subject. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0902307

  18. About Statistical Analysis of Qualitative Survey Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Loehnert

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Gathered data is frequently not in a numerical form allowing immediate appliance of the quantitative mathematical-statistical methods. In this paper are some basic aspects examining how quantitative-based statistical methodology can be utilized in the analysis of qualitative data sets. The transformation of qualitative data into numeric values is considered as the entrance point to quantitative analysis. Concurrently related publications and impacts of scale transformations are discussed. Subsequently, it is shown how correlation coefficients are usable in conjunction with data aggregation constrains to construct relationship modelling matrices. For illustration, a case study is referenced at which ordinal type ordered qualitative survey answers are allocated to process defining procedures as aggregation levels. Finally options about measuring the adherence of the gathered empirical data to such kind of derived aggregation models are introduced and a statistically based reliability check approach to evaluate the reliability of the chosen model specification is outlined.

  19. Sample size in qualitative interview studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malterud, Kirsti; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Guassora, Ann Dorrit Kristiane

    2016-01-01

    Sample sizes must be ascertained in qualitative studies like in quantitative studies but not by the same means. The prevailing concept for sample size in qualitative studies is “saturation.” Saturation is closely tied to a specific methodology, and the term is inconsistently applied. We propose...... the concept “information power” to guide adequate sample size for qualitative studies. Information power indicates that the more information the sample holds, relevant for the actual study, the lower amount of participants is needed. We suggest that the size of a sample with sufficient information power...... depends on (a) the aim of the study, (b) sample specificity, (c) use of established theory, (d) quality of dialogue, and (e) analysis strategy. We present a model where these elements of information and their relevant dimensions are related to information power. Application of this model in the planning...

  20. Qualitative Research on Emergency Medicine Physicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paltved, Charlotte; Musaeus, Peter

    2012-01-01

    studies on EM physicians were designed using the following strategies of inquiry: Ethnography, mixed methods, action research, grounded theory, phenomenology, content analysis, discourse analysis, and critical incident analysis. The reviewed studies were categorized into four main themes: Education......Aim: This study aims to systematically review the qualitative research studying Emergency Medicine (EM) physicians in Emergency Departments (ED). Background: Qualitative research aims to study complex social phenomena. EM is a highly complex medical and social environment that can be investigated...... with qualitative research. Methods: Electronic databases of English peer-reviewed articles were searched from 1971 to 2012 using Medline through PubMed and PsychINFO. This search was supplemented with hand-searches of Academic Emergency Medicine and Emergency Medicine Journal from 1999 to 2012 and cross references...

  1. Transitioning from Clinical to Qualitative Research Interviewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Hunt BSc (PT, PhD

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper one aspect of the transition that must be made by experienced clinicians who become involved in conducting qualitative health research is examined, specifically, the differences between clinical and research interviewing. A clinician who is skillful and comfortable carrying out a clinical interview may not initially apprehend the important differences between these categories and contexts of interviewing. This situation can lead to difficulties and diminished quality of data collection because the purpose, techniques and orientation of a qualitative research interview are distinct from those of the clinical interview. Appreciation of these differences between interview contexts and genres, and strategies for addressing challenges associated with these differences, can help clinician researchers to become successful qualitative interviewers.

  2. Smartphone log data in a qualitative perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørmen, Jacob; Thorhauge, Anne Mette

    2015-01-01

    Log data from smartphones have primarily been used in large-scale research designs to draw statistical inferences from hundreds or even thousands of participants. In this article, we argue that more qualitatively oriented designs can also benefit greatly from integrating these rich data sources...... serve as cues to instigate discussion and reflection as well as act as resources for contextualizing and organizing related empirical material. In the discussion, the advantages of a qualitative perspective for research designs are assessed in relation to issues of validity. Further perspectives...... into studies of smartphones in everyday life. Through an illustrative study, we explore a more nuanced perspective on what can be considered “log data” and how these types of data can be collected and analysed. A qualitative approach to log data analysis offers researchers new opportunities to situate...

  3. Dialog on a country path: the qualitative research journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrell, Jeanne M; Cangelosi, Pamela R; Dinkins, Christine S

    2014-03-01

    There is little information in the literature describing how students learn qualitative research. This article describes an approach to learning that is based on the pedagogical approach of Dinkins' Socratic-Hermeneutic Shared Inquiry. This approach integrates shared dialog as an essential aspect of learning. The qualitative pedagogy described in this article focused on three questions: What is knowing in qualitative research? How do we come to know qualitative research? What can we do with qualitative research? Students learned the basics of qualitative research within a context that fostered interpretive inquiry. In this way, the course framework mirrored the combination of interviewing, storytelling, and journeying toward understanding that constitute qualitative research. © 2013.

  4. Rapid Diagnosis of Trichomonas vaginalis by Testing Vaginal Swabs in an Isothermal Helicase-Dependent AmpliVue Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaydos, Charlotte A; Hobbs, Marcia; Marrazzo, Jeanne; Schwebke, Jane; Coleman, Jenell S; Masek, Billie; Dize, Laura; Jang, Dan; Li, Jenny; Chernesky, Max

    2016-06-01

    The AmpliVue Trichomonas Assay (Quidel) is a new Federal Drug Administration-cleared rapid test for qualitative detection of Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) DNA in female vaginal specimens. The assay is based on BioHelix's helicase-dependent amplification isothermal technology in conjunction with a disposable lateral-flow detection device, with a total turnaround time of approximately 45 minutes. The objective of this study was to compare the performance of this new assay to wet preparation and culture as well as to another Federal Drug Administration-cleared nucleic acid amplification assay. Four clinician collected vaginal swabs were obtained from women attending sexually transmitted disease, family planning, and OB/GYN clinics and tested by AmpliVue Trichomonas Assay and comparator tests: saline microscopy, TV culture (InPouch), and Aptima TV. AmpliVue Trichomonas Assay results were compared with a composite positive comparator (CPC) as determined by the results from culture and/or wet mount microscopic examination. At least one of either the wet preparation or culture reference test results was required to be positive to establish CPC. A total of 992 patients, 342 symptomatic and 650 asymptomatic patients, were included in the study. Results for AmpliVue for all women combined compared with saline microscopy and culture as a CPC yielded a sensitivity of 100%. Specificity for all women was 98.2%. Overall percent agreement versus Aptima TV was 97.8%. Sensitivity for AmpliVue compared with Aptima was 90.7% %, whereas specificity was 98.9%. The rapid AmpliVue Trichomonas Assay performed as well as microscopy and culture, and had comparable sensitivity and specificity to another nucleic acid amplification test for the detection of TV. This study provided evidence of new diagnostic options and indicated very good performance of amplified testing for detection of TV in symptomatic and asymptomatic women.

  5. Rapid Diagnosis of Trichomonas vaginalis by Testing Vaginal Swabs in an Isothermal Helicase-Dependent AmpliVue™ Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaydos, Charlotte A.; Hobbs, Marcia; Marrazzo, Jeanne; Schwebke, Jane; Coleman, Jenell S.; Masek, Billie; Dize, Laura; Jang, Dan; Li, Jenny; Chernesky, Max

    2016-01-01

    Background The AmpliVue™ Trichomonas Assay (Quidel) is a new FDA cleared rapid test for qualitative detection of Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) DNA in female vaginal specimens. The assay is based on BioHelix’s Helicase-Dependent Amplification (HDA) isothermal technology in conjunction with a disposable lateral-flow detection device, with a total turn-around time of approximately 45 minutes. Objective The objective of this study was to compare the performance of this new assay to wet preparation and culture, as well as to another FDA cleared nucleic acid amplification assay. Methods Four clinician collected vaginal swabs were obtained from women attending STD, family planning, and OB/GYN clinics and tested by AmpliVue™ Trichomonas Assay and comparator tests: saline microscopy, TV culture (InPouch™), and Aptima® TV (ATV). AmpliVue™ Trichomonas Assay results were compared to a composite positive comparator (CPC) as determined by the results from culture and/or wet mount microscopic examination. At least one of either the wet preparation or culture reference test results was required to be positive to establish CPC. Results A total of 992 patients, 342 symptomatic and 650 asymptomatic patients, were included in the study. Results for AmpliVue for all women combined compared to saline microscopy and culture as a composite positive comparator yielded a sensitivity of 100%. Specificity for all women was 98.2%. Overall percent agreement versus Aptima® TV was 97.8%. Sensitivity for AmpliVue compared to Aptima® was 90.7% %, while specificity was 98.9%. Conclusions The rapid AmpliVue™ Trichomonas Assay performed as well as microscopy and culture, and had comparable sensitivity and specificity to another NAAT for the detection of TV. This study provided evidence of new diagnostic options and indicated very good performance of amplified testing for detection of TV in symptomatic and asymptomatic women. PMID:27196258

  6. Employing a Qualitative Description Approach in Health Care Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Carmel; Atkinson, Sandra; Doody, Owen

    2017-01-01

    A qualitative description design is particularly relevant where information is required directly from those experiencing the phenomenon under investigation and where time and resources are limited. Nurses and midwives often have clinical questions suitable to a qualitative approach but little time to develop an exhaustive comprehension of qualitative methodological approaches. Qualitative description research is sometimes considered a less sophisticated approach for epistemological reasons. Another challenge when considering qualitative description design is differentiating qualitative description from other qualitative approaches. This article provides a systematic and robust journey through the philosophical, ontological, and epistemological perspectives, which evidences the purpose of qualitative description research. Methods and rigor issues underpinning qualitative description research are also appraised to provide the researcher with a systematic approach to conduct research utilizing this approach. The key attributes and value of qualitative description research in the health care professions will be highlighted with the aim of extending its usage.

