WorldWideScience

Sample records for assay project phase

  1. Final Report Nucleic Acid System - Hybrid PCR and Multiplex Assay Project Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, R P; Langlois, R G; Nasarabadi, S; Benett, W J; Colston, B W; Johnson, D C; Brown, S B; Stratton, P L; Milanovich, F P

    2002-04-17

    This report covers phase 2 (year 2) of the Nucleic Acid System--Hybrid PCR and Multiplex Assay project. The objective of the project is to reduce to practice the detection and identification of biological warfare pathogens by the nucleic acid recognition technique of PCR (polymerase chain reaction) in a multiplex mode using flow cytometry. The Hybrid instrument consists of a flow-through PCR module capable of handling a multiplexed PCR assay, a hybridizing module capable of hybridizing multiplexed PCR amplicons and beads, and a flow cytometer module for bead-based identification, all controlled by a single computer. Multiplex immunoassay using bead-based Luminex flow cytometry is available, allowing rapid screening for many agents. PCR is highly specific and complements and verifies immunoassay. It can also be multiplexed and detection provided using the bead-based Luminex flow cytometer. This approach allows full access to the speed and 100-fold multiplex capability of flow cytometry for rapid screening as well as the accuracy and specificity of PCR. This project has two principal activities: (1) Design, build and test a prototype hybrid PCR/flow cytometer with the basic capabilities for rapid, broad spectrum detection and identification, and (2) Develop and evaluate multiplex flow analysis assay protocols and reagents for the simultaneous detection of PCR products. This project requires not only building operationally functional instrumentation but also developing the chemical assays for detection of priority pathogens. This involves development and evaluation of multiplex flow analysis assay protocols and reagents for the simultaneous detection of PCR products.

  2. Project Risk Management Phases

    OpenAIRE

    Claudiu-George BOCEAN

    2008-01-01

    Risk management is the human activity which integrates recognition of risk, risk assessment, developing strategies to manage it, and mitigation of risk using managerial resources. Notwithstanding the domain of activities where they are conducted, projects often entail risks, and risk management has been widely recognized as a success factor in project management. Following a concept clarification on project risk management, this paper presents a generic list steps in the risk management proce...

  3. Inception phase of construction project

    OpenAIRE

    Zahirović, Bojan

    2015-01-01

    The thesis describes the construction project in terms of investment. The documentation is collected for the design and concept phase. In addition to the aforementioned investment documentation there is the environmental and spatial documentation and implementation path for the construction project start. Construction project coordination is interlinked with management, i.e. connection of two disciplines – economics and construction – into construction management, which is credite...

  4. The Organizational Phase of Project Open Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Donald; Weaver, Shari

    The Yale University Library is now organized to move ahead with Project Open Book, the conversion of 10,000 books from microfilm to digital imagery. In the first phase of the Project--the organizational phase--a Steering Committee was established that included several faculty members, and a project team was created. In addition, Yale conducted a…

  5. Solid phase group specific absorbants in assays for glycoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The focus of this paper is on several technical advances in the assays for glycoprotein hormones and enzymes that have been achieved by use of the solid phase carbohydrate specific adsorbant concanavalin-A. Puriffication of glycoprotein radioligand after labelling by the chloramine-T method is readily accomplished using a small column of agarose bound concanavalin-A which separates glycoprotein radioligand from radioiodide and radiolabelled unadsorbed contaminants. After concanavalin-A column chromatography, radiolabelled glycoprotein hormone preparations exhibited improved binding to antibodies and tissue receptors. To increase the effective sensitivity of radioimmunoassays for glycoproteins, agarose bound concanavalin-A is used to extract and concentrate the glycoproteins from various biologic samples. For example, the effective sensitivity for the detection of human thyrotropin in serum was improved approximately 5 fold by using concanavalin-A concentrates of 1.5 ml of serum. Partial purification of the glycoprotein dopamine-β-hydroxylase from serum using agarose bound concanavalin-A resulted in separation of the serum factors that interfere with the measurement of enzyme activity. We conclude that in assays for glycoproteins, concanavalin-A is useful for purification of radioligand, for preparation of concentrates of glycoproteins from biologic samples, and for separation of glycoproteins from various interfering factors contained in biologic samples prior to radioligand or radioenzyme assay. (orig.)

  6. PROJECT GOVERNANCE – PHASES AND LIFE CYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbert Titus DEENEN

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available When talking about projects, the barrier is clear: successful and failed. Some fail due to different reasons, but lack of good project and risk management played a large part. Others succeed largely because of the rigorous and disciplined application of good project practices. But both groups illustrate many points that underline and demonstrate important concepts applicable to current projects. Systematic application of good methods leads to successful outcomes in projects of all types. All projects are fundamentally dependent on people, and human beings are not very different today than we were hundreds, or even thousands, of years ago. This paper uncovers main elements in projects area such as the concepts and governance of projects, with an underline of the main characteristics and the projects phases and life cycle that erase the uncertainty that joins all the projects built at any time.

  7. ART/Ada design project, phase 1: Project plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Bradley P.

    1988-01-01

    The plan and schedule for Phase 1 of the Ada based ESBT Design Research Project is described. The main platform for the project is a DEC Ada compiler on VAX mini-computers and VAXstations running the Virtual Memory System (VMS) operating system. The Ada effort and lines of code are given in tabular form. A chart is given of the entire project life cycle.

  8. Yakima Basin Fish Passage Project, Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Implementation of the Yakima Basin Fish Passage Project -- Phase 2 would significantly improve the production of anadromous fish in the Yakima River system. The project would provide offsite mitigation and help to compensate for lower Columbia River hydroelectric fishery losses. The Phase 2 screens would allow greater numbers of juvenile anadromous fish to survive. As a consequence, there would be higher returns of adult salmon and steelhead to the Yakima River. The proposed action would play an integral part in the overall Yakima River anadromous fish enhancement program (fish passage improvement, habitat enhancement, hatchery production increases, and harvest management). These would be environmental benefits associated with implementation of the Fish Passage and Protective Facilities Phase 2 Project. Based on the evaluation presented in this assessment, there would be no significant adverse environmental impacts if the proposed action was carried forward. No significant adverse environmental effects have been identified from construction and operation of the Yakima Phase 2 fish passage project. Proper design and implementation of the project will ensure no adverse effects will occur. Based on the information in this environmental analysis, BPA's and Reclamation's proposal to construct these facilities does not constitute a major Federal action that could significantly affect the quality of the human environment. 8 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  9. Laser projection using generalized phase contrast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin; Rodrigo, Peter John;

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate experimental laser projection of a gray-level photographic image with 74% light efficiency using the generalized phase contrast (GPC) method. In contrast with a previously proposed technique [Alonzo et al., New J. Phys. 9, 132 (2007)], a new approach to image construction via GPC...

  10. IDC Reengineering Phase 2 Project Scope.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, James M.

    2015-02-01

    This report provides a brief description of the scope of the IDC Reengineering Phase 2 project. It describes the goals and objectives of reengineering, the system definition, and the technical scope of the system. REVISIONS Version Date Author/Team Revision Description Authorized by 1.0 9/25/2014 SNL IDC Reengineering Team Unlimited Release for I2 M. Harris 1.1 28/01/2015 IDC Reengineering Team Align with previous IDC scope document E. Tomuta

  11. Nondestructive assay instrumentation for a Savannah River Plant upgrade project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have designed and are developing three different computer-based spectrometer systems. Two will measure the concentration of Pu solutions by gamma-ray and by stimulated x-ray fluorescence emissions of solid samples in closed containers. All systems are coupled to remote terminals and bar code readers, and also to mini-computer based multichannel analyzers, which in turn are linked to another computer to provide a state-of-the-art nondestructive assay capability. Installation at the Savannah River Plant is planned in late 1985. 7 references

  12. Project Phase Dependent Configuration of Project Management Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bērziša, S; Grabis, J.

    2012-01-01

    Project management information systems ensure the collection and display of project information. The project information changes depend upon the project environment. According to project environment and requirements, the configuration of project management information system is ensured by means of an approach to configuration of project management information systems. However, topicality of information and access to it change during the project life cycle depending upo...

  13. Vapor Compressor Driven Hybrid Two-Phase Loop Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will demonstrate a vapor compressor driven hybrid two-phase loop technology. The hybrid two-phase loop...

  14. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the assay of oxytetracycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, W N; Ray, A; Bates, L J

    1985-10-25

    The British Pharmacopoeia monograph for oxytetracycline calcium describes an high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) assay which requires packing of the column by the analyst. Presented in this report is an HPLC method for the assay of oxytetracycline which employs a commercially available reversed-phase column and a solvent system which gives improved separation of the antibiotic from common impurities. Results obtained using this method for both bulk and dosage forms of oxytetracycline are in accord with the results of the microbiological assays. PMID:4086631

  15. Ultrasonic Communication Project, Phase 1, FY1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, H.D.; Akerman, M.A.; Baylor, V.M.

    2000-06-01

    This Phase 1 project has been successful in identifying, exploring, and demonstrating methods for ultrasonic-based communication with an emphasis on the application of digital signal processing techniques. During the project, at the direction of the agency project monitor, particular attention was directed at sending and receiving ultrasonic data through air and through pipes that would be commonly found in buildings. Efforts were also focused on development of a method for transmitting computer files ultrasonically. New methods were identified and evaluated for ultrasonic communication. These methods are based on a technique called DFS. With DFS, individual alphanumeric characters are broken down into a sequence of bits, and each bit is used to generate a discrete ultrasonic frequency. Characters are then transmitted one-bit-at-a-time, and reconstructed by the receiver. This technique was put into practice through the development of LabVIEW{trademark}VIs. These VIs were integrated with specially developed electronic circuits to provide a system for demonstrating the transmission and reception/reconstruction of typed messages and computer files. Tests were performed to determine the envelope for ultrasound transmission through pipes (with and without water) versus through air. The practical aspects of connections, efficient electronics, impedance matching, and the effect of damping mechanisms were all investigated. These tests resulted in a considerable number of reference charts that illustrate the absorption of ultrasound through different pipe materials, both with and without water, as a function of distance. Ultrasound was found to be least attenuated by copper pipe and most attenuated by PVC pipe. Water in the pipe provides additional damping and attenuation of ultrasonic signals. Dramatic improvements are observed, however, in ultrasound signal strength if the transducers are directly coupled to the water, rather than simply attaching them to the outside of

  16. Automatic on-chip RNA–DNA hybridization assay with integrated phase change microvalves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An RNA–DNA hybridization assay microfluidic chip integrated with electrothermally actuated phase change microvalves for detecting pathogenic bacteria is presented in this paper. In order to realize the sequential loading and washing processes required in such an assay, gravity-based pressure-driven flow and phase-change microvalves were used in the microfluidic chip. Paraffin wax was used as the phase change material in the valves and thin film heaters were used to electrothermally actuate microvalves. Light absorption measured by a photodetector to determine the concentrations of the samples. The automatic control of the complete assay was implemented by a self-coded LabVIEW program. To examine the performance of this chip, Salmonella was used as a sample pathogen. Significantly, reduction in reagent/sample consumption (up to 20 folds) was achieved by this on-chip assay, compared with using the commercial test kit following the same protocol in conventional labs. The experimental results show that the quantitative detection can be obtained in approximately 26 min, and the detection limit is as low as 103 CFU ml−1. This RNA–DNA hybridization assay microfluidic chip shows an excellent potential in the development of a portable device for point-of-testing applications. (paper)

  17. Creation of reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatographic technique to assay platelet-activating factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨云梅; 曹红翠; 徐哲荣; 陈晓明

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To establish a new assay for platelet-activating factor (PAF), to compare it with bio-assay; and to discuss its significance in some elderly people diseases such as cerebral infarction and coronary heart disease. Methods: To measure PAF levels in 100 controls, 23 elderly patients with cerebral infarction and 65 cases with coronary heart disease by reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatographic technique (rHPLC). Results:rHPLC is more convenient, sensitive,specific, and less confusing, compared with bio-assay. The level of plasma PAF in patients with cerebral infarction was higher than that in the controls (P<0.01), and in patients with coronary heart disease. Conclusion: Detection of PAF with rHPLC is more reliable and more accurate. The new assay has important significance in PAF research.

  18. Creation of reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatographic technique to assay platelet-activating factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨云梅; 曹红翠; 徐哲荣; 陈晓明

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To establish a new assay for platelet-activating factor (PAF), to compare it with bio-assay; and to discuss its significance in some elderly people diseases such as cerebral infarction and coronary heart disease. Methods: To measure PAF levels in 100 controls, 23 elderly patients with cerebral infarction and 65 cases with coronary heart disease by reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatographic technique (rHPLC). Results: rHPLC is more convenient, sensitive, specific, and less confusing, compared with bio-assay. The level of plasma PAF in patients with cerebral infarction was higher than that in the controls (P<0.01), and in patients with coronary heart disease. Conclusion: Detection of PAF with rHPLC is more reliable and more accurate. The new assay has important significance in PAF research.

  19. Indirect solid-phase immunosorbent assay for detection of arenavirus antigens and antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A.P.; Rezapkin, G.V.; Dzagurova, T.K.; Tkachenko, E.A. (Institute of Poliomyelitis anU Viral Encephalities of the U.S.S.R. Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow)

    1984-05-01

    Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and solid phase radioimmunoassay (SPRIA) using either enti-human or anti-mouse IgG labelled with horseradish peroxidase and /sup 125/I, respectively, were developed for the detection of Junin, Machupo, Tacaribe, Amapari, Tamiami, Lassa and LCM arenaviruses. Both methods allow high sensitivity detection of arenavirus antigens and antibodies.

  20. Identification of Acute Phase Proteins and Assays Applicable in Nondomesticated Mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, M. F.; Kjelgaard-Hansen, M.; Grøndahl, C.;

    2009-01-01

    The serum concentration of acute phase proteins (APPs) increases dramatically in response to inflammation and tissue injury. APPs are clinically useful in a range of domesticated mammals; however, knowledge is limited in nondomesticated mammals. The detective ability of two assays for each of thr...

  1. Vapor Compressor Driven Hybrid Two-Phase Loop Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase I project successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the vapor compression hybrid two-phase loop (VCHTPL). The test results showed the high...

  2. Early Stakeholder Involvement in the Project Definition Phase: Case Renovation

    OpenAIRE

    Aki Aapaoja; Harri Haapasalo; Pia Söderström

    2013-01-01

    Relational project delivery methods (RPDMs) have been widely offered as a solution to increasing holistic project value creation. Furthermore, early stakeholder involvement has been emphasized as one of the cornerstones of RPDM. The purpose of this paper is to examine who the stakeholders are that should be involved early in the project definition phase. This paper discusses the process and nature of the project definition phase in RPDM, with the main focus on early stakeholder involvement. T...

  3. Project Wish: The Emerald City, phase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Phase 3 of Project Wish saw the evolution of the Emerald City (E-City) from a collection of specialized independent analyses and ideas to a working structural design integrated with major support systems and analyses. Emphasis was placed on comparing and contrasting the closed and open cycle gas core nuclear rocket engines to further determine the optimum propulsive system for the C-City. Power and thermal control requirements were then defined and the question of how to meet these requirements was addressed. Software was developed to automate the mission/system/configuration analysis so changes dictated by various subsystems constraints could be managed efficiently and analyzed interactively. In addition, the liquid hydrogen propellant tank was statically designed for minimum mass and shape optimization using a finite element modeling package called SDRC I-DEAS while spoke and shaft cross-sectional areas were optimized on ASTROS (Automated Structural Optimization System). A structural dynamic analysis also conducted using ASTROS enabled a study of the displacements, accelerations, modes and frequencies of the C-City. Finally, the attitude control system design began with an initial mass moment of inertia analysis and was then designed and optimized using linear quadratic regulator control theory.

  4. Project WISH: The Emerald City, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the Permanently Manned Autonomous Space Oasis, designated Project WISH: The Emerald City, is to serve as permanent living quarters for space colonists. In addition, it will serve as a stopover for space missions and will be capable of restationing itself practically anywhere within the solar system to provide support for these missions. The station should be self-sufficient, with no specific dependence on any resources from Earth. The 1990 to 1991 design team continued work started by last year's class. Further studies were conducted in the areas of orbital mechanics, propulsion, attitude control, and human factors. Critical elements were identified in each of these areas, and guidelines were established for the design of the Emerald City. Using the knowledge gained from these studies, two particular missions of interest, a Saturn Envelope mission and an Earth to Mars mission, were examined. The size and mass estimates, along with the methodologies used in their determination, are considered to be the main accomplishments of phase 2.

  5. Capture-S, a nontreponemal solid-phase erythrocyte adherence assay for serological detection of syphilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, D L; Moheng, M C; Rolih, S; Sinor, L T

    1997-01-01

    A solid-phase erythrocyte adherence assay has been developed for the serological detection of reagin antibodies in syphilis. Capture-S (Immucor, Inc., Norcross, Ga.) is a nontreponemal, qualitative screening test for the detection of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM antilipid antibodies in serum or plasma samples from blood donors. The Capture-S assay utilizes a modified Venereal Disease Research Laboratory antigen bound to microtitration wells and anti-IgG- plus anti-IgM-coated indicator eryth...

  6. Low Cost Phased Array Antenna System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — JEM Engineering proved the technical feasibility of the FlexScan array?a very low-cost, highly-efficient, wideband phased array antenna?in Phase I, and stands ready...

  7. Fabrication, in vitro Degradation and Cytotoxic Assay of Different Cystalline Phases Calcium Polyphosphate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Fabrication, in vitro degradation and cytotoxic assay of different crystalline phases calcium polyphosphate (CPP) were reported. The CPP ceramics were fabricated by crystallizing the amorphous frits , and sintered at 550 ℃ ,875 ℃ ,1000 ℃ for 1 h to obtain the γ-CPP, β-CPP anda-CPP respectively. The effects of the different crystalline phases on their weight loss and released PO4 3- were investigated during the degradation.And the surface change was observed by the SEM. The osteoblastic ROS17/2.8 cell line was used to estimate the cytotoxicity of CPP. The effects of CPP on cells' proliferation were evaluated by using MTT assay. The experimental results showed that γ-CPP, β- CPP and α-CPP did not exert cytotoxic effect on the cells. In addition, the proliferation of the growth of ROS17/2.8 cells on β-CPP was optimal.

  8. New methodological improvements in the Microtox® solid phase assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burga Pérez, Karen F; Charlatchka, Rayna; Sahli, Leila; Férard, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    The classic Microtox® solid phase assay (MSPA) based on the inhibition of light production of the marine bacteria recently renamed Aliivibrio fischeri suffers from various bias and interferences, mainly due to physico-chemical characteristics of the tested solid phase. To precisely assess ecotoxicity of sediments, we have developed an alternative method, named Microtox® leachate phase assay (MLPA), in order to measure the action of dissolved pollutants in the aqueous phase. Two hypotheses were formulated to explain the observed difference between MSPA and MLPA results: a real ecotoxicity of the solid phase or the fixation of bacteria to fine particles and/or organic matter. To estimate the latter, flow cytometry analyses were performed with two fluorochromes (known for their ability to stain bacterial DNA), allowing correction of MSPA measurements and generation of new (corrected) IC50. Comparison of results of MLPA with the new IC50 MSPA allows differentiating real ecotoxic and fixation effect in classic MSPA especially for samples with high amount of fines and/or organic matter. PMID:21962521

  9. ART/Ada design project, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    An Ada-Based Expert System Building Tool Design Research Project was conducted. The goal was to investigate various issues in the context of the design of an Ada-based expert system building tool. An attempt was made to achieve a comprehensive understanding of the potential for embedding expert systems in Ada systems for eventual application in future projects. The current status of the project is described by introducing an operational prototype, ART/Ada. How the project was conducted is explained. The performance of the prototype is analyzed and compared with other related works. Future research directions are suggested.

  10. Complementary Spectroscopic Assays for Investigating Protein-Ligand Binding Activity: A Project for the Advanced Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascotti, David P.; Waner, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    A protein-ligand binding, guided-inquiry laboratory project with potential application across the advanced undergraduate curriculum is described. At the heart of the project are fluorescence and spectrophotometric assays utilizing biotin-4-fluorescein and streptavidin. The use of the same stock solutions for an assay that may be examined by two…

  11. Factors Affecting Sustainable Performance of Construction Projects during Project Life Cycle Phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Enshassi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development (SD is one of the main challenges faced by the construction industry, which has acquired global attention. Sustainable performance (SP of a construction project during its life cycle (LC is considered crucial to achieve the SD. The aim of this paper is to investigate the factors affecting sustainable performance of construction projects throughout project life cycle phases in the Gaza Strip. A total of 53 sustainable factors (economic, social, and environmental sustainable factors were identified through extensive literature review and confirmed by experts’ interviews and a pilot study. These factors are classified in relation to the project life cycle phases; inception phase, design phase, construction phase, operation phase, and demolition phase. A structured questionnaire survey is employed in this study for primary data collection. A total of 119 questionnaires were distributed randomly to engineers working in construction projects in the Gaza Strip to solicit their views regarding the factors affecting sustainable performance of construction projects throughout project life cycle phases. The results revealed that five factors among the top ten factors that impacting the sustainable performance of construction projects are classified under the construction phase, which confirmed that the construction process has the most effect on the projects SP. Three factors are classified under the inception phase, which assured that the inception of a potential project has a considerable effect projects. In addition, one factor was classified under operation phase and one factor was classified under demolition phase. The most common factors affecting the SP of construction project through the overall sustainability elements: reusable/recyclable element, provision of services, energy consumption, water cost, and water pollution assessment. Further studies are recommended to explore how to integrated sustainability concepts into

  12. Pancharatnam geometric phase originating from successive partial projections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sohrab Abbas; Apoorva G Wagh

    2008-11-01

    The spin of a polarized neutron beam subjected to a partial projection in another direction, traces a geodesic arc in the 2-sphere ray space. We delineate the geometric phase resulting from two successive partial projections on a general quantal state and derive the direction and strength of the third partial projection that would close the geodesic triangle. The constraint for the three successive partial projections to be identically equivalent to a net spin rotation regardless of the initial state, is derived.

  13. Low Cost Phased Array Antenna System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A program is proposed to research the applicability of a unique phased array technology, dubbed FlexScan, to S-band and Ku-band communications links between...

  14. Development of solid phase immunoradiometric assay for determination of carcinoembryonic antigen as a tumor marker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of solid phase coated tube immunoradiometric assay for estimation of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was the aim of the present study. Labeling of CEA was carried out using Ch-T and iodogen as oxidizing agents and 125I. The tracers were used to test the presence of antibodies produced by immunization. Production of polyclonal antibody was carried out through immunization of four mice. After purification step, the tubes were coated by purified polyclonal antibodies. Immunoradiometric that system was performed using the commercial IZOTOP 125I-anti hCEA tracer then the validity studies were carried out. The results show that the local coated tubes made the assay is more than sufficient to fulfill the clinical requirement of CEA as a tumor marker. (author)

  15. Tailoring Small IT Projects in the Project Planning Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulhearn, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Project management (PM) and systems engineering (SE) are essential skills in information technology (IT). There is an abundance of information available detailing the comprehensive bodies of knowledge, standards, and best practices. Despite the volume of information, there is surprisingly little information about how to tailor PM and SE tasks for…

  16. Improving decision making in the early phases of configuration projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Henrik; Harlou, Ulf; Haug, Anders

    2008-01-01

    During the early phases of configuration projects very important decisions are made which will heavily influence the performance of the company, benefits in different functional areas (production, sales, purchase, product development, service etc), maintenance of the configuration system...

  17. Improving decision making in the early phases of configuration projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Henrik; Hvam, Lars; Harlou, Ulf;

    2011-01-01

    During the early phases of configuration projects very important decisions are made which will heavily influence the performance of the company, benefits in different functional areas (production, sales, purchase, product development, service etc), maintenance of the configuration system...

  18. Project Initiation Document Phase Two: Scoping Exercise within mainstream schools

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2015-01-01

    This Project Initiation Document outlines the purpose and plan of Phase Two of the Review of AHP Support for Children with Statements of Special Educational Needs in Special Schools and Mainstream Education.

  19. Project Initiation Document Phase One: Scoping Exercise within special schools

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2014-01-01

    This Project Initiation Document outlines the purpose and plan of Phase One of the Review of AHP Support for Children with Statements of Special Educational Needs in Special Schools and Mainstream Education.

  20. Vermont gasifier project. Final report, Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This report presents an engineering status report for the Vermont gasifier project. Technical areas of concern are discussed with the cyclone performance, agglomeration problems in the combustor, particlate emissions, valve design, deflagration venting, gasifier and combustion blower surge control, and other related areas. Attachments pertaining to the drawing and specification register are included.

  1. A solid-phase dot assay using silica/gold nanoshells

    OpenAIRE

    Zharov Vladimir; Khlebtsov Boris; Dykman Lev; Bogatyrev Vladimir; Khlebtsov Nikolai

    2006-01-01

    AbstractWe report on the first application of silica-gold nanoshells to a solid-phase dot immunoassay. The assay principle is based on staining of a drop (1 µl) analyte on a nitrocellulose membrane strip by using silica/gold nanoshells conjugated with biospecific probing molecules. Experimental example is human IgG (hIgG, target molecules) and protein A (probing molecules). For usual 15-nm colloidal gold conjugates, the minimal detectable amount of hIgG is about 4 ng. By contrast, for na...

  2. Code of Conduct for wind-power projects - Phase 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the results of phase three of a project concerning wind-power projects. Feasibility and strategy aspects are examined and discussed. The current state of the wind power market is discussed on the basis of the results of a survey made on the subject. The social acceptance of wind power installations is discussed, whereby the rejection of particular projects is compared with a general lack of acceptance. Requirements placed on such projects and possible solutions are discussed. Finally, the feasibility of setting up a code of conduct in the area of wind-power projects is discussed and the definition of further instruments is examined

  3. Solid-phase group-specific adsorbants in assays for glycoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The focus of the paper is on several technical advances in the assays for glycoprotein hormones and enzymes that have been achieved by the use of the solid-phase cabohydrate-specific adsorbant concanavalin-A. Purification of glycoprotein radioligand after labelling by the Chloramine-T method is readily accomplished using a small column of agarose-bound concanavalin-A which separates glycoprotein radioligand from radioiodide and radiolabelled unadsorbed contaminants. After concanavalin-A column chromatography, radiolabelled glycoprotein hormone preparations exhibited improved binding to antibodies and tissue receptors. To increase the effective sensitivity of radioimmunoassays for glycoproteins, agarose-bound concanavalin-A is used to extract and concentrate the glycoproteins from various biological samples. For example, the effective sensitivity for the detection of human thyrotropin in serum was improved approximately 5-fold by using concanavalin-A concentrates of 1.5ml of serum. Partial purification of the glycoprotein dopamine-β-hydroxylase from serum using agarose-bound concanavalin-A resulted in separation of the serum factors that interfere with the measurement of enzyme activity. We conclude that in assays for glycoproteins, concanavalin-A is useful for purification of radioligand, for preparation of concentrates of glycoproteins from biological samples and for separation of glycoproteins from various interfering factors contained in biological samples before radioligand or radioenzyme assay. (author)

  4. Best practice influence on project changes during the construction phase.

    OpenAIRE

    Ciaravino, Brian Douglas.

    1998-01-01

    CIVINS This thesis analyzes the influence of team building, constructability, and project change management best practices on the reduction of project changes during the construction phase. Construction Industry Institute Owner, Naval Facilities Command, and Construction Industry Institute Contractor data are separately evaluated to determine if a statistically significance relationship between best practice use and a reduction in the project change rate during construction exists. Conclus...

  5. Applications of monolithic solid-phase extraction in chromatography-based clinical chemistry assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Dustin R; Wang, Sihe

    2013-04-01

    Complex matrices, for example urine, serum, plasma, and whole blood, which are common in clinical chemistry testing, contain many non-analyte compounds that can interfere with either detection or in-source ionization in chromatography-based assays. To overcome this problem, analytes are extracted by protein precipitation, solid-phase extraction (SPE), and liquid-liquid extraction. With correct chemistry and well controlled material SPE may furnish clean specimens with consistent performance. Traditionally, SPE has been performed with particle-based adsorbents, but monolithic SPE is attracting increasing interest of clinical laboratories. Monoliths, solid pieces of stationary phase, have bimodal structures consisting of macropores, which enable passage of solvent, and mesopores, in which analytes are separated. This structure results in low back-pressure with separation capabilities similar to those of particle-based adsorbents. Monoliths also enable increased sample throughput, reduced solvent use, varied support formats, and/or automation. However, many of these monoliths are not commercially available. In this review, application of monoliths to purification of samples from humans before chromatography-based assays will be critically reviewed.

  6. Final Report for the ADMX Phase 2a Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Leslie J. [University of Washington

    2015-08-22

    This is a final report of the ADMX Phase 2a program. This program is a project allowing for a sensitive axion dark-matter axion search at higher axion masses. The Phase 2a program also prepares the project for lower temperature anticipated in later operations. The Phase 2a program includes sensitive data-taking operations at two cavity modes, TM010 and TM020, allowing for faster data-taking operations and extending the search to higher and plausible dark-matter axion masses.

  7. Holographic and weak-phase projection system for 3D shape reconstruction using temporal phase unwrapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, C. A.; Dávila, A.; Garnica, G.

    2007-09-01

    Two projection systems that use an LCoS phase modulator are proposed for 3D shape reconstruction. The LCoS is used as an holographic system or as a weak phase projector, both configurations project a set of fringe patterns that are processed by the technique known as temporal phase unwrapping. To minimize the influence of camera sampling, and the speckle noise in the projected fringes, an speckle noise reduction technique is applied to the speckle patterns generated by the holographic optical system. Experiments with 3D shape reconstruction of ophthalmic mold and other testing specimens show the viability of the proposed techniques.

  8. FY 1991 project plan for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-02-01

    Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project was designed to develop and demonstrate a method for estimating radiation doses people may have received from Hanford Site operations since 1944. The method researchers developed relied on a variety of measured and reconstructed data as input to a modular computer model that generates dose estimates and their uncertainties. As part of Phase 1, researchers used the reconstructed data and computer model to calculate preliminary dose estimates for populations in a limited geographical area and time period. Phase 2, now under way, is designed to evaluate the Phase 1 data and model and improve them to calculate more accurate and precise dose estimates. Phase 2 will also be used to obtain preliminary estimates of two categories of doses: for Native American tribes and for individuals included in the pilot phase of the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS). TSP Directive 90-1 required HEDR staff to develop Phase 2 task plans for TSP approval. Draft task plans for Phase 2 were submitted to the TSP at the October 11--12, 1990 public meeting, and, after discussions of each activity and associated budget needs, the TSP directed HEDR staff to proceed with a slate of specific project activities for FY 1991 of Phase 2. This project plan contains detailed information about those activities. Phase 2 is expected to last 15--18 months. In mid-FY 1991, project activities and budget will be reevaluated to determine whether technical needs or priorities have changed. Separate from, but related to, this project plan, will be an integrated plan for the remainder of the project. HEDR staff will work with the TSP to map out a strategy that clearly describes end products'' for the project and the work necessary to complete them. This level of planning will provide a framework within which project decisions in Phases 2, 3, and 4 can be made.

  9. FY 1991 project plan for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project was designed to develop and demonstrate a method for estimating radiation doses people may have received from Hanford Site operations since 1944. The method researchers developed relied on a variety of measured and reconstructed data as input to a modular computer model that generates dose estimates and their uncertainties. As part of Phase 1, researchers used the reconstructed data and computer model to calculate preliminary dose estimates for populations in a limited geographical area and time period. Phase 2, now under way, is designed to evaluate the Phase 1 data and model and improve them to calculate more accurate and precise dose estimates. Phase 2 will also be used to obtain preliminary estimates of two categories of doses: for Native American tribes and for individuals included in the pilot phase of the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS). TSP Directive 90-1 required HEDR staff to develop Phase 2 task plans for TSP approval. Draft task plans for Phase 2 were submitted to the TSP at the October 11--12, 1990 public meeting, and, after discussions of each activity and associated budget needs, the TSP directed HEDR staff to proceed with a slate of specific project activities for FY 1991 of Phase 2. This project plan contains detailed information about those activities. Phase 2 is expected to last 15--18 months. In mid-FY 1991, project activities and budget will be reevaluated to determine whether technical needs or priorities have changed. Separate from, but related to, this project plan, will be an integrated plan for the remainder of the project. HEDR staff will work with the TSP to map out a strategy that clearly describes ''end products'' for the project and the work necessary to complete them. This level of planning will provide a framework within which project decisions in Phases 2, 3, and 4 can be made

  10. Uncertainty in project phases: A framework for organisational change management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreye, Melanie; Balangalibun, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainty is an integral challenge when managing organisational change projects (OCPs). Current literature highlights the importance of uncertainty; however, falls short of giving insights into the nature of uncertainty and suggestions for managing it. Specifically, no insights exist on how...... in the early stage of the change project but was delayed until later phases. Furthermore, the sources of uncertainty were found to be predominantly within the organisation that initiated the change project and connected to the project scope. Based on these findings, propositions for future research are defined...

  11. Integrated Monitoring and Surveillance System demonstration project. Phase 2 accomplishments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the results of the Integrated Monitoring and Surveillance System (IMSS) demonstration project Phase 2 efforts. the rationale behind IMSS development is reviewed and progress in each of the 5 basic tasks is detailed. Significant results include further development of the data acquisition system and procurement of necessary hardware/software, options and associated costs for plutonium canning systems and gloveboxes, initiation of facility modifications, determination of possibly affected facility documentation, results from sensor system trade study, and preliminary storage configuration designs. Resources invested during Phase 1 and Phase 2 are summarized and budgetary requirements for completion of Phase 3 presented. The results show that the IMSS demonstration project team has met and in many cases exceeded the commitments made for Phase 2 deliverables

  12. Development of kits for radioimmunometric assays for tumour markers. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many tumour marker assays have been reported over the years and their role is well recognized and acknowledged in the follow-up of known cancer cases. However, their true potential for use in primary diagnosis or screening of high risk groups is still to be fully realized due to the need to achieve better specificity. Among the various tumour markers, the one for prostate cancer - prostate specific antigen (PSA) - appears to have better specificity, coming close to a tumour specific antigen. Prostate cancer is a commonly encountered cancer in men, and can be effectively treated if detected early. PSA levels in serum appear to provide good correlation with tumour burden. Estimation of free PSA in serum is reported to further improve the diagnosis. In several developed countries routine screening of men above 50 years of age for prostate cancer using serum PSA as marker is recommended. Radioimmunometric assay techniques offer themselves as attractive candidates for measurement of tumour markers. They are robust, economical and didactic, thus eminently suitable for technology transfer, training and teaching. Preparation of primary reagents is relatively easy. The methodology is flexible. As a result of co-operation projects of the IAEA, many developing Member States have built up indigenous capabilities to perform radioimmunometric assays, which can be extended to development of kits for tumour marker assays. Considering the need for indigenous development of capabilities to produce reliable kits for radioimmunometric assays for PSA, in 1997 the IAEA initiated a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development of Kits for Radioimmunometric Assays for Tumour Markers. Even though the focus of the project was PSA, it was expected that the expertise to be gained by the participants would also help them undertake development of kits for other tumour markers, essentially using the same methodology. Ten laboratories from Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas participated

  13. A solid phase radioimmunoassay for free triiodothyronine in serum:assay development and validation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A solid phase radioimmunoassay for free triiodothyroninein serum was developed based on double-antibody coated tubes.The method was turned out to be reliable with good reproducibility,higher sensitivity and easy performance.The measurable range of FT3 in serum was 1.2 to 38pmol/L.The mean coefficients of variationwithin and between assays were 1.79%~3.18% and 4.72%~9.31%,respectively.The FT3 concentrations in euthyroid serum as determined by this methodwere 2.8 to 7.8pmol/L.The FT3 values determined by this new methodcorrelated well with those measured by a commercial radioimmunoassay(r=0.853).

  14. A simple and safe method for single HLA-antigen-typing by a solid phase assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häcker-Shahin, B; Giannitsis, D J

    1991-01-01

    A rapid solid phase assay for detection of single HLA-antigens on platelets was developed. The platelets were attached to the surface of polystyrene microtitre plate wells by means of a sodium carbonate buffer and centrifugation. Uncovered areas were blocked by a gelatin blocking buffer. After incubation with commercially available anti-HLA-sera the bound anti-HLA-specific antibodies directed against HLA-antigens present on the platelets were made visible by anti-IgG-coated indicator red cells and a brief centrifugation. A positive result, meaning the presence of an HLA-antigen, was indicated by a slight red cell adherence over the reaction surface. In the absence of the HLA-antigen no binding occurred and the indicator red cells formed a small red disc-like pellet.

  15. HLA antibody detection with solid phase assays: great expectations or expectations too great?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebel, H M; Bray, R A

    2014-09-01

    Alloantibodies directed against HLA antigens, are a barrier to long-term solid organ allograft survival. The clinical impact of preformed, donor-directed HLA alloantibodies range from acceptable risk to unequivocal contraindication for organ transplantation. HLA antibodies are key factors that limit patient access to donor organs. Serological methods were once the only approach to identify HLA antigens and antibodies. Limitations in these technologies led to the development of solid phase approaches. In the early 1990s, the development of the polymerase chain reaction enabled DNA-based HLA antigen testing to be performed. By the mid-1990s, microparticle-based technology that utilized flow cytometry for analysis was developed to detect both classes I and II HLA antibodies. These methodologies revolutionized clinical histocompatibility testing. The strengths and weaknesses of these assays are described in detail in this review.

  16. A solid-phase dot assay using silica/gold nanoshells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zharov Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWe report on the first application of silica-gold nanoshells to a solid-phase dot immunoassay. The assay principle is based on staining of a drop (1 µl analyte on a nitrocellulose membrane strip by using silica/gold nanoshells conjugated with biospecific probing molecules. Experimental example is human IgG (hIgG, target molecules and protein A (probing molecules. For usual 15-nm colloidal gold conjugates, the minimal detectable amount of hIgG is about 4 ng. By contrast, for nanoshell conjugates (silica core diameter of 70 nm and gold outer diameter of 100 nm we have found significant increase in detection sensitivity and the minimal detectable amount of hIgG is about 0.5 ng. This finding is explained by the difference in the monolayer particle extinction.

  17. Integrated monitoring and surveillance system demonstration project: Phase I accomplishments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aumeier, S.E.; Walters, B.G.; Crawford, D.C. [and others

    1997-01-15

    The authors present the results of the Integrated Monitoring and Surveillance System (IMSS) demonstration project Phase I efforts. The rationale behind IMSS development is reviewed and progress in each of the 5 basic tasks is detailed. Significant results include decisions to use Echelon LonWorks networking protocol and Microsoft Access for the data system needs, a preliminary design for the plutonium canning system glovebox, identification of facilities and materials available for the demonstration, determination of possibly affected facility documentation, and a preliminary list of available sensor technologies. Recently imposed changes in the overall project schedule and scope are also discussed and budgetary requirements for competition of Phase II presented. The results show that the IMSS demonstration project team has met and in many cases exceeded the commitments made for Phase I deliverables.

  18. Integrated monitoring and surveillance system demonstration project: Phase I accomplishments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present the results of the Integrated Monitoring and Surveillance System (IMSS) demonstration project Phase I efforts. The rationale behind IMSS development is reviewed and progress in each of the 5 basic tasks is detailed. Significant results include decisions to use Echelon LonWorks networking protocol and Microsoft Access for the data system needs, a preliminary design for the plutonium canning system glovebox, identification of facilities and materials available for the demonstration, determination of possibly affected facility documentation, and a preliminary list of available sensor technologies. Recently imposed changes in the overall project schedule and scope are also discussed and budgetary requirements for competition of Phase II presented. The results show that the IMSS demonstration project team has met and in many cases exceeded the commitments made for Phase I deliverables

  19. Evolution of classical projected phase space density in billiards

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debabrata Biswas

    2005-04-01

    The classical phase space density projected on to the configuration space offers a means of comparing classical and quantum evolution. In this alternate approach that we adopt here, we show that for billiards, the eigenfunctions of the coarse-grained projected classical evolution operator are identical to a first approximation to the quantum Neumann eigenfunctions. Moreover, there exists a correspondence between the respective eigenvalues although their time evolutions differ.

  20. Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work described in this report was prompted by the public's concern about potential effect from the radioactive materials released from the Hanford Site. The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project was established to estimate radiation dose the public might have received from the Hanford Site since 1944, when facilities began operating. Phase 1 of the HEDR Project is a ''pilot'' or ''demonstration'' phase. The objectives of this initial phase were to determine whether enough historical information could be found or reconstructed to be used for dose estimation and develop and test conceptual and computational models for calculating credible dose estimates. Preliminary estimates of radiation doses were produced in Phase 1 because they are needed to achieve these objectives. The reader is cautioned that the dose estimates provided in this and other Phase 1 HEDR reports are preliminary. As the HEDR Project continues, the dose estimates will change for at least three reasons: more complete input information for models will be developed; the models themselves will be refined; and the size and shape of the geographic study area will change. This is one of three draft reports that summarize the first phase of the four-phased HEDR Project. This, the Summary Report, is directed to readers who want a general understanding of the Phase 1 work and preliminary dose estimates. The two other reports -- the Air Pathway Report and the Columbia River Pathway Report -- are for readers who understand the radiation dose assessment process and want to see more technical detail. Detailed descriptions of the dose reconstruction process are available in more than 20 supporting reports listed in Appendix A. 32 refs., 46 figs

  1. The international INTRAVAL project. Phase 2, Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international project INTRAVAL addresses the validation of models of transport of radionuclides through groundwater in the geosphere. Such models are used in the assessment of the long-term safety of radioactive waste disposal systems. The second phase of INTRAVAL, which started in 1990, was concluded at the end of 1993. The objective of Phase 2 was to increase the understanding how various geophysical, geohydrological and geochemical phenomena of importance for radionuclide transport from a repository to the biosphere could be described by mathematical models and to study the model validation process. Summarized results from Phase 2 of the INTRAVAL study are presented in this report. (K.A.)

  2. Phase-aware projection model for steganalysis of JPEG images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holub, Vojtěch; Fridrich, Jessica

    2015-03-01

    State-of-the-art JPEG steganographic algorithms, such as J-UNIWARD, are currently better detected in the spatial domain rather than the JPEG domain. Rich models built from pixel residuals seem to better capture the impact of embedding than features constructed as co-occurrences of quantized JPEG coefficients. However, when steganalyzing JPEG steganographic algorithms in the spatial domain, the pixels' statistical properties vary because of the underlying 8 × 8 pixel grid imposed by the compression. In order to detect JPEG steganography more accurately, we split the statistics of noise residuals based on their phase w.r.t. the 8 × 8 grid. Because of the heterogeneity of pixels in a decompressed image, it also makes sense to keep the kernel size of pixel predictors small as larger kernels mix up qualitatively different statistics more, losing thus on the detection power. Based on these observations, we propose a novel feature set called PHase Aware pRojection Model (PHARM) in which residuals obtained using a small number of small-support kernels are represented using first-order statistics of their random projections as in the projection spatial rich model PSRM. The benefit of making the features "phase-aware" is shown experimentally on selected modern JPEG steganographic algorithms with the biggest improvement seen for J-UNIWARD. Additionally, the PHARM feature vector can be computed at a fraction of computational costs of existing projection rich models.

  3. Cholesterol transport via ABCA1: new insights from solid-phase binding assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboul, Emmanuelle; Dyka, Frank M; Quazi, Faraz; Molday, Robert S

    2013-04-01

    It is now well established that the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) plays a pivotal role in HDL metabolism, reverse cholesterol transport and net efflux of cellular cholesterol and phospholipids. We aimed to resolve some uncertainties related to the putative function of ABCA1 as a mediator of lipid transport by using a methodology developed in the laboratory to isolate a protein and study its interactions with other compounds. ABCA1 was tagged with the 1D4 peptide at the C terminus and expressed in human HEK 293 cells. Preliminary experiments showed that the tag modified neither the protein expression/localization within the cells nor the ability of ABCA1 to promote cholesterol cellular efflux to apolipoprotein A-I. ABCA1-1D4 was then purified and reconstituted in liposomes. ABCA1 displayed an ATPase activity in phospholipid liposomes that was significantly decreased by cholesterol. Finally, interactions with either cholesterol or apolipoprotein A-I were assessed by binding experiments with protein immobilized on an immunoaffinity matrix. Solid-phase binding assays showed no direct binding of cholesterol or apolipoprotein A-I to ABCA1. Overall, our data support the hypothesis that ABCA1 is able to mediate the transport of cholesterol from cells without direct interaction and that apo A-I primarily binds to membrane surface or accessory protein(s). PMID:23201557

  4. Three phases of the Pacific Islands Project (1995-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, David A K; Ewing, Hamish; McCaig, Eddie

    2012-05-01

    The Pacific Islands Project (PIP), funded by AusAid and managed by the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS), has progressed through three phases from 1995 to 2010. During this time, it has sent over 520 teams to 11 Pacific Island Countries, providing over 60,000 consultations and some 16,000 procedures. In addition to this delivery of specialist medical and surgical services that were not previously available in-country, the project has contributed as a partner in capacity building with the Fiji School of Medicine and Ministries of Health of the individual nations. By 2011, Fiji School of Medicine, which began postgraduate specialist training in 1998, had awarded 51 doctors a diploma in surgery (1 year), 20 of whom had completed their Masters in Medicine (4 years). PIP was independently evaluated on completion of every phase, including the bridging Phase III (2006-2010). The project delivered on its design, to deliver services, and also helped build capacity. The relationship established with the RACS throughout the project allowed Pacific Island graduates to access the Rowan Nicks scholarship, and the majority of MMed graduates received International Travel Grants to attend the Annual Scientific Meeting. PIP has been a highly successful partnership in delivering and building specialist medical services. Although AusAid contributed some $20 million over 16 years, the value added from pro bono contributions by Specialist Teams, Specialty Coordinators and the Project Directors amounted to an equivalent amount. With the emergence of Pacific Island-trained specialists, PIP is ready to move into a new phase where the agendas are set, monitored and managed within the Pacific, and RACS fulfils the role of a service provider. A critical mass of Pacific Island surgeons has been trained, so that sub-specialization will be an option for the general surgeons of the larger island nations. PMID:22507204

  5. Solid Phase Red Cell Adherence Assay: a tubeless method for pretransfusion testing and other applications in transfusion science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Solid Phase Red Cell Adherence Assay (SPRCA) is one of the two tubeless methods developed to improve sensitivity and specificity in blood group serology. The SPRCA (solid phase) and the column agglutination (gel) technology have gained wide acceptance following successful adaptation to fully automated platforms, The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development, principle, procedures as well as laboratory and clinical applications of the SPRCA in transfusion medicine.

  6. Phase-dependent preference of thermosensation and chemosensation during simultaneous presentation assay in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingai Ryuzo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multi-sensory integration is necessary for organisms to discriminate different environmental stimuli and thus determine behavior. Caenorhabditis elegans has 12 pairs of amphid sensory neurons, which are involved in generating behaviors such as thermotaxis toward cultivation temperature, and chemotaxis toward chemical stimuli. This arrangement of known sensory neurons and measurable behavioral output makes C. elegans suitable for addressing questions of multi-sensory integration in the nervous system. Previous studies have suggested that C. elegans can process different chemoattractants simultaneously. However, little is known about how these organisms can integrate information from stimuli of different modality, such as thermal and chemical stimuli. Results We studied the behavior of a population of C. elegans during simultaneous presentation of thermal and chemical stimuli. First, we examined thermotaxis within the radial temperature gradient produced by a feedback-controlled thermoregulator. Separately, we examined chemotaxis toward sodium chloride or isoamyl alcohol. Then, assays for simultaneous presentations of 15°C (colder temperature than 20°C room temperature and chemoattractant were performed with 15°C-cultivated wild-type worms. Unlike the sum of behavioral indices for each separate behavior, simultaneous presentation resulted in a biased migration to cold regions in the first 10 min of the assay, and sodium chloride-regions in the last 40 min. However, when sodium chloride was replaced with isoamyl alcohol in the simultaneous presentation, the behavioral index was very similar to the sum of separate single presentation indices. We then recorded tracks of single worms and analyzed their behavior. For behavior toward sodium chloride, frequencies of forward and backward movements in simultaneous presentation were significantly different from those in single presentation. Also, migration toward 15°C in simultaneous

  7. Advanced conceptual design report solid waste retrieval facility, phase I, project W-113

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K.E.

    1994-03-21

    Project W-113 will provide the equipment and facilities necessary to retrieve suspect transuranic (TRU) waste from Trench 04 of the 218W-4C burial ground. As part of the retrieval process, waste drums will be assayed, overpacked, vented, head-gas sampled, and x-rayed prior to shipment to the Phase V storage facility in preparation for receipt at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP). Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) studies focused on project items warranting further definition prior to Title I design and areas where the potential for cost savings existed. This ACD Report documents the studies performed during FY93 to optimize the equipment and facilities provided in relation to other SWOC facilities and to provide additional design information for Definitive Design.

  8. Environmental information volume: Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the commercial viability of the Liquid Phase Methanol Process using coal-derived synthesis gas, a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. This report describes the proposed actions, alternative to the proposed action, the existing environment at the coal gasification plant at Kingsport, Tennessee, environmental impacts, regulatory requirements, offsite fuel testing, and DME addition to methanol production. Appendices include the air permit application, solid waste permits, water permit, existing air permits, agency correspondence, and Eastman and Air Products literature.

  9. Environmental information volume: Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH trademark) project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the commercial viability of the Liquid Phase Methanol Process using coal-derived synthesis gas, a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. This report describes the proposed actions, alternative to the proposed action, the existing environment at the coal gasification plant at Kingsport, Tennessee, environmental impacts, regulatory requirements, offsite fuel testing, and DME addition to methanol production. Appendices include the air permit application, solid waste permits, water permit, existing air permits, agency correspondence, and Eastman and Air Products literature

  10. Capabilities for frequent innovation : Managing the early project phases in the pharmaceutical R&D process

    OpenAIRE

    Biedenbach, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Despite their recognized significance for project success and innovation, the management of the early project phases is still an under-researched area in project management. For organizations to secure a continuous stream of innovation, the utilization of capabilities is crucial for managing the early phases of R&D projects. The purpose of this dissertation is to advance the understanding of the management of the early project phases in hypercompetitive environments. The thesis addresses ...

  11. The Thirty-Meter Telescope project design and development phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepp, Larry M.; Strom, Stephen E.

    2004-07-01

    The U.S. National Observatories have responded to the call of the astronomy decadal survey committee to develop a Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope by forming the AURA New Initiatives Office. Drawing on the engineering and scientific staffs of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory and the Gemini Observatory, NIO has for the past 30 months carried out studies aimed at: understanding the key science drivers for a thirty-meter telescope; developing a feasible point design that is responsive to the science goals; and identifying key technical issues that must be solved in order to successfully build such a telescope. In parallel, NIO has followed the charge of the decadal survey to identify potential private and international partners to fulfill the committee vision of a public-private partnership to build and operate this facility. NIO has now joined with two other groups -- the CELT Development Corporation (a partnership between the University of California and the California Institute of Technology) and the Association of Canadian Unviersities for Research In Astronomy (ACURA) -- to initiate the next step, the design & development (D & D) phase of a joint project that is being called the Thirty-Meter Telescope (TMT) Project. This paper reviews the plans for the TMT D & D phase, including the organizational structure, science requirements, and plans for conceptual design studies, technology development, and site selection.

  12. Hawaii Geothermal Project summary report for Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-05-01

    Results of Phase I of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) are reported. It was a multidisciplinary research effort in the following program areas: (1) geophysical--exploratory surveys to define the most favorable areas for geothermal investigations; (2) engineering-- analytical models to assist in interpretation of geophysical results, and studies on energy recovery from hot brine; and (3) socioeconomic--legal and regulatory aspects of ownership and administration of geothermal resources, and economic planning studies on the impact of geothermal resources, and economic planning studies on the impact of geothermal power. The major emphasis of Phase I was on the Geophysical Program, since the issue of if and where geothermal resources exist is crucial to the project. However, parallel studies were initiated in all supporting programs, so that progress was made in identifying and clarifying the technological, environmental, legal, regulatory, social and economic problems that could impede the development of geothermal power in Hawaii. Although the analysis and interpretation of field data are still incomplete, the consensus developed early--both on the basis of preliminary geophysical results and from complementary studies conducted on the Big Island over the past several decades--that an exploratory drilling program would be essential to check out the subsurface conditions predicted by the surveys.

  13. Qinshan phase Ⅱ expansion project to minimize solid waste transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear power plant in the production and maintenance period usually have a certain amount of radioactive waste, according to the physical state of these wastes, it can be divided into radioactive waste gas, radioactive waste water and solid waste. Radioactive waste gas and water, treated by the waste treatment system, and the corresponding facilities for filtration, purification. compression, storage to meet discharging requirements, discharge to the environment finally. As for solid radioactive waste, common solution in nuclear power plants is to use specially formulated cement to cure and packaged into the barrel, stored in a particular building for naturally decaying. Qinshan NPP have optimized the solid waste treatment process m extension project. As the nuclear power industry prospering, radioactive solid waste generation would increased dramatically,. how to reduce solid waste production volume, how to control the volume of waste bins will become serious issues in future. Qinshan Phase Ⅱ expansion project as 'replica plus improvement' projects, 'solid waste minimization transformation' has received great attention from SEPA (State Environmental Protection Department). (authors)

  14. SELDI Phase I: Assay Validation-Prostate — EDRN Public Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is then the goal of this collaborative project – EDRN-Prostate-SELDI Investigational Collaboration (EPSIC) - to use state-of-the-art protein profiling technology to develop and validate such screening methods

  15. Cyprus natural analogue project (CNAP). Phase III final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CNAP Phase III project was carried out following identification of the requirement to support ongoing laboratory and modelling efforts on the potential reaction of the bentonite buffer with cementitious leachates in the repository EBS. Although it is known that the higher pH (12.5 to 13) leachates from OPC cement will degrade bentonite, it is unclear if this will also be the case for the lower pH (10 to 11) leachates typical of low alkali cements. Ongoing laboratory and URL programmes which are currently investigating this face the obstacle of slow kinetics and the production of short-lived metastable phases, meaning obtaining unambiguous results may take decades. This is exacerbated by the limitations of the thermodynamic databases for minerals of interest to models of bentonite/low alkali cement leachate reaction. It was therefore decided to implement a focussed NA study on bentonite/low alkali cement leachate reaction to provide indications of likely long-term reaction products and reaction pathways to provide feedback on the existing short-term investigations noted above and to ascertain if any critical path R and D needs to be instigated now. The results of the analyses presented here suggest that there has been very limited alkaline groundwater reaction with the bentonite. This is generally supported by both the geomorphological evidence and the natural decay series data which imply groundwater groundwater/rock interaction in the last 105 a. When integrated with the novel data currently being produced in the BIGRAD project, the CNAP data tend to indicate that any long-term bentonite reaction in low alkali cement leachates is minimal. (orig.)

  16. Cyprus natural analogue project (CNAP). Phase III final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, W.R. [Bedrock Geosciences, Auenstein (Switzerland); Milodowski, A.E. [British Geological Survey, Keyworth (United Kingdom); Pitty, A.F. [Pitty (EIA) Consulting, Norwich (United Kingdom)] (eds.)

    2012-01-15

    The CNAP Phase III project was carried out following identification of the requirement to support ongoing laboratory and modelling efforts on the potential reaction of the bentonite buffer with cementitious leachates in the repository EBS. Although it is known that the higher pH (12.5 to 13) leachates from OPC cement will degrade bentonite, it is unclear if this will also be the case for the lower pH (10 to 11) leachates typical of low alkali cements. Ongoing laboratory and URL programmes which are currently investigating this face the obstacle of slow kinetics and the production of short-lived metastable phases, meaning obtaining unambiguous results may take decades. This is exacerbated by the limitations of the thermodynamic databases for minerals of interest to models of bentonite/low alkali cement leachate reaction. It was therefore decided to implement a focussed NA study on bentonite/low alkali cement leachate reaction to provide indications of likely long-term reaction products and reaction pathways to provide feedback on the existing short-term investigations noted above and to ascertain if any critical path R and D needs to be instigated now. The results of the analyses presented here suggest that there has been very limited alkaline groundwater reaction with the bentonite. This is generally supported by both the geomorphological evidence and the natural decay series data which imply groundwater groundwater/rock interaction in the last 10{sup 5} a. When integrated with the novel data currently being produced in the BIGRAD project, the CNAP data tend to indicate that any long-term bentonite reaction in low alkali cement leachates is minimal. (orig.)

  17. TWRS phase 1 infrastructure project (W-519) characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, C.J.

    1998-09-24

    In order to treat the mixed radioactive and hazardous waste stored in 177 underground tanks, the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) program is developing a `demonstration` site for treatment and immobilization of these wastes by a private contractor. Project W-519 is providing the infrastructure support to this site by developing the designs and emplacing required pipelines, roads, electrical, etc. In support of the TWRS Phase 1 Infrastructure Project (W-519) Characterization, Numatec Hanford Corporation (NHC) contracted with Waste Management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations (WMNW) to investigate a number of locations in and just outside the 200 East Area eastern fenceline boundary. These areas consisted of known or suspected waste lines or waste sites that could potentially impact the construction and emplacement of the proposed facility improvements, including waterlines and roads. These sites were all located subsurface and sugaring would be required to obtain sample material from the desired depth. The soils would then be sampled and submitted to the laboratory for analysis of radioactivity.

