WorldWideScience

Sample records for assay performance demonstration

  1. Performance in the WIPP nondestructive assay performance demonstration program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcinkiewicz, C.J. [Consolidated Technical Services, Inc., Frederick, MD (United States); Connolly, M.J.; Becker, G.K. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Measurement facilities performing nondestructive assay (NDA) of wastes intended for disposal at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are required to demonstrate their ability to meet specific Quality Assurance Objectives (QAOs). This demonstration is performed, in part, by participation in the NDA Performance Demonstration Program (PDP). The PDP is funded and managed by the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) of DOE and is conducted by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It tests the characteristics of precision, system bias and/or total uncertainty through the measurement of variable, blind combinations of simulated waste drums and certified radioactive standards. Each facility must successfully participate in the PDP using each different type of measurement system planned for use in waste characterization. The first cycle of the PDP using each different type of measurement system planned for use in waste characterization. The first cycle of the PDP was completed in July 1996 and the second is scheduled for completion by December 1996. Seven sites reported data in cycle 1 for 11 different measurement systems. This paper describes the design and operation of the PDP and provides the performance data from cycle 1. It also describes the preliminary results from cycle 2 and updates the status and future plans for the NDA PDP. 4 refs., 9 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. Performance demonstration by ROC method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Hannelore; Nockemann, Christina; Tillack, Gerd-Rüdiger; Mattis, Arne

    1994-12-01

    The question of the efficiency of a material testing system is important, when a competing or advanced system appears at the market. The comparison of the different systems can be done partly by the comparison of the technical specification of the systems, but not all parameters can be expressed by measured values, especially not the influence of human inspectors. A testing system in the field of NDT - for example weld inspection - often consists of several different devices and components (radiographic film, its irradiation and development, conventional inspection with a light box, human inspector). The demonstration of the performance of such a system with similar or advanced methods can be done by a statistical method, the ROC method. This quantitative measure for testing performance allows the comparison of complex NDT systems which will be demonstrated in detail by the comparison of conventional weld inspection with inspection of welds using the digitised image of the radiographs.

  3. Demonstration of DSI-semen--A novel DNA methylation-based forensic semen identification assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserstrom, Adam; Frumkin, Dan; Davidson, Ariane; Shpitzen, Moshe; Herman, Yael; Gafny, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Determining whether the source tissue of biological material is semen is important in confirming sexual assaults, which account for a considerable percentage of crime cases. The gold standard for confirming the presence of semen is microscopic identification of sperm cells, however, this method is labor intensive and operator-dependent. Protein-based immunologic assays, such as PSA, are highly sensitive and relatively fast, but suffer from low specificity in some situations. In addition, proteins are less stable than DNA under most environmental insults. Recently, forensic tissue identification advanced with the development of several approaches based on mRNA and miRNA for identification of various body fluids. Herein is described DNA source identifier (DSI)-semen, a DNA-based assay that determines whether the source tissue of a sample is semen based on detection of semen-specific methylation patterns in five genomic loci. The assay is comprised of a simple single tube biochemical procedure, similar to DNA profiling, followed by automatic software analysis, yielding the identification (semen/non-semen) accompanied by a statistical confidence level. Three additional internal control loci are used to ascertain the reliability of the results. The assay, which aims to replace microscopic examination, can easily be integrated by forensic laboratories and is automatable. The kit was tested on 135 samples of semen, saliva, venous blood, menstrual blood, urine, and vaginal swabs and the identification of semen vs. non-semen was correct in all cases. In order to test the assay's applicability in "real-life" situations, 33 actual casework samples from the forensic biological lab of the Israeli police were analyzed, and the results were compared with microscopic examination performed by Israeli police personnel. There was complete concordance between both analyses except for one sample, in which the assay identified semen whereas no sperm was seen in the microscope. This

  4. Erythrocyte-based Pig-a gene mutation assay: demonstration of cross-species potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phonethepswath, Souk; Bryce, Steven M; Bemis, Jeffrey C; Dertinger, Stephen D

    2008-12-08

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors attach specific proteins to the cell surface of hematopoietic cells. Of the genes required to form GPI anchors, only Pig-a is located on the X-chromosome. Prior work with rats suggests that the GPI anchor deficient phenotype is a reliable indicator of Pig-a mutation [Bryce et al., Environ. Mol. Mutagen., 49 (2008) 256-264]. The current report extends this line of investigation by describing simplified blood handling procedures, and by testing the assay principle in a second species, Mus musculus. With this method, erythrocytes are isolated, incubated with anti-CD24-PE, and stained with SYTO 13. Flow cytometric analyses quantify GPI anchor-deficient erythrocytes and reticulocytes. After reconstruction experiments with mutant-mimicking cells demonstrated that the analytical performance of the method is high, CD-1 mice were treated on three occasions with 7,12-dimethyl-1,2-benz[a]anthracene (DMBA, 75 mg/kg/day) or ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU, 40 mg/kg/day). Two weeks after the final treatment, DMBA-treated mice were found to exhibit markedly elevated frequencies of GPI anchor deficient erythrocytes and reticulocytes. For the ENU experiment, blood specimens were collected at weekly intervals over a 5-week period. Whereas the frequencies of mutant reticulocytes were significantly elevated 1 week after the last administration, the erythrocyte population was unchanged until the second week. Thereafter, both populations exhibited persistently elevated frequencies for the duration of the experiment (mean frequency at termination=310x10(-6) and 523x10(-6) for erythrocyte and reticulocyte populations, respectively). These data provide evidence that Pig-a mutation does not convey an appreciable positive or negative cell survival advantage to affected erythroid progenitors, although they do suggest that affected erythrocytes have a reduced lifespan in circulation. Collectively, accumulated data support the hypothesis that flow cytometric

  5. SWATH Mass Spectrometry Performance Using Extended Peptide MS/MS Assay Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jemma X; Song, Xiaomin; Pascovici, Dana; Zaw, Thiri; Care, Natasha; Krisp, Christoph; Molloy, Mark P

    2016-07-01

    The use of data-independent acquisition methods such as SWATH for mass spectrometry based proteomics is usually performed with peptide MS/MS assay libraries which enable identification and quantitation of peptide peak areas. Reference assay libraries can be generated locally through information dependent acquisition, or obtained from community data repositories for commonly studied organisms. However, there have been no studies performed to systematically evaluate how locally generated or repository-based assay libraries affect SWATH performance for proteomic studies. To undertake this analysis, we developed a software workflow, SwathXtend, which generates extended peptide assay libraries by integration with a local seed library and delivers statistical analysis of SWATH-quantitative comparisons. We designed test samples using peptides from a yeast extract spiked into peptides from human K562 cell lysates at three different ratios to simulate protein abundance change comparisons. SWATH-MS performance was assessed using local and external assay libraries of varying complexities and proteome compositions. These experiments demonstrated that local seed libraries integrated with external assay libraries achieve better performance than local assay libraries alone, in terms of the number of identified peptides and proteins and the specificity to detect differentially abundant proteins. Our findings show that the performance of extended assay libraries is influenced by the MS/MS feature similarity of the seed and external libraries, while statistical analysis using multiple testing corrections increases the statistical rigor needed when searching against large extended assay libraries.

  6. Prop Demonstrations in Biology Lectures Facilitate Student Learning and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshad Tamari

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Science students can benefit from visual aids. In biology lectures, visual aids are usually limited to tables, figures, and PowerPoint presentations. In this IRB-approved study, we examined the effectiveness of the use of five prop demonstrations, three of which are at the intersection of biology and chemistry, in three community college biology courses. We hypothesized that students’ performance on test questions is enhanced by the use of prop demonstrations. Consistent with our hypothesis, we showed that students learn more effectively and perform better on questions that relate to demonstrations than on questions related to lessons that do not have a demonstration component.

  7. GATEWAY Demonstrations: Exploring SSL Product Performance in the Real World

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-10-01

    Fact sheet that outlines DOE's GATEWAY technology demonstration program, which evaluates high-performance SSL products for general illumination in a variety of real-world exterior and interior applications.

  8. Pu-238 assay performance with the Canberra IQ3 system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booth, L.; Gillespie, B.; Seaman, G.

    1997-11-01

    Canberra Industries has recently completed a demonstration project at the Westinghouse Savannah River Site (WSRC) to characterize 55-gallon drums containing Pu-238 contaminated waste. The goal of this project was to detect and quantify Pu-238 contaminated waste. The goal of this project was to detect and quantify Pu-238 waste to detection limits of less than 50 nCi/g using gamma assay techniques. This would permit reclassification of these drums from transuranic (TRU) waste to low-level waste (LLW). The instrument used for this assay was a Canberra IQ3 high sensitivity gamma assay system, mounted in a trailer. The results of the measurements demonstrate achievement of detection levels as low as 1 nCi/g for low density waste drums, and good correlation with known concentrations in several test drums. In addition, the data demonstrates significant advantages for using large area low-energy germanium detectors for achieving the lowest possible MDAs for gamma rays in the 80-250 keV range. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. Evaluation of the Thermo Scientific SureTect Listeria species assay. AOAC Performance Tested Method 071304.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloke, Jonathan; Evans, Katharine; Crabtree, David; Hughes, Annette; Simpson, Helen; Holopainen, Jani; Wickstrand, Nina; Kauppinen, Mikko; Leon-Velarde, Carlos; Larson, Nathan; Dave, Keron

    2014-01-01

    The Thermo Scientific SureTect Listeria species Assay is a new real-time PCR assay for the detection of all species of Listeria in food and environmental samples. This validation study was conducted using the AOAC Research Institute (RI) Performance Tested Methods program to validate the SureTect Listeria species Assay in comparison to the reference method detailed in International Organization for Standardization 11290-1:1996 including amendment 1:2004 in a variety of foods plus plastic and stainless steel. The food matrixes validated were smoked salmon, processed cheese, fresh bagged spinach, cantaloupe, cooked prawns, cooked sliced turkey meat, cooked sliced ham, salami, pork frankfurters, and raw ground beef. All matrixes were tested by Thermo Fisher Scientific, Microbiology Division, Basingstoke, UK. In addition, three matrixes (pork frankfurters, fresh bagged spinach, and stainless steel surface samples) were analyzed independently as part of the AOAC-RI-controlled independent laboratory study by the University ofGuelph, Canada. Using probability of detection statistical analysis, a significant difference in favour of the SureTect assay was demonstrated between the SureTect and reference method for high level spiked samples of pork frankfurters, smoked salmon, cooked prawns, stainless steel, and low-spiked samples of salami. For all other matrixes, no significant difference was seen between the two methods during the study. Inclusivity testing was conducted with 68 different isolates of Listeria species, all of which were detected by the SureTect Listeria species Assay. None of the 33 exclusivity isolates were detected by the SureTect Listeria species Assay. Ruggedness testing was conducted to evaluate the performance of the assay with specific method deviations outside of the recommended parameters open to variation, which demonstrated that the assay gave reliable performance. Accelerated stability testing was additionally conducted, validating the assay

  10. [Plasma assay of methadone enantiomers with high performance liquid chromatography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, R; Badré-Sentenac, S; Bardin, C; Chast, F

    2004-05-01

    6-Dimethylamino-4,4-diphenylheptane-3-one (methadone) is a synthetic opioid. Presence of an assymetrical carbon in its structure explains existence of two enantiomers. Levogyral enantiomer or R-methadone exhibits an 25 fold superior analgesic activity to the dextrogyral enantiomer S-methadone. In order to run separately a plasma assay of these two enantiomers, a chromatographic chiral separation method coupled with an ultraviolet detection has been performed. It allows selective assay of each enantiomer. This method, although an analytical interference with d-propoxyphene, is sensitive, reproductible, specific and shows a convenient resolution for the analysis of both the stereospecific and racemic forms. This method can be applied for pharmacokinetic study of the drug in patients treated by methadone.

  11. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsbad Field Office

    2007-11-13

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes blind audit samples in a gas matrix for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facility’s compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document

  12. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsbad Field Office

    2007-11-19

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes blind audit samples in a gas matrix for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facility’s compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document

  13. Repeated dose liver micronucleus assay using adult mice with multiple genotoxicity assays concurrently performed as a combination test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagio, Soichiro; Furukawa, Satoshi; Abe, Masayoshi; Kuroda, Yusuke; Hayashi, Seigo; Ogawa, Izumi

    2014-06-01

    Recently, the liver micronucleus (MN) assay using young adult rats with repeated administrations has been investigated by employing a new method without partial hepatectomy or in situcollagenase perfusion as the repeated dose liver MN (RDLMN) assay by Narumi et al. (2012). In our study, in order to investigate the possibility of the RDLMN assay using young adult mice instead of rats and the feasibility of employing some genotoxicity assays along with the RDLMN assay as a combination test, two genotoxic carcinogens (N,N-diethylnitrosoamine (DEN) and cisplatin (CIS)) and a nongenotoxic carcinogen (phenobarbital sodium (PHE)) were administered to mice for 15 or 29 days. Then, the liver MN assay, peripheral blood (PB) MN assay and comet assay using the liver and kidney were concurrently performed as a combination test. DEN showed positive responses to all endpoints except MN induction in PB after 15 days of repeat administration. A cross-linking agent, CIS, showed MN induction in liver after 29 days of repeat administration, and in PB after 15 and 29 days of repeat administration, although the comet assay yielded negative responses for both organs at both sampling times. PHE yielded negative responses for all endpoints. In conclusion, it is suggested that the RDLMN assay using mice is a feasible method to be integrated into the general repeated toxicity test along with the combination assays, i.e., comet assay or PB MN assay, which would help in risk assessment for carcinogenicity by comparing the results of combination assays with each other.

  14. Performance Characteristics of Xpert Flu/RSV XC Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popowitch, Elena B; Miller, Melissa B

    2015-08-01

    The Xpert Flu/RSV XC assay was compared to laboratory-developed tests (LDTs) (n = 207) and the Xpert Flu assay (n = 147) using archived nasopharyngeal swabs. The percentages of positive agreements with LDTs were 97.8% for influenza A, 97.2% for influenza B, and 89.3% for RSV. The sensitivity of influenza detection was improved with the Xpert Flu/RSV XC assay compared to the Xpert Flu assay.

  15. The Beckman DxI 800 prolactin assay demonstrates superior specificity for monomeric prolactin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, Brendan

    2010-02-01

    Commercially available prolactin immunoassays detect macroprolactin to variable degrees. Best practice requires laboratories to assess the cross-reactivity of their prolactin assay with macroprolactin, and where appropriate, introduce a screen for the presence of macroprolactin. Our policy has been to reanalyse hyperprolactinaemic samples following polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation and to report the resultant value as the monomeric prolactin content of the sample. The goal of this study was to determine the need to continue PEG precipitation when prolactin measurements with the Wallac AutoDELFIA were replaced by the Beckman DxI 800.

  16. Eddy current NDE performance demonstrations using simulation tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurice, L. [EDF - CEIDRE, 2 rue Ampere, 93206 Saint-Denis Cedex 1 (France); Costan, V.; Guillot, E.; Thomas, P. [EDF - R and D, THEMIS, 1, avenue du General de Gaulle, 92141 Clamart (France)

    2013-01-25

    To carry out performance demonstrations of the Eddy-Current NDE processes applied on French nuclear power plants, EDF studies the possibility of using simulation tools as an alternative to measurements on steam generator tube mocks-up. This paper focuses on the strategy led by EDF to assess and use code{sub C}armel3D and Civa, on the case of Eddy-Current NDE on wears problem which may appear in the U-shape region of steam generator tubes due to the rubbing of anti-vibration bars.

  17. Performance of the Majorana Demonstrator Muon Veto System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Clinton; Majorana Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator is a neutrinoless double beta decay experiment operating at the 4850-ft. level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. The low-background goals of this Ge-based experiment require a muon veto system. The operation of the partial veto panel array (2/3 coverage) provides the first opportunity to study muon events during the commissioning of the Ge detectors. The Prototype Ge detector module operated in the Demonstrator shield for a total exposure of over 600 kg*day with the partial veto system. The operation of Module 1, consisting of 22.5 kg of Ge mass, in the shield with full veto panel coverage will provide a complete array to study muon-induced events in the experiment. The veto panels are synchronized with Ge detectors using a common 100MHz clock, presenting a unique opportunity to 1) study the flux and angular distribution of muons incident on the Demonstrator using the experiment's modular veto panel design, and 2) examine the effect of muon-related events on the Ge detectors. In this talk the performance of the muon veto system, including an analysis of the coincidence patterns of the incident muons and the corresponding spectra produced in the Ge detectors, is presented. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics Program of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

  18. High Input Voltage, Silicon Carbide Power Processing Unit Performance Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozak, Karin E.; Pinero, Luis R.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Aulisio, Michael V.; Gonzalez, Marcelo C.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    A silicon carbide brassboard power processing unit has been developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The power processing unit operates from two sources: a nominal 300 Volt high voltage input bus and a nominal 28 Volt low voltage input bus. The design of the power processing unit includes four low voltage, low power auxiliary supplies, and two parallel 7.5 kilowatt (kW) discharge power supplies that are capable of providing up to 15 kilowatts of total power at 300 to 500 Volts (V) to the thruster. Additionally, the unit contains a housekeeping supply, high voltage input filter, low voltage input filter, and master control board, such that the complete brassboard unit is capable of operating a 12.5 kilowatt Hall effect thruster. The performance of the unit was characterized under both ambient and thermal vacuum test conditions, and the results demonstrate exceptional performance with full power efficiencies exceeding 97%. The unit was also tested with a 12.5kW Hall effect thruster to verify compatibility and output filter specifications. With space-qualified silicon carbide or similar high voltage, high efficiency power devices, this would provide a design solution to address the need for high power electric propulsion systems.

  19. Pecan Street Grid Demonstration Program. Final technology performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-02-10

    This document represents the final Regional Demonstration Project Technical Performance Report (TPR) for Pecan Street Inc.’s (Pecan Street) Smart Grid Demonstration Program, DE-OE-0000219. Pecan Street is a 501(c)(3) smart grid/clean energy research and development organization headquartered at The University of Texas at Austin (UT). Pecan Street worked in collaboration with Austin Energy, UT, Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), the City of Austin, the Austin Chamber of Commerce and selected consultants, contractors, and vendors to take a more detailed look at the energy load of residential and small commercial properties while the power industry is undergoing modernization. The Pecan Street Smart Grid Demonstration Program signed-up over 1,000 participants who are sharing their home or businesses’s electricity consumption data with the project via green button protocols, smart meters, and/or a home energy monitoring system (HEMS). Pecan Street completed the installation of HEMS in 750 homes and 25 commercial properties. The program provided incentives to increase the installed base of roof-top solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, plug-in electric vehicles with Level 2 charging, and smart appliances. Over 200 participants within a one square mile area took advantage of Austin Energy and Pecan Street’s joint PV incentive program and installed roof-top PV as part of this project. Of these homes, 69 purchased or leased an electric vehicle through Pecan Street’s PV rebate program and received a Level 2 charger from Pecan Street. Pecan Street studied the impacts of these technologies along with a variety of consumer behavior interventions, including pricing models, real-time feedback on energy use, incentive programs, and messaging, as well as the corresponding impacts on Austin Energy’s distribution assets.The primary demonstration site was the Mueller community in Austin, Texas. The Mueller development, located less than three miles from the Texas State Capitol

  20. Performance of MycAssay Aspergillus DNA real-time PCR assay compared with the galactomannan detection assay for the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis from serum samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danylo, Alexis; Courtemanche, Chantal; Pelletier, René; Boudreault, Alexandre A

    2014-08-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is a major problem in the immunocompromised population, and its diagnosis is difficult due to the low sensitivity of available tests. Detection of Aspergillus nucleic acid by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in serum samples is a promising diagnostic tool; however, use of multiple "in-house" methods precludes standardization. The first commercial PCR assay, MycAssay Aspergillus (Myconostica, Ltd), became available recently, and its performance in the diagnosis of IA was evaluated and compared with the galactomannan (GM) assay. Serum samples obtained from patients with hematological cancer were tested retrospectively with MycAssay Aspergillus PCR. Per-episode and per-test analyses were undertaken with 146 sera from 35 hematological patients. Sixteen patients had proven or probable IA and 19 had possible or no IA. In per-episode analysis, MycAssay Aspergillus had a sensitivity of 43.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 19.8%-70.1%) and a specificity of 63.2% (95% CI, 38.4%-83.7%) for IA diagnosis. In per-test analyses, MycAssay Aspergillus had a lower specificity than the GM assay (83.3% vs. 93.1%, P = 0.04). The addition of PCR to routine clinical practice would have permitted the diagnosis of one additional probable IA in our cohort. Use of PCR instead of GM assay would have delayed the diagnosis in two cases. Aspergillus DNA detection by PCR with serum specimens using MycAssay showed a lower specificity than the GM assay and was associated with a low sensitivity for IA diagnosis. More studies are needed to determine the exact role of MycAssay in IA diagnosis in patients with hematological malignancy.

  1. Point-of-care platelet function assays demonstrate reduced responsiveness to clopidogrel, but not aspirin, in patients with Drug-Eluting Stent Thrombosis whilst on dual antiplatelet therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawkins Keith D

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To test the hypothesis that point-of-care assays of platelet reactivity would demonstrate reduced response to antiplatelet therapy in patients who experienced Drug Eluting Stent (DES ST whilst on dual antiplatelet therapy compared to matched DES controls. Whilst the aetiology of stent thrombosis (ST is multifactorial there is increasing evidence from laboratory-based assays that hyporesponsiveness to antiplatelet therapy is a factor in some cases. Methods From 3004 PCI patients, seven survivors of DES ST whilst on dual antiplatelet therapy were identified and each matched with two patients without ST. Analysis was performed using (a short Thrombelastogram PlateletMapping™ (TEG and (b VerifyNow Aspirin and P2Y12 assays. TEG analysis was performed using the Area Under the Curve at 15 minutes (AUC15 as previously described. Results There were no differences in responses to aspirin. There was significantly greater platelet reactivity on clopidogrel in the ST group using the Accumetrics P2Y12 assay (183 ± 51 vs. 108 ± 31, p = 0.02 and a trend towards greater reactivity using TEG AUC15 (910 ± 328 vs. 618 ± 129, p = 0.07. 57% of the ST group by TEG and 43% of the ST cases by Accumetrics PRU had results > two standard deviations above the expected mean in the control group. Conclusion This study demonstrates reduced platelet response to clopidogrel in some patients with DES ST compared to matched controls. The availability of point-of-care assays that can detect these responses raises the possibility of prospectively identifying DES patients at risk of ST and manipulating their subsequent risk.

  2. Milliken Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project. Project performance summary, Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2002-11-30

    The New York State Electric & Gas Corporation (NYSEG) demonstrated a combination of technologies at its Milliken Station in Lansing, New York, designed to: (1) achieve high sulfur dioxide (SO2) capture efficiency, (2) bring nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions into compliance with Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA), (3) maintain high station efficiency, and (4) eliminate waste water discharge. This project is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) established to address energy and environmental concerns related to coal use. DOE sought cost-shared partnerships with industry through five nationally competed solicitations to accelerate commercialization of the most promising advance coal-based power generation and pollution control technologies. The CCTDP, valued at over five billion dollars, has significantly leveraged federal funding by forging effective partnerships founded on sound principles. For every federal dollar invested, CCTDP participants have invested two dollars. These participants include utilities, technology developers, state governments, and research organizations. The project presented here was one of nine selected in January 1991 from 33 proposals submitted in response to the program's fourth solicitation.

  3. Thermal Performance of ATLAS Laser Thermal Control System Demonstration Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung; Robinson, Franklin; Patel, Deepak; Ottenstein, Laura

    2013-01-01

    than 135 watts of heater power. 4) The LHP reservoir control heater power is limited to 15 watts with a 70 percent duty cycle. 5) The voltage of the power supply can vary between 26 volts direct current and 34 volts direct current during the spacecraft lifetime. A design analysis shows that a single LTCS can satisfy these requirements. However, shutdown of· the LHP is particularly challenging and the shutdown heater must be wired in series with two reservoir thermostats and two CCHP thermostats at different set points. An LTCS demonstration unit has been tested to verify these performance characteristics experimentally prior to proceeding to the final LTCS design and fabrication. Test results showed that the LHP shutdown scheme would be able to shut down the LHP as designed and the reservoir control heater can maintain the ATLAS mass simulator within the plus or minus 1 degrees Centigrade accuracy under various combinations of the heat load, sink temperature, and power supply voltage.

  4. In-beam performance of the MAPS demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amar-Youcef, Samir; Bialas, Norbert; Deveaux, Michael; Duering, Horst; Froehlich, Ingo; Muentz, Christian; Michel, Jan; Schrader, Christoph; Seddiki, Selim; Stroth, Joachim; Tischler, Tobias; Wiedemann, Bernhard [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    CMOS sensors technology is the most promising candidate for the microvertex detector of CBM experiment at GSI. Due to the optimum compromise between an excellent spatial resolution, low material budget, adequate radiation tolerance and readout speed, they are more suited than any other technology for the reconstruction of the decay vertex (secondary vertex) of e.g. open-charm mesons, providing a secondary vertex resolution of better than 70 microns along the beam axis. To demonstrate the feasibility of such a detector based on CMOS sensors, provided by IPHC Strasbourg, a so called MVD demonstrator was developed, which comprises all functional components to be used in a heavy ion collision experiment. A concluding beam test at CERN SPS with a reference system, providing tracking and triggering, was accomplished. Detector setup and results of the beam time will be presented.

  5. High-performance liquid chromatographic assay for benzocaine and p-aminobenzoic acid including preliminary stability data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, P K; Bird, G; Crouthamel, W G

    1980-12-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic assay was developed that separates and quantitates benzocaine and its primary degradation product, p-aminobenzoic acid. This method is rapid, sensitive, and specific. Preliminary stability data obtained with this method demonstrate its utility for this purpose.

  6. Performance Analysis of XCPC Powered Solar Cooling Demonstration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widyolar, Bennett K.

    A solar thermal cooling system using novel non-tracking External Compound Parabolic Concentrators (XCPC) has been built at the University of California, Merced and operated for two cooling seasons. Its performance in providing power for space cooling has been analyzed. This solar cooling system is comprised of 53.3 m2 of XCPC trough collectors which are used to power a 23 kW double effect (LiBr) absorption chiller. This is the first system that combines both XCPC and absorption chilling technologies. Performance of the system was measured in both sunny and cloudy conditions, with both clean and dirty collectors. It was found that these collectors are well suited at providing thermal power to drive absorption cooling systems and that both the coinciding of available thermal power with cooling demand and the simplicity of the XCPC collectors compared to other solar thermal collectors makes them a highly attractive candidate for cooling projects.

  7. Performance Measurements and Technology Demonstration of the VASIMR® VX-200

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmier, B. W.; Bering, E. A.; Squire, J. P.; Glover, T. W.; Cassady, L. D.; Ilin, A. V.; Carter, M. D.; Olsen, C. S.; McCaskill, G. E.; Chang Díaz, F.

    2010-12-01

    Recent progress is discussed in the development of an advanced RF electric propulsion engine: the VAriable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR®) VX-200, a 200 kW flight-technology prototype. This device is the only known industrial application of the physics of the aurora borealis. Results are presented from first stage only and first stage with booster stage experiments that were performed on the VX-200 using between 60 mg/s and 150 mg/s argon propellant. The plasma source is a helicon discharge that uses whistler mode waves near the lower hybrid frequency. The booster stage uses electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave absorption to accelerate the ions. Measurements of ion flux, ion energy, plasma density and potential gradients, and force density profiles taken in the exhaust plume of the VX-200 are made within a 150 cubic meter vacuum chamber and are presented in the context of individual stage and total engine performance. Measurements include detailed pitch angle scans of the accelerated ions and plasma parameter maps of the exhaust plume. An emphasis will be given to our ability to probe wave-particle interactions in the exhaust plume. We are now in a position to conduct more detailed auroral simulation studies and are actively seeking collaborators.

  8. The optimal condition of performing MTT assay for the determination of radiation sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Semie; Kim, Il Han [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-01

    The measurement of radiation survival using a clonogenic assay, the established standard, can be difficult and time consuming. In this study, We have used the MTT assay, based on the reduction of a tetrazolium salt to a purple formazan precipitate by living cells, as a substitution for clonogenic assay and have examined the optimal condition for performing this assay in determination of radiation sensitivity. Four human cancer cell lines - PCI-1, SNU-1066, NCI-H63O and RKO cells have been used. For each cell line, a clonogenic assay and a MTT assay using Premix WST-1 solution, which is one of the tetrazolium salts and does not require washing or solubilization of the precipitate were carried out after irradiation of 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 Gy, For clonogenic assay, cells in 25 cm{sup 2} flasks were irradiated after overnight incubation and the resultant colonies containing more than 50 cells were scored after culturing the cells for 10-14 days, For MTT assay, the relationship between absorbance and cell number, optimal seeding cell number, and optimal timing of assay was determined. Then, MTT assay was performed when the irradiated cells had regained exponential growth or when the non-irradiated cells had undergone four or more doubling times. There was minimal variation in the values gained from these two methods with the standard deviation generally less than 5%, and there were no statistically significant differences between two methods according to t-test in low radiation dose (below 6 Gy). The regression analyses showed high linear correlation with the R{sup 2} value of 0.975-0.992 between data from the two different methods. The optimal cell numbers for MTT assay were found to be dependent on plating efficiency of used cell line. Less than 300 cells/well were appropriate for cells with high plating efficiency (more than 30%). For cells with low plating efficiency (less than 30%), 500 cells/well or more were appropriate for assay. The optimal time for MTT assay was

  9. Assessing the performance capabilities of LRE-based assays for absolute quantitative real-time PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G Rutledge

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Linear regression of efficiency or LRE introduced a new paradigm for conducting absolute quantification, which does not require standard curves, can generate absolute accuracies of +/-25% and has single molecule sensitivity. Derived from adapting the classic Boltzmann sigmoidal function to PCR, target quantity is calculated directly from the fluorescence readings within the central region of an amplification profile, generating 4-8 determinations from each amplification reaction. FINDINGS: Based on generating a linear representation of PCR amplification, the highly visual nature of LRE analysis is illustrated by varying reaction volume and amplification efficiency, which also demonstrates how LRE can be used to model PCR. Examining the dynamic range of LRE further demonstrates that quantitative accuracy can be maintained down to a single target molecule, and that target quantification below ten molecules conforms to that predicted by Poisson distribution. Essential to the universality of optical calibration, the fluorescence intensity generated by SYBR Green I (FU/bp is shown to be independent of GC content and amplicon size, further verifying that absolute scale can be established using a single quantitative standard. Two high-performance lambda amplicons are also introduced that in addition to producing highly precise optical calibrations, can be used as benchmarks for performance testing. The utility of limiting dilution assay for conducting platform-independent absolute quantification is also discussed, along with the utility of defining assay performance in terms of absolute accuracy. CONCLUSIONS: Founded on the ability to exploit lambda gDNA as a universal quantitative standard, LRE provides the ability to conduct absolute quantification using few resources beyond those needed for sample preparation and amplification. Combined with the quantitative and quality control capabilities of LRE, this kinetic-based approach has the

  10. Performance validation of commercially available mobile waste-assay systems: Preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schanfein, M.; Bonner, C.; Maez, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-11-01

    Prior to disposal, nuclear waste must be accurately characterized to identify and quantify the radioactive content to reduce the radioactive hazard to the public. Validation of the waste-assay systems` performance is critical for establishing the credibility of the assay results for storage and disposal purposes. Canberra Nuclear has evaluated regulations worldwide and identified standard, modular, neutron- and gamma-waste-assay systems that can be used to characterize a large portion of existing and newly generated transuranic (TRU) and low-level waste. Before making claims of guaranteeing any system`s performance for specific waste types, the standardized systems` performance be evaluated. 7 figs., 11 tabs.

  11. Performance of the new automated Abbott RealTime MTB assay for rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in respiratory specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J H K; She, K K K; Kwong, T-C; Wong, O-Y; Siu, G K H; Leung, C-C; Chang, K-C; Tam, C-M; Ho, P-L; Cheng, V C C; Yuen, K-Y; Yam, W-C

    2015-09-01

    The automated high-throughput Abbott RealTime MTB real-time PCR assay has been recently launched for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) clinical diagnosis. This study would like to evaluate its performance. We first compared its diagnostic performance with the Roche Cobas TaqMan MTB assay on 214 clinical respiratory specimens. Prospective analysis of a total 520 specimens was then performed to further evaluate the Abbott assay. The Abbott assay showed a lower limit of detection at 22.5 AFB/ml, which was more sensitive than the Cobas assay (167.5 AFB/ml). The two assays demonstrated a significant difference in diagnostic performance (McNemar's test; P = 0.0034), in which the Abbott assay presented significantly higher area under curve (AUC) than the Cobas assay (1.000 vs 0.880; P = 0.0002). The Abbott assay demonstrated extremely low PCR inhibition on clinical respiratory specimens. The automated Abbott assay required only very short manual handling time (0.5 h), which could help to improve the laboratory management. In the prospective analysis, the overall estimates for sensitivity and specificity of the Abbott assay were both 100 % among smear-positive specimens, whereas the smear-negative specimens were 96.7 and 96.1 %, respectively. No cross-reactivity with non-tuberculosis mycobacterial species was observed. The superiority in sensitivity of the Abbott assay for detecting MTBC in smear-negative specimens could further minimize the risk in MTBC false-negative detection. The new Abbott RealTime MTB assay has good diagnostic performance which can be a useful diagnostic tool for rapid MTBC detection in clinical laboratories.

  12. High-performance liquid chromatographic assay detects pentamidine metabolism by Fisher rat liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, R H; Hall, J E; Tidwell, R R

    1997-01-24

    Fisher rat liver microsomes metabolized the antimicrobial drug pentamidine to four new compounds detected by gradient elution reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with variable wavelength detection. Coelution experiments with pentamidine metabolite standards determined the new peaks to be previously identified hydroxylated metabolites of pentamidine, with 1,5-bis(4'-amidinophenoxy)-3-pentanol and 1,5-di-(4'-amidinophenoxy)-2-pentanol formed in the greatest amount. The data contradict a previous report that Fisher rat liver homogenates do not metabolize pentamidine. Pentamidine and its known primary metabolites have almost identical absorption spectra; thus, pentamidine metabolism must be evaluated using gradient elution HPLC to resolve pentamidine from its metabolites. The current assay has now been used to demonstrate that Fisher and Sprague-Dawley rat, mouse, rabbit and human liver microsomes all metabolize pentamidine in vitro.

  13. Performance Assessment of Human and Cattle Associated Quantitative Real-time PCR Assays - slides

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presentation overview is (1) Single laboratory performance assessment of human- and cattle associated PCR assays and (2) A Field Study: Evaluation of two human fecal waste management practices in Ohio watershed.

  14. Assessing HTS performance using BioAssay Ontology: screening and analysis of a bacterial phospho-N-acetylmuramoyl-pentapeptide translocase campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Andreas; Zander Balderud, Linda; Hansson, Eva; Boyd, Helen

    2014-01-01

    With the public availability of biochemical assays and screening data constantly increasing, new applications for data mining and method analysis are evolving in parallel. One example is BioAssay Ontology (BAO) for systematic classification of assays based on screening setup and metadata annotations. In this article we report a high-throughput screening (HTS) against phospho-N-acetylmuramoyl-pentapeptide translocase (MraY), an attractive antibacterial drug target involved in peptidoglycan synthesis. The screen resulted in novel chemistry identification using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay. To address a subset of the false positive hits, a frequent hitter analysis was performed using an approach in which MraY hits were compared with hits from similar assays, previously used for HTS. The MraY assay was annotated according to BAO and three internal reference assays, using a similar assay design and detection technology, were identified. Analyzing the assays retrospectively, it was clear that both MraY and the three reference assays all showed a high false positive rate in the primary HTS assays. In the case of MraY, false positives were efficiently identified by applying a method to correct for compound interference at the hit-confirmation stage. Frequent hitter analysis based on the three reference assays with similar assay method identified additional false actives in the primary MraY assay as frequent hitters. This article demonstrates how assays annotated using BAO terms can be used to identify closely related reference assays, and that analysis based on these assays clearly can provide useful data to influence assay design, technology, and screening strategy.

  15. Performance of an automated multiplex immunofluorescence assay for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis immunoglobulin G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, David; Zufferey, Jade; Hohlfeld, Patrick; Greub, Gilbert

    2014-03-01

    Chlamydia serology is indicated to investigate etiology of miscarriage, infertility, pelvic inflammatory disease, and ectopic pregnancy. Here, we assessed the reliability of a new automated-multiplex immunofluorescence assay (InoDiag test) to detect specific anti-C. trachomatis immunoglobulin G. Considering immunofluorescence assay (IF) as gold standard, InoDiag tests exhibited similar sensitivities (65.5%) but better specificities (95.1%-98%) than enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). InoDiag tests demonstrated similar or lower cross-reactivity rates when compared to ELISA or IF.

  16. Multicentric performance analysis of HCV quantification assays and its potential relevance for HCV treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesmann, F; Naeth, G; Berger, A; Hirsch, H H; Regenass, S; Ross, R S; Sarrazin, C; Wedemeyer, H; Knechten, H; Braun, P

    2016-06-01

    An accurate quantification of low viremic HCV RNA plasma samples has gained importance since the approval of direct acting antivirals and since only one single measurement predicts the necessity of a prolonged or shortened therapy. As reported previously, HCV quantification assays such as Abbott RealTime HCV and Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HCV version 2 (CTM v2) may vary in sensitivity and precision particularly in low-level viremia. Importantly, substantial variations were previously demonstrated between some of these assays compared to the Roche High Pure System/COBAS TaqMan assay (HPS) reference assay, which was used to establish the clinical decision points in clinical studies. In this study, the reproducibility of assay performances across several laboratories was assessed by analysing quantification results generated by six independent laboratories (3× RealTime, 3× CTM v2) in comparison with one HPS reference laboratory. The 4th WHO Standard was diluted to 100, 25 and 10 IU/ml, and aliquots were tested in triplicates in 5 independent runs by each assay in the different laboratories to assess assay precision and detection rates. In a second approach, 2 clinical samples (GT 1a & GT 1b) were diluted to 100 and 25 IU/ml and tested as described above. While the result range for WHO 100 IU/ml replicates across all laboratories was similar in this analysis, the CVs of each laboratory ranged from 19.3 to 25.6 % for RealTime laboratories and were lower than CVs of CTM v2 laboratories with a range of 26.1-47.3 %, respectively, and also in comparison with the CV of the HPS reference laboratory (34.9 %). At WHO standard dilution of 25 IU/ml, 24 replicates were quantified by RealTime compared to 8 replicates with CTM v2. Results of clinical samples again revealed a higher variation of CTM v2 results as compared to RealTime values. (CVs at 100 IU/ml: RealTime: 13.1-21.0 % and CTM v2: 15.0-32.3 %; CVs at 25 IU/ml: RealTime 17.6-34.9 % and CTM v2 28

  17. In vivo virus growth competition assays demonstrate equal fitness of fish rhabdovirus strains that co-circulate in aquaculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, R.M.; Garver, K.A.; Ranson, J.C.; Wargo, A.R.; Kurath, G.

    2008-01-01

    A novel virus growth competition assay for determining relative fitness of RNA virus variants in vivo has been developed using the fish rhabdovirus, Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). We have conducted assays with IHNV isolates designated B, C, and D, representing the three most common genetic subtypes that co-circulate in Idaho trout farm aquaculture. In each assay, groups of 30 fish were immersed in a 1:1 mixture of two genotypes of IHNV, and then held in individual beakers for a 72 h period of in vivo competitive virus replication. Progeny virus populations in each fish were analyzed for the presence and proportion of each viral genotype. In two independent assays of the B:C isolate pair, and two assays of the B:D pair, all fish were co-infected and there was a high level of fish-to-fish variation in the ratio of the two competing genotypes. However, in each assay the average ratio in the 30-fish group was not significantly different from the input ratio of 1:1, indicating equal or nearly equal viral fitness on a host population basis, under the conditions tested. ?? 2008.

  18. In vivo virus growth competition assays demonstrate equal fitness of fish rhabdovirus strains that co-circulate in aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Ryan M; Garver, Kyle A; Ranson, Judith C; Wargo, Andrew R; Kurath, Gael

    2008-11-01

    A novel virus growth competition assay for determining relative fitness of RNA virus variants in vivo has been developed using the fish rhabdovirus, Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). We have conducted assays with IHNV isolates designated B, C, and D, representing the three most common genetic subtypes that co-circulate in Idaho trout farm aquaculture. In each assay, groups of 30 fish were immersed in a 1:1 mixture of two genotypes of IHNV, and then held in individual beakers for a 72h period of in vivo competitive virus replication. Progeny virus populations in each fish were analyzed for the presence and proportion of each viral genotype. In two independent assays of the B:C isolate pair, and two assays of the B:D pair, all fish were co-infected and there was a high level of fish-to-fish variation in the ratio of the two competing genotypes. However, in each assay the average ratio in the 30-fish group was not significantly different from the input ratio of 1:1, indicating equal or nearly equal viral fitness on a host population basis, under the conditions tested.

  19. On-line radiochemical assay for monoamine oxidase utilizing high-performance liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissinen, E.; Linko-Loeppoenen SMae; Maennistoe P4

    1984-12-01

    A fast and sensitive assay for the determination of monoamine oxidase activity was developed. The method is based on the separation and quantitation of /sup 14/C-labeled assay products by high-performance liquid chromatography, which is interfaced directly into a flow-through radioactivity detector. This allows on-line quantitation of the radioactive compounds with picomole sensitivity. The method makes possible the complete separation and detection of the deaminated products of monoamine oxidase A and B substrates benzylamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine, respectively. This assay has been applied to the measurement of monoamine oxidase A and B activities in rat brain.

  20. Demonstration of a visual cell-based assay for screening glucose transporter 4 translocation modulators in real time

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maleppillil Vavachan Vijayakumar; Amrendra Kumar Ajay; Manoj Kumar Bhat

    2010-12-01

    Insulin-stimulated translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) to cell membrane leading to glucose uptake is the rate-limiting step in diabetes. It is also a defined target of antidiabetic drug research. Existing GLUT4 translocation assays are based on time-consuming immunoassays and are hampered by assay variability and low sensitivity. We describe a real-time, visual, cell-based qualitative GLUT4 translocation assay using CHO-HIRc-myc-GLUT4eGFP cells that stably express myc- and eGFP-tagged GLUT4 in addition to human insulin receptor (HIRc). GLUT4 translocation is visualized by live cell imaging based on GFP fluorescence by employing a cooled charge-coupled device camera attached to a fluorescent microscope. This video imaging method and further quantitative analysis of GLUT4 on the cell membrane provide rapid and foolproof visual evidence that this method is suitable for screening GLUT4 translocation modulators.

  1. Optimization and Performance Assessment of the Chorion-Off [Dechorinated] Zebrafish Developmental Toxicity Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzica-Kelly, Julieta M; Zhang, Cindy X; Augustine-Rauch, Karen A

    2015-07-01

    The Dechorinated Zebrafish Embryo Developmental toxicity assay was originally developed from a training set of 31 compounds and reported to be 87% concordant with in vivo teratogenicity data (Brannen, K. C., Panzica-Kelly, J. M., Danberry, T. L., and Augustine-Rauch, K. A. (2010). Development of a zebrafish embryo teratogenicity assay and quantitative prediction model. Birth Defects Res. 89, 66-77.). The assay includes scoring larva treated in a concentration range for malformations of specific morphological structures/organ systems. The model includes identifying a no-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) and the concentration resulting in 25% lethality (LC25) at 5 days postfertilization. An LC25/NOAEL ratio ≥10 classifies a compound positive for teratogenic potential. A consortium effort evaluated a modified version of this assay which involved enzymatic chorion treatment instead of manual dissection and used experimental replicates for final classification. The modified assay achieved an 85% overall predictivity (Gustafson, A. L., Stedman, D. B., Ball, J., Hillegass, J. M., Flood, A., Zhang, C. X., Panzica-Kelly, J., Cao, J., Coburn, A., Enright, B. P., et al. (2012). Inter-laboratory assessment of a harmonized zebrafish developmental toxicology assay - progress report on phase I. Reprod. Toxicol. 33, 155-164.). The objective of this study was to perform a thorough performance evaluation of the dechorinated assay by repeating the original training set and testing additional compounds in experimental replicates. When the initial training set was repeated with inclusion of experimental replicates, the overall predictivity was 83%. Model performance was tested with an additional 34 compounds and achieved overall predictivity of 74%. When the training and test sets were combined (63 compounds) the assay's final sensitivity was 83% and the specificity was 71%. Total predictivity was 78% with relatively balanced predictivity for nonteratogens (77%) and teratogens (78%). The

  2. Trueness investigation of routine creatinine assays on nine homogeneous systems in Beijing demonstrates an encouraging outcome that meets clinical requirements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yan; XU Guo-bin

    2010-01-01

    criteria; Roche (Enzymatic) met the optimum criteria. The other five systems met the desirable criteria. Compared with the second criterion, all the results met the requirement of CLIA' 88. Trueness evaluation showed: the MEeGFR of Dade Behring exceeded 10% while the MEeGFRs of Beckman (traceable to rate Jaffe), Beckman (traceable to IDMS) and Ortho (traceable to Jaffe/High Pedormance Liquid Chromatography)exceeded 20% at level Ⅰ. At level Ⅱ the MEeGFRs of Dade Behring, Ortho (traceable to GC/IDMS) and Beckman (traceable to rate Jaffe) exceeded 10%. None of the nine systems got a MEeGFR higher than 20%. The conclusions of NIST SRM 967 agreed with those of LN 24 except for the Beckman measurement system.Conclusions Trueness investigation of routine creatinine assays on nine homogeneous systems demonstrates an encouraging outcome that meets clinical requirements. Among the nine homogeneous routine systems, Roche and Daiichi produce the most accurate results. The implementation of traceability is effective.

  3. Creation of reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatographic technique to assay platelet-activating factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨云梅; 曹红翠; 徐哲荣; 陈晓明

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To establish a new assay for platelet-activating factor (PAF), to compare it with bio-assay; and to discuss its significance in some elderly people diseases such as cerebral infarction and coronary heart disease. Methods: To measure PAF levels in 100 controls, 23 elderly patients with cerebral infarction and 65 cases with coronary heart disease by reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatographic technique (rHPLC). Results: rHPLC is more convenient, sensitive, specific, and less confusing, compared with bio-assay. The level of plasma PAF in patients with cerebral infarction was higher than that in the controls (P<0.01), and in patients with coronary heart disease. Conclusion: Detection of PAF with rHPLC is more reliable and more accurate. The new assay has important significance in PAF research.

  4. Creation of reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatographic technique to assay platelet-activating factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨云梅; 曹红翠; 徐哲荣; 陈晓明

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To establish a new assay for platelet-activating factor (PAF), to compare it with bio-assay; and to discuss its significance in some elderly people diseases such as cerebral infarction and coronary heart disease. Methods: To measure PAF levels in 100 controls, 23 elderly patients with cerebral infarction and 65 cases with coronary heart disease by reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatographic technique (rHPLC). Results:rHPLC is more convenient, sensitive,specific, and less confusing, compared with bio-assay. The level of plasma PAF in patients with cerebral infarction was higher than that in the controls (P<0.01), and in patients with coronary heart disease. Conclusion: Detection of PAF with rHPLC is more reliable and more accurate. The new assay has important significance in PAF research.

  5. [Comparison of the clinical performance of the ECLusys HIV combi assay with the Lumipulse f and HISCL 2000-i HIV-1/2 ab screening assays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Aya; Iwahara, Kunihiro; Suga, Yasuyuki; Uchiyama, Sachinori; Maekawa, Masato

    2012-04-01

    We compared the ECLusys HIV combi assay (ECL HIV Ag/Ab) to the Lumipulse Forte (LPf HIV 1/2 Ab) and HISCL (HIS HIV 1/2 Ab) assays. In a dilution sensitivity test using dilution panels of WHO HIV antibody international reference panel (HIV-1 Subtype A, B, C, E, HIV-1 Group O, HIV-2) and HIV-1/2 Ab CE marked material(HIV-1, HIV-2) parent specimens, the ECL assay enabled detection at a higher level of sensitivity than either the LPf assay or the HIS assay for all dilution panels. In an early detection test in the early phase of infection in which a BBI HIV seroconversion panel was used, the ECL assay enabled detection 7 days after initial blood sample collection, whereas the LPf and HIS assays enabled detection after 27 days. In a specificity test using high RF positive specimens (n=33), pregnancy specimens (n=35), cytomegalovirus antibody positive specimens (n=36), and high M protein positive specimens (n=21) that were confirmed negative for HIV-1/2 antibodies by the LPf assay, negative results were obtained for all specimens on both the ECL assay and the HIS assay. In a correlation test using routinely collected clinical specimens (n=121), including positive stock specimens, the ECL and HIS assays demonstrated the highest agreement rate 98.3%. The above results confirmed that the fourth-generation reagent ECL assay, which simultaneously detects both HIV-1/2 antibodies and p24 antigens, is both highly sensitive and specific, and is a suitable assay for use in routine testing.

  6. A sensitive high performance liquid chromatography assay for the quantification of doxorubicin associated with DNA in tumor and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Andrew T; O'Neal, Sara K; Santos, Charlene M; White, Taylor F; Zamboni, William C

    2016-02-01

    Doxorubicin, a widely used anticancer agent, exhibits antitumor activity against a wide variety of malignancies. The drug exerts its cytotoxic effects by binding to and intercalating within the DNA of tumor and tissue cells. However, current assays are unable to accurately determine the concentration of the intracellular active form of doxorubicin. Thus, the development of a sample processing method and a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methodology was performed in order to quantify doxorubicin that is associated with DNA in tumors and tissues, which provided an intracellular cytotoxic measure of doxorubicin exposure after administration of small molecule and nanoparticle formulations of doxorubicin. The assay uses daunorubicin as an internal standard; liquid-liquid phase extraction to isolate drug associated with DNA; a Shimadzu HPLC with fluorescence detection equipped with a Phenomenex Luna C18 (2μm, 2.0×100mm) analytical column and a gradient mobile phase of 0.1% formic acid in water or acetonitrile for separation and quantification. The assay has a lower limit of detection (LLOQ) of 10ng/mL and is shown to be linear up to 3000ng/mL. The intra- and inter-day precision of the assay expressed as a coefficient of variation (CV%) ranged from 4.01 to 8.81%. Furthermore, the suitability of this assay for measuring doxorubicin associated with DNA in vivo was demonstrated by using it to quantify the doxorubicin concentration within tumor samples from SKOV3 and HEC1A mice obtained 72h after administration of PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil(®); PLD) at 6mg/kg IV x 1. This HPLC assay allows for sensitive intracellular quantification of doxorubicin and will be an important tool for future studies evaluating intracellular pharmacokinetics of doxorubicin and various nanoparticle formulations of doxorubicin.

  7. An improved behavioural assay demonstrates that ultrasound vocalizations constitute a reliable indicator of chronic cancer pain and neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj Deepitha

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On-going pain is one of the most debilitating symptoms associated with a variety of chronic pain disorders. An understanding of mechanisms underlying on-going pain, i.e. stimulus-independent pain has been hampered so far by a lack of behavioural parameters which enable studying it in experimental animals. Ultrasound vocalizations (USVs have been proposed to correlate with pain evoked by an acute activation of nociceptors. However, literature on the utility of USVs as an indicator of chronic pain is very controversial. A majority of these inconsistencies arise from parameters confounding behavioural experiments, which include novelty, fear and stress due to restrain, amongst others. Results We have developed an improved assay which overcomes these confounding factors and enables studying USVs in freely moving mice repetitively over several weeks. Using this improved assay, we report here that USVs increase significantly in mice with bone metastases-induced cancer pain or neuropathic pain for several weeks, in comparison to sham-treated mice. Importantly, analgesic drugs which are known to alleviate tumour pain or neuropathic pain in human patients significantly reduce USVs as well as mechanical allodynia in corresponding mouse models. Conclusions We show that studying USVs and mechanical allodynia in the same cohort of mice enables comparing the temporal progression of on-going pain (i.e. stimulus-independent pain and stimulus-evoked pain in these clinically highly-relevant forms of chronic pain.

  8. How to best freeze liver samples to perform the in vivo mammalian alkaline comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Enciso Gadea

    2015-06-01

    None of the different methods used was capable of giving good results, except immersing the liver samples in liquid nitrogen, followed by Jackson’s et al. (2013 thawing protocol, suggesting that the thawing process may be as critical as the freezing process. To sum up, these results highlight the importance of deepening the possibility to perform the comet assay with frozen tissue.

  9. Molecular drug susceptibility testing in the Netherlands: performance of the MTBDRplus and MTBDRsl assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, S.O.; Laan, T. van der; Zwaan, R. de; Kamst, M.; Ingen, J. van; Dekhuijzen, P.N.; Boeree, M.J.; Soolingen, D. van

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The performance of molecular drug susceptibility testing in countries with a low prevalence of drug resistance, such as the Netherlands, has not been adequately studied. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the GenoType((R)) MTBDRplus and MTBDRsl assays to detect resistance

  10. An interferon-gamma release assay test performs well in routine screening for tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard Danielsen, Allan; Fløe, Andreas; Lillebæk, Troels;

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: A positive interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) is regarded as proof of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. We conducted an evaluation of the IGRA test “T-SPOT.TB” to test its performance during clinical routine use by analysing the positivity rate and odds, effect of season...

  11. Performance of the SNPforID 52 SNP-plex assay in paternity testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, Claus; Sanchez, Juan Jose; Hansen, Hanna E;

    2008-01-01

    The performance of a multiplex assay with 52 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) developed for human identification was tested on 124 mother-child-father trios. The typical paternity indices (PIs) were 10(5)-10(6) for the trios and 10(3)-10(4) for the child-father duos. Using the SNP...

  12. Performance of the Roche LightCycler real-time PCR assay for diagnosing extrapulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gous, N; Scott, L E; Wong, E; Omar, T; Venter, W D F; Stevens, W

    2012-06-01

    The Roche LightCycler mycobacterium detection molecular assay for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. avium, and M. kansasii, was applied to tissue specimens. It performed well on lymph node and cerebrospinal fluid specimens and less well on lung, liver, and bone marrow core biopsy specimens, but used in conjunction with a clinical suspicion of tuberculosis, it could augment patient management.

  13. Performance evaluation of new automated hepatitis B viral markers in the clinical laboratory: two quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen assays and an HBV core-related antigen assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongjung; Hong, Duck Jin; Shin, Saeam; Cho, Yonggeun; Kim, Hyon-Suk

    2012-05-01

    We evaluated quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen (qHBsAg) assays and a hepatitis B virus (HBV) core-related antigen (HBcrAg) assay. A total of 529 serum samples from patients with hepatitis B were tested. HBsAg levels were determined by using the Elecsys (Roche Diagnostics, Indianapolis, IN) and Architect (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL) qHBsAg assays. HBcrAg was measured by using Lumipulse HBcrAg assay (Fujirebio, Tokyo, Japan). Serum aminotransferases and HBV DNA were respectively quantified by using the Hitachi 7600 analyzer (Hitachi High-Technologies, Tokyo, Japan) and the Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan test (Roche). Precision of the qHBsAg and HBcrAg assays was assessed, and linearity of the qHBsAg assays was verified. All assays showed good precision performance with coefficients of variation between 4.5% and 5.3% except for some levels. Both qHBsAg assays showed linearity from 0.1 to 12,000.0 IU/mL and correlated well (r = 0.9934). HBsAg levels correlated with HBV DNA (r = 0.3373) and with HBcrAg (r = 0.5164), and HBcrAg also correlated with HBV DNA (r = 0.5198; P HBcrAg assays.

  14. Diagnosis of Russell-Silver syndrome by the combined bisulfite restriction analysis-denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Mitsu; Torii, Chiharu; Yagihashi, Tatsuhiko; Izumi, Kosuke; Suda, Naoto; Ohyama, Kimie; Takahashi, Takao; Moriyama, Keiji; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2009-10-01

    Russell-Silver syndrome (RSS) is characterized by prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, triangular facies, and fifth-finger clinodactyly. Half of all patients with RSS have hypomethylation of the differentially methylated region of the H19 gene on chromosome 11p15.5. Hence, a quantitative methylation analysis of this region can be useful for the molecular diagnosis of RSS. However, conventional assays based on bisulfite clone sequencing are rather time and labor consuming and are not suitable for clinical use. In the present study, we investigated a possible method of quantitatively determining H19 hypomethylation in RSS patients using a combined bisulfite restriction analysis (COBRA)-denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) assay; in this combined assay, polymerase chain reaction products amplified from the H19 differentially methylated region of bisulfite-treated genomic DNA were analyzed using a COBRA assay, which detects methylation-dependent sequence differences in the bisulfite-treated genomic DNA using a restriction enzyme analysis. We designed the assay so that a restriction enzyme (HinfI) would cut the methylated, but not the unmethylated, template. The molar ratio between the cut and uncut fragments was measured using DHPLC, and the construction of a calibration curve enabled the methylation index for the original genomic DNA to be estimated. An analysis of seven RSS patients using the COBRA-DHPLC assay demonstrated that three of the seven RSS patients had a low methylation index of around 10%. A comparison of the methylation indices obtained using COBRA-DHPLC and conventional bisulfite clone sequencing revealed an excellent intermethod agreement. In summary, we have developed a robust, rapid, and cost-effective COBRA-DHPLC-based screening system for RSS.

  15. A fluorescent microplate assay quantifies bacterial efflux and demonstrates two distinct compound binding sites in AcrB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Ramkumar; Ferrari, Annette; Rijnbrand, R; Erwin, Alice L

    2015-04-01

    A direct assay of efflux by Escherichia coli AcrAB-TolC and related multidrug pumps would have great value in discovery of new Gram-negative antibiotics. The current understanding of how efflux is affected by the chemical structure and physical properties of molecules is extremely limited, derived from antibacterial data for compounds that inhibit growth of wild-type E. coli. We adapted a previously described fluorescent efflux assay to a 96-well microplate format that measured the ability of test compounds to compete for efflux with Nile Red (an environment-sensitive fluor), independent of antibacterial activity. We show that Nile Red and the lipid-sensitive probe DiBAC4-(3) [bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid)-trimethine oxonol] can quantify efflux competition in E. coli. We extend the previous findings that the tetracyclines compete with Nile Red and show that DiBAC4-(3) competes with macrolides. The extent of the competition shows a modest correlation with the effect of the acrB deletion on MICs within the compound sets for both dyes. Crystallographic studies identified at least two substrate binding sites in AcrB, the proximal and distal pockets. High-molecular-mass substrates bound the proximal pocket, while low-mass substrates occupied the distal pocket. As DiBAC4-(3) competes with macrolides but not with Nile Red, we propose that DiBAC4-(3) binds the proximal pocket and Nile Red likely binds the distal site. In conclusion, competition with fluorescent probes can be used to study the efflux process for diverse chemical structures and may provide information as to the site of binding and, in some cases, enable rank-ordering a series of related compounds by efflux.

  16. Performance of cryptococcal antigen lateral flow assay using saliva in Ugandans with CD4 <100.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Kwizera

    Full Text Available Cryptococcal meningitis can best be diagnosed by cerebrospinal fluid India ink microscopy, cryptococcal antigen detection, or culture. These require invasive lumbar punctures. The utility of cryptococcal antigen detection in saliva is unknown. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of the point-of-care cryptococcal antigen lateral flow assay (CrAg LFA in saliva.We screened HIV-infected, antiretroviral therapy naïve persons with symptomatic meningitis (n = 130 and asymptomatic persons with CD4+<100 cells/µL entering into HIV care (n = 399 in Kampala, Uganda. The diagnostic performance of testing saliva was compared to serum/plasma cryptococcal antigen as the reference standard.The saliva lateral flow assay performance was overall more sensitive in symptomatic patients (88% than in asymptomatic patients (27%. The specificity of saliva lateral flow assay was excellent at 97.8% in the symptomatic patients and 100% in asymptomatic patients. The degree of accuracy of saliva in diagnosing cryptococcosis and the level of agreement between the two sample types was better in symptomatic patients (C-statistic 92.9, κ-0.82 than in asymptomatic patients (C-statistic 63.5, κ-0.41. Persons with false negative salvia CrAg tests had lower levels of peripheral blood CrAg titers (P<0.001.There was poor diagnostic performance in testing saliva for cryptococcal antigen, particularly among asymptomatic persons screened for preemptive treatment of cryptococcosis.

  17. Development of an in vitro assay and demonstration of Plasmodium berghei liver-stage inhibition by TRAP-specific CD8+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhea J Longley

    Full Text Available The development of an efficacious vaccine against the Plasmodium parasite remains a top priority. Previous research has demonstrated the ability of a prime-boost virally vectored sub-unit vaccination regimen, delivering the liver-stage expressed malaria antigen TRAP, to produce high levels of antigen-specific T cells. The liver-stage of malaria is the main target of T cell-mediated immunity, yet a major challenge in assessing new T cell inducing vaccines has been the lack of a suitable pre-clinical assay. We have developed a flow-cytometry based in vitro T cell killing assay using a mouse hepatoma cell line, Hepa1-6, and Plasmodium berghei GFP expressing sporozoites. Using this assay, P. berghei TRAP-specific CD8+ T cell enriched splenocytes were shown to inhibit liver-stage parasites in an effector-to-target ratio dependent manner. Further development of this assay using human hepatocytes and P. falciparum would provide a new method to pre-clinically screen vaccine candidates and to elucidate mechanisms of protection in vitro.

  18. Development and validation of a potentiometric biosensor assay for tylosin with demonstrated applicability for the detection of two other antimicrobial growth-promoter compounds in feedstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stead, S L; Wolodko-Cierniak, K B; Richmond, S F; Sharman, M; Driver, P; Teale, P; Leonardova, O; Purvis, D

    2011-01-01

    A potentiometric biosensor assay based on a commercially available polyclonal antibody was developed to detect tylosin residues in animal feed. The method can be used as a rapid (less than 45 min) laboratory-based procedure or as a portable field-test for the simultaneous measurement of up to 12 different samples. For both procedures the qualitative detection capability (CCβ) for tylosin was determined as 0.2 mg kg(-1) in a range of animal feeds with a measurement repeatability at concentrations between 0.2 and 4 mg kg(-1) of ≤13% coefficient of variation (%CV). The field-test format was capable of detecting tylosin residues at operating (external air) temperatures ranging between +4 and 37°C, although some reduction in signal was observed at the lower temperatures. The laboratory-based tylosin assay was evaluated using 16 medicated and 22 non-medicated feeds and was found to give comparable data with a confirmatory method based upon liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The potential to develop a multi-probe format assay for the simultaneous detection of tylosin, spiramycin and virginiamycin was also demonstrated. Cross-validation in a second laboratory showed the assay to be transferable, reliable and robust.

  19. Quantification of cerivastatin toxicity supports organismal performance assays as an effective tool during pharmaceutical safety assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaukler, Shannon M; Ruff, James S; Galland, Tessa; Underwood, Tristan K; Kandaris, Kirstie A; Liu, Nicole M; Morrison, Linda C; Veranth, John M; Potts, Wayne K

    2016-06-01

    A major problem in pharmaceutical development is that adverse effects remain undetected during preclinical and clinical trials, but are later revealed after market release when prescribed to many patients. We have developed a fitness assay known as the organismal performance assay (OPA), which evaluates individual performance by utilizing outbred wild mice (Mus musculus) that are assigned to an exposed or control group, which compete against each other for resources within semi-natural enclosures. Performance measurements included reproductive success, survival, and male competitive ability. Our aim was to utilize cerivastatin (Baycol(®), Bayer), a pharmaceutical with known adverse effects, as a positive control to assess OPAs as a potential tool for evaluating the safety of compounds during preclinical trials. Mice were exposed to cerivastatin (~4.5 mg/kg/day) into early adulthood. Exposure ceased and animals were released into semi-natural enclosures. Within enclosures, cerivastatin-exposed females had 25% fewer offspring and cerivastatin-exposed males had 10% less body mass, occupied 63% fewer territories, sired 41% fewer offspring, and experienced a threefold increase in mortality when compared to controls. OPAs detected several cerivastatin-induced adverse effects indicating that fitness assays, commonly used in ecology and evolutionary biology, could be useful as an additional tool in safety testing during pharmaceutical development.

  20. Designing Scholarships to Improve College Success: Final Report on the Performance-Based Scholarship Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Alexander K.; Patel, Reshma; Rudd, Timothy; Ratledge, Alyssa

    2015-01-01

    Performance-based scholarships have two main goals: (1) to give students more money for college; and (2) to provide incentives for academic progress. MDRC launched the Performance-Based Scholarship (PBS) Demonstration in 2008 to evaluate the effectiveness of these scholarships in a diverse set of states, institutions, and low-income student…

  1. Improved Performance of Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assays via Swarm Priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martineau, Rhett L; Murray, Sarah A; Ci, Shufang; Gao, Weimin; Chao, Shih-Hui; Meldrum, Deirdre R

    2017-01-03

    This work describes an enhancement to the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) reaction which results in improved performance. Enhancement is achieved by adding a new set of primers to conventional LAMP reactions. These primers are termed "swarm primers" based on their relatively high concentration and their ability to create new amplicons despite the theoretical lack of single-stranded annealing sites. The primers target a region upstream of the FIP/BIP primer recognition sequences on opposite strands, substantially overlapping F1/B1 sites. Thus, despite the addition of a new primer set to an already complex assay, no significant increase in assay complexity is incurred. Swarm priming is presented for three DNA templates: Lambda phage, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 rbcL gene, and human HFE. The results of adding swarm primers to conventional LAMP reactions include increased amplification speed, increased indicator contrast, and increased reaction products. For at least one template, minor improvements in assay repeatability are also shown. In addition, swarm priming is shown to be effective at increasing the reaction speed for RNA amplification via RT-LAMP. Collectively, these results suggest that the addition of swarm primers will likely benefit most if not all existing LAMP assays based on state-of-the-art, six-primer reactions.

  2. High-performance liquid chromatographic assay of free norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine, vanillylmandelic acid and homovanillic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlo, E; Malfait, R

    1985-09-13

    A procedure is described for the concurrent assay of free norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine, vanillylmandelic acid and homovanillic acid in physiological fluids using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. The column packing is an octadecyl-bonded silica. A single mobile phase containing 1-octanesulphonate is used for the assay of catecholamines and for the assay of the acidic metabolites. An efficient sample preparation scheme is presented for the isolation of the catecholamines and their acidic metabolites from the same sample aliquot. Catecholamines are extracted by ion exchange on small columns and adsorption on alumina, using dihydroxybenzylamine as an internal standard. Vanillylmandelic acid and homovanillic acid are recovered from the combined loading and washing effluents of the ion-exchange column by a solvent extraction procedure. Recovery of catecholamines averages 67%. The limit of detection for individual catecholamines is ca. 30 pg. Recoveries of vanillylmandelic acid and homovanillic acid average 77% and 87%, respectively. The use of the same mobile phase for the concurrent assay of catecholamines and their acidic metabolites considerably increases the throughput of samples in the chromatographic system by eliminating the time-consuming column-equilibration periods.