  7. Collaborative ring trial of the papaya endogenous reference gene and its polymerase chain reaction assays for genetically modified organism analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jiaojun; Li, Feiwu; Guo, Jinchao; Li, Xiang; Xu, Junfeng; Wu, Gang; Zhang, Dabing; Yang, Litao

    2013-11-27

    The papaya (Carica papaya L.) Chymopapain (CHY) gene has been reported as a suitable endogenous reference gene for genetically modified (GM) papaya detection in previous studies. Herein, we further validated the use of the CHY gene and its qualitative and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays through an interlaboratory collaborative ring trial. A total of 12 laboratories working on detection of genetically modified organisms participated in the ring trial and returned test results. Statistical analysis of the returned results confirmed the species specificity, low heterogeneity, and single-copy number of the CHY gene among different papaya varieties. The limit of detection of the CHY qualitative PCR assay was 0.1%, while the limit of quantification of the quantitative PCR assay was ∼25 copies of haploid papaya genome with acceptable PCR efficiency and linearity. The differences between the tested and true values of papaya content in 10 blind samples ranged from 0.84 to 6.58%. These results indicated that the CHY gene was suitable as an endogenous reference gene for the identification and quantification of GM papaya.

  8. Qualitative properties of monotone linear parabolic operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István Faragó

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available When we construct mathematical or numerical models in order to solve a real-life problem, it is important to preserve the characteristic properties of the original process. The models have to possess the equivalents of these properties. Parabolic partial equations generally serve as the mathematical models of heat conduction or diffusion processes, where the most important properties are the monotonicity, the nonnegativity preservation and the maximum principles. In this paper, the validity of the equivalents of these qualitative properties are investigated for the second order linear partial differential operator. Conditions are given that guarantee the qualitative properties. On some examples we investigate these conditions.

  9. Qualitative research and the modern library

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Valeda Dent

    2011-01-01

    Qualitative Research and the Modern Library examines the present-day role and provides suggestions for areas that might be suited to this type of research for the purposes of evaluation. The author discusses how the results from such research might be applied, and the overall impact of using this type of research to inform development of a more user-centred organisation. The book provides a thoughtful look at the implications of using qualitative research to inform decision-making processes within libraries and is written by an author and library researcher with international experience in var

  10. The low molecular weight DNA diffusion assay as an indicator of cytotoxicity for the in vitro comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speit, Günter; Vesely, Alexandra; Schütz, Petra; Linsenmeyer, Regina; Bausinger, Julia

    2014-07-01

    The low molecular weight DNA diffusion assay (LMW assay) has been recommended as a measure for cytotoxicity for the in vivo comet assay. To better understand the relationship between effects in the LMW assay, DNA migration in the comet assay and effects in established cytotoxicity tests, we performed in vitro experiments with cultured human cell lines (TK6, A549) and comparatively investigated five test substances (methyl methanesulfonate, (±)-benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide, sodium dodecyl sulphate, menthol and sodium arsenite). We measured DNA migration (tail intensity) in the comet assay and the frequency of 'hedgehogs' (cells with almost all DNA in the tail), DNA diffusion in the LMW assay, cell viability (trypan blue and fluorescein diacetate/ethidium bromide staining) and inhibition of proliferation (relative cell counts). Our in vitro experiments indicate that effects in the LMW assay occur independently from DNA effects in the comet assay and are not related to the occurrence of hedgehogs. Results from the LMW assay are in good agreement with results from viability assays and seem to allow discriminating genotoxic from non-genotoxic substances when appropriate preparation times are considered. Measurements of cytotoxicity by these methods only at an early preparation time after exposure to genotoxic substances may lead to erroneous results. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Evaluation of lot-to-lot repeatability and effect of assay media choice in the recombinant Factor C assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Jennifer Helen; Alwis, K Udeni; Sordillo, Joanne E; Kalluri, Kesava Srinivas; Milton, Donald Kirby

    2011-06-01

    Measurement of environmental endotoxin exposures is complicated by variability encountered using current biological assay methods arising in part from lot-to-lot variability of the Limulus-amebocyte lysate (LAL) reagents. Therefore, we investigated the lot-to-lot repeatability of commercially available recombinant Factor C (rFC) kits as an alternative to LAL. Specifically, we compared endotoxin estimates obtained from rFC assay of twenty indoor dust samples, using four different extraction and assay media, to endotoxin estimates previously obtained by Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay and amounts of 3-hydroxy fatty acids (3-OHFA) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using gas-chromatography mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). We found that lot-to-lot variability of the rFC assay kits does not significantly alter endotoxin estimates in house dust samples when performed using three of the four assay media tested and that choice of assay media significantly altered endotoxin estimates obtained by rFC assay of house dust samples. Our findings demonstrate lot-to-lot reproducibility of rFC assay of environmental samples and suggest that use of rFC assay performed with Tris buffer or water as the extraction and assay medium for measurement of endotoxin in dust samples may be a suitable choice for developing a standardized methodology.

  12. Reliability of mycotoxin assays--an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, W; Albert, R; Nesheim, S

    1993-01-01

    The precision parameters of the method-performance (collaborative) studies for mycotoxins published in the literature through 1991 have been recalculated on a uniform basis by following the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry protocol. About 80% of the 793 accepted assays for mycotoxins, almost all of which have been conducted by thin-layer chromatography (TLC), liquid chromatography (LC), and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), exhibit relative standard deviations among laboratories (RSDR) that are less than 2 times the values predicted from the Horwitz equation: RSDR, % = 2(1-0.5log10C) where C is the concentration expressed as a decimal fraction. The precision of TLC and LC methods is about the same, but that of ELISA is somewhat poorer. For those commodities for which sufficient data exist to provide a meaningful comparison, the methods applied to cottonseed products have the best precision and corn the worst, with peanuts intermediate. Overall, however, the primary factor affecting RSDR is concentration, more or less independent of analyte, method, matrix, and age of the study. If it is assumed that the test results are normally distributed and that an RSDR of 50% is the point where effective control of the results begins to be lost (a value equivalent to the production of 2% false-negative values), then relying on the Horwitz curve, the limit of quantitative measurement is the single digit, i.e., 5, micrograms/kg (10(-9); ppb) concentration for solid food commodities. Such a value must be considered as a limit applicable to a single analyte, aflatoxin B1, and not as a mean, and not applicable to the sum of the individual components, each of whose associated standard deviation would lie in the unacceptable region. Enforcement of a 5 micrograms aflatoxin B1/kg limit, under the assumptions made, requires that a responsible manufacturer and a prudent regulator operate at opposite extremes of tolerance limits: e.g., the producer at 2

  13. Comparison of Fluorescent Microspheres and Colloidal Gold as Labels in Lateral Flow Immunochromatographic Assays for the Detection of T-2 Toxin

    OpenAIRE

    Xiya Zhang; Chao Wu; Kai Wen; Haiyang Jiang; Jianzhong Shen; Suxia Zhang; Zhanhui Wang

    2015-01-01

    A new highly specific and sensitive monoclonal antibody (MAb) to T-2 toxin (T-2) was produced, providing an IC50 value of 1.02 ng/mL and negligible cross-reactivity (CR) to other related mycotoxins. Based on the new MAb, a lateral-flow immunochromatographic assay (LFIA) using colloidal gold (CG) and fluorescent microspheres (FMs) as labels was proposed for T-2. Under the optimized conditions, in rapid qualitative assay, the cut-off values of the CG-LFIA were 400 μg/kg in rice and 50 μg/L in f...

  14. DNA integrity in sexed bull sperm assessed by neutral Comet assay and sperm chromatin structure assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boe-Hansen, Gry B; Morris, Ian D; Ersbøll, Annette K; Greve, Torben; Christensen, Preben

    2005-04-01

    During the production of sex-sorted spermatozoa from bull semen, the cells are exposed to a number of potential hazards including: dilution, centrifugation, incubation, exposure to DNA stains and laser light. These factors may affect the survival capacity and fertilization potential of the sperm. The objective of this study was to determine whether sex-sorted bull spermatozoa have more DNA damage than sperm from conventional processed bull semen. Two methods were used to determine DNA integrity: the neutral Comet assay (NCA) and the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The NCA showed that the conventional samples had a higher tail moment (TM) (P sperm and that cell sorting by flow cytometry improves the integrity of the sperm cell population. Additionally the results from the SCSA indicated that the sex-sorted sperm had less homogenous sperm chromatin. In the future assessment of sperm DNA integrity may be used to select bulls for sperm sex sorting and optimizing sperm sex sorting procedures.

  15. Heated oligonucleotide ligation assay (HOLA): an affordable single nucleotide polymorphism assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, W C; Gorrochotegui-Escalante, N; Duteau, N M

    2006-03-01

    Most single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection requires expensive equipment and reagents. The oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) is an inexpensive SNP assay that detects ligation between a biotinylated "allele-specific detector" and a 3' fluorescein-labeled "reporter" oligonucleotide. No ligation occurs unless the 3' detector nucleotide is complementary to the SNP nucleotide. The original OLA used chemical denaturation and neutralization. Heated OLA (HOLA) instead uses a thermal stable ligase and cycles of denaturing and hybridization for ligation and SNP detection. The cost per genotype is approximately US$1.25 with two-allele SNPs or approximately US$1.75 with three-allele SNPs. We illustrate the development of HOLA for SNP detection in the Early Trypsin and Abundant Trypsin loci in the mosquito Aedes aegypti (L.) and at the a-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase locus in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae s.s.