  18. Recovery Efficiency Test Project Phase 2 activity report, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of Phase II operations of the Recovery Efficiency Test Project is to enhance the natural production of the well and evaluate the relative improvement as a function of the type of stimulation conducted. Another purpose is to compare the stimulated production performance of the horizontal well with vertical wells in the field. The objectives considered for Phase II operations and plans were: (1) Develop a rationale for a systematic approach to designing stimulations for the well. (2) Conduct a series of stimulations designed to optimize the fluids, injection rates, proppant volumes and general approach to stimulating a horizontal well with similar geologic conditions. (3) Develop and test a method or methods for determining the geometry of stimulation-induced fractures. (4) Conduct tests and analyze the results to determine the efficiency of stimulation operations. The technical approach pursued in developing plans to accomplish three objectives was to: (1) Review the data needs for all objectives and obtain that data first. (2) Identify the operating geologic, geomechanical, and reservoir parameters that need additional clarification or definition. (3) Investigate existing models which could be used to plan or evaluate stimulation on the well and the reservoir. (4) Plan for analysis and verification of models and approaches.

  19. The Start-Up Phase in a Research and Development Work Project: A Foundation for Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postholm, May Britt

    2008-01-01

    The article is based on a research and development work project (R&D project) conducted in a Norwegian lower secondary school. The purpose of the text is to describe the researchers' and teachers' roles during the initial phase of such a project, and what this phase and the close cooperation between the researcher and teachers mean for the…

  20. Examination of chromogenic and fluorogenic substrates in solid-phase enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorogenic and chromogenic substrates were used in direct and trapping enzyme linked immunosorbent assays for the detection of mouse IgG and foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV). The detection limits for both antigens were compared, using different combinations of enzymes and substrates. Various times and concentrations of chemicals were used to obtain maximum sensitivity for both systems. Similar sensitivities were found using fluorogenic and chromogenic substrates. Tetramethyl benzidine substrate for horse radish peroxidase enzyme conjugates was found to attain the highest sensitivity levels for chromogenic assays (0.12 ng IgG/ml and 1.0 ng/ml FMDV respectively), after 10 min incubation. Of the two fluorogenic enzyme/substrates studied, B-galactosidase was the most sensitive but required extended incubation times (2-3 h) as compared with chromogenic systems. Special microplates for fluoro-immunoassay were compared with conventional microplates and no advantage was found to justify their use. An alkaline phosphatase anti-guinea pig conjugate was used to confirm the equivalence of fluorogenic and chromogenic substrates in terms of sensitivity. A comparison of the amount of signal generated using various concentrations of enzyme in the absence of antigen was made for two different alkaline phosphatase conjugates to obtain theoretical sensitivity limits. One possible advantage of fluorogenic substrates is that high binding ratio can improve the confidence in discrimination of positive results. (author). 3 refs, 6 figs, 5 tabs

  1. Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-20

    For more than 40 years, the US government made plutonium for nuclear weapons at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Radioactive materials were released to both the air and water from Hanford. People could have been exposed to these materials, called radionuclides. The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is a multi-year scientific study to estimate the radiation doses the public may have received as a results of these releases. The study began in 1988. During the first phase, scientists began to develop and test methods for reconstructing the radiation doses. To do this, scientists found or reconstructed information about the amount and type of radionuclides that were released from Hadford facilities, where they traveled in environment, and how they reached people. Information about the people who could have been exposed was also found or reconstructed. Scientists then developed a computer model that can estimate doses from radiation exposure received many years ago. All the information that had been gathered was fed into the computer model. Then scientists did a test run'' to see whether the model was working properly. As part of its test run,'' scientists asked the computer model to generate two types of preliminary results: amounts of radionuclides in the environment (air, soil, pasture grass, food, and milk) and preliminary doses people could have received from all the routes of radiation exposure, called exposure pathways. Preliminary dose estimates were made for categories of people who shared certain characteristics and for the Phase 1 population as a whole. 26 refs., 48 figs.

  2. A rapid and robust assay for detection of S-phase cell cycle progression in plant cells and tissues by using ethynyl deoxyuridine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horváth Gábor V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progress in plant cell cycle research is highly dependent on reliable methods for detection of cells replicating DNA. Frequency of S-phase cells (cells in DNA synthesis phase is a basic parameter in studies on the control of cell division cycle and the developmental events of plant cells. Here we extend the microscopy and flow cytometry applications of the recently developed EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine-based S-phase assay to various plant species and tissues. We demonstrate that the presented protocols insure the improved preservation of cell and tissue structure and allow significant reduction in assay duration. In comparison with the frequently used detection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU and tritiated-thymidine incorporation, this new methodology offers several advantages as we discuss here. Results Applications of EdU-based S-phase assay in microscopy and flow cytometry are presented by using cultured cells of alfalfa, Arabidopsis, grape, maize, rice and tobacco. We present the advantages of EdU assay as compared to BrdU-based replication assay and demonstrate that EdU assay -which does not require plant cell wall digestion or DNA denaturation steps, offers reduced assay duration and better preservation of cellular, nuclear and chromosomal morphologies. We have also shown that fast and efficient EdU assay can also be an efficient tool for dual parameter flow cytometry analysis and for quantitative assessment of replication in thick root samples of rice. Conclusions In plant cell cycle studies, EdU-based S-phase detection offers a superior alternative to the existing S-phase assays. EdU method is reliable, versatile, fast, simple and non-radioactive and it can be readily applied to many different plant systems.

  3. The Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison Project. Phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ruei-Fong; Starr, D.; DeMott, P.; Cotten, R.; Jensen, E.; Sassen, K.

    2000-01-01

    The cirrus Parcel Model Comparison Project involves the systematic comparison of current models of ice crystal nucleation and growth for specified, typical, cirrus cloud environments. In Phase 1 of the project reported here, simulated cirrus cloud microphysical properties are compared for situations of "warm" (-40 C) and "cold" (-60 C) cirrus subject to updrafts of 4, 20 and 100 centimeters per second, respectively. Five models are participating in the project. These models employ explicit microphysical schemes wherein the size distribution of each class of particles (aerosols and ice crystals) is resolved into bins. Simulations are made including both homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation mechanisms. A single initial aerosol population of sulfuric acid particles is prescribed for all simulations. To isolate the treatment of the homogeneous freezing (of haze drops) nucleation process, the heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is disabled for a second parallel set of simulations. Qualitative agreement is found amongst the models for the homogeneous-nucleation-only simulations, e.g., the number density of nucleated ice crystals increases with the strength of the prescribed updraft. However, non-negligible quantitative differences are found. Systematic bias exists between results of a model based on a modified classical theory approach and models using an effective freezing temperature approach to the treatment of nucleation. Each approach is constrained by critical freezing data from laboratory studies. This information is necessary, but not sufficient, to construct consistent formulae for the two approaches. Large haze particles may deviate considerably from equilibrium size in moderate to strong updrafts (20-100 centimeters per second) at -60 C when the commonly invoked equilibrium assumption is lifted. The resulting difference in particle-size-dependent solution concentration of haze particles may significantly affect the ice nucleation rate during the initial

  4. Nano-Phase Powder Based Exothermic Braze Repair Technology For RCC Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase II project will advance innovative, cost effective and reliable nano-phase exothermic RCC joining processes (ExoBrazeTM) in order to be able to reinforce...

  5. Code of Conduct for wind-power projects - Phase 3; Code of Conduct fuer windkraftprojekte. Phase 3 Machbarkeit und Strategie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strub, P. [Pierre Strub, freischaffender Berater, Binningen (Switzerland); Ziegler, Ch. [Inter Act, Basel (Switzerland)

    2008-11-15

    This paper discusses the results of phase three of a project concerning wind-power projects. Feasibility and strategy aspects are examined and discussed. The current state of the wind power market is discussed on the basis of the results of a survey made on the subject. The social acceptance of wind power installations is discussed, whereby the rejection of particular projects is compared with a general lack of acceptance. Requirements placed on such projects and possible solutions are discussed. Finally, the feasibility of setting up a code of conduct in the area of wind-power projects is discussed and the definition of further instruments is examined

  6. Rapid, Sensitive, Enzyme-Immunodotting Assay for Detecting Cow Milk Adulteration in Sheep Milk: A Modern Laboratory Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, Luis A.; Razquín, Pedro; Lampreave, Fermín; Alava, María A.; Calvo, Miguel

    1998-12-01

    Specificity, sensitivity, and experimental simplicity make the immunoenzymatic assay suitable for a variety of laboratories dedicated to diverse activities such as research, quality control in food analysis, or clinical biochemistry. In these assays, the antibody that specifically recognizes the antigen is covalently attached to an enzyme. Once the antigen-antibody immunocomplex is formed, the enzymatic reaction gives a colored product that allows the detection of the initial antigen. The aim of this work was the design of a new laboratory project appropriate for use in courses of biochemistry, immunochemistry, or analytical chemistry. The assay described here detects the presence of cow milk in milk of other species. The main application is the detection of cow milk in sheep milk and cheese. Specific proteins, immunoglobulins (IgG) of the fraudulent bovine milk, are specifically recognized and retained by antibodies immobilized on a membrane. The binding of a second antibody covalently attached to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) allows the development of a visible signal. Thus, students can rapidly detect milk adulterations using a specific, sensitive, and safe experimental approach. The experiment allows students to apply their theoretical knowledge, resulting in a stimulating experience of solving a real problem during a 4-hour laboratory period.

  7. Pig-MAP, porcine acute phase proteins and standardisation of assays in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alava, M.A.; Gonzalez-Ramon, N.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.;

    1997-01-01

    reactive protein (CRP) and haptoglobin (Hp) increase 5-7 times 48 h after the injection. Porcine Alb, alpha-lipoprotein, fetuin and transferrin were negative APP. Finally, the concentration of alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein and alpha(1)-protease inhibitor (alpha(1)-antitrypsin) did not change significantly......The pattern of plasma proteins changes greatly following infection, inflammation or tissue injury. The concentration of some proteins referred to as acute phase proteins (APPs) significantly increases within hours or days after the onset of these processes. In contrast, the concentration of other...... for the presence of infectious, inflammatory and pathological lesions in animals. The ability to monitor the APP concentration in serum of pigs will improve the quality and safety of the meat produced as well as provide important diagnostic information for animal health and welfare. The serum concentration of APP...

  8. Final report on the surface-based investigation phase (phase 1) at the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) Project is a comprehensive research project investigating the deep underground environment within crystalline rock being conducted by Japan Atomic Energy Agency at Mizunami City in Gifu Prefecture, central Japan and its role is defined in 'Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy' by Japan Atomic Energy Commission. The MIU Project has three overlapping phases: Surface-based Investigation phase (Phase I), Construction phase (Phase II), and Operation phase (Phase III), with a total duration of 20 years. The overall project goals of the MIU Project from Phase I through to Phase III are: 1) to establish techniques for investigation, analysis and assessment of the deep geological environment, and 2) to develop a range of engineering for deep underground application. During Phase I, the overall project goals were supported by Phase I goals. For the overall project goals 1), the Phase I goals were set to construct models of the geological environment from all surface-based investigation results that describe the geological environment prior to excavation and predict excavation response. For the overall project goals 2), the Phase I goals were set to formulate detailed design concepts and a construction plan for the underground facilities. This report summarizes the Phase I investigation which was completed in March 2005. The authors believe this report will make an important milestone, since this report clarifies how the Phase I goals are achieved and evaluate the future issues thereby direct the research which will be conducted during Phase II. With regard to the overall project goals 1), 'To establish techniques for investigation, analysis and assessment of the deep geological environment,' a step-wise investigation was conducted by iterating investigation, interpretation, and assessment, thereby understanding of geologic environment was progressively and effectively improved with progress of investigation. An optimal

  9. Phased project planning and development in anticipation of operational programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, W. G.

    1973-01-01

    The impact of future operational status on the planning and execution of the research and development activities for major space flight projects is assessed. These projects, within NASA, are part of the Applications Program involving communications and meteorology. The NASA management approach to these projects is determined by national policies governing the responsibilities and relationships among the various government agencies and private industries.

  10. Full-field phase error detection and compensation method for digital phase-shifting fringe projection profilometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital fringe projection profilometry is one of the most widely utilized non-contact three-dimensional (3D) profile measurement techniques. The phase error caused by nonlinear gamma of digital projectors and cameras eventually reduces the 3D measurement accuracy. This kind of phase error still cannot be detected directly at present. A novel method is present in this paper not only to measure the phase error straightforwardly but also to extract the full-field error distributions. With the aid of the detected phase error distributions, the full-field look-up tables (LUTs) can be obtained to correct the phase measurement result. A set of experiments to validate our methods has been performed. Experimental results well prove that the full-field phase error distributions have been detected successfully, and after utilizing our phase correction method the phase accuracy is obviously improved. (paper)

  11. A comparison of a solid phase IRC assay and the PSIFT for detection of antibodies to platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häcker-Shahin, B; Giannitsis, D J

    1992-01-01

    A rapid solid phase indicator red cells assay (IRCA) for detection of platelet antibodies was developed and its sensitivity compared with PSIFT. Platelets were attached to the surface of polystyrene microtitre plate wells by means of a sodium carbonate buffer and centrifugation. Uncovered areas were blocked by a gelatin blocking buffer. After serum incubation bound platelet-specific antibodies were made visible by anti-IgG-coated indicator red cells and a brief centrifugation. A positive result, meaning the presence of an anti-platelet antibody was indicated by red cell adherence over the reaction surface. In the absence of serum antibodies to platelets the indicator red cells formed a pellet. The IRCA showed a high sensitivity; the anti-platelet antibody Thrombocyte was detectable until a dilution of 1:1,600 whereas the same antibody in the PSIFT could only be detected until a dilution of 1:400.

  12. Modification of solid phase red cell adherence assay for the detection of platelet antibodies in patients with thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongchan, Preeyanat; Nawarawong, Weerasak; Linhardt, Robert J

    2008-09-01

    Platelet refractoriness is caused by HLA antibodies and platelet-specific antibodies. Current methods used to detect antiplatelet antibodies have limitations. Solid phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) lacks sensitivity and requires a second assay using chloroquine-treated intact platelets to specify the response due to anti-HLA. We modified SPRCA by using 2 types of antihuman platelet antibodies with different specificities toward platelet lysate and tested samples from 361 patients (69 with unexplained thrombocytopenia and 292 with poor response to platelet transfusions not explicable by alloimmunization or the clinical situation) and 50 from healthy volunteers. Our method compared favorably with platelet suspension direct immunofluorescence. All samples from healthy volunteers were negative; of the samples from the patient population, 240 were positive (147 samples had only antiplatelet and 3 samples had only anti-HLA antibodies). This modified technique had a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 91%.

  13. Detection of Lewis, P1, and some MNS blood group system antibodies by a solid phase assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolih, S; Thomas, R; Sinor, L

    1995-01-01

    Some solid phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) assays are designed to detect IgG antibodies to red blood cell (RBC) antigens. These assays use anti-IgG-coated red cells as the indicator. It is reported that most antibodies to Lea, Leb, P1, M, and N fail to react by solid phase (SP), presumably because they are IgM antibodies. Those detected are assumed to be IgG. In one year, during routine testing using SPRCA to screen patients for intended RBC transfusion, 28 of 59 such examples were found to react: anti-Lea(9), -Leb(1), -M(14), -N(1), and -P1(3). A study was undertaken to determine if reactivity was due to crosslinking by IgM antibodies of antigen-positive indicator RBCs to antigen-positive reagent RBC monolayers, or due to detection of IgG antibodies. Antibodies were tested according to standard SP protocols, except where IgG-neutralized indicator RBCs were substituted for anti-IgG-active indicator cells. The 59 samples were retested with antigen-positive and antigen-negative indicator RBCs. Only 5 of 59 reacted optimally when antigen-positive indicator cells were used: anti-Lea(2), -Leb(1), -M(1), and -N(1). The reactions of all antibodies were abolished when the anti-IgG component of the indicator was neutralized by soluble IgG. These findings show that detection of most Lewis, P1, M, and N antibodies by SPRCA is dependent on the presence of an IgG antibody in the serum.

  14. Functional design criteria for project W-252, phase II liquid effluent treatment and disposal. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is the Functional Design Criteria for Project W-252. Project W-252 provides the scope to provide BAT/AKART (best available technology...) to 200 Liquid Effluent Phase II streams (B-Plant). This revision (Rev. 2) incorporates a major descoping of the project. The descoping was done to reflect a combination of budget cutting measures allowed by a less stringent regulatory posture toward the Phase II streams

  15. Evaluation of absolute phase for 3D profile measurement using fringe projection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mengtao Huang; Zhuangde Jiang; Bing Li; Suping Fang

    2006-01-01

    A new method of absolute phase evaluation for three-dimensional (3D) profile measurement using fringe projection is presented, which combines the gray code and the phase shift technique. Two kinds of fringe patterns are projected onto the object surface respectively, one is sinusoidal intensity distribution used for phase demodulation and the other is gray code fringe pattern for unwrapping. These images are acquired by camera and stored into computer. The absolute phase is obtained by analyzing these images. The validity of this method is verified experimentally. The method is superior to other phase unwrapping methods.

  16. Optoelectronic Infrastructure for RF/Optical Phased Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Optoelectronic integrated circuits offer radiation-hard solutions for satellite systems with much improved SWPB (size, weight, power and bandwidth). The phased...

  17. Individualized In-Service Teacher Education. (Project IN-STEP). Evaluation Report, Phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, John C.

    Phase 2 of Project IN-STEP was conducted to revise, refine, and conduct further field testing of a new inservice teacher education model. The method developed (in Phase 1--see ED 003 905 for report) is an individualized, multi-media approach. Revision activities, based on feedback provided for Phase 1, include the remaking of six videotape…

  18. Radiometric ligand binding assay for C-reactive protein. Complexed C-reactive protein is not detectable in acute phase serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Beer, F C; Shine, B; Pepys, M B

    1982-10-01

    A radiometric ligand binding assay for human C-reactive protein (CRP) was established using pneumococcal C polysaccharide (CPS) coupled to magnetizable cellulose particles as the solid phase ligand. Competition for binding to the solid phase between 125I-CRP and unlabelled CRP permitted detection of 30 micrograms/l of CRP and the precise assay of concentrations up to 3000 micrograms/l. Identical results were obtained when the assay was used to quantitate isolated pure CRP and pure CRP added to normal human serum. However in vitro addition of known ligands for CRP to acute phase serum resulted in lowering of the apparent CRP concentration in this assay and addition of as little as 1 microgram/l of free CPS or 1 mg/l of lecithin was demonstrable in this way. A combination of the ligand binding assay and the standard electroimmunoassay for CRP was therefore used to test acute phase sera for the presence of CRP complexed in vitro. No evidence of complexed CRP was detected among sera containing between 1-319 mg/l of CRP from patients with Hodgkin's disease (10), rheumatoid arthritis (10), Crohn's disease (19) and various microbial infections (11), including six with subacute bacterial endocarditis. Since it is likely that CRP does form complexes with its ligands in the plasma these results suggest that complexed CRP is rapidly cleared from the circulation.

  19. Implementing Effective Mission Systems Engineering Practices During Early Project Formulation Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moton, Tryshanda

    2016-01-01

    Developing and implementing a plan for a NASA space mission can be a complicated process. The needs, goals, and objectives of any proposed mission or technology must be assessed early in the Project Life Cycle. The key to successful development of a space mission or flight project is the inclusion of systems engineering in early project formulation, namely during Pre-phase A, Phase A, and Phase B of the NASA Project Life Cycle. When a space mission or new technology is in pre-development, or "pre-Formulation", feasibility must be determined based on cost, schedule, and risk. Inclusion of system engineering during project formulation is key because in addition to assessing feasibility, design concepts are developed and alternatives to design concepts are evaluated. Lack of systems engineering involvement early in the project formulation can result in increased risks later in the implementation and operations phases of the project. One proven method for effective systems engineering practice during the pre-Formulation Phase is the use of a mission conceptual design or technology development laboratory, such as the Mission Design Lab (MDL) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). This paper will review the engineering process practiced routinely in the MDL for successful mission or project development during the pre-Formulation Phase.

  20. South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project : Phase 1 monitoring plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This SBSP Restoration Project Monitoring Plan provides methods to document the effect of restoration on important elements such as mercury uptake, and water and...

  1. Phase Change Material (PCM) Heat Exchanger Development Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Project has identified two PCM HX concepts that will be designed, developed and demonstrated on-board the International Space Station (ISS):The first heat exchanger...

  2. Advanced Aqueous Phase Catalyst Development using Combinatorial Methods Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The use of combinatorial methods is proposed to rapidly screen catalyst formulations for the advanced development of aqueous phase oxidation catalysts with greater...

  3. Optoelectronic Infrastructure for RF/Optical Phased Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Optoelectronic integrated holds the key to higher performance, reduced mass and radiation-hard space systems. A special need is increased flexibility of phased...

  4. Three Phase Resonant DC Power Converter for Ion Thrusters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our phase 1 study has revealed many significant benefits of a new class of DC-to-DC power converters with performance that cannot be matched by current flight power...

  5. Gravity Independence of Microchannel Two-Phase Flow Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Most of the amassed two-phase flow and heat transfer knowledge comes from experiments conducted in Earth’s gravity. Space missions span varying gravity...

  6. Scaling of Two-Phase Systems Across Gravity Levels Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is a defined need for long term earth based testing for the development and deployment of two-phase flow systems in reduced-gravity, including lunar gravity,...

  7. The joint phase-space transformer up-scattering project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Neutrons from a moderating system have a certain phase space density corresponding to the moderator temperature. According to the Liouville Theorem, the phase-space density cannot be changed within a conservative system, but by means of advanced cooling methods. Nevertheless it is possible to change the shape and position of the phase-space element using conservative forces. Phase-space transformation has been used successfully in high-end backscattering instruments, such as the HFBS at NIST. Here the phase-space element is rotated in order to obtain more neutrons in the backscattering energy region, but with a higher beam divergence. Based on the original idea of Schelten and Alefeld, a new kind of phase-space transformation has been proposed: it is to change the position of the phase-space element in order to produce a well defined neutron beam by coherent up-scattering of an UCN gas. It has been shown that this principle could yield to gain factors of hundred and more compared to 'classical' beam generation. The Atominstitut and the Paul Scherrer Institut have joined to design and construct a 'proof of principle'-experiment. The aims of this experiment are to exploit the feasibility as well as the experimental limitations and to validate preceding MC-simulations. Its scalability makes it a solid starting point for future instruments. Employing a sophisticated mechanical system, Stage-2 Potassium intercalated HOPG crystals (d = 8.74 AA) will be moved with velocities up to 250 m/s. The experiment is planned to take place at the PF-2 UCN source at the ILL in the second half of 2007. (author)

  8. Coupling solid-phase extraction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for ultratrace determination of herbicides in pristine water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were coupled for automated trace analysis of pristine water samples containing 2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamine-s-triazine (atrazine) and 2-chloro-2???,6???-diethyl-N-(methoxymethyl)acetanilide (alachlor). The isolation of the two herbicides on a C18-resin involved the selection of an elution solvent that both removes interfering substances and is compatible with ELISA. Ethyl acetate was selected as the elution solvent followed by a solvent exchange with methanol/water (20/80, % v/v). The SPE-ELISA method has a detection limit of 5.0 ng/L (5 ppt), >90% recovery, and a relative standard deviation of ??10%. The performance of a microtiter plate-based ELISA and a magnetic particle-based ELISA coupled to SPE was also evaluated. Although the sensitivity of the two ELISA methods was comparable, the precision using magnetic particles was improved considerably (??10% versus ??20%) because of the faster reaction kinetics provided by the magnetic particles. Finally, SPE-ELISA and isotope dilution gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry correlated well (correlation coefficient of 0.96) for lake-water samples. The SPE-ELISA method is simple and may have broader applications for the inexpensive automated analysis of other contaminants in water at trace levels.

  9. Detection of drug-dependent, platelet-reactive antibodies by solid-phase red cell adherence assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, M F; Cooper, L K; AuBuchon, J P

    1997-06-01

    We developed a simple modification of the solid-phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) assay system that can be used to identify drug-dependent platelet antibodies (DDPAs) reactive by either the hapten or immune complex reaction mechanisms. Between January 1994 and August 1996 we tested sera from 173 patients [123 (71%) with unexplained thrombocytopenia and 50 (29%) because of poor responses to platelet transfusions not explicable by alloimmunization or the clinical situation] for DDPAs possibly associated with the receipt of 61 different drugs. We correlated positive results with patients' clinical courses. DDPAs were identified in samples from 138 (80%) of the patients tested. Antibodies reactive only by the hapten mechanism were identified in 51 (37%) of those sera exhibiting positive reactions. The clinical courses of 108 (78%) patients were evaluable. Discontinuation of the implicated drug(s) resulted in prompt (<5 d) resolution of the thrombocytopenia or improvement in response to transfusion in all of these patients. In four cases thrombocytopenia returned upon re-exposure to the implicated drug. This adaptation of SPRCA provides a simple means of investigating the possibility of DDPAs and documents a higher frequency of these antibodies than has previously been suspected.

  10. Project W-314 phase I environmental permits and approvals plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TOLLEFSON, K.S.

    1999-02-24

    This document describes the range of environmental actions, including required permits and other agency approvals, for Project W-314 activities in the Hanford Site's Tank Waste Remediation System. This document outlines alternative approaches to satisfying applicable environmental standards, and describes selected strategies for acquiring permits and other approvals needed for waste feed delivery to proceed. This document also includes estimated costs and schedule to obtain the required permits and approvals based on the selected strategy. It also provides estimated costs for environmental support during design and construction based on the preliminary project schedule provided.

  11. Phase Change Permeation Technology for Environmental Control & Life Support Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will explore a recent advancement in Phase Change Permeation™ technology to enable improved (1) water recovery from urine/brine for Environmental...

  12. IMPROVING KNOWLEDGE CAPTURE DURING CONCEPTUAL DESIGN PHASE OF BUILDING PROJECTS

    OpenAIRE

    POURZOLFAGHAR, ZOHREH

    2010-01-01

    Incomplete knowledge flow between architects and mechanical/electrical engineers engenders large expense and untimely delivery of building projects. It is essential to consider mechanical/electrical requirements from the early stages of design; and many experienced architects acknowledge this knowledge entities and the necessity for considering them at the right time. Therefore, inefficient knowledge flow among professionals during architectural conceptual design is emphasiz...

  13. CEC project Mirage - Second phase on migration of radionuclides in the geosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A second phase of the Community coordinated project Mirage (migration of radionuclides in the geosphere) was launched in 1986. The present report brings together reviews of work done in the four research areas of this phase for 1988, and therefore constitues an update of the previous report, ref. EUR 11589. This project is part of the CEC R and D programme on radioactive waste management (1985-89)

  14. Mixed Waste Focus Area/Characterization Monitoring Sensor Technology Nondestructive Waste Assay Capability Evaluation Project End-User Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. K. Becker; M. E. McIlwain; M. J. Connolly

    1998-11-01

    The Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) in conjunction with the Characterization Monitoring and Sensor Technology (CMST) crosscut program identified the need to objectively evaluate the capability of nondestructive waste assay (NDA) technologies. This was done because of a general lack of NDA technology performance data with respect to a representative cross section of waste form configurations comprising the Department of Energy (DOE) contact-handled alpha contaminated [e.g., transuranic (TRU) waste]. The overall objective of the Capability Evaluation Project (CEP) was to establish a known and unbiased NDA data and information base that can be used to support end-user decisions with regards to technology system selection and to support technology development organizations in identifying technology system deficiencies. The primary performance parameters evaluated in the CEP were measurement bias and relative precision. The performance of a given NDA technology is a direct function of the attributes represented by the waste matrix configuration. Such attributes include matrix density, matrix elemental composition, radionuclidic composition, radionuclide mass loading, and the spatial variation of these components. Analyzing the manner in which bias and precision vary as a function of test sample attribute and NDA technology provides a foundation for deriving performance capability and limitation statements and determines which waste matrix attributes, or combinations of attributes, are compatible or incompatible with existing technologies. The CEP achieved the stated end-user objective. The data indicate that the nondestructive waste assay systems evaluated have a definite capability to perform assay of contact-handled TRU waste packaged in 55-gallon drums. There is, however, a performance envelope where this capability exists, an area near the envelope boundaries where it is questionable, and a realm outside the envelope where the technologies do not perform. Therefore

  15. Mixed Waste Focus Area/Characterization Monitoring Sensor Technology Nondestructive Waste Assay Capability Evaluation Project End-User Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) in conjunction with the Characterization Monitoring and Sensor Technology (CMST) crosscut program identified the need to objectively evaluate the capability of nondestructive waste assay (NDA) technologies. This was done because of a general lack of NDA technology performance data with respect to a representative cross section of waste form configurations comprising the Department of Energy (DOE) contact-handled alpha contaminated [e.g., transuranic (TRU) waste]. The overall objective of the Capability Evaluation Project (CEP) was to establish a known and unbiased NDA data and information base that can be used to support end-user decisions with regards to technology system selection and to support technology development organizations in identifying technology system deficiencies. The primary performance parameters evaluated in the CEP were measurement bias and relative precision. The performance of a given NDA technology is a direct function of the attributes represented by the waste matrix configuration. Such attributes include matrix density, matrix elemental composition, radionuclidic composition, radionuclide mass loading, and the spatial variation of these components. Analyzing the manner in which bias and precision vary as a function of test sample attribute and NDA technology provides a foundation for deriving performance capability and limitation statements and determines which waste matrix attributes, or combinations of attributes, are compatible or incompatible with existing technologies. The CEP achieved the stated end-user objective. The data indicate that the nondestructive waste assay systems evaluated have a definite capability to perform assay of contact-handled TRU waste packaged in 55-gallon drums. There is, however, a performance envelope where this capability exists, an area near the envelope boundaries where it is questionable, and a realm outside the envelope where the technologies do not perform. Therefore

  16. 105-B Reactor museum Phase 2 project supplement cost estimate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document serves as a supplement to BHI-0134, 105-B Reactor Museum Feasibility Assessment. The Phase 2 105-B Reactor assessment was performed to provide a basis for identifying and mitigating the hazards in specific areas of the B Reactor facility to support public tours

  17. Code of Conduct for wind-power projects - Phases 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the results of the first two phases of a project concerning wind-power projects. The paper deals with the results of a system analysis, takes a look at lessons learned and presents an appraisal of existing instruments. A system-analysis of wind-power projects is presented with emphasis on social factors and the role of stakeholders. The success factors concerning social acceptance of wind-power projects and their special characteristics are discussed. Lessons learned are examined. Instruments for the sustainable implementation of projects are looked at, in particular with a focus on social acceptance

  18. Guangxi Pingguo Aluminum Alumina 3rd Phase Project to Put Into Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>In April,the handover ceremony was held for the first completed sub-project of the 3rd phase of 900,000-ton alumina project of China Alu- minum Guangxi Company (Pingguo Aluminum in short),standing for the commencement of

  19. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Wilkins, D.W.; Keltch, B.; Saradji, B.; Salamy, S.P.

    1988-04-01

    This report is the second volume of the Recovery Efficiency Test Phase I Report of Activities. Volume 1 covered selection, well planning, drilling, coring, logging and completion operations. This volume reports on well testing activities, reclamation activities on the drilling site and access roads, and the results of physical and mechanical properties tests on the oriented core material obtained from a horizontal section of the well. 3 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. Fish tracking technology development. Phase 1 project definition desk study

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, A.; Potter, E.C.E.

    1994-01-01

    The document reports on Phase 1 of a definition study to appraise the options to develop fish tracking equipment, in particular tags and data logging systems in order to improve the efficiency of the Environment Agency's tracking studies and to obtain a greater understanding of fish biology. Covered in this report are radio telemetry, audio telemetry, High Resolution Position Fixing, data storage and archival tags and other fish tracking systems such as biosonics.

  1. The FAZIA project in Europe: R and D phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bougault, R.; Le Neindre, N.; Bougard, B.; Desrues, P.; Legouee, E.; Lopez, O.; Merrer, Y.; Pain, C.; Vient, E. [Universite de Caen, CNRS-IN2P3, LPC Caen, ENSICAEN, Caen cedex (France); Poggi, G.; Barlini, S.; Pasquali, G.; Bardelli, L.; Bini, M.; Carboni, S.; Pastore, G.; Stefanini, A.A.; Valdre, S. [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Sezione di Firenze, INFN, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Borderie, B.; Ademard, G.; Barbey, S.; Brulin, G.; Edelbruck, P.; Hamrita, H.; Huss, C.; Lavergne, L.; Rauly, E.; Rivet, M.F.; Salomon, F.; Seredov, V.; Wanlin, E. [Universite Paris-Sud 11, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay cedex (France); Casini, G.; Piantelli, S.; Olmi, A.; Tobia, G. [Sezione di Firenze, INFN, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Chbihi, A.; Boisjoli, M.; Bonnet, E.; Frankland, J.D.; Gruyer, D.; Marini, P.; Spitaels, C. [CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, GANIL, Caen cedex (France); Parlog, M. [Universite de Caen, CNRS-IN2P3, LPC Caen, ENSICAEN, Caen cedex (France); Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest Magurele (Romania); Sosin, Z.; Kajetanowicz, M.; Kozik, T.; Kulig, P.; Palka, M.; Sierpowski, D.; Twarog, T.; Wieloch, A. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Alba, R.; Maiolino, C.; Santonocito, D. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Anastasio, A.; Boiano, A.; Cassese, C.; Cassese, F.; D' Aquino, B.; Di Meo, P.; Masone, V.; Meoli, A.; Ordine, A.; Paduano, G.; Passeggio, G.; Pontoriere, G.; Rocco, R.; Roscilli, L.; Tortone, G.; Vanzanella, A.; Vanzanella, E.; Vitiello, G. [Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Napoli (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Borcea, R.; Ciolacu, L.; Cruceru, I.; Cruceru, M.; Negoita, F.; Petcu, M.; Petrascu, H. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest Magurele (Romania); Bruno, M.; Morelli, L. [INFN, Sezione di Bologna (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Universita di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Marchi, T. [LNL Legnaro, INFN, Legnaro (Italy); De Fazio, B. [Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Napoli ' ' Federico II' ' , Napoli (Italy); Degerlier, M. [Nevsehir Haci Bektas University, Science and Art Faculty, Physics Department, Nevsehir (Turkey); Duenas, J.A.; Martel, I. [FCCEE Universidad de Huelva, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Huelva (Spain); Energico, S. [Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Istituto SPIN - CNR, Napoli (Italy); Falorsi, M.; Scarlini, E. [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Galichet, E. [Universite Paris-Sud 11, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay cedex (France); Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers, Paris (France); Gasior, K.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Zipper, W. [University of Silesia, August Chellkowski Institute of Physics, Katowice (Poland); Giordano, R. [Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Napoli (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Universita di Napoli ' ' Federico II' ' , Dipartimento di Informatica e Sistemistica, Napoli (Italy); Guerzoni, M.; Serra, S. [Sezione di Bologna, INFN, Bologna (Italy); Korcyl, K.; Lukasik, J.; Pawlowski, P. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Krakow (Poland); Kordyasz, A.; Piasecki, E. [University of Warsaw, Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw (Poland); Rosato, E.; Spadaccini, G.; Vigilante, M. [Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Napoli (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Napoli ' ' Federico II' ' , Napoli (Italy); Collaboration: The FAZIA Collaboration

    2014-02-15

    The goal of the FAZIA Collaboration is the design of a new-generation 4π detector array for heavy-ion collisions with radioactive beams. This article summarizes the main results of the R and D phase, devoted to the search for significant improvements of the techniques for charge and mass identification of reaction products. This was obtained by means of a systematic study of the basic detection module, consisting of two transmission-mounted silicon detectors followed by a CsI(Tl) scintillator. Significant improvements in ΔE-E and pulse-shape techniques were obtained by controlling the doping homogeneity and the cutting angles of silicon and by putting severe constraints on thickness uniformity. Purposely designed digital electronics contributed to identification quality. The issue of possible degradation related to radiation damage of silicon was also addressed. The experimental activity was accompanied by studies on the physics governing signal evolution in silicon. The good identification quality obtained with the prototypes during the R and D phase, allowed us to investigate also some aspects of isospin physics, namely isospin transport and odd-even staggering. Now, after the conclusion of the R and D period, the FAZIA Collaboration has entered the demonstrator phase, with the aim of verifying the applicability of the devised solutions for the realization of a larger-scale experimental set-up. (orig.)

  2. The FAZIA project in Europe: R&D phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougault, R.; Poggi, G.; Barlini, S.; Borderie, B.; Casini, G.; Chbihi, A.; Le Neindre, N.; Pârlog, M.; Pasquali, G.; Piantelli, S.; Sosin, Z.; Ademard, G.; Alba, R.; Anastasio, A.; Barbey, S.; Bardelli, L.; Bini, M.; Boiano, A.; Boisjoli, M.; Bonnet, E.; Borcea, R.; Bougard, B.; Brulin, G.; Bruno, M.; Carboni, S.; Cassese, C.; Cassese, F.; Cinausero, M.; Ciolacu, L.; Cruceru, I.; Cruceru, M.; D'Aquino, B.; De Fazio, B.; Degerlier, M.; Desrues, P.; Di Meo, P.; Dueñas, J. A.; Edelbruck, P.; Energico, S.; Falorsi, M.; Frankland, J. D.; Galichet, E.; Gasior, K.; Gramegna, F.; Giordano, R.; Gruyer, D.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Guerzoni, M.; Hamrita, H.; Huss, C.; Kajetanowicz, M.; Korcyl, K.; Kordyasz, A.; Kozik, T.; Kulig, P.; Lavergne, L.; Legouée, E.; Lopez, O.; Łukasik, J.; Maiolino, C.; Marchi, T.; Marini, P.; Martel, I.; Masone, V.; Meoli, A.; Merrer, Y.; Morelli, L.; Negoita, F.; Olmi, A.; Ordine, A.; Paduano, G.; Pain, C.; Pałka, M.; Passeggio, G.; Pastore, G.; Pawłowski, P.; Petcu, M.; Petrascu, H.; Piasecki, E.; Pontoriere, G.; Rauly, E.; Rivet, M. F.; Rocco, R.; Rosato, E.; Roscilli, L.; Scarlini, E.; Salomon, F.; Santonocito, D.; Seredov, V.; Serra, S.; Sierpowski, D.; Spadaccini, G.; Spitaels, C.; Stefanini, A. A.; Tobia, G.; Tortone, G.; Twaróg, T.; Valdré, S.; Vanzanella, A.; Vanzanella, E.; Vient, E.; Vigilante, M.; Vitiello, G.; Wanlin, E.; Wieloch, A.; Zipper, W.

    2014-02-01

    The goal of the FAZIA Collaboration is the design of a new-generation 4 π detector array for heavy-ion collisions with radioactive beams. This article summarizes the main results of the R&D phase, devoted to the search for significant improvements of the techniques for charge and mass identification of reaction products. This was obtained by means of a systematic study of the basic detection module, consisting of two transmission-mounted silicon detectors followed by a CsI(Tl) scintillator. Significant improvements in ΔE- E and pulse-shape techniques were obtained by controlling the doping homogeneity and the cutting angles of silicon and by putting severe constraints on thickness uniformity. Purposely designed digital electronics contributed to identification quality. The issue of possible degradation related to radiation damage of silicon was also addressed. The experimental activity was accompanied by studies on the physics governing signal evolution in silicon. The good identification quality obtained with the prototypes during the R&D phase, allowed us to investigate also some aspects of isospin physics, namely isospin transport and odd-even staggering. Now, after the conclusion of the R&D period, the FAZIA Collaboration has entered the demonstrator phase, with the aim of verifying the applicability of the devised solutions for the realization of a larger-scale experimental set-up.

  3. The FAZIA project in Europe: R and D phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the FAZIA Collaboration is the design of a new-generation 4π detector array for heavy-ion collisions with radioactive beams. This article summarizes the main results of the R and D phase, devoted to the search for significant improvements of the techniques for charge and mass identification of reaction products. This was obtained by means of a systematic study of the basic detection module, consisting of two transmission-mounted silicon detectors followed by a CsI(Tl) scintillator. Significant improvements in ΔE-E and pulse-shape techniques were obtained by controlling the doping homogeneity and the cutting angles of silicon and by putting severe constraints on thickness uniformity. Purposely designed digital electronics contributed to identification quality. The issue of possible degradation related to radiation damage of silicon was also addressed. The experimental activity was accompanied by studies on the physics governing signal evolution in silicon. The good identification quality obtained with the prototypes during the R and D phase, allowed us to investigate also some aspects of isospin physics, namely isospin transport and odd-even staggering. Now, after the conclusion of the R and D period, the FAZIA Collaboration has entered the demonstrator phase, with the aim of verifying the applicability of the devised solutions for the realization of a larger-scale experimental set-up. (orig.)

  4. Laser speckle reduction by phase range limited computer generated hologram in laser projection display system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yan-Shuo; Lin, Chia-Hsin; Hsu, Ku-Hui; Hsu, Wei-Feng; Hsiao, Li-Jen; Lin, Hoang Yan

    2014-09-20

    The speckle phenomenon is an annoyance in laser projection display systems. We propose a novel speckle suppression method that utilizes the interference concept on a pixel point, which reduces the speckle contrast (SC) of the project image by limiting the phase distribution range in the optical field. The SC formula is derived in the uniform interval phase range for partially developed speckle conditions, showing that the SC can be lowered by lessening the phase range limitation. In the ideal simulation model, the SC can be reduced from 98.77% to 0% as the phase range limitation varies from 2π to 0. The phase range limitation model is a novel method using a computer generated hologram to provide beam shaping and phase limitation. In a more realistic simulation model, the SC is reduced from 99.18% to 16.68%.

  5. Individualized Inservice Teacher Education (Project In-Step). Evaluation Report. Phase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, John C.

    This is a report on the third phase of Project IN-STEP, which was intended to develop a viable model for individualized, multi-media in-service teacher education programs. (Phase I and II are reported in ED 033 905, and ED 042 709). The rationale for Phase III was to see if the model could be successfully transferred to an area other than teaching…

  6. Materials Information for Science and Technology (MIST): Project overview: Phase 1 and 2 and general considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grattidge, W.; Westbrook, J.; McCarthy, J.; Northrup, C. Jr.; Rumble, J. Jr.

    1986-11-01

    The National Bureau of Standards and the Department of Energy have embarked on a program to build a demonstration computerized materials data system called Materials Information for Science and Technology (MIST). This report documents the first two phases of the project. The emphasis of the first phase was on determining what information was needed and how it could impact user productivity. The second phase data from the Aerospace Metal Handbook on a set of alloys was digitized and incorporated in the system.

  7. Geothermal project in Brig-Glis - Final report for phase 1 and further work in phase 2; Geothermieprojekt Brig-Glis, Abschlussbericht Phase 1 und weiteres Vorgehen Phase 2 - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buser, M. [Creato, Ennetbaden (Switzerland); Paris, U. [SRP Schneller Ritz und Partner AG, Brig (Switzerland); Bianchetti, G. [AlpGeo Sarl, Sierre (Switzerland); Jacquod, J. [Norbert SA, Martigny (Switzerland); Kreuter, H. [GeoThermal Engineering GmbH, Geo-T, Karlsruhe (Germany); Surbeck, H. [Centre of Hydrogeology, CHYN, University of Neuchatel, Neuchatel (Switzerland); Vuataz, F.-D. [Centre de Recherche en Geothermie, CREGE, Neuchatel (Switzerland)

    2008-05-15

    This final report for Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the work done in phase 1 of the project and discusses further work planned for the second phase of this project. The geothermal borehole is to be driven down at the Brigerbad thermal spa in Switzerland and is to use the artesian waters found under the Rhone valley. The first phase of the project is reported on and the results obtained are analysed. Temperatures and conductivity of the waters found at various depths are commented on. The planning of the second and third phases is discussed and organisational improvements are noted.

  8. Final Report for the ADMX Phase 2a Project at the University of Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Leslie J. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2015-08-22

    This is a final report of the ADMX Phase 2a program. This program is a project allowing for a sensitive axion dark-matter axion search at higher axion masses. The Phase 2a program also prepares the project for lower temperature anticipated in later operations. The Phase 2a program includes sensitive data-taking operations at two cavity modes, TM010 and TM020, allowing for faster data-taking operations and extending the search to higher and plausible dark-matter axion masses.

  9. The Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP) Phase 2: Scientific objectives and experimental design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Alan M.; Dowsett, Harry J.; Dolan, Aisling M.; Rowley, David; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Otto-Bliesner, Bette; Chandler, Mark A.; Hunter, Stephen J.; Lunt, Daniel J.; Pound, Matthew; Salzmann, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP) is a co-ordinated international climate modelling initiative to study and understand climate and environments of the Late Pliocene, as well as their potential relevance in the context of future climate change. PlioMIP examines the consistency of model predictions in simulating Pliocene climate and their ability to reproduce climate signals preserved by geological climate archives. Here we provide a description of the aim and objectives of the next phase of the model intercomparison project (PlioMIP Phase 2), and we present the experimental design and boundary conditions that will be utilized for climate model experiments in Phase 2. 

  10. Confirmation of positive antibody screens by solid-phase red cell adherence assay using a tube technique method with polyethylene glycol enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, R R; Lake, M; Velasquez, N; Prichard, A

    2001-01-01

    Our blood bank routinely screens donors for antibodies using a solid-phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) assay. Positive results are then confirmed using a tube technique with polyethylene glycol (PEG) enhancement due to reported higher specificity than with SPRCA. Over a 5-month period, 49,084 donor serum or plasma samples were tested using the SPRCA assay. Further identification of positive samples was performed using a PEG enhancement method. Testing was performed with strict adherence to the manufacturers' inserts. Of 49,084 samples, 313 (0.64%) were positive by the SPRCA assay. Of these, 99 (31.6%) samples remained positive when tested with PEG enhancement. The remaining 214 (68.4%) were negative, giving specificity for the SPRCA assay of 99.6 percent (48,985/ 49,199). We report a high specificity for antibody screening using the SPRCA assay. However, it is cost effective to perform a confirmatory tube test with PEG enhancement because 214 SPRCA assay samples were interpreted as having a negative antibody screen, thus allowing the release of valuable blood components for transfusion.

  11. Project PARAS: Phased array radio astronomy from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, Kenneth; Hoffmann, Christopher; Dungan, Michael; Madden, Michael; Bendakhlia, Monia

    1992-01-01

    An orbiting radio telescope is proposed which, when operated in a very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) scheme, would allow higher than currently available angular resolution and dynamic range in the maps and the ability to observe rapidly changing astronomical sources. Using passive phased array technology, the proposed design consists of 656 hexagonal modules forming a 150-m diameter antenna dish. Each observatory module is largely autonomous, having its own photovoltaic power supply and low-noise receiver and processor for phase shifting. The signals received by the modules are channeled via fiber optics to the central control computer in the central bus module. After processing and multiplexing, the data are transmitted to telemetry stations on the ground. The truss frame supporting each observatory panel is a novel hybrid structure consisting of a bottom graphite/epoxy tubular triangle and rigidized inflatable Kevlar tubes connecting the top observatory panel and the bottom triangle. Attitude control and station keeping functions will be performed by a system of momentum wheels in the bus and four propulsion modules located at the compass points on the periphery of the observatory dish. Each propulsion module has four monopropellant thrusters and four hydrazine arcjets, the latter supported by either a photovoltaic array or a radioisotope thermoelectric generator. The total mass of the spacecraft is about 20,500 kg.

  12. Local random phase approximation with projected oscillator orbitals

    CERN Document Server

    Mussard, Bastien

    2015-01-01

    An approximation to the many-body London dispersion energy in molecular systems is expressed as a functional of the occupied orbitals only. The method is based on the local-RPA theory. The occupied orbitals are localized molecular orbitals and the virtual space is described by projected oscillator orbitals, i.e. functions obtained by multiplying occupied localized orbitals with solid spherical harmonic polynomials having their origin at the orbital centroids. Since we are interested in the long-range part of the correlation energy, responsible for dispersion forces, the electron repulsion is approximated by its multipolar expansion. This procedure leads to a fully non-empirical long-range correlation energy expression. Molecular dispersion coefficients calculated from determinant wave functions obtained by a range-separated hybrid method reproduce experimental values with less than 15% error.

  13. Cyprus natural analogue project (CNAP). Phase II Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the extremely slow kinetics of bentonite reaction in low alkali cement leachates, natural analogues would appear to be the only viable method of studying bentonite reaction. As a result of a review of the available literature, several sites in Cyprus were selected as particularly promising for this purpose. This report presents the results of two short field campaigns in Cyprus in November/December, 2008 and February, 2009. The main aim of these campaigns was to establish if appropriate sites existed for a natural analogue study of bentonite-low alkali cement leachate reaction. Focus is on mineralogical changes and not changes in physical properties (such as porosity and permeability) of bentonite as the industrially-processed bentonite used in a repository will be completely different in terms of its engineering and hydrogeological properties to the unprocessed natural bentonite or analogue smectite-rich materials. The first campaign was in the form of a reconnaissance study to identify sites of likely interest and the second, follow-up, campaign focussed on obtaining preliminary groundwater and solid phase (bentonites/clay-rich sediments/altered igneous rocks/soils) samples which would allow a more detailed assessment of several of the potential sites. A large amount of information was collected during these short field campaigns and subsequent laboratory analysis of the collected samples so, to keep the main report down to a digestible size, much of the supporting information has been collated in seven appendices. These include full details of all 30 sites visited during both campaigns along with sample details, information on the analytical techniques, the analytical raw data and numerous photographs of the sites. The intention is that this report will provide full supporting information for a potential Phase III and a detailed database for our colleagues at the Geological Survey Department (GSD) in Cyprus. Consequently, all the information acquired

  14. Small and medium power reactors: project initiation study, Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In conformity with the Agency's promotional role in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, IAEA has provided, over the past 20 years, assistance to Member States, particularly developing countries, in planning for the introduction of nuclear power plants in the Small and Medium range (SMPR). However these efforts did not produce any significant results in the market introduction of these reactors, due to various factors. In 1983 the Agency launched a new SMPR Project Initiation Study with the objective of surveying the available designs, examining the major factors influencing the decision-making processes in Developing Countries and thereby arriving at an estimate of the potential market. Two questionnaires were used to obtain information from possible suppliers and prospective buyers. The Nuclear Energy Agency of OECD assisted in making a study of the potential market in industrialized countries. The information gained during the study and discussed during a Technical Committee Meeting on SMPRs held in Vienna in March 1985, along with the contribution by OECD-NEA is embodied in the present report

  15. National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). Project definition study: Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagunas-Solar, M.C.

    1995-02-15

    This report describes a five-year plan for the construction and commissioning of a reliable and versatile NBTF facility for the production of high-quality, high-yield radioisotopes for research, biomedical, and industrial applications. The report is organized in nine sections providing, in consecutive order, responses to the nine questions posed by the U.S. Department of Energy in its solicitation for the NBTF Project Definition Study. In order to preserve direct correspondence (e.g., Sec. 3 = 3rd item), this Introduction is numbered {open_quotes}0.{close_quotes} Accelerator and facility designs are covered in Section 1 (Accelerator Design) and Section 2 (Facility Design). Preliminary estimates of capital costs are detailed in Section 3 (Design and Construction Costs). Full licensing requirements, including federal, state, and local ordinances, are discussed in Section 4 (Permits). A plan for the management of hazardous materials to be generated by NBTF is presented in Section 5 (Waste Management). An evaluation of NBTF`s economic viability and its potential market impact is detailed in Section 6(Business Plan), and is complemented by the plans in Section 7 (Operating Plan) and Section 8 (Radioisotope Plan). Finally, a plan for NBTF`s research, education, and outreach programs is presented in Section 9 (Research and Education Programs).

  16. Generalized Morse wavelets for the phase evaluation of projected fringe pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocahan Yılmaz, Özlem; Coşkun, Emre; Özder, Serhat

    2014-10-01

    Generalized Morse wavelets are proposed to evaluate the phase information from projected fringe pattern with the spatial carrier frequency in the x direction. The height profile of the object is determined through the phase change distribution by using the phase of the continuous wavelet transform. The choice of an appropriate mother wavelet is an important step for the calculation of phase. As a mother wavelet, zero order generalized Morse wavelet is chosen because of the flexible spatial and frequency localization property, and it is exactly analytic. Experimental results for the Morlet and Paul wavelets are compared with the results of generalized Morse wavelets analysis.

  17. Trans-Pacific HDR Satellite Communications Experiment Phase-2 Project Plan and Experimental Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Eddie; Kadowaki, Naoto; Yoshimura, Naoko; Takahashi, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Bergman, Larry; Bhasin, Kul

    2000-01-01

    The trans-Pacific high data rate (TP-HDR) satellite communications experiment was proposed at the Japan-U.S. Cooperation in Space (JUCS) Program Workshop held in Hawaii in 1993 and remote high definition video post-production was demonstrated as the first phase trial. ATM-based 45 Mbps trans-Pacific link was established in the first phase, and the following experiments with 155 Mbps was planned as the phase 2. This paper describes the experimental network configuration and project plan of TP-HDR experiment phase 2. Additional information is provided in the original.

  18. Project construction and important technical innovation for Qinshan phase III (PHWR) nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qinshan Phase III (PHWR) Nuclear Power Plant, the first commercial heavy water reactor nuclear power plant in China, was the biggest trade project performed between the governments of China and Canada.As the owner, the Third Qinshan Nuclear Power Company (TQNPC) persisted in independent innovation management during the project construction, commissioning and self-dependent operation, efficiently realizing the three controls of the project, i. e. quality control, schedule control and investment control, and persisted in technical improvement on the basis of digestion and absorption of CANDU-6 technology to improve the unit safety and reliability. The project construction practice has helped China's nuclear power project management to becomeprogrammed, computerized,standardized and internationalized management from the existing basis.After completion of the project, with unit safe and steady operation as the prerequisite, TQNPC performed several technical modifications and innovations to continuously improve the unit performance. In the area of staff development, TQNPC paid much attention to cultivation of corporate culture, strengthed staff training and built up a good circulating mechanism with staff training and project construction promoting each other. Further to 'Zero Breakthrough' and a new step forward of locolization successfully realized in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant and Nuclear Power Qinshan Joint Venture Company, the improvement and developemnt of nuclear power project management level in Qinshan Phase III (PHWR) Nuclear Power Plant provided reference for promotion of nuclear power development in China and standardized management of introducing large imported project. (authors)

  19. Native Fish Sanctuary Project - Sanctuary Development Phase, 2007 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Gordon A.

    2007-01-01

    Notable progress was made in 2007 toward the development of native fish facilities in the Lower Colorado River Basin. More than a dozen facilities are, or soon will be, online to benefit native fish. When this study began in 2005 no self-supporting communities of either bonytail or razorback sucker existed. Razorback suckers were removed from Rock Tank in 1997 and the communities at High Levee Pond had been compromised by largemouth bass in 2004. This project reversed that trend with the establishment of the Davis Cove native fish community in 2005. Bonytail and razorback sucker successfully produced young in Davis Cove in 2006. Bonytail successfully produced young in Parker Dam Pond in 2007, representing the first successful sanctuary established solely for bonytail. This past year, Three Fingers Lake received 135 large razorback suckers, and Federal and State agencies have agreed to develop a cooperative management approach dedicating a portion of that lake toward grow-out and (or) the establishment of another sanctuary. Two ponds at River's Edge Golf Course in Needles, California, were renovated in June and soon will be stocked with bonytail. Similar activities are taking place at Mohave Community College, Cerbat Cliffs Golf Course, Cibola High Levee Pond, Office Cove, Emerald Canyon Golf Course, and Bulkhead Cove. Recruitment can be expected as fish become sexually mature at these facilities. Flood-plain facilities have the potential to support 6,000 adult razorback suckers and nearly 20,000 bonytail if native fish management is aggressively pursued. This sanctuary project has assisted agencies in developing 15 native fish communities by identifying specific resource objectives for those sites, listing and prioritizing research opportunities and needs, and strategizing on management approaches through the use of resource-management plans. Such documents have been developed for Davis Cove, Cibola High Levee Pond, Parker Dam Pond, and Three Fingers Lake. We

  20. Structures and Design Phase I Summary for the NASA Composite Cryotank Technology Demonstration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ted; Sleight, David W.; Martin, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    A description of the Phase I structures and design work of the Composite Cryotank Technology Demonstration (CCTD) Project is in this paper. The goal of the CCTD Project in the Game Changing Development (GCD) Program is to design and build a composite liquid-hydrogen cryogenic tank that can save 30% in weight and 25% in cost compared to state-of-the-art aluminum metallic cryogenic tank technology when the wetted composite skin wall is at an allowable strain of 5000 in/in. Three Industry teams developed composite cryogenic tank concepts that are compared for weight to an aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) cryogenic tank designed by NASA in Phase I of the CCTD Project. The requirements used to design all of the cryogenic tanks in Phase I will be discussed and the resulting designs, analyses, and weight of the concepts developed by NASA and Industry will be reviewed and compared.