  3. Environmental assessment for the electric and hybrid vehicle demonstration project, performance standards and financial incentives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBelle, S. J.

    1978-10-01

    The assessment is concerned with the impacts of the demonstration of electric and hybrid vehicles acquired to fulfill certain requirements of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development, and Demonstration Act, PL 94-413 as amended. The financial incentives programs and vehicle performance standards associated with the demonstration are also covered. Not included is an assessment of the long term effects of EHV commercialization and of the research and development program being carried out simultaneously with the demonstration, also in response to PL 94-413. These federal actions will be included in a programmatic environmental assessment scheduled for completion in FY 79.

  4. Evaluation of a BED-SIDE Platelet Function Assay : Performance and Clinical Utility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Wei

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelets have a pivotal role in the initial defense against insult to the vasculature and are also recognized of critical importance in the acute care settings of percutaneous coronary intervention and cardiopulmonary bypass. In these environments both platelet count and function may be markedly compromised. Unfortunately, current assays to evaluate the parameters of platelet count and function are of limited utility for bed-side testing. Moreover, it is suggested that there may be significant inter patient variation in response to antiplatelet therapy that may be exacerbated by other agents (e.g. heparin that are routinely administered during cardiac intervention. Here we describe a practical, rapid and user-friendly whole blood platelet function assay that has been developed for use in bed-side settings. Platelet agonists were formulated with an anticoagulant and lyophilized in blood collection tubes standardised to receive a l mL fresh whole blood sample. In the presence of an agonist, platelets are activated and interact (aggregate. Using traditional cell counting principles, non-aggregated platelets are counted whereas aggregated platelets are not. The percentage (% of functional platelets in reference to a baseline tube may then be determined. Results are available within four minutes. Platelet aggregation in whole blood demonstrated good correlation with turbidometric aggregometry for both ADP (r=0.91 and collagen (r=0.88. Moreover, in clinical settings where antiplatelet agents were administered, this rapid, bed-side, platelet function assay demonstrated utility in monitoring patient response to these therapies. This novel bed-side assay of platelet function is extremely suitable for the clinical environment with a rapid turn-around time. In addition, it provides a full haematology profile, including platelet count, and should permit enhancement of transfusion and interventional decisions.

  5. Demonstration of extracellular peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) activity in synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis using a novel assay for citrullination of fibrinogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Dres; Senolt, Ladislav; Nielsen, Michael Friberg

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Members of the peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) family catalyse the posttranslational conversion of peptidylarginine to peptidylcitrulline. Citrullination of proteins is well described in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and hypercitrullination of proteins may be related to inflammation...... in general. PAD activity has been demonstrated in various cell lysates, but so far not in synovial fluid. We aimed to develop an assay for detection of PAD activity, if any, in synovial fluid from RA patients. METHODS: An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human fibrinogen as the immobilized substrate...... for citrullination and anti-citrullinated fibrinogen antibody as the detecting agent were used for measurement of PAD activity in synovial fluid samples from five RA patients. The concentrations of PAD2 and calcium were also determined. RESULTS: Approximately 150 times lower levels of recombinant human PAD2 (rhPAD2...

  6. Superior performance of liposomes over enzymatic amplification in a high-throughput assay for myoglobin in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Katie A; Meyers, Katherine J; Leonard, Barbara; Baeumner, Antje J

    2013-05-01

    Myoglobin is one of several cardiac markers which become elevated in the blood following an acute myocardial infarction and can aid in the diagnosis of a heart attack. Here, a sandwich immunoassay for myoglobin was developed, including a thorough optimization of fluorescent dye-encapsulating liposomes versus enzymatic amplification (alkaline phosphatase and horseradish peroxidase) at each step. The optimized microtiter plate-based assay was capable of detecting as low as 11.3 pg/mL myoglobin and was successfully applied for the quantification of myoglobin in human serum. In comparison to enzymatic approaches, the liposomes demonstrated lower limits of detection, significantly reduced limits of quantification, improved signal discrimination through substantial signal enhancement, and reduced assay time. Liposomes were stable and functional at ambient temperatures for over 400 days. Finally, ease of use was greater due to lack of reliance on additional reagents, non-time-based signal enhancement, and excellent photostability. Optimal conditions identified for enzymatic approaches can also be used for liposome amplification, which makes substitution of these liposomes into existing assays straightforward. Thus, the extensive studies carried out here suggest that liposomes may be incorporated into formats currently utilizing enzymatic enhanced fluorescence with a potential for increased performance on various levels.

  7. Performance of three microimmunofluorescence assays for detection of Chlamydia pneumoniae immunoglobulin M, G, and A antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Mette; Berthelsen, Lene; Lind, Inga

    2002-01-01

    Labsystems (LAB) and MRL Diagnostics (MRL) by investigation of sera from three groups of patients: group I, 83 sera from 28 patients with atypical pneumonia; group II, 37 sera from 16 patients with acute C. pneumoniae or Chlamydia psittaci respiratory tract infection confirmed by PCR or culture; group III......The microimmunofluorescence (MIF) test is considered the "gold standard" for laboratory diagnosis of acute and chronic Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. The performance of a MIF test based on C. pneumoniae antigen from Washington Research Foundation (WRF) was compared with those of assays from...

  8. Fluorimetric assay for ornithine decarboxylase by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, K; Kai, M; Kohashi, K; Ohkura, Y

    1980-12-05

    A highly sensitive method for the assay of ornithine decarboxylase in sample solutions prepared from rat tissue homogenate is described which employs high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Putrescine formed from ornithine under the optimal conditions for the enzyme reaction is treated by Cellex P column chromatography for clean-up and converted into the fluorescamine derivative in the presence of cupric ion which inhibits the reaction of interfering amines with fluorescamine. The derivative is separated by reversed-phase chromatography on LiChrosorb RP-18 with linear gradient elution. The lower limit of detection for putrescine formed enzymatically is 5 pmol.

  9. Library screening by means of mass spectrometry (MS) binding assays-exemplarily demonstrated for a pseudostatic library addressing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter 1 (GAT1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindelar, Miriam; Wanner, Klaus T

    2012-09-01

    In the present study, the application of mass spectrometry (MS) binding assays as a tool for library screening is reported. For library generation, dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) was used. These libraries can be screened by means of MS binding assays when appropriate measures are taken to render the libraries pseudostatic. That way, the efficiency of MS binding assays to determine ligand binding in compound screening with the ease of library generation by DCC is combined. The feasibility of this approach is shown for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter 1 (GAT1) as a target, representing the most important subtype of the GABA transporters. For the screening, hydrazone libraries were employed that were generated in the presence of the target by reacting various sets of aldehydes with a hydrazine derivative that is delineated from piperidine-3-carboxylic acid (nipecotic acid), a common fragment of known GAT1 inhibitors. To ensure that the library generated is pseudostatic, a large excess of the nipecotic acid derivative is employed. As the library is generated in a buffer system suitable for binding and the target is already present, the mixtures can be directly analyzed by MS binding assays-the process of library generation and screening thus becoming simple to perform. The binding affinities of the hits identified by deconvolution were confirmed in conventional competitive MS binding assays performed with single compounds obtained by separate synthesis. In this way, two nipecotic acid derivatives exhibiting a biaryl moiety, 1-{2-[2'-(1,1'-biphenyl-2-ylmethylidene)hydrazine]ethyl}piperidine-3-carboxylic acid and 1-(2-{2'-[1-(2-thiophenylphenyl)methylidene]hydrazine}ethyl)piperidine-3-carboxylic acid, were found to be potent GAT1 ligands exhibiting pK(i) values of 6.186 ± 0.028 and 6.229 ± 0.039, respectively. This method enables screening of libraries, whether generated by conventional chemistry or DCC, and is applicable to all kinds of targets including

  10. Learning to perform a new movement with robotic assistance: comparison of haptic guidance and visual demonstration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinkensmeyer DJ

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanical guidance with a robotic device is a candidate technique for teaching people desired movement patterns during motor rehabilitation, surgery, and sports training, but it is unclear how effective this approach is as compared to visual demonstration alone. Further, little is known about motor learning and retention involved with either robot-mediated mechanical guidance or visual demonstration alone. Methods Healthy subjects (n = 20 attempted to reproduce a novel three-dimensional path after practicing it with mechanical guidance from a robot. Subjects viewed their arm as the robot guided it, so this "haptic guidance" training condition provided both somatosensory and visual input. Learning was compared to reproducing the movement following only visual observation of the robot moving along the path, with the hand in the lap (the "visual demonstration" training condition. Retention was assessed periodically by instructing the subjects to reproduce the path without robotic demonstration. Results Subjects improved in ability to reproduce the path following practice in the haptic guidance or visual demonstration training conditions, as evidenced by a 30–40% decrease in spatial error across 126 movement attempts in each condition. Performance gains were not significantly different between the two techniques, but there was a nearly significant trend for the visual demonstration condition to be better than the haptic guidance condition (p = 0.09. The 95% confidence interval of the mean difference between the techniques was at most 25% of the absolute error in the last cycle. When asked to reproduce the path repeatedly following either training condition, the subjects' performance degraded significantly over the course of a few trials. The tracing errors were not random, but instead were consistent with a systematic evolution toward another path, as if being drawn to an "attractor path". Conclusion These results indicate

  11. Performance of the SNPforID 52 SNP-plex assay in paternity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Børsting, Claus; Sanchez, Juan J; Hansen, Hanna E; Hansen, Anders J; Bruun, Hanne Q; Morling, Niels

    2008-09-01

    The performance of a multiplex assay with 52 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) developed for human identification was tested on 124 mother-child-father trios. The typical paternity indices (PIs) were 10(5)-10(6) for the trios and 10(3)-10(4) for the child-father duos. Using the SNP profiles from the randomly selected trios and 700 previously typed individuals, a total of 83,096 comparisons between mother, child and an unrelated man were performed. On average, 9-10 mismatches per comparison were detected. Four mismatches were genetic inconsistencies and 5-6 mismatches were opposite homozygosities. In only two of the 83,096 comparisons did an unrelated man match perfectly to a mother-child duo, and in both cases the PI of the true father was much higher than the PI of the unrelated man. The trios were also typed for 15 short tandem repeats (STRs) and seven variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs). The typical PIs based on 15 STRs or seven VNTRs were 5-50 times higher than the typical PIs based on 52 SNPs. Six mutations in tandem repeats were detected among the randomly selected trios. In contrast, there was not found any mutations in the SNP loci. The results showed that the 52 SNP-plex assay is a very useful alternative to currently used methods in relationship testing. The usefulness of SNP markers with low mutation rates in paternity and immigration casework is discussed.

  12. Summary of WPT FOA phase II demonstration performed on July 21, 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Perry T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Onar, Omer C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This summary provides details of the activities, presentations and hardware demonstrations performed at the International Transportation Innovation Center (iTiC) in Greenville, South Carolina as deliverables for the wireless power transfer (WPT) FOA #000667 phase II gateway. This report does not attempt to identify all encompassing efforts from each of the partners leading up to the demonstration, but will attempt to provide a record which briefly describes the project deliverables met and expectations from the Department of Energy (DOE) as action items agreed to during the wrap-up session on July 21, 2015.

  13. Increased Performances of the Biological Diagnosis of the Antiphospholipid Syndrome by the Use of a Multiplex Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sénant, M; Rostane, H; Fernani-Oukil, F; Hosking, F; Bellery, F; Courchinoux, A; Tartour, E; Darnige, L; Dragon-Durey, M-A

    2015-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is characterized by development of venous and/or arterial thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity. Biological criteria are the persistent presence of lupus anticoagulant (LA) and/or anti-cardiolipin (aCL) and/or anti-B2GP1 autoantibodies' positivity. The assays' performances are of crucial importance. We evaluated a multiplex assay allowing simultaneous detection of IgG anti-cardiolipin, anti-B2GP1, and anti-factor II. 300 samples were tested. Patients were categorized according to clinical scores of APS from 0 to 3 based on presence or not of arterial or venous thrombosis, fetal loss, and autoimmunity. We used a multiplex assay for APS for simultaneous detection of aCL, anti-B2GP1, and factor II and compared its performances to ELISA assays. Presence of LA was also assessed. We performed a correlation study of the tested assays and compared their clinical efficacy by ROC curve analysis. We obtained significantly higher performances with the multiplex assay than ELISA with higher area under the curve (AUC). The disease rate increased with the number of positive markers from 9% for 1 marker to 100% for 4 markers positive for patients with high risk scores. The multiplex APS assay exhibited higher performances particularly in case of primary APS and is useful for rapid diagnosis of APS.

  14. Performance-Based Technology Selection Filter description report. INEL Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration System Analysis project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, M.C.; Morrison, J.L.; Morneau, R.A.; Rudin, M.J.; Richardson, J.G.

    1992-05-01

    A formal methodology has been developed for identifying technology gaps and assessing innovative or postulated technologies for inclusion in proposed Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) remediation systems. Called the Performance-Based Technology Selection Filter, the methodology provides a formalized selection process where technologies and systems are rated and assessments made based on performance measures, and regulatory and technical requirements. The results are auditable, and can be validated with field data. This analysis methodology will be applied to the remedial action of transuranic contaminated waste pits and trenches buried at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL).

  15. Thermo-physical performance prediction of the KSC Ground Operation Demonstration Unit for liquid hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, J. H.; Notardonato, W. U.; Karng, S. W.; Oh, I.

    2015-12-01

    NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) researchers have been working on enhanced and modernized cryogenic liquid propellant handling techniques to reduce life cycle costs of propellant management system for the unique KSC application. The KSC Ground Operation Demonstration Unit (GODU) for liquid hydrogen (LH2) plans to demonstrate integrated refrigeration, zero-loss flexible term storage of LH2, and densified hydrogen handling techniques. The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) has partnered with the KSC researchers to develop thermal performance prediction model of the GODU for LH2. The model includes integrated refrigeration cooling performance, thermal losses in the tank and distribution lines, transient system characteristics during chilling and loading, and long term steady-state propellant storage. This paper will discuss recent experimental data of the GODU for LH2 system and modeling results.

  16. Impact of immunization technology and assay application on antibody performance--a systematic comparative evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C Brown

    Full Text Available Antibodies are quintessential affinity reagents for the investigation and determination of a protein's expression patterns, localization, quantitation, modifications, purification, and functional understanding. Antibodies are typically used in techniques such as Western blot, immunohistochemistry (IHC, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA, among others. The methods employed to generate antibodies can have a profound impact on their success in any of these applications. We raised antibodies against 10 serum proteins using 3 immunization methods: peptide antigens (3 per protein, DNA prime/protein fragment-boost ("DNA immunization"; 3 per protein, and full length protein. Antibodies thus generated were systematically evaluated using several different assay technologies (ELISA, IHC, and Western blot. Antibodies raised against peptides worked predominantly in applications where the target protein was denatured (57% success in Western blot, 66% success in immunohistochemistry, although 37% of the antibodies thus generated did not work in any of these applications. In contrast, antibodies produced by DNA immunization performed well against both denatured and native targets with a high level of success: 93% success in Western blots, 100% success in immunohistochemistry, and 79% success in ELISA. Importantly, success in one assay method was not predictive of success in another. Immunization with full length protein consistently yielded the best results; however, this method is not typically available for new targets, due to the difficulty of generating full length protein. We conclude that DNA immunization strategies which are not encumbered by the limitations of efficacy (peptides or requirements for full length proteins can be quite successful, particularly when multiple constructs for each protein are used.

  17. Demonstration of worldsens: a fast prototyping and performance evaluation of wireless sensor network applications & protocols

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    International audience; We present Worldsens, a complete environment for fast prototyping of wireless sensor protocols and applications. Our environment proposes a full simulation platform with both embedded software instruction and radio packet accuracy. We propose a demonstration including a full software design, simulation, performance estimation and deployment on a set of nodes within the same design environment. Through these first experimentations, we show that accurate sensor network s...

  18. Experience with local lymph node assay performance standards using standard radioactivity and nonradioactive cell count measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basketter, David; Kolle, Susanne N; Schrage, Arnhild; Honarvar, Naveed; Gamer, Armin O; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Landsiedel, Robert

    2012-08-01

    The local lymph node assay (LLNA) is the preferred test for identification of skin-sensitizing substances by measuring radioactive thymidine incorporation into the lymph node. To facilitate acceptance of nonradioactive variants, validation authorities have published harmonized minimum performance standards (PS) that the alternative endpoint assay must meet. In the present work, these standards were applied to a variant of the LLNA based on lymph node cell counts (LNCC) run in parallel as a control with the standard LLNA with radioactivity measurements, with threshold concentrations (EC3) being determined for the sensitizers. Of the 22 PS chemicals tested in this study, 21 yielded the same results from standard radioactivity and cell count measurements; only 2-mercaptobenzothiazole was positive by LLNA but negative by LNCC. Of the 16 PS positives, 15 were positive by LLNA and 14 by LNCC; methylmethacrylate was not identified as sensitizer by either of the measurements. Two of the six PS negatives tested negative in our study by both LLNA and LNCC. Of the four PS negatives which were positive in our study, chlorobenzene and methyl salicylate were tested at higher concentrations than the published PS, whereas the corresponding concentrations resulted in consistent negative results. Methylmethacrylate and nickel chloride tested positive within the concentration range used for the published PS. The results indicate cell counts and radioactive measurements are in good accordance within the same LLNA using the 22 PS test substances. Comparisons with the published PS results may, however, require balanced analysis rather than a simple checklist approach.

  19. Hybrid Neural-Network: Genetic Algorithm Technique for Aircraft Engine Performance Diagnostics Developed and Demonstrated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takahisa; Simon, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    As part of the NASA Aviation Safety Program, a unique model-based diagnostics method that employs neural networks and genetic algorithms for aircraft engine performance diagnostics has been developed and demonstrated at the NASA Glenn Research Center against a nonlinear gas turbine engine model. Neural networks are applied to estimate the internal health condition of the engine, and genetic algorithms are used for sensor fault detection, isolation, and quantification. This hybrid architecture combines the excellent nonlinear estimation capabilities of neural networks with the capability to rank the likelihood of various faults given a specific sensor suite signature. The method requires a significantly smaller data training set than a neural network approach alone does, and it performs the combined engine health monitoring objectives of performance diagnostics and sensor fault detection and isolation in the presence of nominal and degraded engine health conditions.

  20. Evaluation of Signature Erosion in Ebola Virus Due to Genomic Drift and Its Impact on the Performance of Diagnostic Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanmuga Sozhamannan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Genome sequence analyses of the 2014 Ebola Virus (EBOV isolates revealed a potential problem with the diagnostic assays currently in use; i.e., drifting genomic profiles of the virus may affect the sensitivity or even produce false-negative results. We evaluated signature erosion in ebolavirus molecular assays using an in silico approach and found frequent potential false-negative and false-positive results. We further empirically evaluated many EBOV assays, under real time PCR conditions using EBOV Kikwit (1995 and Makona (2014 RNA templates. These results revealed differences in performance between assays but were comparable between the old and new EBOV templates. Using a whole genome approach and a novel algorithm, termed BioVelocity, we identified new signatures that are unique to each of EBOV, Sudan virus (SUDV, and Reston virus (RESTV. Interestingly, many of the current assay signatures do not fall within these regions, indicating a potential drawback in the past assay design strategies. The new signatures identified in this study may be evaluated with real-time reverse transcription PCR (rRT-PCR assay development and validation. In addition, we discuss regulatory implications and timely availability to impact a rapidly evolving outbreak using existing but perhaps less than optimal assays versus redesign these assays for addressing genomic changes.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of mitomycin C in dogs: application of a high-performance liquid chromatographic assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbhaiya, R H; Papp, E A; Van Harken, D R; Smyth, R D

    1984-09-01

    A normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) assay was developed for the determination of mitomycin C in plasma and urine. The method involves extraction of mitomycin C from plasma or urine into ethyl acetate-2-propanol-chloroform (70:15:15) with UV detection at 365 nm. Quantitation was performed with an internal standard (porfiromycin) by the peak height ratio method. Excellent correlation was obtained between the HPLC assay and the established microbiological cup-plate bioassay. The pharmacokinetics of mitomycin C were investigated in beagle dogs following a 1-mg/kg iv (22-mg/m2) bolus dose. The plasma mitomycin C concentration versus time data were analyzed by using an open three-compartment model. The average volume of distribution was 1.90 L or 17% of body weight for the central compartment and 7.7 L or 68% of body weight for the terminal elimination phase. The volumes of distribution at steady state, calculated by model-dependent and -independent methods, compared very well with each other and were 6.5 L or 58% of body weight. Total body clearance averaged 112 mL/min, and the mean terminal plasma half-life was 53 min. The 0-24-h urinary excretion of intact mitomycin C accounted for 19% of the dose. The terminal half-life and percent urinary recovery of mitomycin C in dogs is similar to that in humans. Based on these observations, the dog appears to be a good model for studying the disposition of mitomycin C.

  2. Increased Performances of the Biological Diagnosis of the Antiphospholipid Syndrome by the Use of a Multiplex Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sénant

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is characterized by development of venous and/or arterial thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity. Biological criteria are the persistent presence of lupus anticoagulant (LA and/or anti-cardiolipin (aCL and/or anti-B2GP1 autoantibodies’ positivity. The assays’ performances are of crucial importance. We evaluated a multiplex assay allowing simultaneous detection of IgG anti-cardiolipin, anti-B2GP1, and anti-factor II. 300 samples were tested. Patients were categorized according to clinical scores of APS from 0 to 3 based on presence or not of arterial or venous thrombosis, fetal loss, and autoimmunity. We used a multiplex assay for APS for simultaneous detection of aCL, anti-B2GP1, and factor II and compared its performances to ELISA assays. Presence of LA was also assessed. We performed a correlation study of the tested assays and compared their clinical efficacy by ROC curve analysis. We obtained significantly higher performances with the multiplex assay than ELISA with higher area under the curve (AUC. The disease rate increased with the number of positive markers from 9% for 1 marker to 100% for 4 markers positive for patients with high risk scores. The multiplex APS assay exhibited higher performances particularly in case of primary APS and is useful for rapid diagnosis of APS.

  3. STATISTICAL EVALUATION OF SMALL SCALE MIXING DEMONSTRATION SAMPLING AND BATCH TRANSFER PERFORMANCE - 12093

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREER DA; THIEN MG

    2012-01-12

    The ability to effectively mix, sample, certify, and deliver consistent batches of High Level Waste (HLW) feed from the Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST) to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) presents a significant mission risk with potential to impact mission length and the quantity of HLW glass produced. DOE's Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) has previously presented the results of mixing performance in two different sizes of small scale DSTs to support scale up estimates of full scale DST mixing performance. Currently, sufficient sampling of DSTs is one of the largest programmatic risks that could prevent timely delivery of high level waste to the WTP. WRPS has performed small scale mixing and sampling demonstrations to study the ability to sufficiently sample the tanks. The statistical evaluation of the demonstration results which lead to the conclusion that the two scales of small DST are behaving similarly and that full scale performance is predictable will be presented. This work is essential to reduce the risk of requiring a new dedicated feed sampling facility and will guide future optimization work to ensure the waste feed delivery mission will be accomplished successfully. This paper will focus on the analytical data collected from mixing, sampling, and batch transfer testing from the small scale mixing demonstration tanks and how those data are being interpreted to begin to understand the relationship between samples taken prior to transfer and samples from the subsequent batches transferred. An overview of the types of data collected and examples of typical raw data will be provided. The paper will then discuss the processing and manipulation of the data which is necessary to begin evaluating sampling and batch transfer performance. This discussion will also include the evaluation of the analytical measurement capability with regard to the simulant material used in the demonstration tests. The

  4. Image Slicer Performances from a Demonstrator for the SNAP/JDEM Mission - Part I: Wavelength Accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Aumeunier, M-H; Prieto, E; Cerna, C; Crouzet, P-E

    2008-01-01

    A well-adapted visible and infrared spectrograph has been developed for the SNAP (SuperNova/Acceleration Probe) experiment proposed for JDEM. The instrument should have a high sensitivity to see faint supernovae but also a good redshift determination better than 0.003(1+z) and a precise spectrophotometry (2%). An instrument based on an integral field method with the powerful concept of imager slicing has been designed. A large prototyping effort has been performed in France which validates the concept. In particular a demonstrator reproducing the full optical configuration has been built and tested to prove the optical performances both in the visible and in the near infrared range. This paper is the first of two papers. The present paper focus on the wavelength measurement while the second one will present the spectrophotometric performances. We adress here the spectral accuracy expected both in the visible and in the near infrared range in such configuration and we demonstrate, in particular, that the image...

  5. The impact of initiation: Early onset marijuana smokers demonstrate altered Stroop performance and brain activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.A. Sagar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Marijuana (MJ use is on the rise, particularly among teens and emerging adults. This poses serious public health concern, given the potential deleterious effects of MJ on the developing brain. We examined 50 chronic MJ smokers divided into early onset (regular MJ use prior to age 16; n = 24 and late onset (age 16 or later; n = 26, and 34 healthy control participants (HCs. All completed a modified Stroop Color Word Test during fMRI. Results demonstrated that MJ smokers exhibited significantly poorer performance on the Interference subtest of the Stroop, as well as altered patterns of activation in the cingulate cortex relative to HCs. Further, early onset MJ smokers exhibited significantly poorer performance relative to both HCs and late onset smokers. Additionally, earlier age of MJ onset as well as increased frequency and magnitude (grams/week of MJ use were predictive of poorer Stroop performance. fMRI results revealed that while late onset smokers demonstrated a more similar pattern of activation to the control group, a different pattern was evident in the early onset group. These findings underscore the importance of assessing age of onset and patterns of MJ use and support the need for widespread education and intervention efforts among youth.

  6. Noise Performance Evaluation of the Candidate Digitizers for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao

    2011-03-16

    The noise performance evaluation of the two digitizer cards being considered for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR (MJD) is presented in this document. The procurement of the data acquisition electronics for the MJD is scheduled to happen this year. At the time of writing this document, there are two candidate digitizer electronic boards. One aspect that is being considered by the collaboration is the feasibility of using the MJD for dark matter searches. The feasibility of using the MJD for this application is going to be dictated by the ability of the demonstrator to reach sub-keV energy resolution. One of the potential sources of noise in the MJD is the data acquisition system. This document will is concluded with a recommendation for the final digitizer board by comparing the noise performance of the two electronics systems. Noise parameters such as the effective number of bits, input range linearity and signal to noise ratio are experimentally determined. The two digitizer cards feature different on-board digital signal processing and these features are compared. The experimental set-up was also used to identify sources of noise. This paper describes these sources of noise in the data acquisition system, along with mitigation strategies. Issues such as grounding and wiring scheme have an impact in the overall data acquisition system performance and are discussed in detail. As a conclusion, the suitability of each one of the cards to become the back bone of the data acquisition system of the MJD is discussed.

  7. Technical and diagnostic performance of five commercial anti-diphtheria toxoid IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruq, A; Dadson, L; Cox, H; Alcock, F; Parker, A R

    2010-10-01

    The technical and diagnostic performances of five commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for the measurement of anti-diphtheria toxoid IgG antibodies were evaluated. There was good agreement between the relative sensitivities of the five assays, but the relative specificity of one of the assays differed from that of the other four assays. Three of the five assays possessed recoveries of the international reference material NIBSC 00/496 within the range of 90% to 110% at antibody levels >0.1 IU/ml. The data suggest that there are manufacture-dependent differences in relative sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the determination of anti-diphtheria toxoid IgG antibodies that could result in different diagnostic interpretations.

  8. Experimental demonstration of improved analog device performance of nanowire-TFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte-Braucks, Christian; Richter, Simon; Knoll, Lars; Selmi, Luca; Zhao, Qing-Tai; Mantl, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    We present experimental data on analog device performance of p-type planar- and gate all around (GAA) nanowire (NW) Tunnel-FETs (TFETs) as well as on n-type Tri-Gate-TFETs. A significant improvement of the analog performance by enhancing the electrostatics from planar TFETs to GAA-NW-TFETs with diameters of 20 nm and 10 nm is demonstrated. A maximum transconductance of 122 μS/μm and on-currents up to 23 μA/μm at a gate overdrive of Vgt = Vd = -1 V were achieved for the GAA NW-pTFETs. Furthermore, a good output current-saturation is observed leading to high intrinsic gain up to 217. The Tri-Gate nTFETs beat the fundamental MOSFET limit for the subthreshold slope of 60 mV/dec and by that also reach extremely high transconductance efficiencies up to 82 V-1.

  9. Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) demonstration project: Volume 2, Project performance and economics. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-30

    The project objective is to demonstrate removal of 90--95% or more of the SO{sub 2} at approximately one-half the cost of conventional scrubbing technology; and to demonstrate significant reduction of space requirements. In this project, Pure Air has built a single SO{sub 2} absorber for a 528-MWe power plant. The absorber performs three functions in a single vessel: prequencher, absorber, and oxidation of sludge to gypsum. Additionally, the absorber is of a co- current design, in which the flue gas and scrubbing slurry move in the same direction and at a relatively high velocity compared to conventional scrubbers. These features all combine to yield a state- of-the-art SO{sub 2} absorber that is more compact and less expensive than conventional scrubbers. The project incorporated a number of technical features including the injection of pulverized limestone directly into the absorber, a device called an air rotary sparger located within the base of the absorber, and a novel wastewater evaporation system. The air rotary sparger combines the functions of agitation and air distribution into one piece of equipment to facilitate the oxidation of calcium sulfite to gypsum. Additionally, wastewater treatment is being demonstrated to minimize water disposal problems inherent in many high-chloride coals. Bituminous coals primarily from the Indiana, Illinois coal basin containing 2--4.5% sulfur were tested during the demonstration. The Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) process has demonstrated removal of 95% or more of the SO{sub 2} while providing a commercial gypsum by-product in lieu of solid waste. A portion of the commercial gypsum is being agglomerated into a product known as PowerChip{reg_sign} gypsum which exhibits improved physical properties, easier flowability and more user friendly handling characteristics to enhance its transportation and marketability to gypsum end-users.

  10. Bentonite mat demonstration: Field performance evaluation of an alternative geosynthetic composite cover system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrato, M.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Site

    1994-12-31

    The Savannah River Site is investigating an alternative RCRA closure cover system configuration for hazardous solid-waste landfills. The bentonite mat demonstration is a field performance test of an alternative composite geosynthetic material cover configuration. The bentonite mat demonstration consists of four test pads; each test pad is a compacted sandy clay layer 30 ft wide, 80 ft long, and 2 ft deep. Three of the test pads will be blanketed with one of the commercially available bentonite mats (geosynthetic clay liner), then overlain by a flexible membrane liner to form the composite barrier. The remaining test pad will not contain any geosynthetic materials and will be used as the control pad for the demonstration. Each test pad will be constructed over a 4-ft sand layer. A series of access pipes will be embedded in the sand layer to provide a means for evacuating portions of the sand layer in order to create underlying cavities, thus inducing localized subsidence in the test pad. Material stress data will be collected to identify the composite barrier failure point. Infiltration data will be collected for each test pad to correlate permeability as a function of deflection. At the conclusion of the subsidence testing, the test pads will be dismantled to identify the failure mechanisms of the barriers. A finite-element analysis computer model is being developed to predict the structural behavior of the composite barrier system. The bentonite mat demonstration data will be used to verify this model, which will serve as a diagnostic tool for future designs. The formulation and execution of this demonstration is one element in achieving regulatory approval of the composite geosynthetic materials alternative cover system design configuration.

  11. LIFAC sorbent injection desulfurization demonstration project. Final report, volume II: Project performance and economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    This publication discusses the demonstration of the LIFAC sorbent injection technology at Richmond Power and Light`s Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2, performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program. LIFAC is a sorbent injection technology capable of removing 75 to 85 percent of a power plant`s SO{sub 2} emissions using limestone at calcium to sulfur molar ratios of between 2 and 2.5 to 1. The site of the demonstration is a coal-fired electric utility power plant located in Richmond, Indiana. The project is being conducted by LIFAC North America (LIFAC NA), a joint venture partnership of Tampella Power Corporation and ICF Kaiser Engineers, in cooperation with DOE, RP&L, and Research Institute (EPRI), the State of Indiana, and Black Beauty Coal Company. The purpose of Public Design Report Volume 2: Project Performance and Economics is to consolidate, for public use, the technical efficiency and economy of the LIFAC Process. The report has been prepared pursuant to the Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-90PC90548 between LIFAC NA and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  12. Tracking Performance Analysis and Simulation of the Digital Pointing System for the Optical Communication Demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racho, C.; Portillo, A.

    1998-10-01

    Over the past 3 years, JPL has been heavily engaged in designing and developing a reduced-complexity optical communication terminal for high-data-volume applications. The terminal is called the Optical Communication Demonstrator (OCD) and has the ability to point microradian-level beams with a very small number of detectors and steering elements. Using only a single steering mirror and a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector array, the OCD can accomplish the functions of beacon signal acquisition, beacon tracking, transmit and receive beam coalignment, and transmit beam point-ahead offset. At a higher system level, developing an understanding of the OCD performance is an essential part of achieving a better understanding of the end-to-end optical communication system performance in the field. During the latter half of fiscal year 1998, a series of experiments was conducted between Table Mountain and Strawberry Peak using the OCD as a transmitting terminal for terrestrial ground-to- ground optical link demonstrations. The OCD was taken to Strawberry Peak and set up to receive the multibeam laser beacon from the 0.6-meter telescope located at Table Mountain, a distance of approximately 40 kilometers. In the presence of atmospheric effects, the laser beacon will fluctuate both in intensity and position. The ability to determine the performance of the control loop under atmospheric-induced fades and distortion becomes very important in evaluating the results of the field testing. This article describes the design and performance of the OCD digital control loop system, which includes the steering mirror, the CCD detector array tracker, and the associated electronics. The digital control loop performance is a key factor in the ultimate performance of the laser beacon acquisition and tracking algorithm of the OCD. A model of the OCD digital control loop is developed for use in simulations. The analytical results from control loop simulations are compared with measured data

  13. Performance and data interpretation of the in vivo comet assay in pharmaceutical industry: EFPIA survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Leede, Bas-Jan; Doherty, Ann; Guérard, Melanie; Howe, Jonathan; O'Donovan, Mike; Plappert-Helbig, Ulla; Thybaud, Véronique

    2014-12-01

    In genotoxicity testing of pharmaceuticals the rodent alkaline comet assay is being increasingly used as a second in vivo assay in addition to the in vivo micronucleus assay to mitigate in vitro positive results as recommended by the ICH S2(R1) guideline. This paper summarizes a survey suggested by the Safety Working Party of European Medicines Agency (EMA), and conducted by the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA) to investigate the experience among European pharmaceutical companies by conducting the in vivo comet assay for regulatory purpose. A special focus was given on the typology of the obtained results and to identify potential difficulties encountered with the interpretation of study data. The participating companies reported a total of 147 studies (conducted in-house or outsourced) and shared the conclusion on the comet assay response for 136 studies. Most of the studies were negative (118/136). Only about 10% (14/136 studies) of the comet assays showed a positive response. None of the positive comet assay results were clearly associated with organ toxicity indicating that the positive responses are not due to cytotoxic effects of the compound in the tissue examined. The number of comet assays with an equivocal or inconclusive response was rare, respectively comet assay and the regulatory acceptance of the current ICH S2 guidance.

  14. Normalized performance and load data for the deepwind demonstrator in controlled conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Battisti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Performance and load normalized coefficients, deriving from an experimental campaign of measurements conducted at the large scale wind tunnel of the Politecnico di Milano (Italy, are presented with the aim of providing useful benchmark data for the validation of numerical codes. Rough data, derived from real scale measurements on a three-bladed Troposkien vertical-axis wind turbine, are manipulated in a convenient form to be easily compared with the typical outputs provided by simulation codes. The here proposed data complement and support the measurements already presented in “Wind Tunnel Testing of the DeepWind Demonstrator in Design and Tilted Operating Conditions” (Battisti et al., 2016 [1].

  15. Count rate performance study of the Lausanne ClearPET scanner demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rey, M. [LPHE, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)]. E-mail: martin.rey@epfl.ch; Jan, S. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA, F-91401 Orsay (France); Vieira, J.-M. [LPHE, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Mosset, J.-B. [LPHE, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Krieguer, M. [IIHE, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Comtat, C. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA, F-91401 Orsay (France); Morel, C. [CPPM, CNRS-IN2P3, Universite de la Mediterranee Aix-Marseille II, F-13288 Marseille (France)

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents the count rate measurements obtained with the Lausanne partial ring ClearPET scanner demonstrator and compares them against GATE Monte Carlo simulations. For the present detector setup, a maximum single event count rate of 1.1 Mcps is measured or a 250-750 keV energy window. This corresponds to a coincidence count rate of approximately 22 kcps. Good agreements are observed between measured and simulated data. Count rate performance, including Noise Equivalent Count (NEC) curves, are determined and extrapolated for a full ring ClearPET design using GATE Monte Carlo simulations. For a full ring design with three rings of detector modules, NEC is peaking at about 70 kcps for 20 MBq.

  16. High performance magnesium anode in paper-based microfluidic battery, powering on-chip fluorescence assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Youngmi; Sankar, Jagannathan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2014-09-01

    A high power density and long-lasting stable/disposable magnesium battery anode was explored for a paper-based fluidic battery to power on-chip functions of various Point of Care (POC) devices. The single galvanic cell with magnesium foil anode and silver foil cathode in Origami cellulose chip provided open circuit potential, 2.2 V, and power density, 3.0 mW/cm(2). A paper-based fluidic galvanic cell was operated with one drop of water (80 μl) and continued to run until it was dry. To prove the concept about powering on-chip POC devices, two-serial galvanic cells are developed and incorporated with a UV-light emitting diode (λ = 365 nm) and fluorescence assay for alkaline phosphatase reaction. Further, detection using smart phones was performed for quantitative measurement of fluorescent density. To conclude, a magnesium-based fluidic battery paper chip was extremely low-cost, required minute sample volumes, was easy to dispose of, light weight, easy to stack, store and transport, easy to fabricate, scalable, and has faster analysis times.

  17. Design and Performance of the NASA SCEPTOR Distributed Electric Propulsion Flight Demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borer, Nicholas K.; Patterson, Michael D.; Viken, Jeffrey K.; Moore, Mark D.; Clarke, Sean; Redifer, Matthew E.; Christie, Robert J.; Stoll, Alex M.; Dubois, Arthur; Bevirt, JoeBen; Gibson, Andrew R.; Foster, Trevor J.; Osterkamp, Philip G.

    2016-01-01

    Distributed Electric Propulsion (DEP) technology uses multiple propulsors driven by electric motors distributed about the airframe to yield beneficial aerodynamic-propulsion interaction. The NASA SCEPTOR flight demonstration project will retrofit an existing internal combustion engine-powered light aircraft with two types of DEP: small "high-lift" propellers distributed along the leading edge of the wing which accelerate the flow over the wing at low speeds, and larger cruise propellers co-located with each wingtip for primary propulsive power. The updated high-lift system enables a 2.5x reduction in wing area as compared to the original aircraft, reducing drag at cruise and shifting the velocity for maximum lift-to-drag ratio to a higher speed, while maintaining low-speed performance. The wingtip-mounted cruise propellers interact with the wingtip vortex, enabling a further efficiency increase that can reduce propulsive power by 10%. A tradespace exploration approach is developed that enables rapid identification of salient trades, and subsequent creation of SCEPTOR demonstrator geometries. These candidates were scrutinized by subject matter experts to identify design preferences that were not modeled during configuration exploration. This exploration and design approach is used to create an aircraft that consumes an estimated 4.8x less energy at the selected cruise point when compared to the original aircraft.

  18. Performance of a molecular assay to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex DNA in clinical specimens: multicenter study in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verza, Mirela; Schmid, Karen Barros; Barcellos, Regina Bones; Linck, Natali; Bello, Graziele Lima; Scapin, Daniel; Sperhacke, Rosa Dea; Silva, Márcia Susana Nunes; Wollheim, Claudia; Rivero, Martha Gabriela Celle; Kritski, Afrânio Lineu; Rezende, Leonides; Oliveira, Martha Maria; Costa, Elis Regina Dalla; Rossetti, Maria Lucia Rosa

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND In high tuberculosis (TB) burden countries, there are few data on the performance of new molecular commercialised assays developed locally. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the performance of a new molecular commercialised assay for TB diagnosis (Detect-TB) in three laboratories. METHODS A total of 302 sputum samples from an equal number of patients with presumptive diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) were submitted for routine smear microscopy, culture, and Detect-TB assay at three different sites in Brazil (the cities of Caxias do Sul, São Paulo and Canoas). FINDINGS Seventy four (24.7%) TB cases were diagnosed (65 bacteriologically confirmed). When compared to smear microscopy/culture results, the overall sensitivity and specificity of Detect-TB assay was 84.6% (CI 95%; 73.7-91.6) and 93.1% (CI 95%; 89.1-95.8), respectively. When compared to bacteriological and clinical diagnostic criteria, the sensitivity and specificity of Detect-TB assay was 74.3% (CI 95%; 63.3-82.9) and 92.9% (CI 95%; 88.7-95.6), respectively. Among the three sites - Caxias do Sul, São Paulo and Canoas - the sensitivity and specificity were respectively 94.7% and 97.8%; 71.4% and 93.9%, 82.1% and 88.9%. MAIN CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that the Detect-TB assay could be applied routinely in reference laboratories across different regions in Brazil. PMID:28177043

  19. Technical and Diagnostic Performance of Five Commercial Anti-Diphtheria Toxoid IgG Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Kits ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Faruq, A.; Dadson, L.; H Cox; Alcock, F.; Parker, A R

    2010-01-01

    The technical and diagnostic performances of five commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for the measurement of anti-diphtheria toxoid IgG antibodies were evaluated. There was good agreement between the relative sensitivities of the five assays, but the relative specificity of one of the assays differed from that of the other four assays. Three of the five assays possessed recoveries of the international reference material NIBSC 00/496 within the range of 90% to 110% at ant...

  20. Demonstrating the capability of the high-performance plasmonic gallium-graphene couple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losurdo, Maria; Yi, Congwen; Suvorova, Alexandra; Rubanov, Sergey; Kim, Tong-Ho; Giangregorio, Maria M; Jiao, Wenyuan; Bergmair, Iris; Bruno, Giovanni; Brown, April S

    2014-03-25

    Metal nanoparticle (NP)-graphene multifunctional platforms are of great interest for exploring strong light-graphene interactions enhanced by plasmons and for improving performance of numerous applications, such as sensing and catalysis. These platforms can also be used to carry out fundamental studies on charge transfer, and the findings can lead to new strategies for doping graphene. There have been a large number of studies on noble metal Au-graphene and Ag-graphene platforms that have shown their potential for a number of applications. These studies have also highlighted some drawbacks that must be overcome to realize high performance. Here we demonstrate the promise of plasmonic gallium (Ga) nanoparticle (NP)-graphene hybrids as a means of modulating the graphene Fermi level, creating tunable localized surface plasmon resonances and, consequently, creating high-performance surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) platforms. Four prominent peculiarities of Ga, differentiating it from the commonly used noble (gold and silver) metals are (1) the ability to create tunable (from the UV to the visible) plasmonic platforms, (2) its chemical stability leading to long-lifetime plasmonic platforms, (3) its ability to n-type dope graphene, and (4) its weak chemical interaction with graphene, which preserves the integrity of the graphene lattice. As a result of these factors, a Ga NP-enhanced graphene Raman intensity effect has been observed. To further elucidate the roles of the electromagnetic enhancement (or plasmonic) mechanism in relation to electron transfer, we compare graphene-on-Ga NP and Ga NP-on-graphene SERS platforms using the cationic dye rhodamine B, a drug model biomolecule, as the analyte.

  1. Performance of a Taqman Assay for Improved Detection and Quantification of Human Rhinovirus Viral Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kim Tien; Chook, Jack Bee; Oong, Xiang Yong; Chan, Yoke Fun; Chan, Kok Gan; Hanafi, Nik Sherina; Pang, Yong Kek; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Tee, Kok Keng

    2016-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) is the major aetiology of respiratory tract infections. HRV viral load assays are available but limitations that affect accurate quantification exist. We developed a one-step Taqman assay using oligonucleotides designed based on a comprehensive list of global HRV sequences. The new oligonucleotides targeting the 5′-UTR region showed high PCR efficiency (E = 99.6%, R2 = 0.996), with quantifiable viral load as low as 2 viral copies/μl. Assay evaluation using an External Quality Assessment (EQA) panel yielded a detection rate of 90%. When tested on 315 human enterovirus-positive specimens comprising at least 84 genetically distinct HRV types/serotypes (determined by the VP4/VP2 gene phylogenetic analysis), the assay detected all HRV species and types, as well as other non-polio enteroviruses. A commercial quantification kit, which failed to detect any of the EQA specimens, produced a detection rate of 13.3% (42/315) among the clinical specimens. Using the improved assay, we showed that HRV sheds in the upper respiratory tract for more than a week following acute infection. We also showed that HRV-C had a significantly higher viral load at 2–7 days after the onset of symptoms (p = 0.001). The availability of such assay is important to facilitate disease management, antiviral development, and infection control. PMID:27721388

  2. Comparison of Hemoglobin A1c assay performance on two different commercial systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozo Ćorić

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c is formed by non-enzymatic binding of glucose to the free amino group of the N-terminal end of the ß-chain of hemoglobin A. HbA1c is representative of the mean blood glucose level over three months. The aim of the study was to evaluate the Hemoglobin A1c immunoturbidimetric assay performance on two different commercial systems.Methods: We evaluated the precision and trueness for determination of HbA1c in whole blood. Concentrations of total hemoglobin and HbA1c were evaluated on Dimension Xpand (Siemens and Cobas 501 (Roche analyzers. HbA1c was measured in a latex agglutination inhibition test. Commercial controls Liquichek Diabetes Control Level 1 and Liquichek Diabetes Control Level 2 (Bio Rad at two levels were used for quality control. Analytical validation of HbA1c included: within-run imprecision, between-day imprecision, inaccuracy and comparison determination on the human samples on 2 systems: Dimension Xpand and Cobas 501 analyzers. Results: Within-run imprecision on the commercially controls for Level 1 is 4.5% and Level 2 is 3.2% between-day imprecision on commercially controls is 6.1% Level 1 and 5.1% Level 2 for respectively inac- curacy on commercially controls for Level 1 is 1.8% and Level 2 is 4.8%. Method comparison on human samples shows the correlation coefficient of 0.99.Conclusion: The presented results of the analytical evaluation methods for the determination of HbA1c showed an acceptable accuracy and precision.

  3. Performance of commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for detection of antibodies to Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffelmann, M; Thiel, K; Schmetz, J; Wirsing von Koenig, C H

    2010-12-01

    Measuring antibodies to Bordetella pertussis antigens is mostly done by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). We compared the performance of ELISA kits that were commercially available in Germany. Eleven measured IgG antibodies, and nine measured IgA antibodies. An in-house ELISA with purified antigens served as a reference method. Samples included two WHO reference preparations, the former Food and Drug Administration (FDA)/Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) reference preparations, serum samples from patients with clinically suspected pertussis, and serum samples from patients having received a combined tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Tdap) vaccination. Kits using pertussis toxin (PT) as an antigen showed linearity compared to the WHO Reference preparation (r2 between 0.82 and 0.99), and these kits could quantify antibodies according to the reference preparation. ELISA kits using mixed antigens showed no linear correlation to the reference preparations. Patient results were compared to results of in-house ELISAs using a dual cutoff of either ≥100 IU/ml anti-PT IgG or ≥40 IU/ml anti-PT IgG together with ≥12 IU/ml anti-PT IgA. The sensitivities of kits measuring IgG antibodies ranged between 0.84 and 1.00. The specificities of kits using PT as an antigen were between 0.81 and 0.93. The specificities of kits using mixed antigens were between 0.51 and 0.59 and were thus not acceptable. The sensitivities of kits measuring IgA antibodies ranged between 0.53 and 0.73, and the specificities were between 0.67 and 0.94, indicating that IgA antibodies may be of limited diagnostic value. Our data suggest that ELISAs should use purified PT as an antigen and be standardized to the 1st International Reference preparation.

  4. High Performance Liquid Chromatographic Assay for the Simultaneous Determination of Posaconazole and Vincristine in Rat Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadeel A. Khalil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Developing a validated HPLC-DAD method for simultaneous determination of posaconazole (PSZ and vincristine (VCR in rat plasma. Methods. PSZ, VCR, and itraconazole (ITZ were extracted from 200 μL plasma using diethyl ether in the presence of 0.1 M sodium hydroxide solution. The organic layer was evaporated in vacuo and dried residue was reconstituted and injected through HC-C18 (4.6 × 250 mm, 5 μm column. In the mobile phase, acetonitrile and 0.015 M potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate (30 : 70 to 80 : 20, linear gradient over 7 minutes pumped at 1.5 mL/min. VCR and PSZ were measured at 220 and 262 nm, respectively. Two Sprague Dawley rats were orally dosed PSZ followed by iv dosing of VCR and serial blood sampling was performed. Results. VCR, PSZ, and ITZ were successfully separated within 11 min. Calibration curves were linear over the range of 50–5000 ng/mL for both drugs. The CV% and % error of the mean were ≤18% and limit of quantitation was 50 ng/mL for both drugs. Rat plasma concentrations of PSZ and VCR were simultaneously measured up to 72 h and their calculated pharmacokinetics parameters were comparable to the literature. Conclusion. The assay was validated as per ICH guidelines and is appropriate for pharmacokinetics drug-drug interaction studies.

  5. Preliminary Assessment of a Debris Bed Cooling Performance for Demonstration Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chung Ho; Park, Chang Gyu; Song, Hoon; Kim, Young Gyun; Jeong, Hae Yong; Chang, Jin Wook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    In the case of the sodium-cooled fast reactor such as KALIMER-600, Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident (HCDA) attributed from mass nuclear fuel melting is unlikely to occur due to defense in depth concepts to meet requirements of redundancy and diversity. Multiple faults such as loss of flow, loss of heat sink, or transient overpower without scram are to lead rising the power level until cladding failure as reactivity increasing. The fact that metallic fuel melts at a lower temperature than the cladding allows significant in-pin- fuel motion to occur prior to cladding failure. Also, the combination of Doppler and axial expansion feedback and negative feedback associated with the in-pin fuel relocation prevents the reactivity from reaching prompt critical. Finally, the resulting reactivity and power reductions help prevent fuel temperatures from rising more than the fuel melting temperature. It is more difficult to occur HCDA in a metallic fueled core because reactor power and heat removal capability is maintained in balance by inherent safety characteristics However, for the future design of sodium-cooled fast reactor, the evaluation of the safety performance and the determination of containment requirements may be worth considering due to the triple-fault accident sequences of extremely low probability of occurrence that leads to core melting. For any postulated accident sequence which leads to core melting, in-vessel retention of the core debris will be required as a design requirement for the future design of sodium cooled fast reactor. Also, proof of the capacity of the debris bed cooling is an essential condition to solve the problem of in-vessel retention of the core debris. Accordingly, evaluation of a packed debris bed cooling performance with single phase flow for demonstration sodium-cooled fast reactor was carried out for proof of the in-vessel retention of the core debris

  6. Cool-down performance of the new apparatus for fuel layering demonstrations of FIREX targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, A.; Norimatsu, T.; Nakai, M.; Sakagami, H.; Shiraga, H.; Azechi, H.

    2016-03-01

    FIREX targets have been developed under two layering strategies: foam shell and cone guide laser heating methods. Basic studies have been conducted by the collaboration research between ILE and NIFS. Then the next stage requires the characterization of a layered solid fuel. The present system is at the disadvantage of optical observations. Therefore, a new apparatus is designed to solve it. Glass windows with a wide aperture are installed for an interferometer and a microscope. To isolate the vibration from a cryocooler, active vibration control units are equipped, and flexible thermal conductive links are utilized. Furthermore, a quick target exchange mechanism is applied to deal with different types of FIREX targets. A target holder is detachable from a main vacuum chamber. A metal gasket with not fixing bolts but a load of ∼ thousand newtons on ensures GHe leak tightness for target cooling. Eventually, the design temperature of 10.00 K at a target container has been achieved. The cool-down performance indecates that the new apparatus provides a cryogenic environment for fuel layering demonstrations.

  7. Multicenter comparison study of both analytical and clinical performance across 4 Roche HCV RNA assays utilizing different platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermehren, Johannes; Stelzl, Evelyn; Maasoumy, Benjamin; Michel-Treil, Veronique; Berkowski, Caterina; Marins, Ed G; Paxinos, Ellen E; Marino, Enrique; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Sarrazin, Christoph; Kessler, Harald H

    2017-01-25

    Antiviral treatment efficacy for chronic HCV infection is determined based on measurement of HCV RNA at specific time points throughout therapy by highly sensitive and accurate HCV RNA assays. This study evaluated the performance of two recently-developed real-time PCR HCV RNA assays, the cobas HCV for use on the cobas 6800/8800 systems (cobas 6800/8800 HCV) and the cobas HCV for use on the cobas 4800 system (cobas 4800 HCV) in comparison to two established assays, the COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HCV Quantitative Test, version 2.0 (CAP/CTM v2) and the COBAS TaqMan HCV Test, version 2.0 for use with the High Pure System (HPS/CTM v2). Limit of detection (LOD) and linearity at lower concentrations (5-1000 IU/mL) were assessed for cobas 6800/8800 HCV and cobas 4800 HCV using WHO standard traceable panels representing HCV genotypes (GT) 1-4. Pairwise assay comparisons were also performed using 245 clinical samples representing HCV GT 1-4.cobas 6800/8800 HCV and cobas 4800 HCV were linear at low HCV RNA concentrations (<0.3 log10 IU/mL difference between expected and observed results) with LOD of 8.2 IU/mL and 11.7 IU/mL, respectively, for GT1. The new assays showed excellent agreement with CAP/CTM v2 and HPS/CTM v2 results in samples with quantifiable viral load. Concordance across the 6 million IU/mL cutoff was high among all four assays (90-94%). In conclusion, both cobas 6800/8800 HCV and cobas 4800 HCV tests are sensitive and linear, and correlate well with established Roche assays used in clinical practice.

  8. Analytical performance of RNA isolated from BD SurePath™ cervical cytology specimens by the PreTect™ HPV-Proofer assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Eric P; Grønn, Petter; King, Lorraine M; Passineau, Heather; Doobay, Hema; Skomedal, Hanne; Hariri, Jalil; Hay, Shauna N; Brown, Charlotte A; Fischer, Timothy J; Malinowski, Douglas P

    2012-11-01

    Several commercial HPV ancillary tests are available for detection of E6/E7 RNA. It is not clear how storage of a cervical Pap affects the analytical and clinical performance of the PreTect™ HPV-Proofer assay. To investigate the qualitative performance of RNA extracted from BD SurePath™ liquid-based cytology (LBC) specimens for the detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 mRNA using the PreTect™ HPV-Proofer assay, studies including stability, reproducibility, residual specimen analysis, and storage medium comparison assays were performed. Cervical cytology specimens were collected and stored in BD SurePath™ LBC preservative fluid and/or PreTect™ Transport Media. RNA was isolated using the RecoverAll™ Total Nucleic Acid Isolation kit and RNA integrity was evaluated in the PreTect™ HPV-Proofer assay. The performance of RNA isolated from cervical cells collected and stored in BD SurePath™ LBC preservative fluid or PreTect™ Transport Media was also evaluated through a storage medium comparison study. The RNA was found to be stable for a minimum of 21 days when stored at ambient temperature and displayed high reproducibility with the mean percentage reproducibility ranging from 90.5% to 100% for the HPV types detected by the PreTect™ HPV-Proofer assay. The prevalence rate of HPV types in this study cohort was consistent with published reports. A 93.7% first pass acceptance rate was demonstrated across all cytology grades. The positive human U1 snRNP specific A protein (U1A) and HPV rate for BD SurePath™ LBC and PreTect™ Transport Media specimens was statistically equivalent for both normal and abnormal specimens. This data support the use of RNA isolated from BD SurePath™ LBC for ancillary HPV testing and demonstrates the feasibility of using BD SurePath™ preservative fluid as a specimen type with the PreTect™ HPV-Proofer assay.

  9. Performance assessment of self-interrogation neutron resonance densitometry for spent nuclear fuel assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jianwei, E-mail: huj1@ornl.gov [Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, PO Box 2008, MS-6172, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Tobin, Stephen J.; LaFleur, Adrienne M.; Menlove, Howard O.; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States)

    2013-11-21

    Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) is one of several nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques being integrated into systems to measure spent fuel as part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) Spent Fuel Project. The NGSI Spent Fuel Project is sponsored by the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration to measure plutonium in, and detect diversion of fuel pins from, spent nuclear fuel assemblies. SINRD shows promising capability in determining the {sup 239}Pu and {sup 235}U content in spent fuel. SINRD is a relatively low-cost and lightweight instrument, and it is easy to implement in the field. The technique makes use of the passive neutron source existing in a spent fuel assembly, and it uses ratios between the count rates collected in fission chambers that are covered with different absorbing materials. These ratios are correlated to key attributes of the spent fuel assembly, such as the total mass of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 235}U. Using count rate ratios instead of absolute count rates makes SINRD less vulnerable to systematic uncertainties. Building upon the previous research, this work focuses on the underlying physics of the SINRD technique: quantifying the individual impacts on the count rate ratios of a few important nuclides using the perturbation method; examining new correlations between count rate ratio and mass quantities based on the results of the perturbation study; quantifying the impacts on the energy windows of the filtering materials that cover the fission chambers by tallying the neutron spectra before and after the neutrons go through the filters; and identifying the most important nuclides that cause cooling-time variations in the count rate ratios. The results of these studies show that {sup 235}U content has a major impact on the SINRD signal in addition to the {sup 239}Pu content. Plutonium-241 and {sup 241}Am are the two main nuclides responsible for the variation in the count

  10. Analytical Performance Characteristics of the Cepheid GeneXpert Ebola Assay for the Detection of Ebola Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A Pinsky

    Full Text Available The recently developed Xpert® Ebola Assay is a novel nucleic acid amplification test for simplified detection of Ebola virus (EBOV in whole blood and buccal swab samples. The assay targets sequences in two EBOV genes, lowering the risk for new variants to escape detection in the test. The objective of this report is to present analytical characteristics of the Xpert® Ebola Assay on whole blood samples.This study evaluated the assay's analytical sensitivity, analytical specificity, inclusivity and exclusivity performance in whole blood specimens. EBOV RNA, inactivated EBOV, and infectious EBOV were used as targets. The dynamic range of the assay, the inactivation of virus, and specimen stability were also evaluated. The lower limit of detection (LoD for the assay using inactivated virus was estimated to be 73 copies/mL (95% CI: 51-97 copies/mL. The LoD for infectious virus was estimated to be 1 plaque-forming unit/mL, and for RNA to be 232 copies/mL (95% CI 163-302 copies/mL. The assay correctly identified five different Ebola viruses, Yambuku-Mayinga, Makona-C07, Yambuku-Ecran, Gabon-Ilembe, and Kikwit-956210, and correctly excluded all non-EBOV isolates tested. The conditions used by Xpert® Ebola for inactivation of infectious virus reduced EBOV titer by ≥6 logs.In summary, we found the Xpert® Ebola Assay to have high analytical sensitivity and specificity for the detection of EBOV in whole blood. It offers ease of use, fast turnaround time, and remote monitoring. The test has an efficient viral inactivation protocol, fulfills inclusivity and exclusivity criteria, and has specimen stability characteristics consistent with the need for decentralized testing. The simplicity of the assay should enable testing in a wide variety of laboratory settings, including remote laboratories that are not capable of performing highly complex nucleic acid amplification tests, and during outbreaks where time to detection is critical.

  11. A novel in vivo transcription assay demonstrates the presence of globin-inducing trans-acting factors in uninduced Murine Erythroleukemia cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Wrighton; F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractWe report the development of a novel in vivo transcription assay for trans-acting factors regulating the human gamma- and beta-globin genes. A cDNA coding for the human tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) was inserted into the globin genes. Simian virus 40 small T-antigen splice and

  12. Complete validation of a unique digestion assay to detect Trichinella larvae in horsemeat demonstrates its reliability for meeting food safety and trade requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A tissue digestion assay using a double separatory funnel (DSF) procedure for the detection of Trichinella larvae in horsemeat was validated for application in food safety programs and trade. It consisted of a pepsin-HCl digestion step to release larvae from muscle tissue followed by two sequential ...

  13. The influence of uncertainties of measurements in laboratory performance evaluation using an intercomparison program of radionuclide assays in environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tauhata, Luiz [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes, LNMRI/IRD/CNEN-Avenida Salvador Allende s/n, Recreio, CEP:22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: tauhata@ird.gov.br; Elizabeth Couto Machado Vianna, Maria [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes, LNMRI/IRD/CNEN-Avenida Salvador Allende s/n, Recreio, CEP:22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Eduardo de Oliveira, Antonio [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes, LNMRI/IRD/CNEN-Avenida Salvador Allende s/n, Recreio, CEP:22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Cristina de Melo Ferreira, Ana [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes, LNMRI/IRD/CNEN-Avenida Salvador Allende s/n, Recreio, CEP:22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Julia Camara da Silva Braganca, Maura [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes, LNMRI/IRD/CNEN-Avenida Salvador Allende s/n, Recreio, CEP:22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Faria Clain, Almir [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes, LNMRI/IRD/CNEN-Avenida Salvador Allende s/n, Recreio, CEP:22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2006-10-15

    To show the influence of measurement uncertainties in performance evaluation of laboratories, data from 42 comparison runs were evaluated using two statistical criteria. The normalized standard deviation, D, used by US EPA, that mainly takes into account the accuracy, and the normalized deviation, E, that includes the individual laboratory uncertainty used for performance evaluation in the key-comparisons by BIPM. The results show that data evaluated by the different criteria give a significant deviation of laboratory performance in each radionuclide assay when we analyse a large quantity of data.

  14. [Comparison of the clinical performance of the ECLusys HBsAg II assay with the Lumipulse f and HISCL 2000-i HBsAg screening assays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Aya; Iwahara, Kunihiro; Suga, Yasuyuki; Uchiyama, Sachinori; Maekawa, Masato

    2012-02-01

    We compared the ECLusys HBsAgII (ECL HBsAg) assay to the Lumipulse Forte (LPf HBsAg) and HISCL (HIS HBsAg) assays. Measurement of dilution panels for which the WHO HBsAg international reference panel was the parent specimen revealed that the ECL and HIS assays enabled detection to a theoretical level of 0.04 IU/mL, whereas the LPf assay enabled detection to a level of 0.08 IU/mL. In a specificity test using high RF positive specimens (n = 33), pregnancy specimens (n = 35), cytomegalovirus antibody positive specimens (n = 36), and high M protein positive specimens (n = 21) that were confirmed negative for HBsAg by the LPf assay, negative results were obtained for all specimens on the HIS assay, but the ECL assay yielded a positive result for one of the high RF positive specimens. This individual was suggested on further testing to be an HBV carrier who was strongly positive for HBc antibody. In HBsAg mutants detection test, the detection rate was 92.3% with the ECL assay and 69.2% with the HIS assay. In a correlation test using routinely collected clinical specimens (n = 155), including positive stock specimens, aside from the one case where the LPf assay gave a negative result but both the ECL and HIS assays gave positive results, all of the results were consistent for all specimens. The above results confirmed that the ECL assay is both highly sensitive and specific, and also enables a high rate of HBsAg mutant detection.

  15. A Low-Cost, High-Performance System for Fluorescence Lateral Flow Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda G. Lee

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a fluorescence lateral flow system that has excellent sensitivity and wide dynamic range. The illumination system utilizes an LED, plastic lenses and plastic and colored glass filters for the excitation and emission light. Images are collected on an iPhone 4. Several fluorescent dyes with long Stokes shifts were evaluated for their signal and nonspecific binding in lateral flow. A wide range of values for the ratio of signal to nonspecific binding was found, from 50 for R-phycoerythrin (R-PE to 0.15 for Brilliant Violet 605. The long Stokes shift of R-PE allowed the use of inexpensive plastic filters rather than costly interference filters to block the LED light. Fluorescence detection with R-PE and absorbance detection with colloidal gold were directly compared in lateral flow using biotinylated bovine serum albumen (BSA as the analyte. Fluorescence provided linear data over a range of 0.4–4,000 ng/mL with a 1,000-fold signal change while colloidal gold provided non-linear data over a range of 16–4,000 ng/mL with a 10-fold signal change. A comparison using human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG as the analyte showed a similar advantage in the fluorescent system. We believe our inexpensive yet high-performance platform will be useful for providing quantitative and sensitive detection in a point-of-care setting.

  16. Performance of a MALDI-TOF MS-based imipenem hydrolysis assay incorporating zinc sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, James; Palombo, Enzo

    2017-03-01

    A MALDI-TOF MS(1)-based imipenem hydrolysis assay was modified by adding ZnSO4. This improved detection of metallo-β-lactamase producing strains without compromising detection of other carbapenemase types. Using 129 genetically characterized Gram-negative bacilli, the sensitivity and specificity were 98.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 91.9-99.7%) and 100% (95% CI: 94.3-100%), respectively.

  17. Performance of scintillation proximity assay (SPA) to measure the level of VEGFR 1 protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LEE, So-Young; LIM, Jae-Cheong; KIM, Jin-Joo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Scintillation proximity assay is a one of radioimmunoassay and can be assayed without the washing or filtration procedures normally used to separate bound from free fractions. Due to its simplicity and high-throughput protocol, it is broadly applicable to immunology, receptor binding, monitoring receptor-ligand interactions and enzyme reactions. Briefly, an antibody or receptor is coated on SPA beads. When a radiolabeled antigen or ligand binds to the beads, the SPA beads stimulate to emit short range electrons. The {sup 3}H and {sup 125}I are commonly used for radiolabeling and the produced photons are detectable with a liquid scintillation counter (LSC). A binding affinity of unlabeled ligands can be determined by competitive reaction of the radiolabeled ligands. Bevacizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody, and can stop or delay growth of tumors by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Bevacizumab was approved by FDA for metastatic cancer such as colorectal cancers, ovarian cancers, breast cancers and glioblastoma multiform of the brain. Recently, Dan G. duda et al. was reported that the concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) in plasma may potentially be used as a negative selection biomarker. In this study, we describe a method using scintillation proximity assay to detect the amounts of VEGFR-1 protein. This method is successfully used to measure the concentration of VEGFR-1 protein in human cell extracts. In summary, a simple and sensitive assay is developed for measuring the amount of VEGFR 1 protein in cancer cell lysate using SPA beads. The antibody coating on the beads and antigen binding are achieved in one mixing step.