  16. A quantitative comet infection assay for influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Stephen M.; Timm, Andrea; Yin, John

    2011-01-01

    Summary The virus comet assay is a cell-based virulence assay used to evaluate an antiviral drug or antibody against a target virus. The comet assay differs from the plaque assay in allowing spontaneous flows in 6-well plates to spread virus. When implemented quantitatively the comet assay has been shown to have an order-of-magnitude greater sensitivity to antivirals than the plaque assay. In this study, a quantitative comet assay for influenza virus is demonstrated, and is shown to have a 13-fold increase in sensitivity to ribavirin. AX4 cells (MDCK cells with increased surface concentration of α2–6 sialic acid, the influenza virus receptor) have reduced the comet size variability relative to MDCK cells, making them a better host cell for use in this assay. Because of enhanced antiviral sensitivity in flow-based assays, less drug is required, which could lead to lower reagent costs, reduced cytotoxicity, and fewer false-negative drug screen results. The comet assay also serves as a readout of flow conditions in the well. Observations from comets formed at varying humidity levels indicate a role for evaporation in the mechanism of spontaneous fluid flow in wells. PMID:22155578

  17. Validation of qualitative microbiological test methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJzerman-Boon, Pieta C.; van den Heuvel, Edwin R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers a statistical model for the detection mechanism of qualitative microbiological test methods with a parameter for the detection proportion (the probability to detect a single organism) and a parameter for the false positive rate. It is demonstrated that the detection proportion

  18. Innovative Interpretive Qualitative Case Study Research Method ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lc2o

    Systems theory is used to explore innovation, change and ... methodology for aligning an innovative, interpretive qualitative case .... importance. Researchers can adopt either a single-case or multiple-case study design depending on the phenomenon in question. A single-case design could be criticized for its inability to ...

  19. Handbook of Qualitative Research. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzin, Norman K., Ed.; Lincoln, Yvonna S., Ed.

    This handbook's second edition represents the state of the art for the theory and practice of qualitative inquiry. It features eight new topics, including autoethnography, critical race theory, applied ethnography, queer theory, and "testimonio"every chapter in the handbook has been thoroughly revised and updated. The book…

  20. Collecting and Interpreting Qualitative Materials. Third Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzin, Norman K., Ed.; Lincoln, Yvonna, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This book is the third volume of the paperback versions of "The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Research, Third Edition." This portion of the handbook considers the tasks of collecting, analyzing, and interpreting empirical materials, and comprises the Handbook's Parts IV ("Methods of Collecting and Analyzing Empirical Materials") and V ("The Art and…

  1. Innovative Data Collection Strategies in Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Leech, Nancy L.; Collins, Kathleen M. T.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides an innovative meta-framework comprising strategies designed to guide qualitative data collection in the 21st century. We present a meta-framework comprising strategies for collecting data from interviews, focus groups, observations, and documents/material culture. We present a template for collecting nonverbal data during…

  2. Hypertext and Database Tools for Qualitative Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horney, Mark A.; Healey, Deborah

    This study compared and contrasted the use of hypertext and relational database knowledge representation techniques in the analysis of qualitative data. A parallel analysis of teacher interview transcripts was conducted with two computer programs: "EntryWay," a hypertext editor, and "FoxBase+/Mac," a relational database with a…

  3. Culturally Competent Qualitative Research with Latino Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Lizette; Flores, Lisa Y.; Meza, Rocio Rosales; Morales, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    This article provides recommendations for conducting culturally competent qualitative research with Latino immigrants, a historically exploited group that represents more than half of all U.S. immigrants and is continuously growing. Limited research exists on Latino immigrants despite their large presence in the United States. The authors draw…

  4. Facilitating Coherence across Qualitative Research Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenail, Ronald J.; Duffy, Maureen; St. George, Sally; Wulff, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Bringing the various elements of qualitative research papers into coherent textual patterns presents challenges for authors and editors alike. Although individual sections such as presentation of the problem, review of the literature, methodology, results, and discussion may each be constructed in a sound logical and structural sense, the…

  5. Writing Posthumanism, Qualitative Enquiry and Early Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges-Rhoads, Sarah; Van Cleave, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    This paper was written in the midst of enquiry--provoked by the question of what happens when we write posthumanism, qualitative enquiry and early literacy together. Rather than offer a stable methodology that is the product of our experimentation, the paper functions as a map, a situated cartography that has multiple access points and is…

  6. Methodological issues involved in conducting qualitative research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this article is to describe the methodological issues involved in conducting qualitative research to explore and describe nurses' experience of being directly involved with termination of pregnancies and developing guidelines for support for these nurses. The article points out the sensitivity and responsibility ...

  7. QUALITATIVE EDUCATION FOR PRISONERS: A PANACEA TO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elizabeth

    This study investigated the perception of prison staff and the academic staff of College of. Education, Agbor on the effect of qualitative education on prisoners as a .... Instrument: The questionnaire was constructed by the two researchers based on literature relating to prison education and rehabilitation. It was given to.

  8. Qualitative research across boundaries of language: the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Qualitative methodology has a growing importance in primary care research, reflected in projects submitted for the degree of MFamMed at The ... Results: Researchers acknowledged issues of language and developed a range of strategies to ensure the faithful representation of their subjects' beliefs and ...

  9. Peer Helpers in Hungary: A Qualitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racz, Jozsef; Lacko, Zsuzsa

    2008-01-01

    Hungary is a country in transition that has no real tradition of peer helping. A qualitative study was carried out involving 13 peer helpers of two kinds (a) age-based peers, and (b) way-of-life-based peers (fellow helpers). The motivations for and the processes of becoming a peer helper were analyzed. Results showed the largest difference being…

  10. Using Qualitative Inquiry to Promote Organizational Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Ezekiel; Loya, Karla I.

    2017-01-01

    Framed by Terenzini's revision of his classic "On the nature of institutional research" article, this chapter offers concluding thoughts on the way in which technical/analytical, issues, and contextual types of awarenesses appeared across chapters in this volume. Moreover, it outlines how each chapter demonstrated how qualitative inquiry…

  11. CHARACTERIZATION QUALITATIVE OF SOEL FOR A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    15 janv. 2015 ... ABSTRACT. The main objective of this study was to qualitatively characterize biomass of Solanum elaeagnifolium Cav. (or SOEL) to highlight the essential alternatives its valorization. At first, we studied the potential of composting biomass of this plant. The physico-chemical characterization of biomass ...

  12. Qualitative content analysis of complementary topical therapies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to alleviate diabetic foot problems, patients sometimes seek complementary therapies outside the professional context. This paper describes the use of complementary remedies as a topical treatment for diabetic foot ulcers among Jordanians. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse written responses of 68 ...

  13. Qualitative Data Sharing Practices in Social Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Social scientists have been sharing data for a long time. Sharing qualitative data, however, has not become a common practice, despite the context of e-Research, information growth, and funding agencies' mandates on research data archiving and sharing. Since most systematic and comprehensive studies are based on quantitative data practices, little…

  14. Murder and Motivation: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Mirzaei Alavijeh; Mostafavi; Ahmadpanah; Karami Matin; Amoei; Jalilian,

    2015-01-01

    Background Murder is considered as the worst crime in all societies. It might be accomplished suddenly based on previous resolution, effect of stimuli, or due to a mental condition. Objectives The present study aimed to determine the reasons and motivations to commit a murder from murderers’ point of view. Patients and Methods It is a qualitative research making use of content anal...

  15. Qualitative evaluation of smallholder farmer decisions, support ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Qualitative evaluation of smallholder farmer decisions, support systems, knowledge and disease management tools. ... Due to resource-limitations of most smallholder farmers in South Africa, production practices, including disease control could be much improved, using indigenous-based, local knowledge about cultural ...

  16. Qualitative Variables in Medical School Admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaghie, William C.

    1990-01-01

    Ten qualitative categories associated with excellence in medical education and practice are identified: character and integrity; breadth of knowledge; leadership; geographic preferences; gender, race, and religious preference; work habits and motivation to study; personality and attitude; personal orientation toward service; altruism; and personal…

  17. Resilient Women Leaders: A Qualitative Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Julia; Maldonado, Nancy L.; Lacey, Candace H.; Efinger, Joan

    2004-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated perceptions of resilient, transformational, successful women leaders regarding their own resiliency and leadership. The ten participants provided information during semi-structured, open-ended, audio taped interviews which were transcribed, hand coded, and then analyzed with QSR N6 software. Findings indicated…

  18. Values in Qualitative and Quantitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Maureen; Chenail, Ronald J.

    2008-01-01

    The authors identify the philosophical underpinnings and value-ladenness of major research paradigms. They argue that useful and meaningful research findings for counseling can be generated from both qualitative and quantitative research methodologies, provided that the researcher has an appreciation of the importance of philosophical coherence in…

  19. Martini Qualitative Research: Shaken, Not Stirred

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuis, F. J.

    2015-01-01

    Although the number of qualitative research studies has boomed in recent years, close observation reveals that often the research designs and methodological considerations and approaches have developed a type of configuration that does not adhere to purist definitions of the labels attached. Very often so called interpretivist studies are not…

  20. Why Students Procrastinate: A Qualitative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingsieck, Katrin B.; Grund, Axel; Schmid, Sebastian; Fries, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In this study we adopted an impartial view on academic procrastination in order to gain new insights for the development of intervention programs. Following a qualitative approach, we thereby explored antecedents of procrastination by attending to the actual voices and experiences of 29 students. Students' subjective theories were in line…

  1. a qualitative case study of jimma university

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    practicum experience as a tool of learning to teach by using qualitative research methods. Data were collected through interview from ..... was able to identify diverse learner, I was able to develop collaboration and team work ..... Family and consumer sciences Pre- service Teachers: Impact of an. Early Field Experience.

  2. Qualitative Description of College Students' Dinner Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Brita; Brown, Lora Beth

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To discover how college students conduct dinner groups and perceptions of the benefits and difficulties of participation. Design: Qualitative study conducted with 7 focus groups. Setting and Participants: A university campus, with 36 students participating in dinner groups, defined as a group of 3 people or more cooking for one another…

  3. Innovative Interpretive Qualitative Case Study Research Method ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this paper is to review the methodology for interpretive qualitative case study research method using systems theory. The paper also addresses the underlying assumptions of this research methodology and how these affect the way research questions are answered. In reviewing this methodology, an example is ...

  4. a qualitative study of providers' perspectives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Glaucoma management is challenging to patients as well as to the eye care providers.The study is aimed at describing the challenges faced by providers using qualitative methods. Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with selected Ophthalmologists and resident doctors in ophthalmology at centres ...