  1. Interfacial Chemistry and the Design of Solid-Phase Nucleic Acid Hybridization Assays Using Immobilized Quantum Dots as Donors in Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrich J. Krull; W. Russ Algar

    2011-01-01

    The use of quantum dots (QDs) as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) offer several advantages for the development of multiplexed solid-phase QD-FRET nucleic acid hybridization assays. Designs for multiplexing have been demonstrated, but important challenges remain in the optimization of these systems. In this work, we identify several strategies based on the design of interfacial chemistry for improving sensitivity, obtaining lower limits of detection (LOD) and enabling th...

  2. RF Phase Reference Distribution System for the TESLA Technology Based Projects

    CERN Document Server

    Czuba, K; Romaniuk, R S

    2013-01-01

    Since many decades physicists have been building particle accelerators and usually new projects became more advanced, more complicated and larger than predecessors. The importance and complexity of the phase reference distribution systems used in these accelerators have grown significantly during recent years. Amongst the most advanced of currently developed accelerators are projects based on the TESLA technology. These projects require synchronization of many RF devices with accuracy reaching femtosecond levels over kilometre distances. Design of a phase reference distribution system fulfilling such requirements is a challenging scientific task. There are many interdisciplinary problems which must be solved during the system design. Many, usually negligible issues, may became very important in such system. Furthermore, the design of a distribution system on a scale required for the TESLA technology based projects is a new challenge and there is almost no literature sufficiently covering this subject. This th...

  3. Functional design criteria for Project W-252, Phase II Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides the functional design criteria required for the Phase 2 Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal Project, Project W-252. Project W-252 shall provide new facilities and existing facility modifications required to implement Best Available Technology/All Known, Available, and Reasonable Methods of Prevention, Control, and Treatment (BAT/AKART) for the 200 East Phase II Liquid Effluent Streams. The project will also provide a 200 East Area Phase II Effluent Collection System (PTECS) for connection to a disposal system for relevant effluent streams to which BAT/AKART has been applied. Liquid wastestreams generated in the 200 East Area are currently discharged to the soil column. Included in these wastestreams are cooling water, steam condensate, raw water, and sanitary wastewaters. It is the policy of the DOE that the use of soil columns to treat and retain radionuclides and nonradioactive contaminants be discontinued at the earliest practical time in favor of wastewater treatment and waste minimization. In 1989, the DOE entered into an interagency agreement with Ecology and EPA. This agreement is referred to as the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). Project W-252 is one of the projects required to achieve the milestones set forth in the Tri-Party Agreement. One of the milestones requires BAT/AKART implementation for Phase II streams by October 1997. This Functional Design Criteria (FDC) document provides the technical baseline required to initiate Project W-252 to meet the Tri-Party Agreement milestone for the application of BAT/AKART to the Phase II effluents

  4. Managing Software Project Risks (Analysis Phase) with Proposed Fuzzy Regression Analysis Modelling Techniques with Fuzzy Concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Elzamly, Abdelrafe; Hussin, Burairah

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose new mining techniques by which we can study the impact of different risk management techniques and different software risk factors on software analysis development projects. The new mining technique uses the fuzzy multiple regression analysis techniques with fuzzy concepts to manage the software risks in a software project and mitigating risk with software process improvement. Top ten software risk factors in analysis phase and thirty risk management techni...

  5. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert Calderon

    2002-10-29

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy.

  6. Maqarin natural analogue project: Phase IV. Reconnaissance mission report (April 28 to May 7, 1999)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smellie, J.A.T. [ed.] [Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2000-08-01

    Final planning of the Technical Proposal for Phase IV of the Maqarin Natural Analogue Project was preceded by a ten day Reconnaissance Mission to the Jordan sites. The main objective of this mission was to: i) allow new organisations within the project to become familiar with the geological context of the Maqarin and Central Jordan sites and also to appreciate the prevailing technical and logistical limitations, ii) carry out limited field investigations, and iii) based on the experience from these two points, provide the opportunity to finalise the Maqarin Phase IV Technical Proposal. This report details the results of the mission.

  7. Reverse projection retrieval in edge illumination x-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Charlotte K.; Endrizzi, Marco; Diemoz, Paul C.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    Edge illumination (EI) x-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) can provide three-dimensional distributions of the real and imaginary parts of the complex refractive index (n=1-δ +\\text{i}β ) of the sample. Phase retrieval, i.e. the separation of attenuation and refraction data from projections that contain a combination of both, is a key step in the image reconstruction process. In EI-based x-ray phase contrast CT, this is conventionally performed on the basis of two projections acquired in opposite illumination configurations (i.e. with different positions of the pre-sample mask) at each CT angle. Displacing the pre-sample mask at each projection makes the scan susceptible to motor-induced misalignment and prevents a continuous sample rotation. We present an alternative method for the retrieval of attenuation and refraction data that does not require repositioning the pre-sample mask. The method is based on the reverse projection relation published by Zhu et al (2010 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 107 13576-81) for grating interferometry-based x-ray phase contrast CT. We use this relation to derive a simplified acquisition strategy that allows acquiring data with a continuous sample rotation, which can reduce scan time when combined with a fast read-out detector. Besides discussing the theory and the necessary alignment of the experimental setup, we present tomograms obtained with reverse projection retrieval and demonstrate their agreement with those obtained with the conventional EI retrieval.

  8. Reverse projection retrieval in edge illumination x-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Charlotte K.; Endrizzi, Marco; Diemoz, Paul C.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    Edge illumination (EI) x-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) can provide three-dimensional distributions of the real and imaginary parts of the complex refractive index (n=1-δ +\\text{i}β ) of the sample. Phase retrieval, i.e. the separation of attenuation and refraction data from projections that contain a combination of both, is a key step in the image reconstruction process. In EI-based x-ray phase contrast CT, this is conventionally performed on the basis of two projections acquired in opposite illumination configurations (i.e. with different positions of the pre-sample mask) at each CT angle. Displacing the pre-sample mask at each projection makes the scan susceptible to motor-induced misalignment and prevents a continuous sample rotation. We present an alternative method for the retrieval of attenuation and refraction data that does not require repositioning the pre-sample mask. The method is based on the reverse projection relation published by Zhu et al (2010 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 107 13576–81) for grating interferometry-based x-ray phase contrast CT. We use this relation to derive a simplified acquisition strategy that allows acquiring data with a continuous sample rotation, which can reduce scan time when combined with a fast read-out detector. Besides discussing the theory and the necessary alignment of the experimental setup, we present tomograms obtained with reverse projection retrieval and demonstrate their agreement with those obtained with the conventional EI retrieval.

  9. Phase II Final Project Report SBIR Project: "A High Efficiency PV to Hydrogen Energy System"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slade, A; Turner, J; Stone, K; McConnell, R

    2008-09-02

    The innovative research conducted for this project contributed greatly to the understanding of generating low-cost hydrogen from solar energy. The project’s research identified two highly leveraging and complementary pathways. The first pathway is to dramatically increase the efficiency of converting sunlight into electricity. Improving solar electric conversion efficiency directly increases hydrogen production. This project produced a world record efficiency for silicon solar cells and contributed to another world record efficiency for a solar concentrator module using multijunction solar cells. The project’s literature review identified a second pathway in which wasted heat from the solar concentration process augments the electrolysis process generating hydrogen. One way to do this is to use a “heat mirror” that reflects the heat-producing infrared and transmits the visible spectrum to the solar cells; this also increases solar cell conversion efficiency. An economic analysis of this concept confirms that, if long-term concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) and solid-oxide electrolyzer cost goals can be achieved, hydrogen will be produced from solar energy cheaper than the cost of gasoline. The potential public benefits from this project are significant. The project has identified a potential energy source for the nation’s future electricity and transportation needs that is entirely “home grown” and carbon free. As CPV enter the nation’s utility markets, the opportunity for this approach to be successful is greatly increased. Amonix strongly recommends further exploration of this project’s findings.

  10. Application of isotopes and radiation to increasing agricultural production - Phase 2. Indonesia. Project findings and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Phase 2 Project was primarily aimed at consolidating the advances made during the previous phase, formulating practical agricultural technologies which can be adopted by farmers, disseminating and applying these technologies, and enhancing the capability of the Centre for Application of Isotopes and Radiation (CAIR) to conduct agricultural research using nuclear and related techniques. Outputs generated by this project were generally in accordance with those anticipated in the Project Document. Some outputs have been transferred to the target beneficiaries (farmers) through existing systems of extension, in co-operation with the main implementing agency (BATAN). Other outputs have potential for further assessment, and may lead to practical applications in future. The rest remain as important contributions to scientific knowledge. The project has been managed to assure sustainability after project termination. A strong indication of such sustainability is evident in the on-going research and development work at CAIR and the adoption of transferred technologies by the end-users. To keep up with rapid global advancements in bio-science and technology, a new project on application of nuclear and related techniques in agricultural bio-science and technology would be needed in relation to the second long-term phase of the national development programmes. (author)

  11. X-ray phase radiography and tomography with grating interferometry and the reverse projection technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray grating interferometry provides substantially increased contrast over conventional absorption-based imaging methods, and therefore new and complementary information. Compared with other phase-contrast imaging techniques, x-ray grating interferometry can overcome some of the problems that have impaired the applications of x-ray phase-contrast radiography and phase tomography. Recently, special attention has been paid to the development of quantitative phase retrieval methods, which is mandatory to perform x-ray phase tomography, to achieve material identification, to differentiate distinct tissues, etc. Typically, the phase-stepping approach has been utilized for phase retrieval in grating interferometry. This method requires a grating scanning and acquisition of multiple radiographic projections, and therefore is disadvantageous in terms of imaging speed and radiation damage. Here we present an innovative, highly sensitive approach, dubbed ‘reverse projection’ (RP), for quantitative phase retrieval. Compared with the phase-stepping approach, the present RP method abandons grating scanning completely, and thus is advantageous due to its much higher efficiency and the reduced radiation dose, without the degradation of reconstruction quality. This review presents a detailed explanation of the principle of the RP method. Both radiography and phase tomography experiments are performed to validate the RP method. We believe that this new technique will find widespread applications in biomedical imaging and in vivo studies. (paper)

  12. Fast reactor cycle technology development project (FaCT project). Phase 1 (Interim report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JAEA and JAPC launched Fast Reactor cycle Technology Development Project (FaCT) in 2006. 'The JAEA sodium-cooled loop-type fast reactor (JSFR) with MOX fuel, the advanced aqueous reprocessing, and the simplified pelletizing fuel fabrication systems' have been studied as a main concept in the FaCT project. JAEA targets 2015 in which the design concept that fulfills the development target and the design requirement is to be proposed. R and D system and R and D progress management have been improved and firmly established. Based on the indication of Japan Atomic Energy Commission and in cooperation with related organizations, R and Ds and design studies have been executed to evaluate innovative technologies. Direction in the adoption of the innovative technologies is to be determined in 2010. To attain this step, this report describes progress and results, and specifies issues and countermeasures upto 2008. This report also indicates future study procedure of the FaCT project. A CD-ROM is attached as an appendix. (J.P.N.)

  13. Exercise Countermeasures Demonstration Project During the Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project Phase 2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Guilliams, Mark E.; Moore, Alan D., Jr.; Williams, W. Jon; Greenisen, M. C.; Fortney, S. M.

    1998-01-01

    This demonstration project assessed the crew members' compliance to a portion of the exercise countermeasures planned for use onboard the International Space Station (ISS) and the outcomes of their performing these countermeasures. Although these countermeasures have been used separately in other projects and investigations, this was the first time they'd been used together for an extended period (60 days) in an investigation of this nature. Crew members exercised every day for six days, alternating every other day between aerobic and resistive exercise, and rested on the seventh day. On the aerobic exercise days, subjects exercised on an electronically braked cycle ergometer using a protocol that has been previously shown to maintain aerobic capacity in subjects exposed to a space flight analogue. On the resistive exercise days, crew members performed five major multijoint resistive exercises in a concentric mode, targeting those muscle groups and bones we believe are most severely affected by space flight. The subjects favorably tolerated both exercise protocols, with a 98% compliance to aerobic exercise prescription and a 91% adherence to the resistive exercise protocol. After 60 days, the crew members improved their peak aerobic capacity by an average 7%, and strength gains were noted in all subjects. These results suggest that these exercise protocols can be performed during ISS, lunar, and Mars missions, although we anticipate more frequent bouts with both protocols for long-duration spaceflight. Future projects should investigate the impact of increased exercise duration and frequency on subject compliance, and the efficacy of such exercise prescriptions.

  14. ART/Ada design project, phase 1. Task 3 report: Test plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Bradley P.

    1988-01-01

    The plan is described for the integrated testing and benchmark of Phase Ada based ESBT Design Research Project. The integration testing is divided into two phases: (1) the modules that do not rely on the Ada code generated by the Ada Generator are tested before the Ada Generator is implemented; and (2) all modules are integrated and tested with the Ada code generated by the Ada Generator. Its performance and size as well as its functionality is verified in this phase. The target platform is a DEC Ada compiler on VAX mini-computers and VAX stations running the VMS operating system.

  15. Managing Innovative Projects - Dynamics of Managerial Activities in the Front-End and Development Phases of Innovation Process

    OpenAIRE

    Rekonen, Satu

    2013-01-01

    Although there is a widespread agreement on the significant inherent disparities between different phases of innovation process, current management research largely ignores the differences of innovative project phases in the prescriptions of appropriate managerial activities. Further, not much emphasis has been put on the actual practices and actions of project managers, i.e., what is it that project managers actually do to manage innovative projects on a daily basis? This study addresses thi...

  16. A spatial algorithm to reduce phase wraps from two dimensional signals in fringe projection profilometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arevalillo-Herráez, Miguel; Gdeisat, Munther; Lilley, Francis; Burton, David R.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present a novel algorithm to reduce the number of phase wraps in two dimensional signals in fringe projection profilometry. The technique operates in the spatial domain, and achieves a significant computational saving with regard to existing methods based on frequency shifting. The method works by estimating the modes of the first differences distribution in each axial direction. These are used to generate a tilted plane, which is subtracted from the entire phase map. Finally, the result is re-wrapped to obtain a phase map with fewer wraps. The method may be able to completely eliminate the phase wraps in many cases, or can achieve a significant phase wrap reduction that helps the subsequent unwrapping of the signal. The algorithm has been exhaustively tested across a large number of real and simulated signals, showing similar results compared to approaches operating in the frequency domain, but at significantly lower running times.

  17. Improving Highway Safety Manpower: Traffic Engineering Technician Project at Lansing Community College. Final Report, Phase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of Community and Junior Colleges, Washington, DC.

    Phase I of this project was conducted to pilot test an associate degree program for the preparation of traffic safety technicians. Previously developed curriculum materials were revised by an advisory committee in accordance with the level of expertise and sophistication of the 27 students enrolled in the 2-year program and to meet the needs of…

  18. Guangxi Shanglin Aluminum Plant cross-regional technical upgrade project(phase 1)put into operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>The project(Phase 1)of cross-regional techni- cal upgrade of the aluminum plant of Guangxi Shanglin Nannan Industrial Co.was completed and put into operation on June 8,2007.The plant is a cross-regional technical upgrade pro- ject of Nanning Aluminum Plant,featuring the integration of coal,electricity and aluminum.

  19. Small business innovation research. Abstracts of completed 1987 phase 1 projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Non-proprietary summaries of Phase 1 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects supported by NASA in the 1987 program year are given. Work in the areas of aeronautical propulsion, aerodynamics, acoustics, aircraft systems, materials and structures, teleoperators and robotics, computer sciences, information systems, spacecraft systems, spacecraft power supplies, spacecraft propulsion, bioastronautics, satellite communication, and space processing are covered.

  20. Practice of the bar reinforcement jointing technique in the second phase of Qinshan Nuclear Power Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The jointing modalities, including lapping, flash welding, sleeve cold squeezed jointing, tapered thread of uniform strength and straight thread, are utilized in the second phase of Qinshan Nuclear Power Project. The application of the mechanical joint of the large-diameter bars is introduced emphatically. Meanwhile the technical and economic comparison are given for several kinds of bar joint modalities

  1. Diagnosing the success of the construction projects during the initial phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Ghazimoradi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available As construction projects are becoming more deployed and more complicated at the same time, having an instrument for anticipation of success has become a primary requirement for every stakeholder. On this basis, several models have been introduced which implement different methods for anticipation of the entire goals or a series of goals of projects. In this research, at the first step, 16 criteria as instruments of anticipation of success and 33 factors as required instruments for obtaining success were extracted through library studies, semi-structured interviews and the Delphi method. At the next step, by having 169 questionnaires filled by senior managers of construction projects, the importance and priority of each of these 16 criteria and 33 factors for the initial phases of projects were determined according to Iran’s local conditions. Ultimately, through modeling of data by a propagation neural network including 35 hidden layers, the anticipator model for success of construction projects during their initial phases was developed with Performance and Regression. This model is able to anticipate the level of realization of projects’ success criteria according to the level of realization of success factors at the initial phase.

  2. A liquid-phase-blocking concanavalin A enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of antibodies against Newcastle disease virus in serum of free-ranging pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Elisabete Schirato; Silva, Ketherson Rodrigues; Fernando, Filipe Santos; Gonçalves, Mariana Costa Mello; Fernandes, Camila Cesário; Borzi, Mariana Monezi; dos Santos, Romeu Moreira; Tamanini, Maria de Lourdes Feres; Montassier, Maria de Fátima da Silva; Montassier, Helio José

    2013-11-01

    A competitive liquid-phase-blocking concanavalin A enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (LPB-ConA-ELISA) was developed in the current study. The assay used ConA as a capture reagent, and the sera of specific pathogen-free chickens immunized with nonpurified Newcastle disease virus (NDV) suspension as detector antibodies, to detect and quantify specific antiviral antibodies in serum samples from free-ranging pigeons. The comparison between the LPB-ConA-ELISA and the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test for the detection of antibodies in serum samples from 107 pigeons showed significant correlation between the assays (r = 0.875), a high sensitivity (100%), specificity (95.8%), accuracy (96.3%) for the ELISA, and good agreement (κ = 0.83) between the 2 assays. The results of this study suggest that the LPB-ConA-ELISA could be a useful alternative to HI test in the serodiagnosis of NDV in pigeons, or other species of birds.

  3. Interfacial Chemistry and the Design of Solid-Phase Nucleic Acid Hybridization Assays Using Immobilized Quantum Dots as Donors in Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich J. Krull

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of quantum dots (QDs as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET offer several advantages for the development of multiplexed solid-phase QD-FRET nucleic acid hybridization assays. Designs for multiplexing have been demonstrated, but important challenges remain in the optimization of these systems. In this work, we identify several strategies based on the design of interfacial chemistry for improving sensitivity, obtaining lower limits of detection (LOD and enabling the regeneration and reuse of solid-phase QD-FRET hybridization assays. FRET-sensitized emission from acceptor dyes associated with hybridization events at immobilized QD donors provides the analytical signal in these assays. The minimization of active sensing area reduces background from QD donor PL and allows the resolution of smaller amounts of acceptor emission, thus lowering the LOD. The association of multiple acceptor dyes with each hybridization event can enhance FRET efficiency, thereby improving sensitivity. Many previous studies have used interfacial protein layers to generate selectivity; however, transient destabilization of these layers is shown to prevent efficient regeneration. To this end, we report a protein-free interfacial chemistry and demonstrate the specific detection of as little as 2 pmol of target, as well as an improved capacity for regeneration.

  4. JSS project phase 4: Experimental and modelling studies of HLW glass dissolution in repository environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A goal of the JSS project was to develop a scientific basis for understanding the effects of waste package components, groundwater chemistry, and other repository conditions on glass dissolution behaviour, and to develop and refine a model for the processes governing glass dissolution. The fourth phase of the project, which was performed by the Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Berlin, FRG, dealt specifically with model development and application. Phase 4 also adressed whether basaltic glasses could serve as natural analogues for nuclear waste glasses, thus providing a means to test the capability of the model for long-term predictions. Additional experiments were performed in order to complete the data base necessary to model interactions between the glass and bentonite and between glass and steel corrosion products. More data on temperature, S/V, and pH dependence of the glass/water reaction were also collected. In this report, the data acquired during phase 4 are presented and discussed. (orig./DG)

  5. OC5 Project Phase I: Validation of Hydrodynamic Loading on a Fixed Cylinder: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, A. N.; Wendt, F. F.; Jonkman, J. M.; Popko, W.; Vorpahl, F.; Stansberg, C. T.; Bachynski, E. E.; Bayati, I.; Beyer, F.; de Vaal, J. B.; Harries, R.; Yamaguchi, A.; Shin, H.; Kim, B.; van der Zee, T.; Bozonnet, P.; Aguilo, B.; Bergua, R.; Qvist, J.; Qijun, W.; Chen, X.; Guerinel, M.; Tu, Y.; Yutong, H.; Li, R.; Bouy, L.

    2015-04-23

    This paper describes work performed during the first half of Phase I of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation, with Correlation project (OC5). OC5 is a project run under the IEA Wind Research Task 30, and is focused on validating the tools used for modeling offshore wind systems. In this first phase, simulated responses from a variety of offshore wind modeling tools were modeling tools were validated against tank test data of a fixed, suspended cylinder (without a wind turbine) that was tested under regular and irregular wave conditions at MARINTEK. The results from this phase include an examination of different approaches one can use for defining and calibrating hydrodynamic coefficients for a model, and the importance of higher-order wave models in accurately modeling the hydrodynamic loads on offshore substructures.

  6. Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: The one thousand microbial genomes (KMG-I) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja; Eisen, Jonathan A; Garrity, George; Lilburn, Timothy G; Beck, Brian J; Whitman, William B; Hugenholtz, Phil; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-06-15

    The Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) project was launched by the JGI in 2007 as a pilot project with the objective of sequencing 250 bacterial and archaeal genomes. The two major goals of that project were (a) to test the hypothesis that there are many benefits to the use the phylogenetic diversity of organisms in the tree of life as a primary criterion for generating their genome sequence and (b) to develop the necessary framework, technology and organization for large-scale sequencing of microbial isolate genomes. While the GEBA pilot project has not yet been entirely completed, both of the original goals have already been successfully accomplished, leading the way for the next phase of the project. Here we propose taking the GEBA project to the next level, by generating high quality draft genomes for 1,000 bacterial and archaeal strains. This represents a combined 16-fold increase in both scale and speed as compared to the GEBA pilot project (250 isolate genomes in 4+ years). We will follow a similar approach for organism selection and sequencing prioritization as was done for the GEBA pilot project (i.e. phylogenetic novelty, availability and growth of cultures of type strains and DNA extraction capability), focusing on type strains as this ensures reproducibility of our results and provides the strongest linkage between genome sequences and other knowledge about each strain. In turn, this project will constitute a pilot phase of a larger effort that will target the genome sequences of all available type strains of the Bacteria and Archaea.

  7. Projection of phase singularities in moiré fringe onto a light field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Seigo

    2016-06-01

    A moiré pattern, which is a kind of spatial interference between two periodic patterns, is regarded as a spatial modulation of a "field." By defining the displacement field, we reveal that moiré patterns can have a topological phase singularity, similar to a disclination in liquid crystal and, more generally, a vector field treated in the singular optics. We propose that topological singularities in the moiré displacement field can be projected by passing an electromagnetic field through a metasurface. We designed a metasurface constructed from two layers of a metal disk array operating in the terahertz band; then we numerically estimated the spatial distribution of its transmission properties. The phase singularities in the electromagnetic fields coincided with the singularities appearing in the moiré pattern. We found two kinds of singularities, and the phase of the electromagnetic field changed by 2π or 4π around them. These phase changes were independent of the light frequency, implying that the topological properties of the moiré fields were projected onto the electromagnetic field. This feature of moiré metasurfaces can potentially be exploited in spiral phase plate arrays with no frequency dispersion of the phase change.

  8. Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory project. Synthesis of phase I investigation 2001-2005. Volume 'geoscientific research'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory (URL) Project is being pursued by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) to enhance the reliability of relevant disposal technologies through investigations of the deep geological environment within the host sedimentary formations at Horonobe in Hokkaido, northern Japan. The project consists of two major research areas, 'Geoscientific Research' and 'R and D on Geological Disposal', and proceeds in three overlapping phases, 'Phase I: Surface-based investigation', 'Phase II: Construction' and 'Phase III: Operation', over a period of 20 years. The present report summarises the results of the Phase I geoscientific research carried out from March 2001 to March 2005. Integration of the results from different disciplines ensures that the Phase I goals have been successfully achieved and identifies key issues that need to be addressed in Phases II and III. More importantly, efforts are made to summarise as many lessons learnt from the Phase I investigations and other technical achievements as possible to form a 'knowledge base' that will reinforce the technical basis for both implementation and the formulation of safety regulations. Based on experiences of selecting the URL area and site in Horonobe Town, important factors that should be taken into consideration in such selection processes and their rationale are demonstrated. In the course of stepwise surface-based investigations, a number of achievements have been made, which can eventually provide examples of integrated methodologies for characterising the sedimentary formations. The relevant surface-based investigation techniques have thus been further developed. The Horonobe URL has been designed based on geoscientific information accumulated during the surface-based investigations and the plans for safe construction and operation of the URL have been defined in a feasible manner. In addition, a variety of environmental measures taken during Phase I have proved to be

  9. The use of microsomal in vitro assay to study phase I biotransformation of chlorobornanes (Toxaphene) in marine mammals and birds. Possible consequences of biotransformation for bioaccumulation and genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, J P; Sleiderink, H M; Helle, M S; Dekker, M; van Schanke, A; Roex, E; Hillebrand, M T; Klamer, H J; Govers, B; Pastor, D; Morse, D; Wester, P G; de Boer, J

    1998-11-01

    The factors determining the bioaccumulation of lipophilic compounds in wildlife are often poorly understood, partly because it is difficult to do in vivo experiments with animals such as marine mammals and birds. To evaluate the role of phase I biotransformation in the bioaccumulation process of chlorobornanes (toxaphene), this was studied in in vitro assays with hepatic microsomes of animals that could be sampled shortly after death. The capacity of microsomes to metabolise a technical toxaphene mixture decreased in the order Phoca vitulina (harbour seal) > Lagenorhynchus albirostris (whitebeaked dolphin) approximately equal to Diomedea immutabilis (Laysan albatross) > Physeter macrocephalus (sperm whale). Harbour seal microsomes metabolised the chlorobornane (CHB) congeners CHB-32 and CHB-62; whitebeaked dolphin and Laysan albatross microsomes only metabolised CHB-32. Metabolism of CHB-26 and CHB-50 was never observed. The negative chemical ionisation (NCI-) mass spectra of some of the hydroxylated metabolites were obtained. The number of peaks in the toxaphene residues of wildlife extracts decreased in the order of increasing in-vitro biotransformation capacity. Thus, the results of the in vitro assays and residue analysis were in accordance, although assays with microsomes of more individuals of the same species are required for a more general conclusion at the species level. Finally, the effect of in vitro biotransformation was evaluated in terms of the genotoxic potential using the Mutatox assay. Only technical toxaphene and CHB-32 were genotoxic in the direct assay, whereas the addition of rat S9 fraction or microsomes of harbour seal and albatross decreased the genotoxic response. Thus, organisms with a low ability to metabolise chlorobornanes, such as whales, may be most affected by the carcinogenic properties of toxaphene. A hypothetical reaction which fits the experimental results is discussed. Based on these results it is concluded that in vitro assays

  10. Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) phase 1. Volume 3: Project cost estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The laser atmospheric wind sounder (LAWS) cost modeling activities were initiated in phase 1 to establish the ground rules and cost model that would apply to both phase 1 and phase 2 cost analyses. The primary emphasis in phase 1 was development of a cost model for a LAWS instrument for the Japanese Polar Orbiting Platform (JPOP). However, the Space Station application was also addressed in this model, and elements were included, where necessary, to account for Space Station unique items. The cost model presented in the following sections defines the framework for all LAWS cost modeling. The model is consistent with currently available detail, and can be extended to account for greater detail as the project definition progresses.

  11. Aspects pertinent to the usefulness of a solid phase radio-immuno-sorbent assay for the detection of spermatozoa antibodies in sera of infertility patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solid phase Radio-Immuno-Sorbent Assay (RISA) is a highly sensitive and valid test to detect 125-iodinetagged antibodies to spermatozoa that allows qualitative and quantitative evaluations of sperm-incapacitating immunglobulin Ig G in sera from patients believed to be infertile for immunological reasons. The study failed to reveal any correlations between the results of RISA and those of micro-sperm-agglutination or micro-sperm-immobilisation tests. There was a major body of evidence pointing to possible links between female isoimmunity and male autoimmunity. (TRV)

  12. The Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP) Phase 2: Scientific Objectives and Experimental Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Alan M.; Dowsett, Harry J.; Dolan, Aisling M.; Rowley, David; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Otto-Bliesner, Bette; Chandler, Mark A.; Hunter, Stephen J.; Lunt, Daniel J.; Pound, Matthew; Salzmann, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP) is a co-ordinated international climate modelling initiative to study and understand climate and environments of the Late Pliocene, as well as their potential relevance in the context of future climate change. PlioMIP examines the consistency of model predictions in simulating Pliocene climate and their ability to reproduce climate signals preserved by geological climate archives. Here we provide a description of the aim and objectives of the next phase of the model intercomparison project (PlioMIP Phase 2), and we present the experimental design and boundary conditions that will be utilized for climate model experiments in Phase 2. Following on from PlioMIP Phase 1, Phase 2 will continue to be a mechanism for sampling structural uncertainty within climate models. However, Phase 1 demonstrated the requirement to better understand boundary condition uncertainties as well as uncertainty in the methodologies used for data-model comparison. Therefore, our strategy for Phase 2 is to utilize state-of-the-art boundary conditions that have emerged over the last 5 years. These include a new palaeogeographic reconstruction, detailing ocean bathymetry and land-ice surface topography. The ice surface topography is built upon the lessons learned from offline ice sheet modelling studies. Land surface cover has been enhanced by recent additions of Pliocene soils and lakes. Atmospheric reconstructions of palaeo-CO2 are emerging on orbital timescales, and these are also incorporated into PlioMIP Phase 2. New records of surface and sea surface temperature change are being produced that will be more temporally consistent with the boundary conditions and forcings used within models. Finally we have designed a suite of prioritized experiments that tackle issues surrounding the basic understanding of the Pliocene and its relevance in the context of future climate change in a discrete way.

  13. Project Management Phases of a SCADA System for Automation of Electrical Distribution Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Najeh Lakhoua

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is, firstly, to recall the basic concepts of SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition systems, to present the project management phases of SCADA for real time implementation, and then to show the need of the automation for Electricity Distribution Companies (EDC on their distribution networks and the importance of using computer based system towards sustainable development of their services. A proposed computer based power distribution automation system is then discussed. Finally, some projects of SCADA system implementation in electrical companies over the world are briefly presented.

  14. The optical modules of the phase-2 of the NEMO project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 13-inch Optical Module (OM) containing a large-area (10-inch) photomultiplier was designed as part of Phase-2 of the NEMO project. An intense R and D activity on the photomultipliers, the voltage supply boards, the optical coupling as well as the study of the influences of the Earth's magnetic field has driven the choice of each single component of the OM. Following a well-established production procedure, 32 OMs were assembled and their functionality tested. The design, the testing and the production phases are thoroughly described in this paper

  15. Operations planning and analysis handbook for NASA/MSFC phase B development projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batson, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    Current operations planning and analysis practices on NASA/MSFC Phase B projects were investigated with the objectives of (1) formalizing these practices into a handbook and (2) suggesting improvements. The study focused on how Science and Engineering (S&E) Operational Personnel support Program Development (PD) Task Teams. The intimate relationship between systems engineering and operations analysis was examined. Methods identified for use by operations analysts during Phase B include functional analysis, interface analysis methods to calculate/allocate such criteria as reliability, Maintainability, and operations and support cost.

  16. The optical modules of the phase-2 of the NEMO project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, S.; Leonora, E.; Ameli, F.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anzalone, A.; Barbarino, G.; Barbarito, E.; Barbato, F.; Bersani, A.; Beverini, N.; Biagi, S.; Bonori, M.; Bouhadef, B.; Bozza, C.; Cacopardo, G.; Capone, A.; Caruso, F.; Ceres, A.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Cocimano, R.; Coniglione, R.; Cordelli, M.; Costa, M.; D'Amico, A.; De Asmundis, R.; De Bonis, G.; De Rosa, G.; De Vita, R.; Distefano, C.; Fermani, P.; Flaminio, V.; Fusco, L. A.; Garufi, F.; Giordano, V.; Giovanetti, G.; Grella, G.; Grimaldi, A.; Habel, R.; Imbesi, M.; Kulikovsky, V.; Lattuada, D.; Leotta, G.; Lonardo, A.; Longhitano, F.; Lo Presti, D.; Maccioni, E.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martini, A.; Masullo, R.; Maugeri, F.; Migliozzi, P.; Migneco, E.; Minutoli, S.; Miraglia, A.; Mollo, C.; Mongelli, M.; Morganti, M.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Nicolau, C. A.; Orlando, A.; Papaleo, R.; Pappalardo, V.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Pugliatti, C.; Pulvirenti, S.; Raffaelli, F.; Raia, G.; Randazzo, N.; Riccobene, G.; Rovelli, A.; Russo, A.; Russo, G. V.; Sapienza, P.; Sciliberto, D.; Sedita, M.; Sgura, I.; Shirokov, E.; Simeone, F.; Sipala, V.; Sollima, C.; Spina, M.; Spurio, M.; Stefani, F.; Taiuti, M.; Terreni, G.; Trasatti, L.; Trovato, A.; Vicini, P.; Viola, S.; Vivolo, D.

    2013-07-01

    A 13-inch Optical Module (OM) containing a large-area (10-inch) photomultiplier was designed as part of Phase-2 of the NEMO project. An intense R&D activity on the photomultipliers, the voltage supply boards, the optical coupling as well as the study of the influences of the Earth's magnetic field has driven the choice of each single component of the OM. Following a well-established production procedure, 32 OMs were assembled and their functionality tested. The design, the testing and the production phases are thoroughly described in this paper.

  17. Thickness Measurements from Single X-ray Phase-contrast Speckle Projection

    OpenAIRE

    Xi, Yan; Tang, Rongbiao; Ma, Jingchen; Zhao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We propose a one-shot thickness measurement method for sponge-like structures using a propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging (P-PCI) method. In P-PCI, the air-material interface refracts the incident X-ray. Refracted many times along their paths by such a structure, incident X-rays propagate randomly within a small divergent angle range, resulting in a speckle pattern in the captured image. We found structure thickness and contrast of a phase-contrast projection are directly related i...

  18. Planning and reporting of Russian transmutation research projects within ISTC. Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conde, H. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Neutron Research; Gudowski, W. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Reactor and Neutron Physics; Liljenzin, J.O. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Chemistry; Mileikovsky, C. [Pully (Switzerland)

    1998-11-01

    The present report about phase 2 of the SKI project on Planning and Reporting of Russian Transmutation Research Projects within ISTC is an update of the information given in the SKI report no 97:15 (Feb 1997) about phase 1 of the same project. The background information is partly repeated in the present report to avoid that the reader has to go back to the report of Phase 1 for information about the basis for the project. USA, EU, Japan, Republic of Korea and Norway are at present supporting the International Scientific and Technical Center (ISTC) in Moscow. The Centre gives funds to research projects of civilian interest to former nuclear weapon laboratories to counteract the risk of nuclear weapon proliferation by the emigration of former USSR technical and scientific experts to `border countries` which are aiming towards the development of nuclear weapons. Before Sweden and Finland entered the EU, both countries gave national support to ISTC, in the case of Sweden 4 MUSD. Some of the projects which were funded by the Swedish national support to ISTC are still in progress. Nuclear technical concepts (i.e. Accelerator Transmutation of Nuclear Waste, ATW) have been proposed to incinerate and transmute long-lived radioactive nuclear waste to relax the time needed to store the waste in a geological repository. The named Russian experts are knowledgeable and well equipped of doing research in the different technical fields of relevance for the transmutation concepts. Thus, a number of ISTC projects have been initiated, and further ones have been proposed, to investigate different technical aspects of ATW with a result that a fair number of former weapon specialists have converted from military to peaceful civilian research. A similar centre STCU (The Scientific and Technical Centre of the Ukraine) has been set up in Kiev. Sweden has been active in promoting this Centre, which is supported by USA, Japan, Canada and recently also by EU. The present report describes the

  19. Toxicity assessment of diesel- and metal-contaminated soils through elutriate and solid phase assays with the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ruiz, Amaia; Dondero, Francesco; Viarengo, Aldo; Marigómez, Ionan

    2016-06-01

    A suite of organisms from different taxonomical and ecological positions is needed to assess environmentally relevant soil toxicity. A new bioassay based on Dictyostelium is presented that is aimed at integrating slime molds into such a testing framework. Toxicity tests on elutriates and the solid phase developmental cycle assay were successfully applied to a soil spiked with a mixture of Zn, Cd, and diesel fuel freshly prepared (recently contaminated) and after 2 yr of aging. The elutriates of both soils provoked toxic effects, but toxicity was markedly lower in the aged soil. In the D. discoideum developmental cycle assay, both soils affected amoeba viability and aggregation, with fewer multicellular units, smaller fruiting bodies and, overall, inhibition of fruiting body formation. This assay is quick and requires small amounts of test soil, which might facilitate its incorporation into a multispecies multiple-endpoint toxicity bioassay battery suitable for environmental risk assessment in soils. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1413-1421. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26450765

  20. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert Calderon

    2006-04-19

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets, briquettes, sinter and coke.

  1. The SNO+ Scintillator Purification Plant and Projected Sensitivity to Solar Neutrinos in the Pure Scintillator Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershing, Teal; SNO+ Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The SNO+ detector is a neutrino and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment utilizing the renovated SNO detector. In the second phase of operation, the SNO+ detector will contain 780 tons of organic liquid scintillator composed of 2 g/L 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). In this phase, SNO+ will strive to detect solar neutrinos in the sub-MeV range, including CNO production neutrinos and pp production neutrinos. To achieve the necessary detector sensitivity, a four-part scintillator purification plant has been constructed in SNOLAB for the removal of ionic and radioactive impurities. We present an overview of the SNO+ scintillator purification plant stages, including distillation, water extraction, gas stripping, and metal scavenger columns. We also give the projected SNO+ sensitivities to various solar-produced neutrinos based on the scintillator plant's projected purification efficiency.

  2. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert Calderon

    2004-04-27

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  3. Colour hologram projection with an SLM by exploiting its full phase modulation range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesacher, Alexander; Bernet, Stefan; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2014-08-25

    We demonstrate independent and simultaneous manipulation of light beams of different wavelengths by a single hologram, which is displayed on a phase-only liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM). The method uses the high dynamic phase modulation range of modern SLMs, which can shift the phase of each pixel in a range between 0 up to 10π, depending on the readout wavelength. The extended phase range offers additional degrees of freedom for hologram encoding. Knowing the phase modulation properties of the SLM (i.e. the so-called lookup table) in the entire exploited wavelength range, an exhaustive search algorithm allows to combine different independently calculated 2π-holograms into a multi-level hologram with a phase range extending over several multiples of 2π. The combined multi-level hologram then reconstructs the original diffractive patterns with only small phase errors at preselected wavelengths, thus projecting the desired image fields almost without any crosstalk. We demonstrate this feature by displaying a static hologram at an SLM which is read out with an incoherent red-green-blue (RGB) beam, projecting a color image at a camera chip. This is done for both, a Fourier setup which needs a lens for image focusing, and in a "lensless" Fresnel setup, which also avoids the appearance of a focused zero-order spot in the image center. The experimentally obtained efficiency of a two-colour combination is on the order of 83% for each wavelength, with a crosstalk level between the two colour channels below 2%, whereas a three-colour combination still reaches an efficiency of about 60% and a crosstalk level below 5%.

  4. 75 FR 5279 - Sucker Creek Channel and Floodplain Restoration Project (Phase II), Rogue River-Siskiyou National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-02

    ... project reach (Sucker Creek) has changed over time due to the effects of hydraulic and placer mining...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Sucker Creek Channel and Floodplain Restoration Project (Phase II..., reduce stream temperature, and reduce excessive fine sediment inputs from the project reach....

  5. The OECD validation program of the H295R steroidogenesis assay: Phase 3. Final inter-laboratory validation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecker, Markus; Hollert, Henner; Cooper, Ralph;

    2011-01-01

    for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) test guideline.A previously optimized and pre-validated protocol was used to assess the potential of 28 chemicals of diverse structures and properties to validate the H295R steroidogenesis assay. These chemicals are comprised of known endocrine-active chemicals...... tested affected production of T and E2, respectively, while 11 and 8 did not result in significant effects on T and E2 production, respectively. Four and six chemicals produced ambiguous results for effects on T and E2 production, respectively. However, four of these cases each for T and E2 were...... associated with only one laboratory after a personnel change occurred. Significant interference of test chemicals with some of the antibody-based hormone detection systems occurred for four chemicals. Only one of these chemicals, however, significantly affected the ability of the detection system...

  6. Analysis and control of welding deformation in Qinshan nuclear power phase II extension project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper analyzes the severe deformation in the welding of core barrel in Qinshan Nuclear Power Phase II Extension Project Reactor No. 3 unit, which nearly induces the loss of the function of the core barrel. Measures such as improving the welding fixture,process and parameter, and loading the counterweight is taken for the No. 4 unit to minimize the deformation, and the result shows that the weld of the No. 4 core barrel satisfies the design requirements. (authors)

  7. Advanced conceptual design report. Phase II. Liquid effluent treatment and disposal Project W-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Advanced Conceptual Design Report (ACDR) provides a documented review and analysis of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR), WHC-SD-W252-CDR-001, June 30, 1993. The ACDR provides further design evaluation of the major design approaches and uncertainties identified in the original CDR. The ACDR will provide a firmer basis for the both the design approach and the associated planning for the performance of the Definitive Design phase of the project

  8. Advanced conceptual design report. Phase II. Liquid effluent treatment and disposal Project W-252

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-31

    This Advanced Conceptual Design Report (ACDR) provides a documented review and analysis of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR), WHC-SD-W252-CDR-001, June 30, 1993. The ACDR provides further design evaluation of the major design approaches and uncertainties identified in the original CDR. The ACDR will provide a firmer basis for the both the design approach and the associated planning for the performance of the Definitive Design phase of the project.

  9. Supply curve impacts of Quick Start projects in Phase 1 of the Resource Supply Expansion Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, G.A.; Warwick, W.M.; Durfee, D.L.

    1993-12-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) prepared this report under contract to the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville), as part of the Resource Supply Expansion Project (RSEP). RSEP is a regional program instituted by Bonneville to expand conservation and renewable generation options available to resource planners and utilities. Resource alternatives are increased by RSEP through demonstration projects designed in a collaborative process that targets specific barriers to resource development including institutional, market, and reliability barriers. RSEP was launched with several projects that were designed and implemented quickly in 1992 to lay a foundation for future collaboration. The purpose of this report is to introduce the goal and structure of RSEP and to describe the so-called ``Quick Start`` RSEP projects in Phase One of RSEP. This description includes a preliminary estimate of the energy savings and/or other expected impacts of RSEP projects funded in FY 1992 and 1993. Similar estimates are also included for Bonneville projects to confirm wind and geothermal generation potential. Bonneville`s Geothermal Confirmation Agenda preceded implementation of RSEP, although it has a similar objective and collaborative approach.

  10. Code of Conduct for wind-power projects - Phases 1 and 2; Code of Conduct fuer windkraftprojekte. Phase 1 und 2 - Systemanalyse, Lessons Learned und Bewertung bestehender Instrumente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strub, P. [Pierre Strub, freischaffender Berater, Binningen (Switzerland); Ziegler, Ch. [Inter Act, Basel (Switzerland)

    2008-08-15

    This paper discusses the results of the first two phases of a project concerning wind-power projects. The paper deals with the results of a system analysis, takes a look at lessons learned and presents an appraisal of existing instruments. A system-analysis of wind-power projects is presented with emphasis on social factors and the role of stakeholders. The success factors concerning social acceptance of wind-power projects and their special characteristics are discussed. Lessons learned are examined. Instruments for the sustainable implementation of projects are looked at, in particular with a focus on social acceptance

  11. Columbia River pathway report: phase I of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes the river-pathway portion of the first phase of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The HEDR Project is estimating radiation doses that could have been received by the public from the Department of Energy's Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the river-pathway dose reconstruction effort sought to determine whether dose estimates could be calculated for populations in the area from above the Hanford Site at Priest Rapids Dam to below the site at McNary Dam from January 1964 to December 1966. Of the potential sources of radionuclides from the river, fish consumption was the most important. Doses from drinking water were lower at Pasco than at Richland and lower at Kennewick than at Pasco. The median values of preliminary dose estimates calculated by HEDR are similar to independent, previously published estimates of average doses to Richland residents. Later phases of the HEDR Project will address dose estimates for periods other than 1964--1966 and for populations downstream of McNary Dam. 17 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Phase Retrieval with One or Two Diffraction Patterns by Alternating Projections of the Null Vector

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Pengwen; Liu, Gi-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Two versions of alternating projection (AP), the parallel alternating projection (PAP) and the serial alternating projection (SAP), are proposed to solve phase retrieval with at most two coded diffraction patterns. The proofs of geometric convergence are given with sharp bounds on the rates of convergence in terms of a spectral gap condition. To compensate for the local nature of convergence, the null vector method is proposed for initialization and proved to produce asymptotically accurate initialization for the Gaussian case. Extensive numerical experiments are performed to show that the null vector method produces more accurate initialization than the spectral vector method and that PAP/SAP converge faster to more accurate solutions than other iterative schemes for non-convex optimization such as the Wirtinger flow. Moreover, SAP converges still faster than PAP. In practice AP and the null vector method together produce globally convergent iterates to the true object.

  13. Water Use Optimization Toolset Project: Development and Demonstration Phase Draft Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasper, John R. [Argonne National Laboratory; Veselka, Thomas D. [Argonne National Laboratory; Mahalik, Matthew R. [Argonne National Laboratory; Hayse, John W. [Argonne National Laboratory; Saha, Samrat [Argonne National Laboratory; Wigmosta, Mark S. [PNNL; Voisin, Nathalie [PNNL; Rakowski, Cynthia [PNNL; Coleman, Andre [PNNL; Lowry, Thomas S. [SNL

    2014-05-19

    This report summarizes the results of the development and demonstration phase of the Water Use Optimization Toolset (WUOT) project. It identifies the objective and goals that guided the project, as well as demonstrating potential benefits that could be obtained by applying the WUOT in different geo-hydrologic systems across the United States. A major challenge facing conventional hydropower plants is to operate more efficiently while dealing with an increasingly uncertain water-constrained environment and complex electricity markets. The goal of this 3-year WUOT project, which is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is to improve water management, resulting in more energy, revenues, and grid services from available water, and to enhance environmental benefits from improved hydropower operations and planning while maintaining institutional water delivery requirements. The long-term goal is for the WUOT to be used by environmental analysts and deployed by hydropower schedulers and operators to assist in market, dispatch, and operational decisions.

  14. Sakhalin 2, phase 2 project : meeting the Arctic challenge in a sub-Arctic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakhalin Energy's objective is to commercially develop, operate and market the hydrocarbon resources and associated infrastructure governed by the Sakhalin 2 licenses for the sustainable benefit of shareholders, the Russian Federation, the Sakhalin Oblast and the wider community. This presentation discussed Sakhalin Energy's holdings including its investment company and hydrocarbon projects in eastern Russia. The Sakhalin area is a remote island that lacks infrastructure, has a low population density, with a rich onshore and offshore wildlife. It is a seismically active area, with seasonal operating windows, drifting pack ice from December to June, waves up to 18 metre maximum height, and frequent fog in spring and summer. The temperature also varies from 28 degrees Celsius to -40 degrees Celsius. The presentation also addressed the rerouting of offshore pipelines to ensure the least possible disturbance to western gray whale migration. Several photographs and illustrations of the phase 1 project were presented. Open water conditions were also illustrated. The phase 2 project was then outlined. This included illustrations of the platform, plant and export terminal, and onshore processing facility. Other photographs that were shown in the presentation included the offshore pipeline installation; a view of the shore approach to the pipeline installation; oil spill response; and escape, evacuation, and response. The design challenges and design philosophy of the project were also identified. The presentation concluded with a discussion of ice loading and platform response. figs

  15. Temporal phase unwrapping algorithms for fringe projection profilometry: A comparative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Chao; Huang, Lei; Zhang, Minliang; Chen, Qian; Asundi, Anand

    2016-10-01

    In fringe projection profilometry (FPP), temporal phase unwrapping is an essential procedure to recover an unambiguous absolute phase even in the presence of large discontinuities or spatially isolated surfaces. So far, there are typically three groups of temporal phase unwrapping algorithms proposed in the literature: multi-frequency (hierarchical) approach, multi-wavelength (heterodyne) approach, and number-theoretical approach. In this paper, the three methods are investigated and compared in detail by analytical, numerical, and experimental means. The basic principles and recent developments of the three kind of algorithms are firstly reviewed. Then, the reliability of different phase unwrapping algorithms is compared based on a rigorous stochastic noise model. Furthermore, this noise model is used to predict the optimum fringe period for each unwrapping approach, which is a key factor governing the phase measurement accuracy in FPP. Simulations and experimental results verified the correctness and validity of the proposed noise model as well as the prediction scheme. The results show that the multi-frequency temporal phase unwrapping provides the best unwrapping reliability, while the multi-wavelength approach is the most susceptible to noise-induced unwrapping errors.

  16. Final Report for Phase I Northern California CO2 Reduction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagoner, J

    2010-10-26

    On June 8, 2009, the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory released a Funding Opportunity Announcement (DE-FOA 0000015) with the title, Recovery Act: Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Industrial Sources and Innovative Concepts for Beneficial CO{sub 2} Use. C6 Resources (C6), an affiliate of Shell Oil Company, responded with a proposal for Technology Area 1: Large-scale industrial carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) projects from industrial sources. As DOE Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC) Contractors, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LBNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LLNL) proposed to collaborate with C6 and perform technical tasks, which C6 included in the C6 proposal, titled the Northern California CO{sub 2} Reduction Project. The proposal was accepted for Phase I funding and C6 received DOE Award DEFE0002042. LLNL and LBNL each received Phase I funding of $200,000, directly from DOE. The essential task of Phase I was to prepare a proposal for Phase II, which would be a five-year, detailed technical proposal, budget, and schedule for a complete carbon capture, transportation, and geologic storage project, with the objective of starting the injection of 1 million tons per year of industrial CO2 by the end of FY2015. LLNL and LBNL developed technical proposals (and DOE Field Work Proposals [FWPs]) for many aspects of the geologic testing and CO{sub 2} monitoring that were included in the C6 Phase II proposal, which C6 submitted by the deadline of April 16, 2010. This document is the Final Report for LLNL's Phase I efforts and is presented in two parts. Part 1 is the complete text of the technical proposal provided to C6 by LLNL and LBNL for inclusion in the C6 Phase II proposal. Because of space limitations, however, C6 may not have included all of this information in their proposal. In addition to developing the proposal presented below, LLNL's Bill Foxall and Laura

  17. Draft Air Pathway Report: Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-20

    This report summarizes the air pathway portion of the first phase of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, conducted by Battelle staff at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel. The HEDR Project is estimating historical radiation doses that could have been received by populations near the Department of Energy's Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the air-pathway dose reconstruction sought to determine whether dose estimates could be calculated for populations in the 10 counties nearest the Hanford Site from atmospheric releases of iodine-131 from the site from 1944--1947. Phase 1 demonstrated the following: HEDR-calculated source-term estimates of iodine-131 releases to the atmosphere were within 20% of previously published estimates; calculated vegetation concentrations of iodine-131 agree well with previously published measurements; the highest of the Phase 1 preliminary dose estimates to the thyroid are consistent with independent, previously published estimates of doses to maximally exposed individuals; and relatively crude, previously published measurements of thyroid burdens for Hanford workers are in the range of average burdens that the HEDR model estimated for similar reference individuals'' for the period 1944--1947. 4 refs., 10 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. Thickness Measurements from Single X-ray Phase-contrast Speckle Projection

    CERN Document Server

    Xi, Yan; Ma, Jingchen; Zhao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We propose a one-shot thickness measurement method for sponge-like structures using a propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging (P-PCI) method. In P-PCI, the air-material interface refracts the incident X-ray. Refracted many times along their paths by such a structure, incident X-rays propagate randomly within a small divergent angle range, resulting in a speckle pattern in the captured image. We found structure thickness and contrast of a phase-contrast projection are directly related in images. This relationship can be described by a natural logarithm equation. Thus, from the one phase-contrast view, depth information can be retrieved from its contrast. Our preliminary biological experiments indicate promise in its application to measurements requiring in vivo and ongoing assessment of lung tumor progression.

  19. Phase 1 Characterization sampling and analysis plan West Valley demonstration project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R. L. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-06-30

    The Phase 1 Characterization Sampling and Analysis Plan (CSAP) provides details about environmental data collection that will be taking place to support Phase 1 decommissioning activities described in the Phase 1 Decommissioning Plan for the West Valley Demonstration Project, Revision 2 (Phase I DP; DOE 2009). The four primary purposes of CSAP data collection are: (1) pre-design data collection, (2) remedial support, (3) post-remediation status documentation, and (4) Phase 2 decision-making support. Data collection to support these four main objectives is organized into two distinct data collection efforts. The first is data collection that will take place prior to the initiation of significant Phase 1 decommissioning activities (e.g., the Waste Management Area [WMA] 1 and WMA 2 excavations). The second is data collection that will occur during and immediately after environmental remediation in support of remediation activities. Both data collection efforts have a set of well-defined objectives that encompass the data needs of the four main CSAP data collection purposes detailed in the CSAP. The main body of the CSAP describes the overall data collection strategies that will be used to satisfy data collection objectives. The details of pre-remediation data collection are organized by WMA. The CSAP contains an appendix for each WMA that describes the details of WMA-specific pre-remediation data collection activities. The CSAP is intended to expand upon the data collection requirements identified in the Phase 1 Decommissioning Plan. The CSAP is intended to tightly integrate with the Phase 1 Final Status Survey Plan (FSSP). Data collection described by the CSAP is consistent with the FSSP where appropriate and to the extent possible.

  20. Technical Cross-Cutting Issues for the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative's Spent Fuel Nondestructive Assay Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, S. J.; Menlove, H. O.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Blanc, P.; Burr, T.; Evans, L. G.; Favalli, A.; Fensin, M. L.; Freeman, C. R.; Galloway, J.; Gerhart, J.; Rajasingam, A.; Rauch, E.; Sandoval, N. P.; Trellue, H.; Ulrich, T. J.; Conlin, J. L.; Croft, S.; Hendricks, John; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Eigenbrodt, J. M.; Koehler, W. E.; Lee, D. W.; Lee, T. H.; Lafleur, A. M.; Schear, M. A.; Humphrey, M. A.; Smith, Leon E.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Campbell, Luke W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Shaver, Mark W.; Misner, Alex C.; Amber, S. D.; Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Quiter, B.; Solodov, Alexander; Charlton, W.; Stafford, A.; Romano, C.; Cheatham, J.; Ehinger, Michael; Thompson, S. J.; Chichester, David; Sterbentz, James; Hu, Jianwei; Hunt, A.; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Richard, J. G.

    2012-03-01

    Ever since there has been spent fuel (SF), researchers have made nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of that fuel to learn about its content. In general these measurements have focused on the simplest signatures (passive photon and total neutron emission) and the analysis has often focused on diversion detection and on determining properties such as burnup (BU) and cooling time (CT). Because of shortcomings in current analysis methods, inspectorates and policy makers are interested in improving the state-of-the-art in SF NDA. For this reason the U.S. Department of Energy, through the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), targeted the determination of elemental Pu mass in SF as a technical goal. As part of this research effort, 14 nondestructive assay techniques were studied . This wide range of techniques was selected to allow flexibility for the various needs of the safeguards inspectorates and to prepare for the likely integration of one or more techniques having complementary features. In the course of researching this broad range of NDA techniques, several cross-cutting issues were. This paper will describe some common issues and insights. In particular we will describe the following: (1) the role of neutron absorbers with emphasis on how these absorbers vary in SF as a function of initial enrichment, BU and CT; (2) the need to partition the measured signal among different isotopic sources; and (3) the importance of the “first generation” concept which indicates the spatial location from which the signal originates as well as the isotopic origins.

  1. The First Phase of the Titanium Sponge Project of Chalco Having an Annual Capacity of 15,000 Tons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>The titanium sponge project of Chalco will be carried out by two phases.The annual capacity for first phase will be 15,000 tons,which will be expanded to 30,000 tons in the 2nd phase. The total investment for the 1st phase is about 2.2 billion yuan and will be put into production in 2009.