  18. A Demonstration of the Uncertainty in Predicting the Estrogenic Activity of Individual Chemicals and Mixtures From an In Vitro Estrogen Receptor Transcriptional Activation Assay (T47D-KBluc) to the In Vivo Uterotrophic Assay Using Oral Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Justin M; Hannas, Bethany R; Furr, Johnathan R; Wilson, Vickie S; Gray, L Earl

    2016-10-01

    In vitro estrogen receptor assays are valuable tools for identifying environmental samples and chemicals that display estrogenic activity. However, in vitro potency cannot necessarily be extrapolated to estimates of in vivo potency because in vitro assays are currently unable to fully account for absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion. To explore this issue, we calculated relative potency factors (RPF), using 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) as the reference compound, for several chemicals and mixtures in the T47D-KBluc estrogen receptor transactivation assay. In vitro RPFs were used to predict rat oral uterotrophic assay responses for these chemicals and mixtures. EE2, 17β-estradiol (E2), benzyl-butyl phthalate (BBP), bisphenol-A (BPA), bisphenol-AF (BPAF), bisphenol-C (BPC), bisphenol-S (BPS), and methoxychlor (MET) were tested individually, while BPS + MET, BPAF + MET, and BPAF + BPC + BPS + EE2 + MET were tested as equipotent mixtures. In vivo ED50 values for BPA, BPAF, and BPC were accurately predicted using in vitro data; however, E2 was less potent than predicted, BBP was a false positive, and BPS and MET were 76.6 and 368.3-fold more active in vivo than predicted from the in vitro potency, respectively. Further, mixture ED50 values were more accurately predicted by the dose addition model using individual chemical in vivo uterotrophic data (0.7-1.5-fold difference from observed) than in vitro data (1.4-86.8-fold). Overall, these data illustrate the potential for both underestimating and overestimating in vivo potency from predictions made with in vitro data for compounds that undergo substantial disposition following oral administration. Accounting for aspects of toxicokinetics, notably metabolism, in in vitro models will be necessary for accurate in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolations.

  19. Hanford Tanks Initiative alternate retrieval system demonstrations - final report of testing performed by Grey Pilgrim LLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berglin, E.J.

    1997-07-24

    A waste retrieval system has been defined to provide a safe and cost-effective solution to the Hanford Tanks Initiative. This system consists of the EMMA robotic manipulator (by GreyPilgrim LLC) and the lightweight Scarifier (by Waterjet Technology, Inc.) powered by a 36-kpsi Jet-Edge diesel powered high pressure pumping system. For demonstration and testing purposes, an air conveyance system was utilized to remove the waste from the simulated tank floor. The EMMA long reach manipulator utilized for this demonstration was 33 feet long. It consisted of 4 hydraulically controlled stages of varying lengths and coupling configurations. T

  20. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: PHASE II. PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report describes Phase II of a demonstration of the utilization of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cells to recover energy from landfill gas. This phase consisted primarily of the construction and testing of a Gas Pretreatment Unit (GPU) whose function is to remove those impu...

  1. Performance of multiplex cytokine assays in serum and saliva among community-dwelling postmenopausal women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard W Browne

    Full Text Available Multiplexing arrays increase the throughput and decrease sample requirements for studies employing multiple biomarkers. The goal of this project was to examine the performance of Multiplex arrays for measuring multiple protein biomarkers in saliva and serum. Specimens from the OsteoPerio ancillary study of the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study were used. Participants required the presence of at least 6 teeth and were excluded based on active cancer and certain bone issues but were not selected on any specific condition. Quality control (QC samples were created from pooled serum and saliva. Twenty protein markers were measured on five multiplexing array panels. Sample pretreatment conditions were optimized for each panel. Recovery, lower limit of quantification (LLOQ and imprecision were determined for each analyte. Statistical adjustment at the plate level was used to reduce imprecision estimates and increase the number of usable observations. Sample pre-treatment improved recovery estimates for many analytes. The LLOQ for each analyte agreed with manufacturer specifications except for MMP-1 and MMP-2 which were significantly higher than reported. Following batch adjustment, 17 of 20 biomarkers in serum and 9 of 20 biomarkers in saliva demonstrated acceptable precision, defined as <20% coefficient of variation (<25% at LLOQ. The percentage of cohort samples having levels within the reportable range for each analyte varied from 10% to 100%. The ratio of levels in saliva to serum varied from 1∶100 to 28∶1. Correlations between saliva and serum were of moderate positive magnitude and significant for CRP, MMP-2, insulin, adiponectin, GM-CSF and IL-5. Multiplex arrays exhibit high levels of analytical imprecision, particularly at the batch level. Careful sample pre-treatment can enhance recovery and reduce imprecision. Following statistical adjustments to reduce batch effects, we identified biomarkers that are of acceptable quality in

  2. SNOX demonstration project: Volume 2, Project performance and economics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The SNOX process, developed by Haldor Topsoe A/S and demonstrated and marketed in North America by ABB Environmental Systems (ABBES), is an innovative process which removes both sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides from power plant flue gases. Sulfur dioxide is recovered as high purity, concentrated sulfuric acid and nitrogen oxides are converted to nitrogen gas and water vapor; no additional waste streams are produced. As part of the Clean Coal Technology Program, this project was demonstrated under joint sponsorship from the US Department of Energy, Ohio Coal Development Office, ABBES, Snamprogetti, and Ohio Edison. The project objective was to demonstrate the SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} reduction efficiencies of the SNOX process on an electric power plant firing high-sulfur Ohio Coal. A 35-MWe demonstration has been conducted on a 108-MWe unit, Ohio Edison`s Niles Plant Unit 2, in Trumbull County, Ohio. The $31.4 million project began site preparation in November 1990 and commenced treating flue gas in March of 1992. A parametric test program has been completed. This report presents a description of the technology, results from the 33 month testing and operation phase, and information from a commercial scale economic evaluation. During the demonstration, the process met or exceeded its design goals of 95% SO{sub 2} removal, 90% NO{sub x} removal, and production of commercial grade (>93.2 wt.%) sulfuric acid. The plant was operated for approximately 8000 hours and produced more than 5600 tons of acid, which was purchased and distributed by a local supplier to end users. Projected economics for a 500 MWe commercial SNOX plant indicate a total capital requirement of 305 $/kW, levelized incremental cost of power at 6.1 mills/kWh, 219 $/ton of SO{sub 2} removed, and 198 $/ton of SO{sub 2}+NO{sub x} removed (all at constant dollars).

  3. Evaluation of hemoglobin A1c measurement from filter paper using high-performance liquid chromatography and immunoturbidimetric assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yonghua; Yang, Xu; Wang, Haining; Li, Zhenrong; Wang, Tiancheng

    2017-04-01

    Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) measurement from whole blood (WB) samples is inconvenient for epidemic surveillance and self-monitoring of glycemic level. We evaluated HbA1c measurement from WB blotted on filter paper (FP), which can be easily transported to central laboratories, with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and immunoturbidimetric assay (ITA). WB was applied to Whatman filter paper. By using HPLC and WB samples as reference methods, these FP samples were evaluated on HPLC and ITA. Inter- and intra-assay variation, WB vs. FP agreement and sample stability at 20-25 °C and -70 °C were assessed by statistical analysis. Results showed that the coefficient of variation (CV, %) of FP samples for HPLC and ITA were 0.44-1.02% and 1.47-2.72%, respectively (intra-assay); 2.13-3.56% and 3.21-4.82%, respectively (inter-assay). The correlation of WB HPLC with FP analyzed using HPLC and ITA are both significant (p < 0.001). Sample stability showed that FP method up to 5 days at 20-25 °C and 5 weeks at -70 °C is accurate and reproducible. In conclusion, FP samples analyzed by HPLC and ITA can both provide an alternative to WB for HbA1c measurement, supporting the use of FP method in epidemic surveillance and healthcare units.

  4. Test and demonstration of a high performance slot furnace. Progress report, December 1, 1976--June 1, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjerklie, J.W.; Most, I.G.

    1977-06-01

    Hague International has embarked upon a two phase program that will verify and demonstrate several methods of energy conservation in the forge industry. A slot furnace was built and installed at Hague International, which incorporates these methods. Tests will be performed on this furnace to demonstrate the effects of the various energy saving devices separately and in combination. This overall project is divided into two phases: test facility preparation and performance tests; and furnace demonstration. Progress through June 1, 1977 on Phase 1 of the overall project is reported. Included is a discussion of the test facility design, instrumentation schedule, furnace modification, burner design, and test program.

  5. Design and expected performance of the MICE demonstration of ionization cooling arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Bogomilov, M.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Song, Y.; Tang, J.; Li, Z.; Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; Chignoli, F.; Mazza, R.; Palladino, V.; de Bari, A.; Cecchet, G.; Orestano, D.; Tortora, L.; Kuno, Y.; Ishimoto, S.; Filthaut, F.; Jokovic, D.; Maletic, D.; Savic, M.; Hansen, O.M.; Ramberger, S.; Vretenar, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Blondel, A.; Drielsma, F.; Karadzhov, Y.; Charnley, G.; Collomb, N.; Gallagher, A.; Grant, A.; Griffiths, S.; Hartnett, T.; Martlew, B.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Oates, A.; Owens, P.; Stokes, G.; Tucker, M.; Warburton, P.; White, C.; Adams, D.; Anderson, R.J.; Barclay, P.; Bayliss, V.; Boehm, J.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Courthold, M.; Dumbell, K.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Hayler, T.; Hills, M.; Lintern, A.; Macwaters, C.; Nichols, A.; Preece, R.; Ricciardi, S.; Rogers, C.; Stanley, T.; Tarrant, J.; Wilson, A.; Watson, S.; Bayes, R.; Nugent, J.C.; Soler, F.J.P.; Gamet, R.; Barber, G.; Blackmore, V.J.; Colling, D.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Hunt, C.; Kurup, A.; Lagrange, J.B.; Long, K.; Martyniak, J.; Middleton, S.; Pasternak, J.; Uchida, M.A.; Cobb, J.H.; Lau, W.; Booth, C.N.; Hodgson, P.; Langlands, J.; Overton, E.; Robinson, M.; Smith, P.J.; Wilbur, S.; Dick, A.J.; Ronald, K.; Whyte, C.G.; Young, A.R.; Boyd, S.; Franchini, P.; Greis, J.R.; Pidcott, C.; Taylor, I.; Gardener, R.B.S.; Kyberd, P.; Nebrensky, J.J.; Palmer, M.; Witte, H.; Bross, A.D.; Bowring, D.; Liu, A.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Rubinov, P.; DeMello, A.; Gourlay, S.; Li, D.; Prestemon, S.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Freemire, B.; Hanlet, P.; Kaplan, D.M.; Mohayai, T.A.; Rajaram, D.; Snopok, P.; Suezaki, V.; Torun, Y.; Onel, Y.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Sanders, D.A.; Summers, D.J.; Hanson, G.G.; Heidt, C.

    Muon beams of low emittance provide the basis for the intense, well-characterised neutrino beams necessary to elucidate the physics of flavour at a neutrino factory and to provide lepton-antilepton collisions at energies of up to several TeV at a muon collider. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) aims to demonstrate ionization cooling, the technique by which it is proposed to reduce the phase-space volume occupied by the muon beam at such facilities. In an ionization-cooling channel, the muon beam passes through a material in which it loses energy. The energy lost is then replaced using RF cavities. The combined effect of energy loss and re-acceleration is to reduce the transverse emittance of the beam (transverse cooling). A major revision of the scope of the project was carried out over the summer of 2014. The revised experiment can deliver a demonstration of ionization cooling. The design of the cooling demonstration experiment will be described together with its predicted cooling p...

  6. Design and Demonstration of RSFQ Processor Datapath for High Performance Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    the development of superconducting ferromagnetic Random Access Memory. During the project, we have achieved the following results: 1) The VHDL ...level design of the 8-BIT datapath was performed in collaboration with SUNY at Stonybrook group. Based on VHDL simulation results, we have designed...5 VHDL -level 8-bit datapath design

  7. The Development of Accepted Performance Items to Demonstrate Competence in Literary Braille

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Sandra; D'Andrea, Frances Mary; Rosenblum, L. Penny

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This research attempted to establish the content validity of several performance statements that are associated with basic knowledge, production, and reading of braille by beginning teachers. Methods: University instructors (n = 21) and new teachers of students with visual impairments (n = 20) who had taught at least 2 braille…

  8. Evaluation of GLAS Demonstration Model Loop Heat Pipe Thermal Vacuum Performance with Various Fluid Charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Charles; Butler, Dan; Ku, Jentung; Grob, Eric; Swanson, Ted; Nikitkin, Michael; Paquin, Krista C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Two loop heat pipes (LHPs) are to be used for tight thermal control of the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) instrument, planned for flight in late 2001. The LHPs are charged with Propylene as a working fluid. One LHP will be used to transport 110 W from a laser a radiator, the other will transport 190 W from electronic boxes to a separate radiator. The application includes a large amount of thermal mass in each LHP system and low initial startup powers. This along with some non-ideal flight design compromises, such as a less than ideal charge level for this design concept with a symmetrical secondary wick, lead to inadequate performance of the flight LHPs during the flight thermal vacuum test in October of 2000. This presentation focuses on identifying; the sources of the flight test difficulties by modifying the charge and test setup of the successfully tested Development Model Loop Heat Pipe (DM LHP). While very similar to the flight design, the DM L14P did have several significant difference in design and method of testing. These differences were evaluated for affect on performance by conforming the DM LHP to look more like the flight units. The major difference that was evaluated was the relative fill level of the working fluid within the concentrically design LHP compensation chamber. Other differences were also assessed through performance testing including starter heater size and "hot biasing" of major interior components. Performance was assessed with respect to startup, low power operation, conductance, and control heater power. The results of the testing showed that performance improves as initial charge increases, and when the starter heater is made smaller. The "hot biasing" of the major components did not appear to have a detrimental effect. As a result of test results of the DM LHP, modifications are being made to the flight units to increase the fluid charge and increase the watt-density of the starter heater.

  9. Demonstration of the dynamic mass redistribution label-free technology as a useful cell-based pharmacological assay for endogenously expressed GABAA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Anders B.; Nittegaard-Nielsen, Mia; Christensen, Julie T.

    2016-01-01

    Within the continuous quest for the discovery of pharmacol. interesting compds., the development of new and superior drug screening assays is desired. In recent years, the use of label-free techniques has paved the way for an alternative high-throughput screening method. An example is the Epic...... IMR-32 neuroblastoma cell line, which expresses relatively high levels of several endogenous GABAA receptor subunits, we show that GABA produces concn.-dependent cellular responses that can be measured and quantified in real-time. With the aid of the GABAA receptor-specific agonist muscimol...

  10. Analytical and clinical performance of the CDC real time RT-PCR assay for detection and typing of dengue virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto A Santiago

    Full Text Available Dengue is an acute illness caused by the positive-strand RNA dengue virus (DENV. There are four genetically distinct DENVs (DENV-1-4 that cause disease in tropical and subtropical countries. Most patients are viremic when they present with symptoms; therefore, RT-PCR has been increasingly used in dengue diagnosis. The CDC DENV-1-4 RT-PCR Assay has been developed as an in-vitro diagnostic platform and was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA for detection of dengue in patients with signs or symptoms of mild or severe dengue. The primers and probes of this test have been designed to detect currently circulating strains of DENV-1-4 from around the world at comparable sensitivity. In a retrospective study with 102 dengue cases confirmed by IgM anti-DENV seroconversion in the convalescent sample, the RT-PCR Assay detected DENV RNA in 98.04% of the paired acute samples. Using sequencing as a positive indicator, the RT-PCR Assay had a 97.92% positive agreement in 86 suspected dengue patients with a single acute serum sample. After extensive validations, the RT-PCR Assay performance was highly reproducible when evaluated across three independent testing sites, did not produce false positive results for etiologic agents of other febrile illnesses, and was not affected by pathological levels of potentially interfering biomolecules. These results indicate that the CDC DENV-1-4 RT-PCR Assay provides a reliable diagnostic platform capable for confirming dengue in suspected cases.

  11. Performance of an automated solid-phase red cell adherence system compared with that of a manual gel microcolumn assay for the identification of antibodies eluted from red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finck, R H; Davis, R J; Teng, S; Goldfinger, D; Ziman, A F; Lu, Q; Yuan, S

    2011-01-01

    IgG antibodies coating red blood cells (RBCs) can be removed by elution procedures and their specificity determined by antibody identification studies. Although such testing is traditionally performed using the tube agglutination assay, prior studies have shown that the gel microcolumn (GMC) assay may also be used with comparable results. The purpose of this study was to compare an automated solid-phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) system with a GMC assay for the detection of antibodies eluted from RBCs. Acid eluates from 51 peripheral blood (PB) and 7 cord blood (CB) samples were evaluated by both an automated SPRCA instrument and a manual GMC assay. The concordance rate between the two systems for peripheral RBC samples was 88.2 percent (45 of 51), including cases with alloantibodies (n = 8), warm autoantibodies (n = 12), antibodies with no identifiable specificity (n = 2), and negative results (n = 23). There were six discordant cases, of which four had alloantibodies (including anti-Jka, -E, and -e) demonstrable by the SPRCA system only. In the remaining 2 cases, anti-Fya and antibodies with no identifiable specificity were demonstrable by the GMC assay only. All seven CB specimens produced concordant results, showing anti-A (n = 3), -B (n = 1), maternal anti-Jka (n = 2), or a negative result (n = 1). Automated SPRCA technology has a performance that is comparable with that of a manual GMC assay for identifying antibodies eluted from PB and CB RBCs.

  12. An easy to perform but often counterintuitive demonstration of gas expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Brad

    1999-08-01

    During their thermodynamics courses, students learn that the temperature of an ideal gas will drop during an adiabatic reversible expansion. They also usually learn that no change of temperature occurs as a result of a certain free expansion. These results often become intuitively connected with gas expansion. However when air expands freely into an evacuated chamber from a constant pressure atmosphere, its temperature increases. This can be easily demonstrated using only simple equipment and makes for a memorable lesson on the importance of identifying what exactly is the system and then simply applying the first law of thermodynamics.

  13. Performance of human fecal anaerobe-associated PCR-based assays in a multi-laboratory method evaluation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, Blythe A.; Cao, Yiping; Ebentier, Darcy L.; Hanley, Kaitlyn; Ballesté, Elisenda; Brandão, João; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Converse, Reagan; Farnleitner, Andreas H.; Gentry-Shields, Jennifer; Gourmelon, Michèle; Lee, Chang Soo; Lee, Jiyoung; Lozach, Solen; Madi, Tania; Meijer, Wim G.; Noble, Rachel; Peed, Lindsay; Reischer, Georg H.; Rodrigues, Raquel; Rose, Joan B.; Schriewer, Alexander; Sinigalliano, Chris; Srinivasan, Sangeetha; Stewart, Jill; ,; Laurie, C.; Wang, Dan; Whitman, Richard; Wuertz, Stefan; Jay, Jenny; Holden, Patricia A.; Boehm, Alexandria B.; Shanks, Orin; Griffith, John F.

    2013-01-01

    A number of PCR-based methods for detecting human fecal material in environmental waters have been developed over the past decade, but these methods have rarely received independent comparative testing in large multi-laboratory studies. Here, we evaluated ten of these methods (BacH, BacHum-UCD, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (BtH), BsteriF1, gyrB, HF183 endpoint, HF183 SYBR, HF183 Taqman®, HumM2, and Methanobrevibacter smithii nifH (Mnif)) using 64 blind samples prepared in one laboratory. The blind samples contained either one or two fecal sources from human, wastewater or non-human sources. The assay results were assessed for presence/absence of the human markers and also quantitatively while varying the following: 1) classification of samples that were detected but not quantifiable (DNQ) as positive or negative; 2) reference fecal sample concentration unit of measure (such as culturable indicator bacteria, wet mass, total DNA, etc); and 3) human fecal source type (stool, sewage or septage). Assay performance using presence/absence metrics was found to depend on the classification of DNQ samples. The assays that performed best quantitatively varied based on the fecal concentration unit of measure and laboratory protocol. All methods were consistently more sensitive to human stools compared to sewage or septage in both the presence/absence and quantitative analysis. Overall, HF183 Taqman® was found to be the most effective marker of human fecal contamination in this California-based study.

  14. Calculating inspector probability of detection using performance demonstration program pass rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumblidge, Stephen; D'Agostino, Amy

    2016-02-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has been working since the 1970's to ensure that nondestructive testing performed on nuclear power plants in the United States will provide reasonable assurance of structural integrity of the nuclear power plant components. One tool used by the NRC has been the development and implementation of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section XI Appendix VIII[1] (Appendix VIII) blind testing requirements for ultrasonic procedures, equipment, and personnel. Some concerns have been raised, over the years, by the relatively low pass rates for the Appendix VIII qualification testing. The NRC staff has applied statistical tools and simulations to determine the expected probability of detection (POD) for ultrasonic examinations under ideal conditions based on the pass rates for the Appendix VIII qualification tests for the ultrasonic testing personnel. This work was primarily performed to answer three questions. First, given a test design and pass rate, what is the expected overall POD for inspectors? Second, can we calculate the probability of detection for flaws of different sizes using this information? Finally, if a previously qualified inspector fails a requalification test, does this call their earlier inspections into question? The calculations have shown that one can expect good performance from inspectors who have passed appendix VIII testing in a laboratory-like environment, and the requalification pass rates show that the inspectors have maintained their skills between tests. While these calculations showed that the PODs for the ultrasonic inspections are very good under laboratory conditions, the field inspections are conducted in a very different environment. The NRC staff has initiated a project to systematically analyze the human factors differences between qualification testing and field examinations. This work will be used to evaluate and prioritize

  15. Demonstration of short-range wind lidar in a high-performance wind tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Montes, Belen Fernández; Pedersen, Jens Engholm;

    A short-range continuous-wave coherent laser radar (lidar) has been tested in a high-performance wind tunnel for possible use as a standard component in wind tunnels. The lidar was tested in a low as well as a high speed regime ranging from 5-35 m/s and 40-75 m/s, respectively. In both low and hi...... future for short range lidars as a complement to LDA and other standard equipment in wind tunnels....

  16. Demonstration of short-range wind lidar in a high-performance wind tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Montes, Belen Fernández; Pedersen, Jens Engholm;

    2012-01-01

    A short-range continuous-wave coherent laser radar (lidar) has been tested in a high-performance wind tunnel for possible use as a standard component in wind tunnels. The lidar was tested in a low as well as a high speed regime ranging from 5-35 m/s and 40-75 m/s, respectively. In both low and hi...... future for short range lidars as a complement to LDA and other standard equipment in wind tunnels....

  17. Performance of a real-time PCR assay for the rapid identification of Mycobacterium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hye-young; Kim, Hyunjung; Kim, Sunghyun; Kim, Do-kyoon; Cho, Sang-Nae; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteria cause a variety of illnesses that differ in severity and public health implications. The differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) from nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is of primary importance for infection control and choice of antimicrobial therapy. The diagnosis of diseases caused by NTM is difficult because NTM species are prevalent in the environment and because they have fastidious properties. In the present study, we evaluated 279 clinical isolates grown in liquid culture provided by The Catholic University of Korea, St. Vincent's Hospital using real-time PCR based on mycobacterial rpoB gene sequences. The positive rate of real-time PCR assay accurately discriminated 100% (195/195) and 100% (84/84) between MTB and NTM species. Comparison of isolates identified using the MolecuTech REBA Myco-ID(®) and Real Myco-ID® were completely concordant except for two samples. Two cases that were identified as mixed infection (M. intracellulare-M. massiliense and M. avium-M. massiliense co-infection) by PCRREBA assay were only detected using M. abscessus-specific probes by Real Myco-ID(®). Among a total of 84 cases, the most frequently identified NTM species were M. intracellulare (n=38, 45.2%), M. avium (n=18, 23.7%), M. massiliense (n=10, 13.2%), M. fortuitum (n=5, 6%), M. abscessus (n=3, 3.9%), M. gordonae (n=3, 3.9%), M. kansasii (n=2, 2.4%), M. mucogenicum (n=2, 2.4%), and M. chelonae (n= 1, 1.2%). Real Myco-ID(®) is an efficient tool for the rapid detection of NTM species as well as MTB and sensitive and specific and comparable to conventional methods.

  18. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport- Demonstration of Approach and Results on Used Fuel Performance Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adkins, Harold [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Geelhood, Ken [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Koeppel, Brian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Coleman, Justin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bignell, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flores, Gregg [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wang, Jy-An [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sanborn, Scott [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Spears, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Klymyshyn, Nick [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    This document addresses Oak Ridge National Laboratory milestone M2FT-13OR0822015 Demonstration of Approach and Results on Used Nuclear Fuel Performance Characterization. This report provides results of the initial demonstration of the modeling capability developed to perform preliminary deterministic evaluations of moderate-to-high burnup used nuclear fuel (UNF) mechanical performance under normal conditions of storage (NCS) and normal conditions of transport (NCT) conditions. This report also provides results from the sensitivity studies that have been performed. Finally, discussion on the long-term goals and objectives of this initiative are provided.

  19. Demonstration of Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) Performance for Planetary and Geostationary Earth Observing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revercomb, Henry E.; Sromovsky, Lawrence A.; Fry, Patrick M.; Best, Fred A.; LaPorte, Daniel D.

    2001-01-01

    The combination of massively parallel spatial sampling and accurate spectral radiometry offered by imaging FTS makes it extremely attractive for earth and planetary remote sensing. We constructed a breadboard instrument to help assess the potential for planetary applications of small imaging FTS instruments in the 1 - 5 micrometer range. The results also support definition of the NASA Geostationary Imaging FTS (GIFTS) instrument that will make key meteorological and climate observations from geostationary earth orbit. The Planetary Imaging FTS (PIFTS) breadboard is based on a custom miniaturized Bomen interferometer that uses corner cube reflectors, a wishbone pivoting voice-coil delay scan mechanism, and a laser diode metrology system. The interferometer optical output is measured by a commercial infrared camera procured from Santa Barbara Focalplane. It uses an InSb 128x128 detector array that covers the entire FOV of the instrument when coupled with a 25 mm focal length commercial camera lens. With appropriate lenses and cold filters the instrument can be used from the visible to 5 micrometers. The delay scan is continuous, but slow, covering the maximum range of +/- 0.4 cm in 37.56 sec at a rate of 500 image frames per second. Image exposures are timed to be centered around predicted zero crossings. The design allows for prediction algorithms that account for the most recent fringe rate so that timing jitter produced by scan speed variations can be minimized. Response to a fixed source is linear with exposure time nearly to the point of saturation. Linearity with respect to input variations was demonstrated to within 0.16% using a 3-point blackbody calibration. Imaging of external complex scenes was carried out at low and high spectral resolution. These require full complex calibration to remove background contributions that vary dramatically over the instrument FOV. Testing is continuing to demonstrate the precise radiometric accuracy and noise characteristics.

  20. Operational demonstration of a field of high performance flat plate collectors with isothermal heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merges, V.; Klippel, E.

    1983-12-01

    A solar plant with 21 sq m of highly efficient flat plate collectors and which requires no electricity is described. Heat transport is provided by saturated steam that condenses in a four cubic meter storage tank. The operation temperature is set by the buffer gas pressure between 100 and 140 C, and an absorption chiller is simulated as a heat consumer. The solar collectors were observed to exhibit high performance. Heat transport and temperature control offered high reliability and the thermal stratification in the tank was satisfactory. The positive result permits the design and construction of larger solar plants following the same technical principles.

  1. Genotyping performance assessment of whole genome amplified DNA with respect to multiplexing level of assay and its period of storage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W H Ho

    Full Text Available Whole genome amplification can faithfully amplify genomic DNA (gDNA with minimal bias and substantial genome coverage. Whole genome amplified DNA (wgaDNA has been tested to be workable for high-throughput genotyping arrays. However, issues about whether wgaDNA would decrease genotyping performance at increasing multiplexing levels and whether the storage period of wgaDNA would reduce genotyping performance have not been examined. Using the Sequenom MassARRAY iPLEX Gold assays, we investigated 174 single nucleotide polymorphisms for 3 groups of matched samples: group 1 of 20 gDNA samples, group 2 of 20 freshly prepared wgaDNA samples, and group 3 of 20 stored wgaDNA samples that had been kept frozen at -70°C for 18 months. MassARRAY is a medium-throughput genotyping platform with reaction chemistry different from those of high-throughput genotyping arrays. The results showed that genotyping performance (efficiency and accuracy of freshly prepared wgaDNA was similar to that of gDNA at various multiplexing levels (17-plex, 21-plex, 28-plex and 36-plex of the MassARRAY assays. However, compared with gDNA or freshly prepared wgaDNA, stored wgaDNA was found to give diminished genotyping performance (efficiency and accuracy due to potentially inferior quality. Consequently, no matter whether gDNA or wgaDNA was used, better genotyping efficiency would tend to have better genotyping accuracy.

  2. Demonstrating ultra-filtration and reverse osmosis performance using size exclusion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, R K; Stuetz, R M; Khan, S J

    2010-01-01

    Advanced water treatment plants employing ultrafiltration (UF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membrane processes are frequently implemented for the production of high-quality recycled water. It is important that process performance is able to be quantified and assessed to ensure it is fit for purpose. This research utilizes size exclusion chromatography with organic carbon, organic nitrogen and UV(254) detection to determine the change in both DOC concentration and character through a UF/3 stage-RO pilot plant. It was determined that 97% of the influent DOC was removed on average to produce a water of less than 0.5 mg L(-1) as C. The UF process removed more than half of the biopolymer fraction, equating to 4.5% DOC removal, while the RO process generally removed all DOC except a small proportion of the low MW humics and acids and low MW neutral fraction. While not changing significantly in concentration, the Stage 3 RO permeate typically contained low concentrations of humic fraction, indicating a change in character and therefore a change in rejection mechanism. Overall, it was determined that while TOC monitoring is important in advanced water treatment systems, improved understanding of the character of the TOC present lends greater insight into the assessment of process performance.

  3. Foundation Heat Exchanger Final Report: Demonstration, Measured Performance, and Validated Model and Design Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Patrick [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Im, Piljae [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2012-01-01

    (FHX) has been coined to refer exclusively to ground heat exchangers installed in the overcut around the basement walls. The primary technical challenge undertaken by this project was the development and validation of energy performance models and design tools for FHX. In terms of performance modeling and design, ground heat exchangers in other construction excavations (e.g., utility trenches) are no different from conventional HGHX, and models and design tools for HGHX already exist. This project successfully developed and validated energy performance models and design tools so that FHX or hybrid FHX/HGHX systems can be engineered with confidence, enabling this technology to be applied in residential and light commercial buildings. The validated energy performance model also addresses and solves another problem, the longstanding inadequacy in the way ground-building thermal interaction is represented in building energy models, whether or not there is a ground heat exchanger nearby. Two side-by-side, three-level, unoccupied research houses with walkout basements, identical 3,700 ft{sup 2} floor plans, and hybrid FHX/HGHX systems were constructed to provide validation data sets for the energy performance model and design tool. The envelopes of both houses are very energy efficient and airtight, and the HERS ratings of the homes are 44 and 45 respectively. Both houses are mechanically ventilated with energy recovery ventilators, with space conditioning provided by water-to-air heat pumps with 2 ton nominal capacities. Separate water-to-water heat pumps with 1.5 ton nominal capacities were used for water heating. In these unoccupied research houses, human impact on energy use (hot water draw, etc.) is simulated to match the national average. At House 1 the hybrid FHX/HGHX system was installed in 300 linear feet of excavation, and 60% of that was construction excavation (needed to construct the home). At House 2 the hybrid FHX/HGHX system was installed in 360 feet of

  4. Foundation Heat Exchanger Final Report: Demonstration, Measured Performance, and Validated Model and Design Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Patrick [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Im, Piljae [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2012-04-01

    (FHX) has been coined to refer exclusively to ground heat exchangers installed in the overcut around the basement walls. The primary technical challenge undertaken by this project was the development and validation of energy performance models and design tools for FHX. In terms of performance modeling and design, ground heat exchangers in other construction excavations (e.g., utility trenches) are no different from conventional HGHX, and models and design tools for HGHX already exist. This project successfully developed and validated energy performance models and design tools so that FHX or hybrid FHX/HGHX systems can be engineered with confidence, enabling this technology to be applied in residential and light commercial buildings. The validated energy performance model also addresses and solves another problem, the longstanding inadequacy in the way ground-building thermal interaction is represented in building energy models, whether or not there is a ground heat exchanger nearby. Two side-by-side, three-level, unoccupied research houses with walkout basements, identical 3,700 ft{sup 2} floor plans, and hybrid FHX/HGHX systems were constructed to provide validation data sets for the energy performance model and design tool. The envelopes of both houses are very energy efficient and airtight, and the HERS ratings of the homes are 44 and 45 respectively. Both houses are mechanically ventilated with energy recovery ventilators, with space conditioning provided by water-to-air heat pumps with 2 ton nominal capacities. Separate water-to-water heat pumps with 1.5 ton nominal capacities were used for water heating. In these unoccupied research houses, human impact on energy use (hot water draw, etc.) is simulated to match the national average. At House 1 the hybrid FHX/HGHX system was installed in 300 linear feet of excavation, and 60% of that was construction excavation (needed to construct the home). At House 2 the hybrid FHX/HGHX system was installed in 360 feet of

  5. Thermal performance demonstration of a prototype internally cooled nose tip/forebody/window assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, Carl J.; Brooks, Lori C.; Teal, Gene; Karu, Zain; Kalin, David A.; Jones, Gregory W.; Romero, Harold

    1996-11-01

    Internally liquid cooled apertures (windows) installed in a full size forebody have been characterized under high heat flux conditions representative of endoatmospheric flight. Analysis and test data obtained in the laboratory and at arc heater test facilities at Arnold Engineering Development Center and NASA Ames are presented in this paper. Data for several types of laboratory bench tests are presented: transmission interferometry and imaging, coolant pressurization effects on optical quality, and coolant flow rate calibrations for both the window and other internally cooled components. Initially, using heat transfer calibration models identical in shape to the flight test articles, arc heater facility thermal test environments were obtained at several conditions representative of full flight thermal environments. Subsequent runs tested the full-up flight article including nosetip, forebody and aperture for full flight duplication of surface heating rates and exposure ties. Pretest analyses compared will to test measurements. These data demonstrate a very efficient internal liquid cooling design which can be applied to other applications such as cooled mirrors for high heat flux applications.

  6. Demonstrating the potential of yttrium-doped barium zirconate electrolyte for high-performance fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Kiho; Jang, Dong Young; Choi, Hyung Jong; Kim, Donghwan; Hong, Jongsup; Kim, Byung-Kook; Lee, Jong-Ho; Son, Ji-Won; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2017-02-01

    In reducing the high operating temperatures (>=800 °C) of solid-oxide fuel cells, use of protonic ceramics as an alternative electrolyte material is attractive due to their high conductivity and low activation energy in a low-temperature regime (fuel cells. However, poor sinterability of yttrium-doped barium zirconate discourages its fabrication as a thin-film electrolyte and integration on porous anode supports, both of which are essential to achieve high performance. Here we fabricate a protonic-ceramic fuel cell using a thin-film-deposited yttrium-doped barium zirconate electrolyte with no impeding grain boundaries owing to the columnar structure tightly integrated with nanogranular cathode and nanoporous anode supports, which to the best of our knowledge exhibits a record high-power output of up to an order of magnitude higher than those of other reported barium zirconate-based fuel cells.

  7. GATEWAY Demonstrations: LED System Performance in a Trial Installation--One Year Later, Yuma Border Patrol, Yuma, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, A. M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Davis, R. G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Along the Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area in Yuma, Arizona, the GATEWAY program conducted a trial demonstration in which the incumbent quartz metal halide area lighting was replaced with LED at three pole locations at the Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area in Yuma, Arizona. The retrofit was documented to better understand LED technology performance in high-temperature environments. This report follows the GATEWAY Yuma Phase 1.0 Report and reflects LED system results documented one year after the demonstration began.

  8. Demonstrating the potential of yttrium-doped barium zirconate electrolyte for high-performance fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Kiho; Jang, Dong Young; Choi, Hyung Jong; Kim, Donghwan; Hong, Jongsup; Kim, Byung-Kook; Lee, Jong-Ho; Son, Ji-Won; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2017-02-23

    In reducing the high operating temperatures (≥800 °C) of solid-oxide fuel cells, use of protonic ceramics as an alternative electrolyte material is attractive due to their high conductivity and low activation energy in a low-temperature regime (≤600 °C). Among many protonic ceramics, yttrium-doped barium zirconate has attracted attention due to its excellent chemical stability, which is the main issue in protonic-ceramic fuel cells. However, poor sinterability of yttrium-doped barium zirconate discourages its fabrication as a thin-film electrolyte and integration on porous anode supports, both of which are essential to achieve high performance. Here we fabricate a protonic-ceramic fuel cell using a thin-film-deposited yttrium-doped barium zirconate electrolyte with no impeding grain boundaries owing to the columnar structure tightly integrated with nanogranular cathode and nanoporous anode supports, which to the best of our knowledge exhibits a record high-power output of up to an order of magnitude higher than those of other reported barium zirconate-based fuel cells.

  9. [Comparison of refractometric and ultraviolet detection methods in lactulose assay by high performance liquid chromatography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccher, C; Berthelot, P; Flouquet, N; Debaert, M

    1990-01-01

    Dosage of lactulose and determination of related sugars (lactose, fructose, galactose, épilactose) were undertaken by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The present note described two modes of detection used simultaneously and compared: refractive index detector (RI) and multiwavelength ultraviolet detector (UV). HPLC is performed with an aminopropylsylil phase as stationary phase and an isocratic mobile phase containing acetonitrile and aqueous sodium phosphate. The results are outlined and discussed.

  10. Medipix3 Demonstration and understanding of near ideal detector performance for 60 & 80 keV electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Mir, J A; MacInnes, R; Gough, C; Plackett, R; Shipsey, I; Sawada, H; MacLaren, I; Ballabriga, R; Maneuski, D; O'Shea, V; McGrouther, D; Kirkland, A I

    2016-01-01

    In our article we report first quantitative measurements of imaging performance for the current generation of hybrid pixel detector, Medipix3, as direct electron detector. Utilising beam energies of 60 & 80 keV, measurements of modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) have revealed that, in single pixel mode (SPM), energy threshold values can be chosen to maximize either the MTF or DQE, obtaining values near to, or even exceeding, those for an ideal detector. We have demonstrated that the Medipix3 charge summing mode (CSM) can deliver simultaneous, near ideal values of both MTF and DQE. To understand direct detection performance further we have characterized the detector response to single electron events, building an empirical model which can predict detector MTF and DQE performance based on energy threshold. Exemplifying our findings we demonstrate the Medipix3 imaging performance, recording a fully exposed electron diffraction pattern at 24-bit depth and images in SPM a...

  11. Performance of the flow cytometric E-screen assay in screening estrogenicity of pure compounds and environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanparys, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.vanparys@ua.ac.be [Laboratory of Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, University of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium); Depiereux, Sophie; Nadzialek, Stephanie [Research Unit in Organismal Biology (URBO), University of Namur (FUNDP), Namur (Belgium); Robbens, Johan; Blust, Ronny [Laboratory of Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, University of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium); Kestemont, Patrick [Research Unit in Organismal Biology (URBO), University of Namur (FUNDP), Namur (Belgium); De Coen, Wim [Laboratory of Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, University of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium); European Chemicals Agency (ECHA), Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-09-15

    In vitro estrogenicity screens are believed to provide a first prioritization step in hazard characterization of endocrine disrupting chemicals. When applied to complex environmental matrices or mixture samples, they have been indicated valuable in estimating the overall estrogen-mimicking load. In this study, the performance of an adapted format of the classical E-screen or MCF-7 cell proliferation assay was profoundly evaluated to rank pure compounds as well as influents and effluents of sewage treatment plants (STPs) according to estrogenic activity. In this adapted format, flow cytometric cell cycle analysis was used to allow evaluation of the MCF-7 cell proliferative effects after only 24 h of exposure. With an average EC{sub 50} value of 2 pM and CV of 22%, this assay appears as a sensitive and reproducible system for evaluation of estrogenic activity. Moreover, estrogenic responses of 17 pure compounds corresponded well, qualitatively and quantitatively, with other in vitro and in vivo estrogenicity screens, such as the classical E-screen (R{sup 2} = 0.98), the estrogen receptor (ER) binding (R{sup 2} = 0.84) and the ER transcription activation assay (R{sup 2} = 0.87). To evaluate the applicability of this assay for complex samples, influents and effluents of 10 STPs covering different treatment processes, were compared and ranked according to estrogenic removal efficiencies. Activated sludge treatment with phosphorus and nitrogen removal appeared most effective in eliminating estrogenic activity, followed by activated sludge, lagoon and filter bed. This is well in agreement with previous findings based on chemical analysis or biological activity screens. Moreover, ER blocking experiments indicated that cell proliferative responses were mainly ER mediated, illustrating that the complexity of the end point, cell proliferation, compared to other ER screens, does not hamper the interpretation of the results. Therefore, this study, among other E-screen studies

  12. Simultaneous High Performance Liquid Chromatography Assay of Pentoxifylline, Mupirocin, Itraconazole, and Fluticasone Propionate in Humco™ Lavare Wound Base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy Purvis

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article details the elements used in the method verification for the simultaneous high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC assay of Pentoxifylline, Mupirocin, Itraconazole, and Fluticasone Propionate in Humco™ Lavare Wound base. The method was proven to be linear over 50%–150% of the nominal concentration of the standards. The method was proven to be accurate over 50%–150%, with 98%–102% recovery of the actives from spiked placeboes over that range. The method was shown to be specific to the analytes listed and precise, yielding acceptable results for system reproducibility and method repeatability. The method, as written, is considered to have been verified.

  13. Improved performance of Brucella melitensis native hapten over Brucella abortus OPS tracer on goat antibody detection by the fluorescence polarization assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Pfeiffer, C; Díaz-Aparicio, E; Rodríguez-Padilla, C; Morales-Loredo, A; Alvarez-Ojeda, G; Gomez-Flores, R

    2008-06-15

    The current method for goat brucellosis diagnosis is based on the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) using the screening card test (CT), with antigen at 8% (CT8) or 3% (CT3) of cell concentrations, and the confirmatory complement fixation test (CFT). However, these tests do not differentiate antibodies induced by vaccination from those derived from field infections by Brucella species or other bacterial agents; in places like Mexico, where the prevalence of brucellosis and the vaccination rates are high, there is a considerable percentage of false positive reactions that causes significant unnecessary slaughter of animals. Furthermore, results of the fluorescence polarization assay (FPA) using the Brucella abortus O-polysaccharide (OPS) tracer in goats are poorer than those with cattle. The present study was undertaken to investigate a tracer prepared from the native hapten (NH) of the Rev. 1 strain of Brucella melitensis to improve FPA performance on goat brucellosis diagnosis. Evaluation of 48 positive samples and 96 negative samples showed that the NH tracer was more accurate (pgoat sera samples selected by test series approved by the OIE (card test 3% and CFT). We demonstrated a new application for the NH lipopolysaccharide on detecting antibodies against Brucella using the FPA, which may yield faster results (minutes vs. 24-72h) than the immunodiagnosis assays frequently used in bovine brucellosis. In addition, NH tracer produces similar or better performance results than the conventional OPS tracer, using the FPA in goat sera samples.

  14. Four-year post-exposure assay of vegetation surrounding project pinstripe: demonstration of the utility of delayed damage appraisals. [Larrea divaricata, Ephedra funerea, Atriplex confertifolia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragsdale, H.L. (Emory Univ., Atlanta); Rhoads, W.A.

    1974-01-01

    This report illustrates the feasibility of using temporally-delayed vegetation assays to determine radiation damage, by documenting the radiation damage resulting from the accidental venting of radioactive materials during Project Pinstripe, Frenchman's Flat, Nevada Test Site, in April, 1966. Evidence of desert shrub radiation damage was first observed and photographed, in April, 1968. Systematic study of the vegetation was initiated in October, 1970, and evidence of radiation damage documented over 72.9 hectares adjacent to the vent. Beta doses were estimated at 15--21 krads based on gamma exposure dose measurements. The minimum beta dose estimate was substantially greater than the theoretical lethal dose for the shrub, Larrea divaricata. Radiation damage to the shrubs, Larrea divaricata, Ephedra funerea, and Atriplex confertifolia was expressed as differential bud mortality, partial death of shrub crowns with and without crown regrowth, and total shrub crown death without crown regrowth. Each of the shrub populations was statistically different from its control population with respect to the distribution of individuals among damage classes. Generally, damage patterns were similar to those observed at two previously-studied Plowshare events.

  15. First demonstration and performance of an injection locked continuous wave magnetron to phase control a superconducting cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.C. Dexter, G. Burt, R.G. Carter, I. Tahir, H. Wang, K. Davis, R. Rimmer

    2011-03-01

    The applications of magnetrons to high power proton and cw electron linacs are discussed. An experiment is described where a 2.45 GHz magnetron has been used to drive a single cell superconducting cavity. With the magnetron injection locked, a modest phase control accuracy of 0.95° rms has been demonstrated. Factors limiting performance have been identified.

  16. Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria and the Performance of Interferon Gamma Release Assays in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Thomas Stig; Thomsen, Vibeke Østergaard; Lillebaek, Troels

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The QuantiFERON-TB-Gold Test (QFT) is more specific than the Mantoux skin-test to discriminate between Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infections. Here we study the performance of the QFT in patients with NTM disease. METHODS: From 2005 to 2011...

  17. How is the Xpert MRSA Gen 3 assay (Cepheid) performing on pooled eSwab medium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonckheere, Stijn; Van Vaerenbergh, Kristien; Boel, An; Vankeerberghen, Anne; De Beenhouwer, Hans

    2015-11-01

    The performance of the Xpert MRSA Gen 3 was compared to the Xpert MRSA on pooled eSwab media from nose, throat, and perineum using broth enriched cultured as gold standard. A lower specificity was found for the Xpert MRSA Gen 3 compared to the Xpert MRSA (91.8% versus 97.9%; P<0.05).

  18. An on-line high performance liquid chromatography-crocin bleaching assay for detection of antioxidants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bountagkidou, O.; Klift, van der E.J.C.; Tsimidou, M.Z.; Ordoudi, S.A.; Beek, van T.A.

    2012-01-01

    An on-line HPLC (high performance liquid chromatography) method for the rapid screening of individual antioxidants in mixtures was developed using crocin as a substrate (i.e. oxidation probe) and 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane dihydrochloride (AAPH)) in phosphate buffer (pH 7.5) as a radical generator

  19. Performance of the CLSI Carba NP and the Rosco Carb Screen Assays Using North American Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Lauren C.; Roundtree, Sylvester S.; Lancaster, Diana P.; Rudin, Susan D.; Bard, Jennifer Dien; Roberts, Amity L.; Marshall, Steven H.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the performance of the Carba NP assay, published by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, and the Rosco Rapid Carb Screen kit. Carba NP had superior sensitivity, but both assays required an increased inoculum to detect carbapenemase production in isolates with blaNDM, blaIMP, and blaOXA-48. PMID:26269624

  20. Performance of the CLSI Carba NP and the Rosco Carb Screen Assays Using North American Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Lauren C; Roundtree, Sylvester S; Lancaster, Diana P; Rudin, Susan D; Bard, Jennifer Dien; Roberts, Amity L; Marshall, Steven H; Bonomo, Robert A; Sullivan, Kaede V

    2015-10-01

    This study compared the performance of the Carba NP assay, published by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, and the Rosco Rapid Carb Screen kit. Carba NP had superior sensitivity, but both assays required an increased inoculum to detect carbapenemase production in isolates with blaNDM, blaIMP, and blaOXA-48.

  1. Performance and Verification of a Real-Time PCR Assay Targeting the gyrA Gene for Prediction of Ciprofloxacin Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemarajata, P; Yang, S; Soge, O O; Humphries, R M; Klausner, J D

    2016-03-01

    In the United States, 19.2% of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates are resistant to ciprofloxacin. We evaluated a real-time PCR assay to predict ciprofloxacin susceptibility using residual DNA from the Roche Cobas 4800 CT/NG assay. The results of the assay were 100% concordant with agar dilution susceptibility test results for 100 clinical isolates. Among 76 clinical urine and swab specimens positive for N. gonorrhoeae by the Cobas assay, 71% could be genotyped. The test took 1.5 h to perform, allowing the physician to receive results in time to make informed clinical decisions.

  2. Fully automated high-performance liquid chromatographic assay for the analysis of free catecholamines in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, R; Robinet, D; Barbier, C; Sartre, J; Huguet, C

    1990-08-24

    A totally automated and reliable high-performance liquid chromatographic method is described for the routine determination of free catecholamines (norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine) in urine. The catecholamines were isolated from urine samples using small alumina columns. A standard automated method for pH adjustment of urine before the extraction step has been developed. The extraction was performed on an ASPEC (Automatic Sample Preparation with Extraction Columns, Gilson). The eluate was collected in a separate tube and then automatically injected into the chromatographic column. The catecholamines were separated by reversed-phase ion-pair liquid chromatography and quantified by fluorescence detection. No manual intervention was required during the extraction and separation procedure. One sample may be run every 15 min, ca. 96 samples in 24 h. Analytical recoveries for all three catecholamines are 63-87%, and the detection limits are 0.01, 0.01, and 0.03 microM for norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine, respectively, which is highly satisfactory for urine. Day-to-day coefficients of variation were less than 10%.

  3. Assay of tolnaftate in human skin samples after in vitro penetration studies using high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezutyte, Toma; Kornysova, Olga; Maruska, Audrius; Briedis, Vitalis

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Tolnaftate, an antifungal of thiocarbamate class, is used topically in 1% formulations. Its penetration into skin layers is a prerequisite for tolnaftate action against dermatophytes. The aim of this work was to optimize and validate a simple, rapid, accurate and reproducible procedure for tolnaftate assay in human skin samples and to apply this procedure for in vitro tolnaftate penetration studies. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with UV detection was used to validate tolnaftate assay for linearity, specificity, accuracy, precision, limit of quantitation, limit of detection, drug extraction recovery and stability in skin extracts. In vitro tolnaftate penetration studies were carried out using flow-through diffusion cells, mounted with human skin. Epidermis and dermis, separated by heat-separation method, were extracted using ultrasonication in methanol. Linear range of the analytical procedure was within 0.6-100 pg/mL. The assay was specific, accurate (within-day and between-day recovery values were 98.2-104.2% and 98.7-101.4%, respectively) and precise (within-day and between-day imprecision was = 3.8%). Mean extraction recoveries of tolnaftate from epidermis and dermis were satisfactory and reaching 90%. In vitro skin penetration studies revealed that after application of 1% (w/w) tolnaftate solution in polyethylene glycol 400 for 24 hours, the mean amount of tolnaftate penetrating into the epidermis and dermis was 2.60 +/- 0.28 microg/cm2 and 0.92 +/- 0.12 microg/cm2, respectively. A validated reliable HPLC method could be recommended for biopharmaceutical evaluation of tolnaftate preparations and studies of pharmacokinetics in human skin after in vitro penetration studies.

  4. High Performance Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry Assay for the Determination of Cobinamide in Pig Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Brent A.; Brittain, Matthew K.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has been widely utilized for the analysis of compounds in biological matrices due to its selectivity and sensitivity. This study describes the application of an LC-MS/MS-based approach toward the analysis of cobinamide in Yorkshire pig plasma. The selectivity, accuracy, precision, recovery, linearity, range, carryover, sensitivity, matrix effect, interference, stability, reproducibility, and ruggedness of the method were investigated in pig plasma. The accuracy and precision of the method was determined to be within 10% over three different days over a range of concentrations (25–10,000 ng/mL) that spanned more than two orders of magnitude. The lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) for dicyanocobinamide was determined to be 25 ng/mL in pig plasma. Carryover was acceptable, as the area response of the carryover blanks were ≤15% of the area response of the nearest LLOQ standard for the analyte, while it was nonexistent for the internal standard. Specificity was ensured using six different lots of pig plasma. While the matrix effects of dicyanocobinamide in plasma were enhanced, ginsenoside Rb1 experienced signal suppression under the described conditions. The absolute recovery results for both compounds were consistent, precise, and reproducibly lower than expected at ~60% for dicyanocobinamide and ~22% for ginsenoside Rb1, confirming that a matrix standard curve was required for accurate quantitation. Cobinamide was shown to be very stable in matrix at various storage conditions including room temperature, refrigerated, and frozen at time intervals of 20 hours, 4 days, and 60 days respectively. This method was demonstrated to be sensitive, reproducible, stable, and rugged, and it should be applicable to the analysis of cobinamide in other biological matrices and species. PMID:26540437

  5. DuPont Qualicon BAX System polymerase chain reaction assay. Performance Tested Method 100201.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, George; Andaloro, Bridget; Fallon, Dawn; Wallace, F Morgan

    2009-01-01

    A recent outbreak of Salmonella in peanut butter has highlighted the need for validation of rapid detection methods. A multilaboratory study for detecting Salmonella in peanut butter was conducted as part of the AOAC Research Institute Emergency Response Validation program for methods that detect outbreak threats to food safety. Three sites tested spiked samples from the same master mix according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual (FDA-BAM) method and the BAX System method. Salmonella Typhimurium (ATCC 14028) was grown in brain heart infusion for 24 h at 37 degrees C, then diluted to appropriate levels for sample inoculation. Master samples of peanut butter were spiked at high and low target levels, mixed, and allowed to equilibrate at room temperature for 2 weeks. Spike levels were low [1.08 most probable number (MPN)/25 g]; high (11.5 MPN/25 g) and unspiked to serve as negative controls. Each master sample was divided into 25 g portions and coded to blind the samples. Twenty portions of each spiked master sample and five portions of the unspiked sample were tested at each site. At each testing site, samples were blended in 25 g portions with 225 mL prewarmed lactose broth until thoroughly homogenized, then allowed to remain at room temperature for 55-65 min. Samples were adjusted to a pH of 6.8 +/- 0.2, if necessary, and incubated for 22-26 h at 35 degrees C. Across the three reporting laboratories, the BAX System detected Salmonella in 10/60 low-spike samples and 58/60 high-spike samples. The reference FDA-BAM method yielded positive results for 11/60 low-spike and 58/60 high-spike samples. Neither method demonstrated positive results for any of the 15 unspiked samples.

  6. VIDAS Salmonella (SLM) assay method EasySLM with ChromID Salmonella (SM2) Agar. Performance Tested Method 020901.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ronald; Mills, John; Colón-Reveles, Judith

    2009-01-01

    A method modification study was conducted for the VIDAS Salmonella (SLM) assay (AOAC Performance Tested Method 020901) using the EasySLM method to validate a matrix extension for peanut butter. The VIDAS EasySLM method is a simple enrichment procedure compared to traditional Salmonella methods, requiring only pre-enrichment and a single selective enrichment media, Salmonella Xpress 2 (SX2) broth. SX2 replaces the two selective broths in traditional methods and eliminates the M broth transfer, incubation, and subsequent pooling of M broths prior to VIDAS assay. The validation study was conducted under the AOAC Research Institute Emergency Response Validation program. VIDAS SLM was compared to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual (FDA-BAM) method for detection of S. enterica ser. Typhimurium in peanut butter. All peanut butter samples were prepared, blind-coded, and shipped to the method developers' laboratory by Q Laboratories. In addition, Q Laboratories performed most probable number and reference method analyses on peanut butter samples. The VIDAS EasySLM ChromID Salmonella (SM2) Agar was previously validated in the Performance Tested Methods program for the detection of Salmonella in roast beef, raw ground pork, turkey, pork sausage, raw chicken breast, dry pet food, whole milk, ice cream, bagged spinach, shrimp (raw, peeled), raw cod, spent irrigation water, pecans, peanut butter, dry pasta, cake mix, ground black pepper, nonfat dry milk, liquid eggs, cantaloupe, and orange juice. In the matrix extension study for peanut butter, the VIDAS EasySLM method was shown to be equivalent to the appropriate reference culture procedure using both buffered peptone water pre-enrichment and the FDA-BAM lactose pre-enrichment in the two-step enrichment method with SX2 media. The current study extends the validation to include peanut butter.

  7. A model for the training effects in swimming demonstrates a strong relationship between parasympathetic activity, performance and index of fatigue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Chalencon

    Full Text Available Competitive swimming as a physical activity results in changes to the activity level of the autonomic nervous system (ANS. However, the precise relationship between ANS activity, fatigue and sports performance remains contentious. To address this problem and build a model to support a consistent relationship, data were gathered from national and regional swimmers during two 30 consecutive-week training periods. Nocturnal ANS activity was measured weekly and quantified through wavelet transform analysis of the recorded heart rate variability. Performance was then measured through a subsequent morning 400 meters freestyle time-trial. A model was proposed where indices of fatigue were computed using Banister's two antagonistic component model of fatigue and adaptation applied to both the ANS activity and the performance. This demonstrated that a logarithmic relationship existed between performance and ANS activity for each subject. There was a high degree of model fit between the measured and calculated performance (R(2=0.84±0.14,p<0.01 and the measured and calculated High Frequency (HF power of the ANS activity (R(2=0.79±0.07, p<0.01. During the taper periods, improvements in measured performance and measured HF were strongly related. In the model, variations in performance were related to significant reductions in the level of 'Negative Influences' rather than increases in 'Positive Influences'. Furthermore, the delay needed to return to the initial performance level was highly correlated to the delay required to return to the initial HF power level (p<0.01. The delay required to reach peak performance was highly correlated to the delay required to reach the maximal level of HF power (p=0.02. Building the ANS/performance identity of a subject, including the time to peak HF, may help predict the maximal performance that could be obtained at a given time.

  8. Performance demonstration of 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system for standardization of radionuclides with complex decay scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, D B; Anuradha, R; Joseph, Leena; Kulkarni, M S; Tomar, B S

    2016-02-01

    A standardization of (134)Cs and (131)I was carried out in order to demonstrate the performance and applicability of the 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system for standardization of radionuclides with complex decay scheme. The coincidence analyzer, capable of analyzing coincidence between beta and two gamma windows simultaneously, was developed and used for the standardization. The use of this dual coincidence analyzer has reduced the total experimental time by half. The activity concentrations obtained using the 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system, a 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence counting system, and the CIEMAT/NIST method are in excellent agreement with each other within uncertainty limits and hence demonstrates its performance for standardization of radionuclides decaying with complex decay scheme. Hence use of this 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system can be an alternative method suitable to standardize radionuclides with complex decay scheme with acceptable precision.

  9. Optimization and development of a high-performance liquid chromatography-based one-site immunometric assay with chemiluminescence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oates, Matthew R.; Clarke, William; Zimlich, Alden; Hage, David S

    2002-10-11

    Various practical and theoretical considerations were examined in the creation and optimization of a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based one-site immunometric assay. This method used an HPLC analyte analog column and post-column chemiluminescence detection. The specific analyte chosen as the model for this study was L-thyroxine (also known as T{sub 4}). In this technique, a sample containing thyroxine was first combined with an excess of anti-T{sub 4} antibody Fab fragments that had earlier been conjugated with chemiluminescent acridinium ester labels. After incubation, the mixture was injected onto a column that contained immobilized T{sub 4}. The amount of thyroxine in the original sample was then determined by measuring the labeled Fab fragments that appeared in the non-retained fraction, or the decrease in excess Fab fragments that were bound to and later eluted from the column. Items considered in creating this assay included the preparation of acridinium ester-labeled Fab fragments, the detection of these fragments with a post-column reactor, and the creation of a suitable immobilized analog column for capturing excess labeled Fab fragments. The final method could measure T{sub 4} in standards at clinically-relevant concentrations and provided a response within 1.5 min of sample injection, following a 20-45 min incubation with the labeled Fab fragments. Possible applications of this method include its use in clinical chemistry and the screening of proteomic or combinatorial libraries.

  10. A high-performance liquid chromatography-based radiometric assay for acyl-CoA:alcohol transacylase from jojoba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garver, W S; Kemp, J D; Kuehn, G D

    1992-12-01

    Acyl-CoA:alcohol transacylase catalyzes the final step in the biosynthesis of storage liquid wax esters from acyl-CoA fatty acids and fatty alcohols in a limited number of microbes, algae, and Simmondsia chinensis Link (jojoba). An improved and automated method of enzyme assay for this catalyst from cotyledons of jojoba is described. The assay method uses reversed-phase C18 high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to separate the labeled C30:1 liquid wax product, [14C]-dodecanyl-octadecenoate, from the unreacted substrate, [14C]octadecenoyl-CoA (oleyl-CoA), and other components produced from enzymes present in the crude homogenate of jojoba cotyledons, including [14C]-octadecenoic acid (oleic acid) and [14C]octadecenol (oleyol). Methods are also described for microscale chemical synthesis in one vessel of 14C-radiolabeled substrates and products for the transacylase. These labeled reagents are required to confirm the HPLC separations of reaction products. The radioactive components are quantitated using an on-line flow-through scintillation detector enabling sensitive and precise analysis of the reaction products.

  11. Complete Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelon, Stephen; Maddocks, Peg

    1986-01-01

    Describes four-step approach to educational demonstration: tell learners they will have to perform; what they should notice; describe each step before doing it; and require memorization of steps. Examples illustrate use of this process to demonstrate a general mental strategy, and industrial design, supervisory, fine motor, and specific…

  12. Automated direct assay system for RU38486, an antiprogesterone-antiglucocorticoid agent, and its metabolites using high performance liquid chromatography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagoshi,Kazusuke

    1991-04-01

    Full Text Available An automated direct assay system using high performance liquid chromatography was developed for the measurement of RU38486 and its three metabolites (RU42698, RU42848, RU42633 in human serum. Serum concentrations of these compounds were measured up to 144 h following single oral administration of 200 (200 mg group, n = 3 or 400 mg (400 mg group, n = 3 of RU38486 to healthy female volunteers. The serum half-lives (200 mg group-400 mg group of RU38486, RU42698, RU42848 and RU42633 were 31.8-33.1 h, 41.2-39.3 h, 33.9-36.6 h and 29.2-36.6 h, respectively. Our system could quantify them easily and simultaneously, and was considered to be valuable in studies on the relationship between the pharmacokinetics and the clinical effects of RU38486.

  13. An Isocratic High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Assay for CYP7A1-Catalyzed Cholesterol 7α-Hydroxylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxman, David J; Chang, Thomas K H

    2006-01-01

    A normal-phase, isocratic high-performance liquid chromatography assay is described for cholesterol 7α-hydroxylation catalyzed by CYP7A1, which corresponds to the first and rate-limiting step in the conversion of cholesterol into bile acids. This method is based on the conversion of the primary cytochrome P450 metabolite, 7α-hydroxycholesterol, into 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one in a reaction catalyzed by exogenous cholesterol oxidase, followed by chromatographic separation with monitoring at 254 nm. This technique is applicable to enzymatic studies for determination of cholesterol 7α- hydroxylation activity catalyzed by cDNA-expressed CYP7A1 and animal or human liver microsomes.

  14. New High-Performance Droplet Freezing Assay (HP-DFA) for the Analysis of Ice Nuclei with Complex Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert, Anna Theresa; Scheel, Jan Frederik; Helleis, Frank; Klimach, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2016-04-01

    Freezing of water above homogeneous freezing is catalyzed by ice nucleation active (INA) particles called ice nuclei (IN), which can be of various inorganic or biological origin. The freezing temperatures reach up to -1 °C for some biological samples and are dependent on the chemical composition of the IN. The standard method to analyze IN in solution is the droplet freezing assay (DFA) established by Gabor Vali in 1970. Several modifications and improvements were already made within the last decades, but they are still limited by either small droplet numbers, large droplet volumes or inadequate separation of the single droplets resulting in mutual interferences and therefore improper measurements. The probability that miscellaneous IN are concentrated together in one droplet increases with the volume of the droplet, which can be described by the Poisson distribution. At a given concentration, the partition of a droplet into several smaller droplets leads to finely dispersed IN resulting in better statistics and therefore in a better resolution of the nucleation spectrum. We designed a new customized high-performance droplet freezing assay (HP-DFA), which represents an upgrade of the previously existing DFAs in terms of temperature range and statistics. The necessity of observing freezing events at temperatures lower than homogeneous freezing due to freezing point depression, requires high-performance thermostats combined with an optimal insulation. Furthermore, we developed a cooling setup, which allows both huge and tiny temperature changes within a very short period of time. Besides that, the new DFA provides the analysis of more than 750 droplets per run with a small droplet volume of 5 μL. This enables a fast and more precise analysis of biological samples with complex IN composition as well as better statistics for every sample at the same time.

  15. Multi-laboratory evaluations of the performance of Catellicoccus marimammalium PCR assays developed to target gull fecal sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinigalliano, Christopher D.; Ervin, Jared S.; Van De Werfhorst, Laurie C.; Badgley, Brian D.; Ballestée, Elisenda; Bartkowiaka, Jakob; Boehm, Alexandria B.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Goodwin, Kelly D.; Gourmelon, Michèle; Griffith, John; Holden, Patricia A.; Jay, Jenny; Layton, Blythe; Lee, Cheonghoon; Lee, Jiyoung; Meijer, Wim G.; Noble, Rachel; Raith, Meredith; Ryu, Hodon; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Schriewer, Alexander; Wang, Dan; Wanless, David; Whitman, Richard; Wuertz, Stefan; Santo Domingo, Jorge W.

    2013-01-01

    Here we report results from a multi-laboratory (n = 11) evaluation of four different PCR methods targeting the 16S rRNA gene of Catellicoccus marimammalium originally developed to detect gull fecal contamination in coastal environments. The methods included a conventional end-point PCR method, a SYBR® Green qPCR method, and two TaqMan® qPCR methods. Different techniques for data normalization and analysis were tested. Data analysis methods had a pronounced impact on assay sensitivity and specificity calculations. Across-laboratory standardization of metrics including the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ), target detected but not quantifiable (DNQ), and target not detected (ND) significantly improved results compared to results submitted by individual laboratories prior to definition standardization. The unit of measure used for data normalization also had a pronounced effect on measured assay performance. Data normalization to DNA mass improved quantitative method performance as compared to enterococcus normalization. The MST methods tested here were originally designed for gulls but were found in this study to also detect feces from other birds, particularly feces composited from pigeons. Sequencing efforts showed that some pigeon feces from California contained sequences similar to C. marimammalium found in gull feces. These data suggest that the prevalence, geographic scope, and ecology of C. marimammalium in host birds other than gulls require further investigation. This study represents an important first step in the multi-laboratory assessment of these methods and highlights the need to broaden and standardize additional evaluations, including environmentally relevant target concentrations in ambient waters from diverse geographic regions.