  5. Asian American Career Development: A Qualitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Nadya A.; Kantamneni, Neeta; Smothers, Melissa K.; Chen, Yung-Lung; Fitzpatrick, Mary; Terry, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    This study used a modified version of consensual qualitative research design to examine how contextual, cultural, and personal variables influence the career choices of a diverse group of 12 Asian Americans. Seven domains of influences on career choices emerged including family, culture, external factors, career goals, role models, work values,…

  6. Qualitative studies of stroke: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKevitt, Christopher; Redfern, Judith; Mold, Freda; Wolfe, Charles

    2004-06-01

    Qualitative studies are increasingly used to investigate social processes and phenomena influencing health behaviors and service provision. We aimed to identify the scope of published qualitative studies of stroke, consider their relevance to development and delivery of services for people with stroke, and make recommendations for future work. Literature review of published articles was identified by systematically searching online literature databases using keywords from the start of each database until 2002. Articles were reviewed by 2 authors, using a standardized matrix for data extraction. The 2003 European Stroke Initiative recommendations for stroke management were used to categorize the literature for consideration of its contribution to stroke research. We included 95 articles. Their empirical contribution includes an emphasis on recording the "human" experience of stroke; identification of needs as perceived by patients and their families, differences in priorities between patients and professionals, and barriers to best-quality care. We identified 12 papers that were specifically undertaken to develop or evaluate interventions. Qualitative studies have addressed a wide range of issues related to the impact of stroke on individuals and caregivers, and to the organization and delivery of services. Significant problems remain in ensuring the delivery of best-quality stroke care, which such studies have the potential to address. Maximizing this potential requires greater collaboration between nonclinical and clinical scientists, service providers, and users to formulate research questions of interest as well as new research strategies, such as meta-analysis, to pool qualitative research findings and multisited investigations.

  7. Alternative quality standards in qualitative research?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortman, Cindy Louise; Schildkamp, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Qualitative researchers often use other principles for judging the quality of their study than quantitative researchers. This inhibits a straightforward assessment of the quality and comparability of different types of studies, as well as decision-making about their usefulness for further research

  8. Experiences of patients undergoing chemotherapy - a qualitative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to describe adult Ugandan cancer patients' experiences of undergoing chemotherapy treatment. Methodology: Using a qualitative descriptive design, seven in-patients with varying cancer diagnoses at the Uganda Cancer ... tance of focusing research on persons with cancer in.

  9. Qualitative research across boundaries of language: the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Qualitative methodology has a growing importance in primary care research, reflected in projects submitted for the degree of MFamMed at The Medical University of Southern Africa (Medunsa). These projects were completed in multilingual settings and sought highly subjective information. This paper aimed to ...

  10. A Qualitative Acceleration Model Based on Intervals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester MARTINEZ-MARTIN

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available On the way to autonomous service robots, spatial reasoning plays a main role since it properly deals with problems involving uncertainty. In particular, we are interested in knowing people's pose to avoid collisions. With that aim, in this paper, we present a qualitative acceleration model for robotic applications including representation, reasoning and a practical application.

  11. Qualitative Study of an Amish School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avenatti, Linda

    1991-01-01

    Presents a qualitative study of an Amish elementary school where classroom management and teaching methods prepare children to cope with their everyday lifestyle. Religious values are reinforced with reading lessons and Bible study. The article concludes with a brief description of Amish culture and lifestyle. (SM)

  12. Mouse lung adhesion assay for Bordetella pertussis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, K.A.; Freer, J.H. (Department of Microbiology, Alexander Stone Building, Bearsden, Glasgow, Scotland)

    1982-03-01

    The ability of Bordetella pertussis to adhere to cell surfaces has been demonstrated by adhesion to tissue culture cells and adhesion to chicken, hamster or rabbit trachea in organ culture. In this report a mouse lung assay for adhesion is described and the results obtained using two virulent strains of B. pertussis and their avirulent counterparts. These were a C modulation of one of the original virulent strains and a phase IV variant of the other virulent strain. Organisms were radiolabelled by adding 1 ..mu..Ci (37 K Bq) of (/sup 14/C)glutamic acid per 10 ml of culture medium before inoculation and incubation for 5 days. The lungs were washed by perfusion in situ with at least two volumes (1 ml) of sterile 1% (w/v) casamino acids. The percentage of the inoculated organisms retained in the lungs was determined, after removal of the lungs, by one of the following two methods: viable count or radioactive count. Results for both methods were expressed as the percentage of the inoculum retained in the lungs plus or minus one standard deviation.

  13. Prandiology of Drosophila and the CAFE assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ja, William W.; Carvalho, Gil B.; Mak, Elizabeth M.; de la Rosa, Noelle N.; Fang, Annie Y.; Liong, Jonathan C.; Brummel, Ted; Benzer, Seymour

    2007-01-01

    Studies of feeding behavior in genetically tractable invertebrate model systems have been limited by the lack of proper methodology. We introduce the Capillary Feeder (CAFE), a method allowing precise, real-time measurement of ingestion by individual or grouped fruit flies on the scale of minutes to days. Using this technique, we conducted the first quantitative analysis of prandial behavior in Drosophila melanogaster. Our results allow the dissection of feeding into discrete bouts of ingestion, defining two separate parameters, meal volume and frequency, that can be uncoupled and thus are likely to be independently regulated. In addition, our long-term measurements show that flies can ingest as much as 1.7× their body mass over 24 h. Besides the study of appetite, the CAFE can be used to monitor oral drug delivery. As an illustration, we used the CAFE to test the effects of dietary supplementation with two compounds, paraquat and ethanol, on food ingestion and preference. Paraquat, a prooxidant widely used in stress tests, had a strong anorexigenic effect. In contrast, in a feeding preference assay, ethanol-laced food, but not ethanol by itself, acted as an attractant. PMID:17494737

  14. Fluorometric enzymatic assay of L-arginine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasyuk, Nataliya; Gayda, Galina; Yepremyan, Hasmik; Stepien, Agnieszka; Gonchar, Mykhailo

    2017-01-01

    The enzymes of L-arginine (further - Arg) metabolism are promising tools for elaboration of selective methods for quantitative Arg analysis. In our study we propose an enzymatic method for Arg assay based on fluorometric monitoring of ammonia, a final product of Arg splitting by human liver arginase I (further - arginase), isolated from the recombinant yeast strain, and commercial urease. The selective analysis of ammonia (at 415 nm under excitation at 360 nm) is based on reaction with o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) in the presence of sulfite in alkali medium: these conditions permit to avoid the reaction of OPA with any amino acid. A linearity range of the fluorometric arginase-urease-OPA method is from 100 nM to 6 μМ with a limit of detection of 34 nM Arg. The method was used for the quantitative determination of Arg in the pooled sample of blood serum. The obtained results proved to be in a good correlation with the reference enzymatic method and literature data. The proposed arginase-urease-OPA method being sensitive, economical, selective and suitable for both routine and micro-volume formats, can be used in clinical diagnostics for the simultaneous determination of Arg as well as urea and ammonia in serum samples.

  15. Virus Characterization by FFF-MALS Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razinkov, Vladimer

    2009-03-01

    Adequate biophysical characterization of influenza virions is important for vaccine development. The influenza virus vaccines are produced from the allantoic fluid of developing chicken embryos. The process of viral replication produces a heterogeneous mixture of infectious and non-infectious viral particles with varying states of aggregation. The study of the relative distribution and behavior of different subpopulations and their inter-correlation can assist in the development of a robust process for a live virus vaccine. This report describes a field flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering (FFF-MALS) method optimized for the analysis of size distribution and total particle counts. A method using a combination of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AFFFF) and multiangle light scattering (MALS) techniques has been shown to improve the estimation of virus particle counts and the amount of aggregated virus in laboratory samples. The FFF-MALS method was compared with several other methods such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), size exclusion chromatography followed by MALS (SEC-MALS), quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT Q-PCR), median tissue culture dose (TCID(50)), and the fluorescent focus assay (FFA). The correlation between the various methods for determining total particle counts, infectivity and size distribution is reported. The pros and cons of each of the analytical methods are discussed.

  16. Assaying Carcinoembryonic Antigens by Normalized Saturation Magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kai-Wen; Chieh, Jen-Jie; Shi, Jin-Cheng; Chiang, Ming-Hsien

    2015-07-01

    Biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles (BMNs) that provide unique advantages have been extensively used to develop immunoassay methods. However, these developed magnetic methods have been used only for specific immunoassays and not in studies of magnetic characteristics of materials. In this study, a common vibration sample magnetometer (VSM) was used for the measurement of the hysteresis loop for different carcinoembryonic antigens (CEA) concentrations ( Φ CEA) based on the synthesized BMNs with anti-CEA coating. Additionally, magnetic parameters such as magnetization ( M), remanent magnetization ( M R), saturation magnetization ( M S), and normalized parameters (Δ M R/ M R and Δ M S/ M S) were studied. Here, Δ M R and Δ M s were defined as the difference between any ΦCEA and zero Φ CEA. The parameters M, Δ M R, and Δ M S increased with Φ CEA, and Δ M S showed the largest increase. Magnetic clusters produced by the conjugation of the BMNs to CEAs showed a Δ M S greater than that of BMNs. Furthermore, the relationship between Δ M S/ M S and Φ CEA could be described by a characteristic logistic function, which was appropriate for assaying the amount of CEAs. This analytic Δ M S/ M S and the BMNs used in general magnetic immunoassays can be used for upgrading the functions of the VSM and for studying the magnetic characteristics of materials.