  2. Fourier analysis of RGB fringe-projection profilometry and robust phase-demodulation methods against crosstalk distortion

    CERN Document Server

    Padilla, Moises; Garnica, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we apply the frequency transfer function (FTF) formalism to analyze the red, green and blue (RGB) phase-shifting fringe-projection profilometry technique. The phase-shifted fringe patterns in RGB fringe projection are typically corrupted by crosstalk because the sensitivity curves of most projection-recording systems overlap. Crosstalk distortion needs to be compensated in order to obtain high quality measurements. We study phase-demodulation methods for null/mild, moderate, and severe levels of RGB crosstalk. For null/mild crosstalk, we can estimate the searched phase-map using Bruning's 3-step phase-shifting algorithm (PSA). For moderate crosstalk, the RGB recorded data is usually preprocessed before feeding it into Bruning's PSA; alternatively, in this paper we propose a computationally more efficient approach, which combines crosstalk compensation and phase-demodulation into a single process. For severe RGB crosstalk, we expect non-sinusoidal fringes' profiles (distorting harmonics) and sign...

  3. Detection of the acute phase of abdominal angiostrongyliasis with a parasite-specific IgG enzyme linked immunosorbent assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geiger Stefan Michael

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiostrongylus costaricensis may cause intestinal lesions of varied severity when it accidentally infects man in Central and South America. First-stage larvae have never been detected in stools. Therefore, a parasite-specific IgG ELISA was evaluated for the determination of the acute phase of infection. The specificity and the sensitivity of the immunoassay was shown to be 76.2% and 91.1%, respectively. Eight serum samples taken from patients with histopathological diagnosis, at different time points (3 to 15 months after surgical treatment, showed a sharp and early decline in antibody reactivity. The titration of anti-A. costaricensis antibodies has proved to be a useful method for the diagnosis of acute abdominal angiostrongyliasis.

  4. California Food Processing Industry Wastewater Demonstration Project: Phase I Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Glen; Atkinson, Barbara; Rhyne, Ivin

    2009-09-09

    Wastewater treatment is an energy-intensive process and electricity demand is especially high during the utilities summer peak electricity demand periods. This makes wastewater treatment facilities prime candidates for demand response programs. However, wastewater treatment is often peripheral to food processing operations and its demand response opportunities have often been overlooked. Phase I of this wastewater demonstration project monitored wastewater energy and environmental data at Bell-Carter Foods, Inc., California's largest olive processing plant. For this monitoring activity the project team used Green Energy Management System (GEMS) automated enterprise energy management (EEM) technologies. This report presents results from data collected by GEMS from September 15, 2008 through November 30, 2008, during the olive harvest season. This project established and tested a methodology for (1) gathering baseline energy and environmental data at an industrial food-processing plant and (2) using the data to analyze energy efficiency, demand response, daily peak load management, and environmental management opportunities at the plant. The Phase I goals were to demonstrate the measurement and interrelationship of electricity demand, electricity usage, and water quality metrics and to estimate the associated CO{sub 2} emissions.

  5. Phase II Water Rental Pilot Project: Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stovall, Stacey H.

    1994-08-01

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented in 1991 as part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to quantify resident fish and wildlife impacts resulting from salmon flow augmentation releases made from the upper Snake River Basin. Phase I summarized existing resource information and provided management recommendations to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat resulting from storage releases for the I improvement of an adromous fish migration. Phase II includes the following: (1) a summary of recent biological, legal, and political developments within the basin as they relate to water management issues, (2) a biological appraisal of the Snake River between American Falls Reservoir and the city of Blackfoot to examine the effects of flow fluctuation on fish and wildlife habitat, and (3) a preliminary accounting of 1993--1994 flow augmentation releases out of the upper Snake, Boise, and Payette river systems. Phase III will include the development of a model in which annual flow requests and resident fish and wildlife suitability information are interfaced with habitat time series analysis to provide an estimate of resident fish and wildlife resources.

  6. Phase-retrieved optical projection tomography for 3D imaging through scattering layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancora, Daniele; Di Battista, Diego; Giasafaki, Georgia; Psycharakis, Stylianos; Liapis, Evangelos; Zacharopoulos, Athanasios; Zacharakis, Giannis

    2016-03-01

    Recently great progress has been made in biological and biomedical imaging by combining non-invasive optical methods, novel adaptive light manipulation and computational techniques for intensity-based phase recovery and three dimensional image reconstruction. In particular and in relation to the work presented here, Optical Projection Tomography (OPT) is a well-established technique for imaging mostly transparent absorbing biological models such as C. Elegans and Danio Rerio. On the contrary, scattering layers like the cocoon surrounding the Drosophila during the pupae stage constitutes a challenge for three dimensional imaging through such a complex structure. However, recent studies enabled image reconstruction through scattering curtains up to few transport mean free paths via phase retrieval iterative algorithms allowing to uncover objects hidden behind complex layers. By combining these two techniques we explore the possibility to perform a three dimensional image reconstruction of fluorescent objects embedded between scattering layers without compromising its structural integrity. Dynamical cross correlation registration was implemented for the registration process due to translational and flipping ambiguity of the phase retrieval problem, in order to provide the correct aligned set of data to perform the back-projection reconstruction. We have thus managed to reconstruct a hidden complex object between static scattering curtains and compared with the effective reconstruction to fully understand the process before the in-vivo biological implementation.

  7. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron (hot metal) consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy. The work which is labeled as Phase II will take place at two levels; namely, the bench scale level and the process development unit (PDU) level. The bench scale work is being divided into two parts; the construction and operation of Bench Scale No.1 to make hot metal direct as one part and the construction and operation of Bench Scale No.2 to make DRI with its conversion to hot metal as the second part. The work at the PDU consists of getting the PDU which exists ready for advancing the activities from bench scale to PDU level

  8. A rapid and sensitive assay of perfluorocarboxylic acids in aqueous matrices by headspace solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, Marcello; Naccarato, Attilio; Sindona, Giovanni; Tagarelli, Antonio

    2012-08-17

    The work aims at developing a rapid and sensitive method for the quantification of perfluorocarboxylic acids in aqueous matrices. The proposed analytical approach is based on the use of solid phase microextraction in headspace mode after a fast derivatization of the carboxylate function by propylchloroformate/propanol mixture. Several fibers were evaluated and the optimization of the parameters affecting the SPME process was carried out using a central composite design. The optimum working conditions in terms of response values were achieved by performing analysis with CAR/PDMS fiber at room temperature, without addition of NaCl, with a sample volume of 6 ml and an extraction time of 10 min. Assay of PFCAs was performed by using a gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-QqQ MS) system in negative chemical ionization mode with ammonia as reagent gas. An overall evaluation of all analytical parameters shows that the proposed method provides satisfactory results. In particular, the observed accuracies, ranging from 84.4% to 116.8%, and the RSD values in the range 0.4% and 14.5% confirm the effectiveness of the developed protocol in the assay of PFCAs content in aqueous matrices. Moreover, LOD and LOQ values ranging from 0.08 to 6.6 ng l(-1) and from 0.17 to 14.3 ng l(-1), respectively, can be considered very satisfactory. None of the compounds were detected in six samples of river collected in Calabria. PMID:22762954

  9. Manufacturing of biodegradable polyurethane scaffolds based on polycaprolactone using a phase separation method: physical properties and in vitro assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asefnejad A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Azadeh Asefnejad1, Mohammad Taghi Khorasani2, Aliasghar Behnamghader3, Babak Farsadzadeh1, Shahin Bonakdar4 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran; 2Iran Polymers and Petrochemical Institute, Tehran, Iran; 3Materials and Energy Research Center, Tehran, Iran; 4National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran Background: Biodegradable polyurethanes have found widespread use in soft tissue engineering due to their suitable mechanical properties and biocompatibility. Methods: In this study, polyurethane samples were synthesized from polycaprolactone, hexamethylene diisocyanate, and a copolymer of 1,4-butanediol as a chain extender. Polyurethane scaffolds were fabricated by a combination of liquid–liquid phase separation and salt leaching techniques. The effect of the NCO:OH ratio on porosity content and pore morphology was investigated. Results: Scanning electron micrographs demonstrated that the scaffolds had a regular distribution of interconnected pores, with pore diameters of 50–300 µm, and porosities of 64%–83%. It was observed that, by increasing the NCO:OH ratio, the average pore size, compressive strength, and compressive modulus increased. L929 fibroblast and chondrocytes were cultured on the scaffolds, and all samples exhibited suitable cell attachment and growth, with a high level of biocompatibility. Conclusion: These biodegradable polyurethane scaffolds demonstrate potential for soft tissue engineering applications. Keywords: polyurethane, tissue engineering, biodegradable, fibroblast cells

  10. Two-Phased Approach to Synchronize the FERC-USACE Processes for Authorizing Non-Federal Hydropower Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-07-01

    Publication summarizing how the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and Federal Regulatory Energy Commission (FERC) have developed a two-phased, coordinated approach to regulating non-federal hydropower projects.

  11. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A full report has been released describing the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) Orientation Phase Mission to Colombia. The Mission suggests that the speculative uranium resources of the country could be within the very wide range of 20 000 tonnes of 220 000 tonnes of uranium metal. The Mission finds that the area with the highest potential is the Llanos Orientales (Interior Zone), which has the potential of hosting quartz-pebble conglomerate deposits, Proterozoic unconformity-related deposits and sandstone deposits. The Mission recommends that approximately US$80 million should be expended in a phased ten-year exploration programme. It is likely that the majority of the funds will be needed for drilling, followed by ground surveys and airborne radiometry. It is the opinion of the Mission that the considerable funds required for the proposed programme could most suitably be raised by inviting national or foreign commercial organizations to participate under a shared production agreement. (author)

  12. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report has recently been published which describes the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) mission to Turkey. The IUREP Orientation Phase mission to Turkey estimates that the Speculative Resources of that country fall within the range of 21 000 to 55 000 tonnes of uranium. This potential is expected to lie in areas of Neogene and possibly other Tertiary sediments, in particular in the areas of the Menderes Massif and Central Anatolia. The mission describes a proposed exploration programme with expenditures over a five year period of between $80 million and $110 million, with nearly half of the amount being spent on drilling. (author)

  13. Final waste forms project: Performance criteria for phase I treatability studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document defines the product performance criteria to be used in Phase I of the Final Waste Forms Project. In Phase I, treatability studies will be performed to provide open-quotes proof-of-principleclose quotes data to establish the viability of stabilization/solidification (S/S) technologies. This information is required by March 1995. In Phase II, further treatability studies, some at the pilot scale, will be performed to provide sufficient data to allow treatment alternatives identified in Phase I to be more fully developed and evaluated, as well as to reduce performance uncertainties for those methods chosen to treat a specific waste. Three main factors influence the development and selection of an optimum waste form formulation and hence affect selection of performance criteria. These factors are regulatory, process-specific, and site-specific waste form standards or requirements. Clearly, the optimum waste form formulation will require consideration of performance criteria constraints from each of the three categories. Phase I will focus only on the regulatory criteria. These criteria may be considered the minimum criteria for an acceptable waste form. In other words, a S/S technology is considered viable only if it meet applicable regulatory criteria. The criteria to be utilized in the Phase I treatability studies were primarily taken from Environmental Protection Agency regulations addressed in 40 CFR 260 through 265 and 268; and Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations addressed in 10 CFR 61. Thus the majority of the identified criteria are independent of waste form matrix composition (i.e., applicable to cement, glass, organic binders etc.)

  14. Final waste forms project: Performance criteria for phase I treatability studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilliam, T.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hutchins, D.A. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chodak, P. III [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)

    1994-06-01

    This document defines the product performance criteria to be used in Phase I of the Final Waste Forms Project. In Phase I, treatability studies will be performed to provide {open_quotes}proof-of-principle{close_quotes} data to establish the viability of stabilization/solidification (S/S) technologies. This information is required by March 1995. In Phase II, further treatability studies, some at the pilot scale, will be performed to provide sufficient data to allow treatment alternatives identified in Phase I to be more fully developed and evaluated, as well as to reduce performance uncertainties for those methods chosen to treat a specific waste. Three main factors influence the development and selection of an optimum waste form formulation and hence affect selection of performance criteria. These factors are regulatory, process-specific, and site-specific waste form standards or requirements. Clearly, the optimum waste form formulation will require consideration of performance criteria constraints from each of the three categories. Phase I will focus only on the regulatory criteria. These criteria may be considered the minimum criteria for an acceptable waste form. In other words, a S/S technology is considered viable only if it meet applicable regulatory criteria. The criteria to be utilized in the Phase I treatability studies were primarily taken from Environmental Protection Agency regulations addressed in 40 CFR 260 through 265 and 268; and Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations addressed in 10 CFR 61. Thus the majority of the identified criteria are independent of waste form matrix composition (i.e., applicable to cement, glass, organic binders etc.).

  15. Supporting innovation. International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles moves into first phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    energy needs and environmental impact. In order for nuclear energy to play a meaningful role in the global energy supply in the foreseeable future, innovative approaches will be required to address concerns about economic competitiveness, safety, waste and potential proliferation risks.' INPRO's objectives, as defined in the Terms of Reference, are: to help to ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute in fulfilling, in a sustainable manner, energy needs in the 21st century; to bring together all interested Member States, both technology holders and technology users, to consider jointly the international and national actions required to achieve desired innovations in nuclear reactors and fuel cycles that use sound and economically competitive technology, are based - to the extent possible - on systems with inherent safety features and minimise the risk of proliferation and the impact on the environment; to create a process that involves all relevant stake holders that will have an impact on, draw from, and complement the activities of existing institutions, as well as ongoing initiatives at the national and international level. INPRO is an Agencywide project, with contributions from all relevant IAEA Departments within available resources. The Project will be implemented in two phases. Phase I was initiated in early 2001 and is planned to run to 2003. In the first phase, work will proceed in five subject areas recognized as important for the future development of nuclear energy technology, and on two parallel tracks. Upon successful completion of INPRO's first phase, taking into account advice from the Steering Committee, and with the approval of participating Member States, a second phase of INPRO may be initiated. Drawing on the results from the first phase, it would be directed at: examining in the context of available technologies the feasibility of commencing an international project; and identifying technologies which might be appropriate for

  16. Texas Clean Energy Project: Topical Report, Phase 1 - February 2010-December 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattes, Karl

    2012-11-01

    Summit Texas Clean Energy, LLC (STCE) is developing the Texas Clean Energy Project (TCEP or the project) to be located near Penwell, Texas. The TCEP will include an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant with a nameplate capacity of 400 megawatts electric (MWe), combined with the production of urea fertilizer and the capture, utilization and storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) sold commercially for regional use in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the Permian Basin of west Texas. The TCEP will utilize coal gasification technology to convert Powder River Basin subbituminous coal delivered by rail from Wyoming into a synthetic gas (syngas) which will be cleaned and further treated so that at least 90 percent of the overall carbon entering the facility will be captured. The clean syngas will then be divided into two high-hydrogen (H2) concentration streams, one of which will be combusted as a fuel in a combined cycle power block for power generation and the other converted into urea fertilizer for commercial sale. The captured CO2 will be divided into two streams: one will be used in producing the urea fertilizer and the other will be compressed for transport by pipeline for offsite use in EOR and permanent underground sequestration. The TCEP was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) for cost-shared co-funded financial assistance under Round 3 of its Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). A portion of this financial assistance was budgeted and provided for initial development, permitting and design activities. STCE and the DOE executed a Cooperative Agreement dated January 29, 2010, which defined the objectives of the project for all phases. During Phase 1, STCE conducted and completed all objectives defined in the initial development, permitting and design portions of the Cooperative Agreement. This topical report summarizes all work associated with the project objectives, and additional work

  17. Hangzhou Jinjiang Group Shanxi Fusheng Aluminum Phase I 800,000 t/a Aluminum Oxide Project Started Operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>On October 19,the Shanxi Province Pinglu County Phase I 800,000t/a Aluminum Oxide Project of Shanxi Fusheng Aluminum Co.,Ltd,a subordinate of Hangzhou Jinjiang Group,started operation.This is the fourth Aluminum oxide project constructed and operated by Jinjiang Group.

  18. Fluid-phase immunoradiometric assay for the detection of qualitative abnormalities of factor VIII/von Willebrand factor in variants of von Willebrand's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antigenic reactivity of F.VIII/WF in variants of von Willebrand's disease (vWd) was studied with both fluid-phase and solid-phase immunoradiometric assays. Two different (rabbit and goat) 125I-labeled specific antibodies against purified F.VIII/WF were used in both their divalent (lgG) and their monovalent (Fab fragment) forms. Dose-response curves obtained by reacting a constant amount of antibody with serial dilutions of plasmas from normal or homozygous vWd demonstrated the specificity of the test. The accuracy was significantly higher with 125I-Fab fragments of goat anti-F.VIII/WF antiserum than intact goat lgG or rabbit lgG or Fab fragments. The significant decrease of the slope of the dose-response curves obtained with plasma from variants of vWd has been interpreted as due to the presence of abnormal F.VIII/WF molecules with decreased antigenic reactivity. A similar anomaly was found in cryosupernatant prepared from normal plasma, paralleling similarities demonstrated between variants of vWd and cryosupernatant. Results of experiments performed by reacting constant plasma dilutions from control or variants of vWd and varying concentrations of anti-F.VIII/WF Fab fragments (rabbit or goat) confirmed the decreased antigenic reactivity of variant F.VIII/WF

  19. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 SLUDGE STORAGE OPTIONS ASSESSMENT OF T PLANT VERSUS ALTERNATE STORAGE FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RUTHERFORD WW; GEUTHER WJ; STRANKMAN MR; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER DD; BLACK DM; POTTMEYER JA

    2009-04-29

    The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a two phase approach for removal and storage (Phase 1) and treatment and packaging for offsite shipment (Phase 2) of the sludge currently stored within the 105-K West Basin. This two phased strategy enables early removal of sludge from the 105-K West Basin by 2015, allowing remediation of historical unplanned releases of waste and closure of the 100-K Area. In Phase 1, the sludge currently stored in the Engineered Containers and Settler Tanks within the 105-K West Basin will be transferred into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs). The STSCs will be transported to an interim storage facility. In Phase 2, sludge will be processed (treated) to meet shipping and disposal requirements and the sludge will be packaged for final disposal at a geologic repository. The purpose of this study is to evaluate two alternatives for interim Phase 1 storage of K Basin sludge. The cost, schedule, and risks for sludge storage at a newly-constructed Alternate Storage Facility (ASF) are compared to those at T Plant, which has been used previously for sludge storage. Based on the results of the assessment, T Plant is recommended for Phase 1 interim storage of sludge. Key elements that support this recommendation are the following: (1) T Plant has a proven process for storing sludge; (2) T Plant storage can be implemented at a lower incremental cost than the ASF; and (3) T Plant storage has a more favorable schedule profile, which provides more float, than the ASF. Underpinning the recommendation of T Plant for sludge storage is the assumption that T Plant has a durable, extended mission independent of the K Basin sludge interim storage mission. If this assumption cannot be validated and the operating costs of T Plant are borne by the Sludge Treatment Project, the conclusions and recommendations of this study would change. The following decision-making strategy, which is

  20. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 SLUDGE STORAGE OPTIONS. ASSESSMENT OF T PLANT VERSUS ALTERNATE STORAGE FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a two phase approach for removal and storage (Phase 1) and treatment and packaging for offsite shipment (Phase 2) of the sludge currently stored within the 105-K West Basin. This two phased strategy enables early removal of sludge from the 105-K West Basin by 2015, allowing remediation of historical unplanned releases of waste and closure of the 100-K Area. In Phase 1, the sludge currently stored in the Engineered Containers and Settler Tanks within the 105-K West Basin will be transferred into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs). The STSCs will be transported to an interim storage facility. In Phase 2, sludge will be processed (treated) to meet shipping and disposal requirements and the sludge will be packaged for final disposal at a geologic repository. The purpose of this study is to evaluate two alternatives for interim Phase 1 storage of K Basin sludge. The cost, schedule, and risks for sludge storage at a newly-constructed Alternate Storage Facility (ASF) are compared to those at T Plant, which has been used previously for sludge storage. Based on the results of the assessment, T Plant is recommended for Phase 1 interim storage of sludge. Key elements that support this recommendation are the following: (1) T Plant has a proven process for storing sludge; (2) T Plant storage can be implemented at a lower incremental cost than the ASF; and (3) T Plant storage has a more favorable schedule profile, which provides more float, than the ASF. Underpinning the recommendation of T Plant for sludge storage is the assumption that T Plant has a durable, extended mission independent of the K Basin sludge interim storage mission. If this assumption cannot be validated and the operating costs of T Plant are borne by the Sludge Treatment Project, the conclusions and recommendations of this study would change. The following decision-making strategy, which is

  1. Materials information for science and technology (MIST): Project overview: Phases I and II and general considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grattidge, W.; Westbrook, J.; McCarthy, J.; Northrup, C. Jr.; Rumble, J. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This report documents the initial phases of the Materials Information for Science and Technology (MIST) project jointly supported by the Department of Energy and the National Bureau of Standards. The purpose of MIST is to demonstrate the power and utility of computer access to materials property data. The initial goals include: to exercise the concept of a computer network of materials databases and to build a demonstration of such a system suitable for use as the core of operational systems in the future. Phases I and II are described in detail herein. In addition, a discussion is given of the expected usage of the system. The primary MIST prototype project is running on an IBM 3084 under STS at the Stanford University's Information Technology Services (ITS). Users can access the Stanford system via ARPANET, TELENET, and TYMNET, as well as via commercial telephone lines. For fastest response time and use of the full screen PRISM interface, direct connection using a 2400 baud modem with the MNP error-correcting protocol over standard telephone lines gives the best results - though slower speed connections and a line-oriented interface are also available. This report gives detailed plans regarding the properties to be enterend and the materials to be entered into the system.

  2. Balancing between freedom and control - Leadership roles of a new product development project leader at different phases of innovation process

    OpenAIRE

    Luukkonen, Satu

    2010-01-01

    Research Objectives In the success of innovation, leadership plays an important role. Project leader is usually responsible in managing the innovation process as well as the people in the team. The innovation process consists of phases that are very different by nature and hence, leadership practices applicable for the development phase may not be applicable for the front end phase. Thus, leaders of an innovative team need to balance between different kinds of roles and functions during t...

  3. The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (GeoMIP6: simulation design and preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kravitz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a suite of new climate model experiment designs for the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP. This set of experiments, named GeoMIP6 (to be consistent with the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6, builds on the previous GeoMIP project simulations, and has been expanded to address several further important topics, including key uncertainties in extreme events, the use of geoengineering as part of a portfolio of responses to climate change, and the relatively new idea of cirrus cloud thinning to allow more longwave radiation to escape to space. We discuss experiment designs, as well as the rationale for those designs, showing preliminary results from individual models when available. We also introduce a new feature, called the GeoMIP Testbed, which provides a platform for simulations that will be performed with a few models and subsequently assessed to determine whether the proposed experiment designs will be adopted as core (Tier 1 GeoMIP experiments. This is meant to encourage various stakeholders to propose new targeted experiments that address their key open science questions, with the goal of making GeoMIP more relevant to a broader set of communities.

  4. The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (GeoMIP6): simulation design and preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, B.; Robock, A.; Tilmes, S.; Boucher, O.; English, J. M.; Irvine, P. J.; Jones, A.; Lawrence, M. G.; MacCracken, M.; Muri, H.; Moore, J. C.; Niemeier, U.; Phipps, S. J.; Sillmann, J.; Storelvmo, T.; Wang, H.; Watanabe, S.

    2015-10-01

    We present a suite of new climate model experiment designs for the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). This set of experiments, named GeoMIP6 (to be consistent with the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6), builds on the previous GeoMIP project simulations, and has been expanded to address several further important topics, including key uncertainties in extreme events, the use of geoengineering as part of a portfolio of responses to climate change, and the relatively new idea of cirrus cloud thinning to allow more longwave radiation to escape to space. We discuss experiment designs, as well as the rationale for those designs, showing preliminary results from individual models when available. We also introduce a new feature, called the GeoMIP Testbed, which provides a platform for simulations that will be performed with a few models and subsequently assessed to determine whether the proposed experiment designs will be adopted as core (Tier 1) GeoMIP experiments. This is meant to encourage various stakeholders to propose new targeted experiments that address their key open science questions, with the goal of making GeoMIP more relevant to a broader set of communities.

  5. The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (GeoMIP6). Simulation Design and Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravitz, Benjamin S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Robock, Alan [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Tilmes, S. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Boucher, Olivier [Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique, Paris (France); English, J. [NOAA Earth System Research Lab. and Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Irvine, Peter [Inst. of Advanced Sustainability Studies, Potsdam (Germany); Jones, Andrew [Met Office Hadley Centre, Exeter (United Kingdom); Lawrence, M. G. [Inst. of Advanced Sustainability Studies, Potsdam (Germany); Maccracken, Michael C. [Climate Inst., Washington, DC (United States); Muri, Helene O. [Univ. of Oslo (Norway); Moore, John [Beijing Normal Univ., Beijing (China); Niemeier, Ulrike [Max Planck Inst. for Meterology, Hamburg (Germany); Phipps, Steven [Univ. of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Sillmann, Jana [Center for International Climate and Environmental Research, Oslo (Norway); Storelvmo, Trude [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Wang, Hailong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Watanabe, Shingo [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokohama (Japan)

    2015-10-27

    We present a suite of new climate model experiment designs for the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). This set of experiments, named GeoMIP6 (to be consistent with the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6), builds on the previous GeoMIP project simulations, and has been expanded to address several further important topics, including key uncertainties in extreme events, the use of geoengineering as part of a portfolio of responses to climate change, and the relatively new idea of cirrus cloud thinning to allow more longwave radiation to escape to space. We discuss experiment designs, as well as the rationale for those designs, showing preliminary results from individual models when available. We also introduce a new feature, called the GeoMIP Testbed, which provides a platform for simulations that will be performed with a few models and subsequently assessed to determine whether the proposed experiment designs will be adopted as core (Tier 1) GeoMIP experiments. This is meant to encourage various stakeholders to propose new targeted experiments that address their key open science questions, with the goal of making GeoMIP more relevant to a broader set of communities.

  6. The Greenhouse Gas Project Of ESA's Climate Change Initiative (GHG-CCI): Phase 1 Achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwitz, M.; Reuter, M.; Schneising, O.; Boesch, H.; Aben, I.; Armante, R.; Bergamaschi, P.; Blumenstock, T.; Bovensmann, H.; Brunner, D.; Buchmann, B.; Burrows, J. P.; Butz, A.; Chevallier, F.; Crevoisier, C. D.; Detmers, R.; Deutcher, N.; Dils, B.; Frankenberg, C.; Guerlet, S.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Heymann, J.; Kaminski, T.; Laeng, A.; Lichtenberg, G.; De Maziere, M.; Noel, S.; Notholt, J.; Parker, R.; Scholze, M.; Sussmann, R.; Stiller, G. P.; Warneke, T.; Zehner, C.

    2013-12-01

    The GHG-CCI project (http://www.esa-ghg-cci.org) is one of several projects of ESA's Climate Change Initiative (CCI, http://www.esa-cci.org/), which delivers data sets of various Essential Climate Variables (ECVs). The goal of GHG-CCI is to generate global satellite-derived data sets of the two important anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHG) carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) with a quality as needed to derive information on regional CO2 and CH4 surface sources and sinks. A good understanding of GHG sources and sinks is a pre-requisite for reliable climate prediction. The GHG-CCI core ECV data products are near-surface sensitive column-averaged dry air mole fractions of CO2 and CH4, denoted XCO2 and XCH4, retrieved from SCIAMACHY/ENVISAT and TANSO- FTS/GOSAT. Other satellite instruments such as IASI and MIPAS are also used as they provide additional information about the two GHGs. Here we present an overview of Phase 1 of the GHG-CCI project (Sept.2010 - Dec.2013), focusing on scientific achievements and on the “Climate Research Data Package” (CRDP), which is the first version of the ECV GHG data base.

  7. FALSIRE phase 2: CSNI project for fracture analyses of large- scale international reference experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary of Phase II of the Project for Fracture Analysis of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (FALSIRE) is presented. FALSIRE I was initiated by the CSNI/FAG in 1988 to assess various fracture methodologies through interpretive analyses of six large-scale fracture experiments. Following the successful completion of FALSIRE I in 1992, several participating organizations indicated a desire to proceed with further evaluation of fracture analysis methods in a Phase II program. FALSIRE II included seven reference cleavage fracture experiments that focused primarily on behavior of relatively shallow cracks in the transition temperature region. Included were experiments for which cracks showed either unstable extension or two stages of extension (e.g., stable crack extension followed by unstable extension) under transient thermal and mechanical loadings. Also, crack initiation was investigated in connection with clad surfaces and with biaxial loading conditions. A comparative assessment and discussion of the analysis results are presented in the report. Generally, structural responses of the test specimens were predicted with tolerable scatter bands; these represent a marked improvement over the results achieved in the initial phase (FALSIRE I). The analyses revealed that the loss-of-constraint effects observed in specific cases require a second (or dual) fracture parameter to be introduced into the fracture model to characterize crack-tip conditions. Additional toughness data obtained from a range of specimen geometries and constraint conditions are required to validate these dual-parameter cleavage fracture methodologies. Finally, proposals for future work in the context of cooperative international analytical projects similar to FALSIRE are provided

  8. Air pathway report: Phase I of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-07-01

    Phase 1 of the air-pathway portion of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project sought to determine whether dose estimates could be calculated for populations in the 10 counties nearest the Hanford Site from atmospheric releases of iodine-131 from the site from 1944--1947. Phase 1 demonstrated the following: HEDR-calculated source-term estimates of iodine-131 releases to the atmosphere were within 20% of previously published estimates; calculated vegetation concentrations of iodine-131 agree well with previously published measurements; the highest of the Phase 1 preliminary dose estimates to the thyroid are consistent with independent, previously published estimates of doses to maximally exposed individuals; and, relatively crude, previously published measurements of thyroid burdens for Hanford workers are in the range of average burdens that the HEDR model estimated for similar reference individuals'' for the period 1944--1947. Preliminary median dose estimates summed over the year 1945--1947 for the primary pathway, air-pasture-cow-milk-thyroid, ranged from low median values of 0.006 rad for upwind adults who obtained milk from backyard cows not on pasture to high median values of 68.0 rad for downwind infants who drank milk from pasture-fed cows. Extremes of the estimated range are a low of essentially zero to upwind adults and a high of almost 3000 rem to downwind infants. 37 refs., 37 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Construction and operation of a Double Phase LAr Large Electron Multiplier Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Badertscher, A; Laffranchi, M; Marchionni, A; Natterer, G; Otiougova, P; Resnati, F; Rubbia, A

    2008-01-01

    We successfully operated a novel kind of LAr Time Projection Chamber based on a Large Electron Multiplier (LEM) readout system. The prototype, of about 3 liters active volume, is operated in liquid-vapour (double) phase pure Ar. The ionization electrons, after drifting in the LAr volume, are extracted by a set of grids into the gas phase and driven into the holes of a double stage LEM, where charge amplification occurs. Each LEM is a thick macroscopic hole multiplier of 10x10 cm$^2$ manufactured with standard PCB techniques. The electrons signal is readout via two orthogonal coordinates, one using the induced signal on the segmented upper electrode of the LEM itself and the other by collecting the electrons on a segmented anode. Custom-made preamplifiers have been especially developed for this purpose. Cosmic ray tracks have been successfully observed in pure gas at room temperature and in double phase Ar operation. We believe that this proof of principle represents an important milestone in the realization o...

  10. CHANNEL EVOLUTION AFTER THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE 1ST PHASE OF THE DEEPWATER CHANNEL PROJECT OF THE YANGTZE ESTUARY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hualin WU; Huanting SHEN; Yonghong WANG

    2006-01-01

    In order to deepen the navigation channel, the Chinese government authorized the construction of the Yangtze Estuary Deepwater Channel Project in 1997. The project is divided into three phases,increasing the navigation channel depth to 8.5, 10.0, and 12.5 m stage by stage. The evolution of the North Passage after the construction of the first phase of the deepwater channel project is analyzed,based on surveyed topographic data. Then, the paper summarizes the comprehensive effect of the first phase of the project. Regarding hydrologic data monitored during the constructing process, the effects of the training dikes and groins on the riverbed erosion of the North Passage is studied.Finally, the evolution mechanism is analyzed and summarized. The evolution mechanism found can be helpful for regulation of other braided rivers or estuaries.

  11. The Convergence of Heat, Groundwater & Fracture Permeability. Innovative Play Fairway Modelling Applied to the Tularosa Basin Phase 1 Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Carlon R. [Ruby Mountain Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Nash, Gregory D. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Energy & Geoscience Institute; Sorkhabi, Rasoul [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Energy & Geoscience Institute; Moore, Joseph [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Energy & Geoscience Institute; Simmons, Stuart [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Energy & Geoscience Institute; Brandt, Adam [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Energy & Geoscience Institute; Barker, Benjamin [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Energy & Geoscience Institute; Swanson, Brigitte [Ruby Mountain Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-10-16

    This report summarizes the activities and key findings of the project team occurring during Phase 1 (August 2014-October 2015) of the Tularosa Basin Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis Project. The Tularosa Basin Play Fairway Analysis (PFA) project tested two distinct geothermal exploration methodologies covering the entire basin within South Central New Mexico and Far West Texas. Throughout the initial phase of the project, the underexplored basin proved to be a challenging, yet ideal test bed to evaluate effectiveness of the team’s data collection techniques as well as the effectiveness of our innovative PFA. Phase 1 of the effort employed a low-cost, pragmatic approach using two methods to identify potential geothermal plays within the study area and then compared and contrasted the results of each method to rank and evaluate potential plays. Both methods appear to be very effective and highly transferable to other areas.

  12. Determination of eugenol in fish and shrimp muscle tissue by stable isotope dilution assay and solid-phase extraction coupled gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jincheng; Liu, Huan; Wang, Chaoying; Wu, Lidong; Liu, Dan

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we developed a new method for the accurate quantification of eugenol in fish samples based on stable isotope dilution assay (SIDA) and solid-phase extraction (SPE) coupled gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (SIDA-SPE-GC-MS/MS). Due to the difference of matrix effect (ME), it was difficult to determine accurately the level of eugenol residue in different fish and shrimp samples based on external standard calibration method. SIDA was applied to compensate matrix effect (ME) that eugenol-d3 was used as internal standard (IS). Freshwater fish (carp, channel catfish), marine fish (turbot), and shrimp (Penaeus vannawei) were used for the method validation. The average recoveries of eugenol were in the range of 94.7 to 109.78 % when the spiking levels were 10, 50, and 200 μg kg(-1). The inter-day and intra-day precisions were in the range of 1.15-8.19 and 0.71-8.45 %. The limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) were approximately 2.5 and 5.0 μg kg(-1). This method was applied to the real fish samples assay obtained from aquaculture markets in Beijing, China. Eugenol residue was found in two fish samples with the levels at 6.2 and 7.7 μg kg(-1), respectively. Graphical abstract Determination of eugenol in fish and shrimp muscle tissue. PMID:27531030

  13. Determination of eugenol in fish and shrimp muscle tissue by stable isotope dilution assay and solid-phase extraction coupled gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jincheng; Liu, Huan; Wang, Chaoying; Wu, Lidong; Liu, Dan

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we developed a new method for the accurate quantification of eugenol in fish samples based on stable isotope dilution assay (SIDA) and solid-phase extraction (SPE) coupled gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (SIDA-SPE-GC-MS/MS). Due to the difference of matrix effect (ME), it was difficult to determine accurately the level of eugenol residue in different fish and shrimp samples based on external standard calibration method. SIDA was applied to compensate matrix effect (ME) that eugenol-d3 was used as internal standard (IS). Freshwater fish (carp, channel catfish), marine fish (turbot), and shrimp (Penaeus vannawei) were used for the method validation. The average recoveries of eugenol were in the range of 94.7 to 109.78 % when the spiking levels were 10, 50, and 200 μg kg(-1). The inter-day and intra-day precisions were in the range of 1.15-8.19 and 0.71-8.45 %. The limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) were approximately 2.5 and 5.0 μg kg(-1). This method was applied to the real fish samples assay obtained from aquaculture markets in Beijing, China. Eugenol residue was found in two fish samples with the levels at 6.2 and 7.7 μg kg(-1), respectively. Graphical abstract Determination of eugenol in fish and shrimp muscle tissue.

  14. Design, methods and demographics from phase I of Alberta's Tomorrow Project cohort: a prospective cohort profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Paula J.; Solbak, Nathan M.; Haig, Tiffany R.; Whelan, Heather K.; Vena, Jennifer E.; Akawung, Alianu K.; Rosner, William K.; Brenner, Darren R.; Cook, Linda S.; Csizmadi, Ilona; Kopciuk, Karen A.; McGregor, S. Elizabeth; Friedenreich, Christine M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prospective cohorts have the potential to support multifactorial, health-related research, particularly if they are drawn from the general population, incorporate active and passive follow-up and permission is obtained to allow access by researchers to data repositories. This paper describes Phase I of the Alberta's Tomorrow Project cohort, a broad-based research platform designed to support investigations into factors that influence cancer and chronic disease risk. Methods: Adults aged 35-69 years living in Alberta, Canada, with no previous cancer diagnosis other than nonmelanoma skin cancer were recruited to the project by telephone-based random digit dialling. Participants were enrolled if they returned a Health and Lifestyle Questionnaire. Past year diet and physical activity questionnaires were mailed 3 months after enrolment. Consent was sought for active follow-up and linkage with administrative databases. Depending on enrolment date, participants were invited to complete up to 2 follow-up questionnaires (2004 and 2008). Results: Between 2001 and 2009, 31 072 (39% men) participants (mean age 50.2 [± 9.2] yr) were enrolled and 99% consented to linkage with administrative databases. Participants reported a wide range of educational attainment and household income. Compared with provincial surveillance data from the Canadian Community Health Survey, Alberta's Tomorrow Project participants had higher body mass index, lower prevalence of smoking and similar distribution of chronic health conditions. Follow-up questionnaires were completed by 83% and 72% of participants in 2004 and 2008, respectively. Robust quality control measures resulted in low frequencies of missing data. Interpretation: Alberta's Tomorrow Project provides a robust platform, based on a prospective cohort design, to support research into risk factors for cancer and chronic disease. PMID:27730115

  15. Phase 1 Final status survey plan for the West Valley demonstration project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R. L. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-05-31

    This plan provides the technical basis and associated protocols to support Phase 1 final status survey (FSS) data collection and interpretation as part of the West Valley Demonstration Project Phase 1 Decommissioning Plan process. This plan is consistent with the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). The Phase 1 Decommissioning Plan provides the relevant derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs) for the Phase 1 radionuclides of interest. This plan includes protocols that will be applied to the deep excavations planned for Waste Management Area (WMA) 1 and WMA 2, for surface soils outside the WMA 1 and WMA 2 excavations that do not have contamination impacts at depths greater than one meter, and for areas that are used for Phase 1 contaminated soil lay-down purposes. All excavated and lay-down areas will be classified as MARSSIM Class 1 areas. Surface soils that have not been excavated, are not expected to exceed DCGLs, and do not have contamination impacts at depths greater than one meter will be divided into either Class 1 or Class 2 areas depending on the expected potential for surface soil contamination in those areas. The plan uses gamma scans combined with biased soil samples to address DCGLemc concerns. The plan uses systematic soil sampling combined with area factors to address DCGLw and DCGLemc concerns. The Sign test will be used to statistically evaluate DCGLw compliance. If the results from the characterization sampling and analysis plan (CSAP) data collection indicate that background may be a significant issue for Sign test implementation, the Wilcoxon rank sum (WRS) test will be used instead to demonstrate DCGLw compliance. A reference area will be selected on the basis of CSAP data results if the WRS test becomes a necessity. The WMA 1 excavation footprint includes approximately 476 foundation pilings that will be trimmed and left in place. Piling-specific systematic and biased sampling will be conducted to

  16. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Uganda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A full report has been compiled describing the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) Orientation Phase Mission to Uganda. The Mission suggest that the speculative uranium resources of the country could be within the very wide range of 0 to 105 000 tonnes of uranium metal. The Mission finds that most of these speculative resources are related to Proterozoic unconformities and to Cenozoic sandstones of the Western Rift Valley. Some potential is also associated with Post-tectonic granites. The Mission recommends to rehabilitate the Geological Survey of Uganda in order to enable it to conduct and support a uranium exploration programme for unconformity related and for standstone hosted uranium deposits. Recommended exploration methods encompass geological mapping and compilation, an airborne gamma-ray spectrometer survey north of 1 deg. North latitude, stream sediment sampling, and ground scintillometric surveys in favourable areas. Follow up work should include VLF-EM surveys, emanometry and drilling. (author)

  17. Improved gas installations and services. Phase 1: Analysis project. Part report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As Danish gas companies receive a large number of complaints related to the installation and operation of gas installations it was suggested that a course for personnel should be established in order to raise the standard of services and installation requirements. The first phase of the described project was to evaluate the quality of the gas installers' services so as to determine which aspects of installation and services should be emphasized during such a course. Interviews were carried out and questionnaires (illustrated within the document) sent out to installaters etc. Recommendations include that the level of information given to customers should be raised, also in relation to maintenance, and that installation should be improved. Analyses of the degree of customers' satisfaction, of the nature of the quality of services etc. expected, subjects for further training in this area and details of the training system are dealt with

  18. Low Energy Nuclear Reaction Aircraft- 2013 ARMD Seedling Fund Phase I Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Douglas P.; McDonald, Robert; Campbell, Robbie; Chase, Adam; Daniel, Jason; Darling, Michael; Green, Clayton; MacGregor, Collin; Sudak, Peter; Sykes, Harrison; Waddington, Michael; Fredericks, William J.; Lepsch, Roger A.; Martin, John G.; Moore, Mark D.; Zawodny, Joseph M.; Felder, James L.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    This report serves as the final written documentation for the Aeronautic Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) Seedling Fund's Low Energy Nuclear Reaction (LENR) Aircraft Phase I project. The findings presented include propulsion system concepts, synergistic missions, and aircraft concepts. LENR is a form of nuclear energy that potentially has over 4,000 times the energy density of chemical energy sources. It is not expected to have any harmful emissions or radiation which makes it extremely appealing. There is a lot of interest in LENR, but there are no proven theories. This report does not explore the feasibility of LENR. Instead, it assumes that a working system is available. A design space exploration shows that LENR can enable long range and high speed missions. Six propulsion concepts, six missions, and four aircraft concepts are presented. This report also includes discussion of several issues and concerns that were uncovered during the study and potential research areas to infuse LENR aircraft into NASA's aeronautics research.

  19. Online monitoring of gas-solid two-phase flow using projected CG method in ECT image reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi wang; Chengyi Yang; Huaxiang Wang; Ziqiang Cui; Zhentao Gao

    2013-01-01

    Electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) is a promising technique for multi-phase flow measurement due to its high speed,low cost and non-intrusive sensing.Image reconstruction for ECT is an inverse problem of finding the permittivity distribution of an object by measuring the electrical capacitances between sets of electrodes placed around its periphery.The conjugate gradient (CG) method is a popular image reconstruction method for ECT,in spite of its low convergence rate.In this paper,an advanced version of the CG method,the projected CG method,is used for image reconstruction of an ECT system.The solution space is projected into the Krylov subspace and the inverse problem is solved by the CG method in a low-dimensional specific subspace.Both static and dynamic experiments were carried out for gas-solid two-phase flows.The flow regimes are identified using the reconstructed images obtained with the projected CG method.The results obtained indicate that the projected CG method improves the quality of reconstructed images and dramatically reduces computation time,as compared to the traditional sensitivity,Landweber,and CG methods.Furthermore,the projected CG method was also used to estimate the important parameters of the pneumatic conveying process,such as the volume concentration,flow velocity and mass flow rate of the solid phase.Therefore,the projected CG method is considered suitable for online gas-solid two-phase flow measurement.

  20. Fourier analysis of RGB fringe-projection profilometry and robust phase-demodulation methods against crosstalk distortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Moises; Servin, Manuel; Garnica, Guillermo

    2016-07-11

    In this paper, we apply the frequency transfer function formalism to analyze the red, green and blue (RGB) phase-shifting fringe-projection profilometry technique. The phase-shifted patterns in RGB fringe projection are typically corrupted by crosstalk because the sensitivity curves of most projection-recording systems overlap. This crosstalk distortion needs to be compensated in order to obtain high quality measurements. We study phase-demodulation methods for null/mild, moderate, and severe levels of RGB crosstalk. For null/mild crosstalk distortion, we can estimate the searched phase-map using Bruning's 3-step phase-shifting algorithm (PSA). For moderate crosstalk, the recorded data is usually preprocessed before feeding it into the PSA; alternatively, in this paper we propose a computationally more efficient approach, which combines linear crosstalk compensation with the phase-demodulation algorithm. For severe RGB crosstalk, we expect non-sinusoidal fringes' profiles (distorting harmonics) and a significant uncertainty on the linear crosstalk calibration (which produces pseudo-detuning error). Analyzing these distorting phenomena, we conclude that squeezing interferometry is the most robust demodulation method for RGB fringe-projection techniques. Finally, we support our conclusions with numerical simulations and experimental results. PMID:27410817

  1. Determination of alachlor and its sulfonic acid metabolite in water by solid-phase extraction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.; Pomes, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were combined for the trace analysis of the herbicide alachlor and its major soil metabolite, ethanesulfonic acid (ESA). The anti-alachlor antibody cross-reacted with ESA, which produced false-positive detections of alachlor in water samples by immunoassay screens. Alachlor and ESA were isolated from water by SPE on a C18 resin and eluted sequentially with ethyl acetate and methanol. Alachlor is soluble in ethyl acetate while the anionic ESA is not. Thus ESA remained adsorbed on the C18 resin and was eluted later with methanol. The combination of SPE with ELISA effectivety separated and quantified both alachlor and ESA using the same antibody for two ELISA methods. The general method may have applicability for the separation of other herbicides and their ionic metabolites. The SPE-ELISA method has a, detection limit of 0.01 ??g/L for alachlor and 0.05 ??g/L for ESA, with a precision of ?? 10%. Analyses of surface and ground water samples were confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode-array detection. Results showed widespread occurrence of ESA in surface and ground water of the midwestern United States, with concentrations ranging from 10 ??g/L.

  2. Selection of dominant radionuclides for Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, B.A.

    1991-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions from nuclear operations at Hanford since their inception in 1944. A vital step in the estimation of radiation doses is the determination of the source term,'' that is, the quantities of radionuclides that were released to the environment from the various Hanford operations. Hanford operations have at various times involved hundreds of different radionuclides, some in relatively large quantities. Those radionuclides present in the largest quantities, although significant from an operational handling point of view, may not necessarily have been those of greatest concern for offsite radiation dose. This report documents the selection of the dominant radionuclides (those that may have resulted in the largest portion of the received doses) in the source term for Phase 1 of the HEDR Project, that is, for atmospheric releases from 1944 through 1947 and for surface water releases from 1964 through 1966. 15 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  3. The MYRRHA ADS Project in Belgium Enters the Front End Engineering Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bruyn, Didier; Abderrahim, Hamid Aït; Baeten, Peter; Leysen, Paul

    The MYRRHA project started in 1998 by SCK•CEN. MYRRHA is a MTR, based on the ADS concept, for material and fuel research, for studying the feasibility of transmutation of Minor Actinides and Long-Lived Fission Products arising from radioactive waste reprocessing and finally for demonstrating at a reasonable power scale the principle of the ADS. The MYRRHA design has progressed through various framework programmes of the European Commission in the context of Partitioning and Transmutation. The design has now entered into the Front End Engineering Phase (FEED) covering the period 2012-2015. The engineering company, which will handle this phase, has been selected and the works have begun in the late 2013. In the mean time we have made some refinements in both primary systems and plant layout, including reactor building design. In this paper, we present the most recent developments of the MYRRHA design in terms of reactor building and plant layout as existing today as well as a preliminary study concerning the spent fuel building of the facility. During the oral presentation we add some preliminary results of the interaction with the FEED contractor and the most recent version of the primary systems.

  4. Recovery Efficiency Test Project Phase 2 activity report, Volume 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of Phase II operations of the Recovery Efficiency Test Project is to enhance the natural production of the well and evaluate the relative improvement as a function of the type of stimulation conducted. Another purpose is to compare the stimulated production performance of the horizontal well with vertical wells in the field. The objectives considered for Phase II operations and plans were: (1) Develop a rationale for a systematic approach to designing stimulations for the well. (2) Conduct a series of stimulations designed to optimize the fluids, injection rates, proppant volumes and general approach to stimulating a horizontal well with similar geologic conditions. (3) Develop and test a method or methods for determining the geometry of stimulation-induced fractures. (4) Conduct tests and analyze the results to determine the efficiency of stimulation operations. The technical approach pursued in developing plans to accomplish three objectives was to: (1) Review the data needs for all objectives and obtain that data first. (2) Identify the operating geologic, geomechanical, and reservoir parameters that need additional clarification or definition. (3) Investigate existing models which could be used to plan or evaluate stimulation on the well and the reservoir. (4) Plan for analysis and verification of models and approaches.

  5. Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project. Phase 2; Human Factors and Crew Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, D. W.; Hurlbert, K. M.; Kirby, G.; Lewis, J. F.; ORear, P.

    1997-01-01

    Phase 2 of the Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project was conducted in June and July of 1996 at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The primary objective of Phase 2 was to demonstrate and evaluate an integrated physicochemical air revitalization and regenerative water recovery system capable of sustaining a human crew of four for 30 days inside a closed chamber. The crew (3 males and 1 female) was continuously present inside a chamber throughout the 30-day test. The objective of this paper was to describe crew interactions and human factors for the test. Crew preparations for the test included training and familiarization of chamber systems and accommodations, and medical and psychological evaluations. During the test, crew members provided metabolic loads for the life support systems, performed maintenance on chamber systems, and evaluated human factors inside the chamber. Overall, the four crew members found the chamber to be comfortable for the 30-day test. The crew performed well together and this was attributed in part to team dynamics, skill mix (one commander, two system experts, and one logistics lead), and a complementary mix of personalities. Communication with and support by family, friends, and colleagues were identified as important contributors to the high morale of the crew during the test. Lessons learned and recommendations for future testing are presented by the crew in this paper.

  6. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report has recently been published on the findings of the mission to Morocco under the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) Orientation Phase. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission estimates that the speculative resources of Morocco range from 70 000 to 180 000 tonnes of uranium, half of which could be expected to occur in the Northern Provinces, which are relatively well explored, and the other half in the little explored Southern Provinces. In the north, speculative resources are fairly evenly distributed among the various types of deposit, in particular vein deposits (intragranitic and contact) linked with Hercynian and Precambrian blocks, the sandstone type deposits linked with Mesozoic strata and the volcanogenic deposits, especially of Precambrian age. The potential for large high-grade deposits, especially for those linked with unconformities and linear albitites, has been little investigated in Morocco and is chiefly thought to lie in the Precambrian in the Anti-Atlas and Southern Provinces. Here, the presence of acid volcanic rock reinforces the uranium potential, and there is also some potential for calcrete-related deposits. Phosphate-related uranium, to be recovered shortly, constitutes by far the largest reserves in Morocco, estimated at about 7 million tonnes of recoverable uranium. Recommendations have been made for further study of known occurrences and identification of new ones, such as unconformity and albitite-related deposits. (author)

  7. Overview of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (CMIP6) experimental design and organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyring, Veronika; Bony, Sandrine; Meehl, Gerald A.; Senior, Catherine A.; Stevens, Bjorn; Stouffer, Ronald J.; Taylor, Karl E.

    2016-05-01

    By coordinating the design and distribution of global climate model simulations of the past, current, and future climate, the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) has become one of the foundational elements of climate science. However, the need to address an ever-expanding range of scientific questions arising from more and more research communities has made it necessary to revise the organization of CMIP. After a long and wide community consultation, a new and more federated structure has been put in place. It consists of three major elements: (1) a handful of common experiments, the DECK (Diagnostic, Evaluation and Characterization of Klima) and CMIP historical simulations (1850-near present) that will maintain continuity and help document basic characteristics of models across different phases of CMIP; (2) common standards, coordination, infrastructure, and documentation that will facilitate the distribution of model outputs and the characterization of the model ensemble; and (3) an ensemble of CMIP-Endorsed Model Intercomparison Projects (MIPs) that will be specific to a particular phase of CMIP (now CMIP6) and that will build on the DECK and CMIP historical simulations to address a large range of specific questions and fill the scientific gaps of the previous CMIP phases. The DECK and CMIP historical simulations, together with the use of CMIP data standards, will be the entry cards for models participating in CMIP. Participation in CMIP6-Endorsed MIPs by individual modelling groups will be at their own discretion and will depend on their scientific interests and priorities. With the Grand Science Challenges of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) as its scientific backdrop, CMIP6 will address three broad questions: - How does the Earth system respond to forcing? - What are the origins and consequences of systematic model biases? - How can we assess future climate changes given internal climate variability, predictability, and uncertainties in

  8. W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture and Sequestration Project Phase 1 Definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armpriester, Anthony; Smith, Roger; Scheriffius, Jeff; Smyth, Rebecca; Istre, Michael

    2014-02-01

    For a secure and sustainable energy future, the United States (U.S.) must reduce its dependence on imported oil and reduce its emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other greenhouse gases (GHGs). To meet these strategic challenges, the U.S. wiU have to create fundamentally new technologies with performance levels far beyond what is now possible. Developing advanced post-combustion clean coal technologies for capturing CO{sub 2} from existing coal-fired power plants can play a major role in the country's transition to a sustainable energy future, especially when coupled with CO{sub 2}-enhanced oil recovery (CO{sub 2}-EOR). Pursuant to these goals, NRG Energy, Inc. (NRG) submitted an application and entered into a cost-shared collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Round 3 of the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) to advance low-emission coal technologies. The objective of the NRG W A Parish Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture and Sequestration Demonstration Project is to establish the technical feasibility and economic viability of post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture using flue gas from an existing pulverized coal-fired boiler integrated with geologic sequestration via an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) process. To achieve these objectives, the project will be executed in three phases. Each phase represents a distinct aspect of the project execution. The project phases are: • Phase I. Project Definition/Front-End Engineering Design (FEED) • Phase ll. Detailed Engineering, Procurement & Construction • Phase III. Demonstration and Monitoring The purpose of Phase I is to develop the project in sufficient detail to facilitate the decision-making process in progressing to the next stage of project delivery. Phase n. This report provides a complete summary of the FEED study effort, including pertinent project background information, the scope of facilities covered, decisions, challenges, and considerations made regarding configuration and

  9. Final report for the ASC gas-powder two-phase flow modeling project AD2006-09.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Gregory Herbert; Winters, William S.

    2007-01-01

    This report documents activities performed in FY2006 under the ''Gas-Powder Two-Phase Flow Modeling Project'', ASC project AD2006-09. Sandia has a need to understand phenomena related to the transport of powders in systems. This report documents a modeling strategy inspired by powder transport experiments conducted at Sandia in 2002. A baseline gas-powder two-phase flow model, developed under a companion PEM project and implemented into the Sierra code FUEGO, is presented and discussed here. This report also documents a number of computational tests that were conducted to evaluate the accuracy and robustness of the new model. Although considerable progress was made in implementing the complex two-phase flow model, this project has identified two important areas that need further attention. These include the need to compute robust compressible flow solutions for Mach numbers exceeding 0.35 and the need to improve conservation of mass for the powder phase. Recommendations for future work in the area of gas-powder two-phase flow are provided.

  10. Improved fiber-optic link for the phase reference distribution system for the TESLA technology based projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuba, Krzysztof; Felber, Matthias

    2005-09-01

    The UV Free-Electron Laser (UVFEL) [1], The X-Ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL) [2] and The International Linear Accelerator (ILC) [9] projects will require phase synchronization of various RF frequency subsystems on kilometer distances with accuracy better than 1ps. To fulfill these requirements, a phase reference distribution system concept was proposed and a prototype was developed for tests in the TESLA Test Facility 2 (TTF2). An important part of the phase reference system is the fiber-optic phase stable, long distance link described in this paper. An interferometrical scheme with feedback on phase, suppressing long term phase drifts induced by temperature changes was developed and tested in laboratory and under accelerator conditions. A motorized optical delay line was used in the system to compensate for phase errors. Described are error considerations and most important project issues like the hardware development and the real time phase controller software. The presented measurement results satisfy the design requirements. Experience gained during the experiments yielded proposals for system improvements.

  11. Profilometry of discontinuous solids by means of co-phased demodulation of projected fringes with RGB encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, J. M.; Servin, M.; Garnica, G.

    2015-05-01

    Here we describe a 2-projectors and 1-camera setup for profilometry of discontinuous solids by means of co-phased demodulation of projected fringes and red, green, and blue (RGB) multichannel operation. The dual projection configuration for this profilometer is proposed to solve efficiently specular regions and self-occluding shadows due to discontinuities, which are the main drawbacks for a 1-projector 1-camera configuration. This is because the regions where shadows and specular reflections are generated, and the fringe contrast drops to zero, are in general different for each projection direction; thus, the resulting fringe patterns will have complementary phase information. Multichannel RGB operation allows us to work simultaneously with both projectors and to record independently the complementary fringe patterns phase-modulated by the 3D profile of the object under study. In other words, color encoding/decoding reduces the acquisition time respect to one-at-a-time grayscale operation and, in principle, enables the study of dynamic phenomena. The co-phased demodulation method implemented in this work benefits from the complex (analytic) nature of the output signals estimated with most phase demodulation methods (such as the Fourier method, and temporal phaseshifting algorithms). This allowed us to straightforwardly generate a single phase-map well-defined for the entire area of interest. Finally we assessed our proposed profilometry setup by measuring a fractured spherical cap made of (uncoated) expanded polystyrene. The results were satisfactory but in the authors' opinion this must be considered a preliminary report.