  16. Use of activity-based probes to develop high throughput screening assays that can be performed in complex cell extracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Deu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High throughput screening (HTS is one of the primary tools used to identify novel enzyme inhibitors. However, its applicability is generally restricted to targets that can either be expressed recombinantly or purified in large quantities. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we described a method to use activity-based probes (ABPs to identify substrates that are sufficiently selective to allow HTS in complex biological samples. Because ABPs label their target enzymes through the formation of a permanent covalent bond, we can correlate labeling of target enzymes in a complex mixture with inhibition of turnover of a substrate in that same mixture. Thus, substrate specificity can be determined and substrates with sufficiently high selectivity for HTS can be identified. In this study, we demonstrate this method by using an ABP for dipeptidyl aminopeptidases to identify (Pro-Arg2-Rhodamine as a specific substrate for DPAP1 in Plasmodium falciparum lysates and Cathepsin C in rat liver extracts. We then used this substrate to develop highly sensitive HTS assays (Z'>0.8 that are suitable for use in screening large collections of small molecules (i.e >300,000 for inhibitors of these proteases. Finally, we demonstrate that it is possible to use broad-spectrum ABPs to identify target-specific substrates. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that this approach will have value for many enzymatic systems where access to large amounts of active enzyme is problematic.

  17. Initial demonstration of the NRC`s capability to conduct a performance assessment for a High-Level Waste Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Codell, R.; Eisenberg, N.; Fehringer, D.; Ford, W.; Margulies, T.; McCartin, T.; Park, J.; Randall, J.

    1992-05-01

    In order to better review licensing submittals for a High-Level Waste Repository, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff has expanded and improved its capability to conduct performance assessments. This report documents an initial demonstration of this capability. The demonstration made use of the limited data from Yucca Mountain, Nevada to investigate a small set of scenario classes. Models of release and transport of radionuclides from a repository via the groundwater and direct release pathways provided preliminary estimates of releases to the accessible environment for a 10,000 year simulation time. Latin hypercube sampling of input parameters was used to express results as distributions and to investigate model sensitivities. This methodology demonstration should not be interpreted as an estimate of performance of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. By expanding and developing the NRC staff capability to conduct such analyses, NRC would be better able to conduct an independent technical review of the US Department of Energy (DOE) licensing submittals for a high-level waste (HLW) repository. These activities were divided initially into Phase 1 and Phase 2 activities. Additional phases may follow as part of a program of iterative performance assessment at the NRC. The NRC staff conducted Phase 1 activities primarily in CY 1989 with minimal participation from NRC contractors. The Phase 2 activities were to involve NRC contractors actively and to provide for the transfer of technology. The Phase 2 activities are scheduled to start in CY 1990, to allow Sandia National Laboratories to complete development and transfer of computer codes and the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) to be in a position to assist in the acquisition of the codes.

  18. High-performance liquid chromatographic assay of parabens in wash-off cosmetic products and foods using chemiluminescence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Qunlin [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Jinzai Road 96, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Lian Mei [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Jinzai Road 96, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Liu Lijuan [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Jinzai Road 96, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Cui Hua [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Jinzai Road 96, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)]. E-mail: hcui@ustc.edu.cn

    2005-04-29

    A new method for the simultaneous determination of parabens including methylparaben, ethylparaben, propylparaben, and butylparaben by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with chemiluminescence detection was developed. The procedure was based on the chemiluminescent enhancement by parabens of the cerium(IV)-rhodamine 6G system in the strong sulfuric acid medium. The good separation of parabens was carried out with an isocratic elution using a mixture of methanol and water (60:40, v/v) within 8.5 min. Under the optimized conditions, a linear working range extends three orders of magnitude with the relative standard deviations of intra- and inter-day precision below 4.5%, and the detection limits were 1.9 x 10{sup -9}, 2.7 x 10{sup -9}, 3.9 x 10{sup -9}, and 5.3 x 10{sup -9} g ml{sup -1} for methylparaben, ethylparaben, propylparaben, and butylparaben, respectively. The chemiluminescence reaction was well compatible with the mobile phase of high-performance liquid chromatography. The proposed method has been successfully applied to the assay of parabens in wash-off cosmetic products and foods with the minimal sample preparation.

  19. FY16 Status of Immersion Phased Array Ultrasonic Probe Development and Performance Demonstration Results for Under Sodium Viewing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Aaron A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chamberlin, Clyde E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Edwards, Matthew K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hagge, Tobias J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hughes, Michael S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Larche, Michael R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mathews, Royce A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Neill, Kevin J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Prowant, Matthew S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-31

    This section of the Joint summary technical letter report (TLR) describes work conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) during FY 2016 (FY16) on the under-sodium viewing (USV) PNNL project 58745, work package AT-16PN230102. This section of the TLR satisfies PNNL’s M3AT-16PN2301025 milestone and is focused on summarizing the design, development, and evaluation of two different phased-array ultrasonic testing (PA-UT) probe designs—a two-dimensional (2D) matrix phased-array probe, and two one-dimensional (1D) linear array probes, referred to as serial number 4 (SN4) engineering test units (ETUs). The 2D probe is a pulse-echo (PE), 32×2, 64-element matrix phased-array ETU. The 1D probes are 32×1 element linear array ETUs. This TLR also provides the results from a performance demonstration (PD) of in-sodium target detection trials at 260°C using both probe designs. This effort continues the iterative evolution supporting the longer term goal of producing and demonstrating a pre-manufacturing prototype ultrasonic probe that possesses the fundamental performance characteristics necessary to enable the development of a high-temperature sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) inspection system for in-sodium detection and imaging.

  20. Development and performance assessment of a qualitative SYBR® green real-time PCR assay for the detection of Aspergillus versicolor in indoor air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libert, X; Chasseur, C; Bladt, S; Packeu, A; Bureau, F; Roosens, N H; De Keersmaecker, S C J

    2015-09-01

    Currently, contamination of indoor environment by fungi and molds is considered as a public health problem. The monitoring of indoor airborne fungal contamination is a common tool to help understanding the link between fungi in houses and respiratory problems. Classical analytical monitoring methods, based on cultivation and microscopic identification, depend on the growth of the fungi. Consequently, they are biased by difficulties to grow some species on certain culture media and under certain conditions or by noncultivable or dead fungi that can consequently not be identified. However, they could have an impact on human health as they might be allergenic. Since molecular methods do not require a culture step, they seem an excellent alternative for the monitoring of indoor fungal contaminations. As a case study, we developed a SYBR® green real-time PCR-based assay for the specific detection and identification of Aspergillus versicolor, which is frequently observed in indoor environment and known to be allergenic. The developed primers amplify a short region of the internal transcribed spacer 1 from the 18S ribosomal DNA complex. Subsequently, the performance of this quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method was assessed using specific criteria, including an evaluation of the selectivity, PCR efficiency, dynamic range, and repeatability. The limit of detection was determined to be 1 or 2 copies of genomic DNA of A. versicolor. In order to demonstrate that this SYBR® green qPCR assay is a valuable alternative for monitoring indoor fungal contamination with A. versicolor, environmental samples collected in contaminated houses were analyzed and the results were compared to the ones obtained with the traditional methods.

  1. FY15 Status of Immersion Phased Array Ultrasonic Probe Development and Performance Demonstration Results for Under Sodium Viewing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Aaron A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Larche, Michael R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mathews, Royce [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Neill, Kevin J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Baldwin, David L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Prowant, Matthew S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Edwards, Matthew K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chamberlin, Clyde E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This Technical Letter Report (TLR) describes work conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) during FY 2015 on the under-sodium viewing (USV) PNNL project 58745, Work Package AT-15PN230102. This TLR satisfies PNNL’s M3AT-15PN2301027 milestone, and is focused on summarizing the design, development, and evaluation of a two-dimensional matrix phased-array probe referred to as serial number 3 (SN3). In addition, this TLR also provides the results from a performance demonstration of in-sodium target detection trials at 260°C using a one-dimensional 22-element linear array developed in FY14 and referred to as serial number 2 (SN2).

  2. Factors associated with the performance of a blood-based interferon-γ release assay in diagnosing tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Banfield

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Indeterminate results are a recognised limitation of interferon-γ release assays (IGRA in the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis (TB infection (LTBI and TB disease, especially in children. We investigated whether age and common co-morbidities were associated with IGRA performance in an unselected cohort of resettled refugees. METHODS: A retrospective cross-sectional study of refugees presenting for their post-resettlement health assessment during 2006 and 2007. Refugees were investigated for prevalent infectious diseases, including TB, and for common nutritional deficiencies and haematological abnormalities as part of standard clinical screening protocols. Tuberculosis screening was performed by IGRA; QuantiFERON-TB Gold in 2006 and QuantiFERON-TBGold In-Tube in 2007. RESULTS: Complete data were available on 1130 refugees, of whom 573 (51% were children less than 17 years and 1041 (92% were from sub-Saharan Africa. All individuals were HIV negative. A definitive IGRA result was obtained in 1004 (89% refugees, 264 (26% of which were positive; 256 (97% had LTBI and 8 (3% had TB disease. An indeterminate IGRA result was obtained in 126 (11% refugees (all failed positive mitogen control. In multivariate analysis, younger age (linear OR= 0.93 [95% CI 0.91-0.95], P<0.001, iron deficiency anaemia (2.69 [1.51-4.80], P = 0.001, malaria infection (3.04 [1.51-6.09], P = 0.002, and helminth infection (2.26 [1.48-3.46], P<0.001, but not vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency, were associated with an indeterminate IGRA result. CONCLUSIONS: Younger age and a number of common co-morbidities are significantly and independently associated with indeterminate IGRA results in resettled predominantly African refugees.

  3. [Comparison of the performance of the ECLusys anti-HCV reagent with the Lumipulse f and HISCL 2000-i HCVAb assays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Aya; Iwahara, Kunihiro; Suga, Yasuyuki; Uchiyama, Sachinori; Maekawa, Masato

    2012-09-01

    We compared the ECLusys Anti-HCV (ECL) reagent to the Lumipulse f (LPf) and HISCL (HIS) HCV assays. In a correlation test using 210 routine clinical specimens measured using the Lumipulse method (96 positive and 114 negative), most of the results were consistent for all specimens. In a dilution sensitivity test using three different routine positive specimens, the ECL assay enabled detection at higher levels of sensitivity than either the LPf or the HIS assay. Moreover, when the distribution of the cut-off index (C.O.I.) values of the routine LPf negative specimens were compared to those on the ECL and HIS assays, it was found that on the ECL assay, most of the specimens had cut-off index values < 0.1, indicating a more clear-cut distribution. In a specificity test using high RF positive specimens(n = 33), pregnancy specimens (n = 35), cytomegalovirus (CMV) antibody positive specimens (n = 36), and high M protein positive specimens (n = 21), the ECL assay yielded positive results for a CMV antibody positive specimen and three high M protein positive specimens. Further testing using samples from the same patients collected on different days than these four samples resulted in a second positive result for the CMV positive specimen, and single antigen measurement yielded a Core/NS3 positive result, as well, suggesting past infection. However, since negative results were obtained for the three M protein positive specimens, the possibility of this being a ECLusys non-specific reaction could not be ruled out. The above results confirmed that the ECL assay provides superior fundamental performance, and possesses test performance nearly identical to that of the existing measurement methods that are widely used at a large number of facilities, and would therefore be a suitable assay for use in routine HCV antibody screening.

  4. A high-performance liquid chromatography-based assay of glutathione transferase omega 1 supported by glutathione or non-physiological reductants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németi, Balázs; Poór, Miklós; Gregus, Zoltán

    2015-01-15

    The unusual glutathione S-transferase GSTO1 reduces, rather than conjugates, endo- and xenobiotics, and its role in diverse cellular processes has been proposed. GSTO1 has been assayed spectrophotometrically by measuring the disappearance of its substrate, S-(4-nitrophenacyl)glutathione (4-NPG), in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol that regenerates GSTO1 from its mixed disulfide. To assay GSTO1 in rat liver cytosol, we have developed a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based procedure with two main advantages: (i) it measures the formation of the 4-NPG reduction product 4-nitroacetophenone, thereby offering improved sensitivity and accuracy, and (ii) it can use glutathione, the physiological reductant of GSTO1, which is impossible to do with the spectrophotometric procedure. Using the new assay, we show that (i) the GSTO1-catalyzed reduction of 4-NPG in rat liver cytosol also yields 1-(4-nitrophenyl)ethanol, whose formation from 4-nitroacetophenone requires NAD(P)H; (ii) the two assays measure comparable activities with 2-mercaptoethanol or tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine used as reductant; (iii) the cytosolic reduction of 4-NPG is inhibited by GSTO1 inhibitors (KT53, 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate, and zinc), although the inhibitory effect is strikingly influenced by the type of reductant in the assay and by the sequence of reductant and inhibitor addition. Characterization of GSTO1 inhibitors with the improved assay provides better understanding of interaction of these chemicals with the enzyme.

  5. The impact of HIV infection and CD4 cell count on the performance of an interferon gamma release assay in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabye, Martine G.; Ravn, Pernille; PrayGod, George;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The performance of the tuberculosis specific Interferon Gamma Release Assays (IGRAs) has not been sufficiently documented in tuberculosis- and HIV-endemic settings. This study evaluated the sensitivity of the QuantiFERON TB-Gold In-Tube (QFT-IT) in patients with culture confirmed...

  6. Improved performance of PACE 2 with modified collection system in combination with probe competition assay for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis in urethral specimens from males

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.J.W. Kluytmans (Jan); W.H.F. Goessens (Wil); J.H. van Rijsoort-Vos; H.G.M. Niesters (Bert); E. Stolz (Ernst)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe Gen-Probe PACE 2 assay (GP) in combination with a modified collection system was compared with cell culture (CC) for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis in urethral specimens from males. Analysis of discordant results was performed by PCR. The modific

  7. Use of Mathematical Models in the Design and Performance Evaluation of a Surfactant Flushing Demonstration at the Bachman Road Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abriola, L. M.; Drummond, C. D.; Lemke, L. D.; Rathfelder, K. M.; Pennell, K. D.

    2001-05-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the design and performance evaluation of a surfactant enhanced remediation pilot demonstration conducted in the summer of 2000 at a former dry cleaning facility in Oscoda, Michigan, USA. The unconfined contaminated formation is composed of relatively homogeneous glacial outwash sands, underlain by a thick clay layer. Core samples have revealed the presence of a reasonably persistent coarse sand and gravel layer at a depth of 11-16 feet and a sand/silt/clay transition zone at the base of the aquifer. A narrow tetrachloroethylene (PCE) plume emanates from the suspected source area, beneath the former dry cleaning building, and discharges into Lake Huron, approximately 700 feet down gradient. There is little evidence of microbial plume attenuation at the site. Aqueous samples from multilevel piezometers installed beneath the building have confirmed the presence of residual PCE within the coarse sand and gravel layer and have detected consistently high PCE concentrations at the base of the aquifer. The actual distribution and volume of entrapped PCE, however, is unknown. A surfactant injection and recovery scheme was designed and implemented to effectively flush the identified source area beneath the building. In this scheme, a line of water injection wells was installed behind the surfactant injection points to control surfactant delivery and maximize solubilized plume capture. Prior to surfactant injection, conservative and partitioning tracer tests were also conducted to confirm sweep and estimate source zone mass. Mass recovery calculations indicate that more than 94% of the injected surfactant and approximately 19 liters of PCE were recovered during the test. This volume of DNAPL is consistent with estimated low saturations within the swept zone. Single and multiphase transport models were employed to aid in remedial design and predict system performance. For the model simulations, input parameters were determined from

  8. Performance of the NG OligoGen kit for the diagnosis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: comparison with cobas 4800 assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Sánchez, M; García-Rey, S; Marcuello, A; Zakariya-Yousef, I; Bernal, S; Pueyo, I; Martín-Mazuelos, E; Palomares, J C

    2016-01-01

    PCR assays are nowadays between the most sensitive and reliable methods for screening and diagnosing sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The aim of this study was to analyze the reliability, accuracy, and usefulness of the new NG OligoGen kit in comparison with the cobas 4800 assay for the detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in clinical samples. A prospective study was designed for detection of N. gonorrhoeae including urine samples (n=152), rectal (n=80), endocervical (n=67), pharyngeal (n=41), and urethral swabs (n=5) that were sent from a regional STI clinic in Seville, Spain. Samples were collected from 255 (73.9%) men and 90 women. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predicative values, and kappa value for N. gonorrhoeae detection using the NG OligoGen kit were 99.6%, 100%, 100%, 99.1%, and 0.99, respectively. Statistical data obtained in this study confirm the usefulness and reliable results of this new assay.

  9. Performance of the Verigene Gram-negative blood culture assay for rapid detection of bacteria and resistance determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodémont, Magali; De Mendonça, Ricardo; Nonhoff, Claire; Roisin, Sandrine; Denis, Olivier

    2014-08-01

    Nonduplicate blood cultures that were positive for Gram-negative bacilli (n = 125) were tested by the Verigene Gram-negative blood culture (BC-GN) assay; 117 (90.7%) isolates were members of the panel. For identification and resistance markers, the agreements with routine methods were 97.4% (114/117) and 92.3% (12/13). The BC-GN assay is a rapid and accurate tool for the detection of pathogens from blood cultures and could be integrated alongside conventional systems to enable faster patient management, but the clinical benefits should be further evaluated.

  10. Modification of the BAX System PCR assay for detecting Salmonella in beef, produce, and soy protein isolate. Performance Tested Method 100201.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Linda X; Wallace, Morgan; Andaloro, Bridget; Fallon, Dawn; Fleck, Lois; Delduco, Dan; Tice, George

    2011-01-01

    The BAX System PCR assay for Salmonella detection in foods was previously validated as AOAC Research Institute (RI) Performance Tested Method (PTM) 100201. New studies were conducted on beef and produce using the same media and protocol currently approved for the BAX System PCR assay for E. coli O157:H7 multiplex (MP). Additionally, soy protein isolate was tested for matrix extension using the U.S. Food and Drug Administration-Bacteriological Analytical Manual (FDA-BAM) enrichment protocols. The studies compared the BAX System method to the U.S. Department of Agriculture culture method for detecting Salmonella in beef and the FDA-BAM culture method for detecting Salmonella in produce and soy protein isolate. Method comparison studies on low-level inoculates showed that the BAX System assay for Salmonella performed as well as or better than the reference method for detecting Salmonella in beef and produce in 8-24 h enrichment when the BAX System E. coli O157:H7 MP media was used, and soy protein isolate in 20 h enrichment with lactose broth followed by 3 h regrowth in brain heart infusion broth. An inclusivity panel of 104 Salmonella strains with diverse serotypes was tested by the BAX System using the proprietary BAX System media and returned all positive results. Ruggedness factors involved in the enrichment phase were also evaluated by testing outside the specified parameters, and none of the factors examined affected the performance of the assay.

  11. High performance liquid chromatography with two simultaneous on-line antioxidant assays: Evaluation and comparison of espresso coffees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, Neil W [ORNL; Gritti, Fabrice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Guiochon, Georges A [ORNL; Shalliker, R. Andrew [University of Western Sydney, Australia

    2010-01-01

    The antioxidant profiles of various espresso coffees were established using HPLC with UV-absorbance detection and two rapid, simultaneous, on-line chemical assays that enabled the relative reactivity of sample components to be screened. The assays were based on (i) the colour change associated with reduction of the 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH{sm_bullet}); and (ii) the emission of light (chemiluminescence) upon reaction with acidic potassium permanganate. Results from the two approaches were similar and reflected the complex array of antioxidant species present in the samples. However, some differences in selectivity were observed. Chromatograms generated with the chemiluminescence assay contained more peaks, which was ascribed to the greater sensitivity of the reagent towards minor, readily oxidisable sample components. The three coffee samples produced closely related profiles, signifying their fundamentally similar chemical compositions and origin. Nevertheless, the overall intensity and complexity of the samples in both UV absorption and antioxidant assay chromatograms were aligned with the manufacturers description of flavour intensity and character.

  12. Hybrid Capture 2 and cobas human papillomavirus assays perform similarly on SurePath samples from women with abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fornari, D; Rebolj, Matejka; Bjerregård, B;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In two laboratories (Departments of Pathology, Copenhagen University Hospitals of Herlev and Hvidovre), we compared cobas and Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) human papillomavirus (HPV) assays using SurePath® samples from women with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS...

  13. Multicenter analytical performance evaluation of a fully automated anti-Müllerian hormone assay and reference interval determination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anckaert, E.; Öktem, M.; Thies, A.; Cohen-Bacrie, M.; Daan, N. M P; Schiettecatte, J.; Müller, C.; Topcu, D.; Gröning, A.; Ternaux, F.; Engel, C.; Engelmann, S.; Milczynski, C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) is an established biomarker for assessing ovarian reserve and predicting response to controlled ovarian stimulation. Its routine clinical use is hampered by the variability and low-throughput of available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The presen

  14. Comparison of analytical and clinical performance of CLART HPV2 genotyping assay to Linear Array and Hybrid Capture 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejegod, Ditte Møller; Rebolj, Matejka; Bonde, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    prone to inter-observer variability. The reading of test results on the CLART HPV2 genotyping assay is, on the other hand, automated. The aim of our study was to directly compare the detection of HPV genotypes and high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) by CLART, Linear Array (LA...

  15. A simple and specific high performance liquid chromatography method for the assay of a series of novel dermal penetration enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michniak, B B; Seyda, K L

    1993-02-01

    Synopsis A series of clofibric acid amides has been synthesized and previously reported by the authors as possessing enhancer activity in vitro in athymic nude mouse skin against model drugs, hydrocortisone-21-acetate and beta-methasone-17-valerate. An assay was required for each of these enhancers however, which would be specific for each compound and would also separate model drugs and their metabolite peaks. This study reports reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography assays for clofibric acid amide and seven derivatives (Ia-Ig). All enhancers showed maximum absorption at 232 nm, betamethasone (BM) and its valerate (BMV) at 238 nm, and hydrocortisone (HC) and its acetate (HCA) at 242 nm. Practical units of detection for the amides were 0.46-2.8 mug ml(-1) and peaks were sharp and well-separated from steroid peaks in three vehicles - methanol alone. Franz diffusion cell receptor phase samples (isotonic phosphate buffer), and full-thickness athymic nude mouse skin extracts in methanol. Mobile phases consisted of various proportions of acetonitrile and water, some with 2-propanol. The octyl amide for example, with mobile phase CH(3)CN: H(2)O (85:15) at 1 ml min(-1) had a retention time (t(R)) of 7.9 mins. Under the same conditions, retention times for the steroids were HC, t(R)= 3.3 mins; HCA, t(R)= 4.3 mins; BM, t(R)= 3.4 mins; BMV, t(R)= 4.6 mins. Résumé Les auteurs avaient démontré dans un article précédent le pouvoir accélérateur de pénétration dermique in vitro d'une gamme d'amides d'acide clofibrique sur la peau de souris sans poils, et sans thymus avec des médicaments types tels que l'acetate 21 d'hydrocortisone et le valerate 17 de beta-metasone. Il a cependant été requis, pour chacun de ces accélérateurs, un test spécifique pour chaque composition, permettant de séparer chaque médicament et les pics des métabolites. Cette étude décrit des tests par chromatographie liquide à haute performance en phase inverse pour l

  16. Antibody performance in ChIP-sequencing assays: From quality scores of public data sets to quantitative certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Parra, Marco-Antonio; Saravaki, Vincent; Cholley, Pierre-Etienne; Blum, Matthias; Billoré, Benjamin; Gronemeyer, Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    We have established a certification system for antibodies to be used in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays coupled to massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq). This certification comprises a standardized ChIP procedure and the attribution of a numerical quality control indicator (QCi) to biological replicate experiments. The QCi computation is based on a universally applicable quality assessment that quantitates the global deviation of randomly sampled subsets of ChIP-seq dataset with the original genome-aligned sequence reads. Comparison with a QCi database for >28,000 ChIP-seq assays were used to attribute quality grades (ranging from ‘AAA’ to ‘DDD’) to a given dataset. In the present report we used the numerical QC system to assess the factors influencing the quality of ChIP-seq assays, including the nature of the target, the sequencing depth and the commercial source of the antibody.  We have used this approach specifically to certify mono and polyclonal antibodies obtained from Active Motif directed against the histone modification marks H3K4me3, H3K27ac and H3K9ac for ChIP-seq. The antibodies received the grades AAA to BBC ( www.ngs-qc.org). We propose to attribute such quantitative grading of all antibodies attributed with the label “ChIP-seq grade”. PMID:27335635

  17. Antibody performance in ChIP-sequencing assays: From quality scores of public data sets to quantitative certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Parra, Marco-Antonio; Saravaki, Vincent; Cholley, Pierre-Etienne; Blum, Matthias; Billoré, Benjamin; Gronemeyer, Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    We have established a certification system for antibodies to be used in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays coupled to massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq). This certification comprises a standardized ChIP procedure and the attribution of a numerical quality control indicator (QCi) to biological replicate experiments. The QCi computation is based on a universally applicable quality assessment that quantitates the global deviation of randomly sampled subsets of ChIP-seq dataset with the original genome-aligned sequence reads. Comparison with a QCi database for >28,000 ChIP-seq assays were used to attribute quality grades (ranging from 'AAA' to 'DDD') to a given dataset. In the present report we used the numerical QC system to assess the factors influencing the quality of ChIP-seq assays, including the nature of the target, the sequencing depth and the commercial source of the antibody.  We have used this approach specifically to certify mono and polyclonal antibodies obtained from Active Motif directed against the histone modification marks H3K4me3, H3K27ac and H3K9ac for ChIP-seq. The antibodies received the grades AAA to BBC ( www.ngs-qc.org). We propose to attribute such quantitative grading of all antibodies attributed with the label "ChIP-seq grade".

  18. Kilowatt Isotope Power System: component test report for the ground demonstration system jet condenser orifice performance. 77-KIPS-103

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brainard, E.L.

    1977-11-08

    The purpose of these tests was to determine which orifice elements achieved satisfactory hydraulic and thermal performance prior to their incorporation into the Jet Condenser Assembly. Requirements were as set forth within the Kilowatt Isotope Power System (KIPS) Component Test Procedure number 414 for the Jet Condenser Orifice Performance testing. The results of the performance testing conducted on the Jet Condenser Orifices are presented. Part Number 720841 Jet Condenser Orifice Nozzle successfully completed the orifice screening tests.

  19. Locating sweet spots for screening hits and evaluating pan-assay interference filters from the performance analysis of two lead-like libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, N Yi; Maxe, Sara; Brenk, Ruth

    2013-03-25

    The efficiency of automated compound screening is heavily influenced by the design and the quality of the screening libraries used. We recently reported on the assembly of one diverse and one target-focused lead-like screening library. Using data from 15 enzyme-based screenings conducted using these libraries, their performance was investigated. Both libraries delivered screening hits across a range of targets, with the hits distributed across the entire chemical space represented by both libraries. On closer inspection, however, hit distribution was uneven across the chemical space, with enrichments observed in octants characterized by compounds at the higher end of the molecular weight and lipophilicity spectrum for lead-like compounds, while polar and sp(3)-carbon atom rich compounds were underrepresented among the screening hits. Based on these observations, we propose that screening libraries should not be evenly distributed in lead-like chemical space but be enriched in polar, aliphatic compounds. In conjunction with variable concentration screening, this could lead to more balanced hit rates across the chemical space and screening hits of higher ligand efficiency will be captured. Apart from chemical diversity, both screening libraries were shown to be clean from any pan-assay interference (PAINS) behavior. Even though some compounds were flagged to contain PAINS structural motifs, some of these motifs were demonstrated to be less problematic than previously suggested. To maximize the diversity of the chemical space sampled in a screening campaign, we therefore consider it justifiable to retain compounds containing PAINS structural motifs that were apparently clean in this analysis when assembling screening libraries.

  20. Development and validation of a high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric assay for the determination of 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17-OHPC) in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shimin; Mada, Sripal Reddy; Mattison, Don; Caritis, Steve; Venkataramanan, Raman

    2007-09-01

    A sensitive and specific method for the determination of 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17-OHPC) in human plasma using high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry has been developed and validated. Plasma samples were processed by a solid phase extraction (SPE) procedure using Oasis HLB extraction cartridge prior to chromatography. Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) was used as the internal standard. Chromatography was performed using Waters C18 Symmetry analytical column, 3.5 microm, 2.1 mm x 10 mm, using a gradient elusion with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile [A] and 5% acetonitrile in water [B], with 0.1% formic acid being added to both [A] and [B], at a flow rate 0.2 ml/min. The retention times of 17-OHPC and MPA were 8.1 and 5.0 min, respectively, with a total run time of 15 min. Analysis was performed on Thermo Electron Finnigan TSQ Quantum Ultra mass spectrometer in a selected reaction-monitoring (SRM), positive mode using electron spray ionization (ESI) as an interface. Positive ions were measured using extracted ion chromatogram mode. The extracted ions following SRM transitions monitored were m/z 429.2-->313.13 and 429.2-->271.1, for 17-OHPC and m/z 385.1-->276 for MPA. The extraction recoveries at concentrations of 5, 10 and 50 ng/ml were 97.1, 92.6 and 88.7%, respectively. The assay was linear over the range 0.5-50 ng/ml for 17-OHPC. The analysis of standard samples for 17-OHPC 0.5, 1, 2.5, 5, 10, 25 and 50 ng/ml demonstrated a relative standard deviation of 16.7, 12.4, 13.7, 1.4, 5.2, 3.7 and 5.3%, respectively (n=6). This method is simple, adaptable to routine application, and allows easy and accurate measurement of 17-OHPC in human plasma.

  1. 40 CFR 63.1571 - How and when do I conduct a performance test or other initial compliance demonstration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) You may use design analysis based on engineering principles, measurable process parameters, or... Compliance Requirements § 63.1571 How and when do I conduct a performance test or other initial compliance..., according to § 63.7(a)(2)(ix). (b) What are the general requirements for performance test and...

  2. Performance of Xpert MTB/RIF RUO assay and IS6110 real-time PCR for Mycobacterium tuberculosis detection in clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Melissa B; Popowitch, Elena B; Backlund, Michael G; Ager, Edward P C

    2011-10-01

    The Cepheid Xpert MTB/RIF research-use-only (RUO) assay and a laboratory-developed test (LDT) targeting IS6110 were evaluated and compared to mycobacterial culture as the gold standard. The performance characteristics of both molecular assays were determined by using 112 specimens from 90 patients, including 89 pulmonary specimens and 23 extrapulmonary specimens. Of the specimens tested, 37 (33%) were culture positive for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex; 29 were pulmonary, and 8 were extrapulmonary. Of these culture-positive specimens, 83% of the pulmonary specimens and 50% of the extrapulmonary specimens were smear positive. There was complete concordance between the smear-positive culture-positive specimens, independent of the anatomical site (100% sensitivity). The sensitivity of the MTB/RIF RUO assay for smear-negative specimens was 60% for pulmonary and 75% for extrapulmonary specimens, while the IS6110 LDT sensitivities were 40% and 0%, respectively. There was also complete concordance among the culture-negative specimens tested. Both assays showed 95% specificity, with four culture-negative specimens testing as positive. A review of patient records indicated that there was a high likelihood of the presence of M. tuberculosis complex DNA in the false-positive specimens. Biosafety analysis was performed and showed an acceptable reduction in organism viability using the processing methods described above. Both molecular assays are suitable for the detection of M. tuberculosis isolates in smear-positive pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens, while the sensitivity of the detection of M. tuberculosis isolates in smear-negative specimens was variable.

  3. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Richmond Elementary School in Susanville, CA Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained for the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Richmond Elementary School in Susanville, CA. The objectives of the project were to evaluate: (1) the effectiveness of an Aquatic Treatme...

  4. Detection of enteropathogens associated with travelers’ diarrhea using a multiplex Luminex-based assay performed on stool samples smeared on Whatman FTA Elute cards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalani, Tahaniyat; Tisdale, Michele D; Maguire, Jason D; Wongsrichanalai, Chansuda; Riddle, Mark S; Tribble, David R

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the limits of detection (LoD) for an 11-plex PCR-Luminex assay performed on Whatman FTA Elute cards smeared with stool containing pathogens associated with travelers’ diarrhea. LoDs ranged between 102-105 CFU, PFU or cysts/g for most pathogens except Cryptosporidium. Campylobacter and norovirus LoD increased with prolonged storage of cards. PMID:26072151

  5. A molecular approach for the rapid, selective and sensitive detection of Exophiala jeanselmei in environmental samples: development and performance assessment of a real-time PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libert, X; Chasseur, C; Packeu, A; Bureau, F; Roosens, N H; De Keersmaecker, S J C

    2016-02-01

    Exophiala jeanselmei is an opportunistic pathogenic black yeast growing in humid environments such as water reservoirs of air-conditioning systems. Because this fungal contaminant could be vaporized into the air and subsequently cause health problems, its monitoring is recommended. Currently, this monitoring is based on culture and microscopic identification which are complex, sometimes ambiguous and time-demanding, i.e., up to 21 days. Therefore, molecular, culture-independent methods could be more advantageous for the monitoring of E. jeanselmei. In this study, we developed a SYBR®green real-time PCR assay based on the internal transcribed spacer 2 from the 18S ribosomal DNA complex for the specific detection of E. jeanselmei. The selectivity (100 %), PCR efficiency (95.5 %), dynamic range and repeatability of this qPCR assay were subsequently evaluated. The limit of detection for this qPCR assay was determined to be 1 copy of genomic DNA of E. jeanselmei. Finally, water samples collected from cooling reservoirs were analyzed using this qPCR assay to deliver a proof of concept for the molecular detection of E. jeanselmei in environmental samples. The results obtained by molecular analysis were compared with those of classical methods (i.e., culture and microscopic identification) used in routine analysis and were 100 % matching. This comparison demonstrated that this SYBR®green qPCR assay can be used as a molecular alternative for monitoring and routine investigation of samples contaminated by E. jeanselmei, while eliminating the need for culturing and thereby considerably decreasing the required analysis time to 2 days.

  6. Serum antibodies from a subset of horses positive for Babesia caballi by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrate a protein recognition pattern that is not consistent with infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awinda, Peter O; Mealey, Robert H; Williams, Laura B A; Conrad, Patricia A; Packham, Andrea E; Reif, Kathryn E; Grause, Juanita F; Pelzel-McCluskey, Angela M; Chung, Chungwon; Bastos, Reginaldo G; Kappmeyer, Lowell S; Howe, Daniel K; Ness, SallyAnne L; Knowles, Donald P; Ueti, Massaro W

    2013-11-01

    Tick-borne pathogens that cause persistent infection are of major concern to the livestock industry because of transmission risk from persistently infected animals and the potential economic losses they pose. The recent reemergence of Theileria equi in the United States prompted a widespread national survey resulting in identification of limited distribution of equine piroplasmosis (EP) in the U.S. horse population. This program identified Babesia caballi-seropositive horses using rhoptry-associated protein 1 (RAP-1)-competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA), despite B. caballi being considered nonendemic on the U.S. mainland. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the suitability of RAP-1-cELISA as a single serological test to determine the infection status of B. caballi in U.S. horses. Immunoblotting indicated that sera from U.S. horses reacted with B. caballi lysate and purified B. caballi RAP-1 protein. Antibody reactivity to B. caballi lysate was exclusively directed against a single ∼50-kDa band corresponding to a native B. caballi RAP-1 protein. In contrast, sera from experimentally and naturally infected horses from regions where B. caballi is endemic bound multiple proteins ranging from 30 to 50 kDa. Dilutions of sera from U.S. horses positive by cELISA revealed low levels of antibodies, while sera from horses experimentally infected with B. caballi and from areas where B. caballi is endemic had comparatively high antibody levels. Finally, blood transfer from seropositive U.S. horses into naive horses demonstrated no evidence of B. caballi transmission, confirming that antibody reactivity in cELISA-positive U.S. horses was not consistent with infection. Therefore, we conclude that a combination of cELISA and immunoblotting is required for the accurate serodiagnosis of B. caballi.

  7. Arsenic and Uranium Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Upper Bodfish in Lake Isabella, CA -Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the performance evaluation of an arsenic (As) and uranium (U) removal technology demonstrated at Upper Bodfish in Lake Isabella, CA. The objectives of the project are to evaluate: (1) the effecti...

  8. A real-time semi-quantitative RT–PCR assay demonstrates that the pilE sequence dictates the frequency and characteristics of pilin antigenic variation in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    OpenAIRE

    Rohrer, Melissa S.; Lazio, Matthew P.; Seifert, H. Steven

    2005-01-01

    A semi-quantitative real-time RT–PCR assay was designed to measure gonococcal pilin antigenicvariation (SQ-PCR Av assay). This assay employs 17 hybridization probe sets that quantitate subpopulations of pilin transcripts carrying different silent pilin copy sequences and one set that detects total pilE transcript levels. Mixtures of a DNA standard carrying the silent copy being detected and a clone encoding the starting pilE sequence, which is the majority pilE template, provided amplificatio...

  9. LIFAC Demonstration at Richmond Power and Light Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2 Volume II: Project Performance and Economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1998-04-01

    The C1ean Coal Technology (CCT) Program has been recognized in the National Energy Strategy as a major initiative whereby coal will be able to reach its full potential as a source of energy for the nation and the international marketplace. Attainment of this goal depends upon the development of highly efficient, environmentally sound, competitive coal utilization technologies responsive to diverse energy markets and varied consumer needs. The CCT Program is an effort jointly funded by government and industry whereby the most promising of the advanced coal-based technologies are being moved into the marketplace through demonstration. The CCT Program is being implemented through a total of five competitive solicitations. LIFAC North America, a joint venture partnership of ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., and Tampella Power Corporation, is currently demonstrating the LIFAC flue gas desulfurization technology developed by Tampella Power. This technology provides sulfur dioxide emission control for power plants, especially existing facilities with tight space limitations. Sulfur dioxide emissions are expected to be reduced by up to 85% by using limestone as a sorbent. The LIFAC technology is being demonstrated at Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2, a 60-MW coal-fired power plant owned and operated by Richmond Power and Light (RP&L) and located in Richmond, Indiana. The Whitewater plant consumes high-sulfur coals, with sulfur contents ranging from 2.0-2.9 $ZO. The project, co-funded by LIFAC North America and DOE, is being conducted with the participation of Richmond Power and Light, the State of Indiana, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Black Beauty Coal Company. The project has a total cost of $21.4 million and a duration of 48 months from the preliminary design phase through the testing program.

  10. Diagnostic performance of a cytokine and IFN-γ-induced chemokine mRNA assay after Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific antigen stimulation in whole blood from infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunghyun; Lee, Hyejon; Kim, Hyunjung; Kim, Yeun; Cho, Jang-Eun; Jin, Hyunwoo; Kim, Dae Yeon; Ha, Sang-Jun; Kang, Young Ae; Cho, Sang-Nae; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2015-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-γ release assays have limited sensitivity and cannot differentiate between active tuberculosis (TB) disease and latent TB infection (LTBI). Numerous cytokines and regulator factors have been implicated in the pathogenesis and control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Additional cytokines and chemokines associated with M. tuberculosis infection may improve the performance of IFN-γ release assays. We developed a real-time RT-PCR TaqMan assay for targeting levels of eight human targets [IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-2R, IL-4, IL-10, CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11] and evaluated the assay with three different study groups. Results showed that the sensitivity of TNF-α, IL-2R, and CXCL10 in the active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) group was 96.43%, 96.43%, and 100%, respectively. The sensitivity of IL-2R and CXCL10 in the latent tuberculosis infection group was 86.36% and 81.82%, respectively. Statistical results showed that TNF-α and CXCL9 were the best individual markers for differentiating between the PTB, LTBI, and non-TB groups. For optimal sensitivity and differentiation of M. tuberculosis infection status, the simultaneous detection of multiple targets was attempted. The combination of IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2R, and the combination of TNF-α, IL-2R, CXCL9, and CXCL10 showed the best performance for detecting active PTB (both 100% positivity) and LTBI (86.36% and 81.82% positivity, respectively). These results imply that the combination of suitable markers is useful in efficiently diagnosing TB and differentiating M. tuberculosis infection status.

  11. Colorimetric protein assay techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapan, C V; Lundblad, R L; Price, N C

    1999-04-01

    There has been an increase in the number of colorimetric assay techniques for the determination of protein concentration over the past 20 years. This has resulted in a perceived increase in sensitivity and accuracy with the advent of new techniques. The present review considers these advances with emphasis on the potential use of such technologies in the assay of biopharmaceuticals. The techniques reviewed include Coomassie Blue G-250 dye binding (the Bradford assay), the Lowry assay, the bicinchoninic acid assay and the biuret assay. It is shown that each assay has advantages and disadvantages relative to sensitivity, ease of performance, acceptance in the literature, accuracy and reproducibility/coefficient of variation/laboratory-to-laboratory variation. A comparison of the use of several assays with the same sample population is presented. It is suggested that the most critical issue in the use of a chromogenic protein assay for the characterization of a biopharmaceutical is the selection of a standard for the calibration of the assay; it is crucial that the standard be representative of the sample. If it is not possible to match the standard with the sample from the perspective of protein composition, then it is preferable to use an assay that is not sensitive to the composition of the protein such as a micro-Kjeldahl technique, quantitative amino acid analysis or the biuret assay. In a complex mixture it might be inappropriate to focus on a general method of protein determination and much more informative to use specific methods relating to the protein(s) of particular interest, using either specific assays or antibody-based methods. The key point is that whatever method is adopted as the 'gold standard' for a given protein, this method needs to be used routinely for calibration.

  12. Demonstration of the Performance of an Air-Type Photovoltaic Thermal (PVT System Coupled with a Heat-Recovery Ventilator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hee Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A heat-recovery ventilator (HRV effectively conducts ventilation by recovering waste heat from indoors to outdoors during heating periods. However, dew condensation associated with the HRV system may arise due to the difference between the indoor temperature and the very low outdoor temperature in winter, and this can decrease the heat exchange efficiency. These problems can be solved by the pre-heating of the incoming air, but additional energy is required when pursuing such a strategy. On the other hand, an air-type photovoltaic thermal (PVT system produces electricity and thermal energy simultaneously using air as the heat transfer medium. Moreover, the heated air from the air-type PVT system can be connected to the HRV to pre-heat the supply air instead of taking in the cold outdoor air. Thus, the ventilation efficiency can be improved and the problems arising during the heating period can be resolved. Consequentially, the heating energy required in a building can be reduced, with additional electricity acquired as well. In this paper, the performance of an air-type PVT system coupled with an HRV is assessed. To do this, air-type PVT collectors operating at 1 kWp were installed in an experimental house and coupled to an HRV system. Thermal performance and heating energy required during the winter season were analyzed experimentally. Furthermore, the electrical performances of the air-type PVT system with and without ventilation at the back side of the PV during the summer season were analyzed.

  13. Dataset demonstrating the modeling of a high performance Cu(In,Ga)Se2 absorber based thin film photovoltaic cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaduzzaman, Md; Bahar, Ali Newaz; Bhuiyan, Mohammad Maksudur Rahman

    2017-04-01

    The physical data of the semiconductor materials used in the design of a CIGS absorber based thin film photovoltaic cell have been presented in this data article. Besides, the values of the contact parameter and operating conditions of the cell have been reported. Furthermore, by conducting the simulation with data corresponding to the device structure: soda-lime glass (SLG) substrate/Mo back-contact/CIGS absorber/CdS buffer/intrinsic ZnO/Al-doped ZnO window/Al-grid front-contact, the solar cell performance parameters such as open circuit voltage [Formula: see text], short circuit current density [Formula: see text], fill factor [Formula: see text], efficiency [Formula: see text], and collection efficiency [Formula: see text] have been analyzed.

  14. A stability-indicating high performance liquid chromatographic assay for the simultaneous determination of atenolol and lercanidipine hydrochloride in tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H O Kaila

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple, rapid, precise and accurate isocratic reversed phase stability indicating HPLC method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of atenolol and lercanidipine hydrochloride in commercial tablets. The chromatographic separation was achieved on phenomenex Gemini C18 (250×4.6 mm, 5 μm column using a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and buffer (20 mM potassium dihydrogen phosphate pH 3.5 in the ratio of (55:45, v/v at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min and UV detection at 235 nm. The linearity of the proposed method was investigated in the range of 40-160 μg/ml (r 2 =0.9995 for atenolol and 8-32 μg/ml (r 2 =0.9993 for lercanidipine. Degradation products produced as a result of stress studies did not interfere with the detection of atenolol and lercanidipine and the assay can thus be considered stability-indicating.

  15. Human liver cytosolic sulfotransferase 2A1-dependent dehydroepiandrosterone sulfation assay by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Sumit; Lau, Aik Jiang

    2016-02-20

    Sulfotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1) is a major catalyst of the sulfation of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) to dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) in human liver cytosol. However, there is a lack of a sensitive and fast analytical method for the human liver cytosolic SULT2A1-dependent DHEA sulfation assay. Therefore, we developed and validated an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (UPLC-MS/MS) method to quantify DHEA-S and used it to optimize the human liver cytosolic SULT2A1-dependent DHEA sulfation assay. DHEA-S and cortisol (internal standard) eluted at 2.95 and 2.75min, respectively. Negative multiple reaction monitoring was used to quantify DHEA-S (m/z 367.3→97.0) and cortisol (m/z 407.2→331.3). No interfering peaks were observed in blank samples. The lower limit of quantification was 0.2pmol DHEA-S and the calibration curve was linear from 0.2 to 200pmol. The intra-day and inter-day accuracy and precision was sulfotransferase enzyme assays, and it is the first UPLC-MS/MS method for determining SULT2A1-dependent DHEA sulfation in human liver cytosol.

  16. INTERIM REPORT ON THE EVOLUTION AND PERFORMANCE OF THE EICHROM TECHNOLOGIES PROCEPT RAPID DIOXIN ASSAY FOR SOIL AND SEDIMENT SAMPLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A demonstration of screening technologies for determining the presence of dioxin and dioxin-like compounds in soil and sediment was conducted under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's(EPA's) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program in Saginaw, Michigan in 2004. T...

  17. Proof-of-Concept Demonstrations for Computation-Based Human Reliability Analysis. Modeling Operator Performance During Flooding Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe, Jeffrey Clark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Boring, Ronald Laurids [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Herberger, Sarah Elizabeth Marie [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis Lee [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program has the overall objective to help sustain the existing commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs). To accomplish this program objective, there are multiple LWRS “pathways,” or research and development (R&D) focus areas. One LWRS focus area is called the Risk-Informed Safety Margin and Characterization (RISMC) pathway. Initial efforts under this pathway to combine probabilistic and plant multi-physics models to quantify safety margins and support business decisions also included HRA, but in a somewhat simplified manner. HRA experts at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) have been collaborating with other experts to develop a computational HRA approach, called the Human Unimodel for Nuclear Technology to Enhance Reliability (HUNTER), for inclusion into the RISMC framework. The basic premise of this research is to leverage applicable computational techniques, namely simulation and modeling, to develop and then, using RAVEN as a controller, seamlessly integrate virtual operator models (HUNTER) with 1) the dynamic computational MOOSE runtime environment that includes a full-scope plant model, and 2) the RISMC framework PRA models already in use. The HUNTER computational HRA approach is a hybrid approach that leverages past work from cognitive psychology, human performance modeling, and HRA, but it is also a significant departure from existing static and even dynamic HRA methods. This report is divided into five chapters that cover the development of an external flooding event test case and associated statistical modeling considerations.

  18. Enzyme assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymond, Jean-Louis; Fluxà, Viviana S; Maillard, Noélie

    2009-01-07

    Enzyme assays are analytical tools to visualize enzyme activities. In recent years a large variety of enzyme assays have been developed to assist the discovery and optimization of industrial enzymes, in particular for "white biotechnology" where selective enzymes are used with great success for economically viable, mild and environmentally benign production processes. The present article highlights the aspects of fluorogenic and chromogenic substrates, sensors, and enzyme fingerprinting, which are our particular areas of interest.

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are provided. The solubility of ammonia gas in water is demonstrated by introducing water into a closed can filled with the gas, collapsing the can. The second demonstration relates scale of standard reduction potentials to observed behavior of metals in reactions with hydrogen to produce hydrogen gas. (Author/JN)

  20. Changing Feeding Regimes To Demonstrate Flexible Biogas Production: Effects on Process Performance, Microbial Community Structure, and Methanogenesis Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulat, Daniel Girma; Jacobi, H Fabian; Feilberg, Anders; Adamsen, Anders Peter S; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Nikolausz, Marcell

    2015-10-23

    Flexible biogas production that adapts biogas output to energy demand can be regulated by changing feeding regimes. In this study, the effect of changes in feeding intervals on process performance, microbial community structure, and the methanogenesis pathway was investigated. Three different feeding regimes (once daily, every second day, and every 2 h) at the same organic loading rate were studied in continuously stirred tank reactors treating distiller's dried grains with solubles. A larger amount of biogas was produced after feeding in the reactors fed less frequently (once per day and every second day), whereas the amount remained constant in the reactor fed more frequently (every 2 h), indicating the suitability of the former for the flexible production of biogas. Compared to the conventional more frequent feeding regimes, a methane yield that was up to 14% higher and an improved stability of the process against organic overloading were achieved by employing less frequent feeding regimes. The community structures of bacteria and methanogenic archaea were monitored by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA and mcrA genes, respectively. The results showed that the composition of the bacterial community varied under the different feeding regimes, and the observed T-RFLP patterns were best explained by the differences in the total ammonia nitrogen concentrations, H2 levels, and pH values. However, the methanogenic community remained stable under all feeding regimes, with the dominance of the Methanosarcina genus followed by that of the Methanobacterium genus. Stable isotope analysis showed that the average amount of methane produced during each feeding event by acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was not influenced by the three different feeding regimes.

  1. High-performance thin-layer chromatography linked with (bio)assays and mass spectrometry - a suited method for discovery and quantification of bioactive components? Exemplarily shown for turmeric and milk thistle extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Mahmoud N; Krawinkel, Michael B; Morlock, Gertrud E

    2015-05-15

    Extraction parameters, chemical fingerprint, and the single compounds' activity levels were considered for the selection of active botanicals. For an initial survey, the total bioactivity (i.e., total reducing capacity, total flavonoids contents and free radical scavenging capacity) of 21 aqueous and 21 ethanolic plant extracts was investigated. Ethanolic extracts showed a higher yield and were further analyzed by HPTLC in detail to obtain fingerprints of single flavonoids and further bioactive components. Exemplarily shown for turmeric (Curcuma longa) and milk thistle (Silybum marianum), effect-directed analysis (EDA) was performed using three selected (bio)assays, the Aliivibrio fischeri bioassay, the Bacillus subtilis bioassay and the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH*) assay. As a proof of principle, the bioactive components found in the extracts were confirmed by HPTLC-MS. Bioassays in combination with planar chromatography directly linked to the known, single effective compounds like curcumin and silibinin. However, also some unknown bioactive components were discovered and exemplarily characterized, which demonstrated the strength of this kind of EDA. HPTLC-UV/Vis/FLD-EDA-MS could become a useful tool for selection of active botanicals and for the activity profiling of the active ingredients therein. The flexibility in effect-directed detections allows a comprehensive survey of effective ingredients in samples. This streamlined methodology comprised a non-targeted, effect-directed screening first, followed by a highly targeted characterization of the discovered bioactive compounds. HPTLC-EDA-MS can also be recommended for bioactivity profiling of food on the food intake side, as not only effective phytochemicals, but also unknown bioactive degradation products during food processing or contamination products or residues or metabolites can be detected. Thus, an efficient survey on potential food intake effects on wellness could be obtained. Having performed

  2. Genetic toxicity assessment: employing the best science for human safety evaluation. Part II: Performances of the in vitro micronucleus test compared to the mouse lymphoma assay and the in vitro chromosome aberration assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorge, Elisabeth; Lambert, Carine; Gervais, Véronique; Becourt-Lhote, Nathalie; Delongeas, Jean-Luc; Claude, Nancy

    2007-04-01

    The in vitro micronucleus test is commonly used in the early stages of pharmaceutical development as a predictive tool for the regulatory mouse lymphoma assay or in vitro chromosome aberration test. The accumulated data from this assay leads to the suggestion that it could be used as an alternative to the chromosome aberration test or the mouse lymphoma assay in the regulatory genotoxicity battery. In this paper, we present the results of the in vitro micronucleus test on L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells with 25 compounds from Servier research and have compared these results to those obtained in the genotoxicity regulatory battery. All the negative compounds were also negative in the in vitro micronucleus assay. Among the 14 positive compounds, two of them, positive in the mouse lymphoma assay, were found negative in the in vitro micronucleus test. However, this apparent discordance was likely to be due to cytotoxicity- or high concentration-related false positive responses in the mouse lymphoma assay. In addition, we confirmed that the in vitro micronucleus assay is useful for detecting aneugens, especially, when cells in metaphasis and multinucleated cells are also scored and when cells are allowed to recover after the long treatment. On this series of compounds, the in vitro micronucleus assay showed high sensitivity and possibly a better specificity than the mouse lymphoma assay. Thus, the in vitro micronucleus assay was shown to be at least as adequate as the mouse lymphoma assay or the in vitro chromosome aberration test to be used in the standard genotoxicity battery.

  3. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Iron Removal U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Vintage on the Ponds in Delavan, WI Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained for the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Vintage on the Ponds in Delavan, WI. The objectives of the project were to evaluate: (1) the effectiveness of a Kinetico Macrolite® press...

  4. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY PROCESS MODIFICATION TO COAGULATION/FILTRATION. USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT LIDGERWOOD, ND. FINAL PERFORMANCE EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained for the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Lidgerwood, North Dakota site. The objectives of the project were to evaluate: (1) the effectiveness of process modifications to an e...

  5. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Coagulation/Filtration - U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Village of Waynesville, IL - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the arsenic removal drinking water treatment technology demonstration project at the Village of Waynesville, IL. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Peerless coagu...

  6. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Coagulation/Filtration, U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at the City of Okanogan, WA - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the City of Okanogan, WA facility. The objectives of the project were to evaluate: (1) the effectiveness of Filtronics’ FH-13 Ele...

  7. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Coagulation/Filtration U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Village of Pentwater, MI. Final performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Village of Pentwater, MI facility. The objectives of the project were to evaluate: (1) the effectiveness of Kinetico’s FM-260...

  8. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Coagulation/Filtration - U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Town of Arnaudville, LA - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the United Water Systems’ facility in Arnaudville, LA. The objectives of the project were to evaluate: (1) the effectiveness of K...

  9. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Coagulation/Filtration U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Sandusky, MI Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) arsenic removal technology demonstration project at the City of Sandusky, MI facility. The objectives of the project were to evaluate: 1) the effect...

  10. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Iron Removal and Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Stewart, MN, Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the one-year U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) arsenic removal technology demonstration project at the Stewart, MN facility. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the effectiveness ...

  11. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Webb Consolidated Independent School District in Bruni, TX - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Webb Consolidated Independent School District (Webb CISD) in Bruni, TX. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the effect...

  12. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media - U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Woodstock Middle School in Woodstock, CT - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed for and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Woodstock Middle School in Woodstock, CT. The objectives of the project were to evaluate the effectiveness of Adsorbsia™ GTO™ me...

  13. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Iron Removal - U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Northeastern Elementary School in Fountain City, IN - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Northeastern Elementary School in Fountain City, IN. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the effectiveness of US Water Sys...

  14. Highly sensitive assay for the measurement of serotonin in microdialysates using capillary high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrot, Sandrine; Lambás-Señas, Laura; Sentenac, Sabine; Denoroy, Luc; Renaud, Bernard

    2007-05-01

    A highly sensitive isocratic capillary high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method with electrochemical detection (ED) for the simultaneous measurement of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (5-HIAA) in microdialysates has been developed using a 0.5 mm i.d. capillary column and a 11-nL detection cell. This method, validated on both pharmacological and analytical bases, can be performed using injection volumes as low as 1 microL. The limits of detection were 5.6 x 10(-11)mol/L and 3.0 x 10(-9)mol/L for 5-HT and 5-HIAA. Several applications of the present method are given on microdialysates from rodent brain and human spinal cord.

  15. HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY METHOD VALIDATION OF α-MANGOSTIN ASSAY IN MANGOSTEEN (Garcinia mangostana L. FRUIT RIND EXTRACT FORMULATED IN ORAL SOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliek Nurhidayati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mangosteen fruit rind extract contain a lot of antioxidants. α-Mangostin is a component in mangosteen fruit rind that has highest antioxidant effect. The oral solution containing mangosteen fruit rind extract is required an assay method for quality assessment. Determination of a very low concentration of analyte in sample with very complex matrix, such as α-mangostin in oral solution, needs a selective and sensitive method, such as high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. In this study, α-mangostin assay was performed by reverse phase HPLC system using octadecylsilane (C18 as stationary phase, methanol-water (90:10 as mobile phase, the flow rate is 1.0 mL/min, and the UV detector at 316 nm. The retention time of α-mangostin was 9.622 minutes. Peak of α-mangostin was well separated with resolution of 1.725. Linearity was in the range of 1.67-5.01 ppm with correlation coefficient of 0.9986. The relative standard deviation (RSD was 1.30 %, the recovery was in the range of 95.80-100.76.

  16. Development of a high-throughput ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry assay to profile 18 eicosanoids as exploratory biomarkers for atherosclerotic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rago, Brian; Fu, Cexiong

    2013-10-01

    Abundant evidence suggests a prominent role for eicosanoids and metabolites in the pathogenesis and prognosis of inflammatory diseases. A sensitive and high-throughput SPE UPLC-MS/MS method was developed to quantitatively interrogate the levels of 18 eicosanoids in human and monkey plasma samples. A limit of quantitation of 0.25ng/mL was achieved for all 18 investigated compounds with linear ranges spanning four orders of magnitude. Bioanalytical performance of this assay was fully characterized including SPE extraction efficiency, matrix effect, autosampler stability, benchtop stability and freeze-thaw cycle variability. Endogenous levels of the eicosanoids and analogs within a set of monkey plasma samples challenged with lipopolysaccharide and human plasma samples were quantified by this ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) assay. Quantitative eicosanoid profiles of the human samples were further analyzed by a non-supervised cluster analysis, which revealed a set of potential positive and negative lipid biomarkers to distinguish the following three groups: healthy individuals, hypertensive patients and severe atherosclerosis patients. The components of the negative biomarker cluster (8-HETE, LTB4, 9-HODE and 13-HODE) are putative ligands of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), a family of master genes controlling the resolution of inflammatory signaling.

  17. The Comet Assay: Tails of the (Unexpected. Use of the comet assay in pharmaceutical development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas-jan Van Der Leede

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In genotoxicity testing of pharmaceuticals the rodent alkaline comet assay is being increasingly used as a second in vivo assay in addition to the in vivo micronucleus assay to mitigate in vitro positive results as recommended by regulatory guidance. In this presentation we want to give insight into the circumstances in vivo comet assay is deployed in a Genetic Toxicology Department of a pharmaceutical company. As the in vivo comet assay is a salvage assay, it means that some events have occurred in an in vitro assay and that the compound (or metabolite responsible for this signal is potentially deselected for further development. More than often the decision to perform an in vivo comet assay is at a very early stage in development and the first time that the compound will be tested in vivo at high/toxic dose levels. As almost no toxicokinetic data and tissue distribution data are available a careful design with maximizes the chances for successful mitigation is necessary. Decisions on acute or repeated dosing need to be made and arrangements for combining the in vivo comet assay with the in vivo micronucleus assay are to be considered. Often synthesis methods need to be scaled up fast to provide the required amount of compound and information on suitable formulations needs to be in place. As exposure data is crucial for interpretation of results, analytical methods need to be brought in place rapidly. An experienced multi skilled and communicative team needs to be available to deploy successfully this kind of assays at an early stage of development. We will present a few scenarios on study conduct and demonstrate how this assay can make a difference for the further development of a new drug.

  18. A fast reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry assay for the quantification of clindamycin in plasma and saliva using a rapid resolution package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catena, Esther; Perez, Guiomar; Sadaba, Belen; Azanza, Jose Ramón; Campanero, Miguel Angel

    2009-11-01

    A new method for the quantitative analysis of clindamycin in human plasma and saliva by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) has been developed using a rapid resolution C18 column (2.1 mm x 30 mm x 3.5 microm). A simple deproteinization procedure was applied to the samples before analysis. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode of precursor-product ion transitions for clindamycin (425.1/126.1) and the internal standard, lincomycin (407.2/126.0) was used. Chromatographic separation was achieved at 0.6 ml/min in less than 1.5 min, with improved peak resolution and sensitivity between drug and internal standard. The assay exhibited a linear dynamic range between 0.05 and 15.0 microg/ml and gave a determination coefficient of 0.991 or better. The limit of quantification of the method was 10 ng/ml in both biological samples. Intra-day and inter-day precision ranged from 7.5% to 11.5%. Good accuracy was observed for both the intra-day and inter-day assays (R.S.D. below +/-4%). The suitability of the developed method for the analysis of clindamycin in plasma and saliva samples was demonstrated by the measure of clindamycin in samples taken up to 6h after oral and intravenous administration of this drug in infectious patients.

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two laboratory demonstrations in chemistry. One uses dry ice, freon, and freezer bags to demonstrate volume changes, vapor-liquid equilibrium, a simulation of a rain forest, and vaporization. The other uses the clock reaction technique to illustrate fast reactions and kinetic problems in releasing carbon dioxide during respiration. (TW)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines a simple, inexpensive way of demonstrating electroplating using the reaction between nickel ions and copper metal. Explains how to conduct a demonstration of the electrolysis of water by using a colored Na2SO4 solution as the electrolyte so that students can observe the pH changes. (TW)

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a supplement to the "water to rose" demonstration in which a pink color is produced. Also discusses blood buffer demonstrations, including hydrolysis of sodium bicarbonate, simulated blood buffer, metabolic acidosis, natural compensation of metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, acidosis treatment, and alkalosis treatment. Procedures…

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Free radical chlorination of methane is used in organic chemistry to introduce free radical/chain reactions. In spite of its common occurrence, demonstrations of the reaction are uncommon. Therefore, such a demonstration is provided, including background information, preparation of reactants/reaction vessel, introduction of reactants, irradiation,…

  3. Surface plasmon resonance-enhanced fluorescence implementation of a single-step competition assay: demonstration of fatty acid measurement using an anti-fatty acid monoclonal antibody and a Cy5-labeled fatty acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vareiro, Margarida M L M; Tranchant, Isabelle; Maplin, Sandra; Zak, Kris; Gani, M M; Slevin, Christopher J; Hailes, Helen C; Tabor, Alethea B; Cameron, Petra J; Jenkins, A Toby A; Williams, David E

    2008-06-15

    The development of a single-step, separation-free method for measurement of low concentrations of fatty acid using a surface plasmon resonance-enhanced fluorescence competition assay with a surface-bound antibody is described. The assay behavior was unexpectedly complex. A nonlinear coverage-dependent self-quenching of emission from surface-bound fluorescent label was deduced from the response kinetics and attributed to a surface plasmon-mediated energy transfer between adsorbed fluorophores, modified by the effects of plasmon interference. Principles of assay design to avoid complications from such effects are discussed. An anti-fatty acid mouse monoclonal antibody reacting to the alkyl chain was prepared and supported on a gold chip at a spacing appropriate for surface-plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPEFS), by applying successively a self-assembled biotinylated monolayer, then streptavidin, then biotinylated protein A, and then the antibody, which was crosslinked to the protein A. Synthesis of a fluorescently (Cy5) tagged C-11 fatty acid is reported. SPEFS was used to follow the kinetics of the binding of the labeled fatty acid to the antibody, and to implement a competition assay with free fatty acid (undecanoic acid), sensitive at the 1 microM scale, a sensitivity limit caused by the low affinity of antibodies for free fatty acids, rather than the SPEFS technique itself. Free fatty acid concentration in human serum is in the range 0.1-1mM, suggesting that this measurement approach could be applied in a clinical diagnostic context. Finally, a predictive, theoretical model of fatty acid binding was developed that accounted for the observed "overshoot" kinetics.

  4. Performance and diagnostic usefulness of commercially available enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and rapid kits for detection of HIV, HBV and HCV in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maity Susmita

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV, HBV and HCV pose a major public health problem throughout the world. Detection of infection markers for these agents is a major challenge for testing laboratories in a resource poor setting. As blood transfusion is an important activity saving millions of live every year, it also carries a risk of transfusion transmissible infections caused by these fatal blood borne pathogens if the quality of testing is compromised. Conventional ELISA is regarded as the mostly used screening technique but due to limitations like high cost, unavailability in many blood banks and testing sites, involvement of costly instruments, time taking nature and requirement of highly skilled personnel for interpretation, rapid tests are gaining more importance and warrants comparison of performance. Results A comparative study between these two techniques has been performed using commercially available diagnostic kits to assess their efficacy for detection of HIV, HBV and HCV infections. Rapid kits were more efficient in specificity with synthetic antigens along with high PPV than ELISA in most cases. Comparison between different ELISA kits revealed that Microlisa HIV and Hepalisa (J. Mitra & Co. Pvt. Ltd.; ERBA LISA HIV1 + 2, ERBA LISA Hepatitis B and ERBA LISA HCV (Transasia Bio-medicals Ltd. gives uniform result with good performance in terms of sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and efficiency, whereas, Microlisa HCV (J. Mitra & Co. Pvt. Ltd., Microscreen HBsAg ELISA and INNOVA HCV (Span Diagnostics Ltd. did not perform well. Rapid kits were also having high degree of sensitivity and specificity (100% except in HIV Comb and HCV Comb (J. Mitra & Co. Pvt. Ltd.. The kit efficiency didn’t vary significantly among different companies and lots in all the cases except for HCV ELISA showing statistically significant variation (p  Conclusions ELISA is a good screening assay for markers of HIV, HBV and HCV infections. Rapid tests are useful for

  5. A Novel Method of Safely Measuring Influenza Virus Aerosol Using Antigen-Capture Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for the Performance Evaluation of Protective Clothing Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimasaki, Noriko; Nojima, Yasuhiro; Okaue, Akira; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Kageyama, Tsutomu; Hamamoto, Itsuki; Shinohara, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Currently, threats caused by pathogens are serious public health problems worldwide. Protective clothing is essential when one is treating infected patients or dealing with unknown pathogens. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the performance of protective clothing against pathogens. In Japan, some methods for evaluating the performance of protective clothing have been established in the Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS). However, a test method against virus aerosols has not been established. Because there is a risk of infection from a live virus during the test, it is necessary to devise a safe method for the virus-aerosol-based test. Here, we propose a new method of safely measuring virus aerosols for the performance evaluation of protective clothing materials. To ensure safety, an inactivated virus was used. As a model virus, the influenza virus was selected owing to the proper small diameter of the virus particles. To quantitatively measure the particle-amount of the inactivated influenza virus, we developed an antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) targeting the M1 protein. Furthermore, we evaluated two materials using our method. Significant differences in the protection performance against the virus aerosol were observed between different sample materials, thereby confirming the applicability of our new method for performance evaluation.