  17. Assaying Visual Memory in the Desert Locust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senne Dillen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of associative learning cues has been demonstrated in several stages of feeding and food selection. Short neuropeptide F (sNPF, an insect neuropeptide whose effects on feeding behavior have previously been well established, may be one of the factors bridging feeding and learning behavior. Recently, it was shown in Drosophila melanogaster that the targeted reduction of Drome-sNPF transcript levels significantly reduced sugar-rewarded olfactory memory. While Drosophila mainly relies on olfactory perception in its food searching behavior, locust foraging behavior is likely to be more visually orientated. Furthermore, a feeding-dependent regulation of Schgr-sNPF transcript levels has previously been observed in the optic lobes of the locust brain, suggesting a possible involvement in visual perception of food and visual associative memory in this insect species. In this study, we describe the development of a robust and reproducible assay allowing visual associative memory to be studied in the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria. Furthermore, we performed an exploratory series of experiments, studying the role of Schgr-sNPF in this complex process.

  18. Reversible G Protein βγ9 Distribution-Based Assay Reveals Molecular Underpinnings in Subcellular, Single-Cell, and Multicellular GPCR and G Protein Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senarath, Kanishka; Ratnayake, Kasun; Siripurapu, Praneeth; Payton, John L; Karunarathne, Ajith

    2016-12-06

    Current assays to measure the activation of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and G proteins are time-consuming, indirect, and expensive. Therefore, an efficient method which directly measures the ability of a ligand to govern GPCR-G protein interactions can help to understand the molecular underpinnings of the associated signaling. A live cell imaging-based approach is presented here to directly measure ligand-induced GPCR and G protein activity in real time. The number of active GPCRs governs G protein heterotrimer (αβγ) dissociation, thereby controlling the concentration of free βγ subunits. The described γ9 assay measures the GPCR activation-induced extent of the reversible βγ9 subunit exchange between the plasma membrane (PM) and internal membranes (IMs). Confocal microscopy-based γ9 assay quantitatively determines the concentration dependency of ligands on GPCR activation. Demonstrating the high-throughput screening (HTS) adaptability, the γ9 assay performed using an imaging plate reader measures the ligand-induced GPCR activation. This suggests that the γ9 assay can be employed to screen libraries of compounds for their ability to activate GPCRs. Together with subcellular optogenetics, the spatiotemporal sensitivity of the γ9 assay permits experimental determination of the limits of spatially restricted activation of GPCRs and G proteins in subcellular regions of single cells. This assay works effectively for GPCRs coupled to αi/o and αs heterotrimers, including light-sensitive GPCRs. In addition, computational modeling of experimental data from the assay is used to decipher intricate molecular details of the GPCR-G protein activation process. Overall, the γ9 assay provides a robust strategy for quantitative as well as qualitative determination of GPCR and G protein function on a single-cell, multicell, and subcellular level. This assay not only provides information about the inner workings of the signaling pathway, but it also strengthens

  19. Learning to Think Qualitatively: Experiences of Graduate Students Conducting Qualitative Health Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Hunt BSc (PT, MSc, PhD

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors discuss their experiences as graduate students using qualitative approaches to conduct health research. They explore how their engagement with qualitative research has related to feelings of humility, the desire to honor research participants' stories, challenges of pacing and other practical considerations, experiences of isolation and uncertainty, struggles with method and methodology, and moments of elation and discovery. They offer practical suggestions for students who are beginning similar academic endeavors. Supervisors might also find this paper of interest as they mentor and guide graduate students who are using qualitative methods.

  20. Evaluation of a MTT assay in measurement of radiosensitizing effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Keiko; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Maebayashi, Katsuya; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Niibe, Hideo [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-11-01

    The usefulness of a MTT assay by measuring the radiosensitizing effect of caffeine on rat yolk sac tumor cell line with a mutant-type p53 in vitro was evaluated. A rat yolk sac tumor cell line with a mutant-type p53, NMT-1R, was used in this study. The radiosensitivity of NMT-1R with or without caffeine was measured with a MTT assay. The results were compared with those by a clonogenic assay. Caffeine at a concentration of 2.0 mM which released radiation-induced G{sub 2} block demonstrated a radiosensitizing effect, but caffeine at a concentration of 0.5 mM did not. The radiosensitizing effect of caffeine measured by a MTT assay correlated with that measured by a clonogenic assay. A MTT assay was useful to measure radiosensitivity and/or a radiosensitizing effect in vitro. (author)

  1. An assay to screen bacterial adhesion to mucus biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, A; Da Silva, L; Hearne, J; Parveen, S; Waguespack, Y

    2013-01-01

    To develop an assay for rapid screening of bacterial adhesion to various groups of biomolecules present in fish mucus. A novel assay was developed for investigation of bacterial adhesion to various groups of mucus biomolecules from fish. Lipid-, protein-, carbohydrate- and nucleic acid-rich constituents of mucus were separated using isopycnic density gradient centrifugation techniques. Separated mucus fractions were assayed for bacterial adhesion using a blotting apparatus. The assay was validated using Vibrio vulnificus and skin mucus from hybrid tilapia. A novel assay was developed for the screening of bacterial adhesion to major groups of mucus biomolecules. Adhesion of V. vulnificus MLT403 positively correlated with lipid- and protein-rich mucus constituents and negatively correlated with carbohydrate-rich mucus constituents. The assay can be used as an initial approach in a systematic identification of mucus constituent(s) exhibiting the most favourable adhesion properties for bacteria. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Multiplex cytological profiling assay to measure diverse cellular states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrun M Gustafsdottir

    Full Text Available Computational methods for image-based profiling are under active development, but their success hinges on assays that can capture a wide range of phenotypes. We have developed a multiplex cytological profiling assay that "paints the cell" with as many fluorescent markers as possible without compromising our ability to extract rich, quantitative profiles in high throughput. The assay detects seven major cellular components. In a pilot screen of bioactive compounds, the assay detected a range of cellular phenotypes and it clustered compounds with similar annotated protein targets or chemical structure based on cytological profiles. The results demonstrate that the assay captures subtle patterns in the combination of morphological labels, thereby detecting the effects of chemical compounds even though their targets are not stained directly. This image-based assay provides an unbiased approach to characterize compound- and disease-associated cell states to support future probe discovery.

  3. Comparison of assay formats for drug-tolerant immunogenicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Anthony M; Chain, Jana S; Ackermann, Bradley L; Konrad, Robert J

    2010-12-01

    Immunogenicity testing is required for safety assessment of biotherapeutic drugs. Because levels observed during biotherapeutic administration can approach the mg/ml range, establishing drug tolerance is significantly important for assay development. Three assay formats for immunogenicity assessment were tested with respect to drug tolerance: Meso Scale Discovery(®) bridging (MSDB), solid-phase extraction with acid dissociation (SPEAD) and affinity capture elution (ACE). Six biotherapeutic drugs were analyzed by the three methods; four monoclonal antibodies, one Fc fusion protein and one Pegylated protein. Overall, ACE performed best for assays involving therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and also functioned well for therapeutic proteins. Despite several advantages, the MSDB assays displayed a potentially significant hook effect. SPEAD was comparable in performance to ACE for the biotherapeutic drugs tested, but suffers the disadvantage of being reagent-intensive. Novel assay formats offer significant advantages for immunogenicity testing, particularly in the design of assays that are tolerant to circulating levels of the biotherapeutic drug.

  4. Ecotoxicological Assessment of Aquatic Genotoxicity Using the Comet Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KHUSNUL YAQIN

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Comet assay is a novel biological analysis, which is a sensitive, flexible, simple, rapid, and inexpensive method to assess aquatic genotoxicant. Since Singh and co-workers developed the method in 1988, its use has increased exponentially in various fields. This review discourses on the application of this assay in aquatic ecosystems. Various types of cells from various aquatic organisms have been tested by various genotoxicant both direct- and indirect-acting using the comet assay. The applications of this assay suggest that it is a useful assay to assess aquatic genotoxicants. However, there are some factors, which should be taken into account when using this assay as aquatic ecotoxicological assessment device such as inter-animal and cell variability.

  5. Proteomics: from hypothesis to quantitative assay on a single platform. Guidelines for developing MRM assays using ion trap mass spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bomie; Higgs, Richard E

    2008-09-01

    High-throughput HPLC-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) is routinely used to profile biological samples for potential protein markers of disease, drug efficacy and toxicity. The discovery technology has advanced to the point where translating hypotheses from proteomic profiling studies into clinical use is the bottleneck to realizing the full potential of these approaches. The first step in this translation is the development and analytical validation of a higher throughput assay with improved sensitivity and selectivity relative to typical profiling assays. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) assays are an attractive approach for this stage of biomarker development given their improved sensitivity and specificity, the speed at which the assays can be developed and the quantitative nature of the assay. While the profiling assays are performed with ion trap mass spectrometers, MRM assays are traditionally developed in quadrupole-based mass spectrometers. Development of MRM assays from the same instrument used in the profiling analysis enables a seamless and rapid transition from hypothesis generation to validation. This report provides guidelines for rapidly developing an MRM assay using the same mass spectrometry platform used for profiling experiments (typically ion traps) and reviews methodological and analytical validation considerations. The analytical validation guidelines presented are drawn from existing practices on immunological assays and are applicable to any mass spectrometry platform technology.

  6. Diagnostic performance of HPV E6/E7 mRNA assay for detection of cervical high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer among women with ASCUS Papanicolaou smears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Chenchen; Zhu, Yuanhang; Yang, Li; Zhang, Xiaoan; Liu, Ling; Ren, Chunying

    2017-11-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical performance of high risk (HR) HPV E6/E7 mRNA assay in detecting cervical high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer among women with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) Papanicolaou (Pap) smears. A total of 160 patients with ASCUS who underwent HR-HPV DNA assay, HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA assay and colposcopy biopsy at Third Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, China, from December 2015 to March 2017, were enrolled. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between pathological results with clinical biologic factors. Univariate analysis showed that the qualitative results of HR-HPV DNA, qualitative results of HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA and expression levels of HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA were risk factors of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer (all P mRNA was associated with high-grade CIN and cervical cancer (OR = 8.971, 95% CI = 2.572-31.289, P = 0.001). An optimal cut-off value of ≥ 558.26 copies/ml was determined using receiver operating characteristic curve, and specificity of cut-off value were higher than E6/E7 mRNA qualitative assay and DNA qualitative assay. HPV E6/E7 mRNA quantitative assay may be a valuable tool in triage of ASCUS pap smears. A high specificity of E6/E7 mRNA quantitative assay as a triage test in women with ASCUS can be translated into a low referral for colposcopy.