  12. Platelet antibody screening by flow cytometry is more sensitive than solid phase red cell adherence assay and lymphocytotoxicity technique: a comparative study in Thai patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buakaew, Jarin; Promwong, Charuporn

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of lymphocytotoxicity test (LCT), solid phase red cell adherence assay (SPRCA) and flow cytometry in detecting platelet reactive antibodies against human leukocyte antigens (HLA) class I and human platelet antigens (HPA). Sera from 38 thrombocytopenic patients and 5 mothers of thrombocytopenic newborns were screened for platelet reactive antibodies by these three methods using screening platelets and/or lymphocytes panels derived from six subjects. The sensitivity and specificity of each method and levels of agreement were analysed. HLA antibodies were found in 18, 17 and 19 out of 43 patients' sera tested by LCT, SPRCA and flow cytometry, respectively. Four out of 43 patients' sera were reactive against HPA by flow cytometry, but were reactive to only 2 sera by SPRCA. Using flow cytometry as the reference method, the sensitivities/specificities of SPRCA and LCT in HLA antibody detection were 84.21/95.83% and 94.73/100%, respectively, with a good strength of agreement. SPRCA had 50% sensitivity and 100% specificity in HPA antibody detection compare to flow cytometry. Flow cytometry appeared to be the most sensitive technique compared with SPRCA and LCT for both HPA and HLA antibody screening. SPRCA sensitivity was too low for HPA antibody detection, but this might be because of the small number of samples. There was one serum from the mother of a baby suffering neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT), in whom SPRCA could not detect HPA antibodies, while flow cytometry came out positive. Therefore, SPRCA should not be used in NAIT investigation and flow cytometry should be employed instead.

  13. Simulation of the multiple-fracture model. Phase 1, benchmark test 2 of the DECOVALEX project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DECOVALEX is an international co-operative project for the development of coupled models and their validation against experiments in nuclear waste isolation. The emphasis of this project is on the coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical effects in jointed hard rock. In the first phase of DECOVALEX, two benchmark tests and one test case have been selected for modelling. This report describes the results of the second benchmark test, the Multiple-Fracture Model, as obtained by the AECL Research team. This problem relates to groundwater flow and coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical deformation in a simple system comprising several blocks of porous medium and several intersecting fractures. The simulation domain is defined to be a rectangular box that is made up of an assemblage of nine blocks separated by two sets of discontinuities (planar fractures). The rock mass is subjected to in situ stress and thermal loading as well as a hydraulic gradient. Both no-flow and adiabatic heat flux acting along a section of one of the lateral boundaries will induce expansion of the rock and cause shearing in the model. The MOTIF finite-element code, developed at AECL, has been employed to simulate this problem. The simulation results show that thermal expansion of the solid blocks reduced the aperture and, consequently, the permeability of the fractures. As a result, the fluid velocity along the horizontal fractures decreased with time, except in the vicinity close to the heat source, where the velocity initially increased and then decreased as a result of the decrease in permeability. (author). 9 refs., 7 tabs., 23 figs

  14. High sensitivity assays for docetaxel and paclitaxel in plasma using solid-phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Anders; Warren, David J; Brunsvig, Paal F; Aamdal, Steinar; Kristensen, Gunnar B; Olsen, Harald

    2006-01-01

    Background The taxanes paclitaxel and docetaxel have traditionally been used in high doses every third week in the treatment of cancer. Lately there has been a trend towards giving weekly low doses to improve the therapeutic index. This article describes the development of high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) methods suitable for monitoring taxane levels in patients, focusing on patients receiving low-dose therapy. Methods Paclitaxel and docetaxel were extracted from human plasma by solid phase extraction, and detected by absorbance at 227 nm after separation by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography. The methods were validated and their performance were tested using samples from patients receiving paclitaxel or docetaxel. Results The limits of quantitation were 1 nM for docetaxel and 1.2 nM for paclitaxel. For both compounds linearity was confirmed from the limit of quantitation up to 1000 nM in plasma. The recoveries ranged between 92% and 118% for docetaxel and between 76% and 104% for paclitaxel. Accuracy and precision were within international acceptance criteria, that is within ± 15%, except at the limit of quantitation where values within ± 20% are acceptable. Low-dose patients included in an on going clinical trial had a median docetaxel concentration of 2.8 nM at 72 hours post infusion. Patients receiving 100 mg/m2 of paclitaxel had a mean paclitaxel concentration of 21 nM 48 hours after the end of infusion. Conclusion We have developed an HPLC method using UV detection capable of quantifying 1 nM of docetaxel in plasma samples. The method should be useful for pharmacokinetic determinations at all relevant doses of docetaxel. Using a similar methodology paclitaxel can be quantified down to a concentration of 1.2 nM in plasma with acceptable accuracy and precision. We further demonstrate that the previously reported negative influence of Cremophor EL on assay performance may be overcome by degradation of the detergent by

  15. Advanced 700{degree}C pf power plant (AD700): start of phase 2 of the European project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bregani, F.; Bugge, J.; Klauke, F.; Kjaer, S.; Vanstone, R.; Wieghart, K. [Cesi, Milan (Italy)

    2002-07-01

    A large European group of manufacturers, utilities and institutes are co-operating in a phased long-term project dealing with 'Advanced 700{degree}C PF Power Plant'. The overall objective is the development of an economically viable and sustainable, coal-fired power plant technology with a net efficiency of more than 50%, which can ensure a future strategic important role for coal in Europe. These targets can be reached through development of a super-critical steam cycle operating at maximum steam temperatures in the range of 700 C. The demonstration programme will leave the possibility of any plant output between 400 and 1,000 MW. The phase 1 of the project started in January 1998 based on a grant from the Commission's Thermie programme under the 4th Framework Programme. Work to date has already demonstrated the economic viability of this concept and design concepts have been developed without encountering any significant technical obstacles. The phase 2 of the project started in January 2002 on another grant from the Commission's Energy programme under the 5th Framework Programme. 35 partners from 10 European countries are involved. This phase will focus on fabricability of new super-alloys, welding of thick walled super-alloys, dissimilar weldings and on testing, in operating boilers, of materials for super heaters in the range of 700{degree}C and for furnace walls. Potential for cost reductions will be addressed through boiler and turbine design work to minimise the use of expensive super-alloys. The second phase also deals with a dissemination programme and the financial and operational conditions for a separate demonstration facility and demonstration programme which will be applied for later as phase 3 of the project. Finally business plan for the full-scale demonstration plant to be applied for as phase 4 has been included. 7 figs., tabs.

  16. Results of the research project EnEff:Waerme. Phase I, fundamental investigations; Ergebnisse im Forschungsvorhaben EnEff:Waerme. Phase I, Grundlagenuntersuchung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huther, Heiko; Weidlich, Ingo [AGFW - Der Energieeffizienzverband fuer Waerme, Kaelte und KWK e.V., Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Forschung und Entwicklung; Achmus, Martin [Leibniz Univ. Hannover (DE). Inst. fuer Grundbau, Bodenmechanik und Energiewasserbau (IGBE); Vollmar, Roland [Stahlklar GbR, Kassel (Germany); Fabricius, Jens-Ole [Fabricius Consulting, Odense (Denmark); Solas, Hartmut [Forschungsinstitut fuer Tief- und Rohrleitungsbau gemeinnuetzige GmbH (FITR), Weimar (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    The project 'EnEff:Waerme Energieeffiziente Waermeverteilung Phase I, Grundlagenermittlung' was to provide a scientific basis for a general concept for further development of district heating grids by establishing and evaluating the state of knowledge and identifying aspects that necessitate further research. It was found that there is still potential for optimization in the construction and operation of district heating grids.

  17. Performance of an automated solid-phase red cell adherence system compared with that of a manual gel microcolumn assay for the identification of antibodies eluted from red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finck, R H; Davis, R J; Teng, S; Goldfinger, D; Ziman, A F; Lu, Q; Yuan, S

    2011-01-01

    IgG antibodies coating red blood cells (RBCs) can be removed by elution procedures and their specificity determined by antibody identification studies. Although such testing is traditionally performed using the tube agglutination assay, prior studies have shown that the gel microcolumn (GMC) assay may also be used with comparable results. The purpose of this study was to compare an automated solid-phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) system with a GMC assay for the detection of antibodies eluted from RBCs. Acid eluates from 51 peripheral blood (PB) and 7 cord blood (CB) samples were evaluated by both an automated SPRCA instrument and a manual GMC assay. The concordance rate between the two systems for peripheral RBC samples was 88.2 percent (45 of 51), including cases with alloantibodies (n = 8), warm autoantibodies (n = 12), antibodies with no identifiable specificity (n = 2), and negative results (n = 23). There were six discordant cases, of which four had alloantibodies (including anti-Jka, -E, and -e) demonstrable by the SPRCA system only. In the remaining 2 cases, anti-Fya and antibodies with no identifiable specificity were demonstrable by the GMC assay only. All seven CB specimens produced concordant results, showing anti-A (n = 3), -B (n = 1), maternal anti-Jka (n = 2), or a negative result (n = 1). Automated SPRCA technology has a performance that is comparable with that of a manual GMC assay for identifying antibodies eluted from PB and CB RBCs.

  18. Learning More about Those Who Play in Session: The National Play Therapy in Counseling Practices Project (Phase I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Simone F.; LeBlanc, Michael; Mullen, Jodi Ann; Ray, Dee; Baggerly, Jennifer; White, JoAnna; Kaplan, David

    2007-01-01

    Through a joint research committee sponsored by the Association for Play Therapy (APT) and the American Counseling Association (ACA), The National Play Therapy in Counseling Practices Project conducted the first phase of investigation. Findings offered a snapshot of mental health providers of play therapy, regarding the nature of who they are and…

  19. Sustainable development in city districts: BaLaLuZ project - Gundeldinger Feld - Phase 1; Schlussbericht Quartier Gundeldingerfeld Basel - Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binz, A.; Voyame, J.-P.

    2004-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) is one of a series of reports concerning municipal development in various cities in Switzerland. The four city districts involved include Basel (Gundeldinger Feld), Lausanne (Bellevaux), Lucerne (Basel-/Bernstrasse) and Zurich (Werdwies). This final report summarises the results of the first phase of the project in Gundeldinger Feld, Basel. In an analysis of the initial situation in the Gundeldinger Feld, ecological and economical aspects are examined as are questions concerning mobility and urban planning. The various players involved are introduced and their expectations reviewed; work done and the involvement of the local inhabitants in the project are looked at. Measures to be taken to realise the visions proposed are discussed and suggestions for projects are made.

  20. Evaluation of the GEM-AQ model in the context of the AQMEII Phase 1 project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Struzewska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the scope of the AQMEII Phase 1 project the GEM-AQ model was run over Europe for the year 2006. The modelling domain was defined using a global variable resolution grid with a rotated equator and uniform resolution of 0.2° × 0.2° over the European continent. Spatial distribution and temporal variability of the GEM-AQ model results were analysed for surface ozone and PM10 concentrations. Model results were compared with measurements available in the ENSEMBLE database. Statistical measures were used to evaluate performance of the GEM-AQ model. The mean bias error, the mean absolute gross error and the Pearson correlation coefficient were calculated for the maximum 8 h running average ozone concentrations and daily mean PM10 concentrations. The GEM-AQ model performance was characterised for station types, European climatic regions, and seasons. The best performance for ozone was obtained at suburban stations and the worst performance was obtained for rural stations where the model tends to underestimate. The best results for PM10 were calculated for urban stations, while over most of Europe concentrations at rural sites were too high. Discrepancies between modelled and observed concentrations were discussed in the context of emission data uncertainty as well as the impact of large scale dynamics and circulation of air masses. Presented analyses suggest that interpretation of modelling results is enhanced when regional climate characteristics are ta ken into consideration.

  1. STTR Phase 1 Final Technical Report for Project Entitled "Developing a Mobile Torrefaction Machine"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Joseph J. [President, ATP

    2014-03-11

    The goal of this project, sponsored by Agri-Tech Producers, LLC (ATP), the small business grantee, was to determine if the torrefaction technology, developed by North Carolina State University (NCSU), which ATP has licensed, could be feasibly deployed in a mobile unit. The study adds to the area investigated, by having ATP’s STTR Phase I team give thoughtful consideration to how to use NCSU’s technology in a mobile unit. The findings by ATP’s team were that NCSU’s technology would best perform in units 30’ by 80’ (See Spec Sheet for the Torre-Tech 5.0 Unit in the Appendix) and the technical effectiveness and economic feasibility investigation suggested that such units were not easily, efficiently or safely utilized in a forest or farm setting. (Note rendering of possible mobile system in the Appendix) Therefore, the findings by ATP’s team were that NCSU’s technology could not feasibly be deployed as a mobile unit.

  2. Cardiovascular-related proteins identified in human plasma by the HUPO Plasma Proteome Project pilot phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhane, Beniam T; Zong, Chenggong; Liem, David A; Huang, Aaron; Le, Steven; Edmondson, Ricky D; Jones, Richard C; Qiao, Xin; Whitelegge, Julian P; Ping, Peipei; Vondriska, Thomas M

    2005-08-01

    Proteomic profiling of accessible bodily fluids, such as plasma, has the potential to accelerate biomarker/biosignature development for human diseases. The HUPO Plasma Proteome Project pilot phase examined human plasma with distinct proteomic approaches across multiple laboratories worldwide. Through this effort, we confidently identified 3020 proteins, each requiring a minimum of two high-scoring MS/MS spectra. A critical step subsequent to protein identification is functional annotation, in particular with regard to organ systems and disease. Performing exhaustive literature searches, we have manually annotated a subset of these 3020 proteins that have cardiovascular-related functions on the basis of an existing body of published information. These cardiovascular-related proteins can be organized into eight groups: markers of inflammation and/or cardiovascular disease, vascular and coagulation, signaling, growth and differentiation, cytoskeletal, transcription factors, channels/receptors and heart failure and remodeling. In addition, analysis of the peptide per protein ratio for MS/MS identification reveals group-specific trends. These findings serve as a resource to interrogate the functions of plasma proteins, and moreover, the list of cardiovascular-related proteins in plasma constitutes a baseline proteomic blueprint for the future development of biosignatures for diseases such as myocardial ischemia and atherosclerosis. PMID:16052623

  3. Use of Social Network Analysis in Early Phases of ICT Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Libor Mesicek; Jiri Svoboda

    2012-01-01

    According to results of our surveys in 2011 the ICT project managers operating in the Czech Republic would like to have wider possibility of influencing the selection of team members in their projects.The article focuses on the psychological and the sociological aspects of the ICT project teams’ structure, analyzing the existing social networks within a company as well as the concept of the team roles when setting up the project team by mapping the existing relationships among the team member...

  4. Presentation of main results of Phase I of the SMPR project initiation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of a first Technical Committee Meeting held in Vienna in August 1983 the IAEA launched a new SMPR Project Initiation Study with the objective of surveying the available designs, examining the major factors influencing the decision-making processes in developing countries and thereby also arriving at an estimate of the potential market. The Nuclear Energy Agency of OECD offered its assistance in making a study of the potential market in industrialized countries. Two questionnaires were used to obtain information from potential suppliers and buyers. Suppliers responded with an overwhelming 23 design concepts which could be offered for export but with varying levels of readiness and provenness. From potential buyers 17 responses were received, 16 of which were from the developing countries. The analysis of the responses which was done by the Agency with the help of experts from Member States gave the basis for a draft report including the OECD/NEA part. This draft was discussed during a second Technical Committee Meeting held in Vienna in March 1985. The meeting was characterized by a strong supplier interest but also by hesitation of potential buyers to make any kind of commitments relating to the market introduction of SMPRs. All new information has been incorporated into the report together with a number of expressed comments, especially related to the presentation of the economics of SMPRs, the necessity of a reference plant, provenness of major components and systems etc. The results of the study are presented here with direct reference to the SMPR supply situation and the potential market for SMPRs in terms of the decision-making factors: the financial factors, the economical factors, and the technological factors were identified as the most important ones. The economic competitiveness is not the only decision-making factor and consequently it was decided to end the general study called Phase I by the publication of a report. Specific case studies

  5. Physical Modeling of Localized Scour for the Yangtze Estuary Waterway Improvement Project, Phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JlA Jianjun; LU Wujiang; QIAN Yadong

    2000-01-01

    In order to examine the effectiveness of engineering protection against localized scour in front of the south groin-group of the Yangtze Estuary Waterway Improvement Project, Phase Ⅰ , an undistorted physical model on a geometric scale of 1:250 is built in this study, covering two groins and their adacent estuarine areas. By use of rinsing fix-bed model as well as localized mobile-bed model, the experiment is undertaken under bi-directional steady flow. According to the experimental results, waterway dredging leads to the increase in steram velocity, the increase being larger during the ebb than during the flood. Construction of the upstream groin has some influence on the flow patterns near the downstream groin. Localized scour in front of the groin-heads is controlled mainly by ebb flow. In the case of a riverbed composed entirely of silt, the depths of localized scour in front of the two groin-heads are 27 m and 29 m,respectively. In reality, the underneath sediment of the prototype riverbed is clay whose threshold velocity is much higher than the stream velocity in the Yangtze Estuary; therefore, the depths of localized scour will not be much larger than the thickness of the silt layer, i. e. 7.4 m and 4.7 m, respectively. The designed aprons covering the riverbed in fron of the groin-heads are very effective in scour control. Aprons of slightly smaller size can also fulfill the task of protection, but the area of localized scour increases significantly.

  6. New shipyard layout design for the preliminary phase & case study for the green field project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young Joo; Woo, Jong Hun

    2013-03-01

    For several decades, Asian nations such as Korea, Japan and China have been leading the shipbuilding industry since the decline in Europe and America. However, several developing countries such as India, Brazil, etc. are going to make an entrance into the shipbuilding industry. These developing countries are finding technical partners or information providers because they are in situation of little experiences and technologies. Now, the shipbuilding engineering companies of shipbuilding advanced countries are getting a chance of engineering business against those developing countries. The starting point of this business model is green field project for the construction of new shipyard. This business model is started with a design of the shipyard layout. For the conducting of the shipyard layout design, four kinds of engineering parts are required. Those are civil engineering, building engineering, utility engineering and production layout engineering. Among these parts, production layout engineering is most important because its result is the foundation of the other engineering parts and it determines the shipyard capacity during the shipyard operation lifecycle. Previous researches about the shipyard layout design are out of the range from the business requirements because most research cases are in the tower of ivory, which means that there are little consideration of real ship and shipbuilding operation. In this paper, a shipyard layout design for preliminary phase is conducted for the target of newly planned shipyard at Venezuela of South America with an integrated method that is capable of dealing with actual master data from the shipyard. The layout design method of this paper is differentiated from the previous researches in that the actual product data from the target ship and the actual shipbuilding operation data are used for the required area estimation.

  7. OC5 Project Phase Ib: Validation of Hydrodynamic Loading on a Fixed, Flexible Cylinder for Offshore Wind Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Amy N.; Wendt, Fabian; Jonkman, Jason M.; Popko, Wojciech; Borg, Michael; Bredmose, Henrik; Schlutter, Flemming; Qvist, Jacob; Bergua, Roger; Harries, Rob; Yde, Anders; Nygaard, Tor Anders; de Vaal, Jacobus Bernardus; Oggiano, Luca; Bozonnet, Pauline; Bouy, Ludovic; Sanchez, C. B.; Garcia, R. G.; Bachynski, E. E.; Tu, Y.; Bayati, I.; Borisade, F.; Shin, H.; van der Zee, T.; Guerinel, M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper summarizes the findings from Phase Ib of the Offshore Code Comparison, Collaboration, Continued with Correlation (OC5) project. OC5 is a project run under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Research Task 30, and is focused on validating the tools used for modelling offshore wind systems through the comparison of simulated responses of select offshore wind systems (and components) to physical test data. For Phase Ib of the project, simulated hydrodynamic loads on a flexible cylinder fixed to a sloped bed were validated against test measurements made in the shallow water basin at the Danish Hydraulic Institute (DHI) with support from the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). The first phase of OC5 examined two simple cylinder structures (Phase Ia and Ib) to focus on validation of hydrodynamic models used in the various tools before moving on to more complex offshore wind systems and the associated coupled physics. Verification and validation activities such as these lead to improvement of offshore wind modelling tools, which will enable the development of more innovative and cost-effective offshore wind designs.

  8. High Performance Ka-band Phase Shifters for Space Telecommunications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a novel MEMS-based digital phase shifter targeted for Ka-band operation, but scalable down to X-band and up to W-band. This novel phase shifter will...

  9. Design and Development of a compact and ruggest phase and flouresence microscope for space utilization Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR Phase 1 we propose to develop a novel microscope by integrating Fourier phase contrast microscopy (FPCM) and epi-fluorescence microscopy. In FPCM, the...

  10. Waveguide Phase Modulator for Integrated Planar Lightwave Circuits in KTP Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort proposes the development of a potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) waveguide phase modulator for future integration into a Planar Lightwave...

  11. Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison Project. Phase 1; The Critical Components to Simulate Cirrus Initiation Explicitly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ruei-Fong; Starr, David OC; DeMott, Paul J.; Cotton, Richard; Sassen, Kenneth; Jensen, Eric; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison Project, a project of the GCSS (GEWEX Cloud System Studies) Working Group on Cirrus Cloud Systems, involves the systematic comparison of current models of ice crystal nucleation and growth for specified, typical, cirrus cloud environments. In Phase I of the project reported here, simulated cirrus cloud microphysical properties are compared for situations of "warm" (40 C) and "cold" (-60 C) cirrus, both subject to updrafts of 4, 20 and 100 centimeters per second. Five models participated. The various models employ explicit microphysical schemes wherein the size distribution of each class of particles (aerosols and ice crystals) is resolved into bins or treated separately. Simulations are made including both the homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation mechanisms. A single initial aerosol population of sulfuric acid particles is prescribed for all simulations. To isolate the treatment of the homogeneous freezing (of haze droplets) nucleation process, the heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is disabled for a second parallel set of simulations. Qualitative agreement is found for the homogeneous-nucleation- only simulations, e.g., the number density of nucleated ice crystals increases with the strength of the prescribed updraft. However, significant quantitative differences are found. Detailed analysis reveals that the homogeneous nucleation rate, haze particle solution concentration, and water vapor uptake rate by ice crystal growth (particularly as controlled by the deposition coefficient) are critical components that lead to differences in predicted microphysics. Systematic bias exists between results based on a modified classical theory approach and models using an effective freezing temperature approach to the treatment of nucleation. Each approach is constrained by critical freezing data from laboratory studies, but each includes assumptions that can only be justified by further laboratory research. Consequently, it is not yet

  12. Minnesota Project: district heating and cooling through power plant retrofit and distribution network. Final report. Phase 1. [Minnesota Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    Appendices are presented for the Minnesota Project: District Heating and Cooling Through Power Plant Retrofit and Distribution Network. These are: SYNTHA results (SYNTHA II is a proprietary program of the SYNTHA Corporation); Market Survey Questionnaire: Environmental Review Procedures; Public Service Commission Regulation of District Heating; Energy Use Normalization Procedures; Power Plant Description; Letters of Commitment; Bond Opinion and Issuance; and Marvin Koeplin Letter, Chairman of Public Service Commission, Moorehead, Minnesota.

  13. Sustainable development in city districts: BaLaLuZ project - Bellevaux Phase 2; Quartiers durables BaLaLuZh. Rapport Lausanne-Bellevaux. Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, D.; Nicol, L. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Laboratoire d' energie solaire et de physique du batiment (LESO-PB), Lausanne (Switzerland); Pattaroni, L. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Laboratoire de sociologie urbaine (LASUR), Lausanne (Switzerland); Muehll, D. von der [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Laboratoire Choros, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2007-04-15

    This comprehensive final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) is one of a series of reports concerning municipal development in various cities in Switzerland. The four city districts involved include Basel (Gundeldinger Feld), Lausanne (Bellevaux), Lucerne (Basel-/Bernstrasse) and Zurich (Werdwies). This final report summarises the results of the second phase of the project in the Bellevaux district of Lausanne. The work done in this second phase is reviewed. The results of phase 1 were followed up in that it was decided to facilitate the renovation of specific buildings where possible. A further aim was to evaluate the extent to which cycling is used as a means of transport as well as to identify possible barriers and solutions to the more widespread use of cycling as a means of transportation. The report describes the work necessary and strategies for specific buildings, including participatory procedures. As far as cycling is concerned, the results of questionnaires are examined and discussed. Communication and animation projects are also looked at.

  14. In Situ Mercury Stabilization (ISMS) Treatment: Technology Maturation Project Phase I Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalb,P.D.; Milian, L.

    2008-03-01

    technology. If further developed it has the potential for large-scale in-situ treatment of contaminated soils that could substantially reduce the prohibitive cost of thermal desorption and/or excavation and disposal. Licensing and spin-off technology development opportunities would then be viable. Depending on performance and regulatory acceptance, the treated mercury could either be excavated for disposal elsewhere or left in place as a stable alternative. Excavated spent treatment rods could be processed by the SPSS process to reduce the potential for dispersion and lower leachability even further. The Phase I objectives of the In Situ Mercury Stabilization Treatment Process Technology Maturation Project were to: (1) replicate the original bench-scale results that formed the basis for BNL's patent application, i.e., mercury contamination in soil will migrate to and react with 'rods' containing sulfur and/or sulfur compounds, (2) provide enough information to evaluate a decision to conduct further development, and (3) establish some of the critical parameters that require further technology maturation during Phase II. The information contained in this report summarizes the work conducted in Phase I to meet these objectives.

  15. Scientists help the children of Chernobyl. The GAST/VDEW project. Report on phase II: 1. April 1996 - 31. March 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this project phase II, from 1. April 1996 until 31. March 1998, the activities under the four partial projects entitled 'Therapy and training', 'Biological dosimetry', 'Dosimetry and risk assessment', and 'Coordination and examination authority at Minsk' have been continued and concluded, except for the partial project 'Therapy and training'. (orig./CB)

  16. Assessing the Benefits of Social Networks for Organizations - Report on the first phase of the SEA-SoNS Project

    OpenAIRE

    MARTIN AARON KRISTOPHER; VAN BAVEL Rene

    2012-01-01

    The first phase of the SEA-SoNS ("Assessing the Benefits of Social Networks on Organizations”) project aimed to analyse the current market situation for a limited number of social media stakeholders, to identify and analyse best practices for these selected stakeholders, and to define and prioritise relevant policy options. It was observed that while social media technologies present several potential benefits to organisations, there are considerable challenges and bottlenecks affecting adopt...

  17. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Peru. August - October 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Peru believes that the Speculative Resources of that country fall between 6,000 and 11,000 tonnes uranium. There has been no uranium production in Peru and there are no official estimates of uranium resources. Past exploration in Peru (dating from about 1952) has indicated a paucity of valid uranium occurrences and radioactive anomalies. Only recently (1980) have anomalous areas been identified, (Macusani-Picotani). The identified Speculative Resources are mainly in Late Tertiary ignimbrites and associated sediments in the high Andes of southern Peru. Geologically, there are direct parallels between these resources and deposits of the Los Frailes areas of neighbouring Bolivia. Other minor Speculative Resources may be present in calcretes developed from Tertiary volcanogenic sources over the Precambrian in the Pacific Coastal desert of southern Peru but no positive indications have been recognised. Hercynian sub-volcanic granites in the eastern cordillera of southern Peru may have some associated Speculative Resources both intra and extra granitic. No Speculative Potential could be identified in Permo-Triassic or Tertiary post tectonic continental sediments anywhere in Peru. Such potential may exist but further reconnaissance of the continental late Tertiary basins, with positive indications would be required before inclusion of potential in this category. Recent discoveries in the volcanogenic environment of southern Peru have been by carborne, helicopter borne and on on-foot reconnaissance of isolated areas. It is recommended that there be a more systematic, integrated study of the entire volcanic district assisted by volcanic petrographic examination. Assessment of the known occurrences requires immediate subsurface study by drilling and exploration audits to assess their continuity, grade variation and thickness. This phase will be significantly more expensive than previous exploration. Non-core drilling should supplement

  18. Assay method and compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods are described for measuring catecholamine levels in human and animal body fluids and tissues using the catechol-O-methyl-transferase (COMT) radioassay. The assay involves incubating the biological sample with COMT and the tritiated methyl donor, S-adenosyl-L-methionine(3H)-methyl. The O-methylated (3H) epinephrine and/or norepinephrine are extracted and oxidised to vanillin-3H which in turn is extracted and its radioactivity counted. When analysing dopamine levels the assay is extended by vanillin-3H and raising the pH of the aqueous periodate phase from which O-methylated (3H) dopamine is extracted and counted. The assay may be modified depending on whether measurements of undifferentiated total endogenous catecholamine levels or differential analyses of the catecholamine levels are being performed. The sensitivity of the assay can be as low as 5 picograms for norepinephrine and epinephrine and 12 picograms for dopamine. The assemblance of the essential components of the assay into a kit for use in laboratories is also described. (U.K.)

  19. QUEST2: Project plan for preliminary analysis/system architecture phase (PA/SA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braaten, F.D.

    1995-03-08

    This Project Management Plan combines the project management deliverables from the P+ methodology that are applicable to this part of the QUEST2 work. This consolidation reflects discussions with WHC QA regarding an appropriate method for ensuring that P+ deliverables fulfill the intent of WHC-CM-3-10 and QR-19.

  20. Supplemental design requirements document enhanced radioactive and mixed waste storage Phase V Project W-112

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocampo, V.P.; Boothe, G.F.; Greager, T.M.; Johnson, K.D.; Kooiker, S.L.; Martin, J.D.

    1994-11-01

    This document provides additional and supplemental information to WHC-SD-W112-FDC-001, Project W-112 for radioactive and mixed waste storage. It provides additional requirements for the design and summarizes Westinghouse Hanford Company key design guidance and establishes the technical baseline agreements to be used for definitive design of the Project W-112 facilities.

  1. Investigation of noise properties in grating-based x-ray phase tomography with reverse projection method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuan; Wang, Yan; Gao, Kun; Wang, Zhi-Li; Zhu, Pei-Ping; Wu, Zi-Yu

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between noise variance and spatial resolution in grating-based x-ray phase computed tomography (PCT) imaging is investigated with reverse projection extraction method, and the noise variances of the reconstructed absorption coefficient and refractive index decrement are compared. For the differential phase contrast method, the noise variance in the differential projection images follows the same inverse-square law with spatial resolution as in conventional absorption-based x-ray imaging projections. However, both theoretical analysis and simulations demonstrate that in PCT the noise variance of the reconstructed refractive index decrement scales with spatial resolution follows an inverse linear relationship at fixed slice thickness, while the noise variance of the reconstructed absorption coefficient conforms with the inverse cubic law. The results indicate that, for the same noise variance level, PCT imaging may enable higher spatial resolution than conventional absorption computed tomography (ACT), while ACT benefits more from degraded spatial resolution. This could be a useful guidance in imaging the inner structure of the sample in higher spatial resolution. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB825800), the Science Fund for Creative Research Groups, the Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant Nos. KJCX2-YW-N42 and Y4545320Y2), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11475170, 11205157, 11305173, 11205189, 11375225, 11321503, 11179004, and U1332109).

  2. Facilitating Client Value Creation in the Conceptual Design Phase of Construction Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Mikael Hygum; Emmitt, Stephen; Bonke, Sten;

    2009-01-01

    If client values are not fully understood in a construction project it is likely to result in either low fulfilment of client expectations or multiple design alterations during the project process which lead to additional costs and frustration among the project participants. However, it is not a ...... that incorporates client values into the conceptual design of construction projects. The workshop model draws on value management and lean thinking as underlying principles in an attempt to address the ambiguous concept of ‘value’.......If client values are not fully understood in a construction project it is likely to result in either low fulfilment of client expectations or multiple design alterations during the project process which lead to additional costs and frustration among the project participants. However......, it is not a straightforward management task to operationalize client value in construction. Within this context, the client group comprises multiple stakeholders, which often have conflicting goals and values that may not be fully realized by the stakeholders themselves. The management challenge is further complicated...

  3. Angiogenesis Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Dhanya K; Kujur, Praveen K; Singh, Rana P

    2016-01-01

    Neoangiogenesis constitutes one of the first steps of tumor progression beyond a critical size of tumor growth, which supplies a dormant mass of cancerous cells with the required nutrient supply and gaseous exchange through blood vessels essentially needed for their sustained and aggressive growth. In order to understand any biological process, it becomes imperative that we use models, which could mimic the actual biological system as closely as possible. Hence, finding the most appropriate model is always a vital part of any experimental design. Angiogenesis research has also been much affected due to lack of simple, reliable, and relevant models which could be easily quantitated. The angiogenesis models have been used extensively for studying the action of various molecules for agonist or antagonistic behaviour and associated mechanisms. Here, we have described two protocols or models which have been popularly utilized for studying angiogenic parameters. Rat aortic ring assay tends to bridge the gap between in vitro and in vivo models. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay is one of the most utilized in vivo model system for angiogenesis-related studies. The CAM is highly vascularized tissue of the avian embryo and serves as a good model to study the effects of various test compounds on neoangiogenesis. PMID:26608294

  4. A multisubstrate assay for lipases/esterases: assessing acyl chain length selectivity by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divakar, K; Gautam, Pennathur

    2014-03-01

    Lipases and esterases are hydrolytic enzymes and are known to hydrolyze esters with unique substrate specificity and acyl chain length selectivity. We have developed a simple competitive multiple substrate assay for determination of acyl chain length selectivity of lipases/esterases using RP-HPLC with UV detection. A method for separation and quantification of 4-nitrophenyl fatty acid esters (C4-C18) was developed and validated. The chain length selectivity of five lipases and two esterases was determined in a multisubstrate reaction system containing equimolar concentrations of 4-nitrophenyl esters (C4-C18). This assay is simple, reproducible, and a useful tool for determining chain length selectivity of lipases/esterases. PMID:24316114

  5. Reconstruction of gyrotropic phase-space distributions from one-dimensional projections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egedal, J.; Bindslev, H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes mathematical tools applicable to the reconstruction of anisotropic velocity distributions through the unfolding of data coming from techniques like collective Thomson scattering or laser induced fluorescence, where one-dimensional projections of the velocity space along...

  6. Development of a Solid-Phase Receptor-Based Assay for the Detection of Cyclic Imines Using a Microsphere-Flow Cytometry System

    OpenAIRE

    Laura P. Rodríguez; Vilariño, Natalia; Molgó, Jordi; Aráoz, Rómulo; Louzao, M. Carmen; Taylor, Palmer; Talley, Todd; Botana, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    Biologically active macrocycles containing a cyclic imine were isolated for the first time from aquaculture sites in Nova Scotia, Canada, during the 1990s. These compounds display a “fast-acting” toxicity in the traditional mouse bioassay for lipophilic marine toxins. Our work aimed at developing receptor-based detection method for spirolides using a microsphere/flow cytometry Luminex system. For the assay two alternatives were considered as binding proteins, the Torpedo marmorata nicotinic a...

  7. River Protection Project Integrated safety management system phase II verification report, volumes I and II - 8/19/99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SHOOP, D.S.

    1999-09-10

    The Department of Energy policy (DOE P 450.4) is that safety is integrated into all aspects of the management and operations of its facilities. In simple and straightforward terms, the Department will ''Do work safely.'' The purpose of this River Protection Project (RPP) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase II Verification was to determine whether ISMS programs and processes are implemented within RFP to accomplish the goal of ''Do work safely.'' The goal of an implemented ISMS is to have a single integrated system that includes Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) requirements in the work planning and execution processes to ensure the protection of the worker, public, environment, and federal property over the RPP life cycle. The ISMS is comprised of the (1) described functions, components, processes, and interfaces (system map or blueprint) and (2) personnel who are executing those assigned roles and responsibilities to manage and control the ISMS. Therefore, this review evaluated both the ''paper'' and ''people'' aspects of the ISMS to ensure that the system is implemented within RPP. Richland Operations Office (RL) conducted an ISMS Phase I Verification of the TWRS from September 28-October 9, 1998. The resulting verification report recommended that TWRS-RL and the contractor proceed with Phase II of ISMS verification given that the concerns identified from the Phase I verification review are incorporated into the Phase II implementation plan.

  8. A Multi-band Photonic Phased Array Antenna for High-Date Rate Communication Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Multi-band phased array antenna (PAA) can reduce the number of antennas on shipboard platforms while offering significantly improved performance. In order to steer...

  9. A Multi-Band Photonic Phased Array Antenna for High-Data Rate Communication Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Multi-band phased array antenna (PAA) can reduce the number of antennas on shipboard platforms while offering significantly improved performance. In order to steer...

  10. Waveguide Phase Modulator for Integrated Planar Lightwave Circuits in KTP Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase II effort proposes the development and integration of a Planar Lightwave Circuit (PLC) into an all fiber-based seed laser system used in high...

  11. SPS-ALPHA: The First Practical Solar Power Satellite via Arbitrarily Large PHased Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SPS-ALPHA (Solar Power Satellite via Arbitrarily Large Phased Array) is a novel, bio-mimetic approach to the challenge of space solar power. If successful, this...

  12. Fiber Optic Microcantilever Sensor Coupled with Reactive Polymers for Vapor Phase Detection of Ammonia Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations proposes to adapt its current aqueous-based, fiber-optic microcantilever sensor technology for real-time, monitoring of ammonia in air. Phase I...

  13. Integrated Planar Lightwave Circuits for UV Generation and Phase Modulation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort proposes to establish the feasibility of developing a UV Planar Lightwave Circuit (PLC); a compact, highly efficient, waveguide-based...

  14. SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 9. Science Applications, Incorporated Phase 2 - definition study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the effort required to implement the design of the Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Engineering Test Facility, SCEA-ETF. This report is a basic blueprint for the Phase 2 activities which have as a goal the construction of the ETF. These activities have been broken down into five major tasks, namely Project Management; Engineering and Design; Procurement/Fabrication; Construction, Installation and Checkout; and Operation and Maintenance. The type of activities required under each of these tasks are described followed by a detailed work breakdown structure. The Phase 2 project organization is discussed. A 13 month schedule for the total project is also given. Lastly, two appendices discuss cost adjustment factors for an ETF located in the KSA, and an update of the commercial system cost estimate based on preliminary cost quotations for the ETF. The results show a 63% cost increase for the KSA ETF primarily due to higher construction costs and greater well depth. The commercial system cost required an adjustment upwards of 7.7%.

  15. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 of 38-Foot Project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.; Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Barrows, E.S.; Kohn, N.P.; Lefkovitz, L.F. (Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    At the request of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), environmental studies were conducted by Battelle/Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) to evaluate the suitability of sediments from Oakland Inner Harbor for dredging and ocean disposal. During the Phase 3 38-Foot Project, sediment cores were collected from mudline to {minus}39 ft mean lower low water at various locations in Oakland Inner Harbor channel and allocated to six composite samples. These composites were evaluated through physical/chemical analyses, acute toxicity to sensitive marine organisms, and bioaccumulation potential. Sediment samples from individual locations were tested for physical/chemical parameters only. The results of toxicological and bioaccumulation testing may be used by USACE to determine the amount of potential dredged material from Oakland Inner Harbor channel acceptable for open-water disposal as defined by the Draft Implementation Manual (EPA/USACE 1990) and consistent with the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662). This is Volume 2 of a two-volume data report that represents the data gathered during the Oakland Harbor Phase 3 38-Foot Project, conducted in the Fall of 1990. This data report does not include interpretation or statistical analysis of the 38-Foot data. Volume 1 includes the project background as well as data and results presented in Appendixes A through H. Volume 2 includes the remaining data presented in Appendixes I through L.

  16. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 of 38-Foot Project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.; Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Barrows, E.S.; Kohn, N.P.; Lefkovitz, L.F. (Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    At the request of the US Army Corps of Engineering (USACE), environmental studies were conducted by Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to evaluate the suitability of sediments from Oakland Inner Harbor for dredging and ocean disposal. During the Phase 3 38-Foot Project, sediment cores were collected from mudline to {minus}39 ft mean lower low water at various locations in Oakland Inner Harbor channel and allocated to six composite samples. These composites were evaluated through physical/chemical analyses, acute toxicity to sensitive marine organisms, and bioaccumulation potential. Sediment samples from individual locations were tested for physical/chemical parameters only. The results of toxicological and bioaccumulation testing may be used by USACE to determine the amount of potential dredged material from Oakland Inner Harbor channel acceptable for open-water disposal as defined by the Draft Implementation Manual (EPA/USACE 1990) and consistent with the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662). This is Volume 1 of a two-volume data report that presents the data gathered during the Oakland Harbor Phase 3 38-Foot Project, conducted in the Fall of 1990. This data report does not include interpretation or statistical analysis of the 38-Foot data. Volume 1 includes the project background as well as a full presentation of data and results in Appendixes A through H. Volume 2 contains the remaining data in Appendixes I through L.

  17. Optimized projection binning for improved helical amplitude- and phase-based 4DCT reconstruction in the presence of breathing irregularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, René; Hofmann, Christian; Gauer, Tobias

    2016-03-01

    Respiration-correlated CT (4DCT) forms the basis of clinical 4D radiotherapy workflows for patients with thoracic and abdominal lesions. 4DCT image data, however, often suffers from motion artifacts due to unfulfilled assumptions during reconstruction and image/projection data sorting. In this work and focusing on low-pitch helical scanning protocols, two questionable assumptions are addressed: (1) the need for regular breathing patterns and (2) a constant correlation between the external breathing signal acquired for image/projection sorting and internal motion patterns. To counteract (1), a patient-specific upper breathing signal amplitude threshold is introduced to avoid artifacts due to unusual deep inspiration (helpful for both amplitude- and phase-based reconstruction). In addition, a projection data binning algorithm based on a statistical analysis of the patient's breathing signal is proposed to stabilize phase-based sorting. To further alleviate the need for (2), an image artifact metric is incorporated into and minimized during the reconstruction process. The optimized reconstruction is evaluated using 30 clinical 4DCT data sets and demonstrated to significantly reduce motion artifacts.

  18. Investigation of noise properties in grating-based x-ray phase tomography with reverse projection method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲍园; 王研; 高昆; 王志立; 朱佩平; 吴自玉

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between noise variance and spatial resolution in grating-based x-ray phase computed tomography (PCT) imaging is investigated with reverse projection extraction method, and the noise variances of the reconstructed absorption coefficient and refractive index decrement are compared. For the differential phase contrast method, the noise variance in the differential projection images follows the same inverse-square law with spatial resolution as in conventional absorption-based x-ray imaging projections. However, both theoretical analysis and simulations demonstrate that in PCT the noise variance of the reconstructed refractive index decrement scales with spatial resolution follows an inverse linear relationship at fixed slice thickness, while the noise variance of the reconstructed absorption coefficient conforms with the inverse cubic law. The results indicate that, for the same noise variance level, PCT imaging may enable higher spatial resolution than conventional absorption computed tomography (ACT), while ACT benefits more from degraded spatial resolution. This could be a useful guidance in imaging the inner structure of the sample in higher spatial resolution.

  19. Facilitating Client Value Creation in the Conceptual Design Phase of Construction Projects: A Workshop Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Hygum Thyssen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available If client values are not fully understood in a construction project it is likely to result in either low fulfilment of client expectations or multiple design alterations during the project process which lead to additional costs and frustration among the project participants. However, it is not a straightforward management task to operationalize client value in construction. Within this context, the client group comprises multiple stakeholders, which often have conflicting goals and values that may not be fully realized by the stakeholders themselves. The management challenge is further complicated by the fact that the delivery team, which is responsible for understanding and delivering client value, is made up of even more different parties. The article reports the initial outcome of a joint research project between academics and practitioners, which aims to develop a practical workshop model that incorporates client values into the conceptual design of construction projects. The workshop model draws on value management and lean thinking as underlying principles in an attempt to address the ambiguous concept of `value'. DOI: 10.3763/aedm.2008.0095

  20. Introducing Environmental Toxicology in Instructional Labs: The Use of a Modified Amphibian Developmental Toxicity Assay to Support Inquiry-Based Student Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauterer, Roger; Rayburn, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Introducing students to the process of scientific inquiry is a major goal of high school and college labs. Environmental toxins are of great concern and public interest. Modifications of a vertebrate developmental toxicity assay using the frog Xenopus laevis can support student-initiated toxicology experiments that are relevant to humans. Teams of…

  1. An Algorithmic Form Of Verification Of Appointed Phases Of The Project Documentation For A Building Investment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanek, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The process of area development and planning in compliance with conditions outlined in the Zoning Scheme is significant because of the current rapid development of rural and urban areas. The verification of project documentation in terms of observing constant and nationally binding norms, legislation and local laws is based on certain standards. In order to streamline the process of verification undertaken by the relevant public authorities, it is necessary to create formal algorithms that will automate the existing method of control of architecture-building documentation. The objective of this article is algorithmisation of the project documentation verification allowing further streamlining and automation of the process.

  2. Independent Technical Review of the C-400 Interim Remedial Project Phase I Results, Paducah, Kentucky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The groundwater and soil in the vicinity of the C-400 Building at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), is contaminated with substantial quantities of industrial solvents, primarily trichoroethene (TCE). This solvent 'source' is recognized as a significant challenge and an important remediation target in the overall environmental cleanup strategy for PGDP. Thus, the cleanup of the C-400 TCE Source is a principal focus for the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors, and for PGDP regulators and stakeholders. Using a formal investigation, feasibility study and decision process, Electrical Resistance Heating (ERH) was selected for the treatment of the soil and groundwater in the vicinity of C-400. ERH was selected as an interim action to remove 'a significant portion of the contaminant mass of TCE at the C-400 Cleaning Building area through treatment' with the longer term goal of reducing 'the period the TCE concentration in groundwater remains above its Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL).' ERH is a thermal treatment that enhances the removal of TCE and related solvents from soil and groundwater. The heterogeneous conditions at PGDP, particularly the high permeability regional gravel aquifer (RGA), are challenging to ERH. Thus, a phased approach is being followed to implement this relatively expensive and complex remediation technology. Conceptually, the phased approach encourages safety and efficiency by providing a 'lessons learned' process and allowing appropriate adjustments to be identified and implemented prior to follow-on phase(s) of treatment. More specifically, early deployment targeted portions of the challenging RGA treatment zone with relatively little contamination reducing the risk of adverse collateral impacts from underperformance in terms of heating and capture. Because of the importance and scope of the C-400 TCE source remediation activities, DOE chartered an Independent Technical Review (ITR) in 2007 to assess the C-400 ERH plans prior

  3. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE C-400 INTERIM REMEDIAL PROJECT PHASE I RESULTS, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, B.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart,L.; Richards, W.

    2010-10-29

    The groundwater and soil in the vicinity of the C-400 Building at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), is contaminated with substantial quantities of industrial solvents, primarily trichoroethene (TCE). This solvent 'source' is recognized as a significant challenge and an important remediation target in the overall environmental cleanup strategy for PGDP. Thus, the cleanup of the C-400 TCE Source is a principal focus for the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors, and for PGDP regulators and stakeholders. Using a formal investigation, feasibility study and decision process, Electrical Resistance Heating (ERH) was selected for the treatment of the soil and groundwater in the vicinity of C-400. ERH was selected as an interim action to remove 'a significant portion of the contaminant mass of TCE at the C-400 Cleaning Building area through treatment' with the longer term goal of reducing 'the period the TCE concentration in groundwater remains above its Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL).' ERH is a thermal treatment that enhances the removal of TCE and related solvents from soil and groundwater. The heterogeneous conditions at PGDP, particularly the high permeability regional gravel aquifer (RGA), are challenging to ERH. Thus, a phased approach is being followed to implement this relatively expensive and complex remediation technology. Conceptually, the phased approach encourages safety and efficiency by providing a 'lessons learned' process and allowing appropriate adjustments to be identified and implemented prior to follow-on phase(s) of treatment. More specifically, early deployment targeted portions of the challenging RGA treatment zone with relatively little contamination reducing the risk of adverse collateral impacts from underperformance in terms of heating and capture. Because of the importance and scope of the C-400 TCE source remediation activities, DOE chartered an Independent Technical Review (ITR) in

  4. Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling and Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henkle, William R.; Ronne, Joel

    2008-06-15

    This report covers the drilling and testing of the slim well 56-4 at the Reese River Geothermal Project in Lander County, Nevada. This well was partially funded through a GRED III Cooperative Funding Agreement # DE-FC36-04GO14344, from USDOE.

  5. Project NECESSITIES, Phase III. Volume III: Case Studies in Teacher Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt Associates, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

    The staff of Project NECESSITIES conducted 2 workshops for educators concerned with curriculum for American Indian (including Eskimo) students. The purpose of these sessions was to familiarize participants with techniques pertinent to development of curriculum for Indian students at both the elementary and secondary school levels. The practica…

  6. Phase V storage (Project W-112) Central Waste Complex operational readiness review, final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is the final report for the RFSH conducted, Contractor Operational Readiness Review (ORR) for the Central Waste Complex (CWC) Project W-112 and Interim Safety Basis implementation. As appendices, all findings, observations, lines of inquiry and the implementation plan are included

  7. Phase 5 storage (Project W-112) Central Waste Complex operational readiness review, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wight, R.H.

    1997-05-30

    This document is the final report for the RFSH conducted, Contractor Operational Readiness Review (ORR) for the Central Waste Complex (CWC) Project W-112 and Interim Safety Basis implementation. As appendices, all findings, observations, lines of inquiry and the implementation plan are included.

  8. D-Area Drip Irrigation/Phytoremediation Project: SRTC Report on Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, E.W.

    2001-09-11

    The overall objective of this project is to evaluate a novel drip irrigation-phytoremediation process for remediating volatile organic contaminants (VOCs), primarily trichloroethylene (TCE), from groundwater in D-Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The process is expected to be less expensive and more beneficial to the environment than alternative TCE remediation technologies.

  9. 75 FR 39042 - Solicitation for a Cooperative Agreement: The Norval Morris Project Implementation Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ... Norval Morris and other NIC sponsored projects on organizational culture and performance, implementing... for expediting the application of research-based innovations by addressing specific topics of vital... policy and practice, create opportunities to test these innovations in correctional settings, and...

  10. Socio-economic Analysis of the Beijing-Tianjin Sandstorm Source Control Project Phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhangfenglai

    2012-01-01

    With the purpose of improving the air quality as well as curbing sand and dust hazard in the Beijing-Tianjin Area,our country urgently started Beijing-Tianjin Sandstorm Source Control Project in 2000,which,more then ten years' construction,has achieved enormous social,economic and ecological results.

  11. JCCRER Project 2.3 - Deterministic effects of occupational exposure to radiation. Phase 1: Feasibility study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase 1 of Project 2.3, a short-term collaborative Feasibility Study, was funded for 12 months starting on 1 February 1996. The overall aim of the study was to determine the practical feasibility of using the dosimetric and clinical data on the MAYAK worker population to study the deterministic effects of exposure to external gamma radiation and to internal alpha radiation from inhaled plutonium. Phase 1 efforts were limited to the period of greatest worker exposure (1948--1954) and focused on collaboratively: assessing the comprehensiveness, availability, quality, and suitability of the Russian clinical and dosimetric data for the study of deterministic effects; creating an electronic data base containing complete clinical and dosimetric data on a small, representative sample of MAYAK workers; developing computer software for the testing of a currently used health risk model of hematopoietic effects; and familiarizing the US team with the Russian diagnostic criteria and techniques used in the identification of Chronic Radiation Sickness

  12. JCCRER Project 2.3 -- Deterministic effects of occupational exposure to radiation. Phase 1: Feasibility study; Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okladnikova, N.; Pesternikova, V.; Sumina, M. [Inst. of Biophysics, Ozyorsk (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1998-12-01

    Phase 1 of Project 2.3, a short-term collaborative Feasibility Study, was funded for 12 months starting on 1 February 1996. The overall aim of the study was to determine the practical feasibility of using the dosimetric and clinical data on the MAYAK worker population to study the deterministic effects of exposure to external gamma radiation and to internal alpha radiation from inhaled plutonium. Phase 1 efforts were limited to the period of greatest worker exposure (1948--1954) and focused on collaboratively: assessing the comprehensiveness, availability, quality, and suitability of the Russian clinical and dosimetric data for the study of deterministic effects; creating an electronic data base containing complete clinical and dosimetric data on a small, representative sample of MAYAK workers; developing computer software for the testing of a currently used health risk model of hematopoietic effects; and familiarizing the US team with the Russian diagnostic criteria and techniques used in the identification of Chronic Radiation Sickness.

  13. DECOVALEX-THMC Project. Task B. Understanding and characterizing the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ). Phase 2 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, John A. (ed.) [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)]|[Rock Engineering Consultants (United Kingdom); Lanru Jing (ed.) [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Antikainen, Juha [Helsinki University of Technology, Helsinki (Finland); Backers, Tobias [GeoFrames GmbH, (Germany); Baeckstroem, Ann [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)]|[Bergbyggkonsult AB (Sweden); Koyama, Tomofumi [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden); Xiating Feng; Pengzhi Pan [Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Kobayashi, Akira [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Rinne, Mikael; Baotang Shen [Fracom Ltd. (Finland)

    2007-02-15

    The DECOVALEX-THMC project is an ongoing international co-operative project that was stared in 2004 to support the development of mathematical models of coupled Thermal (T), Hydrological (H), Mechanical (M) and Chemical (C) processes in geological media for siting potential nuclear fuel waste repositories. The general objective is to characterise and evaluate the coupled THMC processes in the near field and far field of a geological repository and to assess their impact on performance assessment: - during the three phases of repository development: excavation phase, operation phase and post-closure phase; - for three different rocks types: crystalline, argillaceous and tuff; - with specific focus on the issues of: Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ), permanent property changes of rock masses, and glaciation and permafrost phenomena. The project involves a large number of research teams supported by radioactive waste management agencies or governmental regulatory bodies in Canada, China, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Sweden and USA, who conducted advanced studies and numerical modelling of coupled THMC processes under five tasks. This report summarizes the work contributed to Phase 2 of Task B of the project, which took place during the period of March 2004 to May 2006. The Phase 2 work incorporated the use of a wide range of numerical models to simulate the failure of a number of intact rock core samples, from the APSE tunnel at Aespoe HRL, as tested in uniaxial compression and other loading conditions with the intention of establishing the common and code-specific features of the models. The core samples of the Aespoe diorite were treated with different initial mechanical and chemical conditions as dry samples, saturated with distilled water, formation water and saline water, with different durations of submersion, respectively, in order to observe the mechanical effects of saturation by different chemical fluids on the mechanical properties of the intact core

  14. Use of Social Network Analysis in Early Phases of ICT Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libor Mesicek

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available According to results of our surveys in 2011 the ICT project managers operating in the Czech Republic would like to have wider possibility of influencing the selection of team members in their projects.The article focuses on the psychological and the sociological aspects of the ICT project teams’ structure, analyzing the existing social networks within a company as well as the concept of the team roles when setting up the project team by mapping the existing relationships among the team members and the possible personality divergence of each employee.The first part of the article summarizes the important milestones for mapping the social networks, the possibility of mapping the network of social relationships, communication channels and relationships in the company, it is focusing on the differences between a team and a work group and the consequences on their functioning.The article represents two surveys results. First one took place among 36 ICT project managers and the second one among visitors of international conference Systems integration 2011. Based on these results, we are presenting a brief description of process design that supports and is important for the ICT team leader’s nominations, as well as for the ICT team members, respecting their relationship structure, results of past cooperation and psychological team roles.The process includes a mapping of a subset of social networks, recommendations of competent managers for the approved project charters based on the output of the analysis, progress and outcomes of finished projects and other relevant business information. The following stage carries the selection and recommendation for individual leaders in regards of the appropriate team members. To ensure the continuous process improvement and preservation of knowledge for the next cycle, the last part is completed by the feedback and evaluation. The proposed process cycle should stress the importance of psychological and

  15. Uncovering a Salt Giant. Deep-Sea Record of Mediterranean Messinian Events (DREAM) multi-phase drilling project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerlenghi, Angelo; Aoisi, Vanni; Lofi, Johanna; Hübscher, Christian; deLange, Gert; Flecker, Rachel; Garcia-Castellanos, Daniel; Gorini, Christian; Gvirtzman, Zohar; Krijgsman, Wout; Lugli, Stefano; Makowsky, Yizhaq; Manzi, Vinicio; McGenity, Terry; Panieri, Giuliana; Rabineau, Marina; Roveri, Marco; Sierro, Francisco Javier; Waldmann, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    In May 2013, the DREAM MagellanPlus Workshop was held in Brisighella (Italy). The initiative builds from recent activities by various research groups to identify potential sites to perform deep-sea scientific drilling in the Mediterranean Sea across the deep Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) sedimentary record. In this workshop three generations of scientists were gathered: those who participated in formulation of the deep desiccated model, through DSDP Leg 13 drilling in 1973; those who are actively involved in present-day MSC research; and the next generation (PhD students and young post-docs). The purpose of the workshop was to identify locations for multiple-site drilling (including riser-drilling) in the Mediterranean Sea that would contribute to solve the several open questions still existing about the causes, processes, timing and consequences at local and planetary scale of an outstanding case of natural environmental change in the recent Earth history: the Messinian Salinity Crisis in the Mediterranean Sea. The product of the workshop is the identification of the structure of an experimental design of site characterization, riser-less and riser drilling, sampling, measurements, and down-hole analyses that will be the core for at least one compelling and feasible multiple phase drilling proposal. Particular focus has been given to reviewing seismic site survey data available from different research groups at pan-Mediterranean basin scale, to the assessment of additional site survey activity including 3D seismics, and to ways of establishing firm links with oil and gas industry. The scientific community behind the DREAM initiative is willing to proceed with the submission to IODP of a Multi-phase Drilling Project including several drilling proposals addressing specific drilling objectives, all linked to the driving objectives of the MSC drilling and understanding . A series of critical drilling targets were identified to address the still open questions

  16. Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 4 discusses the following topics: Rod Compaction/Loading System Test Results and Analysis Report; Waste Collection System Test Results and Analysis Report; Waste Container Transfer Fixture Test Results and Analysis Report; Staging and Cutting Table Test Results and Analysis Report; and Upper Cutting System Test Results and Analysis Report.