  6. An optimized gossypol high-performance liquid chromatography assay and its application in evaluation of different gland genotypes of cotton

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yingfan Cai; Hong Zhang; Yu Zeng; Jianchuan Mo; Jinku Bao; Chen Miao; Jie Bai; Fang Yan; Fang Chen

    2004-03-01

    A comparative study on gossypol content of various genetic types of pigment glands of cotton varieties was conducted through an optimized high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on a C18 column (4.6 mm × 250 mm, 5 m particle) with methanol–0.5% acetic acid aqueous solution, 90 : 10 (v/v), as mobile phase, at a flow rate of 0.8 ml/min and UV detection at 254 nm. The method was shown to be highly reproducible, with precision [as relative standard deviation (RSD)] and accuracy [as relative mean error (RME)] < 10%, both intra-day and inter-day. Absolute recoveries were > 94%. The results revealed major differences among the different gland varieties or species of cotton, including the special and ordinary glandless and glanded Gossypium hirsutum, G. barbadense, and displayed the precious resources of different glands of extraordinary cotton.

  7. Interferon-Gamma Release Assay Performance of Cerebrospinal Fluid and Peripheral Blood in Tuberculous Meningitis in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Zhang, Jinli; Yang, Xinting; Zheng, Shiqi; Li, Jing; Jia, Hongyan; Chen, Xiaoyou; Gao, Mengqiu

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the performance of T-SPOT.TB on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral blood (PB) in diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (TBM) in China. Of 100 patients with presumed TBM prospectively enrolled from Sep 2012 to Oct 2014, 53 were TBM (21 definite and 32 probable TBM cases) and 37 were non-TBM cases; the other 10 patients were excluded from analysis due to inconclusive diagnosis, no sufficient CSF samples, or incomplete follow-up. T-SPOT.TB on CSF and PB and routine laboratory tests of CSF were performed simultaneously. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and cut-off value of CSF T-SPOT.TB and routine CSF parameters were established between TBM and non-TBM group. The area under ROC curve (AUC) of the T-SPOT.TB on CSF and PB was 0.81 and 0.89, which was higher than that of the routine CSF parameters (AUC 0.67–0.77). Although the sensitivity of CSF T-SPOT.TB was lower than that of PB T-SPOT.TB (60.8% versus 90.6%, P < 0.001), the specificity of CSF T-SPOT.TB was significantly higher than that of PB T-SPOT.TB (97.2% versus 75.7%, P = 0.007). These results indicated that the diagnostic accuracies of PB and CSF T-SPOT.TB are higher than routine laboratory tests. Furthermore, the higher specificity of CSF T-SPOT.TB makes it a useful rule-in test in rapid diagnosis of TBM. PMID:28316991

  8. Rabies neutralizing antibody detection by indirect immunperoxidase serum neutralization assay performed on chicken embryo related cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Cristina Cardoso

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the indirect immunoperoxidase virus neutralization (IPVN and mouse neutralization test (MNT to detect antibodies against rabies virus from vaccinated dogs and cattle. The IPVN was set up for the ability to measure 0.5 International Units/ml (IU of antibody required by the World Health Organization and the Office International des Epizooties as the minimum response for proof of rabies immunization. IPVN was developed and standardized in chicken embryo related (CER cell line when 141 dog and 110 cattle sera were applied by serial five-fold dilutions (1:5, 1:25, 1:125 as well as the positive and negative reference controls, all added in four adjacent wells, of 96-well microplates. A 50 µl amount of CVS32 strain dilution containing 50-200 TCID50/ml was mixed to each serum dilution, and after 90 min 50 µl of 3 x 10(5 cells/mlcell suspension added to each well. After five days of incubation, the monolayers were fixed and the IPVN test performed. The correlation coefficient between the MNT and IPVN performed in CER cells was r = 0.9949 for dog sera (n = 100 and r = 0.9307 for cattle sera (n = 99, as well as good specificity (94.7%, sensitivity (87.5%, and agreement (96.6% were also obtained. IPVN technique can adequately identify vaccinated and unvaccinated animals, even from low-responding vaccinated animals, with the advantage of low cost and faster then MNT standard test.

  9. Analytical performance of a multiplex Real-Time PCR assay using TaqMan probes for quantification of Trypanosoma cruzi satellite DNA in blood samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Duffy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The analytical validation of sensitive, accurate and standardized Real-Time PCR methods for Trypanosoma cruzi quantification is crucial to provide a reliable laboratory tool for diagnosis of recent infections as well as for monitoring treatment efficacy. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have standardized and validated a multiplex Real-Time quantitative PCR assay (qPCR based on TaqMan technology, aiming to quantify T. cruzi satellite DNA as well as an internal amplification control (IAC in a single-tube reaction. IAC amplification allows rule out false negative PCR results due to inhibitory substances or loss of DNA during sample processing. The assay has a limit of detection (LOD of 0.70 parasite equivalents/mL and a limit of quantification (LOQ of 1.53 parasite equivalents/mL starting from non-boiled Guanidine EDTA blood spiked with T. cruzi CL-Brener stock. The method was evaluated with blood samples collected from Chagas disease patients experiencing different clinical stages and epidemiological scenarios: 1- Sixteen Venezuelan patients from an outbreak of oral transmission, 2- Sixty three Bolivian patients suffering chronic Chagas disease, 3- Thirty four Argentinean cases with chronic Chagas disease, 4- Twenty seven newborns to seropositive mothers, 5- A seronegative receptor who got infected after transplantation with a cadaveric kidney explanted from an infected subject. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The performing parameters of this assay encourage its application to early assessment of T. cruzi infection in cases in which serological methods are not informative, such as recent infections by oral contamination or congenital transmission or after transplantation with organs from seropositive donors, as well as for monitoring Chagas disease patients under etiological treatment.

  10. Analytical Performance of a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay Using TaqMan Probes for Quantification of Trypanosoma cruzi Satellite DNA in Blood Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Teresa; Cayo, Nelly M.; Parrado, Rudy; Bello, Zoraida Diaz; Velazquez, Elsa; Muñoz-Calderon, Arturo; Juiz, Natalia A.; Basile, Joaquín; Garcia, Lineth; Riarte, Adelina; Nasser, Julio R.; Ocampo, Susana B.; Yadon, Zaida E.; Torrico, Faustino; de Noya, Belkisyole Alarcón; Ribeiro, Isabela; Schijman, Alejandro G.

    2013-01-01

    Background The analytical validation of sensitive, accurate and standardized Real-Time PCR methods for Trypanosoma cruzi quantification is crucial to provide a reliable laboratory tool for diagnosis of recent infections as well as for monitoring treatment efficacy. Methods/Principal Findings We have standardized and validated a multiplex Real-Time quantitative PCR assay (qPCR) based on TaqMan technology, aiming to quantify T. cruzi satellite DNA as well as an internal amplification control (IAC) in a single-tube reaction. IAC amplification allows rule out false negative PCR results due to inhibitory substances or loss of DNA during sample processing. The assay has a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.70 parasite equivalents/mL and a limit of quantification (LOQ) of 1.53 parasite equivalents/mL starting from non-boiled Guanidine EDTA blood spiked with T. cruzi CL-Brener stock. The method was evaluated with blood samples collected from Chagas disease patients experiencing different clinical stages and epidemiological scenarios: 1- Sixteen Venezuelan patients from an outbreak of oral transmission, 2- Sixty three Bolivian patients suffering chronic Chagas disease, 3- Thirty four Argentinean cases with chronic Chagas disease, 4- Twenty seven newborns to seropositive mothers, 5- A seronegative receptor who got infected after transplantation with a cadaveric kidney explanted from an infected subject. Conclusions/Significance The performing parameters of this assay encourage its application to early assessment of T. cruzi infection in cases in which serological methods are not informative, such as recent infections by oral contamination or congenital transmission or after transplantation with organs from seropositive donors, as well as for monitoring Chagas disease patients under etiological treatment. PMID:23350002

  11. Application of the micronucleus assay performed by different scorers in case of large-scale radiation accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawojć Kamila

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mass casualty scenarios of radiation exposure require high throughput biological dosimetry techniques for population triage, in order to rapidly identify individuals, who require clinical treatment. Accurate dose estimates can be made by biological dosimetry, to predict the acute radiation syndrome (ARS within days after a radiation accident or a malicious act involving radiation. Timely information on dose is important for the medical management of acutely irradiated persons [1]. The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of the micronuclei (MNi scoring procedure in an experimental mode, where 500 binucleated cells were analyzed in different exposure dose ranges. Whole-body exposure was simulated in an in vitro experiment by irradiating whole blood collected from one healthy donor with 60 MeV protons and 250 keV X-rays, in the dose range of 0.3-4.0 Gy. For achieving meaningful results, sample scoring was performed by three independent persons, who followed guidelines described in detail by Fenech et al. [2, 3]. Compared results revealed no significant differences between scorers, which has important meaning in reducing the analysis time. Moreover, presented data based on 500 cells distribution, show that there are significant differences between MNi yields after 1.0 Gy exposure of blood for both protons and X-rays, implicating this experimental mode as appropriate for the distinction between high and low dose-exposed individuals, which allows early classification of exposed victims into clinically relevant subgroups.

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L.

    1990-01-01

    Included are three demonstrations that include the phase change of ice when under pressure, viscoelasticity and colloid systems, and flame tests for metal ions. The materials, procedures, probable results, and applications to real life situations are included. (KR)

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presents three demonstrations suitable for undergraduate chemistry classes. Focuses on experiments with calcium carbide, the induction by iron of the oxidation of iodide by dichromate, and the classical iodine clock reaction. (ML)

  14. Application of 3D Printing Technology in Increasing the Diagnostic Performance of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) for Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harpal; Shimojima, Masayuki; Shiratori, Tomomi; An, Le Van; Sugamata, Masami; Yang, Ming

    2015-07-08

    Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA)-based diagnosis is the mainstay for measuring antibody response in infectious diseases and to support pathogen identification of potential use in infectious disease outbreaks and clinical care of individual patients. The development of laboratory diagnostics using readily available 3D printing technologies provides a timely opportunity for further expansion of this technology into immunodetection systems. Utilizing available 3D printing platforms, a '3D well' was designed and developed to have an increased surface area compared to those of 96-well plates. The ease and rapidity of the development of the 3D well prototype provided an opportunity for its rapid validation through the diagnostic performance of ELISA in infectious disease without modifying current laboratory practices for ELISA. The improved sensitivity of the 3D well of up to 2.25-fold higher compared to the 96-well ELISA provides a potential for the expansion of this technology towards miniaturization and Lab-On-a-Chip platforms to reduce time, volume of reagents and samples needed for such assays in the laboratory diagnosis of infectious and other diseases including applications in other disciplines.

  15. Application of 3D Printing Technology in Increasing the Diagnostic Performance of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA for Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpal Singh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA-based diagnosis is the mainstay for measuring antibody response in infectious diseases and to support pathogen identification of potential use in infectious disease outbreaks and clinical care of individual patients. The development of laboratory diagnostics using readily available 3D printing technologies provides a timely opportunity for further expansion of this technology into immunodetection systems. Utilizing available 3D printing platforms, a ‘3D well’ was designed and developed to have an increased surface area compared to those of 96-well plates. The ease and rapidity of the development of the 3D well prototype provided an opportunity for its rapid validation through the diagnostic performance of ELISA in infectious disease without modifying current laboratory practices for ELISA. The improved sensitivity of the 3D well of up to 2.25-fold higher compared to the 96-well ELISA provides a potential for the expansion of this technology towards miniaturization and Lab-On-a-Chip platforms to reduce time, volume of reagents and samples needed for such assays in the laboratory diagnosis of infectious and other diseases including applications in other disciplines.

  16. Application of 3D Printing Technology in Increasing the Diagnostic Performance of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) for Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harpal; Shimojima, Masayuki; Shiratori, Tomomi; An, Le Van; Sugamata, Masami; Yang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA)-based diagnosis is the mainstay for measuring antibody response in infectious diseases and to support pathogen identification of potential use in infectious disease outbreaks and clinical care of individual patients. The development of laboratory diagnostics using readily available 3D printing technologies provides a timely opportunity for further expansion of this technology into immunodetection systems. Utilizing available 3D printing platforms, a ‘3D well’ was designed and developed to have an increased surface area compared to those of 96-well plates. The ease and rapidity of the development of the 3D well prototype provided an opportunity for its rapid validation through the diagnostic performance of ELISA in infectious disease without modifying current laboratory practices for ELISA. The improved sensitivity of the 3D well of up to 2.25-fold higher compared to the 96-well ELISA provides a potential for the expansion of this technology towards miniaturization and Lab-On-a-Chip platforms to reduce time, volume of reagents and samples needed for such assays in the laboratory diagnosis of infectious and other diseases including applications in other disciplines. PMID:26184194

  17. Development of a combined in vitro cell culture--quantitative PCR assay for evaluating the disinfection performance of pulsed light for treating the waterborne enteroparasite Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Mary; Stocca, Alessia; Rowan, Neil

    2014-09-01

    Giardia lamblia is a flagellated protozoan parasite that is recognised as a frequent cause of water-borne disease in humans and animals. We report for the first time on the use of a combined in vitro HCT-8 cell culture-quantitative PCR assay for evaluating the efficacy of using pulsed UV light for treating G. lamblia parasites. Findings showed that current methods that are limited to using vital stains before and after cyst excystation are not appropriate for monitoring or evaluating cyst destruction post PUV-treatments. Use of the human ileocecal HCT-8 cell line was superior to that of the human colon Caco-2 cell line for in vitro culture and determining PUV sensitivity of treated cysts. G. lamblia cysts were also shown to be more resistant to PUV irradiation compared to treating similar numbers of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. These observations also show that the use of this HCT-8 cell culture assay may replace use of animal models for determining disinfection performances of PUV for treating both C. parvum and G. lamblia.

  18. An ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric assay for quantifying 3-ketocholanoic acid: Application to the human liver microsomal CYP3A-dependent lithocholic acid 3-oxidation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Sumit; Chai, Swee Fen; Lau, Aik Jiang

    2016-06-15

    Lithocholic acid (LCA), a hepatotoxic and carcinogenic bile acid, is metabolized to 3-ketocholanoic acid (3-KCA) by cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A). In the present study, the objectives were to develop and validate an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (UPLC-MS/MS) method to quantify 3-KCA and apply it to the human liver microsomal CYP3A-dependent LCA 3-oxidation assay. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Waters ACQUITY™ UPLC C18 column (50×2.1mm, 1.7μm) with a gradient system consisting of 0.1% v/v formic acid in water (solvent A) and 0.1% v/v formic acid in acetonitrile (solvent B). The retention time was 3.73min for 3-KCA and 2.73min for cortisol (internal standard). Positive electrospray ionization with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode was used to quantify 3-KCA (m/z 375.4→135.2) and cortisol (m/z 363.5→121.0). The limit of detection of 3-KCA was 10μM, the lower limit of quantification was 33.3μM, and the calibration curve was linear from 0.05-10μM with r(2)>0.99. Intra-day and inter-day accuracy and precision were Michaelis-Menten model with an apparent Km of 26±7μM and Vmax of 303±50pmol/min/mg protein. This novel UPLC-MS/MS method for quantifying 3-KCA offers a specific, sensitive, and fast approach to determine liver microsomal LCA 3-oxidation.

  19. Development of a high-throughput replicon assay for the identification of respiratory syncytial virus inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiong-Yip, Choi-Lai; Plant, Helen; Sharpe, Paul; Fan, Jun; Rich, Kirsty; Gorseth, Elise; Yu, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) drug discovery has been hindered by the lack of good chemistry starting points and would benefit from robust and convenient assays for high-throughput screening (HTS). In this paper, we present the development and optimization of a 384-well RSV replicon assay that enabled HTS for RSV replication inhibitors with a low bio-containment requirement. The established replicon assay was successfully implemented for high-throughput screening. A validation screen was performed which demonstrated high assay performance and reproducibility. Assay quality was further confirmed via demonstration of appropriate pharmacology for different classes of RSV replication tool inhibitors. RSV replicon and cytotoxicity assays were further developed into a multiplexed format that measured both inhibition of viral replication and cytotoxicity from the same well. This provided a time and cost efficient approach to support lead optimization. In summary, we have developed a robust RSV replicon assay to help expedite the discovery of novel RSV therapeutics.

  20. The relative test performance characteristics of two commercial assays for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in paraffin-fixed human biopsy specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broukhanski George

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Seeplex™ TB Detection-2 assay (Rockville, MD is a nested endpoint PCR for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC targets IS6110 and MPB64 that utilizes dual priming oligonucleotide technology. When used to detect the presence of MTBC DNA in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens, the sensitivity and specificity of this assay is equivalent to a labor-intensive traditional endpoint PCR assay and is more sensitive than a commercial real-time PCR assay.

  1. Determination of vitamin B6 vitamers and pyridoxic acid in plasma: development and evaluation of a high-performance liquid chromatographic assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisp, Marianne R; Bor, Mustafa Vakur; Heinsvig, Else-Marie

    2002-01-01

    Marginal deficiency of vitamin B6 has recently been related to cardiovascular diseases. Because of that there is an increasing interest in a suitable and reliable method for quantifying this vitamin in routine laboratory medicine. We have developed a HPLC-based method able to quantify the B6...... were eluted with a gradient of acetonitrile (0.5-15%) in a potassium phosphate buffer with 1-octanesulfonic acid and triethylamine, pH 2.16. The concentration of the vitamers was determined with fluorescence detector (328 nm excitation, 393 nm emission) after postcolumn derivatization with phosphate...... buffer containing 1 g/L sodium bisulfite. The performance of the assay was evaluated by analyzing six plasma samples with interrelated concentration and two control samples (unspiked and vitamer spiked) over a 3-months period. The HPLC method was able to identify PLP, 4-PA, PM, PL, PN, and PMP from all...

  2. Results from an inter-laboratory comparison of pneumococcal serotype-specific IgG measurement and critical parameters that affect assay performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balloch, A; Licciardi, P V; Leach, A; Nurkka, A; Tang, M L K

    2010-02-01

    Quantitation of specific IgG to polysaccharides (serotypes) of Streptococcus pneumoniae provides the basis for evaluating vaccine efficacy. Different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods are used internationally, making comparisons between laboratories difficult. We undertook an inter-laboratory comparison between two international laboratories performing serotype-specific IgG ELISAs using a panel of well-characterized serum samples: the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute Pneumococcal Laboratory (Melbourne, Australia) and the Vaccine Immunology Laboratory, National Public Health Institute (Helsinki, Finland). While good agreement was found for the inter-laboratory comparison for most serotypes, differences in ELISA methodology influenced specific IgG measurement. Therefore, use of the World Health Organization (WHO)-based ELISA methods for measurement of serotype-specific IgG is reliable, accurate and provides consistent results between international laboratories.

  3. ICT Demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tine Wirenfeldt; Bay, Gina

    In this demonstration we present and discuss two interrelated on-line learning resources aimed at supporting international students at Danish universities in building study skills (the Study Metro) and avoiding plagiarism (Stopplagiarism). We emphasize the necessity of designing online learning r...

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations to illustrate characteristics of substances. Outlines a method to detect the changes in pH levels during the electrolysis of water. Uses water pistols, one filled with methane gas and the other filled with water, to illustrate the differences in these two substances. (TW)

  5. Low-dose paroxetine exposure causes lifetime declines in male mouse body weight, reproduction and competitive ability as measured by the novel organismal performance assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaukler, Shannon M; Ruff, James S; Galland, Tessa; Kandaris, Kirstie A; Underwood, Tristan K; Liu, Nicole M; Young, Elizabeth L; Morrison, Linda C; Yost, Garold S; Potts, Wayne K

    2015-01-01

    Paroxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) that is currently available on the market and is suspected of causing congenital malformations in babies born to mothers who take the drug during the first trimester of pregnancy. We utilized organismal performance assays (OPAs), a novel toxicity assessment method, to assess the safety of paroxetine during pregnancy in a rodent model. OPAs utilize genetically diverse wild mice (Mus musculus) to evaluate competitive performance between experimental and control animals as they compete among each other for limited resources in semi-natural enclosures. Performance measures included reproductive success, male competitive ability and survivorship. Paroxetine-exposed males weighed 13% less, had 44% fewer offspring, dominated 53% fewer territories and experienced a 2.5-fold increased trend in mortality, when compared with controls. Paroxetine-exposed females had 65% fewer offspring early in the study, but rebounded at later time points, presumably, because they were no longer exposed to paroxetine. In cages, paroxetine-exposed breeders took 2.3 times longer to produce their first litter and pups of both sexes experienced reduced weight when compared with controls. Low-dose paroxetine-induced health declines detected in this study that were undetected in preclinical trials with doses 2.5-8 times higher than human therapeutic doses. These data indicate that OPAs detect phenotypic adversity and provide unique information that could be useful towards safety testing during pharmaceutical development.

  6. On the safety and performance demonstration tests of Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor and validation and verification of computational codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Bum; Jeong, Ji Young; Lee, Tae Ho; Kim, Sung Kyun; Euh, Dong Jin; Joo, Hyung Kook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The design of Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (PGSFR) has been developed and the validation and verification (V and V) activities to demonstrate the system performance and safety are in progress. In this paper, the current status of test activities is described briefly and significant results are discussed. The large-scale sodium thermal-hydraulic test program, Sodium Test Loop for Safety Simulation and Assessment-1 (STELLA-1), produced satisfactory results, which were used for the computer codes V and V, and the performance test results of the model pump in sodium showed good agreement with those in water. The second phase of the STELLA program with the integral effect tests facility, STELLA-2, is in the detailed design stage of the design process. The sodium thermal-hydraulic experiment loop for finned-tube sodium-to-air heat exchanger performance test, the intermediate heat exchanger test facility, and the test facility for the reactor flow distribution are underway. Flow characteristics test in subchannels of a wire-wrapped rod bundle has been carried out for safety analysis in the core and the dynamic characteristic test of upper internal structure has been performed for the seismic analysis model for the PGSFR. The performance tests for control rod assemblies (CRAs) have been conducted for control rod drive mechanism driving parts and drop tests of the CRA under scram condition were performed. Finally, three types of inspection sensors under development for the safe operation of the PGSFR were explained with significant results.

  7. Performance-Based Technology Selection Filter application report for Teledyne Wah Chang Albany Operable Unit Number One. INEL Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, J.G.; Morrison, J.L.; Morneau, R.A.; O`Brien, M.C.; Rudin, M.J.

    1992-05-01

    This report summarizes the application of the Performance-Based Technology Selection Filter (PBTSF) developed for the Idaho National Laboratory`s Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program as applied to remediation activities conducted at the Teledyne Wah Chang Albany (TWCA) Superfund Site, Operable Unit One. The remedial action at the TWCA Operable Unit One consisted of solidification, excavation, transportation, and monocell disposal of the contents of two sludge ponds contaminated with various inorganic and organic compounds. Inorganic compounds included low levels of uranium and radium isotopes, as well zirconium, hafnium, chromium, mercury, and nickel. Organic compounds included methylene chloride, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethane, tetrachloroethane, and hexachlorobenzene. Remediation began in June 1991, and was completed in November 1991. The TWCA Operable Unit One configuration option consisted of 15 functional subelements. Data were gathered on these subelements and end-to-end system operation to calculate numerical values for 28 system performance measures. These were then used to calculate a system performance score. An assessment was made of the availability and definitional clarity of these performance measures, applicability of PBTSF utility functions, and rollup methodology. The PBTSF scoring function worked well, with few problems noted in data gathering, utility function normalization, and scoring calculation. The application of this process to an actual in situ treatment and excavation technical process option clarified the specific terms and bounds of the performance score functions, and identified one problem associated with the definition of system boundary.

  8. Validation of a fluorescence polarization assay (FPA) performed in microplates and comparison with other tests used for diagnosing B. melitensis infection in sheep and goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minas, A; Stournara, A; Minas, M; Stack, J; Petridou, E; Christodoulopoulos, G; Krikelis, V

    2007-03-30

    Fluorescence polarization assay (FPA) is a relatively new test for the serological diagnosis of Brucella spp. infection in animals. FPA, carried out in 96-well microplate format, was validated here for diagnosing B. melitensis infection in sheep and goats. This study included sera from 1933 sheep and goats, from animals reared in naturally infected flocks (verified by culture) and showing a positive reaction to two different tests conducted in parallel. In addition, 2154 sera originating from healthy sheep and goats, reared in areas where B. melitensis had never been isolated, were assayed. The optimum cut-off value offering the highest diagnostic sensitivity (DSn) and diagnostic specificity (DSp) was determined at 15 mP over the mean value of the buffer control used in each microplate as determined by receiver operating characteristic analysis. The DSn and DSp of the FPA for small ruminants carried out in microplates at this cut-off value were calculated to be 95.9% and 97.9% with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of 94.9-97.7% and 97.2-98.4%, respectively. The accuracy of the FPA, as expressed by determination of the area under the curve, was 0.991. Indirect ELISA and FPA tests offered the highest DSn when compared with the Rose Bengal test, the complement fixation test, the modified Rose Bengal test and competitive ELISA. The parallel or serial combination of FPA with indirect ELISA offers the highest DSn and DSp. As temperature can affect the results of the FPA, all reagents must be at the same temperature and the standard for comparison must always be read under the same conditions as the sera under test. FPA performed in microplates is a promising assay; the DSn and accuracy are better than those of the tests currently approved for diagnosing B. melitensis in small ruminants. Because of its simplicity, speed, and accuracy, this test can improve capacity for laboratory testing and the efficacy of an eradication program based on a test-and-slaughter policy.

  9. Development and validation of a high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay for the determination of sanfetrinem in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nardi, C; Braggio, S; Ferrari, L; Fontana, S

    2001-10-25

    A rapid, selective and accurate high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay for the quantification of sanfetrinem in human plasma has been developed and validated. The performance of manual and automated sample preparation was assessed; 50 microl of plasma sample was deproteinized with acetonitrile, followed by dilution with water and injection onto the LC system. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Phenomenex Luna C18(2), 50x2.0 (5 microm) column with a mobile phase consisting of water-acetonitrile with 0.1% formic acid followed by detection with a Perkin-Elmer API3000 mass spectrometer in multiple reaction monitoring mode. The lower limit of quantification was improved by five times compared to the UV method previously reported. A range of concentration from 10 ng/ml to 5 microg/ml was covered. The method was applied to the quantification of sanfetrinem in human plasma samples from healthy volunteers participating in a clinical study.

  10. [Comparison of the indirect immunofluorescence assay performance of Bartonella henselae antigens obtained by co-cultivation in Vero and HeLa cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergin, Cağrı; Akkaya, Yüksel; Kiriş Satılmış, Ozgün; Yılmaz, Cansev

    2011-07-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of Bartonella henselae infection is mainly based on serological testing by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA). Cell line co-cultivation with B.henselae and agar derivated antigens are the two major procedures used for evaluation of anti-Bartonella antibodies. Vero and Hep-2 cell lines are the most commonly used media for co-cultivation both in-house and commercial diagnostic kits production. However, HeLa cells which are easily supplied and grown, also can easily be infected by B.henselae. The aim of this study was to compare the performances of antigens obtained by co-cultivation of B.henselae ATCC 49882 (Houston-1) in Vero and HeLa Cells in IFA serology. Out of 381 sera samples, 127 (33.3%) were found positive and 195 (51.2%) were found negative by IFA performed by both cell line co-cultivations. The total agreement between the methods were found as 84.5% (322/381), and Cohen kappa value was calculated as 0.68 (strong, coherent). As a result, He-La cells were found to be useful for the preparation of B.henselae antigens to be used in IFA for the serologic diagnosis of B.henselae infections. However different genotype strains and cross reactions with other infectious agents should be investigated by further studies before routine applications of HeLa cell co-cultivations procedure is established.

  11. Comparison of In-Vitro and Ex-Vivo Wound Healing Assays for the Investigation of Diabetic Wound Healing and Demonstration of a Beneficial Effect of a Triterpene Extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueck, Christopher; Volksdorf, Thomas; Houdek, Pia; Vidal-y-Sy, Sabine; Sehner, Susanne; Ellinger, Bernhard; Lobmann, Ralf; Larena-Avellaneda, Axel; Reinshagen, Konrad; Ridderbusch, Ina; Kohrmeyer, Klaas; Moll, Ingrid; Daniels, Rolf; Werner, Philipp; Merfort, Irmgard; Brandner, Johanna M.

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a frequent cause for chronic, difficult-to-treat wounds. New therapies for diabetic wounds are urgently needed and in-vitro or ex-vivo test systems are essential for the initial identification of new active molecules. The aim of this study is to compare in-vitro and ex-vivo test systems for their usability for early drug screening and to investigate the efficacy of a birch bark triterpene extract (TE) that has been proven ex-vivo and clinically to accelerate non-diabetic wound healing (WH), in a diabetic context. We investigated in-vitro models for diabetic WH, i.e. scratch assays with human keratinocytes from diabetic donors or cultured under hyperglycaemic conditions and a newly developed porcine ex-vivo hyperglycaemic WH model for their potential to mimic delayed diabetic WH and for the influence of TE in these test systems. We show that keratinocytes from diabetic donors often fail to exhibit significantly delayed WH. For cells under hyperglycaemic conditions significant decrease is observed but is influenced by choice of medium and presence of supplements. Also, donor age plays a role. Interestingly, hyperglycaemic effects are mainly hyperosmolaric effects in scratch assays. Ex-vivo models under hyperglycaemic conditions show a clear and substantial decrease of WH, and here both glucose and hyperosmolarity effects are involved. Finally, we provide evidence that TE is also beneficial for ex-vivo hyperglycaemic WH, resulting in significantly increased length of regenerated epidermis to 188±16% and 183±11% (SEM; p<0.05) compared to controls when using two different TE formulations. In conclusion, our results suggest that microenvironmental influences are important in WH test systems and that therefore the more complex hyperglycaemic ex-vivo model is more suitable for early drug screening. Limitations of the in-vitro and ex-vivo models are discussed. Furthermore our data recommend TE as a promising candidate for in-vivo testings in diabetic

  12. Performance of the Demonstrator System for the Phase-I Upgrade of the Trigger Readout Electronics of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Dumont Dayot, Nicolas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    For the Phase-I luminosity upgrade of the LHC a higher granularity trigger readout of the ATLAS LAr Calorimeters is foreseen in order to enhance the trigger feature extraction and background rejection. The new readout system digitizes the detector signals, which are grouped into 34000 so-called Super Cells, with 12 bit precision at 40 MHz and transfers the data on optical links to the digital processing system, which extracts the Super Cell energies. A demonstrator version of the complete system has now been installed and operated on the ATLAS detector. Results from the commissioning and performance measurements will be reported.

  13. Performance of the Demonstrator System for the Phase-I Upgrade of the Trigger Readout Electronics of the ATLAS Liquid-Argon Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Dumont Dayot, Nicolas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    For the Phase-I luminosity upgrade of the LHC a higher granularity trigger readout of the ATLAS LAr Calorimeters is foreseen in order to enhance the trigger feature extraction and background rejection. The new readout system digitizes the detector signals, which are grouped into 34000 so-called Super Cells, with 12 bit precision at 40 MHz and transfers the data on optical links to the digital processing system, which extracts the Super Cell energies. A demonstrator version of the complete system has now been installed and operated on the ATLAS detector. Results from the commissioning and performance measurements will be reported.

  14. On the Safety and Performance Demonstration Tests of Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor and Validation and Verification of Computational Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Bum Kim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The design of Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (PGSFR has been developed and the validation and verification (V&V activities to demonstrate the system performance and safety are in progress. In this paper, the current status of test activities is described briefly and significant results are discussed. The large-scale sodium thermal-hydraulic test program, Sodium Test Loop for Safety Simulation and Assessment-1 (STELLA-1, produced satisfactory results, which were used for the computer codes V&V, and the performance test results of the model pump in sodium showed good agreement with those in water. The second phase of the STELLA program with the integral effect tests facility, STELLA-2, is in the detailed design stage of the design process. The sodium thermal-hydraulic experiment loop for finned-tube sodium-to-air heat exchanger performance test, the intermediate heat exchanger test facility, and the test facility for the reactor flow distribution are underway. Flow characteristics test in subchannels of a wire-wrapped rod bundle has been carried out for safety analysis in the core and the dynamic characteristic test of upper internal structure has been performed for the seismic analysis model for the PGSFR. The performance tests for control rod assemblies (CRAs have been conducted for control rod drive mechanism driving parts and drop tests of the CRA under scram condition were performed. Finally, three types of inspection sensors under development for the safe operation of the PGSFR were explained with significant results.

  15. Dual-energy CT in vertebral compression fractures: performance of visual and quantitative analysis for bone marrow edema demonstration with comparison to MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bierry, Guillaume; Venkatasamy, Aina; Kremer, Stephane; Dosch, Jean-Claude; Dietemann, Jean-Louis [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Radiology, Strasbourg (France)

    2014-04-15

    To prospectively evaluate the performance of virtual non-calcium (VNC) dual-energy CT (DECT) images for the demonstration of trauma-related abnormal marrow attenuation in collapsed and non-collapsed vertebral compression fractures (VCF) with MRI as a reference standard. Twenty patients presenting with non-tumoral VCF were consecutively and prospectively included in this IRB-approved study, and underwent MRI and DECT of the spine. MR examination served as a reference standard. Two independent readers visually evaluated all vertebrae for abnormal marrow attenuation (''CT edema'') on VNC DECT images; specificity, sensitivity, predictive values, intra and inter-observer agreements were calculated. A last reader performed a quantitative evaluation of CT numbers; cut-off values were calculated using ROC analysis. In the visual analysis, VNC DECT images had an overall sensitivity of 84 %, specificity of 97 %, and accuracy of 95 %, intra- and inter-observer agreements ranged from k = 0.74 to k = 0.90. CT numbers were significantly different between vertebrae with edema on MR and those without (p < 0.0001). Cut-off values provided sensitivity of 85 % (77 %) and specificity of 82 % (74 %) for ''CT edema'' on thoracic (lumbar) vertebrae. VNC DECT images allowed an accurate demonstration of trauma-related abnormal attenuation in VCF, revealing the acute nature of the fracture, on both visual and quantitative evaluation. (orig.)

  16. Development and validation of a high-performance liquid chromatographic assay for the determination of fluconazole in human whole blood using solid phase extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shimin; Mada, Sripal Reddy; Torch, Marilyn; Goyal, Rakesh K; Venkataramanan, Raman

    2008-06-01

    A sensitive and specific high-performance liquid chromatographic ultraviolet method for the determination of fluconazole in human whole blood has been developed and validated. Whole blood samples were processed by a solid phase extraction procedure using an Oasis HLB extraction cartridge before chromatography. Phenacetin was used as the internal standard. Chromatography was performed using Waters C18 Symmetry analytical column, 5 microm, 4.6 x 250 mm, using an isocratic elution with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and water (36:64, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min. The retention times of fluconazole and phenacetin were 4.7 and 8.3 minutes, respectively, and the total run time was 10 minutes. Quantitative analysis was performed using a Waters UV-VIS detector at a wavelength of 210 nm. The assay was linear over the concentration range of 0.5 to 15 microg/mL for fluconazole. The extraction recoveries at concentrations of 2.5, 5, and 10 microg/mL were 105.9%, 98.4%, and 95%, respectively. The method can quantify 0.5 microg/mL fluconazole using 300 microL of whole blood. At concentrations of 2.5, 5, and 10 microg/mL, the intraday precision expressed as coefficient of variation was 3.47%, 8.81%, and 1.14% and the interday precision was 5.21%, 5.48%, and 7.18%, respectively. This method is simple, uses a low blood volume for analysis, and allows reproducible and accurate measurement of fluconazole in whole blood samples from pediatric patients.

  17. GASIS demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidas, E.H. [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    A prototype of the GASIS database and retrieval software has been developed and is the subject of this poster session and computer demonstration. The prototype consists of test or preliminary versions of the GASIS Reservoir Data System and Source Directory datasets and the software for query and retrieval. The prototype reservoir database covers the Rocky Mountain region and contains the full GASIS data matrix (all GASIS data elements) that will eventually be included on the CD-ROM. It is populated for development purposes primarily by the information included in the Rocky Mountain Gas Atlas. The software has been developed specifically for GASIS using Foxpro for Windows. The application is an executable file that does not require Foxpro to run. The reservoir database software includes query and retrieval, screen display, report generation, and data export functions. Basic queries by state, basin, or field name will be assisted by scrolling selection lists. A detailed query screen will allow record selection on the basis of any data field, such as depth, cumulative production, or geological age. Logical operators can be applied to any-numeric data element or combination of elements. Screen display includes a {open_quotes}browse{close_quotes} display with one record per row and a detailed single record display. Datasets can be exported in standard formats for manipulation with other software packages. The Source Directory software will allow record retrieval by database type or subject area.

  18. Development of a sensitive and false-positive free PMA-qPCR viability assay to quantify VBNC Escherichia coli and evaluate disinfection performance in wastewater effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibbee, Richard J; Örmeci, Banu

    2017-01-01

    The detection and quantification of viable Escherichia coli cells in wastewater treatment plant effluent is very important as it is the main disinfection efficacy parameter for assessing its public health risk and environmental impact. The aim of this study was to develop a sensitive and false-positive free propidium monoazide-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PMA-qPCR) assay to quantify the viable but non-culturable (VBNC) E. coli present in secondary wastewater effluent after chlorine disinfection. The qPCR target was the E. coli uidA gene, and native Taq was used to eliminate false positives caused by the presence of contaminant E. coli DNA in recombinant Taq polymerase reagents. Due to issues with qPCR inhibitors in wastewater, this study explored several pre-DNA extraction treatment methods for qPCR inhibitor removal. PMA-qPCR validation was done using salmon testes DNA (Sketa DNA) as an exogenous control added directly to the wastewater samples and amplified using a separate qPCR assay. After disinfection of secondary effluent with 2ppm chlorine at the plant, the mean Log10 CFU reduction in E. coli was 2.85 from a mean CFU of 3.48/10mL compared to 0.21 Log10 CCE mean reduction of the uidA gene from a mean CCE of 3.16/10mL. The VBNC cell concentrations were calculated as 2.32 Log10/10mL by subtracting the colony forming units (CFU) obtained from membrane filtration from the calculated CFU equivalent (CCE) values obtained from PMA-qPCR. These results demonstrate the effective use of a PMA-qPCR method for the quantification of the E. coli uidA gene and indicate there are high numbers (2.01×10(3)CCE/100mL) of VBNC E. coli cells leaving the wastewater treatment plant in the final effluent after chlorine treatment. VBNC bacterial cells are of concern as they have the potential to resuscitate and grow, regain virulence, affect natural microbiome in the discharge sites, and pass on antimicrobial resistant genes to other microorganisms.

  19. Quality by design based optimization of a high performance liquid chromatography method for assay determination of low concentration preservatives in complex nasal formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrajšek, Jure; Stojić, Vladimir; Bohanec, Simona; Urleb, Uroš

    2015-01-01

    The effects of seven different chromatographic parameters and five sample preparation parameters in a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for assay determination of benzalkonium chloride (BKC) in a nasal formulation were evaluated using two fractional factorial experimental designs. The design space of the analytical method was modeled using Umetrics Modde software and the optimal method conditions were predicted. The optimum HPLC chromatographic conditions were obtained using a Luna CN column (150 x 4.6 mm, 3 µm). The results show that mobile phase pH, amount of acetonitrile in the mobile phase and column temperature are the most important factors in obtaining good separation of BKC homologs from an interfering peak. In the sample preparation step, the use of an aqueous solution for dissolving the samples was the most important factor since it eliminated the interfering effect of the active compound. The optimal method was validated for linearity, accuracy and precision. The use of experimental designs enables obtaining the maximum amount of information with the least possible number of experiments. Such designs are an economical manner in evaluating a variety of different factors and their interactions.

  20. A broad range assay for rapid detection and etiologic characterization of bacterial meningitis: performance testing in samples from sub-Sahara☆, ☆☆,★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Helen; Yang, Samuel; Gaydos, Charlotte; Hardick, Justin; Ramachandran, Padmini; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Kecojevic, Alexander; Njanpop-Lafourcade, Berthe-Marie; Mueller, Judith E.; Tameklo, Tsidi Agbeko; Badziklou, Kossi; Gessner, Bradford D.; Rothman, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to conduct a pilot evaluation of broad-based multiprobe polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in clinical cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples compared to local conventional PCR/culture methods used for bacterial meningitis surveillance. A previously described PCR consisting of initial broad-based detection of Eubacteriales by a universal probe, followed by Gram typing, and pathogen-specific probes was designed targeting variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene. The diagnostic performance of the 16S rRNA assay in “”127 CSF samples was evaluated in samples from patients from Togo, Africa, by comparison to conventional PCR/culture methods. Our probes detected Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae. Uniprobe sensitivity and specificity versus conventional PCR were 100% and 54.6%, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity of uniprobe versus culture methods were 96.5% and 52.5%, respectively. Gram-typing probes correctly typed 98.8% (82/83) and pathogen-specific probes identified 96.4% (80/83) of the positives. This broad-based PCR algorithm successfully detected and provided species level information for multiple bacterial meningitis agents in clinical samples. PMID:22809694

  1. Cell-based assays in combination with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight tandem mass spectrometry for screening bioactive capilliposide C metabolites generated by rat intestinal microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhongzhe; Huang, Meilin; Chen, Guiying; Yang, Guangjie; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Chang; Zhang, Yang; Xu, Yong; Feng, Yulin; Zhang, Lin; Jiang, Hongliang

    2016-02-01

    Many plant-derived glycosides are used as medications. It is common that these glycosides show poor intestinal absorption but their metabolites generated by intestinal microflora demonstrate strong bioactivity. Hence, it is crucial to develop a method for the identification and characterization of the metabolites, and consequently reveal the pathway in which the glycosides are processed in gut. In this study, cell-based assays in combination with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF-MS/MS) were developed for rapid discovery and evaluation of the metabolites of a glycoside compound, capilliposide C (LC-C). 92.7% of LC-C was biotransformed by rat intestinal microflora after 36-h incubation at 37°C. Human cancer cell lines HepG2, PC-3 and A549 was treated with metabolites pool, respectively, which was followed by cell viability assays and characterization of metabolites using UHPLC-QTOF-MS/MS. As a result, significant cytotoxicity was observed for the metabolites pool, from which six metabolites were identified. Based on the metabolites identified, deglycosylation and esterolysis were proposed as the major metabolic pathways of LC-C in rat intestinal microflora. In addition, M4, an esterolysis product of LC-C, was obtained and evaluated for its bioactivity in vitro. As a result, M4 exhibited a reduction in cell viability in HepG2 with an IC50 value of 17.46±1.55μg/mL.

  2. Rover waste assay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akers, D.W.; Stoots, C.M.; Kraft, N.C.; Marts, D.J. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-11-01

    The Rover Waste Assay System (RWAS) is a nondestructive assay system designed for the rapid assay of highly-enriched {sup 235}U contaminated piping, tank sections, and debris from the Rover nuclear rocket fuel processing facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. A scanning system translates a NaI(Tl) detector/collimator system over the structural components where both relative and calibrated measurements for {sup 137}Cs are made. Uranium-235 concentrations are in operation and is sufficiently automated that most functions are performed by the computer system. These functions include system calibration, problem identification, collimator control, data analysis, and reporting. Calibration of the system was done through a combination of measurements on calibration standards and benchmarked modeling. A description of the system is presented along with the methods and uncertainties associated with the calibration and analysis of the system for components from the Rover facility. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Quantification of imatinib in human serum: validation of a high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method for therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacokinetic assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezende VM

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Vinicius Marcondes Rezende,1 Ariane Rivellis,1 Mafalda Megumi Yoshinaga Novaes,1 Dalton de Alencar Fisher Chamone,2 Israel Bendit1,21Laboratory of Tumor Biology, 2Department of Hematology, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, BrazilBackground: Imatinib mesylate has been a breakthrough treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia. It has become the ideal tyrosine kinase inhibitor and the standard treatment for chronic-phase leukemia. Striking results have recently been reported, but intolerance to imatinib and noncompliance with treatment remain to be solved. Molecular monitoring by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction is the gold standard for monitoring patients, and imatinib blood levels have also become an important tool for monitoring.Methods: A fast and cheap method was developed and validated using high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for quantification of imatinib in human serum and tamsulosin as the internal standard. Remarkable advantages of the method includes use of serum instead of plasma, less time spent on processing and analysis, simpler procedures, and requiring reduced amounts of biological material, solvents, and reagents. Stability of the analyte was also studied. This research also intended to drive the validation scheme in clinical centers. The method was validated according to the requirements of the US Food and Drug Administration and Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency within the range of 0.500–10.0 µg/mL with a limit of detection of 0.155 µg/mL. Stability data for the analyte are also presented.Conclusion: Given that the validated method has proved to be linear, accurate, precise, and robust, it is suitable for pharmacokinetic assays, such as bioavailability and bioequivalence, and is being successfully applied in routine therapeutic drug monitoring in the hospital service.Keywords: imatinib, high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, therapeutic

  4. A simple cost-effective high performance liquid chromatographic assay of sulphadoxine in whole blood spotted on filter paper for field studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijuade Abayomi O

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artesunate plus sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine is one of the four artemisinin-based combination therapies currently recommended by WHO as first-line treatment for falciparum malaria. Sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine is also used for intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in pregnancy. Drug use patterns and drug pharmacokinetics are important factors impacting the spread of drug resistant parasites hence it is imperative to monitor the effect of pharmacokinetic variability on therapeutic efficacy. Unfortunately, information on the pharmacokinetics of sulphadoxine in children and pregnant women with malaria is very limited. Methods for the assay of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine have been previously reported, but they are not cost-effective and practicable in analytical laboratories in low resource areas where malaria is endemic. Efforts in this study were thus devoted to development and evaluation of a simple, cost-effective and sensitive method for quantification of sulphadoxine in small capillary samples of whole blood dried on filter paper. Methods Sulphadoxine was determined in whole blood by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection at 340 nm. Sulisoxazole (SLX was used as internal standard. Chromatographic separation was achieved using a Beckman Coulter ODS C18 and a mobile phase consisting of 0.05 M phosphate buffer-methanol-acetonitrile (70:17:13 V/V/V containing 1% triethylamine solution. Results Standard curves from sulphadoxine-spiked blood added to filter paper were linear over the concentration range studied. Linear regression analysis yielded correlation coefficient r2 > 0.99 (n = 6. Extraction recoveries were about 82-85%. The limit of quantification was 120 ng/ml while the within and between assay coefficient of variations were Conclusion The recovery and accuracy of determination of SDX from whole blood filter paper samples using the method described in this study is satisfactory, thus

  5. Dissimilar Metal Weld Probability of Detection Curve Fits from Performance Demonstration Initiative Data: A Comparison with Other Round-Robin Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heasler, Patrick G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, Michael T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Doctor, Steven R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-20

    The NRC, in cooperation with industry, is developing a computerized simulation and analytical tool within the Extremely Low Probability of Rupture (xLPR) Project to provide insights for determining whether certain types of service degradation would be expected to challenge safety-related systems at operating nuclear power plants. One input for this tool is the probability of detection (POD) for the nondestructive examinations conducted during inservice inspections at these plants. EPRI produced a series of POD curves for ultrasonic testing with data from the industry’s Performance Demonstration Initiative. This report compares the POD curves developed from the EPRI data to other relevant attempts to quantify POD on similar component configurations. The objectives of this report are 1) to determine the reasonableness of the EPRI curves and 2) attempt to explain discrepancies noted with other recent POD studies.

  6. The impact of HIV infection and CD4 cell count on the performance of an interferon gamma release assay in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine G Aabye

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The performance of the tuberculosis specific Interferon Gamma Release Assays (IGRAs has not been sufficiently documented in tuberculosis- and HIV-endemic settings. This study evaluated the sensitivity of the QuantiFERON TB-Gold In-Tube (QFT-IT in patients with culture confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB in a TB- and HIV-endemic population and the effect of HIV-infection and CD4 cell count on test performance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 161 patients with sputum culture confirmed PTB were subjected to HIV- and QFT-IT testing and measurement of CD4 cell count. The QFT-IT was positive in 74% (119/161; 95% CI: 67-81%. Sensitivity was higher in HIV-negative (75/93 than in HIV-positive (44/68 patients (81% vs. 65%, p = 0.02 and increased with CD4 cell count in HIV-positive patients (test for trend p = 0.03. 23 patients (14% had an indeterminate result and this proportion decreased with increasing CD4 cell count in HIV-positive patients (test for trend p = 0.03. Low CD4 cell count (<300 cells/microl did not account for all QFT-IT indeterminate nor all negative results. Sensitivity when excluding indeterminate results was 86% (95% CI: 81-92% and did not differ between HIV-negative and HIV-positive patients (88 vs. 83%, p = 0.39. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Sensitivity of the QFT-IT for diagnosing active PTB infection was reasonable when excluding indeterminate results and in HIV-negative patients. However, since the test missed more than 10% of patients, its potential as a rule-out test for active TB disease is limited. Furthermore, test performance is impaired by low CD4 cell count in HIV-positive patients and possibly by other factors as well in both HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients. This might limit the potential of the test in populations where HIV-infection is prevalent.

  7. Performance of the Aptima High-Risk Human Papillomavirus mRNA Assay in a Referral Population in Comparison with Hybrid Capture 2 and Cytology▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clad, Andreas; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Weinschenk, Johanna; Grote, Ruth; Rahmsdorf, Janina; Freudenberg, Nikolaus

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the Aptima human papillomavirus (HPV) (AHPV; Gen-Probe Incorporated) assay, which detects E6/E7 mRNA from 14 high-risk types, the Hybrid Capture 2 HPV DNA (HC2; Qiagen Incorporated) test, and repeat cytology for their ability to detect high-grade cervical lesions (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2+ [CIN2+]) in women referred to colposcopy due to an abnormal Papanicolaou (Pap) smear. A total of 424 clinical specimens, stored in liquid-based cytology (LBC) vials at room temperature for up to 3 years, were tested by repeat cytology, the AHPV assay, and the HC2 test. Assay results were compared to each other and to histology results. The overall agreement between the AHPV assay and the HC2 test was 88.4%. The sensitivity (specificity) of cytology, the HC2 test, and the AHPV assay for the detection of CIN2+ was 84.9% (66.3%), 91.3% (61.0%), and 91.7% (75.0%) and for the detection of CIN3+ was 93.9% (54.4%), 95.7% (46.0%), and 98.2% (56.3%), respectively. Of the disease-positive specimens containing high-risk HPV (HR HPV) DNA as determined by Linear Array (Roche Diagnostics), the AHPV assay missed 3 CIN2 and 1 microfocal CIN3 specimen, while the HC2 test missed 6 CIN2, 4 CIN3, and 1 cervical carcinoma specimen. The AHPV assay had a sensitivity similar to but a specificity significantly higher (P < 0.0001) than the HC2 test for the detection of CIN2+. The AHPV assay was significantly more sensitive (P = 0.0041) and significantly more specific (P = 0.0163) than cytology for the detection of disease (CIN2+). PMID:21191046

  8. Performance of the Aptima high-risk human papillomavirus mRNA assay in a referral population in comparison with Hybrid Capture 2 and cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clad, Andreas; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Weinschenk, Johanna; Grote, Ruth; Rahmsdorf, Janina; Freudenberg, Nikolaus

    2011-03-01

    This study compared the Aptima human papillomavirus (HPV) (AHPV; Gen-Probe Incorporated) assay, which detects E6/E7 mRNA from 14 high-risk types, the Hybrid Capture 2 HPV DNA (HC2; Qiagen Incorporated) test, and repeat cytology for their ability to detect high-grade cervical lesions (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2+ [CIN2+]) in women referred to colposcopy due to an abnormal Papanicolaou (Pap) smear. A total of 424 clinical specimens, stored in liquid-based cytology (LBC) vials at room temperature for up to 3 years, were tested by repeat cytology, the AHPV assay, and the HC2 test. Assay results were compared to each other and to histology results. The overall agreement between the AHPV assay and the HC2 test was 88.4%. The sensitivity (specificity) of cytology, the HC2 test, and the AHPV assay for the detection of CIN2+ was 84.9% (66.3%), 91.3% (61.0%), and 91.7% (75.0%) and for the detection of CIN3+ was 93.9% (54.4%), 95.7% (46.0%), and 98.2% (56.3%), respectively. Of the disease-positive specimens containing high-risk HPV (HR HPV) DNA as determined by Linear Array (Roche Diagnostics), the AHPV assay missed 3 CIN2 and 1 microfocal CIN3 specimen, while the HC2 test missed 6 CIN2, 4 CIN3, and 1 cervical carcinoma specimen. The AHPV assay had a sensitivity similar to but a specificity significantly higher (P < 0.0001) than the HC2 test for the detection of CIN2+. The AHPV assay was significantly more sensitive (P = 0.0041) and significantly more specific (P = 0.0163) than cytology for the detection of disease (CIN2+).

  9. New oligosaccharyltransferase assay method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohda, Daisuke; Yamada, Masaki; Igura, Mayumi; Kamishikiryo, Jun; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2007-11-01

    We developed a new in vitro assay for oligosaccharyltransferase (OST), which catalyzes the transfer of preassembled oligosaccharides on lipid carriers onto asparagine residues in polypeptide chains. The asparagine residues reside in the sequon, Asn-X-Thr/Ser, where X can be any amino acid residue except Pro. We demonstrate the potency of our assay using the OST from yeast. In our method, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is used to separate the glycopeptide products from the peptide substrates. The substrate peptide is fluorescently labeled and the formation of glycopeptides is analyzed by fluorescence gel imaging. Two in vitro OST assay methods are now widely used, but both the methods depend on previous knowledge of the oligosaccharide moiety: One method uses lectin binding as the separation mechanism and the other method uses biosynthetically or chemoenzymatically synthesized lipid-linked oligosaccharides as donors. N-linked protein glycosylation is found in all three domains of life, but little is known about the N-glycosylation in Archaea. Thus, our new assay, which does not require a priori knowledge of the oligosaccharides, will be useful in such cases. Indeed, we have detected the OST activity in the membrane fraction from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus.

  10. Performance assessment of a nested-PCR assay (the RAPID BAP-MTB) and the BD ProbeTec ET system for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in clinical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jann-Yuan; Lee, Li-Na; Chou, Chin-Sheng; Huang, Chung-Yi; Wang, Shu-Kuan; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Luh, Kwen-Tay

    2004-10-01

    The performance of a nested PCR-based assay (the RAPID BAP-MTB; AsiaGen, Taichung, Taiwan) and the BD ProbeTec ET (DTB) system (Becton Dickinson, Sparks, Md.) for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was evaluated with 600 consecutive clinical samples. These samples, including 552 respiratory specimens and 48 nonrespiratory specimens, were collected from 333 patients treated at National Taiwan University Hospital from September to October 2003. The results of both assays were compared to the gold standard of combined culture results and clinical diagnosis. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the RAPID BAP-MTB assay for respiratory specimens were 66.7% and 97.2%, respectively, and for the DTB assay they were 56.7% and 95.3%, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values for the RAPID BAP-MTB were 74.1% and 96.0%, respectively, and for the DTB assay they were 59.6% and 94.7%, respectively. For smear-negative samples, the sensitivity of the RAPID BAP-MTB and DTB assays was 57.1% and 40.5%, respectively. The RAPID BAP-MTB assay produced 14 false-positive results in 14 samples, including one of the six samples yielding Mycobacterium abscessus, one of the six samples yielding Mycobacterium avium intracellulare, one sample from a patient with a history of pulmonary tuberculosis with complete treatment, and three samples from three patients with a previous diagnosis of tuberculosis who were under treatment at the time of specimen collection. Among the 48 nonrespiratory specimens, the RAPID BAP-MTB assay was positive in one biopsy sample from a patient with lumbar tuberculous spondylitis and one pus sample from a patient with tuberculous cervical lymphadenopathy. Our results showed that the RAPID BAP-MTB assay is better than the DTB assay for both respiratory specimens and nonrespiratory specimens. The overall time for processing this assay is only 5 h. In addition, its diagnostic accuracy in smear-negative samples is as high as in smear

  11. Comparative evaluation of the performance of the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay for measurement of HIV-1 plasma viral load on genetically diverse samples from Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraskevis Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 is characterized by increased genetic heterogeneity which tends to hinder the reliability of detection and accuracy of HIV-1 RNA quantitation assays. Methods In this study, the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 (Abbott RealTime assay was compared to the Roche Cobas TaqMan HIV-1 (Cobas TaqMan and the Siemens Versant HIV-1 RNA 3.0 (bDNA 3.0 assays, using clinical samples of various viral load levels and subtypes from Greece, where the recent epidemiology of HIV-1 infection has been characterized by increasing genetic diversity and a marked increase in subtype A genetic strains among newly diagnosed infections. Results A high correlation was observed between the quantitative results obtained by the Abbott RealTime and the Cobas TaqMan assays. Viral load values quantified by the Abbott RealTime were on average lower than those obtained by the Cobas TaqMan, with a mean (SD difference of -0.206 (0.298 log10 copies/ml. The mean differences according to HIV-1 subtypes between the two techniques for samples of subtype A, B, and non-A/non-B were 0.089, -0.262, and -0.298 log10 copies/ml, respectively. Overall, differences were less than 0.5 log10 for 85% of the samples, and >1 log10 in only one subtype B sample. Similarly, Abbott RealTime and bDNA 3.0 assays yielded a very good correlation of quantitative results, whereas viral load values assessed by the Abbott RealTime were on average higher (mean (SD difference: 0.160 (0.287 log10 copies/ml. The mean differences according to HIV-1 subtypes between the two techniques for subtype A, B and non-A/non-B samples were 0.438, 0.105 and 0.191 log10 copies/ml, respectively. Overall, the majority of samples (86% differed by less than 0.5 log10, while none of the samples showed a deviation of more than 1.0 log10. Conclusions In an area of changing HIV-1 subtype pattern, the Abbott RealTime assay showed a high correlation and good agreement of results when compared both to the Cobas TaqMan and bDNA 3

  12. Geothermal power plant R and D: an analysis of cost-performance tradeoffs and the Heber Binary-Cycle Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassel, T.A.V.; Amundsen, C.B.; Blair, P.D.

    1983-06-30

    A study of advancements in power plant designs for use at geothermal resources in the low to moderate (300 to 400F) temperature range is reported. In 3 case studies, the benefits of R and D to achieve these advancements are evaluated in terms of expected increases in installed geothermal generating capacity over the next 2 decades. A parametric sensitivity study is discussed which analyzes differential power development for combinations of power plant efficiency and capitol cost. Affordable tradeoffs between plant performance and capital costs are illustrated. The independent review and analysis of the expected costs of construction, operation and maintenance of the Heber Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Demonstration Plant are described. Included in this assessment is an analysis of each of the major cost components of the project, including (1) construction cost, (2) well field development costs, (3) fluid purchase costs, and (4) well field and power plant operation and maintenance costs. The total cost of power generated from the Heber Plant (in terms of mills per kWh) is then compared to the cost of power from alternative fossil-fueled base load units. Also evaluated are the provisions of both: (a) the Cooperative Agreement between the federal government and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG and E); and (b) the Geothermal Heat Sales Contract with Union Oil Company.

  13. Development of liquid scintillation based 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system and demonstration of its performance by standardization of ⁶⁰Co.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, D B; Anuradha, R; Joseph, Leena; Tomar, B S

    2013-02-01

    A single-vial, single-PMT 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system has been developed at the Radiation Safety Systems Division, BARC. It has advantages of simple sample preparation, higher counting efficiency and the absence of self absorption over the conventional proportional counter based 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence counting system. The performance of the system is demonstrated by standardizing a (60)Co solution using the 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system, 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence counting system and CIEMAT/NIST method and comparing the results obtained by each method. The detection efficiency of liquid scintillation counter of the 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system was varied by color quenching, by chemical quenching and by varying the bias voltage applied to the LSC PMT. For the proportional counter based 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence counting system the detection efficiency was varied by source self absorption. The activity concentrations obtained using the 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system, the 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence counting system and the CIEMAT/NIST method are comparable within the uncertainty limits.

  14. Towards a high throughput droplet-based agglutination assay

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2013-10-22

    This work demonstrates the detection method for a high throughput droplet based agglutination assay system. Using simple hydrodynamic forces to mix and aggregate functionalized microbeads we avoid the need to use magnetic assistance or mixing structures. The concentration of our target molecules was estimated by agglutination strength, obtained through optical image analysis. Agglutination in droplets was performed with flow rates of 150 µl/min and occurred in under a minute, with potential to perform high-throughput measurements. The lowest target concentration detected in droplet microfluidics was 0.17 nM, which is three orders of magnitude more sensitive than a conventional card based agglutination assay.

  15. Use of dual priming oligonucleotide system-based multiplex RT-PCR combined with high performance liquid chromatography assay for simultaneous detection of five enteric viruses associated with acute enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wen-Lu; Wang, Zi-Wei; Qin, Yue; Sun, Chao; Liu, Zhong-Mei; Jiang, Yan-Ping; Qiao, Xin-Yuan; Tang, Li-Jie; Li, Yi-Jing; Xu, Yi-Gang

    2017-05-01

    In this study, a specific and sensitive method for simultaneous detection of human astrovirus, human rotavirus, norovirus, sapovirus and enteric adenovirus associated with acute enteritis was developed, based on the specific dual priming oligonucleotide (DPO) system and the sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. The DPO system-based multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) combined with HPLC assay was more sensitive than agarose gel electrophoresis analysis and real-time SYBR Green PCR assay, and showed a specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 96%-100%. The high sensitivity and specificity of the assay indicates its great potential to be a useful tool for the accurate diagnosis of enteric virus infections.

  16. Performance of interferon-gamma and IP-10 release assays for diagnosing latent tuberculosis infections in patients with concurrent malaria in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drabe, Camilla H; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Helleberg, Marie

    2016-01-01

    the possible influence of Plasmodium falciparum infection on the IGRA test QuantiFERON-TB GOLD(®) In-Tube (QFT) test and an in-house IP-10 release assay. In total, 241 Tanzanian adults were included; 184 patients with uncomplicated malaria (88 human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] coinfected) and 57 HIV...

  17. High-performance liquid chromatographic assay for catecholamines and metanephrines using fluorimetric detection with pre-column 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl chloride derivatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, E C; Wee, P Y; Ho, P Y; Ho, P C

    2000-12-01

    A convenient HPLC-fluorescent assay of norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E), dopamine (DA) and their 3-O-methylated metabolites, normetanephrine (NM) and metanephrine (MN) was developed. These analytes were coupled to 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl chloride (FMOC-Cl) before assays. Results showed that using a linear gradient elution, peaks of FMOC-NE, FMOC-E, FMOC-DA, FMOC-NM, FMOC-MN and FMOC-DHBA (3,4-dihydroxybenzylamine, internal standard) were simultaneously resolved within 40 min. Optimization of the chromatographic and derivatization conditions, and validation of the assay were further discussed in the paper. The structures of these derivatives were confirmed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS). The molecular ions [M+H]- of FMOC-NE, FMOC-E, FMOC-DA, FMOC-NM and FMOC-MN were m/z 836, 850, 820, 628 and 642, respectively. Based on these findings, the FMOC-derivatives of metanephrines and catecholamines were confirmed to be bi-substituted and tri-substituted respectively at the amino and catechol functional groups. Finally, the assay was successfully applied to the measurement of urinary E, DA, NM and MN after direct derivatization and simple cleaning.

  18. Education Payload Operation - Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Education Payload Operation - Demonstrations (EPO-Demos) are recorded video education demonstrations performed on the International Space Station (ISS) by crewmembers using hardware already onboard the ISS. EPO-Demos are videotaped, edited, and used to enhance existing NASA education resources and programs for educators and students in grades K-12. EPO-Demos are designed to support the NASA mission to inspire the next generation of explorers.

  19. Arsenic and Nitrate Removal from Drinking Water by Ion Exchange U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Vale, OR - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of the EPA Arsenic Removal Technology Demonstration Program, a 540-gal/min (gpm) ion exchange (IX) system proposed by Kinetico was selected for demonstration at Vale, OR to remove arsenic and nitrate from a groundwater supply to meet their respective maximum contaminant l...

  20. Fluorosurfactant-prepared triangular gold nanoparticles as postcolumn chemiluminescence reagents for high-performance liquid chromatography assay of low molecular weight aminothiols in biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qianqian; Shang, Fei; Lu, Chao; Zheng, Zhixia; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2011-12-16

    Our recent study demonstrates the synthesized triangular gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by trisodium citrate reduction of HAuCl(4) in the presence of nonionic fluorosurfactant (FSN) could display stronger catalytic activity towards luminol-chemiluminescence (CL) than spherical AuNPs. Ultratrace aminothiols may cause a great decrease in CL intensity of the triangular AuNPs-luminol CL system. In this article, we utilize the as-prepared triangular AuNPs as novel postcolumn CL reagents to explore a simple high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-CL method for the determination of low molecular weight aminothiols (i.e., cysteine, homocysteine, glutathione, cysteinylglycine and glutamylcysteine). The as-prepared triangular AuNPs were easier to synthesize, stable at a wider pH range and high ionic strength, and highly selective and sensitive towards reduced aminothiols. The detection limits at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 for cysteine, homocysteine, glutathione, cysteinylglycine and glutamylcysteine were 0.016, 0.08, 0.1, 0.04 and 0.1pmol, respectively. Recoveries from spiked urine and plasma samples were 95.7-104.3%. The applicability of the proposed method has been validated by determining these low molecular weight aminothiols in human urine and plasma samples with satisfactory results, and thus it will have great potential application in clinical diagnosis.