  7. Epithelial cells as alternative human biomatrices for comet assay

    OpenAIRE

    Emilio eRojas; Yolanda eLorenzo; Kristiane eHuag-Berg; Bjørn eNicolaissen; Mahara eValverde

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a valuable experimental tool aimed at mapping DNA damage in human cells in vivo for environmental and occupational monitoring, as well as for therapeutic purposes, such as storage prior to transplant, during tissue engineering, and in experimental ex vivo assays. Furthermore, due to its great versatility, the comet assay allows to explore the use of alternative cell types to assess DNA damage, such as epithelial cells. Epithelial cells, as specialized components of many org...

  8. Ecotoxicological Assessment of Aquatic Genotoxicity Using the Comet Assay

    OpenAIRE

    YAQIN, KHUSNUL

    2006-01-01

    Comet assay is a novel biological analysis, which is a sensitive, flexible, simple, rapid, and inexpensive method to assess aquatic genotoxicant. Since Singh and co-workers developed the method in 1988, its use has increased exponentially in various fields. This review discourses on the application of this assay in aquatic ecosystems. Various types of cells from various aquatic organisms have been tested by various genotoxicant both direct- and indirect-acting using the comet assay. The appli...

  9. Enzyme Assay Methods to Validate DIGE Proteomics Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    Enzyme activity assay methods can be used to corroborate the results generated by Difference Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE) proteomic experiments. Two assay methods were chosen to demonstrate how this can be achieved. Assays for determining the activity of superoxide dismutase and NADH dehydrogenase are outlined in detail in this paper. These methods were chosen as examples because they are frequently used in conjunction with DIGE proteomics.

  10. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Mano K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2015-12-01

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  11. Comparative investigation of various cellulase assay procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canevascini, G.; Gattlen, C.

    1981-07-01

    The cellulolytic activity of crude enzyme preparations from different cellulolytic fungi (namely Trichoderma viride, Trichoderma koningii, Fusarium solani, Sporotrichum pulverulentum, Sporotrichum thermophile) was assayed comparatively with several common analytical procedures described in the literature. The investigation was carried out with the objective of evaluating, with raw culture filtrates, the different cellulase tests in relation to their specificity for endo- and exo-cellulase action as well as to allow comparisons to be made between results from different research groups using different methods. 1) Cellulase activity was tested viscometrically as well as chemically (determination of reducing end groups) with different carboxymethylcelluloses as substrates. Essentially constant ratios between both kinds of activities were obtained, indicating that they are directly related. By estimating cellulase activity with insoluble cellulosic substrates no direct relationship could be established with the above-described activities except in the case where the cellulose was amorphous. The ratio profile between activities thus obtained and endo-cellulase activities determined viscometrically shows that some enzyme preparations (such as those from both Trichoderma sp.) are clearly more active than others against crystalline cellulose reflecting quantitative differences in enzyme composition. Nevertheless, for a biological understanding of cellulolysis, analytical procedures using crystalline celluloses are not adequate for specifically monitoring exo-cellulase activity in crude enzyme solutions for essentially two reasons: a) they are not sufficiently sensitive to detect small changes in enzyme activity during the early phase of growth, and b) exo-cellulase activity in crude enzyme solutions also depends on the endo-cellulase activity present. (Refs. 39).

  12. BROMATOMATRIC ASSAY OF GATIFLOXACIN IN PHARMACEUTICALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KALSANG THARPA

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Three new, simple, and cost-effective visible spectrophotometric methods are proposed for determination of gatifloxacin (GTF using bromate-bromide mixture, and three dyes, methyl orange, indigocarmine and thymol blue, as reagents.The methods engross the addition of a known excess of bromate-bromide mixture to GTF in hydrochloric acid medium followed by determination of residual bromine by reacting with a fixed amount of either methyl orange andmeasuring the absorbance at 520 nm (method A or indigo carmine and measuring the absorbance at 610 nm (method B or thymol blue and measuring the absorbance at 550 nm (method C. In all the methods, the amount of brominereacted corresponds to the amount of GTF, and the absorbance is found to increase linearly with the concentration of GTF. Under the optimum conditions, GTF could be assayed in the concentration range 0.25-1.5, 0.5-6.0, and 0.5-10μg/mL by method A, method B and method C, respectively. The apparent molar absorptivities are calculated to be 1.6x105, 4.0x104 and 3.2x104 L mol-1 cm-1 for the method A, method B and method C, respectively, and the corresponding Sandell sensitivity values are 0.0025, 0.010 and 0.012 μg/cm2. The intra-day and inter-day precision, and the accuracy of the methods were evaluated as per the current ICH guidelines. The methods were successfully applied to the determination of GTF in pharmaceutical preparations without the interference from any of the pharmaceutical adjuvants.

  13. Improvements and Variants of the Multiple Antigen Blot Assay-MABA: An Immunoenzymatic Technique for Simultaneous Antigen and Antibody Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noya, Oscar; Losada, Sandra; Toledo, Marilyan; Gauna, Adriana; Lorenzo, María Angelita; Bermúdez, Henry; de Noya, Belkisyolé Alarcón

    2015-01-01

    This simple, versatile, reliable, reproducible, multipurpose, and inexpensive technique is based on the adhesion of different antigens to a single nitrocellulose strip using, as template, an acrylic device containing 28 parallel channels. The inclusion of channels containing normal human serum improves the quality control of this assay. Antigen-sensitized nitrocellulose strips are cut perpendicularly to the antigen-rows, exposed to immune sera followed by the appropriate conjugate. Positive signals are recorded using chemiluminescent or precipitable colorimetric substrates. This assay allows the simultaneous qualitative demonstration of antigenicity and immunogenicity of antigens obtained as synthetic peptides, recombinant molecules, or crude preparations, with high sensitivity and specificity. Its major value is based on the rapid and simultaneous comparative evaluation of various antigenic preparations allowing the diagnosis of a variety of infectious, allergic, and autoimmune diseases. It can in general be used to detect any type of antibody or circulating antigen. Some improvements and variants of the original technique are included.

  14. Functional assays for hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, John M; Li, Linheng

    2010-01-01

    Stem cells are defined by the ability to self-renew. Specific functional assays have been developed for the rigorous identification and quantification of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), making these cells the benchmark in studies of self-renewal. Here, we review the theory behind these functional stem cell tests and discuss important considerations in choosing and designing these assays. Finally, we provide a basic protocol for the serial-dilution assay, a quantitative assay for HSCs, from which individual researchers can construct their own customized protocols utilizing the guidelines discussed.

  15. Bracketing as a skill in conducting unstructured qualitative interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorsa, Minna Anneli; Kiikkala, Irma; Åstedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2015-03-01

    To provide an overview of bracketing as a skill in unstructured qualitative research interviews. Researchers affect the qualitative research process. Bracketing in descriptive phenomenology entails researchers setting aside their pre-understanding and acting non-judgementally. In interpretative phenomenology, previous knowledge is used intentionally to create new understanding. A literature search of bracketing in phenomenology and qualitative research. This is a methodology paper examining the researchers' impact in creating data in creating data in qualitative research. Self-knowledge, sensitivity and reflexivity of the researcher enable bracketing. Skilled and experienced researchers are needed to use bracketing in unstructured qualitative research interviews. Bracketing adds scientific rigour and validity to any qualitative study.

  16. Learning to Think Qualitatively: Experiences of Graduate Students Conducting Qualitative Health Research

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew R. Hunt BSc (PT), MSc, PhD; Anita Mehta BSc, MSc (A), PhD; Lisa S. Chan BSc, MSc (A), PhD (candidate)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the authors discuss their experiences as graduate students using qualitative approaches to conduct health research. They explore how their engagement with qualitative research has related to feelings of humility, the desire to honor research participants' stories, challenges of pacing and other practical considerations, experiences of isolation and uncertainty, struggles with method and methodology, and moments of elation and discovery. They offer practical suggestions for stude...

  17. Structured Qualitative Research: Organizing “Mountains of Words” for Data Analysis, both Qualitative and Quantitative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bruce D.; Dunlap, Eloise; Benoit, Ellen

    2008-01-01

    Qualitative research creates mountains of words. U.S. federal funding supports mostly structured qualitative research, which is designed to test hypotheses using semi-quantitative coding and analysis. The authors have 30 years of experience in designing and completing major qualitative research projects, mainly funded by the US National Institute on Drug Abuse [NIDA]. This article reports on strategies for planning, organizing, collecting, managing, storing, retrieving, analyzing, and writing about qualitative data so as to most efficiently manage the mountains of words collected in large-scale ethnographic projects. Multiple benefits accrue from this approach. Several different staff members can contribute to the data collection, even when working from remote locations. Field expenditures are linked to units of work so productivity is measured, many staff in various locations have access to use and analyze the data, quantitative data can be derived from data that is primarily qualitative, and improved efficiencies of resources are developed. The major difficulties involve a need for staff who can program and manage large databases, and who can be skillful analysts of both qualitative and quantitative data. PMID:20222777

  18. The Journal Project: Qualitative Computing and the Technology/Aesthetics Divide in Qualitative Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Davidson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-first century qualitative research is at a crossroads as it faces the double challenges of new technologies for conducting research and the powerful strand of interest in arts-based research (including memoir and autoethnography. The journal project, a study of eighteen months of my personal journals, aims to demonstrate how this tension can be addressed within qualitative research. In this article, I describe how I combined the use of qualitative data analysis software with humanistic approaches to qualitative research, namely arts-based research and memoir or autoethnography. I identify five stages of visual activity (creating data, organizing data, primary responses, secondary responses, and curation and describe how the visual components intersected with and supported the work in the qualitative computing software (QSR's NVivo. In today's world, qualitative researchers (like everyone else are immersed in the opportunities of digitalness and its visual possibilities, and it is critically important that we learn to leverage the potential of these tools for our work. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1202152

  19. Assessment and reduction of comet assay variation in relation to DNA damage: studies from the European Comet Assay Validation Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Peter; Möller, Lennart; Godschalk, Roger W L

    2010-01-01

    The alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay has become a widely used method for the detection of DNA damage and repair in cells and tissues. Still, it has been difficult to compare results from different investigators because of differences in assay conditions and because the data...... are reported in different units. The European Comet Assay Validation Group (ECVAG) was established for the purpose of validation of the comet assay with respect to measures of DNA damage formation and its repair. The results from this inter-laboratory validation trail showed a large variation in measured level...... reliability for the measurement of DNA damage by the comet assay but there is still a need for further validation to reduce both assay and inter-laboratory variation....