  17. CEC project Mirage - second phase on migration of radionuclides in the geosphere. Third (and final) summary progress report (work period 1989)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A second phase of the Community coordinated project Mirage (migration of radionuclides in the geosphere) was launched in 1986. The present report brings together reviews of work done in the four research areas of this phase for 1989, and therefore constitutes an update of the previous reports, ref. EUR 11589 and 12229. This project is part of the CEC R and D programme on radioactive waste management (1985-89)

  18. Taking Ultra-Wideband Communications To The Next Phase Is The Goal Of Virginia Tech Project

    OpenAIRE

    Crumbley, Liz

    2003-01-01

    A team of Virginia Tech researchers is attempting to push ultra-wideband (UWB) technology into the next phase--where military communications can completely elude detection by nearby enemy troops and all manner of home electronics systems can be operated wirelessly.

  19. Navy Radon Assessment and Mitigation Program: Work/quality assurance project plan screening phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1987, the military services of the United States were tasked to take appropriate action to establish an indoor radon assessment and mitigation program. As a result, the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFACENGCOM) was assigned the responsibility of identifying potential hazards to personnel from exposure to naturally occurring radon gas and prioritizing corrective actions and to coordinating these actions with the major claimants. NAVRAMP is based upon current US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines. The program has been separated into four phases. The screening phase will concentrate on evaluating radon levels, based on statistical samples, in those buildings that have been determined to be at most at risk to elevated levels of radon, such as base housing, schools, day-care centers, hospitals, brigs, Base Officer Quarters, and Base Enlisted Quarters. During the assessment phase, every building that contains personnel for over 4 h/day will be evaluated. Mitigation work will be accomplished by Navy or Navy-contracted personnel. HAZWRAP services during the mitigation phase will consist of determining the extent of reduction in radon levels after the mitigation effort. 7 refs., 11 figs

  20. [Participatory Quality Development: Engaging Community Members in All Phases of Project Planning and Implementation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, M T; Kilian, H; Block, M; von Unger, H; Brandes, S; Ziesemer, M; Gold, C; Rosenbrock, R

    2015-09-01

    Community participation, recognised as a central feature of successful health promotion and prevention, is often difficult to implement. In this research project internationally recognised methods of participatory health research were applied to demonstrate ways in which community members can be engaged. Participatory health research is characterised by a close collaboration between academic researchers, practitioners and community members in order to generate common knowledge. It is not a question of translating knowledge from research into practice, but rather a question of promoting a collective learning process on the part of all participants for the purpose of developing solutions which address the interests and needs of local people. The result of the project is a new approach for strengthening the quality of prevention and health promotion interventions: participatory quality development (PQD).

  1. ART/Ada design project, phase 1. Task 1 report: Overall design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Bradley P.

    1988-01-01

    The design methodology for the ART/Ada project is introduced, and the selected design for ART/Ada is described in detail. The following topics are included: object-oriented design, reusable software, documentation techniques, impact of Ada, design approach, and differences between ART-IM 1.5 and ART/Ada 1.0 prototype. Also, Ada generator and ART/Ada runtime systems are discussed.

  2. Roadway Powered Electric Vehicle Project Track Construction And Testing Program Phase 3D

    OpenAIRE

    Systems Control Technology, Inc.

    1994-01-01

    This report covers the construction and testing of a Roadway Powered Electric Vehicle (RPEV) proof-of-concept system. The test facility was built at the University of California Richmond Field Station. The facility has a 700-foot test track and an operational 35-passenger RPEV. The report contains an introduction to the concept of RPEV and discusses the following aspects of the project: systems engineering and design, vehicle, facilities, testing, related RPEV research, and control circuits.

  3. Development of in vivo biotransformation enzyme assays for ecotoxicity screening: In vivo measurement of phases I and II enzyme activities in freshwater planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei-Hui

    2016-08-01

    The development of a high-throughput tool is required for screening of environmental pollutants and assessing their impacts on aquatic animals. Freshwater planarians can be used in rapid and sensitive toxicity bioassays. Planarians are known for their remarkable regeneration ability but much less known for their metabolic and xenobiotic biotransformation abilities. In this study, the activities of different phase I and II enzymes were determined in vivo by directly measuring fluorescent enzyme substrate disappearance or fluorescent enzyme metabolite production in planarian culture media. For phase I enzyme activity, O-deethylation activities with alkoxyresorufin could not be detected in planarian culture media. By contrast, O-deethylation activities with alkoxycoumarin were detected in planarian culture media. Increases in 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (ECOD) activities was only observed in planarians exposed to 1μM, but not 10μM, β-naphthoflavone for 24h. ECOD activity was inhibited in planarians exposed to 10 and 100μM rifampicin or carbamazepine for 24h. For phase II enzyme activity, DT-diaphorase, arylsulfatases, uridine 5'-diphospho (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferase or catechol-O-methyltransferase activity was determined in culture media containing planarians. The results of this study indicate that freshwater planarians are a promising model organism to monitor exposure to environmental pollutants or assess their impacts through the in vivo measurement of phase I and II enzyme activities. PMID:27062342

  4. Supplmental design requirements document enhanced radioactive and mixed waste storage: Phase 5, Project W-113

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Supplemental Design Requirements Document (SDRD) is used to communicate Project W-113 specific plant design information from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the cognizant Architect Engineer (A/E). The SDRD is prepared after the completion of the project Conceptual Design report (CDR) and prior to the initiation of definitive design. Information in the SDRD serves two purposes: to convey design requirements that are too detailed for inclusion in the Functional Design Criteria (FDC) report and to serve as a means of change control for design commitments in the Title I and Title II design. The Solid Waste Retrieval Project (W-113) SDRD has been restructured from the equipment based outline used in previous SDRDs to a functional systems outline. This was done to facilitate identification of deficiencies in the information provided in the initial draft SDRD and aid design confirmation. The format and content of this SDRD adhere as closely as practicable to the requirements of WHC-CM-6-1, Standard Engineering Practices for Functional Design Criteria

  5. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Ghana. Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Republic of Ghana has no claimed uranium resources in the categories Reasonably Assured and Estimated Additional. The only occurrences known are within pegmatites and are of no economic importance. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Ghana estimates that the Speculative Resources of the country fall between 15,000 and 40,000 tonnes uranium. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Ghana believes that the Panafrican Mobile Belt has the highest uranium potential of all geological units of the country. The Obosum beds are the priority number two target. A three years exploration programme is recommended for a total cost of US $ 5,000,000. The Ghana Atomic Energy Commission and the Ghana Geological Survey provide a basic infrastructure for uranium exploration. Any future uranium development in Ghana should be embedded in a well defined national uranium policy. It is recommended that such a policy be draw, up by the Ghanaian authorities

  6. Project 2010 Project Management

    CERN Document Server

    Happy, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The ideal on-the-job reference guide for project managers who use Microsoft Project 2010. This must-have guide to using Microsoft Project 2010 is written from a real project manager's perspective and is packed with information you can use on the job. The book explores using Project 2010 during phases of project management, reveals best practices, and walks you through project flow from planning through tracking to closure. This valuable book follows the processes defined in the PMBOK Guide, Fourth Edition , and also provides exam prep for Microsoft's MCTS: Project 2010 certification.: Explains

  7. Metholology for the selection of LWR safety R and D projects. Phase I, status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the LWR R and D Selection Methodology Program is to develop and demonstrate an R and D selection methodology appropriate for LWR safety technology. This report documents the development work from the program beginning in April, 1979 to the end of Fiscal Year 1979. The scope of work for this period included three tasks; methodology review (Task 1), measures development (Task 2), and methodology development for the first phase of application (Task 3). The accomplishments of these tasks are presented

  8. Lifecycle information for E-literature: an introduction to the second phase of the LIFE project

    OpenAIRE

    Ayris, P.; R Davies; McLeod, R; Miao, R.; Shenton, H.; P. Wheatley(University of Warwick, United Kingdom)

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: The first phase of LIFE (Lifecycle Information For E-Literature) made a major contribution to understanding the long-term costs of digital preservation; an essential step in helping institutions plan for the future. The LIFE work models the digital lifecycle and calculates the costs of preserving digital information for future years. Organisations can apply this process in order to understand costs and plan effectively for the preservation of their digital collection...

  9. Fish tracking technology development. Phases 1 and 2, project definition desk study and equipment

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, A.; Potter, E.C.E.; Elson, J

    1997-01-01

    The document reports on the major findings from a definition study to appraise the options to develop fish tracking equipment, in particular tags and data logging systems, in order to improve the effeciency of the Agency tracking studies and to obtain a greater understanding of fish biology. The definition study was in two parts. The first, Phase 1, collated and evaluated all the known tracking systems that may be suitable for studies of fish which are either produced commercially or have bee...

  10. 360-degree fringe-projection profilometry of discontinuous solids with 2 co-phased projectors and 1-camera

    CERN Document Server

    Servin, Manuel; Padilla, J M

    2014-01-01

    We describe a theoretical analysis and experimental set-up of a co-phased 360-degree fringe-projection profilometer. This 360-degree profilometer is built using 2-projections and 1-camera and can digitize discontinuous solids with diffuse light surface. A 360-degree profilometer rotate the object a full revolution to digitize the analyzing solid. Although 360-degree profilometry is not new, we are proposing however a new experimental set-up which permits the 360-degree digitalization of discontinuous (piecewise-continuous) solids. The main advantage of using this co-phased 2-projectors profilometer is that self-occluding shadows due to discontinuities are solved efficiently. Previous 1-projector, 1-camera 360-degree profilometers generate self-occluding shadows at the solid discontinuities. Yet another advantage of our new profilometer is a trivial line-by-line fringe-data assembling from all 360-degree perspectives. Finally we used a 400 steps/rotation turntable, and a 640x480 pixels CCD camera. Higher resol...

  11. Analysis of the Emission Inventories and Model-Ready Emission Datasets of Europe and North America for Phase 2 of the AQMEII Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper highlights the development of the emission inventories and emission processing for Europe (EU) and North America (NA) in the second phase of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) project. The main purpose of the second phase of the AQMEII...

  12. The Setup Phase of Project Open Book: A Report to the Commission on Preservation and Access on the Status of an Effort To Convert Microfilm to Digital Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Paul; Weaver, Shari

    Digital image quality, indexing structures, and production workflow were the three central issues examined during the second phase--the set-up phase--of Project Open Book, a major effort by Yale University Library to explore the usefulness of digital technologies for preserving and improving access to deteriorating documents. This report outlines…

  13. Growth cone collapse assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Geoffrey M W; Jareonsettasin, Prem; Keynes, Roger J

    2014-01-01

    The growth cone collapse assay has proved invaluable in detecting and purifying axonal repellents. Glycoproteins/proteins present in detergent extracts of biological tissues are incorporated into liposomes, added to growth cones in culture and changes in morphology are then assessed. Alternatively purified or recombinant molecules in aqueous solution may be added directly to the cultures. In both cases after a defined period of time (up to 1 h), the cultures are fixed and then assessed by inverted phase contrast microscopy for the percentage of growth cones showing a collapsed profile with loss of flattened morphology, filopodia, and lamellipodia.

  14. Global Radiological Source Sorting, Tracking, and Monitoring Project: Phase I Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL; Gorman, Bryan L [ORNL

    2010-09-01

    As a proof of concept tested in an operational context, the Global Radiological Source Sorting, Tracking, and Monitoring (GRadSSTraM) Project successfully demonstrated that radio frequency identification (RFID) and Web 2.0* technologies can be deployed to track controlled shipments between the United States and the European Union. Between November 2009 and May 2010, a total of 19 shipments were successfully shipped from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) and tracked to their delivery at England's National Physical Laboratory (NPL) by the United Kingdom Royal Mail. However, the project can only be viewed as a qualified success as notable shortcomings were observed. Although the origin and terminus of all RFID-enabled shipments were recorded and no shipments were lost, not all the waypoints between ORNL and NPL were incorporated into the pilot. Given limited resources, the project team was able to install RFID listeners/actuators at three waypoints between the two endpoints. Although it is likely that all shipments followed the same route between ORNL and NPL, it cannot be determined beyond question that all 19 shipments were routed on identical itineraries past the same three waypoints. The pilot also raises the distinct possibility that unattended RFID tracking alone, without positive confirmation that a tagged item has been properly recorded by an RFID reader, does not meet a rigorous standard for shipping controlled items. Indeed, the proof of concept test strongly suggests that a multifaceted approach to tracking may be called for, including tracking methods that are capable of reading and accepting multiple inputs for individual items [e.g., carrier-provided tracking numbers, Universal Product Codes (UPCs), and RFID tags]. For controlled items, another apparent requirement is a confirmation feature, human or otherwise, which can certify that an item's RFID tag, UPC, or tracking number has been recorded.

  15. Texas Clean Energy Project: Decision Point Application, Section 2: Topical Report - Phase 1, February 2010-October 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattes, Karl

    2013-09-01

    Summit Texas Clean Energy, LLC (STCE) is developing the Texas Clean Energy Project (TCEP or the Project) to be located near Penwell, Texas. The TCEP will include an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with a nameplate capacity of 400 megawatts electric (MWe), combined with the production of urea fertilizer and the capture, utilization and storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) sold commercially for regional use in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the Permian Basin of west Texas. The TCEP will utilize coal gasification technology to convert Powder River Basin subbituminous coal delivered by rail from Wyoming into a synthetic gas (syngas) that will be cleaned and further treated so that at least 90 percent of the overall carbon entering the IGCC facility will be captured. The clean syngas will then be divided into two highhydrogen (H2) concentration streams, one of which will be combusted as a fuel in a combined cycle power block for power generation and the other converted into urea fertilizer for commercial sale. The captured CO2 will be divided into two streams: one will be used in producing the urea fertilizer and the other will be compressed for transport by pipeline for offsite use in EOR and permanent underground sequestration. The TCEP was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) for cost-shared co-funded financial assistance under Round 3 of its Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). A portion of this financial assistance was budgeted and provided for initial development, permitting and design activities. STCE and the DOE executed a Cooperative Agreement dated January 29, 2010, which defined the objectives of the Project for all phases. During Phase 1, STCE conducted and completed all objectives defined in the initial development, permitting and design portions of the Cooperative Agreement. This topical report summarizes all work associated with the project objectives, and

  16. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (Phase I). Project IV. Structural building response; Structural Building Response Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the Phase I effort of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) being performed by the University of California Lawrence Livermore Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the basic objective of Subtask IV.1 (Structural Building Response Review) is to review and summarize current methods and data pertaining to seismic response calculations particularly as they relate to the objectives of the SSMRP. This material forms one component in the development of the overall computational methodology involving state of the art computations including explicit consideration of uncertainty and aimed at ultimately deriving estimates of the probability of radioactive releases due to seismic effects on nuclear power plant facilities

  17. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (Phase I). Project IV. Structural building response; Structural Building Response Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Healey, J.J.; Wu, S.T.; Murga, M.

    1980-02-01

    As part of the Phase I effort of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) being performed by the University of California Lawrence Livermore Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the basic objective of Subtask IV.1 (Structural Building Response Review) is to review and summarize current methods and data pertaining to seismic response calculations particularly as they relate to the objectives of the SSMRP. This material forms one component in the development of the overall computational methodology involving state of the art computations including explicit consideration of uncertainty and aimed at ultimately deriving estimates of the probability of radioactive releases due to seismic effects on nuclear power plant facilities.

  18. Processing of projections containing phase contrast in laboratory micro-computerized tomography imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Zápražný, Zdenko; Korytár, Dušan; Mikulík, Petr; Áč, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Free-space-propagation-based imaging belongs to several techniques for achieving phase contrast in the hard X-ray range. The basic precondition is to use an X-ray beam with a high degree of coherence. Although the best sources of coherent X-rays are synchrotrons, spatially coherent X-rays emitted from a sufficiently small spot of laboratory microfocus or sub-microfocus sources allow the transfer of some of the modern imaging techniques from synchrotrons to laboratories. Spatially coherent X-r...

  19. Aptamer-based fluorescent solid-phase thrombin assay using a silver-coated glass substrate and signal amplification by glucose oxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe an aptamer-based solid-state biosensor for the fluorometric determination of thrombin. The surface of silver-coated glass was modified with the thrombin-binding aptamer 1 (TBA 1) of the sequence 5′-HS-TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT GGT TGG TGT GGT TGG-3′. A second (and biotinylated) thrombin -binding aptamer (TBA 2) with the sequence 5′-biotin-AGT CCG TGG TAG GGC AGG TTG GGG TGA CT-3′ was applied as the signaling aptamer. Following binding of thrombin by TBA 1 on the surface, TBA 2 is added and then binds to the thrombin on the surface of the silver-coated glass to form the thrombin-aptamer complex. The biotin groups on TBA 2 are then coated with streptavidin, and biotin-labeled glucose oxidase (biotin-GOx) is added to bind to streptavidin. The quantity of GOx immobilized in this way is directly related to the quantity of thrombin bound on the surface. Following cleavage of the aptamer with DNase I, glucose is added and oxidized by GOx to yield H2O2. Horseradish peroxidase is added and causes the oxidation of 3-p-hydroxyphenylpropanoic acid to yield a fluorescent product. The intensity of the blue fluorescence is directly related to the thrombin concentration in the 300 pM to 6500 pM range, and the detection limit is as low as 82 pM. The assay has good selectivity and practicability. (author)

  20. Coherent digital demodulation of single-camera N-projections for 3D-object shape measurement: co-phased profilometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servin, M; Garnica, G; Estrada, J C; Quiroga, A

    2013-10-21

    Fringe projection profilometry is a well-known technique to digitize 3-dimensional (3D) objects and it is widely used in robotic vision and industrial inspection. Probably the single most important problem in single-camera, single-projection profilometry are the shadows and specular reflections generated by the 3D object under analysis. Here a single-camera along with N-fringe-projections is (digital) coherent demodulated in a single-step, solving the shadows and specular reflections problem. Co-phased profilometry coherently phase-demodulates a whole set of N-fringe-pattern perspectives in a single demodulation and unwrapping process. The mathematical theory behind digital co-phasing N-fringe-patterns is mathematically similar to co-phasing a segmented N-mirror telescope.

  1. Limitations to the determination of a Laguerre-Gauss spectrum via projective, phase-flattening measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Qassim, Hammam; Torres, Juan P; Padgett, Miles J; Karimi, Ebrahim; Boyd, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    One of the most widely used techniques for measuring the orbital angular momentum components of a light beam is to flatten the spiral phase front of a mode, in order to couple it to a single-mode optical fiber. This method, however, suffers from an efficiency that depends on the orbital angular momentum of the initial mode and on the presence of higher order radial modes. The reason is that once the phase has been flattened, the field retains its ringed intensity pattern and is therefore a nontrivial superposition of purely radial modes, of which only the fundamental one couples to a single mode optical fiber. In this paper, we study the efficiency of this technique both theoretically and experimentally. We find that even for low values of the OAM, a large amount of light can fall outside the fundamental mode of the fiber, and we quantify the losses as functions of the waist of the coupling beam of the orbital angular momentum and radial indices. Our results can be used as a tool to remove the efficiency bias...

  2. The Urban Environmental Monitoring/100 Cities Project: Legacy of the First Phase and Next Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanov, William L.; Wentz, Elizabeth A.; Brazel, Anthony; Netzband, Maik; Moeller, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    The Urban Environmental Monitoring (UEM) project, now known as the 100 Cities Project, at Arizona State University (ASU) is a baseline effort to collect and analyze remotely sensed data for 100 urban centers worldwide. Our overarching goal is to use remote sensing technology to better understand the consequences of rapid urbanization through advanced biophysical measurements, classification methods, and modeling, which can then be used to inform public policy and planning. Urbanization represents one of the most significant alterations that humankind has made to the surface of the earth. In the early 20th century, there were less than 20 cities in the world with populations exceeding 1 million; today, there are more than 400. The consequences of urbanization include the transformation of land surfaces from undisturbed natural environments to land that supports different forms of human activity, including agriculture, residential, commercial, industrial, and infrastructure such as roads and other types of transportation. Each of these land transformations has impacted, to varying degrees, the local climatology, hydrology, geology, and biota that predate human settlement. It is essential that we document, to the best of our ability, the nature of land transformations and the consequences to the existing environment. The focus in the UEM project since its inception has been on rapid urbanization. Rapid urbanization is occurring in hundreds of cities worldwide as population increases and people migrate from rural communities to urban centers in search of employment and a better quality of life. The unintended consequences of rapid urbanization have the potential to cause serious harm to the environment, to human life, and to the resulting built environment because rapid development constrains and rushes decision making. Such rapid decision making can result in poor planning, ineffective policies, and decisions that harm the environment and the quality of human life

  3. Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

    1992-10-01

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat

  4. Analytical quality assurance procedures developed for the IAEA's Reference Asian Man Project (Phase 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical quality assurance procedures adopted for use in the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project on Ingestion and Organ Content of Trace Elements of Importance in Radiological Protection are designed to ensure comparability of the analytical results for Cs, I, Sr, Th, U and other elements in human tissues and diets collected and analysed in nine participating countries. The main analytical techniques are NAA and ICP-MS. For sample preparation, all participants are using identical food blenders which have been centrally supplied after testing for contamination. For quality control of the analyses, six NIST SRMs covering a range of matrices with certified and reference values for the elements of interest have been distributed. A new Japanese reference diet material has also been developed. These quality assurance procedures are summarized here and new data are presented for Cs, I, Sr, Th and U in the NIST SRMs. (author)

  5. Computational model design specification for Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emission from nuclear operations at Hanford since their inception in 1944. The purpose of this report is to outline the basic algorithm and necessary computer calculations to be used to calculate radiation doses specific and hypothetical individuals in the vicinity of Hanford. The system design requirements, those things that must be accomplished, are defined. The system design specifications, the techniques by which those requirements are met, are outlined. Included are the basic equations, logic diagrams, and preliminary definition of the nature of each input distribution. 4 refs., 10 figs., 9 tabs

  6. River Protection Project Integrated safety management system phase II verification review plan - 7/29/99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this review is to verify the implementation status of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) for the River Protection Project (RPP) facilities managed by Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) and operated by Lockheed Martin Hanford Company (LMHC). This review will also ascertain whether within RPP facilities and operations the work planning and execution processes are in place and functioning to effectively protect the health and safety of the workers, public, environment, and federal property over the RPP life cycle. The RPP ISMS should support the Hanford Strategic Plan (DOERL-96-92) to safely clean up and manage the site's legacy waste and deploy science and technology while incorporating the ISMS central theme to ''Do work safely'' and protect human health and the environment

  7. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Sudan. February-March 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to the Democratic Republic of the Sudan believes that the Speculative Resources of the country might fall between 20,000 and 40,000 tonnes uranium and more. This indicates that the Speculative Resources of the Sudan could be significantly higher than previously estimated (7,500 tonnes uranium) by the NEA/IAEA Steering Group on the Uranium Resources - IUREP Phase I. The Government is willing to consider valid exploration programmes presented by prospective partners as long as they serve the interests of both parties. Within the general six-year (1977/78-1982/83) plan for development of the country's mineral resources, the Ministry of Energy and Mining has set up certain priorities which it would like to see expeditiously implemented: uranium exploration and production stands high on the list of priorities. On the basis of very limited information on regional geology and on previous exploration which was available to the Mission, it is estimated that the greatest potential for the Speculative Resources of possible economic significance will prove to occur in the following geological environments of the Sudan (Red Sea Hills area is not included): precambrian basement complex, palaeozoic-mesozoic-tertiary sedimentary basins and the tertiary to recent calcretes. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission believes that some 20 Million US$ (very rough estimate) will be needed to (1) check the validity of the basic geological concepts formulated on the uranium potential of the selected areas, (2) accumulate diagnostic geological, geophysical, geochemical data indicative of a true uranium potential there, (3) study the basement complex rocks and the sedimentary formations at least on a broad structural-stratigraphic reconnaissance basis (a tremendous amount of valuable water drilling data has accumulated over the last years for some of the selected sedimentary basins) and (4) determine the most appropriate investigation techniques to be utilized

  8. The carcinoGENOMICS project: Critical selection of model compounds for the development of omics-based in vitro carcinogenicity screening assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinken, M.; Doktorova, T.; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, H.; Ahr, H.-J.; Lock, E.; Carmichael, P.; Roggen, E.; Delft, J. van; Kleinjans, J.; Castell, J.; Bort, R.; Donato, T.; Ryan, M.; Corvi, R.; Keun, H.; Ebbels, T.; Athersuch, T.; Sansone, S.-A.; Rocca-Serra, P.; Stierum, R.; Jennings, P.; Pfaller, W.; Gmuender, H.; Vanhaecke, T.; Rogiers, V.

    2008-01-01

    Recent changes in the European legislation of chemical-related substances have forced the scientific community to speed up the search for alternative methods that could partly or fully replace animal experimentation. The Sixth Framework Program project carcinoGENOMICS was specifically raised to deve

  9. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Turkey. September to November 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Turkey estimates the Speculative Resources of the country to lie between 21 000 and 55 000 tonnes uranium. Past exploration in Turkey, dating from 1953, has indicated a very high number of uranium occurrences and radioactive anomalies, but ore deposits of significant size and grade have not been found. Present reserves amount to 4 600 tonnes uranium which can be allocated to approximately 15 sandstone type deposits in Neogene continental sediments. Several hundreds of other occurrences and radioactive anomalies exist where ore reserves have not been delineated. The uranium occurrences and radioactive anomalies can be divided according to host rock into (a) crystalline massif and (b) Tertiary continental sediment. The greatest geological potential for further resources is estimated to exist in the above mentioned two geological terrains. The most favourable geological potential exists in Neogene continental sedimentary basins near the crystalline massifs. Because surface exploration in the known favourable areas such as the Koepruebasi Basin has been so systematic, extensive, and successful, it is improbable that additional surface work will have much effect in increasing the number of new radioactive anomalies or uranium occurrences detected at the surface in these areas. Surface survey work in these areas should be mainly designed to assist the understanding of structures at depth. Surface reconnaissance survey work is, however, required in other parts of the above mentioned two geological terrains in this country. Before starting such a reconnaissance survey in new areas, the Mission suggests that a careful and extensive library study be conducted in close co-operation with sedimentologists, petrologists, and remote sensing specialists. The Mission suggests that in the medium term, 8 to 10 years, some 85 - 110 million U.S. Dollars be spent on airborne and ground surveys, including geological, radiometric, geochemical, and

  10. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Somalia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Somalia suggests that in addition to the reasonably assured resources (RAR) of 5 000 t uranium and estimated additional resources (EAR) of 11 000 t uranium in calcrete deposits, the speculative resources (SR) could be within the wide range of 0 - 150 000 t uranium. The majority of these speculative resources are related to sandstone and calcrete deposits. The potential for magmatic hydrothermal deposits is relatively small. The Mission recommends an exploration programme of about US $ 22 000 000 to test the uranium potential of the country which is thought to be excellent. The Mission also suggests a reorganization of the Somalia Geological Survey in order to improve its efficiency. Recommended methods include geological mapping, Landsat Imagery Interpretation, airborne and ground scintillometer surveys, and geochemistry. Follow-up radiometric surveys, exploration geophysics, mineralogical studies, trenching and drilling are proposed in favourable areas

  11. The AquaDEB project: Physiological flexibility of aquatic animals analysed with a generic dynamic energy budget model (phase II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alunno-Bruscia, Marianne; van der Veer, Henk W.; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A. L. M.

    2011-11-01

    This second special issue of the Journal of Sea Research on development and applications of Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory concludes the European Research Project AquaDEB (2007-2011). In this introductory paper we summarise the progress made during the running time of this 5 years' project, present context for the papers in this volume and discuss future directions. The main scientific objectives in AquaDEB were (i) to study and compare the sensitivity of aquatic species (mainly molluscs and fish) to environmental variability within the context of DEB theory for metabolic organisation, and (ii) to evaluate the inter-relationships between different biological levels (individual, population, ecosystem) and temporal scales (life cycle, population dynamics, evolution). AquaDEB phase I focussed on quantifying bio-energetic processes of various aquatic species ( e.g. molluscs, fish, crustaceans, algae) and phase II on: (i) comparing of energetic and physiological strategies among species through the DEB parameter values and identifying the factors responsible for any differences in bioenergetics and physiology; (ii) considering different scenarios of environmental disruption (excess of nutrients, diffuse or massive pollution, exploitation by man, climate change) to forecast effects on growth, reproduction and survival of key species; (iii) scaling up the models for a few species from the individual level up to the level of evolutionary processes. Apart from the three special issues in the Journal of Sea Research — including the DEBIB collaboration (see vol. 65 issue 2), a theme issue on DEB theory appeared in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B (vol 365, 2010); a large number of publications were produced; the third edition of the DEB book appeared (2010); open-source software was substantially expanded (over 1000 functions); a large open-source systematic collection of ecophysiological data and DEB parameters has been set up; and a series of DEB

  12. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Colombia. February - March 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic objective of IUREP is to 'review the present body of knowledge pertinent to the existence of uranium resources, to review and evaluate the potential for discovery of additional uranium resources, and to suggest new exploration efforts which might be carried out in promising new areas in collaboration with the countries concerned'. Following the initial bibliographic study, which formed Phase I of IUREP, it was envisaged that a further assessment in co-operation with the country in question would lead to a better delineation of areas of high potential and a more reliable estimate as to the degree of favourability for the discovery of additional uranium resources. It was planned that such work would be accomplished through field missions to the country and that these field missions and the resulting report would constitute the IUREP Orientation Phase. The purpose of the Orientation Mission to Colombia was (i) to develop a better understanding of the uranium potential of the country, (ii) to delineate areas favourable for the discovery of speculative uranium resources, (iii) to make recommendations, as appropriate, on the best methods for evaluating the favourable areas, operating procedures and estimated possible costs, (iv) to develop the logistical data required to carry out any possible further work, and (v) to compile a report that would be immediately available to the Colombian authorities. Uranium exploration in Colombia is of very recent date, with the majority of activities getting under way only after 1970. In spite of the limited work that has been done, however, over 1300 radioactive anomalies have been recorded. The total number of uranium mineral occurrences resulting from follow-up work is still very small, and some are unusual in world terms. Topographic and geographic conditions in Colombia make geological and exploration work very difficult and costly, especially in the Cordilleras and the Interior Zone (Llanos Orientales). There are, at

  13. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Thailand. February-March 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The I.U.R.E.P. Orientation Phase Mission assesses the Speculative Uranium Resources in Thailand to be within the range of 1,500 to 38,500 tonnes U. This range is higher than the previous assessment in Phase I because the Mission recognizes additional favourable geological environments. At the same time, the untested and therefore the unknown degree of mineralization in some of these environments is acknowledged. Past exploration, dating from 1977, has been mainly confined to ground surveys of a small mineralized area and to airborne gamma-ray surveys of two small test areas. Ground reconnaissance work and prospecting has recognized some mineralization in several different host rocks and environments. Geological environments considered by the Mission to be favourable for uranium occurrences include sandstone of Jurassic to Triassic age, tertiary sedimentary basins (northern Thailand), tertiary sedimentary basins (southern Thailand), associated with fluorite deposits, granitic rocks, black shales and graphitic slates of the Paleozoic, associated with sedimentary phosphate deposits and associated with monazite sands. It is recommended that exploration for uranium resources in Thailand should continue. Planners of future exploration programmes should take the following activities into consideration. Rapid extension of carborne surveys to cover, without excessive overburdening, all areas having sufficient road density. Airborne gamma-ray surveys should be carried out in certain selected areas. In the selection of such areas, the considerable higher cost factor attendant on this method of surveying dictates that airborne surveys should only be carried out where carborne surveys prove ineffective (lack of adequate road network.) and where the topography is sufficiently even to assure a low but safe clearance and meaningful results. In certain areas, including the Khorat Plateau and the Tertiary Basins in northern and southern Thailand, there is a need for widely spaced

  14. Waste acid detoxification and reclamation: Phase 1, Project planning and concept development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this project are to develop processes for reducing the volume, quantity, and toxicity of metal-bearing waste acids. The primary incentives for implemeting these types of waste minimization processes are regulatory and economic in that they meet requirements in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and reduce the cost for treatment, storage, and disposal. Two precipitation processes and a distillation process are being developed to minimize waste from fuel fabrication operations, which comprise a series of metal-finishing operations. Waste process acids, such as HF/--/HNO3 etch solutions contianing Zr as a major metal impurity and HNO3 strip solutions containing Cu as a major metal impurity, are detoxified and reclaimed by concurrently precipitating heavy metals and regenerating acid for recycle. Acid from a third waste acid stream generated from chemical milling operations will be reclaimed using distillation. This stream comprises HNO3 and H2SO4 which contains U as the major metal impurity. Distillation allows NO3/sup /minus// to be displaced by SO4/sup /minus/2/ in metal salts; free HNO3 is then vaporized from the U-bearing sulfate stream. Uranium can be recovered from the sulfate stream in downstream precipitation step. These waste minimization processes were developed to meet Hanford's fuel fabrication process needs. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  15. The Eurosdr Project "RADIOMETRIC Aspects of Digital Photogrammetric IMAGES" - Results of the Empirical Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkavaara, E.; Arbiol, R.; Markelin, L.; Martínez, L.; Bovet, S.; Bredif, M.; Chandelier, L.; Heikkinen, V.; Korpela, I.; Lelegard, L.; Pérez, F.; Schläpfer, D.; Tokola, T.

    2011-09-01

    This article presents the empirical research carried out in the context of the multi-site EuroSDR project "Radiometric aspects of digital photogrammetric images" and provides highlights of the results. The investigations have considered the vicarious radiometric and spatial resolution validation and calibration of the sensor system, radiometric processing of the image blocks either by performing relative radiometric block equalization or into absolutely reflectance calibrated products, and finally aspects of practical applications on NDVI layer generation and tree species classification. The data sets were provided by Leica Geosystems ADS40 and Intergraph DMC and the participants represented stakeholders in National Mapping Authorities, software development and research. The investigations proved the stability and quality of evaluated imaging systems with respect to radiometry and optical system. The first new-generation methods for reflectance calibration and equalization of photogrammetric image block data provided promising accuracy and were also functional from the productivity and usability points of view. The reflectance calibration methods provided up to 5% accuracy without any ground reference. Application oriented results indicated that automatic interpretation methods will benefit from the optimal use of radiometrically accurate multi-view photogrammetric imagery.

  16. The environmental control and life support system advanced automation project. Phase 1: Application evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewberry, Brandon S.

    1990-01-01

    The Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) is a Freedom Station distributed system with inherent applicability to advanced automation primarily due to the comparatively large reaction times of its subsystem processes. This allows longer contemplation times in which to form a more intelligent control strategy and to detect or prevent faults. The objective of the ECLSS Advanced Automation Project is to reduce the flight and ground manpower needed to support the initial and evolutionary ECLS system. The approach is to search out and make apparent those processes in the baseline system which are in need of more automatic control and fault detection strategies, to influence the ECLSS design by suggesting software hooks and hardware scars which will allow easy adaptation to advanced algorithms, and to develop complex software prototypes which fit into the ECLSS software architecture and will be shown in an ECLSS hardware testbed to increase the autonomy of the system. Covered here are the preliminary investigation and evaluation process, aimed at searching the ECLSS for candidate functions for automation and providing a software hooks and hardware scars analysis. This analysis shows changes needed in the baselined system for easy accommodation of knowledge-based or other complex implementations which, when integrated in flight or ground sustaining engineering architectures, will produce a more autonomous and fault tolerant Environmental Control and Life Support System.

  17. The International intraval project. Phase 1 case 8: The Alligator rivers natural analogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INTRAVAL is an international coordinated research program for predicting the potential radionuclide migration in the geosphere with the use of mathematical models. Such models are used to help assess the long-term safety of radioactive waste disposal systems. The objective of the Alligator Rivers Analogue Project (ARAP) is to identify and study long-term processes that have been significant in the development of the uranium dispersion zone at the Koongarra uranium ore deposit in the Northern Territory of Australia. This report includes a description of the site geology and gives an outline of the experimental programs, which are aimed to study the hydrogeology and geochemistry of the system, and the distribution of uranium and its daughter radionuclides in the rock strata. The extensive databases that have resulted from these studies have been used to develop and test hydrological, geochemical and transport models. A good basis has been established for modelling the transport of radionuclides in the porous, weathered zone of the Koongarra uranium deposit and its surroundings. A number of preliminary transport, hydrology and geochemical modelling reports are given, with the Koongarra databases also being used to test a Performance Assessment model. The possible application of scenario development procedures to the Koongarra site is discussed. 106 refs., 67 figs., 28 tabs

  18. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Morocco. Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the study carried out during the IUREP Orientation Phase in Morocco permit to think that the possible reserves of uranium in this country range between 33,500 t and 89,500 t U3O8 for what concerns the known traces and the already prospected zones in the Northern provinces. If we consider the favourability criteria of certain geological contexts that have not been researched yet in the same provinces and the speculative potential of the Southern provinces that have not been prospected at all, we can reasonably estimate reserves to double. In this case, the potential in uranium for the whole Morocco could range between 70,000 and 180,000 tons. The uranium phosphate constitutes by far the most important reserves of Morocco and the Moroccan government has decided to recuperate this uranium as sub-product from phosphoric acid. The consultants of the IUREP mission have estimated that the 'geological reserves' were ranging at about 12,3 million tons of U3O8 and that the recoverable reserves could be between 7 and 10 million tons of U3O8

  19. Analysis of Early Severe Accident Initiated by LBLOCA for Qinshan Phase II Nuclear Power Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Xing-Wei

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to simulate an early Severe Accident (SA scenario more detail through transferring the thermal-hydraulic status of the plant predicted by RELAP5 computer code to SA Program (SAP. Based on the criterion of date extract time, the RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic calculation data is extracted to form a file for SAP input card at 1477K of cladding surface. Relying on the thermal-hydraulic boundary parameters calculated by RELAP5 code, analysis of early SA initiated by the Large Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LBLOCA without mitigation measures for Qinshan Phase II Nuclear Power Plant (QSP-II performed by SAP through finding the key events of accident sequence, estimating the amount of hydrogen generation and oxidation behavior of the cladding and evaluating the relocation order of the materials collapsed in the central region of the core. The results of this study are expected to improve the SA analysis methodology more detail through analyzing early SA scenario.

  20. A reversed-phase HPLC-UV assay for simultaneous analysis of EGCG and ECG of tea polyphenols in rat plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Ting; LIANG Jun; HAN Guo-zhu; L(U) Li; LI Nan

    2008-01-01

    Objective To develop a simple and specific reversed-phase HPLC-UV method for simultaneous determination of (-) Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and (-) Epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG), the main active ingredients of tea polyphenols (TP), in rat plasma. Methods EGCG and ECG were eluted on a Kromasil C18 analytical column (150 mm×4.6 mm, 5μm) protected by a C18 pre-column (4.6 mm×20 mm, 10μm) with a linear gradient mobile phase composed of CH3CN (A)-0.1% citric acid (B), which was run from initial 14 % A and 86 % B to 20 % A and 80 % B at a flow rate of 1.0 mL·min-1 in 14 min, then changed to 14% A and 86% B at a gradient flow rate of 1.0-1.5 mL·min-1 during 14-18 min, and then maintained until 22 min at a gradient flow rate of 1.5-1.0 mL·min-1. The UV detector was set at 280 nm. Plasma samples (200 μL each) were prepared by liquid-liquid extraction procedure with double volumes of EtoAc and then evaporation of organic phase under N2 stream to dry, followed by reconstitution with 100 μL of 20 % CH3CN aqueous solution. The peak area ratios of analytes to vanillin as internal standard vs concentration of analytes to construct calibration curves. Results The HPLC resulted in base-line separation of vanillin, EGCG, ECG and other components; there was no interference from blank plasma. The linear range was 0.5-300 μg·mL-1 for EC, CG (r=0.9999) and 0.1-60 μg·mL-1 for ECG (r = 0.9999). The intra-and inter-day precision (RSD) was better than 6.1% and 12.6%, respectively, and the average accuracy was between 86.25%-103.14%. The extraction recovery of EGCG and ECG was 79.80%-84.64% and 75.22 %-91.39 %, respectively. The plasma samples were stable for at least 30 days at -20 ℃ and 8 h at room temperature;EGCG, ECG and IS stock solutions 2 months at -20 ℃, and the EtoAc-extracted plasma samples 24 h at 4 ℃. Application of the method to the determination of EGCG and ECG in plasma of rats receiving iv 100 mg·kg-1 of TP showed that these 2 compounds

  1. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Madagascar. September-October 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study, resulting from the IUREP Orientation Mission to Madagascar, includes the reported information on infrastructure, mining regulations and conditions made available to the Mission. Within the structure of the centrally planned economic system, uranium exploration and mining is considered the exclusive activity of OMNIS, an organization founded by the State for that purpose (Office Militaire National pour les Industries Strategiques). Madagascar has a long history of prospection and small-scale exploitation of uranium (thorium and radium). Some of this activity dates back to 1909, culminating in significant production of both uranium and thorium (in excess of 5900 tonnes of uranothorianite) by the CEA and private contractors in the Fort Dauphin area from 1955 to 1968. Past exploration and development work in a number of areas, notably by the CEA, OMNIS and the IAEA/UNDP, is reviewed and the uranium resources and mineral indications reported. The areas rated at present as the more important and which continue to be investigated (by OMNIS, in conjunction with IAEA/UNDP projects) in the order of priority are: the Fort Dauphin area, the Karroo formation and the Neogene lacustrine basin at Antsirabe. The Mission estimates that Madagascar has a moderate potential for undiscovered resources; it is estimated that such speculative resources could lie within the range of 4000 - 38000 tonnes U. In addition there are areas with as yet untested environments and with no known occurrences which may be favourable but which will require prospection. Modifications to existing programmes and new programmes are suggested. Policy alternatives are reviewed

  2. Opportunities with the K600 Magnetic Spectrometer During Phase 1 of the iThemba LABS RIB Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveling, R.

    2015-11-01

    Measurements of hadronic scattering and reactions at zero degrees is highly sought after because of its selectivity to excitations with low angular momentum transfer. High energy resolution measurements of this nature can only be performed at a few facilities worldwide, including iThemba LABS. Such measurements present significant experimental challenges due to the small difference in magnetic rigidity between the projectiles and the particles of interest. Hence a substantial amount of time and effort is required to achieve suitably stable and clean beam conditions before any measurement can be attempted. This results in large inefficiencies in beam usage and data collection under the current beam schedule at iThemba LABS, severely limiting the scope of research that can be performed with this facility. However, it is foreseen that during the first phase of the radioactive-ion beam (RIB) project at iThemba LABS a significant amount of beam-time will become available for stable beam nuclear physics research. It is imperative to plan ahead to ensure optimum utilization of beam-time during this period while taking advantage of the existing unique facilities at iThemba LABS. Potential projects that can make use of the zero-degree capabilities of the K600 magnetic spectrometer are discussed.

  3. Sun Valley Photovoltaic Power Project, Phase 1. Final report, June 1, 1978-February 28, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, Jr, F R

    1980-03-01

    An application experiment was devised for fabrication, installation, operation, and evaluation of a concentrating photovoltaic system for direct conversion of sunlight to electricity. If the experiment is performed, the photovoltaic system will be connected to an electric motor load and to an electric utility system. Provisions will be made to allow the motor load to be supplied with power from either the photovoltaic system or the utility system. When the demand of the motor load is low, the photovoltaic system will deliver excess power to the utility system for use elsewhere. Thus, the experimental installation has been designed with sufficient flexibility to enable several modes of operation to be evaluated. This type of application is a typical example of on-site power generation at an individual load center involving two-way energy exchange with the adjacent utility system. Because a growing market for photovoltaic systems in this type of application is expected in the 1980's, the experiment will provide needed information in a timely manner. The experiment was devised jointly by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) and its subcontractor, Spectrolab, Inc. LADWP will furnish a site and operate the equipment after installation. The subcontractor will manufacture and furnish a concentrating photovoltaic array with a power rating of approximately 200 kilowatts at one kilowatt per square meter of insolation. Other required equipment will be purchased to specification from appropriate suppliers. The photovoltaic system represents a state-of-the-art design at the time this report was prepared. However, minor design improvements may be made prior to and during system installation. All phases of fabrication, installation and operation will be documented through formal reports. The results of the experiment will contribute to the goals of the National Photovoltaic Conversion Program.

  4. The Waveform Correlation Event Detection System project, Phase II: Testing with the IDC primary network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, C.J.; Beiriger, J.I.; Moore, S.G. [and others

    1998-04-01

    Further improvements to the Waveform Correlation Event Detection System (WCEDS) developed by Sandia Laboratory have made it possible to test the system on the accepted Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) seismic monitoring network. For our test interval we selected a 24-hour period from December 1996, and chose to use the Reviewed Event Bulletin (REB) produced by the Prototype International Data Center (PIDC) as ground truth for evaluating the results. The network is heterogeneous, consisting of array and three-component sites, and as a result requires more flexible waveform processing algorithms than were available in the first version of the system. For simplicity and superior performance, we opted to use the spatial coherency algorithm of Wagner and Owens (1996) for both types of sites. Preliminary tests indicated that the existing version of WCEDS, which ignored directional information, could not achieve satisfactory detection or location performance for many of the smaller events in the REB, particularly those in the south Pacific where the network coverage is unusually sparse. To achieve an acceptable level of performance, we made modifications to include directional consistency checks for the correlations, making the regions of high correlation much less ambiguous. These checks require the production of continuous azimuth and slowness streams for each station, which is accomplished by means of FK processing for the arrays and power polarization processing for the three-component sites. In addition, we added the capability to use multiple frequency-banded data streams for each site to increase sensitivity to phases whose frequency content changes as a function of distance.

  5. Detailed accident analysis for the high level waste preparation phase of the commercial nuclear waste vitrification project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental consequences and the probability of conceivable accidents occurring during the high level waste preparation (HLWP) phase of the Commercial Nuclear Waste Vitrification Project (CNWVP) were analyzed. The maximum environmental consequences of postulated accidents were calculated to result in low radiation doses: a 50-year dose commitment of 0.3 rem to the whole body for a maximum individual, and of 20 man-rem to the whole body for the surrounding population. This may be compared to Department of Energy (DOE) values, in Manual Chapter Appendix 0524, of 0.5-rem whole-body annual dose commitment to individuals at points of maximum probable exposure in uncontrolled areas. The calculated whole-body relative dose risk to individuals from accidents is low (1.6 x 10-6 rem/yr) as compared to that received from natural background radiation (approximately 1.5 x 10-1 rem/yr) and as compared to levels specified in Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements for routine releases from nuclear power reactors (5.0 x 10-3 rem/yr). Therefore, the design and operation plans for the HLWP phase are judged not to represent an undue environmental risk from accident conditions

  6. Phase Velocity Analysis of Projected Wave Motion Along Oblique Radar Beams - A Numerical Study of Type-1 Radar Echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Lon Fern

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear features of type-1 radar echoes were studied by a two-dimensional (2D simulation of saturation the Farley-Buneman (FB wave. The behavior of this FB wave in a plane perpendicular to the _ magnetic field was simulated with a two-fluid code in which electron inertia was discounted while ion inertia was retained. It showed that the appearance of secondary waves propagating vertically and obliquely as the primary horizontal FB wave saturates. The secondary waves originating from nonlinear saturation process will construct the evolution of 2D modes which can be observed by oblique radar beams. We carried out the statistical analysis of projection phase velocities of 2D modes along oblique radar beam at different radar elevation angles. The result revealed that a likely density gradient effect of type-1 radar echoes for the wavelength dependence of phase velocity would appear at a larger radar elevation angle while short wavelength waves would approach isotropic speeds close to ion acoustic speed. This interesting result is primarily attributed to the spectral features of 2D modes.

  7. Low side lobe pattern synthesis using projection method with genetic algorithm for truncated cone conformal phased arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoqi Zeng; Siyin Li; Yan Zhang; Shanwei Lü

    2014-01-01

    A hybrid method for synthesizing antenna’s three di-mensional (3D) pattern is proposed to obtain the low sidelobe feature of truncated cone conformal phased arrays. In this method, the elements of truncated cone conformal phased arrays are pro-jected to the tangent plane in one generatrix of the truncated cone. Then two dimensional (2D) Chebyshev amplitude distribution optimization is respectively used in two mutual vertical directions of the tangent plane. According to the location of the elements, the excitation current amplitude distribution of each element on the conformal structure is derived reversely, then the excitation cur-rent amplitude is further optimized by using the genetic algorithm (GA). A truncated cone problem with 8×8 elements on it, and a 3D pattern desired side lobe level (SLL) up to 35 dB, is studied. By using the hybrid method, the optimal goal is accomplished with acceptable CPU time, which indicates that this hybrid method for the low sidelobe synthesis is feasible.

  8. Quality assurance plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Phase 1 -- Interim corrective measures and Phase 2 -- Purge and trap reactive gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) identifies and describes the systems utilized by the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project (MSRERP) personnel to implement the requirements and associated applicable guidance contained in the Quality Program Description Y/QD-15 Rev. 2 (Energy Systems 1995f). This QAP defines the quality assurance (QA) requirements applicable to all activities and operations in and directly pertinent to the MSRERP Phase 1--Interim Corrective Measures and Phase 2--Purge and Trap objectives. This QAP will be reviewed, revised, and approved as necessary for Phase 3 and Phase 4 activities. This QAP identifies and describes the QA activities and procedures implemented by the various Oak Ridge National Laboratory support organizations and personnel to provide confidence that these activities meet the requirements of this project. Specific support organization (Division) quality requirements, including the degree of implementation of each, are contained in the appendixes of this plan.

  9. Preliminary Public Design Report for the Texas Clean Energy Project: Topical Report - Phase 1, June 2010-July 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattes, Karl

    2012-02-01

    Summit Texas Clean Energy, LLC (Summit) is developing the Texas Clean Energy Project (TCEP or the project) to be located near Penwell, Texas. The TCEP will include an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant with a nameplate capacity of 400 megawatts electric (MWe), combined with the production of urea fertilizer and the capture, utilization and storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) sold commercially for regional use in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the Permian Basin of west Texas. The TCEP will utilize coal gasification technology to convert Powder River Basin sub-bituminous coal delivered by rail from Wyoming into a synthetic gas (syngas) which will be cleaned and further treated so that at least 90 percent of the overall carbon entering the facility will be captured. The clean syngas will then be divided into two high-hydrogen (H2) concentration streams, one of which will be combusted as a fuel in a combined cycle power block for power generation and the other converted into urea fertilizer for commercial sale. The captured CO2 will be divided into two streams: one will be used in producing the urea fertilizer and the other will be compressed for transport by pipeline for offsite use in EOR. The TCEP was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) for cost-shared co-funded financial assistance under Round 3 of its Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). A portion of this financial assistance was budgeted and provided for initial development, permitting and design activities. Front-end Engineering and Design (FEED) commenced in June 2010 and was completed in July 2011, setting the design basis for entering into the detailed engineering phase of the project. During Phase 1, TCEP conducted and completed the FEED, applied for and received its air construction permit, provided engineering and other technical information required for development of the draft Environmental Impact Statement, and

  10. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Cameroon. Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the International Uranium Resource Evaluation Project (IUREP) missions to host nations is to: Review the present body of knowledge pertinent to the existence of uranium resources, to review and evaluate the potential for the discovery of additional resources, and to suggest new exploration efforts which might be carried out in promising areas in collaboration with the countries concerned. Guidance in the achievement of these goals is provided through a check list of desired relevant information on: general background, the potential role of nuclear energy, and organizations involved, information on the mining industry, technical manpower employed or available, available maps, aerial photographs, and publications, national geological survey and organizations involved in uranium, private organizations involved in uranium exploration and mining, results of previous exploration, known uranium occurrences, plans for further work, legal and administrative requirements for exploration and logistical information on facilities available. The economy of CAMEROON is sound and continues to expand with an annual growth rates of 5-6%. Emphasis is placed on private investment with government participation in major development projects. The overall investment climate is good. Minerals exploration is carried out under nonexclusive Prospecting License and exclusive Exploration License that may later be converted to a Mining Lease or Mining Concession. Many of the conditions must be negotiated. Uranium is classified as a strategic mineral, and may be subject to special review. There is no defined policy on uranium development. Two government organizations are concerned with geology and mining. The INSTITUT DE RECHERCHES GEOLOGIQUES ET MINIERES (IRGM) conducts programs of geologic mapping and research, mineralogy, hydrology, and alternate energy sources. The DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND GEOLOGY (DMG) is responsible for all minerals exploration and mining. It includes a

  11. EVALUATION OF THOR MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR THE DOE ADVANCED REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES PHASE 2 PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C.; Jantzen, C.

    2012-02-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). In addition, the WTP LAW Vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as Cs-137, I-129, Tc-99, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap. The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to recycle it to the supplemental LAW treatment to avoid a large steady state accumulation in the pretreatment-vitrification loop. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and/or WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates

  12. Historic land use dynamics in and around Natura2000 sites as indicators for impact on biodiversity; Phase 1 of the BIOPRESS project for the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Hazeu, G.W.; Mücher, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    BIOPRESS is a EC-FP5 research project to support GMES `Global Monitoring for Environment and Security¿. It aims to provide the EU-user community with quantitative information on how changes in land cover and land use have affected the environment and biodiversity in Europe. This report is dealing with the results of the first phase of the BIOPRESS project for the Netherlands. The report concentrates on the selection, acquisition, processing and interpretation of recent and historical aerial p...

  13. NERI Project 99-119. A New Paradigm for Automatic Development of Highly Reliable Control Architectures for Nuclear Power Plants. Phase-2 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    March-Leuba, JA

    2002-01-15

    This report describes the tasks performed and the progress made during Phase 2 of the DOE-NERI project number 99-119 entitled Automatic Development of Highly Reliable Control Architecture for Future Nuclear Power Plants. This project is a collaboration effort between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), The University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) and the North Carolina State University (NCSU). ORNL is the lead organization and is responsible for the coordination and integration of all work.

  14. High-solids black liquor firing in pulp and paper industry kraft recovery boilers: Phase 1 -- Final report. Volume 2: Project technical results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southards, W.T.; Clement, J.L.; McIlroy, R.A.; Tharp, M.R.; Verrill, C.L.; Wessell, R.A.

    1995-11-01

    This project is a multiple-phase effort to develop technologies to improve high-solids black liquor firing in pulp mill recovery boilers. The principal means to this end is to construct and operate a pilot-scale recovery furnace simulator (RFS) in which these technologies can be tested. The Phase 1 objectives are to prepare a preliminary design for the RFS, delineate a project concept for evaluating candidate technologies, establish industrial partners, and report the results. Phase 1 addressed the objectives with seven tasks: Develop a preliminary design of the RFS; estimate the detailed design and construction costs of the RFS and the balance of the project; identify interested parties in the paper industry and key suppliers; plan the Phase 2 and Phase 3 tests to characterize the RFS; evaluate the economic justification for high-solids firing deployment in the industry; evaluate high-solids black liquor property data to support the RFS design; manage the project and reporting results, which included planning the future program direction.