  1. Exogenous versus endogenous recovery of 25-hydroxyvitamins D2 and D3 in human samples using high-performance liquid chromatography and the DiaSorin LIAISON Total-D Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Ronald L

    2010-07-01

    Demand for circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] measurements has exploded due to its relationship with many serious health problems. The present study was designed to investigate the validity of samples "spiked" with 25-hydroxyvitamin D2 [25(OH)D2] or 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] to determine their analytical recovery by the DiaSorin LIAISON 25 OH Vitamin D Total Assay (DiaSorin Assay) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). 25(OH)D was measured in nine volunteers taking large daily doses of vitamin D2 for 2 weeks. Samples were obtained pre-supplementation and 1 week following vitamin D2. Pre-supplementation samples were used for exogenous recovery studies by adding 25(OH)D2 or 25(OH)D3. Endogenous 25(OH)D [25(OH)D2 plus 25(OH)D3] concentrations reported by the DiaSorin Assay or detected by HPLC were in excellent agreement. However, exogenously added 25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3 were under-recovered by the DiaSorin Assay. NIST vitamin D standards containing serum from another species (horse) or exogenous 25(OH)D2 were similarly affected when using the DiaSorin Assay. Exogenous 25(OH)D2, 25(OH)D3 or serum from other species added to human samples is inappropriate in determining the analytical recovery of vitamin D compounds when using the DiaSorin Assay. Only endogenous 25(OH)D2 and/or 25(OH)D3 contained in human blood samples should be utilized for this purpose.

  2. FLUIDICS DEVICE FOR ASSAY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device for use in performing assays on standard laboratory solid supports whereon chemical entities are attached. The invention furthermore relates to the use of such a device and a kit comprising such a device. The device according to the present invention is a......, when operatively connected, one or more chambers (21) comprising the chemical entities (41), the inlet(s) (5) and outlet(s) (6) and chambers (21) being in fluid connection. The device further comprise means for providing differing chemical conditions in each chamber (21)....

  3. Development of a stability-indicating high performance liquid chromatography method for assay of erythromycin ethylsuccinate in powder for oral suspension dosage form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Kamarei

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study an effective method was developed to assay erythromycin ethylsuccinate for an oral suspension dosage form. The chromatographic separation was achieved on an X-Terra™ C18 analytical column. A mixture of acetonitrile–ammonium dihydrogen phosphate buffer (0.025 mol L-1 (60:40, V/V (pH 7.0 was used as the mobile phase, effluent flow rate monitored at 1.0 mL min−1, and UV detection at 205 nm. In forced degradation studies, the effects of acid, base, oxidation, UV light and temperature were investigated showing no interference in the peak of drug. The proposed method was validated in terms of specificity, linearity, robustness, precision and accuracy. The method was linear at concentrations ranging from 400 to 600 μg mL−1, precise (intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations <0.65, accurate (mean recovery; 99.5%. The impurities and degradation products of erythromycin ethylsuccinate were selectively determined with good resolution in both the raw material and the final suspension forms. The method could be useful for both routine analytical and quality control assays of erythromycin ethylsuccinate in commercial powder for an oral suspension dosage form and it could be a very powerful tool to investigate the chemical stability of erythromycin ethylsuccinate.

  4. Toward standardization of carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) measurements: III. Performance of native serum and serum spiked with disialotransferrin proves that harmonization of CDT assays is possible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weykamp, Cas; Wielders, Jos P M; Helander, Anders; Anton, Raymond F; Bianchi, Vincenza; Jeppsson, Jan-Olof; Siebelder, Carla; Whitfield, John B; Schellenberg, François

    2013-05-01

    Carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) is a generic term that refers to the transferrin glycoforms whose concentration in blood is temporarily increased by sustained alcohol consumption. Due to high clinical specificity, CDT was proposed as a biomarker of heavy alcohol use and has been available for about 20 years. A number of methods have been developed for CDT measurement based on different analytical techniques and principles and without any harmonization or calibration to a reference method. As a consequence, neither the reference limits nor the cut-off values have been similar across assays, hampering understanding of the diagnostic value of CDT and its routine use. This prompted the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) to initiate a Working Group on Standardization of CDT (WG-CDT). This third publication of the WG-CDT is devoted to testing the commutability of native and disialotransferrin-spiked serum panels as candidate secondary reference materials, in order to prove the harmonization potential of commercial CDT methods. The results showed that assay harmonization reduced the inter-laboratory imprecision in a network of reference laboratories running the HPLC candidate reference method. In the seven commercial methods evaluated in this study, the use of multi-level secondary calibrators of human serum origin significantly reduced the between-method imprecision. Thus, harmonization of CDT measurements by different methods can be achieved using this calibration system, opening the way for a full standardization of commercial methods against a reference method by use of certified reference materials.

  5. Development of maraviroc, a CCR5 antagonist for treatment of HIV, using a novel tropism assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ryst, Elna; Heera, Jayvant; Demarest, James; Knirsch, Charles

    2015-06-01

    Assays to identify infectious organisms are critical for diagnosis and enabling the development of therapeutic agents. The demonstration that individuals with a 32-bp deletion within the CCR5 locus were resistant to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, while those heterozygous for the mutation progressed more slowly, led to the discovery of maraviroc (MVC), a CCR5 antagonist. As MVC is only active against CCR5-tropic strains of HIV, it was critical to develop a diagnostic assay to identify appropriate patients. Trofile™, a novel phenotypic tropism assay, was used to identify patients with CCR5-tropic virus for the MVC development program. Results of these clinical studies demonstrated that the assay correctly identified patients likely to respond to MVC. Over time, the performance characteristics of the phenotypic assay were enhanced, necessitating retesting of study samples. Genotypic tropism tests that have the potential to allow for local use and more rapid turnaround times are also being developed.

  6. Performance of four different indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) to detect specific IgG, IgA, and IgM in Legionnaires' disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Shand, G H; Hansen, K;

    1994-01-01

    Currently recommended methods in Legionnaires' disease serology are based upon crude whole-cell antigenic preparations. To investigate whether purified antigens would perform better in a given diagnostic test for antibodies against Legionella pneumophila, we compared the performance of three...

  7. Performance Testing of PCR Assay in Blood Samples for the Diagnosis of Toxoplasmic Encephalitis in AIDS Patients from the French Departments of America and Genetic Diversity of Toxoplasma gondii: A Prospective and Multicentric Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ajzenberg

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmic encephalitis in patients with AIDS is a life-threatening disease mostly due to reactivation of Toxoplasma gondii cysts in the brain. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of real-time PCR assay in peripheral blood samples for the diagnosis of toxoplasmic encephalitis in AIDS patients in the French West Indies and Guiana.Adult patients with HIV and suspicion of toxoplasmic encephalitis with start of specific antitoxoplasmic therapy were included in this study during 40 months. The real-time PCR assay targeting the 529 bp repeat region of T. gondii was performed in two different centers for all blood samples. A Neighbor-Joining tree was reconstructed from microsatellite data to examine the relationships between strains from human cases of toxoplasmosis in South America and the Caribbean. A total of 44 cases were validated by a committee of experts, including 36 cases with toxoplasmic encephalitis. The specificity of the PCR assay in blood samples was 100% but the sensitivity was only 25% with moderate agreement between the two centers. Altered level of consciousness and being born in the French West Indies and Guiana were the only two variables that were associated with significantly decreased risk of false negative results with the PCR assay.Our results showed that PCR sensitivity in blood samples increased with severity of toxoplasmic encephalitis in AIDS patients. Geographic origin of patients was likely to influence PCR sensitivity but there was little evidence that it was caused by differences in T. gondii strains.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00803621.

  8. Correlation between the genotoxicity endpoints measured by two different genotoxicity assays: comet assay and CBMN assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Ladeira

    2015-06-01

    The results concerning of positive findings by micronuclei and non significant ones by comet assay, are corroborated by Deng et al. (2005 study performed in workers occupationally exposed to methotrexate, also a cytostatic drug. According to Cavallo et al. (2009, the comet assay seems to be more suitable for the prompt evaluation of the genotoxic effects, for instance, of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons mixtures containing volatile substances, whereas the micronucleus test seems more appropriate to evaluate the effects of exposure to antineoplastic agents. However, there are studies that observed an increase in both the comet assay and the micronucleus test in nurses handling antineoplastic drugs, although statistical significance was only seen in the comet assay, quite the opposite of our results (Maluf & Erdtmann, 2000; Laffon et al. 2005.

  9. Development of Measures of Performance for Evaluating the COMDAT Technology Demonstrator: Potential Use of the Naval Combat Operator Trainer (NCOT) for Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    multicapteurs (MSDF), ainsi qu’une évaluation de la logistique et de l’utilité du simulateur d’opérateur d’équipement de combat naval (NCOT) en vue de la...la performance pour la technologie de fusion de données de multicapteurs (MSDF), ainsi qu’une évaluation de la logistique et de l’utilité du

  10. Passive damping technology demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Robert E.; Spencer, Susan M.; Austin, Eric M.; Johnson, Conor D.

    1995-05-01

    A Hughes Space Company study was undertaken to (1) acquire the analytical capability to design effective passive damping treatments and to predict the damped dynamic performance with reasonable accuracy; (2) demonstrate reasonable test and analysis agreement for both baseline and damped baseline hardware; and (3) achieve a 75% reduction in peak transmissibility and 50% reduction in rms random vibration response. Hughes Space Company teamed with CSA Engineering to learn how to apply passive damping technology to their products successfully in a cost-effective manner. Existing hardware was selected for the demonstration because (1) previous designs were lightly damped and had difficulty in vibration test; (2) multiple damping concepts could be investigated; (3) the finite element model, hardware, and test fixture would be available; and (4) damping devices could be easily implemented. Bracket, strut, and sandwich panel damping treatments that met the performance goals were developed by analysis. The baseline, baseline with damped bracket, and baseline with damped strut designs were built and tested. The test results were in reasonable agreement with the analytical predictions and demonstrated that the desired reduction in dynamic response could be achieved. Having successfully demonstrated this approach, it can now be used with confidence for future designs as a means for reducing weight and enhancing reliability.

  11. Evaluation of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays performed on milk and serum samples for detection of neosporosis and leukosis in lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Robert B; Kelton, David F; Hietala, Sharon K; Duffield, Todd F

    2013-04-01

    Serum and milk samples from 1229 cows on 22 Ontario dairy farms were individually tested for antibodies specific for bovine leukosis virus (BLV) and Neospora caninum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Antibodies against BLV were present in 361 serum samples (29.4%) and 369 milk samples (30.0%). Comparing the 2 tests, agreement was almost perfect (k = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.83 to 0.90) and the proportions of samples positive were not significantly different (P = 0.56). Both tests identified the same 3 herds free of bovine leukosis virus. Antibodies against N. caninum were detected in 138 serum samples (11.2%), and 111 milk samples (9.0%). Agreement between the 2 tests was moderate (k = 0.52; 95% CI = 0.43 to 0.59). Four herds were free of neosporosis by the serum test, while 10 herds were negative by the milk test. The ELISA on milk samples facilitates sample collection to classify herds free of BLV; the milk N. caninum ELISA was less reliable in predicting herd-level infection.

  12. Performance of Helicobacter pylori acid extract and urease enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in relation to 14C-urea breath test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wulffen, H; Gatermann, S; Windler, E; Gabbe, E; Heinrich, H C

    1993-09-01

    The 14C-urea breath test has been shown to be a reliable non-invasive method to detect the presence or absence of H. pylori infection. Alternatively, a number of techniques have been devised to detect circulating antibodies against H. pylori in serum, the most commonly used being enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). In the present study we compared the value of two ELISA antigen preparations, an acid glycine extract and a urease preparation, in relation to the results achieved in a 14C-urea breath test. Seventy-five gastroenterology outpatients were screened for the presence of H. pylori infection using the urea breath test. At the same time serum specimens were obtained. Thirty-seven patients had a positive breath test, i.e. they expired more than 2% of the oral 14C test dose within 60 min. Using the breath test as reference, sensitivity and specificity for the acid extract were 89.2% and 84.2% respectively, and for the urease ELISA 81.1% and 89.5%. Agreement between the two ELISAs was found in 82.7%, overall agreement between all three tests was observed in 77.3%. All three tests were found to be useful for monitoring therapy directed against H. pylori.

  13. Development and Validation of a Specific Stability Indicating High Performance Liquid Chromatographic Methods for Related Compounds and Assay of Solifenacin Succinate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. V. Rami Reddy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gradient, reverse phase liquid chromatographic methods were developed separately for the related compounds and solifenacin succinate, an active pharmaceutical ingredient used for the treatment of overactive bladder. Gradient LC method was employed for related compounds. The mobile phase-A contains a 0.01 M phosphate buffer pH: 3.5±0.05 with orthophosphoric acid (88% and mobile phase-B contains a mixture of acetonitrile and water in the ratio of 90 : 10(v/v. The flow rate was 1.0 mL/minute, column temperature was kept at 35°C, and detection was monitored at 220 nm. In the developed HPLC method the resolution between solifenacin succinate and its closely eluting impurity, that is, solifenacin N-oxide was found to be greater than 3.0. The drug was subjected to stress conditions such as hydrolysis, oxidation, photolysis, and thermal degradation. Considerable degradation was found to occur in only oxidative stress condition. Degradation product formed during oxidative stress condition was found to be impurity-C and it can be identified by LC-MS. The stress samples were assayed against a qualified reference standard and the mass balance was found close to 99.5%. The developed RP-LC method was validated as per ICH guidelines. We also developed LC-MS/MS method for determination and identification of these impurities in solifenacin succinate.

  14. Development of plasmids for quantitative detection of integrated lentiviral vectors and evaluation of culture time to perform vector titer by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Baiamonte

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The accurate assessment of provirus copy number per cell (VCN/cell is a fundamental issue in transgenesis as well as in gene therapy studies based on stably integrated vectors. To this end, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR is a powerful method but it is sensible to differences in quality or concentration of the two-plasmid preparations used for the construction of the standard curves. In order to minimize technical errors we included genome specific sequences (mouse or human and vector specific sequences in the same plasmid. We evaluated the specificity and sensitivity of these bivalent plasmids by qPCR analysis on mouse and human genomic DNA containing a known number of a reporter lentiviral vector and we found that the system is reliable to measure up to 0.1 VCN/cell. Here we have applied this assay to measure vector titer of virus stock preparations and to determine the optimal cell passages at which viral titration effectively reflects the number of integrated vectors.

  15. A new search-and-rescue service in the Mediterranean Sea: a demonstration of the operational capability and an evaluation of its performance using real case scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppini, Giovanni; Jansen, Eric; Turrisi, Giuseppe; Creti, Sergio; Yurievna Shchekinova, Elena; Pinardi, Nadia; Lecci, Rita; Carluccio, Ivano; Vittal Kumkar, Yogesh; D'Anca, Alessandro; Mannarini, Gianandrea; Martinelli, Sara; Marra, Palmalisa; Capodiferro, Tommaso; Gismondi, Tommaso

    2016-12-01

    A new web-based and mobile decision support system (DSS) for search-and-rescue (SAR) at sea is presented, and its performance is evaluated using real case scenarios. The system, named OCEAN-SAR, is accessible via the website http://www.ocean-sar.com. In addition to the website, dedicated applications for iOS and Android have been created to optimise the user experience on mobile devices. OCEAN-SAR simulates drifting objects at sea, using as input ocean currents and wind data provided, respectively, by the CMEMS and ECMWF. The modelling of the drifting objects is based on the leeway model, which parameterises the wind drag of an object using a series of coefficients. These coefficients have been measured in field experiments for different types of objects, ranging from a person in the water to a coastal freighter adrift. OCEAN-SAR provides the user with an intuitive interface to run simulations and to visualise their results using Google Maps. The performance of the service is evaluated by comparing simulations to data from the Italian Coast Guard pertaining to actual incidents in the Mediterranean Sea.

  16. In-house validation study of the DuPont Qualicon BAX system Q7 instrument with the BAX system PCR Assay for Salmonella (modification of AOAC Official Method 2003.09 and AOAC Research Institute Performance-Tested Method 100201).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, George; Andaloro, Bridget; White, H Kirk; Bolton, Lance; Wang, Siqun; Davis, Eugene; Wallace, Morgan

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, DuPont Qualicon introduced the BAX system Q7 instrument for use with its assays. To demonstrate the equivalence of the new and old instruments, a validation study was conducted using the BAX system PCR Assay for Salmonella, AOAC Official Method 2003.09, on three food types. The foods were simultaneously analyzed with the BAX system Q7 instrument and either the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual or the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Food Safety and Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook reference method for detecting Salmonella. Comparable performance between the BAX system and the reference methods was observed. Of the 75 paired samples analyzed, 39 samples were positive by both the BAX system and reference methods, and 36 samples were negative by both the BAX system and reference methods, demonstrating 100% correlation. Inclusivity and exclusivity for the BAX system Q7 instrument were also established by testing 50 Salmonella strains and 20 non-Salmonella isolates. All Salmonella strains returned positive results, and all non-Salmonella isolates returned a negative response.

  17. Diagnostic performance and application of a real-time PCR assay for the detection of Salmonella in fecal samples collected from hospitalized horses with or without signs of gastrointestinal tract disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekiri, A B; Long, M T; Hernandez, J A

    2016-02-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the detection of Salmonella in fecal samples collected from hospitalized horses with or without signs of gastrointestinal (GI) tract disease. The PCR assay used primers and a probe that targeted the invA gene of Salmonella. Assuming a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 96.6%, and a disease prevalence of 2%, 5%, and 10-15% in study horses, the PCR assay had a high (100%) negative predictive value, and a positive predictive value that ranged from 37% in horses without signs of GI disease that tested Salmonella culture-negative, to 60% in horses with signs of GI disease that tested Salmonella culture-negative, to 76-83% in horses with signs of GI disease that tested Salmonella culture-positive. This study provides evidence that the real-time PCR that targets the Salmonella invA gene can be used as a screening test for the detection of Salmonella in feces of hospitalized horses with signs of GI disease. Horses that test PCR-positive can be tested in series using bacteriologic culture to reduce false positive results or to provide additional data (e.g., antibiogram and serotyping data) that can be used to identify potential nosocomial Salmonella infections.

  18. Analytical performance specifications for changes in assay bias (Δbias) for data with logarithmic distributions as assessed by effects on reference change values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyltoft Petersen, Per; Lund, Flemming; Fraser, Callum G;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The distributions of within-subject biological variation are usually described as coefficients of variation, as are analytical performance specifications for bias, imprecision and other characteristics. Estimation of specifications required for reference change values is traditionally...... performance specifications for reference change value, with combination of Δbias and CVA based on log-Gaussian distributions of CVI as natural logarithms. The model was tested using plasma prolactin and glucose as examples. RESULTS: Analytical performance specifications for reference change value generated...... using the new model based on log-Gaussian distributions were practically identical with the traditional model based on Gaussian distributions. CONCLUSION: The traditional and simple to apply model used to generate analytical performance specifications for reference change value, based on the use...

  19. Improved benzodiazepine radioreceptor assay using the MultiScreen (R) Assay System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, MJ; Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, RA

    1999-01-01

    In this article, an improved benzodiazepine radioreceptor assay is described, which allows substantial reduction in assay time, The filtration in this method was performed by using the MultiScreen(R) Assay System. The latter consists of a 96-well plate with glass fibre filters sealed at the bottom,

  20. Assessment of urine solute and matrix effects on the performance of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for measurement of interleukin-6 in dog urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Michael W; Nordone, Sushila K; Vaden, Shelly L; Breitschwerdt, Edward B

    2011-03-01

    Measurement of cytokine concentrations within body fluids is a means of recognizing subclinical and/or unresolved, infectious and inflammatory states in patients. In the urinary tract, such information may be useful for identifying patients with pyelonephritis, asymptomatic bacteriuria, recurrent infections, and cystitis. One such cytokine, interleukin-6 (IL-6), is recognized as a primary cytokine that is produced following exposure of the urothelium to bacterial virulence factors. Complicating reliable testing for this and other cytokines is the nature of urine itself. Urine varies widely in its composition as indicated by the range of pH and urine specific gravity (USG) observed in healthy patients. An additional variable is the protein and carbohydrate matrix capable of hindering immunologic testing modalities, such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). The purpose of the current study was to examine the role of urine pH, USG, and matrix while optimizing a canine-specific chemiluminescent ELISA for the measurement of IL-6 in the urine of dogs. Urine spiked with IL-6 obtained maximal IL-6 quantitative recoveries of only 55 ± 10% (mean ± 1 standard deviation) when an ELISA optimized for cell culture supernatants was used. The urine matrix and variations in USG were determined to by contributing to this poor IL-6 recovery. Using specific matrix inhibitors and optimal dilutions improved the IL-6 quantitative recovery to 91 ± 5%. Urine pH (5.5-9.5) had no effect. The current work underscores the importance of critically optimizing testing modalities for biomarkers, particularly if they are immunologic in origin.

  1. Barcoded microchips for biomolecular assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Sun, Jiashu; Zou, Yu; Chen, Wenwen; Zhang, Wei; Xi, Jianzhong Jeff; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-01-20

    Multiplexed assay of analytes is of great importance for clinical diagnostics and other analytical applications. Barcode-based bioassays with the ability to encode and decode may realize this goal in a straightforward and consistent manner. We present here a microfluidic barcoded chip containing several sets of microchannels with different widths, imitating the commonly used barcode. A single barcoded microchip can carry out tens of individual protein/nucleic acid assays (encode) and immediately yield all assay results by a portable barcode reader or a smartphone (decode). The applicability of a barcoded microchip is demonstrated by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) immunoassays for simultaneous detection of three targets (anti-gp41 antibody, anti-gp120 antibody, and anti-gp36 antibody) from six human serum samples. We can also determine seven pathogen-specific oligonucleotides by a single chip containing both positive and negative controls.

  2. Optics Demonstrations Using Cylindrical Lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Dragia; Nikolov, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider the main properties of cylindrical lenses and propose several demonstrational experiments that can be performed with them. Specifically we use simple glasses full of water to demonstrate some basic geometrical optics principles and phenomena. We also present some less standard experiments that can be performed with such…

  3. Diagnostic performance of an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect bovine leukemia virus antibodies in bulk-tank milk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekouei, Omid; Durocher, Jean; Keefe, Greg

    2016-07-01

    This study assessed the diagnostic performance of a commercial ELISA for detecting bovine leukemia virus antibodies in bulk-tank milk samples from eastern Canada. Sensitivity and specificity of the test were estimated at 97.2% and 100%, respectively. The test was recommended as a cost-efficient tool for large-scale screening programs.

  4. In house reverse membrane hybridisation assay versus GenoType MTBDRplus and their performance to detect mutations in the genes rpoB, katG and inhA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Luiz Montego Ferreira Junior

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB threatens global TB control and is a major public health concern in several countries. We therefore developed a multiplex assay (LINE-TB/MDR that is able to identify the most frequent mutations related to rifampicin (RMP and isoniazid (INH resistance. The assay is based on multiplex polymerase chain reaction, membrane hybridisation and colorimetric detection targeting of rpoB and katG genes, as well as the inhA promoter, which are all known to carry specific mutations associated with multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB. The assay was validated on a reference panel of 108 M. tuberculosis isolates that were characterised by the proportion method and by DNA sequencing of the targets. When comparing the performance of LINE-TB/MDR with DNA sequencing, the sensitivity, specificity and agreement were 100%, 100% and 100%, respectively, for RMP and 77.6%, 90.6% and 88.9%, respectively, for INH. Using drug sensibility testing as a reference standard, the performance of LINE-TB/MDR regarding sensitivity, specificity and agreement was 100%, 100% and 100% (95%, respectively, for RMP and 77%, 100% and 88.7% (82.2-95.1, respectively, for INH. LINE-TB/MDR was compared with GenoType MTBDRplus for 65 isolates, resulting in an agreement of 93.6% (86.7-97.5 for RIF and 87.4% (84.3-96.2 for INH. LINE-TB/MDR warrants further clinical validation and may be an affordable alternative for MDR-TB diagnosis.

  5. Demonstration of impact performance of the nuclear transport package in on-site hypothetical collision scenarios by a heavy goods vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tso, C.F.; Izatt, C. [Arup (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    Spent fuel modules are contained in Module Removal Container (MRC) during on-site transport at the D154 facilities in the Devonport Naval Dockyard in the United Kingdom. The container is transported on its own on a Low Level Transfer Trolley (LLTT) and accommodated within a Transfer Frame. The LLTT travels on rails and moves either under its own power or towed by a Rail Tug Unit. The Transfer Frame provides a secure means of support to the MRC during transit and provides impact protection in the event of collision. The MRC is accommodated within the Transfer Frame by way of a sub-frame assembly. It rests on its sub-frame and is held in a vertical position by a number of support arms bolted to the Frame. The Transfer Frame is attached to the Low Level Transfer Trolley by a combination of bolts and shear pins. The combination of LLTT, Transfer Frame, sub-frame and a MRC is known as a Nuclear Transport Package (NTP). The design basis vehicle impact accident specifies a collision from a 20 tonne vehicle travelling at 20 mph from any direction. In order to satisfy the safety functional requirements, the NTP is required to meet the following conditions: The NTP should not overturn as a complete assembly following the impact. The Transfer Frame should not detach from the LLTT, and with the attachments remaining within the Level D stress limits specified in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section 3. The MRC should be shown to withstand any potential impacts of the vehicle in the event of failure of any of the frame members. The frame must not transmit as a result of the vehicle impact, to either container, loads that would compromise their shielding and containment boundaries. The performance of the NTP was substantiated by finite element (FE) analysis, using the explicit non-linear transient code LS-DYNA. The work formed part of the site license application for the D154 facilities.

  6. Lessons from the use of genetically modified Drosophila melanogaster in ecological studies: Hsf mutant lines show highly trait-specific performance in field and laboratory thermal assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Loeschcke, Volker; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård

    2009-01-01

    1.  Laboratory studies on genetically modified strains may reveal important information on mechanisms involved in coping with thermal stress. However, to address the evolutionary significance of specific genes or physiological mechanisms, ecologically relevant field tests should also be performed....... 2.  We have tested the importance of inducible heat shock proteins (Hsps) under different thermal conditions using two heat shock factor (Hsf) mutant lines (either able (Hsf+) or unable (Hsf0) to mount a heat stress response) and an outbred laboratory adapted wild-type line of Drosophila...... that the ecological relevance of specific molecular mechanisms should be tested under a range of conditions both in the laboratory and in the field. Genetically modified lines cannot be assumed to represent the performance of natural populations, especially for field and/or ecologically relevant studies.6...

  7. Learning From Demonstration?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Bertelsen, Niels Haldor

    2014-01-01

    , and micro combined heat and power using hydrogen. Using sociological and business economic theories of innovation, the paper discusses how early movers of innovation tend to obtain only partial success when demonstrating their products and often feel obstructed by minor details. The empirical work...... encompasses both an evaluation of the design and Construction process as well as a post-occupancy evaluation. Process experiences include the use of a multidisciplinary competence group and performance measurement. The commencement of the project was enthusiastic, but it was forced into more traditional forms...

  8. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY POINT-OF-USE (POU) REVERSE OSMOSIS. U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT SUNSET RANCH DEVELOPMENT IN HOMEDALE, ID. FINAL PERFORMANCE EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the arsenic removal technology demonstration project at the Sunset Ranch Development in Homedale, ID. The objectives of the project are to evaluate: 1) the effectiveness of a point of use (POU) re...

  9. Arsenic and Antimony Removal from Drinking Water by Point-of-Entry Reverse Osmosis Coupled with Dual Plumbing Distribution - U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Carmel Elementary School in Carmel, ME -Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed for and the results obtained from the arsenic and antimony removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Carmel Elementary School (CES) in Carmel, ME. An innovative approach of employing point of entry (POE) reverse osmo...

  10. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Oxidation/Filtration and Adsorptive Media, U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Clinton Christian School in Goshen, IN - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed for and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Clinton Christian School in Goshen, IN. The objectives of the project were to evaluate the effectiveness of AdEdge Technologies’...

  11. Teleoperation for learning by demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kukliński, Kamil; Fischer, Kerstin; Marhenke, Ilka;

    2014-01-01

    Learning by demonstration is a useful technique to augment a robot's behavioral inventory, and teleoperation allows lay users to demonstrate novel behaviors intuitively to the robot. In this paper, we compare two modes of teleoperation of an industrial robot, the demonstration by means of a data...... glove and by means of a control object (peg). Experiments with 16 lay users, performing assembly task on the Cranfield benchmark objects, show that the control peg leads to more success, more efficient demonstration and fewer errors....

  12. Radioreceptor assay method for insulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, K.F.; Wood, R.J. (Bureau of Drug Research, Health and Welfare Canada, Ottawa, Ontario. Health Protection Branch)

    1984-01-01

    A sensitive practical radioreceptor assay method for pharmaceutical insulin products has been developed with partially purified rat liver plasma membranes and the optimal conditions under which the best overall assay performance is obtainable have been defined. Intra- and inter-assay variations of the method averaged 7.3 and 12.2% of the man, respectively, when expressed as the coefficient of variation. Potency estimates of an insulin product obtained with the proposed method correlated well with those determined by the mouse convulsion bioassay method. Liver membranes prepared according to the method could be stored for up to ten weeks at 4/sup 0/C and for 6 months or more at -18/sup 0/C without losing insulin-binding ability.

  13. A versatile electrowetting-based digital microfluidic platform for quantitative homogeneous and heterogeneous bio-assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergauwe, Nicolas; Witters, Daan; Ceyssens, Frederik; Vermeir, Steven; Verbruggen, Bert; Puers, Robert; Lammertyn, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) lab-on-a-chip systems have already proven their potential within a broad range of bio-assays. Nevertheless, research on the analytical performance of those systems is limited, yet crucial for a further breakthrough in the diagnostic field. Therefore, this paper presents the intrinsic possibilities of an EWOD lab-on-a-chip as a versatile platform for homogeneous and heterogeneous bio-assays with high analytical performance. Both droplet dispensing and splitting cause variations in droplet size, thereby directly influencing the assay's performance. The extent to which they influence the performance is assessed by a theoretical sensitivity analysis, which allows the definition of a basic framework for the reduction of droplet size variability. Taking advantage of the optimized droplet manipulations, both homogeneous and heterogeneous bio-assays are implemented in the EWOD lab-on-a-chip to demonstrate the analytical capabilities and versatility of the device. A fully on-chip enzymatic assay is realized with high analytical performance. It demonstrates the promising capabilities of an EWOD lab-on-a-chip in food-related and medical applications, such as nutritional and blood analyses. Further, a magnetic bio-assay for IgE detection using superparamagnetic nanoparticles is presented whereby the nanoparticles are used as solid carriers during the bio-assay. Crucial elements are the precise manipulation of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles with respect to dispensing and separation. Although the principle of using nano-carriers is demonstrated for protein detection, it can be easily extended to a broader range of bio-related applications like DNA sensing. In heterogeneous bio-assays the chip surface is actively involved during the execution of the bio-assay. Through immobilization of specific biological compounds like DNA, proteins and cells a reactive chip surface is realized, which enhances the bio-assay performance. To demonstrate

  14. Enantiomeric separation of organophosphorus pesticides by high-performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography and capillary electrophoresis and their applications to environmental fate and toxicity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Zhou, Shanshan; Jin, Lixia; Zhang, Cheng; Liu, Weiping

    2010-05-15

    In recent years, the continuous evolution of the field of stereochemistry has produced a heightened awareness of the applications of pure enantiomers of agrochemicals. This review describes reports of the enantiomeric separation of commercial organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) and the applications of these methods to research on the enantioselectivity of the toxicity and environmental fate of these compounds. Chiral OPs can be analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas chromatography (GC), and capillary electrophoresis (CE). These different separation techniques for OP enantiomers are briefly discussed, and their applications are presented.

  15. Microbead agglutination based assays

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2013-01-21

    We report a simple and rapid room temperature assay for point-of-care (POC) testing that is based on specific agglutination. Agglutination tests are based on aggregation of microbeads in the presence of a specific analyte thus enabling the macroscopic observation. Such tests are most often used to explore antibody-antigen reactions. Agglutination has been used for protein assays using a biotin/streptavidin system as well as a hybridization based assay. The agglutination systems are prone to selftermination of the linking analyte, prone to active site saturation and loss of agglomeration at high analyte concentrations. We investigated the molecular target/ligand interaction, explaining the common agglutination problems related to analyte self-termination, linkage of the analyte to the same bead instead of different microbeads. We classified the agglutination process into three kinds of assays: a two- component assay, a three-component assay and a stepped three- component assay. Although we compared these three kinds of assays for recognizing DNA and protein molecules, the assay can be used for virtually any molecule, including ions and metabolites. In total, the optimized assay permits detecting analytes with high sensitivity in a short time, 5 min, at room temperature. Such a system is appropriate for POC testing.

  16. A Cell Lysis and Protein Purification - Single Molecule Assay Devices for Evaluation of Genetically Engineered Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakyama, Tetsuya; Tabata, Kazuhito; Noji, Hiroyuki; Yokokawa, Ryuji

    We have developed two devices applicable to evaluate genetically engineered proteins in single molecule assay: on-chip cell lysis device, and protein purification - assay device. A motor protein, F1-ATPase expressed in E.coli, was focused in this report as a target protein. Cell lysis was simply performed by applying pulse voltage between Au electrodes patterned by photolithography, and its efficiency was determined by absorptiometry. The subsequent processes, purification and assay of extracted proteins, were demonstrated in order to detect F1-ATPase and to evaluate its activity. The specific bonding between his-tag in F1-ATPase and Ni-NTA coated on a glass surface was utilized for the purification process. After immobilization of F1-ATPase, avidin-coated microspheres and adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) solution were infused sequentially to assay the protein. Microsphere rotation was realized by activity of F1-ATPase corresponding to ATP hydrolysis. Results show that the cell lysis device, at the optimum condition, extracts enough amount of protein for single molecule assay. Once cell lysate was injected to the purification - assay device, proteins were diffused in the lateral direction in a Y-shape microchannel. The gradient of protein concentratioin provides an optimal concentration for the assay i.e. the highest density of rotating beads. Density of rotating beads is also affected by the initial concentration of protein injected to the device. The optimum concentration was achieved by our cell lysis device not by the conventional method by ultrasonic wave. Rotation speed was analyzed for several microspheres assayed in the purification - assay device, and the results were compatible to that of conventional assay in which F1-ATPase was purified in bulk scale. In conclusion, we have demonstrated on-chip cell lysis and assay appropriate for the sequential analysis without any pretreatment. On-chip devices replacing conventional bioanalytical methods will be

  17. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  18. [Comparing performance of "TB-BIOCHIP", "Xpert MTB/RIF" and "genotype MTBDRplus" assays for fast identification of mutations in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in sputum from TB patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosova, E Iu; Krasnova, M A; Galkina, K Iu; Makarova, M V; Litvinov, V I; Moroz, A M

    2013-01-01

    The frequency of mutations causing drug resistance in MTB isolates were studied in the respiratory material obtained from TB-patients in the Moscow Region. In izoniazid-resistant isolates, the most prevalent mutation was found to be the Ser315Thr substitution in the katG gene (15.8%) whereas the most frequent mutations in multidrug-resistant isolates were Ser531Leu and Ser315Thr in the rpoB and katG genes (26.3%), or a combination of these two substitutions with a T15 mutation in the inhA gene (5.3%). We compared performance of three molecular assays--"TB-BIOCHIP" ("BIOCHIP-IMB", Ltd, Russia), Xpert MTB/RIF ("Cepheid", USA) and GenoType MTBDRplus ("Hain Life-science", Germany), with the efficiency of luminescent microscopy, and phenotypic drug-suscepibility testing in an automated system BACTEC MGIT 960 (Becton, Disckinson and Company, USA). Xpert MTB/RIF, TB-BIOCHIP and GenoType MTBDRplus detected MTB in sputum in 92, 78 and 49% of all culture-positive cases, respectively. The agreement between standard cultural data and molecular DST results for Xpert MTB/RIF (resistance towards rifampicin), for TB-BIOCHIP and GenoType MTBDRplus (resistance towards rifampicin and izoniazid) amounted to 100, 97 and 100% respectively. Summing up, Xpert MTB/RIF was concluded to be the most efficient assay for primary detection of MTB, whereas the TB-BIOCHIP was shown to be the only molecular assay sensitive enough for simultaneous detection of MTB DNA and for revealing multidrug resistance in sputum (i.e. resistance to both first-line anti-TB drugs, rifampicin and izoniazid).

  19. Determination of cell survival after irradiation via clonogenic assay versus multiple MTT Assay - A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buch Karl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For studying proliferation and determination of survival of cancer cells after irradiation, the multiple MTT assay, based on the reduction of a yellow water soluble tetrazolium salt to a purple water insoluble formazan dye by living cells was modified from a single-point towards a proliferation assay. This assay can be performed with a large number of samples in short time using multi-well-plates, assays can be performed semi-automatically with a microplate reader. Survival, the calculated parameter in this assay, is determined mathematically. Exponential growth in both control and irradiated groups was proven as the underlying basis of the applicability of the multiple MTT assay. The equivalence to a clonogenic survival assay with its disadvantages such as time consumption was proven in two setups including plating of cells before and after irradiation. Three cell lines (A 549, LN 229 and F 98 were included in the experiment to study its principal and general applicability.

  20. Peroxene Demonstration Performance and Cost Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-02

    recognized that some natural buffering capacity existed. This may also have impacted on the observed increase in pH. The average doses for "Actual" and...2 o C\\J O) en ■* o w« CO ’" CO o t~- if> 2 o o r^ CO ■* Sg CO ° ^t " ■<t 05 o I-- iVf 2 o CO ° CO CO OJ - CO o CM d o CO

  1. IGCC technology and demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palonen, J. [A. Ahlstrom Corporation, Karhula (Finland). Hans Ahlstrom Lab.; Lundqvist, R.G. [A. Ahlstrom Corporation, Helsinki (Finland); Staahl, K. [Sydkraft AB, Malmoe (Sweden)

    1996-12-31

    Future energy production will be performed by advanced technologies that are more efficient, more environmentally friendly and less expensive than current technologies. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants have been proposed as one of these systems. Utilising biofuels in future energy production will also be emphasised since this lowers substantially carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere due to the fact that biomass is a renewable form of energy. Combining advanced technology and biomass utilisation is for this reason something that should and will be encouraged. A. Ahlstrom Corporation of Finland and Sydkraft AB of Sweden have as one part of company strategies adopted this approach for the future. The companies have joined their resources in developing a biomass-based IGCC system with the gasification part based on pressurised circulating fluidized-bed technology. With this kind of technology electrical efficiency can be substantially increased compared to conventional power plants. As a first concrete step, a decision has been made to build a demonstration plant. This plant, located in Vaernamo, Sweden, has already been built and is now in commissioning and demonstration stage. The system comprises a fuel drying plant, a pressurised CFB gasifier with gas cooling and cleaning, a gas turbine, a waste heat recovery unit and a steam turbine. The plant is the first in the world where the integration of a pressurised gasifier with a gas turbine will be realised utilising a low calorific gas produced from biomass. The capacity of the Vaernamo plant is 6 MW of electricity and 9 MW of district heating. Technology development is in progress for design of plants of sizes from 20 to 120 MWe. The paper describes the Bioflow IGCC system, the Vaernamo demonstration plant and experiences from the commissioning and demonstration stages. (orig.)

  2. Development of a high-performance liquid chromatography-based assay for carotenoids in human red blood cells: application to clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Kiko, Takehiro; Hatade, Keijiro; Asai, Akira; Kimura, Fumiko; Sookwong, Phumon; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi; Arai, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2008-10-01

    Peroxidized phospholipid-mediated cytotoxicity is involved in the pathophysiology of many diseases; for example, there is an abnormal increase of phospholipid hydroperoxides in red blood cells (RBCs) of dementia patients. Dietary carotenoids have gained attention as potent inhibitors of RBC phospholipid hydroperoxidation, thereby making them plausible candidates for preventing disease. However, the occurrence of carotenoids in human RBCs is still unclear. This is in contradistinction to plasma carotenoids, which have been investigated thoroughly for analytical methods as well as biological significance. In this study, we developed a method to analyze RBC carotenoids using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with ultraviolet (UV) diode array detection (DAD) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS). Under optimized conditions that included extraction, separation, and detection procedures, six carotenoids (lutein, zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and lycopene) were separated, detected by DAD, and concurrently identified based on APCI/MS and UV spectra profiles when an extract from human RBCs was subjected to HPLC-DAD-APCI/MS. The amounts of carotenoids varied markedly (1.3-70.2 nmol/L packed cells), and polar oxygenated carotenoids (xanthophylls) were predominant in RBCs. The HPLC-DAD-APCI/MS method would be a useful tool for clinical studies for evaluating the bioavailability of RBC carotenoids.

  3. Development and validation of a reversed-phase ultra-performance liquid chromatographic method for assay of lacidipine and related substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Arivozhi; Patel, Hitesh B; Saravanan, Dhandayutham

    2011-01-01

    A simple isocratic, RP-ultra-performance LC method was developed and validated for the determination of lacidipine, three process impurities formed during synthesis, and three degradation products present in drug substance and the drug product. An efficient chromatographic separation was achieved on an Acquity BEH C18 column using pH 4.5 ammonium acetate-acetic acid buffer-methanol (70 + 30, v/v) mobile phase. The monitoring wavelength was 240 nm, and the flow rate 0.25 mL/min. Forced degradation studies using acid, alkali, peroxide, water, heat, and light were conducted, and all impurities were separated. The method was validated successfully for specificity, precision, linearity, accuracy, LOD, LOQ, and robustness, according to International Conference on Harmonization guidelines. The linearity of the calibration curve for lacidipine and each impurity was found to be very good (r2 > 0.999). This method is shown to be suitable for analysis of lacidipine to evaluate the quality of drug substance and a drug product.

  4. High-performance liquid chromatography assay of cysteine and homocysteine using fluorosurfactant-functionalized gold nanoparticles as postcolumn resonance light scattering reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qunyan; Gao, Huiling; Yuan, Qipeng; Lu, Chao; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2013-01-25

    Herein, a new postcolumn resonance light scattering (RLS) detection approach coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed to detect cysteine and homocysteine. In the established system, the fluorosurfactant-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were first employed as postcolumn RLS reagents. The detection principle was based on the enhancement of RLS intensity of AuNPs upon the addition of cysteine/homocysteine. The RLS signals were detected by a common fluorescence detector at λ(EX)=λ(EM)=560 nm. The linear ranges for both cysteine and homocysteine were in the range of 5.0-50 μM. The detection limits were 5.9 pmol for cysteine and 12 pmol for homocysteine at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. HPLC separation and RLS detection conditions were optimized in detail. The applicability of the proposed method has been validated by detecting cysteine and homocysteine in human urine samples. Recoveries from spiked urine samples were 95.0-103.0%.

  5. A high-performance liquid chromatography assay with a triazole-bonded column for evaluation of d-amino acid oxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Megumi; Kashiwaguma, Yoshiyuki; Nagashima, Chihiro; Izumi, Mao; Uekusa, Ayano; Iwasa, Sumiko; Onozato, Mayu; Ichiba, Hideaki; Fukushima, Takeshi

    2016-03-01

    Elution profiles of kynurenic acid (KYNA) and 7-chlorokynurenic acid (Cl-KYNA) were examined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using a triazole-bonded stationary phase column (Cosmosil® HILIC) under isocratic elution of a mobile phase consisting of CH3 CN-aqueous 10 mm ammonium formate between pH 3.0 and 6.0. The capacity factors of KYNA and Cl-KYNA varied with both the CH3 CN content and the pH of the mobile phase. The elution order of KYNA and Cl-KYNA was reversed between the CH3 CN- and H2 O-rich mobile phases, suggesting that hydrophilic interactions and anion-exchange interactions caused retention of KYNA and Cl-KYNA in the CH3 CN- and H2 O-rich mobile phases, respectively. The present HPLC method using a triazole-bonded column and fluorescence detection (excitation 250 nm, emission 398 nm) was applied to monitor in vitro production of KYNA from d-kynurenine (d-KYN) by d-amino acid oxidase (DAO) using Cl-KYNA as an internal standard. A single KYNA peak was clearly observed after enzymatic reaction of d-KYN with DAO. Production of KYNA from d-KYN was suppressed by the addition of commercial DAO inhibitors. The present HPLC method can be used to evaluate DAO activity and DAO inhibitory effects in candidate drugs for the treatment of schizophrenia.

  6. A Stability-Indicating High Performance Liquid Chromatographic Assay for the Simultaneous Determination of Pyridoxine, Ethionamide, and Moxifloxacin in Fixed Dose Combination Tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munib-ur-Rehman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stability indicating reversed phase HPLC method was developed and validated for the simultaneous quantitation of antitubercular drugs, ethionamide (ETH, and moxifloxacin (MOX with commonly coprescribed vitamin, pyridoxine (PYR in tablet dosage form. The method was found rapid, precise and accurate. The separation was performed in Hibar 150-4.6, Purospher STAR, RP-18e (5 μm column, using mobile phase A (0.03 M sodium citrate adjusted to pH 5 with glacial acetic acid and mobile phase B (100% methanol, ran at variable proportions at flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The detection was carried out at 320 nm. The method was observed linearly in the range of 2.5–17.5 μg/mL for PYR, 25–175 μg/mL for ETH, and 40–280 μg/mL for MOX with respective limits of detection/quantitation of 0.125 μg/mL/1.28 μg/mL, 0.25 μg/mL/2.56 μg/mL, and 0.35 μg/mL/3.65 μg/mL. The drugs were also subjected to oxidative, hydrolytic, photolytic, and thermal degradation; the degradation products showed interference with the detection of PYR, ETH, and MOX. The proposed method was observed to be effective to quantitate MOX (400 mg, ETH (250 mg, and PYR (25 mg in fixed dose combination tablet formulation.

  7. Development and validation of a simple high performance thin layer chromatography method combined with direct 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl assay to quantify free radical scavenging activity in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agatonovic-Kustrin, Snezana; Morton, David W; Yusof, Ahmad P

    2016-04-15

    The aim of this study was to: (a) develop a simple, high performance thin layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method combined with direct 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay to rapidly assess and compare free radical scavenging activity or anti-oxidant activity for major classes of polyphenolics present in wines; and (b) to investigate relationship between free radical scavenging activity to the total polyphenolic content (TPC) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in the wine samples. The most potent free radical scavengers that we tested for in the wine samples were found to be resveratrol (polyphenolic non-flavonoid) and rutin (flavonoid), while polyphenolic acids (caffeic acid and gallic acid) although present in all wine samples were found to be less potent free radical scavengers. Therefore, the total antioxidant capacity was mostly affected by the presence of resveratrol and rutin, while total polyphenolic content was mostly influenced by the presence of the less potent free radical scavengers gallic and caffeic acids.

  8. A multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assay to diagnose Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, N B; Ledezma, L A; Farris, R E; Epstein, M E; Gilligan, T M

    2011-10-01

    A molecular assay for diagnosis of light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), in North America is reported. The assay multiplexes two TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) probe systems that are designed to target DNA segments of the internal transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS2) and 18S rRNA gene. The RT-PCR probe designed for the 18S target recognizes a DNA sequence conserved in all of the moths included in the study and functions as a control in the assay. The second probe recognizes a segment of the ITS2 specifically found in E. postvittana and not found in the other moths included in the study, i.e., this segment is not conserved. Inclusion of the two markers in a single multiplex reaction did not affect assay performance. The assay was tested against 637 moths representing > 90 taxa in 15 tribes in all three subfamilies in the Tortricidae. The assay generated no false negatives based on analysis of 355 E. postvittana collected from California, Hawaii, England, New Zealand, and Australia. Analysis of a data set including 282 moths representing 41 genera generated no false positives. Only three inconclusive results were generated from the 637 samples. Spike experiments demonstrated that DNA contamination in the assay can affect samples differently. Contaminated samples analyzed with the ITS2 RT-PCR assay and DNA barcode methodology by using the cytochrome oxidase I gene can generate contradictory diagnoses.

  9. Using Exclusion-Based Sample Preparation (ESP) to Reduce Viral Load Assay Cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Scott M; Pezzi, Hannah M; Williams, Eram D; Loeb, Jennifer M; Guckenberger, David J; Lavanway, Alex J; Puchalski, Alice A; Kityo, Cissy M; Mugyenyi, Peter N; Graziano, Franklin M; Beebe, David J

    2015-01-01

    Viral load (VL) measurements are critical to the proper management of HIV in developing countries. However, access to VL assays is limited by the high cost and complexity of existing assays. While there is a need for low cost VL assays, performance must not be compromised. Thus, new assays must be validated on metrics of limit of detection (LOD), accuracy, and dynamic range. Patient plasma samples from the Joint Clinical Research Centre in Uganda were de-identified and measured using both an existing VL assay (Abbott RealTime HIV-1) and our assay, which combines low cost reagents with a simplified method of RNA isolation termed Exclusion-Based Sample Preparation (ESP).71 patient samples with VLs ranging from 3,000,000 copies/mL were used to compare the two methods. We demonstrated equivalent LOD (~50 copies/mL) and high accuracy (average difference between methods of 0.08 log, R2 = 0.97). Using expenditures from this trial, we estimate that the cost of the reagents and consumables for this assay to be approximately $5 USD. As cost is a significant barrier to implementation of VL testing, we anticipate that our assay will enhance access to this critical monitoring test in developing countries.

  10. Using Exclusion-Based Sample Preparation (ESP to Reduce Viral Load Assay Cost.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M Berry

    Full Text Available Viral load (VL measurements are critical to the proper management of HIV in developing countries. However, access to VL assays is limited by the high cost and complexity of existing assays. While there is a need for low cost VL assays, performance must not be compromised. Thus, new assays must be validated on metrics of limit of detection (LOD, accuracy, and dynamic range. Patient plasma samples from the Joint Clinical Research Centre in Uganda were de-identified and measured using both an existing VL assay (Abbott RealTime HIV-1 and our assay, which combines low cost reagents with a simplified method of RNA isolation termed Exclusion-Based Sample Preparation (ESP.71 patient samples with VLs ranging from 3,000,000 copies/mL were used to compare the two methods. We demonstrated equivalent LOD (~50 copies/mL and high accuracy (average difference between methods of 0.08 log, R2 = 0.97. Using expenditures from this trial, we estimate that the cost of the reagents and consumables for this assay to be approximately $5 USD. As cost is a significant barrier to implementation of VL testing, we anticipate that our assay will enhance access to this critical monitoring test in developing countries.

  11. Validation of the Filovirus Plaque Assay for Use in Preclinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurtleff, Amy C; Bloomfield, Holly A; Mort, Shannon; Orr, Steven A; Audet, Brian; Whitaker, Thomas; Richards, Michelle J; Bavari, Sina

    2016-04-21

    A plaque assay for quantitating filoviruses in virus stocks, prepared viral challenge inocula and samples from research animals has recently been fully characterized and standardized for use across multiple institutions performing Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4) studies. After standardization studies were completed, Good Laboratory Practices (GLP)-compliant plaque assay method validation studies to demonstrate suitability for reliable and reproducible measurement of the Marburg Virus Angola (MARV) variant and Ebola Virus Kikwit (EBOV) variant commenced at the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID). The validation parameters tested included accuracy, precision, linearity, robustness, stability of the virus stocks and system suitability. The MARV and EBOV assays were confirmed to be accurate to ±0.5 log10 PFU/mL. Repeatability precision, intermediate precision and reproducibility precision were sufficient to return viral titers with a coefficient of variation (%CV) of ≤30%, deemed acceptable variation for a cell-based bioassay. Intraclass correlation statistical techniques for the evaluation of the assay's precision when the same plaques were quantitated by two analysts returned values passing the acceptance criteria, indicating high agreement between analysts. The assay was shown to be accurate and specific when run on Nonhuman Primates (NHP) serum and plasma samples diluted in plaque assay medium, with negligible matrix effects. Virus stocks demonstrated stability for freeze-thaw cycles typical of normal usage during assay retests. The results demonstrated that the EBOV and MARV plaque assays are accurate, precise and robust for filovirus titration in samples associated with the performance of GLP animal model studies.

  12. Nondestructive boxed transuranic (TRU) waste assay systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, John T.; Jones, Stephanie A.; Lucero, Randy F.

    1999-01-01

    A brief history of boxed waste assay systems (primarily those developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory) is presented. The characteristics and design process involved with current generation systems--as practiced by BII--are also discussed in some detail. Finally, a specific boxed waste assay system and acceptance test results are presented. This system was developed by BII and installed at the Waste Receiving and Packaging (WRAP) facility in Hanford, Washington in early 1997. The WRAP system combines imaging passive/active neutron (IPAN) techniques with gamma- ray energy analysis (GEA) to assay crates up to 2.5 m X 2.5 m X 6.5 m in size. (Systems that incorporate both these methodologies are usually denoted IPAN/GEA types.) Two separate gamma-ray measurements are accomplished utilizing 16 arrayed NaI detectors and a moveable HPGe detector, while 3He detectors acquire both active and passive neutron data. These neutron measurements use BII's proprietary imaging methodology. Acceptance testing of the system was conducted at Hanford in January 1998. The system's operating performance was evaluated based on accuracy and sensitivity requirements for three different matrix types. Test results indicate an average 13% active mode accuracy for 10 nCi/g loadings of Pu waste and 5% passive mode accuracy for 10 g loadings of Pu waste. Sensitivity testing demonstrated an active mode lower limit of detection of less than 5 nCi/g of 239Pu for the medium matrix and less than 20 pCi/g of fission and activation products at 3(sigma) above background.

  13. Temperature Switch PCR (TSP: Robust assay design for reliable amplification and genotyping of SNPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mather Diane E

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many research and diagnostic applications rely upon the assay of individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Thus, methods to improve the speed and efficiency for single-marker SNP genotyping are highly desirable. Here, we describe the method of temperature-switch PCR (TSP, a biphasic four-primer PCR system with a universal primer design that permits amplification of the target locus in the first phase of thermal cycling before switching to the detection of the alleles. TSP can simplify assay design for a range of commonly used single-marker SNP genotyping methods, and reduce the requirement for individual assay optimization and operator expertise in the deployment of SNP assays. Results We demonstrate the utility of TSP for the rapid construction of robust and convenient endpoint SNP genotyping assays based on allele-specific PCR and high resolution melt analysis by generating a total of 11,232 data points. The TSP assays were performed under standardised reaction conditions, requiring minimal optimization of individual assays. High genotyping accuracy was verified by 100% concordance of TSP genotypes in a blinded study with an independent genotyping method. Conclusion Theoretically, TSP can be directly incorporated into the design of assays for most current single-marker SNP genotyping methods. TSP provides several technological advances for single-marker SNP genotyping including simplified assay design and development, increased assay specificity and genotyping accuracy, and opportunities for assay automation. By reducing the requirement for operator expertise, TSP provides opportunities to deploy a wider range of single-marker SNP genotyping methods in the laboratory. TSP has broad applications and can be deployed in any animal and plant species.

  14. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

    1992-11-10

    This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0[sub 2] removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0[sub 2] emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

  15. Transgenic Animal Mutation Assays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Chen; Ph.D.D.A.B.T.

    2005-01-01

    @@ The novel transgenic mouse and rat mutation assays have provided a tool for analyzing in vivo mutation in any tissue, thus permitting the direct comparison of cancer incidence with mutant frequency.

  16. Tube-Forming Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ryan M; Meah, Christopher J; Heath, Victoria L; Styles, Iain B; Bicknell, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis involves the generation of new blood vessels from the existing vasculature and is dependent on many growth factors and signaling events. In vivo angiogenesis is dynamic and complex, meaning assays are commonly utilized to explore specific targets for research into this area. Tube-forming assays offer an excellent overview of the molecular processes in angiogenesis. The Matrigel tube forming assay is a simple-to-implement but powerful tool for identifying biomolecules involved in angiogenesis. A detailed experimental protocol on the implementation of the assay is described in conjunction with an in-depth review of methods that can be applied to the analysis of the tube formation. In addition, an ImageJ plug-in is presented which allows automatic quantification of tube images reducing analysis times while removing user bias and subjectivity.

  17. Cell viability assays: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddart, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of cell viability plays a fundamental role in all forms of cell culture. Sometimes it is the main purpose of the experiment, such as in toxicity assays. Alternatively, cell viability can be used to -correlate cell behaviour to cell number, providing a more accurate picture of, for example, anabolic -activity. There are wide arrays of cell viability methods which range from the most routine trypan blue dye exclusion assay to highly complex analysis of individual cells, such as using RAMAN microscopy. The cost, speed, and complexity of equipment required will all play a role in determining the assay used. This chapter aims to provide an overview of many of the assays available today.

  18. New Rapid Spore Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kminek, Gerhard; Conley, Catharine

    2012-07-01

    The presentation will detail approved Planetary Protection specifications for the Rapid Spore Assay for spacecraft components and subsystems. Outlined will be the research and studies on which the specifications were based. The research, funded by ESA and NASA/JPL, was conducted over a period of two years and was followed by limited cleanroom studies to assess the feasibility of this assay during spacecraft assembly.

  19. Validation of a quantitative flow cytometer assay for monitoring HER-2/neu expression level in cell-based cancer immunotherapy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randlev, Britta; Huang, Li-chun; Watatsu, Mitsuko; Marcus, Matthew; Lin, Andy; Shih, Shian-Jiun

    2010-03-01

    GVAX immunotherapy for prostate cancer is comprised of two genetically modified prostate cancer cell lines, CG1940 and CG8711, engineered to secrete granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor. As part of the matrix of potency assays, CG1940 and CG8711 are tested for the expression level of cell surface HER-2/neu using a quantitative flow cytometer assay. This assay reports the antibody binding capacity value of the cells as a measure of HER-2/neu expression using cells immediately after thawing from cryogenic storage. With optimized cell handling and staining procedure and appropriate system suitability controls, the assay was validated as a quantitative assay. The validation results showed that assay accuracy, specificity, precision, linearity, and range were suitable for the intended use of ensuring lot-to-lot consistency of HER-2/neu expression. Assay robustness was demonstrated using design of experiments that evaluated critical assay parameters. Finally, the assay was successfully transferred to a current good manufacturing practice Quality Control laboratory in a separate facility. Since the overall precision of this assay is better than that of ELISA methods and it can be performed with ease and high throughput, quantitative flow cytometer-based assays may be an appropriate immunological assay platform for Quality Control laboratories for characterization and release of cell-based therapies.

  20. Performance of self-collected penile-meatal swabs compared to clinician-collected urethral swabs for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Mycoplasma genitalium by nucleic acid amplification assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dize, Laura; Barnes, Perry; Barnes, Mathilda; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Marsiglia, Vincent; Duncan, Della; Hardick, Justin; Gaydos, Charlotte A

    2016-10-01

    Men were enrolled in a study to assess the performance and acceptability of self-collected penile meatal swabs as compared to clinician-collected urethral swabs for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We expected penile-meatal swabs to perform favorably to urethral swabs for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), Trichomonas vaginalis (TV), and Mycoplasma genitalium (MG) detection by nucleic acid amplification assays (NAATs). Of 203 swab pairs tested; for CT, penile-meatal swab sensitivity was 96.8% and specificity was 98.8%. NG sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 98.9%, respectively. For TV, sensitivity was 85.0% and specificity was 96.7%. For MG sensitivity and specificity were 79.3% and 99.4%, respectively. No significant statistical differences between sample type accuracy (CT: P=0.625; NG: P=0.248; TV: P=0.344; and MG: P=0.070) existed. Most men, 90.1%, reported self-collection of penile-meatal swabs as "Very Easy" or "Easy". Self-collected penile-meatal swabs appeared acceptable for NAAT STI detection and an acceptable collection method by men.

  1. Evaluation of clinical diagnostic performance of interferon-gamma release assays for tuberculosis%γ-干扰素释放试验对结核病患者临床诊断性能评价研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦建成; 徐军; 戴亮; 赵静; 王卫东; 李想; 张岚; 毛远丽

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic performance and application value of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) with A.TB kit for patients with tuberculosis. Methods Of 108 patients en-rolled in the study, 60 were definitely diagnosed with tuberculosis (tuberculosis group), and 48 were controls (non-tuberculosis group). ELISA-based IGRAs with A.TB kit and enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT)-based IGRAs with T-SPOT.TB kit were car-ried out simultaneously. Results The sensitivity and specificity of ELISA-based IGRAs with A.TB kit were 86.67% and 85.42%, and the area under a receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.822 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.733-0.912]. The sensitivity and specificity of ELISPOT-based IGRAs with T-SPOT.TB kit were 91.67% and 87.50%, and the area under ROC curve was 0.884 (95%CI, 0.806-0.962). The difference in the area under ROC curve was not significant between the two assays (χ2=0.081, P=0.776). The consistency of the two assays was 87.04%(94/108) with the Kappa value of 0.738. Conclusions ELISA-based IGRAs with A.TB kit and ELISPOT-based IGRAs with T-SPOT.TB kit have a similar overall diagnostic performance, but ELISA-based IGRAs with A.TB kit is superior to ELISPOT-based IGRAs with T-SPOT.TB kit in the operation and interpretation of the test results.%目的:评价采用A.TB试剂[酶联免疫吸附试验(enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, ELISA)]进行结核杆菌特异性γ-干扰素释放试验(interferon-gamma release assays, IGRAs)对结核病的临床诊断性能及应用价值。方法108例研究对象中,临床明确诊断结核病60例(结核组),非结核病对照者48例(非结核对照组)。同时采用A.TB试剂(ELISA法)和T-SPOT. TB试剂[酶联免疫斑点试验(enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot, ELISPOT)]进行IGRAs。结果 A.TB试剂(ELISA法)检测的灵敏度为86.67%,特异度为85.42%,受试

  2. The POSEIDON Demonstrator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, P.J.L.J. van de

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, we discuss the Poseidon demonstrator: a demonstrator that integrates the individual research results of all partners of the Poseidon project. After describing how the Poseidon demonstrator was built, deployed, and operated, we will not only show many results obtained from the demons

  3. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Details two demonstrations for use with an overhead projector in a chemistry lecture. Includes "A Very Rapidly Growing Silicate Crystal" and "A Colorful Demonstration to Simulate Orbital Hybridization." The materials and directions for each demonstration are included as well as a brief explanation of the essential learning involved. (CW)

  4. Strategy Guideline. Demonstration Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, A.; Savage, C.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  5. Strategy Guideline: Demonstration Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, C.; Hunt, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  6. Slant Borehole Demonstration Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GARDNER, M.G.

    2000-07-19

    This report provides a summary of the demonstration project for development of a slant borehole to retrieve soil samples from beneath the SX-108 single-shell tank. It provides a summary of the findings from the demonstration activities and recommendations for tool selection and methods to deploy into the SX Tank Farm. Daily work activities were recorded on Drilling and Sampling Daily Work Record Reports. The work described in this document was performed during March and April 2000.

  7. Radioreceptor assay: theory and applications to pharmacology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perret, G. (U.E.R. de Medecine, Sante et Biologie Humaine, 93 - Bobigny (France)); Simon, P. (Faculte de Medecine Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France))

    The aim of the first part of this work is to present the theory of the radioreceptor assay and to compare it to the other techniques of radioanalysis (radioimmunoassay, competitive protein binding assays). The technology of the radioreceptor assay is then presented and its components (preparation of the receptors, radioligand, incubation medium) are described. The analytical characteristics of the radioreceptor assay (specificity, sensitivity, reproductibility, accuracy) and the pharmacological significance of the results are discussed. The second part is devoted to the description of the radioreceptor assays of some pharmacological classes (neuroleptics, tricyclic antidepressants, benzodiazepines, ..beta..-blockers, anticholinergic drugs) and to their use in therapeutic drug monitoring. In conclusion, by their nature, radioreceptor assays are highly sensitive, reliable, precise, accurate and simple to perform. Their chief disadvantage relates to specificity, since any substance having an appreciable affinity to the receptor site will displace the specifically bound radioligand. Paradoxically in some cases, this lack of specificity may be advantageous in that it allows for the detection of not only the apparent compound but of active metabolites and endogenous receptor agonists as well and in that radioreceptors assays can be devised for a whole pharmacological class and not only for one drug as it is the case for classical physico-chemical techniques. For all these reasons future of radioreceptor assay in pharmacology appears promising.

  8. Against vaccine assay secrecy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, Matthew; Hatchette, Todd F; Halperin, Scott A; Langley, Joanne M

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the transparency of the evidence base behind health interventions such as pharmaceuticals, biologics, and medical devices, has become a major point of critique, conflict, and policy focus in recent years. Yet the lack of publicly available information regarding the immunogenicity assays upon which many important, widely used vaccines are based has received no attention to date. In this paper we draw attention to this critical public health problem by reporting on our efforts to secure vaccine assay information in respect of 10 vaccines through Canada's access to information law. We argue, under Canadian law, that the public health interest in having access to the methods for these laboratory procedures should override claims by vaccine manufacturers and regulators that this information is proprietary; and, we call upon several actors to take steps to ensure greater transparency with respect to vaccine assays, including regulators, private firms, researchers, research institutions, research funders, and journal editors.

  9. Against vaccine assay secrecy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, Matthew; Hatchette, Todd F; Halperin, Scott A; Langley, Joanne M

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the transparency of the evidence base behind health interventions such as pharmaceuticals, biologics, and medical devices, has become a major point of critique, conflict, and policy focus in recent years. Yet the lack of publicly available information regarding the immunogenicity assays upon which many important, widely used vaccines are based has received no attention to date. In this paper we draw attention to this critical public health problem by reporting on our efforts to secure vaccine assay information in respect of 10 vaccines through Canada's access to information law. We argue, under Canadian law, that the public health interest in having access to the methods for these laboratory procedures should override claims by vaccine manufacturers and regulators that this information is proprietary; and, we call upon several actors to take steps to ensure greater transparency with respect to vaccine assays, including regulators, private firms, researchers, research institutions, research funders, and journal editors. PMID:25826194

  10. Mobile non-destructive assay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colarusso, A.P.; Audas, J.H.; Bieri, J.M.; Herrera, G.C.; Hastings, R.D.; Horton, W.S.; Kuckertz, T.H.; Kunz, W.E.; Medvick, P.A.; Vogel, P.A.

    1987-07-01

    A mobile system for non-destructive assay (NDA), developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, provides accurate and sensitive measurements for transuranic (TRU) isotopes contained in 208-iota drums of miscellaneous nuclear wastes. The NDA unit consists of four major subsystems: an assay chamber, counting and digital electronics, data acquisition, and a neutron generator. It performs both active and passive neutron waste measurements. The former determines the amount of fissile isotopes at a sensitivity level of 1 mg plutonium. The latter determines spontaneous fission and ..cap alpha..,n) isotopes at a comparable level. A complete assay consists of sequential active and passive measurements. The assay measurement and other supporting data are incorporated in a commercial spreadsheet program (Lotus 1,2,3) for further analysis, which includes various matrix corrections and a determination of whether or not the drum exceeds the 100-nCi/g threshold for TRU wastes. Field tests have been performed on three separate occasions, accomplishing more than 1800 waste drum assays. These waste drum assays are discussed, especially those comparing passive and active neutron measurements with independent segmented gamma scan assays. Results obtained with a set of 15 drums containing plutonium prepared from standards and actual hot waste matrices are also reviewed.