  20. Real-time PCR assays compared to culture-based approaches for identification of aerobic bacteria in chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez, J H; Frankel, Y M; An, A T; Williams, L; Price, L B; Wang, N-Y; Lazarus, G S; Zenilman, J M

    2010-12-01

    Chronic wounds cause substantial morbidity and disability. Infection in chronic wounds is clinically defined by routine culture methods that can take several days to obtain a final result, and may not fully describe the community of organisms or biome within these wounds. Molecular diagnostic approaches offer promise for a more rapid and complete assessment. We report the development of a suite of real-time PCR assays for rapid identification of bacteria directly from tissue samples. The panel of assays targets 14 common, clinically relevant, aerobic pathogens and demonstrates a high degree of sensitivity and specificity using a panel of organisms commonly associated with chronic wound infection. Thirty-nine tissue samples from 29 chronic wounds were evaluated and the results compared with those obtained by culture. As revealed by culture and PCR, the most common organisms were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) followed by Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The sensitivities of the PCR assays were 100% and 90% when quantitative and qualitative culture results were used as the reference standard, respectively. The assays allowed the identification of bacterial DNA from ten additional organisms that were not revealed by quantitative or qualitative cultures. Under optimal conditions, the turnaround time for PCR results is as short as 4-6 h. Real-time PCR is a rapid and inexpensive approach that can be easily introduced into clinical practice for detection of organisms directly from tissue samples. Characterization of the anaerobic microflora by real-time PCR of chronic wounds is warranted. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  1. Cell Enumeration Assays: Application of the MTT and Sulforhodamine B Assays to Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Neonatal Rodent Microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facci, Laura; Skaper, Stephen D

    2018-01-01

    Glial cell activation, in particular microglia, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative disorders as well as in chronic and neuropathic pain. This chapter compares two established cell enumeration assays, namely, the colorimetric 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay and the protein-binding sulforhodamine B assay for microglia as a function of culture condition and activation state. The pros and cons of each are then described.

  2. [Evaluation of Abbott Fourth Generation HIV Antigen and Antibody Assays.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hee Jung; Yoo, Kyeong Ha; Kim, Han Sung; Cho, Hyoun Chan

    2006-02-01

    In order to reduce the diagnostic window period between the time of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and serological diagnosis, new fourth generation screening assays which detect HIV p24 antigen and specific antibody simultaneously have been developed. In this study, we evaluated the performance of a new fourth generation assay. We compared a new fourth generation assay, Architect HIV Ag/Ab combo, with another fourth generation assay AxSYM HIV Ag/Ab combo and a third generation assay, AxSYM HIV 1/2 gO for their performance. The assays were evaluated using 3 HIV seroconversion panels, 305 sera of healthy subjects and 100 sera of patients with HBsAg or anti-HCV antibodies. Within-run and total coefficient variations of the three screening assays were analyzed for the evaluation of precision. Architect HIV Ag/Ab combo shortened the window period by 8.7+/-2.1 days relative to AxSYM HIV 1/2 gO and 2.0+/-2.0 days relative to AxSYM HIV Ag/Ab combo in seroconversion panels. Architect HIV Ag/Ab combo presented the best performance in precision among the three reagents; total CV for positive control was 3.6%, 9.6% and 4.6% for Architect HIV Ag/Ab combo, AxSYM HIV Ag/Ab combo and AxSYM HIV 1/2 gO, respectively. Specificities of three assays were not different in this study. HIV Ag/Ab combined assays reduced the diagnostic window as compared to the third generation screening assays, enabling an earlier diagnosis of HIV infection. A new fourth generation assay, Architect HIV Ag/Ab combo presents a better performance than AxSYM HIV Ag/Ab combo, showing improved seroconversion sensitivity and precision.

  3. Assay optimization for molecular detection of Zika virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corman, Victor M; Rasche, Andrea; Baronti, Cecile; Aldabbagh, Souhaib; Cadar, Daniel; Reusken, Chantal BEM; Pas, Suzan D; Goorhuis, Abraham; Schinkel, Janke; Molenkamp, Richard; Kümmerer, Beate M; Bleicker, Tobias; Brünink, Sebastian; Eschbach-Bludau, Monika; Eis-Hübinger, Anna M; Koopmans, Marion P; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Grobusch, Martin P; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Drosten, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine the diagnostic performance of real-time reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for Zika virus detection. Methods We compared seven published real-time RT–PCR assays and two new assays that we have developed. To determine the analytical sensitivity of each assay, we constructed a synthetic universal control ribonucleic acid (uncRNA) containing all of the assays’ target regions on one RNA strand and spiked human blood or urine with known quantities of African or Asian Zika virus strains. Viral loads in 33 samples from Zika virus-infected patients were determined by using one of the new assays. Findings Oligonucleotides of the published real-time RT–PCR assays, showed up to 10 potential mismatches with the Asian lineage causing the current outbreak, compared with 0 to 4 mismatches for the new assays. The 95% lower detection limit of the seven most sensitive assays ranged from 2.1 to 12.1 uncRNA copies/reaction. Two assays had lower sensitivities of 17.0 and 1373.3 uncRNA copies/reaction and showed a similar sensitivity when using spiked samples. The mean viral loads in samples from Zika virus-infected patients were 5 × 104 RNA copies/mL of blood and 2 × 104 RNA copies/mL of urine. Conclusion We provide reagents and updated protocols for Zika virus detection suitable for the current outbreak strains. Some published assays might be unsuitable for Zika virus detection, due to the limited sensitivity and potential incompatibility with some strains. Viral concentrations in the clinical samples were close to the technical detection limit, suggesting that the use of insensitive assays will cause false-negative results. PMID:27994281

  4. Qualitative Reasoning for Additional Die Casting Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Allen Miller; Dehua Cui; Yuming Ma

    2003-05-28

    If manufacturing incompatibility of a product can be evaluated at the early product design stage, the designers can modify their design to reduce the effect of potential manufacturing problems. This will result in fewer manufacturing problems, less redsign, less expensive tooling, lower cost, better quality, and shorter development time. For a given design, geometric reasoning can predict qualitatively the behaviors of a physical manufacturing process by representing and reasoning with incomplete knowledge of the physical phenomena. It integrates a design with manufacturing processes to help designers simultaneously consider design goals and manufacturing constraints during the early design stage. The geometric reasoning approach can encourage design engineers to qualitatively evaluate the compatibility of their design with manufacturing limitations and requirements.

  5. Computer-assisted qualitative data analysis software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Diane G

    2014-05-01

    Advances in technology have provided new approaches for data collection methods and analysis for researchers. Data collection is no longer limited to paper-and-pencil format, and numerous methods are now available through Internet and electronic resources. With these techniques, researchers are not burdened with entering data manually and data analysis is facilitated by software programs. Quantitative research is supported by the use of computer software and provides ease in the management of large data sets and rapid analysis of numeric statistical methods. New technologies are emerging to support qualitative research with the availability of computer-assisted qualitative data analysis software (CAQDAS).CAQDAS will be presented with a discussion of advantages, limitations, controversial issues, and recommendations for this type of software use.

  6. Handling knowledge on osteoporosis - a qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dorthe; Huniche, Lotte; Brixen, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Scand J Caring Sci; 2012 Handling knowledge on osteoporosis - a qualitative study The aim of this qualitative study was to increase understanding of the importance of osteoporosis information and knowledge for patients' ways of handling osteoporosis in their everyday lives. Interviews were...... performed with 14 patients recruited from two English university hospitals and 12 patients from a Danish university hospital. Critical psychology was used as a theoretical framework for the data analysis, which aimed at shedding light on patients' ways of conducting everyday life with osteoporosis....... The themes that emerged from the analysis showed that life conditions influenced the way in which risk, pain and osteoporosis were handled. Everyday life was also influenced by patients' attitude to treatment. The patients who were experiencing emotional difficulties in handling osteoporosis were not those...

  7. Conceptual foundations of qualitative life course research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter R. Heinz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Analyzing biographies is a main field of qualitative social research that studies individuals’ sensemaking in regard to transitions and life projects. The paper presents concepts for linking the macrosocial and micro-social levels in life course analysis. First, the concept of “status passage” is reviewed, with a focus on social structure, institutions, and biography. Second, the concept of “selfsocialization” is introduced, highlighting the notion of the “biographical actor”. Third, recent elaborations of the concept of “agency” in life course research are discussed. Fourth, two examples of qualitative longitudinal research are presented: one on occupational careers, another on the process of family formation. Finally, methodological implications are sketched.