  15. Characterization of a backfill candidate material, IBECO-RWC-BF Baclo Project - Phase 3 Laboratory tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannesson, Lars-Erik; Sanden, Torbjoern; Dueck, Ann; Ohlsson, Lars (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2010-01-15

    A backfill candidate material, IBECO-RWC-BF, which origin from Milos, Greece, has been investigated. The material was delivered both as granules and as pellets. The investigation described in this report aimed to characterize the material and evaluate if it can be used in a future repository. The following investigations have been done and are presented in this report: 1. Standard laboratory tests. Water content, liquid limit and swelling potential are examples on standard tests that have been performed. 2. Block manufacturing. The block compaction properties of the material have been determined. A first test was performed in laboratory but also tests in large scale have been performed. After finishing the test phase, 60 tons of blocks were manufactured at Hoeganaes Bjuf AB. The blocks will be used in large scale laboratory tests at Aespoe HRL. 3. Mechanical parameters. The compressibility of the material was investigated with oedometer tests (four tests) where the load was applied in steps after saturation. The evaluated oedometer modulus varied between 34.50 MPa. Tests were made to evaluate the elastic parameters of the material (E, nu). Altogether three tests were made on specimens with dry densities of about 1,710 kg/m3. The evaluated E-modulus and Poisson's ratio varied between 231-263 MPa and 0.16-0.19 respectively. The strength of the material, both the compressive strength and the tensile strength were measured on specimens compacted to different dry densities. The test results yielded a relation between density and the two types of strength. Furthermore, tests have been made in order to determine the compressibility of the unsaturated filling of pellets. Two tests were made where the pellets were loosely filled in a Proctor cylinder and then compressed at a constant rate of strain during continuously measurement of the applied load. 4. Swelling pressure and hydraulic conductivity. There is, as expected, a very clear influence of the dry density on the

  16. Road-testing the outreach best practices manual: Applicability for implementation of the development phase projects by the regional carbon sequestration partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, D.; Bradbury, J.; Garrett, G.; Greenberg, S.; Myhre, R.; Peterson, T.; Tollefson, L.; Wade, S.; Sacuta, N.

    2011-01-01

    Geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) storage verification tests by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) provided the experience base for the Public Outreach and Education for Carbon Storage Projects, a best practices manual, published in December 2009. This paper summarizes these outreach best practices; discusses their application in Aquistorc, a grcenficld CO2 storage project under way in western Canada; and reviews the implications for applying the best practices to new projects during the Development Phase of the DOE's RCSP Program. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Young drivers experience: the results of a second phase training on higher order skills : evaluation study in the framework of the European project NovEV.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craen, S. de Vissers, J.A.M.M. Houtenbos, M. & Twisk, D.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    To diminish the high accident risk of young drivers, new methods for accident prevention are being investigated. This study in the framework of the European project NovEV evaluates the effects of a post-license training on higher order skills. This second phase driver training consisted of an on-roa

  18. Evaluation of Project P.A.T.H.S. (Secondary 1 Program) by the Program Participants: Findings Based on the Full Implementation Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Sun, Rachel C. F.

    2008-01-01

    A total of 207 schools (N = 33,693 students) participated in the Secondary 1 Program of Project P.A.T.H.S. in the Full Implementation Phase (2006-07). Participants responded to a Subjective Outcome Evaluation Form (Form A) to assess their views of the program, instructors, and perceived effectiveness after program completion. Utilizing the…

  19. The final collimator has been installed ready for the LHC restart (phase 1 of the LHC collimator project)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN audiovisual service

    2009-01-01

    The collimators are installed around the LHC ring and the transfer lines to absorb ‘stray’ particles that have spread out, forming a halo around the beam. It is important to absorb this halo to protect the rest of the machine from damage, in particular the superconducting magnets, where any slight heating by the ‘stray particles’ could cause a magnet quench. The one-meter long collimators absorb the particles in the halo by closing a set of ‘jaws’ of various materials around the beam; the most robust collimators use fiber-reinforced graphite. Before the start-up last year, 88 collimators were installed. The unforeseen shutdown caused by the incident in Sector 3-4, allowed the collimator team to continue with the final 20 collimators necessary to maximize the LHC intensity and luminosity reach with the phase 1 collimation system. This marks the end of 6.5 years of hard work since the project began

  20. Community and team member factors that influence the operations phase of local prevention teams: the PROSPER Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Mark E; Chilenski, Sarah M; Greenberg, Mark T; Spoth, Richard L; Redmond, Cleve

    2007-09-01

    This study examined the longitudinal predictors of quality of functioning of community prevention teams during the "operations" phase of team development. The 14 community teams were involved in a randomized-trial of a university-community partnership project, PROSPER (Spoth et al., Prevention Science, 5(1): 31-39, 2004b), that implements evidence-based interventions intended to support positive youth development and reduce early substance use, as well as other problem behaviors. The study included a multi-informant approach to measurement of constructs, and included data from 137 team members, 59 human service agency directors and school administrators, 16 school principals, and 8 Prevention Coordinators (i.e. technical assistance providers). We examined how community demographics and social capital, team level characteristics, and team member attributes and attitudes are related to local team functioning across an 18-month period. Findings indicate that community demographics (poverty), social capital, team member attitudes towards prevention, and team members' views of the acceptability of teen alcohol use played a substantial role in predicting various indicators of the quality of team functioning 18 months later. PMID:17602297

  1. 建设工程施工阶段项目管理研究%Construction Project Management of Construction Phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄新哲

    2011-01-01

    在工程项目建设过程中,施工阶段的项目管理至关重要,对工程各个方面的质量有着直接的影响,其重要地位不可估量,所以非常值得我们去思考和探究.本文就建设工程施工阶段项目管理进行了详细的阐述,以供读者参考.%In the project construction process, project management of construction phase is essential to quality of construction, it is worth to think and explore. This paper describes the construction project management of construction phase for reference.

  2. Sustainable development in city districts: BaLaLuZ project - Bellevaux; Quartier de Bellevaux - Lausanne. Rapport final de la phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, J.-B.; Montavon, M. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Laboratoire d' Energie solaire et de physique du batiment (LESO-PB), Lausanne (Switzerland); Muehll, D. von der [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Laboratoire de Dynamiques territoriales (LADYT), Lausanne (Switzerland); Malatesta, D. [Ecole d' Etudes sociales et pedagogiques (EESP), Lausanne (Switzerland); Cunha, A. da; Dind, J.-P. [University of Lausanne, Institut de Geographie (UNIL-IGUL), Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2004-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) is one of a series of reports concerning municipal development in various cities in Switzerland. The four city districts involved include Basel (Gundeldinger Feld), Lausanne (Bellevaux), Lucerne (Basel-/Bernstrasse) and Zurich (Werdwies). This final report summarises the results of the first phase of the project in the Bellevaux district of Lausanne. The work done in the first phase is reviewed: A database with details on 240 buildings was set up, a pilot analysis of a building was carried out and suggestions for renovation work were made. Also, a socio-economic analysis of the district was made and the expectations of inhabitants were noted. Mobility was critically analysed and first possibilities in the urban planning area were looked at. Recommendations for the second phase of the project are presented.

  3. The Role and Function of Effective Communication in the Planning-Phase of Multi-Organizational International Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Zakaria, Mohamad

    2007-01-01

    This thesis aims at tackling an important issue in the communication management of multi-organizational international projects. Furthermore, it focuses on the importance of effective communication in the planning stage of this kind of projects. The literature review shows the importance of effective communication among the different stakeholders at this stage of the project planning in the life cycle of such projects in particular. The empirical data received through interviews of three proje...

  4. Possible utilization of BIM in the production phase of construction projects : BIM in work preparations at Skanska Sweden AB

    OpenAIRE

    Kojadinovic, Ivica; Björk Löf, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Construction organizations have had to increase their productivity and make the project process, from conceptual design to handing over, more efficient in order to increase their profit margins. The Information Technology (IT) industry has developed new Information and Communication Technology (ICT) solutions and tools which aim to support construction organizations in projects in order for them to achieve their goals of reduced project costs, increased project control and increased productiv...

  5. The International intraval project. Phase 1, test case 13: Experimental study of brine transport in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INTRAVAL is an international coordinated research program for predicting the potential radionuclide migration in the geosphere with the use of mathematical models. Such models are used to help assess the long-term safety of radioactive waste disposal systems. This report describes the findings of the project teams involved in test case 13 of INTRAVAL Phase 1. The test case is based on laboratory experiments dealing with flow and dispersion of brine in a porous medium. The purpose of these experiments was twofold : (i) to investigate some of the relevant processes in brine transport in porous media, and (ii) to provide sets of data to be used for (partial) validation of transport models. The experiments were carried out in a column packed with glass beads of diameter 0.40 to 0.52 mm. Salt water was injected through nine holes at the bottom and withdrawn through nine holes at the top. Initially a low salt concentration was used which was then displaced with higher concentrated salt water. The salt mass-fraction was detected using an array of electrodes such that breakthrough curves were obtained at five different levels in the column. The report reviews a number of conceptual models and the corresponding numerical codes employed by different modelling teams. The experiments on one- and two-dimensional flow and transport were simulated by various groups. The question underlying the experiments, namely the applicability of Fick's laws over the whole range of salt concentration, could be addressed satisfactorily. All models could simulate low-concentration experiment using a dispersivity value of 0.8 mm to 1.00 mm. However, using the same dispersivity value, it was not possible to simulate high concentration experiments. Another question intended to be studied by the experiments was the validity of Darcy's law at high concentrations. Two-dimensional experiments were carried out for this purpose. In practice, calculations were hampered by extremely high demand on

  6. Project cost control in construction phase based on WSR%基于WSR的施工阶段工程造价控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志鼎; 张晓芸; 郭琦

    2015-01-01

    工程项目施工阶段,因工期长,人工、材料等资源消耗量大,市场价格波动、自然条件变化等不确定因素相互作用,会对工程项目总体目标的实现产生不利影响. 为有效控制该阶段的工程造价,利用WSR(物理-事理-人理)系统方法论,建立施工阶段工程造价的WSR模型,分析工程造价控制管理活动各环节的相关要素,制定控制目标及措施,以降低施工管理活动的复杂性,为不同建设项目施工阶段工程造价提供有效的控制方法.%In the construction phase of a project, the interplay of uncertain factors including long construction duration, the maximum cost of resources like labor and material, fluctuation of market prices, change of natural conditions will affect the reali-zation of the general target of the project. To effectively control the cost in construction phase, based on WSR ( Wuli which means Technical perspective in Chinese, Shili which means organizational perspective, Renli which means personal perspective) System Methodology, a WSR model of the project cost in construction phase is established to analyze the related elements in project cost control and management, draw up cost control aims and measures, which in turn will reduce the complexity of construction man-agement and provide effective methods for cost control in construction phase of different construction projects.

  7. Project Maghreb - Europe: Solar Production of Hydrogen. Phase I: Feasibility and opportunity study of the project; Projet Maghreb - Europe: Production d'hydrogene solaire. Phase I: Etude d'opportunite et de faisabilite du projet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmah, Bouziane; Belhamel, Maiouf; Chader, Samira; M' Raoui, Abdelhamid; Harouadi, Farid; Etievant, Claude; Lechevalier, Steve; Cherigui, Abdel-Nasser

    2007-07-01

    During the 16th World Hydrogen Energy Conference which held on June 13-16, 2006, in Lyon (France), an important project appeared, the Maghreb-Europe Project for production and export of solar hydrogen, proposed in the Algiers Declaration of the hydrogen of origin renewable and directed by the researchers efforts of the Renewable Energies Development Center of Algiers (CDER) and members of the European company of Hydrogen Technologies (CETH). The present introductory communication exposes a scientific study on the appropriateness and the feasibility of the Project, as well as the objectives, missions and the fundamental elements for a scientific and technique accompaniment of this important project. (auth)

  8. TU-F-17A-08: The Relative Accuracy of 4D Dose Accumulation for Lung Radiotherapy Using Rigid Dose Projection Versus Dose Recalculation On Every Breathing Phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the accuracy of 4D dose accumulation using projection of dose calculated on the end-exhalation, mid-ventilation, or average intensity breathing phase CT scan, versus dose accumulation performed using full Monte Carlo dose recalculation on every breathing phase. Methods: Radiotherapy plans were analyzed for 10 patients with stage I-II lung cancer planned using 4D-CT. SBRT plans were optimized using the dose calculated by a commercially-available Monte Carlo algorithm on the end-exhalation 4D-CT phase. 4D dose accumulations using deformable registration were performed with a commercially available tool that projected the planned dose onto every breathing phase without recalculation, as well as with a Monte Carlo recalculation of the dose on all breathing phases. The 3D planned dose (3D-EX), the 3D dose calculated on the average intensity image (3D-AVE), and the 4D accumulations of the dose calculated on the end-exhalation phase CT (4D-PR-EX), the mid-ventilation phase CT (4D-PR-MID), and the average intensity image (4D-PR-AVE), respectively, were compared against the accumulation of the Monte Carlo dose recalculated on every phase. Plan evaluation metrics relating to target volumes and critical structures relevant for lung SBRT were analyzed. Results: Plan evaluation metrics tabulated using 4D-PR-EX, 4D-PR-MID, and 4D-PR-AVE differed from those tabulated using Monte Carlo recalculation on every phase by an average of 0.14±0.70 Gy, - 0.11±0.51 Gy, and 0.00±0.62 Gy, respectively. Deviations of between 8 and 13 Gy were observed between the 4D-MC calculations and both 3D methods for the proximal bronchial trees of 3 patients. Conclusions: 4D dose accumulation using projection without re-calculation may be sufficiently accurate compared to 4D dose accumulated from Monte Carlo recalculation on every phase, depending on institutional protocols. Use of 4D dose accumulation should be considered when evaluating normal tissue complication

  9. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 10: Summary report to phase 3 academic library respondents including frequency distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; White, Terry F.

    1991-01-01

    Phase 3 of a 4 part study was undertaken to study the use of scientific and technical information (STI) in the academic aerospace community. Phase 3 of this project used three questionnaires that were sent to three groups (i.e., faculty, librarians, and students) in the academic aerospace community. Specific attention was paid to the types of STI used and the methods in which academic users acquire STI. The responses of the academic libraries are focussed on herein. Demographic information on academic aerospace libraries is provided. Data regarding NASA interaction with academic aerospace libraries is also included, as is the survey instrument.

  10. 19. The HUman Micro Nucleus project. International Date Base Comparison for results with the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in human lymphocytes. Ⅰ. Effect of laboratory protocol, scoring criteria, and host factors on the frequency of micronuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The first results of an analysis of pooled data from laboratories using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in human lymphocytes and participating in the HUMN (HUman MicroNucleus project) international collaborative study are presented. The effects of laboratory protocol, scoring criteria, and host factors on baseline micronucleus(MN) frequency are evaluated, and a reference range of “normal” values against which future studies may be compared is provided. Primary data from historical records were submitted by 25 laboratories distributed in 16 countries. This resulted in a database of nearly 7000 subjects. Potentially significant differences were present in the methods used by participating laboratories, such as in the type of culture medium, the concentration of Cytochalasin-B, the percentage of fetal calf serum, and in the culture method. Differences in criteria for scoring MN were also evident. The overall median MN frequency in non-exposed(i.e., normal) subjects was 6.5‰ and the interquartile range was between 3‰ and 12‰. An increase in MN frequency with age was evident in all but two laboratories. The effect of gender, although not so evident in all databases, was also present, with females having a 19% higher level of MN (95% C.I.:14-24%). Statistical analyses were performed using random-effects models for correlated data. Our best model, which included exposure to genotoxic factors, host factors, methods, and scoring criteria, explained 75% of the total variance, with the largest contribution attributable to laboratory methods.

  11. Assessing sediment contamination using six toxicity assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen G. BURTON Jr.

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of sediment toxicity at Lake Orta, Italy was conducted to compare a toxicity test battery of 6 assays and to evaluate the extent of sediment contamination at various sediment depths. Lake Orta received excessive loadings of copper and ammonia during the 1900’s until a large remediation effort was conducted in 1989-90 using lime addition. Since that time, the lake has shown signs of a steady recovery of biological communities. The study results showed acute toxicity still exists in sediments at a depth of 5 cm and greater. Assays that detected the highest levels of toxicity were two whole sediment exposures (7 d using Hyalella azteca and Ceriodaphnia dubia. The MicrotoxR assay using pore water was the third most sensitive assay. The Thamnotox, Rototox, Microtox solid phase, and Seed Germination-Root Elongation (pore and solid phase assays showed occasional to no toxicity. Based on similarity of responses and assay sensitivity, the two most useful assays were the C. dubia (or H. azteca and Microtox pore water. These assays were effective at describing sediment toxicity in a weight-of-evidence approach.

  12. "Lunar Phases Project" as a Foundation for the Development of Innovative Inquiry Based ASTRO 101 Activities Utilizing Existing Concept Inventories as Assessment Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mon, M. J.; Meyer, A. O.

    2012-08-01

    The cause and process of the lunar phases are difficult concepts for undergraduates and non-science majors to grasp. At Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU) we have combined an inquiry-based instructional method (Mental Model Building) which can be more effective increasing students' conceptual understanding of the lunar phase cycle, together with the students' own observations. Undergraduate and non-science major students completed a hands-on project designed to integrate real observations, application of the scientific method, and Mental Model Building to connect the students' own observations to the Earth-Sun-Moon orientations responsible for their findings. Students' learning was assessed by administering the Lunar Phases Concept Inventory (developed by Rebecca S. Lindell and James P. Olsen, Southern Illinois University) before and after students completed the project, with positive results. We describe the methodology and activities utilized in our Lunar Phases Project, and propose their expansion to a variety of astronomical topics for undergraduate non-science majors and pre-service teachers. We emphasize developing and implementing new instructional strategies through the expansion of the Mental Model Building and similar pedagogical methodologies to develop innovative inquiry-based projects and activities in a variety of astronomical topics for undergraduate non-science majors and pre-service teachers. In order to meaningfully assess the new curriculum tools, we recommend utilizing already existing research-validated concept inventories specific to the astronomy content in the curriculum tools. These inventories can be analyzed to determine the conceptual learning gains achieved by the participating students and with further analysis can be used to refine portions of the activity under study.

  13. The project for intercomparison of land-surface parameterization schemes (PILPS) phase 2(c) Red-Arkansas River basin experiment: 1. Experiment description and summary intercomparisons

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, EF; Lettenmaier, DP; Liang, X.; D. Lohmann; Boone, A.; Chang, S; Chen, F.; Dai, Y.; Dickinson, RE; Duan, Q; M. Ek; Gusev, YM; Habets, F.; Irannejad, P.; Koster, R

    1998-01-01

    Sixteen land-surface schemes participating in the project for the Intercomparison of Land-surface Schemes (PILPS) Phase 2(c) were run using 10 years (1979-1988) of forcing data for the Red-Arkansas River basins in the Southern Great Plains region of the United States. Forcing data (precipitation, incoming radiation and surface meteorology) and land-surface characteristics (soil and vegetation parameters) were provided to each of the participating schemes. Two groups of runs are presented. (1)...

  14. Annual report on the Background Soil Characterization Project on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Results of Phase 1 investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many constituents of potential concern for human health occur naturally at low concentrations in undisturbed soils. The Background soil Characterization Project (BSCP) was undertaken to provide background concentration data on potential contaminants in natural soils on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The objectives of the BSCP are to provide baseline data for contaminated site assessment and estimates of potential human health risk associated with background concentrations of hazardous and other constituents in native soils. This report presents, evaluates, and documents data and results obtained in Phase I of the project. It is intended to be a stand-alone document for application and use in structuring and conducting remedial investigation and remedial action projects in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program

  15. Annual report on the Background Soil Characterization Project on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Results of Phase 1 investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, D.R.; Goddard, P.L.; Hatmaker, T.L.; Hook, L.A.; Jackson, B.L.; Kimbrough, C.W.; Lee, S.Y.; Lietzke, D.A.; McGin, C.W.; Nourse, B.D.; Schmoyer, R.L.; Shaw, R.A.; Stinnette, S.E.; Switek, J.; Wright, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ammons, J.T.; Branson, J.L.; Burgoa, B.B. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Plant and Soil Science; Lietzke, D.A. [Lietzke (David A.), Rutledge, TN (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Many constituents of potential concern for human health occur naturally at low concentrations in undisturbed soils. The Background soil Characterization Project (BSCP) was undertaken to provide background concentration data on potential contaminants in natural soils on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The objectives of the BSCP are to provide baseline data for contaminated site assessment and estimates of potential human health risk associated with background concentrations of hazardous and other constituents in native soils. This report presents, evaluates, and documents data and results obtained in Phase I of the project. It is intended to be a stand-alone document for application and use in structuring and conducting remedial investigation and remedial action projects in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program.

  16. Microbead agglutination based assays

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2013-01-21

    We report a simple and rapid room temperature assay for point-of-care (POC) testing that is based on specific agglutination. Agglutination tests are based on aggregation of microbeads in the presence of a specific analyte thus enabling the macroscopic observation. Such tests are most often used to explore antibody-antigen reactions. Agglutination has been used for protein assays using a biotin/streptavidin system as well as a hybridization based assay. The agglutination systems are prone to selftermination of the linking analyte, prone to active site saturation and loss of agglomeration at high analyte concentrations. We investigated the molecular target/ligand interaction, explaining the common agglutination problems related to analyte self-termination, linkage of the analyte to the same bead instead of different microbeads. We classified the agglutination process into three kinds of assays: a two- component assay, a three-component assay and a stepped three- component assay. Although we compared these three kinds of assays for recognizing DNA and protein molecules, the assay can be used for virtually any molecule, including ions and metabolites. In total, the optimized assay permits detecting analytes with high sensitivity in a short time, 5 min, at room temperature. Such a system is appropriate for POC testing.

  17. The Manhattan Court Employment Project. Summary Report on Phase One: November 1, 1967, to October 3, 1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera Inst. of Justice, New York, NY.

    This report on the first 2 years of a projected 3-year project describes an attempt to use counseling and job placement to divert some arrestees from possible jail sentences. Arrestees who meet the criteria for acceptance into the program are granted a 90-day continuance, during which time the staff representative, who is an ex-offender himself,…

  18. Protocol Development for the NASA-JSC Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project (LMLSTP) Phase 3 Project: A Report on Baseline Studies at KSC for Continuous Salad Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goins, G. D.; Yorio, N. C.; Vivenzio, H. R.

    1998-01-01

    The Phase 3 Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project (LMLSTP) was conducted in a 20-foot chamber at Johnson Space Center. The overall objective of the Phase 3 project was to conduct a 90-day regenerative life support system test involving 4 human subjects to demonstrate an integrated biological and physicochemical life support system. A secondary objective of the Phase 3 LMLSTP was to demonstrate the ability to produce salad-type vegetable by integration of a small benchtop growth chamber located within the crew habitat area. This small chamber, commercially manufactured as the Controlled Environment Research Ecosystem (CERES 2010(TM)), functioned as a means to continuously provide fresh lettuce crops for crew members. The CERES 2010(TM) growth chamber utilized hardware components developed for effective plant biomass production in spaceflight applications. These components included: (1) LED lighting; (2) Astroculture(TM) Root Trays; and (3) Zeoponic media. In planning for the LMLSTP Phase 3, a request was put forward for KSC scientists to generate a protocol for successful continuous planting, culturing, and harvesting of the salad-crop, lettuce. By conducting baseline tests with components of the CERES 2010(TM), a protocol was developed.

  19. Radioreceptor opioid assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioreceptor assay is described for assaying opioid drugs in biological fluids. The method enables the assay of total opioid activity, being specific for opioids as a class but lacking specificity within the class. A radio-iodinated opioid and the liquid test sample are incubated with an opiate receptor material. The percentage inhibition of the binding of the radio-iodinated compound to the opiate receptor is calculated and the opioid activity of the test liquid determined from a standard curve. Examples of preparing radio-iodinated opioids and assaying opioid activity are given. A test kit for the assay is described. Compared to other methods, this assay is cheap, easy and rapid. (U.K.)

  20. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  1. Gas-phase evaluation of the online NMMB/BSC-CTM model over Europe for 2010 in the framework of the AQMEII-Phase2 project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, A.; Jorba, O.

    2015-08-01

    The Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative Phase2 aims to intercompare online coupled regional-scale models over North America and Europe. The NMMB/BSC Chemical Transport Model (NMMB/BSC-CTM) is a fully online integrated system for meso- to global-scale applications under development at the Barcelona Supercomputing Center. The NMMB/BSC-CTM is applied to Europe for the year 2010 in the framework of the AQMEII-Phase2 intercomparison exercise. This paper presents a spatial, temporal and vertical evaluation of the gas-phase model results. This is the first time that the model has been evaluated on a regional scale over a whole annual cycle. The model is compared with available ground-based monitoring stations for relevant reactive gases, ozonesondes, and OMI and MOPITT satellite retrievals of NO2 and CO. A comparative analysis of the present results and several European model evaluations is also presented here. The seasonal cycle for O3, NO2, SO2 and CO is successfully reproduced by the model. The O3 daily mean and daily maximum correlations for the analysed period are r = 0.68 and r = 0.75, respectively. The OMI tropospheric NO2 column retrievals are well reproduced, capturing the most polluted areas over Europe throughout the whole year. Modelled SO2 and CO surface concentrations are generally underestimated, especially during the winter months. Two different vertical configurations of the model (24 and 48 vertical layers) are also analysed. Although model results are very similar, the simulation configured with 48 vertical layers provides better results regarding surface O3 concentrations during summer. Compared to previous model evaluations, the NMMB/BSC-CTM's performance corresponds to state-of-the-art regional air quality models.

  2. Low-Cost, High-Performance Combustion Chamber for LOX/CH4 Propulsion, Phase II Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this project, Ultramet is designing and fabricating a lightweight, high temperature combustion chamber for use with cryogenic liquid oxygen/methane (LOX/CH4)...

  3. 园林工程设计阶段造价控制的浅见%The Humble Opinion of the Landscape Engineering Project Design Phase Cost Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪淼

    2012-01-01

    The key phase to control the cost of the whole landscape engineering project investment process is the design phase. This article first discusses several points of author, first of all, the author discusses how important of cost control in the design phase for the entire project. Secondly, finds out the appropriate solutions for the practical problems relating to the landscape engineering design ideas and the direction of the cost analysis of a variety of problems. For strengthen the cost control in design phase, the methods which make the design works better embody the value of capital investment are required. It becomes the key issues of the landscaping project total investment.%园林工程项目投资控制的关键在于设计阶段的造价控制。本文论述了园林工程项目中设计阶段造价控制对于整个项目的重要性,说明园林工程设计的思路和方向对造价的影响,对存在的各种问题进行分析,最后针对现实问题提出相应的措施及方法来加强设计阶段的造价控制,提出既有较高的技术含量又有科学工程造价控制的设计方案,使设计作品更好地体现资金的投资价值,是控制园林绿化工程项目总投资的关键问题。

  4. Study of Factors Related to Accidents Occuring during the Construction Phase of Oil, Gas and Petrochemical Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Asilian Mahabadi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Construction phase in industries is a dynamic process that is naturally and intrinsically dangerous and as it becomes more complicated, the accidents rate also increases. One should note that without considering a model, one could not obtain useful and reliable information and method to prevent accidents. Therefore, to achieve useful methods for preventing accidents, it is desirable to consider a model. The general goal of this study was presentation of a model. A model is the reflection of a fact. In other words, it should be said that the model represents a system or process whose behavior can be predicted. Models are therefore used for understanding the behavior of actual terminals and show a theory in the way that covers important variables for describing phenomena and instead, ignore factors of low importance in the expression of those phenomena. Methods: This study was a research article conducted in 2004-2005 in the Assaluyeh region. Data was gathered from accident reports present in security and health records of the projects and also statistics present at the treatment centers. In this study, an analytical model (multi-regression was presented to describe the impact of effective and deep factors on the possibility of an increase in accidents leading to death, through measurement of the effects of independent variables on the dependent variables. For this purpose, the structure of 50 accidents that led to death were studied along with another 2700 accidents, and after studying the accident reports and related documents, observing operations and equipment, counseling with accident observers and an expert team of managers, supervisors and engineers, and simulation of some accidents, unsafe conditions and functions, mismanagement and use of worn out and defective tools, equipment, devices and machinery were considered as the four independent variables and the job accidents leading to death were considered as dependent

  5. Isotopic evolution of Mauna Kea volcano: Results from the initial phase of the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassiter, J.C.; DePaolo, D.J.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions of Mauna Kea lavas recovered by the first drilling phase of the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project. These lavas, which range in age from ???200 to 400 ka, provide a detailed record of chemical and isotopic changes in basalt composition during the shied/postshield transition and extend our record of Mauna Kea volcanism to a late-shield period roughly equivalent to the last ???100 ka of Mauna Loa activity. Stratigraphic variations in isotopic composition reveal a gradual shift over time toward a more depleted source composition (e.g., higher 143Nd/144Nd, lower 87Sr/86Sr, and lower 3He/4He). This gradual evolution is in sharp contrast with the abrupt appearance of alkalic lavas at ???240 ka recorded by the upper 50 m of Mauna Kea lavas from the core. Intercalated tholeiitic and alkalic lavas from the uppermost Mauna Kea section are isotopically indistinguishable. Combined with major element evidence (e.g., decreasing SiO2 and increasing FeO) that the depth of melt segregation increased during the transition from tholeiitic to alkalic volcanism, the isotopic similarity of tholeiitic and alkalic lavas argues against significant lithosphere involvement during melt generation. Instead, the depleted isotopic signatures found in late shield-stage lavas are best explained by increasing the proportion of melt generated from a depleted upper mantle component entrained and heated by the rising central plume. Direct comparison of Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa lavas erupted at equivalent stages in these volcanoes' life cycles reveals persistent chemical and isotopic differences independent of the temporal evolution of each volcano. The oldest lavas recovered from the drillcore are similar to modern Kilauea lavas, but are distinct from Mauna Loa lavas. Mauna Kea lavas have higher 143Nd/144Nd and 206Pb/204Pb and lower 87Sr/86Sr. Higher concentrations of incompatible trace elements in primary magmas, lower SiO2, and higher FeO also

  6. Metastability and Delta-Phase Retention in Plutonium Alloys Final Report of LDRD Project 01-ERD-029

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, J; Schwartz, A J; Blobaum, K M; Krenn, C R; Wall, M A; Wolfer, W G; Haslam, J J; Moore, K T

    2004-02-11

    The {delta} to {alpha}' phase transformation in Pu-Ga alloys is intriguing for both scientific and technological reasons. On cooling, the ductile fcc {delta}-phase transforms martensitically to the brittle monoclinic {alpha}'-phase at approximately -120 C (depending on composition). This exothermic transformation involves a 20% volume contraction and a significant increase in resistivity. The reversion of {alpha}' to {delta} involves a large temperature hysteresis beginning just above room temperature. In an attempt to better understand the underlying thermodynamics and kinetics responsible for these unusual features, we have investigated the {delta} {leftrightarrow} {alpha}' phase transformations in a Pu-0.6 wt% Ga alloy using a combination of experimental and modeling techniques.

  7. Vapor Chamber with Phase Change Material-based Wick Structure for Thermal Control of Manned Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In response to NASA SBIR solicitation H3.01 "Thermal Control for Future Human Exploration", Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) is proposing a novel Phase...

  8. A Super Cooled, Non-toxic, Non-flammable Phase Change Material Thermal Pack for Portable Life Support Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The concept development and test of a water-based, advanced Phase Change Material (PCM) heat sink is proposed. Utilizing a novel material choice for both an...

  9. A Super Cooled, Non-toxic, Non-flammable Phase Change Material Thermal Pack for Portable Life Support Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The continuation of concept development and test of a water-based, advanced Phase Change Material (PCM) heat sink is proposed. Utilizing a novel material choice for...

  10. The role of advocacy coalitions in a project implementation process: the example of the planning phase of the At Home/Chez Soi project dealing with homelessness in Montreal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Marie-Josée; Grenier, Guy; Vallée, Catherine; Hurtubise, Roch; Lévesque, Paul-André

    2014-08-01

    This study analyzed the planning process (summer 2008 to fall 2009) of a Montreal project that offers housing and community follow-up to homeless people with mental disorders, with or without substance abuse disorders. With the help of the Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF), advocacy groups that were able to navigate a complex intervention implementation process were identified. In all, 25 people involved in the Montreal At Home/Chez Soi project were surveyed through interviews (n=18) and a discussion group (n=7). Participant observations and documentation (minutes and correspondence) were also used for the analysis. The start-up phase of the At Home/Chez may be broken down into three separate periods qualified respectively as "honeymoon;" "clash of cultures;" and "acceptance & commitment". In each of the planning phases of the At Home/Chez Soi project in Montreal, at least two advocacy coalitions were in confrontation about their specific belief systems concerning solutions to address the recurring homelessness social problem, while a third, more moderate one contributed in rallying most key actors under specified secondary aspects. The study confirms the importance of policy brokers in achieving compromises acceptable to all advocacy coalitions.

  11. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 of 38-Foot Project). Volume 1, Background and appendixes A through H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.; Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Barrows, E.S.; Kohn, N.P.; Lefkovitz, L.F. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1992-01-01

    At the request of the US Army Corps of Engineering (USACE), environmental studies were conducted by Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to evaluate the suitability of sediments from Oakland Inner Harbor for dredging and ocean disposal. During the Phase 3 38-Foot Project, sediment cores were collected from mudline to {minus}39 ft mean lower low water at various locations in Oakland Inner Harbor channel and allocated to six composite samples. These composites were evaluated through physical/chemical analyses, acute toxicity to sensitive marine organisms, and bioaccumulation potential. Sediment samples from individual locations were tested for physical/chemical parameters only. The results of toxicological and bioaccumulation testing may be used by USACE to determine the amount of potential dredged material from Oakland Inner Harbor channel acceptable for open-water disposal as defined by the Draft Implementation Manual (EPA/USACE 1990) and consistent with the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662). This is Volume 1 of a two-volume data report that presents the data gathered during the Oakland Harbor Phase 3 38-Foot Project, conducted in the Fall of 1990. This data report does not include interpretation or statistical analysis of the 38-Foot data. Volume 1 includes the project background as well as a full presentation of data and results in Appendixes A through H. Volume 2 contains the remaining data in Appendixes I through L.

  12. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 of 38-Foot Project). Volume 2, Appendixes I through L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.; Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Barrows, E.S.; Kohn, N.P.; Lefkovitz, L.F. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1992-01-01

    At the request of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), environmental studies were conducted by Battelle/Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) to evaluate the suitability of sediments from Oakland Inner Harbor for dredging and ocean disposal. During the Phase 3 38-Foot Project, sediment cores were collected from mudline to {minus}39 ft mean lower low water at various locations in Oakland Inner Harbor channel and allocated to six composite samples. These composites were evaluated through physical/chemical analyses, acute toxicity to sensitive marine organisms, and bioaccumulation potential. Sediment samples from individual locations were tested for physical/chemical parameters only. The results of toxicological and bioaccumulation testing may be used by USACE to determine the amount of potential dredged material from Oakland Inner Harbor channel acceptable for open-water disposal as defined by the Draft Implementation Manual (EPA/USACE 1990) and consistent with the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662). This is Volume 2 of a two-volume data report that represents the data gathered during the Oakland Harbor Phase 3 38-Foot Project, conducted in the Fall of 1990. This data report does not include interpretation or statistical analysis of the 38-Foot data. Volume 1 includes the project background as well as data and results presented in Appendixes A through H. Volume 2 includes the remaining data presented in Appendixes I through L.

  13. Phase and group velocity tracing analysis of projected wave packet motion along oblique radar beams – qualitative analysis of QP echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Fern

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The wave packets of atmospheric gravity waves were numerically generated, with a given characteristic wave period, horizontal wave length and projection mean wind along the horizontal wave vector. Their projection phase and group velocities along the oblique radar beam (vpr and vgr, with different zenith angle θ and azimuth angle φ, were analyzed by the method of phase- and group-velocity tracing. The results were consistent with the theoretical calculations derived by the dispersion relation, reconfirming the accuracy of the method of analysis. The RTI plot of the numerical wave packets were similar to the striation patterns of the QP echoes from the FAI irregularity region. We propose that the striation range rate of the QP echo is equal to the radial phase velocity vpr, and the slope of the energy line across the neighboring striations is equal to the radial group velocity vgr of the wave packet; the horizontal distance between two neighboring striations is equal to the characteristic wave period τ. Then, one can inversely calculate all the properties of the gravity wave responsible for the appearance of the QP echoes. We found that the possibility of some QP echoes being generated by the gravity waves originated from lower altitudes cannot be ruled out.

  14. Sustainable development in city districts: BaLaLuZ project. Final report phase 2. BaBeL Lucerne; Nachhaltige Quartierentwicklung BaLaLuZh. Schlussbericht Phase 2. Quartier BaBeL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wandeler, M.; Inderbitzin, J. [Babel, Lucerne (Switzerland); Geissbuehler, D. [Hochschule fuer Technik und Architektur (HTA) Luzern, Horw (Switzerland)

    2006-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) is one of a series of reports concerning municipal development in various cities in Switzerland. The four city districts involved include Basel (Gundeldinger Feld), Lausanne (Bellevaux), Lucerne (Basel-/Bernstrasse) and Zurich (Werdwies). This final report summarises the results of the second phase of the project concerning the Baselstrasse and Bernstrasse districts in Lucerne. Alongside the planned work, a planning instrument that aids co-ordination and know-how-transfer was developed in this second phase. This master plan and the organisational structure for 2006 is described. Application work to be done from 2007 onwards is looked at. The main part of this report consists of eight annexes that define and describe building blocks for measures to be taken, the master plan, a plan of action 2007 - 2009, along with organisational and financial data.

  15. SUNSTORE 3. Phase 1. Project design and tender. Final report; SUNSTORE 3. Fase 1. Projektering og udbud. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, P.A. (PlanEnergi, Skoerping (Denmark)); Moeller Nielsen, C. (Dronninglund Fjernvarme, Dronninglund (Denmark)); Baunwall, M. (NIRAS Aalborg (Denmark)); Munkholt, H. (GG-Construction, Aalborg (Denmark)); Paaske, B. (Teknologisk Institut, AArhus (Denmark)); Schmidt, T. (SOLITES, Stuttgart (Germany))

    2011-03-15

    The objective of the project has been to carry out detailed design and tendering for a heat production plant consisting of: - 35.000 m{sub 2} solar thermal collectors, - 60.000 m{sub 3} pit heat storage, - 3 MW{sub heat} heat pump, covering app. 50% of the heat production at Dronninglund district heating plant (Denmark). The final report for the project includes detailed design of the pit heat storage (a further development of a 10.000 m{sub 3} storage implemented in Marstal) and simulation of the total production system in the simulation software TRNSYS. (ln)

  16. Phase 2 of the Array Automated Assembly Task for the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Second quarterly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wihl, M.

    1978-04-01

    Automation is the key factor in reaching the LSSA Project goal of 500 megawatts annual production at $0.50 per watt. Solarex is currently analyzing the potential for automating a particular process sequence. Assessment of the cell making steps for this sequence is nearly complete. For the steps analyzed so far there seems to be no technological barrier to reaching the LSSA Project goals. The cell making steps are reviewed individually. A review of the technology, a description of verification experiments, and an economic analysis are given for the process sequence of junction formation, metalligation, edge removal, and testing. (WHK)

  17. Reliability Data for Piping Components in Nordic Nuclear Power Plants 'R-Book'. Project Phase 1. Rev 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lydell, Bengt (Scandpower Risk Management Inc., Houston, TX (US)); Olsson, Anders (Relcon Scandpower AB, Stockholm (SE))

    2008-01-15

    This report constitutes a planning document for a new RandD project to develop a piping component reliability parameter handbook for use in probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) and related activities. The Swedish acronym for this handbook is 'R-Book.' The objective of the project is to utilize the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency 'OECD Pipe Failure Data Exchange Project' (OPDE) database to derive piping component failure rates and rupture probabilities for input to internal flooding probabilistic safety assessment, high-energy line break' (HELB) analysis, risk-informed in-service inspection (RI-ISI) program development, and other activities related to PSA. This new RandD project is funded by member organizations of the Nordic PSA Group (NPSAG) - Forsmark AB, OKG AB, Ringhals AB, and the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI). The history behind the current effort to produce a handbook of piping reliability parameters goes back to 1994 when SKI funded a 5-year RandD project to explore the viability of establishing an international database on the service experience with piping system components in commercial nuclear power plants. An underlying objective behind this 5-year program was to investigate the different options and possibilities for deriving pipe failure rates and rupture probabilities directly from service experience data as an alternative to probabilistic fracture mechanics. The RandD project culminated in an international piping reliability seminar held in the fall of 1997 in Sigtuna (Sweden) and a pilot project to demonstrate an application of the pipe failure database to the estimation of loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) frequency (SKI Report 98:30). A particularly important outcome of the 5-year project was a decision by SKI to transfer the pipe failure database including the lessons learned to an international cooperative effort under the auspices of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. Following on information exchange and planning

  18. Reliability Data for Piping Components in Nordic Nuclear Power Plants 'R-Book'. Project Phase 1. Rev 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report constitutes a planning document for a new RandD project to develop a piping component reliability parameter handbook for use in probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) and related activities. The Swedish acronym for this handbook is 'R-Book.' The objective of the project is to utilize the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency 'OECD Pipe Failure Data Exchange Project' (OPDE) database to derive piping component failure rates and rupture probabilities for input to internal flooding probabilistic safety assessment, high-energy line break' (HELB) analysis, risk-informed in-service inspection (RI-ISI) program development, and other activities related to PSA. This new RandD project is funded by member organizations of the Nordic PSA Group (NPSAG) - Forsmark AB, OKG AB, Ringhals AB, and the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI). The history behind the current effort to produce a handbook of piping reliability parameters goes back to 1994 when SKI funded a 5-year RandD project to explore the viability of establishing an international database on the service experience with piping system components in commercial nuclear power plants. An underlying objective behind this 5-year program was to investigate the different options and possibilities for deriving pipe failure rates and rupture probabilities directly from service experience data as an alternative to probabilistic fracture mechanics. The RandD project culminated in an international piping reliability seminar held in the fall of 1997 in Sigtuna (Sweden) and a pilot project to demonstrate an application of the pipe failure database to the estimation of loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) frequency (SKI Report 98:30). A particularly important outcome of the 5-year project was a decision by SKI to transfer the pipe failure database including the lessons learned to an international cooperative effort under the auspices of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. Following on information exchange and planning meetings that were

  19. Co-ordinated research project: Ingestion and organ content of trace elements of importance in radiological protection (CRP: E4.30.08). Reference Asian man project, phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Second Research Coordination Meeting for the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Ingestion and Organ Content of Trace Elements of Importance in Radiological Protection: Reference Asian Man Project, Phase 2' was held at the China Institute for Radiation Protection (CIRP) in Taiyuan, People's Republic of China. During the first technical Session, an overview of the current status of the CRP was presented by the IAEA technical officer, Dr. Parr, and the responsible officer of the Central Reference Laboratory (NIRS, Japan), Dr. Kawamura. They drew attention to the agreed programme of work, as described in the project documentation, and the timetable foreseen for the CRP as summarized in table 1. In general, they concluded that the achievements of the CRP to-date appear to be good, particularly in relation to sample collection (in most countries) and quality control (the development of appropriate reference materials). However, some aspects of the work appear to be a little behind schedule, particularly (1) the final stages of preparation of total diet samples (because of delays in providing a suitable food blender), (2) the analysis of some of the elements of first priority (because of the non-availability, until now, of suitable analytical reference materials), and (3) in some countries, the collection of autopsy specimens. One country (Malaysia) has experienced considerable difficulties in implementing the project due to the retirement of the former Chief Scientific Investigator. For this reason it was unfortunately not possible for the Malaysian representative to be present at the RCM

  20. Central key project `Biotechnology`. Final report. 2nd project phase (1992-1995); Zentrales Schwerpunktprojekt Bioverfahrenstechnik. Abschlussbericht 2. Foerderphase (1992-1995)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The report describes the activities of the three sections of the key project `Biotechnology`: Biological systems, e.g. environmental biotechnology, enzyme reactions, protein engineering, fermentation problems of secondary metabolites, tetrachloroethylene degradation, stereoselective synthesis; process engineering, i.e. supercritical solvents, enzyme-catalyzed reactions, bipolar membrane technology, membrane separation processes, anaerobic processes; information engineering, i.e. morphology recording, process control. Separate abstracts are available in this database for two articles of this report. (SR) [Deutsch] Dargestellt werden die Taetigkeiten der verschiedenen Arbeitsbereiche des Schwerpunktprojektes Biotechnologie. Es handelt sich hierbei um die drei Projektbereiche: Biologische Systeme unter anderem mit den Themen Umweltbiotechnologie, Enzymreaktionen, Protein-Engineering, Fermentationsprobleme bei sekundaeren Metaboliten, Tetrachlorethylen-Abbau, Stereoselektive Synthese; des weiteren der Projektbereich Verfahrenstechnik unter anderem mit den Themen Ueberkritische Loesungsmittel, Enzymkatalysierte Reaktionen, Bipolare Membrantechnik, Membrantrennverfahren, Anaerobprozesse; als letztes der Projektbereich Informationstechnik mit den Themen Morphologieerfassung, Prozessfuehrung. (SR)

  1. Sustainable development in city districts: BaLaLuZ project - BaBeL Lucerne; Schlussbericht Quartier BaBeL - Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duss, A.; Inderbitzin, J.; Wandeler, M.

    2004-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) is one of a series of reports concerning municipal development in various cities in Switzerland. The four city districts involved include Basel (Gundeldinger Feld), Lausanne (Bellevaux), Lucerne (Basel-/Bernstrasse) and Zurich (Werdwies). This final report summarises the results of the first phase of the project concerning the Baselstrasse and Bernstrasse districts in Lucerne. A database containing details of the various buildings in the districts was set up, energy-relevant refurbishment of buildings was investigated, owners were counselled and various diploma-theses for the University of Applied Sciences in Lucerne were initiated. Ecological, economical and mobility aspects are considered and suggestions are made for follow-up projects.

  2. Sustainable development in city districts: BaLaLuZ project - Gruenau Zurich; Schlussbericht Quartier Gruenau/Siedlung Bernerstrasse/Werdwies, Zuerich - Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, W.; Kaufmann, Y.; Arend, M.

    2004-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) is one of a series of reports concerning municipal development in various cities in Switzerland. The four city districts involved include Basel (Gundeldinger Feld), Lausanne (Bellevaux), Lucerne (Basel-/Bernstrasse) and Zurich (Werdwies). This final report summarises the results of the first phase of the project concerning the Bernerstrasse/Werdwies estate in western Zurich. The results of an analysis of the present situation are presented that cover social aspects, residential buildings and their heating using waste heat from sewage, economical factors and, also, mobility and urban planning aspects. The replacement of a residential estate with new buildings is looked at from the energy and ecological viewpoints. Measures to be taken are suggested and recommendations for projects are made.

  3. Aerospace Systems Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proposal Title: Aerospace Systems Monitor PHASE 1 Technical Abstract: This Phase II STTR project will continue development and commercialization of the Aerospace...

  4. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (Phase I). Project I. Plant/site selection, plant/site selection assessment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) is conducting research on the seismic risk of nuclear power plants through the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP). Phase I of the SSMRP will include a study of an existing plant and site. Results are presented of a study of existing and planned nuclear power plants in the United States. Selection criteria were developed and a recommendation for a specific plant for the SSMRP Phase I effort is given. Power plant characteristics including types of nuclear steam supply steam, containment structure, electric power capacity, geographic location, site seismicity, and foundation soil properties were evaluated

  5. 论建设项目实施阶段工程造价确定与控制%The Determination and Control of Project Cost in Construction Project Implementation Phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王越

    2013-01-01

    工程建筑全过程的造价多少直接关系到施工企业的经济利益。其中,施工阶段的造价管理又是整个工程造价的关键,对施工成本起着非常重要的作用。%How much of the whole process construction cost is directly related to the enterprise's economic benefits. The construction cost management of construction phase is the key of the whole project cost, plays a very important role in con-struction cost.

  6. A COMPARISON OF STEPWISE AND FUZZY MULTIPLE REGRESSION ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES FOR MANAGING SOFTWARE PROJECT RISKS: ANALYSIS PHASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelrafe Elzamly

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Risk is not always avoidable, but it is controllable. The aim of this study is to identify whether those techniques are effective in reducing software failure. This motivates the authors to continue the effort to enrich the managing software project risks with consider mining and quantitative approach with large data set. In this study, two new techniques are introduced namely stepwise multiple regression analysis and fuzzy multiple regression to manage the software risks. Two evaluation procedures such as MMRE and Pred (25 is used to compare the accuracy of techniques. The model’s accuracy slightly improves in stepwise multiple regression rather than fuzzy multiple regression. This study will guide software managers to apply software risk management practices with real world software development organizations and verify the effectiveness of the new techniques and approaches on a software project. The study has been conducted on a group of software project using survey questionnaire. It is hope that this will enable software managers improve their decision to increase the probability of software project success.

  7. User-Centered Digital Library Project Phase 2: User Testing with Teachers and Students with Disabilities. Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Babette

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the User-Centered Digital Library Project, conducted by the National Center for Accessible Media (NCAM) at WGBH, was to adapt the Teachers' Domain online digital library to enable teachers and students with disabilities to more readily use the resources in science classrooms. NCAM added accessibility features such as captions and audio…

  8. College Management System Improvement: Overall Description of the Review Phase. Working Paper. College Management System Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Roger G.

    The Resource Allocations and Management Program grant funds a project aimed at facilitating the use of management science and information systems techniques by developing, documenting, and testing a methodology that small postsecondary units can use in considering the application of these tools. This document provides a description and an overview…

  9. Discussion on Controlling Implementation Phase of Construction Project Cost%浅议建设项目工程造价实施阶段的控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    虞亚敏

    2013-01-01

    In view of the problems of financial estimation exceeding budget , budget exceeding financial estima-tion and final accounts exceeding budget existing in project cost , some helpful discussion on how strictly control the estimated cost problem in engineering implementation phase was focused on .%针对工程造价中存在的概算超估算、预算超概算、决算超预算等问题及现状,着重对工程实施阶段如何严格掌控预算造价问题进行了有益的探讨。

  10. An evaluation of 20th century climate for the Southeastern United States as simulated by Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) global climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    David E. Rupp,

    2016-05-05

    The 20th century climate for the Southeastern United States and surrounding areas as simulated by global climate models used in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) was evaluated. A suite of statistics that characterize various aspects of the regional climate was calculated from both model simulations and observation-based datasets. CMIP5 global climate models were ranked by their ability to reproduce the observed climate. Differences in the performance of the models between regions of the United States (the Southeastern and Northwestern United States) warrant a regional-scale assessment of CMIP5 models.

  11. CPTAC Assay Portal: a repository of targeted proteomic assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Halusa, Goran; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Sharma, Vagisha; MacLean, Brendan; Yan, Ping; Wrobel, John; Kennedy, Jacob; Mani, DR; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Meyer, Matthew R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Abbateillo, Susan E.; Boja, Emily; Carr, Steven A.; Chan, Daniel W.; Chen, Xian; Chen, Jing; Davies, Sherri; Ellis, Matthew; Fenyo, David; Hiltket, Tara; Ketchum, Karen; Kinsinger, Christopher; Kuhn, Eric; Liebler, Daniel; Lin, De; Liu, Tao; Loss, Michael; MacCoss, Michael; Qian, Weijun; Rivers, Robert; Rodland, Karin D.; Ruggles, Kelly; Scott, Mitchell; Smith, Richard D.; Thomas, Stefani N.; Townsend, Reid; Whiteley, Gordon; Wu, Chaochao; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2014-06-27

    To address these issues, the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched an Assay Portal (http://assays.cancer.gov) to serve as a public repository of well-characterized quantitative, MS-based, targeted proteomic assays. The purpose of the CPTAC Assay Portal is to facilitate widespread adoption of targeted MS assays by disseminating SOPs, reagents, and assay characterization data for highly characterized assays. A primary aim of the NCI-supported portal is to bring together clinicians or biologists and analytical chemists to answer hypothesis-driven questions using targeted, MS-based assays. Assay content is easily accessed through queries and filters, enabling investigators to find assays to proteins relevant to their areas of interest. Detailed characterization data are available for each assay, enabling researchers to evaluate assay performance prior to launching the assay in their own laboratory.

  12. Solution-Phase Synthesis of Dipeptides: A Capstone Project That Employs Key Techniques in an Organic Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Louis; DeBoef, Brenton

    2015-01-01

    A contemporary approach to the synthesis and purification of several UV-active dipeptides has been developed for the second-year organic laboratory. This experiment exposes students to the important technique of solution-phase peptide synthesis and allows an instructor to highlight the parallel between what they are accomplishing in the laboratory…

  13. Transgenic Animal Mutation Assays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Chen; Ph.D.D.A.B.T.

    2005-01-01

    @@ The novel transgenic mouse and rat mutation assays have provided a tool for analyzing in vivo mutation in any tissue, thus permitting the direct comparison of cancer incidence with mutant frequency.

  14. Lateral flow assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczula, Katarzyna M; Gallotta, Andrea

    2016-06-30

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) are the technology behind low-cost, simple, rapid and portable detection devices popular in biomedicine, agriculture, food and environmental sciences. This review presents an overview of the principle of the method and the critical components of the assay, focusing on lateral flow immunoassays. This type of assay has recently attracted considerable interest because of its potential to provide instantaneous diagnosis directly to patients. The range and interpretation of results and parameters used for evaluation of the assay will also be discussed. The main advantages and disadvantages of LFAs will be summarized and relevant future improvements to testing devices and strategies will be proposed. Finally, the major recent advances and future diagnostic applications in the LFA field will be explored. PMID:27365041

  15. Summary of Research through Phase II/Year 2 of Initially Approved 3 Phase/3 Year Project - Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Grammer

    2007-09-30

    This final scientific/technical report covers the first 2 years (Phases I and II of an originally planned 3 Year/3 Phase program). The project was focused on evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin. The characterization of select dolomite reservoirs was the major focus of our efforts in Phases I and II of the project. Structural mapping and log analysis in the Dundee (Devonian) and Trenton/Black River (Ordovician) suggest a close spatial relationship among gross dolomite distribution and regional-scale, wrench fault-related NW-SE and NE-SW structural trends. A high temperature origin for much of the dolomite in these 2 studied intervals (based upon fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and stable isotopic analyses,) coupled with persistent association of this dolomite in reservoirs coincident with wrench fault-related features, is strong evidence for these reservoirs being influenced by hydrothermal dolomitization. In the Niagaran (Silurian), there is a general trend of increasing dolomitization shelfward, with limestone predominant in more basinward positions. A major finding is that facies types, when analyzed at a detailed level, are directly related to reservoir porosity and permeability in these dolomites which increases the predictability of reservoir quality in these units. This pattern is consistent with our original hypothesis of primary facies control on dolomitization and resulting reservoir quality at some level. The identification of distinct and predictable vertical stacking patterns within a hierarchical sequence and cycle framework provides a high degree of confidence at this point that the results should be exportable throughout the basin. Much of the data synthesis and modeling for the project was scheduled to be part of Year 3/Phase III, but the discontinuation of funding after Year 2 precluded those efforts

  16. New Rapid Spore Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kminek, Gerhard; Conley, Catharine

    2012-07-01

    The presentation will detail approved Planetary Protection specifications for the Rapid Spore Assay for spacecraft components and subsystems. Outlined will be the research and studies on which the specifications were based. The research, funded by ESA and NASA/JPL, was conducted over a period of two years and was followed by limited cleanroom studies to assess the feasibility of this assay during spacecraft assembly.

  17. Community and Team Member Factors that Influence the Early Phase Functioning of Community Prevention Teams: The PROSPER Project

    OpenAIRE

    Greenberg, Mark T.; Feinberg, Mark E; Meyer-Chilenski, Sarah; Spoth, Richard L.; Redmond, Cleve

    2007-01-01

    This research examines the early development of community teams in a specific university-community partnership project called PROSPER (Spoth et al., Prev Sci 5:31-39, 2004). PROSPER supports local community teams in rural areas and small towns to implement evidence-based programs intended to support positive youth development and reduce early substance use. The study evaluated 14 community teams and included longitudinal data from 108 team members. Specifically, it examined how community demo...

  18. Evaluation of cytotoxicity of aqueous extract of Graviola leaves on squamous cell carcinoma cell-25 cell lines by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-Yl -2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and determination of percentage of cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle by flow cytometry: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visveswaraiah Paranjyothi Magadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Malignancies constitute a wide variety of disorders having high mortality and morbidity rates. Current protocols for management include surgical intervention, chemotherapy, and radiation which possess numerous adverse effects. Many phytochemicals are available with anticancer properties similar to anticancer drugs. Major benefit of these compounds is apparent lack of toxicity to normal tissues. Graviola (botanical name: Annona Muricata contain bioactive compound “annonaceous acetogenins” known for anticancer activity on cancer cell lines. Aims: To determine cytotoxicity of Graviola and percentage cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle. Settings and Design: The cytotoxicity of aqueous extract of Graviola leaves on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC-25 cell lines at various concentrations evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-Yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. The percentage of SCC-25 cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle determined using flow cytometry. Methods: Graviola Leaves, American Type Culture Collection SCC-25 cell lines were procured from Skanda Laboratories, Bengaluru. The cytotoxicity of aqueous extract of Graviola on SCC-25 cells at various concentrations evaluated using MTT assay. The percentage of SCC-25 cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle determined using flow cytometry. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was done using one-way ANOVA. Results: MTT assay showed statistically significant (P < 0.001 dose-dependent inhibition of SCC-25 cell lines by Graviola with IC50 value of 12.42 μg/ml. Flow cytometry revealed that Graviola at 25 and 50 g/ml arrested 53.39% and 52.09% cells in G2M phase of cell cycle respectively, which was statistically significant. Conclusion: Graviola showed significant cytotoxic activity and percentage of cell inhibition at G2M phase cell cycle against SCC-25 cell lines.