  11. Hits identified in library screening demonstrate selective CYP17A1 lyase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Sebastian J; Hu, Qingzhong; Hartmann, Rolf W

    2013-03-01

    A screening of structurally different steroid hormone synthesis inhibitors was performed in order to find a starting point for the development of a new inhibitor of the bifunctional steroidogenic enzyme CYP17A1. Emphasis was placed on determination of selectivity between the two catalytic steps, namely 17α-hydroxylase and C(17,20)-lyase. For that purpose a new inhibition assay has been developed. Hits identified within this novel assay demonstrated selective inhibition of CYP17A1 lyase activity, and thus mark the basis for the development of selective C(17,20)-lyase inhibitors for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  12. Validation of the Filovirus Plaque Assay for Use in Preclinical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy C. Shurtleff

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A plaque assay for quantitating filoviruses in virus stocks, prepared viral challenge inocula and samples from research animals has recently been fully characterized and standardized for use across multiple institutions performing Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4 studies. After standardization studies were completed, Good Laboratory Practices (GLP-compliant plaque assay method validation studies to demonstrate suitability for reliable and reproducible measurement of the Marburg Virus Angola (MARV variant and Ebola Virus Kikwit (EBOV variant commenced at the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID. The validation parameters tested included accuracy, precision, linearity, robustness, stability of the virus stocks and system suitability. The MARV and EBOV assays were confirmed to be accurate to ±0.5 log10 PFU/mL. Repeatability precision, intermediate precision and reproducibility precision were sufficient to return viral titers with a coefficient of variation (%CV of ≤30%, deemed acceptable variation for a cell-based bioassay. Intraclass correlation statistical techniques for the evaluation of the assay’s precision when the same plaques were quantitated by two analysts returned values passing the acceptance criteria, indicating high agreement between analysts. The assay was shown to be accurate and specific when run on Nonhuman Primates (NHP serum and plasma samples diluted in plaque assay medium, with negligible matrix effects. Virus stocks demonstrated stability for freeze-thaw cycles typical of normal usage during assay retests. The results demonstrated that the EBOV and MARV plaque assays are accurate, precise and robust for filovirus titration in samples associated with the performance of GLP animal model studies.

  13. Validation of the Filovirus Plaque Assay for Use in Preclinical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurtleff, Amy C.; Bloomfield, Holly A.; Mort, Shannon; Orr, Steven A.; Audet, Brian; Whitaker, Thomas; Richards, Michelle J.; Bavari, Sina

    2016-01-01

    A plaque assay for quantitating filoviruses in virus stocks, prepared viral challenge inocula and samples from research animals has recently been fully characterized and standardized for use across multiple institutions performing Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4) studies. After standardization studies were completed, Good Laboratory Practices (GLP)-compliant plaque assay method validation studies to demonstrate suitability for reliable and reproducible measurement of the Marburg Virus Angola (MARV) variant and Ebola Virus Kikwit (EBOV) variant commenced at the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID). The validation parameters tested included accuracy, precision, linearity, robustness, stability of the virus stocks and system suitability. The MARV and EBOV assays were confirmed to be accurate to ±0.5 log10 PFU/mL. Repeatability precision, intermediate precision and reproducibility precision were sufficient to return viral titers with a coefficient of variation (%CV) of ≤30%, deemed acceptable variation for a cell-based bioassay. Intraclass correlation statistical techniques for the evaluation of the assay’s precision when the same plaques were quantitated by two analysts returned values passing the acceptance criteria, indicating high agreement between analysts. The assay was shown to be accurate and specific when run on Nonhuman Primates (NHP) serum and plasma samples diluted in plaque assay medium, with negligible matrix effects. Virus stocks demonstrated stability for freeze-thaw cycles typical of normal usage during assay retests. The results demonstrated that the EBOV and MARV plaque assays are accurate, precise and robust for filovirus titration in samples associated with the performance of GLP animal model studies. PMID:27110807

  14. Quantification of Human Kallikrein-Related Peptidases in Biological Fluids by Multiplatform Targeted Mass Spectrometry Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakosta, Theano D; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Batruch, Ihor; Drabovich, Andrei P

    2016-09-01

    Human kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are a group of 15 secreted serine proteases encoded by the largest contiguous cluster of protease genes in the human genome. KLKs are involved in coordination of numerous physiological functions including regulation of blood pressure, neuronal plasticity, skin desquamation, and semen liquefaction, and thus represent promising diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Until now, quantification of KLKs in biological and clinical samples was accomplished by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Here, we developed multiplex targeted mass spectrometry assays for the simultaneous quantification of all 15 KLKs. Proteotypic peptides for each KLK were carefully selected based on experimental data and multiplexed in single assays. Performance of assays was evaluated using three different mass spectrometry platforms including triple quadrupole, quadrupole-ion trap, and quadrupole-orbitrap instruments. Heavy isotope-labeled synthetic peptides with a quantifying tag were used for absolute quantification of KLKs in sweat, cervico-vaginal fluid, seminal plasma, and blood serum, with limits of detection ranging from 5 to 500 ng/ml. Analytical performance of assays was evaluated by measuring endogenous KLKs in relevant biological fluids, and results were compared with selected ELISAs. The multiplex targeted proteomic assays were demonstrated to be accurate, reproducible, sensitive, and specific alternatives to antibody-based assays. Finally, KLK4, a highly prostate-specific protein and a speculated biomarker of prostate cancer, was unambiguously detected and quantified by immunoenrichment-SRM assay in seminal plasma and blood serum samples from individuals with confirmed prostate cancer and negative biopsy. Mass spectrometry revealed exclusively the presence of a secreted isoform and thus unequivocally resolved earlier disputes about KLK4 identity in seminal plasma. Measurements of KLK4 in either 41 seminal plasma or 58 blood serum samples

  15. 21 CFR 864.7415 - Abnormal hemoglobin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Abnormal hemoglobin assay. 864.7415 Section 864... hemoglobin assay. (a) Identification. An abnormal hemoglobin assay is a device consisting of the reagents... hemoglobin types. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  16. Assays for calcitonin receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teitelbaum, A.P.; Nissenson, R.A.; Arnaud, C.D.

    1985-01-01

    The assays for calcitonin receptors described focus on their use in the study of the well-established target organs for calcitonin, bone and kidney. The radioligand used in virtually all calcitonin binding studies is /sup 125/I-labelled salmon calcitonin. The lack of methionine residues in this peptide permits the use of chloramine-T for the iodination reaction. Binding assays are described for intact bone, skeletal plasma membranes, renal plasma membranes, and primary kidney cell cultures of rats. Studies on calcitonin metabolism in laboratory animals and regulation of calcitonin receptors are reviewed.

  17. CTL ELISPOT assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Elena; Popescu, Iulia; Gigante, Margherita

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immune absorbent spot (Elispot) is a quantitative method for measuring relevant parameters of T cell activation. The sensitivity of Elispot allows the detection of low-frequency antigen-specific T cells that secrete cytokines and effector molecules, such as granzyme B and perforin. Cytotoxic T cell (CTL) studies have taken advantage with this high-throughput technology by providing insights into quantity and immune kinetics. Accuracy, sensitivity, reproducibility, and robustness of Elispot resulted in a wide range of applications in research as well as in diagnostic field. Actually, CTL monitoring by Elispot is a gold standard for the evaluation of antigen-specific T cell immunity in clinical trials and vaccine candidates where the ability to detect rare antigen-specific T cells is of relevance for immune diagnostic. The most utilized Elispot assay is the interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) test, a marker for CD8(+) CTL activation, but Elispot can also be used to distinguish different subsets of activated T cells by using other cytokines such as T-helper (Th) 1-type cells (characterized by the production of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12, IL-21, and TNF-α), Th2 (producing cytokines like IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IL-13), and Th17 (IL-17) cells. The reliability of Elispot-generated data, by the evaluation of T cell frequency recognizing individual antigen/peptide, is the core of this method currently applied widely to investigate specific immune responses in cancer, infections, allergies, and autoimmune diseases. The Elispot assay is competing with other methods measuring single-cell cytokine production, e.g., intracellular cytokine by FACS or Miltenyi cytokine secretion assay. Other types of lymphocyte frequency and function assays include limiting dilution assay (LDA), cytotoxic T cell assay (CTL), and tetramer staining. Compared with respect to sensitivity the Elispot assay is outranking other methods to define frequency of antigen-specific lymphocytes. The method

  18. Bench-top validation testing of selected immunological and molecular Renibacterium salmoninarum diagnostic assays by comparison with quantitative bacteriological culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, D G; Applegate, L J; Murray, A L; Purcell, M K; McKibben, C L

    2013-09-01

    No gold standard assay exhibiting error-free classification of results has been identified for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Validation of diagnostic assays for R. salmoninarum has been hindered by its unique characteristics and biology, and difficulties in locating suitable populations of reference test animals. Infection status of fish in test populations is often unknown, and it is commonly assumed that the assay yielding the most positive results has the highest diagnostic accuracy, without consideration of misclassification of results. In this research, quantification of R. salmoninarum in samples by bacteriological culture provided a standardized measure of viable bacteria to evaluate analytical performance characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and repeatability) of non-culture assays in three matrices (phosphate-buffered saline, ovarian fluid and kidney tissue). Non-culture assays included polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), direct smear fluorescent antibody technique (FAT), membrane-filtration FAT, nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and three real-time quantitative PCR assays. Injection challenge of specific pathogen-free Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), with R. salmoninarum was used to estimate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Results did not identify a single assay demonstrating the highest analytical and diagnostic performance characteristics, but revealed strengths and weaknesses of each test.

  19. Bench-top validation testing of selected immunological and molecular Renibacterium salmoninarum diagnostic assays by comparison with quantitative bacteriological culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, D.G.; Applegate, L.J.; Murray, A.L.; Purcell, M.K.; McKibben, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    No gold standard assay exhibiting error-free classification of results has been identified for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Validation of diagnostic assays for R. salmoninarum has been hindered by its unique characteristics and biology, and difficulties in locating suitable populations of reference test animals. Infection status of fish in test populations is often unknown, and it is commonly assumed that the assay yielding the most positive results has the highest diagnostic accuracy, without consideration of misclassification of results. In this research, quantification of R. salmoninarum in samples by bacteriological culture provided a standardized measure of viable bacteria to evaluate analytical performance characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and repeatability) of non-culture assays in three matrices (phosphate-buffered saline, ovarian fluid and kidney tissue). Non-culture assays included polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), direct smear fluorescent antibody technique (FAT), membrane-filtration FAT, nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and three real-time quantitative PCR assays. Injection challenge of specific pathogen-free Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), with R. salmoninarum was used to estimate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Results did not identify a single assay demonstrating the highest analytical and diagnostic performance characteristics, but revealed strengths and weaknesses of each test.

  20. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Department of Energy Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a collaborative, shared infrastructure to...

  1. Rapid diagnosis of MDR and XDR tuberculosis with the MeltPro TB assay in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yu; Dong, Haiyan; Tan, Yaoju; Deng, Yunfeng; Cai, Xingshan; Jing, Hui; Xia, Hui; Li, Qiang; Ou, Xichao; Su, Biyi; Li, Xuezheng; Zhang, Zhiying; Li, Junchen; Zhang, Jiankang; Huan, Shitong; Zhao, Yanlin

    2016-05-06

    New diagnostic methods have provided a promising solution for rapid and reliable detection of drug-resistant TB strains. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the MeltPro TB assay in identifying multidrug-resistant (MDR-) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) patients from sputum samples. The MeltPro TB assay was evaluated using sputum samples from 2057 smear-positive TB patients. Phenotypic Mycobacterial Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) 960 drug susceptibility testing served as a reference standard. The sensitivity of the MeltPro TB assay was 94.2% for detecting resistance to rifampicin and 84.9% for detecting resistance to isoniazid. For second-line drugs, the assay showed a sensitivity of 83.3% for ofloxacin resistance, 75.0% for amikacin resistance, and 63.5% for kanamycin resistance. However, there was a significant difference for detecting kanamycin resistance between the two pilot sites in sensitivity, which was 53.2% in Guangdong and 81.5% in Shandong (P = 0.015). Overall, the MeltPro TB assay demonstrated good performance for the detection of MDR- and XDR-TB, with a sensitivity of 86.7% and 71.4%, respectively. The MeltPro TB assay is an excellent alternative for the detection of MDR- and XDR-TB cases in China, with high accuracy, short testing turn-around time, and low unit price compared with other tests.

  2. Instrument for assaying radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Jody Rustyn; Farfan, Eduardo B.

    2016-03-22

    An instrument for assaying radiation includes a flat panel detector having a first side opposed to a second side. A collimated aperture covers at least a portion of the first side of the flat panel detector. At least one of a display screen or a radiation shield may cover at least a portion of the second side of the flat panel detector.

  3. Hyaluronic Acid Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itenov, Theis S; Kirkby, Nikolai S; Bestle, Morten H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUD: Hyaluronic acid (HA) is proposed as a marker of functional liver capacity. The aim of the present study was to compare a new turbidimetric assay for measuring HA with the current standard method. METHODS: HA was measured by a particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (PETIA) and enzyme...

  4. Kinetics and Catalysis Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, John L.; Britten, Jerald A.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven videotaped kinetics and catalysis demonstrations are described. Demonstrations include the clock reaction, oscillating reaction, hydrogen oxidation in air, hydrogen-oxygen explosion, acid-base properties of solids, high- and low-temperature zeolite reactivity, copper catalysis of ammonia oxidation and sodium peroxide decomposition, ammonia…

  5. Toy Demonstrator's "VISIT" Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenstein, Phyllis

    The role of the toy demonstrator in a home-based, mother-involved intervention effort (Verbal Interaction Project) is presented in this handbook for staff members. It is believed that the prerequisites for functioning in the toy demonstrator's role are a sense of responsibility, patience with the children and their mothers, and willingness to be…

  6. Better Ira Remsen Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalby, David K.; Maynard, James H.; Moore, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Many versions of the classic Ira Remsen experience involving copper and concentrated nitric acid have been used as lecture demonstrations. Remsen's original reminiscence from 150 years ago is included in the Supporting Information, and his biography can be found on the Internet. This article presents a new version that makes the demonstration more…

  7. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  8. Mining Chemical Activity Status from High-Throughput Screening Assays

    KAUST Repository

    Soufan, Othman

    2015-12-14

    High-throughput screening (HTS) experiments provide a valuable resource that reports biological activity of numerous chemical compounds relative to their molecular targets. Building computational models that accurately predict such activity status (active vs. inactive) in specific assays is a challenging task given the large volume of data and frequently small proportion of active compounds relative to the inactive ones. We developed a method, DRAMOTE, to predict activity status of chemical compounds in HTP activity assays. For a class of HTP assays, our method achieves considerably better results than the current state-of-the-art-solutions. We achieved this by modification of a minority oversampling technique. To demonstrate that DRAMOTE is performing better than the other methods, we performed a comprehensive comparison analysis with several other methods and evaluated them on data from 11 PubChem assays through 1,350 experiments that involved approximately 500,000 interactions between chemicals and their target proteins. As an example of potential use, we applied DRAMOTE to develop robust models for predicting FDA approved drugs that have high probability to interact with the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) in humans. Our findings are further partially and indirectly supported by 3D docking results and literature information. The results based on approximately 500,000 interactions suggest that DRAMOTE has performed the best and that it can be used for developing robust virtual screening models. The datasets and implementation of all solutions are available as a MATLAB toolbox online at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dramote and can be found on Figshare.

  9. Mining Chemical Activity Status from High-Throughput Screening Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soufan, Othman; Ba-alawi, Wail; Afeef, Moataz; Essack, Magbubah; Rodionov, Valentin; Kalnis, Panos; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) experiments provide a valuable resource that reports biological activity of numerous chemical compounds relative to their molecular targets. Building computational models that accurately predict such activity status (active vs. inactive) in specific assays is a challenging task given the large volume of data and frequently small proportion of active compounds relative to the inactive ones. We developed a method, DRAMOTE, to predict activity status of chemical compounds in HTP activity assays. For a class of HTP assays, our method achieves considerably better results than the current state-of-the-art-solutions. We achieved this by modification of a minority oversampling technique. To demonstrate that DRAMOTE is performing better than the other methods, we performed a comprehensive comparison analysis with several other methods and evaluated them on data from 11 PubChem assays through 1,350 experiments that involved approximately 500,000 interactions between chemicals and their target proteins. As an example of potential use, we applied DRAMOTE to develop robust models for predicting FDA approved drugs that have high probability to interact with the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) in humans. Our findings are further partially and indirectly supported by 3D docking results and literature information. The results based on approximately 500,000 interactions suggest that DRAMOTE has performed the best and that it can be used for developing robust virtual screening models. The datasets and implementation of all solutions are available as a MATLAB toolbox online at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dramote and can be found on Figshare.

  10. Low-energy ED-XRF spectrometry application in gold assaying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marucco, Alessandra E-mail: marucco@itia.cnr.it

    2004-01-01

    The performances of a low-energy dispersive XRF spectrometer in gold assaying are evaluated by a series of analysis on international standards and other certified gold alloys with. Results of standard-free analysis based on fundamental parameters method compared to results of multi-standard method, demonstrate a large gain of accuracy by drawing appropriate calibration curves with use of 1 to 16 matrix-specific standards. The accuracy of gold assaying has improved by a factor of 10, as compared to the conventional touchstone test. This rather economical technique satisfies then numerous precious alloys analyst needs, representing an excellent alternative to the traditional method for quick anti-fraud controls.

  11. Methanol Cannon Demonstrations Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes two variations on the traditional methanol cannon demonstration. The first variation is a chain reaction using real metal chains. The second example involves using easily available components to produce sequential explosions that can be musical in nature. (AIM)

  12. TENCompetence tool demonstration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluijfhout, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Kluijfhout, E. (2009). TENCompetence tool demonstration. Presented at Zorgacademie Parkstad (Health Academy Parkstad), Limburg Leisure Academy, Life Long Learning Limburg and a number of regional educational institutions. May, 18, 2009, Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open University of the Netherlands, T

  13. Land Management Research Demonstration

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 2002, Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge became one of the first Land Management and Research Demonstration (LMRD) sites. These sites are intended to serve as...

  14. Antioxidant assay using genetically engineered bioluminescent Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolome, Amelita; Macalino, Bernadette; Pastoral, Ian Lemuel; Sevilla, Fortunato, III

    2006-02-01

    A new antioxidant activity assay based on the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-inducible bacterial strain (E. coli DPD2511) is described. The strain harbors the plasmid pKatG::luxCDABE and responds to hydrogen peroxide treatment by increasing light emission at 490 nm. Antioxidant capacity is evaluated through the ability of an agent to inhibit the hydrogen peroxide-induced bioluminescence of E. coli DPD2511. Applicability of the developed assay in detecting levels of antioxidants in various aqueous plant extracts is demonstrated. The assay was validated against 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, a known antioxidant assay.

  15. Pancreaticopleural fistula : CT demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahm, Jin Kyeung [Chuncheon Medical Center, ChunChon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-01

    In patients with chronic pancreatitis, the pancreaticopleural fistula is known to cause recurrent exudative or hemorrhagic pleural effusions. These are often large in volume and require treatment, unlike the effusions in acute pancreatitis. Diagnosis can be made either by the finding of elevated pleural fluid amylase level or, using imaging studies, by the direct demonstration of the fistulous tract. We report two cases of pancreaticopleural fistula demonstrated by computed tomography.

  16. Using the CPTAC Assay Portal to identify and implement highly characterized targeted proteomics assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteaker, Jeffrey R; Halusa, Goran N; Hoofnagle, Andrew N; Sharma, Vagisha; MacLean, Brendan; Yan, Ping; Wrobel, John A; Kennedy, Jacob; Mani, DR; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Meyer, Matthew R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Abbatiello, Susan E; Boja, Emily; Carr, Steven A.; Chan, Daniel W.; Chen, Xian; Chen, Jing; Davies, Sherri R; Ellis, Matthew J. C.; Fenyö, David; Hiltke, Tara; Ketchum, Karen A.; Kinsinger, Chris; Kuhn, Eric; Liebler, Daniel C.; Lin, De; Liu, Tao; Loss, Michael; MacCoss, Michael J; Qian, Wei-Jun; Rivers, Robert; Rodland, Karin D.; Ruggles, Kelly V; Scott, Mitchell G; Smith, Richard D.; Thomas, Stefani; Townsend, R. Reid; Whiteley, Gordon; Wu, Chaochao; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Rodriguez, Henry; Paulovich, Amanda G

    2016-01-01

    Summary The Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched an Assay Portal (http://assays.cancer.gov) to serve as an open-source repository of well-characterized targeted proteomic assays. The portal is designed to curate and disseminate highly characterized, targeted mass spectrometry (MS)-based assays by providing detailed assay performance characterization data, standard operating procedures, and access to reagents. Assay content is accessed via the portal through queries to find assays targeting proteins associated with specific cellular pathways, protein complexes, or specific chromosomal regions. The position of the peptide analytes for which there are available assays are mapped relative to other features of interest in the protein, such as sequence domains, isoforms, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and post-translational modifications. The overarching goals are to enable robust quantification of all human proteins and to standardize the quantification of targeted MS-based assays to ultimately enable harmonization of results over time and across laboratories. PMID:26867747

  17. Using the CPTAC Assay Portal to identify and implement highly characterized targeted proteomics assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Halusa, Goran; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Sharma, Vagisha; MacLean, Brendan; Yan, Ping; Wrobel, John; Kennedy, Jacob; Mani, DR; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Meyer, Matthew R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Boja, Emily; Carr, Steven A.; Chan, Daniel W.; Chen, Xian; Chen, Jing; Davies, Sherri; Ellis, Matthew; Fenyo, David; Hiltket, Tara; Ketchum, Karen; Kinsinger, Christopher; Kuhn, Eric; Liebler, Daniel; Liu, Tao; Loss, Michael; MacCoss, Michael; Qian, Weijun; Rivers, Robert; Rodland, Karin D.; Ruggles, Kelly; Scott, Mitchell; Smith, Richard D.; Thomas, Stefani N.; Townsend, Reid; Whiteley, Gordon; Wu, Chaochao; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Rodriguez, Henry; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2016-02-12

    The Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched an Assay Portal (http://assays.cancer.gov) to serve as an open-source repository of well-characterized targeted proteomic assays. The portal is designed to curate and disseminate highly characterized, targeted mass spectrometry (MS)-based assays by providing detailed assay performance characterization data, standard operating procedures, and access to reagents. Assay content is accessed via the portal through queries to find assays targeting proteins associated with specific cellular pathways, protein complexes, or specific chromosomal regions. The position of the peptide analytes for which there are available assays are mapped relative to other features of interest in the protein, such as sequence domains, isoforms, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and post-translational modifications. The overarching goals are to enable robust quantification of all human proteins and to standardize the quantification of targeted MS-based assays to ultimately enable harmonization of results over time and across laboratories.

  18. Edible Astronomy Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowich, Donald A.

    2007-12-01

    Astronomy demonstrations with edible ingredients are an effective way to increase student interest and knowledge of astronomical concepts. This approach has been successful with all age groups from elementary school through college students - and the students remember these demonstrations after they are presented. In this poster I describe edible demonstrations I have created to simulate the expansion of the universe (using big-bang chocolate chip cookies); differentiation during the formation of the Earth and planets (using chocolate or chocolate milk with marshmallows, cereal, candy pieces or nuts); and radioactivity/radioactive dating (using popcorn). Other possible demonstrations include: plate tectonics (crackers with peanut butter and jelly); convection (miso soup or hot chocolate); mud flows on Mars (melted chocolate poured over angel food cake); formation of the Galactic disk (pizza); formation of spiral arms (coffee with cream); the curvature of Space (Pringles); constellations patterns with chocolate chips and chocolate chip cookies; planet shaped cookies; star shaped cookies with different colored frostings; coffee or chocolate milk measurement of solar radiation; Oreo cookie lunar phases. Sometimes the students eat the results of the astronomical demonstrations. These demonstrations are an effective teaching tool and can be adapted for cultural, culinary, and ethnic differences among the students.

  19. Kinetic Tetrazolium Microtiter Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond; Koenig, David

    1993-01-01

    Kinetic tetrazolium microtiter assay (KTMA) involves use of tetrazolium salts and Triton X-100 (or equivalent), nontoxic, in vitro color developer solubilizing colored metabolite formazan without injuring or killing metabolizing cells. Provides for continuous measurement of metabolism and makes possible to determine rate of action of antimicrobial agent in real time as well as determines effective inhibitory concentrations. Used to monitor growth after addition of stimulatory compounds. Provides for kinetic determination of efficacy of biocide, greatly increasing reliability and precision of results. Also used to determine relative effectiveness of antimicrobial agent as function of time. Capability of generating results on day of test extremely important in treatment of water and waste, disinfection of hospital rooms, and in pharmaceutical, agricultural, and food-processing industries. Assay also used in many aspects of cell biology.

  20. The corneal pocket assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The cornea in most species is physiologically avascular, and thus this assay allows the measurement of newly formed vessels. The continuous monitoring of neovascular growth in the same animal allows the evaluation of drugs acting as suppressors or stimulators of angiogenesis. Under anesthesia a micropocket is produced in the cornea thickness and the angiogenesis stimulus (tumor tissue, cell suspension, growth factor) is placed into the pocket in order to induce vascular outgrowth from the limbal capillaries. Neovascular development and progression can be modified by the presence of locally released or applied inhibitory factors or by systemic treatments. In this chapter the experimental details of the avascular cornea assay, the technical challenges, and advantages and disadvantages in different species are discussed. Protocols for local drug treatment and tissue sampling for histology and pharmacokinetic profile are reported.

  1. Appraisal of within- and between-laboratory reproducibility of non-radioisotopic local lymph node assay using flow cytometry, LLNA:BrdU-FCM: comparison of OECD TG429 performance standard and statistical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyeri; Na, Jihye; Jang, Won-Hee; Jung, Mi-Sook; Jeon, Jun-Young; Heo, Yong; Yeo, Kyung-Wook; Jo, Ji-Hoon; Lim, Kyung-Min; Bae, SeungJin

    2015-05-05

    Mouse local lymph node assay (LLNA, OECD TG429) is an alternative test replacing conventional guinea pig tests (OECD TG406) for the skin sensitization test but the use of a radioisotopic agent, (3)H-thymidine, deters its active dissemination. New non-radioisotopic LLNA, LLNA:BrdU-FCM employs a non-radioisotopic analog, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and flow cytometry. For an analogous method, OECD TG429 performance standard (PS) advises that two reference compounds be tested repeatedly and ECt(threshold) values obtained must fall within acceptable ranges to prove within- and between-laboratory reproducibility. However, this criteria is somewhat arbitrary and sample size of ECt is less than 5, raising concerns about insufficient reliability. Here, we explored various statistical methods to evaluate the reproducibility of LLNA:BrdU-FCM with stimulation index (SI), the raw data for ECt calculation, produced from 3 laboratories. Descriptive statistics along with graphical representation of SI was presented. For inferential statistics, parametric and non-parametric methods were applied to test the reproducibility of SI of a concurrent positive control and the robustness of results were investigated. Descriptive statistics and graphical representation of SI alone could illustrate the within- and between-laboratory reproducibility. Inferential statistics employing parametric and nonparametric methods drew similar conclusion. While all labs passed within- and between-laboratory reproducibility criteria given by OECD TG429 PS based on ECt values, statistical evaluation based on SI values showed that only two labs succeeded in achieving within-laboratory reproducibility. For those two labs that satisfied the within-lab reproducibility, between-laboratory reproducibility could be also attained based on inferential as well as descriptive statistics.

  2. The diagnostic performance of an antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using serum and colostrum to determine the disease status of a Jersey dairy herd infected with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenvey, Caitlin J; Reichel, Michael P; Cockcroft, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    Colostrum may have the ability to improve the diagnostic accuracy of some tests when compared to serum for important livestock diseases because of the high concentrations of immunoglobulins present within this sample type. The ELISA for Johne's disease is one such test, as it suffers from low sensitivity when testing serum samples collected during the subclinical stage of infection. Blood and colostrum samples were collected from 34 Jersey dairy cows and tested for antibodies against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) by ELISA. Fecal samples were also collected and tested by a high-throughput Johne's polymerase chain reaction (HT-J PCR) assay and fecal culture (FC), with the latter being used as the reference test. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed, and the area under the curve (AUC) was calculated. The HT-J PCR and FC results were also compared. Of the 34 cows in this study, 4 had FC results consistent with MAP infection. The HT-J PCR did not identify any FC-positive cows. Using a 1:20 dilution and sample-to-positive (S/P) ratio cutoff threshold of 0.15, the relative sensitivity values of both serum (AUC 0. 56) and colostrum (AUC 0.63) were 0%. With lower sample dilutions, the relative sensitivity values of serum were 0% (1:2, AUC 0.62; 1:5, AUC 0.55); however, the relative sensitivity value of colostrum was 75% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 19-99%) at a dilution of 1:5, S/P ratio cutoff threshold of 0.15, and AUC of 0.73 (95% CI: 0.55-0.87). The testing of colostrum samples for MAP-specific antibodies by ELISA may provide improved identification of animals in the early stages of infection with MAP when compared with serum samples.

  3. Serodiagnosis of Zika virus (ZIKV) infections by a novel NS1-based ELISA devoid of cross-reactivity with dengue virus antibodies: a multicohort study of assay performance, 2015 to 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhagen, Katja; Probst, Christian; Radzimski, Christiane; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Emmerich, Petra; van Esbroeck, Marjan; Schinkel, Janke; Grobusch, Martin P; Goorhuis, Abraham; Warnecke, Jens M; Lattwein, Erik; Komorowski, Lars; Deerberg, Andrea; Saschenbrecker, Sandra; Stöcker, Winfried; Schlumberger, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Serological diagnosis of Zika virus (ZIKV) infections is challenging due to high cross-reactivity between flaviviruses. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of a novel anti-ZIKV ELISA based on recombinant ZIKV non-structural protein 1 (NS1). Assay sensitivity was examined using sera from 27 patients with reverse transcription (RT)-PCR-confirmed and 85 with suspected ZIKV infection. Specificity was analysed using sera from 1,015 healthy individuals. Samples from 252 patients with dengue virus (n = 93), West Nile virus (n = 34), Japanese encephalitis virus (n = 25), chikungunya virus (n = 19) or Plasmodium spp. (n = 69) infections and from 12 yellow fever-vaccinated individuals were also examined. In confirmed ZIKV specimens collected ≥ 6 days after symptom onset, ELISA sensitivity was 58.8% (95% confidence interval (CI): 36.0–78.4) for IgM, 88.2% (95% CI: 64.4–98.0) for IgG, and 100% (95% CI: 78.4–100) for IgM/IgG, at 99.8% (95% CI: 99.2–100) specificity. Cross-reactivity with high-level dengue virus antibodies was not detected. Among patients with potentially cross-reactive antibodies anti-ZIKV positive rates were 0.8% (95% CI: 0–3.0) and 0.4% (95% CI: 0–2.4) for IgM and IgG, respectively. Providing high specificity and low cross-reactivity, the NS1-based ELISA has the potential to aid in counselling patients, pregnant women and travellers after returning from ZIKV-endemic areas. PMID:28006649

  4. The Analysis and Demonstration of Value Engineering about Operating Performance of Chinese Commercial Bank%我国商业银行经营绩效的价值工程分析及实证研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴娜

    2016-01-01

    Along with the opening up of financial market in China, the gradual formation of the competition pattern of diversified banks, the development of China's commercial banks is facing an unprecedented huge impact. How to maximize the performance of commercial banks is an important issue for the current financial regulatory authorities and market economies. One of the effective solutions is setting and improving the performance value system of commercial bank. By researching, the paper makes a performance value indexes system of operating performance of Chinese commercial bank, which is scientific and effective, and makes use of the theory and methods of value engineering to construct the synthetic model of valuing the performance of Chinese commercial bank, which is made for demonstration research.%随着中国金融市场的逐步对外开放、多元化银行竞争格局的逐渐形成,我国商业银行的发展面临着前所未有的巨大冲击。如何最大程度地提高商业银行的经营绩效,是当前金融监管当局和市场各经济体普遍关注的重要问题。解决这一问题的有效途径之一,是建立和完善科学的商业银行经营绩效评价体系。本文通过研究和确定科学有效的商业银行经营绩效评价指标体系,采用价值工程理论和方法为主要分析工具,构造了商业银行经营绩效评价的综合模型,并用该模型进行了实证研究。

  5. B cell helper assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrignani, Sergio; Tonti, Elena; Casorati, Giulia; Dellabona, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Activation, proliferation and differentiation of naïve B lymphocytes into memory B cells and plasma cells requires engagement of the B cell receptor (BCR) coupled to T-cell help (1, 2). T cells deliver help in cognate fashion when they are activated upon recognition of specific MHC-peptide complexes presented by B cells. T cells can also deliver help in a non-cognate or bystander fashion, when they do not find specific MHC-peptide complexes on B cells and are activated by alternative mechanisms. T-cell dependent activation of B cells can be studied in vitro by experimental models called "B cell helper assays" that are based on the co-culture of B cells with activated T cells. These assays allow to decipher the molecular bases for productive T-dependent B cell responses. We show here examples of B cell helper assays in vitro, which can be reproduced with any subset of T lymphocytes that displays the appropriate helper signals.

  6. Micropatterned comet assay enables high throughput and sensitive DNA damage quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jing; Chow, Danielle N; Fessler, Jessica L; Weingeist, David M; Wood, David K; Engelward, Bevin P

    2015-01-01

    The single cell gel electrophoresis assay, also known as the comet assay, is a versatile method for measuring many classes of DNA damage, including base damage, abasic sites, single strand breaks and double strand breaks. However, limited throughput and difficulties with reproducibility have limited its utility, particularly for clinical and epidemiological studies. To address these limitations, we created a microarray comet assay. The use of a micrometer scale array of cells increases the number of analysable comets per square centimetre and enables automated imaging and analysis. In addition, the platform is compatible with standard 24- and 96-well plate formats. Here, we have assessed the consistency and sensitivity of the microarray comet assay. We showed that the linear detection range for H2O2-induced DNA damage in human lymphoblastoid cells is between 30 and 100 μM, and that within this range, inter-sample coefficient of variance was between 5 and 10%. Importantly, only 20 comets were required to detect a statistically significant induction of DNA damage for doses within the linear range. We also evaluated sample-to-sample and experiment-to-experiment variation and found that for both conditions, the coefficient of variation was lower than what has been reported for the traditional comet assay. Finally, we also show that the assay can be performed using a 4× objective (rather than the standard 10× objective for the traditional assay). This adjustment combined with the microarray format makes it possible to capture more than 50 analysable comets in a single image, which can then be automatically analysed using in-house software. Overall, throughput is increased more than 100-fold compared to the traditional assay. Together, the results presented here demonstrate key advances in comet assay technology that improve the throughput, sensitivity, and robustness, thus enabling larger scale clinical and epidemiological studies.

  7. Solar renovation demonstration projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruun Joergensen, O. [ed.

    1998-10-01

    In the framework of the IEA SHC Programme, a Task on building renovation was initiated, `Task 20, Solar Energy in Building Renovation`. In a part of the task, Subtask C `Design of Solar Renovation Projects`, different solar renovation demonstration projects were developed. The objective of Subtask C was to demonstrate the application of advanced solar renovation concepts on real buildings. This report documents 16 different solar renovation demonstration projects including the design processes of the projects. The projects include the renovation of houses, schools, laboratories, and factories. Several solar techniques were used: building integrated solar collectors, glazed balconies, ventilated solar walls, transparent insulation, second skin facades, daylight elements and photovoltaic systems. These techniques are used in several simple as well as more complex system designs. (au)

  8. Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deri, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-13

    The Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator (GOLD) project has demonstrated a novel optical amplifier for high energy pulsed lasers operating at high repetition rates. The amplifier stores enough pump energy to support >10 J of laser output, and employs conduction cooling for thermal management to avoid the need for expensive and bulky high-pressure helium subsystems. A prototype amplifier was fabricated, pumped with diode light at 885 nm, and characterized. Experimental results show that the amplifier provides sufficient small-signal gain and sufficiently low wavefront and birefringence impairments to prove useful in laser systems, at repetition rates up to 60 Hz.

  9. Demonstrating Supernova Remnant Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Denis A.; Williams, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    We have created a software tool to calculate at display supernova remnant evolution which includes all stages from early ejecta dominated phase to late-time merging with the interstellar medium. The software was created using Python, and can be distributed as Python code, or as an executable file. The purpose of the software is to demonstrate the different phases and transitions that a supernova remnant undergoes, and will be used in upper level undergraduate astrophysics courses as a teaching tool. The usage of the software and its graphical user interface will be demonstrated.

  10. Demonstrating marketing accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombeski, William R; Britt, Jason; Taylor, Jan; Riggs, Karen; Wray, Tanya; Adkins, Wanda; Springate, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Pressure on health care marketers to demonstrate effectiveness of their strategies and show their contribution to organizational goals is growing. A seven-tiered model based on the concepts of structure (having the right people, systems), process (doing the right things in the right way), and outcomes (results) is discussed. Examples of measures for each tier are provided and the benefits of using the model as a tool for measuring, organizing, tracking, and communicating appropriate information are provided. The model also provides a framework for helping management understand marketing's value and can serve as a vehicle for demonstrating marketing accountability.

  11. Evaluation of Presto(plus) assay and LightMix kit Trichomonas vaginalis assay for detection of Trichomonas vaginalis in dry vaginal swabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waaij, Dewi J; Ouburg, Sander; Dubbink, Jan Henk; Peters, Remco P H; Morré, Servaas A

    2016-08-01

    This is an evaluation study of the Presto(plus) Assay for T. vaginalis by comparing to the TIB MOLBIOL LightMix Kit Trichomonas vaginalis Assay using 615 dry collected vaginal and rectal swabs. Discordant samples were analyzed by the Qiagen® Microbial DNA qPCR for TV Assay. Both assays showed comparable performances (McNemar p>0.05).

  12. Monty Roberts’ public demonstrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loftus, Loni; Marks, Kelly; Jones-McVey, Rosie; Gonzales, Jose L.; Fowler, Veronica L.

    2016-01-01

    Effective training of horses relies on the trainer’s awareness of learning theory and equine ethology, and should be undertaken with skill and time. Some trainers, such as Monty Roberts, share their methods through the medium of public demonstrations. This paper describes the opportunistic analys

  13. Calculus Demonstrations Using MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Peter K.; Harman, Chris

    2002-01-01

    The note discusses ways in which technology can be used in the calculus learning process. In particular, five MATLAB programs are detailed for use by instructors or students that demonstrate important concepts in introductory calculus: Newton's method, differentiation and integration. Two of the programs are animated. The programs and the…

  14. Demonstrating the Gas Laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holko, David A.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a complete computer program demonstrating the relationship between volume/pressure for Boyle's Law, volume/temperature for Charles' Law, and volume/moles of gas for Avagadro's Law. The programing reinforces students' application of gas laws and equates a simulated moving piston to theoretical values derived using the ideal gas law.…

  15. PHARUS ASAR demonstrator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, A.J.E.; Bree, R.J.P. van; Calkoen, C.J.; Dekker, R.J.; Otten, M.P.G.; Rossum, W.L. van

    2001-01-01

    PHARUS is a polarimetric phased array C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), designed and built for airborne use. Advanced SAR (ASAR) data in image and alternating polarization mode have been simulated with PHARUS to demonstrate the use of Envisat for a number of typical SAR applications that are no

  16. Arctic Craft Demonstration Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    it received a lot of attention from the local population. Demonstration personnel, both Coast Guard and contractors, were asked to be receptive to...www.uscg.mil/top/missions/ . Counter-Drug Interdiction and Alien Migrant Interdiction operations are currently not included. In the non-Polar regions

  17. Polarized Light: Three Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goehmann, Ruth; Welty, Scott

    1984-01-01

    Describes three demonstrations used in the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry polarized light show. The procedures employed are suitable for the classroom by using smaller polarizers and an overhead projector. Topic areas include properties of cellophane tape, nondisappearing arrows, and rope through a picket fence. (JN)

  18. A Two-Tube Multiplex Reverse Transcription PCR Assay for Simultaneous Detection of Viral and Bacterial Pathogens of Infectious Diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diarrhea caused by viral and bacterial infections is a major health problem in developing countries. The purpose of this study is to develop a two-tube multiplex PCR assay using automatic electrophoresis for simultaneous detection of 13 diarrhea-causative viruses or bacteria, with an intended application in provincial Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention, China. The assay was designed to detect rotavirus A, norovirus genogroups GI and GII, human astrovirus, enteric adenoviruses, and human bocavirus (tube 1, and Salmonella, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, diarrheagenic Escherichia coli, Campylobacter jejuni, Shigella, Yersinia, and Vibrio cholera (tube 2. The analytical specificity was examined with positive controls for each pathogen. The analytical sensitivity was evaluated by performing the assay on serial tenfold dilutions of in vitro transcribed RNA, recombinant plasmids, or bacterial culture. A total of 122 stool samples were tested by this two-tube assay and the results were compared with those obtained from reference methods. The two-tube assay achieved a sensitivity of 20–200 copies for a single virus and 102-103 CFU/mL for bacteria. The clinical performance demonstrated that the two-tube assay had comparable sensitivity and specificity to those of reference methods. In conclusion, the two-tube assay is a rapid, cost-effective, sensitive, specific, and high throughput method for the simultaneous detection of enteric bacteria and virus.

  19. Radon assay for SNO+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumleskie, Janet [Laurentian University, Greater Sudbury, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-12-31

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

  20. Growth cone collapse assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Geoffrey M W; Jareonsettasin, Prem; Keynes, Roger J

    2014-01-01

    The growth cone collapse assay has proved invaluable in detecting and purifying axonal repellents. Glycoproteins/proteins present in detergent extracts of biological tissues are incorporated into liposomes, added to growth cones in culture and changes in morphology are then assessed. Alternatively purified or recombinant molecules in aqueous solution may be added directly to the cultures. In both cases after a defined period of time (up to 1 h), the cultures are fixed and then assessed by inverted phase contrast microscopy for the percentage of growth cones showing a collapsed profile with loss of flattened morphology, filopodia, and lamellipodia.

  1. Active and passive computed tomography for nondestructive assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardi, R T; Camp, D E; Clard, D; Jackson, J A; Martz, H E, Decman, D J; Roberson, G P

    1998-10-28

    Traditional gamma-ray methods used to characterize nuclear waste introduce errors that are related to non-uniform measurement responses associated with unknown radioactive source and matrix material distributions. These errors can be reduced by applying an active and passive tomographic technique (A&PCT) developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The technique uses an external radioactive source and active tomography to map the attenuation within a waste barrel as a function of mono-energetic gamma-ray energy. Passive tomography is used to localize and identify specific radioactive waste within the same container. Reconstruction of the passive data using the attenuation maps at specific energies allows internal waste radioactivity to be corrected for any overlying heterogeneous materials, thus yielding an absolute assay of the waste activity. LLNL and Bio-Imaging Research, Inc. have collaborated in a technology transfer effort to integrate an A&PCT assay system into a mobile waste characterization trailer. This mobile system has participated in and passed several formal DOE-sponsored performance demonstrations, tests and evaluations. The system is currently being upgraded with multiple detectors to improve throughput, automated gamma-ray analysis code to simplify the assay, and a new emission reconstruction code to improve accuracy

  2. Recombinant streptavidin nanopeptamer anti-immunocomplex assay for noncompetitive detection of small analytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlomagno, Mariana; Lassabe, Gabriel; Rossotti, Martín; González-Techera, Andrés; Vanrell, Lucía; González-Sapienza, Gualberto

    2014-10-21

    Short peptide loops selected from phage libraries can specifically recognize the formation of hapten-antibody immunocomplexes and can thus be used to develop phage anti-immunocomplex assays (PHAIA) for noncompetitive detection of small molecules. In this study, we generated recombinant chimeras by fusing anti-immunocomplex peptides selected from phage libraries to the N- or C-termini of core streptavidin and used them to setup phage-free noncompetitive assays for the herbicide clomazone (MW 240 Da). The best conditions for refolding were optimized by a high throughput screening allowing to obtain tens of mg of purified protein per liter of culture. The noncompetitive assay developed with these chimeras performed with a 50% saturating concentration (SC50) of 2.2 ± 0.3 ng/mL and limit of detection (LOD) of 0.48 ng/mL. Values that are 13- and 8-fold better that those obtained for the SC50 and LOD of the competitive assay setup with the same antibody. Apart from the first demonstration that recombinant peptide-streptavidin chimeras can be used for sensitive immunodetection of small molecules with a positive readout, this new assay component is a highly standardized reagent with a defined stoichiometry, which can be used in combination with the broad option of existing biotinylated reagents offering a great versatility for the development of conventional immunoassay and biosensors. The utility of the test was demonstrated analyzing the clomazone runoff during the rice growing season in northern Uruguay.

  3. Comparison of Droplet Digital PCR and Quantitative PCR Assays for Quantitative Detection of Xanthomonas citri Subsp. citri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Zhao

    Full Text Available Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR is a novel molecular biology technique providing absolute quantification of target nucleic acids without the need for an external calibrator. Despite its emerging applications in medical diagnosis, there are few reports of its use for the detection of plant pathogens. This work was designed to assess the diagnosis potential of the ddPCR for absolute quantitative detection of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, a quarantine plant pathogenic bacterium that causes citrus bacterial canker in susceptible Citrus species. We transferred an established quantitative PCR (qPCR assay for citrus bacterial canker diagnosis directly to the ddPCR format and compared the performance of the two methods. The qPCR assay has a broader dynamic range compared to the ddPCR assay and the ddPCR assay has a significantly higher degree of sensitivity compared to the qPCR assay. The influence of PCR inhibitors can be reduced considerably in the ddPCR assay because the collection of end-point fluorescent signals and the counting of binomial events (positive or negative droplets are associated with a Poisson algorithm. The ddPCR assay also shows lower coefficient of variation compared to the qPCR assay especially in low target concentration. The linear association of the measurements by ddPCR and qPCR assays is strong (Pearson correlation = 0.8633; P<0.001. Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicates the ddPCR methodology is a more robust approach for diagnosis of citrus bacterial canker. In summary, the results demonstrated that the ddPCR assay has the potential for the quantitative detection of X. citri subsp. citri with high precision and accuracy as compared with the results from qPCR assay. Further studies are required to evaluate and validate the value of ddPCR technology in the diagnosis of plant disease and quarantine applications.

  4. Nucla CFB Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    This report documents Colorado-Ute Electric Association's Nucla Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Combustion (AFBC) demonstration project. It describes the plant equipment and system design for the first US utility-size circulating AFBC boiler and its support systems. Included are equipment and system descriptions, design/background information and appendices with an equipment list and selected information plus process flow and instrumentation drawings. The purpose of this report is to share the information gathered during the Nucla circulating AFBC demonstration project and present it so that the general public can evaluate the technical feasibility and cost effectiveness of replacing pulverized or stoker-fired boiler units with circulating fluidized-bed boiler units. (VC)

  5. The Majorana Demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo, Estanislao; Fast, James E.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Keillor, Martin E.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Merriman, Jason H.; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Avignone, Frank T.; Back, Henning O.; Combs, Dustin C.; Leviner, L.; Young, A.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Konovalov, S.; Vanyushin, I.; Yumatov, Vladimir; Bergevin, M.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Detwiler, Jason A.; Loach, J. C.; Martin, R. D.; Poon, Alan; Prior, Gersende; Vetter, Kai; Bertrand, F.; Cooper, R. J.; Radford, D. C.; Varner, R. L.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Boswell, M.; Elliott, S.; Gehman, Victor M.; Hime, Andrew; Kidd, M. F.; LaRoque, B. H.; Rielage, Keith; Ronquest, M. C.; Steele, David; Brudanin, V.; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Gusey, K.; Kochetov, Oleg; Shirchenko, M.; Timkin, V.; Yakushev, E.; Busch, Matthew; Esterline, James H.; Tornow, Werner; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Horton, Mark; Howard, S.; Sobolev, V.; Collar, J. I.; Fields, N.; Creswick, R.; Doe, Peter J.; Johnson, R. A.; Knecht, A.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Marino, Michael G.; Miller, M. L.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Wolfe, B. A.; Efremenko, Yuri; Ejiri, H.; Hazama, R.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Shima, T.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, M.; Henning, Reyco; Howe, M. A.; MacMullin, S.; Phillips, D.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Strain, J.; Vorren, Kris R.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Keller, C.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Thomas, K.; Zhang, C.; Hallin, A. L.; Keeter, K.; Mizouni, Leila; Wilkerson, J. F.

    2011-09-03

    A brief review of the history and neutrino physics of double beta decay is given. A description of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR research and development program, including background reduction techniques, is presented in some detail. The application of point contact (PC) detectors to the experiment is discussed, including the effectiveness of pulse shape analysis. The predicted sensitivity of a PC detector array enriched to 86% to 76Ge is given.

  6. The Majorana Demonstrator

    CERN Document Server

    Aguayo, E; Hoppe, E W; Keillor, M E; Kephart, J D; Kouzes, R T; LaFerriere, B D; Merriman, J; Orrell, J L; Overman, N R; Avignone, F T; Back, H O; Combs, D C; Leviner, L E; Young, A R; Barabash, A S; Konovalov, S I; Vanyushin, I; Yumatov, V; Bergevin, M; Chan, Y-D; Detwiler, J A; Loach, J C; Martin, R D; Poon, A W P; Prior, G; Vetter, K; Bertrand, F E; Cooper, R J; Radford, D C; Varner, R L; Yu, C -H; Boswell, M; Elliott, S R; Gehman, V M; Hime, A; Kidd, M F; LaRoque, B H; Rielage, K; Ronquest, M C; Steele, D; Brudanin, V; Egorov, V; Gusey, K; Kochetov, O; Shirchenko, M; Timkin, V; Yakushev, E; Busch, M; Esterline, J; Tornow, W; Christofferson, C D; Horton, M; Howard, S; Sobolev, V; Collar, J I; Fields, N; Creswick, R J; Doe, P J; Johnson, R A; Knecht, A; Leon, J; Marino, M G; Miller, M L; Robertson, R G H; Schubert, A G; Wolfe, B A; Efremenko, Yu; Ejiri, H; Hazama, R; Nomachi, M; Shima, T; Finnerty, P; Fraenkle, F M; Giovanetti, G K; Green, M P; Henning, R; Howe, M A; MacMullin, S; Phillips, D G; Snavely, K J; Strain, J; Vorren, K; Guiseppe, V E; Keller, C; Mei, D -M; Perumpilly, G; Thomas, K; Zhang, C; Hallin, A L; Keeter, K J; Mizouni, L; Wilkerson, J F

    2011-01-01

    A brief review of the history and neutrino physics of double beta decay is given. A description of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR research and development program including background reduction techniques is presented in some detail. The application of point contact (PC) detectors to the experiment is discussed, including the effectiveness of pulse shape analysis. The predicted sensitivity of a PC detector array enriched to 86% in 76Ge is given.

  7. Evaluation of performances of VERSANT HCV RNA 1.0 assay (kPCR) and Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HCV test v2.0 at low level viremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzuti, Laura; Lozzi, Maria Antonietta; Riva, Elisabetta; Maida, Paola; Falasca, Francesca; Antonelli, Guido; Turriziani, Ombretta

    2016-07-01

    We assess the concordance between low level HCV values obtained using the VERSANT HCV RNA 1.0 Assay (kPCR) and COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HCV Quantitative Test v2.0. The correlation between the values obtained by the two RT-PCR assays for samples with quantifiable HCV RNA levels revealed that viral load measured by kPCR significantly correlated with that of the CAP/CTM (R=0.644, PHCV triple therapy or interferon- free regimens. It is therefore recommended to monitor individual patients with the same test throughout treatment.

  8. Influence of NADH Concetration in the AST Reagent on Assay Performance%AST 试剂中 NADH 含量变化对线性范围影响的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    穆润清; 王银铃; 颜青

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the assay performance of two different kind of reagent with different concentration of NADH.Methods Verificated function index of these two reagents,such as accuracy,sensitiveness,blank space and so on, and determined the molar extinction coefficient of NADH using hexokinase method and calculated the NADH density in two kind of AST reagents.Then estimated the effect of concentation of NADH on the analysis performance.Results NADH concentration was 0.21 mmol/L,and the sample detection limit of the linear was 1 629 U/L.NADH concentration was 0.13 mmol/L,and the sample detection limit of the linear was 1 263 U/L.So the gap between the two reagent’s detection linear was visible.But there were no significant changes in other performance indicators such as detection sensitivity,reagent blank,precision.Conclusion The NADH concentration in the reagent of AST had greatimpact on the detecting linear range, so should pay attention to the potential change of linear range in the daily work.%目的:评估天门冬氨酸氨基转移酶(AST)试剂中还原型辅酶(NADH)含量变化对试剂盒线性范围的影响。方法对两个具有不同 NADH 含量的同一品牌 AST 试剂的线性范围、精密度、灵敏度、试剂空白等性能指标分别进行验证,利用己糖激酶法测定葡萄糖浓度的方法测定 NADH 的摩尔消光系数,进而评估 NADH 浓度变化对分析性能的影响。结果较高及较低 NADH 浓度 AST 试剂的 R1试剂中 NADH 浓度分别为0.21 mmol/L(基础吸光度为1.1876)和0.13 mmol/L(基础吸光度为0.7567),NADH 浓度降低可造成试剂盒的线性范围减小,检测上限由1629 U/L 降至1263 U/L。NADH 浓度变化对两种试剂的精密度、灵敏度、试剂空白等性能指标无明显影响。结论AST 试剂盒的 R1试剂中NADH 浓度降低(基础吸光度减小)可造成样品检测线性范围减小,因此实验室通过合适

  9. RAS - Screens & Assays - Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    The RAS Drug Discovery group aims to develop assays that will reveal aspects of RAS biology upon which cancer cells depend. Successful assay formats are made available for high-throughput screening programs to yield potentially effective drug compounds.

  10. Validation of a novel in vitro assay using ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS) to detect and quantify hydroxylated metabolites of BDE-99 in rat liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erratico, Claudio A; Szeitz, András; Bandiera, Stelvio M

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS) method to investigate the hepatic oxidative metabolism of 2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-99), a widely used flame retardant and ubiquitous environmental contaminant. Hydroxylated metabolites were extracted using liquid-to-liquid extraction, resolved on a C18 column with gradient elution and detected by mass spectrometry in single ion recording mode using electrospray negative ionization. The assay was validated for linearity, accuracy, precision, limit of quantification, range and recovery. Calibration curves were linear (R2 > or = 0.98) over a concentration range of 0.010-1.0 microM for 4-OH-2,2',3,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (4-OH-BDE-90), 5'-OH-2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (5'-OH-BDE-99) and 6'-OH-2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (6'-OH-BDE-99), and a concentration range of 0.0625-12.5 microM for 2,4,5-tribromophenol (2,4,5-TBP). Inter- and intra-day accuracy values ranged from -2.0% to 6.0% and from -7.7% to 7.3%, respectively, and inter- and intra-day precision values ranged from 2.0% to 8.5% and from 2.2% to 8.6% (n=6), respectively. The limits of quantification were 0.010 microM for 4-OH-BDE-90, 5'-OH-BDE-99 and 6'-OH-BDE-99, and 0.0625 microM for 2,4,5-TBP. Recovery values ranged between 85 and 100% for the four analytes. The validated analytical method was applied to identify and quantify hydroxy BDE-99 metabolites formed in vitro. Incubation of BDE-99 with rat liver microsomes yielded 4-OH-BDE-90 and 6'-OH-BDE-99 as major metabolites and 5'-OH-BDE-99 and 2,4,5-TBP as minor metabolites. To our knowledge, this is the first validated UPLC/MS method to quantify hydroxylated metabolites of PBDEs without the need of derivatization.

  11. Controlling variation in the comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Richard Collins

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Variability of the comet assay is a serious issue, whether it occurs from experiment to experiment in the same laboratory, or between different laboratories analysing identical samples. Do we have to live with high variability, just because the comet assay is a biological assay rather than analytical chemistry? Numerous attempts have been made to limit variability by standardising the assay protocol, and the critical steps in the assay have been identified; agarose concentration, duration of alkaline incubation, and electrophoresis conditions (time, temperature and voltage gradient are particularly important. Even when these are controlled, variation seems to be inevitable. It is helpful to include in experiments reference standards, i.e. cells with a known amount of specific damage to the DNA. They can be aliquots frozen from a single large batch of cells, either untreated (negative controls or treated with, for example, H2O2 or X-rays to induce strand breaks (positive control for the basic assay, or photosensitiser plus light to oxidise guanine (positive control for Fpg- or OGG1-sensitive sites. Reference standards are especially valuable when performing a series of experiments over a long period - for example, analysing samples of white blood cells from a large human biomonitoring trial - to check that the assay is performing consistently, and to identify anomalous results necessitating a repeat experiment. The reference values of tail intensity can also be used to iron out small variations occurring from day to day. We present examples of the use of reference standards in human trials, both within one laboratory and between different laboratories, and describe procedures that can be used to control variation.

  12. NAVAJO ELECTRIFICATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry W. Battiest

    2008-06-11

    The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year project which addresses the electricity needs of the unserved and underserved Navajo Nation, the largest American Indian tribe in the United States. The program serves to cumulatively provide off-grid electricty for families living away from the electricty infrastructure, line extensions for unserved families living nearby (less than 1/2 mile away from) the electricity, and, under the current project called NEDP-4, the construction of a substation to increase the capacity and improve the quality of service into the central core region of the Navajo Nation.

  13. Parameters for assay in engines of agricultural tractor for biofuel use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Reny Adilmar Prestes; Meyer, Wagner [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (DEA/CCA/UEM), Cidade Gaucha, PR (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Agrarias. Dept. de Engenharia Agricola], E-mail: raplopes@uem.br; Pinheiro Neto, Raimundo; Pinheiro, Andreia Cristina [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (DAG/CCA/UEM), PR (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Agrarias. Dept. de Agronomia; Laurindo, Jose Carlos [Instituto de Tecnologia do Parana (CERBIO/TECPAR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Centro Brasileiro de Referencia em Biocombustiveis; Biazzono, Sergio Luis [Instituto de Tecnologia do Parana (TECPAR), Maringa, PR (Brazil). Inspecao Veicular

    2008-07-01

    The use of biofuel in tractors of diesel engines and agricultural harvester, in the operations of preparation of soil and harvest, is a good option of economy for the agriculturist. For a good performance of the machine, regulation and maintenance is necessary. This paper has the objective to prepare the agricultural tractors engine for the use of biofuel. The experiment was carried through State University of Maringa. One used for the assays three Massey Ferguson tractors engines. The smoke assays and opacity had shown that both the tractors had presented problems of regulations. The assays demonstrate the necessity of periodically to carry through the correct maintenance of the machines, as well as the training of the operators. The regulations allow adjusting the engines of the tractors to operate in situations recommended for the manufacturers. The regulations allow the correct functioning and better accompaniment of the useful life of the engine using biofuel in operations of soil preparation, sowing and harvest. (author)

  14. Detection of Biological Threat Agents by Real-Time PCR: Comparison of Assay Performance on the R.A.I.D., the LightCycler, and the Smart Cycler Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    specific tool for the molecular identification of these agents. A common chemistry that can be used on a variety of rapid, real - time PCR instruments...provides the greatest flexibility for assay utilization. Methods: Real - time PCR primers and dual-labeled fluorogenic probes were designed to detect Bacillus

  15. PFBC Utility Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    This report provides a summary of activities by American Electric Power Service Corporation during the first budget period of the PFBC Utility Demonstration Project. In April 1990, AEP signed a Cooperative Agreement with the US Department of Energy to repower the Philip Sporn Plant, Units 3 4 in New Haven, West Virginia, with a 330 KW PFBC plant. The purpose of the program was to demonstrate and verify PFBC in a full-scale commercial plant. The technical and cost baselines of the Cooperative Agreement were based on a preliminary engineering and design and a cost estimate developed by AEP subsequent to AEP's proposal submittal in May 1988, and prior to the signing of the Cooperative Agreement. The Statement of Work in the first budget period of the Cooperative Agreement included a task to develop a preliminary design and cost estimate for erecting a Greenfield plant and to conduct a comparison with the repowering option. The comparative assessment of the options concluded that erecting a Greenfield plant rather than repowering the existing Sporn Plant could be the technically and economically superior alternative. The Greenfield plant would have a capacity of 340 MW. The ten additional MW output is due to the ability to better match the steam cycle to the PFBC system with a new balance of plant design. In addition to this study, the conceptual design of the Sporn Repowering led to several items which warranted optimization studies with the goal to develop a more cost effective design.

  16. Demonstrating Martian Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Pirkola, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    The surface gravity on Mars is smaller than the surface gravity on Earth, resulting in longer falling times. This effect can be simulated on Earth by taking advantage of air resistance and buoyancy, which cause low density objects to fall slowly enough to approximate objects falling on the surface of Mars. We describe a computer simulation based on an experiment that approximates Martian gravity, and verify our numerical results by performing the experiment.

  17. Smart Grid Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Craig [National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Arlington, VA (United States); Carroll, Paul [National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Arlington, VA (United States); Bell, Abigail [National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Arlington, VA (United States)

    2015-03-11

    The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) organized the NRECA-U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Smart Grid Demonstration Project (DE-OE0000222) to install and study a broad range of advanced smart grid technologies in a demonstration that spanned 23 electric cooperatives in 12 states. More than 205,444 pieces of electronic equipment and more than 100,000 minor items (bracket, labels, mounting hardware, fiber optic cable, etc.) were installed to upgrade and enhance the efficiency, reliability, and resiliency of the power networks at the participating co-ops. The objective of this project was to build a path for other electric utilities, and particularly electrical cooperatives, to adopt emerging smart grid technology when it can improve utility operations, thus advancing the co-ops’ familiarity and comfort with such technology. Specifically, the project executed multiple subprojects employing a range of emerging smart grid technologies to test their cost-effectiveness and, where the technology demonstrated value, provided case studies that will enable other electric utilities—particularly electric cooperatives— to use these technologies. NRECA structured the project according to the following three areas: Demonstration of smart grid technology; Advancement of standards to enable the interoperability of components; and Improvement of grid cyber security. We termed these three areas Technology Deployment Study, Interoperability, and Cyber Security. Although the deployment of technology and studying the demonstration projects at coops accounted for the largest portion of the project budget by far, we see our accomplishments in each of the areas as critical to advancing the smart grid. All project deliverables have been published. Technology Deployment Study: The deliverable was a set of 11 single-topic technical reports in areas related to the listed technologies. Each of these reports has already been submitted to DOE, distributed to co-ops, and

  18. Bacterial assays for recombinagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, G R

    1992-12-01

    Two principal strategies have been used for studying recombinagenic effects of chemicals and radiation in bacteria: (1) measurement of homologous recombination involving defined alleles in a partially diploid strain, and (2) measurement of the formation and loss of genetic duplications in the bacterial chromosome. In the former category, most methods involve one allele in the bacterial chromosome and another in a plasmid, but it is also possible to detect recombination between two chromosomal alleles or between two extrachromosomal alleles. This review summarizes methods that use each of these approaches for detecting recombination and tabulates data on agents that have been found to be recombinagenic in bacteria. The assays are discussed with respect to their effectiveness in testing for recombinagens and their potential for elucidating mechanisms underlying recombinagenic effects.

  19. Is the Comet Assay a Sensitive Procedure for Detecting Genotoxicity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satomi Kawaguchi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the Comet assay, a procedure for quantitating DNA damage in mammalian cells, is considered sensitive, it has never been ascertained that its sensitivity is higher than the sensitivity of other genotoxicity assays in mammalian cells. To determine whether the power of the Comet assay to detect a low level of genotoxic potential is superior to those of other genotoxicity assays in mammalian cells, we compared the results of Comet assay with those of micronucleus test (MN test. WTK1 human lymphoblastoid cells were exposed to methyl nitrosourea (MNU, ethyl nitrosourea (ENU, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS, ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS, bleomycin (BLM, or UVC. In Comet assay, cells were exposed to each mutagen with (Comet assay/araC and without (Comet assay DNA repair inhibitors (araC and hydroxyurea. Furthermore, acellular Comet assay (acellular assay was performed to determine how single-strand breaks (SSBs as the initial damage contributes to DNA migration and/or to micronucleus formation. The lowest genotoxic dose (LGD, which is defined as the lowest dose at which each mutagen causes a positive response on each genotoxicity assay, was used to compare the power of the Comet assay to detect a low level of genotoxic potential and that of MN test; that is, a low LGD indicates a high power. Results are summarized as follows: (1 for all mutagens studied, LGDs were MN test ≦ Comet assay; (2 except for BLM, LGDs were Comet assay/araC ≦ MN test; (3 except for UVC and MNU, LGDs were acellular assay ≦ Comet assay/araC ≦ MN test ≦ Comet assay. The following is suggested by the present findings: (1 LGD in the Comet assay is higher than that in MN test, which suggests that the power of the MN test to detect a low level of genotoxic potential is superior to that of the Comet assay; (2 for the studied mutagens, all assays were able to detect all mutagens correctly, which suggests that the sensitivity of the Comet assay and that of the MN test were

  20. Jennings Demonstration PLant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russ Heissner

    2010-08-31

    Verenium operated a demonstration plant with a capacity to produce 1.4 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol from agricultural resiues for about two years. During this time, the plant was able to evaluate the technical issues in producing ethanol from three different cellulosic feedstocks, sugar cane bagasse, energy cane, and sorghum. The project was intended to develop a better understanding of the operating parameters that would inform a commercial sized operation. Issues related to feedstock variability, use of hydrolytic enzymes, and the viability of fermentative organisms were evaluated. Considerable success was achieved with pretreatment processes and use of enzymes but challenges were encountered with feedstock variability and fermentation systems. Limited amounts of cellulosic ethanol were produced.

  1. Detection of Eperythrozoon wenyoni by PCR assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian WANG; Yutao ZHU; Jianhua QIN; Fumei ZHANG; Yuelan ZHAO

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop a detection method for Eperythrozoon wenyoni infection using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay technique. A pair of primers was designed and synthesized according to the conservative sequence 16S rRNA. The PCR assay was performed with the primers. A 985-bp fragment was amplified by using PCR. The amplified fragments with the expected size were identified by EcoR I restriction digestion. The crossing-reaction, specific-reaction and duplicate-reaction indicated that the PCR method is a specific, sensitive, fast and effective method for diagnosing E. Wenyoni infection at group level.