  8. Rigor in Qualitative Supply Chain Management Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goffin, Keith; Raja, Jawwad; Claes, Björn

    2012-01-01

    rigorous than in the past, and how results can be generated that are inaccessible using quantitative methods. Design/methodology/approach – This paper presents two studies undertaken using the repertory grid technique to illustrate its application in supply chain management research. Findings – The paper......-mentioned constructs are not necessarily the most important. Research limitations/implications – The paper demonstrates how quantitative calculations can strengthen qualitative research. Importantly, from the authors' experience of using the technique the paper details how to focus on demonstrating validity......, reliability, and theoretical saturation. Originality/value – It is the authors' contention that the addition of the repertory grid technique to the toolset of methods used by logistics and supply chain management researchers can only enhance insights and the building of robust theories. Qualitative studies...

  9. Qualitative inquiry, reflective practice and jazz improvisation

    OpenAIRE

    Bjerstedt, Sven

    2015-01-01

    This paper, based on my PhD empirical study, suggests that qualitative investigations, seen as reflective practices, have much in common with – and probably much to learn from – jazz improvisational practices. The complex processes of hermeneutic understanding include laying bare the researcher’s pre-understanding as well as, in the interpretation of statements, the dynamics between their holistic coherence and the agent’s intentions. Through interview excerpts, the important phenomenon of br...

  10. Integrating Qualitative and Quantitative Research in Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    that real people do in real organizations. Practicing managers such as Frederick W. Taylor, Henri Fayol and Chester Barnard were among the earliest...r AD-AION 549 NEBRASKA UNIV LINCOLN DEPT OF MANAGEMENT F/ S 51INTEGRATING QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH IN ORGANIZATI-ETC(U) JUL 81 T R DAVIS...McNally, 1966. Carlson, S . Executive behavior: A study of the work load and the working methods of managing directors. Stockholm: Strombergs, 1951

  11. The qualitative criterion of transient angle stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyu, R.; Xue, Y.; Xue, F.

    2015-01-01

    In almost all the literatures, the qualitative assessment of transient angle stability extracts the angle information of generators based on the swing curve. As the angle (or angle difference) of concern and the threshold value rely strongly on the engineering experience, the validity and robust...... that misjudgment would be taken if an angle (or angle difference) of concern departing from the concept of the controlling mode or a constant threshold value is used in the criterion....

  12. Qualitative properties of nonlinear Volterra integral equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Islam

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the contraction mapping principle and Liapunov's method are used to study qualitative properties of nonlinear Volterra equations of the form $x(t = a(t -\\int^{t}_{0}C(t,sg(s,x(s\\;ds,t\\geq0.$ In particular, the existence of bounded solutions and solutions with various $L^p$ properties are studied under suitable conditions on the functions involved with this equation.

  13. Clinical Homework Directives: A Qualitative Exploratory Study

    OpenAIRE

    Harker, Emil F.

    2000-01-01

    A qualitative study was conducted to better understand how marriage and family therapists use homework directives in their work with couples. Eleven therapists of different marital therapy orientations were interviewed. Remarkably, all of the therapists reported using clinical homework directives in their practice with couples, including those clinicians who primarily identify themselves with psychodynamic models- -models that do not typically include homework in their constructs. Four themes...

  14. Genetic damage in oligozoospermic patients detected by fluorescence in-situ hybridization, inverse restriction site mutation assay, sperm chromatin structure assay and the Comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, T E; Kamischke, A; Bollwein, H; Nieschlag, E; Brinkworth, M H

    2003-07-01

    The possibility that oligozoospermic men may have elevated levels of genetic damage in their sperm is of particular concern as they could transmit defects to their offspring. Sperm samples were obtained from 12 infertile, oligozoospermic patients and 12 healthy normozoospermic volunteers. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) was used to determine aneuploidy rates in sperm and inverse restriction site mutation (iRSM) assay to determine gene mutations; defective chromatin packaging was quantified by sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) and DNA strand breaks by the Comet assay. FISH analysis showed a significant increase in gonosomal X,Y,18 (P sperm with X,Y,18,18 (P sperm chromatin was found in the infertility patients compared with the control group using the SCSA assay. In the Comet assay, a significant increase (P assay. The data indicate that infertile oligozoospermic men have an elevated level of XY aneuploidy and XY diploidy in the germ-line, as well as elevated levels of sperm chromatin disturbances and sperm DNA strand breaks. These data demonstrate that oligozoospermic infertility patients show several different types of genetic damage in their sperm. Thus, such men appear to have defects at a variety of levels of spermatogenesis and their infertility may not just be a result of the oligozoospermia.

  15. Review Essay: Does Qualitative Network Analysis Exist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Diaz-Bone

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Social network analysis was formed and established in the 1970s as a way of analyzing systems of social relations. In this review the theoretical-methodological standpoint of social network analysis ("structural analysis" is introduced and the different forms of social network analysis are presented. Structural analysis argues that social actors and social relations are embedded in social networks, meaning that action and perception of actors as well as the performance of social relations are influenced by the network structure. Since the 1990s structural analysis has integrated concepts such as agency, discourse and symbolic orientation and in this way structural analysis has opened itself. Since then there has been increasing use of qualitative methods in network analysis. They are used to include the perspective of the analyzed actors, to explore networks, and to understand network dynamics. In the reviewed book, edited by Betina HOLLSTEIN and Florian STRAUS, the twenty predominantly empirically orientated contributions demonstrate the possibilities of combining quantitative and qualitative methods in network analyses in different research fields. In this review we examine how the contributions succeed in applying and developing the structural analysis perspective, and the self-positioning of "qualitative network analysis" is evaluated. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0701287

  16. Troubling Methods in Qualitative Inquiry and Beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanggaard, Lene

    2013-01-01

    This present paper troubles and literally ‘shakes’ the idea of methods as the founding ground of qualitative inquiry. It does so by addressing the real-time messiness of research and the retrospective character of research reports. While the paper is not as such opposed to methods, it does sugges...... suggestion is that these open-ended and flexible strategies allow for an innovative approach to the development of a qualitative psychology while also serving to trouble (at least for a moment) the current popularity of methods in research.......This present paper troubles and literally ‘shakes’ the idea of methods as the founding ground of qualitative inquiry. It does so by addressing the real-time messiness of research and the retrospective character of research reports. While the paper is not as such opposed to methods, it does suggest...... that many actual research practices do not follow defined and regular plans as the terminology of methods inclines. However, rather than seeing the messiness as a bias to be eliminated, a more constructive approach is suggested. With the intention of inviting more creative and thought-provoking research...

  17. Hermeneutic Constructivism: An Ontology for Qualitative Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Blake; Mummery, Jane

    2018-02-01

    Qualitative research is entirely an operation with language, in language, and occasionally on language. This article suggests a tension between theoretical recognition of a multiplicity of human experience on one hand and a reliance upon practices of thematic representation that prioritize the common or the general over individualized experience. The fulcrum of this tension is the nature of language itself and its role in human experience and meaning-making. This article sets out the theoretical foundations of Hermeneutic Constructivism as one proposed approach to redress this problematic within many qualitative frameworks and open up an opportunity for a deeper and more nuanced understanding of human being. Within Hermeneutic Constructivism, a Fundamental Postulate and 11 elaborative corollaries detail a cogent relationship between language and the structures and processes of mental activity that support the human comportment toward understanding. The authors argue that this theoretical position is able to inform a model for qualitative research that makes possible an exploration of a person's experience at a deeper level of abstraction and that may provide an avenue for overcoming this identified tension.

  18. Performance of the Cobas® Influenza A/B Assay for Rapid Pcr-Based Detection of Influenza Compared to Prodesse ProFlu+ and Viral Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L.; Tian, Y.; Chen, S.; Liesenfeld, O.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and accurate diagnosis of influenza is important for patient management and infection control. We determined the performance of the cobas® Influenza A/B assay, a rapid automated nucleic acid assay performed on the cobas® Liat System for qualitative detection of influenza A and influenza B from nasopharyngeal (NP) swab specimens. Retrospective frozen and prospectively collected NP swabs from patients with signs and symptoms of influenza collected in universal transport medium (UTM) were tested at multiple sites including CLIA-waived sites using the cobas® Influenza A/B assay. Results were compared to the Prodesse Pro-Flu+ assay and to viral culture. Compared to the Prodesse ProFlu+ Assay, sensitivities of the cobas® Influenza A/B assay for influenza A and B were 97.7 and 98.6%, respectively; specificity was 99.2 and 99.4%. Compared to viral culture, the cobas® Influenza A/B assay showed sensitivities of 97.5 and 96.9% for influenza virus A and B, respectively; specificities were 97.9% for both viruses. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/sequencing showed that the majority of viral culture negative but cobas® Influenza A/B positive results were true positive results, indicating that the cobas® Influenza A/B assay has higher sensitivity compared to viral culture. In conclusion, the excellent accuracy, rapid time to result, and remarkable ease of use make the cobas® Influenza A/B nucleic acid assay for use on the cobas® Liat System a highly suitable point-of-care solution for the management of patients with suspected influenza A and B infection. PMID:26716012

  19. Application of Qualitative Methods in Health Research: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Upadhyaya

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative research is type of formative research that includes specialized techniques for obtaining in-depth responses about what people think and how they feel. It is seen as the research that seeks answer to the questions in the real world. Qualitative researchers gather what they see, hear, read from people and places, from events and activities, with the purpose to learn about the community and to generate new understanding that can be used by the social world. Qualitative research have often been conducted to answer the question “why” rather than “what”. A purpose of qualitative research is the construction of new understanding. Here, we present an overview of application of qualitative methods in health research. We have discussed here the different types of qualitative methods and how we and others have used them in different settings/scenarios; sample size and sampling techniques; analysis of qualitative data; validity in qualitative research; and ethical issues.

  20. Qualitative Research in Organizational and Vocational Psychology, 1979-1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Thomas W.; Mitchell, Terence R.; Sablynski, Chris J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes qualitative techniques and their use in industrial and vocational psychology for theory generation, elaboration, and testing. Discusses research design, data analysis, and best practices using qualitative methods. Contains 54 references. (SK)