  19. Proximity assays for sensitive quantification of proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Greenwood

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Proximity assays are immunohistochemical tools that utilise two or more DNA-tagged aptamers or antibodies binding in close proximity to the same protein or protein complex. Amplification by PCR or isothermal methods and hybridisation of a labelled probe to its DNA target generates a signal that enables sensitive and robust detection of proteins, protein modifications or protein–protein interactions. Assays can be carried out in homogeneous or solid phase formats and in situ assays can visualise single protein molecules or complexes with high spatial accuracy. These properties highlight the potential of proximity assays in research, diagnostic, pharmacological and many other applications that require sensitive, specific and accurate assessments of protein expression.

  20. Drugs, Women and Violence in the Americas: U.S. Results of a Multi-Centric Pilot Project (Phase 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Guarda, Rosa María; Peragallo, Nilda; Lynch, Ami; Nemes, Susanna

    2010-09-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore the collective and individual experiences that Latin American females in the U. S. have with substance abuse, violence and risky sexual behaviors. METHODS: This study was conducted in two phases that were carried out from July 2006 to June 2007 in south Florida. This paper covers Phase 1. In Phase 1, focus groups were conducted among 93 women in English, Spanish and Portuguese. Through content analyses of the focus group transcriptions, major themes were identified. RESULTS: Participants identified substance abuse, violence and risky sexual behaviors as closely related problems of great concern in Latina women in the U.S. Three important themes emerged from the focus groups. These included "Living in the US and the Devaluing of Latino Culture," the "Vicious Cycle of Abuse" and "Breaking the Silence". CONCLUSIONS: The results from this study suggest that substance abuse, violence and HIV should be addressed in an integrative and comprehensive manner. Recommendations for the development of policies, programs and services addressing substance abuse, violence and risk for HIV among Latinos are provided. PMID:21593995

  1. Analysis of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) benchmark problem phase IV for liquid metal fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ki Bog; Song, Hoon; Jang, Jin Wook [and others

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to report the calculation results based on the K-CORE system developed by KAERI and to compare the results performed by the each participant for the IAEA CRP Phase 4 of BN-600 full Mixed OXide (MOX) fueled core benchmark analyses. The K-CORE calculational methods employed in the benchmark analyses are explained. The benchmark results carried out by KAERI and the results of other participants are collected and inter-compared. According to comparison results, the k-eff and the fuel Doppler coefficients of KAERI shows a little bit higher than the other's values mainly due to using JEF 2.2 cross section data library as described in sensitivity analysis. The fuel density coefficients and the effective delayed neutron fraction and the neutron lifetime show good agreement compared with the other participants' values. Even though the KAERI results for the steel Doppler and sodium density coefficients, exists in the range of minimum and maximum values between the participants, there are big discrepancies in reactivity coefficients. So the prediction of reactivity coefficients requires further investigation, and the study of Phase5, Phase 6 will be continuously performed.

  2. Kinship--king's social harmonisation project. Pilot phase of a social network for use in higher education (HE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, B A

    2013-01-01

    Students entering Higher Education are increasingly information and communications technology literate. Many students (graduates and undergraduates) arrive as "digital residents", who are adept with social media and technologically fluent. The informal use of social media for learning is becoming increasingly evident, along with the potentially detrimental effects of a poor digital profile on employment prospects. This paper describes the creation of Kinship (King's Social Harmonisation Project), a university hosted, members only social network, which is currently being piloted in the Medical School at King's College London. Along with a number of other teaching and learning resources, it is intended to use Kinship to establish an informal code of conduct by modelling and moderating appropriate professional online behaviour. Kinship was developed using an open source Elgg platform, thanks to funding of £20,000 from the College Teaching Fund under the mentorship of Brighton University (1). This educational research project, led by Medicine, was proposed to select, customise and evaluate a social networking platform in order to provide functionality that would enhance new and existing e-learning resources, support group interaction, participation and sharing and meet the diverse needs of three academic schools: Medicine, the Dental Institute and two separate Departments, the Modern Languages Centre and the Department of English from Arts & Humanities, as a pilot for wider College deployment. Student involvement is central to the project, from conducting the evaluation to moulding and customising the functionality and look of Kinship, in order to ensure that the site is authentic and evolves in response to their wishes and requirements. Formal evaluation of Kinship commences summer 2012. PMID:25461124

  3. Multi-phase Temporal Seismic Imaging of a Slope Stability Mitigation Project at Newby Island Sanitary Landfill, San Jose, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treece, B. J.; Catchings, R.; Reed, D.; Goldman, M.

    2014-12-01

    Without slope stability mitigation, liquefaction-induced settlement in bay mud and Pleistocene alluvial deposits may lead to the collapse of levee walls surrounding sanitary landfills that are located adjacent to the San Francisco Bay. To analyze the effectiveness of a slope stability mitigation project involving deep soil mixing at Newby Island Sanitary Landfill in San Jose, California, we acquired P- and S-wave seismic surveys along a transect through the mitigated region during, and two years after, completion of the mitigation project. Deep soil mixing involves the injection of a cement slurry in augered holes, resulting in groups of soil-cement columns (elements) that are intended to increase the strength and rigidity of the subsurface materials. For our seismic investigations, we used accelerated-weight-drop (AWD) and hammer impacts to generate P- and S-wave seismic sources, respectively, at 57 geophone locations, spaced 5 m apart. The resulting seismic data were recorded using 40-Hz, vertical-component (P-wave) and 4.5-Hz, horizontal-component (S-wave) sensors. Initially, we developed tomographic refraction (velocity) images along a progressive transition from a yet-to-be-mitigated area into a more recently mitigated area, located along the base of a steep slope composed of compacted landfill. The initial survey revealed an increase in seismic velocity in the treated area, seismic velocity increases with curing time for soil-cement elements, and a high-velocity zone beneath the active injection zone. The influence of the mitigation was most apparent from increases in Vp/Vs and Poisson's ratios. To assess the long-term effects of the mitigation project, an identical, follow-up survey was acquired in July 2014, 23 months after the initial survey. We present a comparative analysis of the tomographic images from the two surveys, variations in Vp/Vs and Poisson's ratios over time, and a comparison of in situ, time-varying seismic parameters with laboratory

  4. Phase I Archaeological Investigation Cultural Resources Survey, Hawaii Geothermal Project, Makawao and Hana Districts, South Shore of Maui, Hawaii (DRAFT )

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erkelens, Conrad

    1994-03-01

    This report details the archaeological investigation of a 200 foot wide sample corridor extending approximately 9 miles along the southern portion of Maui within the present districts of Hana and Makawao. A total of 51 archaeological sites encompassing 233 surface features were documented. A GPS receiver was used to accurately and precisely plot locations for each of the documented sites. Analysis of the locational information suggests that archaeological sites are abundant throughout the region and only become scarce where vegetation has been bulldozed for ranching activities. At the sea-land transition points for the underwater transmission cable, both Ahihi Bay and Huakini Bay are subjected to seasonal erosion and redeposition of their boulder shorelines. The corridor at the Ahihi Bay transition point runs through the Moanakala Village Complex which is an archaeological site on the State Register of Historic Places within a State Natural Area Reserve. Numerous other potentially significant archaeological sites lie within the project corridor. It is likely that rerouting of the corridor in an attempt to avoid known sites would result in other undocumented sites located outside the sample corridor being impacted. Given the distribution of archaeological sites, there is no alternative route that can be suggested that is likely to avoid encountering sites. A total of twelve charcoal samples were obtained for potential taxon identification and radiocarbon analysis. Four of these samples were subsequently submitted for dating and species identification. Bird bone from various locations within a lava tube were collected for identification. Sediment samples for subsequent pollen analysis were obtained from within two lava tubes. With these three sources of information it is hoped that paleoenvironmental data can be recovered that will enable a better understanding of the setting for Hawaiian habitation of the area. A small test unit was excavated at one habitation site

  5. Sustainable development in city districts: BaLaLuZ project - Society; Schlussbericht 'Gesellschaft' - Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arend, M.

    2004-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) is one of a series of reports concerning municipal development in various cities in Switzerland. The four city districts involved include Basel (Gundeldinger Feld), Lausanne (Bellevaux), Lucerne (Basel-/Bernstrasse) and Zurich (Werdwies). This paper takes a look at society aspects in the four districts and examines the factors that influence the sustainable development of the districts. Topics discussed include basic residential needs, safety, health, and supply along with culture and education. Also examined are the possible topics equality and fairness and participation along with geographical reference and neighbourhood relations. A project for this area of investigation is suggested.

  6. {Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and aliphatic hydrocarbons in gas and particle phases in two sites of Mexico: MILAGRO project}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador-Muñoz, O.; Villalobos-Pietrini, R.; Castro, T.; Gaspariano-Larino, R.

    2009-04-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons are markers of anthropogenic and biogenic emission sources1; meanwhile PAHs are generated by incomplete combustion sources2. The last ones are important compounds due to their carcinogenic and mutagenic properties3,4. The aim of this study was to identify and quantify aliphatic hydrocarbons and PAHs in gas and particles phases of the atmospheric aerosol and to determine the day and night time behavior during the MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local Global and Research Observations) campaign. The gas phase was collected on polyurethane foam, while particles less than 2.5 m (PM2.5) were collected on glass fiber filters covered with Teflon (TIGF, pallflex) of 8x10 in. Samplings were carried out with a high volume sampler (Tisch) with a flow of 1.13 m3 min-1 at two sites: Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo (T0) and Tecamac (T1) located at North and Northeast of Mexico City, respectively during day (7:00 am-7:00 pm) and night time (7:00 pm-7:00 am) from 1 to 29 of March, 2006. Ninteen PAHs and 23 aliphatic hydrocarbons from n-C13H28 to n-C35H72 were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in impact mode. The samples were spiked with deuterads PAHs and aliphatics hydrocarbons before ultrasound extraction. Medians comparisons were made with Mann-Whitney U test. PAHs with molecular weight (MW) less than 228 g mol-1 were distributed in the gas phase, in both sites. Higher concentrations of PAHs ≥ 228 g mol-1 in PM2.5, were observed during night period (p

  7. Cliffs Minerals, Inc. Eastern Gas Shales Project, Ohio No. 6 series: Gallia County. Phase II report. Preliminary laboratory results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-06-01

    The US Department of Energy is funding a research and development program entitled the Eastern Gas Shales Project designed to increase commercial production of natural gas in the eastern United States from Middle and Upper Devonian Shales. On September 28, 1978 the Department of Energy entered into a cooperative agreement with Mitchell Energy Corporation to explore Devonian shale gas potential in Gallia County, Ohio. Objectives of the cost-sharing contract were the following: (1) to select locations for a series of five wells to be drilled around the periphery of a possible gas reservoir in Gallia County, Ohio; (2) to drill, core, log, case, fracture, clean up, and test each well, and to monitor production from the wells for a five-year period. This report summarizes the procedures and results of core characterization work performed at the Eastern Gas Shales Project Core Laboratory on core retrieved from the Gallia County EGSP wells, designated OH No. 6/1, OH No. 6/2, OH No. 6/3, OH No. 6/4, and OH No. 6/5. Characterization work performed includes photographic logs, fracture logs, measurements of core color variation, and stratigraphic interpretation of the cored intervals. In addition the following tests were performed by Michigan Technological University to obtain the following data: directional ultrasonic velocity; directional tensile strength, strength in point load; trends of microfractures; and hydraulic fracturing characteristics.

  8. Rover waste assay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akers, D.W.; Stoots, C.M.; Kraft, N.C.; Marts, D.J. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-11-01

    The Rover Waste Assay System (RWAS) is a nondestructive assay system designed for the rapid assay of highly-enriched {sup 235}U contaminated piping, tank sections, and debris from the Rover nuclear rocket fuel processing facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. A scanning system translates a NaI(Tl) detector/collimator system over the structural components where both relative and calibrated measurements for {sup 137}Cs are made. Uranium-235 concentrations are in operation and is sufficiently automated that most functions are performed by the computer system. These functions include system calibration, problem identification, collimator control, data analysis, and reporting. Calibration of the system was done through a combination of measurements on calibration standards and benchmarked modeling. A description of the system is presented along with the methods and uncertainties associated with the calibration and analysis of the system for components from the Rover facility. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Rover waste assay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Rover Waste Assay System (RWAS) is a nondestructive assay system designed for the rapid assay of highly-enriched 235U contaminated piping, tank sections, and debris from the Rover nuclear rocket fuel processing facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. A scanning system translates a NaI(Tl) detector/collimator system over the structural components where both relative and calibrated measurements for 137Cs are made. Uranium-235 concentrations are in operation and is sufficiently automated that most functions are performed by the computer system. These functions include system calibration, problem identification, collimator control, data analysis, and reporting. Calibration of the system was done through a combination of measurements on calibration standards and benchmarked modeling. A description of the system is presented along with the methods and uncertainties associated with the calibration and analysis of the system for components from the Rover facility. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  10. Interpreting coagulation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David

    2010-09-01

    The interpretation of coagulation assays requires knowledge of the principal clotting pathways. The activated partial thromboplastin time is sensitive to all hemostatic factors except FVII, whereas the prothrombin time reflects levels of prothrombin and FV, FVII, and FX. Using the two tests in concert is helpful in identifying hemophilia, the coagulopathy of liver disease, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. In addition, the activated partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time are used for monitoring anticoagulant therapy with heparin and warfarin, respectively. Measurement of D-dimer is informative in patients suspected of having thrombotic disorders and determining the risk of thrombosis recurrence. Mixing tests distinguish clotting factor deficiencies from circulating anticoagulants such as heparin, the lupus anticoagulant, and antibodies directed against specific clotting factors. The modified Bethesda assay detects and provides an indication of the strength of FVIII inhibitors. However, interpreting the results of coagulation assays is not always straightforward, and expert consultation is occasionally required to resolve difficult clinical situations. PMID:20855988

  11. Neutral Comet Assay

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The Comet assay (or Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis assay) is a sensitive technique to detect DNA damage at the level of an individual cell. This technique is based on micro-electrophoresis of cells DNA content. Briefly, cells are embedded in agarose, lysed and submitted to an electric field, before the staining step with a fluorescent DNA binding dye. Damaged DNA (charged DNA) migrates in this field, forming the tail of a “comet”, while undamaged DNA remained in the head of the “comet”. The ...

  12. Lateral flow strip assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Robin R.; Benett, William J.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Pearson, Francesca S.; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L.

    2011-03-08

    A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

  13. Automated phantom assay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes an automated phantom assay system developed for assaying phantoms spiked with minute quantities of radionuclides. The system includes a computer-controlled linear-translation table that positions the phantom at exact distances from a spectrometer. A multichannel analyzer (MCA) interfaces with a computer to collect gamma spectral data. Signals transmitted between the controller and MCA synchronize data collection and phantom positioning. Measured data are then stored on disk for subsequent analysis. The automated system allows continuous unattended operation and ensures reproducible results

  14. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program. Phase 1. Project V. Structural sub-system response: subsystem response review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project is directed toward a portion of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program which includes one link in the seismic methodology chain. The link addressed here is the structural subsystem dynamic response which consists of those components and systems whose behavior is often determined decoupled from the major structural response. Typically the mathematical model utilized for the major structural response will include only the mass effects of the subsystem and the main model is used to produce the support motion inputs for subsystem seismic qualification. The main questions addressed in this report have to do with the seismic response uncertainty of safety-related components or equipment whose seismic qualification is performed by (a) analysis, (b) tests, or (c) combinations of analysis and tests, and where the seismic input is assumed to have no uncertainty

  15. Assessment of the feasibility of studying the potential health effects of the West Valley Solidification Project. Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities at West Valley involve potential exposure to ionizing radiation. The health effects from radiation are well known and the projected levels of exposure in this situation are so low as to pose no known health hazard in the community. In such a situation it is not reasonable to propose an expensive, comprehensive and physically invasive screening program for the public unless one could justify the benefits. This report describes a feasible population-based surveillance or disease monitoring system which could be implemented in the West Valley area in order to assess the relevance of any changes in incidence of disease which might be attributable to radiation. The proposed plan is both practical and inexpensive. It would anticipate any potential changes in the health status of the population and provide a means to objectively interpret such changes before major concerns develop

  16. The OECD validation program of the H295R steroidogenesis assay for the identification of in vitro inhibitors and inducers of testosterone and estradiol production. Phase 2: Inter-laboratory pre-validation studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecker, Markus; Hollert, Henner; Cooper, Ralph;

    2007-01-01

    , the EC(50)s calculated were comparable (coefficients of variation 34-49%) for all hormones. Discussion and Perspectives. The results indicated that the H295R Steroidogenesis Assay protocol was robust, transferable and reproducible among all laboratories. However, in several instances that were primarily...... chemicals that may interfere with endocrine systems of vertebrates. Here we report on studies that were conducted to develop and standardize a cell-based screening assay using the H295R cell line to prioritize chemicals that may act on steroidogenic processes in humans and wildlife. These studies...... their potential to interact with the endocrine system of vertebrates. Study Design. Six laboratories from five countries participated in the pre-validation studies. Each laboratory tested the effects of three model chemicals on the production of testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2) using the H295R Steroidogenesis...

  17. Correction of contrast in projection systems by means of phase-controlled prism coatings and band-shifted twist compensators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbluth, Alan E.; Lu, Minhua; Yang, Kei H.; Ho, Kenneth; Singh, Rama N.; Nakasogi, Teruhiro

    2000-04-01

    Projectors that use LCOS lightvalves face special contrast requirements. Most configurations for reflective light valves employ tilted beam-dividing coatings that see both bright and dark polarization states. The optics must then be designed to eliminate polarization mixing at these coatings, which ordinarily arises when the S and P planes for different rays are non-parallel. We show how phase- controlled coatings can exploit the double-pass symmetry of the Plumbicon tri-prism geometry to correct this effect, reducing cross-polarized reflectivity to approximately 1E-3 when the light valve is mirror-like in black-state. Though contrast in different rays varies as a function of both ray skew component and coating angle of incidence, we show that for NA EQ 0.2 the computation involved in calculating beam contrast is essentially equivalent to tracing a single ray. Light valves that use a normally-black TN mode exhibit a non-mirror-like phase dispersion in their black-state, complicating contrast control in the optics. Scatter depolarization at the edges of pixel electrodes is enhanced in these light valves, because the inherent twist causes the backplane polarization to be rotated out of alignment with pixel edges. We show that all of these contrast degradation mechanisms can be addressed by incorporating into the light valve a compensating layer having opposite birefringence to the black-state TN active layer. Moreover, when the compensating layer and driven layer are blue-shifted to a shorter LC thickness than would ordinarily be appropriate for the wavelength band of interest, a highly achromatic response is obtained at all gray levels.

  18. Multiplexed Dosing Assays by Digitally Definable Hydrogel Volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faralli, Adele; Melander, Fredrik; Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack;

    2016-01-01

    Stable and low-cost multiplexed drug sensitivity assays using small volumes of cells or tissue are in demand for personalized medicine, including patientspecific combination chemotherapy. Spatially defined projected light photopolymerization of hydrogels with embedded active compounds is introduced...

  19. Lateral flow assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posthuma-Trumpie, G.A.; Amerongen, van A.

    2012-01-01

    A simple version of immunochemical-based methods is the Lateral Flow Assay (LFA). It is a dry chemistry technique (reagents are included); the fluid from the sample runs through a porous membrane (often nitrocellulose) by capillary force. Typically the membrane is cut as a strip of 0.5*5 cm. In most

  20. Hyaluronic Acid Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itenov, Theis Skovsgaard; Kirkby, Nikolai S; Bestle, Morten H;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUD: Hyaluronic acid (HA) is proposed as a marker of functional liver capacity. The aim of the present study was to compare a new turbidimetric assay for measuring HA with the current standard method. METHODS: HA was measured by a particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (PETIA) and enzyme...

  1. Instrument for assaying radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Jody Rustyn; Farfan, Eduardo B.

    2016-03-22

    An instrument for assaying radiation includes a flat panel detector having a first side opposed to a second side. A collimated aperture covers at least a portion of the first side of the flat panel detector. At least one of a display screen or a radiation shield may cover at least a portion of the second side of the flat panel detector.

  2. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 5: Aerospace librarians and technical information specialists as information intermediaries: A report of phase 2 activities of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The flow of U.S. government-funded and foreign scientific and technical information (STI) through libraries and related facilities to users in government and industry is examined, summarizing preliminary results of Phase 2 of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project (NAKDRP). The design and objectives of NAKDRP are reviewed; the NAKDRP model of STI transfer among producers, STI intermediaries, surrogates (technical report repositories or clearinghouses), and users is explained and illustrated with diagrams; and particular attention is given to the organization and operation of aerospace libraries. In a survey of North American libraries it was found that 25-30 percent of libraries regularly receive technical reports from ESA and the UK; the corresponding figures for Germany and for France, Sweden, and Japan are 18 and 5 percent, respectively. Also included is a series of bar graphs showing the librarians' assessments of the quality and use of NASA Technical Reports.

  3. ELBE - Validation and improvement of load prognoses (project phase 1); ELBE - Validierung und Verbesserung von Lastprognosen (Projektphase 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronig, P.; Waelchli, U.; Zuercher, S. [BKW FMB Energie AG, Bern (Switzerland); Hoeckel, M. [Berner Fachhochschule, Biel (Switzerland)

    2009-10-15

    In the project 'Prognosekompetenz' we have identified and quantified by means of a comprehensive analysis of grid and climate data the factors which have a significant impact on the grid load. The study focused in the beginning on the regional data from a big electricity utility. In a second step, additional local data were also considered to better identify climatic and economic characteristics. We found a strong correlation between load, on the one hand, and outdoor temperature and economic activity, on the other hand. The influence of further factors is very limited. On this basis we developed two Matlab-based, easy-to-use tools for the prediction of the daily grid load profile in quarter-of-hour steps. One tool uses the method of the transfer function, where specific correlation factors account for the influential factors. The second tool based on the method of the artificial neuronal network, which had been tuned with data from several years to make sure that a high accuracy is obtained. We could show by self developed testing procedures that for both tools the precision in forecasting the daily load profile is very high. (authors)

  4. Advanced Seismic Data Analysis Program (The Hot Pot Project), DOE Award: DE-EE0002839, Phase 1 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oski Energy, LLC,

    2013-03-28

    A five-line (23 mile) reflection- seismic survey was conducted at the Hot Pot geothermal prospect area in north-central Nevada under the USDOE (United States Department of Energy) Geothermal Technologies Program. The project objective was to utilize innovative seismic data processing, integrated with existing geological, geophysical and geochemical information, to identify high-potential drilling targets and to reduce drilling risk. Data acquisition and interpretation took place between October 2010 and April 2011. The first round of data processing resulted in large areas of relatively poor data, and obvious reflectors known from existing subsurface information either did not appear on the seismic profiles or appeared at the wrong depth. To resolve these issues, the velocity model was adjusted to include geologic input, and the lines were reprocessed. The resulting products were significantly improved, and additional detail was recovered within the high-velocity and in part acoustically isotropic basement. Features visible on the improved seismic images include interpreted low angle thrust faults within the Paleozoic Valmy Formation, which potentially are reactivated in the current stress field. Intermediate-depth wells are currently targeted to test these features. The seismic images also suggest the existence of Paleogene sedimentary and volcanic rocks which potentially may function as a near- surface reservoir, charged by deeper structures in Paleozoic rocks.

  5. The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project: Phase I Activities by a Global Community of Science. Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, Cynthia E.; Jones, James W.; Hatfield, Jerry L.; Antle, John M.; Ruane, Alexander C.; Mutter, Carolyn Z.

    2015-01-01

    The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) was founded in 2010. Its mission is to improve substantially the characterization of world food security as affected by climate variability and change, and to enhance adaptation capacity in both developing and developed countries. The objectives of AgMIP are to: Incorporate state-of-the-art climate, crop/livestock, and agricultural economic model improvements into coordinated multi-model regional and global assessments of future climate impacts and adaptation and other key aspects of the food system. Utilize multiple models, scenarios, locations, crops/livestock, and participants to explore uncertainty and the impact of data and methodological choices. Collaborate with regional experts in agronomy, animal sciences, economics, and climate to build a strong basis for model applications, addressing key climate related questions and sustainable intensification farming systems. Improve scientific and adaptive capacity in modeling for major agricultural regions in the developing and developed world, with a focus on vulnerable regions. Improve agricultural data and enhance data-sharing based on their intercomparison and evaluation using best scientific practices. Develop modeling frameworks to identify and evaluate promising adaptation technologies and policies and to prioritize strategies.

  6. Exploration on Sub-phase Tax Planning for Real Estate Projects%房地产项目分阶段纳税筹划初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康丽娟; 杨永辉; 司冠婷

    2012-01-01

    在国家对房地产实行宏观调控的背景下,我国房地产企业面临着来自各方面的压力,加之其在开发及经营过程投入资金多、建设及销售周期长、涉税标的金额大、涉及税种多、范围广等特点,使房地产业成为税收负担较重的行业.房地产行业的一般项目通常分为前期准备阶段、开发建设阶段、销售或保有阶段,本文将分别针对房地产项目的这几个阶段进行纳税筹划的初探.%In the context of implementing macro-control to real estate, China's real estate companies are facing pressure from all sides, together with its features in development and operation, such as more funds and long period of construction and sales, business funding, cycle length, the large amount of tax-related subject matter, involving many taxes, wide range, which makes the real estate become industry with more heavier tax burden. The general project of the real estate industry is usually divided into the preparation stage, the development and construction phase, sale or retention phase, this paper explores tax planning in view of these stages of the real estate project.

  7. JSS Project Phase V: Final report. Testing and modelling of the corrosion of simulated nuclear waste glass powders in a waste package environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the results of phase V of the project and the final evaluation of the COGEMA glass data base for the whole project in terms of glass long-term performance. The effects of the following parameters and additives on the corrosion performance of the COGEMA glass were studied explicitly or implicitly by comparison with data from JSS phases 1 and to 4: - time, - temperature, - S/V, - pH, - radioactivity (ABS-118 and R7T7 versus JSS-A glass), - bentonite, - magnetite, - bentonite + magnetite. The results showed that even if there was permanent contract between the glass and groundwater in a respository at 90 degree C and fractured glass block would not be fully altered within 10000 years provided that the groundwater flow rate did not exceed 100 l/yr/glass block. At a lower, more typical, temperature of about 50 degree C the durability may be higher. It is unlikely that, for long-term contact with groundwater, the glass block would remain intact at this temperature for time periods longer than 1 million years. The long-term rate controls the release of soluble elements. The release of sparingly soluble glass constituents is lower and, although controlled by the flow rate, is not proportional to it. The chemical effect of bentonite was of minor importance for the evaluation of the long-term alteration of the glass matrix, but the sorption capacity of bentonite significantly reduces the concentrations of radionuclides such as Cs in the contacting groundwater. The magnitude of the effect of magnetite on glass corrosion depended on the corrosion rate of the steel canister and/or the rate of iron silicate formation or multilayer silica sorption. This implies that in the presence of iron canisters the rate of glass corrosion will significantly depend on redox conditions

  8. A Case Study on the Implementation of a Positive Youth Development Program (Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong: Learning from the Experimental Implementation Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tak Yan Lee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation of the implementation of a positive youth development program (Project P.A.T.H.S. was part of a large study undertaken comprehensively to explore how effective the Tier 1 Program was in practice and how the results can shed light on future developments. Utilizing a case study approach, individual and focus group interviews were conducted in 2007 to examine the factors that influence the process and quality of implementation of the Tier 1 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. The focus of this study was on how the implementers of a school made use of the experience gained in the Experimental Implementation Phase (EIP in 2005/06 to improve the program implementation quality in the Full Implementation Phase (FIP in 2006/07. Results showed that the program implementation in the FIP was generally high and the program was well received by the implementers. Factors that facilitated the implementation of the program were identified, including the adoption of an incremental change strategy, the incorporation of the program into both formal and informal curricula, positive perceptions of the program among staff and agency social workers, sufficient school administrative support, excellent cooperation between the school and the social work agency, presence of a dedicated school contact person and instructors who engaged themselves in continuous quality improvement of the implementation, and an emphasis on application of what had been learned. Difficulties encountered by the school in the process of implementation were also observed. Based on the present findings, key process variables that facilitate or impede the implementation of positive youth development programs are discussed. Implications for future program implementation are also discussed.

  9. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 2 of -42-foot project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Word, J.Q.; Ward, J.A.; Strand, J.A.; Kohn, N.P.; Squires, A.L. (Battelle Marine Research Lab., Sequim, WA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District, was authorized by the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 to deepen and widen the navigation channels of Inner and Outer Oakland Harbor, California, to accommodate modern deep-draft vessels. The recommended plan consists of deepening the harbor channels from the presently authorized water depth of {minus}35 ft mean lower low water (MLLW) to {minus}42 ft MLLW and supplying the harbor with adequate turning basins and berthing areas. Offshore ocean disposal of the dredged sediment is being considered, provided there is no evident of harmful ecological effects. It harmful ecological effects are not evident then the appropriate certifications from state environmental quality agencies and concurrence from the Environmental Protection Agency can be obtained to allow disposal of sediment. To help provide the scientific basis for determining whether Oakland Harbor sediments are suitable for offshore disposal, the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) collected sediment cores from 23 stations in Inner and Outer Oakland Harbor, evaluated these sediment cores geologically, performed chemical analyses for selected contaminants in sediments, conducted a series of solid phase toxicity tests with four sensitive marine invertebrates and assessed the bioaccumulation potential of sediment-associated contaminants in the tissues of Macoma Nasuta. 43 refs., 26 figs., 61 tabs.

  10. Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project Probability/Coordination Study Resident Fish and Wildlife Impacts Phase III, 1996 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitzinger, Eric J. [Idaho Dept. of Fish and Game, Boise, ID (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Phase 3 began in 1995 with the overall goal of quantifying changes in resident fish habitat in the Snake River Basin upstream of Brownlee Reservoir resulting from the release of salmon flow augmentation water. Existing data, in the form of weighted usable area versus flow relationships, were used to estimate habitat changes for white sturgeon (Acipenser transinontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the Snake River between C.J. Strike Dam and Brownlee pool. The increased flows resulted in increased habitat for adult and juvenile white sturgeon and adult rainbow trout. But, the flows have failed to meet mean monthly flow recommendations for the past three years despite the addition of the flow augmentation releases. It is unlikely that the flow augmentation releases have had any significant long-term benefit for sturgeon and rainbow trout in the Snake River. Flow augmentation releases from the Boise and Payette rivers have in some years helped to meet or exceed minimum flow recommendations in these tributaries. The minimum flows would not have been reached without the flow augmentation releases. But, in some instances, the timing of the releases need to be adjusted in order to maximize benefits to resident fishes in the Boise and Payette rivers.

  11. NIHAO project II: Halo shape, phase-space density and velocity distribution of dark matter in galaxy formation simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Butsky, Iryna; Dutton, Aaron A; Wang, Liang; Stinson, Greg S; Penzo, Camilla; Kang, Xi; Keller, Ben W; Wadsley, James

    2015-01-01

    We show the effect of galaxy formation on the dark matter (DM) distribution across a wide range of halo masses. We focus on how baryon physics changes the dark matter halo shape, the so called "pseudo phase-space density distribution" and the velocity distribution within the virial radius, Rvir and in the solar neighborhood. This study is based on the NIHAO galaxy formation simulations, a large suite of cosmological zoom-in simulations. The galaxies reproduce key properties of observed galaxies, and hence offer unique insight into how baryons change the dark matter morphology and kinematics. When compared to dark matter only simulations, the NIHAO haloes have similar shapes at Rvir, but are substantially rounder inside ~0.1 Rvir. In DM-only simulations the inner halo has a minor-to-major axis ratio of c/a~0.5. In hydro simulations c/a increases with halo mass and integrated star formation efficiency, reaching ~0.8 at the Milky Way mass, reconciling a long-standing conflict between observations and DM only sim...

  12. Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project probability/coordination study resident fish and wildlife impacts. Phase 3. Annual report 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase 3 began in 1995 with the overall goal of quantifying changes in resident fish habitat in the Snake River Basin upstream of Brownlee Reservoir resulting from the release of salmon flow augmentation water. Existing data, in the form of weighted usable area versus flow relationships, were used to estimate habitat changes for white sturgeon (Acipenser transinontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the Snake River between C.J. Strike Dam and Brownlee pool. The increased flows resulted in increased habitat for adult and juvenile white sturgeon and adult rainbow trout. But, the flows have failed to meet mean monthly flow recommendations for the past three years despite the addition of the flow augmentation releases. It is unlikely that the flow augmentation releases have had any significant long-term benefit for sturgeon and rainbow trout in the Snake River. Flow augmentation releases from the Boise and Payette rivers have in some years helped to meet or exceed minimum flow recommendations in these tributaries. The minimum flows would not have been reached without the flow augmentation releases. But, in some instances, the timing of the releases need to be adjusted in order to maximize benefits to resident fishes in the Boise and Payette rivers

  13. The Two-Column Aerosol Project: Phase I - Overview and Impact of Elevated Aerosol Layers on Aerosol Optical Depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Barnard, James C.; Burton, Sharon; Cairns, Brian; Chand, Duli; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Dunagan, Stephen; Ferrare, Richard A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hubbe, John M.; Jefferson, Anne; Johnson, Roy; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Kollias, Pavlos; Lamer, Katia; Lantz, K.; Mei, Fan; Miller, Mark A.; Michalsky, Joseph; Ortega, Ivan; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Rogers, Ray; Russell, P.; Redemann, Jens; Sedlacek, Art; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal; Schmid, Beat; Shilling, John E.; Shinozuka, Yohei; Springston, Stephen R.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Tyrrell, Megan; Wilson, Jacqueline; Volkamer, Rainer M.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    2016-01-08

    The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP), which was conducted from June 2012 through June 2013, was a unique field study that was designed to provide a comprehensive data set that can be used to investigate a number of important climate science questions, including those related to aerosol mixing state and aerosol radiative forcing. The study was designed to sample the atmosphere at a number of altitudes, from near the surface to as high as 8 km, within two atmospheric columns; one located near the coast of North America (over Cape Cod, MA) and a second over the Atlantic Ocean several hundred kilometers from the coast. TCAP included the yearlong deployment of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) that was located at the base of the Cape Cod column, as well as summer and winter aircraft intensive observation periods of the ARM Aerial Facility. One important finding from TCAP is the relatively common occurrence (on four of six nearly cloud-free flights) of elevated aerosol layers in both the Cape Cod and maritime columns that were detected using the nadir pointing second-generation NASA high-spectral resolution lidar (HSRL-2). These layers contributed up to 60% of the total aerosol optical depth (AOD) observed in the column. Many of these layers were also intercepted by the aircraft configured for in situ sampling, and the aerosol in the layers was found to have increased amounts of biomass burning aerosol and nitrate compared to the aerosol found near the surface.

  14. Phase 1 archaeological investigation, cultural resources survey, Hawaii Geothermal Project, Makawao and Hana districts, south shore of Maui, Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erkelens, C. [International Archaeological Research Inst., Inc., Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1995-04-01

    This report details the archaeological investigation of a 200 foot wide sample corridor extending approximately 9 miles along the southern portion of Maui within the present districts of Hana and Makawao. The survey team documented a total of 51 archaeological sites encompassing 233 surface features. Archaeological sites are abundant throughout the region and only become scarce where vegetation has been bulldozed for ranching activities. At the sea-land transition points for the underwater transmission cable, both Ahihi Bay and Huakini Bay are subjected to seasonal erosion and redeposition of their boulder shorelines. The corridor at the Ahihi Bay transition point runs through the Maonakala Village Complex which is an archaeological site on the State Register of Historic Places within a State Natural Area Reserve. Numerous other potentially significant archaeological sites lie within the project corridor. It is likely that rerouting of the corridor in an attempt to avoid known sites would result in other undocumented sites located outside the sample corridor being impacted. Given the distribution of archaeological sites, there is no alternative route that can be suggested that is likely to avoid encountering sites. Twelve charcoal samples were obtained for potential taxon identification and radiocarbon analysis. Four of these samples were subsequently submitted for dating and species identification. Bird bones from various locations within a lava tube were collected for identification. Sediment samples for subsequent pollen analysis were obtained from within two lava tubes. With these three sources of information it is hoped that paleoenvironmental data can be recovered that will enable a better understanding of the setting for Hawaiian habitation of the area.

  15. Developing community-based preventive interventions in Hong Kong: a description of the first phase of the family project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Sunita M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper describes the development of culturally-appropriate family-based interventions and their relevant measures, to promote family health, happiness and harmony in Hong Kong. Programs were developed in the community, using a collaborative approach with community partners. The development process, challenges, and the lessons learned are described. This experience may be of interest to the scientific community as there is little information currently available about community-based development of brief interventions with local validity in cultures outside the West. Methods The academic-community collaborative team each brought strengths to the development process and determined the targets for intervention (parent-child relationships. Information from expert advisors and stakeholder discussion groups was collected and utilized to define the sources of stress in parent-child relationships. Results Themes emerged from the literature and discussion groups that guided the content of the intervention. Projects emphasized features that were appropriate for this cultural group and promoted potential for sustainability, so that the programs might eventually be implemented at a population-wide level. Challenges included ensuring local direction, relevance and acceptability for the intervention content, engaging participants and enhancing motivation to make behavior changes after a brief program, measurement of behavior changes, and developing an equal partner relationship between academic and community staff. Conclusions This work has public health significance because of the global importance of parent-child relationships as a risk-factor for many outcomes in adulthood, the need to develop interventions with strong evidence of effectiveness to populations outside the West, the potential application of our interventions to universal populations, and characteristics of the interventions that promote dissemination, including minimal

  16. Scientific background of the project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of the proposed project is the development of radioimmunometric assay(s) for the determination of free and total PSA in serum samples from normal and pathological individuals (BPH, PCa). This will be achieved by: A. Selection of appropriate antibody pairs (capture and labelled antibody) for determination of total PSA (free and complex) and for determination of free PSA. From bibliography we have already spotted some antibody pairs. B. Radiolabelling of antibodies. Several labelling and purification procedures will be followed in order to obtain the required analytical sensitivity and dynamic range of the assays. Special attention will be given to the affinity constant as well as to the stability of the radiolabelled molecules. C. Development of protocols for immobilisation of capture antibodies. We will use several solid support formats (plastic tubes, beads and magnetizable particles). Direct adsorption or covalent binding will be used. Immunoadsorption through immobilised second antibody will be also tested in order to decrease the preparation cost of the solid phase reagents. D. Preparation of standards of suitable purity levels. We will test different PSA-free matrices (Bovine serum, buffer solutions etc.) in order to select the most appropriate among them in terms of low background determination and low reagents cost. E. Optimisation of the immunoassays conditions for the free PSA and total PSA (e.g. assay buffers, incubation time, temperature, one or two step procedure, washings). F. Optimisation and standardisation of assay protocols for kit production. G. Production of kits for distribution in clinical laboratories in Greece for comparison with commercial kits. H. Evaluation of the developed assays in real clinical conditions using well characterised human serum samples. This will be performed in co-operation with the Hellenic Society for Tumor Markers, and other anticancer institutions and hospital clinicians of long standing relation

  17. NIHAO project II: halo shape, phase-space density and velocity distribution of dark matter in galaxy formation simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butsky, Iryna; Macciò, Andrea V.; Dutton, Aaron A.; Wang, Liang; Obreja, Aura; Stinson, Greg S.; Penzo, Camilla; Kang, Xi; Keller, Ben W.; Wadsley, James

    2016-10-01

    We use the NIHAO (Numerical Investigation of Hundred Astrophysical Objects) cosmological simulations to study the effects of galaxy formation on key properties of dark matter (DM) haloes. NIHAO consists of ≈90 high-resolution smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations that include (metal-line) cooling, star formation, and feedback from massive stars and supernovae, and cover a wide stellar and halo mass range: 106 ≲ M*/M⊙ ≲ 1011(109.5 ≲ Mhalo/M⊙ ≲ 1012.5). When compared to DM-only simulations, the NIHAO haloes have similar shapes at the virial radius, Rvir, but are substantially rounder inside ≈0.1Rvir. In NIHAO simulations, c/a increases with halo mass and integrated star formation efficiency, reaching ˜0.8 at the Milky Way mass (compared to 0.5 in DM-only), providing a plausible solution to the long-standing conflict between observations and DM-only simulations. The radial profile of the phase-space Q parameter (ρ/σ3) is best fit with a single power law in DM-only simulations, but shows a flattening within ≈0.1Rvir for NIHAO for total masses M > 1011 M⊙. Finally, the global velocity distribution of DM is similar in both DM-only and NIHAO simulations, but in the solar neighbourhood, NIHAO galaxies deviate substantially from Maxwellian. The distribution is more symmetric, roughly Gaussian, with a peak that shifts to higher velocities for Milky Way mass haloes. We provide the distribution parameters which can be used for predictions for direct DM detection experiments. Our results underline the ability of the galaxy formation processes to modify the properties of DM haloes.

  18. First operation and drift field performance of a large area double phase LAr Electron Multiplier Time Projection Chamber with an immersed Greinacher high-voltage multiplier

    CERN Document Server

    Badertscher, A; Degunda, U; Epprecht, L; Gendotti, A; Horikawa, S; Knecht, L; Lussi, D; Marchionni, A; Natterer, G; Nguyen, K; Resnati, F; Rubbia, A; Viant, T

    2012-01-01

    We have operated a liquid-argon large-electron-multiplier time-projection chamber (LAr LEM-TPC) with a large active area of 76 $\\times$ 40 cm$^2$ and a drift length of 60 cm. This setup represents the largest chamber ever achieved with this novel detector concept. The chamber is equipped with an immersed built-in cryogenic Greinacher multi-stage high-voltage (HV) multiplier, which, when subjected to an external AC HV of $\\sim$1 kV$_{\\mathrm{pp}}$, statically charges up to a voltage a factor of $\\sim$30 higher inside the LAr vessel, creating a uniform drift field of $\\sim$0.5 kV/cm over the full drift length. This large LAr LEM-TPC was brought into successful operation in the double-phase (liquid-vapor) operation mode and tested during a period of $\\sim$1 month, recording impressive three-dimensional images of very high-quality from cosmic particles traversing or interacting in the sensitive volume. The double phase readout and HV systems achieved stable operation in cryogenic conditions demonstrating their go...

  19. First operation and drift field performance of a large area double phase LAr Electron Multiplier Time Projection Chamber with an immersed Greinacher high-voltage multiplier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badertscher, A.; Curioni, A.; Degunda, U.; Epprecht, L.; Gendotti, A.; Horikawa, S.; Knecht, L.; Lussi, D.; Marchionni, A.; Natterer, G.; Nguyen, K.; Resnati, F.; Rubbia, A.; Viant, T.

    2012-08-01

    We have operated a liquid-argon large-electron-multiplier time-projection chamber (LAr LEM-TPC) with a large active area of 76 × 40 cm2 and a drift length of 60 cm. This setup represents the largest chamber ever achieved with this novel detector concept. The chamber is equipped with an immersed built-in cryogenic Greinacher multi-stage high-voltage (HV) multiplier, which, when subjected to an external AC HV of ~ 1 kVpp, statically charges up to a voltage a factor of ~ 30 higher inside the LAr vessel, creating a uniform drift field of ~ 0.5 kV/cm over the full drift length. This large LAr LEM-TPC was brought into successful operation in the double-phase (liquid-vapor) operation mode and tested during a period of ~ 1 month, recording impressive three-dimensional images of very high-quality from cosmic particles traversing or interacting in the sensitive volume. The double phase readout and HV systems achieved stable operation in cryogenic conditions demonstrating their good characteristics, which particularly suit applications for next-generation giant-scale LAr-TPCs.

  20. Interim Evaluation of the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 1 Curriculum of the Project P.A.T.H.S.: First Year of the Full Implementation Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the implementation quality of the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 1 Curriculum of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes in the full implementation phase, 100 schools were randomly selected to participate in personal and/or telephone interviews regarding the quality of the implementation process of the Tier 1 Program. In the interviews, the participants described the responses of the students to the program, the perceived benefits of the program, the perceived good aspects of the program, and the areas requiring improvement, difficulties encountered in the implementation process, and perceived attributes of the worker-support scheme (“Co-Walker Scheme”. Results showed that most workers perceived that the students had positive responses to the program and the program was beneficial to the students. They also identified several good aspects in the program, although negative comments on the program design and difficulties in the implementation process were also recorded. Roughly half of the respondents had positive comments on the “Co-Walker Scheme”. In sum, the respondents generally regarded the program as beneficial to the students and they were satisfied with the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 1 Curriculum in the full implementation phase, although some implementation difficulties were also expressed.

  1. Managing Software Development Projects, The Project Management Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felician ALECU

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Software development projects are logically divided into phases that are composing the project life cycle. The name and number of these phases are industry dependent, so they are completely different from one field of activity to another. Typically, the phases are scheduled sequentially but in some cases a project may take clear advantages by running the phases concurrently.

  2. High-Throughput Cell Toxicity Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, David; McWilliams, Lisa; Wigglesworth, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Understanding compound-driven cell toxicity is vitally important for all drug discovery approaches. With high-throughput screening (HTS) being the key strategy to find hit and lead compounds for drug discovery projects in the pharmaceutical industry [1], an understanding of the cell toxicity profile of hit molecules from HTS activities is fundamentally important. Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in phenotypic drug discovery and these cell-based assays are now being run in HTS labs on ever increasing numbers of compounds. As the use of cell assays increases the ability to measure toxicity of compounds on a large scale becomes increasingly important to ensure that false hits are not progressed and that compounds do not carry forward a toxic liability that may cause them to fail at later stages of a project. Here we describe methods employed in the AstraZeneca HTS laboratory to carry out very large scale cell toxicity screening. PMID:27317000

  3. On environment protection points at construction phase in road and tunnel projects%谈公路隧道工程施工阶段环境保护要点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建平

    2012-01-01

    Combining with the potential environment influence of the road tunnel projects,the paper points out the respective measures for the environmental protection at the construction phase of the tunnel projects,and illustrates the controlling points for the environmental protection at the tunnel projects construction phase,so as to avoid the environmental pollution caused by the tunnel projects costruction.%结合公路隧道工程潜在的环境影响,对隧道工程施工阶段环境保护提出相应的措施,并对隧道工程施工阶段环境保护控制要点作出详细阐述,从而尽可能的避免因隧道工程施工造成环境污染。

  4. Disagreement between Human Papillomavirus Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Preisler, Sarah; Ejegod, Ditte Møller;

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the disagreement in primary cervical screening between four human papillomavirus assays: Hybrid Capture 2, cobas, CLART, and APTIMA. Material from 5,064 SurePath samples of women participating in routine cervical screening in Copenhagen, Denmark, was tested with the four...... assays. Positive agreement between the assays was measured as the conditional probability that the results of all compared assays were positive given that at least one assay returned a positive result. Of all 5,064 samples, 1,679 (33.2%) tested positive on at least one of the assays. Among these, 41......-65 years (n = 2,881), 23% tested positive on at least one assay, and 42 to 58% of these showed positive agreement on any compared pair of the assays. While 4% of primary screening samples showed abnormal cytology, 6 to 10% were discordant on any pair of assays. A literature review corroborated our findings...

  5. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  6. A comprehensive company database analysis of biological assay variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Christian; Dahl, Göran; Tyrchan, Christian; Ulander, Johan

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of data from various compounds measured in diverse biological assays is a central part of drug discovery research projects. However, no systematic overview of the variability in biological assays has been published and judgments on assay quality and robustness of data are often based on personal belief and experience within the drug discovery community. To address this we performed a reproducibility analysis of all biological assays at AstraZeneca between 2005 and 2014. We found an average experimental uncertainty of less than a twofold difference and no technologies or assay types had higher variability than others. This work suggests that robust data can be obtained from the most commonly applied biological assays.

  7. Radon assay for SNO+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+

  8. FLUIDICS DEVICE FOR ASSAY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device for use in performing assays on standard laboratory solid supports whereon chemical entities are attached. The invention furthermore relates to the use of such a device and a kit comprising such a device. The device according to the present invention is a......, when operatively connected, one or more chambers (21) comprising the chemical entities (41), the inlet(s) (5) and outlet(s) (6) and chambers (21) being in fluid connection. The device further comprise means for providing differing chemical conditions in each chamber (21)....

  9. Radon assay for SNO+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumleskie, Janet [Laurentian University, Greater Sudbury, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-12-31

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

  10. Project management best practices: forging win-win partnerships and mitigating power project risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trowsdale, R. [EPCOR Power Development Corp. (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    This paper discusses aspects of project management to mitigate power project risk. end-to-end project development involves development phase, permitting phase, implementation phase, and operational phase. Each phase involves a number of different elements. In renewable energy project good management requires maintaining project discipline and schedule throughout all phases. Project success requires commercial competitiveness, fuel availability, power sales contracts, stake holder support, permitting, effective execution, construction and good technical performance.

  11. FURTHER STUDIES ON UNCERTAINTY, CONFOUNDING, AND VALIDATION OF THE DOSES IN THE TECHA RIVER DOSIMETRY SYSTEM: Concluding Progress Report on the Second Phase of Project 1.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degteva, M. O.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2009-10-23

    This is the concluding Progress Report for Project 1.1 of the U.S./Russia Joint Coordinating Committee on Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER). An overwhelming majority of our work this period has been to complete our primary obligation of providing a new version of the Techa River Dosimetry System (TRDS), which we call TRDS-2009D; the D denotes deterministic. This system provides estimates of individual doses to members of the Extended Techa River Cohort (ETRC) and post-natal doses to members of the Techa River Offspring Cohort (TROC). The latter doses were calculated with use of the TRDS-2009D. The doses for the members of the ETRC have been made available to the American and Russian epidemiologists in September for their studies in deriving radiogenic risk factors. Doses for members of the TROC are being provided to European and Russian epidemiologists, as partial input for studies of risk in this population. Two of our original goals for the completion of this nine-year phase of Project 1.1 were not completed. These are completion of TRDS-2009MC, which was to be a Monte Carlo version of TRDS-2009 that could be used for more explicit analysis of the impact of uncertainty in doses on uncertainty in radiogenic risk factors. The second incomplete goal was to be the provision of household specific external doses (rather than village average). This task was far along, but had to be delayed due to the lead investigator’s work on consideration of a revised source term.

  12. Intending Projects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Project name:Jintan tire production base project (the first-phase project) Construction site:Jintan Economic Development Zone, Jiangsu Province Construction unit:Zhongce Rubber (Jintan) Co., Ltd. Total investment:RMB 2.42 billion yuan Project description:It is planned to cover an area of 3,000 mu. In the first phase, it will cover an area of 520.43 mu with designed staff of 4,500 people. It will mix 150,000 tons of rubber and produce 10 million u- nits of high-performance semi-steel-wire saloon car and light truck radial tires, 500,000 units of OTR tires and 100,000 tons of carbon black per year.

  13. 78 FR 56921 - South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project, Phase 2 (Ponds R3, R4, R5, S5, A1, A2W, A8, A8S, A19...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-16

    ... Refuge (Refuge) in Alameda, Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties, California. The proposed project is Phase... be held on September 24, 2013 from 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m., at the San Jose Santa Clara Water... managed by the USFWS, which is mostly in Santa Clara County with five ponds in Alameda County. The...

  14. Strategies for the long-term climate policy. The results of the Cool project. Final report of the second phase of the Dutch National Research Programme on Global Air Pollution and Climate Change (NRP II) 1995-2001. Part 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berk M; Hisschemoller M; Mol T; Hordijk L; Kok M; Metz B; NOP

    2002-01-01

    This report, Climate Change, a Permanent Concern, presents the results of research that was conducted in over 90 projects during the second phase of the National Research Programme on Global Air Pollution and Climate Change (NRP-II, 1995-2001). The report is intended for policymakers, members of bu

  15. Phased Construction Completion Report for Bldg. K-1401 of the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-10-01

    This Phased Construction Completion Report documents the demolition of Bldg. K-1401, Maintenance Building, addressed in the Action Memorandum for the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2003a) as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 non-time-critical removal action. The objectives of the removal action (DOE 2003a) - to eliminate the source of potential contamination, to eliminate the threat of potential future releases, and/or to eliminate the threats to the general public and the environment - were met. The end state of this action is for the slab to remain with all penetrations sealed and grouted or backfilled. The basement and pits remain open. There is residual radiological and polychlorinated biphenyl contamination on the slab and basement. A fixative was applied to the area on the pad contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls. Interim land-use controls will be maintained until final remediation decisions are made under the Zone 2 Record of Decision (DOE 2005a).

  16. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 26: The technical communication practices of aerospace engineering students: Results of the phase 3 AIAA National Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Hecht, Laura M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes similarities and differences between undergraduate and graduate engineering students in the context of two general aspects of the educational experience. First, we explore the extent to which students differ regarding the factors that lead to the choice of becoming an engineer, current satisfaction with that choice, and career-related goals and objectives. Second, we look at the technical communication practices, habits, and training of aerospace engineering students. The reported data were obtained from a survey of student members of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). The survey was undertaken as a phase 3 activity of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Data are reported for the following categories: student demographics; skill importance, skill training, and skill helpfulness; collaborative writing; computer and information technology use and importance; use of electronic networks; use and importance of libraries and library services; use and importance of information sources and products; use of foreign language technical reports; and foreign language (reading and speaking) skills.

  17. Changes in the Effect of Heat on Mortality in the Last 20 Years in Nine European Cities. Results from the PHASE Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de' Donato, Francesca K; Leone, Michela; Scortichini, Matteo; De Sario, Manuela; Katsouyanni, Klea; Lanki, Timo; Basagaña, Xavier; Ballester, Ferran; Åström, Christofer; Paldy, Anna; Pascal, Mathilde; Gasparrini, Antonio; Menne, Bettina; Michelozzi, Paola

    2015-12-08

    The European project PHASE aims to evaluate patterns of change in the temperature-mortality relationship and in the number of deaths attributable to heat in nine European cities in two periods, before and after summer 2003 (1996-2002 and 2004-2010). We performed age-specific Poisson regression models separately in the two periods, controlling for seasonality, air pollution and time trends. Distributed lag non-linear models were used to estimate the Relative Risks of daily mortality for increases in mean temperature from the 75th to 99th percentile of the summer distribution for each city. In the recent period, a reduction in the mortality risk associated to heat was observed only in Athens, Rome and Paris, especially among the elderly. Furthermore, in terms of heat-attributable mortality, 985, 787 and 623 fewer deaths were estimated, respectively, in the three cities. In Helsinki and Stockholm, there is a suggestion of increased heat effect. Noteworthy is that an effect of heat was still present in the recent years in all cities, ranging from +11% to +35%. In Europe, considering the warming observed in recent decades and population ageing, effective intervention measures should be promoted across countries, especially targeting vulnerable subgroups of the population with lower adaptive resources.

  18. Process Evaluation of the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 1 Curriculum of the Project P.A.T.H.S.: Findings Based on the Full Implementation Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the implementation quality of the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 1 Curriculum of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes, observers carried out process evaluation in the form of systematic observations of 22 units in 14 randomly selected schools. Results showed that the overall level of program adherence was generally high (range: 45–100%, with an average of 86.3%. High implementation quality of the program in the areas of student interest, student participation and involvement, classroom control, use of interactive delivery method, use of strategies to enhance student motivation, use of positive and supportive feedbacks, instructors’ familiarity with the students, degree of achievement of the objectives, time management, lesson preparation, overall implementation quality, and success of implementation was also found. The present findings are consistent with those observations based on the experimental implementation phase, suggesting that the implementation quality of the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 1 Curriculum was generally high.

  19. Phased Construction Completion Report for Building K-1401 of the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at the East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garland S.

    2008-03-01

    This Phased Construction Completion Report documents the demolition of Bldg. K-1401, Maintenance Building, addressed in the Action Memorandum for the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2003a) as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 non-time-critical removal action. The objectives of the removal action (DOE 2003a) - to eliminate the source of potential contamination, to eliminate the threat of potential future releases, and/or to eliminate the threats to the general public and the environment - were met. The end state of this action is for the slab to remain with all penetrations sealed and grouted or backfilled. The basement and pits remain open. There is residual radiological and polychlorinated biphenyl contamination on the slab and basement. A fixative was applied to the area on the pad contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls. Interim land-use controls will be maintained until final remediation decisions are made under the Zone 2 Record of Decision (DOE 2005a).

  20. Grid-connected integrated community energy system. Phase II, Stage 1, final report. Conceptual design, demand and fuel projections and cost analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-08

    The Phase I Report, Grid ICES, presented the broad alternatives and implications for development of an energy system satisfying thermal demand with the co-generation of electric power, all predicated on the use of solid fuels. Participants of the system are the University of Minnesota, operator and primary thermal user, and Northern States Power Company, primary electrical user; with St. Mary's Hospital, Fairview Hospital, and Augsburg College as Add-on Customers for the thermal service (Option I). Included for consideration are the Options of (II) solid waste disposal by the Pyrolysis Method, with heat recovery, and (III) conversion of a portion of the thermal system from steam to hot water distribution to increase co-generation capability and as a demonstration system for future expansion. This report presents the conceptual design of the energy system and each Option, with the economic implications identified so that selection of the final system can be made. Draft outline of the Environmental Assessment for the project is submitted as a separate report.