  2. Tidd PFBC demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrocco, M. [American Electric Power, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Tidd project was one of the first joint government-industry ventures to be approved by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in its Clean Coal Technology Program. In March 1987, DOE signed an agreement with the Ohio Power Company, a subsidiary of American Electric Power, to refurbish the then-idle Tidd plant on the banks of the Ohio River with advanced pressurized fluidized bed technology. Testing ended after 49 months of operation, 100 individual tests, and the generation of more than 500,000 megawatt-hours of electricity. The demonstration plant has met its objectives. The project showed that more than 95 percent of sulfur dioxide pollutants could be removed inside the advanced boiler using the advanced combustion technology, giving future power plants an attractive alternative to expensive, add-on scrubber technology. In addition to its sulfur removal effectiveness, the plant`s sustained periods of steady-state operation boosted its availability significantly above design projections, heightening confidence that pressurized fluidized bed technology will be a reliable, baseload technology for future power plants. The technology also controlled the release of nitrogen oxides to levels well below the allowable limits set by federal air quality standards. It also produced a dry waste product that is much easier to handle than wastes from conventional power plants and will likely have commercial value when produced by future power plants.

  3. Nuclear power demonstrating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basmajian, V. V.; Haldeman, C. W.

    1980-08-12

    Apparatus for demonstrating the operation of a closed loop nuclear steam electric generating plant includes a transparent boiler assembly having immersion heating elements, which may be quartz lamps or stainless steel encased resistive immersion heating units with a quartz iodide lamp providing a source of visible radiation when using the encased immersion heating units. A variable voltage autotransformer is geared to a support rod for simulated reactor control rods for controlling the energy delivered to the heating elements and arranged so that when the voltage is high, the rods are withdrawn from the boiler to produce increased heating and illumination proportional to rod position, thereby simulating nuclear reaction. A relief valve, steam outlet pipe and water inlet pipe are connected to the boiler with a small stainless steel resistive heating element in the steam outlet pipe providing superheat. This heater is connected in series with a rheostat mounted on the front panel to provide superheat adjustments and an interlock switch that prevents the superheater from being energized when the steam valve is off with with no flow through the superheater. A heavy blue plastic radiation shield surrounds the boiler inside a bell jar.

  4. Laser Scanner Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuss, B.

    2005-09-06

    In the Summer of 2004 a request for proposals went out to potential vendors to offer a three-dimensional laser scanner for a number of unique metrology tasks at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Specifications were established including range, accuracy, scan density, resolution and field of view in consideration of anticipated department requirements. Four vendors visited the site to present their system and they were asked to perform three unique tests with their system on a two day visit to SLAC. Two of the three tests were created to emulate real-world applications at SLAC while the third was an accuracy and resolution series of experiments. The scope of these tests is presented and some of the vendor's results are included.

  5. Development and validation of Burkholderia pseudomallei-specific real-time PCR assays for clinical, environmental or forensic detection applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin P Price

    Full Text Available The bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis, a rare but serious illness that can be fatal if untreated or misdiagnosed. Species-specific PCR assays provide a technically simple method for differentiating B. pseudomallei from near-neighbor species. However, substantial genetic diversity and high levels of recombination within this species reduce the likelihood that molecular signatures will differentiate all B. pseudomallei from other Burkholderiaceae. Currently available molecular assays for B. pseudomallei detection lack rigorous validation across large in silico datasets and isolate collections to test for specificity, and none have been subjected to stringent quality control criteria (accuracy, precision, selectivity, limit of quantitation (LoQ, limit of detection (LoD, linearity, ruggedness and robustness to determine their suitability for environmental, clinical or forensic investigations. In this study, we developed two novel B. pseudomallei specific assays, 122018 and 266152, using a dual-probe approach to differentiate B. pseudomallei from B. thailandensis, B. oklahomensis and B. thailandensis-like species; other species failed to amplify. Species specificity was validated across a large DNA panel (>2,300 samples comprising Burkholderia spp. and non-Burkholderia bacterial and fungal species of clinical and environmental relevance. Comparison of assay specificity to two previously published B. pseudomallei-specific assays, BurkDiff and TTS1, demonstrated comparable performance of all assays, providing between 99.7 and 100% specificity against our isolate panel. Last, we subjected 122018 and 266152 to rigorous quality control analyses, thus providing quantitative limits of assay performance. Using B. pseudomallei as a model, our study provides a framework for comprehensive quantitative validation of molecular assays and provides additional, highly validated B. pseudomallei assays for the scientific research community.

  6. Improved PCR-Based Detection of Soil Transmitted Helminth Infections Using a Next-Generation Sequencing Approach to Assay Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilotte, Nils; Papaiakovou, Marina; Grant, Jessica R.; Bierwert, Lou Ann; Llewellyn, Stacey; McCarthy, James S.; Williams, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The soil transmitted helminths are a group of parasitic worms responsible for extensive morbidity in many of the world’s most economically depressed locations. With growing emphasis on disease mapping and eradication, the availability of accurate and cost-effective diagnostic measures is of paramount importance to global control and elimination efforts. While real-time PCR-based molecular detection assays have shown great promise, to date, these assays have utilized sub-optimal targets. By performing next-generation sequencing-based repeat analyses, we have identified high copy-number, non-coding DNA sequences from a series of soil transmitted pathogens. We have used these repetitive DNA elements as targets in the development of novel, multi-parallel, PCR-based diagnostic assays. Methodology/Principal Findings Utilizing next-generation sequencing and the Galaxy-based RepeatExplorer web server, we performed repeat DNA analysis on five species of soil transmitted helminths (Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Strongyloides stercoralis). Employing high copy-number, non-coding repeat DNA sequences as targets, novel real-time PCR assays were designed, and assays were tested against established molecular detection methods. Each assay provided consistent detection of genomic DNA at quantities of 2 fg or less, demonstrated species-specificity, and showed an improved limit of detection over the existing, proven PCR-based assay. Conclusions/Significance The utilization of next-generation sequencing-based repeat DNA analysis methodologies for the identification of molecular diagnostic targets has the ability to improve assay species-specificity and limits of detection. By exploiting such high copy-number repeat sequences, the assays described here will facilitate soil transmitted helminth diagnostic efforts. We recommend similar analyses when designing PCR-based diagnostic tests for the detection of other

  7. An ultrasensitive rapid immunocytotoxicity assay for detecting Clostridium difficile toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiangyun; Wang, Jufang; Steele, Jennifer; Sun, Xingmin; Nie, Weijia; Tzipori, Saul; Feng, Hanping

    2009-01-01

    We describe a novel ultrasensitive cell-based immunocytotoxicity assay for detecting less then 1 pg/ml of Clostridium difficile toxins in porcine clinical samples. The assay is simple to perform with a turnaround time of approximately 3 hours and capable of detecting less then 1 pg/ml of toxin A. Using this assay, we were able to detect the presence of C. difficile toxins in the fecal and serum specimens of experimentally infected piglets. PMID:19393695

  8. EDTA interference in electrochemiluminescence ACTH assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toprak, Burak; Yalcin, Hulya; Arı, Elif; Colak, Ayfer

    2016-11-01

    Background As plasma is the recommended sample type for Roche adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) assay, we evaluated the effect of EDTA concentration on Cobas ACTH assay. Methods Samples containing twofold and fourfold higher concentrations of EDTA were prepared by adding plasma to empty K2EDTA tubes and by making under-filled EDTA tubes. All measurements were performed with four replicates. Results Increased EDTA concentration resulted in a significant decrease in ACTH concentration. Fifty-per cent-filled EDTA tube showed 19% decrease in ACTH concentration and 25% filled EDTA tube showed 50% decrease in ACTH concentration. Conclusion We recommend that inadequately filled EDTA specimens should be rejected when using Cobas ACTH assay.

  9. γ干扰素释放试验在儿童肺结核诊断中的价值%Performance of interferon γ release assays in diagnosis of childhood pulmonary tuberculosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲍磊; 李涛; 卢水华; 张文宏

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the performance of two kinds of interferon γrelease assays in the diagnosis of childhood pulmonary tuberculosis in China (with a high rate of bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination and a high incidence of tuberculosis ) , a total of 114 children with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis were recruited .Among the cases ,45 received QuantiFERON-Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT ) test while the other 69 were tested with T-SPOT .TB . The clinical information was collected for diagnostic classification . The sensitivity ,specificity ,positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were compared between the two methods .The sensitivity of QFT-GIT in the diagnosis of childhood pulmonary tuberculosis was 86 .4% ,the specificity was 81 .3% ,PPV was 91 .7% ,and NPV was 76 .5% .In contrast ,the sensitivity of T-SPOT .TB was 72 .3% , the specificity was 93 .7% , PPV was 97 .1% , and NPV was 53 .6% . The positive rates of two methods in the cases treated with glucocorticoids decreased significantly compared to those untreated .In conclusion ,both QFT-GIT and T-SPOT .TB have high PPV in the diagnosis of childhood pulmonary tuberculosis since the rate of latent tuberculosis infection was low in children .%为研究2种γ干扰素释放试验(IGRA)试剂盒在结核病高发、卡介苗(BCG)高接种地区用于诊断儿童肺结核的价值,共入组临床怀疑肺结核患儿114例,其中45例行QuantiFERON-Gold In-Tube(QFT-GIT)检测,69例行T-SPOT .TB检测,收集临床资料,比较2种方法的灵敏度、特异度、阳性预测值(PPV)和阴性预测值(NPV )。结果显示,QFT-GIT 在儿童肺结核诊断中的灵敏度为84.6%、特异度为81.3%、PPV 为91.7%、NPV为76.5%。T-SPOT .TB的灵敏度为72.3%、特异度为93.7%、PPV为97.1%、NPV为53.6%。与未治疗患儿相比,激素治疗患儿QFT-GIT和T-SPOT .TB的阳性率显著下降

  10. Erythrocytes and cell line-based assays to evaluate the cytoprotective activity of antioxidant components obtained from natural sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, Albert; Martínez, Verónica; Mitjans, Montserrat; Balboa, Elena; Conde, Enma; Vinardell, M Pilar

    2014-02-01

    Oxidative stress can damage cellular components including DNA, proteins or lipids, and may cause several skin diseases. To protect from this damage and addressing consumer's appeal to natural products, antioxidants obtained from algal and vegetal extracts are being proposed as antioxidants to be incorporated into formulations. Thus, the development of reliable, quick and economic in vitro methods to study the cytoactivity of these products is a meaningful requirement. A combination of erythrocyte and cell line-based assays was performed on two extracts from Sargassum muticum, one from Ulva lactuca, and one from Castanea sativa. Antioxidant properties were assessed in erythrocytes by the TBARS and AAPH assays, and cytotoxicity and antioxidant cytoprotection were assessed in HaCaT and 3T3 cells by the MTT assay. The extracts showed no antioxidant activity on the TBARS assay, whereas their antioxidant capacity in the AAPH assay was demonstrated. On the cytotoxicity assays, extracts showed low toxicity, with IC50 values higher than 200μg/mL. C. sativa extract showed the most favourable antioxidant properties on the antioxidant cytoprotection assays; while S. muticum and U. lactuca extracts showed a slight antioxidant activity. This battery of methods was useful to characterise the biological antioxidant properties of these natural extracts.

  11. Demonstration projects : learning by experience : the Seabird Island demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2009-10-15

    This article described the Seabird Island sustainable community housing demonstration project near Agassiz, British Columbia. The project provides a sustainable, affordable place for 7 families and demonstrates a new way to build and design communities using renewable energy technologies to provide residents with better quality, energy efficient housing while reducing costs and minimizing environmental impacts. The design integrates renewable energy sources such as wind, solar and geothermal energy to save on heating and lighting costs. This article noted some of the dubious design features that could have been screened out at the design stage if careful analysis had been carried out. It described features such as the solar orientation; climatic factors that influenced the form and details of the building; the high-efficiency, condensing, natural gas water heater for space heating combined with a forced-air and radiant-floor heating system; solariums that provided solar preheating of domestic hot water; ventilation air preheating; the solar roof; an earth-tube ventilation system; and 3 wind turbines to generate electricity to offset conventional electricity sources. Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation has monitored several of the systems in order to evaluate the extent to which these features have influenced the performance of the dwelling units. The energy use in all 7 units was documented along with indoor air quality. An energy performance rating of EnerGuide 80 was achieved, which is comparable to R-2000. The monitoring study revealed that wind energy at this location was not sufficient to justify the installation of the wind turbines. The solar steel roof/solarium energy system did not perform as expected. In addition, the earth-tube ventilation system provided little heat and its overall contribution to ventilation was uncertain. Other deficiencies were also noted, such as leaky ductwork, non-operational dampers and poorly integrated control systems. The

  12. Herbicide resistance screening assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Joan M

    2009-01-01

    Herbicide resistance screening is a method that can be used not only to determine presence of the enzyme, phosphinothricin acetyltransferase, encoded by either the Bar or the Pat gene in transgenic maize, but also to assess the inheritance ratio of those genes in a segregating population. Herbicide screening can also be used to study linkage of a transgene of interest that was cotransformed with the herbicide resistance marker gene. By combining the herbicide screen assay with a PCR-based screen of leaf tissue DNA for the presence of both the Bar or the Pat gene marker and a cotransformed transgene of interest from the same seedling tissue and maintaining that seedling identity, the researcher can identify linkage or the possible breakdown in linkage of the marker gene and the transgene of interest. Further, the occurrence of "DNA silencing" can be evaluated if an individual seedling that was susceptible to the applied herbicide nonetheless gave PCR data that indicated presence of the gene responsible for herbicide resistance. Similarly, "DNA silencing" of the gene of interest may be investigated if the seeds can be screened and scored for that phenotypic trait in a nondestructive manner prior to planting.

  13. A comparison of the human buccal cell assay and the pollen abortion assay in assessing genotoxicity in an urban-rural gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Alan da Silveira; Vieira, Mariana; Amantéa, Sergio Luís; Rhoden, Claudia Ramos

    2014-08-27

    Air pollution is exacerbated near heavy traffic roads in cities. Air pollution concentration and composition vary by region and depend on urban-rural gradients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of air pollution in areas of varying population densities and to compare plant biomonitoring with an established biomarker of human exposure to traffic-related air pollution in children. The areas of study were selected near a major street in 3 different regions. Areas A, B and C represent high, intermediate and low population densities, respectively. Micronucleus assay, an established biomarker of human exposure, was performed in children from these areas. For a plant biomonitoring assay, the pollen abortion assay was performed on Bauhinia variegata in these areas. NO2 and O3 concentrations were determined by passive sampling. We report here that the pollen abortion frequency in Bauhinia variegata is correlated with NO2 concentration (P = 0.004) and is strongly associated with vehicular flow and population density in the studied areas. Micronuclei frequency in buccal cells of children was higher in the regions with more degree of urbanization (P < 0.001) following the same pattern of O3 concentrations (P = 0.030). In conclusion, our results demonstrate that high concentrations of air pollutants in Porto Alegre are related to both human and plant genotoxicity. Areas with different concentration of pollutants demonstrated to have an urbanization gradient dependent pattern which also reflected on genotoxic damage among these areas.

  14. A Comparison of the Human Buccal Cell Assay and the Pollen Abortion Assay in Assessing Genotoxicity in an Urban-Rural Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan da Silveira Fleck

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution is exacerbated near heavy traffic roads in cities. Air pollution concentration and composition vary by region and depend on urban-rural gradients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of air pollution in areas of varying population densities and to compare plant biomonitoring with an established biomarker of human exposure to traffic-related air pollution in children. The areas of study were selected near a major street in 3 different regions. Areas A, B and C represent high, intermediate and low population densities, respectively. Micronucleus assay, an established biomarker of human exposure, was performed in children from these areas. For a plant biomonitoring assay, the pollen abortion assay was performed on Bauhinia variegata in these areas. NO2 and O3 concentrations were determined by passive sampling. We report here that the pollen abortion frequency in Bauhinia variegata is correlated with NO2 concentration (P = 0.004 and is strongly associated with vehicular flow and population density in the studied areas. Micronuclei frequency in buccal cells of children was higher in the regions with more degree of urbanization (P < 0.001 following the same pattern of O3 concentrations (P = 0.030. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that high concentrations of air pollutants in Porto Alegre are related to both human and plant genotoxicity. Areas with different concentration of pollutants demonstrated to have an urbanization gradient dependent pattern which also reflected on genotoxic damage among these areas.

  15. A Comparison of the Human Buccal Cell Assay and the Pollen Abortion Assay in Assessing Genotoxicity in an Urban-Rural Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Alan da Silveira; Vieira, Mariana; Amantéa, Sergio Luís; Rhoden, Claudia Ramos

    2014-01-01

    Air pollution is exacerbated near heavy traffic roads in cities. Air pollution concentration and composition vary by region and depend on urban-rural gradients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of air pollution in areas of varying population densities and to compare plant biomonitoring with an established biomarker of human exposure to traffic-related air pollution in children. The areas of study were selected near a major street in 3 different regions. Areas A, B and C represent high, intermediate and low population densities, respectively. Micronucleus assay, an established biomarker of human exposure, was performed in children from these areas. For a plant biomonitoring assay, the pollen abortion assay was performed on Bauhinia variegata in these areas. NO2 and O3 concentrations were determined by passive sampling. We report here that the pollen abortion frequency in Bauhinia variegata is correlated with NO2 concentration (P = 0.004) and is strongly associated with vehicular flow and population density in the studied areas. Micronuclei frequency in buccal cells of children was higher in the regions with more degree of urbanization (P < 0.001) following the same pattern of O3 concentrations (P = 0.030). In conclusion, our results demonstrate that high concentrations of air pollutants in Porto Alegre are related to both human and plant genotoxicity. Areas with different concentration of pollutants demonstrated to have an urbanization gradient dependent pattern which also reflected on genotoxic damage among these areas. PMID:25166920

  16. Prevalidation of the rat CFU-GM assay for in vitro toxicology applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessina, Augusto; Bonomi, Arianna; Cavicchini, Loredana; Albella, Beatriz; Cerrato, Laura; Parent-Massin, Dominique; Sibiril, Yann; Parchment, Ralph; Behrsing, Holger; Verderio, Paolo; Pizzamiglio, Sara; Giangreco, Manuela; Baglio, Carolina; Coccè, Valentina; Sisto, Francesca; Gribaldo, Laura

    2010-05-01

    In vitro haematotoxicity assays are thought to have the potential to significantly reduce and refine the use of animals for haematotoxicity testing. These assays are used successfully in all types of studies - however, their use is not so common in human toxicology studies in the preclinical setting, as they are not required for regulatory testing in this case. Furthermore, these assays could play a key role in bridging the gap between preclinical toxicology studies in animal models and clinical investigations. In previous studies, the Colony Forming Unit-Granulocyte Macrophage (CFU-GM) assay has been validated for testing drug haematotoxicity (with both mouse bone-marrow and human cord blood) and for predicting the in vivo human maximal tolerated dose (MTD) by adjusting in vivo data on mouse toxicity. Recently, a Colony Forming Unit-Megakaryocyte (CFU-MK) assay has also been prevalidated for testing drug toxicity toward megakaryocytes. The rat CFU-GM assay has been used by many researchers for its ability to evaluate in vitro haematotoxicity. Although it is not yet available, a standardised procedure for data comparison could be very important, since the rat is the most widely-used species for the in vivo testing of toxicants. This report presents the results of the prevalidation study developed to analyse the intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory variability of a standardised operating procedure for this assay and its performance for the in vitro determination of the inhibitory concentration (IC) values of drugs on rat myeloid progenitors (CFU-GM). The results demonstrate that the CFU-GM assay can be performed with cryopreserved rat bone-marrow cells (rBMC). The assay represents a useful tool for evaluating the toxicity of a compound, in terms of both relative toxicity (when different molecules are compared) and the prediction of the degree of in vivo toxicity. The use of this assay could greatly reduce the number of rats used in experimental procedures, and

  17. The low molecular weight DNA diffusion assay as an indicator of cytotoxicity for the in vitro comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speit, Günter; Vesely, Alexandra; Schütz, Petra; Linsenmeyer, Regina; Bausinger, Julia

    2014-07-01

    The low molecular weight DNA diffusion assay (LMW assay) has been recommended as a measure for cytotoxicity for the in vivo comet assay. To better understand the relationship between effects in the LMW assay, DNA migration in the comet assay and effects in established cytotoxicity tests, we performed in vitro experiments with cultured human cell lines (TK6, A549) and comparatively investigated five test substances (methyl methanesulfonate, (±)-benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide, sodium dodecyl sulphate, menthol and sodium arsenite). We measured DNA migration (tail intensity) in the comet assay and the frequency of 'hedgehogs' (cells with almost all DNA in the tail), DNA diffusion in the LMW assay, cell viability (trypan blue and fluorescein diacetate/ethidium bromide staining) and inhibition of proliferation (relative cell counts). Our in vitro experiments indicate that effects in the LMW assay occur independently from DNA effects in the comet assay and are not related to the occurrence of hedgehogs. Results from the LMW assay are in good agreement with results from viability assays and seem to allow discriminating genotoxic from non-genotoxic substances when appropriate preparation times are considered. Measurements of cytotoxicity by these methods only at an early preparation time after exposure to genotoxic substances may lead to erroneous results.

  18. Comparison of immunoturbidimetric and immunonephelometric assays for specific proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Bahera; Armbruster, David; Serediak, Ernie; Ottenbreit, Tammy

    2009-10-01

    Immunoturbidimetric assays for specific proteins are available on "open system" clinical chemistry analyzers. The analytical performance of nine immunoturbidimetric specific protein assays (C3, C4, CRP, Haptoglobin, IgA, IgG, IgM, RF, and Transferrin) was compared to immunonephelometry. Testing was performed on the Abbott ARCHITECT ci8200 and the Dade Behring BNII nephelometer and evaluated for precision, linearity, limit of detection, prozone phenomenon, method comparison, workflow, and proficiency testing survey comparison. Immunoturbidimetric assays performance was satisfactory for total precision, linearity, limit of detection and the prozone effect was not observed. Method comparison was acceptable for the immunoglobulins, CRP and transferrin but less favorable for the other assays, likely due to methodology and antibody specificity differences. Immunourbidimetric specific protein assays allow for efficient test consolidation on a general purpose clinical chemistry analyzer.

  19. Bentonite mat demonstration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrato, M.G.

    1994-12-30

    The Bentonite Mat Demonstration was developed to provide the Environmental Restoration Department with field performance characteristics and engineering data for an alternative closure cover system configuration. The demonstration was initiated in response to regulatory concerns regarding the use of an alternative cover system for future design configurations. These design considerations are in lieu of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Recommended Design for Closure Cover Systems and specifically a single compacted kaolin clay layer with a hydraulic conductivity of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} cm/sec. This alternative configuration is a composite geosynthetic material hydraulic barrier consisting from bottom to top: 2 ft compacted sandy clay layer (typical local Savannah River Site soil type) that is covered by a bentonite mat--geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) and is overlaid by a 40 mil High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane--flexible membrane liner. This effort was undertaken to obtain and document the necessary field performance/engineering data for future designs and meet regulatory technical requirements for an alternative cover system configuration. The composite geosynthetic materials hydraulic barrier is the recommended alternative cover system configuration for containment of hazardous and low level radiological waste layers that have a high potential of subsidence to be used at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This alternative configuration mitigates subsidence effects in providing a flexible, lightweight cover system to maintain the integrity of the closure. The composite geosynthetic materials hydraulic barrier is recommended for the Sanitary Landfill and Low Level Radiological Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF) Closures.

  20. 快速免疫荧光法检测血浆NT-proBNP的分析性能评价%Evaluation of performance of a rapid immunofluorescence method for assaying plasma NT-proBNP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐筑灵; 徐国宾

    2010-01-01

    Objective To analyze the performance of a rapid immunofluorescence assay for plasma NT-proBNP. Methods Human plasma NT-proBNP was measured by RAMP in 264 healthy cases and 78 patients with heart failure. The precision, stability, linearity and interference factors of RAMP were evaluated according to the protocold from America CLSI. Meanwhile, the results were compared with those obtained by Elecsys. Results Functional sensitivity of RAMP in 20% CV and 10% CV were 48 ng/L and 57 ng/L respectively. The linear range was 18-8 000 ng/L. NT-proBNP in plasma samples detected by RAMP were stable at room temperature for 24 hours, 4 ℃ for 3 days and - 20 ℃ for 20 days. No influences on results were observed throughout three freeze-thaw cycles. The results measured by RAMP were compared between EDTA-K2 anticoagulant plasma and heparin anticoagulant plasma, which showed that YEDTA-K2 =0. 953 9 Xheparin + 0. 365 2 ( R2 = 0. 982, P < 0. 01, n = 40 ). The results of EDTA-K2 and heparin anticoagulant plasma using RAMP and Elecsys showed no significant difference( P >0. 05). Slight hemolysis( Hb 2 g/L)had small effect on the results of PAMP and Elecsys assays and deviations of them were below 5%. However median and heavy hemolysis( Hb 3-4 g/L )obviously influenced the results with deviation were more than 15%. The values measured by RMAP fell from 390 ng/L to 82 ng/L, and those measured by Elecsys method fell from 390 ng/L to 178 ng/L when 3 different concentrations of triacylglycerol were added, the values measured by two methods fell from 7 777 ng/L to 7 741 ng/L when bilirubin ( 16-330 μmol/L) was added. The anti-interference ability of RAMP method was similar to Elecsys. Results detected with two methods in 45 EDTA-K2 anticoagulant plasma samples were analyzed with Passing and Bablok regression.The regression equation was YRAMP = 0. 972 8XElecsys - 0. 035 2 (R2 = 0. 994, P > 0. 05, n = 45 ). When heparin anticoagulant plasma samples increased to 78 samples, Passing and

  1. Modeling error in experimental assays using the bootstrap principle: understanding discrepancies between assays using different dispensing technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Sonya M.; Ekins, Sean; Chodera, John D.

    2015-12-01

    All experimental assay data contains error, but the magnitude, type, and primary origin of this error is often not obvious. Here, we describe a simple set of assay modeling techniques based on the bootstrap principle that allow sources of error and bias to be simulated and propagated into assay results. We demonstrate how deceptively simple operations—such as the creation of a dilution series with a robotic liquid handler—can significantly amplify imprecision and even contribute substantially to bias. To illustrate these techniques, we review an example of how the choice of dispensing technology can impact assay measurements, and show how large contributions to discrepancies between assays can be easily understood and potentially corrected for. These simple modeling techniques—illustrated with an accompanying IPython notebook—can allow modelers to understand the expected error and bias in experimental datasets, and even help experimentalists design assays to more effectively reach accuracy and imprecision goals.

  2. Modeling error in experimental assays using the bootstrap principle: understanding discrepancies between assays using different dispensing technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Sonya M; Ekins, Sean; Chodera, John D

    2015-12-01

    All experimental assay data contains error, but the magnitude, type, and primary origin of this error is often not obvious. Here, we describe a simple set of assay modeling techniques based on the bootstrap principle that allow sources of error and bias to be simulated and propagated into assay results. We demonstrate how deceptively simple operations--such as the creation of a dilution series with a robotic liquid handler--can significantly amplify imprecision and even contribute substantially to bias. To illustrate these techniques, we review an example of how the choice of dispensing technology can impact assay measurements, and show how large contributions to discrepancies between assays can be easily understood and potentially corrected for. These simple modeling techniques--illustrated with an accompanying IPython notebook--can allow modelers to understand the expected error and bias in experimental datasets, and even help experimentalists design assays to more effectively reach accuracy and imprecision goals.

  3. Golgi-resident PAP-specific 3'-phosphatase-coupled sulfotransferase assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Brittany; Ethen, Cheryl M; Machacek, Miranda; Wu, Zhengliang L

    2012-04-01

    Sulfotransferases are a large group of enzymes that transfer a sulfonate group from the donor substrate, 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS)(1), to various acceptor substrates, generating 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphate (PAP) as a by-product. A universal phosphatase-coupled sulfotransferase assay is described here. In this method, Golgi-resident PAP-specific 3'-phosphatase (gPAPP) is used to couple to a sulfotransferase reaction by releasing the 3'-phosphate from PAP. The released phosphate is then detected using malachite green reagents. The enzyme kinetics of gPAPP have been determined, which allows calculation of the coupling rate, the ratio of product-to-signal conversion, of the coupled reaction. This assay is convenient, as it eliminates the need for radioisotope labeling and substrate-product separation, and is more accurate through removal of product inhibition and correction of the results with the coupling rate. This assay is also highly reproducible, as a linear correlation factor above 0.98 is routinely achievable. Using this method, we measured the Michaelis-Menten constants for recombinant human CHST10 and SULT1C4 with the substrates phenolphthalein glucuronic acid and α-naphthol, respectively. The activities obtained with the method were also validated by performing simultaneous radioisotope assays. Finally, the removal of PAP product inhibition by gPAPP was clearly demonstrated in radioisotope assays.

  4. The dolognawmeter: a novel instrument and assay to quantify nociception in rodent models of orofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, John C; Lam, David K; Achdjian, Stacy H; Schmidt, Brian L

    2010-03-30

    Rodent pain models play an important role in understanding the mechanisms of nociception and have accelerated the search for new treatment approaches for pain. Creating an objective metric for orofacial nociception in these models presents significant technical obstacles. No animal assay accurately measures pain-induced orofacial dysfunction that is directly comparable to human orofacial dysfunction. We developed and validated a high throughput, objective, operant, nociceptive animal assay, and an instrument to perform the assay termed the dolognawmeter, for evaluation of conditions known to elicit orofacial pain in humans. Using the device our assay quantifies gnawing function in the mouse. We quantified a behavioral index of nociception and demonstrated blockade of nociception in three models of orofacial pain: (1) TMJ inflammation, (2) masticatory myositis, and (3) head and neck cancer. This assay will be useful in the study of nociceptive mediators involved in the development and progression of orofacial pain conditions and it will also provide a unique tool for development and assessment of new therapeutic approaches.

  5. Effects of estradiol and progesterone on the variability of the micronucleus assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeyens, Ans [Department of Anatomy, Embryology, Histology and Medical Physics, Ghent University, L. Pasteurlaan 2, 9000 Gent (Belgium)]. E-mail: ansbaeyens@hotmail.com; Vandersickel, Veerle [Department of Anatomy, Embryology, Histology and Medical Physics, Ghent University, L. Pasteurlaan 2, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Thierens, Hubert [Department of Anatomy, Embryology, Histology and Medical Physics, Ghent University, L. Pasteurlaan 2, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Ridder, Leo De [Department of Anatomy, Embryology, Histology and Medical Physics, Ghent University, L. Pasteurlaan 2, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Vral, Anne [Department of Anatomy, Embryology, Histology and Medical Physics, Ghent University, L. Pasteurlaan 2, 9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2005-10-15

    To investigate chromosomal radiosensitivity of lymphocytes the micronucleus (MN) assay has been used for many years. The results of these studies suggest the use of the MN assay as a biomarker for cancer predisposition. However, the MN assay has still some limitations associated with the reproducibility and sensitivity. Especially a high intra-individual variability has been observed. An explanation for this high intra-individual variability is not yet available. In literature it is suggested that the high variability among females is attributable to hormonal status. In this study we investigated if the high intra-individual variability in micronucleus formation in lymphocytes of females after in vitro exposure to ionising radiation is caused by variations in hormone levels of estradiol (E2) and progesterone (PROG). For this, the MN assay was performed on blood samples of 18 healthy women during 7 consecutive weeks while the estradiol and progesterone levels were determined at the same time. The MN assay was also examined in cultures of isolated blood lymphocytes with estradiol or progesterone levels added in vitro. The results demonstrated that estradiol and progesterone levels have no influence on the variations in radiation-induced MN yields observed in blood samples of healthy women. These conclusions were confirmed by the 'in vitro' experiments as no correlation between the MN yields and the concentrations of hormones (estradiol or progesterone) added in vitro to isolated lymphocytes cultures was observed.

  6. 半胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制剂C透射比浊检测试剂盒性能验证%Cysteine protease inhibitor C turbidimetric assay kit Performance verification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何国坚; 胡劲辉; 肖庆

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the cysteine protease inhibitor (Cys-C) kit performance indicators by turbi-dimetric method ,using the Olympus Au600 automatic biochemical analyzer .Methods The Cys-C kit performance in-dex was evaluated according to the EP series files of US national clinical and laboratory standardization association (NCCLS) .Results Turbidimetric method had good stability .The experimental detection limit was 0 .11 μg/mL .The relative deviation (Bias) of three kinds of different concentration of fixed value quality control serum in accuracy eval -uation were all lower than 8% .The coefficient of variation (CV) for within-run and between-run assays of three kinds of different concentration of clinical patients mixed serum and three kinds of different concentration of fixed value quality control serum evaluation precision were lower than 5% .In the linear range of the evaluation had been found from the group of point ,and the linear regression equation was Y = 0 .017 934 + 0 .993 2 X ,r = 0 .993 .Dilution varia-tion P was 0 .42(P0 .05 = 0 .684 1) ,P< 0 .05 .The dilution variation can be accepted .The linear loss of quasi check was G = 3 .12(F0 .05 = 3 .29) ,G < F0 .05 .The linear was good .Interference test with relative deviation lower than 8% was the medical decision level ,IBil concentration was lower than 28 .2 umol/l ,DBil concentration lower than 29 .1μmol/L ,Hb concentration lower than 9 .7 g/L ,chyle turbidity lower than 2583 ,and Cys-C relative deviation was still in the acceptable range .Conclusion The Cys-C kit stability ,accuracy ,precision ,linearity and anti-interference ability are all in line with the requirements of clinical testing .%目的:在 Olympus Au600全自动生化仪上采用透射比浊法检测半胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制剂 C(Cys-C),评价 Cys-C 试剂盒性能指标。方法参考美国临床和实验室标准化协会 EP 系列文件,对 Cys-C 试剂盒性能指标作出评估。结果透射比浊法有较好的稳

  7. High content screening as high quality assay for biological evaluation of photosensitizers in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela M F Vaz

    Full Text Available A novel single step assay approach to screen a library of photdynamic therapy (PDT compounds was developed. Utilizing high content analysis (HCA technologies several robust cellular parameters were identified, which can be used to determine the phototoxic effects of porphyrin compounds which have been developed as potential anticancer agents directed against esophageal carcinoma. To demonstrate the proof of principle of this approach a small detailed study on five porphyrin based compounds was performed utilizing two relevant esophageal cancer cell lines (OE21 and SKGT-4. The measurable outputs from these early studies were then evaluated by performing a pilot screen using a set of 22 compounds. These data were evaluated and validated by performing comparative studies using a traditional colorimetric assay (MTT. The studies demonstrated that the HCS assay offers significant advantages over and above the currently used methods (directly related to the intracellular presence of the compounds by analysis of their integrated intensity and area within the cells. A high correlation was found between the high content screening (HCS and MTT data. However, the HCS approach provides additional information that allows a better understanding of the behavior of these compounds when interacting at the cellular level. This is the first step towards an automated high-throughput screening of photosensitizer drug candidates and the beginnings of an integrated and comprehensive quantitative structure action relationship (QSAR study for photosensitizer libraries.

  8. Diagnostic performance of HPV E6/E7, hTERT, and Ki67 mRNA RT-qPCR assays on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cervical tissue specimens from women with cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hye-Young; Kim, Geehyuk; Cho, Hyemi; Kim, Sunghyun; Lee, Dongsup; Park, Sunyoung; Park, Kwang Hwa; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2015-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major cause of cervical cancer, which is the third most common cancer in women. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and Ki67 are tumor cell markers indicating cancer cell proliferation in cancer patients, and activation of hTERT and Ki67 leads to progressive cervical carcinogenesis. In the present study, we evaluated the CervicGen HPVE6/E7 mRNA RT-qDx assay, which detects 16 HPV high-risk (HR) genotypes (HPV 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 53, 56, 58, 59, 66, 68 and 69), and the CervicGen hTERT and Ki67 mRNA RT-qDx assay using 117 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cervical cancer tissue samples. The diagnostic validity of the CervicGen HPV RT-qDx assay for detecting histologically proven prevalent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was 94% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 77.8% positive predictive value (PPV), and 78.9% negative predictive value (NPV). The most common HPV genotypes detected in FFPE cervical cancer tissue samples were HPV 16 (56%) and HPV 18 (10%). The positivity rate of hTERT and Ki67 mRNA expressions in FFPE cervical cancer tissue samples on RT-qPCR was 65% and 93% respectively. Moreover, the positivity rates were 92% for a combination of HPV E6/E7 and hTERT mRNA expressions, 97% for HPV E6/E7 and Ki67 mRNA expressions, and 99% (99/100) for the combination of HPV E6/E7, hTERT, and Ki67 mRNA expressions. These data showed that SSC FFPE cervical cancer tissue samples correlated more strongly with high Ki67 mRNA expressions than with hTERT mRNA expressions. Notably, hTERT and Ki67 mRNA expression level was increased in high-grade cervical lesions, but was very low in normal samples. Our findings suggest that the combination of HPV E6/E7, hTERT, and Ki67 mRNA expression levels could be used in a complementary manner in diagnosing high-grade cervical lesions. Further studies are required to evaluate these assays as a useful predictive tool for screening low-grade cervical lesions.

  9. A highly sensitive cell assay for validation of purification regimes of alginates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinfelder, U; Brunnenmeier, F; Cramer, H; Schiller, J; Arnold, K; Vásquez, J A; Zimmermann, U

    2003-10-01

    Among the hydrogels used for microencapsulation of cells and tissues, alginate has been and will continue to be one of the most important biomaterials. A mandatory requirement for clinical immunoisolated transplantations is the reproducible production of biocompatible alginate. As shown here for alginates extracted from freshly collected algal stipes, the current assays used for validation of the quality of the alginate are not sufficient to screen for impurities arising from spores of gram-positive bacteria (and related contaminants). To assess the quality of alginate, we have developed a cell assay based on the induction of apoptosis in Jurkat cells. This assay allows in combination with the "modified mixed lymphocyte" assay a rapid and sensitive screening for any fibrosis-inducing impurities in alginate samples (even during the purification regime) as demonstrated by transplantation experiments performed in parallel with BB rats (exhibiting an elevated macrophage activity). The results clearly demonstrate that the quality of the input algal material is of key relevance for the production of transplantation-grade alginate.

  10. Ultraminiaturized assay for rapid, low cost detection and quantification of clinical and biochemical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parween, Shahila; Nahar, Pradip

    2016-04-01

    Herein, we report a simple, sensitive, rapid and low-cost ultraminiaturized assay technique for quantitative detection of 1 μl of clinical or biochemical sample on a novel ultraminiaturized assay plate (UAP). UAP is prepared by making tiny cavities on a polypropylene sheet. As UAP cannot immobilize a biomolecule through absorption, we have activated the tiny cavities of UAP by 1-fluoro-2-nitro-4-azidobenzene in a photochemical reaction. Activated UAP (AUAP) can covalently immobilize any biomolecule having an active nucleophilic group such as amino group. Efficacy of AUAP is demonstrated by detecting human IgE, antibody of hepatitis C virus core antigen and oligonucleotides. Quantification is performed by capturing the image of the colored assay solution and digitally quantifying the image by color saturation without using costly NanoDrop spectrophotometer. Image - based detection of human IgE and an oligonucleotide shows an excellent correlation with absorbance - based assay (recorded in a NanoDrop spectrophotometer); it is validated by Pearson's product-moment correlation with correlation coefficient of r = 0.9545088 and r = 0.9947444 respectively. AUAP is further checked by detecting hepatitis C virus Ab where strong correlation of color saturation with absorbance with respect to concentration is observed. Ultraminiaturized assay successfully detects target oligonucleotides by perfectly hybridizing with their respective complementary oligonucleotide probes but not with a random oligonucleotide. Ultraminiaturized assay technique has substantially reduced the requirement of reagents by 100 times and assay timing by 50 times making it a potential alternative to conventional method.

  11. Optimization of cell motility evaluation in scratch assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gotsulyak N. Ya.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A scratch test is one of the most popular methods of classical cell migration assay in a monolayer culture. At the same time, the scratch assay has some disadvantages that can be easily corrected. Aim. Optimization the existent scratch assay on the base of detection of scratch wound surface area and the length of the field of observation which is more objective and less time consuming. Methods. Scratch assay. Results. The modification of scratch assay enables to perform measurement more accurately and rapidly. This approach is more simple and eliminates the main disadvantages of the classical method. Conclusions. The procedure of scratch wound width measurement calculated on the base of detection of cell free area and the length of the field of observation is more effective than the classical wound healing assay. It will be useful for the estimation of cell migration dynamics in monolayer culture for a wide range of live cell based experiments.

  12. A comprehensive company database analysis of biological assay variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Christian; Dahl, Göran; Tyrchan, Christian; Ulander, Johan

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of data from various compounds measured in diverse biological assays is a central part of drug discovery research projects. However, no systematic overview of the variability in biological assays has been published and judgments on assay quality and robustness of data are often based on personal belief and experience within the drug discovery community. To address this we performed a reproducibility analysis of all biological assays at AstraZeneca between 2005 and 2014. We found an average experimental uncertainty of less than a twofold difference and no technologies or assay types had higher variability than others. This work suggests that robust data can be obtained from the most commonly applied biological assays.

  13. Determination of Interference During In Vitro Pyrogen Detection: Development and Characterization of a Cell-Based Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Linda; Rossetti, Francesca; Dominici, Sabrina; Buondelmonte, Costantina; Rocchi, Marco B L; Rizzardi, Gian P; Vallanti, Giuliana; Magnani, Mauro

    2016-12-20

    Contamination of pharmaceutical products and medical devices with pyrogens such as endotoxins is the most common cause of systemic inflammation and, in worst cases, of septic shock. Thus, quantification of pyrogens is crucial. The limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL)-based assays are the reference tests for in vitro endotoxin detection, in association with the in vivo rabbit pyrogen test (RPT), according to European Pharmacopoeia (EP 2.6.14), and U.S. Pharmacopoeia (USP ). However, several substances interfere with LAL assay, while RPT is not accurate, not quantitative, and raises ethical limits. Biological assays, as monocyte activation tests, have been developed and included in European Pharmacopoeia (EP 7.0; 04/2010:20630) guidelines as an alternative to RPT and proved relevant to the febrile reaction in vivo. Because this reaction is carried out by endogenous mediators under the transcriptional control of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), we sought to determine whether a NF-kappaB reporter-gene assay, based on MonoMac-6 (MM6) cells, could reconcile the basic mechanism of innate immune response with the relevance of monocytoid cell lines to the organism reaction to endotoxins. This article describes both optimization and characterization of the reporter cells-based assay, which overall proved the linearity, accuracy, and precision of the test, and demonstrated the sensitivity of the assay to 0.24 EU/mL endotoxin, close to the pyrogenic threshold in humans. Moreover, the assay was experimentally compared to the LAL test in the evaluation of selected interfering samples. The good performance of the MM6 reporter test demonstrates the suitability of this assay to evaluate interfering or false-positive samples.

  14. Practical assay issues with the PERT/PBRT assay: a highly sensitive reverse transcriptase assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, A; Dusing, S

    2006-01-01

    Product safety testing for retroviruses can be achieved by a panel of screening assays, including electron microscopy, viral gene specific PCRs, virus propagation, and detection of reverse transciptase activity. The application of PCR-based reverse transcriptase assays (PERT) that are approximately a million-fold more sensitive than conventional nucleotide incorporation assays in the testing of biologicals is described. Use of PERT assays can be applied to three areas: (i) screening for adventitious retrovirus contamination; (ii) detecting and quantifying endogenous viral particle load and (iii) monitoring levels of infectious retrovirus generation in cell lines that contain endogenous retroviruses.

  15. Comparative analytical evaluation of the respiratory TaqMan Array Card with real-time PCR and commercial multi-pathogen assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, John J; Chester, Stephanie; Burke, Stephen A; Ansbro, Marisela; Aden, Tricia; Gose, Remedios; Sciulli, Rebecca; Bai, Jing; DesJardin, Lucy; Benfer, Jeffrey L; Hall, Joshua; Smole, Sandra; Doan, Kimberly; Popowich, Michael D; St George, Kirsten; Quinlan, Tammy; Halse, Tanya A; Li, Zhen; Pérez-Osorio, Ailyn C; Glover, William A; Russell, Denny; Reisdorf, Erik; Whyte, Thomas; Whitaker, Brett; Hatcher, Cynthia; Srinivasan, Velusamy; Tatti, Kathleen; Tondella, Maria Lucia; Wang, Xin; Winchell, Jonas M; Mayer, Leonard W; Jernigan, Daniel; Mawle, Alison C

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a multicenter evaluation of the Life Technologies TaqMan(®) Array Card (TAC) with 21 custom viral and bacterial respiratory assays was performed on the Applied Biosystems ViiA™ 7 Real-Time PCR System. The goal of the study was to demonstrate the analytical performance of this platform when compared to identical individual pathogen specific laboratory developed tests (LDTs) designed at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), equivalent LDTs provided by state public health laboratories, or to three different commercial multi-respiratory panels. CDC and Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL) LDTs had similar analytical sensitivities for viral pathogens, while several of the bacterial pathogen APHL LDTs demonstrated sensitivities one log higher than the corresponding CDC LDT. When compared to CDC LDTs, TAC assays were generally one to two logs less sensitive depending on the site performing the analysis. Finally, TAC assays were generally more sensitive than their counterparts in three different commercial multi-respiratory panels. TAC technology allows users to spot customized assays and design TAC layout, simplify assay setup, conserve specimen, dramatically reduce contamination potential, and as demonstrated in this study, analyze multiple samples in parallel with good reproducibility between instruments and operators.

  16. Rapid molecular assays for the detection of yellow fever virus in low-resource settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Escadafal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Yellow fever (YF is an acute viral hemorrhagic disease transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. The causative agent, the yellow fever virus (YFV, is found in tropical and subtropical areas of South America and Africa. Although a vaccine is available since the 1930s, YF still causes thousands of deaths and several outbreaks have recently occurred in Africa. Therefore, rapid and reliable diagnostic methods easy to perform in low-resources settings could have a major impact on early detection of outbreaks and implementation of appropriate response strategies such as vaccination and/or vector control. METHODOLOGY: The aim of this study was to develop a YFV nucleic acid detection method applicable in outbreak investigations and surveillance studies in low-resource and field settings. The method should be simple, robust, rapid and reliable. Therefore, we adopted an isothermal approach and developed a recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA assay which can be performed with a small portable instrument and easy-to-use lyophilized reagents. The assay was developed in three different formats (real-time with or without microfluidic semi-automated system and lateral-flow assay to evaluate their application for different purposes. Analytical specificity and sensitivity were evaluated with a wide panel of viruses and serial dilutions of YFV RNA. Mosquito pools and spiked human plasma samples were also tested for assay validation. Finally, real-time RPA in portable format was tested under field conditions in Senegal. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The assay was able to detect 20 different YFV strains and demonstrated no cross-reactions with closely related viruses. The RPA assay proved to be a robust, portable method with a low detection limit (<21 genome equivalent copies per reaction and rapid processing time (<20 min. Results from real-time RPA field testing were comparable to results obtained in the laboratory, thus confirming our method is suitable for

  17. Viral concentration determination through plaque assays: using traditional and novel overlay systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Alan; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2014-11-04

    Plaque assays remain one of the most accurate methods for the direct quantification of infectious virons and antiviral substances through the counting of discrete plaques (infectious units and cellular dead zones) in cell culture. Here we demonstrate how to perform a basic plaque assay, and how differing overlays and techniques can affect plaque formation and production. Typically solid or semisolid overlay substrates, such as agarose or carboxymethyl cellulose, have been used to restrict viral spread, preventing indiscriminate infection through the liquid growth medium. Immobilized overlays restrict cellular infection to the immediately surrounding monolayer, allowing the formation of discrete countable foci and subsequent plaque formation. To overcome the difficulties inherent in using traditional overlays, a novel liquid overlay utilizing microcrystalline cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose sodium has been increasingly used as a replacement in the standard plaque assay. Liquid overlay plaque assays can be readily performed in either standard 6 or 12 well plate formats as per traditional techniques and require no special equipment. Due to its liquid state and subsequent ease of application and removal, microculture plate formats may alternatively be utilized as a rapid, accurate and high throughput alternative to larger scale viral titrations. Use of a non heated viscous liquid polymer offers the opportunity to streamline work, conserves reagents, incubator space, and increases operational safety when used in traditional or high containment labs as no reagent heating or glassware are required. Liquid overlays may also prove more sensitive than traditional overlays for certain heat labile viruses.

  18. CRISPR is an optimal target for the design of specific PCR assays for salmonella enterica serotypes Typhi and Paratyphi A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Fabre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Serotype-specific PCR assays targeting Salmonella enterica serotypes Typhi and Paratyphi A, the causal agents of typhoid and paratyphoid fevers, are required to accelerate formal diagnosis and to overcome the lack of typing sera and, in some situations, the need for culture. However, the sensitivity and specificity of such assays must be demonstrated on large collections of strains representative of the targeted serotypes and all other bacterial populations producing similar clinical symptoms. METHODOLOGY: Using a new family of repeated DNA sequences, CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats, as a serotype-specific target, we developed a conventional multiplex PCR assay for the detection and differentiation of serotypes Typhi and Paratyphi A from cultured isolates. We also developed EvaGreen-based real-time singleplex PCR assays with the same two sets of primers. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We achieved 100% sensitivity and specificity for each protocol after validation of the assays on 188 serotype Typhi and 74 serotype Paratyphi A strains from diverse genetic groups, geographic origins and time periods and on 70 strains of bacteria frequently encountered in bloodstream infections, including 29 other Salmonella serotypes and 42 strains from 38 other bacterial species. CONCLUSIONS: The performance and convenience of our serotype-specific PCR assays should facilitate the rapid and accurate identification of these two major serotypes in a large range of clinical and public health laboratories with access to PCR technology. These assays were developed for use with DNA from cultured isolates, but with modifications to the assay, the CRISPR targets could be used in the development of assays for use with clinical and other samples.

  19. An Undergraduate Laboratory Activity Demonstrating Bacteriophage Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Allen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage are among the most diverse and numerous microbes inhabiting our planet. Yet many laboratory activities fail to engage students in meaningful exploration of their diversity, unique characteristics, and abundance. In this curriculum activity students use a standard plaque assay to enumerate bacteriophage particles from a natural sample and use the scientific method to address questions about host specificity and diversity. A raw primary sewage sample is enriched for bacteriophage using hosts in the family Enterobacteriaceae. Students hypothesize about host specificity and use quantitative data (serial dilution and plaque assay to test their hypotheses. Combined class data also help them answer questions about phage diversity. The exercise was field tested with a class of 47 students using pre- and posttests. For all learning outcomes posttest scores were higher than pretest scores at or below p = 0.01. Average individualized learning gain (G was also calculated for each learning outcome. Students’ use of scientific language in reference to bacteriophage and host interaction significantly improved (p = 0.002; G = 0.50. Improved means of expression helped students construct better hypotheses on phage host specificity (G = 0.31, p = 0.01 and to explain the plaque assay method (G = 0.33, p = 0.002. At the end of the exercise students also demonstrated improved knowledge and understanding of phage specificity as related to phage therapy in humans (p < 0.001; G = 51.

  20. A simple demonstration of corrosion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichelaar, Philip J.; Williams, Molly W.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to reinforce and enhance the understanding of galvanic cells, anode cathode reactions and polarization phenomena. Complete instructions are given for laboratory demonstration to be performed by students.

  1. Codes & standards research, development & demonstration Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2008-07-22

    This Roadmap is a guide to the Research, Development & Demonstration activities that will provide data required for SDOs to develop performance-based codes and standards for a commercial hydrogen fueled transportation sector in the U.S.

  2. A novel assay detecting recall response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Comparison with existing assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Denise C; Zaunders, John J; Plit, Marshall; Leeman, Craig; Ip, Susanna; Iampornsin, Thatri; Pett, Sarah L; Bailey, Michelle; Amin, Janaki; Ubolyam, Sasiwimol; Avihingsanon, Anchalee; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Cooper, David A; Kelleher, Anthony D

    2012-07-01

    A strategy to reduce the burden of active TB is isoniazid preventive therapy for latent TB infection (LTBI). However, current assays used to diagnose LTBI all have limitations. In these proof of concept studies, we compared the agreement of a novel flow cytometry assay detecting CD25/CD134 co-expression with QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFN-GIT) and Tuberculin skin test (TST) in the detection of recall immune response to TB. The CD25/CD134 assay, QFN-GIT and TST were performed on 74 participants referred for TB screening in Sydney and on 50 participants with advanced HIV infection (CD4 ≤ 350 × 10(6) cells/L) in Bangkok. The agreement between CD25/CD134 assay and QFN-GIT was 93.2% (Kappa 0.631 95% CI 0.336-0.926) in Sydney and 90% (Kappa 0.747 95% CI 0.541-0.954) in Bangkok. Discordant results occurred around the cut off of both tests. The agreement between CD25/CD134 assay and TST was 73.6% (Kappa 0.206 95% CI 0.004-0.409) in Sydney and 84% (Kappa 0.551 95% CI 0.296-0.806) in Bangkok. The CD25/CD134 assay showed good agreement with QFN-GIT in detecting recall response to TB both in well and less resourced setting as well as in persons with advanced HIV infection. Further study into the performance of this assay is thus warranted.

  3. The application of protein microarray assays in psychoneuroimmunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayling, K; Bowden, T; Tighe, P; Todd, I; Dilnot, E M; Negm, O H; Fairclough, L; Vedhara, K

    2017-01-01

    Protein microarrays are miniaturized multiplex assays that exhibit many advantages over the commonly used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). This article aims to introduce protein microarrays to readers of Brain, Behavior, and Immunity and demonstrate its utility and validity for use in psychoneuroimmunological research. As part of an ongoing investigation of psychological and behavioral influences on influenza vaccination responses, we optimized a novel protein microarray to quantify influenza-specific antibody levels in human sera. Reproducibility was assessed by calculating intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variance on serially diluted human IgG concentrations. A random selection of samples was analyzed by microarray and ELISA to establish validity of the assay. For IgG concentrations, intra-assay and inter-assay precision profiles demonstrated a mean coefficient of variance of 6.7% and 11.5% respectively. Significant correlations were observed between microarray and ELISA for all antigens, demonstrating the microarray is a valid alternative to ELISA. Protein microarrays are a highly robust, novel assay method that could be of significant benefit for researchers working in psychoneuroimmunology. They offer high throughput, fewer resources per analyte and can examine concurrent neuro-immune-endocrine mechanisms.

  4. A demonstrator for bolometric interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ghribi, Adnan; Galli, Silvia; Piat, Michel; Breelle, Eric; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Spinelli, Sebastiano; Gervasi, Massimo; Zannoni, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Bolometric Interferometry (BI) is one of the most promising techniques for precise measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background polarization. In this paper, we present the results of DIBO (Demonstrateur d'Interferometrie Bolometrique), a single-baseline demonstrator operating at 90 GHz, built to proof the validity of the BI concept applied to a millimeter-wave interferometer. This instrument has been characterized in the laboratory with a detector at room temperature and with a 4 K bolometer. This allowed us to measure interference patterns in a clean way, both (1) rotating the source and (2) varying with time the phase shift among the two interferometer's arms. Detailed modelisation has also been performed and validated with measurements.

  5. The Edgewater Coolside process demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, D.C.; Scandrol, R.O.; Statnick, R.M.; Stouffer, M.R.; Winschel, R.A.; Withum, J.A.; Wu, M.M.; Yoon, H. [CONSOL, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1992-02-01

    The Edgewater Coolside process demonstration met the program objectives which were to determine Coolside SO{sub 2} removal performance, establish short-term process operability, and evaluate the economics of the process versus a limestone wet scrubber. On a flue gas produced from the combustion of 3% sulfur coal, the Coolside process achieved 70% SO{sub 2} removal using commercially-available hydrated lime as the sorbent. The operating conditions were Ca/S mol ratio 2.0, Na/Ca mol ratio 0.2, and 20{degree}F approach to adiabatic saturation temperature ({del}T). During tests using fresh plus recycle sorbent, the recycle sorbent exhibited significant capacity for additional SO{sub 2} removal. The longest steady state operation was eleven days at nominally Ca/S = 2, Na/Ca = 0.22, {del}T = 20--22{degree}F, and 70% SO{sub 2} removal. The operability results achieved during the demonstration indicate that with the recommended process modifications, which are discussed in the Coolside process economic analysis, the process could be designed as a reliable system for utility application. Based on the demonstration program, the Coolside process capital cost for a hypothetical commercial installation was minimized. The optimization consisted of a single, large humidifier, no spare air compressor, no isolation dampers, and a 15 day on-site hydrated lime storage. The levelized costs of the Coolside and the wet limestone scrubbing processes were compared. The Coolside process is generally economically competitive with wet scrubbing for coals containing up to 2.5% sulfur and plants under 350 MWe. Site-specific factors such as plant capacity factor, SO{sub 2} emission limit, remaining plant life, retrofit difficulty, and delivered sorbent cost affect the scrubber-Coolside process economic comparison.

  6. The Edgewater Coolside process demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, D.C.; Scandrol, R.O.; Statnick, R.M.; Stouffer, M.R.; Winschel, R.A.; Withum, J.A.; Wu, M.M.; Yoon, H. (CONSOL, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

    1992-02-01

    The Edgewater Coolside process demonstration met the program objectives which were to determine Coolside SO[sub 2] removal performance, establish short-term process operability, and evaluate the economics of the process versus a limestone wet scrubber. On a flue gas produced from the combustion of 3% sulfur coal, the Coolside process achieved 70% SO[sub 2] removal using commercially-available hydrated lime as the sorbent. The operating conditions were Ca/S mol ratio 2.0, Na/Ca mol ratio 0.2, and 20[degree]F approach to adiabatic saturation temperature ([del]T). During tests using fresh plus recycle sorbent, the recycle sorbent exhibited significant capacity for additional SO[sub 2] removal. The longest steady state operation was eleven days at nominally Ca/S = 2, Na/Ca = 0.22, [del]T = 20--22[degree]F, and 70% SO[sub 2] removal. The operability results achieved during the demonstration indicate that with the recommended process modifications, which are discussed in the Coolside process economic analysis, the process could be designed as a reliable system for utility application. Based on the demonstration program, the Coolside process capital cost for a hypothetical commercial installation was minimized. The optimization consisted of a single, large humidifier, no spare air compressor, no isolation dampers, and a 15 day on-site hydrated lime storage. The levelized costs of the Coolside and the wet limestone scrubbing processes were compared. The Coolside process is generally economically competitive with wet scrubbing for coals containing up to 2.5% sulfur and plants under 350 MWe. Site-specific factors such as plant capacity factor, SO[sub 2] emission limit, remaining plant life, retrofit difficulty, and delivered sorbent cost affect the scrubber-Coolside process economic comparison.

  7. Parker Hybrid Hydraulic Drivetrain Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collett, Raymond [Parker-Hannifin Corporation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Howland, James [Parker-Hannifin Corporation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Venkiteswaran, Prasad [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2014-03-31

    This report examines the benefits of Parker Hannifin hydraulic hybrid brake energy recovery systems used in commercial applications for vocational purposes. A detailed background on the problem statement being addressed as well as the solution set specific for parcel delivery will be provided. Objectives of the demonstration performed in high start & stop applications included opportunities in fuel usage reduction, emissions reduction, vehicle productivity, and vehicle maintenance. Completed findings during the demonstration period and parallel investigations with NREL, CALSTART, along with a literature review will be provided herein on this research area. Lastly, results identified in the study by third parties validated the savings potential in fuel reduction of on average of 19% to 52% over the baseline in terms of mpg (Lammert, 2014, p11), Parker data for parcel delivery vehicles in the field parallels this at a range of 35% - 50%, emissions reduction of 17.4% lower CO2 per mile and 30.4% lower NOx per mile (Gallo, 2014, p15), with maintenance improvement in the areas of brake and starter replacement, while leaving room for further study in the area of productivity in terms of specific metrics that can be applied and studied.

  8. Transporter assays and assay ontologies: useful tools for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdrazil, Barbara; Chichester, Christine; Zander Balderud, Linda; Engkvist, Ola; Gaulton, Anna; Overington, John P

    2014-06-01

    Transport proteins represent an eminent class of drug targets and ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity) associated genes. There exists a large number of distinct activity assays for transport proteins, depending on not only the measurement needed (e.g. transport activity, strength of ligand–protein interaction), but also due to heterogeneous assay setups used by different research groups. Efforts to systematically organize this (divergent) bioassay data have large potential impact in Public-Private partnership and conventional commercial drug discovery. In this short review, we highlight some of the frequently used high-throughput assays for transport proteins, and we discuss emerging assay ontologies and their application to this field. Focusing on human P-glycoprotein (Multidrug resistance protein 1; gene name: ABCB1, MDR1), we exemplify how annotation of bioassay data per target class could improve and add to existing ontologies, and we propose to include an additional layer of metadata supporting data fusion across different bioassays.

  9. Square-wave voltammetry assays for glycoproteins on nanoporous gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Binod; Bhattarai, Jay K.; Pornsuriyasak, Papapida; Fujikawa, Kohki; Catania, Rosa; Demchenko, Alexei V.; Stine, Keith J.

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical enzyme-linked lectinsorbent assays (ELLA) were developed using nanoporous gold (NPG) as a solid support for protein immobilization and as an electrode for the electrochemical determination of the product of the reaction between alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and p-aminophenyl phosphate (p-APP), which is p-aminophenol (p-AP). Glycoproteins or concanavalin A (Con A) and ALP conjugates were covalently immobilized onto lipoic acid self-assembled monolayers on NPG. The binding of Con A – ALP (or soybean agglutinin – ALP) conjugate to glycoproteins covalently immobilized on NPG and subsequent incubation with p-APP substrate was found to result in square-wave voltammograms whose peak difference current varied with the identity of the glycoprotein. NPG presenting covalently bound glycoproteins was used as the basis for a competitive electrochemical assay for glycoproteins in solution (transferrin and IgG). A kinetic ELLA based on steric hindrance of the enzyme-substrate reaction and hence reduced enzymatic reaction rate after glycoprotein binding is demonstrated using immobilized Con A–ALP conjugates. Using the immobilized Con A-ALP conjugate, the binding affinity of immunoglobulin G (IgG) was found to be 105 nM, and that for transferrin was found to be 650 nM. Minimal interference was observed in the presence of 5 mg mL−1 BSA as a model serum protein in both the kinetic and competitive ELLA. Inhibition studies were performed with methyl D-mannoside for the binding of TSF and IgG to Con A-ALP; IC50 values were found to be 90 μM and 286 μM, respectively. Surface coverages of proteins were estimated using solution depletion and the BCA protein concentration assay. PMID:24611035

  10. Audit and improve! Evaluation of a real-time probe-based PCR assay with internal control for the direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, M; Tang, W Y; Wee, S Y; Barkham, T

    2011-01-01

    We retrospectively audited the performance of the commercial kit in use in our laboratory for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and found the sensitivity to be unacceptably low at 69% (52/75). We developed an in-house end-point polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detecting IS6110, an IS-like element of MTBC, and achieved a sensitivity of 90% (66/73) with the same DNA samples, re-emphasising the poor performance of the commercial kit. In order to avoid specificity issues surrounding gel-based PCR, we developed a probe-based real-time PCR assay with an internal control and achieved a sensitivity of 84%, specificity of 97% and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) of 207. The evaluation was performed on clinically requested samples, so we expect the performance of the assay in real life to match the data from this evaluation. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines recommending nucleic acid tests for the investigation of possible cases of tuberculosis are expected to promote the use of molecular assays. It is important that clinical laboratories do not assume that assays, in-house or commercial, will perform well or that they will continue to perform well. Audit at regular intervals is necessary to maintain confidence and to demonstrate that the assay works to specification in the real test population.

  11. Nondestructive Waste Assay Using Gamma-Ray Active & Passive Computed Tomography. Mixed Waste Focus Area. OST Reference Number 2123

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1999-09-01

    This project was supported by the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) and the Federal Environmental Technology Center (FETC) to develop an improved nondestructive assay (NDA) capability that uses gamma-ray computed tomography and gamma-energy spectral analysis techniques to perform waste assay measurements. It was the intent of the Gamma-Ray Active & Passive Computed Tomography (A&PCT) development and demonstration project to enhance the overall utility of waste assay through the implementation of techniques that can accommodate known measurement complications, e.g., waste matrix and radioactive material distribution heterogeneities. This technology can measure the radionuclide content in all types of waste regardless of their classification as low level (LLW), transuranic (TRU) or mixed (MLLW or MTRU). The nondestructive waste assay capability needed to support Department of Energy (DOE) mixed waste characterization needs is necessarily a function of the waste form configurations in inventory. These waste form configurations exhibit a number of variables impacting assay system response that must be accounted for to ensure valid measurement data. Such variables include: matrix density, matrix elemental composition, matrix density distribution, radioactive material radionuclidic/isotopic composition, radioactive material physical/chemical form, and physical distribution in the waste matrix. Existing nondestructive assay technologies have identified capability limits with respect to these variables. Certain combinations of these variables result in waste configurations within the capability of one or more of the existing systems. Other combinations that are prevalent in the inventory are outside of the capability of such systems.

  12. Chemical Demonstrations: The Chem Demo Book. A Guide To Fun, Safe & Exciting Chemical Demonstrations. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Thomas K.

    Chemical demonstrations can and do enhance an otherwise potentially dull subjects--the properties of hazardous materials. This book contains the recipes for presenting several chemical demonstrations. Demonstrations are designed to be relatively easy to perform and present minimal hazards if done properly. The book contains an introduction, safety…

  13. Robust versatile tyrosine kinase assay for HTS in drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Sudhir S.; Mineyev, I.; Owicki, John C.

    1999-04-01

    A fluorescence polarization assay was developed as an alternative to the radiolabeled SPA assays currently used to monitor the activity of tyrosine kinases in drug discovery. The assay can be used with enzymes having substrate specificity similar to that of the insulin receptor, the EGF receptor and the Src kinase receptor enzymes. The assay is easy to configure in 96, 384 and 1536-well microplates in assay volumes ranging from (mu) L with minimal efforts. The reconstituted reagents are stable for up to 24 hr at ambient temperatures, thereby minimizing the need for replenishing the stock solutions during the course of a high-throughput screen. Because of the stability and equilibrium kinetics, the assay allows the user the luxury of scheduling the reading of plates any time up to 24 hr after the completion of the assay without substantial deterioration in the assay signal. The antibody and the tracer solutions can also be premixed and added as a preformed complex in a single step. The performance of the assay with the insulin receptor kinase is described. In addition, given the diversity of the substrates used in measuring the activity of different tyrosine kinases, LJL's on-going efforts to provide different antibodies of wide ranging specificity and sensitivity are described.

  14. A Multi-detection Assay for Malaria Transmitting Mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoosook; Weakley, Allison M.; Nieman, Catelyn C.; Malvick, Julia; Lanzaro, Gregory C.

    2015